WorldWideScience

Sample records for human beta s

  1. Mechanism of mismatch recognition revealed by human MutS[beta] bound to unpaired DNA loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Shikha; Gellert, Martin; Yang, Wei (NIH)

    2012-04-17

    DNA mismatch repair corrects replication errors, thus reducing mutation rates and microsatellite instability. Genetic defects in this pathway cause Lynch syndrome and various cancers in humans. Binding of a mispaired or unpaired base by bacterial MutS and eukaryotic MutS{alpha} is well characterized. We report here crystal structures of human MutS{beta} in complex with DNA containing insertion-deletion loops (IDL) of two, three, four or six unpaired nucleotides. In contrast to eukaryotic MutS{alpha} and bacterial MutS, which bind the base of a mismatched nucleotide, MutS{beta} binds three phosphates in an IDL. DNA is severely bent at the IDL; unpaired bases are flipped out into the major groove and partially exposed to solvent. A normal downstream base pair can become unpaired; a single unpaired base can thereby be converted to an IDL of two nucleotides and recognized by MutS{beta}. The C-terminal dimerization domains form an integral part of the MutS structure and coordinate asymmetrical ATP hydrolysis by Msh2 and Msh3 with mismatch binding to signal for repair.

  2. Human beta 2 chain of laminin (formerly S chain): cDNA cloning, chromosomal localization, and expression in carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Gerecke, D R; Durkin, M E

    1994-01-01

    Overlapping cDNA clones that encode the full-length human laminin beta 2 chain, formerly called the S chain, were isolated. The cDNA of 5680 nt contains a 5391-nt open reading frame encoding 1797 amino acids. At the amino terminus is a 32-amino-acid signal peptide that is followed by the mature...... chain showed 86.1% sequence identity to the rat beta 2 chain, 50.0% to the human beta 1 chain, and 36.3% to the human beta 3 chain. The greatest sequence identity was in domains VI, V, and III. The sequence of a 24-amino-acid peptide fragment isolated from the beta 2 chain of laminin purified from human...

  3. Quantification of the beta-adrenoceptor ligand S-1'[F-18]fluorocarazolol in plasma of humans, rats and sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanWaarde, A; Posthumus, H; Elsinga, PH; Anthonio, RL; van Loenen - Weemaes, Anne-miek; Beaufort-Krol, Gertie C. M.; Paans, AMJ; Vaalburg, W; Visser, Thomas; Visser, Gerben

    1996-01-01

    Myocardial and pulmonary beta-adrenoceptors can be imaged with 2-(S)-(-)-(9H-carbazol-4-yl-oxy)-3-[1-(fluoromethyl)ethyl]amino-2-propanol (S-1'-[F-18]fluorocarazolol, I). Quantification of unmodified fluorocarazolol in plasma is necessary for analysis of PET images in terms of receptor densities. We

  4. LHCb: $2\\beta_s$ measurement at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Conti, G

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of $2\\beta_s$, the phase of the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ oscillation amplitude with respect to that of the ${\\rm b} \\rightarrow {\\rm c^{+}}{\\rm W^{-}}$ tree decay amplitude, is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment with first data. In the Standard Model (SM), $2\\beta_s$ is predicted to be $0.0360^{+0.0020}_{-0.0016} \\rm rad$. The current constraints from the Tevatron are: $2\\beta_{s}\\in[0.32 ; 2.82]$ at 68$\\%$CL from the CDF experiment and $2\\beta_{s}=0.57^{+0.24}_{-0.30}$ from the D$\\oslash$ experiment. Although the statistical uncertainties are large, these results hint at the possible contribution of New Physics in the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ box diagram. After one year of data taking at LHCb at an average luminosity of $\\mathcal{L}\\sim2\\cdot10^{32}\\rm cm^{-2} \\rm s^{-1}$ (integrated luminosity $\\mathcal{L}_{\\rm int}\\sim 2 \\rm fb^{-1}$), the expected statistical uncertainty on the measurement is $\\sigma(2\\beta_s)\\simeq 0.03$. This uncertainty is similar to the $2\\beta_s$ value predicted by the SM.

  5. Conversion of the bifunctional 8-oxoguanine/beta-delta apurinic/apyrimidinic DNA repair activities of Drosophila ribosomal protein S3 into the human S3 monofunctional beta-elimination catalyst through a single amino acid change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, V; Kelley, M R; Xu, Y; Mian, I S; Deutsch, W A

    2001-07-20

    The Drosophila S3 ribosomal protein has important roles in both protein translation and DNA repair. In regards to the latter activity, it has been shown that S3 contains vigorous N-glycosylase activity for the removal of 8-oxoguanine residues in DNA that leaves baseless sites in their places. Drosophila S3 also possesses an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) lyase activity in which the enzyme catalyzes a beta-elimination reaction that cleaves phosphodiester bonds 3' and adjacent to an AP lesion in DNA. In certain situations, this is followed by a delta-elimination reaction that ultimately leads to the formation of a single nucleotide gap in DNA bordered by 5'- and 3'-phosphate groups. The human S3 protein, although 80% identical to its Drosophila homolog and shorter by only two amino acids, has only marginal N-glycosylase activity. Its lyase activity only cleaves AP DNA by a beta-elimination reaction, thus further distinguishing itself from the Drosophila S3 protein in lacking a delta-elimination activity. Using a hidden Markov model analysis based on the crystal structures of several DNA repair proteins, the enzymatic differences between Drosophila and human S3 were suggested by the absence of a conserved glutamine residue in human S3 that usually resides at the cleft of the deduced active site pocket of DNA glycosylases. Here we show that the replacement of the Drosophila glutamine by an alanine residue leads to the complete loss of glycosylase activity. Unexpectedly, the delta-elimination reaction at AP sites was also abrogated by a change in the Drosophila glutamine residue. Thus, a single amino acid change converted the Drosophila activity into one that is similar to that possessed by the human S3 protein. In support of this were experiments executed in vivo that showed that human S3 and the Drosophila site-directed glutamine-changed S3 performed poorly when compared with Drosophila wild-type S3 and its ability to protect a bacterial mutant from the harmful effects of

  6. The impact of beta-elemene on beta-tubulin of human hepatoma hepg2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuqiu Mao; Liying Ban; Jielin Zhang; Li Hou; Xiaonan Cui

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of beta-elemene injection on the growth and beta-tubulin of human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Methods:cellproliferation was assessed by MTT assay. cellcycle distribution was detected by flow cytometry (FCM). The mRNA expression of beta-tubulin was measured by RT-PCR. West-ern blot analysis was used to determine protein expression of beta-tubulin and the polymerization of beta-tubulin. Results:Beta-elemene injection inhibited HepG2 cells proliferation in a dose-and time-dependent manner;FCM analysis indicated beta-elemene injection induced cellcycle arrested at S phase. RT-PCR and western-blot analysis showed that beta-elemene injection down-regulated beta-tubulin expression at both mRNA and protein levels, presenting a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, beta-elemene injection reduced the polymerization of microtubules in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion:Beta-elemene injection can inhibit the proliferation of hepatoma HepG2 cells, the mechanism might be partly related to the down-regulation of beta-tubulin and inhibition of microtubular polymerization.

  7. Involvement of the serine/threonine p70S6 kinase in TGF-beta1-induced ADAM12 expression in cultured human hepatic stellate cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Pabic, Hélène; L'Helgoualc'h, Annie; Coutant, Alexandre;

    2005-01-01

    In chronic liver injury, quiescent hepatic stellate cells change into proliferative myofibroblast-like cells, which are a main source of fibrosis. We have recently reported that these cells synthesize ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloprotease whose expression is up-regulated by TGF-beta1 in liver...... cancers. Here, we studied the role of the serine/threonine p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) in regulating TGF-beta1-induced ADAM12 expression....

  8. (22S)-6-O-acetyl-21betaH-hopane-3beta,6beta,22,29-tetrol from oakmoss (Evernia prunastri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutnaes, Bjart Frode; Bruun, Torger; Kjøsen, Helge

    2004-08-01

    A novel hopanoid triterpene, (22S)-6-O-acetyl-21betaH-hopane-3beta,6beta,22,29-tetraol, was isolated from oakmoss (Evernia prunastri (L.) Ach.), as identified from 1H, 13C, DEPT, COSY, NOESY, HSQC and HMBC NMR, MS and IR spectroscopy. During recrystallisation a new compound, 30-nor-6-O-acetyl-3beta,6beta-dihydroxy-21alphaH-hopan-22-one, was formed by a formal loss of methanol from the dihydroxypropyl moiety. No biological activity was found for the naturally occurring compound upon testing against a series of fish and human pathogenic bacteria.

  9. Functions of A[beta], sAPP[alpha] and sAPP[beta] : similarities and differences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chasseigneaux, Stephanie; Allinquant, Bernadette

    2012-01-01

    ...), which also generates the soluble peptide APP[beta] (sAPP[beta]). An antagonist and major APP metabolic pathway involves cleavage by alpha secretase, which releases sAPP[alpha]. Although soluble A[beta...

  10. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  11. Analysis of betaS and betaA genes in a Mexican population with African roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña, María Teresa; Ongay, Zoyla; Tagle, Juan; Bentura, Gilberto; Cobián, José G; Perea, F Javier; Casas-Castañeda, Maricela; Sánchez-López, Yoaly J; Ibarra, Bertha

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the origin of the beta(A) and beta(S) genes in a Mexican population with African roots and a high frequency of hemoglobin S, we analyzed 467 individuals (288 unrelated) from different towns in the states of Guerrero and Oaxaca in the Costa Chica region. The frequency of the sickle-cell trait was 12.8%, which may represent a public health problem. The frequencies of the beta-haplotypes were determined from 350 nonrelated chromosomes (313 beta(A) and 37 beta(S)). We observed 15 different beta(A) haplotypes, the most common of which were haplotypes 1 (48.9%), 2 (13.4%), and 3 (13.4%). The calculation of pairwise distributions and Nei's genetic distance analysis using 32 worldwide populations showed that the beta(A) genes are more closely related to those of Mexican Mestizos and North Africans. Bantu and Benin haplotypes and haplotype 9 were related to the beta(S) genes, with frequencies of 78.8, 18.2, and 3.0%, respectively. Comparison of these haplotypes with 17 other populations revealed a high similitude with the population of the Central African Republic. These data suggest distinct origins for the beta(A) and beta(S) genes in Mexican individuals from the Costa Chica region.

  12. Human RECQL5beta stimulates flap endonuclease 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speina, Elzbieta; Dawut, Lale; Hedayati, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Human RECQL5 is a member of the RecQ helicase family which is implicated in genome maintenance. Five human members of the family have been identified; three of them, BLM, WRN and RECQL4 are associated with elevated cancer risk. RECQL1 and RECQL5 have not been linked to any human disorder yet; cells...... dramatically stimulates the rate of FEN1 cleavage of flap DNA substrates. Moreover, we show that RECQL5beta and FEN1 interact physically and co-localize in the nucleus in response to DNA damage. Our findings, together with the previous literature on WRN, BLM and RECQL4's stimulation of FEN1, suggests...

  13. The lipolytic effect of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor activation in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, C A; Kendall, M J; Maxwell, S; Hughes, B

    1993-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of activation beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors on the process of lipolysis in human volunteers. Ten male subjects underwent a single-blind randomized cross-over trial using infusions of terbutaline (a specific beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist), xamoterol (a partial beta 1-agonist with beta 2-adrenoceptor blocking activity) and saline (placebo control). The effect of these infusions on plasma potassium, glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) (total and individual) and insulin levels was studied. 2. Terbutaline infusion induced a significant rise in plasma glucose and a fall in plasma potassium in keeping with its beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulant properties. Xamoterol infusion had no significant effect on these values. Terbutaline infusion caused a greater rise in total and individual FFA than xamoterol, but both effects were significantly different from placebo. 3. The possible reasons for these results and their implications on the beta-adrenergic control of lipolysis are discussed. PMID:8383517

  14. In vitro proliferation of adult human beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    Full Text Available A decrease in functional beta-cell mass is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 analogues induce proliferation of rodent beta-cells. However, the proliferative capacity of human beta-cells and its modulation by GLP-1 analogues remain to be fully investigated. We therefore sought to quantify adult human beta-cell proliferation in vitro and whether this is affected by the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide.Human islets from 7 adult cadaveric organ donors were dispersed into single cells. Beta-cells were purified by FACS. Non-sorted cells and the beta-cell enriched ("beta-cells" population were plated on extracellular matrix from rat (804G and human bladder carcinoma cells (HTB9 or bovine corneal endothelial ECM (BCEC. Cells were maintained in culture+/-liraglutide for 4 days in the presence of BrdU.Rare human beta-cell proliferation could be observed either in the purified beta-cell population (0.051±0.020%; 22 beta-cells proliferating out of 84'283 beta-cells counted or in the non-sorted cell population (0.055±0.011%; 104 proliferating beta-cells out of 232'826 beta-cells counted, independently of the matrix or the culture conditions. Liraglutide increased human beta-cell proliferation on BCEC in the non-sorted cell population (0.082±0.034% proliferating beta-cells vs. 0.017±0.008% in control, p<0.05.These results indicate that adult human beta-cell proliferation can occur in vitro but remains an extremely rare event with these donors and particular culture conditions. Liraglutide increases beta-cell proliferation only in the non-sorted cell population and only on BCEC. However, it cannot be excluded that human beta-cells may proliferate to a greater extent in situ in response to natural stimuli.

  15. Extrasynaptic location of laminin beta 2 chain in developing and adult human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Thornell, L E; Loechel, F

    1997-01-01

    to the laminin beta 2 chain. We found that laminin beta 1 chain was detected at all times during development from 10 weeks of gestation. Laminin beta 2 chain was first detected in 15 to 22-week-old fetal skeletal muscle as distinct focal immunoreactivity in the sarcolemmal basement membrane area of some......We have investigated the distribution of the laminin beta 2 chain (previously s-laminin) in human fetal and adult skeletal muscle and compared it to the distribution of laminin beta 1. Immunoblotting and transfection assays were used to characterize a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies...... results demonstrate a prominent extrasynaptic localization of laminin beta 2 in the human muscle, suggesting that it may have an important function in the sarcolemmal basement membrane....

  16. Design of retrovirus vectors for transfer and expression of the human. beta. -globin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.D.; Bender, M.A.; Harris, E.A.S.; Kaleko, M.; Gelinas, R.E.

    1988-11-01

    Regulated expression of the human ..beta..-globin gene has been demonstrated in cultured murine erythroleukemia cells and in mice after retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. However, the low titer of recombinant viruses described to date results in relatively inefficient gene transfer, which limits their usefulness for animal studies and for potential gene therapy in humans for diseases involving defective ..beta..-globin genes. The authors found regions that interfered with virus production within intron 2 of the ..beta..-globin gene and on both sides of the gene. The flanking regions could be removed, but intron 2 was required for ..beta..-globin expression. Inclusion of ..beta..-globin introns necessitates an antisense orientation of the gene within the retrovirus vector. However, they found no effect of the antisense ..beta..-globin transcription on virus production. A region downstream of the ..beta..-globin gene that stimulates expression of the gene in transgenic mice was included in the viruses without detrimental effects on virus titer. Virus titers of over 10/sup 6/ CFU/ml were obtained with the final vector design, which retained the ability to direct regulated expression of human ..beta..-globin in murine erythroleukemia cells. The vector also allowed transfer and expression of the human ..beta..-globin gene in hematopoietic cells (CFU-S cells) in mice.

  17. Hemoglobinopathies in the Dogon Country: presence of beta S, beta C, and delta A' genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrocq, R; Bennani, M; Bellis, G; Baby, M; Traore, K; Nagel, R L; Krishnamoorthy, R; Chaventre, A

    1994-07-01

    The population of the Dogon, located in Mali, is divided in an endogamic Noble class and two endogamic servant castes (Tanners and Blacksmiths). We find that the polymorphic frequencies of beta c, beta S, and, unexpectedly, a mutation of the delta-chain (delta A'), are geographically (valley vs. plateau) as well as social status dependent.

  18. Histologic examination of the rat central nervous system after intrathecal administration of human beta-endorphin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hée, P.; Klinken, Leif; Ballegaard, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Neuropathology, analgesics - intrathecal, central nervous system, histology, human beta-endorphin, toxicity......Neuropathology, analgesics - intrathecal, central nervous system, histology, human beta-endorphin, toxicity...

  19. Therapeutic haemoglobin synthesis in beta-thalassaemic mice expressing lentivirus-encoded human beta-globin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, C; Rivella, S; Callegari, J; Heller, G; Gaensler, K M; Luzzatto, L; Sadelain, M

    2000-07-06

    The stable introduction of a functional beta-globin gene in haematopoietic stem cells could be a powerful approach to treat beta-thalassaemia and sickle-cell disease. Genetic approaches aiming to increase normal beta-globin expression in the progeny of autologous haematopoietic stem cells might circumvent the limitations and risks of allogeneic cell transplants. However, low-level expression, position effects and transcriptional silencing hampered the effectiveness of viral transduction of the human beta-globin gene when it was linked to minimal regulatory sequences. Here we show that the use of recombinant lentiviruses enables efficient transfer and faithful integration of the human beta-globin gene together with large segments of its locus control region. In long-term recipients of unselected transduced bone marrow cells, tetramers of two murine alpha-globin and two human betaA-globin molecules account for up to 13% of total haemoglobin in mature red cells of normal mice. In beta-thalassaemic heterozygous mice higher percentages are obtained (17% to 24%), which are sufficient to ameliorate anaemia and red cell morphology. Such levels should be of therapeutic benefit in patients with severe defects in haemoglobin production.

  20. Comparison of the amyloid pore forming properties of rat and human Alzheimer’s beta-amyloid peptide 1-42: Calcium imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Di Scala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The data here consists of calcium imaging of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4AM and then incubated with nanomolar concentrations of either human or rat Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. These data are both of a qualitative (fluorescence micrographs and semi-quantitative nature (estimation of intracellular calcium concentrations of cells probed by Aβ1-42 peptides vs. control untreated cells. Since rat Aβ1-42 differs from its human counterpart at only three amino acid positions, this comparative study is a good assessment of the specificity of the amyloid pore forming assay. The interpretation of this dataset is presented in the accompanying study “Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides” [1].

  1. Atypical beta(s) haplotypes are generated by diverse genetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, M A; Silva, W A; Dalle, B; Gualandro, S; Hutz, M H; Lapoumeroulie, C; Tavella, M H; Araujo, A G; Krieger, J E; Elion, J; Krishnamoorthy, R

    2000-02-01

    The majority of the chromosomes with the beta(S) gene have one of the five common haplotypes, designated as Benin, Bantu, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian haplotypes. However, in every large series of sickle cell patients, 5-10% of the chromosomes have less common haplotypes, usually referred to as "atypical" haplotypes. In order to explore the genetic mechanisms that could generate these atypical haplotypes, we extended our analysis to other rarely studied polymorphic markers of the beta(S)-gene cluster, in a total of 40 chromosomes with uncommon haplotypes from Brazil and Cameroon. The following polymorphisms were examined: seven restriction site polymorphisms of the epsilongammadeltabeta-cluster, the pre-(G)gamma framework sequence including the 6-bp deletion/insertion pattern, HS-2 LCR (AT)xR(AT)y and pre-beta (AT)xTy repeat motifs, the GC/TT polymorphism at -1105-1106 of (G)gamma-globin gene, the C/T polymorphism at -551 of the beta-globin gene, and the intragenic beta-globin gene framework. Among the Brazilian subjects, the most common atypical structure (7/16) was a Bantu 3'-subhaplotype associated with different 5'-sequences, while in two chromosomes a Benin 3'-subhaplotype was associated with two different 5'-subhaplotypes. A hybrid Benin/Bantu configuration was also observed. In three chromosomes, the atypical haplotype differed from the typical one by the change of a single restriction site. In 2/134 chromosomes identified as having a typical Bantu RFLP-haplotype, a discrepant LCR repeat sequence was observed, probably owing to a crossover 5' to the epsilon-gene. Among 80 beta(S) chromosomes from Cameroon, 22 were associated with an atypical haplotype. The most common structure was represented by a Benin haplotype (from the LCR to the beta-gene) with a non-Benin segment 3' to the beta-globin gene. In two cases a Bantu LCR was associated with a Benin haplotype and a non-Benin segment 3' to the beta-globin gene. In three other cases, a more complex

  2. Polymerization of hemoglobin S. Quinary interactions of Glu-43(beta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M J; Iyer, K S; Acharya, A S

    1995-08-18

    Hemoglobin S (HbS) Hoshida and three substituted forms of HbS Hoshida (the substituents being on the amide nitrogen of Gln-43(beta) have been prepared by the amidation of Glu-43(beta) of HbS with ammonia, methylamine, glycine ethyl ester, and galactosamine. The O2 affinity of HbS is increased slightly on amidation of Glu-43(beta). All the four amidated derivatives exhibited nearly the same oxygen affinity. On the other hand, the influence of amidation on the solubility exhibits some sensitivity to the chemical nature of the substituent on the Gln-43(beta). The solubility of HbS Hoshida (a case with no substitution on Gln-43(beta), and the methyl-substituted derivatives are about 33 and 36% higher than that of HbS. The solubility of the HbS modified with the glycine ethyl ester or galactosamine is increased to 41 and 47%, respectively. The first derivative UV spectra of HbS Hoshida and its methyl derivative reflect very little perturbations in their alpha 1 beta 2 interface as compared with that of HbS, whereas the amidated derivatives with larger substituents on Gln-43(beta) reflected noticeable difference. Thus, the increase in the solubility and the oxygen affinity of HbS on the amidation of Glu-43(beta) is primarily a consequence of the loss of the negative charge at 43(beta), a residue proximal to the alpha 1 beta 2 interface. The copolymerization studies of amidated HbS with HbA, and HbS with amidated HbA demonstrate that cis Glu-43(beta) is the "active" residue. This assignment is discrepant with the earlier implication of a trans configuration for this residue in the polymer (Edelstein, S. J. (1981) J. Mol. Biol. 150, 557-575). However, it is consistent with the solution studies of Nagel et al. (Nagel, R. L., Bookchin, R. M., Johnson, J., Labie, D., Wajcman, H.., Isaac-Sodeye, W. A., Honig, G. R., Schiliro, G., Crookstan, J. H., and Matsutomo, K. (1979) Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 76, 670-672) and McCurdy et al. (McCurdy, P. R., Lorkin, P. A., Casey, R

  3. Release of salusin-beta from human monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kengo; Fujimoto, Kazumi; Koyama, Takatoshi; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2010-06-01

    Salusin-alpha and salusin-beta are related bioactive peptides biosynthesized from the same precursor, prosalusin. Despite the potent hemodynamic and proatherosclerotic activities of salusin-beta, its exact distribution and biological functions remain largely undetermined because of technical difficulties associated with its unique physicochemical characteristics, such as marked adhesiveness to polypropylene and polystyrene. By circumventing these problems, we recently established a specific radioimmunoassay for detecting immunoreactive human salusin-beta. In the current study, we demonstrated the release of salusin-beta from the human monoblastic leukemia cell lines, THP-1 and U937. Dilution curves of extracted conditioned media from both cells were parallel with those of standard human salusin-beta by radioimmunoassay. Reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with radioimmunoassay detection of the culture supernatants revealed a major immunoreactive component that co-eluted with authentic salusin-beta. Both cell lines secreted salusin-beta-like immunoreactivity (LI) into serum-free media as a function of time (1234.3 + or - 122.7 and 186.7 + or - 9.1 fmol/10(5) cells per 24h). When THP-1 and U937 cells differentiated into macrophages after incubation with 2-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), they secreted far greater amounts of salusin-beta-LI into the culture supernatant (3351.9 + or - 899.3 and 1545.8 + or - 183.3 fmol/10(5) cells per 24h). TPA treatment accelerated the processing of prosalusin into its cleaved fragments, suggesting that the increased secretion of salusin-beta-LI in THP-1-derived macrophages was caused by the enhanced intracellular processing of prosalusin. Stimulation with the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), resulted in increased secretion of salusin-beta without inducing expression of the gene for preprosalusin, suggesting that TNF-alpha and LPS stimulated

  4. Human beta-mannosidase deficiency associated with peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levade, T; Graber, D; Flurin, V; Delisle, M B; Pieraggi, M T; Testut, M F; Carrière, J P; Salvayre, R

    1994-01-01

    Human beta-mannosidosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder described in only seven families. We present a further case in a black African 14-year-old boy with severely deficient beta-mannosidase activity, bilateral thenar and hypothenar amyotrophy, electrophysiologically demonstrable demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, and cytoplasmic vacuolation of skin fibroblasts and lymphoid cells. The clinical and biochemical features of our patient are compared to those of previously reported patients.

  5. Interrelation of inflammation and APP in sIBM: IL-1 beta induces accumulation of beta-amyloid in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jens; Barthel, Konstanze; Wrede, Arne; Salajegheh, Mohammad; Bähr, Mathias; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-05-01

    Distinct interrelationships between inflammation and beta-amyloid-associated degeneration, the two major hallmarks of the skeletal muscle pathology in sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), have remained elusive. Expression of markers relevant for these pathomechanisms were analysed in biopsies of sIBM, polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), dystrophic and non-myopathic muscle as controls, and cultured human myotubes. By quantitative PCR, a higher upregulation was noted for the mRNA-expression of CXCL-9, CCL-3, CCL-4, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta in sIBM muscle compared to PM, DM and controls. All inflammatory myopathies displayed overexpression of degeneration-associated markers, yet only in sIBM, expression of the mRNA of amyloid precursor protein (APP) significantly and consistently correlated with inflammation in the muscle and mRNA-levels of chemokines and IFN-gamma. Only in sIBM, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that inflammatory mediators including IL-1 beta co-localized to beta-amyloid depositions within myofibres. In human myotubes, exposure to IL-1 beta caused upregulation of APP with subsequent intracellular aggregation of beta-amyloid. Our data suggest that, in sIBM muscle, production of high amounts of pro-inflammatory mediators specifically induces beta-amyloid-associated degeneration. The observations may help to design targeted treatment strategies for chronic inflammatory disorders of the skeletal muscle.

  6. Human kidney 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase: regulation by adrenocorticotropin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, S; Quinkler, M; Miller, K; Heilmann, P; Schoneshofer, M; Oelkers, W

    1996-03-01

    In ectopic adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) syndrome (EAS) with higher ACTH levels than in pituitary Cushing's syndrome and during ACTH infusion, the ratio of cortisol to cortisone in plasma and urine is increased, suggesting inhibition of renal 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-HSD) by ACTH or by ACTH-dependent steroids. Measuring the conversion of cortisol to cortisone by human kidney slices under different conditions, we tested the possibility of 11 beta-HSD regulation by ACTH and corticosteroids. Slices prepared from unaffected parts of kidneys removed because of renal cell carcinoma were incubated with unlabeled or labeled cortisol, and cortisol and cortisone were quantitated after HPLC separation by UV or radioactive detection. The 11 beta HSD activity was not influenced by incubation with increasing concentrations (10(-12)-10(-9) mol/l) of ACTH (1-24 or 1-39) for 1 h. Among 12 ACTH-dependent steroids tested (10(-9)-10(-6) mol/l), only corticosterone (IC50 = 2 x 10(-7) mol/l), 18-OH-corticosterone and 11 beta-OH-androstenedione showed a significant dose-dependent inhibition of 11 beta-HSD activity. The percentage conversion rate of cortisol to cortisone was concentration dependent over the whole range of cortisol concentrations tested (10(-8) - 10(-5) mol/l. A direct inhibitory effect of ACTH on 11 beta-HSD is, therefore, unlikely. The only steroids inhibiting the conversion of cortisol to cortisone are natural substrates for 11 beta-HSD. Kinetic studies show a saturation of the enzyme at high cortisol concentrations. Thus, the reduced percentage renal cortisol inactivation in EAS seems to be due mainly to overload of the enzyme with endogenous substrates (cortisol, corticosterone and others) rather than to direct inhibition of 11 beta-HSD by ACTH or ACTH-dependent steroids, not being substrates of 11 beta-HSD.

  7. Expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1, -beta 2, and -beta 3 in human developing teeth: immunolocalization according to the odontogenesis phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassá Benedete, Ana Paula; Sobral, Ana Paula Veras; Lima, Dirce Mary Correia; Kamibeppu, Leonardo; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Lourenço, Silvia Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a multifunctional growth factor that has several biological effects in vivo, including control of cell growth and differentiation, cell migration, lineage determination, motility, adhesion, apoptosis, and synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix, and TGF-beta plays an important role in regulating tissue repair and regeneration. Our study analyzed the participation of TGF-beta 1, -beta 2, and -beta 3 in the different stages of morphogenesis and differentiation of human developing dental organ using immunohistochemistry. The maxillae and mandibles of 10 human embryos ranging from 8 to 23 weeks of gestation were employed, according to the approval of the ethical committee. Our study revealed that the TGF-beta subunits-beta 1, beta 2, and beta 3-were present in the various stages of tooth development, but the expression varied according to the differentiation stage, tissue, and TGF-beta subunit. Our results indicated that TGF-beta 1 is closely related to differentiation of enamel organ and initiation of matrix secretion, TGF-beta 2 to cellular differentiation, and TGF-beta 3 to mineral maturation matrix.

  8. Transforming growth factor-beta stimulates the expression of fibronectin by human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, N E; Persichitte, K A; Baskin, J B; Nielsen, L D; Clark, R A

    1988-09-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a 25-kD protein which has regulatory activity over a variety of cell types. It is distinct from epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGF analogs, and exerts its action via a distinct receptor. Its effect on proliferation or differentiation can be positive or negative depending on the cell type and the presence of other growth factors. It also modulates the expression of cellular products. TGF-beta causes fibroblasts to increase their production of the extracellular matrix components, fibronectin and collagen. Human keratinocytes (HK) are known to have TGF-beta receptors. We wished to study the effect of TGF-beta on the production of extracellular matrix proteins by human keratinocytes in culture. Human keratinocytes were grown in serum-free defined medium (MCDB-153) to about 70% confluence. Following a 16-h incubation in medium lacking EGF and TGF-beta, cells were incubated for 12 h in medium containing varying concentrations of EGF and TGF-beta. Cells were then labeled with 35S-methionine for 10 h in the same conditions. Labeled proteins from the medium were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. TGF-beta at 10 ng/ml induced a sixfold increase in the secretion of fibronectin, as well as an unidentified 50-kD protein. Thrombospondin production was also increased, but not over a generalized twofold increase in the production of all other proteins. EGF, at 10 ng/ml, caused a smaller additive effect. TGF-beta may be an important stimulator of extracellular matrix production by human keratinocytes.

  9. Directional and balancing selection in human beta-defensins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armour John AL

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In primates, infection is an important force driving gene evolution, and this is reflected in the importance of infectious disease in human morbidity today. The beta-defensins are key components of the innate immune system, with antimicrobial and cell signalling roles, but also reproductive functions. Here we examine evolution of beta-defensins in catarrhine primates and variation within different human populations. Results We show that five beta-defensin genes that do not show copy number variation in humans show evidence of positive selection in catarrhine primates, and identify specific codons that have been under selective pressure. Direct haplotyping of DEFB127 in humans suggests long-term balancing selection: there are two highly diverged haplotype clades carrying different variants of a codon that, in primates, is positively selected. For DEFB132, we show that extensive diversity, including a four-state amino acid polymorphism (valine, isoleucine, alanine and threonine at position 93, is present in hunter-gatherer populations, both African and non-African, but not found in samples from agricultural populations. Conclusion Some, but not all, beta-defensin genes show positive selection in catarrhine primates. There is suggestive evidence of different selective pressures on these genes in humans, but the nature of the selective pressure remains unclear and is likely to differ between populations.

  10. Directional and balancing selection in human beta-defensins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollox, Edward J; Armour, John A L

    2008-04-16

    In primates, infection is an important force driving gene evolution, and this is reflected in the importance of infectious disease in human morbidity today. The beta-defensins are key components of the innate immune system, with antimicrobial and cell signalling roles, but also reproductive functions. Here we examine evolution of beta-defensins in catarrhine primates and variation within different human populations. We show that five beta-defensin genes that do not show copy number variation in humans show evidence of positive selection in catarrhine primates, and identify specific codons that have been under selective pressure. Direct haplotyping of DEFB127 in humans suggests long-term balancing selection: there are two highly diverged haplotype clades carrying different variants of a codon that, in primates, is positively selected. For DEFB132, we show that extensive diversity, including a four-state amino acid polymorphism (valine, isoleucine, alanine and threonine at position 93), is present in hunter-gatherer populations, both African and non-African, but not found in samples from agricultural populations. Some, but not all, beta-defensin genes show positive selection in catarrhine primates. There is suggestive evidence of different selective pressures on these genes in humans, but the nature of the selective pressure remains unclear and is likely to differ between populations.

  11. Identification of tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid in foodstuffs, human urine and human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, J; Mizoi, Y; Naito, T; Ogawa, Y; Uetani, Y; Ninomiya, I

    1991-05-01

    1-Methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid (MTCA) and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid (TCCA), both precursors of mutagenic N-nitroso compounds (N-nitrosamines, 1-methyl-2-nitroso-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid and 2-nitroso-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid), were detected in various food-stuffs, urine from healthy human subjects and human milk. A purification procedure, involving a chemically-bonded material followed by HPLC combined with fluorometric detection, was used for the quantitative determination of these compounds, allowing the separation of two diastereoisomers of MTCA. An HPLC and mass spectrometry method was also developed for their identification. Comparing the concentration of MTCA and TCCA in fermented products and raw materials suggested that tetrahydro-beta-carbolines may have been produced through fermentation or by condensation of tryptophan and acetaldehyde formed from ethanol added as a food preservative. This is the first report of excretion of tetrahydro-beta-carbolines in human urine and human milk. A comparison of the concentrations of tetrahydro-beta-carbolines in urine from human infants and human milk indicates that tetrahydro-beta-carbolines may be synthesized endogenously in humans. A possible pathway of tryptophan metabolism in plants and animals is presented.

  12. Inhibition of human and rat 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 by 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiangdong; Vicker, Nigel; Lawrence, Harshani; Smith, Andrew; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2007-05-01

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) plays an important role in regulating the cortisol availability to bind to corticosteroid receptors within specific tissue. Recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of metabolic syndrome indicate that elevation of cortisol levels within specific tissues through the action of 11beta-HSD1 could contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. Therefore, selective inhibitors of 11beta-HSD1 have been investigated as potential treatments for metabolic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus type 2 or obesity. Here we report the discovery and synthesis of some 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (18beta-GA) derivatives (2-5) and their inhibitory activities against rat hepatic11beta-HSD1 and rat renal 11beta-HSD2. Once the selectivity over the rat type 2 enzyme was established, these compounds' ability to inhibit human 11beta-HSD1 was also evaluated using both radioimmunoassay (RIA) and homogeneous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) methods. The 11-modified 18beta-GA derivatives 2 and 3 with apparent selectivity for rat 11beta-HSD1 showed a high percentage inhibition for human microsomal 11beta-HSD1 at 10 microM and exhibited IC50 values of 400 and 1100 nM, respectively. The side chain modified 18beta-GA derivatives 4 and 5, although showing selectivity for rat 11beta-HSD1 inhibited human microsomal 11beta-HSD1 with IC50 values in the low micromolar range.

  13. UV-independent induction of beta defensin 3 in neonatal human skin explants [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4s2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Wolf Horrell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the effect of UV radiation on β-defensin 3 (BD3 expression in human skin, freshly-isolated UV-naïve skin was obtained from newborn male infants undergoing planned circumcision.  Skin explants sustained ex vivo dermis side down on RPMI media were exposed to 0.5 kJ/m2 UVB, and biopsies were taken from the explant through 72 hours after radiation.  mRNA expression was measured by qRTPCR and normalized to TATA-binding protein.  BD3 expression at each time point was compared with an untreated control taken at time 0 within each skin sample.  Extensive variability in both the timing and magnitude of BD3 induction across individuals was noted and was not predicted by skin pigment phenotype, suggesting that BD3 induction was not influenced by epidermal melanization.  However, a mock-irradiated time course demonstrated UV-independent BD3 mRNA increases across multiple donors which was not further augmented by treatment with UV radiation, suggesting that factors other than UV damage promoted increased BD3 expression in the skin explants.  We conclude that BD3 expression is induced in a UV-independent manner in human skin explants processed and maintained in standard culture conditions, and that neonatal skin explants are an inappropriate model with which to study the effects of UV on BD3 induction in whole human skin.

  14. Distinct down-regulation of cardiac beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in different human heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfath, M; Geertz, B; Schmitz, W; Scholz, H; Haverich, A; Breil, I; Hanrath, P; Reupcke, C; Sigmund, M; Lo, H B

    1991-02-01

    Cardiac beta-adrenoceptor density and beta 1- and beta 2-subtype distribution were examined in human left ventricular myocardium from transplant donors serving as controls and from patients with mitral valve stenosis, aortic valve stenosis, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, and ischaemic cardiomyopathy respectively. The total beta-adrenoceptor density was similar in transplant donors and patients with moderate heart failure (NYHA II-III) due to mitral valve stenosis, but was markedly reduced in all forms of severe heart failure (NYHA III-IV) studied. A reduction of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors was found in patients with severe heart failure due to mitral valve stenosis or ischaemic cardiomyopathy. In contrast, a selective down-regulation of beta 1-adrenoceptors with unchanged beta 2-adrenoceptors and hence a relative increase in the latter was observed in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and aortic valve stenosis. It is concluded that the extent of total beta-adrenoceptor down-regulation is related to the degree of heart failure. Selective loss of beta 1-adrenoceptors is not specific for idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy but also occurs in aortic valve stenosis. Changes in beta 1- and beta 2-subtype distribution are rather related to the aetiology than to the clinical degree of heart failure.

  15. Differential Regulation of Human Thymosin Beta 15 Isoforms by Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Jacqueline; Barrows, Courtney; Zetter, Bruce R.

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified an additional isoform of human thymosin beta 15 (also known as NB-thymosin beta, gene name TMSB15A) transcribed from an independent gene, and designated TMSB15B. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether these isoforms were differentially expressed and functional. Our data show that the TMSB15A and TMSB15B isoforms have distinct expression patterns in different tumor cell lines and tissues. TMSB15A was expressed at higher levels in HCT116, DU145, LNCaP and LNCaP-LN3 cancer cells. In MCF-7, SKOV-3, HT1080 and PC-3MLN4 cells, TMSB15A and TMSB15B showed approximately equivalent levels of expression, while TMSB15B was the predominant isoform expressed in PC-3, MDA-MB-231, NCI-H322 and Caco-2 cancer cells. In normal human prostate and prostate cancer tissues, TMSB15A was the predominant isoform expressed. In contrast, normal colon and colon cancer tissue expressed predominantly TMSB15B. The two gene isoforms are also subject to different transcriptional regulation. Treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with transforming growth factor beta 1 repressed TMSB15A expression but had no effect on TMSB15B. siRNA specific to the TMSB15B isoform suppressed cell migration of prostate cancer cells to epidermal growth factor, suggesting a functional role for this second isoform. In summary, our data reveal different expression patterns and regulation of a new thymosin beta 15 gene paralog. This may have important consequences in both tumor and neuronal cell motility. PMID:19296525

  16. Andes virus recognition of human and Syrian hamster beta3 integrins is determined by an L33P substitution in the PSI domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthys, Valery S; Gorbunova, Elena E; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N; Mackow, Erich R

    2010-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) causes a fatal hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in humans and Syrian hamsters. Human alpha(v)beta(3) integrins are receptors for several pathogenic hantaviruses, and the function of alpha(v)beta(3) integrins on endothelial cells suggests a role for alpha(v)beta(3) in hantavirus directed vascular permeability. We determined here that ANDV infection of human endothelial cells or Syrian hamster-derived BHK-21 cells was selectively inhibited by the high-affinity alpha(v)beta(3) integrin ligand vitronectin and by antibodies to alpha(v)beta(3) integrins. Further, antibodies to the beta(3) integrin PSI domain, as well as PSI domain polypeptides derived from human and Syrian hamster beta(3) subunits, but not murine or bovine beta(3), inhibited ANDV infection of both BHK-21 and human endothelial cells. These findings suggest that ANDV interacts with beta(3) subunits through PSI domain residues conserved in both Syrian hamster and human beta(3) integrins. Sequencing the Syrian hamster beta(3) integrin PSI domain revealed eight differences between Syrian hamster and human beta(3) integrins. Analysis of residues within the PSI domains of human, Syrian hamster, murine, and bovine beta(3) integrins identified unique proline substitutions at residues 32 and 33 of murine and bovine PSI domains that could determine ANDV recognition. Mutagenizing the human beta(3) PSI domain to contain the L33P substitution present in bovine beta(3) integrin abolished the ability of the PSI domain to inhibit ANDV infectivity. Conversely, mutagenizing either the bovine PSI domain, P33L, or the murine PSI domain, S32P, to the residue present human beta(3) permitted PSI mutants to inhibit ANDV infection. Similarly, CHO cells transfected with the full-length bovine beta(3) integrin containing the P33L mutation permitted infection by ANDV. These findings indicate that human and Syrian hamster alpha(v)beta(3) integrins are key receptors for ANDV and that specific residues within the

  17. [Hemoglobin beta S haplotype in the Kebili region (southern Tunisia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikha, M; Fakhfakh, F; Mseddi, S; Gargouri, J; Ghali, L; Labiadh, Z; Harrabi, M; Souissi, T; Ayadi, H

    1998-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a monogenic hereditary disease characterized by a mutation in the beta globin gene. Five major haplotypes associated with the beta S mutation have been defined: Benin, Bantu, Senegalian, Camerounian, and Arabo-Indian. Previous studies in northern Tunisia showed that sickle cell anemia was of Benin origin in this region. Patients from the south of Tunisia, mainly from the Kebili region, were not previously concerned. In this study, we have determined the beta S haplotype and evaluated phenotypical expression of the disease in 14 patients from this latter region. The use of four restriction endonucleases having polymorphic sites in the beta globin gene showed that all patients had the Benin haplotype, confirming the Benin origin of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia. This haplotype is associated with an heterogeneous expression of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) with extremes varying from 2.4 to 16.3% and a mean expression rate of 8.16%, which is in accordance with literature data. In spite of the haplotype homogeneity in our patients, clinical heterogeneity was noted. A unique case of alpha-thalassemia could not explain this heterogeneity. In contrast, we found a certain correlation between fetal hemoglobin expression and clinical severity.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Central Coiled-Coil Domain from Human Liprin-[beta]2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Tang, Ming-Yun; Sawaya, Michael R.; Phillips, Martin L.; Bowie, James U. (UCLA)

    2012-02-07

    Liprins are a conserved family of scaffolding proteins important for the proper regulation and development of neuronal synapses. Humans have four liprin-{alpha}s and two liprin-{beta}s which all contain long coiled-coil domains followed by three tandem SAM domains. Complex interactions between the coiled-coil and SAM domains are thought to create liprin scaffolds, but the structural and biochemical properties of these domains remain largely uncharacterized. In this study we find that the human liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil forms an extended dimer. Several protease-resistant subdomains within the liprin-{beta}1 and liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coils were also identified. A 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the central, protease-resistant core of the liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil reveals a parallel helix orientation. These studies represent an initial step toward determining the overall architecture of liprin scaffolds and understanding the molecular basis for their synaptic functions.

  19. BENIGN EPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA ASSOCIATED WITH BETA-HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Molochkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study an association between acrochordon and human papilloma virus (HPV using quantitative analysis of viral desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA; to detect different phenotypes of beta-HPV. Materials and methods: We examined 52  patients (22 immuno-suppressed patients and 30 immunocompetent subjects in the Dermatovenereology and Dermato-Oncology Department and Chronic Dialysis and Kidney Transplantation Department of the Moscow Regional Research and Clinical Institute (MONIKI. Control group included 49 healthy donors. Burr biopsy samples (micro-samples of acrochordon and intact skin (apper arm were collected in sterile conditions. After sample procession and DNA isolation using DNK-sorb-C kit (Central Research Institute for Epidemiology – CRIE, polymerase chain reaction for HPV was performed with real-time fluorescent hybridization detection. For DNA amplification and detection we used RotorGene 3000 analyzer (Corbett Research, Australia. In the beta-HPV assay, recombinant plasmids were used as positive controls and control human beta-globin gene fragments (CRIE. 4 oligo-nucleotide systems (group-specific primers and probes were used for the detection of beta-HPV DNA. Results: Preliminary data indicated that acrochordons of open and covered skin regions were common in renal transplant recipients. Beta-HPV DNA was more frequent in acrochordons and intact skin (64% and 54% of renal transplant recipients compared to healthy donors (47%. 57% of renal transplant recipients demonstrated mixed infection in acrochordons. Conclusion: HPV DNA was frequently detected in acrochordons and intact skin of renal transplant recipients. In immunocompetent patients prevalence of HPV DNA in acrochordons was significantly higher compared to intact skin.

  20. (S)-N-(5-Chlorothiophene-2-sulfonyl)-beta,beta-diethylalaninol a Notch-1-sparing gamma-secretase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Derek C; Stock, Joseph R; Kreft, Anthony F; Antane, Madelene; Aschmies, Suzan H; Atchison, Kevin P; Casebier, David S; Comery, Thomas A; Diamantidis, George; Ellingboe, John W; Harrison, Boyd L; Hu, Yun; Jin, Mei; Kubrak, Dennis M; Lu, Peimin; Mann, Charles W; Martone, Robert L; Moore, William J; Oganesian, Aram; Riddell, David R; Sonnenberg-Reines, June; Sun, Shaiu-Ching; Wagner, Erik; Wang, Zheng; Woller, Kevin R; Xu, Zheng; Zhou, Hua; Jacobsen, J Steven

    2009-02-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta), produced by the proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretase, is widely believed to be associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Research around the high-throughput screening hit (S)-4-chlorophenylsulfonyl isoleucinol led to the identification of the Notch-1-sparing (9.5-fold) gamma-secretase inhibitor (S)-N-(5-chlorothiophene-2-sulfonyl)-beta,beta-diethylalaninol 7.b.2 (Abeta(40/42) EC(50)=28 nM), which is efficacious in reduction of Abeta production in vivo.

  1. The human thyrotropin beta-subunit gene differs in 5' structure from murine TSH-beta genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidon, P T; Whitfield, G K; Porti, D; Kourides, I A

    1988-12-01

    The gene encoding the beta-subunit of human thyrotropin (hTSH-beta) was isolated, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene is 4.3 kb in length, consists of three exons and two introns, and is present as a single copy as determined by Southern blot analysis of total genomic DNA. The protein coding portion of the gene, which includes exons 2 and 3, was isolated from a human genomic phage library, while exon 1, which encodes only 5' untranslated mRNA sequence, was isolated from a plasmid library of size-selected genomic DNA fragments. Here we describe the isolation of the 5' untranslated exon of the hTSH-beta subunit and 5'-flanking region. The structure of the hTSH-beta gene is very similar to the previously characterized TSH-beta genes from mouse and rat. The genes from all three species have two distinct promoter regions, but while both promoters are utilized by the murine TSH-beta genes, the human TSH-beta gene apparently utilizes only the proximal promoter for transcription initiation. A striking difference in hTSH-beta gene structure compared to the murine genes is that exon 1 of the human gene is 36 nucleotides. An analysis of the mouse, rat, and human exon 1 and 5'-flanking region shows a high percentage of sequence homology, with the exception of a 9-nucleotide insertion 13 bases 3' from the proximal TATA box found in the human gene but not found in the other two species. We propose that this insertion results in the additional length of human exon 1 compared to the mouse and rat genes. By isolating the promoter region of the hTSH-beta gene, we can begin to identify specific sequences involved in the regulation of hTSH gene expression.

  2. The role of SH and S-S groups in Bacillus cereus beta-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, K; Yoneda, I; Nanmori, T; Shinke, R; Morita, Y; Mikami, B

    1995-12-01

    The properties of sulfhydryl (SH) and disulfide (S-S) groups in Bacillus cereus BQ10-S1 Spo III beta-amylase have been investigated to clarify their roles in the enzyme action. Two out of three cysteine residues in B. cereus beta-amylase were found to form an S-S bond, which was found to be located between Cys91 and Cys99 by the analysis of an S-S containing peptide. The replacement of the soybean beta-amylase model around L3 loop 1 revealed that the S-S bond is located at the root of this flexible loop that moves between open and closed forms during catalysis. The analysis of fluorescence labeled peptides revealed that the remaining free SH group was Cys331. Modification of Cys331 with N-ethylmaleimide or p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB) caused inactivation of the enzyme. The rate constants for the reactions were consistent with those of Cys343 in soybean enzyme. The binding affinity of the PCMB-modified enzyme to maltose was also decreased. These results indicate that the modification of Cys331, which exists as a free SH group in B. cereus beta-amylase caused inactivation by a similar mechanism to that in the case of Cys343 in soybean beta-amylase as assumed from the sequence homology. This cysteine residue has a common role in beta-amylases irrespective their origin.

  3. Cloning and characterization of human liver cytosolic beta-glycosidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Graaf, M; Van Veen, IC; Van Der Meulen-Muileman, IH; Gerritsen, WR; Pinedo, HM; Haisma, HJ

    2001-01-01

    Cytosolic beta -glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) from mammalian liver is a member of the family 1 glycoside hydrolases and is known for its ability to hydrolyse a range of beta -D-glycosides. including beta -D-glucoside acid beta -D-galactoside. We therefore refer to this enzyme as cytosolic beta

  4. Promoters for the human beta-hexosaminidase genes, HEXA and HEXB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norflus, F; Yamanaka, S; Proia, R L

    1996-02-01

    Human lysosomal beta-hexosaminidases are encoded by two genes, HEXA and HEXB, specifying an alpha- and a beta-subunit, respectively. The subunits dimerize to form beta-hexosaminidase A (alpha beta), beta-hexosaminidase B (beta beta), and beta-hexosaminidase S (alpha alpha). This enzyme system has the capacity to degrade a variety of cellular substrates: oligosaccharides, glycosaminoglycans, and glycolipids containing beta-linked N-acetylglucosaminyl or N-galactosaminyl residues. Mutations in either the HEXA gene or HEXB gene lead to an accumulation of GM2 ganglioside in neurons, resulting in the severe neurodegenerative disorders termed the GM2 gangliosidoses. To identify the DNA elements responsible for hexosaminidase expression, we ligated the 5'-flanking sequences of both the human and mouse hexosaminidase genes to a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. The resulting plasmids were transfected into NIH-3T3 cells and CAT activity was determined as a measure of promoter strength. By 5' deletion analysis, it was found that essential sequences for HEXA expression resided within a 40-bp region between 100 bp and 60 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. This area contained two potential estrogen response element half-sites as well as potential binding sites for transcription factors NF-E1 and AP-2. Similarly, important HEXB promoter sequences were localized to a 60-bp region between 150 bp and 90 bp upstream of the ATG codon. By performing scanning mutagenesis on a 60-bp region within the 150-bp HEXB construct, we defined an essential promoter element of 12 bp that contained two potential AP-1 sites. The mouse Hexa and Hexb 5'-flanking sequences were found to contain regions similar in sequence, location, and activity to the essential promoter elements defined in the cognate human genes. No sequence similarity was found, however, between 5'-flanking regions of the HEXA and HEXB genes. These essential promoter elements represent potential sites for HEXA and

  5. Induction of human pancreatic beta cell replication by inhibitors of dual specificity tyrosine regulated kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both result ultimately from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with peak beta cell labeling indices achieving approximately 2% in first year of life1-4. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication rates are very low. While beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts1-8. Hence, there remains an urgent need for diabetes therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput small molecule screen (HTS) revealing a novel class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds, analogues of the small molecule, harmine. We also define dual specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine, and the Nuclear Factors of activated T-cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation as well as beta cell differentiation. These observations suggest that harmine analogues (“harmalogs”) may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing potency and beta cell specificity are important future challenges. PMID:25751815

  6. Proteins differentially expressed in human beta-cells-enriched pancreatic islet cultures and human insulinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terra, Letícia F; Teixeira, Priscila C; Wailemann, Rosangela A M

    2013-01-01

    In view of the great demand for human beta-cells for physiological and medical studies, we generated cell lines derived from human insulinomas which secrete insulin, C-peptide and express neuroendocrine and islet markers. In this study, we set out to characterize their proteomes, comparing them t...

  7. Phospholipase C-beta 2 promotes mitosis and migration of human breast cancer-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Benedusi, Mascia; Brugnoli, Federica; Lanuti, Paola; Marchisio, Marco; Querzoli, Patrizia; Capitani, Silvano

    2007-08-01

    Like most human neoplasm, breast cancer has aberrations in signal transduction elements that can lead to increased proliferative potential, apoptosis inhibition, tissue invasion and metastasis. Due to the high heterogeneity of this tumor, currently, no markers are clearly associated with the insurgence of breast cancer, as well as with its progression from in situ lesion to invasive carcinoma. We have recently demonstrated an altered expression of the beta2 isoform of the phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C (PLC) in invasive breast tumors with different histopathological features. In primary breast tumor cells, elevated amounts of this protein are closely correlated with a poor prognosis of patients with mammary carcinoma, suggesting that PLC-beta2 may be involved in the development and worsening of the malignant phenotype. Here we demonstrate that PLC-beta2 may improve some malignant characteristics of tumor cells, like motility and invasion capability, but it fails to induce tumorigenesis in non-transformed breast-derived cells. We also report that, compared with the G(0)/G(1) phases of the cell cycle, the cells in S/G(2)/M phases show high PLC-beta2 expressions that reach the greatest levels during the late mitotic stages. In addition, even if unable to modify the proliferation rate and the expression of cell cycle-related enzymes of malignant cells, PLC-beta2 may promote the G(2)/M progression, a critical event in cancer evolution. Since phosphoinositides, substrates of PLC, are involved in regulating cytoskeleton architecture, PLC-beta2 in breast tumor cells may mediate the modification of cell shape that characterizes cell division, motility and invasion. On the basis of these data, PLC-beta2 may constitute a molecular marker of breast tumor cells able to monitor the progression to invasive cancers and a target for novel therapeutic breast cancer strategies.

  8. Neural mechanisms of transient neocortical beta rhythms: Converging evidence from humans, computational modeling, monkeys, and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Maxwell A.; Lee, Shane; Law, Robert; Haegens, Saskia; Thorn, Catherine A.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Moore, Christopher I.; Jones, Stephanie R.

    2016-01-01

    Human neocortical 15–29-Hz beta oscillations are strong predictors of perceptual and motor performance. However, the mechanistic origin of beta in vivo is unknown, hindering understanding of its functional role. Combining human magnetoencephalography (MEG), computational modeling, and laminar recordings in animals, we present a new theory that accounts for the origin of spontaneous neocortical beta. In our MEG data, spontaneous beta activity from somatosensory and frontal cortex emerged as noncontinuous beta events typically lasting <150 ms with a stereotypical waveform. Computational modeling uniquely designed to infer the electrical currents underlying these signals showed that beta events could emerge from the integration of nearly synchronous bursts of excitatory synaptic drive targeting proximal and distal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, where the defining feature of a beta event was a strong distal drive that lasted one beta period (∼50 ms). This beta mechanism rigorously accounted for the beta event profiles; several other mechanisms did not. The spatial location of synaptic drive in the model to supragranular and infragranular layers was critical to the emergence of beta events and led to the prediction that beta events should be associated with a specific laminar current profile. Laminar recordings in somatosensory neocortex from anesthetized mice and awake monkeys supported these predictions, suggesting this beta mechanism is conserved across species and recording modalities. These findings make several predictions about optimal states for perceptual and motor performance and guide causal interventions to modulate beta for optimal function. PMID:27469163

  9. Proteolytically modified human beta 2-microglobulin augments the specific cytotoxic activity in murine mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Claësson, M H

    1987-01-01

    (M-beta 2-m) bind to murine lymphocytes expressing H-2 class I antigens; M-beta 2-m, when added at day 0 and 1 of culture in nanomolar concentrations to a one-way murine allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) augments the generation of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes; M-beta 2-m increases...... the endogenous production of interleukin 2 in the MLC culture; monoclonal antibody which reacts with both the native beta 2-m and M-beta 2-m molecule blocks the augmentation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte production induced by M-beta 2-m; murine as well as human MLC responder cells can proteolytically modify native...

  10. Cereblon inhibits proteasome activity by binding to the 20S core proteasome subunit beta type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Min; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2012-10-26

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding cereblon (CRBN) are associated with mental retardation. Although CRBN has been investigated in several cellular contexts, its function remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CRBN plays a role in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Heterologous expression of CRBN inhibited proteasome activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line. Furthermore, proteasome subunit beta type 4 (PSMB4), the β7 subunit of the 20S core complex, was identified as a direct binding partner of CRBN. These findings suggest that CRBN may modulate proteasome activity by directly interacting with the β7 subunit.

  11. Molecular analysis of the beta-globin gene cluster in the Niokholo Mandenka population reveals a recent origin of the beta(S) Senegal mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currat, Mathias; Trabuchet, Guy; Rees, David; Perrin, Pascale; Harding, Rosalind M; Clegg, John B; Langaney, André; Excoffier, Laurent

    2002-01-01

    A large and ethnically well-defined Mandenka sample from eastern Senegal was analyzed for the polymorphism of the beta-globin gene cluster on chromosome 11. Five RFLP sites of the 5' region were investigated in 193 individuals revealing the presence of 10 different haplotypes. The frequency of the sickle-cell anemia causing mutation (beta(S)) in the Mandenka estimated from this sample is 11.7%. This mutation was found strictly associated with the single Senegal haplotype. Approximately 600 bp of the upstream region of the beta-globin gene were sequenced for a subset of 94 chromosomes, showing the presence of four transversions, five transitions, and a composite microsatellite polymorphism. The sequence of 22 beta(S) chromosomes was also identical to the previously defined Senegal haplotype, suggesting that this mutation is very recent. Monte Carlo simulations (allowing for a specific balancing selection model, a logistic growth of the population, and variable initial frequencies of the Senegal haplotype) were used to estimate the age of the beta(S) mutation. Resulting maximum-likelihood estimates are 45-70 generations (1,350-2,100 years) for very different demographic scenarios. Smallest confidence intervals (25-690 generations) are obtained under the hypothesis that the Mandenka population is large (N(e) >5,000) and stationary or that it has undergone a rapid demographic expansion to a current size of >5,000 reproducing individuals, which is quite likely in view of the great diversity found on beta(A) chromosomes.

  12. Legionella pneumophila induces human beta Defensin-3 in pulmonary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hippenstiel Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila is an important causative agent of severe pneumonia in humans. Human alveolar epithelium and macrophages are effective barriers for inhaled microorganisms and actively participate in the initiation of innate host defense. The beta defensin-3 (hBD-3, an antimicrobial peptide is an important component of the innate immune response of the human lung. Therefore we hypothesize that hBD-3 might be important for immune defense towards L. pneumophila. Methods We investigated the effects of L. pneumophila and different TLR agonists on pulmonary cells in regard to hBD-3 expression by ELISA. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated inhibition of TLRs as well as chemical inhibition of potential downstream signaling molecules was used for functional analysis. Results L. pneumophila induced release of hBD-3 in pulmonary epithelium and alveolar macrophages. A similar response was observed when epithelial cells were treated with different TLR agonists. Inhibition of TLR2, TLR5, and TLR9 expression led to a decreased hBD-3 expression. Furthermore expression of hBD-3 was mediated through a JNK dependent activation of AP-1 (c-Jun but appeared to be independent of NF-κB. Additionally, we demonstrate that hBD-3 elicited a strong antimicrobial effect on L. pneumophila replication. Conclusions Taken together, human pulmonary cells produce hBD-3 upon L. pneumophila infection via a TLR-JNK-AP-1-dependent pathway which may contribute to an efficient innate immune defense.

  13. Control of yeast mating signal transduction by a mammalian. beta. sub 2 -adrenergic receptor and G sub s. alpha. subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, K.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA)); Dohlman, H.G.; Thorner, J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1990-10-05

    To facilitate functional and mechanistic studies of receptor-G protein interactions by expression of the human {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor (h{beta}-AR) has been expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This was achieved by placing a modified h{beta}-AR gene under control of the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. After induction by galactose, functional h{beta}-AR was expressed at a concentration several hundred times as great as that found in any human tissue. As determined from competitive ligand binding experiments, h{beta}-AR expressed in yeast displayed characteristic affinities, specificity, and stereoselectivity. Partial activation of the yeast pheromone response pathway by {beta}-adrenergic receptor agonists was achieved in cells coexpressing h{beta}-AR and a mammalian G protein (G{sub s}) {alpha} subunit - demonstrating that these components can couple to each other and to downstream effectors when expressed in yeast. This in vivo reconstitution system provides a new approach for examining ligand binding and G protein coupling to cell surface receptors.

  14. Crystalline structures in human pancreatic beta cell adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, H; Kawai, T; Tanaka, T; Fujii, M; Takahashi, M; Miyashita, T

    1978-05-01

    An electron microscopic observation on a pancreatic tumor removed from a 34-year-old woman revealed the fine structural morphology of a functional beta cell adenoma. Characteristic PAS positive crystalline structures were frequently observed in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. They were not bounded by a membrane and had a rectangular or irregular hexagonal shape. Highly regular patterns were seen as such as lattice or honeycomb and parallel ripple structures. They are similar to the Reinke's crystal or crystalline structures reported in human hepatocytes suffering from several different diseases and considered as a protein-carbohydrate complex. Occasionally, small paracrystalline structures appeared to indicate an immature type of these structures in the opaque fine fibrillar mass. Crystalline or paracrystalline structures were not detected in the normal pancreatic tissue removed with the tumor from the patient.

  15. Ionizing radiation predisposes non-malignant human mammaryepithelial cells to undergo TGF beta-induced epithelial to mesenchymaltransition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Chou, William S.; Costes, Sylvain; Gascard, Philippe; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-04-06

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}) is a tumor suppressor during the initial stage of tumorigenesis, but it can switch to a tumor promoter during neoplastic progression. Ionizing radiation (IR), both a carcinogen and a therapeutic agent, induces TGF{beta}, activation in vivo. We now show that IR sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Non-malignant HMEC (MCF10A, HMT3522 S1 and 184v) were irradiated with 2 Gy shortly after attachment in monolayer culture, or treated with a low concentration of TGF{beta} (0.4 ng/ml), or double-treated. All double-treated (IR+TGF{beta}) HMEC underwent a morphological shift from cuboidal to spindle-shaped. This phenotype was accompanied by decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-1, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin. Furthermore, double-treatment increased cell motility, promoted invasion and disrupted acinar morphogenesis of cells subsequently plated in Matrigel{trademark}. Neither radiation nor TGF{beta} alone elicited EMT, even though IR increased chronic TGF{beta} signaling and activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that double treated cells exhibit a specific 10-gene signature associated with Erk/MAPK signaling. We hypothesized that IR-induced MAPK activation primes non-malignant HMEC to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated EMT. Consistent with this, Erk phosphorylation were transiently induced by irradiation, persisted in irradiated cells treated with TGF{beta}, and treatment with U0126, a Mek inhibitor, blocked the EMT phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that the interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways elicit heritable phenotypes that could contribute to neoplastic progression.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis of alpha- and beta-HgS nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galain, Isabel; María, Pérez Barthaburu; Ivana, Aguiar; Laura, Fornaro

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized HgS nanostructures by the hydrothermal method in order to use them as electron acceptors in hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells. We employed different mercury sources (HgO and Hg(CH3COO)2) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or hexadecanethiol (HDT) as stabilizing/capping agent for controlling size, crystallinity, morphology and stability of the obtained nanostructures. We also used thiourea as sulfur source, and a temperature of 180 °C during 6 h. Synthesized nanostructures were characterized by powder X-Ray Diffraction, Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform and Transmission Electron Microscopy. When PVP acts as stabilizing agent, the mercury source has influence on the size -but not in morphology- of the beta-HgS obtained nansostructures. HDT has control over nanostructures' size and depending on the relation Hg:HDT, we obtained a mixture of alpha and beta HgS which can be advantageous in the application in solar cells, due their absorption in different spectral regions. The smallest nanostructures obtained have a mean diameter of 20 nm when using HDT as capping agent. Also, we deposited the aforementioned nanostructures onto flat glass substrates by the spin coating technique as a first approach of an active layer of a solar cell. The depositions were characterized by atomic force microscopy. We obtained smaller particle deposition and higher particle density -but a lower area coverage (5%) - in samples with HDT as capping agent. This work presents promising results on nanostructures for future application on hybrid solar cells. Further efforts will be focused on the deposition of organic-inorganic layers.

  17. Enhanced expression of resistin-like molecule beta in human colon cancer and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Duan; Tong, Qiang-Song; Weng, Mi-Xia; He, Jun; Lv, Qing; Pu, Jia-Rui; Jiang, Guo-Song; Cai, Jia-Bin; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Xiao-Hua

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated that resistin-like molecule beta (RELM beta), an intestinal goblet cell-specific protein, is markedly increased in the intestinal tumors of min mice and over-expressed in a human colon cancer cell line. We hypothesized that RELM beta might be enhanced in human colon cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical importance of RELM beta expression in colon cancer patients and to correlate its expression with various clinicopathological parameters, upstream regulatory molecule expression, tumor proliferative capacity, and patients' survival. Of the 80 colon cancer patients studied, 65 (81.25%) tested positive for RELM beta, mainly in the cytoplasm of colon mucosa. Contrasting sharply with the strongly RELM beta-positive tumors, normal colon mucous membrane was negative or weakly positive. RELM beta positivity in colon cancer was correlated with histological grade of differentiation and lymph node metastasis, but not with age, gender, tumor location and size, tumor infiltration, Dukes' stage, liver metastasis, and venous invasion. RELM beta expression was significantly correlated with the expression of transcription factor CDX-2 (P 0.05). The mean postoperative survival time (2.76 years) of RELM beta-positive patients was significantly longer than that (1.26 years) of RELM beta-negative patients (P = 0.032). These findings support evidence of the enhanced RELM beta expression in colon cancer patients and suggest that further investigation is warranted to explore the role of RELM beta in colon cancer.

  18. beta. -Adrenoceptors in human tracheal smooth muscle: characteristics of binding and relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Koppen, C.J.; Hermanussen, M.W.; Verrijp, K.N.; Rodrigues de Miranda, J.F.; Beld, A.J.; Lammers, J.W.J.; van Ginneken, C.A.M.

    1987-06-29

    Specific binding of (/sup 125/I)-(-)-cyanopindolol to human tracheal smooth muscle membranes was saturable, stereo-selective and of high affinity (K/sub d/ = 5.3 +/- 0.9 pmol/l and R/sub T/ = 78 +/- 7 fmol/g tissue). The ..beta../sub 1/-selective antagonists atenolol and LK 203-030 inhibited specific (/sup 125/I)-(-)-cyanopindolol binding according to a one binding site model with low affinity in nearly all subjects, pointing to a homogeneous BETA/sub 2/-adrenoceptor population. In one subject using LK 203-030 a small ..beta../sub 1/-adrenoceptor subpopulation could be demonstrated. The beta-mimetics isoprenaline, fenoterol, salbutamol and terbutaline recognized high and low affinity agonist binding sites. Isoprenaline's pK/sub H/- and pK/sub L/-values for the high and low affinity sites were 8.0 +/- 0.2 and 5.9 +/- 0.3 respectively. In functional experiments isoprenaline relaxed tracheal smooth muscle strips having intrinsic tone with a pD/sub 2/-value of 6.63 +/- 0.19. 32 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Human cardiac beta1- or beta2-adrenergic receptor stimulation and the negative chronotropic effect of low-dose pirenzepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubetz, J; Schmuck, S; Wochatz, G; Ruhland, B; Poller, U; Radke, J; Brodde, O E

    2000-05-01

    The M1-muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine in low doses (pirenzepine differ in volunteers with activated cardiac beta1-adrenergic receptors versus activated cardiac beta2-adrenergic receptors. In 17 male volunteers (25 +/- 1 years) we studied effects of pirenzepine infusion (0.5 mg intravenous bolus followed by continuous infusion of 0.15 microg/kg/min) on heart rate and heart rate-corrected duration of electromechanical systole (QS2c, as a measure of inotropism) that had been stimulated by activation of cardiac beta1-adrenergic receptors (bicycle exercise in the supine position for 60 minutes at 25 W) or cardiac beta2-adrenergic receptors (continuous intravenous infusion of 100 ng/kg/min terbutaline). Bicycle exercise and terbutaline infusion significantly increased heart rate and shortened QS2c. When pirenzepine was infused 20 minutes after the beginning of the exercise or terbutaline infusion, heart rate decreased in both settings by approximately the same extent (approximately -10 to -14 beats/min), although exercise and terbutaline infusion continued; however, QS2c was not affected. Pirenzepine (0.05 to 1 mg intravenous bolus)-induced decrease in heart rate was abolished after 6 days of transdermal scopolamine treatment of volunteers. Low-dose pirenzepine decreased heart rate by muscarinic receptor stimulation, because this was blocked by scopolamine. Moreover, low-dose pirenzepine did not differentiate between cardiac beta1- or beta2-adrenergic receptor stimulation; however, low-dose pirenzepine did not affect cardiac contractility as measured by QS2c. Low-dose pirenzepine therefore exerted a unique pattern of action in the human heart: it decreased heart rate (basal and beta1- and/or beta2-adrenergic receptor-stimulated) without affecting contractility.

  20. Repetitive in vivo treatment with human recombinant interleukin-1 beta modifies beta-cell function in normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, L D; Reimers, J; Nerup, J

    1992-01-01

    It is unknown whether interleukin-1 exerts a bimodal effect on Beta-cell function in vivo, and whether interleukin-1 has a diabetogenic action in normal animals. We therefore studied: (a) acute effects 2 h after an intraperitoneal bolus injection of 4 micrograms of recombinant human interleukin-1...

  1. Human beta defensin is absent in burn blister fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M R; Ganz, T; Milner, S M

    2000-12-01

    Defensins are a family of cationic antimicrobial peptides that participate in innate host defence. Human beta defensin-2 (HBD-2) is produced by human keratinocytes, and has a potent bactericidal activity against a wide spectrum of microorganisms. We have recently shown that expression of HBD-2 is present in normal skin and lost in the full-thickness burn wound. Defensins have been found in the blister fluid of chronic wounds. Our study was designed to examine blister fluid from partial-thickness burns for defensin content. Fluid from five patients was collected from partial-thickness burn blisters, and then analysed by sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) with a monoclonal antibody and rabbit polyclonal antibody to HBD-2. The assay was validated against a Western blot assay for HBD-2 in samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with inflammatory lung disease. No HBD-2 was detectable in any of the burn blister fluids analysed. HBD-2 is lost in the full-thickness burn wound, and we have now demonstrated its absence in burn blister fluid. This finding represents evidence of a host defence defect within the burn wound and suggests a possible therapeutic role for antimicrobial peptides in the management of burn wounds.

  2. Leptin upregulates beta3-integrin expression and interleukin-1beta, upregulates leptin and leptin receptor expression in human endometrial epithelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, R R; Leavis, P

    2001-10-01

    Human endometrium and endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) either cultured alone or cocultured with human embryos express leptin and leptin receptor. This study compares the effect of leptin with that of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) on the expression of beta3-EEC integrin, a marker of endometrial receptivity. Both cytokines increased the expression of beta3-EEC at concentrations in the range of 0.06-3 nM; however, leptin exhibited a significantly greater effect than IL-1beta. We also determined the regulatory effects of IL-1beta on leptin secretion and on the expression of leptin and leptin receptor at the protein level in both EEC and endometrial stromal cell (ESC) cultures. In EEC cultures, IL-1beta upregulated secretion of leptin and expression of both leptin and leptin receptors. No effect of IL-1beta was found in the ESC cultures. However, leptin exhibited marginal upregulation of leptin receptor. The upregulation of beta3-integrin and leptin/leptin receptor expression by IL-1beta in EEC cultures indicates that both cytokines may be implicated in embryonic-maternal cross-talk during the early phase of human implantation. Our present data also raise the possibility that leptin is an endometrial molecular effector of IL-1beta action on beta3-integrin upregulation. Thus, a new role for leptin in human reproduction as an autocrine/paracrine regulator of endometrial receptivity is proposed.

  3. Differential sensitivity to beta-cell secretagogues in cultured rat pancreatic islets exposed to human interleukin-1 beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizirik, D L; Sandler, S; Hallberg, A; Bendtzen, K; Sener, A; Malaisse, W J

    1989-08-01

    The early stages of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are characterized by a selective inability to secrete insulin in response to glucose, coupled to a better response to nonnutrient secretagogues. The deficient glucose response may be a result of the autoimmune process directed toward the beta-cells. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been suggested to be one possible mediator of immunological damage of the beta-cells. In the present study we characterized the sensitivity of beta-cells to different secretagogues after human recombinant IL-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) exposure. Furthermore, experiments were performed to clarify the biochemical mechanisms behind the defective insulin response observed in these islets. Rat pancreatic islets were isolated and kept in tissue culture (medium RPMI-1640 plus 10% calf serum) for 5 days. The islets were subsequently exposed to 60 pM human recombinant IL-1 beta during 48 h in the same culture conditions as above and examined immediately after IL-1 exposure. The rIL-1 beta-treated islets showed a marked reduction of glucose-stimulated insulin release. Stimulation with arginine plus different glucose concentrations, and leucine plus glutamine partially counteracted the rIL-1 beta-induced reduction of insulin release. The activities of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase, glucokinase, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, were similar in control and IL-1-exposed islets. Treatment with IL-1 also did not impair the activities of NADH+- and NADPH+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-aspartate transaminase, glutamate-alanine transaminase, citrate synthase, and NAD+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase. The oxidation of D-[6-14C]glucose and L-[U-14C]leucine were decreased by 50% in IL-1-treated islets. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in the ratios of [2-14C]pyruvate oxidation/[1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation and L-[U-14C]leucine oxidation/L-[1-14C]leucine decarboxylation, indicating that IL-1 decreases the proportion of

  4. The role of EKLF in human beta-globin gene competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijgerde, M; Gribnau, J; Trimborn, T; Nuez, B; Philipsen, S; Grosveld, F; Fraser, P

    1996-11-15

    We have investigated the role of erythroid Kruppel-like factor (EKLF) in expression of the human beta-globin genes in compound EKLF knockout/human beta-locus transgenic mice. EKLF affects only the adult mouse beta-globin genes in homozygous knockout mice; heterozygous mice are unaffected. Here we show that EKLF knockout mice express the human epsilon and gamma-globin genes normally in embryonic red cells. However, fetal liver erythropoiesis, which is marked by a period of gamma- and beta-gene competition in which the genes are alternately transcribed, exhibits an altered ratio of gamma- to beta-gene transcription. EKLF heterozygous fetal livers display a decrease in the number of transcriptionally active beta genes with a reciprocal increase in the number of transcriptionally active gamma genes. beta-Gene transcription is absent in homozygous knockout fetuses with coincident changes in chromatin structure at the beta promoter. There is a further increase in the number of transcriptionally active gamma genes and accompanying gamma gene promoter chromatin alterations. These results indicate that EKLF plays a major role in gamma- and beta-gene competition and suggest that EKLF is important in stabilizing the interaction between the Locus Control Region and the beta-globin gene. In addition, these findings provide further evidence that developmental modulation of globin gene expression within individual cells is accomplished by altering the frequency and/or duration of transcriptional periods of a gene rather than changing the rate of transcription.

  5. [Influence of ASODN to the human tenon's fibroblasts in expressing CTGF induced by transforming growth factor beta2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi-Zhen; Wang, Yu-Hong; Cao, Yang; Zhang, Ming-Chang

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the effect of connective tissue growth factor's antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN) on the growth of human tenon' s capsule fibroblasts (HTF) induced by transforming growth factor beta2 (TGF-beta2) in vitro. It was a experimental study. HTF was collected from glaucoma patients and cultured. The 5-6 passage was used for experiments. The HTF induced by TGF-beta2 was divided into the following groups: N group: normal HTF; T group: HTF induced by TGF-beta2; A group: CTGF ASODN antisense:5'-TACTGGCGGCGGTCAT-3' encapsulated with liposome; S group: sense 5'-ATGACCGCCGCCAGTA-3' encapsulated with liposome; D group: HTF encapsulated with liposome only. The activity of HTF treated by different concentrations of liposome was detected using methylthianolyldiphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MT) colorimetry. The expression of CTGF was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry assays. The expression of fibronectin (Fn) was examined by Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. Liposome-ASODN (A group) significantly (F=15.25, 204.88, 19.73, 90.00; P HTF induced by TGF-beta2 compared with S and D group. However, Liposome alone (T group) has no significant impact in HTF growth compared with T group (t = 0.90, 2.32, 0.75, 2.11; P > 0.05). CTGF-ASODN inhibits the CTGF and Fn expression of HTF induced by TGF-beta2, which may delay the formation of scar in glaucoma filtering surgery.

  6. MicroRNA-26a modulates transforming growth factor beta-1-induced proliferation in human fetal lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoou [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Liu, Lian [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Shen, Yongchun; Wang, Tao; Chen, Lei; Xu, Dan [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Wen, Fuqiang, E-mail: wenfuqiang.scu@gmail.com [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Endogenous miR-26a inhibits TGF-beta 1 induced proliferation of lung fibroblasts. • miR-26a induces G1 arrest through directly targeting 3′-UTR of CCND2. • TGF indispensable receptor, TGF-beta R I, is regulated by miR-26a. • miR-26a acts through inhibiting TGF-beta 2 feedback loop to reduce TGF-beta 1. • Collagen type I and connective tissue growth factor are suppressed by miR-26a. - Abstract: MicroRNA-26a is a newly discovered microRNA that has a strong anti-tumorigenic capacity and is capable of suppressing cell proliferation and activating tumor-specific apoptosis. However, whether miR-26a can inhibit the over-growth of lung fibroblasts remains unclear. The relationship between miR-26a and lung fibrosis was explored in the current study. We first investigated the effect of miR-26a on the proliferative activity of human lung fibroblasts with or without TGF-beta1 treatment. We found that the inhibition of endogenous miR-26a promoted proliferation and restoration of mature miR-26a inhibited the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts. We also examined that miR-26a can block the G1/S phase transition via directly targeting 3′-UTR of CCND2, degrading mRNA and decreasing protein expression of Cyclin D2. Furthermore, we showed that miR-26a mediated a TGF-beta 2-TGF-beta 1 feedback loop and inhibited TGF-beta R I activation. In addition, the overexpression of miR-26a also significantly suppressed the TGF-beta 1-interacting-CTGF–collagen fibrotic pathway. In summary, our studies indicated an essential role of miR-26a in the anti-fibrotic mechanism in TGF-beta1-induced proliferation in human lung fibroblasts, by directly targeting Cyclin D2, regulating TGF-beta R I as well as TGF-beta 2, and suggested the therapeutic potential of miR-26a in ameliorating lung fibrosis.

  7. Determination of $\\gamma$ and $-2\\beta_s$ from charmless two-body decays of beauty mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Using the latest LHCb measurements of time-dependent $C\\!P$ violation in the $B^0_s \\to K^+K^-$ decay, a U-spin relation between the decay amplitudes of $B^0_s \\to K^+K^-$ and $B^0\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay processes allows constraints to be placed on the angle $\\gamma$ of the unitarity triangle and on the $B^0_s$ mixing phase $-2\\beta_s$. Results from an extended approach, which uses additional inputs on $B^0\\to \\pi^0\\pi^0$ and $B^+\\to \\pi^+\\pi^0$ decays from other experiments and exploits isospin symmetry, are also presented. The dependence of the results on the maximum allowed amount of U-spin breaking is studied. At 68% probability, the value $\\gamma = \\left( 63.5^{\\,+\\, 7.2}_{\\,-\\,6.7} \\right)^\\circ~\\mathrm{modulo}~180^\\circ$ is determined. In an alternative analysis, the value $-2\\beta_s = -0.12 ^{\\,+\\,0.14}_{\\,-\\,0.16}\\,\\,\\mathrm{rad}$ is found. In both measurements, the uncertainties due to U-spin breaking effects up to 50% are included.

  8. Proliferation of sorted human and rat beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnaud, G; Bosco, D; Berney, T;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether purified beta cells can replicate in vitro and whether this is enhanced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factors.......The aim of the study was to determine whether purified beta cells can replicate in vitro and whether this is enhanced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factors....

  9. Human Beta Cells Produce and Release Serotonin to Inhibit Glucagon Secretion from Alpha Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Joana Almaça; Judith Molina; Danusa Menegaz; Pronin, Alexey N.; Alejandro Tamayo; Vladlen Slepak; Per-Olof Berggren; Alejandro Caicedo

    2016-01-01

    In the pancreatic islet, serotonin is an autocrine signal increasing beta cell mass during metabolic challenges such as those associated with pregnancy or high-fat diet. It is still unclear whether serotonin is relevant for regular islet physiology and hormone secretion. Here, we show that human beta cells produce and secrete serotonin when stimulated with increases in glucose concentration. Serotonin secretion from beta cells decreases cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in neighboring alpha cells via ...

  10. Structural organization of the human and mouse laminin beta2 chain genes, and alternative splicing at the 5' end of the human transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Gautam, M; Loechel, F;

    1996-01-01

    We have determined the structural organization of the human and mouse genes that encode the laminin beta2 chain (s-laminin), an essential component of the basement membranes of the neuromuscular synapse and the kidney glomerulus. The human and mouse genes have a nearly identical exon......-intron organization and are the smallest laminin chain genes characterized to date, due to the unusually small size of their introns. The laminin beta2 chain genes of both species consist of 33 exons that span...

  11. Is there a relationship between serum S-100 beta protein and neuropsychologic dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westaby, S; Saatvedt, K; White, S; Katsumata, T; van Oeveren, W; Bhatnagar, NK; Brown, S; Halligan, PW

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: Over the past decade, the glial protein S-100 beta has been used to detect cerebral injury in a number of clinical settings including cardiac surgery. Previous investigations suggest that S-100 beta is capable of identifying patients with cerebral dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass

  12. Proliferative Effect of sTRAIL on Mouse Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim Kahraman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Beta cell loss/impairment of function appears as a significant problem in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand was recently correlated with both types of diabetes with a proposed protective effect. TRAIL was also shown to promote survival and proliferation in different cells such as vascular smooth muscle cells and human vascular endothelial cells. Recently, TRAIL was claimed to protect pancreatic beta cells against cytokine-related harm. We hypothesized a proliferative effect for TRAIL on beta cells, and used Min6 mouse pancreatic beta cell line to test our hypothesis.

  13. Experimental Study on the Milling of a Ti Beta 21S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Ti Beta 21S (Ti-15Mo-2.7Nb-3Al-0.2Si) was devel op ed by TIMET in 1989. It is a metastable beta titanium alloy that offers subs tantial weight reductions over other engineering materials. Compared with common beta Ti alloys, it offers the high specific strength, good cold formability, im proved oxidation resistance, elevated temperature strength, creep resistance, an d thermal stability. Besides the common characters of titanium alloy, such as po or heat diffusivity, low elastic modulus, Ti Beta 21S has ...

  14. Expression and function of beta1 integrins on human eosinophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Cristina Seminario

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils preferentially accumulate at sites of chronic allergic diseases such as bronchial asthma. The mechanisms by which selective eosinophil migration occurs are not fully understood. However, interactions of cell-surface adhesion molecules on the eosinophil with molecular counterligands on endothelial and epithelial cells, and on extracellular matrix proteins, are likely to be critical during the recruitment process. One possible mechanism for selective eosinophil recruitment involves the alpha4beta 1 (VLA-4 integrin which is not expressed on neutrophils. Correlations have been found between infiltration of eosinophils and endothelial expression of VCAM-1, the ligand for VLA-4, in the lungs of asthmatic individuals as well as in late phase reactions in the lungs, nose and skin. Epithelial and endothelial cells respond to the Th2-type cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 with selective de novo expression of VCAM-1, consistent with the possible role of VCAM-1/VLA-4 interactions in eosinophil influx during allergic inflammation. Both beta 1 and beta 2 integrins on eosinophils exist in a state of partial activation. For example, eosinophils can be maximally activated for adhesion to VCAM-1 or fibronectin after exposure to beta 1 integrin-activating antibodies or divalent cations, conditions that do not necessarily affect the total cell surface expression of beta 1 integrins. In contrast, cytokines like IL-5 prevent beta 1 integrin activation while promoting beta 2 integrin function. Furthermore, ligation of integrins can regulate the effector functions of the cell. For example, eosinophil adhesion via beta 1 and/or beta 2 integrins has been shown to alter a variety of functional responses including degranulation and apoptosis. Thus, integrins appear to be important in mediating eosinophil migration and activation in allergic inflammation. Strategies that interfere with these processes may prove to be useful for treatment of allergic diseases.

  15. Structure of the human G gamma-A gamma-delta-beta-globin gene locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Little, P.F.R.; Annison, F.; Williamson, R.; Flavell, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    We have constructed a physical map of the human G gamma-, A gamma-, delta-, and beta-globin genes. The previously described maps of the fetal and adult beta-like globin genes have been linked to one another by identification of a DNA fragment, generated by BamHI, that contains part of each of the A

  16. Crystal structure of the human beta2 adrenergic G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Choi, Hee-Jung; Rosenbaum, Daniel M;

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for hormones and neurotransmitters has been hindered by their low natural abundance, inherent structural flexibility, and instability in detergent solutions. Here we report a structure of the human beta2 adrenoceptor (beta2AR), which...

  17. [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FE and [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FP are superior to [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT for dopamine transporter visualization: Autoradiographic evaluation in the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Ilonka; Hall, Haakan; Halldin, Christer; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Farde, Lars; Sedvall, Goeran

    1997-10-01

    The binding of the three dopamine transporter radioligands ([{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT, [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FE, and [{sup 125}I]{beta}-CIT-FP) was studied using whole-hemisphere autoradiography on postmortem human brains. The autoradiograms revealed an intense and homogeneous labeling of the nucleus caudatus and putamen but also to varying extent to serotonergic and noradrenergic transporters of neocortex and thalamus. The order of specificity estimated (striatum over neocortex ratios) was {beta}-CIT-FP > {beta}-CIT-FE >> {beta}-CIT, suggesting that {beta}-CIT-FE and {beta}-CIT-FP should be preferred for in vivo studies of the dopamine transporter in the human brain.

  18. Uptake of neutral alpha- and beta-amino acids by human proximal tubular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, H; Røigaard, H; Jacobsen, Christian

    1996-01-01

    The transport characteristics of amino acids in primary cell cultures from the proximal tubule of human adults (AHKE cells) were examined, using alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and beta-alanine as representatives of alpha- and beta-amino acids, respectively. The Na(+)-gradient dependent influx...... experiments revealed that all the neutral amino acids tested reduced the uptake of AIB, whereas there was no effect of taurine, L-aspartic acid, and L-arginine. By contrast, the influx of beta-alanine was only drastically reduced by beta-amino acids, whereas the inhibition by neutral alpha-amino acids...... was relatively low. Nor did L-arginine and L-aspartic acid affect the uptake of beta-alanine into AHKE cells. Comparison with the results obtained for normal (NHKE) and immortalized (IHKE) embryonic cells suggested an unaltered expression of the types of transport carriers for neutral alpha- and beta-amino acids...

  19. Increased expression of beta 2-microglobulin and histocompatibility antigens on human lymphoid cells induced by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Heron, I; Berg, K

    1982-01-01

    Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were incubated in the presence of different concentrations of interferon for various incubation periods. Subsequently, the amount of beta 2-Microglobulin and HLA-A, B and C surface antigens was estimated by means of quantitative immunofluorescence (flow...... cytofluorometry) and by a radioimmunoassay for beta 2-Microglobulin. It was found that the amounts of these MHC antigens increased in a dose and time-dependent way after interferon treatment. Furthermore, the influence of different temperatures on this IFN-induced increase in beta 2-Microglobulin was gradually...... enhanced after incubation at 37 degrees C to 39 degrees C incubation mostly suppressed the beta 2-Microglobulin increase observed at 39 degrees C. The total amount of membrane associated beta 2-Microglobulin was estimated by a radioimmunoassay. After interferon treatment a beta 2-Microglobulin increase...

  20. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-02

    {beta}1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of {beta}1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that {beta}1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and {beta}1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo.

  1. Adult Human Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cells Display Limited Turnover and Long Lifespan as Determined by In-Vivo Thymidine Analog Incorporation and Radiocarbon Dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, S; Kushner, J A; Buchholz, B A; Meeker, A K; Stein, G M; Hsieh, M; Kirby, M; Pechhold, S; Liu, E H; Harlan, D M; Tisdale, J F

    2010-03-15

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. The adult human beta-cell's turnover rate remains unknown. We employed novel techniques to examine adult human islet beta-cell turnover and longevity in vivo. Subjects enrolled in NIH clinical trials received thymidine analogues [iododeoxyuridine (IdU) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] 8-days to 4-years prior to death. Archival autopsy samples from ten patients (aged 17-74 years) were employed to assess beta-cell turnover by scoring nuclear analog labeling within insulin staining cells. Human adult beta-cell longevity was determined by estimating the cells genomic DNA integration of atmospheric carbon-14 ({sup 14}C). DNA was purified from pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors; whole islet prep DNA was obtained from a 15 year old donor, and purified beta-cell DNA was obtained from two donors (age 48 and 80 years). {sup 14}C levels were then determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Cellular 'birth date' was determined by comparing the subject's DNA {sup 14}C content relative to a well-established {sup 14}C atmospheric prevalence curve. In the two subjects less than age 20 years, 1-2% of the beta-cell nuclei co-stained for BrdU/IdU. No beta-cell nuclei co-stained in the eight patients more than 30 years old. Consistent with the BrdU/IdU turnover data, beta-cell DNA {sup 14}C content indicated the cells 'birth date' occurred within the subject's first 30 years of life. Under typical circumstances, adult human beta-cells and their cellular precursors are established by young adulthood.

  2. Plasma levels of oestriol-17 beta, oestriol and human placental lactogen during bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, P C; Mok, H; Ratnam, S S

    1976-11-01

    Plasma unconjugated oestradiol-17 beta, total oestriol and human placental lactogen levels were measured in twelve healthy volunteers admitted for bed rest in the last trimester of pregnancy. No significant alteration in levels was observed.

  3. Regulation of laminin beta2 chain gene expression in human cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Nielsen, F C; Loechel, F

    2001-01-01

    The laminin beta2 chain is a basement membrane component expressed in a tissue- and developmental stage-specific manner. In this report we have examined the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the human laminin beta2 chain in human tumor cell lines. Both the A204 rhabdomyosarcoma...... and clone A colon carcinoma cells express the laminin beta2 chain mRNA, but only the A204 cells secrete laminin heterotrimers containing the beta2 chain. Segments of the beta2 chain gene promoter region were cloned into luciferase reporter vectors, and their ability to stimulate transcription was tested...... by transient transfection. Sequences downstream of the transcription start site between nucleotides +91 and +120 were found to be essential for luciferase activity in the two cell lines. Additional positive regulatory regions were present further upstream, between nucleotides -164 to -667 and between...

  4. Successful treatment of murine beta-thalassemia intermedia by transfer of the human beta-globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Chad; Rivella, Stefano; Chadburn, Amy; Sadelain, Michel

    2002-03-15

    The beta-thalassemias are caused by more than 200 mutations that reduce or abolish beta-globin production. The severity of the resulting anemia can lead to lifelong transfusion dependency. A genetic treatment based on globin gene transfer would require that transgene expression be erythroid specific, elevated, and sustained over time. We report here that long-term synthesis of chimeric hemoglobin (mualpha(2):hubeta(A)(2)) could be achieved in mice with beta-thalassemia intermedia following engraftment with bone marrow cells transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding the human beta-globin gene. In the absence of any posttransduction selection, the treated chimeras exhibit durably increased hemoglobin levels without diminution over 40 weeks. Ineffective erythropoiesis and extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) regress, as reflected by normalization of spleen size, architecture, hematopoietic colony formation, and disappearance of liver EMH. These findings establish that a sustained increase of 3 to 4 g/dL hemoglobin is sufficient to correct ineffective erythropoiesis. Hepatic iron accumulation is markedly decreased in 1-year-old chimeras, indicating persistent protection from secondary organ damage. These results demonstrate for the first time that viral-mediated globin gene transfer in hematopoietic stem cells effectively treats a severe hemoglobin disorder.

  5. Limited proteolysis of beta 2-microglobulin at Lys-58 by complement component C1s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Roepstorff, P; Thim, L

    1990-01-01

    We have now demonstrated that activated complement component C1s cleaves beta 2-microglobulin at the position identical to that at which beta 2-microglobulin is cleaved in serum of patients suffering from lung cancer. The main cleavage is in the disulphide loop C-terminal to Lys-58, generating...... a modified form of beta 2-microglobulin with a two-chain structure. The C-terminal Lys-58 in the A chain is highly susceptible to removal by a carboxypeptidase-B-like activity causing the formation of des-Lys58-beta 2-microglobulin. This is the first demonstration of a noncomplement protein substrate...

  6. Origin and spread of beta-globin gene mutations in India, Africa, and Mediterranea: analysis of the 5' flanking and intragenic sequences of beta S and beta C genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabuchet, G; Elion, J; Baudot, G; Pagnier, J; Bouhass, R; Nigon, V M; Labie, D; Krishnamoorthy, R

    1991-06-01

    Nucleotide polymorphisms of both the 5' flanking and intragenic regions of the human beta-globin gene were investigated by directly sequencing genomic DNA after amplification by the polymerase chain reaction in 47 subjects homozygous for the beta S or the beta C mutation. The sickle-cell mutation was found in the context of five different haplotypes defined by eight nucleotide substitutions and various structures of a region of the simple repeated sequence (AT) chi Ty. All subjects from the same geographic origin bear an identical chromosomal structure, defining the Senegal-, Bantu-, Benin-, Cameroon-, and Indian-type chromosomes. These results strengthen our previous conclusions about the multiple occurrence of the sickle-cell mutation. The Benin-type chromosome was also found among Algerian and Sicilian sickle-cell patients, whereas the Indian-type chromosome was observed in two geographically distant tribes, illustrating the spread of these sickle-cell genes. We also found that the intragenic sequence polymorphisms (frameworks) are not always in linkage disequilibrium with the BamH I polymorphism downstream from the beta-globin gene, as had been previously observed. Finally, we present a tentative phylogenetic tree of the different alleles at this locus. Some polymorphisms of this sequence might be contemporary with our last common ancestor, the great apes, that is, about 4-6 millions years old.

  7. Observation of B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi and measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Beta(B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi)/Beta(B(0)(s)-->J/PsiPhi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Haim, E Ben; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'orso, M; Paoli, F Delli; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Sciveres, M Garcia; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C

    2006-06-16

    We report the first observation of B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi decay in p(p_) collisions at square root of 8=1.96 TeV using 360 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 20.2 +/- 5.0 and 12.3 +/- 4.1 B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi candidates, in Psi(2S)-->mu(+)mu(-) and Phi(2S)-->J/Phipi(+)pi(-) decay modes, respectively. We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction Beta(B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi)/Beta(B(0)(s)-->J/PsiPhi)=0.52 +/- 0.13(stat) +/- 0.04(syst) +/- 0.06(BR) using the Psi(2S)-->mu(+)mu(-) decay mode.

  8. Alterations of expression and regulation of transforming growth factor beta in human cancer prostate cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchère, M; Saunier, E; Mestayer, C; Broshuis, M; Mowszowicz, I

    2002-11-01

    TGF beta can promote and/or suppress prostate tumor growth through multiple and opposing actions. Alterations of its expression, secretion, regulation or of the sensitivity of target cells can lead to a favorable environment for tumor development. To gain a better insight in TGF beta function during cancer progression, we have used different cultured human prostate cells: preneoplastic PNT2 cells, the androgen-dependent LNCaP and the androgen-independent PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. We have studied by specific ELISA assays in conditioned media (CM), the secretion of TGF beta 1 and TGF beta 2 in basal conditions and after hormonal treatment (DHT or E2) and the expression of TGF beta 1 mRNA by Northern blot. We have also compared the effect of fibroblast CM on TGF beta secretion by the different cell types. Compared to PNT2 cells, cancer cell lines secrete lower levels of active TGF beta which are not increased in the presence of fibroblast CM. LNCaP cells respond to androgen or estrogen treatment by a 10-fold increase of active TGF beta secretion while PC3 and DU145 are unresponsive. In conclusion, prostate cancer cell lines have lost part of their ability to secrete and activate TGF beta, and to regulate this secretion through stromal-epithelial interactions. Androgen-sensitive cancer cells may compensate this loss by hormonal regulation.

  9. MHC class I phenotype and function of human beta 2-microglobulin transgenic murine lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerager, L; Pedersen, L O; Bregenholt, S;

    1996-01-01

    Lymphoid cells from beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) knockout mice transgenic for human (h) beta 2m (C57BL/10 m beta 2m-/h beta 2m+) were compared with normal mice for their binding to exogenously added h beta 2m, binding to a H-2Db peptide and for functional activity in a one-way allogenic MLC....... Based on data from cellular binding studies, Scatchard analyses and flow cytometry, it is concluded that exogenous h beta 2m does not bind to hybrid MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules composed of mouse heavy chain/h beta 2m molecules expressed on lymphocytes of transgenic mice. Immunoprecipitation and SDS...... binds radiolabelled peptide in the absence of exogenous added h beta 2m suggesting that a stable fraction of hybrid H-2Db molecules is empty or contain peptides with very low affinity. In a one-way allogenic mixed lymphocyte culture, transgenic splenocytes were found to be far less stimulatory than...

  10. Novel non-steroidal inhibitors of human 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicker, Nigel; Su, Xiangdong; Ganeshapillai, Dharshini; Smith, Andrew; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2007-05-01

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) regulates glucocorticoid action at the pre-receptor stage by converting cortisone to cortisol. 11beta-HSD1 is selectively expressed in many tissues including the liver and adipose tissue where metabolic events are important. Metabolic syndrome relates to a number of metabolic abnormalities and currently has a prevalence of >20% in adult Americans. 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors are being investigated by many major pharmaceutical companies for type 2 diabetes and other abnormalities associated with metabolic syndrome. In this area of intense interest a number of structural types of 11beta-HSD1 inhibitor have been identified. It is important to have an array of structural types as the physicochemical properties of the compounds will determine tissue distribution, HPA effects, and ultimately clinical utility. Here we report the discovery and synthesis of three structurally different series of novel 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors that inhibit human 11beta-HSD1 in the low micromolar range. Docking studies with 1-3 into the crystal structure of human 11beta-HSD1 reveal how the molecules may interact with the enzyme and cofactor and give further scope for structure based drug design in the optimisation of these series.

  11. Role of human GABA(A) receptor beta3 subunit in insecticide toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratra, G S; Kamita, S G; Casida, J E

    2001-05-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor is the target for the major insecticides alpha-endosulfan, lindane, and fipronil and for many analogs. Their action as chloride channel blockers is directly measured by binding studies with [(3)H]ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([(3)H]EBOB). This study tests the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptor subunit composition determines the sensitivity and selectivity of insecticide toxicity. Human receptor subtypes were expressed individually (alpha1, alpha6, beta1, beta3, and gamma2) and in combination in insect Sf9 cells. Binding parameters were similar for [(3)H]EBOB in the beta3 homooligomer, alpha1beta3gamma2 heterooligomer, and native brain membranes, but toxicological profiles were very different. Surprisingly, alpha-endosulfan, lindane, and fipronil were all remarkably potent on the recombinant beta3 homooligomeric receptor (IC50 values of 0.5-2.4 nM), whereas they were similar in potency on the alpha1beta3gamma2 subtype (IC50 values of 16-33 nM) and highly selective on the native receptor (IC50 values of 7.3, 306, and 2470 nM, respectively). The selectivity order for 29 insecticides and convulsants as IC50 ratios for native/beta3 or alpha1beta3gamma2/beta3 was as follows: fipronil > lindane > 19 other insecticides including alpha-endosulfan and picrotoxinin > 4 trioxabicyclooctanes and dithianes (almost nonselective) > tetramethylenedisulfotetramine, 4-chlorophenylsilatrane, or alpha-thujone. Specificity between mammals and insects at the target site (fipronil > lindane > alpha-endosulfan) paralleled that for toxicity. Potency at the native receptor is more predictive for inhibition of GABA-stimulated chloride uptake than that at the beta3 or alpha1beta3gamma2 receptors. Therefore, the beta3 subunit contains the insecticide target and other subunits differentially modulate the binding to confer compound-dependent specificity and selective toxicity.

  12. Coexistence of at least three distinct beta-adrenoceptors in human internal mammary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, M; Omrani, G; Mahmoudian, M

    2000-01-01

    The internal mammary artery (IMA) is currently the preferred conduit for myocardial revascularization. However, perioperative vasospasm and a hypoperfusion state during maximal exercise may limit its use as a bypass graft. The mechanism of spasm has not been clearly defined. Since beta-adrenoceptor activation plays a major role in vasorelaxation, the present study was carried out to investigate the beta-adrenoceptor responsiveness of human IMA smooth muscle. Isoproterenol produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in endothelium-denuded IMA segments, precontracted with phenylephrine (maximal relaxation 46.33+/-5.45%). Atenolol (10(-6)M) and propranolol (2x10(-7)M) inhibited isoproterenol-induced relaxation. While atenolol produced partial inhibition, propranolol caused a complete inhibition in a majority of the segments and a partial inhibition in a minority. BRL 37344, a selective beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist, produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted rings of endothelium-denuded IMA (maximal relaxation 40.35+/-4.07%). Cyanopindolol, a beta-adrenoceptor partial agonist, produced a marked relaxation (58.65+/-6.2%) in endothelium-denuded IMA rings, precontracted with phenylephrine. Cyanopindolol-induced relaxation was resistant to blockade by propranolol (2x10(-7)M). Spontaneous contractions of IMA rings were also observed in some cases that were inhibited by isoproterenol and BRL 37344. This observation implies the important role of beta-adrenoceptor activation in prevention of human IMA spasm. The results obtained in present study indicate that human IMA smooth muscle possesses an atypical beta-adrenoceptor together with beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptors. Regarding the relaxation induced in IMA rings by adding BRL 37344, the possible identical entities of IMA atypical beta-adrenoceptors and beta 3-adrenoceptors are suggested.

  13. The pharmacokinetics, distribution and degradation of human recombinant interleukin 1 beta in normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J; Wogensen, L D; Welinder, B

    1991-01-01

    Based upon in vivo rat experiments it was recently suggested that interleukin 1 in the circulation may be implicated in the initial events of beta-cell destruction leading to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in humans. The aim of the present study was to estimate half-lives of distribut......Based upon in vivo rat experiments it was recently suggested that interleukin 1 in the circulation may be implicated in the initial events of beta-cell destruction leading to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in humans. The aim of the present study was to estimate half......-lives of distribution (T1/2 alpha) and elimination phases (T1/2 beta) of human recombinant interleukin 1 beta (rIL-1 beta), and its tissue distribution and cellular localization by means of mono-labelled, biologically active 125I-rIL-1 beta. After intravenous (i.v.) injection, 125I-rIL-1 beta was eliminated from...

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of mutant and wild-type human. beta. -actin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leavitt, J.; Gunning, P.; Porreca, P.; Ng, S.Y.; Lin, C.H.; Kedes, L.

    1984-10-01

    There are more than 20 ..beta..-actin-specific sequences in the human genome, many of which are pseudogenes. To facilitate the isolation of potentially functional ..beta..-actin genes, they used the new method of B. Seed for selecting genomic clones by homologous recombination. A derivative of the ..pi..VX miniplasmid, ..pi..AN7..beta..1, was constructed by insertion of the 600-base-pair 3' untranslated region of the ..beta..-actin mRNA expressed in human fibroblasts. Five clones containing ..beta..-actin sequences were selected from an amplified human fetal gene library by homologous recombination between library phage and the miniplasmid. One of these clones contained a complete ..beta..-actin gene with a coding sequence identical to that determined for the mRNA of human fibroblasts. A DNA fragment consisting of mostly intervening sequences from this gene was then use to identify 13 independent recombinant copies of the analogous gene from two specially constructed gene libraries, each containing one of the two types of mutant ..beta..-actin genes found in a line of neoplastic human fibroblasts. The amino acid and nucleotide sequences encoded by the unmutated gene predict that a guanine-to-adenine transition is responsible for the glycine-to-aspartic acid mutation at codon 244 and would also result in the loss of a HaeIII site. Detection of this HaeIII polymorphism among the fibroblast-derived closed verified the identity of the ..beta..-actin gene expressed in human fibroblasts.

  15. Determination of 2$\\beta_{s}$ in $B^{0}_s \\to J/\\psi K^{+} K^{-}$ Decays in the Presence of a $K^{+}K^{-}$ S-Wave Contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Peter; Muheim, Franz; Xie, Yuehong

    2009-01-01

    We present the complete differential decay rates for the process B_s -> J/psi K^+ K^- including S-wave and P-wave angular momentum states for the K^+ K^- meson pair. We examine the effect of an S-wave component on the determination of the CP violating phase 2beta_s. Data from the B-factories indicate that an S-wave component of about 10% may be expected in the phi(1020) resonance region. We find that if this contribution is ignored in the analysis it could cause a bias in the measured value of 2beta_s towards zero of the order of 10%. When including the K^+K^- S-wave component we observe an increase in the statistical error on 2beta_s by less than 15%. We also point out the possibility of measuring the sign of cos2beta_s by using the interference between the K^+K^- S-wave and P-wave amplitudes to resolve the strong phase ambiguity. We conclude that the S-wave component can be properly taken into account in the analysis.

  16. The Yin and Yang of human beta defensins in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron eWeinberg

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly evolving research examining the extended role of human beta-defensins (hBDs in chemoattraction, innate immune-mediated response and promotion of angiogenesis suggest that the collective effects of hBDs extend well beyond their antimicrobial mechanism(s. Indeed, the numerous basic cellular functions associated with hBDs demonstrate that these peptides have dual impact on health, as they may be advantageous under certain conditions, but potentially detrimental in others. The consequences of these functions are reflected in the overexpression of hBDs in diseases, such as psoriasis, and recently the association of hBDs with pro-tumoral signaling. The mechanisms regulating hBD response in health and disease are still being elucidated. Clearly the spectrum of function now attributed to hBD regulation identifies these molecules as important cellular regulators, whose appropriate expression is critical for proper immune surveillance; i.e., expression of hBDs in proximity to areas of cellular dysregulation may inadvertently exacerbate disease progression. Understanding the mechanism(s that regulate contextual signaling of hBDs is an important area of concentration in our laboratories. Using a combination of immunologic, biochemical and molecular biologic approaches, we have identified signaling pathways associated with hBD promotion of immune homeostasis and have begun to dissect the inappropriate role that beta-defensins may assume in disease.

  17. Beta- and gamma-range human lower limb corticomuscular coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T Gwin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherence between electroencephalography (EEG recorded on the scalp above the motor cortex and electromyography (EMG recorded on the skin of the limbs is thought to reflect corticospinal coupling between motor cortex and muscle motor units. Beta-range (13-30 Hz corticomuscular coherence has been extensively documented during static force output while gamma-range (31-45 Hz coherence has been linked to dynamic force output. However, the explanation for this beta-to-gamma coherence shift remains unclear. We recorded 264-channel EEG and 8-channel lower limb electromyography (EMG while 8 healthy subjects performed isometric and isotonic, knee and ankle exercises. Adaptive mixture independent component analysis (AMICA parsed EEG into models of underlying source signals. We computed magnitude squared coherence between electrocortical source signals and EMG. Significant coherence between contralateral motor cortex electrocortical signals and lower limb EMG was observed in the beta- and gamma-range for all exercise types. Gamma-range coherence was significantly greater for isotonic exercises than for isometric exercises. We conclude that active muscle movement modulates the speed of corticospinal oscillations. Specifically, isotonic contractions shift corticospinal oscillations towards the gamma-range while isometric contractions favor beta-range oscillations. Prior research has suggested that tasks requiring increased integration of visual and somatosensory information may shift corticomuscular coherence to the gamma-range. The isometric and isotonic tasks studied here likely required similar amounts of visual and somatosensory integration. This suggests that muscle dynamics, including the amount and type of proprioception, may play a role in the beta-to-gamma shift.

  18. Lupeol inhibits proliferation of human prostate cancer cells by targeting beta-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohammad; Murtaza, Imtiyaz; Tarapore, Rohinton S; Suh, Yewseok; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Johnson, Jeremy James; Siddiqui, Imtiaz Ahmad; Khan, Naghma; Asim, Mohammad; Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Shekhani, Mohammed Talha; Li, Benyi; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2009-05-01

    Lupeol, a dietary triterpene, was shown to decrease serum prostate-specific antigen levels and inhibit the tumorigenicity of prostate cancer (CaP) cells in vivo. Here, we show that Lupeol inhibits the proliferative potential of CaP cells and delineated its mechanism of action. Employing a focused microarray of human CaP-associated genes, we found that Lupeol significantly modulates the expression level of genes such as ERBB2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3, cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 that are known to be associated with proliferation and survival. A common feature of these genes is that all of them are known to either regulate or act as downstream target of beta-catenin signaling that is highly aberrant in CaP patients. Lupeol treatment significantly (1) reduced levels of beta-catenin in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions, (2) modulated expression levels of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3beta)-axin complex (regulator of beta-catenin stability), (3) decreased the expression level and enzymatic activity of MMP-2 (downstream target of beta-catenin), (4) reduced the transcriptional activation of T Cell Factor (TCF) responsive element (marker for beta-catenin signaling) in pTK-TCF-Luc-transfected cells and (5) decreased the transcriptional activation of MMP-2 gene in pGL2-MMP-2-Luc-transfected cells. Effects of Lupeol treatment on beta-catenin degradation were significantly reduced in CaP cells where axin is knocked down through small interfering RNA transfection and GSK3beta activity is blocked. Collectively, these data suggest the multitarget efficacy of Lupeol on beta-catenin-signaling network thus resulting in the inhibition CaP cell proliferation. We suggest that Lupeol could be developed as an agent for chemoprevention as well as chemotherapy of human CaP.

  19. Expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrial stromal and decidual cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiokawa, Shigetatsu; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Nakamura, Yukio [Kyorin Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrium and decidua using flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoprecipitation. Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry demonstrated the greater expression of the {beta}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, and {alpha}{sub 5} subunits of the {beta}{sub 1} integrin family in cultured stromal cells from the midsecretory phase, than in those of the early proliferative phase. The addition of estradiol (E{sub 2}) and progesterone (P) to cultured stromal cells in the early proliferative phase increased the expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in vitro. Flow cytometry also demonstrated the expression of the {beta}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, {alpha}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {alpha}{sub 6} subunits of {beta}{sub 1} integrin family in cultured decidual cells, and the enriched-fraction of prolactin (PRL)-producing decidual cells isolated by Percoll gradients showed high levels of {beta}{sub 1} integrins expression. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the {beta}{sub 1} integrin cell surface phenotypes in cultured decidual cells observed by flow cytometry. In summary, the present study demonstrated that endometrial stromal and decidual cells expressed {beta}{sub 1} integrin subunits at their surfaces. The expression exhibited a variability throughout the menstrual cycles, being predominantly detected in the secretory phase, and was maintained highly in the decidua. Thus, {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrium and decidua may be important in mediating the organization of extracellular matrix proteins derived from embryos during the early stage of implantation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Homology modeling of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABA receptor channels and Surflex-docking of fipronil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jin; Ju, Xiu-Lian; Chen, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Gen-Yan

    2009-09-01

    To further explore the mechanism of selective binding of the representative gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABARs) noncompetitive antagonist (NCA) fipronil to insect over mammalian GABARs, three-dimensional models of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABAR were generated by homology modeling, using the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) of Torpedo marmorata as a template. Fipronil was docked into the putative binding site of the human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 receptors by Surflex-docking, and the calculated docking energies are in agreement with experimental results. The GABA receptor antagonist fipronil exhibited higher potency with house fly beta 3 GABAR than with human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 GABAR. Furthermore, analyses of Surflex-docking suggest that the H-bond interaction of fipronil with Ala2 and Thr6 in the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of these GABARs plays a relatively important role in ligand selective binding. The different subunit assemblies of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABARs may result in differential selectivity for fipronil.

  1. Oligosaccharide structure and amino acid sequence of the major glycopeptides of mature human. beta. -hexosaminidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Dowd, B.F.; Cumming, D.A.; Gravel, R.A.; Mahuran, D.

    1988-07-12

    Human ..beta..-hexosaminidase is a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes terminal N-acetylhexosamines from GM/sub 2/ ganglioside, oligosaccharides, and other carbohydrate-containing macromolecules. There are two major forms of hexosaminidase: hexosaminidase A, with the structure ..cap alpha..(..beta../sub a/..beta../sub b/), and hexosaminidase B, 2(..beta../sub a/..beta../sub b/). Like other lysosomal proteins, hexosaminidase is targeted to its destination via glycosylation and processing in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Phosphorylation of specific mannose residues allows binding of the protein to the phosphomannosyl receptor and transfer to the lysosome. In order to define the structure and placement of the oligosaccharides in mature hexosaminidase and thus identify candidate mannose 6-phosphate recipient sites, the major tryptic/chymotryptic glycopeptides from each isozyme were purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Two major concanavalin A binding glycopeptides, localized to the ..beta../sub b/f chain, and one non concanavalin A binding glycopeptide, localized to the ..beta../sub a/ chain, were found associated with the ..beta..-subunit in both hexosaminidase A and hexosaminidase B. The oligosaccharide structures were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. The unique glycopeptide associated with the ..beta../sub a/ chain contained a single GlcNAc residue. Thus all three mature polypeptides comprising the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of hexosaminidase contain carbohydrate, the structures of which have the appearance of being partially degraded in the lysosome. In the ..cap alpha.. chain they found only one possible site for in vivo phosphorylation. In the ..beta.. it is unclear if only one or all three of the sites could have contained phosphate. However, mature placental hexosaminidase A and B can be rephosphorylated in vitro. This requires the presence of an oligosaccharide containing an ..cap

  2. beta-Sitosterol inhibits HT-29 human colon cancer cell growth and alters membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, A B; Chen, Y C; Fink, C S; Hennessey, T

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of beta-sitosterol, the main dietary phytosterol on the growth of HT-29 cells, a human colon cancer cell line. In addition, the incorporation of this phytosterol into cellular membranes and how this might influence the lipid composition of the membranes were investigated. Tumor cells were grown in DMEM containing 10% FBS and supplemented with sterols (cholesterol or beta-sitosterol) at final concentrations up to 16 microM. The sterols were supplied to the media in the form of sterol cyclodextrin complexes. The cyclodextrin used was 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The sterol to cyclodextrin molar ratio was maintained at 1:300. The study indicated that 8 and 16 microM beta-sitosterol were effective at cel growth inhibition as compared to cholesterol or to the control (no sterol supplementation). After supplementation with 16 microM beta-sitosterol for 9 days, cell growth was only one-third that of cells supplemented with equimolar concentration of cholesterol. No effect was observed on total membrane phospholipid concentration. At 16 microM beta-sitosterol supplementation, membrane cholesterol was reduced by 26%. Cholesterol supplementation resulted in a significant increase in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio compared to either beta-sitosterol supplemented cells or controls. There was a 50% reduction in membrane sphingomyelin (SM) of cells grown in 16 microM beta-sitosterol. Additional changes were observed in the fatty acid composition of minor phospholipids of beta-sitosterol supplemented cells, such as SM, phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylinositol (PI). Only in the case of PI, was there an effect of these fatty acid changes on the unsaturation index, beta-sitosterol incorporation resulted in an increase in the U.I. It is possible that the observed growth inhibition by beta-sitosterol may be mediated through the influence of signal transduction pathways that involve membrane phospholipids.

  3. Oxidation characteristics of Beta-21S in air in the temperature range 600 to 800 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Terryl A.; Clark, Ronald K.; Wiedemann, Karl E.

    1992-01-01

    The metastable beta-Ti alloy Beta-21S, Ti-15Mo-2.7Nb-3Al-0.2Si (weight percent), has been proposed as a candidate for use in metal matrix composites in future hypersonic vehicles. The present study investigated the oxidation behavior of Beta-21S over the temperature range 600 C to 800 C. Oxidation weight gain was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis. Oxidized specimens were evaluated using x ray diffraction techniques, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x ray analysis, and electron microprobe analysis to identify oxidation products and evaluate oxidation damage to the alloy.

  4. The pharmacokinetics, distribution and degradation of human recombinant interleukin 1 beta in normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, L D; Welinder, B; Hejnaes, K R

    1991-01-01

    -lives of distribution (T1/2 alpha) and elimination phases (T1/2 beta) of human recombinant interleukin 1 beta (rIL-1 beta), and its tissue distribution and cellular localization by means of mono-labelled, biologically active 125I-rIL-1 beta. After intravenous (i.v.) injection, 125I-rIL-1 beta was eliminated from......Based upon in vivo rat experiments it was recently suggested that interleukin 1 in the circulation may be implicated in the initial events of beta-cell destruction leading to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in humans. The aim of the present study was to estimate half...... the circulation with a T1/2 alpha of 2.9 min and a T1/2 beta of 41.1 min. The central and peripheral volume of distribution was 20.7 and 19.1 ml/rat, respectively, and the metabolic clearance rate was 16.9 ml/min/kg. The kidney and liver showed the highest accumulation of tracer, and autoradiography demonstrated...

  5. Discovery of novel inhibitors of human 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiangdong; Vicker, Nigel; Trusselle, Melanie; Halem, Heather; Culler, Michael D; Potter, Barry V L

    2009-03-25

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11beta-HSDs) are key enzymes regulating the pre-receptor metabolism of glucocorticoid hormones, which play essential roles in various vital physiological processes. The modulation of 11beta-HSD type 1 activity with selective inhibitors has beneficial effects on various conditions including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Therefore, inhibition of tissue-specific glucocorticoid action by regulating 11beta-HSD1 constitutes a promising treatment for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Here we report the discovery of a series of novel adamantyl carboxamides as selective inhibitors of human 11beta-HSD1 in HEK-293 cells transfected with the HSD11B1 gene. Compounds 9 and 14 show inhibitory activity against 11beta-HSD1 with IC(50) values in 100nM range. Docking studies with the potent compound 8 into the crystal structure of human 11beta-HSD1 (1XU9) reveals how the molecule may interact with the enzyme and cofactor.

  6. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jian-Yong [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Huang, Yi [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Li, Ji-Peng [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Meng, Yan-Ling [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Yan, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Bian, Yong-Qian [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Zhao, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Wang, Wei-Zhong, E-mail: weichang@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); and others

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  7. An Investigation of low beta triplet vibrational issues at Fermilab's Collider Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael W. McGee

    2004-06-08

    The vibrational aspects of recent disturbances at the low beta focusing quadrupoles, which caused proton beam loss at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), are discussed. Two low beta focusing quadrupoles are supported by a girder, which is extended over the CDF collision hall pit on each side. The low beta girder has a ledge mount support at an alcove's face and two Invar rods near the opposite end. Forced response measurements were taken on the low beta girder, where the power spectral density (PSD) function was used to obtain RMS displacement. The effects of local excitation due to operating equipment and near-field excitation due to ambient ground motion caused by local traffic are examined. The discussion explores dynamic response characteristics of the low beta quadrupoles and supporting girder using beam loss as the vibrational stability criteria. This paper also presents practical problem-solving approaches for similar accelerator components.

  8. Human parvovirus B19 in patients with beta thalassemia major from Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Arabzadeh, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Alizadeh, Farideh; Tavakoli, Ahmad; Mollaei, Hamidreza; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Karimi, Gharib; Farahmand, Mohammad; Mortazavi, Helya Sadat; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    Background Due to the tropism of human parvovirus B19 to erythroid progenitor cells, infection in patients with an underlying hemolytic disorder such as beta-thalassemia major leads to suppression of erythrocyte formation, referred to as transient aplasia crisis (TAC), which may be life-threatening. We investigated the prevalence of parvovirus B19 among patients with beta thalassemia major attending the Zafar Adult Thalassemia Clinic in Tehran, Iran. Methods This cross-sectional study was per...

  9. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. (Univ. of Freiburg (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  10. Movement Preparation and Bilateral Modulation of Beta Activity in Aging and Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziane, Hadj Boumediene; Moisello, Clara; Perfetti, Bernardo; Kvint, Svetlana; Isaias, Ioannis Ugo; Quartarone, Angelo; Di Rocco, Alessandro; Ghilardi, Maria Felice

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies of young subjects performing a reaction-time reaching task, we found that faster reaction times are associated with increased suppression of beta power over primary sensorimotor areas just before target presentation. Here we ascertain whether such beta decrease similarly occurs in normally aging subjects and also in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), where deficits in movement execution and abnormalities of beta power are usually present. We found that in both groups, beta power decreased during the motor task in the electrodes over the two primary sensorimotor areas. However, before target presentation, beta decreases in PD were significantly smaller over the right than over the left areas, while they were symmetrical in controls. In both groups, functional connectivity between the two regions, measured with imaginary coherence, increased before the target appearance; however, in PD, it decreased immediately after, while in controls, it remained elevated throughout motor planning. As in previous studies with young subjects, the degree of beta power before target appearance correlated with reaction time. The values of coherence during motor planning, instead, correlated with movement time, peak velocity and acceleration. We conclude that planning of prompt and fast movements partially depends on coordinated beta activity of both sensorimotor areas, already at the time of target presentation. The delayed onset of beta decreases over the right region observed in PD is possibly related to a decreased functional connectivity between the two areas, and this might account for deficits in force programming, movement duration and velocity modulation. PMID:25635777

  11. Possible Role of DNA Polymerase beta in Protecting Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Against Cytotoxicity of Hydroquinone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DA-LIN HU; JIAN-PING YANG; DAO-KUI FANG; YAN SHA; XIAO-ZHI TU; ZHI-XIONG ZHUANG; HUAN-WEN TANG; HAI-RONG LIANG; DONG-SHENG TANG; YI-MING LIU; WEI-DONG JI; JIAN-HUI YUAN; YUN HE; ZHENG-YU ZHU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explore the toxicological mechanism of hydroquinone in human bronchial epithelial cells and to investigate whether DNA polymerase beta is involved in protecting cells from damage caused by hydroquinone. Methods DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line was established via RNA interference as an experimental group. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells and cells transfected with the empty vector of pEGFP-Cl were used as controls. Cells were treated with different concentrations of hydroquinone (ranged from 10 μmol/L to 120 μmol/L) for 4 hours. MTT assay and Comet assay [single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)] were performed respectively to detect the toxicity of hydroquinone. Results MTT assay showed that DNA polymerase beta knock-down cells treated with different concentrations of hydroquinone had a lower absorbance value at 490 nm than the control cells in a dose-dependant manner. Comet assay revealed that different concentrations of hydroquinone caused more severe DNA damage in DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line than in control cells and there was no significant difference in the two control groups. Conclusions Hydroquinone has significant toxicity to human bronchial epithelial cells and causes DNA damage. DNA polymerase beta knock-down cell line appears more sensitive to hydroquinone than the control cells. The results suggest that DNA polymerase beta is involved in protecting cells from damage caused by hydroquinone.

  12. Structure of the gene for human. beta. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor: expression and promoter characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emorine, L.J.; Marullo, S.; Delavier-Klutchko, C.; Kaveri, S.V.; Durieu-Trautmann, O.; Strosberg, A.D.

    1987-10-01

    The genomic gene coding for the human ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (..beta../sub 2/AR) from A431 epidermoid cells has been isolated. Transfection of the gene into eukaryotic cells restores a fully active receptor/GTP-binding protein/adenylate cyclase complex with ..beta../sub 2/AR properties. Southern blot analyses with ..beta../sub 2/AR-specific probes show that a single ..beta../sub 2/AR gene is common to various human tissues and that its flanking sequences are highly conserved among humans and between man and rabbit, mouse, and hamster. Functional significance of these regions is supported by the presence of a promoter region (including mRNA cap sites, two TATA boxes, a CAAT box, and three G + C-rich regions that resemble binding sites for transcription factor Sp1) 200-300 base pairs 5' to the translation initiation codon. In the 3' flanking region, sequences homologous to glucocorticoid-response elements might be responsible for the increased expression of the ..beta../sub 2/AR gene observed after treatment of the transfected cells with hydrocortisone. In addition, 5' to the promoter region, an open reading frame encodes a 251-residue polypeptide that displays striking homologies with protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

  13. Alpha cells secrete acetylcholine as a non-neuronal paracrine signal priming human beta cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Dando, Robin; Jacques-Silva, M. Caroline; Fachado, Alberto; Molina, Judith; Abdulreda, Midhat; Ricordi, Camillo; Roper, Stephen D.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that plays a major role in the function of the insulin secreting pancreatic beta cell1,2. Parasympathetic innervation of the endocrine pancreas, the islets of Langerhans, has been shown to provide cholinergic input to the beta cell in several species1,3,4, but the role of autonomic innervation in human beta cell function is at present unclear. Here we show that, in contrast to mouse islets, cholinergic innervation of human islets is sparse. Instead, we find that the alpha cells of the human islet provide paracrine cholinergic input to surrounding endocrine cells. Human alpha cells express the vesicular acetylcholine transporter and release acetylcholine when stimulated with kainate or a lowering in glucose concentration. Acetylcholine secretion by alpha cells in turn sensitizes the beta cell response to increases in glucose concentration. Our results demonstrate that in human islets acetylcholine is a paracrine signal that primes the beta cell to respond optimally to subsequent increases in glucose concentration. We anticipate these results to revise models about neural input and cholinergic signaling in the endocrine pancreas. Cholinergic signaling within the islet represents a potential therapeutic target in diabetes5, highlighting the relevance of this advance to future drug development. PMID:21685896

  14. Species-Related Differences in the Proteome of Rat and Human Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Martens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The core proteomes of human and rat pancreatic beta cells were compared by label-free LC-MS/MS: this resulted in quantification of relative molar abundances of 707 proteins belonging to functional pathways of intermediary metabolism, protein synthesis, and cytoskeleton. Relative molar abundances were conserved both within and between pathways enabling the selection of a housekeeping network for geometric normalization and the analysis of potentially relevant differential expressions. Human beta cells differed from rat beta cells in their lower level of enzymes involved in glucose sensing (MDH1, PC, and ACLY and upregulation of lysosomal enzymes. Human cells also expressed more heat shock proteins and radical scavenging systems: apart from SOD2, they expressed high levels of H2O2-scavenger peroxiredoxin 3 (PRDX3, confirmed by microarray, Western blotting, and microscopy. Besides conferring lower susceptibility to oxidative stress to human cells PRDX3 might also play a role in physiological redox regulation as, in rat, its expression was restricted to a beta cell subset with higher metabolic glucose responsiveness. In conclusion, although their core proteomic architecture is conserved, human and rat beta cells differ in their molar expression of key enzymes involved in glucose sensing and redox control.

  15. Developmental- and differentiation-specific patterns of human gamma- and beta-globin promoter DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabaera, Rodwell; Richardson, Christine A; Johnson, Kristin; Hsu, Mei; Fiering, Steven; Lowrey, Christopher H

    2007-08-15

    The mechanisms underlying the human fetal-to-adult beta-globin gene switch remain to be determined. While there is substantial experimental evidence to suggest that promoter DNA methylation is involved in this process, most data come from studies in nonhuman systems. We have evaluated human gamma- and beta-globin promoter methylation in primary human fetal liver (FL) and adult bone marrow (ABM) erythroid cells. Our results show that, in general, promoter methylation and gene expression are inversely related. However, CpGs at -162 of the gamma promoter and -126 of the beta promoter are hypomethylated in ABM and FL, respectively. We also studied gamma-globin promoter methylation during in vitro differentiation of erythroid cells. The gamma promoters are initially hypermethylated in CD34(+) cells. The upstream gamma promoter CpGs become hypomethylated during the preerythroid phase of differentiation and are then remethylated later, during erythropoiesis. The period of promoter hypomethylation correlates with transient gamma-globin gene expression and may explain the previously observed fetal hemoglobin production that occurs during early adult erythropoiesis. These results provide the first comprehensive survey of developmental changes in human gamma- and beta-globin promoter methylation and support the hypothesis that promoter methylation plays a role in human beta-globin locus gene switching.

  16. Modulation of interleukin-1beta mediated inflammatory response in human astrocytes by flavonoids: implications in neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vivek; Mishra, Mamata; Ghosh, Soumya; Tewari, Richa; Basu, Anirban; Seth, Pankaj; Sen, Ellora

    2007-06-15

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) contributes to inflammation and neuronal death in CNS injuries and neurodegenerative pathologies, and astrocytes have been implicated as the primary mediators of IL-1beta induced neuronal death. As astrocytes play an important role in supporting the survival and functions of neurons, we investigated the effect of plant flavonoids quercetin and luteolin, with known anti-inflammatory properties in modulating the response of human astrocytes to IL-1beta for therapeutic intervention. Flavonoids significantly decreased the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from astrocytes stimulated with IL-1beta. This decrease was accompanied by an increase in expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) and thioredoxin (TRX1)-mediators associated with protection against oxidative stress. Flavonoids not only modulated the expression of astrocytes specific molecules such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamine synthetase (GS), and ceruloplasmin (CP) both in the presence and absence of IL-1beta but also decreased the elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), interferon-inducible protein (IP-10), monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and RANTES from IL-1beta activated astrocytes. Significant decrease in neuronal apoptosis was observed in neurons cultured in conditioned medium obtained from astrocytes treated with a combination of IL-1beta and flavonoids as compared to that treated with IL-1beta alone. Our result suggests that by (i) enhancing the potential of activated astrocytes to detoxify free radical, (ii) reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and (iii) modulating expression of mediators associated with enhanced physiological activity of astrocyte in response to injury, flavonoids confer (iv) protection against IL-1beta induced astrocyte mediated neuronal damage.

  17. Rabbit antibodies against the human milk sialyloligosaccharide alditol of LS-tetrasaccharide a (NeuAc alpha 2-3Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcOH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D F; Prieto, P A; Torres, B V

    1985-08-15

    The sialyloligosaccharide, NeuAc alpha 2-3Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc (LS-tetrasaccharide a), a minor component of human milk, is obtained in relatively large quantities from autohydrolysates of the major milk disialyloligosaccharide, NeuAc alpha 2-3Gal beta 1-3[NeuAc alpha 2-6]GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc (disialyllacto-N-tetraose). Rabbits immunized with an oligosaccharide-protein conjugate prepared from keyhole limpet hemocyanin and LS-tetrasaccharide a produce antibodies directed against the corresponding oligosaccharide alditol. The anti-LS-tetrasaccharide a sera bind 3H-labeled LS-tetrasaccharide a in a direct-binding radioimmunoassay on nitrocellulose filters. The specificities of these antibodies are determined by comparing inhibitory activities of structurally related oligosaccharides. Strong hapten-antibody binding (Ka greater than 10(6) M-1) requires sialic acid linked alpha 2-3 to the nonreducing terminal galactose residue of reduced lacto-N-tetraose (Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcOH). Specificities of antibodies prepared against keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugates of LS-tetrasaccharide b (Gal beta 1-3[NeuAc alpha 2-6]GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc) and LS-tetrasaccharide c (NeuAc alpha 2-6Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc) differ only slightly from rabbit antibodies prepared against the corresponding bovine serum albumin conjugates described previously [D. F. Smith and V. Ginsburg (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 55-59].

  18. Evidence for the association of the S100beta gene with low cognitive performance and dementia in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, J-C; Ferreira, S; Gussekloo, J

    2007-01-01

    Variations in the S100beta gene may be instrumental in producing a continuum from mild cognitive decline to overt dementia. After screening 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in S100beta, we observed association of the rs2300403 intron 2 SNP with poorer cognitive function in three...... corresponding mRNA isoform was called S100beta2). S100beta2 expression was increased in AD brain compared with controls, and the rs2300403 SNP was associated with elevated levels of S100beta2 mRNA in AD brains, especially in women. Therefore, this genetic variant in S100beta increases the risk of low cognitive...... performance and dementia, possibly by favouring a splicing event increasing S100beta2 isoform expression in the brain....

  19. High dose 17 beta-estradiol and the alpha-estrogen agonist PPT trigger apoptosis in human adrenal carcinoma cells but the beta-estrogen agonist DPN does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, L M; Brown, J W; Perez-Stable, C; Fishman, L M

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that high dose 17beta-estradiol (10 (-5) M) has a G2/M blocking effect in SW-13 human adrenal carcinoma cultures and strongly enhances apoptosis. To examine the differential effects of estrogen alpha and beta-receptors in this system, we incubated SW-13 cells with specific alpha- and beta-estrogen receptor agonists, PPT [4,4',4''-(propyl-[ (1)H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol] and DPN [2,3-bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) propionitrile], respectively (each at 10 (-5) M). Flow cytometry was used to analyze the percentages of cells in various phases of the cell cycle [sub-G1 (apoptosis), G1, S, and G2/M] in each experimental condition. Exposure to 17 beta-estradiol for 48 hours increased apoptosis more than 5-fold (from 3.6+/-0.5 to 20+/-2.2% of cells; pPPT had a similar effect, increasing apoptosis to 22+/-1.7% (pPPT; p<0.01 for both agents relative to control); the beta-agonist again had no effect. Estrogen was also found to block the cell cycle in G2/M, increasing it from 15+/-0.4 to 21+/-1.0% of cells (p<0.01), but neither the alpha- nor beta-estrogen agonists had any effect at this point in the cell cycle, indicating that the influence of estrogen was not likely to be either alpha- or beta-receptor mediated. There was no apparent effect of any of these agents on DNA synthesis, as indicated by unchanged percentages of cells in S phase. These studies suggest that induction of apoptosis by estrogen in SW-13 human adrenal cortical carcinoma cultures is mediated by the alpha-receptor, but the G2/M blocking effect of estrogen is not likely to be related to either alpha or beta mechanisms.

  20. Correction of murine mucopolysaccharidosis VII by a human. beta. -glucuronidase transgene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, J.W.; Vogler, C.; Hoffmann, J.W.; Sly, W.S. (St. Louis Univ. School of Medicine, MO (USA)); Birkenmeier, E.H.; Gwynn, B. (Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The authors recently described a murine model for mucopolysaccharidosis VII in mice that have an inherited deficiency of {beta}-glucuronidase. Affected mice, of genotype gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps}, present clinical manifestations similar to those of humans with mucopolysaccharidosis VII (Sly syndrome) and are shown here to have secondary elevations of other lysosomal enzymes. The mucopolysaccharidosis VII phenotype in both species includes dwarfism, skeletal deformities, and premature death. Lysosome storage is visualized within enlarged vesicles and correlates biochemically with accumulation of undegraded and partially degraded glycosaminoglycans. In this report they describe the consequences of introducing the human {beta}-glucuronidase gene, GUSB, into gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps} mice that produce virtually no murine {beta}-glucuronidase. Transgenic mice homozygous for the mucopolysaccharidosis VII mutation expressed high levels of human {beta}-glucuronidase activity in all tissues examined and were phenotypically normal. Biochemically, both the intralysosomal storage of glycosaminoglycans and the secondary elevation of other acid hydrolases were corrected. These findings demonstrate that the GUSB transgene is expressed in gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps} mice and that human {beta}-glucuronidase corrects the murine mucopolysaccharidosis storage disease.

  1. Effect of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes on the activity of the transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2) promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murvai, M; Borbély, A A; Kónya, J; Gergely, L; Veress, G

    2004-12-01

    The effect of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16) E6 and E7 proteins was studied on the transcriptional activity of the human transforming growth factor beta2 (TGF-beta) promoter in different cell lines. Luciferase tests were performed after co-transfection of cells with TGF-beta2 reporter constructs and HPV 16 E6 or E7 expression vectors. HPV 16 E7, but not E6 significantly repressed TGF-beta2 promoter activity in NIH/3T3 cells, which have wild-type p53 and pRb proteins. The repressive effect of HPV 16 E7 on the transcriptional activity of the TGF-beta2 promoter could be localized to the promoter region -528 to -251 relative to the transcriptional start site. Ability of E7 to bind pRb was necessary to inhibit the TGF-beta2 promoter. Over-expression of the transcription factor E2F-1 had an effect on the TGF-beta2 promoter similar to that of E7, which may indicate that HPV 16 E7 represses the TGF-beta2 promoter by releasing E2F from pRb.

  2. Magnetic measurements on human erythrocytes: Normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnini, Lama

    2003-05-01

    In this article magnetic measurements were made on human erythrocytes at different hemoglobin states (normal and reduced hemoglobin). Different blood samples: normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle were studied. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples were taken from patients receiving lifelong blood transfusion treatment. All samples examined exhibited diamagnetic behavior. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples showed higher diamagnetic susceptibilities than that for the normal, which was attributed to the increase of membrane to hemoglobin volume ratio of the abnormal cells. Magnetic measurements showed that the erythrocytes in the reduced state showed less diamagnetic response in comparison with erythrocytes in the normal state. Analysis of the paramagnetic component of magnetization curves gave an effective magnetic moment of μeff=7.6 μB per reduced hemoglobin molecule. The same procedure was applied to sickle and beta thalassemia major samples and values for μeff were found to be comparable to that of the normal erythrocytes.

  3. Isolation and characterization of recombinant human casein kinase II subunits alpha and beta from bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grankowski, N; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1991-01-01

    cDNA encoding the casein kinase II (CKII) subunits alpha and beta of human origin were expressed in Escherichia coli using expression vector pT7-7. Significant expression was obtained with E. coli BL21(DE3). The CKII subunits accounted for approximately 30% of the bacterial protein; however, most...... of the expressed proteins were produced in an insoluble form. The recombinant CKII alpha subunit was purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, followed by phosphocellulose and heparin-agarose chromatography. The recombinant CKII beta subunit was extracted from the insoluble pellet and purified in a single step...... on phosphocellulose. From 10 g bacterial cells, the yield of soluble protein was 12 mg alpha subunit and 5 mg beta subunit. SDS/PAGE analysis of the purified recombinant proteins indicated molecular masses of 42 kDa and 26 kDa for the alpha and beta subunits, respectively, in agreement with the molecular masses...

  4. Glucose stimulates human beta cell replication in vivo in islets transplanted into NOD–severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, H. E.; Cyphert, T. J.; Pascoe, J. L.; Hollern, D. A.; Abraham, N.; Lundell, R. J.; Rosa, T.; Romano, L. C.; Zou, B.; O’Donnell, C. P.; Stewart, A. F.; Garcia-Ocaña, A.; Alonso, L. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We determined whether hyperglycaemia stimulates human beta cell replication in vivo in an islet transplant model Methods Human islets were transplanted into streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD–severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Blood glucose was measured serially during a 2 week graft revascularisation period. Engrafted mice were then catheterised in the femoral artery and vein, and infused intravenously with BrdU for 4 days to label replicating beta cells. Mice with restored normoglycaemia were co-infused with either 0.9% (wt/vol.) saline or 50% (wt/vol.) glucose to generate glycaemic differences among grafts from the same donors. During infusions, blood glucose was measured daily. After infusion, human beta cell replication and apoptosis were measured in graft sections using immunofluorescence for insulin, and BrdU or TUNEL. Results Human islet grafts corrected diabetes in the majority of cases. Among grafts from the same donor, human beta cell proliferation doubled in those exposed to higher glucose relative to lower glucose. Across the entire cohort of grafts, higher blood glucose was strongly correlated with increased beta cell replication. Beta cell replication rates were unrelated to circulating human insulin levels or donor age, but tended to correlate with donor BMI. Beta cell TUNEL reactivity was not measurably increased in grafts exposed to elevated blood glucose. Conclusions/interpretation Glucose is a mitogenic stimulus for transplanted human beta cells in vivo. Investigating the underlying pathways may point to mechanisms capable of expanding human beta cell mass in vivo. PMID:20936253

  5. Insulin-producing cells generated from dedifferentiated human pancreatic beta cells expanded in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger A Russ

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansion of beta cells from the limited number of adult human islet donors is an attractive prospect for increasing cell availability for cell therapy of diabetes. However, attempts at expanding human islet cells in tissue culture result in loss of beta-cell phenotype. Using a lineage-tracing approach we provided evidence for massive proliferation of beta-cell-derived (BCD cells within these cultures. Expansion involves dedifferentiation resembling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Epigenetic analyses indicate that key beta-cell genes maintain open chromatin structure in expanded BCD cells, although they are not transcribed. Here we investigated whether BCD cells can be redifferentiated into beta-like cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Redifferentiation conditions were screened by following activation of an insulin-DsRed2 reporter gene. Redifferentiated cells were characterized for gene expression, insulin content and secretion assays, and presence of secretory vesicles by electron microscopy. BCD cells were induced to redifferentiate by a combination of soluble factors. The redifferentiated cells expressed beta-cell genes, stored insulin in typical secretory vesicles, and released it in response to glucose. The redifferentiation process involved mesenchymal-epithelial transition, as judged by changes in gene expression. Moreover, inhibition of the EMT effector SLUG (SNAI2 using shRNA resulted in stimulation of redifferentiation. Lineage-traced cells also gave rise at a low rate to cells expressing other islet hormones, suggesting transition of BCD cells through an islet progenitor-like stage during redifferentiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate for the first time that expanded dedifferentiated beta cells can be induced to redifferentiate in culture. The findings suggest that ex-vivo expansion of adult human islet cells is a promising approach for generation of insulin-producing cells for

  6. Expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) receptors and expression of TGF beta 1, TGF beta 2 and TGF beta 3 in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M;

    1993-01-01

    A panel of 21 small cell lung cancer cell (SCLC) lines were examined for the presence of Transforming growth factor beta receptors (TGF beta-r) and the expression of TGF beta mRNAs. By the radioreceptor assay we found high affinity receptors to be expressed in six cell lines. scatchard analysis...... of the binding data demonstrated that the cells bound between 4.5 and 27.5 fmol mg-1 protein with a KD ranging from 16 to 40 pM. TGF beta 1 binding to the receptors was confirmed by cross-linking TGF beta 1 to the TGF beta-r. Three classes of TGF beta-r were demonstrated, type I and type II receptors with M......(r) = 65,000 and 90,000 and the betaglycan (type III) with M(r) = 280,000. Northern blotting showed expression of TGF beta 1 mRNA in ten, TGF beta 2 mRNA in two and TGF beta 3 mRNA in seven cell lines. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence that a large proportion of a broad panel of SCLC cell...

  7. A tale of two glucose transporters: how GLUT2 re-emerged as a contender for glucose transport into the human beta cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bunt, M; Gloyn, A L

    2012-09-01

    Finding novel causes for monogenic forms of diabetes is important as, alongside the clinical implications of such a discovery, it can identify critical proteins and pathways required for normal beta cell function in humans. It is increasingly apparent that there are significant differences between rodent and human islets. One example that has generated interest is the relative importance of the glucose transporter GLUT2 in rodent and human beta cells. The central role of GLUT2 in rodent beta cells is well established, but a number of studies have suggested that other glucose transporters, namely GLUT1 and GLUT3, may play an important role in facilitating glucose transport into human beta cells. In this issue of Diabetologia Sansbury et al (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-012-2595-0 ) report homozygous loss of function mutations in SLC2A2, which encodes GLUT2, as a rare cause of neonatal diabetes. Evidence for a beta cell defect in these subjects comes from very low birthweights, lack of endogenous insulin secretion and a requirement for insulin therapy. Neonatal diabetes is not a consistent feature of SLC2A2 mutations. It is only found in a small percentage of cases (~4%) and the diabetes largely resolves before 18 months of age. This discovery is significant as it suggests that GLUT2 plays an important role in human beta cells, but the interplay and relative roles of other transporters differ from those in rodents. This finding should encourage efforts to delineate the precise role of GLUT2 in the human beta cell at different developmental time points and is a further reminder of critical differences between human and rodent islets.

  8. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta on long-term human cord blood monocyte cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orcel, P.; Bielakoff, J.; De Vernejoul, M.C. (INSERM U18, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France))

    1990-02-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) modulates growth and differentiation in many cell types and is abundant in bone matrix. We recently showed that human cord blood monocytes cultured in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 acquire some features of osteoclast precursors. Since TGF-beta has been shown to influence bone resorption in organ culture, we have studied the effect of TGF-beta (1-1,000 pg/ml) on cord blood monocyte cultures. These cells were cultured on plastic substrate during 3 weeks in the presence of 20% horse serum and 10(-9) M 1,25(OH)2D3. TGF-beta, from a concentration of 10 pg/ml in the culture medium, decreased in a dose dependent manner the formation of multinucleated cells. At a concentration of TGF-beta of 1 ng/ml, the multinucleated cells were reduced to 2.1% +/- 0.3%, compared to 19.3% +/- 1.5% in control cultures. TGF-beta inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the proliferation of cord blood monocytes as assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation at 7 and 14 days of culture. The fusion index was also decreased by 3 weeks of treatment with TGF-beta. Indomethacin did not reverse the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta. The expression of the osteoclastic phenotype was assessed using two different antibodies: 23C6, a monoclonal antibody directed against the vitronectin receptor, which is highly expressed by osteoclasts but not by adult monocytes, and an antibody to HLA-DR, which is not present on osteoclast. TGF-beta decreased the expression of HLA-DR and increased in a dose-dependent manner the proportion of 23C6-labeled cells; these results suggest that TGF-beta could modulate a differentiation effect to the osteoclastic phenotype. However, when cord blood monocytes were cultured on devitalized rat calvariae prelabeled with 45Ca, TGF-beta did not induce any 45Ca release from bone cultured with monocytes.

  9. Isolation of novel human cDNA (hGMF-gamma) homologous to Glia Maturation Factor-beta gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, K; Fujita, K; Yamamoto, M; Hotta, T; Morikawa, M; Kokubo, M; Moriyama, A; Kato, T

    1998-03-13

    A novel full-length human cDNA homologous to Glia Maturation Factor-beta (GMF-beta) gene was isolated. Sequence analysis of the entire cDNA revealed an open reading frame of 426 nucleotides with a deduced protein sequence of 142 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequences of its putative product is highly homologous to human GMF-beta (82% identity) and named for GMF-gamma. Northern blot analysis indicated that a message of 0.9 kb long, but not 4.1 kb of GMF-beta, is predominantly expressed in human lung, heart, and placenta.

  10. Construction of human Fab library and screening of a single-domain antibody of amyloid-beta 42 oligomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuanning Yuan; Minge Du; Yiwen Chen; Fei Dou

    2013-01-01

    Screening humanized antibodies from a human Fab phage display library is an effective and quick method to obtain beta-amyloid oligomers. Thus, the present study prepared amyloid-beta 42 oli-gomers and constructed a naïve human Fab phage display library based on blood samples from six healthy people. After three rounds of biopanning in vitro, a human single-domain antibody that spe-cifical y recognized amyloid-beta 42 oligomers was identified. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated this antibody bound specifical y to human amyloid-beta 42 te-tramer and nonamer, but not the monomer or high molecular weight oligomers. This study suc-cessful y constructed a human phage display library and screened a single-domain antibody that specifical y recognized amyloid-beta 42 oligomers.

  11. Study of the flavour changing neutral current beta-s gamma at BaBar

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D

    2002-01-01

    The main theme of this thesis, is a monte-carlo analysis of the rare Flavour Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) decay b -> s gamma. The analysis develops techniques that could be applied to real data, to discriminate between signal and background events in order to make a measurement of the branching ratio of this rare decay using the BaBar detector. Also included in this thesis is a description of the BaBar detector and the work I have undertaken in the development of the electronic data acquisition system for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC), a subsystem of the BaBar detector.

  12. Plasma S100 beta and NSE levels and progression in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; Mostert, Jop; Heersema, Dorothea; Teelken, Albert; De Keyser, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Plasma levels of the glial cell marker S100 beta and the neuronal marker neuron-specific enolase (NSE) are elevated in various conditions of central nervous system damage. In this study we investigated whether plasma levels of S 1000 and NSE are related to disease progression in multiple sclerosis (

  13. Plasma S100 beta and NSE levels and progression in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; Mostert, Jop; Heersema, Dorothea; Teelken, Albert; De Keyser, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Plasma levels of the glial cell marker S100 beta and the neuronal marker neuron-specific enolase (NSE) are elevated in various conditions of central nervous system damage. In this study we investigated whether plasma levels of S 1000 and NSE are related to disease progression in multiple sclerosis (

  14. Phagocytosis of haemozoin (malarial pigment enhances metalloproteinase-9 activity in human adherent monocytes: Role of IL-1beta and 15-HETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giribaldi Giuliana

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown previously that human monocytes fed with haemozoin (HZ or trophozoite-parasitized RBCs displayed increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 enzyme activity and protein/mRNA expression and increased TNF production, and showed higher matrix invasion ability. The present study utilized the same experimental model to analyse the effect of phagocytosis of: HZ, delipidized HZ, beta-haematin (lipid-free synthetic HZ and trophozoites on production of IL-1beta and MMP-9 activity and expression. The second aim was to find out which component of HZ was responsible for the effects. Methods Native HZ freshly isolated from Plasmodium falciparum (Palo Alto strain, Mycoplasma-free, delipidized HZ, beta-haematin (lipid-free synthetic HZ, trophozoites and control meals such as opsonized non-parasitized RBCs and inert latex particles, were fed to human monocytes. The production of IL-1beta by differently fed monocytes, in presence or absence of specific MMP-9 inhibitor or anti-hIL-1beta antibodies, was quantified in supernatants by ELISA. Expression of IL-1beta was analysed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. MMP-9 activity and protein expression were quantified by gelatin zymography and Western blotting. Results Monocytes fed with HZ or trophozoite-parasitized RBCs generated increased amounts of IL-1beta and enhanced enzyme activity (in cell supernatants and protein/mRNA expression (in cell lysates of monocyte MMP-9. The latter appears to be causally related to enhanced IL-1beta production, as enhancement of both expression and enzyme activity were abrogated by anti-hIL-1beta Abs. Upregulation of IL-1beta and MMP-9 were absent in monocytes fed with beta-haematin or delipidized HZ, indicating a role for HZ-attached or HZ-generated lipid components. 15-HETE (15(S,R-hydroxy-6,8,11,13-eicosatetraenoic acid a potent lipoperoxidation derivative generated by HZ from arachidonic acid via haem-catalysis was identified as one mediator

  15. PAX4 enhances beta-cell differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Gee Liew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells (HESC readily differentiate into an apparently haphazard array of cell types, corresponding to all three germ layers, when their culture conditions are altered, for example by growth in suspension as aggregates known as embryoid bodies (EBs. However, this diversity of differentiation means that the efficiency of producing any one particular cell type is inevitably low. Although pancreatic differentiation has been reported from HESC, practicable applications for the use of beta-cells derived from HESC to treat diabetes will only be possible once techniques are developed to promote efficient differentiation along the pancreatic lineages. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we have tested whether the transcription factor, Pax4 can be used to drive the differentiation of HESC to a beta-cell fate in vitro. We constitutively over-expressed Pax4 in HESCs by stable transfection, and used Q-PCR analysis, immunocytochemistry, ELISA, Ca(2+ microfluorimetry and cell imaging to assess the role of Pax4 in the differentiation and intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis of beta-cells developing in embryoid bodies produced from such HESC. Cells expressing key beta-cell markers were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting after staining for high zinc content using the vital dye, Newport Green. CONCLUSION: Constitutive expression of Pax4 in HESC substantially enhances their propensity to form putative beta-cells. Our findings provide a novel foundation to study the mechanism of pancreatic beta-cells differentiation during early human development and to help evaluate strategies for the generation of purified beta-cells for future clinical applications.

  16. Lovastatin inhibits TGF-beta-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation in human tenon fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Ter-Vehn, Tobias; Katzenberger, Barbara; Han, Hong; Grehn, Franz; Schlunck, Günther

    2008-09-01

    The transdifferentiation of Tenon fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a pivotal step in filtering bleb scarring. It is mediated by the cytokine TGF-beta, Rho-dependent contractility, and cell-matrix interactions in an interdependent fashion. HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins) have been shown to inhibit Rho-GTPase signaling; therefore, the authors studied the influence of lovastatin on TGF-beta-mediated myofibroblast transdifferentiation to assess the potential use of statins in wound healing modulation. Human Tenon fibroblasts were grown in culture, pretreated with lovastatin, lovastatin and mevalonate, or specific inhibitors of farnesyl transferase or geranylgeranyl transferase and were stimulated with TGF-beta1. alpha-Smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) transcription were assessed by real-time PCR. alpha-SMA protein expression and localization were studied by Western blot and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Cell contractility was determined in collagen gel contraction assays. Phosphorylation of the signaling proteins Smad-2/3 and p38 were detected by Western blot, and Smad-2/3 localization was determined by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Lovastatin inhibited TGF-beta-induced CTGF transcription, alpha-SMA expression and incorporation into actin stress fibers, and subsequent collagen gel contraction. These effects were reversed by mevalonate. The inhibition of geranylgeranyl transferase but not farnesyl transferase blocked TGF-beta-induced alpha-SMA expression. Lovastatin decreased TGF-beta-induced p38 activation, whereas Smad-2/3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation were preserved. Lovastatin inhibits TGF-beta-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation in human Tenon fibroblasts, most likely by interfering with Rho-signaling. Statins may, therefore, serve to inhibit scarring after filtering glaucoma surgery.

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human beta-like globin gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, E F; Lawn, R M; Maniatis, T

    1980-04-01

    The genes encoding human embryonic (epsilon), fetal (G gamma, A gamma) and adult (delta, beta) beta-like globin polypeptides were isolated as a set of overlapping cloned DNA fragments from bacteriophage lambda libraries of high molecular weight (15-20 kb) chromosomal DNA. The 65 kb of DNA represented in these overlapping clones contains the genes for all five beta-like polypeptides, including the embryonic epsilon-globin gene, for which the chromosomal location was previously unknown. All five genes are transcribed from the same DNA strand and are arranged in the order 5'-epsilon-(13.3 kb)-G gamma-(3.5 kb)-A gamma-(13.9 kb)-delta-(5.4 kb)-beta-3'. Thus the genes are positioned on the chromosome in the order of their expression during development. In addition to the five known beta-like globin genes, we have detected two other beta-like globin sequences which do not correspond to known polypeptides. One of these sequences has been mapped to the A gamma-delta intergenic region while the other is located 6-9 kb 5' to the epsilon gene. Cross hybridization experiments between the intergenic sequences of the gene cluster have revealed a nonglobin repeat sequence (*) which is interspersed with the globin genes in the following manner: 5'-**epsilon-*G gamma-A gamma*-**delta-beta*-3'. Fine structure mapping of the region located 5' to the delta-globin gene revealed two repeats with a maximum size of 400 bp, which are separated by approximately 700 bp of DNA not repeated within the cluster. Preliminary experiments indicate that this repeat family is also repeated many times in the human genome.

  18. A new method for high yield purification of type beta transforming growth factor from human platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnden-van Raaij, A.J.M. van den; Koornneef, I.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1988-01-01

    A new method was developed for the purification of type beta transforming growth factor from human platelets. This method is a three-step procedure including gel filtration, weak cation exchange HPLC and reverse phase HPLC. All steps are carried out at low pH using exclusively volatile acidic buffer

  19. The non-enzymatic inactivation of thirteen beta-lactam antibiotics in human faeces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G; Weissing, F; de Vries-Hospers, H; Tonk, R; van der Waaij, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to obtain a method that could predict the in vitro inactivation of an antibiotic in the digestive tract, the non-enzymatic inactivation of 13 beta-lactam antibiotics by human faeces was investigated. Benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cloxacillin, piperacillin, temocill

  20. Fipronil-based photoaffinity probe for Drosophila and human beta 3 GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisoma, N S; Ratra, G S; Tomizawa, M; Casida, J E

    2001-11-19

    Modification of the major insecticide fipronil (1) by replacing three pyrazole substituents (hydrogen for both cyano and amino and trifluoromethyldiazirinyl for trifluoromethylsulfinyl) gives a candidate photoaffinity probe (3) of high potency (IC(50) 2-28 nM) in blocking the chloride channel of Drosophila and human beta 3 GABA receptors.

  1. Using the NCBI Genome Databases to Compare the Genes for Human & Chimpanzee Beta Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The beta hemoglobin protein is identical in humans and chimpanzees. In this tutorial, students see that even though the proteins are identical, the genes that code for them are not. There are many more differences in the introns than in the exons, which indicates that coding regions of DNA are more highly conserved than non-coding regions.

  2. Increased expression of beta 2-microglobulin and histocompatibility antigens on human lymphoid cells induced by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Heron, I; Berg, K

    1982-01-01

    Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were incubated in the presence of different concentrations of interferon for various incubation periods. Subsequently, the amount of beta 2-Microglobulin and HLA-A, B and C surface antigens was estimated by means of quantitative immunofluorescence (flow c...

  3. A single bout of exercise induces beta-adrenergic desensitization in human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion-Latard, F; De Glisezinski, I; Crampes, F; Berlan, M; Galitzky, J; Suljkovicova, H; Riviere, D; Stich, V

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to assess whether physiological activation of the sympathetic nervous system induced by exercise changes adipose tissue responsiveness to catecholamines in humans. Lipid mobilization in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue was studied with the use of a microdialysis method in 11 nontrained men (age: 22. 3 +/- 1.5 yr; body mass index: 23.0 +/- 1.6). Adipose tissue adrenergic sensitivity was explored with norepinephrine, dobutamine (beta(1)-agonist), or terbutaline (beta(2)-agonist) perfused during 30 min through probes before and after 60-min exercise (50% of the maximal aerobic power). The increase in extracellular glycerol concentration during infusion was significantly lower after the exercise when compared with the increase observed before the exercise (P < 0.05, P < 0.02, and P < 0.01, respectively, for norepinephrine, dobutamine, and terbutaline). In a control experiment realized without exercise, no difference in norepinephrine-induced glycerol increase between the two infusions was observed. To assess the involvement of catecholamines in the blunted beta-adrenergic-induced lipolytic response after exercise, adipose tissue adrenergic sensitivity was explored with two 60-min infusions of norepinephrine or epinephrine separated by a 60-min interval. With both catecholamines, the increase in glycerol was significantly lower during the second infusion (P < 0.05). The findings suggest that aerobic exercise, which increased adrenergic activity, induces a desensitization in beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenergic lipolytic pathways in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

  4. Kinetics of Beta-14[14C] Carotene in a Human Subject Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueker, S.R.; Lin, Y.; Follett, J.R.; Clifford, A.J.; Buchholz, B.A.

    2000-01-31

    {beta}-Carotene is a tetraterpenoid distributed widely throughout the plant kingdom. It is a member of a group of pigments referred to as carotenoids that have the distinction of serving as metabolic precursors to vitamin A in humans and many animals [1,2]. We used Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) [3] to determine the metabolic behavior of a physiologic oral dose of {beta}-[{sup 14}C]carotene (200 nanoCuries; 0.57 {micro}mol) in a healthy human subject. Serial blood specimens were collected for 210-d and complete urine and feces were collected for 17 and 10-d, respectively. Balance data indicated that the dose was 42% bioavailable. The absorbed {beta}-carotene was lost slowly via urine in accord with the slow body turnover of {beta}-carotene and vitamin A [4]. HPLC fractionation of plasma taken at early time points (0-24-h) showed the label was distributed between {beta}-carotene and retinyl esters (vitamin A) derived from intestinal metabolism.

  5. Functional analysis of alpha 1 beta 1 integrin in human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Villar, J J; Melero, I; Gismondi, A; Santoni, A; López-Botet, M

    1996-09-01

    Upon activation with interleukin (IL)-2 human natural killer (NK) cells acquire on their surface the alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1 integrins and down-regulate the expression of alpha 6 beta 1. By employing alpha 1 beta 1-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) HP-2B6, characterized in our laboratory, we examined the functional role of the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin in NK cells. Treatment with HP-2B6 mAb partially interfered with attachment of cultured NK cells to type I collagen, and combined with an anti-alpha 2 beta 1 (TEA 1/41) mAb, it completely abrogated cell adhesion to this extracelular matrix protein. In contrast, NK cell attachment to laminin was completely blocked by the anti-beta 1 LIA 1/2 mAb, but was unaffected by alpha 1 and alpha 2-specific mAb; as alpha 3 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1 were undetectable, the data indicate that the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin binding sites for type I collagen and laminin are different. Incubation with anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 or its F(ab')2 fragments specifically induced a rapid homotypic aggregation of NK cells that was dependent on active metabolism, an intact cytoskeleton and the presence of divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+); homotypic cell adhesion was selectively blocked by anti-CD18, CD11a or CD54 mAb. In addition, stimulation of cultured NK cells with the anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 enhanced TNF-alpha production and induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a 110-kDa protein. Pretreatment with specific inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity (tyrphostin 25 and herbimycin A) completely abrogated the functional effects induced by the anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 mAb. Our data show that ligation of the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin positively modulates IL-2-activated NK cell function via a PTK-dependent pathway.

  6. Five adults with mild sickle cell anemia share a beta S chromosome with the same haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakioglu, I; Hattori, Y; Kutlar, A; Mathew, C; Huisman, T H

    1985-11-01

    Five adult SS patients from Qatar, Turkey, and South Africa with mild disease, had greatly elevated Hb F and specific patterns of polymorphic sites on their beta S chromosomes. One subject had an alpha-thalassemia (-alpha/-alpha). The haplotypes were the common type #19, associated with severe disease, and type #31, not seen thus far in an SS patient (numbering system of Antonarakis et al). The data suggest that modifications in the DNA of the beta S #31 chromosome promotes the synthesis of gamma chains.

  7. Ser2 is the autophosphorylation site in the beta subunit from bicistronically expressed human casein kinase-2 and from native rat liver casein kinase-2 beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; James, P; Staudenmann, W;

    1993-01-01

    Human casein kinase-2 (CK-2) subunits alpha and beta were bicistronically expressed in bacteria. The recombinant holoenzyme shared all investigated properties with the native CK-2 from mammalian sources (rat liver, Krebs II mouse ascites tumour cells). Contrary to recombinant human CK-2 produced...

  8. In situ assessment of the role of the beta 1-, beta 2- and beta 3-adrenoceptors in the control of lipolysis and nutritive blood flow in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, P.; Millet, L.; Galitzky, J.; Lafontan, M.; Berlan, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The involvement of beta 1-, beta 2- and beta 3-adrenoceptors in the control of lipolysis and nutritive blood flow was investigated in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy young adults by use of an in situ microdialysis technique. 2. Dialysis probes were infused either with isoprenaline (non-selective beta-adrenoceptor agonist), CGP 12,177 (selective beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist having beta 1-/beta 2-antagonist properties), dobutamine (selective beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist) or terbutaline (selective beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist). The recovery of each probe used for perfusion was calculated by an in vivo calibration method. The local blood flow was estimated through the measurement of the escape of ethanol infused simultaneously with the drugs included in the probe. 3. Isoprenaline infusion at 0.01 microM had a weak effect while higher concentrations of isoprenaline (0.1 and 1 microM) caused a rapid, sustained and concentration-dependent increase of glycerol outflow; the maximum increase was 306 +/- 34% with 1 microM. Isoprenaline also increased the nutritive blood flow in adipose tissue; a significant effect appeared at 0.1 microM isoprenaline and was greater at 1 microM. 4. CGP 12,177 (10 and 100 microM) increased the glycerol concentration in the dialysate (128 +/- 8 and 149 +/- 12%, respectively) and nutritive blood flow. Terbutaline and dobutamine (100 microM) both provoked rapid and similar increases in glycerol outflow (252 +/- 18 and 249 +/- 18%, respectively). Both, terbutaline and dobutamine increased nutritive blood flow. 5. It is concluded that beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor subtypes are both mainly involved in the mobilization of lipids and in the control of nutritive blood flow. beta 3-Adrenoceptors play a weaker role in the control of lipolysis and nutritive blood flow in human subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue. PMID:8851509

  9. Measurement of the CP-Violating Phase beta_s in B0s -> J/Psi Phi Decays with the CDF II Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present a measurement of the \\CP-violating parameter \\betas using approximately 6500 $\\BsJpsiPhi$ decays reconstructed with the CDF\\,II detector in a sample of $p\\bar p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab. We find the \\CP-violating phase to be within the range $\\betas \\in [0.02, 0.52] \\cup [1.08, 1.55]$ at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential $S$-wave contribution to the $\\Bs\\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval $1.009 < m(K^+K^-)<1.028 \\gevcc$. Assuming the standard model prediction for the \\CP-violating phase \\betas, we find the \\Bs decay width difference to be $\\deltaG = 0.075 \\pm 0.035\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm ...

  10. Presence of beta-linked GalNAc residues on N-glycans of human thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeya, Akira; Hosomi, Osamu; Nishijima, Hironori; Ohe, Yoshihide; Sugahara, Kunio; Sagi, Morihisa; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Hayakawa, Hideyuki; Takeshita, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Chizuko; Kogure, Tadahisa; Mukai, Toshiji

    2007-01-16

    Hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor, which may mediate the clearance of circulating thyroglobulin, is known to have a high affinity for GalNAc. Recently, the receptor has been reported to be present also in the thyroid, implicating interaction with thyroglobulin. Here, mammalian thyroglobulins were analyzed for GalNAc termini by Western blotting with GalNAc-recognizing lectins labeled with peroxidase or (125)I. Wistaria floribunda lectin was found to bind human thyroglobulin and, to some extent, bovine, but not porcine thyroglobulin. After desialylation, the lectin bound all of the thyroglobulins tested. The binding was inhibited by competitive inhibitor GalNAc. Peptide N-glycanase treatment of human desialylated thyroglobulin resulted in the complete loss of reactivity with W. floribunda lectin, indicating that the binding sites are exclusively on N-glycans. The binding sites on human desialylated thyroglobulin were partly sensitive to beta-galactosidase, and the remainder was essentially sensitive to beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase. On the other hand, the binding sites of bovine and porcine desialylated thyroglobulins were totally sensitive to beta-galactosidase. Thus the lectin binds beta-Gal termini, as well as beta-GalNAc. GalNAc-specific Dolichos biflorus lectin also bound human thyroglobulin weakly. In contrast to W. floribunda lectin, desialylation diminished binding, suggesting that these two lectins recognize different GalNAc-terminated structures. Again, the binding was inhibited by GalNAc and by treatment with peptide N-glycanase. These results strongly indicate the presence of distinct GalNAc termini of N-glycans on human thyroglobulin.

  11. Applied Developmental Biology: Making Human Pancreatic Beta Cells for Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genes and signaling pathways that determine the differentiation and fate of a cell is a central goal of developmental biology. Using that information to gain mastery over the fates of cells presents new approaches to cell transplantation and drug discovery for human diseases including diabetes. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ADAM12 and alpha9beta1 integrin are instrumental in human myogenic cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafuste, Peggy; Sonnet, Corinne; Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge on molecular systems involved in myogenic precursor cell (mpc) fusion into myotubes is fragmentary. Previous studies have implicated the a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) family in most mammalian cell fusion processes. ADAM12 is likely involved in fusion of murine mpc and human...... extracellular matrix, suggesting specific involvement of ADAM12-alpha9beta1 interaction in the fusion process. Evaluation of the fusion rate with regard to the size of myotubes showed that both ADAM12 antisense oligonucleotides and alpha9beta1 blockade inhibited more importantly formation of large (> or =5...

  13. Prostaglandin E2 stimulates S100A8 expression by activating protein kinase A and CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Lin; Grebhardt, Sina; Shi, Jiandang; Peipe, Isabelle; Zhang, Ju; Mayer, Doris

    2012-11-01

    S100A8 and S100A9 are strongly expressed in epithelial cells of human prostate cancer. However, the regulation of their expression is unclear. Here we show that S100A8 and to a lesser extent S100A9 mRNA expression is induced by prostaglandin E2 in a dose and time-dependent manner in PC-3 prostate cancer cells as well as in BPH-1 benign prostatic epithelial cells. Prostanoid receptor EP2 antagonist AH6809 and EP4 antagonist AH23848, as well as protein kinase A inhibitor H89, inhibited prostaglandin E2 mediated increase in S100A8 mRNA expression as well as promoter activity. Sequence analysis detected a potential binding site of the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta within the proximal S100A8 promoter. CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta overexpression increased S100A8 mRNA and protein expression as well as its promoter activity. The latter was prevented by mutation of the potential CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta binding site within the S100A8 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed increased binding of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta to the S100A8 promoter in prostaglandin E2 treated cells. Knockdown of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta by siRNA blocked prostaglandin E2 mediated induction of S100A8 promoter activity and mRNA expression. Our results indicate that in prostate cancer cells, S100A8 expression is stimulated by prostaglandin E2 via EP2 and EP4 receptors through activation of the protein kinase A signaling pathway and subsequent stimulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-beta binding to the S100A8 promoter.

  14. Synthesis of shape-controlled beta-In2S3 nanotubes through oriented attachment of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Hee; Lee, Jong Hak; Shin, Dong-Wook; Park, Sung Min; Moon, Jin Soo; Nam, Jung Gyu; Yoo, Ji-Beom

    2010-04-07

    Beta-In(2)S(3) nanotubes were synthesized using an organic solution pyrolysis route. The shape of the beta-In(2)S(3) nanotubes was controlled from hexagonal nanoplates to nanotubes simply by changing the reaction time. The growth mechanism of the nanotubes was explained by oriented attachment. The beta-In(2)S(3) nanotubes had a diameter, wall thickness and length of 5.0 nm, 0.79 nm and >10 microm, respectively. The diameter of the beta-In(2)S(3) nanotubes was found to be dependent on the sulfur concentration.

  15. Evidence for the molecular heterogeneity of sickle cell anemia chromosomes bearing the betaS/Benin haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrinos, George P; Samperi, Piera; Lo Nigro, Luca; Kollia, Panagoula; Schiliro, Gino; Papadakis, Manoussos N

    2005-09-01

    There are at least four distinct African and one Asian chromosomal backgrounds (haplotypes) on which the sickle cell mutation has arisen. Additionally, previous data suggest that the beta(S)/Bantu haplotype is heterogeneous at the molecular level. Here, we report the presence of the (A)gamma -499 T-->A variation in sickle cell anemia chromosomes of Sicilian and North African origin bearing the beta(S)/Benin haplotype. Being absent from North American beta(S)/Benin chromosomes, which were studied previously, this variation is indicative for the molecular heterogeneity of the beta(S)/Benin haplotype.

  16. Transforming growth factor-beta inhibits aromatase gene transcription in human trophoblast cells via the Smad2 signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Guodong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta is known to exert multiple regulatory functions in the human placenta, including inhibition of estrodial production. We have previously reported that TGF-beta1 decreased aromatase mRNA levels in human trophoblast cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulatory effect of TGF-beta1 on aromatase expression. Methods To determine if TGF-beta regulates aromatase gene transcription, several reporter constructs containing different lengths of the placental specific promoter of the human aromatase gene were generated. JEG-3 cells were transiently transfected with a promoter construct and treated with or without TGF-beta1. The promoter activity was measured by luciferase assays. To examine the downstream signaling molecule mediating the effect of TGF-beta on aromatase transcription, cells were transiently transfected with dominant negative mutants of TGF-beta type II (TbetaRII and type I receptor (ALK5 receptors before TGF-beta treatment. Smad2 activation was assessed by measuring phophorylated Smad2 protein levels in cytosolic and nuclear fractions. Smad2 expression was silenced using a siRNA expression construct. Finally, aromatase mRNA half-life was determined by treating cells with actinomycin D together with TGF-beta1 and measuring aromatase mRNA levels at various time points after treatment. Results and Discussion TGF-beta1 inhibited the aromatase promoter activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Deletion analysis suggests that the TGF-β1 response element resides between -422 and -117 nucleotides upstream from the transcription start site where a Smad binding element was found. The inhibitory effect of TGF-beta1 was blocked by dominant negative mutants of TbetaRII and ALK5. TGF-beta1 treatment induced Smad2 phosphorylation and translocation into the nucleus. On the other hand, knockdown of Smad2 expression reversed the

  17. Hb Santa Clara (beta 97His-->Asn), a human haemoglobin variant: functional characterization and structure modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Carelli Alinovi, Cristiana; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Clementi, Maria Elisabetta; Amato, Antonio; Cappabianca, Maria Pia; Pezzotti, Michela; Giardina, Bruno

    2007-10-01

    This study examines the functional and structural effects of amino acid substitution at alpha(1)beta(2) interface of Hb Santa Clara (beta 97His-->Asn). We have characterized the variation by a combination of electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and DNA sequence analysis followed by oxygen-binding experiments. Functional studies outlined an increased oxygen affinity, reduced effect of organic phosphates and a reduced Bohr effect with respect to HbA. In view of the primary role of this interface in the cooperative quaternary transition from the T to R conformational state, a theoretical three-dimensional model of Hb Santa Clara was generated. Structural investigations suggest that replacement of Asn for His beta 97 results in a significant stabilization of the high affinity R-state of the haemoglobin molecule with respect to the low affinity T-state. The role of beta FG4 position has been further examined by computational models of known beta FG4 variants, namely Hb Malmö (beta 97His-->Gln), Hb Wood (beta 97His-->Leu), Hb Nagoya (beta 97His-->Pro) and Hb Moriguchi (beta 97His-->Tyr). These findings demonstrate that, among the various residues at the alpha(1)beta(2) (and alpha(2)beta(1)) intersubunit interface, His beta FG4 contributes significantly to the quaternary constraints that are responsible for the low oxygen affinity of human deoxyhaemoglobin.

  18. Regulation of 11beta-HSD genes in human adipose tissue: influence of central obesity and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeli, Stefan; Böhnke, Jana; Feldpausch, Mareike; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Heintze, Ute; Janke, Jürgen; Luft, Friedrich C; Sharma, Arya M

    2004-01-01

    The activity of adipose 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD) 1 is increased in obese subjects, and animal data suggest that increased cortisol formation in adipose tissue contributes to the development of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to determine whether up-regulation of human adipose 11beta-HSD1 in obesity can also be found at the gene expression level. 11beta-HSD gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies of 70 postmenopausal women was studied by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The influence of weight reduction and in vitro effects of several modulators of adipocyte gene expression on 11beta-HSD genes in human adipocytes were also studied. The 11beta-HSD1 gene was highly expressed in human adipose tissue. 11beta-HSD2 mRNA was also detectable at lower levels. Adipose 11beta-HSD1 gene expression was increased by two-fold and was positively correlated with waist circumference and homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance. 11beta-HSD2 gene expression was reduced by half in obese women. Weight reduction did not change gene expression levels of 11beta-HSD1 or 11beta-HSD2. Cortisol increased 11beta-HSD1 gene expression in isolated human adipocytes in vitro, whereas estradiol, triiodothyronine, angiotensin II, and pioglitazone had no influence. Our data suggest that increased expression of the 11beta-HSD1 gene is associated with metabolic abnormalities in obese women and that increased expression of this gene may contribute to the previously reported increased local conversion of cortisone to cortisol in adipose tissue of obese individuals.

  19. Reporte de un probable caso de Hemoglobina S / Talasemia Beta.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with Hemoglobin S / Thalassemia. It is feasible to recognize this infrequent disease by its clinical presentation and the aid of clinical laboratory . On this patient, the diagnosis was established based on the clinical findings, hematological evaluation (with careful observation of the red cell morphology and reticulocyte count) and electrophoretic analysis of hemoglobin. We discusse the physiopathology, clinical manifestations, treatment and alternative of pr...

  20. Enhanced expression of beta2-microglobulin and HLA antigens on human lymphoid cells by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, I; Hokland, M; Berg, K

    1979-01-01

    Mononuclear cells from the blood of healthy normal humans were kept in cultures under nonstimulating conditions for 16 hr in the presence or absence of human interferon. The relative quantities of HLA antigens and beta(2)-microglobulin on the cultured cells were determined by quantitative...... immunofluorescence (fluorescence-activated cell sorter) and by the capacity of cells to absorb out cytotoxic antibodies against the relevant antigens. Interferons of different origin and purities enhanced the expression of HLA antigens and beta(2)-microglobulins, whereas membrane immunoglobulins and antigens...... recognized by antiserum raised against human brain and T cells were the same on interferon-treated and control cells. Similar interferon effects were observed on an Epstein-Barrvirus-negative Burkitt lymphoma cell line. The enhanced expression of histocompatibility antigen subsequent to intereferon treatment...

  1. Interleukin-1 beta stimulates glucose uptake of human peritoneal mesothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, M; Mahiout, A; Kliem, V; Kurz, P; Koch, K M; Brunkhorst, R

    1996-01-01

    To investigate whether the glucose uptake (GU) of human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) is mediated by glucose transporters and whether this uptake is influenced by interleukin 1-beta (IL-1 beta), we measured 2-deoxy-(3H)-GU of HPMC in vitro, after exposing the cells for different times (two and 12 hours) to increasing concentrations (0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 ng/mL) of IL-1 beta. To exclude a noncarrier-mediated transport, GU was also tested in the presence of cytochalasin B. All experiments were performed in triplicate in the cells of two donors. Cytochalasin B inhibits GU of HPMC almost completely. GU of HPMC is not stimulated by insulin. GU is stimulated by IL-1 beta in a dose-dependent manner. These data indicate a GU of HPMC, which is mediated by a glucose transporter and stimulated by IL-1 beta. The increased uptake of glucose from the dialysate in patients with peritonitis may be mediated by a (cytokine-induced) increased activity of HPMC glucose transporters.

  2. Suppression of human monocyte interleukin-1beta production by ajulemic acid, a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurier, Robert B; Rossetti, Ronald G; Burstein, Sumner H; Bidinger, Bonnie

    2003-02-15

    Oral administration of ajulemic acid (AjA), a cannabinoid acid devoid of psychoactivity, reduces joint tissue damage in rats with adjuvant arthritis. Because interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) are central to the progression of inflammation and joint tissue injury in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, we investigated human monocyte IL-1beta and TNFalpha responses after the addition of AjA to cells in vitro. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid monocytes (PBM and SFM) were isolated from healthy subjects and patients with inflammatory arthritis, respectively, treated with AjA (0-30 microM) in vitro, and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Cells were harvested for mRNA, and supernatants were collected for cytokine assay. Addition of AjA to PBM and SFM in vitro reduced both steady-state levels of IL-1beta mRNA and secretion of IL-1beta in a concentration-dependent manner. Suppression was maximal (50.4%) at 10 microM AjA (Parthritis. Development of nonpsychoactive therapeutically useful synthetic analogs of Cannabis constituents, such as AjA, may help resolve the ongoing debate about the use of marijuana as medicine.

  3. Activity of cytisine and its brominated isosteres on recombinant human alpha7, alpha4beta2 and alpha4beta4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, L M; Slater, Y; Guerra, D L; Peng, J H; Kuo, Y P; Lukas, R J; Cassels, B K; Bermudez, I

    2001-09-01

    Effects of cytisine (cy), 3-bromocytisine (3-Br-cy), 5-bromocytisine (5-Br-cy) and 3,5-dibromocytisine (3,5-diBr-cy) on human (h) alpha7-, alpha4beta2- and alpha4beta4 nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors, expressed in Xenopus oocytes and cell lines, have been investigated. Cy and its bromo-isosteres fully inhibited binding of both [alpha-(125)I]bungarotoxin ([alpha-(125)I]BgTx) to halpha7- and [(3)H]cy to halpha4beta2- or halpha4beta4-nACh receptors. 3-Br-cy was the most potent inhibitor of both [alpha-(125)I]BgTx and [(3)H]cy binding. Cy was less potent than 3-Br-cy, but 5-Br-cy and 3,5-diBr-cy were the least potent inhibitors. Cy and 3-Br-cy were potent full agonists at halpha7-nACh receptors but behaved as partial agonists at halpha4beta2- and halpha4beta4-nACh receptors. 5-Br-cy and 3,5-diBr-cy had low potency and were partial agonists at halpha7- and halpha4beta4-nACh receptors, but they elicited no responses on halpha4beta2-nACh receptors. Cy and 3-Br-cy produced dual dose-response curves (DRC) at both halpha4beta2- and halpha4beta4-nACh receptors, but ACh produced dual DRC only at halpha4beta2-nACh receptors. Low concentrations of cy, 3-Br-cy and 5-Br-cy enhanced ACh responses of oocytes expressing halpha4beta2-nACh receptors, but at high concentrations they inhibited the responses. In contrast, 3,5-diBr-cy only inhibited, in a competitive manner, ACh responses of halpha4beta2-nACh receptors. It is concluded that bromination of the pyridone ring of cy produces marked changes in effects of cy that are manifest as nACh receptor subtype-specific differences in binding affinities and in functional potencies and efficacies.

  4. Non-invasive in vivo determination of the carotenoids beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations in the human skin using the Raman spectroscopic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvin, M E [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology (CCP), Department of Dermatology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Gersonde, I [Institute of Medical Physics and Laser Medicine, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Meinke, M [Institute of Medical Physics and Laser Medicine, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Sterry, W [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology (CCP), Department of Dermatology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Lademann, J [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology (CCP), Department of Dermatology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-08-07

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was used as a fast and non-invasive optical method of measuring the absolute concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene in living human skin. Beta-carotene and lycopene have different absorption values at 488 and 514.5 nm and, consequently, the Raman lines for beta-carotene and lycopene have different scattering efficiencies at 488 and 514.5 nm excitations. These differences were used for the determination of the concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene. Using multiline Ar{sup +} laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra can be obtained which are superimposed on a large fluorescence background. The Raman signals are characterized by two prominent Stokes lines at 1160 and 1525 cm{sup -1}, which have nearly identical relative intensities. Both substances were detected simultaneously. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 10 s, and the required laser light exposure level is well within safety standards. The disturbance of the measurements by non-homogeneous skin pigmentation was avoided by using a relatively large measuring area of 35 mm{sup 2}. It was shown that beta-carotene and lycopene distribution in human skin strongly depends upon the skin region studied and drastically changed inter-individually. Skin beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations are lower in smokers than in non-smokers and higher in the vegetarian group.

  5. Non-invasive in vivo determination of the carotenoids beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations in the human skin using the Raman spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, M. E.; Gersonde, I.; Meinke, M.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2005-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was used as a fast and non-invasive optical method of measuring the absolute concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene in living human skin. Beta-carotene and lycopene have different absorption values at 488 and 514.5 nm and, consequently, the Raman lines for beta-carotene and lycopene have different scattering efficiencies at 488 and 514.5 nm excitations. These differences were used for the determination of the concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene. Using multiline Ar+ laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra can be obtained which are superimposed on a large fluorescence background. The Raman signals are characterized by two prominent Stokes lines at 1160 and 1525 cm-1, which have nearly identical relative intensities. Both substances were detected simultaneously. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 10 s, and the required laser light exposure level is well within safety standards. The disturbance of the measurements by non-homogeneous skin pigmentation was avoided by using a relatively large measuring area of 35 mm2. It was shown that beta-carotene and lycopene distribution in human skin strongly depends upon the skin region studied and drastically changed inter-individually. Skin beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations are lower in smokers than in non-smokers and higher in the vegetarian group.

  6. Reporte de un probable caso de Hemoglobina S / Talasemia Beta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ramírez Cuentas

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with Hemoglobin S / Thalassemia. It is feasible to recognize this infrequent disease by its clinical presentation and the aid of clinical laboratory . On this patient, the diagnosis was established based on the clinical findings, hematological evaluation (with careful observation of the red cell morphology and reticulocyte count and electrophoretic analysis of hemoglobin. We discusse the physiopathology, clinical manifestations, treatment and alternative of prevention of this disease. (Rev Med Hered 2004;15:173-178.

  7. Role of TGF-beta1 in relation to exercise-induced type I collagen synthesis in human tendinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja; Langberg, Henning; Olesen, Jens L

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical loading of tissue is known to influence local collagen synthesis, and microdialysis studies indicate that mechanical loading of human tendon during exercise elevates tendinous type I collagen production. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), a potent stimulator of type I collag...... to exercise, suggest a role for TGF-beta1 in mechanical regulation of local collagen type I synthesis in tendon-related connective tissue in vivo....

  8. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  9. Human parvovirus B19 in patients with beta thalassemia major from Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabzadeh, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Alizadeh, Farideh; Tavakoli, Ahmad; Mollaei, Hamidreza; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Karimi, Gharib; Farahmand, Mohammad; Mortazavi, Helya Sadat; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza

    2017-03-01

    Due to the tropism of human parvovirus B19 to erythroid progenitor cells, infection in patients with an underlying hemolytic disorder such as beta-thalassemia major leads to suppression of erythrocyte formation, referred to as transient aplasia crisis (TAC), which may be life-threatening. We investigated the prevalence of parvovirus B19 among patients with beta thalassemia major attending the Zafar Adult Thalassemia Clinic in Tehran, Iran. This cross-sectional study was performed to determine the presence of parvovirus B19 DNA in blood samples and parvovirus B19 genotypes in plasma samples of patients with thalassemia major. The population consisted of 150 patients with beta-thalassemia major who attended the Zafar clinic in Tehran. Specimens were studied using a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The prevalence of parvovirus B19 in our study population was 4%. Of 150 patients with thalassemia, six (4%) were positive for B19 DNA. There was no significant correlation between blood transfusion frequency and B19 DNA positivity. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of human parvovirus B19 revealed genotype I in these six patients. In this study, acute B19 infections were detected in patients with beta thalassemia major. Screening of such high-risk groups can considerably reduce the incidence and prevalence of B19 infection; thus, screening is required for epidemiologic surveillance and disease-prevention measures.

  10. Human parvovirus B19 in patients with beta thalassemia major from Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabzadeh, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Alizadeh, Farideh; Tavakoli, Ahmad; Mollaei, Hamidreza; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Karimi, Gharib; Farahmand, Mohammad; Mortazavi, Helya Sadat

    2017-01-01

    Background Due to the tropism of human parvovirus B19 to erythroid progenitor cells, infection in patients with an underlying hemolytic disorder such as beta-thalassemia major leads to suppression of erythrocyte formation, referred to as transient aplasia crisis (TAC), which may be life-threatening. We investigated the prevalence of parvovirus B19 among patients with beta thalassemia major attending the Zafar Adult Thalassemia Clinic in Tehran, Iran. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed to determine the presence of parvovirus B19 DNA in blood samples and parvovirus B19 genotypes in plasma samples of patients with thalassemia major. The population consisted of 150 patients with beta-thalassemia major who attended the Zafar clinic in Tehran. Specimens were studied using a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Results The prevalence of parvovirus B19 in our study population was 4%. Of 150 patients with thalassemia, six (4%) were positive for B19 DNA. There was no significant correlation between blood transfusion frequency and B19 DNA positivity. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of human parvovirus B19 revealed genotype I in these six patients. Conclusion In this study, acute B19 infections were detected in patients with beta thalassemia major. Screening of such high-risk groups can considerably reduce the incidence and prevalence of B19 infection; thus, screening is required for epidemiologic surveillance and disease-prevention measures.

  11. Human recombinant macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha and -beta and monocyte chemotactic and activating factor utilize common and unique receptors on human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J M; Sherry, B; Fivash, M J; Kelvin, D J; Oppenheim, J J

    1993-04-01

    The human macrophage inflammatory proteins-1 alpha and -beta (MIP-1 alpha and -beta), which are also known as LD78 and ACT2, respectively, are distinct but highly related members of the chemoattractant cytokine (chemokine) family. rMIP-1 alpha and -beta labeled with 125I specifically bind to human peripheral blood monocytes, the monocytic cell line THP-1, peripheral blood T cells, and the YT cell line. Steady state binding experiments revealed approximately 3000 high affinity binding sites/cell for MIP-1 alpha on human monocytes and on THP-1 cells, with Kd values of 383 pM and 450 pM, respectively. Human MIP-1 alpha and -beta had nearly identical affinities for the binding sites and each competed equally well for binding. Human monocyte chemotactic and activating factor (MCAF), a member of the same chemokine family, consistently displaced about 25% of human MIP-1 alpha and -beta binding on monocytes but not on YT cells, which did not bind MCAF. On the other hand, human rMIP-1 alpha and -beta partially inhibited binding of radiolabeled MCAF to monocytes. Both MIP-1 alpha and -beta were chemotactic for human monocytes. Preincubation of monocytes with human rMIP-1 alpha or -beta markedly reduced cell migration towards the other cytokine, whereas preincubation with human rMCAF only partially desensitized the monocyte chemotaxis response to human rMIP-1 alpha or -beta. These data suggest the existence of three subtypes of receptors, i.e., one unique receptor shared by MIP-1 alpha and -beta, a second unique receptor for MCAF, and a third species that recognizes both MCAF and MIP-1 peptides.

  12. Infundibular neurons of the human hypothalamus simultaneously reactive with antisera against endorphins, ACTH, MSH and beta-LPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugnon, C; Bloch, B; Lenys, D; Fellmann, D

    1979-06-27

    In man, discrete neurons of the infundibular (arcuate) nucleus contain compounds that can be stained with anti-endorphin (alpha and beta), anti-ACTH, anti-MSH (alpha and beta) and anti-beta-LPH immune sera (I.S.). In the fetus, certain neurons stain with anti-beta-endorphin or anti((17--39)ACTH starting from the 11th week of fetal life. At the ultrastructural level, these neurons contain elementary granules that are immunoreactive with anti-beta-endorphin. In the adult, neurons immunoreactive with anti-beta-endorphin are found in the infundibular nucleus. Their axonal fibers terminate around blood vessels in the neurovascular zone and in the pituitary stalk, or establish contacts with non-immunoreactive perikarya of the infundibular nucleus. These neurons can be stained with anti(17--39)ACTH and anti-beta-endorphin I.S. The most reactive are also stained moderately with anti-alpha-MSH, anti-beta-MSH, anti-beta-LPH, anti-alpha-endorphin, or anti(1--24)ACTH I.S. These results indicate that, in man, compound(s) identical with or immunologically related to endorphins, beta-LPH, ACTH and MSH are secreted by certain hypothalamic neurons. These agents probably originate from a common precursor molecula similar to the so-called pro-opiocortin.

  13. Nonblack patients with sickle cell disease have African. beta. sup s gene cluster haplotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Z.R.; Powars, D.R.; Williams, W.D. (Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA)); Kinney, T.R. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA)); Schroeder, W.A. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (USA))

    1989-05-26

    Of 18 nonblack patients with sickle cell disease, 14 had sickle cell anemia, 2 had hemoglobin SC disease, and 2 had hemoglobin S-{beta}{sup o}-thalassemia. The {beta}{sup s} gene cluster haplotypes that were determined in 7 patients were of African origin and were identified as Central African Republic, Central African Republic minor II, Benin, and Senegal. The haplotype Central African Republic minor II was present on the {beta}{sup o}-thalassemia chromosome in 2 patients. None of 10 patients whose {alpha}-gene status was determined had {alpha}-thalassemia-2. These data strongly support the concept that the {beta}{sup s} gene on chromosome 11 of these individuals is of African origin and that the {alpha}-gene locus on chromosome 16 is of white or native American origin. The clinical severity of the disease in these nonblack patients is appropriate to their haplotype without {alpha}-thalassemia-2 and is comparable with that of black patients. All persons with congenital hemolytic anemia should be examined for the presence of sickle cell disease regardless of physical appearance or ethnic background.

  14. Hematological observations on Arabian SS patients with a homozygosity or heterozygosity for a beta S chromosome with haplotype #31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlar, A; Hattori, Y; Bakioglu, I; Kutlar, F; Kamel, K; Huisman, T H

    1985-01-01

    Hematological and hemoglobin composition data are presented for seven Arabian SS patients with mild disease and with high Hb F levels varying between 21 and 34%. Four patients were homozygous for a beta S chromosome with a specific haplotype (#31). The data for these four patients were similar to those for three other SS patients (and for five patients reported earlier, Ref. 2) who were heterozygous for the same beta S chromosome (#31) and for a beta S chromosome with another haplotype (mainly #19). These data offer additional evidence indicating that the increased gamma chain production is specific for the beta S chromosome with haplotype #31. The similarities in hematological data and Hb F levels between these two groups of SS patients and the normal Hb F value in Hb S heterozygotes with beta S chromosome (#31) support the suggestion that the increased Hb F production mainly occurs in response to the anemia of the sickle cell disease.

  15. Template-free synthesis of beta-In2S3 superstructures and their photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amutha, R; Akilandeswari, S; Ahmmad, Bashir; Muruganandham, M; Sillanpää, Mika

    2010-12-01

    In this article, we have successfully fabricated various morphological beta-Indium sulfide (In2S3) superstructures by using indium thiocyanate complex at acidic pH. All the synthesis has been performed by a template-free, hydrothermal method at 195 degrees C for 3 h. The photocatalytic activity of synthesized In2S3 have been investigated by using UV-B (lamda = 365 nm) light with Methyl Orange dye as a model pollutant. The synthesized photocatalyst was characterized by using XRD, FE-SEM, HR-TEM, DRS spectra and nitrogen adsorption analysis. The influence of indium precursors and solvents on the morphology as well as the surface properties has also been discussed. The XRD result shows that cubic phase beta-In2S3 formed under all experimental conditions. A plausible mechanism of the In2S3 microsphere formation has been discussed based on experimental observations.

  16. Transport of alpha- and beta-D-glucose by the intact human red cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carruthers, A.; Melchior, D.L.

    1985-07-16

    The kinetics of alpha- and beta-D-glucose mutarotation and the transport of these anomers by intact human red cells were determined at 0.6 and 36.6 degrees C. The mutarotation coefficients for alpha- and beta-D-glucose in cell-free tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane medium (pH 7.4) at 0.6 degrees C are (2.25 +/- 0.2) and (1.73 +/- 0.42) X 10(-3) min-1, respectively, and at 36.6 degrees C are (69 +/- 12) and (75 +/- 5) X 10(-3) min-1, respectively. These values are in good agreement with previous estimates. At 0.6 degrees C, the red cell contains no detectable mutarotase activity. Initial rates of sugar uptake were measured by using radiolabeled D-glucose and time courses of uptake by turbidimetry. The time courses of alpha- and beta-D-glucose and an equilibrium mixture of alpha- and beta-D-glucose infinite-cis entry are identical at 0.66 degrees C (n = 41) where negligible mutarotation is observed. The apparent Ki values for inhibition of radiolabeled D-glucose initial uptake by unlabeled alpha- or beta-D-glucose at 0.6 degrees C are identical (1.6 mM). The calculated Vmax parameters for uptake of the radiolabeled anomers at this temperature are also indistinguishable. The time courses of infinite-cis alpha- and beta-D-glucose uptake at 36.66 degrees C are identical (n = 40). While D-glucose mutarotation is more rapid at this temperature, the anomers of D-glucose are not transported differently by the red cell hexose transfer system.

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta inhibits human antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell proliferation without modulating the cytokine response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemessen, MM; Kunzmann, S; Schmidt-Weber, CB; Garssen, J; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, CAFM; Knol, EF; Van Hoffen, E

    2003-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has been demonstrated to play a key role in the regulation of the immune response, mainly by its suppressive function towards cells of the immune system. In humans, the effect of TGF-beta on antigen-specific established memory T cells has not been investigated y

  18. Decreased gene expression of human beta-defensin-1 in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenghoefer, M.H.; Pantelis, A.; Dommisch, H.; Reich, R.; Martini, M.; Allam, J.P.; Novak, N.; Berge, S.; Jepsen, S.; Winter, J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the gene expression of human beta-defensin-1, -2, -3 (hBD-1, -2, -3), interleukin-1beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) compared to benign and premalignant lesions as well as healthy controls. Biopsies

  19. Decreased gene expression of human beta-defensin-1 in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenghoefer, M.H.; Pantelis, A.; Dommisch, H.; Reich, R.; Martini, M.; Allam, J.P.; Novak, N.; Berge, S.; Jepsen, S.; Winter, J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the gene expression of human beta-defensin-1, -2, -3 (hBD-1, -2, -3), interleukin-1beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) compared to benign and premalignant lesions as well as healthy controls. Biopsies

  20. The beta(2)-subtype of adrenoceptors mediates inhibition of pro-fibrotic events in human lung fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamyel, F.; Warnken-Uhlich, M.; Seemann, W. K.; Mohr, K.; Kostenis, E.; Ahmedat, A. S.; Smit, M.; Gosens, R.; Meurs, H.; Miller-Larsson, A.; Racke, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Fibrosis is part of airway remodelling observed in bronchial asthma and COPD. Pro-fibrotic activity of lung fibroblasts may be suppressed by beta-adrenoceptor activation. We aimed, first, to characterise the expression pattern of beta-adrenoceptor subtypes in human lung fibroblasts and, second, to p

  1. Novel monoclonal antibody against beta 1 integrin enhances cisplatin efficacy in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Young; Cho, Woon-Dong; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Choi, Da Bin; Hong, Jeong Won; Kim, Soseul; Moon, Yoo Ri; Son, Seung-Myoung; Lee, Ok-Jun; Lee, Ho-Chang; Song, Hyung Geun

    2016-05-01

    The use of anti-beta 1 integrin monoclonal antibody in lung cancer treatment has proven beneficial. Here, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb), called P5, by immunizing mice with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Its anti-tumor effect is now being tested, in a clinical phase III trial, in combinatorial treatments with various chemical drugs. To confirm that P5 indeed binds to beta 1 integrin, cell lysates were immunoprecipitated with commercial anti-beta 1 integrin mAb (TS2/16) and immunoblotted against P5 to reveal a 140 kDa molecular weight band, as expected. Immunoprecipitation with P5 followed by LC/MS protein sequence analysis further verified P5 antigen to be beta 1 integrin. Cisplatin treatment upregulated cell surface expression of beta 1 integrin in A549 cells, while causing inhibition of cell growth. When cells were co-treated with different concentrations of P5 mAb, the cisplatin-mediated inhibitory effect was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show that a combinatorial treatment of P5 mAb and cisplatin in A549 cells resulted in a 30% increase in apoptosis, compared to baseline, and significantly more when compared to either the cisplatin or P5 alone group. The entire peptide sequences in CDR from variable region of Ig heavy and light chain gene for P5 mAb are also disclosed. Together, these results provide evidence of the beneficial effect of P5 mAb in combinatorial treatment of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  2. Interaction of selected vasodilating beta-blockers with adrenergic receptors in human cardiovascular tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monopoli, A.; Forlani, A.; Bevilacqua, M.; Vago, T.; Norbiato, G.; Bertora, P.; Biglioli, P.; Alamanni, F.; Ongini, E. (Essex Italia, Subsidiary of Schering-Plough, Milan)

    1989-07-01

    beta- And alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist properties of bufuralol, carvedilol, celiprolol, dilevalol, labetalol, and pindolol were investigated in human myocardium and mammary artery using binding techniques and functional studies. In myocardial membranes, beta-adrenoceptor antagonists showed monophasic competition isotherms for (125I)pindolol binding with high affinity (Ki from 1-100 nM), except for celiprolol which displayed a biphasic competition isotherm (pKi = 6.4 +/- 0.06 for beta 1- and 4.8 +/- 0.07 for beta 2-adrenoceptors). Drug interactions with alpha 1-adrenoceptors were evaluated in human mammary artery by (3H)prazosin binding and by measuring contractile responses to norepinephrine (NE). Labetalol and carvedilol showed a moderate affinity for alpha 1-adrenoceptors (pKi = 6.2 +/- 0.01 and 6.1 +/- 0.06, respectively), and inhibited NE-induced contractions (pA2 = 6.93 +/- 0.23 and 8.64 +/- 0.24, respectively). Dilevalol, bufuralol, and pindolol displayed weak effect both in binding (Ki in micromolar range) and functional experiments (pA2 = 5.98, 5.54, and 6.23, respectively). Celiprolol did not show antagonist properties up to 100 microM in functional studies, but displayed a slight affinity for alpha 1-adrenoceptors in binding studies. The data indicate that the vasodilating activity of these beta-adrenoceptor antagonists is caused in some instances by an alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonism (labetalol, carvedilol), whereas for the others alternative mechanisms should be considered.

  3. Amyloid beta and Alzheimer’s Disease: The role of neprilysin-2 in amyloid-beta clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMarr

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Ab peptide is a central factor in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis as supported by continuing evidence. This review concisely summarizes this evidence supporting a critical role for Ab in AD before discussing the clearance of this peptide. Mechanisms of clearance of Ab are critical for preventing pathological elevations in Ab concentration. Direct degradation of Ab by endopeptidases has emerged as one important pathway for clearance. Of particular interest are endopeptidases that are sensitive to the neprilysin (NEP inhibitors thiorphan and phosphoramidon (i.e. are NEP-like as these inhibitors induce a dramatic increase in Ab levels in rodents. This review will focus on Neprilysin-2 (NEP2, a NEP-like endopeptidase which cooperates with NEP to control Ab levels in the brain. The evidence for the involvement of NEP2 in AD is discussed as well as the therapeutic relevance with regards to gene therapy and the development of molecular markers for the disease.

  4. Beta-Lactamases among extended-spectrum (beta)-lactamase (ESBL)-resistant Salmonella from poultry, poultry products and human patients in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasman, H.; Mevius, D.J.; Veldman, K.T.; Olesen, I.; Aarestrup, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this work was to study the genetic determinants responsible for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) resistance of Salmonella isolated from Dutch poultry, poultry meat and hospitalized humans. Methods: Thirty-four ESBL-resistant Salmonella isolates from The Netherlands

  5. Beta decay of {sup 94}Pd and of the 71s isomer of {sup 94}Rh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batist, L. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Department of Physics of the University ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy); Blazhev, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); University of Sofia, Sofia (Bulgaria); Doering, J. [University of Sofia, Sofia (Bulgaria); Grawe, H.; Kirchner, R.; Mazzocchi, C.; Plettner, C.; Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Kavatsyuk, M.; Kavatsyuk, O. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Kyiv (Ukraine); La Commara, M.; Romoli, M. [Department of Physics of the University ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy); Mukha, I. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); University of Seville, Sevilla (Spain)

    2006-08-15

    The {beta} decay of {sup 94}Pd and of the 71s isomer of {sup 94}Rh was investigated by using total {gamma}-ray absorption techniques. Several levels in {sup 94}Rh are established, including a new low-lying isomer characterized by a half-life of 0.48(3) {mu}s and a de-exciting transition of 55keV. E2 multipolarity is determined for this transition by measuring the intensities of its {gamma}-rays and the characteristic X-rays from its electron conversion. On the basis of the measured reduced {beta}-decay transition rates to known {sup 94}Ru levels and shell model considerations, the spin-parity of the 71s and the 0.48{mu}s isomers of {sup 94}Rh is assigned to be (4{sup +}) and (2{sup +}), respectively. The {beta}-decay strength distributions measured for {sup 94}Pd and the 71s isomer of {sup 94}Rh yield Q{sub EC} values of 6700(320) and 9750(320)keV for these decays and give evidence for the population of those states below and above the magic N=50 gap that belong to both components of the 0g spin-orbit doublet. (orig.)

  6. Late Na+ current produced by human cardiac Na+ channel isoform Nav1.5 is modulated by its beta1 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Victor A; Kyle, John W; Undrovinas, Albertas

    2009-05-01

    Experimental data accumulated over the past decade show the emerging importance of the late sodium current (I(NaL)) for the function of both normal and, especially, failing myocardium, in which I(NaL) is reportedly increased. While recent molecular studies identified the cardiac Na(+) channel (NaCh) alpha subunit isoform (Na(v)1.5) as a major contributor to I (NaL), the molecular mechanisms underlying alterations of I(NaL) in heart failure (HF) are still unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that I(NaL) is modulated by the NaCh auxiliary beta subunits. tsA201 cells were transfected simultaneously with human Na(v)1.5 (former hH1a) and cardiac beta(1) or beta(2) subunits, and whole-cell patch-clamp experiments were performed. We found that I(NaL) decay kinetics were significantly slower in cells expressing alpha + beta(1) (time constant tau = 0.73 +/- 0.16 s, n = 14, mean +/- SEM, P < 0.05) but remained unchanged in cells expressing alpha + beta(2) (tau = 0.52 +/- 0.09 s, n = 5), compared with cells expressing Na(v)1.5 alone (tau = 0.54 +/- 0.09 s, n = 20). Also, beta(1), but not beta(2), dramatically increased I(NaL) relative to the maximum peak current, I(NaT) (2.3 +/- 0.48%, n = 14 vs. 0.48 +/- 0.07%, n = 6, P < 0.05, respectively) and produced a rightward shift of the steady-state availability curve. We conclude that the auxiliary beta(1) subunit modulates I(NaL), produced by the human cardiac Na(+) channel Na(v)1.5 by slowing its decay and increasing I(NaL) amplitude relative to I(NaT). Because expression of Na(v)1.5 reportedly decreases but beta(1) remains unchanged in chronic HF, the relatively higher expression of beta(1) may contribute to the known I(NaL) increase in HF via the modulation mechanism found in this study.

  7. Lipid rafts participate in aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Chun Yang; Yufeng Liu; Peng Li; Huiying Yang; Jingxing Dai; Rongmei Qu; Lin Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, which are found in Alzhei-mer’s disease. The generation and deposition of amyloid-beta is one of the crucial factors for the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Lipid rafts are glycolipid-rich liquid domains of the plasma membrane, where certain types of protein tend to aggregate and intercalate. Lipid rafts are involved in the generation of amyloid-beta oligomers and the formation of amyloid-beta peptides. In this paper, we review the mechanism by which lipid rafts disturb the aberrant deg-radative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta, which plays an important role in the pathological process of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, we describe this mechanism from the view of the Two-system Theory of fasciology and thus, suggest that lipid rafts may be a new target of Alzheimer’s disease treatment.

  8. Enhanced expression of beta2-microglobulin and HLA antigens on human lymphoid cells by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, I; Hokland, M; Berg, K

    1979-01-01

    Mononuclear cells from the blood of healthy normal humans were kept in cultures under nonstimulating conditions for 16 hr in the presence or absence of human interferon. The relative quantities of HLA antigens and beta(2)-microglobulin on the cultured cells were determined by quantitative...... was observed on B- and T-enriched lymphocyte populations and was found to be dose dependent with the optimum with "physiological" concentrations of interferon. Pretreatment of lymphocytes with interferon for 2 hr was found to be as effective as having interferon present during the total culture period...

  9. Isolation and characterization of a new mutant human cell line unresponsive to alpha and beta interferons.

    OpenAIRE

    John, J.; McKendry, R; Pellegrini, S; Flavell, D; Kerr, I M; Stark, G R

    1991-01-01

    Previously we described human cell line 2fTGH, in which expression of guanine phosphoribosyltransferase is tightly controlled by the upstream region of interferon (IFN)-stimulated human gene 6-16. After mutagenesis of 2fTGH and selection with 6-thioguanine and IFN-alpha, we isolated 11.1, a recessive mutant that does not respond to IFN-alpha. We now describe U2, a second recessive mutant, selected similarly, that complements 11.1. U2 had no response to IFN-alpha or IFN-beta, and its response ...

  10. Haplotypes of beta S chromosomes among patients with sickle cell anemia from Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Y; Kutlar, F; Kutlar, A; McKie, V C; Huisman, T H

    1986-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin and G gamma levels have been correlated with the presence or absence of eight restriction sites within the beta globin gene cluster (haplotypes) for numerous sickle cell anemia patients from Georgia. The most common haplotypes were #19 (Benin) and #20 (CAR); all patients with haplotype combinations 19/19, 20/20, and 19/20 were severely affected with low Hb F and low G gamma levels. A modified #19 beta S chromosome with a -G gamma-G gamma- globin gene arrangement, instead of -G gamma-A gamma-, was present in SS and SC newborn babies with G gamma values above 80%. Haplotype #3 (Senegal) was present among 15% of the beta S chromosomes; the two adult patients with the 3/3 combination were mildly affected with high Hb F and G gamma values. The haplotype AT with the variant A gamma T chain was a rarity. A new haplotype was found in one 17-year-old SS patient and five of his Hb S heterozygous relatives. This haplotype is associated with an increased production of Hb F in heterozygous and homozygous Hb S individuals; this Hb F contained primarily A gamma chains. A comparison was made between the different haplotypes among SS patients and normal Black individuals, and a remarkable similarity was noted in the fetal hemoglobin data for subjects with these different chromosomes.

  11. Evaluating the potential of poly(beta-amino ester nanoparticles for reprogramming human fibroblasts to become induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhise NS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nupura S Bhise,1,* Karl J Wahlin,2,* Donald J Zack,2–4 Jordan J Green1,21Department of Biomedical Engineering, Translational Tissue Engineering Center, and Institute for Nanobiotechnology, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 3Solomon H Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, and Institute of Genetic Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Institut de la Vision, Paris, France*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Gene delivery can potentially be used as a therapeutic for treating genetic diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, as well as an enabling technology for regenerative medicine. A central challenge in many gene delivery applications is having a safe and effective delivery method. We evaluated the use of a biodegradable poly(beta-amino ester nanoparticle-based nonviral protocol and compared this with an electroporation-based approach to deliver episomal plasmids encoding reprogramming factors for generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs from human fibroblasts.Methods: A polymer library was screened to identify the polymers most promising for gene delivery to human fibroblasts. Feeder-independent culturing protocols were developed for nanoparticle-based and electroporation-based reprogramming. The cells reprogrammed by both polymeric nanoparticle-based and electroporation-based nonviral methods were characterized by analysis of pluripotency markers and karyotypic stability. The hiPSC-like cells were further differentiated toward the neural lineage to test their potential for neurodegenerative retinal disease modeling.Results: 1-(3-aminopropyl-4-methylpiperazine end-terminated poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4-amino-1-butanol polymer (B4S4E7 self-assembled with plasmid DNA to form nanoparticles that were more effective than leading commercially available

  12. Excited states in {sup 31}S studied via beta decay of {sup 31}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kankainen, A.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Huikari, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kopecky, S.; Moore, I.; Nieminen, A.; Penttilae, H.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Wang, Y.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics (Finland); Fox, S.P.; Jenkins, D.G. [University of York, Department of Physics, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); Fynbo, H.O.U. [University of Aarhus, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus (Denmark); Tengblad, O. [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    The beta decay of {sup 31}Cl has been studied with a silicon detector array and a HPGe detector at the IGISOL facility. Previously controversial proton peaks have been confirmed to belong to {sup 31}Cl and a new proton group with an energy of 762(14) keV has been found. Proton captures to this state at 6921(15) keV in {sup 31}S can have an effect on the reaction rate of {sup 30}P(p,{gamma}) in ONe novae. Gamma rays of 1249.1(14) keV and 2234.5(8) keV corresponding to the de-excitations of the first two excited states in {sup 31}S have been measured. No beta-delayed protons from the IAS have been observed. (orig.)

  13. Antimicrobial actions of the human epididymis 2 (HE2 protein isoforms, HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    French Frank S

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HE2 gene encodes a group of isoforms with similarities to the antimicrobial beta-defensins. We demonstrated earlier that the antimicrobial activity of HE2 proteins and peptides is salt resistant and structure dependent and involves permeabilization of bacterial membranes. In this study, we further characterize the antimicrobial properties of HE2 peptides in terms of the structural changes induced in E. coli and the inhibition of macromolecular synthesis. Methods E. coli treated with 50 micro g/ml of HE2alpha, HE2beta1 or HE2beta2 peptides for 30 and 60 min were visualized using transmission and scanning electron microscopy to investigate the impact of these peptides on bacterial internal and external structure. The effects of HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 on E. coli macromolecular synthesis was assayed by incubating the bacteria with 2, 10 and 25 micro g/ml of the individual peptides for 0–60 min and measuring the incorporation of the radioactive precursors [methyl-3H]thymidine, [5-3H]uridine and L-[4,5-3H(N]leucine into DNA, RNA and protein. Statistical analyses using Student's t-test were performed using Sigma Plot software. Values shown are Mean ± S.D. Results E. coli treated with HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 peptides as visualized by transmission electron microscopy showed extensive damage characterized by membrane blebbing, thickening of the membrane, highly granulated cytoplasm and appearance of vacuoles in contrast to the smooth and continuous membrane structure of the untreated bacteria. Similarly, bacteria observed by scanning electron microscopy after treating with HE2alpha, HE2beta1 or HE2beta2 peptides exhibited membrane blebbing and wrinkling, leakage of cellular contents, especially at the dividing septa, and external accumulation of fibrous materials. In addition, HE2alpha, HE2beta1 and HE2beta2 peptides inhibited E. coli DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Conclusions The morphological changes observed

  14. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    , such as APP, CD44, DCC, ErbB4, E-cadherin, LRP, N-cadherin, Nectin-1, and Notch, within their transmembranous regions (2-11); therefore, in addition to its role in AD, {gamma}-secretase has been found to participate in other important biological functions, such as intracellular signaling. {gamma}-secretase processing of APP requires prior removal of a major fragment of the APP extracellular domain (sAPP{sub {beta}}) by {beta}-secretase to yield a membrane bound fragment (APP CTF{sub {beta}}). Subsequent cleavage of this membrane bound fragment by {gamma}-secretase results in the release of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated amyloid {beta}-peptides (12). The proteolytic activity of {gamma}-secretase is found not to be critically dependent on the specific sequence, but instead on the size of the extracellular domain (13); such sequence independent characteristics of the substrate are reminiscent of those of the 26S proteasome complex that cleaves substrates in a non-sequence specific manner. {gamma}-secretase is present in almost all animal species, vertebrates and invertebrates; it is expressed in many human organs and tissues.

  15. Perimovement decrease of alpha/beta oscillations in the human nucleus accumbens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürschmid, Stefan; Rutledge, Robb B.; Zaehle, Tino; Schmitt, Friedhelm C.; Kaufmann, Jörn; Voges, Jürgen; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J.; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel

    2016-01-01

    The human nucleus accumbens is thought to play an important role in guiding future action selection via an evaluation of current action outcomes. Here we provide electrophysiological evidence for a more direct, i.e., online, role during action preparation. We recorded local field potentials from the nucleus accumbens in patients with epilepsy undergoing surgery for deep brain stimulation. We found a consistent decrease in the power of alpha/beta oscillations (10–30 Hz) before and around the time of movements. This perimovement alpha/beta desynchronization was observed in seven of eight patients and was present both before instructed movements in a serial reaction time task as well as before self-paced, deliberate choices in a decision making task. A similar beta decrease over sensorimotor cortex and in the subthalamic nucleus has been directly related to movement preparation and execution. Our results support the idea of a direct role of the human nucleus accumbens in action preparation and execution. PMID:27486103

  16. Activation of the human beta interferon gene by the adenovirus type 12 E1B gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiroki, K.; Toth, M.

    1988-01-01

    The transcription of endogenous beta interferon mRNA was activated in human embryo kidney (HEK) cells infected with adenovirus 12 (Ad12) but was activated only inefficiently or not at all in HEK cells infected with Ad5 and rc-1 (Ad5 dl312 containing the Ad12 E1A region). The analysis with Ad12 mutants showed that Ad12 E1B products, especially the 19K protein, were important for the expression of the endogenous beta interferon gene and Ad12 E1A products were not involved in the expression. The expression of exogeneously transfected pIFN-CAT (a hybrid plasmid having the human beta interferon promoter fused with the CAT gene) was activated in HEK and chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells infected with either Ad12 or Ad5. The analysis of cotransfection of CEF cells with pIFN-CAT and plasmids containing fragments of Ad12 or Ad5 DNA showed that Ad12 or Ad5 E1B (possibly the 19K protein) was and E1A was not involved in the expression of the exogenous pIFN-CAT.

  17. CP violation in B --> phi K_S decay at large tan(beta)

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, Seungwon

    2003-01-01

    We consider the chargino contribution to the CP violation in B \\to \\phi K_S decay in the minimal supersymmetric standard model at large \\tan\\beta. It is shown that the Wilson coefficient C_{8g} of the chromomagnetic penguin operator can be significantly enhanced by the chargino-mediated diagrams while satisfying other direct/indirect experimental constraints. The enhanced C_{8g} allows large deviation in the CP asymmetry from the standard model prediction.

  18. Production and action of transforming growth factor-beta in human osteoblast cultures: dependence on cell differentiation and modulation by calcitriol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, M; Kveiborg, Marie; Eriksen, E F

    2000-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) plays an important role in skeletal remodelling. However, few studies have examined its effects on cultured human osteoblasts. Our aim is to characterise the biological effects of TGF-beta1 on human osteoblasts and to examine the interaction between TGF-...

  19. Production and action of transforming growth factor-beta in human osteoblast cultures: dependence on cell differentiation and modulation by calcitriol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, M; Kveiborg, Marie; Eriksen, E F

    2000-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) plays an important role in skeletal remodelling. However, few studies have examined its effects on cultured human osteoblasts. Our aim is to characterise the biological effects of TGF-beta1 on human osteoblasts and to examine the interaction between TGF-...

  20. Valores de ferritina sérica em beta talassemia heterozigota Serum ferritin levels in beta thalassemia carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabeth F. Estevão

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A low iron level, the commonest nutritional deficiency in the world, is a public health problem in developing countries. On the other hand, an excessive amount of iron is toxic, causing several organic dysfunctions, such as diabetes, cirrhosis, endocrinopathies and heart disease. Researchers have reported an association of iron overload with beta-thalassemia. The aim of this paper was to compare the serum ferritin levels of women with the beta-thalassemia trait. The results of serologic tests of 137 women of childbearing age were analyzed; 63 had the beta-thalassemia trait and 74 had Hb AA. In the beta-thalassemia carriers, the median ferritin value was 51.90 ng/mL and in the non-carriers 31.60 ng/mL (p = 0.0052. Levels of less than 20 and above 150 ng/mL were observed in 28% and 3% of the non-carriers and in 16% and 11% of the carriers, respectively. With these results it is possible to conclude that women in the reproductive age with the beta-thalassemia trait present higher ferritin levels in the northeastern region of São Paulo State. Further studies are necessary to clarify possible genetic and/or environment factors which interfere in iron absorption.

  1. Key residues for the oligomerization of A{beta}42 protein in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, Sam [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Guo, Zhefeng, E-mail: zhefeng@ucla.edu [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} oligomers are neurotoxins and likely the causing agents for Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}42 fusion protein form globular oligomers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}42 fusion protein oligomers contain SDS-resistant tetramers and hexamers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cysteine substitutions at residues 31, 32, 34, 39-41 disrupt A{beta}42 oligomerization. -- Abstract: Deposition of amyloid fibrils consisting of amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) protein as senile plaques in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. However, a growing body of evidence shows that soluble A{beta} oligomers correlate better with dementia than fibrils, suggesting that A{beta} oligomers may be the primary toxic species. The structure and oligomerization mechanism of these A{beta} oligomers are crucial for developing effective therapeutics. Here we investigated the oligomerization of A{beta}42 in the context of a fusion protein containing GroES and ubiquitin fused to the N-terminus of A{beta} sequence. The presence of fusion protein partners, in combination with a denaturing buffer containing 8 M urea at pH 10, is unfavorable for A{beta}42 aggregation, thus allowing only the most stable structures to be observed. Transmission electron microscopy showed that A{beta}42 fusion protein formed globular oligomers, which bound weakly to thioflavin T and Congo red. SDS-PAGE shows that A{beta}42 fusion protein formed SDS-resistant hexamers and tetramers. In contrast, A{beta}40 fusion protein remained as monomers on SDS gel, suggesting that the oligomerization of A{beta}42 fusion protein is not due to the fusion protein partners. Cysteine scanning mutagenesis at 22 residue positions further revealed that single cysteine substitutions of the C-terminal hydrophobic residues (I31, I32, L34, V39, V40, and I41) led to disruption of hexamer and tetramer formation, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions

  2. Enhanced expression of the type II transforming growth factor beta receptor in human pancreatic cancer cells without alteration of type III receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, H; Yamanaka, Y; Büchler, M; Berger, H G; Kobrin, M S; Baldwin, R L; Korc, M

    1993-06-15

    We have recently found that human pancreatic adenocarcinomas exhibit strong immunostaining for the three mammalian transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) isoforms. These important growth-regulating polypeptides bind to a number of proteins, including the type I TGF-beta receptor (T beta R-I), type II TGF-beta receptor (T beta R-II), and the type III TGF-beta receptor (T beta R-III). In the present study we sought to determine whether T beta R-II and T beta R-III expression is altered in pancreatic cancer. Northern blot analysis indicated that, by comparison with the normal pancreas, pancreatic adenocarcinomas exhibited a 4.6-fold increase (P beta R-II. In contrast, mRNA levels encoding T beta R-III were not increased. In situ hybridization showed that T beta R-II mRNA was expressed in the majority of cancer cells, whereas mRNA grains encoding T beta R-III were detectable in only a few cancer cells and were present mainly in the surrounding stroma. These findings suggest that enhanced levels of T beta R-II may have a role in regulating human pancreatic cancer cell growth, while T beta R-III may function in the extracellular matrix.

  3. BetaS-haplotypes in sickle cell anemia patients from Salvador, Bahia, Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, M S; Bomfim, G C; Maciel, E; Cerqueira, I; Lyra, I; Zanette, A; Bomfim, G; Adorno, E V; Albuquerque, A L; Pontes, A; Dupuit, M F; Fernandes, G B; dos Reis, M G

    2003-10-01

    BetaS-Globin haplotypes were studied in 80 (160 betaS chromosomes) sickle cell disease patients from Salvador, Brazil, a city with a large population of African origin resulting from the slave trade from Western Africa, mainly from the Bay of Benin. Hematological and hemoglobin analyses were carried out by standard methods. The betaS-haplotypes were determined by PCR and dot-blot techniques. A total of 77 (48.1%) chromosomes were characterized as Central African Republic (CAR) haplotype, 73 (45.6%) as Benin (BEN), 1 (0.63%) as Senegal (SEN), and 9 (5.63%) as atypical (Atp). Genotype was CAR/CAR in 17 (21.3%) patients, BEN/BEN in 17 (21.3%), CAR/BEN in 37 (46.3%), BEN/SEN in 1 (1.25%), BEN/Atp in 1 (1.25%), CAR/Atp in 6 (7.5%), and Atp/Atp in 1 (1.25%). Hemoglobin concentrations and hematocrit values did not differ among genotype groups but were significantly higher in 25 patients presenting percent fetal hemoglobin (%HbF) > or = 10% (P = 0.002 and 0.003, respectively). The median HbF concentration was 7.54+/-4.342% for the CAR/CAR genotype, 9.88 3.558% for the BEN/BEN genotype, 8.146 4.631% for the CAR/BEN genotype, and 4.180+/-2.250% for the CAR/Atp genotype (P = 0.02), although 1 CAR/CAR individual presented an HbF concentration as high as 15%. In view of the ethnic and geographical origin of this population, we did not expect a Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for CAR/CAR and BEN/BEN homozygous haplotypes and a high proportion of heterozygous CAR/BEN haplotypes since the State of Bahia historically received more slaves from Western Africa than from Central Africa.

  4. Measurement of the CP-Violating Phase beta_s in B0s -> J/Psi Phi Decays with the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics (Finland); et al.

    2012-04-01

    We present a measurement of the \\CP-violating parameter \\betas using approximately 6500 $\\BsJpsiPhi$ decays reconstructed with the CDF\\,II detector in a sample of $p\\bar p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab. We find the \\CP-violating phase to be within the range $\\betas \\in [0.02, 0.52] \\cup [1.08, 1.55]$ at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential $S$-wave contribution to the $\\Bs\\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval $1.009 < m(K^+K^-)<1.028 \\gevcc$. Assuming the standard model prediction for the \\CP-violating phase \\betas, we find the \\Bs decay width difference to be $\\deltaG = 0.075 \\pm 0.035\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.006\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\ps$. We also present the most precise measurements of the \\Bs mean lifetime $\\tau(\\Bs) = 1.529 \\pm 0.025\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.012\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ ps, the polarization fractions $|A_0(0)|^2 = 0.524 \\pm 0.013\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ and $|A_{\\parallel}(0)|^2 = 0.231 \\pm 0.014\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$, as well as the strong phase $\\delta_{\\perp}= 2.95 \\pm 0.64\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.07\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\textrm{rad}$. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  5. TGF-beta1 regulates human brain pericyte inflammatory processes involved in neurovasculature function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Aalderink, Miranda; Scotter, Emma L; Oldfield, Robyn L; Bergin, Peter S; Mee, Edward W; Graham, E Scott; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A; Park, Thomas I-H; Dragunow, Mike

    2016-02-11

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) is strongly induced following brain injury and polarises microglia to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Augmentation of TGFβ1 responses may therefore be beneficial in preventing inflammation in neurological disorders including stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. However, several other cell types display immunogenic potential and identifying the effect of TGFβ1 on these cells is required to more fully understand its effects on brain inflammation. Pericytes are multifunctional cells which ensheath the brain vasculature and have garnered recent attention with respect to their immunomodulatory potential. Here, we sought to investigate the inflammatory phenotype adopted by TGFβ1-stimulated human brain pericytes. Microarray analysis was performed to examine transcriptome-wide changes in TGFβ1-stimulated pericytes, and results were validated by qRT-PCR and cytometric bead arrays. Flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and LDH/Alamar Blue® viability assays were utilised to examine phagocytic capacity of human brain pericytes, transcription factor modulation and pericyte health. TGFβ1 treatment of primary human brain pericytes induced the expression of several inflammatory-related genes (NOX4, COX2, IL6 and MMP2) and attenuated others (IL8, CX3CL1, MCP1 and VCAM1). A synergistic induction of IL-6 was seen with IL-1β/TGFβ1 treatment whilst TGFβ1 attenuated the IL-1β-induced expression of CX3CL1, MCP-1 and sVCAM-1. TGFβ1 was found to signal through SMAD2/3 transcription factors but did not modify nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) translocation. Furthermore, TGFβ1 attenuated the phagocytic ability of pericytes, possibly through downregulation of the scavenger receptors CD36, CD47 and CD68. Whilst TGFβ did decrease pericyte number, this was due to a reduction in proliferation, not apoptotic death or compromised cell viability. TGFβ1 attenuated pericyte expression of key chemokines and

  6. Immunoreactivity of thymosin beta 4 in human foetal and adult genitourinary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemolato, S.; Cabras, T.; Fanari, M.U.; Cau, F.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Manconi, B.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2010-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) is a member of the beta-thymosins family, a family of peptides playing essential roles in many cellular functions. Our recent studies suggested Tβ4 plays a key role in the development of human salivary glands and the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to analyse the presence of Tβ4 in the human adult and foetal genitourinary tract. Immunolocalization of Tβ4 was studied in autoptic samples of kidney, bladder, uterus, ovary, testicle and prostate obtained from four human foetuses and four adults. Presence of the peptide was observed in cells of different origin: in surface epithelium, in gland epithelial cells and in the interstitial cells. Tβ4 was mainly found in adult and foetal bladder in the transitional epithelial cells; in the adult endometrium, glands and stromal cells were immunoreactive for the peptide; Tβ4 was mainly localized in the glands of foetal prostate while, in the adults a weak Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to the stroma. In adult and foetal kidney, Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to ducts and tubules with completely spared glomeruli; a weak positivity was observed in adult and foetal oocytes; immunoreactivity was mainly localized in the interstitial cells of foetal and adult testis. In this study, we confirm that Tβ4 could play a relevant role during human development, even in the genitourinary tract, and reveal that immunoreactivity for this peptide may change during postnatal and adult life. PMID:21263742

  7. Augmented H2S production via cystathionine-beta-synthase upregulation plays a role in pregnancy-associated uterine vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibani, Lili; Lechuga, Thomas J; Zhang, Honghai; Hameed, Afshan; Wing, Deborah A; Kumar, Sathish; Rosenfeld, Charles R; Chen, Dong-Bao

    2017-03-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) synthesized via metabolizing L-cysteine by cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE) is a potent vasodilator and angiogenic factor. The objectives of this study were to determine if human uterine artery (UA) H2S production increases with augmented expression and/or activity of CBS and/or CSE during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy and whether exogenous H2S dilates UA. Uterine arteries from nonpregnant (NP) premenopausal proliferative (pPRM) and secretory (sPRM) phases of the menstrual cycle and pregnant (P) women were studied. H2S production was measured by the methylene blue assay. CBS and CSE mRNAs were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, and proteins were assessed by immunoblotting and semiquantitative immunofluorescence microscopy. Effects of H2S on rat UA relaxation were determined by wire myography ex vivo. H2S production was greater in NP pPRM and P than NP sPRM UAs and inhibited by the specific CBS but not CSE inhibitor. CBS but not CSE mRNA and protein were greater in NP pPRM and P than NP sPRM UAs. CBS protein was localized to endothelium and smooth muscle and its levels were in a quantitative order of P >NP UAs of pPRM>sPRM. CSE protein was localized in UA endothelium and smooth muscle with no difference among groups. A H2S donor relaxed P > NP UAs but not mesentery artery. Thus, human UA H2S production is augmented with endothelium and smooth muscle CBS upregulation, contributing to UA vasodilation in the estrogen-dominant physiological states in the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Position-independent human beta-globin gene expression mediated by a recombinant adeno-associated virus vector carrying the chicken beta-globin insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T; Yamaza, H; Sakai, Y; Mizuno, S; Ohno, M; Hamasaki, N; Fukumaki, Y

    1999-01-01

    The position-independent expression of transgenes in target cells is an essential subject for determining effective gene therapies. The chicken beta-globin insulator blocks the effects of regulatory sequences on transcriptional units at differential domains. We prepared a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) containing various combinations of the DNase I-hypersensitive site 2 (HS2), 3 (HS3), and 4 (HS4) core elements from the human beta-globin locus control region (LCR), the human beta-globin gene, and the herpes virus thymidine kinase promoter driven neomycin-resistant gene (neoR) (rHS432, rHS43, rHS42, rHS32, and rHS2), and also rAAV containing two copies of the 250-bp core sequence of the chicken beta-globin insulator on both sides of the rHS2 (rIns/HS2/2Ins). After isolating neomycin-resistant mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells infected with each rAAV, we analyzed the rAAV genome by Southern blots and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using primers specific for HS core elements and the human beta-globin gene. All clones contained a single copy of the rAAV genome in the chromosome, however, some of them had a rearranged proviral genome. In five clones with a single unrearranged rAAV genome for each rAAV construct, we assayed the expression of the human b-globin gene relative to the endogenous mouse beta maj-globin gene, using quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. In clones infected with rHS432, the expression level of the human beta-globin gene ranged from 51.6% to 765.6% of that in the mouse beta maj-globin gene. Likewise, in rHS43, the expression level ranged from 36.7% to 259.0%; in rHS42, from 47.8% to 207.0%; in rHS32, from 47.9% to 105.4%; and in rHS2, from 6.1% to 172.1%, indicating a high variability of expression level in clones infected with recombinant virus lacking the insulator. In contrast, in clones infected with rIns/HS2/Ins, the range of expression of the human beta-globin gene ranged from 52.8% to 58.3% of that in the mouse beta maj

  9. Self-assembly of a novel beta-In2S3 nanostructure exhibiting strong quantum confinement effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wu; Ma, Dekun; Huang, Zhen; Tang, Qun; Xie, Qin; Qian, Yitai

    2005-05-01

    The 3D beta-In2S3 flowerlike architecture assembled from nanoflakes was prepared via a novel complex-precursor assisted (CPA) solvothermal route. The as-prepared beta-In2S3 powder was characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), transition electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectra, and photoluminescence spectrum. The novel 3D beta-In2S3 nanostructure exhibit a strong quantum confinement effect. FT-IR spectra were used to investigate the coordinative chemical effect in the complex. A possible mechanism was discussed.

  10. Crystal Structure of Human [Beta]-Hexosaminidase B: Understanding the Molecular Basis of Sandhoff and Tay-Sachs Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark, Brian L.; Mahuran, Don J.; Cherney, Maia M.; Zhao, Dalian; Knapp, Spencer; James, Michael N.G.

    2010-12-01

    In humans, two major {beta}-hexosaminidase isoenzymes exist: Hex A and Hex B. Hex A is a heterodimer of subunits {alpha} and {beta} (60% identity), whereas Hex B is a homodimer of {beta}-subunits. Interest in human {beta}-hexosaminidase stems from its association with Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff disease; these are prototypical lysosomal storage disorders resulting from the abnormal accumulation of G{sub M2}-ganglioside (G{sub M2}). Hex A degrades G{sub M2} by removing a terminal N-acetyl-D-galactosamine ({beta}-GalNAc) residue, and this activity requires the G{sub M2}-activator, a protein which solubilizes the ganglioside for presentation to Hex A. We present here the crystal structure of human Hex B, alone (2.4 {angstrom}) and in complex with the mechanistic inhibitors GalNAc-isofagomine (2.2 {angstrom}) or NAG-thiazoline (2.5 {angstrom}). From these, and the known X-ray structure of the G{sub M2}-activator, we have modeled Hex A in complex with the activator and ganglioside. Together, our crystallographic and modeling data demonstrate how {alpha} and {beta}-subunits dimerize to form either Hex A or Hex B, how these isoenzymes hydrolyze diverse substrates, and how many documented point mutations cause Sandhoff disease ({beta}-subunit mutations) and Tay-Sachs disease ({alpha}-subunit mutations).

  11. beta(S)-Globin gene cluster haplotypes in the West Bank of Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarah, Fekri; Ayesh, Suhail; Athanasiou, Miranda; Christakis, John; Vavatsi, Norma

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder of the beta-globin chain. In Palestine it is accompanied by a low level of Hb F (mean 5.14%) and a severe clinical presentation. In this study, 59 Palestinian patients, homozygotes for Hb S were studied for their haplotype background. Eight polymorphic sites in the beta-globin gene cluster were examined. The Benin haplotype was predominant with a frequency of 88.1%, followed by a frequency of 5.1% for the Bantu haplotype. One chromosome was found to carry the Cameroon haplotype (0.85%). Three atypical haplotypes were also found (5.95%). Heterogeneity was observed in Hb F production, ranging between 1.5 and 17.0%, whereas the (G)gamma ratio was homogeneous among all haplotypes with a normal amount of about 41%. Our results are in agreement with previous reports of the Benin haplotype origin in the Mediterranean.

  12. Monounsaturated fatty acids prevent the deleterious effects of palmitate and high glucose on human pancreatic beta-cell turnover and function

    OpenAIRE

    Maedler, Kathrin; Oberholzer, José; Bucher, Pascal Alain Robert; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Donath, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity contribute to the impaired beta-cell function observed in type 2 diabetes. Here we examine the effect of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids at different glucose concentrations on human beta-cell turnover and secretory function. Exposure of cultured human islets to saturated fatty acid and/or to an elevated glucose concentration for 4 days increased beta-cell DNA fragmentation and decreased beta-cell proliferation. In contrast, the monounsaturated palmitol...

  13. Separation and characterization of mares' milk alpha(s1)-, beta-, kappa-caseins, gamma-casein-like, and proteose peptone component 5-like peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egito, A S; Miclo, L; López, C; Adam, A; Girardet, J M; Gaillard, J L

    2002-04-01

    The equine alpha(s1)- and beta-caseins (CN) were purified by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and by reversed-phase HPLC. The alpha(s1)-, beta-, and kappa-CN were characterized either by monodimensional urea-PAGE or sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS)-PAGE or by bidimensional electrophoresis. Kappa-casein was characterized after electrophoresis by glycoprotein-specific staining. To identify alpha(s1)-CN without ambiguity, internal sequences were determined after trypsin or chymosin digestion of purified alpha(s1)-CN. These sequences, that could be estimated to correspond to 62% of the full protein, presented strong identities with regions of alpha(s1)-CN primary structures of other species. In particular, 51, 48, 43, and 40% identities were obtained with corresponding regions of sow, dromedary, cow, and human alpha(s1)-CN, respectively. On the other hand, trace amounts of equine gamma-CN-like and proteose peptone component 5-like peptides were found in the whole CN. They were identified by microsequencing and corresponded to beta-CN peptides generated by plasmin action on the whole CN. The equine alpha(s1), beta-, and kappa-CN were separated by bidimensional electrophoresis in numerous isoelectric variants with apparent isoelectric points distributed between pH 4.4 to 6.3, 4.4 to 5.9, and 3.5 to 5.5, respectively. The beta- and kappa-CN displayed a more acidic character in the mare than in the cow.

  14. Characterisation of the insulinotropic activity of an aqueous extract of Gymnema sylvestre in mouse beta-cells and human islets of Langerhans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Asare-Anane, Henry; Al-Romaiyan, Altaf; Huang, Guocai; Amiel, Stephanie A; Jones, Peter M; Persaud, Shanta J

    2009-01-01

    Leaves of the Gymnema sylvestre (GS) plant have been used to treat diabetes mellitus for millennia, but the previously documented insulin secretagogue effects of GS extracts in vitro may be non-physiological through damage to the beta-cells. We have now examined the effects of a novel GS extract (termed OSA) on insulin secretion from the MIN6 beta-cell line and isolated human islets of Langerhans. Insulin secretion from MIN6 cells was stimulated by OSA in a concentration-dependent manner, with low concentrations (0.06-0.25 mg/ml) having no deleterious effects on MIN6 cell viability, while higher concentrations (> or = 0.5 mg/ml) caused increased Trypan blue uptake. OSA increased beta-cell Ca2+ levels, an effect that was mediated by Ca2+ influx through voltage-operated calcium channels. OSA also reversibly stimulated insulin secretion from isolated human islets and its insulin secretagogue effects in MIN6 cells and human islets were partially dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+. These data indicate that low concentrations of the GS isolate OSA stimulate insulin secretion in vitro, at least in part as a consequence of Ca2+ influx, without compromising beta-cell viability. Identification of the component of the OSA extract that stimulates regulated insulin exocytosis, and further investigation of its mode(s) of action, may provide promising lead targets for Type 2 diabetes therapy.

  15. Rapid effects of phytoestrogens on human colonic smooth muscle are mediated by oestrogen receptor beta.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have correlated consumption of dietary phytoestrogens with beneficial effects on colon, breast and prostate cancers. Genomic and non-genomic mechanisms are responsible for anti-carcinogenic effects but, until now, the effect on human colon was assumed to be passive and remote. No direct effect on human colonic smooth muscle has previously been described. Institutional research board approval was granted. Histologically normal colon was obtained from the proximal resection margin of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended under 1g of tension in organ baths containing oxygenated Krebs solution at 37 degrees C. After an equilibration period, tissues were exposed to diarylpropionitrile (DPN) (ER beta agonist) and 1,3,5-tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-propyl-1H-pyrazole (PPT) (ER alpha agonist) or to the synthetic phytoestrogen compounds genistein (n=8), daidzein (n=8), fisetin (n=8) and quercetin (n=8) in the presence or absence of fulvestrant (oestrogen receptor antagonist). Mechanism of action was investigated by inhibition of downstream pathways. The cholinergic agonist carbachol was used to induce contractile activity. Tension was recorded isometrically. Phytoestrogens inhibit carbachol-induced colonic contractility. In keeping with a non-genomic, rapid onset direct action, the effect was within minutes, reversible and similar to previously described actions of 17 beta oestradiol. No effect was seen in the presence of fulvestrant indicating receptor modulation. While the DPN exerted inhibitory effects, PPT did not. The effect appears to be reliant on a p38\\/mitogen activated protein kinase mediated induction of nitric oxide production in colonic smooth muscle. The present data set provides the first description of a direct effect of genistein, daidzein, fisetin and quercetin on human colonic smooth muscle. The presence of ER in colonic smooth muscle has been functionally proven and the beta

  16. Presence of. beta. hCG mRNA in the human pituitary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Strien, A.; van Wezenbeek, P. (Organon International BV, Oss (Netherlands))

    1989-07-11

    A strong structural and biological similarity exist between human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and luteinizing hormone (LH). They share the same {alpha} subunit and have evolutionary related {beta} subunits. hCG is synthesized in first trimester placenta, whereas LH is synthesized in the pituitary. Substances with immunological, physical and biological properties of hCG have, however, been observed in postmenopausal urinary gonadotropin preparations as well as in pituitary extracts. Despite this finding it has not yet been proven that the hCG-like material is identical to placental hCG. This report describes the presence of a minor messenger RNA species in the human pituitary. RNA was isolated from five human pituitary glands and an amplified cDNA library was prepared.

  17. [Influence of the human blood serum on contractility and beta-adrenoreactyvity of the isolated human myocardium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotaeva, K N; Viaznikov, V A; Tsirkin, V I; Kostiaev, A A

    2011-01-01

    On strips of the isolated myocardium of right hearts auriculum of the 43 patients with ischemic illness of heart and 9 patients with heart diseases of various ethyology at statement venous canule during aorto-coronary shunting, estimated influence of adrenaline (10(-9)-10(-4) g/ml) on amplitude caused by electrostimulus (1H, 5ms, 25-30 V) contractions, and also inotropic and adrenomodulation activity of serum blood (in dilution 1 : 10000, 1: 1000, 1 : 500, 1: 100, 1 : 50, 1: 10 and 1 : 5) nonpregnant women. Direct dependence of amplitude of contraction on size of fraction of of blood emission on Teyholts is revealed. It means, that strips of right auriculum myocardium reflect contractility of a left ventriculum myocardium. Adrenaline in concentration 10(-7)-10(-6) g/ml dependent of dose raised amplitude of the caused contraction not influencing it in concentration of 10(-9) and 10(-8) g/ml (the constant of dissotiation has 2 x 10(-7) g/ml), that as a whole, speaks about decrease in efficiency of activation beta-AP. Blood Serum in dissolutions 1 : 10000-1 : 50 did not influence on amplitude of contraction, and in dissolutions 1 : 10 and 1 : 5 strengthened it, that speaks presence in blood the endogenous activator of myocyte contractility (EAMC). Serum showed beta-adrenomodulation activity that speaks presence in it endogenous sensitizer of beta-adrenoreceptors (ESBAR) and endogenous blocker of beta-adrenoreceptors (EBBAR). In particular, in experiences with adrenaline in subthreshold concentration (10(-8) g/ml) serum showed ESBAR-activity (in dissolutions 1 : 1000, 1 : 500, 1 : 100 and 1 : 50), and in experiences with adrenaline in as much as possible effective concentration (10(-6) g/ml) serum showed ESBAR-activity (in dissolutions 1 : 50 and 1 : 10) and EBBAR-activity (in dissolutions 1:500) Hence, containing in blood serum endogenous modulators of beta-adrenoreactivity - ESBAR and EBBAR can modulate efficiency of beta-adrenoreceptors activation of human

  18. Molecular Identification Of Sicilian (deltabeta) Degrees-thalassemia Associated With Beta-thalassemia And Hemoglobin S In Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of two unrelated Brazilian families with an association of the Sicilian form of (deltabeta) degrees -thalassemia with hemoglobin S and beta-thalassemia. Direct sequencing of the beta-globin gene showed only the hemoglobin S mutation in patient 1 and the beta-thalassemia IVS1-110 in patient 2. The other allele was deleted in both patients and PCR of DNA samples of the breakpoint region of both patients showed a band of approximately 1,150 ...

  19. 11Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 in human pregnancy and reduced expression in intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, M; Kilby, M D; Somerset, D A; Howie, A J; Gupta, A; Wood, P J; Afnan, M; Stewart, P M

    1998-04-01

    The type 2 isoform of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD2), which inactivates cortisol (F) to cortisone (E), has been suggested to play a role in the ontogeny of the fetal pituitary-adrenal axis and also protect the developing fetus from the deleterious effects of circulating maternal glucocorticoids. The abundance of 11beta-HSD2 in the placenta and other fetal tissues was inferred from the F/E ratio in 17 term deliveries in both umbilical arterial (1.73 +/- 0.24, mean +/- SE) and umbilical venous blood (1.16 +/- 0.14) compared with adult peripheral venous blood (7.76 +/- 0.57, n = 70). Using sensitive assays for 11beta-HSD2 and an in-house human 11beta-HSD2 antibody, the expression and activity of this enzyme in fresh frozen human placenta increased progressively from first (8-12 weeks, n = 16) and second (13-20 weeks, n = 9) to third trimester (term) pregnancies (39-40 weeks, n = 50). Placental 11beta-HSD2 activity was significantly reduced in deliveries complicated by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) [25-36 weeks, n = 12, activity 380 pmol/mg/h median (225-671; 95% confidence interval)], compared with the term deliveries [888 (725-1362)] and with appropriately grown pre-term deliveries [27-36 weeks, n = 14, activity 810 (585-1269)], P < 0.05. In human pregnancy placental 11beta-HSD2 activity increases markedly in the third trimester of pregnancy at a time when maternal circulating levels of glucocorticoid are rising. The finding of attenuated placental 11beta-HSD2 activity in IUGR suggests that glucocorticoids may, in part, contribute to impaired fetal growth and that this is closely controlled in normal gestation through placental 11beta-HSD2 expression.

  20. Beta s gene in Central Iran is in linkage disequilibrium with the Indian-Arab haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahgozar, S; Poorfathollah, A A; Moafi, A R; Old, J M

    2000-11-01

    Sickle cell anemia is not considered to be a significant disease in Iran, although the sickle cell trait is estimated to have a high incidence in the Southern provinces. Since 1977, when the presence of a mild sickle cell anemia was reported in this country, there have been no further investigations published giving precise data on the incidence and origins of the sickle cell mutation in Iran. We report here the finding of patients with the sickle cell trait, sickle cell anemia, and sickle-beta thalassemia in Central Iran. A survey of 300 individuals from a village in Southeast Esfahan revealed an incidence of the sickle cell trait of 8.33%. "Cascade screening" enabled 96 relatives in four surrounding villages to be tested, and the at-risk couples were offered counseling as a "sickle cell control program." The hematological indices and HbF levels of the affected patients were determined. The HbF levels were unusually high, ranging from 18% to 41.4%, and SS patients with the highest levels were asymptomatic. Linkage analysis revealed the betaS gene haplotype in this population to be the Indian-Arab haplotype.

  1. Inefficiency in GM2 ganglioside elimination by human lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase beta-subunit gene transfer to fibroblastic cell line derived from Sandhoff disease model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Tomohiro; Kuroki, Aya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Daisuke; Kawashita, Eri; Higashine, Yukari; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Yamanaka, Shoji; Itoh, Kohji

    2006-08-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive GM2 gangliosidosis caused by the defect of lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase (Hex) beta-subunit gene associated with neurosomatic manifestations. Therapeutic effects of Hex subunit gene transduction have been examined on Sandhoff disease model mice (SD mice) produced by the allelic disruption of Hexb gene encoding the murine beta-subunit. We demonstrate here that elimination of GM2 ganglioside (GM2) accumulated in the fibroblastic cell line derived from SD mice (FSD) did not occur when the HEXB gene only was transfected. In contrast, a significant increase in the HexB (betabeta homodimer) activity toward neutral substrates, including GA2 (asialo-GM2) and oligosaccharides carrying the terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues at their non-reducing ends (GlcNAc-oligosaccharides) was observed. Immunoblotting with anti-human HexA (alphabeta heterodimer) serum after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Native-PAGE) revealed that the human HEXB gene product could hardly form the chimeric HexA through associating with the murine alpha-subunit. However, co-introduction of the HEXA encoding the human alpha-subunit and HEXB genes caused significant corrective effect on the GM2 degradation by producing the human HexA. These results indicate that the recombinant human HexA could interspeciesly associate with the murine GM2 activator protein to degrade GM2 accumulated in the FSD cells. Thus, therapeutic effects of the recombinant human HexA isozyme but not human HEXB gene product could be evaluated by using the SD mice.

  2. Bmi-1 extends the life span of normal human oral keratinocytes by inhibiting the TGF-{beta} signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Reuben H., E-mail: rkim@dentistry.ucla.edu [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Lieberman, Mark B.; Lee, Rachel [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Shin, Ki-Hyuk [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mehrazarin, Shebli; Oh, Ju-Eun [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Park, No-Hee [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Kang, Mo K., E-mail: mkang@dentistry.ucla.edu [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that Bmi-1 extended the in vitro life span of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). We now report that the prolonged life span of NHOK by Bmi-1 is, in part, due to inhibition of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. Serial subculture of NHOK resulted in replicative senescence and terminal differentiation and activation of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. This was accompanied with enhanced intracellular and secreted TGF-{beta}1 levels, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and increased expression of p15{sup INK4B} and p57{sup KIP2}. An ectopic expression of Bmi-1 in NHOK (HOK/Bmi-1) decreased the level of intracellular and secreted TGF-{beta}1 induced dephosphorylation of Smad2/3, and diminished the level of p15{sup INK4B} and p57{sup KIP2}. Moreover, Bmi-1 expression led to the inhibition of TGF-{beta}-responsive promoter activity in a dose-specific manner. Knockdown of Bmi-1 in rapidly proliferating HOK/Bmi-1 and cancer cells increased the level of phosphorylated Smad2/3, p15{sup INK4B}, and p57{sup KIP2}. In addition, an exposure of senescent NHOK to TGF-{beta} receptor I kinase inhibitor or anti-TGF-{beta} antibody resulted in enhanced replicative potential of cells. Taken together, these data suggest that Bmi-1 suppresses senescence of cells by inhibiting the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in NHOK.

  3. Immune response in human chromoblastomycosis and eumycetoma - focusing on human interleukin-17A, interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta and human beta-defensin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeyaphan, Charussri; Hau, Carren; Takeoka, Shintaro; Tada, Yayoi; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Sitthinamsuwan, Panitta; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Sasajima, Yuko; Makimura, Koichi; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-07-12

    Knowledge regarding host immune response to chromoblastomycosis and eumycetoma is limited, particularly concerning cytokines and antimicrobial peptides production. This was a retrospective study of 12 paraffin-embedded tissue samples from patients diagnosed with chromoblastomycosis or eumycetoma from histological findings and tissue culture. DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from tissues were done to evaluate human interleukin-17A (IL-17A), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and human beta-defensin-2 (HBD-2) expressions. Human beta-actin primer was used for confirming DNA detection, and DNA extracted from psoriasis lesional skin samples was used as positive controls. The twelve paraffin-embedded sections used in this study consisted of five chromoblastomycosis and seven eumycetoma tissues. All PCR reactions showed beta-actin band at 51 bp in all clinical specimens, confirming adequate DNA levels in each reaction. As positive control, the psoriasis skin samples revealed bands for IL-17A at 174 bp, IFN-γ at 273 bp, TNF-α at 360 bp, IL-1β at 276 bp and HBD-2 at 255 bp. For the chromoblastomycosis and eumycetoma tissues, PCR analyses showed IL-17A band at 174 bp in two eumycetoma tissues and HBD-2 band at 255 bp in a chromoblastomycosis tissue. This study demonstrated IL-17A expression in human eumycetoma and HBD-2 expression in human chromoblastomycosis for the first time. However, their role in immune response remains to be elucidated. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. A high-throughput chemical screen reveals that harmine-mediated inhibition of DYRK1A increases human pancreatic beta cell replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F

    2015-04-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both ultimately result from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with a peak percentage (∼2%) engaged in the cell cycle in the first year of life. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication is barely detectable. Whereas beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts. Hence, there remains an urgent need for antidiabetic therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, using a high-throughput small-molecule screen (HTS), we find that analogs of the small molecule harmine function as a new class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds. We also define dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine and the nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation and differentiation. Using three different mouse and human islet in vivo-based models, we show that harmine is able to induce beta cell proliferation, increase islet mass and improve glycemic control. These observations suggest that harmine analogs may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing the potency and beta cell specificity of these compounds are important future challenges.

  5. Adaptive regulation of taurine and beta-alanine uptake in a human kidney cell line from the proximal tubule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, H; Jacobsen, Christian

    1997-01-01

    homeostasis occurs predominantly via changes in the activity of the high-affinity taurine transport system by alterations in the uptake capacity and with an unaffected half-saturation constant. An adaptive response was not observed for the structurally related beta-alanine. 3. Only colchicine, which......), mimicking the effects of diacylglycerol, induced inhibition of both beta-alanine and taurine uptake. By contrast, the Ca2(+)-ionophore A23187, mimicking the effects of IP3, only stimulated the uptake of taurine but not the influx of beta-alanine. However, the effect of PMA down-regulation and A23187 up......1. The underlying mechanisms involved in the adaptive regulation of beta-amino acid uptake in the human proximal tubule were examined by use of an immortalized human embryonic kidney epithelial cell line (IHKE). 2. The results indicated that the adaptive response to maintain whole-body taurine...

  6. Serotonin transporters in Parkinson's disease studied with [I-123]{beta}-CIT SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Eun; Choi, Joon Young; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Won Yong; Choi, Yong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), both neuropathological and biochemical studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) neurons are affected by the disease process. The purpose of this study was to assess the integrity of 5-HT transporters in PD using [I-123]{beta}-CIT (2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane], which binds to both 5-HT and dopamine transporters, and SPECT. Forty-five patients with PD at relatively early stages (Hoehn-Yahr stages I-3) and seven agematched healthy controls were injected with 185-370 MBq(I-123]{beta}-CIT. A total of 15 SPECT scans were acquired over a 24 hr period in each subject using a three-headed system. Time activity curves were obtained in the hypothalamic/midbrain region, where the binding of [I-123] {beta}-CIT is associated primarily with 5-HT transporters, and cerebellum, which was assumed to include only nondisplaceable activity. The parameter k3/k4 (forward/dissociation rate), which is a measure of 5-HT transporter density, was estimated by four noninvasive methods: peak equilibrium ratio (PER) [the ratio of specific binding (hypothalamic/midbrain region-cerebellar activity) to nondisplaceable (cerebella) activity when specific binding reaches a peak], area ratio (the ratio of the areas under the specific binding and nondisplaceable activity curves), k3/k4 obtained using a kinetic two-compartment model [R(2C)], and k3/k4 from a modified graphic method [R(DV)] (Ichise et al., 1996). In the healthy controls, the activity in the hypothalamic/midbrain area generally peaked by 3 hr after tracer injection, then decreased slowly; similar patterns were observed in the PD patients. The k3/k4 values estimated by four different methods in the PD patients did not differ significanlty from those in the healthy controls. In the PD patients, the k3/k4 estimates were not significantly correlated with either Hoehn-Yahr scale or UPDRS (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) scores, including total, motor, activities of daily living

  7. Effects of beta interferon on human fibroblasts at different population doubling levels. Proliferation, cell volume, thymidine uptake, and DNA synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Cellular aging had no effect on the ability of beta interferon to increase cell volume and population doubling time in 76-109 cells, a line of human skin fibroblasts. However, DNA synthesis in cells at high population doubling levels (PDL 55-70) was inhibited after 72 h of beta interferon treatment (1,000 U/ml) while no inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed in cells at middle population doubling levels (PDL 30-40).

  8. The effect of cryo-storage on the beta 2-adrenoceptor density and responsiveness in intact human lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlquist, P; Johansen, Torben; Friis, U G

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of cryo-storage on beta 2-adrenoceptor number and formation of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in intact human lymphocytes as a measure of the beta 2-adrenoceptor responsiveness. Cryo-storage at -196 degrees C up to 12 months caused no significant...... results indicate that the method should be further modified in order to preserve the lymphocyte responsiveness after cryo-storage....

  9. The Inflammasome and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR Are Involved in the Staphylococcus aureus-Mediated Induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in Human Keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Simanski

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus (S. aureus is an important pathogen causing various infections including those of the skin. Keratinocytes are able to sense invading S. aureus and to initiate a fast defense reaction by the rapid release of innate defense mediators such as antimicrobial peptides and cytokines. There is increasing evidence that the cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, which both signal through the IL-1 receptor, play an important role in cutaneous defense against S. aureus. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the underlying mechanisms leading to the S. aureus-induced IL-1alpha and IL-1beta expression in keratinocytes. Infection of human primary keratinocytes with S. aureus led to the induction of gene expression and protein secretion of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta. Full S. aureus-induced IL-1 protein release required the inflammasome components caspase-1 and ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD whereas gene induction of IL-1alpha and IL-beta by S. aureus was not dependent on caspase-1 and ASC. Since patients receiving anti-cancer therapy by inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR often suffer from skin infections caused by S. aureus we additionally evaluated whether the EGFR pathway may be involved in the IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction by S. aureus. Inactivation of the EGFR with a blocking antibody decreased the S. aureus-mediated IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction in primary keratinocytes. Moreover, the use of siRNA experiments revealed that ADAM17 (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease 17, a metalloproteinase known to mediate the shedding and release of EGFR ligands, was required for full induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in keratinocytes infected with S. aureus. A failure of keratinocytes to adequately upregulate IL-1alpha and IL-1beta may promote S. aureus skin infections.

  10. The Inflammasome and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Are Involved in the Staphylococcus aureus-Mediated Induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanski, Maren; Rademacher, Franziska; Schröder, Lena; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is an important pathogen causing various infections including those of the skin. Keratinocytes are able to sense invading S. aureus and to initiate a fast defense reaction by the rapid release of innate defense mediators such as antimicrobial peptides and cytokines. There is increasing evidence that the cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, which both signal through the IL-1 receptor, play an important role in cutaneous defense against S. aureus. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the underlying mechanisms leading to the S. aureus-induced IL-1alpha and IL-1beta expression in keratinocytes. Infection of human primary keratinocytes with S. aureus led to the induction of gene expression and protein secretion of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta. Full S. aureus-induced IL-1 protein release required the inflammasome components caspase-1 and ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD) whereas gene induction of IL-1alpha and IL-beta by S. aureus was not dependent on caspase-1 and ASC. Since patients receiving anti-cancer therapy by inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) often suffer from skin infections caused by S. aureus we additionally evaluated whether the EGFR pathway may be involved in the IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction by S. aureus. Inactivation of the EGFR with a blocking antibody decreased the S. aureus-mediated IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction in primary keratinocytes. Moreover, the use of siRNA experiments revealed that ADAM17 (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease 17), a metalloproteinase known to mediate the shedding and release of EGFR ligands, was required for full induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in keratinocytes infected with S. aureus. A failure of keratinocytes to adequately upregulate IL-1alpha and IL-1beta may promote S. aureus skin infections.

  11. Reaction of beta-diketiminate copper(II) complexes and Na2S2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inosako, Masayuki; Kunishita, Atsushi; Shimokawa, Chizu; Teraoka, Junji; Kubo, Minoru; Ogura, Takashi; Sugimoto, Hideki; Itoh, Shinobu

    2008-11-28

    Reaction of beta-diketiminate copper(II) complexes and Na2S2 resulted in formation of (mu-eta2:eta2-disulfido)dicopper(II) complexes (adduct formation) or beta-diketiminate copper(I) complexes (reduction of copper(II)) depending on the substituents of the supporting ligands. In the case of sterically less demanding ligands, adduct formation occurred to provide the (mu-eta2:eta2-disulfido)dicopper(II) complexes, whereas reduction of copper(II) took place to give the corresponding copper(I) complexes with sterically more demanding beta-diketiminate ligands. Spectroscopic examinations of the reactions at low temperature using UV-vis and ESR as well as kinetic analysis have suggested that a 1 : 1 adduct LCuII-S-SNa with an end-on binding mode is initially formed as a common intermediate, from which different reaction pathways exist depending on the steric environment of the metal-coordination sphere provided by the ligands. Thus, with the sterically less demanding ligands, rearrangement of the disulfide adduct from end-on to side-on followed by self-dimerisation occurs to give the (mu-eta2:eta2-disulfido)dicopper(II) complexes, whereas such an intramolecular rearrangement of the disulfide co-ligand does not take place with the sterically more demanding ligands. In this case, homolytic cleavage of the CuII-S bond occurs to give the reduced copper(I) product. The steric effects of the supporting ligands have been discussed on the basis of detailed analysis of the crystal structures of the copper(II) starting materials.

  12. Inhibition of amyloid-beta-induced cell death in human brain pericytes in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, A.A.M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Otte-Holler, I.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Waal, R.M.W. de; Kremer, H.P.H.

    2002-01-01

    Amyloid-beta protein (A beta) deposition in the cerebral vascular walls is one of the key features of Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D). A beta(1-40) carrying the 'Dutch' mutation (HCHWA-D A beta(1-40)) induces pronounced degeneration of cul

  13. A STUDY OF METALLO-BETA-LACTATAMASE PRODUCING PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN CLINICAL SAMPLES OF S.S.G. HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul S Chaudhari Tanuja B Javadekar Govind Ninama Neelam Pandya Jivraj Damor

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pseudomonas spp. is common pathogen causing nosocomial infection. Acquired drug resistance is frequent in nosocomial isolates of Pseudomonas spp. Acquired metallo-β-lactamases (MBL in pseudomonas spp. have recently emerged as one of the most worrisome resistance mechanism because of their capacity to hydrolyze all beta-lactam antibiotics including penicillins, cephalosporins and carbapenems, with the exception of aztreonam. Aim: To detect metallo-β-lactamase producing isolates of Pseudomonas aerugenosa from various clinical samples from patients admitted in our hospital. Material and methods : In this studyt we studied the prevalence, following standard methods of isolation and identification techniques of these bacteria from clinical materials Source : Samples of patients from different wards of S.S.G.Hosital are proceeded in Microbiology department , Medical College and S.S.G.Hospital Baroda. Results: Of total study of 150 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 8 isolates are resistance to Imipenem . Of 8 samples , all are producing Metallo-Beta-Lactamase enzyme. Conclusion :Infection cause by MBL (metallo-β-lactamase positive isolates of Pseudomonas aerugenosa is important to identify because it poses not only therapeutic problem, but also a serious concern for infection control management. [National J of Med Res 2011; 1(2.000: 60-63

  14. Adaptive regulation of taurine and beta-alanine uptake in a human kidney cell line from the proximal tubule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, H; Jacobsen, Christian

    1997-01-01

    1. The underlying mechanisms involved in the adaptive regulation of beta-amino acid uptake in the human proximal tubule were examined by use of an immortalized human embryonic kidney epithelial cell line (IHKE). 2. The results indicated that the adaptive response to maintain whole-body taurine...

  15. A model of the complex between human beta-microseminoprotein and CRISP-3 based on NMR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghasriani, Houman; Fernlund, Per; Udby, Lene

    2008-01-01

    beta-Microseminoprotein (MSP), a 10kDa seminal plasma protein, forms a tight complex with cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3) from granulocytes. The 3D structure of human MSP has been determined but there is as yet no 3D structure for CRISP-3. We have now studied the complex between human...

  16. NOVEL AMYLOID-BETA SPECIFIC scFv and VH ANTIBODY FRAGMENTS FROM HUMAN AND MOUSE PHAGE DISPLAY ANTIBODY LIBRARIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medecigo, M.; Manoutcharian, K.; Vasilevko, V.; Govezensky, T.; Munguia, M. E.; Becerril, B.; Luz-Madrigal, A.; Vaca, L.; Cribbs, D. H.; Gevorkian, G.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-amyloid immunotherapy has been proposed as an appropriate therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Significant efforts have been made towards the generation and assessment of antibody-based reagents capable of preventing and clearing amyloid aggregates as well as preventing their synaptotoxic effects. In this study, we selected a novel set of human anti-amyloid-beta peptide 1-42 (Aβ1-42) recombinant monoclonal antibodies in a single chain fragment variable (scFv) and a single domain (VH) formats. We demonstrated that these antibody fragments recognize in a specific manner amyloid beta deposits in APP/Tg mouse brains, inhibit toxicity of oligomeric Aβ1-42 in neuroblastoma cell cultures in a concentration-dependently manner and reduced amyloid deposits in APP/Tg2576 mice after intracranial administration. These antibody fragments recognize epitopes in the middle/C-terminus region of Aβ, which makes them strong therapeutic candidates due to the fact that most of the Aβ species found in the brains of AD patients display extensive N-terminus truncations/modifications. PMID:20451261

  17. Secretion of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin by non-small cell lung cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varma Seema

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We describe a case of non-small cell lung cancer that was found to stain positive for beta-human chorionic gonadotropin on immunohistochemistry. Only a few case reports have described lung cancers that secrete beta-human chorionic gonadotropin. Case presentation A 68-year-old Caucasian man presented with symptoms of weakness, fatigue and weight loss for the past two months. On examination, he was found to have generalized lymphadenopathy, and radiologic workup revealed numerous metastases in the lungs, liver and kidneys. Biopsy of the supraclavicular lymph node revealed metastatic large cell lung cancer with beta-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone positivity. The serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin level was 11,286 mIU/ml (upper limit of normal, 0.5 mIU/ml in non-pregnant females. He was diagnosed with stage 4 lung non-small cell lung cancer. The patient refused chemotherapy. He was discharged home with hospice care. Conclusion The markedly elevated serum values of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin initially prompted the medical team to investigate germinal tumors. In the presence of a negative testicular ultrasound, workup was performed to find an extratesticular source of the tumor. Finally, the diagnosis was made with a tissue biopsy. This case illustrates that atypical markers can be seen in many cancers, emphasizing the role of immunohistochemistry and tissue biopsy in establishing the diagnosis.

  18. Beta-Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Producing Osteosarcoma of the Sacrum in a 26-Year-Old Woman: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Glass

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic secretion of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin is considered a poor prognostic marker in epithelial tumors. However, very few cases have been reported in sarcomas. We present the case of a 26-year-old female who presented with a metastatic osteosarcoma. She underwent usual testing prior to starting treatment and was found to have elevated levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin. As the patient was not pregnant, another source of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin secretion had to be considered. The tumor cells demonstrated positive staining for beta-human chorionic gonadotropin by immunohistochemistry, and serum levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin were used to monitor tumor progression and response to chemotherapy. We review the literature and discuss a potential role of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin in the treatment of such patients.

  19. Bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s possessing coordinated metal center(s) and their inclusion complexation behavior with model substrates: enhanced molecular binding ability by multiple recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Li, L; Zhang, H Y; Liu, S X; Guan, X D

    2001-12-14

    To investigate quantitatively the cooperative binding ability of several beta-cyclodextrin oligomers bearing single or multiligated metal center(s), the inclusion complexation behavior of four bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s (2-5) linked by 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxy tethers and their copper(II) complexes (6-9) with representative dye guests, i.e., methyl orange (MO), acridine red (AR), rhodamine B (RhB), ammonium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), and sodium 6-(p-toludino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), have been examined in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C by means of UV-vis, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results obtained indicate that bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-5 can associate with one or three copper(II) ion(s) producing 2:1 or 2:3 bis(beta-cyclodextrin)-copper(II) complexes. These metal-ligated oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s can bind two model substrates to form intramolecular 2:2 host-guest inclusion complexes and thus significantly enhance the original binding abilities of parent beta-cyclodextrin and bis(beta-cyclodextrin) toward model substrates through the cooperative binding of two guest molecules by four tethered cyclodextrin moieties, as well as the additional binding effect supplied by ligated metal center(s). Host 6 showed the highest enhancement of the stability constant, up to 38.3 times for ANS as compared with parent beta-cyclodextrin. The molecular binding mode and stability constant of substrates by bridged bis- and oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-9 are discussed from the viewpoint of the size/shape-fit interaction and molecular multiple recognition between host and guest.

  20. THE NEW METALL-BETA-LACTAMASE’S INHIBITOR EFFICACY IN A MODEL SYSTEM IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Afinogenova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Enterobacteriaceae antibiotics resistance depends on a combination of several mechanisms, such as the beta-lactamases overproduction, the microbial cell reduction outer membrane permeability (usually associated with loss of protein porin, the presence of efflux systems. Particularly noteworthy are the metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL whose presence causes resistance of gram-negative microorganisms to all beta-lactam antibiotics (in some cases except aztreonam. Currently there are no MBL inhibitors permitted for use in the clinic. The effective inhibitors search for carbapenem-resistant bacteria’ MBL authorized for use in the clinic and reinforcing effects of carbapenems, served as the basis for the present study. The work was carried out in three stages: 1 creating a model system using a standard enzyme reagent metallo-beta-lactamase P. aeruginosa recombinant expressed in E. coli, to evaluate the increasing of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC of carbapenems against previously sensitive Gram-negative microorganisms strains in vitro; 2 evaluation of MBL promising inhibitors in the presence of the same standard enzyme reagent; 3 evaluation of the ability of the identified inhibitors increase the carbapenems effects against clinical isolates of Gram-negative microorganisms producing MBL, in terms of the their MIC and fractional inhibitory concentration index (FIC index. The checkerboard array was modified to evaluate the combined use of carbapenems and potential MBL inhibitor — a drug from the group of bisphosphonates — etidronic acid. Using a standard enzyme reagent metallo-beta-lactamase P. aeruginosa recombinant expressed in E. coli, we created a model system that allows to assess the prospects of new inhibitors MBL gram-negative microorganisms. A dose-dependent effect of increasing the meropenem level MIC from reagent MBL quantity in a model system against previously antibiotic sensitive reference strains of microorganisms was

  1. Characterization of commercial laminin preparations from human placenta in comparison to recombinant laminins 2 (alpha2beta1gamma1), 8 (alpha4beta1gamma1), 10 (alpha5beta1gamma1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondimu, Zenebech; Gorfu, Gezahegn; Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Smirnov, Sergei; Yurchenco, Peter; Tryggvason, Karl; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2006-03-01

    Laminins, a family of large heterotrimeric (alphabetagamma) proteins, are major components of basement membranes implicated in a variety of cellular functions. Different commercial laminin preparations isolated from human placenta have been widely used in functional studies but their molecular properties are poorly known. In the present study, we characterized several of these preparations by ELISA, silver staining and Western blotting, in comparison to mouse laminin 1 (alpha1beta1gamma1), and recombinant human laminins 2 (alpha2beta1gamma1), 8 (alpha4beta1gamma1) and 10 (alpha5beta1gamma1). The cell migration-promoting activity of different batches was also tested. The placenta laminin preparations differed from one another and consisted of highly fragmented proteins, a mixture of laminin isoforms, and/or contaminating fibronectin. Major functional differences between batches were also observed, reflecting molecular heterogeneity. Previous data obtained in functional studies using these preparations need to be interpreted with caution and may require revision, and future functional studies demand prior molecular characterization of the laminins, particularly their alpha-chain.

  2. Preventive immunization of aged and juvenile non-human primates to beta-amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kofler Julia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunization against beta-amyloid (Aβ is a promising approach for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, but the optimal timing for the vaccination remains to be determined. Preventive immunization approaches may be more efficacious and associated with fewer side-effects; however, there is only limited information available from primate models about the effects of preclinical vaccination on brain amyloid composition and the neuroinflammatory milieu. Methods Ten non-human primates (NHP of advanced age (18–26 years and eight 2-year-old juvenile NHPs were immunized at 0, 2, 6, 10 and 14 weeks with aggregated Aβ42 admixed with monophosphoryl lipid A as adjuvant, and monitored for up to 6 months. Anti-Aβ antibody levels and immune activation markers were assessed in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples before and at several time-points after immunization. Microglial activity was determined by [11C]PK11195 PET scans acquired before and after immunization, and by post-mortem immunohistochemical and real-time PCR evaluation. Aβ oligomer composition was assessed by immunoblot analysis in the frontal cortex of aged immunized and non-immunized control animals. Results All juvenile animals developed a strong and sustained serum anti-Aβ IgG antibody response, whereas only 80 % of aged animals developed detectable antibodies. The immune response in aged monkeys was more delayed and significantly weaker, and was also more variable between animals. Pre- and post-immunization [11C]PK11195 PET scans showed no evidence of vaccine-related microglial activation. Post-mortem brain tissue analysis indicated a low overall amyloid burden, but revealed a significant shift in oligomer size with an increase in the dimer:pentamer ratio in aged immunized animals compared with non-immunized controls (P  Conclusions Our results indicate that preventive Aβ immunization is a safe therapeutic approach lacking adverse CNS immune system

  3. Pancreatic beta cells and islets take up thiamin by a regulated carrier-mediated process: studies using mice and human pancreatic preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Lisa; Nabokina, Svetlana M.; Sekar, V. Thillai; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Maedler, Kathrin; Said, Hamid M.

    2009-01-01

    Thiamin is essential for the normal function of the endocrine pancreas, but very little is known about uptake mechanism(s) and regulation by beta cells. We addressed these issues using mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells, and freshly isolated primary mouse and human pancreatic islets. Results showed that thiamin uptake by beta-TC-6 cells involves a pH (but not Na+)-dependent carrier-mediated process that is saturable at both the nanomolar (apparent Km = 37.17 ± 9.9 nM) and micromolar (apparent Km = 3.26 ± 0.86 μM) ranges, cis-inhibited by thiamin structural analogs, and trans-stimulated by unlabeled thiamin. Involvement of carrier-mediated process was also confirmed in primary mouse and human pancreatic islets. Both THTR-1 and THTR-2 were found to be expressed in these mouse and human pancreatic preparations. Maintaining beta-TC-6 cells in the presence of a high level of thiamin led to a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in thiamin uptake, which was associated with a significant downregulation in level of expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 at the protein and mRNA levels and a decrease in transcriptional (promoter) activity. Modulators of intracellular Ca2+/calmodulin- and protein-tyrosine kinase-mediated pathways also altered thiamin uptake. Finally, confocal imaging of live beta-TC-6 cells showed that clinical mutants of THTR-1 have mixed expression phenotypes and all led to impairment in thiamin uptake. These studies demonstrate for the first time that thiamin uptake by the endocrine pancreas is carrier mediated and is adaptively regulated by the prevailing vitamin level via transcriptional mechanisms. Furthermore, clinical mutants of THTR-1 impair thiamin uptake via different mechanisms. PMID:19423748

  4. Textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels from hydration of synthetic T1-C{sub 3}S, {beta}-C{sub 2}S and their blends; Caracterizacion textural y mecanica de geles C-S-H formados en la hidratacion de muestras sinteticas T1-C{sub 3}S, {beta}-C{sub 2}S y sus mezclas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goni, S.; Guerrero, A.; Puertas, F.; Hernandez, M. S.; Palacios, M.; Dolado, J. S.; Zhu, W.; Howind, T.

    2011-07-01

    The textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of pure T1-C{sub 3}S, {beta}-C{sub 2}S and their blends are studied by Nitrogen sorption and nano indentation experiments. The surface area and nano porosity of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of {beta}-C{sub 2}S and the 30-70 (T1-C{sub 3}S and {beta}-C{sub 2}S mixture) are higher than those from hydration of T1-C{sub 3}S, and 70-30, with the difference decreasing with hydration age. Such changes are well supported by findings of nano indentation study, which shows the greater relative volume of C-S-H phases with lower densities in the {beta}-C{sub 2}S and the 30-70 pastes. With the increase in hydration age, the relative volume of C-S-H phases with higher densities increased at the expenses of those with lower density. Important quantitative correlations were found among these textural characteristics and the mean chain length, determined from {sup 2}9Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR, of the C-S-H gels. (Author) 36 refs.

  5. Differential interleukin-1 receptor antagonism on pancreatic beta and alpha cells. Studies in rodent and human islets and in normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zumsteg, U; Reimers, J I; Pociot, F;

    1993-01-01

    The monokines interleukin-1 alpha and -beta have been implicated as effector molecules in the immune-mediated pancreatic beta-cell destruction leading to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Here we investigated the effects of interleukin-1 receptor antagonism on insulin and glucagon release of rat......, mouse and human islets exposed to recombinant human interleukin-1 beta, and on interleukin-1 beta induced changes in blood glucose, serum insulin and serum glucagon levels in Wistar Kyoto rats. The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist reduced the co-mitogenic effect of interleukin-1 beta on mouse and rat...

  6. Prostaglandin E2 suppresses beta1-integrin expression via E-prostanoid receptor in human monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Shunji; Ichiyama, Takashi; Kohno, Fumitaka; Korenaga, Yuno; Ohsaki, Ayami; Hirano, Reiji; Haneda, Yasuhiro; Fukano, Reiji; Furukawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Beta1-integrins mediate cell attachment to different extracellular matrix proteins, intracellular proteins, and intercellular adhesions. Recently, it has been reported that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has anti-inflammatory properties such as inhibition of the expression of adhesion molecules or production of chemokines. However, the effect of PGE2 on the expression of beta1-integrin remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of PGE2 on the expression of beta1-integrin in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 and in CD14+ monocytes/macrophages in human peripheral blood. For this, we examined the role of four subtypes of PGE2 receptors and E-prostanoid (EP) receptors on PGE2-mediated inhibition. We found that PGE2 significantly inhibited the expression of beta1-integrin, mainly through EP4 receptors in THP-1 cells and CD14+ monocytes/macrophages in human peripheral blood. We suggest that PGE2 has anti-inflammatory effects, leading to the inhibited expression of beta1-integrin in human monocytes/macrophages, and that the EP4 receptor may play an important role in PGE2-mediated inhibition. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Facile synthesis of (S)-beta-hydroxy-beta-trichloromethylated aromatic ketones by the regioselective ring cleavage of chiral beta-trichloromethyl-beta-propiolactone under the Friedel-Crafts conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujisawa, T; Ito, T; Fujimoto, K; Shimizu, M; Wynberg, H; Staring, EGJ

    1997-01-01

    The reaction of enantiomerically pure beta-trichloromethyl-beta-propiolactone (1) as a chiral building block with an aromatic compound in the presence of Lewis acid provided an acylated product with a chiral trichloromethyl carbinol moiety. The acylated product was used as an effective chiral syntho

  8. Expression pattern of thymosin beta 4 in the adult human liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemolato, S.; Van Eyken, P.; Cabras, T.; Cau, F.; Fanari, M.U.; Locci, A.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2011-01-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a member of beta-thymosins, a family of small peptides involved in polymerization of G-actin, and in many critical biological processes including apoptosis, cell migration, angiogenesis, and fibrosis. Previous studies in the newborn liver did not reveal any significant reactivity for Tβ4 during the intrauterine life. The aim of the present study was to investigate by immunohistochemistry Tβ4 expression in the adult normal liver. Thirty-five human liver samples, including 11 needle liver biopsies and 24 liver specimens obtained at autopsy, in which no pathological change was detected at the histological examination, were immunostained utilizing an anti-Tβ4 commercial antibody. Tβ4 was detected in the hepatocytes of all adult normal livers examined. A zonation of Tβ4 expression was evident in the vast majority of cases. Immunostaining was preferentially detected in zone 3, while a minor degree of reactivity was detected in periportal hepatocytes (zone 1). At higher power, Tβ4-reactive granules appeared mainly localized at the biliary pole of hepatocytes. In cases with a strong immunostaining, even perinuclear areas and the sinusoidal pole of hepatocytes appeared interested by immunoreactivity for Tβ4. The current work first evidences a strong diffuse expression of Tβ4 in the adult human liver, and adds hepatocytes to the list of human cells able to synthesize large amounts of Tβ4 in adulthood. Moreover, Tβ4 should be added to the liver proteins characterized by a zonate expression pattern, in a descending gradient from the terminal vein to the periportal areas of the liver acinus. Identifying the intimate role played by this peptide intracellularly and extracellularly, in physiology and in different liver diseases, is a major challenge for future research focusing on Tβ4. PMID:22073372

  9. Expression pattern of thymosin beta 4 in the adult human liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nemolato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a member of beta-thymosins, a family of small peptides involved in polymerization of G-actin, and in many critical biological processes including apoptosis, cell migration, angiogenesis, and fibrosis. Previous studies in the newborn liver did not reveal any significant reactivity for Tβ4 during the intrauterine life. The aim of the present study was to investigate by immunohistochemistry Tβ4 expression in the adult normal liver. Thirty-five human liver samples, including 11 needle liver biopsies and 24 liver specimens obtained at autopsy, in which no pathological change was detected at the histological examination, were immunostained utilizing an anti-Tβ4 commercial antibody. Tβ4 was detected in the hepatocytes of all adult normal livers examined. A zonation of Tβ4 expression was evident in the vast majority of cases. Immunostaining was preferentially detected in zone 3, while a minor degree of reactivity was detected in periportal hepatocytes (zone 1. At higher power, Tβ4-reactive granules appeared mainly localized at the biliary pole of hepatocytes. In cases with a strong immunostaining, even perinuclear areas and the sinusoidal pole of hepatocytes appeared interested by immunoreactivity for Tβ4. The current work first evidences a strong diffuse expression of Tβ4 in the adult human liver, and adds hepatocytes to the list of human cells able to synthesize large amounts of Tβ4 in adulthood. Moreover, Tβ4 should be added to the liver proteins characterized by a zonate expression pattern, in a descending gradient from the terminal vein to the periportal areas of the liver acinus. Identifying the intimate role played by this peptide intracellularly and extracellularly, in physiology and in different liver diseases, is a major challenge for future research focusing on Tβ4.

  10. Complexation of bovine beta-lactoglobulin with 11S protein fractions of soybean (Glycine max) and sesame (Sesamum indicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, S N; Prakash, V

    2009-01-01

    Beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) comprises 50% of the whey component of bovine milk. Protein-protein interactions between bovine beta-Lg and 11S protein fractions of soybean and sesame were investigated by turbidity, solubility behaviour and by evaluation of functional properties in the mixed systems. In this work, the aggregation behaviour of soybean and the whey protein (beta-Lg) showed the formation of soluble complexes. Turbidity and solubility studies showed that the proteins interacted at temperatures between 60 and 90+/-5 degrees C. Heating a mixture of beta-Lg and 11S proteins of soybean at higher temperatures formed soluble complexes with beta-Lg. It also reduced the self aggregation behaviour, especially that of 11S protein fraction of soybean. This reduced the precipitation of soybean proteins at higher temperature. The complex formed was resolved by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Upon heating beta-Lg at neutral pH, native dimer starts to dissociate into monomers leading to the exposure of previously buried hydrophobic amino acids and the free thiol group. The soluble complex is formed by the exposed thiol groups. But interaction of beta-Lg with sesame 11S protein fractions did not form any soluble complexes. The mechanism of interaction indicates that hydrophobic interactions were preferred over disulfide linkages at the high salt concentrations of the buffer used. During thermal treatment the molecules are unfolded, leading to an exposure of the hydrophobic groups that further enhance the protein-protein interactions that are entropically driven hydrophobic interactions.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of (S)-[F-18]-fluoroethylcarazolol for in vivo beta-adrenoceptor imaging in the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doze, P; van Waarde, A; Tewson, TJ; Vaalburg, W; Elsinga, PH

    The beta-adrenergic receptor ligand (S)-4-(3-(2'-[F-18]-fluoroethylamino)-2-hydroxypropoxy)-carbazol ((S)-[F-18]-fluoroethylcarazolol) was prepared by reaction of [F-18]-fluoroethylamine with the corresponding (S)-epoxide and was evaluated in rats by studying its pharmacokinetics and its binding

  12. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray analysis of Human Recombinant Acid beta-glucocerebrosidase, a treatment for Gaucher's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeber, Dana F.; Achari, Aniruddha; Manavalan, Partha; Edmunds, Tim; Scott, David L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Acid beta-glucocerebrosidase (N-acylsphingosyl - O - beta-D - glucoside:glucohydrolase) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the glycolipid glucocerebroside to glucose and ceramide. Inadequate levels of this enzyme underly the pathophysiology of Gaucher's disease. Cerezyme(R) (Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) is a partially deglycosylated form of recombinant human acid beta-glucocerebrosidase that is commercially available for the treatment of Gaucher patients. Although acid beta-glucocerebrosidase belongs to a large family of glycosidases, relatively little is known regarding its structural biology. We report the crystallization and the initial diffraction analysis of Cerezyme(R). The crystals are C-centered orthorhombic, with unit-cell parameters of a = 285.0 A, b = 110.2 A, and c = 91.7 A. A 99.9 A complete data set has been collected to 2.75 A with an R(sub sym) of 8.8 %.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of recombinant human acid beta-glucocerebrosidase, a treatment for Gaucher's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeber, Dana; Achari, Aniruddha; Manavalan, Partha; Edmunds, Tim; Scott, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Acid beta-glucocerebrosidase (N-acylsphingosyl-1-O-beta-D-glucoside:glucohydrolase) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the glycolipid glucocerebroside to glucose and ceramide. Inadequate levels of this enzyme underly the pathophysiology of Gaucher's disease. Cerezyme (Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA, USA) is a partially deglycosylated form of recombinant human acid beta-glucocerebrosidase that is used in the treatment of Gaucher patients. Although acid beta-glucocerebrosidase belongs to a large family of glycosidases, relatively little is known regarding its structural biology. Here, the crystallization and the initial diffraction analysis of Cerezyme are reported. The crystals are C-centered orthorhombic, with unit-cell parameters a = 285.0, b = 110.2, c = 91.7 A. A 99.9% complete data set has been collected to 2.75 A with an R(sym) of 8.8%.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of indium xanthates and their use for the preparation of beta-In2S3 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Dimple P; Sharma, Garima; Ghoshal, Shamik; Kushwah, Nisha P; Jain, Vimal K

    2006-01-01

    Synthesis and characterization of various classical indium xanthate complexes of the type [InCl(3-n)(S2COR)n] (n = 1, 2, or 3; R = Me, Et, Pr(i), and Bu(s)) have been discussed. Crystalline beta-ln2S3 nanoparticles were obtained by the solvent thermolysis of indium tris-alkylxanthates in ethylene glycol at 196 degrees C, and were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, powder XRD, and XPS techniques. TEM results showed that the size of beta-In2S3 nanoparticles depended on the nature of the precursor used. The optical properties of beta-In2S3 nanocrystals have shown quantum confinement of the excitonic transition.

  15. Synthesis of enantiomerically pure N-(S)-alpha-methylbenzyl-Beta-aminoalcohols by regio-and steroselective ring opening of epoxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anaya de Parrodi, C. [Departamento de Quimica y Biologia. Universidad de las Americas-Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Juaristi, E. [Departamento de Quimica Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Avanzados. Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    A high yield, stereoselective ring opening of symmetrically substituted epoxides with (S)-alpha-methylbenzylamine to produce enantiomerically pure N-(S)-alpha-methylbenzyl-Beta-aminoalcohols is described. In addition, the regio selective ring opening of (R)-styrene oxide with (S)-alpha -methylbenzylamine and enantiomerically pure secondary amines. (S)-N-benzyl-, (S)-N-isopropyl-. (S)-N-[(2-biphenyl) methyl]-alpha-methylbenzylamine is described. (Author) 16 refs.

  16. INCA, a novel human caspase recruitment domain protein that inhibits interleukin-1beta generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Denecker, Geertrui; Kalai, Michael; D'hondt, Kathleen; Meeus, Ann; Declercq, Wim; Saelens, Xavier; Vandenabeele, Peter

    2004-12-10

    Using in silico methods for screening the human genome for new caspase recruitment domain (CARD) proteins, we have identified INCA (Inhibitory CARD) as a protein that shares 81% identity with the prodomain of caspase-1. The INCA gene is located on chromosome 11q22 between the genes of COP/Pseudo-ICE and ICEBERG, two other CARD proteins that arose from caspase-1 gene duplications. We show that INCA mRNA is expressed in many tissues. INCA is specifically upregulated by interferon-gamma in the monocytic cell lines THP-1 and U937. INCA physically interacts with procaspase-1 and blocks the release of mature IL-1beta from LPS-stimulated macrophages. Unlike COP/Pseudo-ICE and procaspase-1, INCA does not interact with RIP2 and does not induce NF-kappaB activation. Our data show that INCA is a novel intracellular regulator of procaspase-1 activation, involved in the regulation of pro-IL-1beta processing and its release during inflammation.

  17. GABA{sub A} receptor beta 3 subunit gene is possibly paternally imprinted in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-15

    As the gene for GABA{sub A} receptor beta 3 subunit (GABRB3) is encompassed by a small molecular deletion in chromosome 15q11-q13, which is the critical region for Angelman syndrome(AS), the GABRB3 gene could be a candidate gene for AS. The abnormal phenotype of AS is manifested only when the deletion is inherited from the mother, not from the father. Therefore, a candidate gene for AS should be paternally imprinted. Although it was reported that the GABRB3 gene was expressed equally from either the maternal or paternal chromosome in mouse brain (i.e., not imprinted), it is well known that imprinting shows tissue specificity, and it remains to be determined if all genes imprinted in the mouse are also imprinted in humans. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Studies on stabilities of some human chorionic gonadotropin complexes with {beta}-emitting radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, Moumita [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sen, Kamalika [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 APC Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Sen, Souvik [Malda Town Divisional Railway Hospital, Malda 732102 (India); Lahiri, Susanta, E-mail: susanta.lahiri@saha.ac.i [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a peptide hormone, whose one of the structural subunits is identical to that of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). As a consequence, the receptors of TSH also act as receptor for hCG hormone. Keeping in mind this interesting property of hCG we have studied the complex formation ability of various no-carrier-added {beta}-emitting isotopes of {sup 61}Cu (3.3 h), {sup 62}Zn (9.2 h), {sup 90}Nb (14.60 h) and {sup 99}Mo (66.02 h) with hCG molecule. Stability of the hCG-M (M=metal ions) complexes was investigated by dialysis with respect to triple distilled water and ringer lactate solution, which has the same composition as extracellular fluid.

  19. Role of acetylation and charge in antimicrobial peptides based on human beta-defensin-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Emilios Andrew; Hua, Quyen; Sandouk, Aline; Son, U Hyon; Christenson, Andrew James; Van Hoek, Monique Louise; Bishop, Barney Michael

    2009-07-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are an evolutionarily ancient and essential element of innate immunity in higher organisms. The precise mechanism by which these peptides exert their antimicrobial activity on bacteria is not well understood. Decapeptides based on the C-terminus of human beta-defensin-3 were designed and evaluated to study the role of charge in defining the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of these peptides against Escherichia coli. Acetylated derivatives of these peptides were prepared in order to further evaluate how positively charged primary amines contribute to potency in these small antimicrobial peptides. These peptides enabled us to explore the relationship between net charge, charge distribution and antimicrobial activity. While the results indicate that net charge is a major factor in antimicrobial activity in these peptides, the actual relationship between charge and potency appears to be more complex.

  20. Enantioselective transacetylation of (R,S)-beta-citronellol by propanol rinsed immobilized Rhizomucor miehei lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Abir B; Shah, Shweta; Gupta, Munishwar N

    2007-04-18

    Use of enzymes in low water media is now widely used for synthesis and kinetic resolution of organic compounds. The frequently used enzyme form is the freeze-dried powders. It has been shown earlier that removal of water molecules from enzyme by rinsing with n-propanol gives preparation (PREP) which show higher activity in low water media. The present work evaluates PREP of the lipase (from Rhizomucor miehei) for kinetic resolution of (R,S)-beta-citronellol. The acylating agent was vinyl acetate and the reaction was carried out in solvent free media. The PREP, with 0.75% (v/v, reaction media) water, was indeed found to be more efficient and gave 95% conversion to the ester. Using this PREP, with no added water, 90% ee for (R)-(+)-beta-citronellyl acetate at 45% conversion (E = 42) was obtained in 4 h. The control with freeze-dried enzyme, with zero water content, gave 78% ee at 30% conversion (E = 13). FT-IR analysis showed that PREP had retained the alpha-helical content of the enzyme. On the other hand, freeze-dried enzyme showed considerable loss in the alpha-helical content. The results show that PREP may be a superior biocatalyst for enantioselective conversion by enzymes in low-water media.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of human recombinant thyrotropin (rec-hTSH) with a chimeric {beta}-subunit (rec-hTSH{beta}-CTPE hCG{beta}); Sintese e caracterizacao do hormonio tireotrofico humano recombinante (rec-hTSH) contendo uma subunidade {beta} quimerica (rec-hTSH{beta}-CTPE hCG{beta})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Yoko

    1995-12-31

    Recombinant hTSH is now successfully being used in clinical studies of thyroid cancer. Because of its therapeutic potential, we have constructed a longer acting analog of hTSH by fusing the carboxy terminal extension peptide (CTEP) of hCG{beta} onto hTSH{beta}. When coexpressed either with {alpha}-subunit complementary DNA or {alpha}-minigene in African green monkey (Cos-7) and human embryonic kidney (293) cells, the chimera was fully bioactive in vitro and exhibited enhanced in vivo potency associated with a prolonged plasma half-life. The addition of 29 amino acids with 4 O-linked oligosaccharide chains did not affect the assembly and secretion of chimeric TSH. Wild type (WT) and chimeric hTSH secreted by Cos-7 and 293 cells displayed wide differences in their plasma half-lives, presumably due to the difference in the terminal sialic acid and sulfate of their oligosaccharide chains. Chimeric and WT hTSH secreted by both cell lines demonstrated similar bioactivity in cAMP production, with some differences in [{sup 3} H]-thymidine incorporation. Chimeric hTSH secreted by Cos-7 appears to be more active than that secreted by 293 cells, as judged by growth assay. Cos-7 produced chimeric hTSH showed the maximum increase in half-life, indicating the importance of sialic acid in prolonging half-life and in vivo potency. Sulfation of both subunits, predominantly {beta} and to a lesser extent {alpha}, appears to be responsible, at least in part, for the increased metabolic clearance of WT and chimeric TSH secreted by 293 cells. Apart from its therapeutic potential, chimeric TSH produced in various cell lines can be used as a tool to delineate the roles of sulfate and sialic acid in the in vivo clearance and, thereby in the in vivo bioactivity. (author). 104 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Identification of a novel human islet amyloid polypeptide beta-sheet domain and factors influencing fibrillogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaikaran, E T; Higham, C E; Serpell, L C; Zurdo, J; Gross, M; Clark, A; Fraser, P E

    2001-05-04

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) accumulates as pancreatic amyloid in type 2 diabetes and readily forms fibrils in vitro. Investigations into the mechanism of hIAPP fibril formation have focused largely on residues 20 to 29, which are considered to comprise a primary amyloidogenic domain. In rodents, proline substitutions within this region and the subsequent beta-sheet disruption, prevents fibril formation. An additional amyloidogenic fragment within the C-terminal sequence, residues 30 to 37, has been identified recently. We have extended these observations by examining a series of overlapping peptide fragments from the human and rodent sequences. Using protein spectroscopy (CD/FTIR), electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, a previously unrecognised amyloidogenic domain was localised within residues 8 to 20. Synthetic peptides corresponding to this region exhibited a transition from random coil to beta-sheet conformation and assembled into fibrils having a typical amyloid-like morphology. The comparable rat 8-20 sequence, which contains a single His18Arg substitution, was also capable of assembling into amyloid-like fibrils. Examination of peptide fragments corresponding to residues 1 to 13 revealed that the immediate N-terminal region is likely to have only a modulating influence on fibril formation or conformational conversion. The contributions of charged residues as they relate to the amyloid-forming 8-20 sequence were also investigated using IAPP fragments and by assessing the effects of pH and counterions. The identification of these principal amyloidogenic sequences and the effects of associated factors provide details on the IAPP aggregation pathway and structure of the peptide in its fibrillar state. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Structural alterations of transforming growth factor-beta receptor genes in human cervical carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, TP; De Vries, EGE; Hollema, H; Yegen, HA; Vellucci, VF; Strickler, HD; Hildesheim, A; Reiss, M

    1999-01-01

    The development and progression of invasive uterine cervical carcinomas appear to be associated with the progressive loss of sensitivity to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta)-mediated cell cycle arrest. In order to identify possible molecular mechanisms responsible for TGF beta resistance, w

  4. Beta-lactamases among Extended spectrum Beta-lactamase resistant (ESBL) Salmonella from poultry, poultry products and human patients in The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Mevius, D.; Veldman, K.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this work was to study the genetic determinants responsible for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) resistance of Salmonella isolated from Dutch poultry, poultry meat and hospitalized humans. Methods: Thirty-four ESBL-resistant Salmonella isolates from The Netherlands...... were tested towards 21 antimicrobial agents. PCR and sequencing were used to determine the underlying genetic determinants responsible for the ESBL phenotypes. The transferability of the ESBL phenotypes was tested by conjugation to a susceptible Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin and plasmid...

  5. beta-Lactamases among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-resistant Salmonella from poultry, poultry products and human patients in The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Mevius, D.; Veldman, K.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this work was to study the genetic determinants responsible for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) resistance of Salmonella isolated from Dutch poultry, poultry meat and hospitalized humans. Methods: Thirty-four ESBL-resistant Salmonella isolates from The Netherlands...... were tested towards 21 antimicrobial agents. PCR and sequencing were used to determine the underlying genetic determinants responsible for the ESBL phenotypes. The transferability of the ESBL phenotypes was tested by conjugation to a susceptible Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin and plasmid...

  6. Exogenous thymosin beta4 prevents apoptosis in human intervertebral annulus cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapp, H; Deepe, R; Ingram, J A; Yarmola, E G; Bubb, M R; Hanley, E N; Gruber, H E

    2009-12-01

    Loss of cells in the human disc due to programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a major factor in the aging and degenerating human intervertebral disc. Our objective here was to determine if thymosin beta(4) (TB4), a small, multifunctional 5 kDa protein with diverse activities, might block apoptosis in human annulus cells cultured in monolayer or three-dimensional (3D) culture. Apoptosis was induced in vitro using hydrogen peroxide or serum starvation. Annulus cells were processed for identification of apoptotic cells using the TUNEL method. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined by cell counts. Annulus cells also were treated with TB4 for determination of proliferation, and proteoglycan production was assessed using cell titer and 1,2 dimethylmethylamine (DMB) assays and histological staining. A significant reduction in disc cell apoptosis occurred after TB4 treatment. The percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis decreased significantly in TB4 treated cells in both apoptosis induction designs. TB4 exposure did not alter proteoglycan production as assessed by either DMB measurement or histological staining. Our results indicate the need for further studies of the anti-apoptotic effect of TB4 and suggest that TB4 may have therapeutic application in future biological therapies for disc degeneration.

  7. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Zhang, Yongkang [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Jain, Sumit [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Skidgel, Randal A. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prabhakar, Bellur S. [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Mazzone, Theodore [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Holterman, Mark J. [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  8. Absorption, by humans, of beta-carotene from fortified soybean oil added to rice: effect of heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra-de-Oliveira, J E; Fávaro, R M; Leonardo, I R; Jordão Júnior, A A; Vannucchi, H

    1998-08-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the absorption of beta-carotene in humans when rice is prepared with refined cooking soybean oil fortified with beta-carotene and to assess the effect of heat treatment on its bioavailability. Sixteen healthy adults subjects participated in two experimental trials. Studies were carried out during two experimental periods of 11 days with a 12-day interval between them. Beta carotene was added to the soybean cooking oil and rice was cooked with it or it was added to the rice after cooking. Experimental diets included these two kinds of rice during the first day and fasting blood samples were collected on different days. All of the test diets were low in carotenoids. Plasma carotenoids were measured by HPLC method. beta-carotene absorption was calculated through postabsorptive peak rise in plasma beta-carotene and the total area under the absorption curve was determined by the trapezoidal method for the 11-day period. Absorption of carotene from heated or unheated fortified soybean oil were similar. Peak plasma carotene rise was different in men and women, p oil used in the preparation of rice is absorbed, heated or not, and could be a practical source of provitamin A. Developing countries looking for strategies to increase vitamin A intake could use fortification of vegetable oils with synthetic beta-carotene as a simple method.

  9. Inter-MAR association contributes to transcriptionally active looping events in human beta-globin gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Di, Li-Jun; Lv, Xiang; Zheng, Wei; Xue, Zheng; Guo, Zhi-Chen; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chi-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are important in chromatin organization and gene regulation. Although it is known that there are a number of MAR elements in the beta-globin gene cluster, it is unclear that how these MAR elements are involved in regulating beta-globin genes expression. Here, we report the identification of a new MAR element at the LCR (locus control region) of human beta-globin gene cluster and the detection of the inter-MAR association within the beta-globin gene cluster. Also, we demonstrate that SATB1, a protein factor that has been implicated in the formation of network like higher order chromatin structures at some gene loci, takes part in beta-globin specific inter-MAR association through binding the specific MARs. Knocking down of SATB1 obviously reduces the binding of SATB1 to the MARs and diminishes the frequency of the inter-MAR association. As a result, the ACH establishment and the alpha-like globin genes and beta-like globin genes expressions are affected either. In summary, our results suggest that SATB1 is a regulatory factor of hemoglobin genes, especially the early differentiation genes at least through affecting the higher order chromatin structure.

  10. Acylguanidine inhibitors of beta-secretase: optimization of the pyrrole ring substituents extending into the S1 and S3 substrate binding pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Derek C; Stock, Joseph R; Chopra, Rajiv; Cowling, Rebecca; Ellingboe, John W; Fan, Kristi Y; Harrison, Boyd L; Hu, Yun; Jacobsen, Steve; Jennings, Lee D; Jin, Guixian; Lohse, Peter A; Malamas, Michael S; Manas, Eric S; Moore, William J; O'Donnell, Mary-Margaret; Olland, Andrea M; Robichaud, Albert J; Svenson, Kristine; Wu, JunJun; Wagner, Eric; Bard, Jonathan

    2008-02-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein by beta-secretase (BACE-1) and gamma-secretase leads to formation of beta-amyloid (A beta) a key component of amyloid plaques, which are considered the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Small molecule inhibitors of BACE-1 may reduce levels of A beta and thus have therapeutic potential for treating Alzheimer's disease. We recently reported the identification of a novel small molecule BACE-1 inhibitor N-[2-(2,5-diphenyl-pyrrol-1-yl)-acetyl]guanidine (3.a.1). We report here the initial hit-to-lead optimization of this hit and the SAR around the aryl groups occupying the S(1) and S(2') pockets leading to submicromolar BACE-1 inhibitors.

  11. Beta Blockers Suppress Dextrose-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Michael J; Kurban, William; Shah, Harshit; Onstead-Haas, Luisa; Mooradian, Arshag D

    Beta blockers are known to have favorable effects on endothelial function partly because of their capacity to reduce oxidative stress. To determine whether beta blockers can also prevent dextrose-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in addition to their antioxidative effects, human coronary artery endothelial cells and hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cells were treated with 27.5 mM dextrose for 24 hours in the presence of carvedilol (a lipophilic beta blockers with alpha blocking activity), propranolol (a lipophilic nonselective beta blockers), and atenolol (a water-soluble selective beta blockers), and ER stress, oxidative, stress and cell death were measured. ER stress was measured using the placental alkaline phosphatase assay and Western blot analysis of glucose regulated protein 78, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), phospho-JNK, eukaryotic initiating factor 2α (eIF2α), and phospho-eIF2α and measurement of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Superoxide (SO) generation was measured using the superoxide-reactive probe 2-methyl-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-A]pyrazin-3-one hydrochloride (MCLA) chemiluminescence. Cell viability was measured by propidium iodide staining method. The ER stress, SO production, and cell death induced by 27.5 mM dextrose were inhibited by all 3 beta blockers tested. The antioxidative and ER stress reducing effects of beta blockers were also observed in HepG2 cells. The salutary effects of beta blockers on endothelial cells in reducing both ER stress and oxidative stress may contribute to the cardioprotective effects of these agents.

  12. Corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulates expression of leptin, 11beta-HSD2 and syncytin-1 in primary human trophoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahlbusch Fabian B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The placental syncytiotrophoblast is the major source of maternal plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH in the second half of pregnancy. Placental CRH exerts multiple functions in the maternal organism: It induces the adrenal secretion of cortisol via the stimulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone, regulates the timing of birth via its actions in the myometrium and inhibits the invasion of extravillous trophoblast cells in vitro. However, the auto- and paracrine actions of CRH on the syncytiotrophoblast itself are unknown. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR is accompanied by an increase in placental CRH, which could be of pathophysiological relevance for the dysregulation in syncytialisation seen in IUGR placentas. Methods We aimed to determine the effect of CRH on isolated primary trophoblastic cells in vitro. After CRH stimulation the trophoblast syncytialisation rate was monitored via syncytin-1 gene expression and beta-hCG (beta-human chorionic gonadotropine ELISA in culture supernatant. The expression of the IUGR marker genes leptin and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11beta-HSD2 was measured continuously over a period of 72 h. We hypothesized that CRH might attenuate syncytialisation, induce leptin, and reduce 11beta-HSD2 expression in primary villous trophoblasts, which are known features of IUGR. Results CRH did not influence the differentiation of isolated trophoblasts into functional syncytium as determined by beta-hCG secretion, albeit inducing syncytin-1 expression. Following syncytialisation, CRH treatment significantly increased leptin and 11beta-HSD2 expression, as well as leptin secretion into culture supernatant after 48 h. Conclusion The relevance of CRH for placental physiology is underlined by the present in vitro study. The induction of leptin and 11beta-HSD2 in the syncytiotrophoblast by CRH might promote fetal nutrient supply and placental corticosteroid metabolism in the phase

  13. Two-Dimensional Infrared (2DIR) Spectroscopy of the Peptide Beta3s Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zaizhi; Preketes, Nicholas K; Jiang, Jun; Mukamel, Shaul; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Probing underlying free energy landscape, pathways, and mechanism is the key for understanding protein folding in theory and experiment. Recently time-resolved two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) with femtosecond laser pulses, has emerged as a promising tool for investigating the protein folding dynamics on faster timescales than possible by NMR. We have employed molecular dynamics simulations to compute 2DIR spectra of the folding process of a peptide, Beta3s. Simulated non-chiral and chiral 2DIR signals illustrate the variation of the spectra as the peptide conformation evolves along the free energy landscape. Chiral spectra show stronger changes than the non-chiral signals because cross peaks caused by the formation of the β-sheet are clearly resolved. Chirality-induced 2DIR may be used to detect the folding of β-sheet proteins with high spectral and temporal resolution. PMID:23956818

  14. Mechanical properties of coated titanium Beta-21S after exposure to air at 700 and 800 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Karl E.; Bird, R. Keith; Wallace, Terryl A.; Clark, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical properties of Beta-21S (Ti-15Mo-3Al-2.7Nb-0.2Si, wt percent) with glass, aluminide, and glass-on-aluminide coatings less than 3-micron thick were studied. Coatings were deposited by sol-gel processing or electron-beam evaporation onto 4.5-mil (113-micron) thick Beta-21S sheet from which, after oxidizing in air at 700 or 800 C, tensile test specimens were machined. Plastic elongation was the most severely degraded of the tensile properties; the glass-on-aluminide coatings were the most effective in preventing degradation. It was found that oxygen trapping by forming oxides in the coating, and reactions between the coatings and the Beta-21S alloy played significant roles.

  15. Biotin uptake by mouse and human pancreatic beta cells/islets: a regulated, lipopolysaccharide-sensitive carrier-mediated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Sekar, Thillai V; Said, Hamid M

    2014-08-01

    Biotin is essential for the normal function of pancreatic beta cells. These cells obtain biotin from their surroundings via transport across their cell membrane. Little is known about the uptake mechanism involved, how it is regulated, and how it is affected by internal and external factors. We addressed these issues using the mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells and freshly isolated mouse and human primary pancreatic beta cells as models. The results showed biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells occurs via a Na(+)-dependent, carrier-mediated process, that is sensitive to desthiobiotin, as well as to pantothenic acid and lipoate; the process is also saturable as a function of concentration (apparent Km = 22.24 ± 5.5 μM). These cells express the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT), whose knockdown (with doxycycline-inducible shRNA) led to a sever inhibition in biotin uptake. Similarly, uptake of biotin by mouse and human primary pancreatic islets is Na(+)-dependent and carrier-mediated, and both cell types express SMVT. Biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells is also adaptively regulated (via transcriptional mechanism) by extracellular substrate level. Chronic treatment of pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to inhibition in biotin uptake. This inhibition is mediated via a Toll-Like receptor 4-mediated process and involves a decrease in membrane expression of SMVT. These findings show, for the first time, that pancreatic beta cells/islets take up biotin via a specific and regulated carrier-mediated process, and that the process is sensitive to the effect of LPS.

  16. An Abbreviated Protocol for In Vitro Generation of Functional Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-Like Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massumi, Mohammad; Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Nalla, Amarnadh;

    2016-01-01

    The ability to yield glucose-responsive pancreatic beta-cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro will facilitate the development of the cell replacement therapies for the treatment of Type 1 Diabetes. Here, through the sequential in vitro targeting of selected signaling pathways, we have ...

  17. Mu-opiate receptor and Beta-endorphin expression in nerve endings and keratinocytes in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigliardi-Qi, M; Sumanovski, L T; Büchner, S; Rufli, T; Bigliardi, P L

    2004-01-01

    We have previously shown that human epidermal keratinocytes express a functionally active micro-opiate receptor, which adds a new dimension to the recently developed research in neuroimmunodermatology and neurogenic inflammation in skin diseases. Human keratinocytes specifically bind and also produce beta-endorphin, the endogenous micro-opiate receptor ligand. Using confocal imaging microscopy, we could now demonstrate that micro-opiate receptors are not only expressed in keratinocytes, but also on unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers in the dermis and epidermis. Some of the peripheral nerve fibers also express the ligand beta-endorphin. The keratinocytes positive for beta-endorphin staining are clustered around the terminal ends of the unmyelinated nerve fibers. Therefore the opiate receptor system seems to be crucial in the direct communication between nerves and skin. The keratinocytes can influence the unmyelinated nerve fibers in the epidermis directly via secreting beta-endorphin. On the other hand, nerve fibers can also secrete beta-endorphin and influence the migration, differentiation and probably also the cytokine production pattern of keratinocytes.

  18. NCI’s Cooperative Human Tissue Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality biospecimens are a foundational resource for cancer research. One of NCI’s longest running biospecimen programs is the Cooperative Human Tissue Network, a resource mainly for basic discovery and early translational research.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and assembly of beta-In2S3 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneashwari, B; Dash, S; Tyagi, A K; Parameswaran, P; Ravichandran, V; Sunthathiraraj, S Austin

    2007-06-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles of Indium Sulphide were synthesized by a hydrothermal method using InCl3 and Na2S. Powder X-ray Diffraction analysis confirmed that the product obtained was nanocrystals of single-phase beta-In2S3. The crystallite size distribution was obtained from the diffraction profile and the average size was approximately 5 nm. The compositional analyses performed on the as-prepared powder showed that the material was devoid of any impurity with an In:S ratio very close to 2:3. A colloid of very fine In2S3 particles was obtained from the as-prepared powder by suspending them in acetonitrile. The optical absorption of this colloid showed evidence of strong quantum confinement of excitons and as a result the particles yielded intense photoluminescence in the violet-blue region. These colloidal particles were then electrophoretically driven on to a transparent conducting substrate to assemble into a nanostructure. A Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction analysis of the deposited layer revealed that the preferred orientation noticed in the native powder was removed in the deposit. The surface morphology of the deposit studied using SEM and AFM displayed an inherent ordering behaviour in the clusters organized into a two-dimensional film. The locus of the cluster lines tend to form closed circles, at the nanoscopic as well as microscopic scales, indicative of certain strong neighborhood correlations. Such structures may be expected to exhibit novel correlated properties also.

  20. Genus beta human papillomavirus E6 proteins vary in their effects on the transactivation of p53 target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Elizabeth A; Walther, Johanna; Javanbakht, Hassan; Howley, Peter M

    2014-08-01

    The genus beta human papillomaviruses (beta HPVs) cause cutaneous lesions and are thought to be involved in the initiation of some nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), particularly in patients with the genetic disorder epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). We have previously reported that at least two of the genus beta HPV E6 proteins bind to and/or increase the steady-state levels of p53 in squamous epithelial cells. This is in contrast to a well-characterized ability of the E6 proteins of cancer-associated HPVs of genus alpha HPV, which inactivate p53 by targeting its ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. In this study, we have investigated the ability of genus beta E6 proteins from eight different HPV types to block the transactivation of p53 target genes following DNA damage. We find that the E6 proteins from diverse beta HPV species and types vary in their capacity to block the induction of MDM2, p21, and proapoptotic genes after genotoxic stress. We conclude that some genus beta HPV E6 proteins inhibit at least some p53 target genes, although perhaps not by the same mechanism or to the same degree as the high-risk genus alpha HPV E6 proteins. This study addresses the ability of various human papillomavirus E6 proteins to block the activation of p53-responsive cellular genes following DNA damage in human keratinocytes, the normal host cell for HPVs. The E6 proteins encoded by the high-risk, cancer-associated HPV types of genus alpha HPV have a well-established activity to target p53 degradation and thereby inhibit the response to DNA damage. In this study, we have investigated the ability of genus beta HPV E6 proteins from eight different HPV types to block the ability of p53 to transactivate downstream genes following DNA damage. We find that some, but not all, genus beta HPV E6 proteins can block the transactivation of some p53 target genes. This differential response to DNA damage furthers the understanding of cutaneous HPV biology and may help to explain the

  1. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's A{beta} peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina [Max-Planck-Forschungsstelle fuer Enzymologie der Proteinfaltung, Weinbergweg 22, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Haupt, Caroline [Institute fuer Physik, Biophysik, Martin-Luther Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Betty-Heimann-Str. 7, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Knuepfer, Uwe [Leibniz-Institute for Infection Biology and Natural Product Research, Beutenbergstr. 11a, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica [Leibniz-Institute for Age Research (FLI), Beutenbergstr. 11, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Horn, Uwe [Leibniz-Institute for Infection Biology and Natural Product Research, Beutenbergstr. 11a, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Balbach, Jochen [Institute fuer Physik, Biophysik, Martin-Luther Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Betty-Heimann-Str. 7, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Faendrich, Marcus, E-mail: fandrich@enzyme-halle.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Forschungsstelle fuer Enzymologie der Proteinfaltung, Weinbergweg 22, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Bio zentrum, Martin-Luther Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Weinbergweg 22, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Sodium phosphate buffer accelerated A{beta}(1-40) nucleation relative to HEPES. {yields} A{beta}(1-40) fibrils formed in the two buffers show only minor structural differences. {yields} NMR revealed that A{beta}(1-40) histidine residues mediate buffer dependent changes. -- Abstract: The oligomerization of A{beta} peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of A{beta} and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of A{beta} peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of A{beta} fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of A{beta}(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  2. Review of the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha (PPAR alpha), beta (PPAR beta), and gamma (PPAR gamma) in rodent and human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Barbara D

    2009-06-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) belong to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and there are three primary subtypes, PPARalpha, beta, and gamma. These receptors regulate important physiological processes that impact lipid homeostasis, inflammation, adipogenesis, reproduction, wound healing, and carcinogenesis. These nuclear receptors have important roles in reproduction and development and their expression may influence the responses of an embryo exposed to PPAR agonists. PPARs are relevant to the study of the biological effects of the perfluorinated alkyl acids as these compounds, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), activate PPARalpha. Exposure of the rodent to PFOA or PFOS during gestation results in neonatal deaths, developmental delay and growth deficits. Studies in PPARalpha knockout mice demonstrate that the developmental effects of PFOA, but not PFOS, depend on expression of PPARalpha. This review provides an overview of PPARalpha, beta, and gamma protein and mRNA expression during mouse, rat, and human development. The review presents the results from many published studies and the information is organized by organ system and collated to show patterns of expression at comparable developmental stages for human, mouse, and rat. The features of the PPAR nuclear receptor family are introduced and what is known or inferred about their roles in development is discussed relative to insights from genetically modified mice and studies in the adult.

  3. $\\sin(2\\beta)$ with $B^0 \\rightarrow\\!J/\\!\\psi K_\\text{S}$ at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Niet, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The poster presents the recent measurement of $\\sin(2\\beta)$ using $B^0$ decays to the $J/\\!\\psi K_\\text{S}$ final state. The measurement is based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0$\\,\\text{fb}^{-1}$ collected with the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. To control penguin pollutions in the determination of $\\sin(2\\beta)$, $B_s^0$ decays to the same final state can be analysed. The results of the corresponding analysis are presented as well.

  4. Beta-adrenergic modulation of tremor and corticomuscular coherence in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Baker

    Full Text Available Coherence between the bioelectric activity of sensorimotor cortex and contralateral muscles can be observed around 20 Hz. By contrast, physiological tremor has a dominant frequency around 10 Hz. Although tremor has multiple sources, it is partly central in origin, reflecting a component of motoneuron discharge at this frequency. The motoneuron response to ~20 Hz descending input could be altered by non-linear interactions with ~10 Hz motoneuron firing. We investigated this further in eight healthy human subjects by testing the effects of the beta-adrenergic agents propranolol (non-selective β-antagonist and salbutamol (β(2-agonist, which are known to alter the size of physiological tremor. Corticomuscular coherence was assessed during an auxotonic precision grip task; tremor was quantified using accelerometry during index finger extension. Experiments with propranolol used a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. A single oral dose of propranolol (40 mg significantly increased beta band (15.3-32.2 Hz corticomuscular coherence compared with placebo, but reduced tremor in the 6.2-11.9 Hz range. Salbutamol (2.5 mg was administered by inhalation. Whilst salbutamol significantly increased tremor amplitude as expected, it did not change corticomuscular coherence. The opposite direction of the effects of propranolol on corticomuscular coherence and tremor, and the fact that salbutamol enhances tremor but does not affect coherence, implies that the magnitude of corticomuscular coherence is little influenced by non-linear interactions with 10 Hz oscillations in motoneurons or the periphery. Instead, we suggest that propranolol and salbutamol may affect both tremor and corticomuscular coherence partly via a central site of action.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a new mutant human cell line unresponsive to alpha and beta interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, J; McKendry, R; Pellegrini, S; Flavell, D; Kerr, I M; Stark, G R

    1991-08-01

    Previously we described human cell line 2fTGH, in which expression of guanine phosphoribosyltransferase is tightly controlled by the upstream region of interferon (IFN)-stimulated human gene 6-16. After mutagenesis of 2fTGH and selection with 6-thioguanine and IFN-alpha, we isolated 11.1, a recessive mutant that does not respond to IFN-alpha. We now describe U2, a second recessive mutant, selected similarly, that complements 11.1. U2 had no response to IFN-alpha or IFN-beta, and its response to IFN-gamma was partially defective. Although many genes did respond to IFN-gamma in U2, the 9-27 gene did not and the antiviral response of U2 cells to IFN-gamma was greatly reduced. Band shift assays showed that none of the transcription factors normally induced in 2fTGH cells by IFN-alpha (E and M) or IFN-gamma (G) were induced in U2. However, extracts of untreated U2 cells gave rise to a novel band that was increased by treatment with IFN-gamma but not IFN-alpha. Band shift complementation assays revealed that untreated and IFN-gamma-treated U2 cells lack the functional E gamma subunit of transcription factor E and that IFN-alpha-treated U2 cells do contain the functional E alpha subunit.

  6. Human-Specific SNP in Obesity Genes, Adrenergic Receptor Beta2 (ADRB2), Beta3 (ADRB3), and PPAR γ2 (PPARG), during Primate Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Akiko; Nakamura, Shin; Mitsunaga, Fusako; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Udono, Toshifumi; Suryobroto, Bambang

    2012-01-01

    Adrenergic-receptor beta2 (ADRB2) and beta3 (ADRB3) are obesity genes that play a key role in the regulation of energy balance by increasing lipolysis and thermogenesis. The Glu27 allele in ADRB2 and the Arg64 allele in ADRB3 are associated with abdominal obesity and early onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in many ethnic groups. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARG) is required for adipocyte differentiation. Pro12Ala mutation decreases PPARG activity and resistance to NIDDM. In humans, energy-expense alleles, Gln27 in ADRB2 and Trp64 in ADRB3, are at higher frequencies than Glu27 and Arg64, respectively, but Ala12 in PPARG is at lower frequency than Pro12. Adaptation of humans for lipolysis, thermogenesis, and reduction of fat accumulation could be considered by examining which alleles in these genes are dominant in non-human primates (NHP). All NHP (P. troglodytes, G. gorilla, P. pygmaeus, H. agilis and macaques) had energy-thrifty alleles, Gly16 and Glu27 in ADRB2, and Arg64 in ADRB3, but did not have energy-expense alleles, Arg16, Gln27 and Trp64 alleles. In PPARG gene, all NHP had large adipocyte accumulating type, the Pro12 allele. Conclusions These results indicate that a tendency to produce much more heat through the energy-expense alleles developed only in humans, who left tropical rainforests for savanna and developed new features in their heat-regulation systems, such as reduction of body hair and increased evaporation of water, and might have helped the protection of entrails from cold at night, especially in glacial periods. PMID:22937051

  7. Human-specific SNP in obesity genes, adrenergic receptor beta2 (ADRB2, Beta3 (ADRB3, and PPAR γ2 (PPARG, during primate evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Takenaka

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Adrenergic-receptor beta2 (ADRB2 and beta3 (ADRB3 are obesity genes that play a key role in the regulation of energy balance by increasing lipolysis and thermogenesis. The Glu27 allele in ADRB2 and the Arg64 allele in ADRB3 are associated with abdominal obesity and early onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM in many ethnic groups. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARG is required for adipocyte differentiation. Pro12Ala mutation decreases PPARG activity and resistance to NIDDM. In humans, energy-expense alleles, Gln27 in ADRB2 and Trp64 in ADRB3, are at higher frequencies than Glu27 and Arg64, respectively, but Ala12 in PPARG is at lower frequency than Pro12. Adaptation of humans for lipolysis, thermogenesis, and reduction of fat accumulation could be considered by examining which alleles in these genes are dominant in non-human primates (NHP. All NHP (P. troglodytes, G. gorilla, P. pygmaeus, H. agilis and macaques had energy-thrifty alleles, Gly16 and Glu27 in ADRB2, and Arg64 in ADRB3, but did not have energy-expense alleles, Arg16, Gln27 and Trp64 alleles. In PPARG gene, all NHP had large adipocyte accumulating type, the Pro12 allele. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that a tendency to produce much more heat through the energy-expense alleles developed only in humans, who left tropical rainforests for savanna and developed new features in their heat-regulation systems, such as reduction of body hair and increased evaporation of water, and might have helped the protection of entrails from cold at night, especially in glacial periods.

  8. Human-specific SNP in obesity genes, adrenergic receptor beta2 (ADRB2), Beta3 (ADRB3), and PPAR γ2 (PPARG), during primate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Akiko; Nakamura, Shin; Mitsunaga, Fusako; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Udono, Toshifumi; Suryobroto, Bambang

    2012-01-01

    Adrenergic-receptor beta2 (ADRB2) and beta3 (ADRB3) are obesity genes that play a key role in the regulation of energy balance by increasing lipolysis and thermogenesis. The Glu27 allele in ADRB2 and the Arg64 allele in ADRB3 are associated with abdominal obesity and early onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in many ethnic groups. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARG) is required for adipocyte differentiation. Pro12Ala mutation decreases PPARG activity and resistance to NIDDM. In humans, energy-expense alleles, Gln27 in ADRB2 and Trp64 in ADRB3, are at higher frequencies than Glu27 and Arg64, respectively, but Ala12 in PPARG is at lower frequency than Pro12. Adaptation of humans for lipolysis, thermogenesis, and reduction of fat accumulation could be considered by examining which alleles in these genes are dominant in non-human primates (NHP). All NHP (P. troglodytes, G. gorilla, P. pygmaeus, H. agilis and macaques) had energy-thrifty alleles, Gly16 and Glu27 in ADRB2, and Arg64 in ADRB3, but did not have energy-expense alleles, Arg16, Gln27 and Trp64 alleles. In PPARG gene, all NHP had large adipocyte accumulating type, the Pro12 allele. These results indicate that a tendency to produce much more heat through the energy-expense alleles developed only in humans, who left tropical rainforests for savanna and developed new features in their heat-regulation systems, such as reduction of body hair and increased evaporation of water, and might have helped the protection of entrails from cold at night, especially in glacial periods.

  9. Neuroprotective potential of Beta vulgaris L. in Parkinson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana S Nade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to investigate the neuroprotective role of Beta vulgaris in Parkinson′s disease (PD. Materials and Methods: PD was induced by administration of reserpine (5 mg/kg/day, i.p for 5 consecutive days, haloperidol (1 mg/kg, i.p., and tacrine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p. in experimental animals. The symptoms of PD such as tremors, akinesia, rigidity, catalepsy, and vacuous chewing movements (VCMs were evaluated. Foot shock-induced aggression (FSIA model was used to confirm anti-parkinsonian activity. The methanolic extract of Beta vulgaris (MEBV was administered at doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg, p.o. The combination of L-dopa and carbidopa was used as a standard drug. Behavioral studies such as locomotor activity and grip strength were determined, and oxidative stress was evaluated in FSIA model in rat brain. Results: Pretreatment with MEBV (200 and 300 mg/kg significantly reduced the intensity of muscular rigidity, duration of catalepsy, akinesia, the number of tremors, VCMs, and increase fighting behavior. The locomotor activity and grip strength were significantly increased by MEBV. In FSIA, the biochemical analysis of brain revealed the increased level of lipid peroxidation (LPO and decreased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT. MEBV significantly reduced LPO level and restored the defensive antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT in rat brain. Conclusions: The results indicated the protective role of B. vulgaris against PD. The mechanism of protection may be due to augmentation of cellular antioxidants.

  10. Fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies directed at human T cell receptor variable regions: comparison with oligonucleotide-driven amplification for evaluation of V beta expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Romagné, F; Genevée, C; Rocher, C; Bruneau, J M; David, A; Praz, F; Hercend, T

    1993-07-01

    Seven distinct anti-human T cell receptor (TcR) V region monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were generated by immunizing mice with either human T cell lines or transfected murine cells expressing human TcR V beta genes. The specificity of these reagents was determined as follows: T cells recognized by each mAb were purified from the peripheral blood of healthy donors and TcR transcripts expressed in these cells were analyzed using oligonucleotide-driven amplification and cDNA sequencing. Four mAb were found to delineate the V beta 3, V beta 8, V beta 17 and V beta 19 subfamilies, respectively. The remaining reagents recognize subsets within the V beta 2, V beta 5 and V beta 13 subfamilies. Reactivity of the mAb with circulating T cells from 18 unrelated healthy individuals was determined. Limited variability was found from an individual to another. In four donors, mAb staining was compared to oligonucleotide-driven amplification for evaluation of V beta 3, V beta 8, V beta 17 and V beta 19 subfamily expression in the peripheral blood. Although the V gene subfamily-specific oligonucleotides used in this study belong to a carefully controlled series, our results show that this method does not give an accurate estimate of the percentage of peripheral T cells expressing a given TcR beta chain. The present data confirm the necessity to establish a complete set of well-characterized monoclonal reagents to study human T cell responses.

  11. Transnasal delivery of human A-beta peptides elicits impaired learning and memory performance in wild type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Kristina; Reinhardt, Sven; Geladaris, Anastasia; Knies, Julia; Grimm, Marcus; Hartmann, Tobias; Schmitt, Ulrich

    2016-07-04

    Murine models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are mainly based on overexpression of pathologic amyloid precursor protein and/or presenilins. Those genes resemble underlying cause of early onset type of AD while about 99 % of all human cases are to be characterized as sporadic, late onset. Appropriate animal models for this type of AD are still missing. We here investigated, if transnasal delivery of A-beta 42 peptides might serve to mimic pathological effects in mice. A-beta 42 peptides, used for the behavioral study, showed the expected dose-dependent toxicity in neur oblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y and were able to form higher molecular weight species in vitro. Upon delivery into nostrils of wild type mice, protein bands that might represent aggregation products of the exogenously applied human A-beta 42 were only observed in total brain homogenates from mice pre-treated with mannitol. By using TAMRA-labeled A-beta 42 peptides we demonstrated, that transport throughout the brain was achieved already 1 h after administration. FVB/N mice treated with A-beta 42 for 3 days were significantly impaired in the cue-retention condition of the fear conditioning task as compared to controls whereas A-beta-treated C57B6/J mice were impaired in the context condition. In the Morris water maze test, these mice also displayed a delayed learning performance, indicated by significantly longer time to find the platform. Those deficits were also seen for memory performance in the probe trial as measured by number of crossings of the former platform position and time spent in the goal quadrant. Existing AD mouse models are of genetic origin and need prolonged housing time before onset of pathology. Our short-term treatment induced learning and memory deficits via exogenous application of A-beta peptides comparable to those observed for the transgenic animals. With the transnasal A-beta 42 treatment we present an approach to investigate purely A-beta related changes suitable as a model for

  12. Concentrations of cyclosporin A and FK506 that inhibit IL-2 induction in human T cells do not affect TGF-beta1 biosynthesis, whereas higher doses of cyclosporin A trigger apoptosis and release of preformed TGF-beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguillón, Jordi; Morancho, Beatriz; Kim, Seong-Jin; López-Botet, Miguel; Aramburu, José

    2005-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506 suppress T cell activation by inhibiting calcineurin and the calcineurin-dependent transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc), which are central regulators of T cell function. It was reported that CsA up-regulated the transcription of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) in lymphocytes and other cells and activated its promoter in A549 lung carcinoma cells, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood, and it is unclear whether calcineurin plays any role. We have studied the regulation of TGF-beta1 in normal human lymphocytes and cell lines. In Jurkat T cells, the TGF-beta1 promoter was activated by calcineurin and NFATc and inhibited by CsA and FK506. However, the promoter was insensitive to both drugs in A549 cells. In human T cells preactivated with phytohemagglutinin, biosynthesis of TGF-beta1, induced by the T cell receptor (TCR) or the TGF-beta receptor, was not substantially affected by CsA and FK506 concentrations (< or = 1 microM) that effectively inhibited interleukin-2 production. However, pretreatment of fresh lymphocytes with CsA or FK506 during primary TCR stimulation reduced their production of TGF-beta1 during secondary TCR activation. Finally, high concentrations of CsA (10 microM), in the range attained in vivo in experiments in rodents, caused apoptosis in human T cells and the release of preformed, bioactive TGF-beta1. These effects are unlikely to owe to calcineurin inhibition, as they were not observed with FK506. Our results indicate that CsA and FK506 are not general inducers of TGF-beta1 biosynthesis but can cause different effects on TGF-beta1 depending on the cell type and concentrations used.

  13. Effect of beta-adrenoceptor blockers on human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Delphine S; Klaerke, Dan A; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2005-01-01

    Patients with congenital long QT syndrome may develop arrhythmias under conditions of increased sympathetic tone. We have addressed whether some of the beta-adrenoceptor blockers commonly used to prevent the development of these arrhythmias could per se block the cardiac HERG (Human Ether....... These data showed that HERG blockade by beta-adrenoceptor blockers occurred only at high micromolar concentrations, which are significantly above the recently established safe margin of 100 (Redfern et al., 2003).......-1H-inden-4-yl)oxy]-3-[(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-butanol hydrochloride) blocked the HERG channel with similar affinity, whereas the beta1-receptor antagonists metoprolol and atenolol showed weak effects. Further, the four compounds blocked HERG channels expressed in a mammalian HEK293 cell line...

  14. Functionally graded beta-TCP/PCL nanocomposite scaffolds: in vitro evaluation with human fetal osteoblast cells for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Seher; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Yu, Xiaojun

    2010-03-01

    The engineering of biomimetic tissue relies on the ability to develop biodegradable scaffolds with functionally graded physical and chemical properties. In this study, a twin-screw-extrusion/spiral winding (TSESW) process was developed to enable the radial grading of porous scaffolds (discrete and continuous gradations) that were composed of polycaprolactone (PCL), beta-tricalciumphosphate (beta-TCP) nanoparticles, and salt porogens. Scaffolds with interconnected porosity, exhibiting myriad radial porosity, pore-size distributions, and beta-TCP nanoparticle concentration could be obtained. The results of the characterization of their compressive properties and in vitro cell proliferation studies using human fetal osteoblast cells suggest the promising nature of such scaffolds. The significant degree of freedom offered by the TSESW process should be an additional enabler in the quest toward the mimicry of the complex elegance of the native tissues.

  15. A novel murine model of Cooley anemia and its rescue by lentiviral-mediated human beta-globin gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivella, Stefano; May, Chad; Chadburn, Amy; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2003-04-15

    Patients affected by beta-thalassemia major require lifelong transfusions because of insufficient or absent production of the beta chain of hemoglobin (Hb). A minority of patients are cured by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In the most severe of the hitherto available mouse models of beta-thalassemia, a model for human beta-thalassemia intermedia, we previously demonstrated that globin gene transfer in bone marrow cells is curative, stably raising Hb levels from 8.0-8.5 to 11.0-12.0 g/dL in long-term chimeras. To fully assess the therapeutic potential of gene therapy in the context of a lethal anemia, we now have created an adult model of beta(0)-thalassemia major. In this novel model, mice engrafted with beta-globin-null (Hbb(th3/th3)) fetal liver cells succumb to ineffective erythropoiesis within 60 days. These mice rapidly develop severe anemia (2-4 g/dL), massive splenomegaly, extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), and hepatic iron overload. Remarkably, most mice (11 of 13) treated by lentivirus-mediated globin gene transfer were rescued. Long-term chimeras with an average 1.0-2.4 copies of the TNS9 vector in their hematopoietic and blood cells stably produced up to 12 g/dL chimeric Hb consisting of mu alpha(2):hu beta(2) tetramers. Pathologic analyses indicated that erythroid maturation was restored, while EMH and iron overload dramatically decreased. Thus, we have established an adult animal model for the most severe of the hemoglobinopathies, Cooley anemia, which should prove useful to investigate both genetic and pharmacologic treatments. Our findings demonstrate the remarkable efficacy of lentivirus-mediated globin gene transfer in treating a fulminant blood disorder and strongly support the efficacy of gene therapy in the severe hemoglobinopathies.

  16. Choroid plexus dysfunction impairs beta-amyloid clearance in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim eGonzález Marrero

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Compromised secretory function of choroid plexus (CP and defective cerebrospinal fluid (CSF production, along with accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides at the blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB, likely contribute to complications of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The AD triple transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD at 16 month-old mimics several critical hallmarks of the human disease. In brain, the 3xTg-AD progressively develops β-amyloid (Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles with a temporal- and regional- specific profile resembling their development in human AD. Currently, little is known about transport and metabolic responses by CP to the disrupted homeostasis of CNS Aβ in AD. This study analyzed the effects of highly-expressed AD-linked human transgenes (APP, PS1 and tau on lateral ventricle CP function. Confocal imaging and immunohistochemistry revealed an increase in Aβ42 (but not Aβ40 in epithelial cytosol and in stroma surrounding choroidal capillaries; the buildup in insoluble Aβ42 may reflect insufficient clearance transport from CSF to blood. Still, there was increased expression, presumably compensatory, of the choroidal Aβ transporters: the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE. A thickening of the epithelial basal membrane and greater collagen IV deposition occurred around capillaries in CP of 3xTg-AD mice, probably curtailing solute exchanges. Moreover, there was attenuated expression of epithelial aquaporin-1 and transthyretin protein compared to non-Tg controls. Collectively these findings indicate CP dysfunction (hypothetically linked to increasing Aβ burden resulting in less efficient ion transport, concurrently with reduced production of cerebrospinal fluid (less sink action on brain Aβ and diminished secretion of transthyretin (less neuroprotection against cortical Aβ toxicity. The putative effects of a disabled CP-CSF system on CNS f

  17. Haplotipos del gen de la globina beta en portadores de hemoglobina S en Colombia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Claudia Liliana Durán; Olga Lucía Morales; Sandra Johanna Echeverri; Mario Isaza

    2012-01-01

    ... en la región del cromosoma 11, conocida como conjunto de la globina beta (beta globin cluster). El patrón de combinación de estos polimorfismos da lugar a los haplotipos que se heredan junto...

  18. Optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties in Ga doped {beta}- PbS{sub 2} nanostructured thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geethu, R.; Jacob, Rajani [Thin Film Research Lab, U.C. College, Aluva, Cochin, Kerala (India); Shripathi, T.; Okram, G.S.; Ganesan, V.; Tripathi, Shilpa; Fatima, Anees [UGC-DAE CSR, Khandwa Road, Indore-452 001, Madhya Pradesh (India); Sreenivasan, P.V. [Department of Chemistry, U.C. College, Aluva, Cochin, Kerala (India); Urmila, K.S.; Pradeep, B. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin, Kerala (India); Philip, Rachel Reena, E-mail: reenatara@rediffmail.com [Thin Film Research Lab, U.C. College, Aluva, Cochin, Kerala (India)

    2012-06-15

    Lead sulphide nanostructured thin films were grown on soda lime glass substrates by chemical bath deposition. The films were then doped with gallium using vacuum evaporation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) established the structural type of the host films to be tetragonal {beta}-PbS{sub 2} with average grain size of the order of 15 nm. The nanostructure of films was further confirmed from scanning electron and atomic force micrographs. The shift in the binding energies of the 4f and 4d states of lead, 2p state of sulphur and the 2p states of Ga from their elemental binding energy values, determined from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), indicated intact chemical bonding in the compound. Compositional analysis showed about 0.01% doping of Ga into PbS{sub 2}. Low temperature thermopower measurements indicated p-type conductivity for the films with Fermi level positioned at about 0.017 eV above the maxima of valence band. Optical absorption studies in conjunction with photo sensitivity measurements established its pertinence in junction formation in photovoltaic applications due to the blue shift in the band gap to 2.37 eV and the increased photoconductivity of the films.

  19. Differential interleukin-1 receptor antagonism on pancreatic beta and alpha cells. Studies in rodent and human islets and in normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zumsteg, U; Reimers, J I; Pociot, F

    1993-01-01

    The monokines interleukin-1 alpha and -beta have been implicated as effector molecules in the immune-mediated pancreatic beta-cell destruction leading to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Here we investigated the effects of interleukin-1 receptor antagonism on insulin and glucagon release of rat......, mouse and human islets exposed to recombinant human interleukin-1 beta, and on interleukin-1 beta induced changes in blood glucose, serum insulin and serum glucagon levels in Wistar Kyoto rats. The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist reduced the co-mitogenic effect of interleukin-1 beta on mouse and rat...... thymocytes with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 10- and 100-fold molar excess, respectively. Complete inhibition was obtained with a 100-1,000-fold molar excess. However, at a 100-fold molar excess the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist did not antagonise the potentiating effect of interleukin-1 beta on rat...

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of benzothiophene derivatives as ligands for imaging {beta}-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Young Soo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]|[Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Min [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]|[Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of) and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jmjng@snu.ac.kr; Lee, Yun-Sang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]|[Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Woo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]|[Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ganesha, Rai B.; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, Dong Soo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June-Key [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]|[Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung Chul [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    The imaging of the distribution of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain is becoming an important diagnostic modality in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we synthesized novel benzothiophene derivatives and labeled them with {sup 18}F for the potential diagnostic imaging of AD patients using positron emission tomography. The K {sub i} values of benzothiophene derivatives were evaluated by competitive binding assay using 2-(3'-[{sup 125}I]iodo-4'-N-methylaminophenyl)benzothiazole as a radioligand and A{beta}(1-40) or A{beta}(1-42) aggregates as receptors. All synthesized benzothiophene derivatives showed high binding affinities (K {sub i}=0.28-6.50 nM) to both A{beta}(1-40) and A{beta}(1-42) aggregates. Binding affinities were increased by O-alkylation or N-alkylation of 2-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiophene or 2-(4'-aminophenyl)benzothiophene. Biodistribution studies of 2-(4'-O-(2''-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)hydroxyphenyl)benzothiophene ([{sup 18}F]) and 2-(4'-O-(3''-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl)hydroxyphenyl)benzothiophene ([{sup 18}F]) in normal mice were performed after intravenous injection through the tail vein. In biodistribution data, [{sup 18}F] and [{sup 18}F] showed high initial brain uptakes at 2 min (5.2{+-}0.4% and 3.3{+-}0.2% ID/g, respectively), and brain activities washed out to 2.0{+-}0.2% and 0.5{+-}0.1% ID/g at 4 h, respectively. In conclusion, benzothiophene derivatives showed excellent binding affinities for A{beta} aggregates and high initial brain uptakes in normal mice.

  1. The synthesis of (R)- and (S)-[N-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}, {beta}-difluoromethamphetamine for the investigation of the binding mechanism of biogenic amines in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillings, N.M.; Gee, A.D. [PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C (Denmark); Inoue, O. [School of Allied Health Sciences, Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    In an attempt to elucidate the contribution of the extent of nitrogen protonation on the in vivo binding of methamphetamine in the brain, the enantiomers of [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta},{beta}-difluoroamphetamine (4) were prepared for use in positron emission tomography (PET) studies. Thus, the enantiomers of {beta},{beta}-difluoroamphetamine were prepared from trans-{beta}-methylstyrene, via bromination, conversion into the azirine, fluorination and resolution as the tartrate salts. (R)- and (S)-{beta},{beta}-difluoroamphetamine (3) were then each labelled with carbon-11 (t{sub 1/2}=20.4 min) by N-methylation of the corresponding homochiral {beta},{beta}-difluoroamphetamine with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. The labelled products were each synthesised, purified and formulated in 35 min, starting from [{sup 11}C]carbon dioxide in 15-16% decay-corrected radiochemical yield, with a radiochemical purity of >99% and specific radioactivity of 50-150 GBq {mu}mol{sup -1} at end of synthesis.

  2. Increased GFAP and S100beta but not NSE serum levels after subarachnoid haemorrhage are associated with clinical severity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.E.; Gils, M. van; Beems, T.; Zimmerman, C.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of initial disease severity after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) remains difficult. The objective of the study is to identify biochemical markers of brain damage in peripheral blood after SAH. Hospital admission S100beta, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neuron-specific enolase

  3. Neuroprotective effects of human telomerase reverse transcriptase on beta-amyloid fragment 25-35-treated human embryonic cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingping Kong; Lingzhi Wu; Jie Zhang; Yaping Liao; Huaqiao Wang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Numerous current studies have suggested that human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene has neuroprotective effects and can inhibit apoptosis induced by various cytotoxic stresses;however,the mechanism of action remains unknown.OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the neuroprotective effects and possible mechanism of action of hTERT gene transfection in human embryonic cortical neurons treated with beta-amyloid fragment 25-35 (Aβ25-35).DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:The randomized,controlled and molecular biological studies were performed at the Department of Anatomy and Brain Research,Zhongshan School of Medicine,Sun Yat-sen University,China,from September 2005 to June 2008.MATERIALS:AdEasy-1 Expression System was gifted by Professor Guoquan Gao from Sun Yat-Sen University,China.Human cortical neurons were derived from 12-20 week old aborted fetuses,obtained from the Guangzhou Maternal and Child Health Hospital,China.Mouse anti-Cdk5 and mouse anti-p16 monoclonal antibodies (Lab Vision,USA),and mouse anti-hTERT monoclonal antibody (Epitomics,USA),were used in this study.METHODS:(1) Recombinant adenovirus vectors,encoding hTERT (Ad-hTERT) and green fluorescent protein (Ad-GFP),were constructed using the AdEasy-1 Expression System.Human embryonic cortical neurons in the Ad-hTERT group were transfected with Ad-hTERT for 1-21 days.Likewise,human embryonic cortical neurons in the Ad-GFP group were transfected with Ad-GFP for 1-21 days.Human embryonic cortical neurons in the control group were cultured as normal.(2) Human embryonic cortical neurons in the Ad-hTERT group were treated with 10 μmol/L Aβ25-35 for 24 hours.Normal human embryonic cortical neurons treated with 10 μmol/L Aβ25-35 for 24 hours served as a model group.Human embryonic cortical neurons in the Ad-GFP and control groups were not treated with Aβ25-35.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Expression of hTERT in human embryonic cortical neurons was evaluated by immunocytochemical staining and Western blot assay

  4. Occurrence of “beta bursts” in human frontal cortex related to psychological parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, A.; Schrijer, C.F.M.; Storm van Leeuwen, W.

    1972-01-01

    1. 1. In a psychiatric patient with electrodes implanted in various brain structures the occurrence of paroxysmal 16–26 c/sec activity — “beta bursts” — in the inferior frontal cortex is described. 2. 2. The beta bursts occurred during “free” behavioural situations but could be provoked also by var

  5. Cx36 makes channels coupling human pancreatic beta-cells, and correlates with insulin expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serre-Beinier, Veronique; Bosco, Domenico; Zulianello, Laurence; Charollais, Anne; Caille, Dorothee; Charpantier, Eric; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Diaferia, Giuseppe R.; Giepmans, Ben N.; Lupi, Roberto; Marchetti, Piero; Deng, Shaoping; Buhler, Leo; Berney, Thierry; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Meda, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that the insulin-producing beta-cells of laboratory rodents are coupled by gap junction channels made solely of the connexin36 (Cx36) protein, and have shown that loss of this protein desynchronizes beta-cells, leading to secretory defects reminiscent of those observ

  6. Cx36 makes channels coupling human pancreatic beta-cells, and correlates with insulin expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serre-Beinier, Veronique; Bosco, Domenico; Zulianello, Laurence; Charollais, Anne; Caille, Dorothee; Charpantier, Eric; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Diaferia, Giuseppe R.; Giepmans, Ben N.; Lupi, Roberto; Marchetti, Piero; Deng, Shaoping; Buhler, Leo; Berney, Thierry; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Meda, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that the insulin-producing beta-cells of laboratory rodents are coupled by gap junction channels made solely of the connexin36 (Cx36) protein, and have shown that loss of this protein desynchronizes beta-cells, leading to secretory defects reminiscent of those observ

  7. The function of the human interferon-beta 1a glycan determined in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing-Olesen, Lasse; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Meldgaard, Michael

    2008-01-01

    -response relationship was confirmed, and the Mx response was shown to be receptor-mediated. Using specific glycosidases, different glycosylation analogs of rhIFN-beta1a were obtained, and their activities were determined. The glycosylated rhIFN-beta1a showed significantly higher activity than its deglycosylated...

  8. The fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway is important for decidualization of endometrial stromal cells in both humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jui-He; Chi, Maggie M-Y; Schulte, Maureen B; Moley, Kelle H

    2014-02-01

    Embryo implantation and development requires the endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) to undergo decidualization. This differentiation process requires glucose utilization, and blockade of the pentose phosphate pathway inhibits decidualization of ESCs both in vitro and in vivo. Glucose and fatty acids are energy substrates for many cell types, and fatty acid beta-oxidation is critical for embryo implantation. Here, we investigated whether beta-oxidation is required for decidualization of ESCs. As assessed by marker gene expression, decidualization of human primary ESCs was blocked by reducing activity of carnitine calmitoyltransferase I, the rate-limiting enzyme in beta-oxidation, either by short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing or by treatment with the inhibitor etomoxir. Ranolazine (RAN), a partial beta-oxidation inhibitor, blocked early decidualization of a human ESC line. However, decidualization resumed after several days, most likely due to a compensatory up-regulation of GLUT1 expression and an increase in glucose metabolism. Simultaneous inhibition of the beta-oxidation pathway with RAN and the pentose phosphate pathway with glucosamine (GlcN) impaired in vitro decidualization of human ESCs more strongly than inhibition of either pathway alone. These findings were confirmed in murine ESCs in vitro, and exposure to RAN plus GlcN inhibited decidualization in vivo in a deciduoma model. Finally, intrauterine implantation of time-release RAN and GlcN pellets reduced pup number. Importantly, pup number returned to normal after the end of the pellet-active period. This work indicates that both fatty acids and glucose metabolism pathways are important for ESC decidualization, and suggests novel pathways to target for the design of future nonhormonal contraceptives.

  9. Mutations in the dopamine beta-hydroxylase gene are associated with human norepinephrine deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chun-Hyung; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Cubells, Joseph F.; Cho, Sonhae; Biaggioni, Italo; Cohen, Bruce M.; Robertson, David; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2002-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE), a key neurotransmitter of the central and peripheral nervous systems, is synthesized by dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that catalyzes oxidation of dopamine (DA) to NE. NE deficiency is a congenital disorder of unknown etiology, in which affected patients suffer profound autonomic failure. Biochemical features of the syndrome include undetectable tissue and circulating levels of NE and epinephrine, elevated levels of DA, and undetectable levels of DBH. Here, we report identification of seven novel variants including four potentially pathogenic mutations in the human DBH gene (OMIM 223360) from analysis of two unrelated patients and their families. Both patients are compound heterozygotes for variants affecting expression of DBH protein. Each carries one copy of a T-->C transversion in the splice donor site of DBH intron 1, creating a premature stop codon. In patient 1, there is a missense mutation in DBH exon 2. Patient 2 carries missense mutations in exons 1 and 6 residing in cis. We propose that NE deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from heterogeneous molecular lesions at DBH. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Effects of Genetically Modified Milk Containing Human Beta-Defensin-3 on Gastrointestinal Health of Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the effects of genetically modified (GM milk containing human beta-defensin-3 (HBD3 on mice by a 90-day feeding study. The examined parameters included the digestibility of GM milk, general physical examination, gastric emptying function, intestinal permeability, intestinal microflora composition of mice, and the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT. The emphasis was placed on the effects on gastrointestinal (GI tract due to the fact that GI tract was the first site contacting with food and played crucial roles in metabolic reactions, nutrition absorption and immunity regulation in the host. However, the traditional methods for analyzing the potential toxicological risk of GM product pay little attention on GI health. In this study, the results showed GM milk was easy to be digested in simulated gastric fluid, and it did not have adverse effects on general and GI health compared to conventional milk. And there is little possibility of HGT. This study may enrich the safety assessment of GM product on GI health.

  11. Recombinant expression of human nerve growth factor beta in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Bo-Sheng; Lou, Ji-Yu

    2010-12-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is required for the differentiation and maintenance of sympathetic and sensory neurons. In the present study, the recombinant expression of human nerve growth factor beta (hNGF-β) gene in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) was undertaken. Recombinant vector containing hNGF-β was constructed and transferred into rMSCs, the expressions of the exogenous in rMSCs were determined by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), ELISA and Western blot, whereas the biological activity of recombinant hNGF-β was confirmed using PC12 cells and cultures of dorsal root ganglion neurons from chicken embryos. The results showed that the hNGF-β gene expressed successfully in the rMSCs, a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 13.2 kDa was detected. The maximal expression level of recombinant hNGF-β in rMSCs reached 126.8012 pg/10(6) cells, the mean concentration was 96.4473 pg/10(6) cells. The recombinant hNGF-β in the rMSCs showed full biological activity when compared to commercial recombinant hNGF-β.

  12. Expression of a novel beta adaptin subunit mRNA splice variant in human testes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Dong Zhang; Lan-Lan Yin; Ying Zheng; Li Lu; Zuo-Min Zhou; Jia-Hao Sha

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To identify a novel isoform of adaptin 2 beta subunit (named Ap2β-NY) and to investigate its relationship with testicular development and spermatogenesis. Methods: Using a human testis cDNA microarray, a clone (Ap2β-NY),which was strongly expressed in adult testes but weakly expressed in embryo testes, was sequenced and analyzed.Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the tissue distribution and expression time pattern of Ap2β-NY were determined.Results: Ap2β-NY was identified and has been deposited in the GenBank (AY341427). The expression level of Ap2β-NY in the adult testis was about 3-fold higher than that in the embryo testis. PCR analysis using multi-tissue cDNA indicated that Ap2β-NY was highly expressed in the testis, spleen, thymus, prostate, ovary, blood leukocyte and brain, but not in the heart, placenta, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney and pancreas. In addition, Ap2β-NY was variably expressed in the testes of patients with spermatogenesis-disturbance and spermatogenesis-arrest but not expressed in those of Sertoli-cell-only syndrome, which implied that, in the testis, Ap2β-NY was restrictively expressed in germ cells. Conclusion: Ap2β-NY is an isoform of Ap2β and may be involved in regulating the process of spermatogenesis and testis development.

  13. Human beta-defensin 1, a new animal toxin-like blocker of potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing; Xie, Zili; Yang, Weishan; Zhao, Yonghui; Xiang, Fang; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Chen, Zongyun; Wu, Yingliang

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of human β-defensin 2 (hBD2), as a Kv1.3 channel inhibitor with the unique molecular mechanism and novel immune modulatory function, suggests that human β-defensins are a novel class of channel ligands. Here, the function and mechanism of the human β-defensin 1 (hBD1) binding to potassium channels was investigated. Based on the structural similarity between hBD1 and Kv1.3 channel-sensitive hBD2, hBD1 was found to selectively inhibit human and mouse Kv1.3 channels with IC50 values of 11.8 ± 3.1 μM and 13.2 ± 4.0 μM, respectively. Different from hBD2 modifying Kv1.3 channel activation and increasing activation time constant, hBD1 did not affect the activation feature of both human and mouse Kv1.3 channels. In comparison with hBD2 simultaneously interacting with the extracellular S1-S2 linker and pore region of Kv1.3 channel, the chimeric channel and mutagenesis experiments showed that hBD1 only bound to the extracellular pore region of Kv1.3 channel instead of extracellular S1-S2 linker or S3-S4 linker. Together, these findings enhance knowledge of hBD1 as a new immune-related Kv1.3 channel blocker and highlight the major functional differences between hBD1 and hBD2 to explore in future research.

  14. Mutations in the human naked cuticle homolog NKD1 found in colorectal cancer alter Wnt/Dvl/beta-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutation of Wnt signal antagonists Apc or Axin activates beta-catenin signaling in many cancers including the majority of human colorectal adenocarcinomas. The phenotype of apc or axin mutation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is strikingly similar to that caused by mutation in the segment-polarity gene, naked cuticle (nkd. Nkd inhibits Wnt signaling by binding to the Dishevelled (Dsh/Dvl family of scaffold proteins that link Wnt receptor activation to beta-catenin accumulation and TCF-dependent transcription, but human NKD genes have yet to be directly implicated in cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identify for the first time mutations in NKD1--one of two human nkd homologs--in a subset of DNA mismatch repair-deficient colorectal tumors that are not known to harbor mutations in other Wnt-pathway genes. The mutant Nkd1 proteins are defective at inhibiting Wnt signaling; in addition, the mutant Nkd1 proteins stabilize beta-catenin and promote cell proliferation, in part due to a reduced ability of each mutant Nkd1 protein to bind and destabilize Dvl proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data raise the hypothesis that specific NKD1 mutations promote Wnt-dependent tumorigenesis in a subset of DNA mismatch-repair-deficient colorectal adenocarcinomas and possibly other Wnt-signal driven human cancers.

  15. Human beta-defensin-2 increases cholinergic response in colon epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmerkus, Nina; Vassen, Veit; Sievers, Birte; Goerke, Boeren; Shan, Qixian; Harder, Jürgen; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Bleich, Markus

    2010-06-01

    The human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is expressed in epithelial cells of skin and respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Defensins are arginine-rich small cationic peptides with six intramolecular disulfide bonds and are antimicrobially active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. In addition, they have cytokine-like immunomodulatory properties. We hypothesized that hBD-2 also might influence epithelial cells themselves, thereby altering fluid composition in the gastrointestinal tract. We therefore tested its impact on electrogenic ion transport properties of distal colon in Ussing chamber experiments. Application of hBD-2 did not affect transepithelial voltage or resistance in cAMP-stimulated distal colon. However, it increased cholinergic Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion. After 20 min of incubation with hBD-2, the effect of carbachol (CCh) on the equivalent short circuit current (I'(sc)) was enhanced twofold compared to vehicle-treated colon. Modulation of Ca(2+) signaling by hBD-2 was validated by Fura-2 measurements in human colon carcinoma HT29 cells. Twenty-minute incubation with hBD-2 increased the CCh-induced Ca(2+) transient by 20-30% compared to either vehicle-treated cells or cells treated with the defensins hBD-1, hBD-3, or HD-5. This effect was concentration-dependent, with an EC(50) of 0.043 microg/ml, and still present in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Also, the ionomycin-induced Ca(2+) transient was increased by hBD-2 treatment. We conclude that hBD-2 facilitates cholinergic Ca(2+)-regulated epithelial Cl(-) secretion. These findings contribute to the concept of a specific interaction of antimicrobial peptides with epithelial function.

  16. [Outbreak of subclinical mastitis due to beta hemolytic group L streptococci (S. dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis) in an Austrian dairy herd].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Martina; Giffinger, Friederike; Hoppe, Jan Christoph; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    This study is reporting an outbreak of subclinical mastitis due to beta-hemolytic group L streptococci in an Austrian dairy herd with a history of high somatic cell count. At the first survey 16 of 33 lactating cows (28 quarters of 132) were cultured positive for beta-hemolytic, CAMP and esculin negative cocci that grew on Columbia blood agar with small grey catalase negative colonies. With the commercial API 20 Strep system (bioMerieux, F) isolates were classified as members of streptococci group L. All tested strains (eight of 28) produced acid from ribose, lactose, trehalose, amidon and glycogen; they hydrolysed hippurate and showed beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, alkaline phosphatase, leucinaminopeptidase and arginindehydrolase activity. Isolates were sensitive to bacitracin but resistant to tetracycline. Using phenotypic characterisation as well as sequence analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region of a representative strain, recovered isolates were identified as Streptococcus (S.) dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis. Mastitis was characterized by normal milk secretions and absence of clinical abnormalities but high elevations of somatic cell count. Based on the characteristics of the strains and on the observations during the first herd survey, contagious transmission during milking as a result of poor milking hygiene was assumed. The mastitis was controlled through implementation of a strict hygiene protocol including use of single-use udder towels, post milking teat desinfection and cluster disinfection between milking cows in combination with antibiotic treatment of infected udders.

  17. Type 1 Ig-E mediated allergy to human insulin, insulin analogues and beta-lactam antibiotics Hipersensibilidade imediata a insulina humana, análogos de insulina e a antibióticos beta-lactâmicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Andrade

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin, a crucial therapeutic agent for diabetes mellitus, has been rarely associated with hypersensitivity events. We present a 69-year-old type-2 diabetic patient with urticariform lesions on the sites of subcutaneous injection of insulin. The patient denied any known allergies, except for an unspecific cutaneous reaction after intramuscular penicillin administration in childhood. Prick tests revealed positive reactions to all tested human insulins and insulin analogues. Serum IgE levels were above normal range and RAST tests were positive for human, bovine and porcine insulins, as well as beta-lactams. Type 1 IgEmediated allergy to insulin analogues demands a prompt diagnosis and represents a significant therapeutic challenge in diabetic patients.A insulina é um agente indispensável para o controlo da diabetes mellitus. Os efeitos adversos da sua administração, em particular fenómenos de hipersensibilidade, são raros. Apresentamos um doente de 69 anos, diabético do tipo 2, com episódios recorrentes de lesões urticariformes nos locais de administração subcutânea de insulina. Negava alergias medicamentosas, à excepção de reacção não especificada na infância após penicilina intramuscular. Foram realizados testes cutâneos por puntura (prick tests com diversos tipos de insulina humana e análogos, todos com reacções positivas, associando elevação dos níveis de IgE sérica e provas RAST positivas para as insulinas humana, bovina e porcina e para os antibióticos beta-lactâmicos. A alergia a análogos de insulina exige um diagnóstico precoce, originando um desafio terapêutico importante no doente diabético.

  18. AU-rich elements and alternative splicing in the beta-catenin 3'UTR can influence the human beta-catenin mRNA stability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiele, A.; Nagamine, Y.; Hauschildt, S.; Clevers, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Beta-catenin, the central player of the Wnt signaling cascade, is a well-known oncogene. The regulation of beta-catenin protein stability has been studied extensively while other mechanisms that control cellular levels of beta-catenin have hardly been addressed. In this study, we show that there are

  19. Non-selective beta-adrenergic blockade prevents reduction of the cerebral metabolic ratio during exhaustive exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.S.; Rasmussen, P.; Overgaard, M.

    2008-01-01

    of a non-selective beta-adrenergic (beta(1) + beta(2)) receptor antagonist (propranolol) reduced heart rate (69 +/- 8 to 58 +/- 6 beats min(-1)) and exercise capacity (239 +/- 42 to 209 +/- 31 W; P exercise with propranolol, the increase in a......Intense exercise decreases the cerebral metabolic ratio of oxygen to carbohydrates [O(2)/(glucose + (1/2)lactate)], but whether this ratio is influenced by adrenergic stimulation is not known. In eight males, incremental cycle ergometry increased arterial lactate to 15.3 +/- 4.2 mm (mean +/- s.......d.) and the arterial-jugular venous (a-v) difference from -0.02 +/- 0.03 mm at rest to 1.0 +/- 0.5 mm (P increased from 0.7 +/- 0.3 to 0.9 +/- 0.1 mm (P

  20. Is Beta-Amyloid Accumulation a Cause or Consequence of Alzheimer’s Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoxun; Mims, Paige N.; Roman, Richard J.; Fan, Fan

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by the pathological hallmarks of extracellular beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and intraneuronal tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ also plays a role to accelerate AD progression by promoting neurodegeneration. Additionally, AD is associated with the development of amyloid angiopathy (CAA), in which Aβ builds up on the walls of the cerebral arteries, which augments the development of cerebral vascular disease (CVD). Conversely, CVD promotes Aβ deposition and the development of AD by affecting the balance of Aβ production and clearance. However, it remains to be determined whether the accumulation of Aβ is a cause or consequence of AD. The interaction between AD and CVD is a topic of considerable current interest. Here, we discuss the role of CVD in Aβ accumulation and the development of AD to provide a new point of view that combination therapies that address the accompanying cerebral microvascular disease may potentiate the efficacy of emerging treatment for AD. PMID:28815226

  1. Receptor-binding properties of the peptides corresponding to the beta-endorphin-like sequence of human immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zav'yalov, V P; Zaitseva, O R; Navolotskaya, E V; Abramov, V M; Volodina EYu; Mitin, Y V

    1996-01-01

    The decapeptide H2N-Ser-Leu-Thr-Cys-Leu-Val-Lys-Gly-Phe-Tyr-COOH (termed immunorphin) corresponding to the sequence 364-373 of the CH3 domain of the human immunoglobulin G1 Eu heavy chain and displaying a 43% identity with the antigenic determinant of beta-endorphin was synthesized. Immunorphin was found to compete with 125I-beta-endorphin for high-affinity receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages (K = 2.5 +/- 0.9 x 10(-9) M) and with 3H-morphin for receptors on murine thymocytes (Ki = 2.7 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) M) and murine macrophages (Ki = 5.9 +/- 0.7 x 10(-9) M). In particular two types of receptors to 125I-beta-endorphin with Kd1 = 6.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) M and Kd2 = 3.1 +/- 0.2 x 10(-8) M were revealed on macrophages. The second type of receptors interacted with 125I-beta-endorphin, 3H-Met-enkephalin, 3H-Leu-enkephalin and 3H-morphin; the first displayed reactivity with 125I-beta-endorphin, 3H-morphin and immunorphin. The first type receptors are not present on murine brain cells nor are inhibited by naloxone. A minimum fragment of immunorphin practically completely retaining its inhibitory activity in the competition tests with 125I-beta-endorphin for common receptors on thymocytes was found to correspond to the tetrapeptide H2N-Lys-Gly-Phe-Tyr-COOH (Ki = 5.6 +/- 0.5 x 10(-9) M).

  2. The Effect of Iron in MR Imaging and Transverse Relaxation of Amyloid-Beta Plaques in Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Meadowcroft, Mark D.; Peters, Douglas G.; Dewal, Rahul; Connor, James R.; Yang, Qing X.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of neural iron is known to occur during the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Visualization of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has largely been credited to rapid proton relaxation in the vicinity of plaques due to focal iron deposition. The goal of this work was to determine the relationship between local relaxation and related focal iron content associated with Aβ plaques. Alzheimer’s disease (N=5) and control tissue (N=3) sample slices from th...

  3. Alzheimer’s Toxic Amyloid Beta Oligomers: Unwelcome Visitors to the Na/K ATPase alpha3 Docking Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiChiara, Thomas; DiNunno, Nadia; Clark, Jeffrey; Bu, Riana Lo; Cline, Erika N.; Rollins, Madeline G.; Gong, Yuesong; Brody, David L.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Velasco, Pauline T.; Viola, Kirsten L.; Klein, William L.

    2017-01-01

    Toxic amyloid beta oligomers (AβOs) are known to accumulate in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and in animal models of AD. Their structure is heterogeneous, and they are found in both intracellular and extracellular milieu. When given to CNS cultures or injected ICV into non-human primates and other non-transgenic animals, AβOs have been found to cause impaired synaptic plasticity, loss of memory function, tau hyperphosphorylation and tangle formation, synapse elimination, oxidative and ER stress, inflammatory microglial activation, and selective nerve cell death. Memory loss and pathology in transgenic models are prevented by AβO antibodies, while Aducanumab, an antibody that targets AβOs as well as fibrillar Aβ, has provided cognitive benefit to humans in early clinical trials. AβOs have now been investigated in more than 3000 studies and are widely thought to be the major toxic form of Aβ. Although much has been learned about the downstream mechanisms of AβO action, a major gap concerns the earliest steps: How do AβOs initially interact with surface membranes to generate neuron-damaging transmembrane events? Findings from Ohnishi et al (PNAS 2005) combined with new results presented here are consistent with the hypothesis that AβOs act as neurotoxins because they attach to particular membrane protein docks containing Na/K ATPase-α3, where they inhibit ATPase activity and pathologically restructure dock composition and topology in a manner leading to excessive Ca++ build-up. Better understanding of the mechanism that makes attachment of AβOs to vulnerable neurons a neurotoxic phenomenon should open the door to therapeutics and diagnostics targeting the first step of a complex pathway that leads to neural damage and dementia. PMID:28356893

  4. Choroid plexus dysfunction impairs beta-amyloid clearance in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Marrero, Ibrahim; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Johanson, Conrad E.; Carmona-Calero, Emilia María; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Leandro; Brito-Armas, José Miguel; Castañeyra-Perdomo, Agustín; Castro-Fuentes, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Compromised secretory function of choroid plexus (CP) and defective cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production, along with accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides at the blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB), contribute to complications of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The AD triple transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD) at 16 month-old mimics critical hallmarks of the human disease: β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) with a temporal- and regional- specific profile. Currently, little is known about transport and metabolic responses by CP to the disrupted homeostasis of CNS Aβ in AD. This study analyzed the effects of highly-expressed AD-linked human transgenes (APP, PS1 and tau) on lateral ventricle CP function. Confocal imaging and immunohistochemistry revealed an increase only of Aβ42 isoform in epithelial cytosol and in stroma surrounding choroidal capillaries; this buildup may reflect insufficient clearance transport from CSF to blood. Still, there was increased expression, presumably compensatory, of the choroidal Aβ transporters: the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) and the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE). A thickening of the epithelial basal membrane and greater collagen-IV deposition occurred around capillaries in CP, probably curtailing solute exchanges. Moreover, there was attenuated expression of epithelial aquaporin-1 and transthyretin (TTR) protein compared to Non-Tg mice. Collectively these findings indicate CP dysfunction hypothetically linked to increasing Aβ burden resulting in less efficient ion transport, concurrently with reduced production of CSF (less sink action on brain Aβ) and diminished secretion of TTR (less neuroprotection against cortical Aβ toxicity). The putative effects of a disabled CP-CSF system on CNS functions are discussed in the context of AD. PMID:25705176

  5. An Abbreviated Protocol for In Vitro Generation of Functional Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-Like Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massumi, Mohammad; Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Nalla, Amarnadh

    2016-01-01

    developed an abbreviated five-stage protocol (25-30 days) to generate human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-like Cells (ES-DBCs). We showed that Geltrex, as an extracellular matrix, could support the generation of ES-DBCs more efficiently than that of the previously described culture systems......The ability to yield glucose-responsive pancreatic beta-cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro will facilitate the development of the cell replacement therapies for the treatment of Type 1 Diabetes. Here, through the sequential in vitro targeting of selected signaling pathways, we have...... positive cells, 1% insulin and glucagon positive cells and 30% insulin and NKX6.1 co-expressing cells. Functionally, ES-DBCs were responsive to high glucose in static incubation and perifusion studies, and could secrete insulin in response to successive glucose stimulations. Mitochondrial metabolic flux...

  6. Sources of alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta- and epsilon-carotenes: a twentieth century review Fontes de alfa-, beta-, gama-, delta-, e epsilon-carotenos: uma revisão do século XX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Barbosa-Filho

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Since humans cannot synthesize carotenoids, they depend upon the diet exclusively for the source of these micronutrients. It has claimed that they may alleviate chronic diseases such as cancers. The present communication constitutes a global review of the scientific literature on plants and others organisms that biosynthesize carotenoids, which include the series alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta- and epsilon-carotenes. The results of the literature survey lists more than five hundred sources.Uma vez que os humanos não podem sintetizar carotenóides, dependem exclusivamente da dieta como fonte desses micronutrientes. Tem sido afirmado que eles podem aliviar doenças crônicas, tais como cânceres. O presente artigo constitui uma revisão global da literatura científica sobre plantas e outros organismos que biossintetizam carotenóides, que incluem as séries alfa-, beta-, gama-, delta-, e epsilon-carotenos. Os resultados das listas de pesquisa da literatura mostram mais de quinhentas fontes.

  7. Immunogenicity of Recombinant Human Interferon Beta-1b in Immune-Tolerant Transgenic Mice Corresponds with the Biophysical Characteristics of Aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haji Abdolvahab, Mohadeseh; Fazeli, Ahmad; Halim, Andhyk|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412608294; Sediq, Ahmad S; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Schellekens, Huub|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068406762

    2016-01-01

    Determining to what extent biophysical characteristics of aggregates affect immunogenicity of therapeutic interferon beta-1b. Three recombinant human interferon beta-1b (rhIFNβ-1b) samples with different levels of aggregates generated by copper oxidation, thermal stress, or left untreated, as well

  8. Immunogenicity of Recombinant Human Interferon Beta-1b in Immune-Tolerant Transgenic Mice Corresponds with the Biophysical Characteristics of Aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haji Abdolvahab, Mohadeseh; Fazeli, Ahmad; Halim, Andhyk; Sediq, Ahmad S; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Schellekens, Huub

    2016-01-01

    Determining to what extent biophysical characteristics of aggregates affect immunogenicity of therapeutic interferon beta-1b. Three recombinant human interferon beta-1b (rhIFNβ-1b) samples with different levels of aggregates generated by copper oxidation, thermal stress, or left untreated, as well a

  9. Alpha-interferon induces enhanced expression of HLA-ABC antigens and beta-2-microglobulin in vivo and in vitro in various subsets of human lymphoid cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Larsen, J K; Plesner, T

    1987-01-01

    The effect of cloned alpha-interferon (alpha-IFN) on the in vitro and in vivo expression of HLA-ABC antigens and beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-m) on subpopulations of human lymphoid cells was studied by flow cytometry. Mononuclear cells isolated from patients and cell cultures were labelled...

  10. Monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids by using ZnS(Ag) scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Filippi, D.; Lunardon, M.; Mistura, G.; Moretto, S.; Viesti, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy ' Galileo Galilei' , University of Padova, (Italy); Badocco, D.; Pastore, P.; Romanini, F. [Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    In this work the possibility of monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids using EJ-444 was investigated. Specific tests were carried out to determine the change of the detector properties in water tests. Possible protecting coating is also proposed and tested. Alpha/beta real-time monitoring in liquids is a goal of the EU project TAWARA{sub R}TM. (authors)

  11. Characterization of GLP-1 effects on beta-cell function after meal ingestion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrén, Bo; Holst, Jens Juul; Mari, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that augments insulin secretion after meal intake and is developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. As a novel therapeutic agent, characteristics of its beta-cell effects are important to establish. Previously, beta-cell effects of GLP-1...... overnight were served a breakfast (450 kcal) with intravenous infusion of saline or synthetic GLP-1 (0.75 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)), and beta-cell function was evaluated by estimating the relationship between glucose concentration and insulin secretion (calculated by deconvolution of C-peptide data). RESULTS...

  12. Induction of cross clade reactive specific antibodies in mice by conjugates of HGP-30 (peptide analog of HIV-1(SF2) p17) and peptide segments of human beta-2-microglobulin or MHC II beta chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, D H; Lloyd, J P; Heisey, D; Winship, M D; Siwek, M; Talor, E; Sarin, P S

    2001-09-14

    HGP-30, a 30 amino acid synthetic peptide homologous to a conserved region of HIV-1(SF2) p17 (aa86-115), has previously been shown to elicit both cellular and humoral immune responses when conjugated to KLH and adsorbed to alum. However, the free HGP-30 peptide is not immunogenic in animals. In order to improve the immunogenicity of HGP-30, peptide conjugates consisting of a modified HGP-30 sequence (m-HGP-30/aa82-111) and a peptide segment, residues 38-50, of the MHC I accessory molecule, human beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-M), referred to as Peptide J, or a peptide from the MHC II beta chain (peptide G) were evaluated in mice. The effects of carriers and adjuvants on serum antibody titers, specificities to various HIV-1 clade peptides similar to HGP-30 and isotype patterns were examined. Peptides J or especially G conjugated to modified-HGP-30 (LEAPS 102 and LEAPS 101, respectively) generated comparable or better immune responses to modified HGP-30 than KLH conjugates as judged by the induction of: (1) similar antibody titers; (2) broader HIV clade antigen binding; and (3) antibody isotype response patterns indicative of a TH1 pathway (i.e. increased amounts of IgG2a and IgG2b antibodies). The ISA 51 and MPL(R)-SE adjuvants induced higher antibody responses than alum, with the ISA 51 being more potent. Immune responses to LEAPS 102, as compared to LEAPS 101, were weaker and slower to develop as determined by antibody titers and cross clade reactivity of the antibodies induced. Compared to KLH conjugates which induced significant anti-KLH antibody titers, minimal antibody responses were observed to peptide G, the more immunogenic conjugate, and peptide J. These results suggest that modified HGP-30 L.E.A.P.S. constructs may be useful as HIV vaccine candidates for preferential induction of TH1 directed cell mediated immune responses.

  13. HUMAN CAPITAL FLIGHT - ROMANIA’S CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena VELCIU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge, qualifications of workforce and human capital became key factors for progress. Human capital flight transfers not only people but work, knowledge, tangible and intangible capital and development potential. In this article, trying to answer whether Romania is a source country for emigration of highly skilled or well-educated individuals (ie human capital flight I flew over those two dimensions that have traditionally characterized human capital flight namely: shrinking work resource and lossing high educated peoples. Therefore, Romania was faced with decreasing the number of resident population due to the evolution of demographic phenomena with negative projections and declining number of working age population and young educated and highly skilled workers and professionals. This will generate complex problems for economy, labour market, difficulty in finding highly skilled workers, talent shortages etc so it’s critical to monitor the labour migration or brain drain phenomenon.

  14. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE.

  15. Use of RGD-Functionalized Sandwich Cultures to Promote Redifferentiation of Human Pancreatic Beta Cells After In Vitro Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloy-Reverté, Caterina; Moreno-Amador, José L; Nacher, Montserrat; Montanya, Eduard; Semino, Carlos E

    2017-08-31

    Islet transplantation has provided proof of concept that cell therapy can restore normoglycemia in patients with diabetes. However, limited availability of islet tissue severely restricts the clinical use of the treatment. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new strategies to generate an abundant source of insulin-producing cells that could be used to treat diabetes. A potential approach is the in vitro expansion of pancreatic beta cells obtained from cadaveric organ donors. However, when human beta cells are expanded in vitro, they dedifferentiate and lose the expression of insulin, probably as a consequence of pancreatic islet dissociation into single cells. We have studied whether reestablishment of cell-cell and cell-matrix relationships with a biomimetic synthetic scaffold could induce redifferentiation of expanded dedifferentiated beta cells. Cells isolated from human islet preparations were expanded in monolayer cultures and allowed to reaggregate into islet-like cell clusters (ICCs). Afterward, ICCs were embedded between two thin layers of the noninstructive self-assembling peptide (SAP), RAD16-I or RAD16-I functionalized with the integrin-binding motif RGD (RAD16-I/RGD) (R: arginine, G: glycine, D: aspartic acid), which was expected to promote cell-extracellular matrix interactions. ICCs cultured with RAD16-I were viable, maintained their cluster conformation, and increased in size by aggregation of ICCs, suggesting a self-organizing process. ICCs cultured in RAD16-I/RGD showed enhanced cell adhesion to RAD16-I matrix and reexpression of the beta cell-specific genes, Ins, Pdx1, Nkx6.1, and MafA. Redifferentiation was caused solely by bioactive cues introduced to the RAD16-I peptide since no differentiation factors were added to the culture medium. The results indicate that RGD-functionalized SAP in sandwich conformation is a promising three-dimensional platform to induce redifferentiation toward a beta cell phenotype and to generate insulin

  16. Human resources in the 1980s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, D.Q.

    1979-07-01

    New trends in human resources will test the ingenuity of corporate planners to produce policies for the 1980s that will match changing corporate demands with changing employee expectations. The 1970s produced much-publicized problems - for example, the introduction to the work force of larger numbers of minorities and women - that are not yet fully resolved and that can be expected to continue. But the 1980s will bring their own special challenges. Shifting populations (such as legal and illegal immigrants), the women movement's demand for equal pay for work of comparable worth, and the push for civil liberties at the workplace are all factors that will dramatically change the business climate. With these factors in mind, the author examines the 1980's business environment, takes a backward look at planning policies in the 1970s, and shows how the priorities of those policies will have to be reevaluated to meet the challenges of the future.

  17. Kidney dysfunction and beta S-haplotypes in patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilianne Brito da Silva Rocha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the association between kidney dysfunction and haplotypes in sickle cell disease. Methods: A cohort of 84 sickle cell disease patients, treated in a public health service in Fortaleza, Brazil, was studied. Hemoglobin S haplotypes were obtained from 57 patients as they had recently received blood transfusions with 18 of them agreeing to undertake urinary concentrating ability and acidification tests. The glomerular filtration rate was estimated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation. Urinary concentration was evaluated utilizing the urinary and serum osmolality ratio (U/Posm after 12 hours of water deprivation. Urinary acidification was evaluated by measuring the urinary pH before and after the administration of oral CaCl2. The analysis of the haplotypes of the beta S gene cluster was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The analysis of variance (ANOVA test was used for multiple comparisons of means and the Newman-Keuls test was used to identify which groups were significantly different. Results: The mean age of the patients was 33 ± 13 years with 64.2% being females. The glomerular filtration rate was normal in 25 cases (30% and a rate > 120 mL/min was seen in 52 cases (62%. Urinary concentration deficit was found in all patients who underwent the test and urinary acidification in 22%. There was no significant difference when comparing patients with the Bantu/Bantu and Benin/Benin haplotypes. On comparing patients with the Central African Republic-haplotype however, a higher number had glomerular filtration rates between 60 and 120 mL/min. Conclusion: There was no significant difference among sickle cell disease patients regarding the haplotypes and kidney dysfunction.

  18. Deletion of the core region of 5' HS2 of the mouse beta-globin locus control region reveals a distinct effect in comparison with human beta-globin transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Bulger, Michael; Bender, M A; Fields, Jennifer; Groudine, Mark; Fiering, Steven

    2006-01-15

    The beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is a large DNA element that is required for high-level expression of beta-like globin genes from the endogenous mouse locus or in transgenic mice carrying the human beta-globin locus. The LCR encompasses 6 DNaseI hypersensitive sites (HSs) that bind transcription factors. These HSs each contain a core of a few hundred base pairs (bp) that has most of the functional activity and exhibits high interspecies sequence homology. Adjoining the cores are 500- to 1000-bp "flanks" with weaker functional activity and lower interspecies homology. Studies of human beta-globin transgenes and of the endogenous murine locus show that deletion of an entire HS (core plus flanks) moderately suppresses expression. However, human transgenes in which only individual HS core regions were deleted showed drastic loss of expression accompanied by changes in chromatin structure. To address these disparate results, we have deleted the core region of 5'HS2 from the endogenous murine beta-LCR. The phenotype was similar to that of the larger 5'HS2 deletion, with no apparent disruption of chromatin structure. These results demonstrate that the greater severity of HS core deletions in comparison to full HS deletions is not a general property of the beta-LCR.

  19. A novel expression system of domain I of human beta2 glycoprotein I in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl Laurence H

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, characterised by recurrent miscarriage and thrombosis, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Domain I (DI of human beta 2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI is thought to contain crucial antibody binding epitopes for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL, which are critical to the pathogenesis of APS. Expressing this protein in bacteria could facilitate studies investigating how this molecule interacts with aPL. Methods Using a computer programme called Juniper, sequentially overlapping primers were designed to be used in a recursive polymerase chain reaction (PCR to produce a synthetic DI gene. Specifically Juniper incorporates 'major' codons preferred by bacteria altering 41 codons out of 61. This was cloned into the expression plasmid pET(26b and expressed in BL21(DE3 Escherichia coli (E. coli. By virtue of a pelB leader sequence, periplasmic localisation of DI aided disulphide bond formation and toxicity was addressed by tightly regulating expression through the high stringency T7lac promoter. Results Purified, soluble his-tagged DI in yields of 750 μg/L bacterial culture was obtained and confirmed on Western blot. Expression using the native human cDNA sequence of DI in the same construct under identical conditions yielded significantly less DI compared to the recombinant optimised sequence. This constitutes the first description of prokaryotic expression of soluble DI of β2GPI. Binding to murine monoclonal antibodies that recognise conformationally restricted epitopes on the surface of DI and pathogenic human monoclonal IgG aPL was confirmed by direct and indirect immunoassay. Recombinant DI also bound a series of 21 polyclonal IgG samples derived from patients with APS. Conclusion By producing a synthetic gene globally optimised for expression in E. coli, tightly regulating expression and utilising periplasmic product translocation, efficient, soluble E. coli expression of the

  20. Enhanced expression in vivo of HLA-ABC antigens and beta 2-microglobulin on human lymphoid cells induced by human interferon-alpha in patients with lung cancer. Enhanced expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens prior to treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Plesner, T; Larsen, J K

    1985-01-01

    The effect of cloned human interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) on the expression of HLA-ABC antigens (HLA-ABC) and beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) on human peripheral lymphoid cells in vivo was studied by cytofluorometry using monoclonal antibodies and fluorescein-labelled rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin...

  1. In vitro digestibility of beta-casein and beta-lactoglobulin under simulated human gastric and duodenal conditions: A multi-laboratory evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandalari, G.; Adel-Patient, K.; Barkholt, Vibeke;

    2009-01-01

    Initially the resistance to digestion of two cow's milk allergens, beta-casein, and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg), was compared using a "high-protease assay" and a "low-protease assay" in a single laboratory. The low-protease assay represents an alternative standardised protocol mimicking conditions...... found in the gastrointestinal tract. For the high-protease assay, both proteins were incubated with either pepsin or pancreatin and digestion monitored by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography. The low-protease assay involved...... gastroduodenal digestion in the presence or absence of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Both beta-casein and beta-Lg were susceptible to hydrolysis by pepsin and pancreatin in the high-protease assay. In contrast, the kinetics of beta-casein digestion in the low-protease assay were slower, beta-Lg being pepsin...

  2. Characterization of stimulus-secretion coupling in the human pancreatic EndoC-βH1 beta cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta E Andersson

    Full Text Available Studies on beta cell metabolism are often conducted in rodent beta cell lines due to the lack of stable human beta cell lines. Recently, a human cell line, EndoC-βH1, was generated. Here we investigate stimulus-secretion coupling in this cell line, and compare it with that in the rat beta cell line, INS-1 832/13, and human islets.Cells were exposed to glucose and pyruvate. Insulin secretion and content (radioimmunoassay, gene expression (Gene Chip array, metabolite levels (GC/MS, respiration (Seahorse XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, glucose utilization (radiometric, lactate release (enzymatic colorimetric, ATP levels (enzymatic bioluminescence and plasma membrane potential and cytoplasmic Ca2+ responses (microfluorometry were measured. Metabolite levels, respiration and insulin secretion were examined in human islets.Glucose increased insulin release, glucose utilization, raised ATP production and respiratory rates in both lines, and pyruvate increased insulin secretion and respiration. EndoC-βH1 cells exhibited higher insulin secretion, while plasma membrane depolarization was attenuated, and neither glucose nor pyruvate induced oscillations in intracellular calcium concentration or plasma membrane potential. Metabolite profiling revealed that glycolytic and TCA-cycle intermediate levels increased in response to glucose in both cell lines, but responses were weaker in EndoC-βH1 cells, similar to those observed in human islets. Respiration in EndoC-βH1 cells was more similar to that in human islets than in INS-1 832/13 cells.Functions associated with early stimulus-secretion coupling, with the exception of plasma membrane potential and Ca2+ oscillations, were similar in the two cell lines; insulin secretion, respiration and metabolite responses were similar in EndoC-βH1 cells and human islets. While both cell lines are suitable in vitro models, with the caveat of replicating key findings in isolated islets, EndoC-βH1 cells have the

  3. Integrin {beta}1-dependent invasive migration of irradiation-tolerant human lung adenocarcinoma cells in 3D collagen matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Seiichiro [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Haga, Hisashi, E-mail: haga@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Yasuda, Motoaki [Department of Oral Pathobiological Science, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, N13-W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15-W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Nishioka, Takeshi [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Engineering, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, N12-W5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2010-06-04

    Radiotherapy is one of the effective therapies used for treating various malignant tumors. However, the emergence of tolerant cells after irradiation remains problematic due to their high metastatic ability, sometimes indicative of poor prognosis. In this study, we showed that subcloned human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549P-3) that are irradiation-tolerant indicate high invasive activity in vitro, and exhibit an integrin {beta}1 activity-dependent migratory pattern. In collagen gel overlay assay, majority of the A549P-3 cells displayed round morphology and low migration activity, whereas a considerable number of A549P-3IR cells surviving irradiation displayed a spindle morphology and high migration rate. Blocking integrin {beta}1 activity reduced the migration rate of A549P-3IR cells and altered the cell morphology allowing them to assume a round shape. These results suggest that the A549P-3 cells surviving irradiation acquire a highly invasive integrin {beta}1-dependent phenotype, and integrin {beta}1 might be a potentially effective therapeutic target in combination with radiotherapy.

  4. Case-control study of genus-beta human papillomaviruses in plucked eyebrow hairs and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannacone, Michelle R; Gheit, Tarik; Pfister, Herbert; Giuliano, Anna R; Messina, Jane L; Fenske, Neil A; Cherpelis, Basil S; Sondak, Vernon K; Roetzheim, Richard G; Silling, Steffi; Pawlita, Michael; Tommasino, Massimo; Rollison, Dana E

    2014-05-01

    Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been reported in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We conducted a clinic-based case-control study to investigate the association between genus-beta HPV DNA in eyebrow hairs (EBH) and SCC. EBH from 168 SCC cases and 290 controls were genotyped for genus-beta HPV DNA. SCC tumors from a subset of cases (n = 142) were also genotyped. Viral load was determined in a subset of specimens positive for a single HPV type. Associations with SCC were estimated by odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age and sex using logistic regression. Statistical tests were two-sided. EBH DNA prevalence was greater in cases (87%) than controls (73%) (p genus-beta types tested, when accounting for DNA for the same HPV type in the tumor (ORs = 3.44-76.50). Compared to controls, the mean viral DNA load in EBH among the selected cases was greater for HPV5, HPV8 and HPV24, but lower for HPV38. SCC cases were more likely than controls to have HPV DNA+ EBH for single and multiple HPV types, providing additional support for the potential role of genus-beta HPV infections in SCC development. © 2013 UICC.

  5. Adeno-Associated Vector mediated gene transfer of Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 to normal and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes stimulates cartilage anabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich-Vinther M.

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate whether cartilage anabolism in human primary osteoarthritic chondrocytes could be improved by adeno-associated virus (AAV vector-mediated gene transduction of transforming growth factor TGF-beta1 (TGF-beta1. A bi-cistronic AAV-TGF-beta1-IRES-eGFP (AAV-TGF-beta1 vector was generated and used for transduction of a normal human articular chondrocyte cell line (tsT/AC62 and primary human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes harvested from 8 patients receiving total knee joint arthroplasty. Transduction efficiency was detected by fluorescent microscopy for gene expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP. TGF-beta1 synthesis was determined by ELISA. To assess the influence of TGF-beta1 gene therapy on chondrocyte cartilage metabolism, mRNA expressions of type II collagen, aggrecan, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3 were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. AAV-TGF-beta1 transduction resulted in increased synthesis of TGF-beta1 in both osteoarthritic chondrocytes and the normal articular chondrocyte cell line. The expression levels of the transduced genes were correlated to "multiplicity of infection" (MOI and post-infectious time. In both osteoarthritic chondrocytes and the normal articular chondrocyte cell line, AAV-TGF-beta1 treatment increased mRNA expression of both type II collagen and aggrecan, but decreased MMP-3 mRNA expression. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes and the normal articular chondrocyte cell line could be transduced with equal efficiencies. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that AAV-TGF-beta1 gene transfer stimulates cartilage anabolism and decreases expression of enzymes responsible for cartilage degradation in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. The results indicate that the AAV vector is an efficient mediator of growth factors to human articular chondrocytes, and that it might be useful in future chondrocyte gene therapy.

  6. The role of thymosin beta 4 on odontogenic differentiation in human dental pulp cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Im Lee

    Full Text Available We recently reported that overexpression of thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 in transgenic mice promotes abnormal hair growth and tooth development, but the role of Tβ4 in dental pulp regeneration was not completely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Tβ4 on odontoblastic differentiation and the underlying mechanism regulating pulp regeneration in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs. Our results demonstrate that mRNA and protein expression of Tβ4 is upregulated during odontogenic differentiation in HDPCs. Transfection with Tβ4 siRNA decreases OM-induced odontoblastic differentiation by decreasing alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mRNA expression of differentiation markers, and calcium nodule formation. In contrast, Tβ4 activation with a Tβ4 peptide promotes these processes by enhancing the phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP 2, BMP4, phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 and Smad2/3, and expression of transcriptional factors such as Runx2 and Osterix, which were blocked by the BMP inhibitor noggin. The expression of integrin receptors α1, α2, α3, and β1 and downstream signaling molecules including phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK, p-paxillin, and integrin-linked kinase (ILK were increased by Tβ4 peptide in HDPCs. ILK siRNA blocked Tβ4-induced odontoblastic differentiation and activation of the BMP and MAPK transcription factor pathways in HDPCs. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that Tβ4 plays a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs and activation of Tβ4 could provide a novel mechanism for regenerative endodontics.

  7. (S,S)- and (S,R)-1'-[{sup 18}F]fluorocarazolol, ligands for the visualization of pulmonary {beta}-adrenergic receptors with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Vos, Marten G.; Waarde, Aren van; Braker, Anton H.; Groot, Tjibbe J. de; Anthonio, Rutger L.; Weemaes, Anne-Miek A.; Brodde, Otto-Erich; Visser, Gerben M.; Vaalburg, Willem

    1996-02-01

    The {beta}-adrenoceptor antagonist carazolol has been labelled with fluorine-18 in the isopropyl group via a reductive alkylation by [{sup 18}F]-fluoroacetone of the corresponding (S)-desisopropyl compound according to a known procedure. The introduction of fluorine in the isopropyl group creates a new stereogenic centre resulting in the formation of (S,S)- and (S,R)-1'-[{sup 18}F]fluorocarazolol, which were separated by HPLC. Tissue distribution studies were performed in male Wistar rats. Both the (S,S)- and (S,R)-diastereomers (S.A. 500-2000 Ci/mmol; 18.5-74 TBq/mmol) showed high uptake in lung and heart, which could be blocked by pretreatment of the animals with ({+-})-propranolol. No significant differences were observed between the biodistribution of the two diastereomers. Metabolite analysis showed a rapid appearance of polar metabolites in plasma, while at 60 min postinjection 92% and 82% of the total radioactivity in lung and heart was unmetabolized 1'-[{sup 18}F]fluorocarazolol. In a PET-study with male Wistar rats, the lungs were clearly visualized and the pulmonary uptake was decreased after pretreatment of the animals with ({+-})-propranolol. The heart could not be visualized. Similar results were obtained in PET-studies with lambs.

  8. Effect of the beta-glucuronidase inhibitor saccharolactone on glucuronidation by human tissue microsomes and recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Lauren; Court, Michael H

    2008-09-01

    Glucuronidation studies using microsomes and recombinant uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) can be complicated by the presence of endogenous beta-glucuronidases, leading to underestimation of glucuronide formation rates. Saccharolactone is the most frequently used beta-glucuronidase inhibitor, although it is not clear whether this reagent should be added routinely to glucuronidation incubations. Here we have determined the effect of saccharolactone on eight different UGT probe activities using pooled human liver microsomes (pHLMs) and recombinant UGTs (rUGTs). Despite the use of buffered incubation solutions, it was necessary to adjust the pH of saccharolactone solutions to avoid effects (enhancement or inhibition) of lowered pH on UGT activity. Saccharolactone at concentrations ranging from 1 to 20 mM did not enhance any of the glucuronidation activities evaluated that could be considered consistent with inhibition of beta-glucuronidase. However, for most activities, higher saccharolactone concentrations resulted in a modest degree of inhibition. The greatest inhibitory effect was observed for glucuronidation of 5-hydroxytryptamine and estradiol by pHLMs, with a 35% decrease at 20 mM saccharolactone concentration. Endogenous beta-glucuronidase activities were also measured using various human tissue microsomes and rUGTs with estradiol-3-glucuronide and estradiol-17-glucuronide as substrates. Glucuronide hydrolysis was observed for pHLMs, lung microsomes and insect-cell expressed rUGTs, but not for kidney, intestinal or human embryonic kidney HEK293 microsomes. However, the extent of hydrolysis was relatively small, representing only 9-19% of the glucuronide formation rate measured in the same preparations. Consequently, these data do not support the routine inclusion of saccharolactone in glucuronidation incubations. If saccharolactone is used, concentrations should be titrated to achieve activity enhancement without inhibition.

  9. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A;

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound...... to the partial inverse agonist carazolol at 2.4 angstrom resolution. The structure provides a high-resolution view of a human G protein-coupled receptor bound to a diffusible ligand. Ligand-binding site accessibility is enabled by the second extracellular loop, which is held out of the binding cavity by a pair...

  10. P206-M Understanding the Metabolism of Amyloid-Beta in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease. According to the amyloid hypothesis, the disease is preceded by an accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) protein, which leads to downstream events including activation of microglia, inflammation, synaptic dysfunction, and neuronal loss. The objective of this research is to address the physiology of Aβ in humans by measuring its in vivo metabolic rates.

  11. Genotype-independent decrease in plasma dopamine beta-hydroxylase activity in Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapic, Maja; Presecki, Paola; Pivac, Nela; Mimica, Ninoslav; Hof, Patrick R.; Simic, Goran; Folnegovic-Smalc, Vera; Muck-Seler, Dorotea

    2014-01-01

    The noradrenergic system is involved in the etiology and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but its role is still unclear. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) as a catecholamine-synthesizing enzyme plays a central role in noradrenaline (NA) synthesis and turnover. Plasma DBH (pDBH) activity shows wide inheritable interindividual variability that is under genetic control. The aim of this study was to determine pDBH activity, DBH (C-970T; rs1611115) and DBH (C1603T; rs6271) gene polymorphisms in 207 patients with AD and in 90 healthy age-matched controls. Plasma DBH activity was lower, particularly in the early stage of AD, compared to values in middle and late stages of the disease, as well as to control values. Two-way ANOVA revealed significant effect of both diagnosis and DBH (C-970T) or DBH (C1603T) genotypes on pDBH activity, but without significant diagnosis×genotype interaction. No association was found between AD and DBH C-970T (OR=1.08, 95% CI 1.13–4.37; p=0.779) and C1603T (OR=0.89; 95% CI 0.36–2.20; p=0.814) genotypes controlled for age, gender, and ApoE4 allele. The decrease in pDBH activity, found in early phase of AD suggests that alterations in DBH activity represent a compensatory mechanism for the loss of noradrenergic neurons, and that treatment with selective NA reuptake inhibitors may be indicated in early stages of AD to compensate for loss of noradrenergic activity in the locus coeruleus. PMID:23416088

  12. First Association of Interleukin 12 Receptor Beta 1 Deficiency with Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Sogkas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionInterleukin 12 receptor beta 1 (IL12Rβ1 deficiency is a primary immunodeficiency resulting mainly in susceptibility to opportunistic infection by non-tuberculous, environmental mycobacteria and severe infection caused by Salmonella spp. Till now, less than 300 patients with IL12Rβ1 deficiency have been reported. Among them, only three have been described to develop autoimmunity.Case presentationWe present the case of a 50-year-old male with IL12Rβ1 deficiency due to compound heterozygosity [c. 1623_1624delGCinsTT (pGln542Stop and c.1791 + 2T > C (donor splice site], who—18 months after diagnosis of disseminated BCGitis—presented with recurrent fever and sicca syndrome. No indication of an infectious origin of these symptoms could be found at that point. The diagnosis of a Sjögren’s syndrome (SS was made on the basis of fulfilled American-European consensus classification criteria, including a positive minor salivary gland biopsy.ConclusionApart from persistent antigenic stimulation, which may drive autoimmune inflammation in primary immunodeficiency, evidence on the involvement of interleukin 12 in pathogenesis of SS suggests that the same immunological mechanism may underlie both defense against infection and the maintenance of tolerance. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of autoimmunity in the form of SS in a patient with a primary immunodeficiency and one of the rare cases of IL12Rβ1 deficiency with manifested autoimmunity.

  13. Elevated D-glucose concentrations modulate TGF-beta 1 synthesis by human cultured renal proximal tubular cells. The permissive role of platelet-derived growth factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, A.O.; Steadman, R.; Topley, N; Williams, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Interstitial fibrosis is a marker of progression of renal impairment in diabetic nephropathy. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 is one of a group of pro-fibrotic cytokines and growth factors that have been associated with the development of interstitial fibrosis. We have examined the modulating influence of glucose on the production of TGF-beta 1 by cultured human proximal tubular cells. Incubation of growth-arrested human proximal tubular cells (HPTC) (72 hours in serum free medium) in...

  14. Acylguanidine inhibitors of beta-secretase: optimization of the pyrrole ring substituents extending into the S1' substrate binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Lee D; Cole, Derek C; Stock, Joseph R; Sukhdeo, Mohani N; Ellingboe, John W; Cowling, Rebecca; Jin, Guixian; Manas, Eric S; Fan, Kristi Y; Malamas, Michael S; Harrison, Boyd L; Jacobsen, Steve; Chopra, Rajiv; Lohse, Peter A; Moore, William J; O'Donnell, Mary-Margaret; Hu, Yun; Robichaud, Albert J; Turner, M James; Wagner, Erik; Bard, Jonathan

    2008-01-15

    The proteolytic enzyme beta-secretase (BACE-1) produces amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide, the primary constituent of neurofibrillary plaques, implicated in Alzheimer's disease, by cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. A small molecule inhibitor of BACE-1, (diaminomethylene)-2,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrrole-1-acetamide (1, BACE-1 IC(50)=3.7 microM), was recently described, representing a new small molecule lead. Initial SAR investigation demonstrated the potential of accessing the nearby S(3) and S(1)(') substrate binding pockets of the BACE-1 enzyme by building substituents off one of the phenyl substituents and guanidinyl functional group. We report here the optimization of guanidinyl functional group substituents on 1, leading to potent submicromolar BACE-1 inhibitors.

  15. Characterisation of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 in human orbital adipose tissue: a comparison with subcutaneous and omental fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalska, Iwona J; Durrani, Omar M; Abbott, Joseph; Onyimba, Claire U; Khosla, Pamela; Moosavi, Areeb H; Reuser, Tristan T Q; Stewart, Paul M; Tomlinson, Jeremy W; Walker, Elizabeth A; Rauz, Saaeha

    2007-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have a profound effect on adipose biology increasing tissue mass causing central obesity. The pre-receptor regulation of GCs by 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) that activates cortisol from cortisone has been postulated as a fundamental mechanism underlying the metabolic syndrome mediating adipocyte hyperplasia and hypertrophy in the omental (OM) depot. Orbital adipose tissue (OF) is the site of intense inflammation and tissue remodelling in several orbital inflammatory disease states. In this study, we describe features of the GC metabolic pathways in normal human OF depot and compare it with subcutaneous (SC) and OM depots. Using an automated histological characterisation technique, OF adipocytes were found to be significantly smaller (parameters: area, maximum diameter and perimeter) than OM and SC adipocytes (P<0 x 001). Although immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated resident CD68+ cells in all three whole tissue adipose depots, OF CD68 mRNA and protein expression exceeded that of OM and SC (mRNA, P<0 x 05; protein, P<0 x 001). In addition, there was higher expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR)alpha mRNA in the OF whole tissue depot (P<0 x 05). Conversely, 11beta-HSD1 mRNA together with the markers of late adipocyte differentiation (FABP4 and G3PDH) were significantly lower in OF. Primary cultures of OF preadipocytes demonstrated predominant 11beta-HSD1 oxo-reductase activity with minimal dehydrogenase activity. Orbital adipocytes are smaller, less differentiated, and express low levels of 11beta-HSD1 but abundant GRalpha compared with SC and OM. OF harbours a large CD68+ population. These characteristics define an orbital microenvironment that has the potential to respond to sight-threatening orbital inflammatory disease.

  16. The functional glycosyltransferase signature sequence of the human beta 1,3-glucuronosyltransferase is a XDD motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulberti, Sandrine; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Mulliert, Guillermo; Aubry, André; Netter, Patrick; Magdalou, Jacques; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2003-08-22

    The human beta 1,3-glucuronosyltransferase I (GlcAT-I) is the key enzyme responsible for the completion of glycosaminoglycan-protein linkage tetrasaccharide of proteoglycans (GlcA beta 1,3Gal beta 1,3Gal beta 1,4Xyl beta 1-O-serine). We have investigated the role of aspartate residues Asp194-Asp195-Asp196 corresponding to the glycosyltransferase DXD signature motif, in GlcAT-I function by UDP binding experiments, kinetic analyses, and site-directed mutagenesis. We presented the first evidence that Mn2+ is not only essential for GlcAT-I activity but is also required for cosubstrate binding. In agreement, kinetic studies were consistent with a metal-activated enzyme model whereby activation probably occurs via binding of a Mn2+.UDP-GlcA complex to the enzyme. Mutational analysis showed that the Asp194-Asp195-Asp196 motif is a major element of the UDP/Mn2+ binding site. Furthermore, determination of the individual role of each aspartate showed that substitution of Asp195 as well as Asp196 to alanine strongly impaired GlcAT-I activity, whereas Asp194 replacement produced only a moderate alteration of the enzyme activity. These findings along with molecular modeling and three-dimensional structure comparison of the GlcAT-I catalytic center with that of the Bacillus subtilis glycosyltransferase SpsA provided evidence that the interactions of Asp195 with the ribose moiety of UDP and of Asp196 with the metal cation Mn2+ were crucial for GlcAT-I function. Altogether, these results indicated that, similarly to the SpsA enzyme, the nucleotide binding site of GlcAT-I contains a XDD motif rather than a DXD motif.

  17. Trefoil factor 3 stimulates human and rodent pancreatic islet beta-cell replication with retention of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueger, Patrick T; Schisler, Jonathan C; Lu, Danhong; Babu, Daniella A; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Newgard, Christopher B; Hohmeier, Hans E

    2008-05-01

    Both major forms of diabetes involve a decline in beta-cell mass, mediated by autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells in type 1 diabetes and by increased rates of apoptosis secondary to metabolic stress in type 2 diabetes. Methods for controlled expansion of beta-cell mass are currently not available but would have great potential utility for treatment of these diseases. In the current study, we demonstrate that overexpression of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) in rat pancreatic islets results in a 4- to 5-fold increase in [(3)H]thymidine incorporation, with full retention of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This increase was almost exclusively due to stimulation of beta-cell replication, as demonstrated by studies of bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and co-immunofluorescence analysis with anti-bromodeoxyuridine and antiinsulin or antiglucagon antibodies. The proliferative effect of TFF3 required the presence of serum or 0.5 ng/ml epidermal growth factor. The ability of TFF3 overexpression to stimulate proliferation of rat islets in serum was abolished by the addition of epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist AG1478. Furthermore, TFF3-induced increases in [3H]thymidine incorporation in rat islets cultured in serum was blocked by overexpression of a dominant-negative Akt protein or treatment with triciribine, an Akt inhibitor. Finally, overexpression of TFF3 also caused a doubling of [3H]thymidine incorporation in human islets. In summary, our findings reveal a novel TFF3-mediated pathway for stimulation of beta-cell replication that could ultimately be exploited for expansion or preservation of islet beta-cell mass.

  18. A novel human tectonin protein with multivalent beta-propeller folds interacts with ficolin and binds bacterial LPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Hooi Ping Low

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the human genome database has been completed a decade ago, approximately 50% of the proteome remains hypothetical as their functions are unknown. The elucidation of the functions of these hypothetical proteins can lead to additional protein pathways and revelation of new cascades. However, many of these inferences are limited to proteins with substantial sequence similarity. Of particular interest here is the Tectonin domain-containing family of proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified hTectonin, a hypothetical protein in the human genome database, as a distant ortholog of the limulus galactose binding protein (GBP. Phylogenetic analysis revealed strong evolutionary conservation of hTectonin homologues from parasite to human. By computational analysis, we showed that both the hTectonin and GBP form beta-propeller structures with multiple Tectonin domains, each containing beta-sheets of 4 strands per beta-sheet. hTectonin is present in the human leukocyte cDNA library and immune-related cell lines. It interacts with M-ficolin, a known human complement protein whose ancient homolog, carcinolectin (CL5, is the functional protein partner of GBP during infection. Yeast 2-hybrid assay showed that only the Tectonin domains of hTectonin recognize the fibrinogen-like domain of the M-ficolin. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed real-time interaction between the Tectonin domains 6 & 11 and bacterial LPS, indicating that despite forming 2 beta-propellers with its different Tectonin domains, the hTectonin molecule could precisely employ domains 6 & 11 to recognise bacteria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: By virtue of a recent finding of another Tectonin protein, leukolectin, in the human leukocyte, and our structure-function analysis of the hypothetical hTectonin, we propose that Tectonin domains of proteins could play a vital role in innate immune defense, and that this function has been conserved over several

  19. Humanities in Oliver’s Personality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓龙

    2014-01-01

    Dickens, a great realist novelist in his time, captured the popularity as no other novelist had done. And Oliver Twist, one of his successful works, greatly displays his genius in the novel. Oliver is a perfect figure created by Dickens. In this paper, we will discuss the humanities by analyzing Oliver’s personality and thus build a better understanding of the novel and the great writ-er Dickens.

  20. Indicator of Exo-Solar Planet(s) in the Circumstellar Disk Around Beta Pictoris

    CERN Document Server

    Gorkavyi, N; Ozernoy, L M; Taidakova, T; Mather, J; Gorkavyi, Nick; Heap, Sara; Ozernoy, Leonid; Taidakova, Tanya; Mather, John

    2000-01-01

    Our efficient numerical approach has been applied to modeling the asymmetric circumstellar dust disk around Beta Pictoris as observed with the HST/STIS. We present a new model on the origin of the warping of the Beta Pic disk. We suggest that the observed warp is formed by the gravitational influence of a planet with a mass of about 10 masses of Earth, at a distance of 70 AU, and a small inclination ($\\sim 2.5^\\circ$) of the planetary orbit to the main dust disk. Results of our modeling are compared with the STIS observations.

  1. Effects of mayonnaise on postprandial serum lutein/zeaxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Sayaka; Masuda, Yasunobu; Usuda, Mika; Marushima, Ranko; Ueji, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Mineo; Maruyama, Chizuko

    2009-12-01

    To clarify the effects of different physical forms of oil on postprandial serum lutein/zeaxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations, we performed a vegetable meal loading test. Eighteen healthy subjects participated in the test, which consisted of broccoli as a control (CON) meal, broccoli with oil (OIL), and broccoli with mayonnaise (MS), consumed in random order. After collection of fasting blood samples, subjects consumed one of the three test meals. Fasting and postprandial changes in serum carotenoids were assessed 2, 4, and 6 h after ingestion of each test meal. Serum lutein/zeaxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations were measured. Although no significant change was noted after the CON meal, the serum lutein/zeaxanthin concentration was higher at 4 h after consumption of the OIL meal, and at 2, 4 and 6 h after consumption of the MS meal, as compared with the fasting state. Serum beta-carotene concentrations did not change after ingestion of either the CON or the OIL meal but were elevated 2, 4, and 6 h after MS ingestion as compared with the fasting state. The incremental areas under the curves (IAUCs) of serum lutein/zeaxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations were higher after the MS meal than after the CON meal. IAUCs after the OIL meal exhibited no statistically significant differences from the CON and MS meals. We suggest that mayonnaise contributes to increase serum lutein/zeaxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations when consumed with vegetables rich in these carotenoids.

  2. Statistical evaluation of the isoform patterns of N-acetyl-beta-hexosaminidase from human renal cancer tissue separated by isoelectrofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzym-Kluczyk, Malgorzata; Radziejewska, Iwona; Olszewska, Ewa; Szajda, Sławomir; Knaś, Małgorzata; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2007-03-01

    Isoenzymes of HEX from human renal carcinoma and neighbouring macroscopically normal renal tissue can show different patterns on isoelectrofocusing gels. The aim of our work was to elaborate the method for statistical evaluation of differences. Isoenzymes of N-acetyl-beta-hexosaminidase were separated from renal (control and cancerous) tissues of 15 patients. Isoenzymes were electrofocused in Multiphor II, with ampholine pH 3.5-9.0 (2%) and then evaluated densitometrically and analysed statistically. A similar pattern in activity of isoforms of isoenzymes A and B in normal and cancerous renal tissue was observed. The proposed method of statistical evaluation of differences in isoforms of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase can also be adapted to estimate the isoforms of other enzymes in different tissues.

  3. Measurement of $sin2\\beta$ from $B^{0}_{d} \\rightarrow J/\\Psi K^{0}_{S}$ with the LHCb detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mangiafave, N; Calvi, M; Matteuzzi, C

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb experiment will study CP violation and rare B meson decays at the LHC accelerator, in the CERN laboratories of Geneva. The CP violation in the $b$ quark mesons was observed for the first time measuring the $\\sin2\\beta$ parameter. In the first year of data taking at LHCb the $\\sin2\\beta$ measurement will be performed in the channel $B_d ^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi K_S ^0$ (called golden channel). The comparison with results obtained in previous experiments will show possible systematic errors. Once the systematic errors will be understood, the possible discrepancies with the expected results will be the sign of a new physics beyond the Standard Model. $\\sin2\\beta$ is extracted from the asymmetry in the decay $B_d ^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi(\\mu^+\\mu^-) K_S ^0 (\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ and its CP conjugated $\\overline{B}_d ^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi(\\mu^-\\mu^+) K_S ^0(\\pi^-\\pi^+)$. To distinguish between $B_d ^0$ and $\\overline{B}_d$ flavour tagging algorithms are used. These introduce an additional parameter: the wrong tag fracti...

  4. An Abbreviated Protocol for In Vitro Generation of Functional Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massumi, Mohammad; Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Nalla, Amarnadh; Batchuluun, Battsetseg; Nagy, Kristina; Neely, Eric; Gull, Rida; Nagy, Andras; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to yield glucose-responsive pancreatic beta-cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro will facilitate the development of the cell replacement therapies for the treatment of Type 1 Diabetes. Here, through the sequential in vitro targeting of selected signaling pathways, we have developed an abbreviated five-stage protocol (25–30 days) to generate human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-like Cells (ES-DBCs). We showed that Geltrex, as an extracellular matrix, could support the generation of ES-DBCs more efficiently than that of the previously described culture systems. The activation of FGF and Retinoic Acid along with the inhibition of BMP, SHH and TGF-beta led to the generation of 75% NKX6.1+/NGN3+ Endocrine Progenitors. The inhibition of Notch and tyrosine kinase receptor AXL, and the treatment with Exendin-4 and T3 in the final stage resulted in 35% mono-hormonal insulin positive cells, 1% insulin and glucagon positive cells and 30% insulin and NKX6.1 co-expressing cells. Functionally, ES-DBCs were responsive to high glucose in static incubation and perifusion studies, and could secrete insulin in response to successive glucose stimulations. Mitochondrial metabolic flux analyses using Seahorse demonstrated that the ES-DBCs could efficiently metabolize glucose and generate intracellular signals to trigger insulin secretion. In conclusion, targeting selected signaling pathways for 25–30 days was sufficient to generate ES-DBCs in vitro. The ability of ES-DBCs to secrete insulin in response to glucose renders them a promising model for the in vitro screening of drugs, small molecules or genes that may have potential to influence beta-cell function. PMID:27755557

  5. Interaction of human TNF and beta2-microglobulin with Tanapox virus-encoded TNF inhibitor, TPV-2L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Jeng, David; Singh, Rajkumari; Coughlin, Jake; Essani, Karim; McFadden, Grant

    2009-04-10

    Tanapox virus (TPV) encodes and expresses a secreted TNF-binding protein, TPV-2L or gp38, that displays inhibitory properties against TNF from diverse mammalian species, including human, monkey, canine and rabbit. TPV-2L also has sequence similarity with the MHC-class I heavy chain and interacts differently with human TNF as compared to the known cellular TNF receptors or any of the known virus-encoded TNF receptor homologs derived from many poxviruses. In order to determine the TNF binding region in TPV-2L, various TPV-2L C-terminal truncations and internal deletions were created and the muteins were expressed using recombinant baculovirus vectors. C-terminal deletions from TPV-2L resulted in reduced binding affinity for human TNF and specific mutants of TNF that discriminate between TNF-R1 and TNF-R2. However, deletion of C-terminal 42 amino acid residues totally abolished the binding of human TNF and its mutants. Removal of any of the predicted internal domains resulted in a mutant TPV-2L protein incapable of binding to human TNF. Deletion of C-terminal residues also affected the ability of TPV-2L to block TNF-induced cellular cytotoxicity. In addition to TNF, TPV-2L can also form complexes with human beta2-microglobulin to form a novel macromolecular complex. In summary, the TPV-2L protein is a bona fide MHC-1 heavy chain family member that binds and inhibits human TNF in a fashion very distinct from other known poxvirus-encoded TNF inhibitors, and also can form a novel complex with the human MHC-1 light chain, beta2-microglobulin.

  6. Measurement of the CP Violating Phase $\\boldsymbol{\\sin(2\\beta_{s})}$ using $\\boldsymbol{B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi}$ Decays at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pueschel, Elisa [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-05-01

    A B0 s meson can oscillate into its anti-particle, the $\\bar{B}$0 s meson, before decaying. CP violation in this system is made possible by the presence of amplitudes from both mixed and unmixed B0 s meson decays. The CP violating phase βs appears in the interference between the decay amplitudes. The quantity sin(2βs) is expected to be small in the standard model. Thus, measuring a large value for sin(2βs) would be an unequivocal sign of new physics participation in the B0 s mixing loop diagram. In this thesis, we present a latest measurement of sin(2βs), using 5.2 fb-1 of data collected at CDF from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy of √s=1.96 TeV. A time-dependent angular analysis, with the production flavor of the B0 s meson identified with flavor tagging methods, is used to extract sin(2βs) from ~6500 B0 s→ J/ψφ decays. Other parameters of interest, such as the B0 s lifetime and the decay width difference between the heavy and light B0 s mass eigenstates are determined to high precision. Also, the effect of potential contributions to the final state from B0 s → J/ψf0 and B0 s→ J/ψK+K- decays is considered for the first time. We present 68% and 95% confidence regions in the βs plane. The probability that the observed central value is a fluctuation of the data from the standard model expected value of βs is calculated to be 44%. The observed confidence region shows better agreement with the standard model prediction than previous measurements.

  7. Introduction of an N-glycan sequon into HEXA enhances human beta-hexosaminidase cellular uptake in a model of Sandhoff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Kazuhiko; Tsuji, Daisuke; Aikawa, Sei-Ichi; Matsuzawa, Fumiko; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Itoh, Kohji

    2010-08-01

    Human lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase A is a heterodimer composed of alpha- and beta-subunits encoded by HEXA and HEXB, respectively. We genetically introduced an additional N-glycosylation sequon into HEXA, which caused amino acid substitutions (S51 to N and A53 to T) at homologous positions to N84 and T86 in the beta-subunit. The mutant HexA (NgHexA) obtained from a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line co-expressing the mutated HEXA and wild-type HEXB complementary DNAs was demonstrated to contain an additional mannose-6-phosphate (M6P)-type-N-glycan. NgHexA was more efficiently taken up than the wild-type HexA and delivered to lysosomes, where it degraded accumulated substrates including GM2 ganglioside (GM2) when administered to cultured fibroblasts derived from a Sandhoff disease (SD) patient. On intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of NgHexA to SD model mice, NgHexA more efficiently restored the HexA activity and reduced the GM2 and GA2 (asialoGM2) accumulated in neural cells of the brain parenchyma than the wild-type HexA. These findings indicate that i.c.v. administration of the modified human HexA with an additional M6P-type N-glycan is applicable for enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) involving an M6P-receptor as a molecular target for HexA deficiencies including Tay-Sachs disease and SD.

  8. Bad Beta, Good Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, John; Vuolteenaho, Tuomo

    2003-01-01

    This paper explains the size and value "anomalies" in stock returns using an economically motivated two-beta model. We break the beta of a stock with the market portfolio into two components, one reflecting news about the market's future cash flows and one reflecting news about the market's discount rates. Intertemporal asset pricing theory suggests that the former should have a higher price of risk; thus beta, like cholesterol, comes in "had" and "good" varieties. Empirically, we find that v...

  9. Cerebral oxygenation decreases during exercise in humans with beta-adrenergic blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, T.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Beta-blockers reduce exercise capacity by attenuated increase in cardiac output, but it remains unknown whether performance also relates to attenuated cerebral oxygenation. METHODS: Acting as their own controls, eight healthy subjects performed a continuous incremental cycle test to exhaustion...... with or without administration of the non-selective beta-blocker propranolol. Changes in cerebral blood flow velocity were measured with transcranial Doppler ultrasound and those in cerebral oxygenation were evaluated using near-infrared spectroscopy and the calculated cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension...

  10. Lack of immunological analogy between the beta-subunits of cholera toxin and human choriogonadotropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, H F; Kellen, J A

    1986-01-01

    A chemical relatedness has been described between the beta-subunit of cholera toxin and that of the four dimeric glycoprotein hormones (hCG, hLH, hFSH and hTSH). However, antibodies induced by cholera toxin did not crossreact, when tested by labeled hCG binding and immunocytochemistry, with the beta-subunit of hCG. It appears that differences in the tertiary structures, as shown in this study, account for distinct epitopes. Similarities in biological activity between these two compounds, such as induction of adenyl cyclase or a protective effect against some tumors, are not based on immunological mechanisms.

  11. Multifunctional interleukin-1beta promotes metastasis of human lung cancer cells in SCID mice via enhanced expression of adhesion-, invasion- and angiogenesis-related molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Seiji; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Goto, Hisatsugu; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Kanematsu, Takanori; Miki, Toyokazu; Uehara, Hisanori; Saijo, Yasuo; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Sone, Saburo

    2003-03-01

    We examined whether interleukin-1 (IL-1), a multifunctional proinflammatory cytokine, progresses or regresses metastasis of lung cancer. Exogenous IL-1beta enhanced expression of various cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by A549, PC14, RERF-LC-AI, and SBC-3 cells expressing IL-1 receptors. A549 cells transduced with human IL-1beta-gene with the growth-hormone signaling-peptide sequence (A549/IL-1beta) secreted a large amount of IL-1beta protein. Overexpression of IL-1beta resulted in augmentation of expression of the cytokines, ICAM-1, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). A549/IL-1beta cells intravenously inoculated into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice distributed to the lung more efficiently and developed lung metastasis much more rapidly than did control A549 cells. Treatment of SCID mice with anti-IL-1beta antibody inhibited formation of lung metastasis by A549/IL-1beta cells. Moreover, A549/IL-1beta cells inoculated in the subcutis grew more rapidly, without necrosis, than did control A549 cells, which produced smaller tumors with central necrosis, suggesting involvement of angiogenesis in addition to enhanced binding in the high metastatic potential of A549/IL-1beta cells. Histological analyses showed that more host-cell infiltration, fewer apoptotic cells, more vascularization, and higher MMP activity were observed in tumors derived from A549/IL-1beta cells, compared with tumors derived from control A549 cells. These findings suggest that IL-1beta facilitates metastasis of lung cancer via promoting multiple events, including adhesion, invasion and angiogenesis.

  12. Thymosin Beta-4 Suppresses Osteoclastic Differentiation and Inflammatory Responses in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Im Lee

    Full Text Available Recent reports suggest that thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a key regulator for wound healing and anti-inflammation. However, the role of Tβ4 in osteoclast differentiation remains unclear.The purpose of this study was to evaluate Tβ4 expression in H2O2-stimulated human periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs, the effects of Tβ4 activation on inflammatory response in PDLCs and osteoclastic differentiation in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs, and identify the underlying mechanism.Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and Western blot analyses were used to measure mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Osteoclastic differentiation was assessed in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs using conditioned medium (CM from H2O2-treated PDLCs.Tβ4 was down-regulated in H2O2-exposed PDLCs in dose- and time-dependent manners. Tβ4 activation with a Tβ4 peptide attenuated the H2O2-induced production of NO and PGE2 and up-regulated iNOS, COX-2, and osteoclastogenic cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-17 as well as reversed the effect on RANKL and OPG in PDLCs. Tβ4 peptide inhibited the effects of H2O2 on the activation of ERK and JNK MAPK, and NF-κB in PDLCs. Furthermore, Tβ4 peptide inhibited osteoclast differentiation, osteoclast-specific gene expression, and p38, ERK, and JNK phosphorylation and NF-κB activation in RANKL-stimulated BMMs. In addition, H2O2 up-regulated Wnt5a and its cell surface receptors, Frizzled and Ror2 in PDLCs. Wnt5a inhibition by Wnt5a siRNA enhanced the effects of Tβ4 on H2O2-mediated induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and osteoclastogenic cytokines as well as helping osteoclastic differentiation whereas Wnt5a activation by Wnt5a peptide reversed it.In conclusion, this study demonstrated, for the first time, that Tβ4 was down-regulated in ROS-stimulated PDLCs as well as Tβ4 activation exhibited anti-inflammatory effects and anti-osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Thus, Tβ4 activation might be a

  13. MicroRNA expression in alpha and beta cells of human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Klein

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in pancreatic development and adult β-cell physiology. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that each islet cell type has a specific pattern of miRNA expression. We sought to determine the profile of miRNA expression in α-and β-cells, the main components of pancreatic islets, because this analysis may lead to a better understanding of islet gene regulatory pathways. Highly enriched (>98% subsets of human α-and β-cells were obtained by flow cytometric sorting after intracellular staining with c-peptide and glucagon antibody. The method of sorting based on intracellular staining is possible because miRNAs are stable after fixation. MiRNA expression levels were determined by quantitative high throughput PCR-based miRNA array platform screening. Most of the miRNAs were preferentially expressed in β-cells. From the total of 667 miRNAs screened, the Significant Analysis of Microarray identified 141 miRNAs, of which only 7 were expressed more in α-cells (α-miRNAs and 134 were expressed more in β-cells (β-miRNAs. Bioinformatic analysis identified potential targets of β-miRNAs analyzing the Beta Cell Gene Atlas, described in the T1Dbase, the web platform, supporting the type 1 diabetes (T1D community. cMaf, a transcription factor regulating glucagon expression expressed selectively in α-cells (TFα is targeted by β-miRNAs; miR-200c, miR-125b and miR-182. Min6 cells treated with inhibitors of these miRNAs show an increased expression of cMaf RNA. Conversely, over expression of miR-200c, miR-125b or miR-182 in the mouse alpha cell line αTC6 decreases the level of cMAF mRNA and protein. MiR-200c also inhibits the expression of Zfpm2, a TFα that inhibits the PI3K signaling pathway, at both RNA and protein levels.In conclusion, we identified miRNAs differentially expressed in pancreatic α- and β-cells and their potential transcription factor targets that could add new insights into different

  14. Dysregulation of human beta-defensin-2 protein in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian C Aldhous

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human beta-defensin-2 (HBD2 is an antimicrobial peptide implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Low copy number and concomitant low mRNA expression of the HBD2 gene have been implicated in susceptibility to colonic Crohn's Disease (CD. We investigated the colonic distribution of HBD2 mRNA expression, and the contributions of genetic and environmental factors on HBD2 protein production. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined HBD2 mRNA expression at three colonic locations by microarray analysis of biopsies from 151 patients (53 CD, 67 ulcerative colitis [UC], 31 controls. We investigated environmental and genetic influences on HBD2 protein production using ex vivo cultured sigmoid colon biopsies from 69 patients (22 CD, 26 UC, 21 controls stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and/or nicotine for 24 hours. HBD2 and cytokines were measured in culture supernatants. Using DNA samples from these patients, regions in the HBD2 gene promoter were sequenced for NF-kappaB binding-sites and HBD2 gene copy number was determined. HBD2 mRNA expression was highest in inflamed (vs. uninflamed p = 0.0122 ascending colon in CD and in inflamed (vs. uninflamed p<0.0001 sigmoid colon in UC. HBD2 protein production was increased in inflamed UC biopsies (p = 0.0078. There was no difference in HBD2 protein production from unstimulated biopsies of CD, UC and controls. LPS-induced HBD2 production was significantly increased in CD (p = 0.0375 but not UC (p = 0.2017; this LPS-induced response was augmented by nicotine in UC (p = 0.0308 but not CD (p = 0.6872. Nicotine alone did not affect HBD2 production. HBD2 production correlated with IL8 production in UC (p<0.001 and with IL10 in CD (p<0.05. Variations in the HBD2 promoter and HBD2 gene copy number did not affect HBD2 production. SIGNIFICANCE/CONCLUSIONS: Colonic HBD2 was dysregulated at mRNA and protein level in IBD. Inflammatory status and stimulus but not germline

  15. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of ovine casein genes: close linkage between the alpha s1-, alpha s2-, beta- and kappa-casein loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveziel, H; Metenier, L; Guerin, G; Cullen, P; Provot, C; Bertaud, M; Mercier, J C

    1991-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of ovine casein genes was investigated. Genomic DNA from 56 rams was digested with 10 restriction endonucleases and Southern blots probed with the four ovine casein cDNAs (alpha s1-, beta-, alpha s2- and kappa-Cn). Five enzymes, namely, BglI, PvuII, RsaI, TaqI and HindIII revealed nine different RFLPs. The inheritance of six of these polymorphisms was studied by segregation analysis of gametes in nine rams' families, and each of them could be related to the existence of alleles at the relevant casein locus. A close linkage between the four ovine casein genes was demonstrated since no recombination within the four pairs of loci examined, alpha s1-beta-Cn, alpha s1-kappa-Cn, beta-kappa-Cn and alpha s2-kappa-Cn, was observed in the progeny of double heterozygous rams. The casein genes are thus clustered in the ovine species as in the case of other mammals.

  16. A subset of human pancreatic beta cells express functional CD14 receptors: a signaling pathway for beta cell-related glycolipids, sulfatide and ß-galactosylceramide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerbye, Thomas; Funda, David P; Fundová, Petra;

    2010-01-01

    T1DM is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease targeting insulin-producing beta-cells. Multiple factors may contribute to the development of T1DM. Among these, the metabolic state of beta-cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines, produced by infiltrating immune cells, have been implicated in the precip...

  17. Blood Beta-Amyloid and Tau in Down Syndrome: A Comparison with Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ni-Chung; Yang, Shieh-Yueh; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Huang, Po-Tsang; Chang, Lih-Maan; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Huang, Ai-Chiu; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Changes in β-amyloids (Aβ) and tau proteins have been noted in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and patients with both Down syndrome (DS) and AD. However, reports of changes in the early stage of regression, such as behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), in DS are sparse. Methods: Seventy-eight controls, 62 patients with AD, 35 with DS and 16 with DS with degeneration (DS_D), including 9 with BPSD and 7 with dementia, were enrolled. The levels of β-amyloids 40 and 42 (Aβ-40, Aβ-42) and tau protein in the blood were analyzed using immunomagnetic reduction (IMR). The Adaptive Behavior Dementia Questionnaire (ABDQ) was used to evaluate the clinical status of the degeneration. Results: The Aβ-40 and tau levels were higher and the Aβ-42 level and Aβ-42/Aβ-40 ratio were lower in DS than in the controls (all p < 0.001). Decreased Aβ-40 and increased Aβ-42 levels and Aβ-42/40 ratios were observed in DS_D compared with DS without degeneration (all p < 0.001). The ABDQ score was negatively correlated with the Aβ-40 level (ρ = −0.556) and the tau protein level (ρ = −0.410) and positively associated with the Aβ-42 level (ρ = 0.621) and the Aβ-42/40 ratio (ρ = 0.544; all p < 0.05). Conclusions: The Aβ-40 and Aβ-42 levels and the Aβ-42/Aβ-40 ratio are considered possible biomarkers for the early detection of degeneration in DS. The elevated Aβ-40 and tau levels in DS may indicate early neurodegeneration. The increased Aβ-42 in DS_D may reflect the neurotoxicity of Aβ-42. The paradox of the tau decreases in DS_D could be explained by a burnout phenomenon during long-term neurodegeneration. The different patterns of the plasma beta amyloids and tau protein may imply a different pathogenesis between DS with degeneration and AD in the general population, in spite of their common key pathological features. PMID:28144219

  18. The growth inhibition of human breast cancer cells by a novel synthetic progestin involves the induction of transforming growth factor beta.

    OpenAIRE

    Colletta, A. A.; Wakefield, L M; Howell, F. V.; Danielpour, D; Baum, M.; Sporn, M B

    1991-01-01

    Recent experimental work has identified a novel intracellular binding site for the synthetic progestin, Gestodene, that appears to be uniquely expressed in human breast cancer cells. Gestodene is shown here to inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent fashion, but has no effect on endocrine-responsive human endometrial cancer cells. Gestodene induced a 90-fold increase in the secretion of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) by T47D human breast cancer cells. O...

  19. Synergistic effect of interleukin 1 alpha on nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced up-regulation of human beta-defensin 2 in middle ear epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Raekil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently showed that beta-defensins have antimicrobial activity against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi and that interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha up-regulates the transcription of beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4 according to new nomenclature of the Human Genome Organization in human middle ear epithelial cells via a Src-dependent Raf-MEK1/2-ERK signaling pathway. Based on these observations, we investigated if human middle ear epithelial cells could release IL-1 alpha upon exposure to a lysate of NTHi and if this cytokine could have a synergistic effect on beta-defensin 2 up-regulation by the bacterial components. Methods The studies described herein were carried out using epithelial cell lines as well as a murine model of acute otitis media (OM. Human cytokine macroarray analysis was performed to detect the released cytokines in response to NTHi exposure. Real time quantitative PCR was done to compare the induction of IL-1 alpha or beta-defensin 2 mRNAs and to identify the signaling pathways involved. Direct activation of the beta-defensin 2 promoter was monitored using a beta-defensin 2 promoter-Luciferase construct. An IL-1 alpha blocking antibody was used to demonstrate the direct involvement of this cytokine on DEFB4 induction. Results Middle ear epithelial cells released IL-1 alpha when stimulated by NTHi components and this cytokine acted in an autocrine/paracrine synergistic manner with NTHi to up-regulate beta-defensin 2. This synergistic effect of IL-1 alpha on NTHi-induced beta-defensin 2 up-regulation appeared to be mediated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that IL-1 alpha is secreted by middle ear epithelial cells upon exposure to NTHi components and that it can synergistically act with certain of these molecules to up-regulate beta-defensin 2 via the p38 MAP kinase pathway.

  20. Measurement of the CP violating phase sin(2betas) using neutral B(s) meson going to J/psi phi decays at CDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Elisa

    A B0s meson can oscillate into its anti-particle, the B¯0s meson, before decaying. CP violation in this system is made possible by the presence of amplitudes from both mixed and unmixed B0s meson decays. The CP violating phase beta s appears in the interference between the decay amplitudes. The quantity sin(2betas) is expected to be small in the standard model. Thus, measuring a large value for sin(2beta s) would be an unequivocal sign of new physics participation in the B0s mixing loop diagram. In this thesis, we present a latest measurement of sin(2beta s), using 5.2 fb--1 of data collected at CDF from pp¯ collisions at a center of mass energy of s = 1.96 TeV. A time-dependent angular analysis, with the production flavor of the B0s meson identified with flavor tagging methods, is used to extract sin(2beta s) from ˜6500 B0s → J/psiφ decays. Other parameters of interest, such as the B0s lifetime and the decay width difference DeltaGamma between the heavy and light B0s mass eigenstates are determined to high precision. Also, the effect of potential contributions to the final state from B0s → J/psif0 and B0s → J/psiK+K -- decays is considered for the first time. We present 68% and 95% confidence regions in the beta s -- DeltaGamma plane. The probability that the observed central value is a fluctuation of the data from the standard model expected value of betas is calculated to be 44%. The observed confidence region shows better agreement with the standard model prediction than previous measurements.

  1. Facilitation of Learning by Social-Emotional Feedback in Humans Is Beta-Noradrenergic-Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihov, Yoan; Mayer, Simon; Musshoff, Frank; Maier, Wolfgang; Kendrick, Keith M.; Hurlemann, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in dynamic environments critically depends on the ability to learn rapidly and flexibly from the outcomes of prior choices. In social environments, facial expressions of emotion often serve as performance feedback and thereby guide declarative learning. Abundant evidence implicates beta-noradrenergic signaling in the modulatory…

  2. Structure of protein kinase CK2: dimerization of the human beta-subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Mietens, U; Issinger, O G

    1996-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 has been shown to be elevated in all so far investigated solid tumors and its catalytic subunit has been shown to serve as an oncogene product. CK2 is a heterotetrameric serine-threonine kinase composed of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two regulatory beta...

  3. Insulin inhibits amyloid beta-induced cell death in cultured human brain pericytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, A.A.M.; Otte-Holler, I.; Boer, R.; Bosch, R.R.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.; Kremer, H.P.H.

    2004-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition in the cerebral arterial and capillary walls is one of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type. In vitro, Abeta1-40, carrying the "Dutch" mutation (DAbeta1-40), induced reproducible degeneration of cult

  4. Differential gene expression in human brain pericytes induced by amyloid-beta protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, A.A.M.; Otte-Holler, I.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Waal, R.M.W. de; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is one of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this accumulation of fibrillar amyloid-beta (Alphabeta) in the vascular wall is accompanied by marked vascular damage. In vitro, Abeta1-40 carrying the 'Dutch' mutation (DAbeta1-40) induces degeneration of cult

  5. Modulation of human corticomuscular beta-range coherence with low-level static forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Matthias; Patino, Luis; Andrykiewicz, Agnieszka; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2007-12-01

    Although corticomuscular synchronization in the beta range (15-30 Hz) was shown to occur during weak steady-state contractions, an examination of low-level forces around 10% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) is still missing. We addressed this question by investigating coherence between electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) as well as cortical spectral power during a visuomotor task. Eight healthy right-handed subjects compensated isometrically static forces at a level of 4% and 16% of MVC with their right index finger. While 4% MVC was accompanied by low coherence values in the middle to high beta frequency range (25-30 Hz), a significant increase of coherence mainly confined to low beta frequencies (19-20 Hz) was observed with force of 16% MVC. Furthermore, this increase was associated with better performance, as reflected in decreased relative error in force during 16% MVC. We additionally show that periods of good motor performance within each condition were associated with higher values of EEG-EMG coherence and spectral power. In conclusion, our results suggest a role for beta-range corticomuscular coherence in effective sensorimotor integration, thus stabilizing corticospinal communication.

  6. Tagore’s Dark Vision of Humanity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok BHALLA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tagore struggled against his dark vision of humanity to assert that the earth was a place of hierophanies and human life had a divine purpose. He failed. He called, with skepticism, for peace, equality and the restoration of earth’s loveliness: “I know I am crying in the wilderness, when I raise my voice of warning…” In a war-haunted and hungry Europe and Asia, he was confronted by a strange, cruel, and obstinately tribal world with its “legacy of ruin.” Though he asserted till his death in 1940 that he could never “commit the grievous sin of losing faith in man,” he could not turn away from “the crumbling ruins of … civilization….”

  7. Increased renal gene transcription of protein kinase C-beta in human diabetic nephropathy: relationship to long-term glycaemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langham, R.G.; Kelly, D.J.; Gow, R.M.;

    2008-01-01

    was examined in renal biopsies (n=25) with classical histological features of diabetic nephropathy and compared with that in normal control tissue (n=6). Peptide localisation of PKC-alpha, PKC-beta and the activated forms phosphorylated PKC-alpha and -beta was also performed on matched paraffin......-embedded sections of renal biopsies using immunohistochemistry. The effects of high glucose on PRKC-beta expression and peptide production in cultured human proximal tubular epithelial cells were assessed. RESULTS: Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated a 9.9-fold increase in PRKC-beta mRNA in kidney biopsies...... quantitative analysis of mRNA from archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. RNA was extracted from scraped 6 microm sections of biopsy tissue, and PRKC-alpha and PRKC-beta (also known as PRKCA and PRKCB) mRNA measured using real-time PCR. Expression of genes encoding PKC isoforms...

  8. Frequency of alpha- and beta-haemolysin in Staphylococcus aureus of bovine and human origin - A comparison between pheno- and genotype and variation in phenotypic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Larsen, H.D.; Eriksen, N.H.R.;

    1999-01-01

    change in expression of haemolysins after subcultivation in human and bovine blood and milk was studied in selected isolates. alpha-haemolysin was expressed phenotypically in 39 (37%) of the bovine isolates, in 59 (59%) of the human carrier isolates, and in 40 (67%) of the isolates from septicaemia. beta......The phenotypic expression of haemolysins and the presence of genes encoding alpha and beta-haemolysin were determined in 105 Sraphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis, 100 isolates from the nostrils of healthy humans, and 60 isolates from septicaemia in humans. Furthermore, the possible......-haemolysin was expressed in 76 (72%) bovine, 11 (11%) carrier, and 8 (13%) septicaemia isolates. Significantly more bovine than human isolates expressed beta-haemolysin and significantly fewer expressed alpha-haemolysin. Genotypically, the gene encoding alpha-haemolysin was detected in all isolates. A significant...

  9. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    .S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return...

  10. Amygdalin (Laetrile) and prunasin beta-glucosidases: distribution in germ-free rat and in human tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmark, J; Brady, R O; Grimley, P M; Gal, A E; Waller, S G; Thistlethwaite, J R

    1981-01-01

    Amygdalin, the gentiobioside derivative of mandelonitrile commonly referred to as Laetrile, is presently under intensive investigation as a potential cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Because of this interest, we investigated the activity of beta-glucosidases that cleave glucose from amygdalin and from prunasin (mandelonitrile monoglucoside) in tissues from germ-free rats and in normal and neoplastic human tissues. Rat and human small intestinal mucosa contain high levels of activity of glucosidases that act on both of these cyanogenic glucosides. Release of glucose from these compounds was not detected in any of the human neoplastic tissues examined in the present study. These observations are consistent with reports of cyanide toxicity through the oral use of amygdalin or prunasin and pose serious questions concerning the alleged tumoricidal effect of amygdalin. PMID:6796962

  11. Species-specific vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression in mammalian pancreatic beta cells: implications for optimising radioligand-based human beta cell mass (BCM) imaging in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M K-H; Hartwig, N R; Kalmbach, N; Klietz, M; Anlauf, M; Eiden, L E; Weihe, E

    2013-05-01

    Imaging of beta cell mass (BCM) is a major challenge in diabetes research. The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is abundantly expressed in human beta cells. Radiolabelled analogues of tetrabenazine (TBZ; a low-molecular-weight, cell-permeant VMAT2-selective ligand) have been employed for pancreatic islet imaging in humans. Since reports on TBZ-based VMAT2 imaging in rodent pancreas have been fraught with confusion, we compared VMAT2 gene expression patterns in the mouse, rat, pig and human pancreas, to identify appropriate animal models with which to further validate and optimise TBZ imaging in humans. We used a panel of highly sensitive VMAT2 antibodies developed against equivalently antigenic regions of the transporter from each species in combination with immunostaining for insulin and species-specific in situ hybridisation probes. Individual pancreatic islets were obtained by laser-capture microdissection and subjected to analysis of mRNA expression of VMAT2. The VMAT2 protein was not expressed in beta cells in the adult pancreas of common mouse or rat laboratory strains, in contrast to its expression in beta cells (but not other pancreatic endocrine cell types) in the pancreas of pigs and humans. VMAT2- and tyrosine hydroxylase co-positive (catecholaminergic) innervation was less abundant in humans than in rodents. VMAT2-positive mast cells were identified in the pancreas of all species. Primates and pigs are suitable models for TBZ imaging of beta cells. Rodents, because of a complete lack of VMAT2 expression in the endocrine pancreas, are a 'null' model for assessing interference with BCM measurements by VMAT2-positive mast cells and sympathetic innervation in the pancreas.

  12. Effect of transfection with human interferon-beta gene entrapped in cationic multilamellar liposomes in combination with 5-fluorouracil on the growth of human esophageal cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoo, Hideo; Komura, Sadaaki; Ohishi, Nobuko; Yajima, Haruyoshi; Akiyama, Seiji; Kasai, Yasushi; Ito, Katsuki; Nakao, Akimasa; Yagi, Kunio

    2002-01-01

    When human esophageal cancer cells were transfected with the human interferon-beta (hIFN-beta) gene entrapped in cationic multilamellar liposomes, the growth of all cancer cells tested was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes ranged from 16 to 176 ng plasmid DNA/ml culture medium. Among the 10 cell lines examined, NUEC3, NUEC4, TE-3 and WSSC cell lines were highly susceptible to transfection with this gene entrapped in the liposomes. The IC50 values of the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes with respect to cell growth were positively-correlated with those of exogenous cytokine hIFN-beta, suggesting that the antiproliferative effect of hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes can be mainly ascribed to the function of hIFN-beta produced by cells transfected with the gene. Two days after transfection with the liposome-entrapped gene, the concentration of hIFN-beta secreted into the medium was determined. Even though the level of hIFN-beta observed in the medium was lower than that of the IC50 of exogenously added hIFN-beta, the inhibitory potency of the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes on the cell growth was remarkable. When the esophageal cancer cells were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the presence of a low concentration of liposome-entrapped-gene, the rate of growth inhibition of these cells increased over that caused by either 5-FU or hIFN-beta gene entrapped in the liposomes alone. All these data suggest that combination therapy with the hIFN-beta gene entrapped in cationic multilamellar liposomes and the anticancer drug 5-FU would be beneficial for preoperative treatment of carcinoma of the esophagus.

  13. Low background and high contrast PET imaging of amyloid-{beta} with [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in Alzheimer's disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Anton; Andersson, Jan; Varnaes, Katarina; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Jureus, Anders; Swahn, Britt-Marie; Sandell, Johan; Julin, Per; Svensson, Samuel [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Cselenyi, Zsolt; Schou, Magnus; Johnstroem, Peter; Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Hospital, AstraZeneca Translational Sciences Centre, PET CoE, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksdotter, Maria; Freund-Levi, Yvonne [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jeppsson, Fredrik [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate AZD2995 side by side with AZD2184 as novel PET radioligands for imaging of amyloid-{beta} in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro binding of tritium-labelled AZD2995 and AZD2184 was studied and compared with that of the established amyloid-{beta} PET radioligand PIB. Subsequently, a first-in-human in vivo PET study was performed using [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in three healthy control subjects and seven AD patients. AZD2995, AZD2184 and PIB were found to share the same binding site to amyloid-{beta}. [{sup 3}H]AZD2995 had the highest signal-to-background ratio in brain tissue from patients with AD as well as in transgenic mice. However, [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 had superior imaging properties in PET, as shown by larger effect sizes comparing binding potential values in cortical regions of AD patients and healthy controls. Nevertheless, probably due to a lower amount of nonspecific binding, the group separation of the distribution volume ratio values of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 was greater in areas with lower amyloid-{beta} load, e.g. the hippocampus. Both AZD2995 and AZD2184 detect amyloid-{beta} with high affinity and specificity and also display a lower degree of nonspecific binding than that reported for PIB. Overall [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 seems to be an amyloid-{beta} radioligand with higher uptake and better group separation when compared to [{sup 11}C]AZD2995. However, the very low nonspecific binding of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 makes this radioligand potentially interesting as a tool to study minute levels of amyloid-{beta}. This sensitivity may be important in investigating, for example, early prodromal stages of AD or in the longitudinal study of a disease modifying therapy. (orig.)

  14. Aggregation, impaired degradation and immunization targeting of amyloid-beta dimers in Alzheimer’s disease: a stochastic modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proctor Carole J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most frequently diagnosed neurodegenerative disorder affecting humans, with advanced age being the most prominent risk factor for developing AD. Despite intense research efforts aimed at elucidating the precise molecular underpinnings of AD, a definitive answer is still lacking. In recent years, consensus has grown that dimerisation of the polypeptide amyloid-beta (Aß, particularly Aß42, plays a crucial role in the neuropathology that characterise AD-affected post-mortem brains, including the large-scale accumulation of fibrils, also referred to as senile plaques. This has led to the realistic hope that targeting Aß42 immunotherapeutically could drastically reduce plaque burden in the ageing brain, thus delaying AD onset or symptom progression. Stochastic modelling is a useful tool for increasing understanding of the processes underlying complex systems-affecting disorders such as AD, providing a rapid and inexpensive strategy for testing putative new therapies. In light of the tool’s utility, we developed computer simulation models to examine Aß42 turnover and its aggregation in detail and to test the effect of immunization against Aß dimers. Results Our model demonstrates for the first time that even a slight decrease in the clearance rate of Aß42 monomers is sufficient to increase the chance of dimers forming, which could act as instigators of protofibril and fibril formation, resulting in increased plaque levels. As the process is slow and levels of Aβ are normally low, stochastic effects are important. Our model predicts that reducing the rate of dimerisation leads to a significant reduction in plaque levels and delays onset of plaque formation. The model was used to test the effect of an antibody mediated immunological response. Our results showed that plaque levels were reduced compared to conditions where antibodies are not present. Conclusion Our model supports the current

  15. Role of TGF-beta1 and MAP kinases in the antiproliferative effect of aspirin in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Redondo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to test the antiproliferative effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC from bypass surgery patients and the role of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VSMC were isolated from remaining internal mammary artery from patients who underwent bypass surgery. Cell proliferation and DNA fragmentation were assessed by ELISA. Protein expression was assessed by Western blot. ASA inhibited BrdU incorporation at 2 mM. Anti-TGF-beta1 was able to reverse this effect. ASA (2 mM induced TGF-beta1 secretion; however it was unable to induce Smad activation. ASA increased p38(MAPK phosphorylation in a TGF-beta1-independent manner. Anti-CD105 (endoglin was unable to reverse the antiproliferative effect of ASA. Pre-surgical serum levels of TGF-beta1 in patients who took at antiplatelet doses ASA were assessed by ELISA and remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In vitro antiproliferative effects of aspirin (at antiinflammatory concentration on human VSMC obtained from bypass patients are mediated by TGF-beta1 and p38(MAPK. Pre-surgical serum levels of TGF- beta1 from bypass patients who took aspirin at antiplatelet doses did not change.

  16. Deconfinement on $\\mathbb R^2\\times S^1_L\\times S^1_{\\beta}$ for all gauge groups and duality to double Coulomb Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Teeple, Brett

    2015-01-01

    I study finite-temperature $\\mathcal N=1$ super Yang-Mills for any gauge group $G=A_N, B_N, C_N, D_N, E_{6,7,8},F_4,G_2$, compactified from four dimensions on a torus, $\\mathbb R^2\\times S^1_L\\times S^1_{\\beta}$. I examine in particular the low temperature regime $L\\ll\\beta=1/T$, where $L$ is the length of the spatial circle with periodic boundary conditions and with anti-periodic boundary conditions for the adjoint gauginos along the thermal cycle $S^1_{\\beta}$. For small such $L$ we are in a regime were semiclassical calculations can be performed and a transition occurs at $T_c$ much smaller than $1/NL$. The transition is mediated by the competition between non-perturbative objects including 'exotic' topological molecules: neutral and magnetic bions composed of BPS and KK monopole constituents, with $r=rank(G)$ different charges in the co-root lattice of the gauge group $G$, and the perturbative electrically charged W-bosons (along with their wino superpartners). I determine a duality to a double Coulomb ga...

  17. Estradiol via estrogen receptor beta influences ROS levels through the transcriptional regulation of SIRT3 in human seminoma TCam-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panza, Salvatore; Santoro, Marta; De Amicis, Francesca; Morelli, Catia; Passarelli, Valentina; D'Aquila, Patrizia; Giordano, Francesca; Cione, Erika; Passarino, Giuseppe; Bellizzi, Dina; Aquila, Saveria

    2017-05-01

    Human testis, gonocytes, and adult germ cells mainly express estrogen receptor beta, and estrogen receptor beta loss is associated with advanced tumor stage; however, the molecular mechanisms of estrogen receptor beta-protective effects are still to be defined. Herein, we provide evidence that in human seminoma TCam-2 cells, E2 through estrogen receptor beta upregulates the mitochondrial deacetylase sirtuin-3 at protein and messenger RNA levels. Specifically, E2 increases sirtuin-3 expression through a transcriptional mechanism due to the occupancy of sirtuin-3 promoter by estrogen receptor beta, together with the transcription factor Sp1 as evidenced by Chip reChIp assay. This complex binds to a GC cluster located between -128 bp/+1 bp and is fundamental for E2 effects, as demonstrated by Sp1 small interfering RNA studies. Beside, after 24 h, E2 stimulus significantly increased activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase to scavenge reactive oxygen species produced by 30 min of E2 stimulus. In summary, this article indicates a novel functional interplay between estrogen receptor beta and sirtuin-3 counteracting reactive oxygen species production in TCam-2 cells. Our findings thus show that an important tumor-suppressive pathway through estrogen receptor beta is target of E2, actually proposing a distinctive protecting action against seminoma. Future studies may lead to additional strategies for the current therapy of seminoma.

  18. Transforming growth factor-beta modulates plasminogen activator activity and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 expression in human keratinocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, N E; Elder, J T; Persichitte, K A; Mink, P; Clark, R A

    1990-11-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a multifunctional mediator with effects on cellular growth, differentiation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism. Because TGF-beta stimulates fibronectin expression in cultured human keratinocytes, we wished to determine whether it might also affect ECM degradation through the plasminogen activator (PA)-plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) system. Immunofluorescence of human keratinocytes using a monospecific antiserum to type 1 PAI (PAI-1) showed enhanced cellular and ECM staining when they were cultured in the presence of TGF-beta. The antiserum also identified an Mr 50,000 protein in conditioned media that was markedly enhanced by TGF-beta. A corresponding stimulation of PAI-1 mRNA was demonstrated by quantitative RNA blot analysis. Total plasminogen activating activity of conditioned medium was markedly decreased by TGF-beta. Zymography showed this to be at least partially due to decreased secreted urokinase activity. TGF-beta may play an important role in stabilizing the provisional matrix synthesized by keratinocytes in healing wounds.

  19. Novel Confocal Microscopic and Flow Cytometric Based Assays to Visualize and Detect the (Beta)2-Adrenergic Receptor in Human Lymphocyte and Mononuclear Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salicru, A. N.; Crucian, B. E.; Nelman, M. A.; Sams, C. F.; Actor, J. K.; Marshall, G. D.

    2006-01-01

    The data show that immunophenotyping of leukocyte populations with (beta)2AR is possible with the commercially available Ab, although the FC assay is limited to the IST as a result of the Ab binding site to the intracellular C-terminus of the 2AR. The FC assay has applications for measuring alterations in total (beta)2AR in human leukocyte populations as changes in fluorescence. In addition, CM confirms that both surface and intracellular compartments stain positively for the (beta)2AR and can be used for qualitative assays that screen for changes in receptor compartmentalization and localization.

  20. Beta-cell dysfunction and low insulin clearance in insulin-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Vølund, Aage

    2005-01-01

    of diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance. Prehepatic insulin secretion rates were estimated by deconvolution of C-peptide concentrations. A composite measure of insulin sensitivity was derived from the OGTT. RESULTS: Beta-cell secretory capacity (i.e. the rate of change in insulin secretion per unit...... and diabetes mellitus (63%vs. 20%, P insulin sensitivity despite simultaneous reduction in insulin clearance.......OBJECTIVE: To obtain a better understanding of the physiological aspects of glucose homeostasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy, we evaluated separately beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity after an oral glucose load. DESIGN: Beta-cell function...

  1. Facilitation of learning by social-emotional feedback in humans is beta-noradrenergic-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihov, Yoan; Mayer, Simon; Musshoff, Frank; Maier, Wolfgang; Kendrick, Keith M; Hurlemann, René

    2010-08-01

    Adaptive behavior in dynamic environments critically depends on the ability to learn rapidly and flexibly from the outcomes of prior choices. In social environments, facial expressions of emotion often serve as performance feedback and thereby guide declarative learning. Abundant evidence implicates beta-noradrenergic signaling in the modulatory influence of emotion on declarative learning. It is currently unclear whether a similar mechanism also mediates a guidance of declarative learning by social-emotional feedback administered in the form of facial expressions. We therefore conducted a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial to test the effects of a 40-mg single oral dose of the nonspecific beta-noradrenergic antagonist propranolol in a behavioral task that required gradual declarative learning of item-category associations from either social-emotional (happy vs. angry faces) or nonsocial (green vs. red color signals) trial-by-trial feedback. As predicted on the basis of our previous experiments, learning from social-emotional feedback was more effective than learning from nonsocial feedback in placebo-treated subjects. This advantage of social-emotional over nonsocial feedback was abolished by propranolol treatment. Propranolol had no effect on learning during the nonsocial feedback condition. Our findings suggest that a facilitation of declarative learning by social-emotional feedback critically involves signaling via beta-noradrenergic receptors. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improvement of sciatic nerve regeneration using laminin-binding human NGF-beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sciatic nerve injuries often cause partial or total loss of motor, sensory and autonomic functions due to the axon discontinuity, degeneration, and eventual death which finally result in substantial functional loss and decreased quality of life. Nerve growth factor (NGF plays a critical role in peripheral nerve regeneration. However, the lack of efficient NGF delivery approach limits its clinical applications. We reported here by fusing with the N-terminal domain of agrin (NtA, NGF-beta could target to nerve cells and improve nerve regeneration. METHODS: Laminin-binding assay and sustained release assay of NGF-beta fused with NtA (LBD-NGF from laminin in vitro were carried out. The bioactivity of LBD-NGF on laminin in vitro was also measured. Using the rat sciatic nerve crush injury model, the nerve repair and functional restoration by utilizing LBD-NGF were tested. FINDINGS: LBD-NGF could specifically bind to laminin and maintain NGF activity both in vitro and in vivo. In the rat sciatic nerve crush injury model, we found that LBD-NGF could be retained and concentrated at the nerve injury sites to promote nerve repair and enhance functional restoration following nerve damages. CONCLUSION: Fused with NtA, NGF-beta could bind to laminin specifically. Since laminin is the major component of nerve extracellular matrix, laminin binding NGF could target to nerve cells and improve the repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

  3. Neurofilament heavy polypeptide regulates the Akt-beta-catenin pathway in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Sook Kim

    Full Text Available Aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction are common features of aggressive cancer growth. We observed promoter methylation and loss of expression in neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH in a significant proportion of primary esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC samples that were of a high tumor grade and advanced stage. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NEFH accelerated ESCC cell growth in culture and increased tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas forced expression of NEFH significantly inhibited cell growth and colony formation. Loss of NEFH caused up-regulation of pyruvate kinase-M2 type and down-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, via activation of the Akt/beta-catenin pathway, resulting in enhanced aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. The acceleration of glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction in NEFH-knockdown cells was suppressed in the absence of beta-catenin expression, and was decreased by the treatment of 2-Deoxyglucose, a glycolytic inhibitor, or API-2, an Akt inhibitor. Loss of NEFH activates the Akt/beta-catenin pathway and increases glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cancer cells with methylated NEFH can be targeted for destruction with specific inhibitors of deregulated downstream pathways.

  4. Pilot association study of the beta-glucocerebrosidase N370S allele and Parkinson's disease in subjects of Jewish ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lorraine N; Nicolai, Angelique; Afridi, Shehla; Harris, Juliette; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Strug, Lisa; Cote, Lucien J; Louis, Elan D; Andrews, Howard; Waters, Cheryl; Ford, Blair; Frucht, Steven; Fahn, Stanley; Mayeux, Richard; Ottman, Ruth; Marder, K

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the beta-glucocerebrosidase gene cause Gaucher's disease, one of the most common lysosomal lipid storage diseases in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. The occurrence of parkinsonism in patients with Type 1 Gaucher's disease has been noted previously. In this pilot study, we evaluated a possible association between Parkinson's disease (PD) and the beta-glucocerebrosidase gene N370S allele (nt.1226 A>G) in 160 Parkinson's disease patients and 92 controls of Jewish ethnicity. We observed a higher frequency of the N370S genotype in PD cases (NS and SS, 10.7%) compared to controls (NS and SS 4.3%); however, the difference was not statistically significant (chi(2) = 3.4, P = 0.2). A total of 17 PD cases carry the N370S allele, including 2 homozygotes and 15 heterozygotes. The N370S allele (nt.1226 A>G) may be associated with PD in patients of Jewish ethnicity and should be examined in a larger study.

  5. Structural, optical and thermal properties of {beta}-SnS{sub 2} thin films prepared by the spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khelia, C.; Ben Nasrallah, T.; Amlouk, M.; Belgacem, S. [Faculte des Sciences, Tunis (Tunisia). Lab. de Physique de la Matiere Condensee; Maiz, F. [Equipe de Photothermique de Nabeul, Inst. Preparatoire aux Etudes d' Ingenieur de Nabeul (Tunisia); Mnari, M. [Lab. de Chimie Analytique, Campus Univ., Tunis (Tunisia)

    2000-03-01

    Tin disulfide {beta}-SnS{sub 2} thin films have been prepared on pyrex substrates by the spray pyrolysis technique using tin tetrachloride and thiourea as starting materials. The depositions were carried out in the range of substrate temperatures from 240 to 400 C. Highly c-axis oriented {beta}-SnS{sub 2} films, having a strong (001) X-ray diffraction line are obtained at temperature 280 C and using concentration ratio in solution R = [S]/[Sn] = 2.5. Films surfaces were analyzed by contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to understand the effect of the deposited temperature on the surface structure. On the other hand, from transmission and reflection spectra, the band gap energy determined is about 2.71 eV. Finally using the photodeflection spectroscopy technique, the thermal conductivity K{sub c} and diffusivity D{sub c} were obtained. Their values are 10 Wm{sup -1}K{sup -1} and 10{sup -5} m{sup 2}s{sup -1} respectively. (orig.)

  6. A high performance sensorimotor beta rhythm-based brain computer interface associated with human natural motor behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ou; Lin, Peter; Vorbach, Sherry; Floeter, Mary Kay; Hattori, Noriaki; Hallett, Mark

    2008-03-01

    To explore the reliability of a high performance brain-computer interface (BCI) using non-invasive EEG signals associated with human natural motor behavior does not require extensive training. We propose a new BCI method, where users perform either sustaining or stopping a motor task with time locking to a predefined time window. Nine healthy volunteers, one stroke survivor with right-sided hemiparesis and one patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) participated in this study. Subjects did not receive BCI training before participating in this study. We investigated tasks of both physical movement and motor imagery. The surface Laplacian derivation was used for enhancing EEG spatial resolution. A model-free threshold setting method was used for the classification of motor intentions. The performance of the proposed BCI was validated by an online sequential binary-cursor-control game for two-dimensional cursor movement. Event-related desynchronization and synchronization were observed when subjects sustained or stopped either motor execution or motor imagery. Feature analysis showed that EEG beta band activity over sensorimotor area provided the largest discrimination. With simple model-free classification of beta band EEG activity from a single electrode (with surface Laplacian derivation), the online classifications of the EEG activity with motor execution/motor imagery were: >90%/~80% for six healthy volunteers, >80%/~80% for the stroke patient and ~90%/~80% for the ALS patient. The EEG activities of the other three healthy volunteers were not classifiable. The sensorimotor beta rhythm of EEG associated with human natural motor behavior can be used for a reliable and high performance BCI for both healthy subjects and patients with neurological disorders. Significance: The proposed new non-invasive BCI method highlights a practical BCI for clinical applications, where the user does not require extensive training.

  7. Gross alpha and beta activity analyses in urine-a routine laboratory method for internal human radioactivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Zhao, Luqian; Qin, Hongran; Zhao, Meijia; Zhou, Yirui; Yang, Shuqiang; Su, Xu; Xu, Xiaohua

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to provide rapid results for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The authors hypothesized that valuable information could be obtained from gas proportional counter techniques by screening urine samples from potentially exposed individuals rapidly. Recommended gross alpha and beta activity screening methods generally employ gas proportional counting techniques. Based on International Standards Organization (ISO) methods, improvements were made in the evaporation process to develop a method to provide rapid results, adequate sensitivity, and minimum sample preparation and operator intervention for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The method described by an American National Standards Institute publication was used to calibrate the gas proportional counter, and urine samples from patients with or without radionuclide treatment were measured to validate the method. By improving the evaporation process, the time required to perform the assay was reduced dramatically. Compared with the reference data, the results of the validation samples were very satisfactory with respect to gross-alpha and gross-beta activities. The gas flow proportional counting method described here has the potential for radioactivity monitoring in the body. This method was easy, efficient, and fast, and its application is of great utility in determining whether a sample should be analyzed by a more complicated method, for example radiochemical and/or γ-spectroscopy. In the future, it may be used commonly in medical examination and nuclear emergency treatment.Health Phys. 106(5):000-000; 2014.

  8. HECT E3s and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staub Olivier

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a simplified view, members of the HECT E3 family have a modular structure consisting of the C-terminal HECT domain, which is catalytically involved in the attachment of ubiquitin to substrate proteins, and N-terminal extensions of variable length and sequence that mediate the substrate specificity of the respective HECT E3. Although the physiologically relevant substrates of most HECT E3s have remained elusive, it is becoming increasingly clear that HECT E3s play an important role in sporadic and hereditary human diseases including cancer, cardiovascular (Liddle's syndrome and neurological (Angelman syndrome disorders, and/or in disease-relevant processes including bone homeostasis, immune response and retroviral budding. Thus, molecular approaches to target the activity of distinct HECT E3s, regulators thereof, and/or of HECT E3 substrates could prove valuable in the treatment of the respective diseases. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com.

  9. Impact of inhibitors and L2 antibodies upon the infectivity of diverse alpha and beta human papillomavirus types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihyuck Kwak

    Full Text Available The licensed human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines elicit type-restricted immunity but do not target cutaneous HPV types of the beta genus that are associated with non-melanoma skin cancer in immune-compromised patients, and it is unclear if these diverse types share a common mechanism of infection. Residues 11-88 of minor capsid protein L2 contain cross-protective epitopes, and vaccination with concatamers of this region derived from as many as eight alpha HPV (L2 α11-88x8 is being developed as an alternative prophylactic vaccine with potentially broader efficacy. There is also interest in developing broadly protective topical microbicides, such as carrageenan or heparin that block HPV receptor interactions, or small molecule inhibitors of infection. Here we have examined several inhibitors of HPV infection and antisera to L2 α11-88x8 for their breadth of activity against infection by 34 HPV types from within both the alpha and beta families using pseudovirions (PsV carrying a luciferase reporter as surrogates for native virus. We observed that both heparin and carrageenan prevented infection by mucosatropic HPV types, but surprisingly PsV of several epidermotropic alpha4 and beta HPV types exhibited increased infectivity especially at low inhibitor concentrations. Furin and γ-secretase inhibitors and L2 α11-88x8 antiserum blocked infection by all HPV PsV types tested. These findings suggest that the distinct tropism of mucosal and cutaneous HPV may reflect distinct cell surface receptor interactions, but a common uptake mechanism dependent upon furin and γ-secretase proteolytic activities. Carrageenan, which is being tested as a vaginal microbicide, broadly inhibited infection by the high-risk mucosatropic HPV PsV, but not most skin tropic alpha and beta HPV. Vaccination with an L2 multimer derived exclusively from alpha papillomavirus sequences induced antibodies that broadly neutralized PsV of all 34 HPVs from within both the alpha and

  10. Cellular growth and survival are mediated by beta 1 integrins in normal human breast epithelium but not in breast carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howlett, Anthony R; Bailey, Nina; Damsky, Caroline; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-11-28

    We previously established a rapid three-dimensional assay for discrimination of normal and malignant human breast epithelial cells using a laminin-rich reconstituted basement membrane. In this assay, normal epithelial cells differentiate into well-organized acinar structures whereas tumor cells fail to recapitulate this process and produce large, disordered colonies. The data suggest that breast acinar morphogenesis and differentiation is regulated by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions and that these interactions are altered in malignancy. Here, we investigated the role of ECM receptors (integrins) in these processes and report on the expression and function of potential laminin receptors in normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. Immmunocytochemical analysis showed that normal and carcinoma cells in a three-dimensional substratum express profiles of integrins similar to normal and malignant breast tissues in situ. Normal cells express {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}3, {alpha}6, {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin subunits, whereas breast carcinoma cells show variable losses, disordered expression, or down regulation of these subunits. Function-blocking experiments using inhibitory antiintegrin subunit antibodies showed a >5-fold inhibition of the formation of acinar structures by normal cells in the presence of either anti-{beta}1 or anti-{alpha}3 antibodies, whereas anti-{alpha}2 or -{alpha}6 had little or no effect. In experiments where collagen type I gels were used instead of basement membrane, acinar morphogenesis was blocked by anti-{beta}1 and -{alpha}2 antibodies but not by anti-{alpha}3. These data suggest a specificity of integrin utilization dependent on the ECM ligands encountered by the cell. The interruption of normal acinar morphogenesis by anti-integrin antibodies was associated with an inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Function-blocking antibodies had no inhibitory effect on the rate of tumor cell growth, survival or

  11. Morbidity, beta S haplotype and alpha-globin gene patterns among sickle cell anemia patients in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekile, A D; Haider, M Z

    1996-01-01

    Admission records of children with sickle cell anemia (SS), in the two main teaching hospitals in Kuwait, were reviewed for a 1-year period. The haplotypes of 92 beta s chromosomes (from 39 SS, 11 AS, 2 S beta-thalassemia [S beta-thal] and 1 SD individuals) were determined using an allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization technique, while the alpha-globin gene status of 27 SS and 33 AS individuals, i.e. 120 chromosomes, was determined with a combination of polymerase chain reaction and AS techniques. A vasooclusive crisis was the most common (60.0%) cause of hospitalization, followed by infections (20%). Hospital admissions were most common during the hottest month of the year (July). Few complications of the disease were seen among patients on follow-up; however, splenomegaly was present in 24.0%, hepatomegaly in 15.2%, gallstones in 15.2% and aseptic necrosis of the femoral head in 6.1%. Haplotype 31 (Saudi Arabia/India) is the most frequent in this community, being present in 80.4% of the chromosomes tested; Benin haplotype 19 was found in 12.0% and Bantu haplotype 20 in 6.5%. Hb F in the haplotype 31 homozygotes and heterozygotes ranged from 11.4 to 35.1% (mean 22.5 +/- 5.2%). The frequency of alpha-thal determinants in the study was 40.0%, the commonest being the -alpha 3.7-kb deletion (27.5%), the alpha 2 polyadenylation signal (AATAAA-> AATAAG) mutation (10.2%) and the IVS-I 5' end GAGGT-GAGG->GAGG pentanucleotide (5 nt) deletion (3.3%). SS patients with coexistent alpha-thal trait did not have severe recurrent infections and none had gallstones. The high frequencies of the Saudi Arabia/India beta s haplotype and alpha-thalassemia trait contribute to the mild nature of SS disease among Kuwaiti Arabs comparable to that in eastern Saudi Arabia.

  12. Induction of the expression of genes encoding TGF-beta isoforms and their receptors by inositol hexaphosphate in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapral, Małgorzata; Wawszczyk, Joanna; Hollek, Andrzej; Weglarz, Ludmiła

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factors-beta (TGF-beta) are multifunctional cytokines involved in the regulation of cell development, differentiation, survival and apoptosis. They are also potent anticancer agents that inhibit uncontrolled proliferation of cells. Incorrect TGF-beta regulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including inflammation and cancer. In humans, the TGF-beta family consists of three members (TGF-beta1, 2, 3) that show high similarity and homology. TGF-betas exert biological activities on various cell types including neoplastic cells via their specific receptors. Inositol hexaphosphate (phytic acid, IP6), a phytochemical has been reported to possess various health benefits. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of IP6 on the expression of genes encoding TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3 isoforms and their receptors TbetaRI, TbetaRII, TbetaRIII in human colorectal cancer cell line Caco-2. The cells were treated with 0.5, 1 and 2.5 mM IP6 for 3, 6 and 12 h. The untreated Caco-2 cells were used as the control. Quantification of genes expression was performed by real time QRT-PCR technique with a SYBR Green I chemistry. The experimental data revealed that the TGF-beta1 mRNA was the predominant isoform in Caco-2 cells and that IP6 enhanced transcriptional activity of genes of all three TGF-beta isoforms and their receptors TbetaRI, TbetaRII TbetaRIII in these cells. At concentrations up to 1 mM, IP6 over-expressed the genes in 6 h lasting cultures, and its higher dose (2.5 mM) caused successively increasing transcript level of TGF-beta isoforms and receptors with the duration of experiment up to 12 h. The findings of this study indicate that one of anti-cancer abilities of IP6 can be realized by enhancing the gene expression of TGF-beta isoforms and their receptors at the transcriptional level.

  13. How ionic strength affects the conformational behavior of human and rat beta amyloids--a computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Kříž

    Full Text Available Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid beta occurs in Alzheimers disease and during the aging of certain mammals (human, monkey, dog, bear, cow, cat but not others (rat, mouse. It is possibly due to different amino acid sequences at positions 5, 10 and 13. To address this issue, we performed series of 100 ns long trajectories (each trajectory was run twice with different initial velocity distribution on amyloid beta (1-42 with the human and rat amino acid sequence in three different environments: water with only counter ions, water with NaCl at a concentration of 0.15 M as a model of intracellular Na(+ concentration at steady state, and water with NaCl at a concentration of 0.30 M as a model of intracellular Na(+ concentration under stimulated conditions. We analyzed secondary structure stability, internal hydrogen bonds, and residual fluctuation. It was observed that the change in ionic strength affects the stability of internal hydrogen bonds. Increasing the ionic strength increases atomic fluctuation in the hydrophobic core of the human amyloid, and decreases the atomic fluctuation in the case of rat amyloid. The secondary structure analyses show a stable α-helix part between residues 10 and 20. However, C-terminus of investigated amyloids is much more flexible showing no stable secondary structure elements. Increasing ionic strength of the solvent leads to decreasing stability of the secondary structural elements. The difference in conformational behavior of the three amino acids at position 5, 10 and 13 for human and rat amyloids significantly changes the conformational behavior of the whole peptide.

  14. The FN13 peptide inhibits human tumor cells invasion through the modulation of alpha v beta 3 integrins organization and the inactivation of ILK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppi, Nicoletta; Ritelli, Marco; Salvi, Alessandro; Colombi, Marina; Barlati, Sergio

    2007-06-01

    We report the effect of the stable expression of a 13 amino acid human fibronectin (FN) peptide (FN13) on the organization of the FN extracellular matrix (ECM) and of FN integrin receptors (FNRs), in relationship with the inhibition of cellular invasion, in three FN-ECM defective human tumor-derived cell lines: SK-Hep1C3, hepatoma, ACN, neuroblastoma, and SK-OV-3, ovary carcinoma. All these cell lines stably expressing the FN13 peptide, organized an FN-ECM, disorganized alpha v beta 1 integrins and inactivated the ILK pathway, with the loss of secretion of MMP-9. This was associated with the inhibition of cell invasion in Matrigel matrix only in SK-Hep1C3 and ACN, but not in SK-OV-3 cells. Analysis of the integrin receptors organization showed that the FN13 expressing cells SK-Hep1C3 and ACN organized alpha v beta 3 integrins, whereas SK-OV-3 organized alpha v beta 5 dimers. The functional block of alpha v beta 5 integrins, with an inactivating anti-alpha v beta 5 antibody, led to the induction of alpha v beta 3 integrins also in SK-OV-3 cells, and to the inhibition of cell invasion. These data show that in the human tumor cells studied FN13 inhibits the in vitro invasion through the dissociation of alpha v beta 1 dimers, leading to ILK pathway inactivation, only when the organization of alpha v beta 3 integrins is induced in the plasma membrane.

  15. The Antimicrobial Peptide Human Beta-Defensin-3 Is Induced by Platelet-Released Growth Factors in Primary Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-released growth factors (PRGF and its related clinically used formulations (e.g., Vivostat Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF® contain a variety of chemokines, cytokines, and growth factors and are therefore used to support healing of chronic, hard-to-heal, or infected wounds. Human beta-defensin-3 (hBD-3 is an antimicrobial peptide inducibly expressed in human keratinocytes especially upon wounding. The potent antimicrobial activity of hBD-3 together with its wound closure-promoting activities suggests that hBD-3 may play a crucial role in wound healing. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of PRGF on hBD-3 expression in human primary keratinocytes in vitro. In addition, we investigated the influence of Vivostat PRF on hBD-3 expression in artificially generated human skin wounds in vivo. PRGF treatment of primary keratinocytes induced a significant, concentration- and time-dependent increase in hBD-3 gene expression which was partially mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. In line with these cell culture data, in vivo experiments revealed an enhanced hBD-3 expression in experimentally produced human wounds after the treatment with Vivostat PRF. Thus, the induction of hBD-3 may contribute to the beneficial effects of thrombocyte concentrate lysates in the treatment of chronic or infected wounds.

  16. A Measurement of $sin 2\\beta$ from $B \\to J/\\psi K^{0}_{S}$ with the CDF detector

    CERN Document Server

    Affolder, T; Akopian, A M; Albrow, Michael G; Amaral, P; Amendolia, S R; Amidei, D; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W J; Atac, Muzaffer; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bailey, M W; Bailey, S; De Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, B A; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Bergé, J P; Berryhill, J W; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bevensee, B E; Bhatti, A A; Bigongiari, C; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C A; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, Arie; Bokhari, W; Bölla, G; Bonushkin, Yu; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S C; Bromberg, C; Bruner, N L; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Campbell, M; Caner, A; Carithers, W C; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Cassada, J A; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F S; Christofek, L S; Chu, M L; Cihangir, S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Cobal, M; Cocca, E; Connolly, A; Conway, J; Cooper, J; Cordelli, M; Guimarães da Costa, J; Costanzo, D; Cranshaw, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R J; Dagenhart, D; De Jongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; Done, J; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erdmann, W; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Feild, R G; Ferretti, C; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B L; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Gadomski, S; Galeotti, S; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; García-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Geer, S; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V V; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gordon, A; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Grassmann, H; Green, C; Groer, L S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Günther, M; Guillian, G; Guo, R S; Haber, C; Hafen, E S; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hinrichsen, B; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R J; Holloway, L E; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J E; Ikeda, H; Incagli, M; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jensen, H; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K M; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K F; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R D; Khazins, D M; Kikuchi, T; Kirk, M; Kim, B J; Kim, H S; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knoblauch, D; Koehn, P; Köngeter, A; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A V; Kovács, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lamoureux, J I; Lancaster, M; Latino, G; LeCompte, T J; Lee, A M; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Lockyer, N; Long, O; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E A; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Meschi, E; Mesropian, C; Miao, C; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Musy, M; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakaya, T; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, P; Nicolaidi, P; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pappas, S P; Parri, A; Partos, D S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Perazzo, A; Pescara, L; Peters, M D; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Plunkett, R K; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ragan, K; Reher, D; Ribon, A; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R M; Rossin, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Segler, S L; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M J; Siegrist, J L; Signorelli, G; Sill, A F; Sinervo, P K; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, Paris; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Stanco, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Takano, T; Tannenbaum, B; Taylor, W; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Theriot, D; Thurman-Keup, Randy M; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S M; Tollefson, K; Tollestrup, Alvin V; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; De Trocóniz, J F; Truitt, S; Tseng, J; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Valls, J; Vejcik, S; Velev, G V; Vidal, R; Vilar, R; Volobuev, I P; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wahl, J; Wallace, N B; Walsh, A M; Wang, C; Wang, C H; Wang, M J; Watanabe, T; Watts, T; Webb, R; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Worm, S D; Wu, X; Wyss, J; Yagil, A; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yoh, J K; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports an updated measurement of the Standard Model CP violation parameter $\\sin2\\beta$ using the CDF Detector at Fermilab. The entire Run I data sample of 110 pb$^{-1}$ of proton antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.8 TeV$ is used to identify a signal sample of $\\sim 400$ $B \\to J/\\psi K^0_S$ events, where $J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $K_S^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$. The flavor of the neutral B meson is identified at the time of production by combining information from three tagging algorithms: a same-side tag, a jet-charge tag, and a soft-lepton tag. A maximum likelihood fitting method is used to determine is consistent with the Standard Model prediction, based upon existing measurements, of a large positive CP violating asymmetry in this decay mode.

  17. The interactions between rat-adipose-derived stromal cells, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2, and beta-tricalcium phosphate play an important role in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Ling-Ling; Xu, Lu-Lu; Wu, Xia; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Lv, Yan; Wang, Jia-Zhu; Liu, Hong-Chen

    2010-09-01

    Cells, scaffolds, and growth factors are the three main factors for creating a stem-cell-based tissue-engineered construct, but the interactions between three factors are not very clear. We hereby explored the interactions between rat-adipose-derived stromal cells (rASCs), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) to provide evidence for their application in bone tissue engineering by evaluating the protein adsorption of beta-TCP, the cell attachment, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity/protein, osteocalcin (OCN) content, mineral formation, calcium content, phosphonium content, cell vitality, gene expression, and implantation in the backs of severe combined immunodeficient mice of rhBMP-2 preinducing rASCs seeded onto beta-TCP. The results showed that beta-TCP could adsorb the proteins from the media. The attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic properties of rASCs were supported by beta-TCP, as revealed using scanning electron microscopy. Compared with rASCs cultured on the culture plate, rASCs cultured on beta-TCP had significantly higher ALP activity/protein, OCN content, and mineral formation. These values for rASCs cultured on beta-TCP with rhBMP-2 increased most significantly. The rhBMP-2 significantly increased the calcium content, phosphonium content, and ALP, type I collagen, and OCN mRNA levels of rASCs cultured on beta-TCP. The methylthiazol tetrazolium method revealed that the vitality of rASCs cultured on beta-TCP with or without rhBMP-2 for 4, 7, and 28 days in vitro was insignificantly different. After 8 and 12 weeks of implantation, each group displayed increased bone formation over the 12-week period. The percentage of the new bone formed areas for beta-TCP/rhBMP-2 and beta-TCP was not significantly different. This value for rASCs/beta-TCP construct was significantly higher than that for beta-TCP group, but the maximal and robust bone formation was presented in rASCs/beta-TCP with rhBMP-2

  18. Improved function and proliferation of adult human beta cells engrafted in diabetic immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice treated with alogliptin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurczyk A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Agata Jurczyk,1 Philip diIorio,1 Dean Brostowin,1 Linda Leehy,1 Chaoxing Yang,1 Fumihiko Urano,2 David M Harlan,3 Leonard D Shultz,4 Dale L Greiner,1 Rita Bortell1 1Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 2Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, 3Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 4The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA Purpose: Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are known to increase insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation in rodents. To investigate the effects on human beta cells in vivo, we utilize immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The study goal was to determine the efficacy of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, to enhance human beta cell function and proliferation in an in vivo context using diabetic immunodeficient mice engrafted with human pancreatic islets. Methods: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG mice were transplanted with adult human islets in three separate trials. Transplanted mice were treated daily by gavage with alogliptin (30 mg/kg/day or vehicle control. Islet graft function was compared using glucose tolerance tests and non-fasting plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide; beta cell proliferation was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation. Results: Glucose tolerance tests were significantly improved by alogliptin treatment for mice transplanted with islets from two of the three human islet donors. Islet-engrafted mice treated with alogliptin also had significantly higher plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide compared to vehicle controls. The percentage of insulin+BrdU+ cells in human islet grafts from alogliptin-treated mice was approximately 10-fold more than from vehicle control mice, consistent with a significant increase in human beta cell proliferation. Conclusion: Human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice

  19. Beta Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beta thalassemia is found in people of Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, African, South Asian (Indian, Pakistani, etc.), Southeast Asian and Chinese descent. 1 Beta Thalassemia ßß Normal beta globin genes found on chromosomes ...

  20. Transcriptional profiling of type 1 diabetes genes on chromosome 21 in a rat beta-cell line and human pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, R.; Karlsen, A.E.; Hagedorn, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    We recently finemapped a type 1 diabetes (T1D)-linked region on chromosome 21, indicating that one or more T1D-linked genes exist in this region with 33 annotated genes. In the current study, we have taken a novel approach using transcriptional profiling in predicting and prioritizing the most...... likely candidate genes influencing beta-cell function in this region. Two array-based approaches were used, a rat insulinoma cell line (INS-1alphabeta) overexpressing pancreatic duodenum homeobox 1 (pdx-1) and treated with interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) as well as human pancreatic islets stimulated...... with a mixture of cytokines. Several candidate genes with likely functional significance in T1D were identified. Genes showing differential expression in the two approaches were highly similar, supporting the role of these specific gene products in cytokine-induced beta-cell damage. These were genes involved...

  1. Tubulin Beta-3 Chain as a New Candidate Protein Biomarker of Human Skin Aging: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia G. Lehmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin aging is a complex process, and a lot of efforts have been made to identify new and specific targets that could help to diagnose, prevent, and treat skin aging. Several studies concerning skin aging have analyzed the changes in gene expression, and very few investigations have been performed at the protein level. Moreover, none of these proteomic studies has used a global quantitative labeled proteomic offgel approach that allows a more accurate description of aging phenotype. We applied such an approach on human primary keratinocytes obtained from sun-nonexposed skin biopsies of young and elderly women. A total of 517 unique proteins were identified, and 58 proteins were significantly differentially expressed with 40 that were downregulated and 18 upregulated with aging. Gene ontology and pathway analysis performed on these 58 putative biomarkers of skin aging evidenced that these dysregulated proteins were mostly involved in metabolism and cellular processes such as cell cycle and signaling pathways. Change of expression of tubulin beta-3 chain was confirmed by western blot on samples originated from several donors. Thus, this study suggested the tubulin beta-3 chain has a promising biomarker in skin aging.

  2. The CK2 alpha/CK2 beta interface of human protein kinase CK2 harbors a binding pocket for small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Brunstein, Elena; Issinger, Olaf-Georg;

    2008-01-01

    , selective CK2 inhibitors are required. An often-used CK2 inhibitor is 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB). In a complex structure with human CK2 alpha, DRB binds to the canonical ATP cleft, but additionally it occupies an allosteric site that can be alternatively filled by glycerol....... Inhibition kinetic studies corroborate the dual binding mode of the inhibitor. Structural comparisons reveal a surprising conformational plasticity of human CK2 alpha around both DRB binding sites. After local rearrangement, the allosteric site serves as a CK2 beta interface. This opens the potential...

  3. Long-term progression and therapeutic response of visceral metastatic disease non-invasively monitored in mouse urine using beta-human choriogonadotropin secreting tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Giulio; Emmenegger, Urban; Lee, Christina R; Shaked, Yuval; Folkins, Christopher; Mossoba, Miriam; Medin, Jeffrey A; Man, Shan; Zhu, Zhenping; Witte, Larry; Kerbel, Robert S

    2008-10-01

    Historically, the use of mouse models of metastatic disease to evaluate anticancer therapies has been hampered because of difficulties in detection and quantification of such lesions without sacrificing the mice, which in turn may also be dictated by institutional or ethical guidelines. Advancements in imaging technologies have begun to change this situation. A new method to non-invasively measure tumor burden, as yet untested to monitor spontaneous metastases, is the use of transplanted tumors expressing secretable human beta-chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) that can be measured in urine. We describe examples of beta-hCG-transfected tumor cell lines for evaluating the effect of different therapies on metastatic disease, which in some cases involved monitoring tumor growth for >100 days. We used beta-hCG-tagged mouse B16 melanoma and erbB-2/Her-2-expressing human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 models, and drug treatments included metronomic low-dose cyclophosphamide chemotherapy with or without a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-targeting antibody (DC101) or trastuzumab, the erbB-2/Her-2-targeting antibody. Both experimental and spontaneous metastasis models were studied; in the latter case, an increase in urine beta-hCG always foreshadowed the development of lung, liver, brain, and kidney metastases. Metastatic disease was unresponsive to DC101 or trastuzumab monotherapy treatment, as assessed by beta-hCG levels. Our results also suggest that beta-hCG levels may be set as an end point for metastasis studies, circumventing guidelines, which have often hampered the use of advanced disease models. Collectively, our data indicates that beta-hCG is an effective noninvasive preclinical marker for the long term monitoring of untreated or treated metastatic disease.

  4. Lixisenatide accelerates restoration of normoglycemia and improves human beta-cell function and survival in diabetic immunodeficient NOD–scid IL-2rgnull RIP-DTR mice engrafted with human islets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chaoxing Yang,1 Matthias Loehn,2 Agata Jurczyk,1 Natalia Przewozniak,1 Linda Leehy,1 Pedro L Herrera,3 Leonard D Shultz,4 Dale L Greiner,1 David M Harlan,5 Rita Bortell1 1Program in Molecular Medicine, Diabetes Center of Excellence, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Sanofi-Aventis, Diabetes Division, Frankfurt, Germany; 3University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; 4The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA; 5Department of Medicine, Diabetes Center of Excellence, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA Objective: Glucagon-like peptide-1 induces glucose-dependent insulin secretion and, in rodents, increases proliferation and survival of pancreatic beta cells. To investigate the effects on human beta cells, we used immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The goal was to determine whether lixisenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, improves human islet function and survival in vivo. Methods: Five independent transplant studies were conducted with human islets from five individual donors. Diabetic human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice were treated with lixisenatide (50, 150, and 500 µg/kg or vehicle. Islet function was determined by blood glucose, plasma human insulin/C-peptide, and glucose tolerance tests. Grafts were analyzed for total beta- and alpha-cell number, percent proliferation, and levels of apoptosis. Results: Diabetic mice transplanted with marginal human islet mass and treated with lixisenatide were restored to euglycemia more rapidly than vehicle-treated mice. Glucose tolerance tests, human plasma insulin, and glucose-stimulation indices of lixisenatide-treated mice were significantly improved compared to vehicle-treated mice. The percentages of proliferating or apoptotic beta cells at graft recovery were not different between lixisenatide-treated and vehicle-treated mice. Nevertheless, in one experiment we found a significant twofold to threefold

  5. Production and characterization of antibody probes directed at constant regions of the alpha and beta subunit of the human T cell receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbi, M; Acuto, O; Bensussan, A; Poole, C B; Reinherz, E L

    1985-08-01

    To generate antibodies directed at constant regions of the human T cell receptor, purified alpha and beta subunits of a human T cell antigen/major histocompatibility complex receptor from the REX tumor (Ti-REX) were isolated by preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and utilized to immunize rabbits. H36 (anti-alpha subunit) and H38 (anti-beta subunit) antisera were strongly reactive with the denatured subunits and also immunoprecipitated the Ti heterodimer from 125I surface-labeled lysates of REX, inducer, suppressor and cytotoxic T cell clones, peripheral T lymphocytes and thymocytes. Moreover, immunodepletion experiments showed that such antisera recognized antigenic determinant(s) shared by all Ti molecules expressed in the thymus. Several observations were made with these anticonstant region antibodies. First, peptide map analysis showed that the T cell receptor molecules recognized by the anti-clonotype and the anti-constant region heteroantisera on a given T cell clone are identical, thus supporting the view that the T cell receptor undergoes allelic exclusion. Second, since the individual antisera were weakly cross-reactive with the other denatured subunit, such subunits probably share conserved sequences. Third, the absence of antisera reactivity with intact cells implies that most of these constant region epitopes must be obscured by associated molecules, perhaps including one or more of the 20-25-kDa T3 subunits. Fourth, the extensive difference in two-dimensional peptide maps of Ti alpha subunits from clones of differing specificities makes it likely that the subunit contributes in a major way to antigen/major histocompatibility complex binding.

  6. Beta cell dynamics: beta cell replenishment, beta cell compensation and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2013-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes, characterized by persistent hyperglycemia, arises mostly from beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance and remains a highly complex metabolic disease due to various stages in its pathogenesis. Glucose homeostasis is primarily regulated by insulin secretion from the beta cells in response to prevailing glycemia. Beta cell populations are dynamic as they respond to fluctuating insulin demand. Beta cell replenishment and death primarily regulate beta cell populations. Beta cells, pancreatic cells, and extra-pancreatic cells represent the three tiers for replenishing beta cells. In rodents, beta cell self-replenishment appears to be the dominant source for new beta cells supported by pancreatic cells (non-beta islet cells, acinar cells, and duct cells) and extra-pancreatic cells (liver, neural, and stem/progenitor cells). In humans, beta cell neogenesis from non-beta cells appears to be the dominant source of beta cell replenishment as limited beta cell self-replenishment occurs particularly in adulthood. Metabolic states of increased insulin demand trigger increased insulin synthesis and secretion from beta cells. Beta cells, therefore, adapt to support their physiology. Maintaining physiological beta cell populations is a strategy for targeting metabolic states of persistently increased insulin demand as in diabetes.

  7. A comparison of estimation methods for fitting Weibull, Johnson's SB and beta functions to Pinus pinaster, Pinus radiata and Pinus sylvestris stands in northwest Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorgoseo, J. J.; Rojo, A.; Camara-Obregon, A.; Dieguez-Aranda, U.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of the Weibull, Johnson's SB and beta distributions, fitted with some of the most usual methods and with different fixed values for the location parameters, for describing diameter distributions in even-aged stands of Pinus pinaster, Pinus radiata and Pinus sylvestris in northwest Spain. A total of 155 permanent plots in Pinus sylvestris stands throughout Galicia, 183 plots in Pinus pinaster stands throughout Galicia and Asturias and 325 plots in Pinus radiata stands in both regions were measured to describe the diameter distributions. Parameters of the Weibull function were estimated by Moments and Maximum Likelihood approaches, those of Johnson's SB function by Conditional Maximum Likelihood and by Knoebel and Burkhart's method, and those of the beta function with the method based on the moments of the distribution. The beta and the Johnson's SB functions were slightly superior to Weibull function for Pinus pinaster stands; the Johnson's SB and beta functions were more accurate in the best fits for Pinus radiata stands, and the best results of the Weibull and the Johnson's SB functions were slightly superior to beta function for Pinus sylvestris stands. However, the three functions are suitable for this stands with an appropriate value of the location parameter and estimation of parameters method. (Author) 44 refs.

  8. Sources of alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta- and epsilon-carotenes: a twentieth century review Fontes de alfa-, beta-, gama-, delta-, e epsilon-carotenos: uma revisão do século XX

    OpenAIRE

    José M. Barbosa-Filho; Adriana A. Alencar; Nunes,Xirley P.; Anna C. de Andrade Tomaz; José G. Sena-Filho; Athayde-Filho, Petrônio F.; Silva, Marcelo S.; Maria F. Vanderlei de Souza; Emidio V. Leitão da-Cunha

    2008-01-01

    Since humans cannot synthesize carotenoids, they depend upon the diet exclusively for the source of these micronutrients. It has claimed that they may alleviate chronic diseases such as cancers. The present communication constitutes a global review of the scientific literature on plants and others organisms that biosynthesize carotenoids, which include the series alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta- and epsilon-carotenes. The results of the literature survey lists more than five hundred sources.Uma ...

  9. Human studies on abecarnil a new beta-carboline anxiolytic: safety, tolerability and preliminary pharmacological profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duka, T; Schütt, B; Krause, W; Dorow, R; McDonald, S; Fichte, K

    1993-04-01

    1. Abecarnil (isopropyl-6-benzyloxy-4-methoxymethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate), a beta-carboline with high affinity for benzodiazepine receptors, was tested in healthy male subjects; single doses of abecarnil were given in five dosage levels (1 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg, 40 mg) and in a multiple dose study in four dosage levels (15 mg, 30 mg, 60 mg, 90 mg day-1) for 7 days. On two days following multiple dose treatment, placebo was given in single-blind conditions (follow-up). In each dosage level, in both studies drug was given to 10 subjects (7: verum, 3: placebo). 2. Safety and tolerability were evaluated by changes in vital signs, incidence and severity of adverse reactions and biochemical and haematological screening. Drug effects were estimated utilizing a bipolar visual analogue scale (poles: 'sleepy'-'alert') and a psychomotor task, the digit symbol substitution task. The pharmacokinetics of single and multiple doses were also determined in the multiple dose study. 3. Abecarnil was generally well tolerated. In the single dose study the most frequently reported side effects associated with abecarnil at high doses (20 and 40 mg) were dizziness, unsteady gait, and lack of concentration. A decrement in performance on the digit symbol substitution task was also observed in the two high dosage groups 20 mg and 40 mg. Evaluation of visual analogue scale ratings did not reveal a sedative effect even at higher doses. 4. In the multiple dose study the most frequently reported side effects during the treatment period were dizziness, unsteady gait, and lack of concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Cerebral microvascular amyloid beta protein deposition induces vascular degeneration and neuroinflammation in transgenic mice expressing human vasculotropic mutant amyloid beta precursor protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, J.; Xu, F.; Davis, J.; Otte-Holler, I.; Verbeek, M.M.; Nostrand, W.E. van

    2005-01-01

    Cerebral vascular amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) deposition, also known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy, is a common pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. Additionally, several familial forms of cerebral amyloid angiopathy exist including the Dutch (E22Q) and Iowa (D23N) mutations of Abeta. Incr

  11. Definition of the minimal requirements within the human beta-globin gene and the dominant control region for high level expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, P; Antoniou, M; Grosveld, F

    1990-01-01

    The human beta-globin dominant control region (DCR) was previously identified as a region from the 5' end of the human beta-globin locus which directs high level, site of integration-independent, copy number-dependent expression on a linked human beta-globin gene in transgenic mice and stably transfected mouse erythroleukaemia (MEL) cells. We have now analysed the elements comprising the DCR by systematic deletion mutagenesis in stable MEL transfectants. We have identified two independent elements within the DNase I hypersensitive sites 2 and 3, containing fragments which direct strong transcriptional inducibility of a beta-globin gene. Whilst the remaining two hypersensitive sites do not direct significant transcriptional induction, our data suggest that all four sites may be necessary for the fully regulated expression conferred by the DCR. We have also tested a number of beta-globin minigene constructs under the control of the DCR to assess if any of the local sequences from the gene may be removed without loss of expression. We find that the 3' enhancer may be removed without affecting expression, but there is an absolute requirement for the presence of the second intron, not related to the enhancer present in that intron. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2295312

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing human beta-defensin-2 are more resistant to fungal attack: functional homology between plant and human defensins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, An M; Thevissen, Karin; Bresseleers, Sara M; Sels, Jan; Wouters, Piet; Cammue, Bruno P A; François, Isabelle E J A

    2007-08-01

    Human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is a small antimicrobial peptide with potent activity against different Gram-negative bacteria and fungal/yeast species. Since human beta-defensins and plant defensins share structural homology, we set out to analyse whether there also exists a functional homology between these defensins of different eukaryotic kingdoms. To this end, we constructed a plant transformation vector harbouring the hBD-2 coding sequence, which we transformed to Arabidopsis thaliana plants, giving rise to A. thaliana plants indeed expressing hBD-2. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that this heterologously produced hBD-2 possesses antifungal activity in vitro. Finally, we could show that hBD-2 expressing A. thaliana plants are more resistant against the broad-spectrum fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea as compared to untransformed A. thaliana plants, and that this resistance is correlated with the level of active hBD-2 produced in these transgenic plants. Hence, we demonstrated a functional homology, next to the already known structural homology, between defensins originating from different eukaryotic kingdoms. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this is specifically demonstrated for plant and mammalian defensins.

  13. Galectin-1 as a fusion partner for the production of soluble and folded human {beta}-1,4-galactosyltransferase-T7 in E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasek, Marta [Structural Glycobiology Section, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Center for Cancer Research Nanobiology Program, Center for Cancer Research, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 2170 (United States); Boeggeman, Elizabeth; Ramakrishnan, Boopathy [Structural Glycobiology Section, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Center for Cancer Research Nanobiology Program, Center for Cancer Research, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 2170 (United States); Basic Science Program, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Center for Cancer Research Nanobiology Program, Center for Cancer Research, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 2170 (United States); Qasba, Pradman K., E-mail: qasba@helix.nih.gov [Structural Glycobiology Section, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Center for Cancer Research Nanobiology Program, Center for Cancer Research, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 2170 (United States)

    2010-04-09

    The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli often leads to inactive aggregated proteins known as the inclusion bodies. To date, the best available tool has been the use of fusion tags, including the carbohydrate-binding protein; e.g., the maltose-binding protein (MBP) that enhances the solubility of recombinant proteins. However, none of these fusion tags work universally with every partner protein. We hypothesized that galectins, which are also carbohydrate-binding proteins, may help as fusion partners in folding the mammalian proteins in E. coli. Here we show for the first time that a small soluble lectin, human galectin-1, one member of a large galectin family, can function as a fusion partner to produce soluble folded recombinant human glycosyltransferase, {beta}-1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 ({beta}4Gal-T7), in E. coli. The enzyme {beta}4Gal-T7 transfers galactose to xylose during the synthesis of the tetrasaccharide linker sequence attached to a Ser residue of proteoglycans. Without a fusion partner, {beta}4Gal-T7 is expressed in E. coli as inclusion bodies. We have designed a new vector construct, pLgals1, from pET-23a that includes the sequence for human galectin-1, followed by the Tev protease cleavage site, a 6x His-coding sequence, and a multi-cloning site where a cloned gene is inserted. After lactose affinity column purification of galectin-1-{beta}4Gal-T7 fusion protein, the unique protease cleavage site allows the protein {beta}4Gal-T7 to be cleaved from galectin-1 that binds and elutes from UDP-agarose column. The eluted protein is enzymatically active, and shows CD spectra comparable to the folded {beta}4Gal-T1. The engineered galectin-1 vector could prove to be a valuable tool for expressing other proteins in E. coli.

  14. Expression of LL-37, Human beta Defensin-2, and CCR6 mRNA in Patients with Psoriasis Vulgaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李东升; 李家文; 段逸群; 周小勇

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether LL-37 and human beta defensin-2 (hBD-2) is related to the patients with psoriasis seldom having skin infections and explore the role of the two peptides and CCR6 (the receptor of hBD-2) in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, the expression levels of mRNA of LL-37, hBD-2, and CCR6 in skin lesions of patients with psoriasis vulgaris were detected by using RT-PCR. The results showed that the mRNA expression levels of the two peptides and CCR6 in psoriatic lesions all increased compared with the normal skin (P<0. 001). It was suggested that upregulated expression of LL-37 and hBD-2 might be the main reason that result in the the skin of patients with psoriasis being seldom infected, and the two peptides and CCR6 might play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  15. Effects of acute beta-adrenoceptor blockade with metoprolol on the renal response to dopamine in normal humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Lang-Jensen, T; Hansen, J M

    1994-01-01

    The present study investigated the contribution of adrenergic beta 1-receptor stimulation to the cardiovascular and renal effects of low-dose dopamine in eight normal, water-loaded humans. Metoprolol (100 mg) or placebo was administered orally at 08.00 h in a randomized, double-blind fashion on two...... different days. Renal clearance studies were performed during a 1 h baseline period, two 1 h periods with dopamine infusion (3 micrograms kg-1 min-1), and a 1 h recovery period. Cardiac output was measured by an ultrasonic Doppler method, and lithium clearance (CLLi) was used to estimate proximal tubular...... outflow. Baseline values of heart rate, systolic pressure and mean arterial pressure decreased with metoprolol compared with placebo, but cardiac output, effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were not significantly changed. Metoprolol significantly decreased baseline CLLi...

  16. Effects of 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine and phorbol ester on differentiation of human K562 erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T; Mitchell, T; Sariban, E; Sabbath, K; Griffin, J; Kufe, D

    1985-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) induces hemoglobin synthesis in human K562 erythroleukemia cells. The present study extends these findings by demonstrating that ara-C treatment of K562 cells results in both increased heme synthesis and accumulation of alpha-, gamma-, epsilon-, and zeta-globin RNA. The results also demonstrate that ara-C enhances K562 cell surface expression of glycophorin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate; TPA) inhibits the effects of ara-C on heme production, accumulation of globin RNA, and glycophorin expression. The inhibitory effect occurs maximally when K562 cells are treated with TPA before undergoing ara-C-induced commitment to erythroid differentiation. These findings suggest that TPA inhibits an early step in the process required for ara-C to enhance expression of genes involved in the erythroid program.

  17. Occurrence of thymosin beta4 in human breast cancer cells and in other cell types of the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, L.-I.; Holck, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    that there is a considerable heterogeneity in the cellular distribution of thymosin beta4 in breast cancer. In most tumors examined, cancer cells showed low or intermediate reactivity for thymosin beta4, whereas leukocytes and macrophages showed intense reactivity. In addition, endothelial cells showed variable reactivity...... the tumor microenvironment produce thymosin beta4 and that such expression varies from tumor to tumor. Such heterogeneity of expression should be taken into account when the role of thymosin beta4 in tumor biology is assessed....

  18. Beta-palmitate - a natural component of human milk in supplemental milk formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlicekova, Zuzana; Jesenak, Milos; Banovcin, Peter; Kuchta, Milan

    2016-03-17

    The composition and function of human milk is unique and gives a basis for the development of modern artificial milk formulas that can provide an appropriate substitute for non-breastfed infants. Although human milk is not fully substitutable, modern milk formulas are attempting to mimic human milk and partially substitute its complex biological positive effects on infants. Besides the immunomodulatory factors from human milk, research has been focused on the composition and structure of human milk fat with a high content of β-palmitic acid (sn-2 palmitic acid, β-palmitate). According to the available studies, increasing the content of β-palmitate added to milk formulas promotes several beneficial physiological functions. β-palmitate positively influences fatty acid metabolism, increases calcium absorption, improves bone matrix quality and the stool consistency, and has a positive effect on the development of the intestinal microbiome.

  19. Thymosin Beta-4 Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus Enhances Human Nucleus Pulposus Cell Proliferation and Reduces Cell Apoptosis and Senescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yi Wang; Qing-San Zhu; Yi-Wei Wang; Ruo-Feng Yin

    2015-01-01

    Background:Thymosin beta-4 (TB-4) is considered key roles in tissue development,maintenance and pathological processes.The study aimed to prove TB-4 positive biological function on nucleus pulposus (NP) cell apoptosis and slowing the process of cell aging while increasing the cell proliferation.Methods:TB-4 recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) was constructed and induced to human NP cells.Cell of same group were cultured without gene modification as controlled group.Proliferation capacity and cell apoptosis were observed during 6 passages of the cells.Morphology and expression of the TB-4 gene were documented as parameter of cell activity during cell passage.Results:NP cells with TB-4 transfection has normal TB-4 expression and exocytosis.NP cells with TB-4 transfection performed significantly higher cell activity than that at the control group in each generation.TB-4 recombinant AAV-transfected human NP cells also show slower cell aging,lower cell apoptosis and higher cell proliferation than control group.Conclusions:TB-4 can prevent NP cell apoptosis,slow NP cell aging and promote NP cell proliferation.AAV transfection technique was able to highly and stably express TB-4 in human NP cells,which may provide a new pathway for innovation in the treatment of intervertebral disc degenerative diseases.

  20. Short hairpin RNA screen indicates that Klotho beta/FGF19 protein overcomes stasis in human colonic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinyong; Eskiocak, Ugur; Stadler, Guido; Lou, Zhenjun; Kuro-o, Makoto; Shay, Jerry W; Wright, Woodring E

    2011-12-16

    Normal human colonic epithelial cells (HCECs) are not immortalized by telomerase alone but also require CDK4. Some human cell types growth-arrest due to stress- or aberrant signaling-induced senescence (stasis). Stasis represents the consequences of growth conditions culture that are inadequate to maintain long-term proliferation. Overexpressed CDK4 titers out p16 and allows cells to ignore the growth arrest signals produced by stasis. To identify factors contributing to the inadequate culture environment, we used a 62,000-member shRNA library to knock down factors cooperating with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in the immortalization of HCECs. Knockdown of Klotho gamma (KLG; also known as KLPH and LCTL) allowed hTERT to immortalize HCECs. KLG is one isoform of the Klotho family of factors that coordinate interaction between different FGF ligands and the FGF receptor. We also found that knockdown of KLG induced another member of the Klotho family, Klotho beta (KLB). Induction of KLB was maintained and could activate ERK1/2 in immortalized cells. Supplementation of the culture medium with the KLB ligand FGF19 had a similar effect on hTERT-expressing HCECs as knockdown of KLG regarding both immortalization and down-regulation of the tumor suppressor Klotho alpha. Together, these data suggest that KLB is an important regulator in the immortalization of HCECs by facilitating FGF19 growth factor signaling.

  1. Glucocorticoid-mediated effects on metabolism are reversed by targeting 11 beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh, Firoozeh; Al-Khalili, Lubna; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Wang, Minghan; Lönnqvist, Fredrik; Krook, Anna

    2009-03-01

    Adipose tissue and liver play important roles in mediating the metabolic actions of glucocorticoids. However, the effects of glucocorticoids on glucose and lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle are not understood completely. Intracellular glucocorticoid action is dependent on 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD1), an enzyme that converts cortisone to active cortisol. We investigated the direct role of HSD1 in cultured primary human skeletal muscle cells using siRNA and pharmacological inhibitors of the enzyme. Primary human skeletal muscle cells were cultured in the presence of 0.5 microM cortisone or 0.5 microM cortisol for eight days. siRNA was utilized to reduce expression of either HSD1 or pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) 4. Effects of pharmacological inhibitors of HSD1 were also studied. Exposure to cortisone or cortisol decreased basal glucose uptake and glucose incorporation into glycogen, but was without effect on the insulin-stimulated response. Glucocorticoid exposure increased palmitate oxidation, as well as the expression of PDK4. siRNA-mediated reduction or pharmacological inhibition of HSD1 prevented the effects of cortisone, but not cortisol, on metabolic responses. siRNA-mediated reduction of PDK4 prevented the effect of cortisol to attenuate glycogen synthesis. Targeted reduction or pharmacological inhibition of HSD1 in primary human skeletal muscle cells prevents the effects of cortisone, but not cortisol, on glucose metabolism and palmitate oxidation. Furthermore, the glucocorticoid-mediated reductions in glucose metabolism are dependent on PDK4.

  2. Selective binding of chiral molecules of cinchona alkaloid by beta- and gamma-cyclodextrins and organoselenium-bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Li, Li; Zhang, Heng-Yi; Fan, Zhi; Guan, Xu-Dong

    2003-02-01

    The inclusion complexation behavior of chiral members of cinchona alkaloid with beta- and gamma-cyclodextrins (1 and 2) and 6,6(')-trimethylenediseleno-bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin) (3) was assessed by means of fluorescence and 2D-NMR spectroscopy. The spectrofluorometric titrations have been performed in aqueous buffer solution (pH 7.20) at 25.0 degrees C to determine the stability constants of the inclusion complexation of 1-3 with guest molecules (i.e., cinchonine, cinchonidine, quinine, and quinidine) in order to quantitatively investigate the molecular selective binding ability. The stability constants of the resulting complexes of 2 with guest molecules are larger than that of 1. As a result of cooperative binding, the stability constants of inclusion complexation of dimeric beta-cyclodextrin 3 with cinchonidine and cinchonine are higher than that of parent 1 by factor of 4.5 and 2.4, respectively. These results are discussed from the viewpoint of the size-fit and geometric complementary relationship between the host and guest.

  3. Preservation of beta cell function in adult human pancreatic islets for several months in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunstedt, J; Andersson, A; Frimodt-Møller, C

    1979-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans were isolated from four human kidney donors, aged 16 to 21 years by the collagenase method described for isolation of rodent islets. So far the human islets have been kept in tissue culture, without attachment, in medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 10% calf serum for more than...... 9 months, with preservation of the ability to release insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Replacement of calf serum with serum from normal human subjects did not affect B-cell survival, but resulted in elevated insulin values partly due to lower insulin degrading activity. Thus the described...

  4. Exposure profiles and human papillomavirus infection in skin cancer: an analysis of 25 genus beta-types in a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anita S; Karagas, Margaret R; Perry, Ann E; Nelson, Heather H

    2008-12-01

    An increasing number of studies report that genus beta human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with skin cancer, with suggestions of specificity for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. We have conducted a systematic examination of HPV DNA in tumors from immunocompetent hosts, including SCC and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), using a highly sensitive methodology and population-based samples to test the hypothesis that a differential prevalence of beta-HPVs exists between SCC (n=101) and BCC (n=101) tumors. When testing for all known beta-HPV types, we found no significant difference in HPV prevalence between the two histologies. However, SCC lesions were significantly more likely to be infected with HPV genus beta-species 1 (includes types 5 and 8), than BCC samples (P=0.01); this difference was not observed for any other species. A histologic difference was also observed for those HPV types previously reported to be important in skin cancer (P=0.003). SCC samples showed a higher rate of infectivity (that is, were positive for multiple types) than BCC tumors (P=0.02). These data highlight the potential importance of various genus beta-HPV types, in particular genus beta-species 1 in SCC, and support the hypothesis of a behavioral difference of the virus within the two major histological skin cancers.

  5. Effect of interleukin-1beta and dehydroepiandrosterone on the expression of lumican and fibromodulin in fibroblast-like synovial cells of the human temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Okamoto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Several epidemiological studies have reported that temporomandibular disorders (TMDs are more prevalent in women than in men. It has recently been proposed that sex hormones such as estrogen, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA are involved with the pathogenesis of TMDs. Although studies have investigated the relationship between estrogen and testosterone and the restoration of TMDs, the relationship between DHEA and TMDs is unknown. The synovial tissue of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is made up of connective tissue with an extracellular matrix (ECM composed of collagen and proteoglycan. One proteoglycan family, comprised of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans (SLRPs, was found to be involved in collagen fibril formation and interaction. In recent years, the participation of SLRPs such as lumican and fibromodulin in the internal derangement of TMJ has been suggested. Although these SLRPs may contribute to the restoration of the synovium, their effect is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of DHEA, a sex hormone, on the expression of lumican and fibromodulin in human temporomandibular specimens and in cultured human TMJ fibroblast-like synovial cells in the presence or absence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta. In the in vivo study, both normal and osteoarthritic (OA human temporomandibular synovial tissues were immunohistochemically examined. In the in vitro study, five fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS cell lines were established from human TMJ synovial tissue of patients with osteoarthritis. The subcultured cells were then incubated for 3, 6, 12 or 24 h with/without IL-1beta (1 ng/mL in the presence or absence of DHEA (10 μM. The gene expression of lumican and fibromodulin was examined using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and their protein expression was examined using immunofluorescent staining. We demonstrated that the expression of lumican

  6. Effect of interleukin-1beta and dehydroepiandrosterone on the expression of lumican and fibromodulin in fibroblast-like synovial cells of the human temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, K; Kiga, N; Shinohara, Y; Tojyo, I; Fujita, S

    2015-02-23

    Several epidemiological studies have reported that temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are more prevalent in women than in men. It has recently been proposed that sex hormones such as estrogen, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are involved with the pathogenesis of TMDs. Although studies have investigated the relationship between estrogen and testosterone and the restoration of TMDs, the relationship between DHEA and TMDs is unknown. The synovial tissue of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is made up of connective tissue with an extracellular matrix (ECM) composed of collagen and proteoglycan. One proteoglycan family, comprised of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans (SLRPs), was found to be involved in collagen fibril formation and interaction. In recent years, the participation of SLRPs such as lumican and fibromodulin in the internal derangement of TMJ has been suggested. Although these SLRPs may contribute to the restoration of the synovium, their effect is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of DHEA, a sex hormone, on the expression of lumican and fibromodulin in human temporomandibular specimens and in cultured human TMJ fibroblast-like synovial cells in the presence or absence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). In the in vivo study, both normal and osteoarthritic (OA) human temporomandibular synovial tissues were immunohistochemically examined. In the in vitro study, five fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) cell lines were established from human TMJ synovial tissue of patients with osteoarthritis. The subcultured cells were then incubated for 3, 6, 12 or 24 h with/without IL-1beta (1 ng/mL) in the presence or absence of DHEA (10 μM). The gene expression of lumican and fibromodulin was examined using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and their protein expression was examined using immunofluorescent staining. We demonstrated that the expression of lumican significantly

  7. High Resolution Crystal Structure of Human [beta]-Glucuronidase Reveals Structural Basis of Lysosome Targeting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassan, Md; Waheed, Abdul; Grubb, Jeffery; Klei, Herbert; Korolev, Sergey; Sly, William

    2013-01-01

    ...). Here we report a high resolution crystal structure of human GUS at 1.7 Å resolution and present an extensive analysis of the structural features, unifying recent findings in the field of lysosome targeting and glycosyl hydrolases...

  8. beta-Dystroglycan modulates the interplay between actin and microtubules in human-adhered platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Suárez-Sánchez, Rocío; Hernández-González, Enrique; Galván, Iván

    2008-05-01

    To maintain the continuity of an injured blood vessel, platelets change shape, secrete granule contents, adhere, aggregate, and retract in a haemostatic plug. Ordered arrays of microtubules, microfilaments, and associated proteins are responsible for these platelet responses. In full-spread platelets, microfilament bundles in association with other cytoskeleton proteins are anchored in focal contacts. Recent studies in migrating cells suggest that co-ordination and direct physical interaction of microtubules and actin network modulate adhesion development. In platelets, we have proposed a feasible association between these two cytoskeletal systems, as well as the participation of the dystrophin-associated protein complex, as part of the focal adhesion complex. The present study analysed the participation of microtubules and actin during the platelet adhesion process. Confocal microscopy, fluorescence resonance transfer energy and immunoprecipitation assays were used to provide evidence of a cross-talk between these two cytoskeletal systems. Interestingly, beta-dystroglycan was found to act as an interplay protein between actin and microtubules and an additional communication between these two cytoskeleton networks was maintained through proteins of focal adhesion complex. Altogether our data are indicative of a dynamic co-participation of actin filaments and microtubules in modulating focal contacts to achieve platelet function.

  9. beta-carotene does not change markers of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant activity in human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castenmiller, J.J.M.; Lauridsen, Søren T.; Dragsted, Lars O.

    1999-01-01

    In vitamin A-replete populations, increased concentrations of serum carotenoids have been associated with a decreased risk of degenerative diseases. The mechanism of action of carotenoids in determining antioxidant activity is largely unknown. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of car...... to an increased carotenoid (lutein and zeaxanthin) intake, but beta-carotene is unlikely to be a causative factor. Lower erythrocyte catalase activity after intervention with spinach products may be related to other constituents in spinach such as flavonoids.......In vitamin A-replete populations, increased concentrations of serum carotenoids have been associated with a decreased risk of degenerative diseases. The mechanism of action of carotenoids in determining antioxidant activity is largely unknown. The aim of the study was to examine the effect...... of carotenoid supplementation and spinach intake on erythrocyte enzyme antioxidant activities, serum or plasma nonenzymatic antioxidant concentrations, and concentrations of oxidatively damaged amino acids in plasma; Subjects received for 3 wk a basic diet (n = 10), a basic diet with a carotenoid supplement (n...

  10. Betting Against Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frazzini, Andrea; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We present a model with leverage and margin constraints that vary across investors and time. We find evidence consistent with each of the model’s five central predictions: (1) Since constrained investors bid up high-beta assets, high beta is associated with low alpha, as we find empirically for U...... of the BAB factor is low; (4) Increased funding liquidity risk compresses betas toward one; (5) More constrained investors hold riskier assets........S. equities, 20 international equity markets, Treasury bonds, corporate bonds, and futures; (2) A betting-against-beta (BAB) factor, which is long leveraged low beta assets and short high-beta assets, produces significant positive risk-adjusted returns; (3) When funding constraints tighten, the return...

  11. Reduction of the immunostainable length of the hippocampal dentate granule cells' primary cilia in 3xAD-transgenic mice producing human A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarthy, Balu, E-mail: Balu.Chakravarthy@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Gaudet, Chantal; Menard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Atkinson, Trevor [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); LaFerla, Frank M. [Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Ito, Shingo [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Pra, Ilaria [Department of Life and Reproduction Sciences, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy); Whitfield, James [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} and tau-induced neurofibrillary tangles play a key role in Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}{sub 1-42} and mutant tau protein together reduce the primary cilium length. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This shortening likely reduces cilium-dependent neurogenesis and memory function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This provides a model of an A{beta}/tau targeting of a neuronal signaling organelle. -- Abstract: The hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of the two sites of continuous neurogenesis in adult rodents and humans. Virtually all dentate granule cells have a single immobile cilium with a microtubule spine or axoneme covered with a specialized cell membrane loaded with receptors such as the somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}). The signals from these receptors have been reported to stimulate neuroprogenitor proliferation and the post-mitotic maturation of newborn granule cells into functioning granule cells. We have found that in 6-24-months-old triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice (3xTg-AD) producing both A{beta}{sub 1-42} and the mutant human tau protein tau{sub P301L,} the dentate granule cells still had immunostainable SSTR3- and p75{sup NTR}-bearing cilia but they were only half the length of the immunostained cilia in the corresponding wild-type mice. However, the immunostainable length of the granule cell cilia was not reduced either in 2xTg-AD mice accumulating large amounts of A{beta}{sub 1-42} or in mice accumulating only a mutant human tau protein. Thus it appears that a combination of A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau protein accumulation affects the levels of functionally important receptors in 3xTg-AD mice. These observations raise the important possibility that structural and functional changes in granule cell cilia might have a role in AD.

  12. Migration behavior of alkylphenols, bisphenol A and bisphenol S studied by capillary electrophoresis using sulfated beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, M; Naraoka, H; Tsue, H; Morozumi, T; Kaneta, T; Tanaka, S

    2001-06-01

    An application of capillary electrophoresis (CE) using sulfated beta-cyclodextrin (SCD) has been investigated for separating alkylphenols with different chain lengths, as well as bisphenol A and bisphenol S. In the absence of SCD in running buffer, all the phenols migrated at the same velocity as the electroosmotic flow (EOF), whereas the addition of SCD effectively led to the baseline separation of alkylphenols on the basis of the difference in the abilities to bind into the hydrophobic cavity of CD. The host-guest binding constants between analyte phenols and SCD were evaluated from Benesi-Hildebrand plots of the data obtained by two independent methods, CE and UV-visible measurements, demonstrating that the greater the hydrophobicity of the phenols, the larger the binding constants. The effects of organic solvents on the resolution for alkylphenols and bisphenols were also examined. This system using SCD was effective for the separation of 4-octylphenol and 4-nonylphenol isomers having longer alkyl chains.

  13. Amyloid Beta and Tau Proteins as Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment: Rethinking the Current Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Mondragón-Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is defined by the concurrence of accumulation of abnormal aggregates composed of two proteins: Amyloid beta (Aβ and tau, and of cellular changes including neurite degeneration and loss of neurons and cognitive functions. Based on their strong association with disease, genetically and pathologically, it is not surprising that there has been a focus towards developing therapies against the aggregated structures. Unfortunately, current therapies have but mild benefit. With this in mind we will focus on the relationship of synaptic plasticity with Aβ and tau protein and their role as potential targets for the development of therapeutic drugs. Finally, we will provide perspectives in developing a multifactorial strategy for AD treatment.

  14. 5'HS5 of the human beta-globin locus control region is dispensable for the formation of the beta-globin active chromatin hub.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Kei Chan

    Full Text Available Hypersensitive site 5 (5'HS5 of the beta-globin Locus Control Region functions as a developmental stage-specific border in erythroid cells. Here, we have analyzed the role of 5'HS5 in the three dimensional organization of the beta-gene locus using the Chromatin Conformation Capture (3C technique. The results show that when 5'HS5 is deleted from the locus, both remote and internal regulatory elements are still able to interact with each other in a three-dimensional configuration termed the Active Chromatin Hub. Thus, the absence of 5'HS5 does not have an appreciable effect on the three dimensional organization of the beta-globin locus. This rules out models in which 5'HS5 nucleates interactions with remote and/or internal regulatory elements. We also determined the binding of CTCF, the only defined insulator protei