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Sample records for human basic helix-loop-helix

  1. The Arabidopsis Basic/Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Family

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabriela Toledo-Ortiz; Enamul Huq; Peter H. Quail

    2003-01-01

    The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a superfamily of transcription factors that bind as dimers to specific DNA target sites and that have been well characterized in nonplant eukaryotes as important regulatory components...

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the genome of a typical human-disease vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Yun; Dong, Ying; Chang, Rui-Xue; Ang, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Ran; Wu, Yan-Yan; Xu, Yi-Hui; Lu, Wen-Sheng; Zheng, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis, the black-legged tick, is one of the most common human-disease vectors and transmits Borrelia species, such as B. burgdorferi, as well as Theileria microti, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, etc. As basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors have been recognized for many years as important regulators of various developmental processes, we performed phylogenetic analysis of the black-legged tick genome in order to identify the number and family of bHLH transcription factors. Because bHLH family members have been identified in many organisms, including silkworm and fruit fly, we were able to conduct this survey and identify 58 putative bHLH transcription factors. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the black-legged tick has 26, 10, 9, 1, 9, and 1 member in groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively, whereas two were orphan genes. This analysis also revealed that unlike silkworm and fruit fly, the black-legged tick has no Mesp, Mlx, or TF4 family members, but has one more MyoRb family member. The present study provides useful background information for future studies of the black-legged tick as a disease vector with the goal of prevention and treatment.

  3. Functional diversity of human basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TCF4 isoforms generated by alternative 5' exon usage and splicing.

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    Mari Sepp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factor 4 (TCF4 alias ITF2, E2-2, ME2 or SEF2 is a ubiquitous class A basic helix-loop-helix protein that binds to E-box DNA sequences (CANNTG. While involved in the development and functioning of many different cell types, recent studies point to important roles for TCF4 in the nervous system. Specifically, human TCF4 gene is implicated in susceptibility to schizophrenia and TCF4 haploinsufficiency is the cause of the Pitt-Hopkins mental retardation syndrome. However, the structure, expression and coding potential of the human TCF4 gene have not been described in detail. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we used human tissue samples to characterize human TCF4 gene structure and TCF4 expression at mRNA and protein level. We report that although widely expressed, human TCF4 mRNA expression is particularly high in the brain. We demonstrate that usage of numerous 5' exons of the human TCF4 gene potentially yields in TCF4 protein isoforms with 18 different N-termini. In addition, the diversity of isoforms is increased by alternative splicing of several internal exons. For functional characterization of TCF4 isoforms, we overexpressed individual isoforms in cultured human cells. Our analysis revealed that subcellular distribution of TCF4 isoforms is differentially regulated: Some isoforms contain a bipartite nuclear localization signal and are exclusively nuclear, whereas distribution of other isoforms relies on heterodimerization partners. Furthermore, the ability of different TCF4 isoforms to regulate E-box controlled reporter gene transcription is varied depending on whether one or both of the two TCF4 transcription activation domains are present in the protein. Both TCF4 activation domains are able to activate transcription independently, but act synergistically in combination. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, in this study we have described the inter-tissue variability of TCF4 expression in human and provided evidence

  4. Relaxed Constraint and Evolutionary Rate Variation between Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Floral Anthocyanin Regulators in Ipomoea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Streisfeld, Matthew A; Rausher, Mark D

    2007-01-01

    .... We cloned the full-length coding region from 2 basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors from several species of Ipomoea with diverse flower colors and determined the selective forces operating on them...

  5. A Classification of Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors of Soybean

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    Karen A. Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete genome sequence of soybean allows an unprecedented opportunity for the discovery of the genes controlling important traits. In particular, the potential functions of regulatory genes are a priority for analysis. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH family of transcription factors is known to be involved in controlling a wide range of systems critical for crop adaptation and quality, including photosynthesis, light signalling, pigment biosynthesis, and seed pod development. Using a hidden Markov model search algorithm, 319 genes with basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor domains were identified within the soybean genome sequence. These were classified with respect to their predicted DNA binding potential, intron/exon structure, and the phylogeny of the bHLH domain. Evidence is presented that the vast majority (281 of these 319 soybean bHLH genes are expressed at the mRNA level. Of these soybean bHLH genes, 67% were found to exist in two or more homeologous copies. This dataset provides a framework for future studies on bHLH gene function in soybean. The challenge for future research remains to define functions for the bHLH factors encoded in the soybean genome, which may allow greater flexibility for genetic selection of growth and environmental adaptation in this widely grown crop.

  6. Human variants in the neuronal basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH/PAS transcription factor complex NPAS4/ARNT2 disrupt function.

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    David C Bersten

    Full Text Available Neuronal Per-Arnt-Sim homology (PAS Factor 4 (NPAS4 is a neuronal activity-dependent transcription factor which heterodimerises with ARNT2 to regulate genes involved in inhibitory synapse formation. NPAS4 functions to maintain excitatory/inhibitory balance in neurons, while mouse models have shown it to play roles in memory formation, social interaction and neurodegeneration. NPAS4 has therefore been implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases which are underpinned by defects in excitatory/inhibitory balance. Here we have explored a broad set of non-synonymous human variants in NPAS4 and ARNT2 for disruption of NPAS4 function. We found two variants in NPAS4 (F147S and E257K and two variants in ARNT2 (R46W and R107H which significantly reduced transcriptional activity of the heterodimer on a luciferase reporter gene. Furthermore, we found that NPAS4.F147S was unable to activate expression of the NPAS4 target gene BDNF due to reduced dimerisation with ARNT2. Homology modelling predicts F147 in NPAS4 to lie at the dimer interface, where it appears to directly contribute to protein/protein interaction. We also found that reduced transcriptional activation by ARNT2 R46W was due to disruption of nuclear localisation. These results provide insight into the mechanisms of NPAS4/ARNT dimerisation and transcriptional activation and have potential implications for cognitive phenotypic variation and diseases such as autism, schizophrenia and dementia.

  7. SREBP-2, a second basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein that stimulates transcription by binding to a sterol regulatory element.

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, X; Yokoyama, C; Wu, J; Briggs, M R; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L; Wang, X

    1993-01-01

    We report the cDNA cloning of SREBP-2, the second member of a family of basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors that recognize sterol regulatory element 1 (SRE-1). SRE-1, a conditional enhancer in the promoters for the low density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase genes, increases transcription in the absence of sterols and is inactivated when sterols accumulate. Human SREBP-2 contains 1141 amino acids and is 47% identical t...

  8. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, PhFBH4, regulates flower senescence by modulating ethylene biosynthesis pathway in petunia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in regulating multiple biological processes in plants. However, there are few reports about the function of bHLHs in flower senescence. In this study, a bHLH TF, PhFBH4, was found to be dramatically upregulated during...

  9. Genome-wide identification and analysis of basic helix-loop-helix domains in dog, Canis lupus familiaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-Hua; Wang, Yong; Liu, A-Ke; Liu, Xiao-Ting; Zhou, Yang; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping

    2015-04-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain is a highly conserved amino acid motif that defines a group of DNA-binding transcription factors. bHLH proteins play essential regulatory roles in a variety of biological processes in animal, plant, and fungus. The domestic dog, Canis lupus familiaris, is a good model organism for genetic, physiological, and behavioral studies. In this study, we identified 115 putative bHLH genes in the dog genome. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, 51, 26, 14, 4, 12, and 4 dog bHLH genes were assigned to six separate groups (A-F); four bHLH genes were categorized as ''orphans''. Within-group evolutionary relationships inferred from the phylogenetic analysis were consistent with positional conservation, other conserved domains flanking the bHLH motif, and highly conserved intron/exon patterns in other vertebrates. Our analytical results confirmed the GenBank annotations of 89 dog bHLH proteins and provided information that could be used to update the annotations of the remaining 26 dog bHLH proteins. These data will provide good references for further studies on the structures and regulatory functions of bHLH proteins in the growth and development of dogs, which may help in understanding the mechanisms that underlie the physical and behavioral differences between dogs and wolves.

  10. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TCF21 is a downstream target of the male sex determining gene SRY.

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    Ramji K Bhandari

    Full Text Available The cascade of molecular events involved in mammalian sex determination has been shown to involve the SRY gene, but specific downstream events have eluded researchers for decades. The current study identifies one of the first direct downstream targets of the male sex determining factor SRY as the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor TCF21. SRY was found to bind to the Tcf21 promoter and activate gene expression. Mutagenesis of SRY/SOX9 response elements in the Tcf21 promoter eliminated the actions of SRY. SRY was found to directly associate with the Tcf21 promoter SRY/SOX9 response elements in vivo during fetal rat testis development. TCF21 was found to promote an in vitro sex reversal of embryonic ovarian cells to induce precursor Sertoli cell differentiation. TCF21 and SRY had similar effects on the in vitro sex reversal gonadal cell transcriptomes. Therefore, SRY acts directly on the Tcf21 promoter to in part initiate a cascade of events associated with Sertoli cell differentiation and embryonic testis development.

  11. Phylogeny, Functional Annotation, and Protein Interaction Network Analyses of the Xenopus tropicalis Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors

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    Wuyi Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The previous survey identified 70 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH proteins, but it was proved to be incomplete, and the functional information and regulatory networks of frog bHLH transcription factors were not fully known. Therefore, we conducted an updated genome-wide survey in the Xenopus tropicalis genome project databases and identified 105 bHLH sequences. Among the retrieved 105 sequences, phylogenetic analyses revealed that 103 bHLH proteins belonged to 43 families or subfamilies with 46, 26, 11, 3, 15, and 4 members in the corresponding supergroups. Next, gene ontology (GO enrichment analyses showed 65 significant GO annotations of biological processes and molecular functions and KEGG pathways counted in frequency. To explore the functional pathways, regulatory gene networks, and/or related gene groups coding for Xenopus tropicalis bHLH proteins, the identified bHLH genes were put into the databases KOBAS and STRING to get the signaling information of pathways and protein interaction networks according to available public databases and known protein interactions. From the genome annotation and pathway analysis using KOBAS, we identified 16 pathways in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. From the STRING interaction analysis, 68 hub proteins were identified, and many hub proteins created a tight network or a functional module within the protein families.

  12. Genome-wide features of neuroendocrine regulation in Drosophila by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor DIMMED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadžić, Tarik; Park, Dongkook; Abruzzi, Katharine C; Yang, Lin; Trigg, Jennifer S; Rohs, Remo; Rosbash, Michael; Taghert, Paul H

    2015-02-27

    Neuroendocrine (NE) cells use large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) to traffic, process, store and secrete neuropeptide hormones through the regulated secretory pathway. The dimmed (DIMM) basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor of Drosophila controls the level of regulated secretory activity in NE cells. To pursue its mechanisms, we have performed two independent genome-wide analyses of DIMM's activities: (i) in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to define genomic sites of DIMM occupancy and (ii) deep sequencing of purified DIMM neurons to characterize their transcriptional profile. By this combined approach, we showed that DIMM binds to conserved E-boxes in enhancers of 212 genes whose expression is enriched in DIMM-expressing NE cells. DIMM binds preferentially to certain E-boxes within first introns of specific gene isoforms. Statistical machine learning revealed that flanking regions of putative DIMM binding sites contribute to its DNA binding specificity. DIMM's transcriptional repertoire features at least 20 LDCV constituents. In addition, DIMM notably targets the pro-secretory transcription factor, creb-A, but significantly, DIMM does not target any neuropeptide genes. DIMM therefore prescribes the scale of secretory activity in NE neurons, by a systematic control of both proximal and distal points in the regulated secretory pathway. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET as a method to calculate the dimerization strength of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH proteins

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    Centonze Victoria E.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation play a vital role in the regulation of protein function. In our study of the basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH transcription factor HAND1, we show that HAND1 is phosphorylated during the trophoblast giant cell differentiation on residues residing in Helix I of the bHLH domain. Our hypothesis is that these modifications result in changes in HAND1 dimerization affinities with other bHLH factors. To test this idea, we employed FRET to measure the protein-protein interactions of HAND1 and HAND1 point mutants in HEK293 cells using YFP and CFP fusion proteins and laser scanning confocal microscopy.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of basic/helix-loop-helix gene family in peanut and assessment of its roles in pod development.

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    Chao Gao

    Full Text Available The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH proteins constitute a superfamily of transcription factors that are known to play a range of regulatory roles in eukaryotes. Over the past few decades, many bHLH family genes have been well-characterized in model plants, such as Arabidopsis, rice and tomato. However, the bHLH protein family in peanuts has not yet been systematically identified and characterized. Here, 132 and 129 bHLH proteins were identified from two wild ancestral diploid subgenomes of cultivated tetraploid peanuts, Arachis duranensis (AA and Arachis ipaensis (BB, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these bHLHs could be classified into 19 subfamilies. Distribution mapping results showed that peanut bHLH genes were randomly and unevenly distributed within the 10 AA chromosomes and 10 BB chromosomes. In addition, 120 bHLH gene pairs between the AA-subgenome and BB-subgenome were found to be orthologous and 101 of these pairs were highly syntenic in AA and BB chromosomes. Furthermore, we confirmed that 184 bHLH genes expressed in different tissues, 22 of which exhibited tissue-specific expression. Meanwhile, we identified 61 bHLH genes that may be potentially involved in peanut-specific subterranean. Our comprehensive genomic analysis provides a foundation for future functional dissection and understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of bHLH transcription factors in peanuts.

  15. A genome-wide identification and classification of basic helix-loop-helix genes in the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Yong; Wang, Xu-Hua; Tao, Xia-Fang; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are highly conserved DNA-binding transcription factors of a large superfamily. Animal bHLH proteins play important regulatory roles in various developmental processes such as neurogenesis, myogenesis, heart development, and hematopoiesis. The jewel wasp (Nasonia vitripennis) is a good model organism of hymenoptera insects for studies of developmental and evolutionary genetics. In this study, we identified 48 bHLH genes in the genome of N. vitripennis. According to phylogenetic analysis, based on N. vitripennis bHLH (NvbHLH) motif sequences and structural domain distribution in their full-length protein sequences, the identified NvbHLH genes were classified into 36 bHLH families with 19, 12, 9, 1, 6, and 1 member(s) in groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively. Our classification to the identified NvbHLH family members confirms GenBank annotations for 21 of the 48 NvbHLH proteins and provides useful information for further characterization and annotation of the remaining 27 NvbHLH proteins. Compared to other insect species, N. vitripennis has the lowest number of bHLH family members. No NvbHLH members have been found in the families Net, MyoRa, and PTFa, while all other insect species have at least one member in each of the families. These data constitute a solid basis for further investigations into the functions of bHLH proteins in developmental regulation of N. vitripennis.

  16. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BIS2 is essential for monoterpenoid indole alkaloid production in the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Moerkercke, Alex; Steensma, Priscille; Gariboldi, Ivo; Espoz, Javiera; Purnama, Purin C; Schweizer, Fabian; Miettinen, Karel; Vanden Bossche, Robin; De Clercq, Rebecca; Memelink, Johan; Goossens, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) are produced as plant defence compounds. In the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus, they comprise the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. The iridoid (monoterpenoid) pathway forms one of the two branches that feed MIA biosynthesis and its activation is regulated by the transcription factor (TF) basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) iridoid synthesis 1 (BIS1). Here, we describe the identification and characterisation of BIS2, a jasmonate (JA)-responsive bHLH TF expressed preferentially in internal phloem-associated parenchyma cells, which transactivates promoters of iridoid biosynthesis genes and can homodimerise or form heterodimers with BIS1. Stable overexpression of BIS2 in C. roseus suspension cells and transient ectopic expression of BIS2 in C. roseus petal limbs resulted in increased transcript accumulation of methylerythritol-4-phosphate and iridoid pathway genes, but not of other MIA genes or triterpenoid genes. Transcript profiling also indicated that BIS2 expression is part of an amplification loop, as it is induced by overexpression of either BIS1 or BIS2. Accordingly, silencing of BIS2 in C. roseus suspension cells completely abolished the JA-induced upregulation of the iridoid pathway genes and subsequent MIA accumulation, despite the presence of induced BIS1, indicating that BIS2 is essential for MIA production in C. roseus. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Two basic-helix-loop-helix genes (MYC-146 and GL3) from Arabidopsis can activate anthocyanin biosynthesis in a white-flowered Matthiola incana mutant.

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    Ramsay, Nicola A; Walker, Amanda R; Mooney, Mark; Gray, John C

    2003-06-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins, similar to mammalian Myc transcription factors, regulate the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in both monocots and dicots. Two Arabidopsis bHLH genes, GLABRA3 (GL3) and MYC-146, encode proteins that are similar throughout the predicted amino acid sequence to R and DELILA, which regulate anthocyanin production in maize and snapdragon, respectively. Northern blot analysis indicates that MYC-146 is most highly expressed in flower buds and flowers. Expression of a MYC-146 cDNA from the CaMV 35S promoter was unable to complement the anthocyanin deficiency in a ttg1 mutant of Arabidopsis and resulted in no obvious phenotypic change in Columbia plants. However, transient expression of GL3 and MYC-146 upon microprojectile bombardment of petals of a white-flowered mutant of Matthiola incana was able to complement anthocyanin deficiency. The lack of anthocyanin-deficient Arabidopsis mutants mapping to the locations of GL3 and MYC-146 suggests that the two bHLH proteins may be partially redundant and overlap in function.

  18. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 – Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Seol Ah, E-mail: s6022029@korea.ac.kr; Choi, Young-Im, E-mail: yichoi99@forest.go.kr; Cho, Jin-Seong, E-mail: jinsung3932@gmail.com; Lee, Hyoshin, E-mail: hslee@forest.go.kr

    2015-06-19

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems. - Highlights: • We identify the BEE3-like gene form hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). • We examine effects of overexpression of PagBEE3L on growth in poplar. • We found that 35S:BEE3L transgenic plants showed more rapid growth than wild-type plants. • BEE3L protein plays an important role in the development of plant stem.

  19. The Soybean Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor ORG3-Like Enhances Cadmium Tolerance via Increased Iron and Reduced Cadmium Uptake and Transport from Roots to Shoots

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    Zhaolong Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd is one of the most dangerous heavy metal pollutants in the environment and is toxic to animal and plant cells. On the other hand, iron (Fe is an essential element for plant growth and development. The chlorosis of plant leaves under cadmium stress is similar to the typical symptom of iron deficiency. Recently, several Arabidopsis basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factors have been identified that are involved in the interactions between Cd and Fe. In the present study, over-expression the ORG3-like gene GmORG3, a bHLH transcription factor OBP3-responsive gene (ORG, enhanced Cd tolerance and stabilized Fe homeostasis. The domain analysis of GmORG3 showed that the protein contains a conserved 61-residue bHLH domain belonging to subfamily II. Moreover, subcellular localization experiments showed that GmORG3 is a nucleoprotein. GmORG3 was transcribed only in soybean roots and was significantly induced by external Cd stress in soybean plants. Heterologous expression of GmORG3 enhanced Cd tolerance in yeast. Furthermore, the overexpression of GmORG3 in soybean mosaic seedlings using a hairy root system showed that overexpressing plants increased the translocation ratio of Fe but reduced Cd translocation from the roots to shoots. In addition, the ectopic expression of GmORG3 in tobacco reduced phytotoxic effects induced by Cd stress and Fe deficiency, including the blockage of root elongation and decreased chlorophyll content. By integrating all these results, we found that GmORG3 plays an important role in response to Cd stress. The results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of Cd tolerance in soybean.

  20. Clade IVa Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors Form Part of a Conserved Jasmonate Signaling Circuit for the Regulation of Bioactive Plant Terpenoid Biosynthesis.

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    Mertens, Jan; Van Moerkercke, Alex; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Pollier, Jacob; Goossens, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Plants produce many bioactive, specialized metabolites to defend themselves when facing various stress situations. Their biosynthesis is directed by a tightly controlled regulatory circuit that is elicited by phytohormones such as jasmonate (JA). The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) bHLH iridoid synthesis 1 (BIS1) and Triterpene Saponin Activating Regulator (TSAR) 1 and 2, from Catharanthus roseus and Medicago truncatula, respectively, all belong to clade IVa of the bHLH protein family and activate distinct terpenoid pathways, thereby mediating monoterpenoid indole alkaloid (MIA) and triterpene saponin (TS) accumulation, respectively, in these two species. In this study, we report that promoters of the genes encoding the enzymes involved in the specific terpenoid pathway of one of these species can be transactivated by the orthologous bHLH factor from the other species through recognition of the same cis-regulatory elements. Accordingly, ectopic expression of CrBIS1 in M. truncatula hairy roots up-regulated the expression of all genes required for soyasaponin production, resulting in strongly increased levels of soyasaponins in the transformed roots. Likewise, transient expression of MtTSAR1 and MtTSAR2 in C. roseus petals led to up-regulation of the genes involved in the iridoid branch of the MIA pathway. Together, our data illustrate the functional similarity of these JA-inducible TFs and indicate that recruitment of defined cis-regulatory elements constitutes an important aspect of the evolution of conserved regulatory modules for the activation of species-specific terpenoid biosynthesis pathways by common signals such as the JA phytohormones. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. atonal- and achaete-scute-related genes in the annelid Platynereis dumerilii: insights into the evolution of neural basic-Helix-Loop-Helix genes

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    Arendt Detlev

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional studies in model organisms, such as vertebrates and Drosophila, have shown that basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH proteins have important roles in different steps of neurogenesis, from the acquisition of neural fate to the differentiation into specific neural cell types. However, these studies highlighted many differences in the expression and function of orthologous bHLH proteins during neural development between vertebrates and Drosophila. To understand how the functions of neural bHLH genes have evolved among bilaterians, we have performed a detailed study of bHLH genes during nervous system development in the polychaete annelid, Platynereis dumerilii, an organism which is evolutionary distant from both Drosophila and vertebrates. Results We have studied Platynereis orthologs of the most important vertebrate neural bHLH genes, i.e. achaete-scute, neurogenin, atonal, olig, and NeuroD genes, the latter two being genes absent of the Drosophila genome. We observed that all these genes have specific expression patterns during nervous system formation in Platynereis. Our data suggest that in Platynereis, like in vertebrates but unlike Drosophila, (i neurogenin is the main proneural gene for the formation of the trunk central nervous system, (ii achaete-scute and olig genes are involved in neural subtype specification in the central nervous system, in particular in the specification of the serotonergic phenotype. In addition, we found that the Platynereis NeuroD gene has a broad and early neuroectodermal expression, which is completely different from the neuronal expression of vertebrate NeuroD genes. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that the Platynereis bHLH genes have both proneural and neuronal specification functions, in a way more akin to the vertebrate situation than to that of Drosophila. We conclude that these features are ancestral to bilaterians and have been conserved in the vertebrates and annelids lineages, but

  2. Genome-wide identification, classification, and functional analysis of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the cattle, Bos Taurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengmei; Liu, Wuyi

    2017-06-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) form a huge superfamily and play crucial roles in many essential developmental, genetic, and physiological-biochemical processes of eukaryotes. In total, 109 putative bHLH TFs were identified and categorized successfully in the genomic databases of cattle, Bos Taurus, after removing redundant sequences and merging genetic isoforms. Through phylogenetic analyses, 105 proteins among these bHLH TFs were classified into 44 families with 46, 25, 14, 3, 13, and 4 members in the high-order groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively. The remaining 4 bHLH proteins were sorted out as 'orphans.' Next, these 109 putative bHLH proteins identified were further characterized as significantly enriched in 524 significant Gene Ontology (GO) annotations (corrected P value ≤ 0.05) and 21 significantly enriched pathways (corrected P value ≤ 0.05) that had been mapped by the web server KOBAS 2.0. Furthermore, 95 bHLH proteins were further screened and analyzed together with two uncharacterized proteins in the STRING online database to reconstruct the protein-protein interaction network of cattle bHLH TFs. Ultimately, 89 bHLH proteins were fully mapped in a network with 67 biological process, 13 molecular functions, 5 KEGG pathways, 12 PFAM protein domains, and 25 INTERPRO classified protein domains and features. These results provide much useful information and a good reference for further functional investigations and updated researches on cattle bHLH TFs.

  3. Molecular characterization of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes that are differentially expressed and induced by iron deficiency in Populus.

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    Huang, Danqiong; Dai, Wenhao

    2015-07-01

    Two Populus bHLH genes ( PtFIT and PtIRO ) were cloned and characterized. The iron deficiency tolerance may be regulated by the PtFIT -dependent response pathway in Populus. Five orthologs of eight Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes responding to iron deficiency in Populus were analyzed. Open reading frame (ORF) regions of two bHLH genes (PtFIT and PtIRO) were isolated from the iron deficiency tolerant (PtG) and susceptible (PtY) genotypes of Populus tremula 'Erecta'. Gene sequence analyses showed that each of the two genes was identical in PtG and PtY. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PtFIT was clustered with the bHLH genes regulating iron deficiency responses, while PtIRO was clustered with another group of the bHLH genes regulating iron deficiency responses in a FIT-independent pathway. Tissue-specific expression analysis indicated that PtFIT was only detected in the root among all tested tissues, while PtIRO was rarely detected in all tested tissues. Real-time PCR showed that PtFIT was up-regulated in roots under the iron-deficient condition. A higher level of PtFIT transcripts was detected in PtG than in PtY. Pearson Correlation Coefficient calculations indicated a strong positive correlation (r = 0.94) between PtFIT and PtIRT1 in PtG. It suggests that the iron deficiency tolerance of PtG may be regulated by the PtFIT-dependent response pathway. The PtFIT-transgenic poplar plants had an increased expression level of PtFIT and PtIRT1 responding to iron deficiency. One PtFIT-transgenic line (TL2) showed enhanced iron deficiency tolerance with higher chlorophyll content and Chl a/b ratio under iron deficiency than the control plants, indicating that PtFIT is involved in iron deficiency response in Populus. The results would provide useful information to understand iron deficiency response mechanisms in woody species.

  4. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Nex-1/Math-2 promotes neuronal survival of PC12 cells by modulating the dynamic expression of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2005-02-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Nex1/Math-2 belongs to the NeuroD subfamily, which plays a critical role during neuronal differentiation and maintenance of the differentiated state. Previously, we demonstrated that Nex1 is a key regulatory component of the nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway. Further supporting this hypothesis, this study shows that Nex1 has survival-inducing properties similar to NGF, as Nex1-overexpressing PC12 cells survive in the absence of trophic factors. We dissected the molecular mechanism by which Nex1 confers neuroprotection upon serum removal and found that constitutive expression of Nex1 maintained the expression of specific G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and concomitantly induced a dynamic expression profile of key anti-apoptotic regulators. This study provides the first evidence of the underlying mechanism by which a member of the NeuroD-subfamily promotes an active anti-apoptotic program essential to the survival of neurons. Our results suggest that the survival program may be viewed as an integral component of the intrinsic programming of the differentiated state.

  5. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR): "pioneer member" of the basic-helix/loop/helix per-Arnt-sim (bHLH/PAS) family of "sensors" of foreign and endogenous signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebert, Daniel W

    2017-07-01

    The basic-helix/loop/helix per-Arnt-sim (bHLH/PAS) family comprises many transcription factors, found throughout all three kingdoms of life; bHLH/PAS members "sense" innumerable intracellular and extracellular "signals" - including endogenous compounds, foreign chemicals, gas molecules, redox potential, photons (light), gravity, heat, and osmotic pressure. These signals then initiate downstream signaling pathways involved in responding to that signal. The term "PAS", abbreviation for "per-Arnt-sim" was first coined in 1991. Although the mouse Arnt gene was not identified until 1991, evidence of its co-transcriptional binding partner, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), was first reported in 1974 as a "sensor" of foreign chemicals, up-regulating cytochrome P450 family 1 (CYP1) and other enzyme activities that usually metabolize the signaling chemical. Within a few years, AHR was proposed also to participate in inflammation. The mouse [Ah] locus was shown (1973-1989) to be relevant to chemical carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, toxicity and teratogenesis, the mouse Ahr gene was cloned in 1992, and the first Ahr(-/-) knockout mouse line was reported in 1995. After thousands of studies from the early 1970s to present day, we now realize that AHR participates in dozens of signaling pathways involved in critical-life processes, affecting virtually every organ and cell-type in the animal, including many invertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel basic-region helix-loop-helix transcription factor (AnBH1) of Aspergillus nidulans counteracts the CCAAT-binding complex AnCF in the promoter of a penicillin biosynthesis gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Maria Louise; Litzka, Olivier; Martic, Goran; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Brakhage, Axel A

    2002-10-25

    Cis-acting CCAAT elements are found frequently in eukaryotic promoter regions. Many of the genes containing such elements in their promoters are regulated by a conserved multimeric CCAAT-binding complex. In the fungus Emericella (Aspergillus) nidulans, this complex was designated AnCF (A.nidulans CCAAT-binding factor). AnCF regulates several genes, including the penicillin biosynthesis genes ipnA and aatA. Since it is estimated that the CCAAT-binding complex regulates more than 200 genes, an important question concerns the regulation mechanism that allows so many genes to be regulated by a single complex in a gene-specific manner. One of the answers to this question appears to lie in the interaction of AnCF with other transcription factors. Here, a novel transcription factor designated AnBH1 was isolated. The corresponding anbH1 gene was cloned and found to be located on chromosome IV. The deduced AnBH1 protein belongs to the family of basic-region helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. AnBH1 binds in vitro as a homodimer to an, not previously described, asymmetric E-box within the aatA promoter that overlaps with the AnCF-binding site. This is the first report demonstrating that the CCAAT-binding complex and a bHLH transcription factor bind to overlapping sites. Since deletion of anbH1 appears to be lethal, the anbH1 gene was replaced by a regulatable alcAp-anbH1 gene fusion. The analysis of aatAp-lacZ expression in such a strain indicated that AnBH1 acts as a repressor of aatA gene expression and therefore counteracts the positive action of AnCF.

  7. miR396a-Mediated basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor bHLH74 repression acts as a regulator for root growth in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Maolin; Bian, Hongwu; Zha, Yulong; Li, Fengyun; Sun, Yuzhe; Bai, Bin; Chen, Zhehao; Wang, Junhui; Zhu, Muyuan; Han, Ning

    2014-07-01

    miR396 targets seven GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR (GRF) genes and the BASIC HELIX-LOOP-HELIX (bHLH) TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR 74 gene (bHLH74) in Arabidopsis. Previous research revealed that the miR396 target module regulates cell proliferation and plays a critical role in leaf development. However, no additional biological functions of miR396 have been investigated in detail. In this study, T-DNA insertion mutants and transgenic plants with altered levels of miR396 or its target genes were used to characterize the regulatory role of miR396 in root development. We found that AtMIR396a was the predominant source for miR396 accumulation in the roots of seedlings, and that the mir396a-1 mutant had longer roots than wild-type seedlings. Overexpression of AtMIR396a decreased the transcript levels of target genes such as GRF genes and bHLH74, and resulted in a shorter root phenotype. Furthermore, the bhlh74-1 mutant had shorter roots, whereas overexpression of an miR396-resistant form of bHLH74 (mbHLH74) had an enhanced root growth phenotype. Moreover, MIR396a regulated root growth by affecting the elongation zone. Taken together, these data indicate that miR396a-mediated bHLH74 repression helps regulate root growth in Arabidopsis seedlings. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The Neurogenic Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor NeuroD6 Concomitantly Increases Mitochondrial mass and Regulates Cytoskeletal Organization in the Early Stages of Neuronal Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kathleen Baxter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a central role during neurogenesis by providing energy in the form of ATP for cytoskeletal remodelling, outgrowth of neuronal processes, growth cone activity and synaptic activity. However, the fundamental question of how differentiating neurons control mitochondrial biogenesis remains vastly unexplored. Since our previous studies have shown that the neurogenic bHLH (basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor NeuroD6 is sufficient to induce differentiation of the neuronal progenitor-like PC12 cells and that it triggers expression of mitochondrial-related genes, we investigated whether NeuroD6 could modulate the mitochondrial biomass using our PC12-ND6 cellular paradigm. Using a combination of flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and mitochondrial fractionation, we demonstrate that NeuroD6 stimulates maximal mitochondrial mass at the lamellipodia stage, thus preceding axonal growth. NeuroD6 triggers remodelling of the actin and microtubule networks in conjunction with increased expression of the motor protein KIF5B, thus promoting mitochondrial movement in developing neurites with accumulation in growth cones. Maintenance of the NeuroD6-induced mitochondrial mass requires an intact cytoskeletal network, as its disruption severely reduces mitochondrial mass. The present study provides the first evidence that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in co-ordinating increase in mitochondrial mass with cytoskeletal remodelling, suggestive of a role of this transcription factor as a co-regulator of neuronal differentiation and energy metabolism.

  9. DNA methylation of germ-cell-specific basic helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factors, Sohlh2 and Figlα during gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bo; Chao, Huhe; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Lianjun; Li, Lan; Sun, Xiaofeng; Shen, Wei

    2011-09-01

    Regulation of germ-cell-specific transcription is essential for the differentiation and other physiological processes of germ cells. Germ-cell-specific transcription factors, Sohlh2 and Figla, play key roles in gametogenesis. To elucidate whether an epigenetic mechanism is involved in the controlled expression of Sohlh2 and Figlα, we examined the dynamics of DNA methylation at two gene loci. Results showed changes in methylation patterns in the promoter regions of both genes during the period of germ cell differentiation, while the methylation patterns in first exons and first introns (near the transcription initiation sites) remained constant. The methylation reprogramming at the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) locus in the Figlα promoters (P1: -812 to -568 bp and P2: -692 to -438 bp) and in the Sohlh2 promoter (sohlh2-P: -202 to 173 bp) was found to correlate with the expression of Figlα and Sohlh2 transcripts, respectively. Data therefore suggested that a dynamic DNA CpG methylation in the Sohlh2 and Figlα promoters, but not in the intron and exon sequences, is linked to the regulation of gene expressions, even though CpG islands are also present in their introns or exons. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved.

  10. Associations of the Intellectual Disability Gene MYT1L with Helix-Loop-Helix Gene Expression, Hippocampus Volume and Hippocampus Activation During Memory Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Kepa, Agnes; Medina, Lourdes Martinez; Erk, Susanne; Srivastava, Deepak P.; Fernandes, Alinda; Toro, Roberto; Lévi, Sabine; Ruggeri, Barbara; Fernandes, Cathy; Degenhardt, Franziska; Witt, Stephanie H.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Poncer, Jean-Christophe; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Martinot, Marie-Laure Paillère

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental role of the brain-specific myelin transcription factor 1-like (MYT1L) gene in cases of intellectual disability and in the aetiology of neurodevelopmental disorders is increasingly recognised. Yet, its function remains under-investigated. Here, we identify a network of helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcriptional regulators controlled by MYT1L, as indicated by our analyses in human neural stem cells and in the human brain. Using cell-based knockdown approaches and microarray analyses...

  11. The window period of NEUROGENIN3 during human gestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Salisbury (Rachel J.); J. Blaylock (Jennifer); A.A. Berry (Andrew A.); R.E. Jennings (Rachel E.); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); K.P. Hanley (Karen Piper); N.A. Hanley (Neil A)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, NEUROG3, is critical in causing endocrine commitment from a progenitor cell population in the developing pancreas. In human, NEUROG3 has been detected from 8 weeks postconception (wpc). However, the profile of its production and when it

  12. A Radish Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor, RsTT8 Acts a Positive Regulator for Anthocyanin Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hyung Lim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW complex activates anthocyanin biosynthesis through the transcriptional regulation. RsMYB1 has been identified as a key player in anthocyanin biosynthesis in red radish (Raphanus sativus L., but its partner bHLH transcription factor (TF remains to be determined. In this study, we isolated a bHLH TF gene from red radish. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that this gene belongs to the TT8 clade of the IIIF subgroup of bHLH TFs, and we thus designated this gene RsTT8. Subcellular localization analysis showed that RsTT8-sGFP was localized to the nuclei of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts harboring the RsTT8-sGFP construct. We evaluated anthocyanin biosynthesis and RsTT8 expression levels in three radish varieties (N, C, and D that display different red phenotypes in the leaves, root flesh, and root skins. The root flesh of the C variety and the leaves and skins of the D variety exhibit intense red pigmentation; in these tissues, RsTT8 expression showed totally positive association with the expression of RsMYB1 TF and of five of eight tested anthocyanin biosynthesis genes (i.e., RsCHS, RsCHI, RsF3H, RsDFR, and RsANS. Heterologous co-expression of both RsTT8 and RsMYB1 in tobacco leaves dramatically increased the expression of endogenous anthocyanin biosynthesis genes and anthocyanin accumulation. Furthermore, a yeast two-hybrid assay showed that RsTT8 interacts with RsMYB1 at the MYB-interacting region (MIR, and a transient transactivation assay indicated that RsTT8 activates the RsCHS and RsDFR promoters when co-expressed with RsMYB1. Complementation of the Arabidopsis tt8-1 mutant, which lacks red pigmentation in the leaves and seeds, with RsTT8 restored red pigmentation, and resulted in high anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin contents in the leaves and seeds, respectively. Together, these results show that RsTT8 functions as a regulatory partner with RsMYB1 during anthocyanin biosynthesis.

  13. Reovirus FAST Proteins Drive Pore Formation and Syncytiogenesis Using a Novel Helix-Loop-Helix Fusion-Inducing Lipid Packing Sensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolene Read

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pore formation is the most energy-demanding step during virus-induced membrane fusion, where high curvature of the fusion pore rim increases the spacing between lipid headgroups, exposing the hydrophobic interior of the membrane to water. How protein fusogens breach this thermodynamic barrier to pore formation is unclear. We identified a novel fusion-inducing lipid packing sensor (FLiPS in the cytosolic endodomain of the baboon reovirus p15 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST protein that is essential for pore formation during cell-cell fusion and syncytiogenesis. NMR spectroscopy and mutational studies indicate the dependence of this FLiPS on a hydrophobic helix-loop-helix structure. Biochemical and biophysical assays reveal the p15 FLiPS preferentially partitions into membranes with high positive curvature, and this partitioning is impeded by bis-ANS, a small molecule that inserts into hydrophobic defects in membranes. Most notably, the p15 FLiPS can be functionally replaced by heterologous amphipathic lipid packing sensors (ALPS but not by other membrane-interactive amphipathic helices. Furthermore, a previously unrecognized amphipathic helix in the cytosolic domain of the reptilian reovirus p14 FAST protein can functionally replace the p15 FLiPS, and is itself replaceable by a heterologous ALPS motif. Anchored near the cytoplasmic leaflet by the FAST protein transmembrane domain, the FLiPS is perfectly positioned to insert into hydrophobic defects that begin to appear in the highly curved rim of nascent fusion pores, thereby lowering the energy barrier to stable pore formation.

  14. Conservation of Three-Dimensional Helix-Loop-Helix Structure through the Vertebrate Lineage Reopens the Cold Case of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Associated Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Sirkin, Daniela I.; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle; Kamech, Nédia; Somoza, Gustavo M.; Vissio, Paula G.; Dufour, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    GnRH-associated peptide (GAP) is the C-terminal portion of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) preprohormone. Although it was reported in mammals that GAP may act as a prolactin-inhibiting factor and can be co-secreted with GnRH into the hypophyseal portal blood, GAP has been practically out of the research circuit for about 20 years. Comparative studies highlighted the low conservation of GAP primary amino acid sequences among vertebrates, contributing to consider that this peptide only participates in the folding or carrying process of GnRH. Considering that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of a protein may define its function, the aim of this study was to evaluate if GAP sequences and 3D structures are conserved in the vertebrate lineage. GAP sequences from various vertebrates were retrieved from databases. Analysis of primary amino acid sequence identity and similarity, molecular phylogeny, and prediction of 3D structures were performed. Amino acid sequence comparison and phylogeny analyses confirmed the large variation of GAP sequences throughout vertebrate radiation. In contrast, prediction of the 3D structure revealed a striking conservation of the 3D structure of GAP1 (GAP associated with the hypophysiotropic type 1 GnRH), despite low amino acid sequence conservation. This GAP1 peptide presented a typical helix-loop-helix (HLH) structure in all the vertebrate species analyzed. This HLH structure could also be predicted for GAP2 in some but not all vertebrate species and in none of the GAP3 analyzed. These results allowed us to infer that selective pressures have maintained GAP1 HLH structure throughout the vertebrate lineage. The conservation of the HLH motif, known to confer biological activity to various proteins, suggests that GAP1 peptides may exert some hypophysiotropic biological functions across vertebrate radiation. PMID:28878737

  15. ID helix-loop-helix proteins as determinants of cell survival in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Sarah; Ademokun, Jolaolu A; Norton, John D

    2015-02-03

    Members of the inhibitor of DNA-binding (ID) family of helix-loop-helix proteins have been causally implicated in the pathogenesis of several types of B-cell lineage malignancy, either on the basis of mutation or by altered expression. B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of disorders and is the commonest leukaemia type in the Western world. In this study, we have investigated the pathobiological functions of the ID2 and ID3 proteins in this disease with an emphasis on their role in regulating leukemic cell death/survival. Bioinformatics analysis of microarray gene expression data was used to investigate expression of ID2/ID3 in leukemic versus normal B cells, their association with clinical course of disease and molecular sub-type and to reconstruct a gene regulatory network using the 'maximum information coefficient' (MIC) for target gene inference. In vitro cultured primary leukemia cells, either in isolation or co-cultured with accessory vascular endothelial cells, were used to investigate ID2/ID3 protein expression by western blotting and to assess the cytotoxic response of different drugs (fludarabine, chlorambucil, ethacrynic acid) by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. ID2/ID3 protein levels in primary leukemia cells and in MEC1 cells were manipulated by transduction with siRNA reagents. Datamining showed that the expression profiles of ID2 and ID3 are associated with distinct pathobiological features of disease and implicated both genes in regulating cell death/survival by targeting multiple non-overlapping sets of apoptosis effecter genes. Consistent with microarray data, the overall pattern of ID2/ID3 protein expression in relation to cell death/survival responses of primary leukemia cells was suggestive of a pro-survival function for both ID proteins. This was confirmed by siRNA knock-down experiments in MEC1 cells and in primary leukemia cells, but with variability in the dependence of

  16. Basic helix-loop-helix proteins E2A and HEB induce immature T-cell receptor rearrangements in nonlymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. Langerak (Anton); I.L. Wolvers-Tettero; E.J. van Gastel-Mol (Ellen); M.E. Oud; J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractT-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements are mediated via V(D)J recombination, which is strictly regulated during lymphoid differentiation, most probably through the action of specific transcription factors. Investigated was whether cotransfection of RAG1 and

  17. Functional characterization of a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor GhDEL65 from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Xiao-Xia; Yang, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Xiu-Fang; Wang, Ling-Jian

    2016-10-01

    Cotton fiber is proposed to share some similarity with the Arabidopsis thaliana leaf trichome, which is regulated by the MYB-bHLH-WD40 transcription complex. Although several MYB transcription factors and WD40 family proteins in cotton have been characterized, little is known about the role of bHLH family proteins in cotton. Here, we report that GhDEL65, a bHLH protein from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), is a functional homologue of Arabidopsis GLABRA3 (GL3) and ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 (EGL3) in regulating trichome development. Transcripts of GhDEL65 were detected in 0 ∼ 1 days post-anthesis (DPA) ovules and abundant in 3-DPA fibers, implying that GhDEL65 may act in early fiber development. Ectopic expression of GhDEL65 in Arabidopsis gl3 egl3 double mutant partly rescued the trichome development, and constitutive expression of GhDEL65 in wild-type plants led to increased trichome density on rosette leaves and stems, mainly by activating the transcription of two key positive regulators of trichome development, GLABRA1 (GL1) and GLABRA2 (GL2), and suppressed the expression of a R3 single-repeat MYB factor TRIPTYCHON (TRY). GhDEL65 could interact with cotton R2R3 MYB transcription factors GhMYB2 and GhMYB3, as well as the WD40 protein GhTTG3, suggesting that the MYB-bHLH-WD40 protein complex also exists in cotton fiber cell, though its function in cotton fiber development awaits further investigation. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  18. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wei-Hsuan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C. The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6

  19. PH4 of petunia is an R2R3-MYB protein that activates vacuolar acidification through interactions with Basic-Helix-Loop transcription factors of the anthocyanin pathway.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quattrocchio, F.M.; Verweij, C.W.; Kroon, A.R.; Spelt, C.E.; Mol, J.N.M.; Koes, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    The Petunia hybrids genes ANTHOCYANIN1 (AN1) and AN2 encode transcription factors with a basic-helix-loop-helix (BHLH) and a MYB domain, respectively, that are required for anthocyanin synthesis and acidification of the vacuole in petal cells. Mutation of PH4 results in a bluer flower color,

  20. Induction of human neuronal cells by defined transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhiping P.; Yang, Nan; Vierbuchen, Thomas; Ostermeier, Austin; Fuentes, Daniel R.; Yang, Troy Q.; Citri, Ami; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Marro, Samuele; Südhof, Thomas C.; Wernig, Marius

    2011-01-01

    Summary Somatic cell nuclear transfer, cell fusion, or expression of lineage-specific factors have been shown to induce cell-fate changes in diverse somatic cell types1–12. We recently observed that forced expression of a combination of three transcription factors, Brn2 (also known as Pou3f2), Ascl1, and Myt1l can efficiently convert mouse fibroblasts into functional induced neuronal (iN) cells13. Here, we show that the same three factors can generate functional neurons from human pluripotent stem cells as early as 6 days after transgene activation. When combined with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1, these factors could also convert fetal and postnatal human fibroblasts into iN cells displaying typical neuronal morphologies and expressing multiple neuronal markers, even after downregulation of the exogenous transcription factors. Importantly, the vast majority of human iN cells were able to generate action potentials and many matured to receive synaptic contacts when co-cultured with primary mouse cortical neurons. Our data demonstrate that non-neural human somatic cells, as well as pluripotent stem cells, can be directly converted into neurons by lineage-determining transcription factors. These methods may facilitate robust generation of patient-specific human neurons for in vitro disease modeling or future applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:21617644

  1. TWIST is Expressed in Human Gliomas, Promotes Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Elias

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available TWIST is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor that regulates mesodermal development, promotes tumor cell metastasis, and, in response to cytotoxic stress, enhances cell survival. Our screen for bHLH gene expression in rat C6 glioma revealed TWIST. To delineate a possible oncogenic role for TWIST in the human central nervous system (CNS, we analyzed TWIST message, protein expression in gliomas, normal brain. TWIST was detected in the large majority of human glioma-derived cell lines, human gliomas examined. Increased TWIST mRNA levels were associated with the highest grade gliomas, increased TWIST expression accompanied transition from low grade to high grade in vivo, suggesting a role for TWIST in promoting malignant progression. In accord, elevated TWIST mRNA abundance preceded the spontaneous malignant transformation of cultured mouse astrocytes hemizygous for p53. Overexpression of TWIST protein in a human glioma cell line significantly enhanced tumor cell invasion, a hallmark of high-grade gliomas. These findings support roles for TWIST both in early glial tumorigenesis, subsequent malignant progression. TWIST was also expressed in embryonic, fetal human brain, in neurons, but not glia, of mature brain, indicating that, in gliomas, TWIST may promote the functions also critical for CNS development or normal neuronal physiology.

  2. AcEST: DK950560 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A0|UVRC_SYNWW UvrABC system protein C OS=Syntrophomonas w... 36 0.28 sp|Q9NX45|SOLH2_HUMAN Spermatogenesis- and oogenesis...HUMAN Spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific basic helix-loop-helix-containing protein 2 OS=Homo sapiens GN

  3. FHL2 interacts with and acts as a functional repressor of Id2 in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weidong; Wu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yali; Meng, Yuanguang; Si, Yiling; Yang, Jie; Fu, Xiaobing; Yu, Li

    2009-07-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation 2 (Id2) is a natural inhibitor of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. Although Id2 is well known to prevent differentiation and promote cell-cycle progression and tumorigenesis, the molecular events that regulate Id2 activity remain to be investigated. Here, we identified that Four-and-a-half LIM-only protein 2 (FHL2) is a novel functional repressor of Id2. Moreover, we demonstrated that FHL2 can directly interact with all members of the Id family (Id1-4) via an N-terminal loop-helix structure conserved in Id proteins. FHL2 antagonizes the inhibitory effect of Id proteins on basic helix-loop-helix protein E47-mediated transcription, which was abrogated by the deletion mutation of Ids that disrupted their interaction with FHL2. We also showed a competitive nature between FHL2 and E47 for binding Id2, whereby FHL2 prevents the formation of the Id2-E47 heterodimer, thus releasing E47 to DNA and restoring its transcriptional activity. FHL2 expression was remarkably up-regulated during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells, during which the expression of Id2 was opposite to that. Ectopic FHL2 expression in neuroblastoma cells markedly reduces the transcriptional and cell-cycle promoting functions of Id2. Altogether, these results indicate that FHL2 is an important repressor of the oncogenic activity of Id2 in neuroblastoma cells.

  4. SREBP coordinates iron and ergosterol homeostasis to mediate triazole drug and hypoxia responses in the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Blatzer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs are a class of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that regulate diverse cellular responses in eukaryotes. Adding to the recognized importance of SREBPs in human health, SREBPs in the human fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus are required for fungal virulence and susceptibility to triazole antifungal drugs. To date, the exact mechanism(s behind the role of SREBP in these observed phenotypes is not clear. Here, we report that A. fumigatus SREBP, SrbA, mediates regulation of iron acquisition in response to hypoxia and low iron conditions. To further define SrbA's role in iron acquisition in relation to previously studied fungal regulators of iron metabolism, SreA and HapX, a series of mutants were generated in the ΔsrbA background. These data suggest that SrbA is activated independently of SreA and HapX in response to iron limitation, but that HapX mRNA induction is partially dependent on SrbA. Intriguingly, exogenous addition of high iron or genetic deletion of sreA in the ΔsrbA background was able to partially rescue the hypoxia growth, triazole drug susceptibility, and decrease in ergosterol content phenotypes of ΔsrbA. Thus, we conclude that the fungal SREBP, SrbA, is critical for coordinating genes involved in iron acquisition and ergosterol biosynthesis under hypoxia and low iron conditions found at sites of human fungal infections. These results support a role for SREBP-mediated iron regulation in fungal virulence, and they lay a foundation for further exploration of SREBP's role in iron homeostasis in other eukaryotes.

  5. Stable expression of neurogenin 1 induces LGR5, a novel stem cell marker, in an immortalized human neural stem cell line HB1.F3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Jun-ichi; Obayashi, Shinya; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Wakana, Taeko; Kim, Seung U

    2010-04-01

    Neural stem cells (NSC) with self-renewal and multipotent properties serve as an ideal cell source for transplantation to treat spinal cord injury, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases. To efficiently induce neuronal lineage cells from NSC for neuron replacement therapy, we should clarify the intrinsic genetic programs involved in a time- and place-specific regulation of human NSC differentiation. Recently, we established an immortalized human NSC clone HB1.F3 to provide an unlimited NSC source applicable to genetic manipulation for cell-based therapy. To investigate a role of neurogenin 1 (Ngn1), a proneural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, in human NSC differentiation, we established a clone derived from F3 stably overexpressing Ngn1. Genome-wide gene expression profiling identified 250 upregulated genes and 338 downregulated genes in Ngn1-overexpressing F3 cells (F3-Ngn1) versus wild-type F3 cells (F3-WT). Notably, leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), a novel stem cell marker, showed an 167-fold increase in F3-Ngn1, although transient overexpression of Ngn1 did not induce upregulation of LGR5, suggesting that LGR5 is not a direct transcriptional target of Ngn1. KeyMolnet, a bioinformatics tool for analyzing molecular relations on a comprehensive knowledgebase, suggests that the molecular network of differentially expressed genes involves the complex interaction of networks regulated by multiple transcription factors. Gene ontology (GO) terms of development and morphogenesis are enriched in upregulated genes, while those of extracellular matrix and adhesion are enriched in downregulated genes. These results suggest that stable expression of a single gene Ngn1 in F3 cells induces not simply neurogenic but multifunctional changes that potentially affect the differentiation of human NSC via a reorganization of complex gene regulatory networks.

  6. Smad mediated regulation of inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and its role in phenotypic maintenance of human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangalakumar Veerasamy

    Full Text Available The basic-Helix-Loop-Helix family (bHLH of transcriptional factors plays a major role in regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation and phenotype maintenance. The downregulation of one of the members of bHLH family protein, inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2 has been shown to induce de-differentiation of epithelial cells. Opposing regulators of epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype in renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTEC, TGFβ1 and BMP7 also have counter-regulatory effects in models of renal fibrosis. We investigated the regulation of Id2 by these growth factors in human PTECs and its implication in the expression of markers of epithelial versus myofibroblastic phenotype. Cellular Id2 levels were reduced by TGFβ1 treatment; this was prevented by co-incubation with BMP7. BMP7 alone increased cellular levels of Id2. TGFβ1 and BMP7 regulated Id2 through Smad2/3 and Smad1/5 dependent mechanisms respectively. TGFβ1 mediated Id2 suppression was essential for α-SMA induction in PTECs. Although Id2 over-expression prevented α-SMA induction, it did not prevent E-cadherin loss under the influence of TGFβ1. This suggests that the loss of gate keeper function of E-cadherin alone may not necessarily result in complete EMT and further transcriptional re-programming is essential to attain mesenchymal phenotype. Although BMP7 abolished TGFβ1 mediated α-SMA expression by restoring Id2 levels, the loss of Id2 was not sufficient to induce α-SMA expression even in the context of reduced E-cadherin expression. Hence, a reduction in Id2 is critical for TGFβ1-induced α-SMA expression in this model of human PTECs but is not sufficient in it self to induce α-SMA even in the context of reduced E-cadherin.

  7. Gclust Server: 103130 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(133) 226 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein 1 1.00e-99...Sequences(133) Sequence length 226 Representative annotation basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein Number of

  8. Gclust Server: 9390 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(202) 379 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein 11 1.00e-28...Sequences(202) Sequence length 379 Representative annotation basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein Number of

  9. Gclust Server: 11756 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 38 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(26) 190 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein 9 1.00e-25...Sequences(26) Sequence length 190 Representative annotation basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein Number of

  10. Gclust Server: 14251 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(235) 327 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein 7 1.00e-60...Sequences(235) Sequence length 327 Representative annotation basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein Number of

  11. Gclust Server: 104874 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(115) 263 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein 1 1.00e-99...Sequences(115) Sequence length 263 Representative annotation basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein Number of

  12. Gclust Server: 16336 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(225) 456 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein 6 1.00e-50...Sequences(225) Sequence length 456 Representative annotation basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein Number of

  13. Gclust Server: 14885 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 08 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(29) 242 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein 7 1.00e-35...Sequences(29) Sequence length 242 Representative annotation basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein Number of

  14. Gclust Server: 44645 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 74 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(35) 320 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein 2 9.98e-01...Sequences(35) Sequence length 320 Representative annotation basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein Number of

  15. Gclust Server: 124869 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SCE_YOR032C=HMS1 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(12) 434 Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein with similarity...Sequences(12) Sequence length 434 Representative annotation Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein with similarity

  16. Gclust Server: 20019 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 07 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(31) 240 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein 5 1.00e-45...Sequences(31) Sequence length 240 Representative annotation basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein Number of

  17. Gclust Server: 16589 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(113) 371 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein 6 1.00e-50...Sequences(113) Sequence length 371 Representative annotation basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family protein Number of

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MEUG-01-1823 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MEUG-01-1823 ref|XP_002577979.1| basic helix-loop-helix protein [Schistosoma m...ansoni] emb|CAZ34217.1| basic helix-loop-helix protein, putative [Schistosoma mansoni] XP_002577979.1 0.43 33% ...

  19. HES1, a target of Notch signaling, is elevated in canine osteosarcoma, but reduced in the most aggressive tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Dailey, Deanna D; Anfinsen, Kristin P.; Pfaff, Liza E; Ehrhart, EJ; Charles, J Brad; B?nsdorff, Tina B.; Thamm, Douglas H; Powers, Barbara E; Thora J Jonasdottir; Duval, Dawn L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hairy and enhancer of split 1 (HES1), a basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor, is a downstream target of Notch signaling. Notch signaling and HES1 expression have been linked to growth and survival in a variety of human cancer types and have been associated with increased metastasis and invasiveness in human osteosarcoma cell lines. Osteosarcoma (OSA) is an aggressive cancer demonstrating both high metastatic rate and chemotherapeutic resistance. The current study examin...

  20. Human Memory: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  1. Identifying Novel Helix-Loop-Helix Genes in "Caenorhabditis elegans" through a Classroom Demonstration of Functional Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Vernetta; McMiller, Tracee; Jones, Erika; Johnson, Casonya M.

    2003-01-01

    A 14-week, undergraduate-level Genetics and Population Biology course at Morgan State University was modified to include a demonstration of functional genomics in the research laboratory. Students performed a rudimentary sequence analysis of the "Caenorhabditis elegans" genome and further characterized three sequences that were predicted to encode…

  2. Npas4, a novel helix-loop-helix PAS domain protein, is regulated in response to cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamloo, Mehrdad; Soriano, Liza; von Schack, David

    2006-01-01

    expression characterized with in situ hybridization and Northern blotting. The Npas4 mRNA is specifically expressed in the brain and is highly up-regulated in ischemic tissues following both focal and global cerebral ischemic insults. Immunohistochemistry revealed a strong expression in the limbic system...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK060505 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060505 001-018-H11 (Q9FE22) Long hypocotyl in far-red 1 (bHLH-like protein HFR1) (Reduced... phytochrome signaling) (Basic helix-loop-helix FBI1 protein) (Basic helix-loop-helix protein 26) (bHLH26) (AtbHLH026) (Reduced sensitivity to far-red light) HFR1_ARATH 2e-11 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK105637 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105637 001-200-E02 (Q9FE22) Long hypocotyl in far-red 1 (bHLH-like protein HFR1) (Reduced... phytochrome signaling) (Basic helix-loop-helix FBI1 protein) (Basic helix-loop-helix protein 26) (bHLH26) (AtbHLH026) (Reduced sensitivity to far-red light) HFR1_ARATH 4e-13 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK102252 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102252 J033088H11 (Q9FE22) Long hypocotyl in far-red 1 (bHLH-like protein HFR1) (Reduced... phytochrome signaling) (Basic helix-loop-helix FBI1 protein) (Basic helix-loop-helix protein 26) (bHLH26) (AtbHLH026) (Reduced sensitivity to far-red light) HFR1_ARATH 8e-12 ...

  6. Basic Genetics: A Human Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, Colorado Springs, CO. Center for Education in Human and Medical Genetics.

    This document (which has the form of a magazine) provides a variety of articles, stories, editorials, letters, interviews, and other types of magazine features (such as book reviews) which focus on human genetics. In addition to providing information about the principles of genetics, nearly all of the sections in the "magazine" address moral,…

  7. SREBP-1 dimerization specificity maps to both the helix-loop-helix and leucine zipper domains: use of a dominant negative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishi, Vikas; Gal, Jozsef; Krylov, Dmitry

    2004-01-01

    that the B-SREBP-1.A-SREBP-1 heterodimer is -9.8 kcal mol(-1) dimer(-1) more stable than the B-SREBP-1 homodimer. EMSA assays demonstrate that A-SREBP-1 can inhibit the DNA binding of either B-SREBP-1 or B-SREBP-2 in an equimolar competition but does not inhibit the DNA binding of the three B...

  8. Marked induction of the helix-loop-helix protein Id3 promotes the gammadelta T cell fate and renders their functional maturation Notch independent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Wong, Gladys W; Lee, Sang-Yun

    2009-01-01

    alphabeta and gammadelta T cells arise from a common thymocyte progenitor during development in the thymus. Emerging evidence suggests that the pre-T cell receptor (pre-TCR) and gammadelta T cell receptor (gammadeltaTCR) play instructional roles in specifying the alphabeta and gammadelta T...... IFNgamma-producing effectors. Taken together, these findings identify Id3 as a central player that controls both adoption of the gammadelta fate and its maturation in the thymus....

  9. Analysis of mRNA recognition by human thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunn, Nicholas D; Dibrov, Sergey M; Kao, Melody B; Ghassemian, Majid; Hermann, Thomas

    2014-12-23

    Expression of hTS (human thymidylate synthase), a key enzyme in thymidine biosynthesis, is regulated on the translational level through a feedback mechanism that is rarely found in eukaryotes. At low substrate concentrations, the ligand-free enzyme binds to its own mRNA and stabilizes a hairpin structure that sequesters the start codon. When in complex with dUMP (2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate) and a THF (tetrahydrofolate) cofactor, the enzyme adopts a conformation that is unable to bind and repress expression of mRNA. Here, we have used a combination of X-ray crystallography, RNA mutagenesis and site-specific cross-linking studies to investigate the molecular recognition of TS mRNA by the hTS enzyme. The interacting mRNA region was narrowed to the start codon and immediately flanking sequences. In the hTS enzyme, a helix-loop-helix domain on the protein surface was identified as the putative RNA-binding site.

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα agonists differentially regulate inhibitor of DNA binding expression in rodents and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, María Del Carmen; Corton, J Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Alvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans.

  11. Zn-binding AZUL domain of human ubiquitin protein ligase Ube3A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemak, Alexander; Yee, Adelinda [University of Toronto, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Ontario Cancer Institute, Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada); Bezsonova, Irina, E-mail: bezsonova@uchc.edu [University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Molecular Microbial and Structural Biology (United States); Dhe-Paganon, Sirano, E-mail: sirano.dhepaganon@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H., E-mail: carrow@uhnresearch.ca [University of Toronto, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Ontario Cancer Institute, Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Ube3A (also referred to as E6AP for E6 Associated Protein) is a E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase implicated in the development of Angelman syndrome by controlling degradation of synaptic protein Arc and oncogenic papilloma virus infection by controlling degradation of p53. This article describe the solution NMR structure of the conserved N-terminal domain of human Ube3A (residues 24-87) that contains two residues (Cys44 and Arg62) found to be mutated in patients with Angelman syndrome. The structure of this domain adopts a novel Zn-binding fold we called AZUL (Amino-terminal Zn-finger of Ube3a Ligase). The AZUL domain has a helix-loop-helix architecture with a Zn ion coordinated by four Cys residues arranged in Cys-X{sub 4}-Cys-X{sub 4}-Cys-X{sub 28}-Cys motif. Three of the Zn-bound residues are located in a 23-residue long and well structured loop that connects two {alpha}-helicies.

  12. Soluble Delta-like ligand 1 alters human endometrial epithelial cell adhesive capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sinderen, Michelle; Oyanedel, Jennifer; Menkhorst, Ellen; Cuman, Carly; Rainczuk, Katarzyna; Winship, Amy; Salamonsen, Lois; Edgell, Tracey; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2017-04-01

    The endometrium undergoes substantial morphological and functional changes to become receptive to embryo implantation and to enable establishment of a successful pregnancy. Reduced Delta-like ligand 1 (DLL1, Notch ligand) in the endometrium is associated with infertility. DLL1 can be cleaved by 'a disintegrin and metalloprotease' (ADAM) proteases to produce a soluble ligand that may act to inhibit Notch signalling. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantify soluble DLL1 in uterine lavages from fertile and infertile women in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle. We also determined the cellular location and immunostaining intensity of ADAM12 and 17 in human endometrium throughout the cycle. Functional effects of soluble DLL1 in receptivity were analysed using in vitro adhesion and proliferation assays and gene expression analysis of Notch signalling targets. Soluble DLL1 was significantly increased in uterine lavage samples of infertile women compared with fertile women in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle. This coincided with significantly increased ADAM17 immunostaining detected in the endometrial luminal epithelium in the mid-secretory phase in infertile women. Soluble DLL1 significantly inhibited the adhesive capacity of endometrial epithelial cells via downregulation of helix-loop-helix and hairy/enhancer of split family member HES1 mRNA. Thus, soluble DLL1 may serve as a suitable target or potential biomarker for receptivity.

  13. Basics of teaching Latin at Humanities University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bragova Arina Mikhailovna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the goals, tasks, methods, and results of teaching Latin at Humanities University. The article points out that the basis of teaching is analytical reading with elements of discursive analysis. In Humanities University teaching is being provided through the interdisciplinary approach. The educational process includes interactive exercises, the use various forms of control, for example, lingual-didactic testing in a virtual learning environment. The results of current and final control are formed with the help of the point-rating system of assessing knowledge.

  14. An Assault on Poverty: Basic Human Needs, Science, and Technology

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Does science and technology (S&T) truly have a part to play in meeting basic human needs? Can S&T help the world's communities secure adequate nutrition, health care, water, sanitary facilities, and access to education and information?

  15. Human pain and genetics: some basics

    OpenAIRE

    James, Sabu

    2013-01-01

    Human pain causes untold misery and suffering, with major impact on functioning and resources. Recent advances in genetics have revealed that subtle changes in DNA could partly explain the variation in individual differences in pain. Various genes encoding for receptors are now known to play a major role in the sensitivity, perception and expression of pain. The fields of epigenetics and proteomics hold promises in the way pain could be treated and managed in future.

  16. Basic results for assessment of human ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Torres, A

    1991-01-01

    The study of collagen metabolism during the total life span of mammals has contributed greatly to the understanding of the human ageing process. Particularly relevant is the demonstration that these tissue dynamics of collagen in the whole organism is clearly age-dependent, but progresses non-synchronously in different organs. Thus, supply and degradation are tightly linked processes in all tissues, as in the case of other proteins, but the catabolic process regulates the turnover of already deposited collagen in adaptation to local needs. In the whole body there is a similar age-dependent interaction regarding the part of the organism whose activity is directly related with regulating functions mainly supporting the parenchyma, the other part of the organism to work as well as possible. It can be deduced that this regulation attains great importance in ageing because the capacity to survive is dependent on it. At the same time as we expose this dynamical conception of ageing we point out some ageing parameters from experimental gerontology capable of being applied in such a manner as to objectify human ageing manifestations. Furthermore, we propose a way to quantify total ageing on the basis of this interaction, as in a two-compartment system leading to one result which would mean vitality. We discuss related questions, mainly regarding the reference population as control and a good parameter selection which should represent total ageing manifestations in the human body.

  17. A BAC transgenic Hes1-EGFP reporter reveals novel expression domains in mouse embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinck, Rasmus; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Expression of the basic helix-loop-helix factor Hairy and Enhancer of Split-1 (Hes1) is required for normal development of a number of tissues during embryonic development. Depending on context, Hes1 may act as a Notch signalling effector which promotes the undifferentiated and proliferative stat...

  18. Translational control of TWIST1 expression in MCF-10A cell lines recapitulating breast cancer progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nairismägi, Maarja-Liisa; Vislovukh, Andrii; Meng, Q

    2012-01-01

    TWIST1 is a highly conserved basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that promotes epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Its misregulation has been observed in various types of tumors. Using the MCF-10A-series of cell lines that recapitulate the early stages of breast cancer formation...

  19. Myocardin is a bifunctional switch for smooth versus skeletal muscle differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, Xiaochun; Creemers, Esther E.; Wang, Da-Zhi; Olson, Eric N.; Miano, Joseph M.

    2007-01-01

    Skeletal and smooth muscle can mutually transdifferentiate, but little molecular insight exists as to how each muscle program may be subverted to the other. The myogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors MyoD and myogenin (Myog) direct the development of skeletal muscle and are thought to

  20. Control of lysosomal biogenesis and Notch-dependent tissue patterning by components of the TFEB-V-ATPase axis in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tognon, Emiliana; Kobia, Francis; Busi, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, TFEB (transcription factor EB) and MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates both lysosomal function and organ development. However, it is not clear whether these 2 processes are interconnected. Here...

  1. A new role for E12/E47 in the repression of E-cadherin expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Moreno, M A; Locascio, A; Rodrigo, I

    2001-01-01

    Down-regulation of E-cadherin expression is a determinant of tumor cell invasiveness, an event frequently associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Here we show that the mouse E12/E47 basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (the E2A gene product) acts as a repressor of E-cadherin ex...

  2. Analysis of bHLH and MYB-domain proteins: species-specific regulatory differences caused by divergent evolution of target anthocyanin genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quattrocchio, F.M.; Wing, J.F.; van der Woude, J.F.; Mol, J.N.M.; Koes, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    The regulatory anthocyanin loci, an1, an2, an4 and an11 of Petunia hybrida, and r and c1 from Zea mays, control transcription of different sets of target genes. Both an2 and c1 encode a MYB-type protein. This study reports the isolation of a P. hybrida gene, jaf13, encoding a basic helix-loop-helix

  3. Functionally Similar WRKY Proteins Regulate Vacuolar Acidification in Petunia and Hair Development in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, W.; Spelt, C.E.; Bliek, M.; de Vries, M.; Wit, N.; Faraco, M.; Koes, R.; Quattrocchio, F.

    2016-01-01

    The WD40 proteins ANTHOCYANIN11 (AN11) from petunia (Petunia hybrida) and TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1) fromArabidopsis thalianaand associated basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) and MYB transcription factors activate a variety of differentiation processes. In petunia petals, AN11 and the bHLH protein

  4. Interpretation of basic concepts in theories of human motor abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Adam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic aim of this research is to point to the possible language, logical and knowledge problems in interpretation and understanding of basic concepts in theories of motor abilities (TMA. Such manner of review is not directed only to 'mere understanding', it can lead to a new growth of scientific knowledge. Accordingly, the research question is set, i.e. the research issue: Is there a language, logical and knowledge agreement between basic concepts in the theories of human motor abilities? The answer to the set question direct that a more complete agreement between the basic concepts in the theories of human motor abilities should be searched in a scientific dialog between researchers of various beliefs.

  5. Knowing, Loving, and Willing: Basic Capacities for Developing Human Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarken, Rodney, H.

    Knowing, loving, and willing are identified as the basic capacities for developing human potential. These three faculties are briefly defined and several dynamic models to describe their inter-relationship and role in developing potential presented. These capacities and models are further explored in relation to the fourteen learner-centered…

  6. Chemoselective PEGylation of cysteine analogs of human basic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To improve the stability and bioactivity of human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF) by site-specific pegylation. Methods: Four new mutants of hbFGF were designed with substituted Asp68, Lys77, Glu78 and Arg81 with cysteine with the aid of bioinformatics technique, and then cloned into pET21a plasmid, ...

  7. High level expression of human basic fibroblast growth factor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-19

    Apr 19, 2010 ... High-level expression of recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor in Escherichia coli presents research opportunities such as analysis ... The general agreement from the published data on heterologous gene ..... for protein expression (Casimiro et al., 1997; Gold et al.,. 1981; Hamdan et al., 2002; ...

  8. Basic Science Research and the Protection of Human Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiseman, Elisa

    2001-03-01

    Technological advances in basic biological research have been instrumental in recent biomedical discoveries, such as in the understanding and treatment of cancer, HIV/AIDS, and heart disease. However, many of these advances also raise several new ethical challenges. For example, genetic research may pose no physical risk beyond that of obtaining the initial blood sample, yet it can pose significant psychological and economic risks to research participants, such as stigmatization, discrimination in insurance and employment, invasion of privacy, or breach of confidentiality. These harms may occur even when investigators do not directly interact with the person whose DNA they are studying. Moreover, this type of basic research also raises broader questions, such as what is the definition of a human subject, and what kinds of expertise do Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) need to review the increasingly diverse types of research made possible by these advances in technology. The National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC), a presidentially appointed federal advisory committee, has addressed these and other ethical, scientific and policy issues that arise in basic science research involving human participants. Two of its six reports, in particular, have proposed recommendations in this regard. "Research Involving Human Biological Materials: Ethical and Policy Guidance" addresses the basic research use of human tissues, cells and DNA and the protection of human participants in this type of research. In "Ethical and Policy Issues in the Oversight of Human Research" NBAC proposes a definition of research involving human participants that would apply to all scientific disciplines, including physical, biological, and social sciences, as well as the humanities and related professions, such as business and law. Both of these reports make it clear that the protection of research participants is key to conducting ethically sound research. By ensuring that all participants in

  9. NPAS1-ARNT and NPAS3-ARNT crystal structures implicate the bHLH-PAS family as multi-ligand binding transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dalei; Su, Xiaoyu; Potluri, Nalini; Kim, Youngchang; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2016-10-26

    The neuronal PAS domain proteins NPAS1 and NPAS3 are members of the basic helix-loop-helix-PER-ARNT-SIM (bHLH-PAS) family, and their genetic deficiencies are linked to a variety of human psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders and bipolar disease. NPAS1 and NPAS3 must each heterodimerize with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), to form functional transcription complexes capable of DNA binding and gene regulation. Here we examined the crystal structures of multi-domain NPAS1-ARNT and NPAS3-ARNT-DNA complexes, discovering each to contain four putative ligand-binding pockets. Through expanded architectural comparisons between these complexes and HIF-1α-ARNT, HIF-2α-ARNT and CLOCK-BMAL1, we show the wider mammalian bHLH-PAS family is capable of multi-ligand-binding and presents as an ideal class of transcription factors for direct targeting by small-molecule drugs.

  10. The N-myc Oncogene: Maximizing its Targets, Regulation, and Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Himisha

    2014-06-01

    N-myc (MYCN), a member of the Myc family of basic-helix-loop-helix-zipper (bHLHZ) transcription factors, is a central regulator of many vital cellular processes. As such, N-myc is well recognized for its classic oncogenic activity and association with human neuroblastoma. Amplification and overexpression of N-myc has been described in other tumor types, particularly those of neural origin and neuroendocrine tumors. This review outlines N-myc's contribution to normal development and oncogenic progression. In addition, it highlights relevant transcriptional targets and mechanisms of regulation. Finally, the clinical implications of N-Myc as a biomarker and potential as a target using novel therapeutic approaches are discussed. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Basic Emotions in Human Neuroscience: Neuroimaging and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeghin, Alessia; Diano, Matteo; Bagnis, Arianna; Viola, Marco; Tamietto, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The existence of so-called ‘basic emotions’ and their defining attributes represents a long lasting and yet unsettled issue in psychology. Recently, neuroimaging evidence, especially related to the advent of neuroimaging meta-analytic methods, has revitalized this debate in the endeavor of systems and human neuroscience. The core theme focuses on the existence of unique neural bases that are specific and characteristic for each instance of basic emotion. Here we review this evidence, outlining contradictory findings, strengths and limits of different approaches. Constructionism dismisses the existence of dedicated neural structures for basic emotions, considering that the assumption of a one-to-one relationship between neural structures and their functions is central to basic emotion theories. While these critiques are useful to pinpoint current limitations of basic emotions theories, we argue that they do not always appear equally generative in fostering new testable accounts on how the brain relates to affective functions. We then consider evidence beyond PET and fMRI, including results concerning the relation between basic emotions and awareness and data from neuropsychology on patients with focal brain damage. Evidence from lesion studies are indeed particularly informative, as they are able to bring correlational evidence typical of neuroimaging studies to causation, thereby characterizing which brain structures are necessary for, rather than simply related to, basic emotion processing. These other studies shed light on attributes often ascribed to basic emotions, such as automaticity of perception, quick onset, and brief duration. Overall, we consider that evidence in favor of the neurobiological underpinnings of basic emotions outweighs dismissive approaches. In fact, the concept of basic emotions can still be fruitful, if updated to current neurobiological knowledge that overcomes traditional one-to-one localization of functions in the brain. In

  12. Basic Emotions in Human Neuroscience: Neuroimaging and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Celeghin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The existence of so-called ‘basic emotions’ and their defining attributes represents a long lasting and yet unsettled issue in psychology. Recently, neuroimaging evidence, especially related to the advent of neuroimaging meta-analytic methods, has revitalized this debate in the endeavor of systems and human neuroscience. The core theme focuses on the existence of unique neural bases that are specific and characteristic for each instance of basic emotion. Here we review this evidence, outlining contradictory findings, strengths and limits of different approaches. Constructionism dismisses the existence of dedicated neural structures for basic emotions, considering that the assumption of a one-to-one relationship between neural structures and their functions is central to basic emotion theories. While these critiques are useful to pinpoint current limitations of basic emotions theories, we argue that they do not always appear equally generative in fostering new testable accounts on how the brain relates to affective functions. We then consider evidence beyond PET and fMRI, including results concerning the relation between basic emotions and awareness and data from neuropsychology on patients with focal brain damage. Evidence from lesion studies are indeed particularly informative, as they are able to bring correlational evidence typical of neuroimaging studies to causation, thereby characterizing which brain structures are necessary for, rather than simply related to, basic emotion processing. These other studies shed light on attributes often ascribed to basic emotions, such as automaticity of perception, quick onset, and brief duration. Overall, we consider that evidence in favor of the neurobiological underpinnings of basic emotions outweighs dismissive approaches. In fact, the concept of basic emotions can still be fruitful, if updated to current neurobiological knowledge that overcomes traditional one-to-one localization of functions in

  13. Characterization of an apple TT2-type R2R3 MYB transcription factor functionally similar to the poplar proanthocyanidin regulator PtMYB134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Andreas; Yoshida, Kazuko; Tran, Lan T; Constabel, C Peter

    2014-09-01

    The apple MdMYB9 gene encodes a positive regulator of proanthocyanidin synthesis that activates anthocyanidin reductase promoters from apple and poplar via interaction with basic helix-loop-helix proteins. The regulation of proanthocyanidins (PAs, condensed tannins) is of great importance in food plants due to the many benefits of PAs in the human diet. Two candidate flavonoid MYB regulators, MdMYB9 and MdMYB11, were cloned from apple (Malus × domestica) based on their similarity to known MYB PA regulators. Transcript accumulation of both MdMYB9 and MdMYB11 was induced by high light and wounding, similar to the poplar (Populus spp) PA regulator PtMYB134. In transient activation assays with various basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) co-regulators, MdMYB9 activated apple and poplar anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) promoters, while MdMYB11 showed no activity. Potential transcription factor binding elements were found within several ANR promoters, and the importance of the bHLH binding site (E-box) on ANR promoter activation was demonstrated via mutational analysis. The ability of MdMYB9 and PtMYB134 to reciprocally activate ANR promoters from both apple and poplar and to partner with heterologous bHLH co-factors from these plants confirms the high degree of conservation of PA regulatory complexes across species. The similarity in apple and poplar PA regulation suggests that regulatory genes from poplar could be effectively employed for metabolic engineering of the PA pathway in apple.

  14. Nursing and justice as a basic human need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the idea that justice is a basic human need akin to those famously depicted in Maslow's hierarchy of human needs and, as such, warrants recognition as a core element in representative ideas about nursing. Early nurse theorists positioned the principles and practice of nursing as having their origins in 'universal human needs'. The principle of deriving nursing care from human needs was thought to provide a guide not only for promoting health, but for preventing disease and illness. The nursing profession has had a longstanding commitment to social justice as a core professional value and ideal, obligating nurses to address the social conditions that undermine people's health. The idea of justice as a universal human need per se and its possible relationship to people's health outcomes has, however, not been considered. One reason for this is that justice in nursing discourse has more commonly been associated with law and ethics, and the legal and ethical responsibilities of nurses in relation to individualized patient care and, more recently, changing systems of care to improve health and health outcomes. Although this association is not incorrect, it is incomplete. A key aim of this paper is to redress this oversight and to encourage a broader conceptualization of justice as necessary for human survival, health and development, not merely as a professional value, or legal or ethical principle for guiding human conduct. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. The bHLH transcription factors TSAR1 and TSAR2 regulate triterpene saponin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula

    OpenAIRE

    Mertens, Jan; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Manuel Franco-Zorrilla, José; Goossens, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to stresses by producing a broad spectrum of bioactive specialized metabolites. Hormonal elicitors, such as jasmonates, trigger a complex signaling circuit leading to the concerted activation of specific metabolic pathways. However, for many specialized metabolic pathways, the transcription factors involved remain unknown. Here, we report on two homologous jasmonate-inducible transcription factors of the basic helix-loop-helix family, TRITERPENE SAPONIN BIOSYNTHESIS ACTIVATING ...

  16. Evolutionary relationships and diversification of barhl genes within retinal cell lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Schuhmacher Laura-Nadine; Albadri Shahad; Ramialison Mirana; Poggi Lucia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Basic helix-loop-helix and homeodomain transcription factors have been shown to specify all different neuronal cell subtypes composing the vertebrate retina. The appearance of gene paralogs of such retina-specific transcription factors in lower vertebrates, with differently evolved function and/or conserved non-coding elements, might provide an important source for the generation of neuronal diversity within the vertebrate retinal architecture. In line with this hypothesis...

  17. Transkriptionelle Kontrolle der Differenzierung sympathischer Nervenzellen

    OpenAIRE

    Stanke, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Die verschiedenen Typen von Nervenzellen sind durch die differentielle Expression terminaler Differenzierungsgene charakterisiert. Dies sind z.B. Gene, deren Produkte die Synthese und den Transport der verwendeten Neurotransmitter gewährleisten. Die Expression dieser Gene wird während der Entwicklung durch spezifisch exprimierte Transkriptionsfaktoren reguliert. In der Entwicklung sympathischer Nervenzellen sind Mitglieder aus der Familie der basic Helix-Loop-Helix-(bHLH)-Transkriptionsfaktor...

  18. AltitudeOmics: The Basic Biology of Human Acclimatization to High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    11-2-0040 TITLE: AltitudeOmics: The Basic Biology of Human Acclimatization to High Altitude PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert Roach...code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 AltitudeOmics: The Basic Biology of Human Acclimatization to High...shipped from Bolivia to Denver and are currently undergoing analysis . 5 CONCLUSION: Humans retain acclimatization after 7 and 21 days of de

  19. Basic design of multimedia system for the representation of human error cases in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Geun Ok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-01

    We have developed a multimedia system for the representation of human error cases with the education and training on human errors can be done effectively. The followings are major topics during the basic design; 1 Establishment of a basic concept for representing human error cases using multimedia, 2 Establishment of a design procedure for the multimedia system, 3 Establishment of a hardware and software environment for operating the multimedia system, 4 Design of multimedia input and output interfaces. In order to verify the results of this basic design, we implemented the basic design with an incident triggered by operator`s misaction which occurred at Uljin NPP Unit 1. (Author) 12 refs., 30 figs.,.

  20. An empirical assessment of generational differences in basic human values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Sean T; Duxbury, Linda; Higgins, Christopher

    2007-10-01

    This study assessed generational differences in human values as measured by the Schwartz Value Survey. It was proposed that the two most recent generations, Millennials and Generation Xers, would value Self-enhancement and Openness to Change more than the two older generations, Baby Boomers and Matures, while the two older generations would value Self-transcendence and Conservation more. The hypotheses were tested with a combined sample of Canadian knowledge workers and undergraduate business students (N = 1,194). Two hypotheses were largely supported, although an unexpectedly large difference was observed between Millennials and Generation Xers with respect to Openness to Change and Self-enhancement. The findings suggest that generation is a useful variable in examining differences in social values.

  1. Human Locomotion in Hypogravity: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Lacquaniti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We have considerable knowledge about the mechanisms underlying compensation of Earth gravity during locomotion, a knowledge obtained from physiological, biomechanical, modeling, developmental, comparative, and paleoanthropological studies. By contrast, we know much less about locomotion and movement in general under sustained hypogravity. This lack of information poses a serious problem for human space exploration. In a near future humans will walk again on the Moon and for the first time on Mars. It would be important to predict how they will move around, since we know that locomotion and mobility in general may be jeopardized in hypogravity, especially when landing after a prolonged weightlessness of the space flight. The combination of muscle weakness, of wearing a cumbersome spacesuit, and of maladaptive patterns of locomotion in hypogravity significantly increase the risk of falls and injuries. Much of what we currently know about locomotion in hypogravity derives from the video archives of the Apollo missions on the Moon, the experiments performed with parabolic flight or with body weight support on Earth, and the theoretical models. These are the topics of our review, along with the issue of the application of simulated hypogravity in rehabilitation to help patients with deambulation problems. We consider several issues that are common to the field of space science and clinical rehabilitation: the general principles governing locomotion in hypogravity, the methods used to reduce gravity effects on locomotion, the extent to which the resulting behavior is comparable across different methods, the important non-linearities of several locomotor parameters as a function of the gravity reduction, the need to use multiple methods to obtain reliable results, and the need to tailor the methods individually based on the physiology and medical history of each person.

  2. Human Locomotion in Hypogravity: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yury P.; Sylos-Labini, Francesca; La Scaleia, Valentina; La Scaleia, Barbara; Willems, Patrick A.; Zago, Myrka

    2017-01-01

    We have considerable knowledge about the mechanisms underlying compensation of Earth gravity during locomotion, a knowledge obtained from physiological, biomechanical, modeling, developmental, comparative, and paleoanthropological studies. By contrast, we know much less about locomotion and movement in general under sustained hypogravity. This lack of information poses a serious problem for human space exploration. In a near future humans will walk again on the Moon and for the first time on Mars. It would be important to predict how they will move around, since we know that locomotion and mobility in general may be jeopardized in hypogravity, especially when landing after a prolonged weightlessness of the space flight. The combination of muscle weakness, of wearing a cumbersome spacesuit, and of maladaptive patterns of locomotion in hypogravity significantly increase the risk of falls and injuries. Much of what we currently know about locomotion in hypogravity derives from the video archives of the Apollo missions on the Moon, the experiments performed with parabolic flight or with body weight support on Earth, and the theoretical models. These are the topics of our review, along with the issue of the application of simulated hypogravity in rehabilitation to help patients with deambulation problems. We consider several issues that are common to the field of space science and clinical rehabilitation: the general principles governing locomotion in hypogravity, the methods used to reduce gravity effects on locomotion, the extent to which the resulting behavior is comparable across different methods, the important non-linearities of several locomotor parameters as a function of the gravity reduction, the need to use multiple methods to obtain reliable results, and the need to tailor the methods individually based on the physiology and medical history of each person. PMID:29163225

  3. How Does Air Pollution Threaten Basic Human Rights? The Case Study of Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedova, Aylin Hasanova

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to analyze the relationship between air pollution and human rights. It investigates whether air pollution threatens basic human rights such as the right to health, life, and the environment. Air pollution represents a major threat both to health and to the environment. Despite the adoption of numerous…

  4. How Does Air Pollution Threaten Basic Human Rights? The Case Study of Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmedova, Aylin

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to analyze the relationship between air pollution and human rights. It investigates whether air pollution threatens basic human rights such as the right to health, life, and the environment. Air pollution represents a major threat both to health and to the environment. Despite the adoption of numerous international, national and regional norms, air pollution still continues to be one of the major environmental issues of concern. The human rights to life, he...

  5. HUMAN NATURE BASED ON AL-QUR’AN AS THE BASIC OF EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Kodir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on perspective of human nature based on Al-Qur‟an as the basic of education development. It used descriptive qualitative method of research as well as library research which aims at collecting data and information from various literatures available in the library such as books, magazines, scripts, notes, histories, and other documents. The results of this research are drawn into conclusion, among others: first, based on all terms refering to human meaning, it can be defined that human nature required in Al-Qur‟an apparently leads to the term al-insân. On the other side, from human structure‟s perspective, Al-Qur‟an describes human as a creature consisting of physical and spiritual elements. Meanwhile from his position and role, human nature based on Al-Qur‟an is described as Allah‟s servant and Allah‟s khalifah on Earth. Second, there is a close relationship both directly and indirectly with education concept in Al-Qur‟an. Third, the concept of human nature in Al-Qur‟an which cannot be separated from its education concept, thus, has a basic implication toward all education aspects, especially, in vision, orientation and objective of education, curriculum, methodology of education and evaluation on education. Fourth, process of education development based on concept of human nature in Al-Qur‟an including objective, curriculum, methodology, and evalution of education aspects, basically, is understood as efforts or ikhtiar to develop all human existences in the term of totality, structure, position, role and other their own potential values.

  6. The basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 limits recombination endonuclease action at human telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; Koelblen, Melanie; Civitelli, Livia; Bah, Amadou; Djerbi, Nadir; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Gilson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The stability of mammalian telomeres depends upon TRF2, which prevents inappropriate repair and checkpoint activation. By using a plasmid integration assay in yeasts carrying humanized telomeres, we demonstrated that TRF2 possesses the intrinsic property to both stimulate initial homologous recombination events and to prevent their resolution via its basic N-terminal domain. In human cells, we further showed that this TRF2 domain prevents telomere shortening mediated by the resolvase-associated protein SLX4 as well as GEN1 and MUS81, 2 different types of endonucleases with resolvase activities. We propose that various types of resolvase activities are kept in check by the basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 in order to favor an accurate repair of the stalled forks that occur during telomere replication.

  7. Twist2 promotes kidney cancer cell proliferation and invasion by regulating ITGA6 and CD44 expression in the ECM-receptor interaction pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao-jie; Tao, Jing; Sheng, Lu; Hu, Xin; Rong, Rui-ming; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Tong-yu

    2016-01-01

    Twist2 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family and plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. Growing evidence has proven that Twist2 is involved in tumor progression; however, the role of Twist2 in human kidney cancer and its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to detect the expression of Twist2 in kidney cancer cells and tissues. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, migration, and invasion assay were analyzed using the Cell Count Kit-8, flow cytometry, wound healing, and Transwell analysis, respectively. In this study, we showed that Twist2 was upregulated in human kidney cancer tissues compared with normal kidney tissues. Twist2 promoted cell proliferation, inhibited cell apoptosis, and augmented cell migration and invasion in human kidney-cancer-derived cells in vitro. Twist2 also promoted tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, we found that the knockdown of Twist2 decreased the levels of ITGA6 and CD44 expression. This result indicates that Twist2 may promote migration and invasion of kidney cancer cells by regulating ITGA6 and CD44 expression. Therefore, our data demonstrated that Twist2 is involved in kidney cancer progression. The identification of the role of Twist2 in the migration and invasion of kidney cancer provides a potential appropriate treatment for human kidney cancer. PMID:27099513

  8. Tgfβ-Smad and MAPK signaling mediate scleraxis and proteoglycan expression in heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnette, Damien N; Hulin, Alexia; Ahmed, A S Ishtiaq; Colige, Alain C; Azhar, Mohamad; Lincoln, Joy

    2013-12-01

    Mature heart valves are complex structures consisting of three highly organized extracellular matrix layers primarily composed of collagens, proteoglycans and elastin. Collectively, these diverse matrix components provide all the necessary biomechanical properties for valve function throughout life. In contrast to healthy valves, myxomatous valve disease is the most common cause of mitral valve prolapse in the human population and is characterized by an abnormal abundance of proteoglycans within the valve tri-laminar structure. Despite the clinical significance, the etiology of this phenotype is not known. Scleraxis (Scx) is a basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor that we previously showed to be required for establishing heart valve structure during remodeling stages of valvulogenesis. In this study, we report that remodeling heart valves from Scx null mice express decreased levels of proteoglycans, particularly chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), while overexpression in embryonic avian valve precursor cells and adult porcine valve interstitial cells increases CSPGs. Using these systems we further identify that Scx is positively regulated by canonical Tgfβ2 signaling during this process and this is attenuated by MAPK activity. Finally, we show that Scx is increased in myxomatous valves from human patients and mouse models, and overexpression in human mitral valve interstitial cells modestly increases proteoglycan expression consistent with myxomatous mitral valve phenotypes. Together, these studies identify an important role for Scx in regulating proteoglycans in embryonic and mature valve cells and suggest that imbalanced regulation could influence myxomatous pathogenesis. © 2013.

  9. Novel approaches to treating sensorineural hearing loss. Auditory genetics and necessary factors for stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastarakos, Petros V; Nikolopoulos, Thomas P; Tavoulari, Evangelia; Kiprouli, Catherine; Ferekidis, Eleftherios

    2008-08-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a chronic disease, with a serious impact on human communication and quality of life. Exposure to various factors can lead to irreversible hearing impairment, as the auditory epithelium in humans comprises terminally differentiated cells. By contrast, the inner ear of lower vertebrates and invertebrates shows regenerative capacity. Efforts to regenerate the damaged human inner ear may involve renewed cell proliferation, or transplanting cells that can differentiate into sensory cells. Literature review. Animal studies, in vitro studies, retrospective-cohort studies, community-based case-controls, clinical guidelines, and review articles. Embryonic stem cells, inner ear stem cells, and stem cells from other tissues (i.e., neural tissue, hematopoietic system) may be candidates for restoring the auditory epithelium. Transcriptional regulation of p27kip1 is the primary determinant of terminal mitosis and the final number of postmitotic progenitors of hair and supporting cells. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Math1 was found to be necessary and sufficient for the production of auditory hair cells. Notch signaling seems to play a major role in the regulation of Math1, through lateral inhibition. Brn3c, Gfi1, and Barhl1 are also specific transcription factors that have been implicated in hair cell maintenance and consequent survival. Evidence concerning development, maintenance, and regeneration of hair cells is still at an embryonic stage. Combined data, as attempted in the present study, will lead to a more successful management of deafness.

  10. A Symbiosis of Islamic Principles and Basic Human Values on Work and Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokis Rohaiza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses some basic issues on work and life based on Islamic and non-religious principles. Work and life are inseparable facets of and for human existence. Work derives from the demands of life, and thus it becomes a responsibility for every individual person. The article attempts to relate some highlighted Qur’anic verses and Hadith with basic occupational values such as honesty, modesty and innovativeness, among others, at workplaces. In the end, it makes an effort to understand the working of the subconscious mind on work to make life worthwhile. The plan for this article is to lay emphasis that the presence of human beings, which includes their mind, energy and whatever they can offer in the forms of work, benefits all. In such a case, not only those humans may be seen as successful in fulfilling the work-needs, but also victorious in completing the life-demands as human beings. “Virtuous workplace” is the most ideal platform for such purpose.

  11. Amino-terminal domains of c-myc and N-myc proteins mediate binding to the retinoblastoma gene product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustgi, Anil K.; Dyson, Nicholas; Bernards, Rene

    1991-08-01

    THE proteins encoded by the myc gene family are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, and aberrant expression of myc proteins has been implicated in the genesis of a variety of neoplasms1. In the carboxyl terminus, myc proteins have two domains that encode a basic domain/helix-loop-helix and a leucine zipper motif, respectively. These motifs are involved both in DNA binding and in protein dimerization2-5. In addition, myc protein family members share several regions of highly conserved amino acids in their amino termini that are essential for transformation6,7. We report here that an N-terminal domain present in both the c-myc and N-myc proteins mediates binding to the retinoblastoma gene product, pRb. We show that the human papilloma virus E7 protein competes with c-myc for binding to pRb, indicating that these proteins share overlapping binding sites on pRb. Furthermore, a mutant Rb protein from a human tumour cell line that carried a 35-amino-acid deletion in its C terminus failed to bind to c-myc. Our results suggest that c-myc and pRb cooperate through direct binding to control cell proliferation.

  12. Genetic dissection of endothelial transcriptional activity of zebrafish aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AHRs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, Wade W.; Leonardo-Mendonça, Roberto C.; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2017-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor conserved across phyla from flies to humans. Activated by a number of endogenous ligands and environmental toxins, studies on AHR function and gene regulation have largely focused on a toxicological perspective relating to aromatic hydrocarbons generated by human activities and the often-deleterious effects of exposure on vertebrates mediated by AHR activation. A growing body of work has highlighted the importance of AHR in physiologic processes, including immune cell differentiation and vascular patterning. Here we dissect the contribution of the 3 zebrafish AHRs, ahr1a, ahr1b and ahr2, to endothelial cyp1a1/b1 gene regulation under physiologic conditions and upon exposure to the AHR ligand Beta-naphthoflavone. We show that in fish multiple AHRs are functional in the vasculature, with vessel-specific differences in the ability of ahr1b to compensate for the loss of ahr2 to maintain AHR signaling. We further provide evidence that AHR can regulate the expression of the chemokine receptor cxcr4a in endothelial cells, a regulatory mechanism that may provide insight into AHR function in the endothelium. PMID:28817646

  13. [Prognosis of basic somatic characteristics of humans in expert examination of fragments of human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zviagin, V N; Grigor'eva, M A

    2006-01-01

    To develop a method of assessing human body somatometric parameters by its fragmentation, we used individual data on the series G. van Vark (1975) from corpses of 62 males and 39 females aged from 23 to 95 years. Statistical processing with SPSS package calculated regression equations allowing prediction of head size, length of the upper and lower limbs and their segments. The data can be used in forensic medicine in expert examination of dismembered corpses and in emergency situations with mass human victims.

  14. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Basic Research to Potential Clinical Applications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa de Souza Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs are derived from a direct reprogramming of human somatic cells to a pluripotent stage through ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. These cells have two important properties, which are the self-renewal capacity and the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. So, the discovery of hiPSCs opens new opportunities in biomedical sciences, since these cells may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of diseases in the production of new diseases models, in drug development/drug toxicity tests, gene therapies, and cell replacement therapies. However, the hiPSCs technology has limitations including the potential for the development of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities leading to tumorigenicity. Nowadays, basic research in the hiPSCs field has made progress in the application of new strategies with the aim to enable an efficient production of high-quality of hiPSCs for safety and efficacy, necessary to the future application for clinical practice. In this review, we show the recent advances in hiPSCs’ basic research and some potential clinical applications focusing on cancer. We also present the importance of the use of statistical methods to evaluate the possible validation for the hiPSCs for future therapeutic use toward personalized cell therapies.

  15. A Sequentially Priming Phosphorylation Cascade Activates the Gliomagenic Transcription Factor Olig2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available During development of the vertebrate CNS, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor Olig2 sustains replication competence of progenitor cells that give rise to neurons and oligodendrocytes. A pathological counterpart of this developmental function is seen in human glioma, wherein Olig2 is required for maintenance of stem-like cells that drive tumor growth. The mitogenic/gliomagenic functions of Olig2 are regulated by phosphorylation of a triple serine motif (S10, S13, and S14 in the amino terminus. Here, we identify a set of three serine/threonine protein kinases (glycogen synthase kinase 3α/β [GSK3α/β], casein kinase 2 [CK2], and cyclin-dependent kinases 1/2 [CDK1/2] that are, collectively, both necessary and sufficient to phosphorylate the triple serine motif. We show that phosphorylation of the motif itself serves as a template to prime phosphorylation of additional serines and creates a highly charged “acid blob” in the amino terminus of Olig2. Finally, we show that small molecule inhibitors of this forward-feeding phosphorylation cascade have potential as glioma therapeutics.

  16. Bisphenol A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical, and brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical, widely used in various industries and the field of dentistry. The consequent increase in BPA exposure among humans has led us to some concerns regarding the potential deleterious effects on reproduction and brain development. The emphasis of this review is on the effects of prenatal and lactational exposure to low doses of BPA on brain development in mice. We demonstrated that prenatal exposure to BPA affected fetal murine neocortical development by accelerating neuronal differentiation/migration during the early embryonic stage, which was associated with up- and down-regulation of the genes critical for brain development, including the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. In the adult mice brains, both abnormal neocortical architecture and abnormal corticothalamic projections persisted in the group exposed to the BPA. Functionally, BPA exposure disturbed murine behavior, accompanied with a disrupted neurotransmitter system, including monoamines, in the postnatal development period and in adult mice. We also demonstrated that epigenetic alterations in promoter-associated CpG islands might underlie some of the effects on brain development after exposure to BPA. © 2012 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  17. Disruption of neurogenesis and cortical development in transgenic mice misexpressing Olig2, a gene in the Down syndrome critical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Chuntao; Deng, Yaqi; Chen, Lina; Wu, Laiman; Mandrycky, Nicole; McNabb, Christopher T; Peng, Yuanbo; Fuchs, Perry N; Lu, Jie; Sheen, Volney; Qiu, Mengsheng; Mao, Meng; Lu, Q Richard

    2015-05-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Olig2 is crucial for mammalian central nervous system development. Human ortholog OLIG2 is located in the Down syndrome critical region in trisomy 21. To investigate the effect of Olig2 misexpression on brain development, we generated a developmentally regulated Olig2-overexpressing transgenic line with a Cre/loxP system. The transgenic mice with Olig2 misexpression in cortical neural stem/progenitor cells exhibited microcephaly, cortical dyslamination, hippocampus malformation, and profound motor deficits. Ectopic misexpression of Olig2 impaired cortical progenitor proliferation and caused precocious cell cycle exit. Massive neuronal cell death was detected in the developing cortex of Olig2-misexpressing mice. In addition, Olig2 misexpression led to a significant downregulation of neuronal specification factors including Ngn1, Ngn2 and Pax6, and a defect in cortical neurogenesis. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-Seq) analysis indicates that Olig2 directly targets the promoter and/or enhancer regions of Nfatc4, Dscr1/Rcan1 and Dyrk1a, the critical neurogenic genes that contribute to Down syndrome phenotypes, and inhibits their expression. Together, our study suggests that Olig2 misexpression in neural stem cells elicits neurogenesis defects and neuronal cell death, which may contribute to developmental disorders including Down syndrome, where OLIG2 is triplicated on chromosomal 21. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CLIF, a novel cycle-like factor, regulates the circadian oscillation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maemura, K; de la Monte, S M; Chin, M T; Layne, M D; Hsieh, C M; Yet, S F; Perrella, M A; Lee, M E

    2000-11-24

    The onset of myocardial infarction occurs frequently in the early morning, and it may partly result from circadian variation of fibrinolytic activity. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity shows a circadian oscillation and may account for the morning onset of myocardial infarction. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating this circadian oscillation remain unknown. Recent evidence indicates that basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS domain transcription factors play a crucial role in controlling the biological clock that controls circadian rhythm. We isolated a novel bHLH/PAS protein, cycle-like factor (CLIF) from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CLIF shares high homology with Drosophila CYCLE, one of the essential transcriptional regulators of circadian rhythm. CLIF is expressed in endothelial cells and neurons in the brain, including the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the center of the circadian clock. In endothelial cells, CLIF forms a heterodimer with CLOCK and up-regulates the PAI-1 gene through E-box sites. Furthermore, Period2 and Cryptochrome1, whose expression show a circadian oscillation in peripheral tissues, inhibit the PAI-1 promoter activation by the CLOCK:CLIF heterodimer. These results suggest that CLIF regulates the circadian oscillation of PAI-1 gene expression in endothelial cells. In addition, the results potentially provide a molecular basis for the morning onset of myocardial infarction.

  19. Interactional role of microRNAs and bHLH-PAS proteins in cancer (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yumin; Wei, Yucai; Guo, Jiwu; Cheng, Yusheng; He, Wenting

    2015-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recognized as an emerging class of master regulators that regulate human gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and are involved in many normal and pathological cellular processes. Mammalian basic HLH (helix-loop-helix)-PER-ARNT-SIM (bHLH-PAS) proteins are heterodimeric transcriptional regulators that sense and respond to environmental signals (such as chemical pollutants) or to physiological signals (for instance hypoxia). In the normal state, bHLH-PAS proteins are responsible for multiple critical aspects of physiology to ensure the cell accurate homeostasis, but dysregulation of these proteins has been shown to contribute to carcinogenic events such as tumor initiation, promotion, and progression. Increasing epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that bHLH-PAS proteins regulate a panel of miRNAs, whereas some miRNAs also target bHLH-PAS proteins. The interaction between miRNAs and certain bHLH-PAS proteins [hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)] is relevant to many vital events associated with tumorigenesis. This review will summarize recent findings on the interesting and complicated underlying mechanisms that miRNAs interact with HIFs or AHR in tumors, hopefully to benefit the discovery of novel drug-interfering targets for cancer therapy.

  20. Structural characterization of mammalian bHLH-PAS transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dalei; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2017-04-01

    The mammalian basic helix-loop-helix-PER-ARNT-SIM (bHLH-PAS) transcription factors share common architectural features that include a bHLH DNA-binding domain and tandemly positioned PAS domains. The sixteen members of this family include the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α), ARNT (also known as HIF-1β), CLOCK and BMAL1. Most bHLH-PAS proteins have been genetically linked to variety of diseases in humans, including cancers, metabolic syndromes and psychiatric conditions. To function as transcription factors, the bHLH-PAS proteins must form heterodimeric complexes. Recent crystallographic studies of HIF-α-ARNT and CLOCK-BMAL1 complexes have unveiled the organization of their multi-domain bHLH-PAS-A-PAS-B segments, revealing how these architectures can give rise to unique patterns of heterodimerization. As our structural understanding becomes better integrated with ligand-discovery and target gene identification, a more comprehensive picture of their architectural and functional properties will emerge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Role of GH/IGF-I Axis in Muscle Homeostasis During Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to reduced gravity during space travel profoundly alters the loads placed on bone and muscle. Astronauts suffer significant losses of muscle and bone strength during weightlessness. Exercise as a countermeasure is only partially effective in remedying severe muscle atrophy and bone demineralization. Similar wasting of muscles and bones affects people on Earth during prolonged bed rest or immobilization due to injury. In the absence of weight bearing activity, atrophy occurs primarily in the muscles that act in low power, routine movements and in maintaining posture. Hormonal disfunction could contribute in part to the loss of muscle and bone during spaceflight. Reduced levels of human Growth Hormone (hGH) were found in astronauts during space flight, as well as reduced GH secretory activity was observed from the anterior pituitary in 7-day space flight rats. Growth hormone has been shown to be required for maintenance of muscle mass and bone mineralization, in part by mediating the biosynthesis IGF-I, a small polypeptide growth factor. IGF biosynthesis and secretion plays an important role in potentiating muscle cell differentiation and has been shown to drive the expression of myogenin, a myogenic specific basic helix-loop-helix factor. IGF-I has also been shown to have an important role in potentiating muscle regeneration, repair and adult muscle hypertrophy.

  2. Genetic basis for glandular trichome formation in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Hu, Yan; Yang, Changqing; Liu, Bingliang; Fang, Lei; Wan, Qun; Liang, Wenhua; Mei, Gaofu; Wang, Lingjian; Wang, Haiping; Ding, Linyun; Dong, Chenguang; Pan, Mengqiao; Chen, Jiedan; Wang, Sen; Chen, Shuqi; Cai, Caiping; Zhu, Xiefei; Guan, Xueying; Zhou, Baoliang; Zhu, Shuijin; Wang, Jiawei; Guo, Wangzhen; Chen, Xiaoya; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2016-01-22

    Trichomes originate from epidermal cells and can be classified as either glandular or non-glandular. Gossypium species are characterized by the presence of small and darkly pigmented lysigenous glands that contain large amounts of gossypol. Here, using a dominant glandless mutant, we characterize GoPGF, which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix domain-containing transcription factor, that we propose is a positive regulator of gland formation. Silencing GoPGF leads to a completely glandless phenotype. A single nucleotide insertion in GoPGF, introducing a premature stop codon is found in the duplicate recessive glandless mutant (gl2gl3). The characterization of GoPGF helps to unravel the regulatory network of glandular structure biogenesis, and has implications for understanding the production of secondary metabolites in glands. It also provides a potential molecular basis to generate glandless seed and glanded cotton to not only supply fibre and oil but also provide a source of protein for human consumption.

  3. Distribution of Major Basic Protein on Human Airway following In Vitro Eosinophil Incubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailing Xue

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major basic protein (MBP released from activated eosinophils may influence airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR by either direct effects on airway myocytes or by an indirect effect. In this study, human bronchi, freshly isolated human eosinophils, or MBP purified from human eosinophil granules were incubated for studying eosinophil infiltration and MBP localization. Eosinophils immediately adhered to intact human airway as well as to cultured human airway myocytes and epithelium. Following incubation 18–24 h, eosinophils migrated into the airway media, including the smooth muscle layer, but had no specific recruitment to airway neurons. Eosinophils released significant amounts of MBP within the airway media, including areas comprising the smooth muscle layer. Most deposits of MBP were focally discrete and restricted by immunologic detection to a maximum volume of ∼300 μm3 about the eosinophil. Native MBP applied exogenously was immediately deposited on the surface of the airway, but required at least 1 h to become detected within the media of the airway wall. Tissue MBP infiltration and deposition increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings suggest that eosinophil-derived cationic proteins may alter airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR in vivo by an effect that is not limited to the bronchial epithelium.

  4. Movement as a basic concept in physiotherapy--a human science approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikström-Grotell, Camilla; Eriksson, Katie

    2012-08-01

    The development of scientific knowledge of physiotherapy (PT) has advanced significantly. Research is mostly conducted within a biomedical paradigm and theory-building is underpinned by a positivist paradigm. The basic philosophical questions and concepts are not much reflected on, and PT lacks an established theoretical frame. The first step in theory development is to define the basic concepts. The aim of this professional theoretical paper was to reflect on and describe the concept of movement in PT based on earlier research as a standpoint for a broader and deeper understanding of the complex nature of PT reality inspired by a model for concept analysis developed in caring science [Eriksson K 2010 Concept determination as part of the development of knowledge in caring science. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences 24: 2-11]. The concept of movement in PT is conceptualized as complex and multidimensional. The understanding of human movement in PT is based on five categories described in the paper. The conceptualization of movement includes acting in relation to the socio-cultural environment, inter-dynamic aspects, as well as personal, intradynamic aspects. This paper argues for the need to further develop the concept of movement in PT within a human science approach. A deeper understanding is needed as a basis for understanding complex clinical practice as well as in shaping the PT discipline.

  5. Defamation of Religions: A Vague and Overbroad Theory that Threatens Basic Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison G. Belnap

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Il contributo è pubblicato con il permesso della Brigham Young University Law Review - dove è apparso nel vol. n. 2 del 2010 (Tribute to Professor Michael Goldsmith, alle pp. 101-148 - e dell‖Autrice, che ringraziamo sentitamente. SUMMARY: 1. Introduction - 2. History of and Motivations for the OIC Defamation of Religions Resolutions - 2.a - The OIC Exerts a Concerted Effort to Protect Islam - 2.b - Terrorist Attacks and Danish Cartoons Raise the Stakes - 3. Defamation of Religions: A Permissible Restraint on Freedom of Speech and Expression? - 3.a - History, Basic Elements, and Contemporary Usage of Defamation - 3.b - Interaction Between Defamation of Religions and the Basic Human Rights Enumerated in Major International Instruments - 4. The Evolution of a Resolution - 4.a. 1999-2000: Beginnings - 4.b. 2001: A Pre-9/11 World - 4.c. 2002: Reactions to the Violent Backlash Against Muslims - 4.d. 2003-2004: Fluctuations in Support - 4.e. 2005: Intensification of a Campaign - 4.f. 2006-2007: The Move to the General Assembly - 4.g. 2008: Decreasing Margins of Support - 4.h. 2009: Current Resolution and Recommendations for Application - 5. Consequences of Accepting the Resolutions and Subsequent Enactment of Statutes Designed to Prevent Defamation of Religions - 5.a. Human Rights Committee - 5.b. The European Court of Human Rights - 5.c. Blasphemy, Incitement, and Hate Speech Laws and Their Enforcement - 5.d. Possible Future Statutes and Enforcement Under Defamation of Religions Theory - 6. Alternatives to Defamation of Religions in the U.N. Resolutions - 7. Conclusion.

  6. Impact Of Wounds In The Assistance To Basic Human Needs In Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelly de Araújo Ferreira

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the impact of soft tissue injuries in the provision of assistance to Basic Human Needs of customers by the nursing staff in the Adult Intensive Care Unit of a hospital in Pernambuco, Brazil. Methodology: this is a descriptive study with quantitative character, performed with 104 nurses in December 2015. A questionnaire drawn from Wanda Horta's theory was used for data collection. Results: the most judicious care provided by the multidisciplinary team (81.7% and the establishment of bond between professionals and clients (57.7% were found to be the main positive effects. However, negative effects were outstanding, indicated by increased hospital stay (86.5% and feeling of anxiety (72.1%. Despite the interference of lesions, body care (86%, communication (63.3%, and religiosity/spirituality (43.3% needs were referred to as met. Conclusion: the presence of wounds represents a difficulty to meet needs, although they bring some positive impact on the client. However, while recognizing the importance of valuing the customer subjectivity, this aspect is not yet addressed with proper attention. Keywords: Intensive Care Unit; Injuries; Nursing Care; Basic needs.

  7. RNA profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing reveal that PTF1a stabilizes pancreas progenitor identity via the control of MNX1/HLXB9 and a network of other transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Nancy; Gésina, Emilie; Scheinert, Peter

    2012-01-01

    those factors, PTF1a, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor which controls pancreas exocrine cell differentiation, maintenance, and functionality, is also needed for the early specification of pancreas progenitors. We used RNA profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing...... by PTF1a. These proteins, most of which were previously shown to be necessary for pancreas bud maintenance or formation, form a transcription factor network that allows the maintenance of pancreas progenitors. In addition, we identify Bmp7, Nr5a2, RhoV, and P2rx1 as new targets of PTF1a in pancreas...

  8. HeyL Regulates the Number of TrkC Neurons in Dorsal Root Ganglia

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Jarrett, Jennifer; Chlon, Timothy; Kessler, John A

    2009-01-01

    The basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor HeyL is expressed at high levels by neural crest progenitor cells (NCPs) that give rise to neurons and glia in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Since HeyL expression was observed in these NCPs during the period of neurogenesis, we generated HeyL null mutants to help examine the factor’s role in ganglion neuronal specification. Homozygous null mutation of HeyL reduced the number of TrkC+ neurons in DRG at birth including the subpopulation that expresse...

  9. Autonomous regulation of the insect gut by circadian genes acting downstream of juvenile hormone signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bajgar, Adam; Jindra, Marek; Doležel, David

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 11 (2013), s. 4416-4421 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500960802; GA ČR GP204/08/P579; GA ČR GAP502/10/1612 Grant - others:Marie Curie Fellowship Award(CZ) 276569 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : reproductive diapuase * photoperiodism * basic helix-loop-helix protein Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 9.809, year: 2013 http://www.pnas.org/content/110/11/4416.full.pdf+html

  10. The Prdm13 histone methyltransferase encoding gene is a Ptf1a-Rbpj downstream target that suppresses glutamatergic and promotes GABAergic neuronal fate in the dorsal neural tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanotel, Julie; Bessodes, Nathalie; Thélie, Aurore

    2014-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional activator Ptf1a determines inhibitory GABAergic over excitatory glutamatergic neuronal cell fate in progenitors of the vertebrate dorsal spinal cord, cerebellum and retina. In an in situ hybridization expression survey of PR domain containing genes...... and a reduction of the GABAergic neuronal marker Pax2. It also leads to an upregulation of Prdm13 transcription, suggesting an autonegative regulation. Conversely, in animal caps, Prdm13 blocks the ability of the bHLH factor Neurog2 to activate Tlx3. Additional gain of function experiments in the chick neural...

  11. Reference: 768 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available odulates abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) signaling pathways at least partly via PHYTOCHROME-IN...TERACTING FACTOR3-LIKE5 (PIL5), a phytochrome-interacting basic helix-loop-helix ...transcription factor. Here, we report a new mutant, somnus (som), that germinates in darkness, independently of various light re...s lower levels of ABA and elevated levels of GA due to expressional changes in AB...A and GA metabolic genes. Unlike PIL5, however, SOM does not regulate the expression of GA-INSENSITIVE and R

  12. Basic fibroblast growth factor promotes the development of human ovarian early follicles during growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian-ren; Yan, Li-ying; Yan, Jie; Lu, Cui-ling; Xia, Xi; Yin, Tai-lang; Zhu, Xiao-hui; Gao, Jiang-man; Ding, Ting; Hu, Wei-hong; Guo, Hong-yan; Li, Rong; Qiao, Jie

    2014-03-01

    What is the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on the growth of individual early human follicles in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system in vitro? The addition of 200 ng bFGF/ml improves human early follicle growth, survival and viability during growth in vitro. It has been demonstrated that bFGF enhances primordial follicle development in human ovarian tissue culture. However, the growth and survival of individual early follicles in encapsulated 3D culture have not been reported. The maturation in vitro of human ovarian follicles was investigated. Ovarian tissue (n= 11) was obtained from 11 women during laparoscopic surgery for gynecological disease, after obtaining written informed consent. One hundred and fifty-four early follicles were isolated by enzymic digestion and mechanical disruption. They were individually encapsulated into alginate (1% w/v) and randomly assigned to be cultured with 0, 100, 200 or 300 ng bFGF/ml for 8 days. Individual follicles were cultured in minimum essential medium α (αMEM) supplemented with bFGF. Follicle survival and growth were assessed by microscopy. Follicle viability was evaluated under confocal laser scanning microscope following Calcein-AM and Ethidium homodimer-I (Ca-AM/EthD-I) staining. After 8 days in culture, all 154 follicles had increased in size. The diameter and survival rate of the follicles and the percentage with good viability were significantly higher in the group cultured with 200 ng bFGF/ml than in the group without bFGF (P < 0.05). The percentage of follicles in the pre-antral stage was significantly higher in the 200 ng bFGF/ml group than in the group without bFGF (P < 0.05), while the percentages of primordial and primary follicles were significantly lower (P < 0.05). The study focuses on the effect of bFGF on the development of individual human early follicles in 3D culture in vitro and has limited ability to reveal the specific effect of bFGF at each different stage. The findings

  13. Basic Amino Acid Residues of Human Eosinophil Derived Neurotoxin Essential for Glycosaminoglycan Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ta-Jen; Chang, Wei-Tang; Tomiya, Noboru; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Chang, Hao-Teng; Chen, Chien-Jung; Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Fan, Tan-chi; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2013-01-01

    Human eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN), a granule protein secreted by activated eosinophils, is a biomarker for asthma in children. EDN belongs to the human RNase A superfamily possessing both ribonucleolytic and antiviral activities. EDN interacts with heparin oligosaccharides and heparin sulfate proteoglycans on bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells. In this study, we demonstrate that the binding of EDN to cells requires cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and the binding strength between EDN and GAGs depends on the sulfation levels of GAGs. Furthermore, in silico computer modeling and in vitro binding assays suggest critical roles for the following basic amino acids located within heparin binding regions (HBRs) of EDN 34QRRCKN39 (HBR1), 65NKTRKN70 (HBR2), and 113NRDQRRD119 (HBR3) and in particular Arg35, Arg36, and Arg38 within HBR1, and Arg114 and Arg117 within HBR3. Our data suggest that sulfated GAGs play a major role in EDN binding, which in turn may be related to the cellular effects of EDN. PMID:24065103

  14. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF. After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC, MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC, MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001; however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008 and microvessel density (P<0.001. Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  15. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.C. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Zheng, G.F. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The People' s Hospital of Ganzhou, Ganzhou (China); Wu, L.; Ou Yang, L.Y.; Li, W.X. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-08-08

    Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF). After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC), MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC), MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001); however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008) and microvessel density (P<0.001). Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  16. Protest of doctors: a basic human right or an ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Imran Naeem

    2014-03-10

    Peaceful protests and strikes are a basic human right as stated in the United Nations' universal declaration on human rights. But for doctors, their proximity to life and death and the social contract between a doctor and a patient are stated as the reasons why doctors are valued more than the ordinary beings. In Pakistan, strikes by doctors were carried out to protest against lack of service structure, security and low pay. This paper discusses the moral and ethical concerns pertaining to the strikes by medical doctors in the context of Pakistan. The author has carefully tried to balance the discussion about moral repercussions of strikes on patients versus the circumstances of doctors working in public sector hospitals of a developing country that may lead to strikes. Doctors are envisaged as highly respectable due to their direct link with human lives. Under Hippocrates oath, care of the patient is a contractual obligation for the doctors and is superior to all other responsibilities. From utilitarian perspective, doctors' strikes are justifiable only if there is evidence of long term benefits to the doctors, patients and an improvement in service delivery. Despite that, it is hard to justify such benefits against the risks to the patients. Harms that may incur to the patients include: prolongation of sufferings, irreversible damage to health, delay in treatment, death, loss of work and waste of financial resources.In a system of socialized medicine, government owing to greater control over resources and important managerial decisions should assume greater responsibility and do justice to all stakeholders including doctors as well as patients. If a doctor is underpaid, has limited options for career growth and is forced to work excessively, then not only quality of medical care and ability to act in the best interests of patients is adversely affected, it may also lead to brain drain. There is no single best answer against or in favor of doctors' industrial

  17. Assessment of basic human performance resources predicts operative performance of laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettman, Matthew T; Kondraske, George V; Traxer, Olivier; Ogan, Ken; Napper, Cheryl; Jones, Daniel B; Pearle, Margaret S; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A

    2003-09-01

    Interest in laparoscopic surgery has prompted development of educational programs designed to teach and assess laparoscopic skills. Although these programs are beneficial, because of the inherent demands imposed by laparoscopy some aspects of operative performance might not improve with practice. This suggests that innate ability could predict level of operative skill. Assessment of operative and technical potential to date has relied largely on subjective rather than objective criteria. In this study, the relationships between objective measures of human basic performance resources (BPRs) and laparoscopic performance were evaluated using Nonlinear Causal Resource Analysis (NCRA), a novel predictive and explanatory modeling approach based on General Systems Performance Theory. Twenty urology residents were voluntary enrolled. Thirteen validated BPRs were measured and analyzed relative to operative laparoscopic performance (assessed by two experts) of two porcine laparoscopic nephrectomies (LN). The laparoscopic procedure, representing a High Level Task (HLT), was evaluated using a modified Global Rating of Operative Performance Scale. NCRA models were devised to predict performance of the HLT laparoscopic nephrectomies based on BPRs and to determine the limiting performance resource. NCRA models predicted excellent agreement with actual operative performance, suggesting that measures of innate ability (or BPRs) predicted performance of laparoscopic nephrectomy. In 65%, the prediction by NCRA was near identical to the expert rating on the HLT. In 25% of cases, NCRA overpredicted performance; in 10%, NCRA underpredicted performance of the HLT compared to the subjective ratings. Neuromotor channel capacity was the most common performance-limiting resource. Preliminary findings suggest objective prediction of laparoscopic performance with limiting resource diagnostics for an individual surgeon is possible and practical using appropriate new measurement and modeling

  18. Epidemiological knowledge on human immunodeficiency virus infection as a basic for programme of prophylactic measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azovtseva, Olga Vladimirovna; Arkhipov, George Sergeyevich

    2015-03-01

    An epidemic situation on human immunodeficiency virus infection can be stopped and even compelled to step back, if adequate and comprehensive prophylactic measures are performed in the proper time. Prophylactic measures should be, directed on those groups, who are at high risk for becoming infected or who are carriers of HIV as the top priority. The epidemic situation in HIV infection in the northwestern region of Russia has been analyzed. The ways of the spread of HIV infection among the infected persons, residents of the St. Petersburg region, Kaliningrad, Novgorod, and Murmansk, have been studied. The infection is transmitted mainly through sexual contacts, both homosexual and heterosexual. High migration activity of HIV-infected persons, homo- and heterosexuals, has been established and a great number of unknown (casual) sexual contacts among them noted. The results of these observations may be useful in the prognostication of the epidemic situation in HIV infection not only in the northwestern region, but also beyond its boundaries, and later in the optimization of screening. The pandemic of HIV infection causes enormous economic damage, destabilizes the socio-political situation in many countries of the world, and hinders the achievement of aims for the development of millennium, both in the area of health protection and in other spheres. In Novgorod region an epidemic situation on HIV infection is estimated as one of most strained one. The basic indexes and tempos of their growth in a region are higher in relation to average federal data. But it can be stopped and even compelled to step back.

  19. Classic and Golli Myelin Basic Protein have distinct developmental trajectories in human visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin R Siu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally myelin is viewed as insulation around axons however more recent studies have shown it plays an important role in plasticity, axonal metabolism and neuroimmune signalling. Myelin is a complex multi-protein structure composed of hundreds of proteins, with Myelin Basic Protein (MBP being the most studied. MBP has two families: Classic-MBP that is necessary for activity driven compaction of myelin around axons, and Golli-MBP that is found in neurons, oligodendrocytes, and T cells, and has been called a 'molecular link' between the nervous and immune systems. In visual cortex myelin proteins interact with immune processes to affect experience-dependent plasticity. We studied myelin in human visual cortex using Western blotting to quantify Classic- and Golli-MBP expression in post-mortem tissue samples ranging in age from 20 days to 80 years. We found that Classic- and Golli-MBP have different patterns of change across the lifespan: Classic-MBP gradually increases to 42 years and then declines into aging; Golli-MBP has changes that are coincident with milestones in visual system sensitive period, before gradually increasing into aging. There are 3 stages in the balance between Classic- and Golli-MBP expression, with Golli-MBP dominating early, then shifting to Classic-MBP, and back to Golli-MBP in aging. Also Golli-MBP has a wave of high inter-individual variability during childhood. These results about cortical MBP expression are timely because they compliment recent advances in MRI techniques that produce high resolution maps of cortical myelin in normal and diseased brain. In addition the unique pattern of Golli-MBP expression across the lifespan suggests that it supports high levels of neuroimmune interaction in cortical development and in aging.

  20. MIST1 and PTF1 Collaborate in Feed-forward Regulatory Loops that Maintain the Pancreatic Acinar Phenotype in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mei; Azevedo-Pouly, Ana; Deering, Tye G; Hoang, Chinh Q; DiRenzo, Daniel; Hess, David A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Swift, Galvin H; MacDonald, Raymond J

    2016-09-19

    Much remains unknown regarding the regulatory networks formed by transcription factors in mature, differentiated mammalian cells in vivo, despite many studies of individual DNA-binding transcription factors. We report a constellation of feed-forward loops formed by the pancreatic transcription factors MIST1 and PTF1 that govern the differentiated phenotype of the adult pancreatic acinar cell. PTF1 is an atypical basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor complex of pancreatic acinar cells and critical to acinar cell fate specification and differentiation. MIST1, also a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, enhances the formation and maintenance of the specialized phenotype of professional secretory cells. The MIST1 and PTF1 collaboration controls a wide range of specialized cellular processes, including secretory protein synthesis and processing, exocytosis, and homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum. PTF1 drives Mist1 transcription, and MIST1 and PTF1 bind and drive the transcription of over a hundred downstream acinar genes. PTF1 binds two canonical bipartite sites within a 0.7-kb transcriptional enhancer upstream of Mist1 that are essential for the activity of the enhancer in vivo MIST1 and PTF1 co-regulate target genes synergistically or additively, depending on the target transcriptional enhancer. The frequent close binding proximity of PTF1 and MIST1 in pancreatic acinar cell chromatin implies extensive collaboration, although the collaboration is not dependent on a stable physical interaction. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Poplar MYB115 and MYB134 Transcription Factors Regulate Proanthocyanidin Synthesis and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Amy Midori; Ma, Dawei; Mellway, Robin; Gesell, Andreas; Yoshida, Kazuko; Walker, Vincent; Tran, Lan; Stewart, Don; Reichelt, Michael; Suvanto, Jussi; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Séguin, Armand; Constabel, C Peter

    2017-05-01

    The accumulation of proanthocyanidins is regulated by a complex of transcription factors composed of R2R3 MYB, basic helix-loop-helix, and WD40 proteins that activate the promoters of biosynthetic genes. In poplar (genus Populus ), MYB134 is known to regulate proanthocyanidin biosynthesis by activating key flavonoid genes. Here, we characterize a second MYB regulator of proanthocyanidins, MYB115. Transgenic poplar overexpressing MYB115 showed a high-proanthocyanidin phenotype and reduced salicinoid accumulation, similar to the effects of MYB134 overexpression. Transcriptomic analysis of MYB115- and MYB134-overexpressing poplar plants identified a set of common up-regulated genes encoding proanthocyanidin biosynthetic enzymes and several novel uncharacterized MYB transcriptional repressors. Transient expression experiments demonstrated the capacity of both MYB134 and MYB115 to activate flavonoid promoters, but only in the presence of a basic helix-loop-helix cofactor. Yeast two-hybrid experiments confirmed the direct interaction of these transcription factors. The unexpected identification of dihydromyricetin in leaf extracts of both MYB115- and MYB134-overexpressing poplar led to the discovery of enhanced flavonoid B-ring hydroxylation and an increased proportion of prodelphinidins in proanthocyanidin of the transgenics. The dramatic hydroxylation phenotype of MYB115 overexpressors is likely due to the up-regulation of both flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylases and cytochrome b 5 Overall, this work provides new insight into the complexity of the gene regulatory network for proanthocyanidin synthesis in poplar. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Coactivators necessary for transcriptional output of the hypoxia inducible factor, HIF, are directly recruited by ARNT PAS-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partch, Carrie L; Gardner, Kevin H

    2011-05-10

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is the key transcriptional effector of the hypoxia response in eukaryotes, coordinating the expression of genes involved in oxygen transport, glycolysis, and angiogenesis to promote adaptation to low oxygen levels. HIF is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS (PER-ARNT-SIM) heterodimer composed of an oxygen-labile HIF-α subunit and a constitutively expressed aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) subunit, which dimerize via basic helix-loop-helix and PAS domains, and recruit coactivators via HIF-α C-terminal transactivation domains. Here we demonstrate that the ARNT PAS-B domain provides an additional recruitment site by binding the coactivator transforming acidic coiled-coil 3 (TACC3) in a step necessary for transcriptional responses to hypoxia. Structural insights from NMR spectroscopy illustrate how this PAS domain simultaneously mediates interactions with HIF-α and TACC3. Finally, mutations on ARNT PAS-B modulate coactivator selectivity and target gene induction by HIF in vivo, demonstrating a bifunctional role for transcriptional regulation by PAS domains within bHLH-PAS transcription factors.

  3. The Human-Computer Interface and Information Literacy: Some Basics and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Gary M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses human/computer interaction research, human/computer interface, and their relationships to information literacy. Highlights include communication models; cognitive perspectives; task analysis; theory of action; problem solving; instructional design considerations; and a suggestion that human/information interface may be a more appropriate…

  4. Characterization of the basic charge variants of a human IgG1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Franklin; Derfus, Gayle; Kluck, Brian; Nogal, Bartek; Emery, Craig; Summers, Christie; Zheng, Kai; Bayer, Robert; Amanullah, Ashraf

    2011-01-01

    We report a case study of an IgG1 with a unique basic charge variant profile caused by C-terminal proline amidation on either one or two heavy chains. The proline amidation was sensitive to copper ion concentration in the production media during cell culture: the higher the Cu2+ ion concentration, the higher the level of proline amidation detected. This conclusion was supported by the analysis of samples that revealed direct correlation between the proline amidation level observed from peptide maps and the level of basic peaks measured by imaged capillary isoelectric focusing and a pH gradient ion-exchange chromatography method. The importance of these observations to therapeutic antibody production is discussed. PMID:22123059

  5. Crystal structure and functional characterization of the human RBM25 PWI domain and its flanking basic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Deshun; Yang, Fan; Li, Fudong; Qian, Dandan; Wu, Minhao; Shao, Zhenhua; Wu, Mian; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2013-02-15

    Human RBM25 (RNA-binding motif protein 25) is a novel splicing factor that contains a PWI domain, a newly identified RNA/DNA-binding domain, and regulates Bcl-x pre-mRNA alternative splicing. The flanking basic region has been suggested to serve as a co-operative partner of the PWI domain in the binding of nucleic acids, but the structure of this basic region is unknown. In the present paper, we report the crystal structure of the RBM25 PWI domain and its flanking basic region. The PWI domain is revealed to comprise a conserved four-helix bundle, and the flanking basic region forms two α-helices and associates with helix H4 of the PWI domain. These interactions promote directly the formation of an enlarged nucleic-acid-binding platform. Structure-guided mutagenesis reveals a positively charged nucleic-acid-binding surface in the RBM25 PWI domain that is entirely different from that in the SRm160 PWI domain. Furthermore, we show that the promotion of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-xS isoform expression by RBM25 is facilitated by the PWI domain in vivo. Thus the present study suggests that the PWI domain plays an important role in the regulation of Bcl-x pre-mRNA alternative splicing.

  6. Arousal Rather than Basic Emotions Influence Long-Term Recognition Memory in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, Artur; Wypych, Marek; Moslehi, Abnoos; Riegel, Monika; Michałowski, Jarosław M; Jednoróg, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Emotion can influence various cognitive processes, however its impact on memory has been traditionally studied over relatively short retention periods and in line with dimensional models of affect. The present study aimed to investigate emotional effects on long-term recognition memory according to a combined framework of affective dimensions and basic emotions. Images selected from the Nencki Affective Picture System were rated on the scale of affective dimensions and basic emotions. After 6 months, subjects took part in a surprise recognition test during an fMRI session. The more negative the pictures the better they were remembered, but also the more false recognitions they provoked. Similar effects were found for the arousal dimension. Recognition success was greater for pictures with lower intensity of happiness and with higher intensity of surprise, sadness, fear, and disgust. Consecutive fMRI analyses showed a significant activation for remembered (recognized) vs. forgotten (not recognized) images in anterior cingulate and bilateral anterior insula as well as in bilateral caudate nuclei and right thalamus. Further, arousal was found to be the only subjective rating significantly modulating brain activation. Higher subjective arousal evoked higher activation associated with memory recognition in the right caudate and the left cingulate gyrus. Notably, no significant modulation was observed for other subjective ratings, including basic emotion intensities. These results emphasize the crucial role of arousal for long-term recognition memory and support the hypothesis that the memorized material, over time, becomes stored in a distributed cortical network including the core salience network and basal ganglia.

  7. An empirical study on the basic human error probabilities for NPP advanced main control room operation using soft control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Inseok, E-mail: nuclear82@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ar Ryum, E-mail: arryum@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Harbi, Mohamed Ali Salem Al, E-mail: 100035556@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Lee, Seung Jun, E-mail: sjlee@kaeri.re.kr [Integrated Safety Assessment Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150-1, Dukjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Gook, E-mail: hyungook@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Poong Hyun, E-mail: phseong@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► The operation environment of MCRs in NPPs has changed by adopting new HSIs. ► The operation action in NPP Advanced MCRs is performed by soft control. ► Different basic human error probabilities (BHEPs) should be considered. ► BHEPs in a soft control operation environment are investigated empirically. ► This work will be helpful to verify if soft control has positive or negative effects. -- Abstract: By adopting new human–system interfaces that are based on computer-based technologies, the operation environment of main control rooms (MCRs) in nuclear power plants (NPPs) has changed. The MCRs that include these digital and computer technologies, such as large display panels, computerized procedures, soft controls, and so on, are called Advanced MCRs. Among the many features in Advanced MCRs, soft controls are an important feature because the operation action in NPP Advanced MCRs is performed by soft control. Using soft controls such as mouse control, touch screens, and so on, operators can select a specific screen, then choose the controller, and finally manipulate the devices. However, because of the different interfaces between soft control and hardwired conventional type control, different basic human error probabilities (BHEPs) should be considered in the Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) for advanced MCRs. Although there are many HRA methods to assess human reliabilities, such as Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP), Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP), Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART), Human Event Repository and Analysis (HERA), Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR), Cognitive Reliability and Error Analysis Method (CREAM), and so on, these methods have been applied to conventional MCRs, and they do not consider the new features of advance MCRs such as soft controls. As a result, there is an insufficient database for assessing human reliabilities in advanced

  8. Arousal rather than basic emotions influence long-term recognition memory in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Marchewka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Emotion can influence various cognitive processes, however its impact on memory has been traditionally studied over relatively short retention periods and in line with dimensional models of affect. The present study aimed to investigate emotional effects on long-term recognition memory according to a combined framework of affective dimensions and basic emotions. Images selected from the Nencki Affective Picture System were rated on the scale of affective dimensions and basic emotions. After six months, subjects took part in a surprise recognition test during an fMRI session. The more negative the pictures the better they were remembered, but also the more false recognitions they provoked. Similar effects were found for the arousal dimension. Recognition success was greater for pictures with lower intensity of happiness and with higher intensity of surprise, sadness, fear, and disgust. Consecutive fMRI analyses showed a significant activation for remembered (recognized vs. forgotten (not recognized images in anterior cingulate and bilateral anterior insula as well as in bilateral caudate nuclei and right thalamus. Further, arousal was found to be the only subjective rating significantly modulating brain activation. Higher subjective arousal evoked higher activation associated with memory recognition in the right caudate and the left cingulate gyrus. Notably, no significant modulation was observed for other subjective ratings, including basic emotion intensities. These results emphasize the crucial role of arousal for long-term recognition memory and support the hypothesis that the memorized material, over time, becomes stored in a distributed cortical network including the core salience network and basal ganglia.

  9. Neuronal medium that supports basic synaptic functions and activity of human neurons in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardy, C.; Hurk, M. van den; Eames, T.; Marchand, C.; Hernandez, R.V.; Kellogg, M.; Gorris, M.A.J.; Galet, B.; Palomares, V.; Brown, J.; Bang, A.G.; Mertens, J.; Bohnke, L.; Boyer, L.; Simon, S.; Gage, F.H.

    2015-01-01

    Human cell reprogramming technologies offer access to live human neurons from patients and provide a new alternative for modeling neurological disorders in vitro. Neural electrical activity is the essence of nervous system function in vivo. Therefore, we examined neuronal activity in media widely

  10. An upcoming program for medical humanities education in Fudan University's School of Basic Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Cheng, Xunjia

    2017-05-23

    Ideal medical care requires professional skills as well as appropriate communication skills. However, traditional medical education in medical schools mostly emphasizes the former. To remedy this situation, medical humanities education will be incorporated into education for medical students at Fudan University. Comprehensive medical education that includes both medical skills and humanities may greatly improve medical care.

  11. Why human evolution should be a basic science for medicine and psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanza, Paola; Parmigiani, Stefano

    2016-06-20

    Based on our teaching experience in medicine and psychology degree programs, we examine different aspects of human evolution that can help students to understand how the human body and mind work and why they are vulnerable to certain diseases. Three main issues are discussed: 1) the necessity to consider not only the mechanisms, i.e. the "proximate causations", implicated in biological processes but also why these mechanisms have evolved, i.e. the "ultimate causations" or "adaptive significance", to understand the functioning and malfunctioning of human body and mind; 2) examples of how human vulnerabilities to disease are caused by phylogenetic constraints, evolutionary tradeoffs reflecting the combined actions of natural and sexual selection, and/or mismatch between past and present environment (i.e., evolution of the eye, teeth and diets, erect posture and their consequences); 3) human pair-bonding and parent-offspring relationships as the result of socio-sexual selection and evolutionary compromises between cooperation and conflict. These psychobiological mechanisms are interwoven with our brain developmental plasticity and the effects of culture in shaping our behavior and mind, and allow a better understanding of functional (normal) and dysfunctional (pathological) behaviors. Thus, because the study of human evolution offers a powerful framework for clinical practice and research, the curriculum studiorum of medical and psychology students should include evolutionary biology and human phylogeny.

  12. Performance-driven facial animation: basic research on human judgments of emotional state in facial avatars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, A A; Neumann, U; Enciso, R; Fidaleo, D; Noh, J Y

    2001-08-01

    Virtual reality is rapidly evolving into a pragmatically usable technology for mental health (MH) applications. As the underlying enabling technologies continue to evolve and allow us to design more useful and usable structural virtual environments (VEs), the next important challenge will involve populating these environments with virtual representations of humans (avatars). This will be vital to create mental health VEs that leverage the use of avatars for applications that require human-human interaction and communication. As Alessi et al.1 pointed out at the 8th Annual Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference (MMVR8), virtual humans have mainly appeared in MH applications to "serve the role of props, rather than humans." More believable avatars inhabiting VEs would open up possibilities for MH applications that address social interaction, communication, instruction, assessment, and rehabilitation issues. They could also serve to enhance realism that might in turn promote the experience of presence in VR. Additionally, it will soon be possible to use computer-generated avatars that serve to provide believable dynamic facial and bodily representations of individuals communicating from a distance in real time. This could support the delivery, in shared virtual environments, of more natural human interaction styles, similar to what is used in real life between people. These techniques could enhance communication and interaction by leveraging our natural sensing and perceiving capabilities and offer the potential to model human-computer-human interaction after human-human interaction. To enhance the authenticity of virtual human representations, advances in the rendering of facial and gestural behaviors that support implicit communication will be needed. In this regard, the current paper presents data from a study that compared human raters' judgments of emotional expression between actual video clips of facial expressions and identical expressions rendered on a

  13. Walisongo’s Educational Leadership through Modelling and Fulfilment of Human Basic Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanang Hasan Susanto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to trace the Walisongo’s (the Nine Saints leadership model that is often considered successful in Islamizing the Javanese community in a relatively short time and almost without conflict. Through the literature search using analytic descriptive, this study brings the conclusion that based on the conventional leadership model division, the Walisongo’s leadership can be categorized into transformational leadership with characteristics capable of fostering the trust, pride, loyalty and respect of Javanese society. In addition, the Walisongo's leadership also conforms to the characteristics proposed by Tobroni, which include spiritual leadership, with characteristics based on the divine aspect, done with honesty and sincerely, drawing public sympathy and mobilizing them to follow the Walisongo’s teachings. This research also produces a finding that the success of Walisongo in educating the people of Java is due to their concern on the efforts to meet the basic needs of the society and provide models to follow.

  14. Uptake and presentation of myelin basic protein by normal human b cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes, Marie Klinge; Hansen, Bjarke Endel; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed

    2014-01-01

    B cells may play both pathogenic and protective roles in T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). These functions relate to the ability of B cells to bind and present antigens. Under serum-free conditions we observed that 3-4% of circulating B cells from healthy donors...... were capable of binding the MS-associated self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP) and of presenting the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99, as determined by staining with the mAb MK16 recognising the peptide presented by HLA-DR15-positive cells. In the presence of serum, however, the majority of B cells....... The mechanisms described here refute the general assumption that B-cell presentation of self-antigens requires uptake via specific B-cell receptors, and may be important for maintenance of tolerance as well as for driving T-cell responses in autoimmune diseases....

  15. Comparison of basic elements of human performance scores between urologists with various extents of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Elspeth M; Corica, Federico A; Chou, David S; Uribe, Carlos A; Abdelshehid, Corollos S; Boker, John R; Khonsari, Sepi S; Eichel, Lou; Lee, David; Finley, David S; Hogg, Deborah; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Pearle, Margaret S; Clayman, Ralph V

    2006-03-01

    An objective evaluation of innate ability and its ability to predict potential success as a surgical trainee is an appealing concept for the selection process of residency applications. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether basic elements of performance (BEP) could discriminate among resident applicants and urologists with various extents of surgical experience. One hundred forty-five participants were divided into four study groups: group A, 57 urology residency applicants to the 2002 and 2003 interview process; group B, 8 post-internship urology residents; group C, 19 urologists tested with BEP within 10 years of graduation from their residency training program; and group D, 61 urologists who had graduated from their residency training program more than 10 years prior to testing. The BEP measures consisted of 13 basic performance resources (BPR) including visual-information processing speed, visual-spatial immediate-recall capacity, and neuromotor channel capacity. The four study groups differed significantly in their mean age: group A=27.6 years, group B=29.1 years, group C=37.1 years, and group D=48.9 years (P<0.0005). There was essentially no significant difference between the groups with regard to immediate-recall memory, reaction time simple, or reaction time complicated. The younger participants (groups A and B) were faster than the older surgeons (groups C and D) (P<0.02). However, the older surgeons (groups C and D) were significantly more accurate than the younger groups (A and B) (P<0.0005). The only sex differences noted were in hand-grip strength and shoulder-strength scores, which were all higher in the men. There generally appears to be a lack of direct correlation between innate abilities and surgical experience. Urology resident applicants with no surgical experience and urology residents with limited surgical experience are faster but less accurate in innate skills testing than experienced practicing urologists.

  16. Human engineered heart tissue as a versatile tool in basic research and preclinical toxicology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schaaf

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC progenies hold great promise as surrogates for human primary cells, particularly if the latter are not available as in the case of cardiomyocytes. However, high content experimental platforms are lacking that allow the function of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes to be studied under relatively physiological and standardized conditions. Here we describe a simple and robust protocol for the generation of fibrin-based human engineered heart tissue (hEHT in a 24-well format using an unselected population of differentiated human embryonic stem cells containing 30-40% α-actinin-positive cardiac myocytes. Human EHTs started to show coherent contractions 5-10 days after casting, reached regular (mean 0.5 Hz and strong (mean 100 µN contractions for up to 8 weeks. They displayed a dense network of longitudinally oriented, interconnected and cross-striated cardiomyocytes. Spontaneous hEHT contractions were analyzed by automated video-optical recording and showed chronotropic responses to calcium and the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline. The proarrhythmic compounds E-4031, quinidine, procainamide, cisapride, and sertindole exerted robust, concentration-dependent and reversible decreases in relaxation velocity and irregular beating at concentrations that recapitulate findings in hERG channel assays. In conclusion this study establishes hEHT as a simple in vitro model for heart research.

  17. Human hydatid disease in Peru is basically restricted to Echinococcus granulosus genotype G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santivañez, Saul J; Gutierrez, Ariana M; Rosenzvit, Mara C; Muzulin, Patricia M; Rodriguez, Mary L; Vasquez, Julio C; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzalez, Armando E; Gilman, Robert H; Garcia, Hector H

    2008-07-01

    A molecular PCR study using DNA from 21 hydatid cysts was performed to determine which strain type is responsible for human infection in Peru. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene was amplified in 20 out of 21 samples, revealing that all but 1 sample (19/20, 95%) belonged to the common sheep strain (G1). The remaining samples belonged to the camel strain (G6). The G1 genotype was most frequently found in human cases of cystic hydatid disease (CHD) in Peru. Local control measures should focus primarily on decreasing dog and sheep infection rather than intermediate reservoirs.

  18. Id1 Deficiency Protects against Tumor Formation in Apc(Min/+) Mice but Not in a Mouse Model of Colitis-Associated Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Chin, Yvette; Benezra, Robert; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Different mechanisms contribute to the development of sporadic, hereditary and colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation (Id) proteins act as dominant-negative antagonists of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. Id1 is a promising target for cancer therapy, but little is known about its role in the development of colon cancer. We used immunohistochemistry to demonstrate that Id1 is overexpressed in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, whether sporadic or syndromic. Furthermore, elevated Id1 levels were found in dysplasia and colon cancer arising in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Because levels of PGE2 are also elevated in both colitis and colorectal neoplasia, we determined whether PGE2 could induce Id1. PGE2 via EP4 stimulated protein kinase A activity resulting in enhanced pCREB-mediated Id1 transcription in human colonocytes. To determine the role of Id1 in carcinogenesis, two mouse models were used. Consistent with the findings in humans, Id1 was overexpressed in tumors arising in both Apc(Min) (/+) mice, a model of familial adenomatous polyposis, and in experimental colitis-associated colorectal neoplasia. Id1 deficiency led to significant decrease in the number of intestinal tumors in Apc(Min) (/+) mice and prolonged survival. In contrast, Id1 deficiency did not affect the number or size of tumors in the model of colitis-associated colorectal neoplasia, likely due to exacerbation of colitis associated with Id1 loss. Collectively, these results suggest that Id1 plays a role in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. Our findings also highlight the need for different strategies to reduce the risk of colitis-associated colorectal cancer compared with sporadic or hereditary colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Introducing Pitt-Hopkins syndrome-associated mutations of TCF4 to Drosophila daughterless

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Tamberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS is caused by haploinsufficiency of Transcription factor 4 (TCF4, one of the three human class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors called E-proteins. Drosophila has a single E-protein, Daughterless (Da, homologous to all three mammalian counterparts. Here we show that human TCF4 can rescue Da deficiency during fruit fly nervous system development. Overexpression of Da or TCF4 specifically in adult flies significantly decreases their survival rates, indicating that these factors are crucial even after development has been completed. We generated da transgenic fruit fly strains with corresponding missense mutations R578H, R580W, R582P and A614V found in TCF4 of PTHS patients and studied the impact of these mutations in vivo. Overexpression of wild type Da as well as human TCF4 in progenitor tissues induced ectopic sensory bristles and the rough eye phenotype. By contrast, overexpression of DaR580W and DaR582P that disrupt DNA binding reduced the number of bristles and induced the rough eye phenotype with partial lack of pigmentation, indicating that these act dominant negatively. Compared to the wild type, DaR578H and DaA614V were less potent in induction of ectopic bristles and the rough eye phenotype, respectively, suggesting that these are hypomorphic. All studied PTHS-associated mutations that we introduced into Da led to similar effects in vivo as the same mutations in TCF4 in vitro. Consequently, our Drosophila models of PTHS are applicable for further studies aiming to unravel the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  20. Bone morphogenetic protein inhibition promotes neurological recovery after intraventricular hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummula, Krishna; Vinukonda, Govindaiah; Chu, Philip; Xing, Yiping; Hu, Furong; Mailk, Sabrina; Csiszar, Anna; Chua, Caroline; Mouton, Peter; Kayton, Robert J; Brumberg, Joshua C; Bansal, Rashmi; Ballabh, Praveen

    2011-08-24

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) results in neural cell death and white matter injury in premature infants. No therapeutic strategy is currently available against this disorder. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling suppresses oligodendrocyte development through basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors and promotes astrocytosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that IVH in premature newborns initiates degeneration and maturation arrest of oligodendrocyte lineage and that BMP inhibition alleviates hypomyelination, gliosis, and motor impairment in the survivors of IVH. To test the hypotheses, a rabbit model of IVH was used in which premature rabbit pups (E29) are treated with intraperitoneal glycerol at 2 h of age to induce IVH; and the pups with IVH exhibit hypomyelination and gliosis at 2 weeks of postnatal age. Maturation of oligodendrocyte lineage was evaluated by specific markers, and the expression of bHLH transcription factors was assessed. BMP levels were measured in both premature rabbit pups and autopsy materials from premature infants. Recombinant human noggin was used to suppress BMP action; and neurobehavioral performance, myelination and gliosis were assessed in noggin-treated pups compared with untreated controls. We found that IVH resulted in apoptosis and reduced proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitors, as well as arrested maturation of preoligodendrocytes in rabbits. BMP4 levels were significantly elevated in both rabbit pups and human premature infants with IVH compared with controls. Importantly, BMP inhibition by recombinant human noggin restored the levels of phospho-Smad1/5/8, Olig2 transcription factor, oligodendrocyte maturation, myelination, astrocyte morphology, and motor function in premature pups with IVH. Hence, BMP inhibition might enhance neurological recovery in premature infants with IVH.

  1. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays. Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:26427040

  2. Neuronal medium that supports basic synaptic functions and activity of human neurons in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardy, Cedric; van den Hurk, Mark; Eames, Tameji; Marchand, Cynthia; Hernandez, Ruben V.; Kellogg, Mariko; Gorris, Mark; Galet, Ben; Palomares, Vanessa; Brown, Joshua; Bang, Anne G.; Mertens, Jerome; Böhnke, Lena; Boyer, Leah; Simon, Suzanne; Gage, Fred H.

    2015-01-01

    Human cell reprogramming technologies offer access to live human neurons from patients and provide a new alternative for modeling neurological disorders in vitro. Neural electrical activity is the essence of nervous system function in vivo. Therefore, we examined neuronal activity in media widely used to culture neurons. We found that classic basal media, as well as serum, impair action potential generation and synaptic communication. To overcome this problem, we designed a new neuronal medium (BrainPhys basal + serum-free supplements) in which we adjusted the concentrations of inorganic salts, neuroactive amino acids, and energetic substrates. We then tested that this medium adequately supports neuronal activity and survival of human neurons in culture. Long-term exposure to this physiological medium also improved the proportion of neurons that were synaptically active. The medium was designed to culture human neurons but also proved adequate for rodent neurons. The improvement in BrainPhys basal medium to support neurophysiological activity is an important step toward reducing the gap between brain physiological conditions in vivo and neuronal models in vitro. PMID:25870293

  3. The Impact of Basic Skills on Human Resource Management in the Retailing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Alice Bird

    A recent survey of retailing firms, ranging from single stores to nationwide chains, showed that the most significant human resources challenge facing these organizations is how to attract and retain qualified employees. Faced with the many changes in the retailing industry and in the composition of the work force that have taken place over the…

  4. Providing context for a medical school basic science curriculum: The importance of the humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Britta M; Vannatta, Jerry B; Scobey, Laura E; Fergeson, Mark; Humanities Research Group; Crow, Sheila M

    2016-01-01

    To increase students' understanding of what it means to be a physician and engage in the everyday practice of medicine, a humanities program was implemented into the preclinical curriculum of the medical school curriculum. The purpose of our study was to determine how medical students' views of being a doctor evolved after participating in a required humanities course. Medical students completing a 16-clock hour humanities course from 10 courses were asked to respond to an open-ended reflection question regarding changes, if any, of their views of being a doctor. The constant comparative method was used for coding; triangulation and a variety of techniques were used to provide evidence of validity of the analysis. A majority of first- and second-year medical students (rr = 70%) replied, resulting in 100 pages of text. A meta-theme of Contextualizing the Purpose of Medicine and three subthemes: the importance of Treating Patients Rather than a Disease, Understanding Observation Skills are Important, and Recognizing that Doctors are Fallible emerged from the data. Results suggest that requiring humanities as part of the required preclinical curriculum can have a positive influence on medical students and act as a bridge to contextualize the purpose of medicine.

  5. How Human Information Behaviour Researchers Use Each Other's Work: A Basic Citation Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Lynne E. F.; Goodall, George R.; Lajoie-Paquette, Darian; Julien, Heidi

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine if and how human information behaviour (HIB) research is used by others. Method: Using ISI Web of Knowledge, a citation analysis was conducted on 155 English-language HIB articles published from 1993 to 2000 in six prominent LIS journals. The bibliometric core of 12 papers was identified.…

  6. The impact of a single administration of intranasal oxytocin on the recognition of basic emotions in humans: a meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shahrestani, Sara; Kemp, Andrew H; Guastella, Adam J

    2013-01-01

    ...) examining responses to the basic emotion types to assess whether OT enhances the recognition of emotion from human faces and whether this was influenced by the emotion expression and exposure time of the face...

  7. Host-Parasite Interactions in Human Malaria: Clinical Implications of Basic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Pragyan; Garg, Manika; Kumar, Praveen; Munjal, Akshay; Raja, K D

    2017-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, is one of the oldest parasites documented to infect humans and has proven particularly hard to eradicate. One of the major hurdles in designing an effective subunit vaccine against the malaria parasite is the insufficient understanding of host-parasite interactions within the human host during infections. The success of the parasite lies in its ability to evade the human immune system and recruit host responses as physiological cues to regulate its life cycle, leading to rapid acclimatization of the parasite to its immediate host environment. Hence understanding the environmental niche of the parasite is crucial in developing strategies to combat this deadly infectious disease. It has been increasingly recognized that interactions between parasite proteins and host factors are essential to establishing infection and virulence at every stage of the parasite life cycle. This review reassesses all of these interactions and discusses their clinical importance in designing therapeutic approaches such as design of novel vaccines. The interactions have been followed from the initial stages of introduction of the parasite under the human dermis until asexual and sexual blood stages which are essential for transmission of malaria. We further classify the interactions as "direct" or "indirect" depending upon their demonstrated ability to mediate direct physical interactions of the parasite with host factors or their indirect manipulation of the host immune system since both forms of interactions are known to have a crucial role during infections. We also discuss the many ways in which this understanding has been taken to the field and the success of these strategies in controlling human malaria.

  8. Expression of a Functional Recombinant Human Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor from Transgenic Rice Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daichang Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 is an important member of the FGF gene family. It is widely used in clinical applications for scald and wound healing in order to stimulate cell proliferation. Further it is applied for inhibiting stem cell differentiation in cultures. Due to a shortage of plasma and low expression levels of recombinant rbFGF in conventional gene expression systems, we explored the production of recombinant rbFGF in rice grains (Oryza sativa bFGF, OsrbFGF. An expression level of up to 185.66 mg/kg in brown rice was obtained. A simple purification protocol was established with final recovery of 4.49% and resulting in a yield of OsrbFGF reaching up to 8.33 mg/kg OsrbFGF. The functional assay of OsrbFGF indicated that the stimulating cell proliferation activity on NIH/3T3 was the same as with commercialized rbFGF. Wound healing in vivo of OsrbFGF is equivalent to commercialized rbFGF. Our results indicate that rice endosperm is capable of expressing small molecular mass proteins, such as bFGF. This again demonstrates that rice endosperm is a promising system to express various biopharmaceutical proteins.

  9. Basic human values in a young group: advances in exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian R. Daset Carreto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of a wide area of Study, developed since 1998 and focused on Childhood and Adolescence. At first, the aim was to research the psychopathological profile of adolescents, with sociodemographic variables. Further on Competence, Coping and Values were added for an approach from the Positive Psychology (Dahlsgaard, Peterson & Seligman, 2005. This article presents the preliminar results of a youth sample of secondary level students (n=152, aged 12 to 18, male and female, belonging to a medium socioeconomical status. The instrument used for the study is the Basic Values Questionnaire, developed by Valdiney V. Gouveia (1998, based on the studies of S. Schwartz and W. Bilsky (1987, 1990, 2004. Once the performance of this instrument was tested with our Spanish speaking population, some linguistic adaptations were implemented. To obtain the profile of the interviewed adolescents, descriptive statistic is used. The results show to statistically significant difference between girls and boys in Experimenting and Realization Values (Personnel Values Group; as well in Existence (Central Category Value and in Normative (Social Value, with bigger M quantity in Suprapersonnel Value (Central Value and Interaction (Social Category Value. In response to open questions about the most and the least important values, subjects have chosen Interaction (Social Value and Existence Values (Central Value as the most important ones, and Realization Values (Personal Value and the Normative Values (Central Value Category, as the least important ones. The study shows the importance of some groups of Values, what would require an analysis in relation to the behaviours with those that are expressed and their cultural relevance. The conclusions open the debate, from the own expression of the value and their relationship with the psychopathology and on the other hand with the well-being. 

  10. Uptake and presentation of myelin basic protein by normal human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Klinge Brimnes

    Full Text Available B cells may play both pathogenic and protective roles in T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS. These functions relate to the ability of B cells to bind and present antigens. Under serum-free conditions we observed that 3-4% of circulating B cells from healthy donors were capable of binding the MS-associated self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP and of presenting the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99, as determined by staining with the mAb MK16 recognising the peptide presented by HLA-DR15-positive cells. In the presence of serum, however, the majority of B cells bound MBP in a complement-dependent manner, and almost half of the B cells became engaged in presentation of MBP85-99. Even though complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35 and CR2 (CD21 both contributed to binding of MBP to B cells, only CR2 was important for the subsequent presentation of MBP85-99. A high proportion of MBP85-99 presenting B cells expressed CD27, and showed increased expression of CD86 compared to non-presenting B cells. MBP-pulsed B cells induced a low frequency of IL-10-producing CD4+ T cells in 3 out of 6 donors, indicating an immunoregulatory role of B cells presenting MBP-derived peptides. The mechanisms described here refute the general assumption that B-cell presentation of self-antigens requires uptake via specific B-cell receptors, and may be important for maintenance of tolerance as well as for driving T-cell responses in autoimmune diseases.

  11. Cloning and characterization of the 5'-flanking region of the pig AgRP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Fei; Wang, Tao; Wei, Liqiong; Zhu, Xiaoping; Chen, Yaosheng; Li, Jiaqi; Zhang, Zongwu; Du, Hongli; Wang, Xiaoning; Wang, Jufang

    2011-04-01

    Agouti-related peptide (AgRP), a brain neuropeptide generated by AgRP/neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons, plays a vital role in the hypothalamic regulation of energy homeostasis. RT-PCR and real-time PCR were carried out in various tissues to detect the AgRP expression pattern in pigs. Our RT-PCR results showed that the pig AgRP gene was ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues including heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, bladder, m. longissimus, belly fat, brain, large intestine, lymph, back fat, skin, and hypothalamus. Real-time quantitative PCR experiments revealed that it is in the hypothalamus with the highest expression of AgRP both in adult Lantang and Landrace pigs compared to the back fat and m.longissimus muscle and the cDNA level of AgRP in the hypothalamus of adult Chinese indigenous Lantang pig (fat-type) is significantly higher than that of Landrace pig (lean-type). To understand the regulation of the pig AgRP gene, the 5'-flanking region was isolated from a pig bacterial artificial chromosome library and used in a luciferase reporter assay. A positive cis-acting element for efficient AgRP expression was identified at nucleotides -501 to -479, by 5'-serial deletion of the promoter. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays (EMSA) with competing oligonucleotides revealed that the critical region contained a cis-acting element for Neurogenic Differentiation (NeuroD), which is a member of the NeuroD family of basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factors. This element has not been reported in human or mouse AgRP genes. Our results indicated that NeuroD might be an essential regulatory factor for transcription of pig AgRP, providing an important clue about energy homeostasis regulation in the porcine and human brain.

  12. Cloning and functional characterisation of avian transcription factor E2A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Kerstin B

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During B lymphocyte development the E2A gene is a critical regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation. With regards to the immunoglobulin genes the E2A proteins contribute to the regulation of gene rearrangement, expression and class switch recombination. We are now using the chicken cell line DT40 as a model system to further analyse the function of E2A. Results Here we report the cloning and functional analysis of the transcription factor E2A from chicken. Using RACE PCR on the chicken lymphoma cell line DT40 we have isolated full-length clones for the two E2A splice variants E12 and E47. Sequence conservation between the human and chicken proteins is extensive: the basic-helix-loop-helix DNA binding domain of human and chicken E47 and E12 are 93% and 92% identical, respectively. In addition high levels of conservation are seen in activation domain I, the potential NLS and the ubiquitin ligase interaction domain. E2A is expressed in a variety of tissues in chicken, with higher levels of expression in organs rich in immune cells. We demonstrate that chicken E12 and E47 proteins are strong transcriptional activators whose function depends on the presence of activation domain I. As in mammals, the dominant negative proteins Id1 and Id3 can inhibit the function of chicken E47. Conclusions The potential for homologous recombination in DT40 allows the genetic dissection of biochemical pathways in somatic cells. With the cloning of avian E2A and the recent description of an in vitro somatic hypermutation assay in this cell line, it should now be possible to dissect the potential role of E2A in the regulation of somatic hypermutation and gene conversion.

  13. SPIRITUALITY AND SINCERITY AS BASIC "EXISTENTIALS" OF HUMAN EXISTENCE: THE PEDAGOGICAL CONTEXT

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. N. Sinitsyn; A. G. Hentonen

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the philosophical-pedagogical and psychological analysis of the categories of "spirit," "soul" and "body", different views on the concepts of "spirituality", "sincerity" and "physicality." The "spirit" and "spirituality" is considered from the perspective of the unity of the three fundamental values of human existence (Truth, Goodness, Beauty), highlighting three areas of spiritual activity - knowledge, art, morality. "Soul" and "sincerity" are associated with the interna...

  14. AltitudeOmics: The Basic Biology of Human Acclimatization to High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    fro m p re - t o po st -e xe rc is e -12 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 Fig. 2. Individual data illustrating the effects of constant-load bike exercise (138...doppler ultrasound during hypoxia and hypercapnia in humans. Stroke 27, 2244- 50. Roach, R. C., Bartsch , P., Olez, O. & Hackett, P. H. 1993. The Lake...cc ep te d A rti cl e This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. 22 References Baumgartner RW, Bartsch P, Maggiorini M, Waber U

  15. Detection of basic drugs (methamphetamine, antidepressants, and nicotine) from human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, I; Nagai, T; Toshida, S

    1983-04-01

    Human hair contains methamphetamine, amitriptyline, imipramine, nicotine, and their metabolites in some amount, which can be detected by routine toxicological methods. Sometimes, the level of drugs reaches over 100 micrograms/g. Animal experiments indicate that these drugs are found solely in sections of hair grown after administration of the drugs. The negative stage after the administration of drugs means that the hair section containing drugs has not come out of the hair follicle. Toxicological examination of the hairs may give some clue helping to identify the chronology of the intoxication.

  16. Body Basics Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents - or Other Adults About the Body Basics Library KidsHealth > For Teens > About the Body Basics Library Print A A A Did you ever wonder ... system, part, and process works. Use this medical library to find out about basic human anatomy, how ...

  17. In vitro peritonitis: basic inflammatory reactions in a two-chamber coculture model of human peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendt, W; Wolff-Vorbeck, G; Leipziger, J; von Specht, B U; Schöffel, U

    2000-08-01

    We developed an in vitro model of the peritoneum by coculturing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) to gather information on peritoneal physiology and to closer reflect the in vivo situation in humans. HUVEC and HPMC were seeded on collagen-coated polytetraflourethylene-insert membranes of pore size 3 microm. HUVEC were grown on the bottom of the membrane and HMPC on the top. The confluent cells were monitored by measuring transepithelial resistance and by confocal microscopy. The transmigration of PMNs as an important mechanism during secondary peritonitis was studied in this two-chamber model. PMNs were isolated by density separation. After stimulation of HMPC with the complement factor 5 split product C5a (1 ng/ml) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; 10 or 50 microg/ml) for 1 h, 1 x 10(6) PMN were given to the lower compartment. Controls were cocultured cells without stimulation. After 1, 2, and 6 h nonadherent PMNs in the upper compartment were harvested and counted, interleukin-8 was measured in each compartment, and cells on the membrane were paraffin-embedded for immunohistochemistry. Each experiment was performed four times. Cells grew to confluence within 2-5 days and were detected on their respective seeding side by CD34 and cytokeratin 18 counterstaining. Transmigration of PMNs after C5a or TNF-alpha stimulation showed a significant time-dependent increase between 1 h and 6 h (P<0.05). PMNs were found in significantly higher numbers after stimulation with either C5a or TNF-alpha at 1, 2, and 6 h than without stimulation. After stimulation of HPMC, interleukin-8 secretion to the apical compartment increased in a time-dependent fashion, resulting in a gradient between the two chambers. Linear regression analysis revealed significant correlation between transmigrated PMN and interleukin-8 in stimulated cocultures; no correlation was found in controls. This new in vitro peritoneum consisting of

  18. Degradation of double-stranded RNA by human pancreatic ribonuclease: crucial role of noncatalytic basic amino acid residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Salvatore; Naddeo, Mariarosaria; Russo, Aniello; D'Alessio, Giuseppe

    2003-09-02

    Under physiological salt conditions double-stranded (ds) RNA is resistant to the action of most mammalian extracellular ribonucleases (RNases). However, some pancreatic-type RNases are able to degrade dsRNA under conditions in which the activity of bovine RNase A, the prototype of the RNase superfamily, is essentially undetectable. Human pancreatic ribonuclease (HP-RNase) is the most powerful enzyme to degrade dsRNA within the tetrapod RNase superfamily, being 500-fold more active than the orthologous bovine enzyme on this substrate. HP-RNase has basic amino acids at positions where RNase A shows instead neutral residues. We found by modeling that some of these basic charges are located on the periphery of the substrate binding site. To verify the role of these residues in the cleavage of dsRNA, we prepared four variants of HP-RNase: R4A, G38D, K102A, and the triple mutant R4A/G38D/K102A. The overall structure and active site conformation of the variants were not significantly affected by the amino acid substitutions, as deduced from CD spectra and activity on single-stranded RNA substrates. The kinetic parameters of the mutants with double-helical poly(A).poly(U) as a substrate were determined, as well as their helix-destabilizing action on a synthetic DNA substrate. The results obtained indicate that the potent activity of HP-RNase on dsRNA is related to the presence of noncatalytic basic residues which cooperatively contribute to the binding and destabilization of the double-helical RNA molecule. These data and the wide distribution of the enzyme in different organs and body fluids suggest that HP-RNase has evolved to perform both digestive and nondigestive physiological functions.

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies ... medication. This information may someday make it possible to predict who ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape from a dangerous ...

  3. Disturbed clockwork resetting in Sharp-1 and Sharp-2 single and double mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz J Rossner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The circadian system provides the basis to anticipate and cope with daily recurrent challenges to maintain the organisms' homeostasis. De-synchronization of circadian feedback oscillators in humans causes 'jet lag', likely contributes to sleep-, psychiatric-, metabolic disorders and even cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the disintegration of tissue-specific clocks are complex and not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on their circadian expression and cell culture experiments, the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH transcription factors SHARP-1(Dec2 and SHARP-2(Stra13/Dec1 were proposed as novel negative regulators of the molecular clock. To address their function in vivo, we generated Sharp-1 and Sharp-2 single and double mutant mice. Our experiments reveal critical roles for both factors in regulating period length, tissue-specific control of clock gene expression and entrainment to external cues. Light-pulse experiments and rapid delays of the light-dark cycle (experimental jet lag unravel complementary functions for SHARP-1 and SHARP-2 in controlling activity phase resetting kinetics. Moreover, we show that SHARP-1 and 2 can serve dual functions as repressors and co-activators of mammalian clock gene expression in a context-specific manner. This correlates with increased amplitudes of Per2 expression in the cortex and liver and a decrease in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of double mutant mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The existence of separate mechanisms regulating phase of entrainment, rhythm amplitude and period length has been postulated before. The differential effects of Sharp-deficiency on rhythmicity and behavioral re-entrainment, coupled to tissue-dependent regulatory functions, provide a new mechanistic basis to further understand the complex process of clock synchronizations.

  4. Disturbed clockwork resetting in Sharp-1 and Sharp-2 single and double mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, Moritz J; Oster, Henrik; Wichert, Sven P; Reinecke, Lisa; Wehr, Michael C; Reinecke, Johannes; Eichele, Gregor; Taneja, Reshma; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2008-07-23

    The circadian system provides the basis to anticipate and cope with daily recurrent challenges to maintain the organisms' homeostasis. De-synchronization of circadian feedback oscillators in humans causes 'jet lag', likely contributes to sleep-, psychiatric-, metabolic disorders and even cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the disintegration of tissue-specific clocks are complex and not well understood. Based on their circadian expression and cell culture experiments, the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors SHARP-1(Dec2) and SHARP-2(Stra13/Dec1) were proposed as novel negative regulators of the molecular clock. To address their function in vivo, we generated Sharp-1 and Sharp-2 single and double mutant mice. Our experiments reveal critical roles for both factors in regulating period length, tissue-specific control of clock gene expression and entrainment to external cues. Light-pulse experiments and rapid delays of the light-dark cycle (experimental jet lag) unravel complementary functions for SHARP-1 and SHARP-2 in controlling activity phase resetting kinetics. Moreover, we show that SHARP-1 and 2 can serve dual functions as repressors and co-activators of mammalian clock gene expression in a context-specific manner. This correlates with increased amplitudes of Per2 expression in the cortex and liver and a decrease in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of double mutant mice. The existence of separate mechanisms regulating phase of entrainment, rhythm amplitude and period length has been postulated before. The differential effects of Sharp-deficiency on rhythmicity and behavioral re-entrainment, coupled to tissue-dependent regulatory functions, provide a new mechanistic basis to further understand the complex process of clock synchronizations.

  5. Hand1 overexpression inhibits medulloblastoma metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Guda, Maheedhara R. [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Martin, Sarah E. [Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Antony, Reuben; Fernandez, Karen [Department of Pediatrics, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Lin, Julian [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Tsung, Andrew J. [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Illinois Neurological Institute, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Velpula, Kiran K., E-mail: velpula@uic.edu [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL 61656 (United States)

    2016-08-19

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most frequent malignant pediatric brain tumor. Current treatment includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, ongoing treatment in patients is further classified according to the presence or absence of metastasis. Since metastatic medulloblastoma are refractory to current treatments, there is need to identify novel biomarkers that could be used to reduce metastatic potential, and more importantly be targeted therapeutically. Previously, we showed that ionizing radiation-induced uPAR overexpression is associated with increased accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. We further demonstrated that uPAR protein act as cytoplasmic sequestration factor for a novel basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Hand1. Among the histological subtypes classical and desmoplastic subtypes account for the majority while large cell/anaplastic variant is most commonly associated with metastatic disease. In this present study using immunohistochemical approach and patient data mining for the first time, we demonstrated that Hand1 expression is observed to be downregulated in all the subtypes of medulloblastoma. Previously we showed that Hand1 overexpression regulated medulloblastoma angiogenesis and here we investigated the role of Hand1 in the context of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Moreover, UW228 and D283 cells overexpressing Hand1 demonstrated decreased-expression of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, β-catenin and SOX2); metastatic marker (SMA); and increased expression of epithelial marker (E-cadherin). Strikingly, human pluripotent stem cell antibody array showed that Hand1 overexpression resulted in substantial decrease in pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct3/4, Otx2, Flk1) suggesting that Hand1 expression may be essential to attenuate the EMT and our findings underscore a novel role for Hand1 in medulloblastoma metastasis. - Highlights: • Hand1 expression is downregulated in Medulloblastoma. • Hand1 over expression reduce

  6. The cardiomyocyte molecular clock regulates the circadian expression of Kcnh2 and contributes to ventricular repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Elizabeth A; Burgess, Don E; Zhang, Xiping; Lefta, Mellani; Smith, Jennifer L; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Bartos, Daniel C; Elayi, Claude S; Esser, Karyn A; Delisle, Brian P

    2015-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) follows a diurnal variation. Data suggest the timing of SCD is influenced by circadian (~24-hour) changes in neurohumoral and cardiomyocyte-specific regulation of the heart's electrical properties. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors brain muscle arnt-like1 (BMAL1) and circadian locomotor output control kaput (CLOCK) coordinate the circadian expression of select genes. We sought to test whether Bmal1 expression in cardiomyocytes contributes to K(+) channel expression and diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization. We used transgenic mice that allow for the inducible cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 (iCSΔBmal1(-/-)). We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction, voltage clamping, promoter-reporter bioluminescence assays, and electrocardiographic telemetry. Although several K(+) channel gene transcripts were downregulated in iCSΔBmal1(-/-)mouse hearts, only Kcnh2 exhibited a robust circadian pattern of expression that was disrupted in iCSΔBmal1(-/-) hearts. Kcnh2 underlies the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K(+) current, and the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K(+) current recorded from iCSΔBmal1(-/-) ventricular cardiomyocytes was ~50% smaller than control ventricular myocytes. Promoter-reporter assays demonstrated that the human Kcnh2 promoter is transactivated by the coexpression of BMAL1 and CLOCK. Electrocardiographic analysis showed that iCSΔBmal1(-/-) mice developed a prolongation in the heart rate-corrected QT interval during the light (resting) phase. This was secondary to an augmented circadian rhythm in the uncorrected QT interval without a corresponding change in the RR interval. The molecular clock in the heart regulates the circadian expression of Kcnh2, modifies K(+) channel gene expression, and is important for normal ventricular repolarization. Disruption of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock mechanism likely unmasks diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization that could contribute

  7. Different cis-acting elements are involved in the regulation of TRP1 and TRP2 promoter activities by cyclic AMP: pivotal role of M boxes (GTCATGTGCT) and of microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolotto, C; Buscà, R; Abbe, P; Bille, K; Aberdam, E; Ortonne, J P; Ballotti, R

    1998-02-01

    In melanocytes and in melanoma cells, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-elevating agents stimulate melanogenesis and increase the transcription of tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. However, two other enzymes, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1) and TRP2, are required for a normal melanization process leading to eumelanin synthesis. In B16 melanoma cells, we demonstrated that stimulation of melanogenesis by cAMP-elevating agents results in an increase in tyrosinase, TRP1, and TRP2 expression. cAMP, through a cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway, stimulates TRP1 and TRP2 promoter activities in both B16 mouse melanoma cells and normal human melanocytes. Regulation of the TRP1 and TRP2 promoters by cAMP involves a M box and an E box. Further, a classical cAMP response element-like motif participates in the cAMP responsiveness of the TRP2 promoter, demonstrating that the TRP2 gene is subjected to different regulatory processes, which could account for its different expression patterns during embryonic development or under specific physiological and pathological conditions. We also found that microphthalmia, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, strongly stimulates the transcriptional activities of the TRP1 and TRP2 promoters, mainly through binding to the M boxes. Additionally, we demonstrated that cAMP increases microphthalmia expression and thereby its binding to TRP1 and TRP2 M boxes. These convergent and compelling results disclose at least a part of the molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of melanogenic gene expression by cAMP and emphasize the pivotal role of microphthalmia in this process.

  8. A HAND2 Loss-of-Function Mutation Causes Familial Ventricular Septal Defect and Pulmonary Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Sun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common developmental abnormality, and is the leading noninfectious cause of mortality in neonates. Increasing evidence demonstrates that genetic defects play an important role in the pathogenesis of CHD. However, CHD exhibits substantial heterogeneity, and the genetic determinants for CHD remain unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. In the current study, the coding exons and flanking introns of the HAND2 gene, which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor essential for normal cardiovascular development, were sequenced in 192 unrelated patients with CHD, and a novel heterozygous mutation, p.S65I, was identified in a patient with congenital ventricular septal defect (VSD. Genetic analysis of the index patient’s pedigree revealed that the mutation was present in all seven affected family members available, but absent in the 13 unaffected family members examined. Besides, in addition to VSD, five of the proband’s close relatives also had pulmonary stenosis (PS, and the proband’s son also had double outlet right ventricle (DORV. The missense mutation, which altered an evolutionarily conserved amino acid, was absent in 300 unrelated, ethnically matched healthy individuals. Biological analyses using a dual-luciferase reporter assay system showed that the mutant HAND2 was associated with significantly diminished transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the mutation abolished the synergistic activation between HAND2 and GATA4, as well as NKX2.5—two other cardiac core transcriptional factors that have been causally linked to CHD. These findings indicate that HAND2 loss-of-function mutation contributes to human CHD, perhaps via its interaction with GATA4 and NKX2.5.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the bHLH gene family in planarians identifies factors required for adult neurogenesis and neuronal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Martis W; Brown, David D R; Nisperos, Sean V; Stanley, Brianna N; Pearson, Bret J; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2013-12-01

    In contrast to most well-studied model organisms, planarians have a remarkable ability to completely regenerate a functional nervous system from a pluripotent stem cell population. Thus, planarians provide a powerful model to identify genes required for adult neurogenesis in vivo. We analyzed the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors, many of which are crucial for nervous system development and have been implicated in human diseases. However, their potential roles in adult neurogenesis or central nervous system (CNS) function are not well understood. We identified 44 planarian bHLH homologs, determined their patterns of expression in the animal and assessed their functions using RNAi. We found nine bHLHs expressed in stem cells and neurons that are required for CNS regeneration. Our analyses revealed that homologs of coe, hes (hesl-3) and sim label progenitors in intact planarians, and following amputation we observed an enrichment of coe(+) and sim(+) progenitors near the wound site. RNAi knockdown of coe, hesl-3 or sim led to defects in CNS regeneration, including failure of the cephalic ganglia to properly pattern and a loss of expression of distinct neuronal subtype markers. Together, these data indicate that coe, hesl-3 and sim label neural progenitor cells, which serve to generate new neurons in uninjured or regenerating animals. Our study demonstrates that this model will be useful to investigate how stem cells interpret and respond to genetic and environmental cues in the CNS and to examine the role of bHLH transcription factors in adult tissue regeneration.

  10. A credit-card library approach for disrupting protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Shi, Jin; Yamamoto, Noboru; Moss, Jason A; Vogt, Peter K; Janda, Kim D

    2006-04-15

    Protein-protein interfaces are prominent in many therapeutically important targets. Using small organic molecules to disrupt protein-protein interactions is a current challenge in chemical biology. An important example of protein-protein interactions is provided by the Myc protein, which is frequently deregulated in human cancers. Myc belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) transcription factors. It is biologically active only as heterodimer with the bHLH-ZIP protein Max. Herein, we report a new strategy for the disruption of protein-protein interactions that has been corroborated through the design and synthesis of a small parallel library composed of 'credit-card' compounds. These compounds are derived from a planar, aromatic scaffold and functionalized with four points of diversity. From a 285 membered library, several hits were obtained that disrupted the c-Myc-Max interaction and cellular functions of c-Myc. The IC50 values determined for this small focused library for the disruption of Myc-Max dimerization are quite potent, especially since small molecule antagonists of protein-protein interactions are notoriously difficult to find. Furthermore, several of the compounds were active at the cellular level as shown by their biological effects on Myc action in chicken embryo fibroblast assays. In light of our findings, this approach is considered a valuable addition to the armamentarium of new molecules being developed to interact with protein-protein interfaces. Finally, this strategy for disrupting protein-protein interactions should prove applicable to other families of proteins.

  11. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT gene as a positional and functional candidate for type 2 diabetes and prediabetic intermediate traits: Mutation detection, case-control studies, and gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Winston S

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ARNT, a member of the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, is located on human chromosome 1q21–q24, a region which showed well replicated linkage to type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that common polymorphisms in the ARNT gene might increase the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes through impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Methods We selected 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms to tag common variation across the ARNT gene. Additionally we searched for novel variants in functional coding domains in European American and African American samples. Case-control studies were performed in 191 European American individuals with type 2 diabetes and 187 nondiabetic European American control individuals, and in 372 African American individuals with type 2 diabetes and 194 African American control individuals. Metabolic effects of ARNT variants were examined in 122 members of 26 European American families from Utah and in 225 unrelated individuals from Arkansas. Gene expression was tested in 8 sibling pairs discordant for type 2 diabetes. Results No nonsynonymous variants or novel polymorphisms were identified. No SNP was associated with type 2 diabetes in either African Americans or European Americans, but among nondiabetic European American individuals, ARNT SNPs rs188970 and rs11204735 were associated with acute insulin response (AIRg; p =ARNT mRNA levels was observed in transformed lymphocytes from sibling pairs discordant for type 2 diabetes. Conclusion Common ARNT variants are unlikely to explain the linkage signal on chromosome 1q, but may alter insulin secretion in nondiabetic subjects. Our studies cannot exclude a role for rare variants or variants of small (

  12. How human information behaviour researchers use each other's work: a basic citation analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne McKechnie

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to determine if and how human information behaviour (HIB research is used by others. Method. Using ISI Web of Knowledge, a citation analysis was conducted on 155 English-language HIB articles published from 1993 to 2000 in six prominent LIS journals. The bibliometric core of 12 papers was identified. Content analysis was performed on papers citing the core (n=377 to determine how the papers were cited. A domain visualization was constructed of the citing relationships within the entire corpus. Analysis. Citation analysis, content analysis and social network analysi were used to analyse the data. Results. HIB literature is being cited, primarily (81.5% by LIS authors. Fields outside of LIS citing HIB articles include engineering, psychology, education and medicine. Papers were cited generally (36.0%, for findings (28.5% and for theory (25.3% with few citations for method (6.0%. The domain visualization depicted a clear core of HIB scholarship surrounded by a periphery of largely uncited literature. Conclusion. HIB literature is yet to have a significant impact on other disciplines. It appears to be a second stage discipline, marked by theoretical consistency and exponential growth in publications and new researchers. More attention should be paid to writing and citation practices to allow HIB literature to become a rich guide to the act of doing HIB research.

  13. Human Papillomaviruses and Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer: Basic Virology and Clinical Manifestations

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    Ingo Nindl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPV infect cutaneous and mucosal epithelia and induce benign and malignant lesions. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, encompassing basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, is the most frequent cancer in the Caucasian population, and the incidence has increased dramatically worldwide. Ultraviolet (UV radiation is a major risk factor for NMSC, and cutaneous HPV is also considered to play an active role during the pathogenesis of these cancers. The first evidence for the involvement of HPV in NMSC was reported in patients with Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV. HPV types detected in skin tumours of these patients are referred to as EV/cutaneous HPV types belonging to the beta- and gamma-papillomaviruses (PV. Epidemiological studies have shown a higher risk of several EV/cutaneous HPV types for NMSC. Furthermore, in vitro and animal models show transforming properties of some PV types. The anti-apoptotic activities, and the delay of DNA repair mechanism caused by some EV/cutaneous HPV E6 proteins in response to UV-induced mutations, may lead to the persistence of DNA-damaged keratinocytes. Thus, specific EV/cutaneous HPV types as co-factors in association with UV-radiation and the immune system seem to be involved in the early pathogenesis of cutaneous SCC.

  14. Comparative properties of the Charcot-Leyden crystal protein and the major basic protein from human eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleich, G J; Loegering, D A; Mann, K G; Maldonado, J E

    1976-01-01

    Guinea pig eosinophil granules contain a protein, the major basic protein (MBP), which accounts for more than half of the total granule protein, has a high content of arginine, and displays a remarkable tendency to form disulfide-linked aggregates. In this study we have purified a similar protein from human eosinophil granules and have compared the human MBP to the protein comprising the Charcot-Leyden crystal (CLC). Eosinophils from patients with various diseases were purified and disrupted, and the granule fraction was obtained. Examination of the granule fraction by transmission electron microscopy showed numerous typical eosinophil granules. Analyses of granule lysates by gel filtration and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of peroxidase and MBP with properties similar to that previously found in guinea pig eosinophil granules. The human MBP had a molecular weight of 9,200, contained less than 1% carbohydrate, was rich in arginine, and readily formed disulfide-bonded aggregates. CLC were prepared from eosinophil-rich cell suspensions by homogenization in hypotonic saline. The supernates following centrifugation of cell debris spontaneously formed CLC. Analysis of CLC revealed the presence of a protein with a molecular weight of 13,000 containing 1.2% carbohydrate. The protein displayed a remarkable tendency to aggregate even in the presence of 0.2 M acetic acid. Human MBP and CLC protein differed in their molecular weights, carbohydrate compositions, and amino acid analyses. Mixtures of the MBP and the CLC protein yielded two bands in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Neither eosinophil protein increased vascular permeability in the guinea pig skin or contracted the guinea pig ileum. The results indicate that the human MBP and the CLC are distinct substances with properties such that one cannot be derived from the other. Images PMID:942977

  15. Towards an integrative post-2015 sustainable development goal framework: Focusing on global justice – peace, security and basic human rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George R. Lueddeke

    2015-12-01

    To strengthen the likelihood of realizing the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs, particularly with regard to “planet and population” health and well-being , UN and other decision-makers are urged to consider the adoption of an integrated SDG framework that is based on (i a vision of global justice - underpinned by peace, security and basic human rights; (ii the development of interdependent and interconnected strategies for each of the eleven thematic indicators identified in the UN document The World We Want; and (iii the application of guiding principles to measure the impact of SDG strategies in terms of holism, equity, sustainability, ownership, and global obligation. While current discussions on the SDGs are making progress in a number of areas, the need for integration of these around a common global vision and purpose seems especially crucial to avoid MDG shortcomings.

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by neurons that carries ...

  17. Therapy for Cerebral Palsy by Human Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation Combined With Basic Rehabilitation Treatment

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    Che Zhang MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common cause leading to childhood disability. Human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs transplantation is a promising alternative considering the safety and efficacy in current reports. This report represents a case of hUCB-MSCs transplantation combined with basic rehabilitation treatment beginning as early as age 6 months with follow-up as long as 5 years. Methods. A 6-year-old female patient was diagnosed with CP at age 6 months. The patient accepted 4 infusions of intravenous hUCB-MSCs in each course and received 4 courses of transplantation totally. A series of assessments were performed before the first transplantation, including laboratory tests, CDCC Infant Mental Development Scale, and Gross Motor Function Measure-88 (GMFM-88. Then annual assessments using the GMFM-88, Ashworth spasm assessment, and comprehensive function assessment scale were made in addition to the annual laboratory tests. In addition, electroencephalography and brain magnetic resonance imaging were conducted before transplantation and in the follow-up phase. Rehabilitation and safety follow-up have been ongoing for 5 years up to date. Results. There was no complaint about adverse effects during hospitalization or postoperative follow-up. Motor function recovered to normal level according to the evaluation of scales. Language function improved significantly. Linguistic rehabilitation therapy was enhanced for further improvement. Conclusions. The clinical application of hUC-MSCs combined with basic rehabilitation treatment was effective and safe for improving motor and comprehensive function in a patient with CP.

  18. Human Amniotic Membrane-Derived Products in Sports Medicine: Basic Science, Early Results, and Potential Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboh, Jonathan C; Saltzman, Bryan M; Yanke, Adam B; Cole, Brian J

    2016-09-01

    Amniotic membrane (AM)-derived products have been successfully used in ophthalmology, plastic surgery, and wound care, but little is known about their potential applications in orthopaedic sports medicine. To provide an updated review of the basic science and preclinical and clinical data supporting the use of AM-derived products and to review their current applications in sports medicine. Systematic review. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using the Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. The search term amniotic membrane was used alone and in conjunction with stem cell, orthopaedic, tissue engineering, scaffold, and sports medicine. The search identified 6870 articles, 80 of which, after screening of the titles and abstracts, were considered relevant to this study. Fifty-five articles described the anatomy, basic science, and nonorthopaedic applications of AM-derived products. Twenty-five articles described preclinical and clinical trials of AM-derived products for orthopaedic sports medicine. Because the level of evidence obtained from this search was not adequate for systematic review or meta-analysis, a current concepts review on the anatomy, physiology, and clinical uses of AM-derived products is presented. Amniotic membranes have many promising applications in sports medicine. They are a source of pluripotent cells, highly organized collagen, antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory cytokines, immunomodulators, and matrix proteins. These properties may make it beneficial when applied as tissue engineering scaffolds, improving tissue organization in healing, and treatment of the arthritic joint. The current body of evidence in sports medicine is heavily biased toward in vitro and animal studies, with little to no human clinical data. Nonetheless, 14 companies or distributors offer commercial AM products. The preparation and formulation of these products alter their biological and mechanical properties, and a thorough understanding of these

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each ... of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes the nucleus, cytoplasm, and ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  4. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Regulates REX1 Expression Via IL-6 In Stem Cells Isolated From Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowwarote, Nunthawan; Sukarawan, Waleerat; Pavasant, Prasit; Osathanon, Thanaphum

    2017-06-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) regulates pluripotent marker expression and cellular differentiation in various cell types. However, the mechanism by which bFGF regulates REX1 expression in stem cells, isolated from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of REX1 expression by bFGF in SHEDs. SHEDs were isolated and characterized. Their mRNA and protein expression levels were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. In some experiments, chemical inhibitors were added to the culture medium to impede specific signaling pathways. Cells isolated from human exfoliated deciduous tooth dental pulp tissue expressed mesenchymal stem cell surface markers (CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105). These cells differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages, when appropriately induced. Treating SHEDs with bFGF induced REX1 mRNA expression and this effect was attenuated by pretreatment with FGFR or Akt inhibitors. Cycloheximide pretreatment also inhibited the bFGF-induced REX1 expression, implying the involvement of intermediate molecule(s). Further, the addition of an IL-6 neutralizing antibody attenuated the bFGF-induced REX1 expression by SHEDs. In conclusion, bFGF enhanced REX1 expression by SHEDs via the FGFR and Akt signaling pathways. Moreover, IL-6 participated in the bFGF-induced REX1 expression in SHEDs. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1480-1488, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The 5 Alpha-Reductase Isozyme Family: A Review of Basic Biology and Their Role in Human Diseases

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    Faris Azzouni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the discovery of 5 alpha-reduction as an enzymatic step in steroid metabolism in 1951, and the discovery that dihydrotestosterone is more potent than testosterone in 1968, the significance of 5 alpha-reduced steroids in human diseases was not appreciated until the discovery of 5 alpha-reductase type 2 deficiency in 1974. Affected males are born with ambiguous external genitalia, despite normal internal genitalia. The prostate is hypoplastic, nonpalpable on rectal examination and approximately 1/10th the size of age-matched normal glands. Benign prostate hyperplasia or prostate cancer does not develop in these patients. At puberty, the external genitalia virilize partially, however, secondary sexual hair remains sparse and male pattern baldness and acne develop rarely. Several compounds have been developed to inhibit the 5 alpha-reductase isozymes and they play an important role in the prevention and treatment of many common diseases. This review describes the basic biochemical properties, functions, tissue distribution, chromosomal location, and clinical significance of the 5 alpha-reductase isozyme family.

  6. Susceptibility towards intramolecular disulphide-bond formation affects conformational stability and folding of human basic fibroblast growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estapé, D; van den Heuvel, J; Rinas, U

    1998-01-01

    The conformational stability and the folding properties of the all-beta-type protein human basic fibroblast growth factor (hFGF-2) were studied by means of fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that the instability of the biological activity of hFGF-2 is also reflected in a low conformational stability of the molecule. The reversibility of the unfolding and refolding process was established under reducing conditions. Determination of the free-energy of unfolding in the presence of reducing agents revealed that the conformational stability of hFGF-2 (DeltaGH2Oapp congruent with21 kJ. mol-1, 25 degreesC) is low compared with other globular proteins under physiological conditions (20-60 kJ.mol-1). However, the conformational stability of hFGF-2 is particularly low under non-reducing conditions. This instability is attributed to intramolecular disulphide-bond formation, rendering the molecule more susceptible to denaturant-induced unfolding. In addition, denaturant-induced unfolding of hFGF-2 renders the protein more susceptible to irreversible oxidative denaturation. Experimental evidence is provided that the irreversibility of the unfolding and refolding process in the absence of reducing agents is linked to the formation of an intramolecular disulphide bond involving cysteines 96 and 101. PMID:9761733

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) ...

  8. Thinking about thinking and emotion: the metacognitive approach to the medical humanities that integrates the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichbaum, Quentin G

    2014-01-01

    Medical knowledge in recent decades has grown prodigiously and has outstripped the capacity of the human brain to absorb and understand it all. This burgeoning of knowledge has created a dilemma for medical educators. We can no longer expect students to continue memorizing this large body of increasingly complex knowledge. Instead, our efforts should be redirected at developing in students a competency as flexible thinkers and agile learners so they can adeptly deal with new knowledge, complexity, and uncertainty in a rapidly changing world. Such a competency would entail not only cognitive but also emotional skills essential for the holistic development of their professional identity. This article will argue that metacognition--“thinking about thinking (and emotion)”--offers the most viable path toward developing this competency. The overwhelming volume of medical knowledge has driven some medical schools to reduce the time allocated in their curricula to the “soft-option” humanities as they tend to consider them an expendable “luxury.” Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, has moved away from the traditional conception of the medical humanities as “the arts,” composed of art, music, and literature, toward an approach that integrates the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences, based on metacognition. This metacognitive approach to the humanities, described in this article, has three goals: 1) to develop students as flexible thinkers and agile learners and to provide them with essential cognitive and emotional skills for navigating medical complexity and uncertainty; 2) to elicit in students empathy and tolerance by making them aware of the immense diversity in human cognition (and emotion); and 3) to integrate the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences. Through this metacognitive approach, students come to understand their patterns of cognition and emotions, and in the group setting, they learn to mindfully

  9. Thinking about Thinking and Emotion: The Metacognitive Approach to the Medical Humanities that Integrates the Humanities with the Basic and Clinical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichbaum, Quentin G

    2014-01-01

    Medical knowledge in recent decades has grown prodigiously and has outstripped the capacity of the human brain to absorb and understand it all. This burgeoning of knowledge has created a dilemma for medical educators. We can no longer expect students to continue memorizing this large body of increasingly complex knowledge. Instead, our efforts should be redirected at developing in students a competency as flexible thinkers and agile learners so they can adeptly deal with new knowledge, complexity, and uncertainty in a rapidly changing world. Such a competency would entail not only cognitive but also emotional skills essential for the holistic development of their professional identity. This article will argue that metacognition—“thinking about thinking (and emotion)”—offers the most viable path toward developing this competency. The overwhelming volume of medical knowledge has driven some medical schools to reduce the time allocated in their curricula to the “soft-option” humanities as they tend to consider them an expendable “luxury.” Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, has moved away from the traditional conception of the medical humanities as “the arts,” composed of art, music, and literature, toward an approach that integrates the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences, based on metacognition. This metacognitive approach to the humanities, described in this article, has three goals: 1) to develop students as flexible thinkers and agile learners and to provide them with essential cognitive and emotional skills for navigating medical complexity and uncertainty; 2) to elicit in students empathy and tolerance by making them aware of the immense diversity in human cognition (and emotion); and 3) to integrate the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences. Through this metacognitive approach, students come to understand their patterns of cognition and emotions, and in the group setting, they learn to mindfully

  10. "What if We Were in a Test Tube?" Students' Gendered Meaning Making during a Biology Lesson about the Basic Facts of the Human Genitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlander, Auli Arvola

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores what happens in the encounters between presentations of "basic facts" about the human genitals and 15-year-old students during a biology lesson in a Swedish secondary school. In this paper, meaning making was approached as relational, context-dependent and continually transacted. For this reason the analysis was…

  11. Feeder & basic fibroblast growth factor-free culture of human embryonic stem cells: Role of conditioned medium from immortalized human feeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teotia, Pooja; Sharma, Shilpa; Airan, Balram; Mohanty, Sujata

    2016-12-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are commonly maintained on inactivated feeder cells, in the medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). However, limited availability of feeder cells in culture, and the high cost of growth factors limit their use in scalable expansion of hESC cultures for clinical application. Here, we describe an efficient and cost-effective feeder and bFGF-free culture of hESCs using conditioned medium (CM) from immortalized feeder cells. KIND-1 hESC cell line was cultured in CM, collected from primary mouse embryonic fibroblast, human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) and immortalized HFF (I-HFF). Pluripotency of KIND-1 hESC cell line was confirmed by expression of genes, proteins and cell surface markers. In culture, these cells retained normal morphology, expressed all cell surface markers, could differentiate to embryoid bodies upon culture in vitro. Furthermore, I-HFF feeder cells without supplementation of bFGF released ample amount of endogenous bFGF to maintain stemness of hESC cells. The study results described the use of CM from immortalized feeder cells as a consistent source and an efficient, inexpensive feeder-free culture system for the maintenance of hESCs. Moreover, it was possible to maintain hESCs without exogenous supplementation of bFGF. Thus, the study could be extended to scalable expansion of hESC cultures for therapeutic purposes.

  12. Beyond Maslow's culture-bound linear theory: a preliminary statement of the double-Y model of basic human needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuo-Shu

    2003-01-01

    Maslow's theory of basic human needs is criticized with respect to two of its major aspects, unidimensional linearity and cross-cultural validity. To replace Maslow's linear theory, a revised Y model is proposed on the base of Y. Yu's original Y model. Arranged on the stem of the Y are Maslow's physiological needs (excluding sexual needs) and safety needs. Satisfaction of these needs is indispensable to genetic survival. On the left arm of the Y are interpersonal and belongingness needs, esteem needs, and the self-actualization need. The thoughts and behaviors required for the fulfillment of these needs lead to genetic expression. Lastly, on the right arm of the Y are sexual needs, childbearing needs, and parenting needs. The thoughts and behaviors entailed in the satisfaction of these needs result in genetic transmission. I contend that needs for genetic survival and transmission are universal and that needs for genetic expression are culture-bound. Two major varieties of culture-specific expression needs are distinguished for each of the three levels of needs on the left arm of the Y model. Collectivistic needs for interpersonal affiliation and belongingness, esteem, and self-actualization prevail in collectivist cultures like those found in East Asian countries. Individualistic needs are dominant in individualist cultures like those in North America and certain European nations. I construct two separate Y models, one for people in collectivist cultures and the other for those in individualist ones. In the first (the Yc model), the three levels of expression needs on the left arm are collectivistic in nature, whereas in the second (the Yi model), the three levels of needs on the left arm are individualistic in nature. Various forms of the double-Y model are formulated by conceptually combining the Yc and Yi models at the cross-cultural, crossgroup, and intra-individual levels. Research directions for testing the various aspects of the double-Y model are

  13. Interaction between the C-terminal region of human myelin basic protein and calmodulin: analysis of complex formation and solution structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Nobuhiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath is a multilamellar membrane structure wrapped around the axon, enabling the saltatory conduction of nerve impulses in vertebrates. Myelin basic protein, one of the most abundant myelin-specific proteins, is an intrinsically disordered protein that has been shown to bind calmodulin. In this study, we focus on a 19-mer synthetic peptide from the predicted calmodulin-binding segment near the C-terminus of human myelin basic protein. Results The interaction of native human myelin basic protein with calmodulin was confirmed by affinity chromatography. The binding of the myelin basic protein peptide to calmodulin was tested with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC in different temperatures, and Kd was observed to be in the low μM range, as previously observed for full-length myelin basic protein. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the peptide bound to calmodulin, and binding was accompanied by a conformational change; furthermore, gel filtration chromatography indicated a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of calmodulin in the presence of the peptide. NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding area to reside mainly within the hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin. The solution structure obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering indicates binding of the myelin basic protein peptide into the interlobal groove of calmodulin, while calmodulin remains in an extended conformation. Conclusion Taken together, our results give a detailed structural insight into the interaction of calmodulin with a C-terminal segment of a major myelin protein, the myelin basic protein. The used 19-mer peptide interacts mainly with the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin, and a conformational change accompanies binding, suggesting a novel mode of calmodulin-target protein interaction. Calmodulin does not collapse and wrap around the peptide tightly; instead, it remains in an extended conformation in the solution structure

  14. Basic electrotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Ashen, R A

    2013-01-01

    BASIC Electrotechnology discusses the applications of Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) in engineering, particularly in solving electrotechnology-related problems. The book is comprised of six chapters that cover several topics relevant to BASIC and electrotechnology. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to BASIC, and Chapter 2 talks about the use of complex numbers in a.c. circuit analysis. Chapter 3 covers linear circuit analysis with d.c. and sinusoidal a.c. supplies. The book also discusses the elementary magnetic circuit theory. The theory and performance of two windi

  15. Basic Warehousing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on basic warehousing is designed to provide Marines with Military Occupation Speciality 3051 in the rank of private through corporal with instruction in those basic principles, methods, and procedures that can be applied to any warehousing or storage…

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  17. Body Basics

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    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español About Body Basics KidsHealth / For Parents / About Body Basics Print Remember the biology class you had ... do, lots of new knowledge about how the body works helps us to understand it now better ...

  18. Anesthesia Basics

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    ... Help? Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Anesthesia Basics KidsHealth > For Teens > Anesthesia Basics Print A ... español Conceptos básicos sobre la anestesia What Is Anesthesia? No doubt about it, getting an operation can ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  20. Activity of human kallikrein-related peptidase 6 (KLK6) on substrates containing sequences of basic amino acids. Is it a processing protease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Roberta N; Oliveira, Lilian C G; Parise, Carolina B; Oliveira, Juliana R; Severino, Beatrice; Corvino, Angela; di Vaio, Paola; Temussi, Piero A; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A

    2017-05-01

    Human kallikrein 6 (KLK6) is highly expressed in the central nervous system and with elevated level in demyelinating disease. KLK6 has a very restricted specificity for arginine (R) and hydrolyses myelin basic protein, protein activator receptors and human ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits. Here we report a previously unreported activity of KLK6 on peptides containing clusters of basic amino acids, as in synthetic fluorogenic peptidyl-Arg-7-amino-4-carbamoylmethylcoumarin (peptidyl-ACC) peptides and FRET peptides in the format of Abz-peptidyl-Q-EDDnp (where Abz=ortho-aminobenzoic acid and Q-EDDnp=glutaminyl-N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) ethylenediamine), in which pairs or sequences of basic amino acids (R or K) were introduced. Surprisingly, KLK6 hydrolyzed the fluorogenic peptides Bz-A-R↓R-ACC and Z-R↓R-MCA between the two R groups, resulting in non-fluorescent products. FRET peptides containing furin processing sequences of human MMP-14, nerve growth factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) were cleaved by KLK6 at the same position expected by furin. Finally, KLK6 cleaved FRET peptides derived from human proenkephalin after the KR, the more frequent basic residues flanking enkephalins in human proenkephalin sequence. This result suggests the ability of KLK6 to release enkephalin from proenkephalin precursors and resembles furin a canonical processing proteolytic enzyme. Molecular models of peptides were built into the KLK6 structure and the marked preference of the cut between the two R of the examined peptides was related to the extended conformation of the substrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  2. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such ... released it increases the chance that the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. ... messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes the nucleus, cytoplasm, and cell organelles. ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences may have made it ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How ... cell, and responds to signals from the environment; this all helps the cell maintain its balance with ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the ... for the cell to work properly including small structures called cell organelles. Dendrites branch off from the ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Opportunities & Announcements Funding Strategy for Grants Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research Training Labs at NIMH Labs ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ... of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that causes the gene ...

  13. Basic Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the basic measures of corporate financial strength, and the sources of the information is reported. Considered are: balance sheet, income statement, funds and cash flow, and financial ratios.

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... in her life. She began to think of suicide because she felt like things weren't going ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  17. Insulin Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Insulin Basics There are different types of insulin depending ... you may be experiencing a reaction. Types of Insulin Rapid-acting insulin , begins to work about 15 ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... leaves the cell, and responds to signals from the environment; this all helps the cell maintain its balance ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... and her husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early- ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Outreach Home Stakeholder Engagement Outreach Partnership Program Alliance for Research Progress Coalition ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... of contact for receiving impulses on a neuron, branching off from the cell body. dopamine —A neurotransmitter ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  11. Blood Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Group Links Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Basics Blood is a specialized body fluid. It ... about nine pints. Jump To: The Components of Blood and Their Importance Many people have undergone blood ...

  12. Using CHAINS, a QuickBASIC 4.5 Program, to Teach Single-Subject Experimentation with Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, Marshall Lev

    2004-01-01

    Students enrolled in a single-subject design course studied the repeated acquisition of response sequences by using CHAINS, a QuickBASIC 4.5 program, which runs in DOS or Windows. For about 2 months, students examined the learning of such sequences as a function of various treatments. Each week students graphed their data, discussed their…

  13. Basic Tilted Helix Bundle – A new protein fold in human FKBP25/FKBP3 and HectD1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helander, Sara; Montecchio, Meri [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Division of Chemistry, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Lemak, Alexander [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Farès, Christophe [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Almlöf, Jonas [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Division of Chemistry, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Li, Yanjun [Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Toronto, 101 College St, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Yee, Adelinda [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Toronto, 101 College St, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Dhe-Paganon, Sirano [Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Toronto, 101 College St, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Sunnerhagen, Maria, E-mail: maria.sunnerhagen@liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Division of Chemistry, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • We describe the structure of a novel fold in FKBP25 and HectD. • The new fold is named the Basic Tilted Helix Bundle (BTHB) domain. • A conserved basic surface patch is presented, suggesting a functional role. - Abstract: In this paper, we describe the structure of a N-terminal domain motif in nuclear-localized FKBP25{sub 1–73}, a member of the FKBP family, together with the structure of a sequence-related subdomain of the E3 ubiquitin ligase HectD1 that we show belongs to the same fold. This motif adopts a compact 5-helix bundle which we name the Basic Tilted Helix Bundle (BTHB) domain. A positively charged surface patch, structurally centered around the tilted helix H4, is present in both FKBP25 and HectD1 and is conserved in both proteins, suggesting a conserved functional role. We provide detailed comparative analysis of the structures of the two proteins and their sequence similarities, and analysis of the interaction of the proposed FKBP25 binding protein YY1. We suggest that the basic motif in BTHB is involved in the observed DNA binding of FKBP25, and that the function of this domain can be affected by regulatory YY1 binding and/or interactions with adjacent domains.

  14. Induction of insulin and islet amyloid polypeptide production in pancreatic islet glucagonoma cells by insulin promoter factor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, P; Jensen, J; Andersen, F G

    1996-01-01

    ) 371, 606-609]. In adults, IPF1 expression is restricted to the beta-cells in the islets of Langerhans. We report here that IPF1 induces expression of a subset of beta-cell-specific genes (insulin and islet amyloid polypeptide) when ectopically expressed in clones of transformed pancreatic islet alpha...... in both alpha- and beta-cells. We conclude that IPF1 is a potent transcriptional activator of endogenous insulin genes in non-beta islet cells, which suggests an important role of IPF1 in beta-cell maturation.......-cells. In contrast, expression of IPF1 in rat embryo fibroblasts factor failed to induce insulin and islet amyloid polypeptide expression. This is most likely due to the lack of at least one other essential insulin gene transcription factor, the basic helix-loop-helix protein Beta 2/NeuroD, which is expressed...

  15. LIN-32/Atonal Controls Oxygen Sensing Neuron Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanos, Teresa Rojo; Pladevall-Morera, David; Langebeck-Jensen, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    Development of complex nervous systems requires precisely controlled neurogenesis. The generation and specification of neurons occur through the transcriptional and post-Transcriptional control of complex regulatory networks. In vertebrates and invertebrates, the proneural basic-helix-loop-helix (b......HLH) family of transcription factors has multiple functions in neurogenesis. Here, we identified the LIN-32/Atonal bHLH transcription factor as a key regulator of URXL/R oxygen-sensing neuron development in Caenorhabditis elegans. When LIN-32/Atonal expression is lost, the expression of URX specification...... and terminal differentiation genes is abrogated. As such, lin-32 mutant animals are unable to respond to increases in environmental oxygen. The URX neurons are generated from a branch of the cell lineage that also produces the CEPDL/R and URADL/R neurons. We found development of these neurons is also defective...

  16. Proprioceptor pathway development is dependent on Math1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, N. A.; Hassan, B. A.; Wang, V. Y.; Fernandez, M.; Banfi, S.; Bellen, H. J.; Fritzsch, B.; Zoghbi, H. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The proprioceptive system provides continuous positional information on the limbs and body to the thalamus, cortex, pontine nucleus, and cerebellum. We showed previously that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Math1 is essential for the development of certain components of the proprioceptive pathway, including inner-ear hair cells, cerebellar granule neurons, and the pontine nuclei. Here, we demonstrate that Math1 null embryos lack the D1 interneurons and that these interneurons give rise to a subset of proprioceptor interneurons and the spinocerebellar and cuneocerebellar tracts. We also identify three downstream genes of Math1 (Lh2A, Lh2B, and Barhl1) and establish that Math1 governs the development of multiple components of the proprioceptive pathway.

  17. Genomic organization of ZP domain containing egg envelope genes in medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Akira; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro; Hori, Hiroshi

    2003-02-13

    To provide insights into the diversity of egg envelope genes in teleosts, we determined the genomic organization and the map position of the medaka egg envelope genes expressed either in the oocytes or in the liver. There seems to be five classes of ZP domain containing egg envelope genes in vertebrates: zpa, zpax, zpb, zpc, and zpd. zpa, zpax, and zpb are much closely related than zpc. There is an expanded family of teleost-specific zpc genes. The duplication of the possible zpb/zpc cluster happened in the teleost lineage may be a cause of liver-specific ZP gene evolution in teleosts. The inconsistent presence of a repetitive amino acid domain among teleost zpb and zpc gene products suggests rapid evolution of this domain. In addition, relative abundance of E-boxes in putative promoters of medaka oocyte-specific ZP genes suggests their regulation by basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, particularly by FIGalpha.

  18. Type I bHLH Proteins Daughterless and Tcf4 Restrict Neurite Branching and Synapse Formation by Repressing Neurexin in Postmitotic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell D’Rozario

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proneural proteins of the class I/II basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH family are highly conserved transcription factors. Class I bHLH proteins are expressed in a broad number of tissues during development, whereas class II bHLH protein expression is more tissue restricted. Our understanding of the function of class I/II bHLH transcription factors in both invertebrate and vertebrate neurobiology is largely focused on their function as regulators of neurogenesis. Here, we show that the class I bHLH proteins Daughterless and Tcf4 are expressed in postmitotic neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and mice, respectively, where they function to restrict neurite branching and synapse formation. Our data indicate that Daughterless performs this function in part by restricting the expression of the cell adhesion molecule Neurexin. This suggests a role for these proteins outside of their established roles in neurogenesis.

  19. Evolutionary aspects of variability in bHLH orthologous families: insights from the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyoja, Fuki; Satoh, Nori

    2013-10-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play significant roles in multiple biological processes in metazoan cells. In recent work, we showed that three orthologous HLH families, pearl, amber, and peridot, have apparently been lost in the Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Homo sapiens lineages. To further address the gain and loss of bHLH proteins during bilaterian evolution, we examined the genome of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata, which has recently been sequenced. We characterized the putative full set 65 bHLH genes and showed that genes previously categorized into the orthologous family PTFb, actually fall into two distinct orthologous families, 48-related-1 and 48-related-2. We also identified a novel orthologous family, clockwork orange. Based on these newly identified orthologous family members and on orphan bHLH factors, we propose that genes encoding bHLH factors in bilaterians are not as evolutionarily stable as previously thought.

  20. Clockwork orange encodes a transcriptional repressor important for circadian-clock amplitude in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chunghun; Chung, Brian Y; Pitman, Jena L; McGill, Jermaine J; Pradhan, Suraj; Lee, Jongbin; Keegan, Kevin P; Choe, Joonho; Allada, Ravi

    2007-06-19

    Gene transcription is a central timekeeping process in animal clocks. In Drosophila, the basic helix-loop helix (bHLH)-PAS transcription-factor heterodimer, CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC), transcriptionally activates the clock components period (per), timeless (tim), Par domain protein 1 (Pdp1), and vrille (vri), which feed back and regulate distinct features of CLK/CYC function. Microarray studies have identified numerous rhythmically expressed transcripts, some of which are potential direct CLK targets. Here we demonstrate a circadian function for one such target, a bHLH-Orange repressor, CG17100/CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO). cwo is rhythmically expressed, and levels are reduced in Clk mutants, suggesting that cwo is CLK activated in vivo. cwo mutants display reduced-amplitude molecular and behavioral rhythms with lengthened periods. Molecular analysis suggests that CWO acts, in part, by repressing CLK target genes. We propose that CWO acts as a transcriptional and behavioral rhythm amplifier.

  1. clockwork orange encodes a transcriptional repressor important for circadian clock amplitude in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chunghun; Chung, Brian Y.; Pitman, Jena L.; McGill, Jermaine J.; Pradhan, Suraj; Lee, Jongbin; Keegan, Kevin P.; Choe, Joonho; Allada, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    Summary Gene transcription is a central timekeeping process in animal clocks. In Drosophila, the basic helix-loop helix (bHLH)-PAS transcription factor heterodimer, CLOCK (CLK)/CYCLE(CYC) transcriptionally activates the clock components period (per), timeless (tim), Par domain protein 1 (Pdp1), and vrille (vri) that feedback and regulate distinct features of CLK/CYC function [1]. Microarray studies have identified numerous rhythmically expressed transcripts [2-7], some of which are potential direct CLK targets [7]. Here we demonstrate a circadian function for one such target, a bHLH-Orange repressor CG17100/CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO). cwo is rhythmically expressed and levels are reduced in Clk mutants, suggesting that cwo is CLK-activated in vivo. cwo mutants display reduced amplitude molecular and behavioral rhythms with lengthened periods. Molecular analysis suggests CWO acts, in part, by repressing CLK target genes. We propose that CWO acts as a transcriptional and behavioral rhythm amplifier. PMID:17555964

  2. Transcriptomic analyses of Hand2 transgenic embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Funato

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we further provide the data generated for the previously published research article “Specification of jaw identity by the Hand2 transcription factor.” To better understand the downstream genes of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand2, we generated double-transgenic mice (Hand2NC by intercrossing CAG-floxed CAT-Hand2 mice with Wnt1-Cre mice for conditional activation of Hand2 expression in the neural crest. Altered expression of Hand2 induces transformation of the upper jaw to the lower jaw in Hand2NC mutant mice. This data article provides Tables detailing the differentially expressed genes between wild-type and Hand2NC mutant embryos. The raw array data of our transcriptomes as generated using Affymetrix microarrays are available on the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO browser (Reference number GSE75805.

  3. Circadian transcription factor BMAL1 regulates innate immunity against select RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Tanmay; Dhar, Jayeeta; Patel, Sonal; Kondratov, Roman; Barik, Sailen

    2017-02-01

    BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT-like protein 1, also known as MOP3 or ARNT3) belongs to the family of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS domain-containing transcription factors, and is a key component of the molecular oscillator that generates circadian rhythms. Here, we report that BMAL1-deficient cells are significantly more susceptible to infection by two major respiratory viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family, namely RSV and PIV3. Embryonic fibroblasts from Bmal1-/- mice produced nearly 10-fold more progeny virus than their wild type controls. These results were supported by animal studies whereby pulmonary infection of RSV produced a more severe disease and morbidity in Bmal1-/-mice. These results show that BMAL1 can regulate cellular innate immunity against specific RNA viruses.

  4. Transcription factors regulating uspA genes in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahieldin, Ahmed; Atef, Ahmed; Shokry, Ahmed M; Al-Karim, Saleh; Al Attas, Sanaa G; Gadallah, Nour O; Edris, Sherif; Al-Kordy, Magdy A; Hassan, Sabah M; Abo-Aba, Salah; El-Domyati, Fotouh M

    2017-01-01

    RNA-Seq of the Catharanthus roseus SRA database was done in order to detect putative universal stress proteins (USPs) and their possible controlling factors. Previous analysis indicated the existence and characterization of uspA-like genes. In silico analysis of RNA-Seq database in several plant tissues revealed the possible functions and regulations of some uspA-like transcripts whose transcription factors (TFs) that might drive their expression were detected. BLAST indicated the existence of TF superfamilies erf (ethylene-responsive TF), bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix) and WRKY that might regulate several uspA-like genes. This data was proven via semi-quantitative RT-PCR in four plant tissues. Several of these transcription factor superfamilies are known for their action in the plant defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The Role of Atonal Factors in Mechanosensory Cell Specification and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tiantian; Groves, Andrew K

    2015-12-01

    Atonal genes are basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that were first identified as regulating the formation of mechanoreceptors and photoreceptors in Drosophila. Isolation of vertebrate homologs of atonal genes has shown these transcription factors to play diverse roles in the development of neurons and their progenitors, gut epithelial cells, and mechanosensory cells in the inner ear and skin. In this article, we review the molecular function and regulation of atonal genes and their targets, with particular emphasis on the function of Atoh1 in the development, survival, and function of hair cells of the inner ear. We discuss cell-extrinsic signals that induce Atoh1 expression and the transcriptional networks that regulate its expression during development. Finally, we discuss recent work showing how identification of Atoh1 target genes in the cerebellum, spinal cord, and gut can be used to propose candidate Atoh1 targets in tissues such as the inner ear where cell numbers and biochemical material are limiting.

  6. TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA 1-Dependent Regulation of Flavonoid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipei Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The flavonoid composition of various tissues throughout plant development is of biological relevance and particular interest for breeding. Arabidopsis thaliana TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA 1 (AtTTG1 is an essential regulator of late structural genes in flavonoid biosynthesis. Here, we provide a review of the regulation of the pathway’s core enzymes through AtTTG1-containing R2R3-MYELOBLASTOSIS-basic HELIX-LOOP-HELIX-WD40 repeat (MBW(AtTTG1 complexes embedded in an evolutionary context. We present a comprehensive collection of A. thaliana ttg1 mutants and AtTTG1 orthologs. A plethora of MBW(AtTTG1 mechanisms in regulating the five major TTG1-dependent traits is highlighted.

  7. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Harold D

    1971-01-01

    Basic Electronics is an elementary text designed for basic instruction in electricity and electronics. It gives emphasis on electronic emission and the vacuum tube and shows transistor circuits in parallel with electron tube circuits. This book also demonstrates how the transistor merely replaces the tube, with proper change of circuit constants as required. Many problems are presented at the end of each chapter. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and opens with an overview of electron theory, followed by a discussion on resistance, inductance, and capacitance, along with their effects on t

  8. The Antirrhinum AmDEL gene enhances flavonoids accumulation and salt and drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feibing; Zhu, Hong; Kong, Weili; Peng, Rihe; Liu, Qingchang; Yao, Quanhong

    2016-07-01

    A basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor gene from Antirrhinum, AmDEL , increases flavonoids accumulation and enhances salt and drought tolerance via up-regulating flavonoid biosynthesis, proline biosynthesis and ROS scavenging genes in transgenic Arabidopsis. In plants, transcriptional regulation is the most important tools for increasing flavonoid biosynthesis. The AmDEL gene, as a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor gene from Antirrhinum, has been shown to increase flavonoids accumulation in tomato. However, its role in tolerance to abiotic stresses has not yet been investigated. In this study, the codon-optimized AmDEL gene was chemically synthesized. Subcellular localization analysis in onion epidermal cells indicated that AmDEL protein was localized to the nucleus. Expression analysis in yeast showed that the full length of AmDEL exhibited transcriptional activation. Overexpression of AmDEL significantly increased flavonoids accumulation and enhanced salt and drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that overexpression of AmDEL resulted in the up-regulation of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, proline biosynthesis and ROS scavenging under salt and drought stresses. Meanwhile, Western blot and enzymatic analyses showed that the activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase, chalcone isomerase, dihydroflavonol reductase, pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were also increased. Further components analyses indicated that the significant increase of proline and relative water content and the significant reduction of H2O2 and malonaldehyde content were observed under salt and drought stresses. In addition, the rates of electrolyte leakage and water loss were reduced in transgenic plants. These findings imply functions of AmDEL in accumulation of flavonoids and tolerance to salt and drought stresses. The AmDEL gene has the potential to be used to increase

  9. BASIC ACTIVITIES OF THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN ENSURING STAFF FOR S.C. ROMLUX S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SECARĂ CARMEN-GABRIELA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the analysis conducted, the main activities in the field of human resource management has been assessed, such as: human resource planning; recruitment and selection of staff; assessment of individual professional performances; initial and continuing training; evaluation of human resources management costs; motivation. However, there have also been reviewed with a lower degree of detailing, other issues of interest, such as: human resources assessment; promotion of staff. Following the integration of conclusions of analysis conducted for the business areas listed, it resulted the picture of the most important elements with generalizing value.

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a major mood circuit called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain ... in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body circuit which plays ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and plays an important ... of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by neurons that carries ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... MSC 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 Follow Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus NIMH Newsletter NIMH RSS ...

  14. Ethanol Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. ... Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah ... had problems getting to sleep and generally felt tired, listless, and had no ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Join A Study News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us About Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading ... the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Join A Study News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us About Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and Groups Strategic ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... our physical surroundings but also factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain ... had problems getting to sleep and generally felt tired, listless, and had no ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting messages. ... specialized brain systems. We have many specialized brain systems that work ... research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: ... of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  4. The truth about universal design: how knowledge on basic human functioning, used to inform design, differs across cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, V.; Hinds, P.; Evers, V.; Abdelnour-Nocera, J.; del Galdo, E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers a literature review of how findings from human psychology can be used as guidance for the design of interactive products for specific cultural settings. By considering cultural differences in human social psychology, we challenge the global applicability of design rules which are

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Top

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... Grants BRAIN Cell Census Launched How DNA Shapes Human Gene Expression More General Health Information from NIH ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News How DNA Shapes Human Gene Expression NIMH ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  8. Albanian: Basic Course. Basic Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    The purpose of this volume is to provide the student with a vehicle for reviewing the grammar and vocabulary of Lessons 1-120 of "Albanian: Basic Course," and, with practice and the help of new words and idioms, increasing his fluency and scope of expression. The volume contains eleven units, each unit describing a situation, which in turn is…

  9. Wavelet basics

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Y T

    1995-01-01

    Since the study of wavelets is a relatively new area, much of the research coming from mathematicians, most of the literature uses terminology, concepts and proofs that may, at times, be difficult and intimidating for the engineer. Wavelet Basics has therefore been written as an introductory book for scientists and engineers. The mathematical presentation has been kept simple, the concepts being presented in elaborate detail in a terminology that engineers will find familiar. Difficult ideas are illustrated with examples which will also aid in the development of an intuitive insight. Chapter 1 reviews the basics of signal transformation and discusses the concepts of duals and frames. Chapter 2 introduces the wavelet transform, contrasts it with the short-time Fourier transform and clarifies the names of the different types of wavelet transforms. Chapter 3 links multiresolution analysis, orthonormal wavelets and the design of digital filters. Chapter 4 gives a tour d'horizon of topics of current interest: wave...

  10. Evaluation of Medical Students' Attitudes and Performance of Basic Surgery Skills in a Training Program Using Fresh Human skin, Excised During Body Contouring Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, Jens; Seyed Jafari, Seyed Morteza; Schnabel, Kai P; Tschumi, Christian; Angermeier, Sarina; Shafighi, Maziar

    2015-01-01

    Learning surgical skills in the operating room may be a challenge for medical students. Therefore, more approaches using simulation to enable students to develop their practical skills are required. We hypothesized that (1) there would be a need for additional surgical training for medical students in the pre-final year, and (2) our basic surgery skills training program using fresh human skin would improve medical students' surgical skills. We conducted a preliminary survey of medical students to clarify the need for further training in basic surgery procedures. A new approach using simulation to teach surgical skills on human skin was set up. The procedural skills of 15 randomly selected students were assessed in the operating room before and after participation in the simulation, using Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills. Furthermore, subjective assessment was performed based on students' self-evaluation. The data were analyzed using SPSS, version 21 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL). The study took place at the Inselspital, Bern University Hospital. A total of 186 pre-final-year medical students were enrolled into the preliminary survey; 15 randomly selected medical students participated in the basic surgical skills training course on the fresh human skin operating room. The preliminary survey revealed the need for a surgical skills curriculum. The simulation approach we developed showed significant (p students become more proficient in handling surgical instruments before stepping into a real surgical situation. We suggest further studies evaluating our proposed teaching method and the possibility of integrating this simulation approach into the medical school curriculum. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... A highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... National Institutes of Health (NIH), a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Top

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... ClinicalTrials.gov : Federally and privately supported research using human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences ...

  13. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Tayal, DC

    2010-01-01

    The second edition of this book incorporates the comments and suggestions of my friends and students who have critically studied the first edition. In this edition the changes and additions have been made and subject matter has been rearranged at some places. The purpose of this text is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date study of the principles of operation of solid state devices, their basic circuits and application of these circuits to various electronic systems, so that it can serve as a standard text not only for universities and colleges but also for technical institutes. This book

  14. Regression Basics

    CERN Document Server

    Kahane, Leo H

    2007-01-01

    Using a friendly, nontechnical approach, the Second Edition of Regression Basics introduces readers to the fundamentals of regression. Accessible to anyone with an introductory statistics background, this book builds from a simple two-variable model to a model of greater complexity. Author Leo H. Kahane weaves four engaging examples throughout the text to illustrate not only the techniques of regression but also how this empirical tool can be applied in creative ways to consider a broad array of topics. New to the Second Edition Offers greater coverage of simple panel-data estimation:

  15. Crystal structure of human protein kinase CK2: insights into basic properties of the CK2 holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Ermakowa, I

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structure of a fully active form of human protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) consisting of two C-terminally truncated catalytic and two regulatory subunits has been determined at 3.1 A resolution. In the CK2 complex the regulatory subunits form a stable dimer linking the two catalyt...

  16. The Perception of Four Basic Emotions in Human and Nonhuman Faces by Children with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    Children who experienced autism, mental retardation, and language disorders; and, children in a clinical control group were shown photographs of human female, orangutan, and canine (boxer) faces expressing happiness, sadness, anger, surprise and a neutral expression. For each species of faces, children were asked to identify the happy, sad, angry,…

  17. A long term study on the role of exogenous human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor on the superficial digital flexor tendon healing in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, A; Moshiri, A

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor on the remodeling phase of the tenotomized superficial digital flexor tendon in rabbits. Forty white New Zealand mature male rabbits were divided randomly into two equal groups of treated and control. After tenotomy and surgical repair, using modified Kessler technique and running pattern, the injured legs were casted for 14 days. Human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was injected subcutaneously over the lesion on days 3, 7 and 10 post injuries. The control animals received normal saline injection similarly. The weight of the animals, tendon diameter, radiographic and ultrasonographic evaluations was conducted at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized 84 days post-injury and the tendons were evaluated at macroscopic, histopathologic and ultrastructural level and were also assessed for biomechanical and percentage dry weight parameters. Treatment significantly reduced the diameter and increased the echogenicity and dry weight content of the injured tendons. Treatment also significantly enhanced the maturation of the tenoblasts, fibrillogenesis, the collagen fibrils' diameter, fibrillar density, stiffness, and ultimate and yield strength. Subcutaneous administration of human recombinant bFGF is effective in restoring the morphological and biomechanical properties of the injured SDFT in rabbits.

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News New BRAIN Grants BRAIN Cell Census Launched ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News Twitter Chat on Seasonal Affective Disorder NIH ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Contact Us Staff Directories Privacy Notice Policies FOIA Accessibility Topic Finder Publicaciones en Español Top

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... NIH), a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Contact Us Staff Directories Privacy Notice Policies FOIA Accessibility Topic Finder Publicaciones en Español Top

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News Approaches to Understanding and Classifying Mental Disorders ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News Memory Gene Goes Viral IRP Researchers Develop ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... How DNA Shapes Human Gene Expression More General Health Information from NIH MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from government agencies and health-related organizations, available in both English and Spanish ( ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News NIMH Launches Director Twitter Account Ethics of ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News NIMH Director Gordon Elected AAAS Fellow NIMH ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News Mental Illnesses by the Numbers Molecular Clues ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science Education : Resources for science educators Pillbox: How to ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... National Library of Medicine Contact Us Staff Directories Privacy Notice Policies FOIA Accessibility Topic Finder Publicaciones en ... Health and Human Services. Contact Us Staff Directories Privacy Notice Policies FOIA Accessibility Topic Finder Publicaciones en ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News IRP Researchers Develop Suicide Risk Screening Toolkit ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  12. Development and evaluation of a hypermedia system that integrates basic concepts of mechanics, biomechanics and human anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Rezende

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the modeling of a hypermedia learning system (called “Biomec” that integrates physical, biomechanical and anatomical concepts involved in the human motion and a study carried out with undergraduate students who interacted with the system. The instructional design of the “Biomec” hypermedia system was developed on the basis of a theoretical framework which articulates the Cognitive Flexibility Theory and the interdisciplinary approach to knowledge. The system was evaluated based on its use by students of Biomechanics I and Kinesiology in a Pre Service Teachers Training Course of Physical Education aiming to discuss the following questions: (i what is its impact on the students’ attitude related to Physics? (ii in what extent does the hypertextual approach to the content favor the interdisciplinary conception of human motion? (iii in what extent do the students’ navigation profiles adapt to conceptual needs of the different disciplines of the course? The students answered instruments that assessed affective and cognitive aspects before and after the interaction with the system, and had their navigation registered and analyzed. The set of data obtained allowed to conclude that the “Biomec” system is a relevant instructional material, capable of positively influence the students’ attitude related to Physics, to favor the interdisciplinary approach of human motion and to attend the students enrolled in Biomechanics I better than the students enrolled in Kinesiology.

  13. Effects of Nerve Growth Factor and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Promote Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells to Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Lian, Min; Cao, Peipei; Bao, Guofeng; Xu, Guanhua; Sun, Yuyu; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Jiajia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Cui, Zhiming

    2017-04-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were the most widely used seed cells in the field of neural regeneration and bone tissue engineering, due to their easily isolation, lack of ethical controversy, low immunogenicity and low rates of transplantation rejection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on neural differentiation of DPSCs in vitro. DPSCs were cultured in neural differentiation medium containing NGF and bFGF alone or combination for 7 days. Then neural genes and protein markers were analyzed using western blot and RT-PCR. Our study revealed that bFGF and NGF increased neural differentiation of DPSCs synergistically, compared with bFGF and NGF alone. The levels of Nestin, MAP-2, βIII-tubulin and GFAP were the most highest in the DPSCs + bFGF + NGF group. Our results suggested that bFGF and NGF signifiantly up-regulated the levels of Sirt1. After treatment with Sirt1 inhibitor, western blot, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining showed that neural genes and protein markers had markedly decreased. Additionally, the ERK and AKT signaling pathway played a key role in the neural differentiation of DPSCs stimulated with bFGF + NGF. These results suggested that manipulation of the ERK and AKT signaling pathway may be associated with the differentiation of bFGF and NGF treated DPSCs. Our date provided theoretical basis for DPSCs to treat neurological diseases and repair neuronal damage.

  14. Drug Distribution to Human Tissues: Prediction and Examination of the Basic Assumption in In Vivo Pharmacokinetics-Pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The tissue:plasma partition coefficients (Kp ) are good indicators of the extent of tissue distribution. Therefore, advanced tissue composition-based models were used to predict the Kp values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on animal tissues and do not challenge the predictions with human tissues for drugs. The first objective of this study was to predict the experimentally determined Kp values of seven human tissues for 26 drugs. In all, 95% of the predicted Kp values are within 2.5-fold error of the observed values in humans. Accordingly, these results suggest that the tissue composition-based model used in this study is able to provide accurate estimates of drug partitioning in the studied human tissues. Furthermore, as the Kp equals to the ratio of total concentration between tissue and plasma, or the ratio of unbound fraction between plasma (fup ) and tissue (fut ), this parameter Kp would deviate from the unity. Therefore, the second objective was to examine the corresponding relationships between fup and fut values experimentally determined in humans for several drugs. The results also indicate that fup may significantly deviate to fut ; the discrepancies are governed by the dissimilarities in the binding and ionization on both sides of the membrane, which were captured by the tissue composition-based model. Hence, this violated the basic assumption in in vivo pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) research, since the free drug concentration in tissue and plasma was not equal particularly for the ionizable drugs due to the pH gradient effect on the fraction of unionized drug in plasma (fuip ) and tissue (fuit ) (i.e., fup × fuip × total plasma concentration = fut × fuit × total tissue concentration, and, hence, the free drug concentration in plasma and tissue differed by fuip/fuit). Therefore, this assumption should be adjusted for the ionized drugs, and, hence, a

  15. 1988 Volvo award in basic science. Proteoglycan synthesis in the human intervertebral disc. Variation with age, region and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, M T; Johnstone, B; O'Brien, J P

    1988-09-01

    Slices of human annulus fibrosus were cultured under conditions that controlled their hydration and prevented loss of proteoglycans from the extracellular matrix. A quantitative analysis of proteoglycan synthesis was carried out. Both the absolute rate of synthesis and the topographical variation in chondrocyte activity changed with age; the most active cells in the adult were found in the mid-annulus region, whereas in the fetal disc the cells in the inner annulus were the most active. The conditions under which the tissue was stored, and changes in hydration during culture, had considerable effects on synthesis. Pathological discs had a wide range of biological activity that reflected the heterogeneous properties of these specimens. It is suggested that this culture method provides a means of investigating the way in which the synthesis of the macromolecular components of the intervertebral disc are coordinated and subsequently incorporated into the extracellular matrix.

  16. Personalized Proteome Profiles of Healthy and Tumor Human Colon Organoids Reveal Both Individual Diversity and Basic Features of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Alba; van den Toorn, Henk W P; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2017-01-03

    Diseases at the molecular level are complex and patient dependent, necessitating development of strategies that enable precision treatment to optimize clinical outcomes. Organoid technology has recently been shown to have the potential to recapitulate the in vivo characteristics of the original individual's tissue in a three-dimensional in vitro culture system. Here, we present a quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and a comparative transcriptomic analysis of human colorectal tumor and healthy organoids derived, in parallel, from seven patients. Although gene and protein signatures can be derived to distinguish the tumor organoid population from healthy organoids, our data clearly reveal that each patient possesses a distinct organoid signature at the proteomic level. We demonstrate that a personalized patient-specific organoid proteome profile can be related to the diagnosis of a patient and with future development contribute to the generation of personalized therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control and memory. serotonin —A neurotransmitter that regulates many functions, including ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Join A Study News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About ... ClinicalTrials.gov : Federally and privately supported research using human ... sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ClinicalTrials.gov : Federally and privately supported research using human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science Education : Resources for science educators Pillbox: How to identify unknown ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related organizations, available in both English and Spanish ( Español ) ClinicalTrials.gov : Federally and privately supported research using ... Notice Policies FOIA Accessibility Topic Finder Publicaciones en Español Contact Us U.S. Department of Health and Human ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity ... the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. ... brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... a cell that contains DNA and information the cell needs for growing, staying alive, and making new neurons. prefrontal cortex —A highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed New BRAIN Grants ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News Disorders Share Molecular Signatures NIMH’s Dr. Ann ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  8. Inflation Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-03-01

    inflation since metrical fluctuations, both scalar and tensor, are also produced in inflationary models. Thus, the time appears to be appropriate for a very basic and simple exposition of the inflationary model written from a particle physics perspective. Only the simplest scalar model will be explored because it is easy to understand and contains all the basic elements of the inflationary model.

  9. ``What if we were in a test tube?'' Students' gendered meaning making during a biology lesson about the basic facts of the human genitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlander, Auli Arvola

    2014-06-01

    This paper explores what happens in the encounters between presentations of "basic facts" about the human genitals and 15-year-old students during a biology lesson in a Swedish secondary school. In this paper, meaning making was approached as relational, context-dependent and continually transacted. For this reason the analysis was conducted through a series of close readings of situations where students interacted with each other and the teacher in opening up gaps about alternative ways of discussing gender. Drawing on Foucault's theories about the inclusion and exclusion of knowledge and the subsequent work of Butler and other feminist researchers, the paper illuminates what gendered relations remain tacit in the conversation. It then illustrates possible ways in which these tacit gendered meanings could be made overt and discussed with the students when making meaning about the human genitals. The paper also shows how the ways in which human genitals are transacted in the science classroom have importance for what kind of learning is made available to the students.

  10. Establishment of LIF-dependent human iPS cells closely related to basic FGF-dependent authentic iPS cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hirai

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs can be divided into a leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF-dependent naïve type and a basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF-dependent primed type. Although the former are more undifferentiated than the latter, they require signal transduction inhibitors and sustained expression of the transgenes used for iPSC production. We used a transcriptionally enhanced version of OCT4 to establish LIF-dependent human iPSCs without the use of inhibitors and sustained transgene expression. These cells belong to the primed type of pluripotent stem cell, similar to bFGF-dependent iPSCs. Thus, the particular cytokine required for iPSC production does not necessarily define stem cell phenotypes as previously thought. It is likely that the bFGF and LIF signaling pathways converge on unidentified OCT4 target genes. These findings suggest that our LIF-dependent human iPSCs could provide a novel model to investigate the role of cytokine signaling in cellular reprogramming.

  11. Redirecting Therapeutic T Cells against Myelin-Specific T Lymphocytes Using a Humanized Myelin Basic Protein-HLA-DR2-{zeta} Chimeric Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moisini, Ioana; Nguyen, Phuong; Fugger, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Therapies that Ag-specifically target pathologic T lymphocytes responsible for multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases would be expected to have improved therapeutic indices compared with Ag-nonspecific therapies. We have developed a cellular immunotherapy that uses chimeric receptors...... to selectively redirect therapeutic T cells against myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific T lymphocytes implicated in MS. We generated two heterodimeric receptors that genetically link the human MBP(84-102) epitope to HLA-DR2 and either incorporate or lack a TCRzeta signaling domain. The Ag-MHC domain serves...... as a bait, binding the TCR of MBP-specific target cells. The zeta signaling region stimulates the therapeutic cell after cognate T cell engagement. Both receptors were well expressed on primary T cells or T hybridomas using a tricistronic (alpha, beta, green fluorescent protein) retroviral expression system...

  12. Prognostic Significance of the Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Derived Sequence 1 (LYL1 Gene Expression in Egyptian Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia El Menshawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aberrant activation of transcription factor genes is the most frequent target of genetic alteration in lymphoid malignancies. The lymphoblastic leukemia-derived sequence 1 (LYL1 gene, which encodes a basic helix-loop helix, was first identified with human T-cell acute leukemia. Recent studies suggest its involvement in myeloid malignancies. We aimed to study the expression percent of oncogene LYL1 in primary and secondary high-risk myeloid leukemia and the impact on prognostic significance in those patients. METHODS: Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of LYL1 oncogenes, our study was carried out on 39 myeloid leukemia patients including de novo cases, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS with transformation, and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML in accelerated and blast crisis, in addition to 10 healthy individuals as the reference control. RESULTS: LYL1 expression was increased at least 2 times compared to the controls. The highest expression of this transcription factor was observed in the MDS cases transformed to acute leukemia at 7.3±3.1, p=0.0011. LYL1 expression was found in 68.2%, 75%, and 77.8% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia, CML crisis, and MDS, respectively. Significant correlation of LYL1 overexpression with some subtypes of French-American-British classification was found. There was, for the first time, significant correlation between the blood count at diagnosis and LYL1 expression (p=0.023, 0.002, and 0.031 for white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets, respectively. The rate of complete remission was lower with very high levels of LYL1 expression and the risk of relapse increased with higher levels of LYL1 expression, suggesting an unfavorable prognosis for cases with enhanced expression. CONCLUSION: Overexpression of LYL1 is highly associated with acute myeloid leukemia and shows more expression in MDS with unfavorable prognosis in response to induction chemotherapy. These

  13. 1997 Volvo Award winner in basic science studies. Immunohistologic markers for age-related changes of human lumbar intervertebral discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerlich, A G; Schleicher, E D; Boos, N

    1997-12-15

    The authors performed a correlative macroscopic, histologic, and immunohistochemical investigation on human lumbar intervertebral discs using complete motion segment slices, including all age groups and stages of degeneration. To identify markers for age-related changes of human lumbar intervertebral discs. In particular, to investigate changes in the distribution pattern of collagen Types I, II, III, IV, V, VI, IX, and X. In addition, to study posttranslational protein modification by the immunolocalization of N-(carboxylmethyl)lysine (CML), which is regarded as a biomarker for oxidative stress. Data on a correlation of age-related changes in disc morphology and disc matrix composition is sparse. So far, no comprehensive analysis considered a correlation of macroscopic, histologic, and biochemical age-related alterations using complete sections of intervertebral discs (i.e., including nucleus pulposus, anulus fibrosus, endplates, and vertebral bodies). In addition, there is need for specific markers for these disc changes to allow for a better correlation with disc function. After photodocumentation of the macroscopic appearance, 229 sagittal lumbar motion segments obtained from 47 individuals (fetal to 86 years) during routine autopsy were processed for histologic and immunohistochemical analysis. All slices were investigated for histologic alterations of disc degeneration. A randomly selected subset of these specimens (n = 45) was used for a correlative analysis of interstitial collagens and molecular modifications of matrix proteins. The presence of CML-modification of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen, was observed first in the nucleus pulposus of a 13-year-old individual and increased significantly with age. In elderly people, both the nucleus pulposus and the anulus fibrosus showed extensive CML deposition. This CML deposition was accentuated in areas of macroscopic and histologic disc degeneration. After the occurrence of CML in the nucleus

  14. HES1, a target of Notch signaling, is elevated in canine osteosarcoma, but reduced in the most aggressive tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Deanna D; Anfinsen, Kristin P; Pfaff, Liza E; Ehrhart, E J; Charles, J Brad; Bønsdorff, Tina B; Thamm, Douglas H; Powers, Barbara E; Jonasdottir, Thora J; Duval, Dawn L

    2013-07-01

    Hairy and enhancer of split 1 (HES1), a basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor, is a downstream target of Notch signaling. Notch signaling and HES1 expression have been linked to growth and survival in a variety of human cancer types and have been associated with increased metastasis and invasiveness in human osteosarcoma cell lines. Osteosarcoma (OSA) is an aggressive cancer demonstrating both high metastatic rate and chemotherapeutic resistance. The current study examined expression of Notch signaling mediators in primary canine OSA tumors and canine and human osteosarcoma cell lines to assess their role in OSA development and progression. Reverse transcriptase - quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was utilized to quantify HES1, HEY1, NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 gene expression in matched tumor and normal metaphyseal bone samples taken from dogs treated for appendicular OSA at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Gene expression was also assessed in tumors from dogs with a disease free interval (DFI) of  300 days following treatment with surgical amputation followed by standard chemotherapy. Immunohistochemistry was performed to confirm expression of HES1. Data from RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical (IHC) experiments were analyzed using REST2009 software and survival analysis based on IHC expression employed the Kaplan-Meier method and log rank analysis. Unbiased clustered images were generated from gene array analysis data for Notch/HES1 associated genes. Gene array analysis of Notch/HES1 associated genes suggested alterations in the Notch signaling pathway may contribute to the development of canine OSA. HES1 mRNA expression was elevated in tumor samples relative to normal bone, but decreased in tumor samples from dogs with a DFI 300 days. NOTCH2 and HEY1 mRNA expression was also elevated in tumors relative to normal bone, but was not differentially expressed between the DFI tumor groups. Survival analysis confirmed an association between

  15. Coronary heart disease-associated variation in TCF21 disrupts a miR-224 binding site and miRNA-mediated regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint L Miller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified chromosomal loci that affect risk of coronary heart disease (CHD independent of classical risk factors. One such association signal has been identified at 6q23.2 in both Caucasians and East Asians. The lead CHD-associated polymorphism in this region, rs12190287, resides in the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR of TCF21, a basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor, and is predicted to alter the seed binding sequence for miR-224. Allelic imbalance studies in circulating leukocytes and human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC showed significant imbalance of the TCF21 transcript that correlated with genotype at rs12190287, consistent with this variant contributing to allele-specific expression differences. 3' UTR reporter gene transfection studies in HCASMC showed that the disease-associated C allele has reduced expression compared to the protective G allele. Kinetic analyses in vitro revealed faster RNA-RNA complex formation and greater binding of miR-224 with the TCF21 C allelic transcript. In addition, in vitro probing with Pb2+ and RNase T1 revealed structural differences between the TCF21 variants in proximity of the rs12190287 variant, which are predicted to provide greater access to the C allele for miR-224 binding. miR-224 and TCF21 expression levels were anti-correlated in HCASMC, and miR-224 modulates the transcriptional response of TCF21 to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF signaling in an allele-specific manner. Lastly, miR-224 and TCF21 were localized in human coronary artery lesions and anti-correlated during atherosclerosis. Together, these data suggest that miR-224 interaction with the TCF21 transcript contributes to allelic imbalance of this gene, thus partly explaining the genetic risk for coronary heart disease associated at 6q23.2. These studies implicating rs12190287 in the miRNA-dependent regulation of TCF21, in

  16. Loss of Ptf1a Leads to a Widespread Cell-Fate Misspecification in the Brainstem, Affecting the Development of Somatosensory and Viscerosensory Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskusnykh, Igor Y.; Steshina, Ekaterina Y.

    2016-01-01

    The brainstem contains diverse neuronal populations that regulate a wide range of processes vital to the organism. Proper cell-fate specification decisions are critical to achieve neuronal diversity in the CNS, but the mechanisms regulating cell-fate specification in the developing brainstem are poorly understood. Previously, it has been shown that basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Ptf1a is required for the differentiation and survival of neurons of the inferior olivary and cochlear brainstem nuclei, which contribute to motor coordination and sound processing, respectively. In this study, we show that the loss of Ptf1a compromises the development of the nucleus of the solitary tract, which processes viscerosensory information, and the spinal and principal trigeminal nuclei, which integrate somatosensory information of the face. Combining genetic fate-mapping, birth-dating, and gene expression studies, we found that at least a subset of brainstem abnormalities in Ptf1a−/− mice are mediated by a dramatic cell-fate misspecification in rhombomeres 2–7, which results in the production of supernumerary viscerosensory and somatosensory neurons of the Lmx1b lineage at the expense of Pax2+ GABAergic viscerosensory and somatosensory neurons, and inferior olivary neurons. Our data identify Ptf1a as a major regulator of cell-fate specification decisions in the developing brainstem, and as a previously unrecognized developmental regulator of both viscerosensory and somatosensory brainstem nuclei. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cell-fate specification decisions are critical for normal CNS development. Although extensively studied in the cerebellum and spinal cord, the mechanisms mediating cell-fate decisions in the brainstem, which regulates a wide range of processes vital to the organism, remain largely unknown. Here we identified mouse Ptf1a as a novel regulator of cell-fate decisions during both early and late brainstem neurogenesis, which are critical for proper

  17. Efficient Encapsulation and Sustained Release of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor in Nanofilm: Extension of the Feeding Cycle of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Uiyoung; Park, Hee Ho; Kim, Yu Jin; Park, Tai Hyun; Park, Ju Hyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2017-08-02

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has an established pivotal function in biomedical engineering, especially for the human pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, the limitation of bFGF is the ease of denaturation under normal physiological conditions, inducing loss of its activity. In this study, we designed multi-trilayered nanofilm composed of a repeating polycation/polyanion/bFGF structure, which has high loading efficiency and short buildup time. We also investigated that the loading and release of bFGF from the nanofilm with two parameters (counter-polyanion and film architectures). Then, we prepared the optimized nanofilm which maintains a sustained bFGF level in physiological condition to apply the nanofilm to human iPSCs culture. The amount of bFGF release from 12 trilayer nanofilm was 36.4 ng/cm(2), and activity of bFGF encapsulated into the nanofilm was maintained (60%) until 72 h during incubation at 37 °C. As a result, the iPSCs grown in the presence of the nanofilm with tridaily replacement of growth medium maintained undifferentiated morphology and expression levels of pluripotency marker proteins.

  18. Implementation of the Zuluaga-Raysmith (Z-R) model for assessment of perceived basic human needs in home health clients and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, B H

    2000-01-01

    The Zuluaga-Raysmith (Z-R) model is a conceptual framework that incorporates accepted concepts of universal basic human needs developed by Maslow, yet removes the hierarchical nature of these. The Z-R model recognizes the existence of a health-illness continuum and accepts that an entity (individual, family, aggregate, or community) may move freely in the direction of greater health and self-actualization or towards illness and premature death. The Z-R model identifies 10 basic needs and recognizes that a perceived deficit in any one of these needs can adversely affect the level of wellness of the entity being considered. This exploratory and descriptive study used 11 nurses as interviewers. Subjects consisted of a convenience sample of homebound clients of a home health agency in a metropolitan city, and selected caregivers (n = 27). A modified functional wellness inventory (developed in 1993 by Louvenia Carter) was used with several open-ended questions, which together related to the 10 needs of the Z-R model. Reliability coefficient of the instrument was 0.84. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data, using means, percentages, and frequencies. Open-ended questions were grouped according to content and ranked in order of frequency. The five most pressing needs of this small sample were income; physical health; opportunity to make a contribution; mobility; and mental, emotional, social, and spiritual health (MESSH). Nurses unanimously reported that use of the instrument and the Z-R model helped them to focus on the total person, identify strengths in their clients, identify perceived needs deficits, and therefore, with the client, facilitate the preparation of a timely and cost-effective interdisciplinary plan of care to help the entity to move to a higher level of wellness despite the presence of chronic disease, disability, or impending death. These findings suggested that further research is warranted to explore the use of the Z-R model. A

  19. Co-localization and regulation of basic fibroblast growth factor and arginine vasopressin in neuroendocrine cells of the rat and human brain

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    Gonzalez Ana M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult rat hypothalamo-pituitary axis and choroid plexus are rich in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2 which likely has a role in fluid homeostasis. Towards this end, we characterized the distribution and modulation of FGF2 in the human and rat central nervous system. To ascertain a functional link between arginine vasopressin (AVP and FGF2, a rat model of chronic dehydration was used to test the hypothesis that FGF2 expression, like that of AVP, is altered by perturbed fluid balance. Methods Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to examine the distribution of FGF2 and AVP neuropeptides in the normal human brain. In order to assess effects of chronic dehydration, Sprague-Dawley rats were water deprived for 3 days. AVP neuropeptide expression and changes in FGF2 distribution in the brain, neural lobe of the pituitary and kidney were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and western blotting (FGF2 isoforms. Results In human hypothalamus, FGF2 and AVP were co-localized in the cytoplasm of supraoptic and paraventricular magnocellular neurons and axonal processes. Immunoreactive FGF2 was associated with small granular structures distributed throughout neuronal cytoplasm. Neurohypophysial FGF2 immunostaining was found in axonal processes, pituicytes and Herring bodies. Following chronic dehydration in rats, there was substantially-enhanced FGF2 staining in basement membranes underlying blood vessels, pituicytes and other glia. This accompanied remodeling of extracellular matrix. Western blot data revealed that dehydration increased expression of the hypothalamic FGF2 isoforms of ca. 18, 23 and 24 kDa. In lateral ventricle choroid plexus of dehydrated rats, FGF2 expression was augmented in the epithelium (Ab773 as immunomarker but reduced interstitially (Ab106 immunostaining. Conclusions Dehydration altered FGF2 expression patterns in AVP-containing magnocellular neurons and neurohypophysis, as well as in choroid

  20. Hypoxia inducible BHLHB2 is a novel and independent prognostic marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weibin; Reiser-Erkan, Carolin; Michalski, Christoph W.; Raggi, Matthias C. [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Quan, Liao; Yupei, Zhao [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Peking (China); Friess, Helmut [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Erkan, Mert, E-mail: erkan@chir.med.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Kleeff, Joerg [Department of Surgery, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} The expression and function of BHLHB2 (DEC1/SHARP2) in pancreatic cancer is unknown. {yields} Hypoxia and serum starvation induces BHLHB2 expression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. {yields} BHLHB2 inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell line SU86.86 increases ED50 of gemcitabine 2.8-fold. {yields} BHLHB2 is an independent prognostic factor in multivariable cox analysis with a hazard ratio of 2:4. -- Abstract: Aims: The cyclic adenosine monophosphate-inducible basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain containing class-B2 transcriptional factor BHLHB2 is differentially expressed in a number of human malignancies. In the present study, the expression, regulation, functions and prognostic impact of BHLHB2 in pancreatic cancer were investigated. Methods: Expression analyses were carried out in tissues of the normal pancreas (n = 10) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n = 77) as well as in eight pancreatic cancer cell lines using quantitative RT-PCR, semiquantitative immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analyses. In vitro functional experiments were conducted using siRNA transfection, hypoxia, serum starvation, apoptosis induction with gemcitabine and actinomycin-D, and invasion assays. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were determined in a multivariable analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: BHLHB2 mRNA and protein expressions were strongly induced by hypoxia and by serum starvation in pancreatic cancer cell lines. BHLHB2 silencing with RNAi had no significant effects on growth and invasion but increased apoptosis resistance against gemcitabine by reducing caspace-3 cleavage. In BHLHB2 silenced cells the ED50 of gemcitabine increased from 13.95 {+-} 1.353 to 38.70 {+-} 5.262 nM (p < 0.05). Ex vivo, the weak/absent nuclear staining in normal pancreatic ducts and acinar cells was replaced by moderate to strong nuclear/cytoplasmic staining in PanIN lesions and pancreatic cancer

  1. Universal human habitat. Basic principles

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanov Vyacheslav Konstantinovich; Starikov Aleksandr Sergeevich

    2012-01-01

    Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities were adopted in 1993 by the United Nations. They have been valid since then. The number of disabled and elderly people is ever growing due to injuries, accidents, environmental problems, deterioration of health, population aging and demographic disorders. The term "universal habitat" reads as "universal design" worldwide. The concept of "universal design" was developed by Ronald Mace, American arc...

  2. Development and Pre-Clinical Evaluation of Recombinant Human Myelin Basic Protein Nano Therapeutic Vaccine in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mice Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghobashy, Medhat A.; Elmeshad, Aliaa N.; Abdelsalam, Rania M.; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Al-Shorbagy, Muhammad; Laible, Götz

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant human myelin basic protein (rhMBP) was previously produced in the milk of transgenic cows. Differences in molecular recognition of either hMBP or rhMBP by surface-immobilized anti-hMBP antibodies were demonstrated. This indicated differences in immunological response between rhMBP and hMBP. Here, the activity of free and controlled release rhMBP poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles (NPs), as a therapeutic vaccine against multiple sclerosis (MS) was demonstrated in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model. Following optimization of nanoformulation, discrete spherical, rough-surfaced rhMBP NPs with high entrapment efficiency and controlled release pattern were obtained. Results indicated that rhMBP was loaded into and electrostatically adsorbed onto the surface of NPs. Subcutaneous administration of free or rhMBP NPs before EAE-induction reduced the average behavioral score in EAE mice and showed only mild histological alterations and preservation of myelin sheath, with rhMBP NPs showing increased protection. Moreover, analysis of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-10) in mice brains revealed that pretreatment with free or rhMBP NPs significantly protected against induced inflammation. In conclusion: i) rhMBP ameliorated EAE symptoms in EAE animal model, ii) nanoformulation significantly enhanced efficacy of rhMBP as a therapeutic vaccine and iii) clinical investigations are required to demonstrate the activity of rhMBP NPs as a therapeutic vaccine for MS.

  3. [PDGFRα Participates in Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor-mediated Recovery of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Proliferation and Osteogenic Differentiation after Irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Kai; Yang, Zhi; Xu, Shuang-Nian; Zhang, Jian-Min; Chen, Jie-Ping

    2015-12-01

    To explore the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hBMMSC) damaged by irradiation and its underlying mechanisms. hBMMSC was irradiated with 0, 6, 12 Gy X ray, then flow cytometry, cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), Western blot and alizarin red staining were used to detect the effects of X ray on apoptosis, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMMSC; 0, 1, 5, 10, 20 ng/ml bFGF was added to hBMMSC irradiated with X ray for selecting the suitable bFGF reaction concentration; then the Western blot was used to detect the expression of PDGFRα so as to evaluate whether the expression of PDGFRα participated in bFGF-mediated recovery of hBMMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation after irradiation. The proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMMSC decreased remarkably after irradiation. bFGF promoted the recovery of proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of irradiated hBMMSC compared with untreated irradiated hBMMSC (P recovery of hBMMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. The damage of hBMMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation associates with downregulation of PDGFRα expression induced by irrediation. PDGFRα involves in repairing effect of bFGF on irradiation damage of hBMMSC.

  4. [Effect of concomitant use of dental drug on the properties of recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor formulation for periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yasuhiko; Oba, Takuma; Danjo, Kazumi

    2013-01-01

    We have discussed the essential property for periodontal disease medication using protein, such as recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor (rhbFGF). In our previous study, the criteria of thickener for the medication, viscosity, flowability etc., were set. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical and chemical effect of concomitant use of general dental drug or device on thickener properties for the clinical use of viscous rhbFGF formulation. Viscous formulation was prepared with six cellulose derivatives, two types hydroxy propyl cellulose (HPC), three types hydroxy ethyl cellulose (HEC) and methyl cellulose (MC). Antibiotic ointment, local anesthetic, bone graft substitute, agent for gargle and mouthwashes, were chosen as general dental drug and device. These drugs and device were mixed with the viscous formulations and the change of viscosity and flowability, the remaining ratio of rhbFGF were evaluated. When the various thickener solutions were mixed with the liquid drugs, viscosity and flowability did not changed much. However, in the case of MC solution, viscous property declined greatly when MC solution was mixed with cationic surfactant for gargle. The flowabilities of thickener solutions were declined with insoluble bone graft. The stabilities of rhbFGF in thickener solutions were no problem for 24 hours even in the case of mixing with dental drug or device. Our findings suggested that the viscous rhbFGF formulations prepared in this research were not substantially affected by the concomitant use of dental drug or device, especially the formulation with HPC or HEC was useful.

  5. Role of basic amino acids of the human angiotensin type 1 receptor in the binding of the non-peptide antagonist candesartan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Vauquelin

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available To explain the insurmountable/long-lasting binding of biphenyltetrazole-containing AT1-receptor antagonists such as candesartan, to the human angiotensin II type 1-receptor, a model is proposed in which the basic amino acids Lys199 and Arg 167 of the receptor interact respectively with the carboxylate and the tetrazole group of the antagonists. To validate this model, we have investigated the impact of substitution of Lys199 by Ala or Gln and of Arg167 by Ala on the binding properties of [3H]candesartan and on competition binding by candesartan, EXP3174, irbesartan, losartan, angiotensin II (Ang II and [Sar1-Ile8]angiotensin. Our results indicate that both amino acids play an important role in the AT1-receptor ligand binding. Whereas the negative charge of Lys 199 is involved in an ionic bond with the end-standing carboxylate group of the peptide ligands, its polarity also contributes to the non-peptide antagonist binding. Substitution of Arg167 by Ala completely abolished [3H]Ang II, as well as [3H] candesartan, binding. Whereas these results are in line with the proposed model, it cannot be excluded that both amino acid residues are important for the structural integrity of the AT1-receptor with respect to its ligand binding properties.

  6. A mutein of human basic fibroblast growth factor TGP-580 accelerates colonic ulcer healing by stimulating angiogenesis in the ulcer bed in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, H; Szabo, S

    2015-10-01

    Previously, we reported that TGP-580, a mutein of human basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), accelerated the healing of gastric and duodenal ulcers in rats. In the present study, we examined the effect of TGP-580 on the healing of colonic ulcers. In male Sprague Dawley rats, ulcers were induced in the colon 6 cm from the anus by enema of 50 μl of 3% N-ethylmaleimide, a sulfhydryl alkylator. The lesions were examined under a dissecting microscope (x10). The concentration of bFGF in the ulcerated colon was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and both the distribution of bFGF and the density of microvessels in the ulcer bed were examined by immunohistochemical staining. The content of bFGF in the ulcerated colon was markedly increased associated with ulcer healing, and ulcer healing was significantly delayed by intravenous administration of a monoclonal antibody for bFGF (MAb 3H3) once daily for 10 days. In the ulcer bed, many cells such as fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells and macrophages were positively stained with bFGF antiserum. TGP-580, human bFGF or dexamethasone was given intracolonally twice daily for 10 days, starting the day after ulcer induction. TGP-580 (0.2 - 20 μg/ml, 200 μl/rat) dose-dependently accelerated ulcer healing, and its effect was more than 10 times stronger than that of human bFGF. Density (μm/0.01 mm(2)) of microvessels in the ulcer bed was significantly increased by treatment with TGP-580, and there was a good correlation between the density of microvessels and the decrease of ulcerated area (R(2) = 0.633). On the other hand dexamethasone (20 μg/ml) inhibited angiogenesis in the ulcer bed and delayed ulcer healing. These results suggest that angiogenesis in the ulcer bed plays an important role in ulcer healing, and that bFGF mutein TGP-580 accelerated colonic ulcer healing, at least in part, by stimulating angiogenesis, whereas glucocorticoids may delay the healing by inhibiting angiogenesis.

  7. The degradation of human endothelial cell-derived perlecan and release of bound basic fibroblast growth factor by stromelysin, collagenase, plasmin, and heparanases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelock, J M; Murdoch, A D; Iozzo, R V; Underwood, P A

    1996-04-26

    Perlecan is a modular heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is localized to cell surfaces and within basement membranes. Its ability to interact with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) suggests a central role in angiogenesis during development, wound healing, and tumor invasion. In the present study we investigated, using domain specific anti-perlecan monoclonal antibodies, the binding site of bFGF on human endothelial perlecan and its cleavage by proteolytic and glycolytic enzymes. The heparan sulfate was removed from perlecan by heparitinase treatment, and the approximately 450-kDa protein core was digested with various proteases. Plasmin digestion resulted in a large fragment of approximately 300 kDa, whereas stromelysin and rat collagenase cleaved the protein core into smaller fragments. All three proteases removed immunoreactivity toward the anti-domain I antibody. We showed also that perlecan bound bFGF specifically by the heparan sulfate chains located on the amino-terminal domain I. Once bound, the growth factor was released very efficiently by stromelysin, rat collagenase, plasmin, heparitinase I, platelet extract, and heparin. Interestingly, heparinase I, an enzyme with a substrate specificity for regions of heparan sulfate similar to those that bind bFGF, released only small amounts of bFGF. Our findings provide direct evidence that bFGF binds to heparan sulfate sequences attached to domain I and support the hypothesis that perlecan represents a major storage site for this growth factor in the blood vessel wall. Moreover, the concerted action of proteases that degrade the protein core and heparanases that remove the heparan sulfate may modulate the bioavailability of the growth factor.

  8. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... Basics » Stem Cell Basics I. Back to top Stem Cell Basics I. Introduction: What are stem cells, and ...

  9. Science Translational Medicine – improving human health care worldwide by providing an interdisciplinary forum for idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forsythe, Katherine

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Science Translational Medicine’s mission is to improve human health care worldwide by providing a forum for communication and interdisciplinary idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners from all relevant established and emerging disciplines. The weekly journal debuted in October 2009 and is published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS, the publisher of Science and Science Signaling. The journal features peer-reviewed research articles, perspectives and commentary, and is guided by an international Advisory Board, led by Chief Scientific Adviser, Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., former Director of the National Institutes of Health, and Senior Scientific Adviser, Elazer R. Edelman, M.D., Ph.D., Thomas D. and Virginia W. Cabot Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Science Translational Medicine editorial team is led by Katrina L. Kelner, Ph.D., AAAS. A profound transition is required for the science of translational medicine. Despite 50 years of advances in our fundamental understanding of human biology and the emergence of powerful new technologies, the rapid transformation of this knowledge into effective health measures is not keeping pace with the challenges of global health care. Creative experimental approaches, novel technologies, and new ways of conducting scientific explorations at the interface of established and emerging disciplines are now required to an unprecedented degree if real progress is to be made. To aid in this reinvention, Science and AAAS have created a new interdisciplinary journal, Science Translational Medicine. The following interview exemplefies the pioneering content found in Science Translational Medicine. It is an excerpt from a Podcast interview with Dr. Samuel Broder, former director of the National Cancer Institute and current Chief Medical Officer at Celera. The Podcast was produced in tangent with Dr

  10. Human resources for health: task shifting to promote basic health service delivery among internally displaced people in ethnic health program service areas in eastern Burma/Myanmar

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    Sharon Low

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burma/Myanmar was controlled by a military regime for over 50 years. Many basic social and protection services have been neglected, specifically in the ethnic areas. Development in these areas was led by the ethnic non-state actors to ensure care and the availability of health services for the communities living in the border ethnic-controlled areas. Political changes in Burma/Myanmar have been ongoing since the end of 2010. Given the ethnic diversity of Burma/Myanmar, many challenges in ensuring health service coverage among all ethnic groups lie ahead. Methods: A case study method was used to document how existing human resources for health (HRH reach the vulnerable population in the ethnic health organizations’ (EHOs and community-based organizations’ (CBHOs service areas, and their related information on training and services delivered. Mixed methods were used. Survey data on HRH, service provision, and training were collected from clinic-in-charges in 110 clinics in 14 Karen/Kayin townships through a rapid-mapping exercise. We also reviewed 7 organizational and policy documents and conducted 10 interviews and discussions with clinic-in-charges. Findings: Despite the lack of skilled medical professionals, the EHOs and CBHOs have been serving the population along the border through task shifting to less specialized health workers. Clinics and mobile teams work in partnership, focusing on primary care with some aspects of secondary care. The rapid-mapping exercise showed that the aggregate HRH density in Karen/Kayin state is 2.8 per 1,000 population. Every mobile team has 1.8 health workers per 1,000 population, whereas each clinic has between 2.5 and 3.9 health workers per 1,000 population. By reorganizing and training the workforce with a rigorous and up-to-date curriculum, EHOs and CBHOs present a viable solution for improving health service coverage to the underserved population. Conclusion: Despite the chronic conflict in

  11. Basic fibroblast growth factor induces matrix metalloproteinase-13 via ERK MAP kinase-altered phosphorylation and sumoylation of Elk-1 in human adult articular chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jeong Im

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Hee-Jeong Im,1–4 Andrew D Sharrocks,5 Xia Lin,6 Dongyao Yan,1 Jaesung Kim,1 Andre J van Wijnen,7 Robert A Hipskind81Departments of Biochemistry, 2Internal Medicine, 3Section of Rheumatology, Orthopedic Surgery, 4Rush University Medical Center, and Department of Bioengineering; University of Illinois at Chicago, IL USA; 5Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, UK; 6Michael D DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA; 7Department of Cell Biology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 8Institute De Genetique Moleculaire de Montpellier, FranceAbstract: Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF are principal aspects of the pathology of osteoarthritis (OA. ECM disruption leads to bFGF release, which activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK pathway and its downstream target the Ets-like transcription factor Elk-1. Previously we demonstrated that the bFGF-ERK-Elk-1 signaling axis is responsible for the potent induction of MMP-13 in human primary articular chondrocytes. Here we report that, in addition to phosphorylation of Elk-1, dynamic posttranslational modification of Elk-1 by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO serves as an important mechanism through which MMP-13 gene expression is regulated. We show that bFGF activates Elk-1 mainly through the ERK pathway and that increased phosphorylation of Elk-1 is accompanied by decreased conjugation of SUMO to Elk-1. Reporter gene assays reveal that phosphorylation renders Elk-1 competent for induction of MMP-13 gene transcription, while sumoylation has the opposite effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the SUMO-conjugase Ubc9 acts as a key mediator for Elk-1 sumoylation. Taken together, our results suggest that sumoylation antagonizes the phosphorylation

  12. Comparison of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) growth rate in culture media supplemented with or without basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdian, Narges; Ghasemi-Dehkordi, Payam; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Ganji-Arjenaki, Mahbobe; Doosti, Abbas; Amiri, Beheshteh

    2015-12-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2) is a member of the FGF family secreted by different kinds of cells like HDFs and it is an important nutritional factor for cell growth and differentiation. The HDFs release bFGF in culture media at very low. The present study aims to investigate the HDFs growth rate in culture media supplemented either with or without bFGF. In brief, HDFs were isolated from human foreskin sample and were cultured in vitro in media containing bFGF and lack of this factor. The cells growth rate was calculated by trypan blue. The karyotyping was performed using G-banding to investigate the chromosomal abnormality of HDFs in both groups. Total RNA of each groups were extracted and cDNA samples were synthesized then, real-time Q-PCR was used to measure the expression level of p27kip1 and cyclin D1 genes normalized to internal control gene (GAPDH). The karyotype analysis showed that HDFs cultured in media or without bFGF had normal karyotype (46 chromosomes, XY) and chromosomal abnormalities were not observed. The cell growth rates in both groups were normal with proliferated exponentially but the slope of growth curve in HDFs cultured in media containing bFGF was increased. Karyotyp test showed that bFGF does not affect on cytogenetic stability of cells. The survey of p27kip1 and cyclin D1 genes by real-time Q-PCR showed that the expression level of these genes were up-regulated when adding bFGF in culture media (p culture media with growth factor like bFGF could enhance the proliferation and differentiation capacity of cells and improve cells growth rate. Similarly, fibroblast growth factors did not induce any chromosomal abnormality in cells. Furthermore, in HDFs cultured in bFGF supplemented media, the p27kip1 and cyclin D1 genes were up-regulated and suggesting an important role for bFGF in cell-cycle regulation and progression and fibroblast division stimulation. It also suggests that the effects of bFGF on different cell types with

  13. Human resources for health: task shifting to promote basic health service delivery among internally displaced people in ethnic health program service areas in eastern Burma/Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sharon; Tun, Kyaw Thura; Mhote, Naw Pue Pue; Htoo, Saw Nay; Maung, Cynthia; Kyaw, Saw Win; Shwe Oo, Saw Eh Kalu; Pocock, Nicola Suyin

    2014-01-01

    Burma/Myanmar was controlled by a military regime for over 50 years. Many basic social and protection services have been neglected, specifically in the ethnic areas. Development in these areas was led by the ethnic non-state actors to ensure care and the availability of health services for the communities living in the border ethnic-controlled areas. Political changes in Burma/Myanmar have been ongoing since the end of 2010. Given the ethnic diversity of Burma/Myanmar, many challenges in ensuring health service coverage among all ethnic groups lie ahead. A case study method was used to document how existing human resources for health (HRH) reach the vulnerable population in the ethnic health organizations' (EHOs) and community-based organizations' (CBHOs) service areas, and their related information on training and services delivered. Mixed methods were used. Survey data on HRH, service provision, and training were collected from clinic-in-charges in 110 clinics in 14 Karen/Kayin townships through a rapid-mapping exercise. We also reviewed 7 organizational and policy documents and conducted 10 interviews and discussions with clinic-in-charges. Despite the lack of skilled medical professionals, the EHOs and CBHOs have been serving the population along the border through task shifting to less specialized health workers. Clinics and mobile teams work in partnership, focusing on primary care with some aspects of secondary care. The rapid-mapping exercise showed that the aggregate HRH density in Karen/Kayin state is 2.8 per 1,000 population. Every mobile team has 1.8 health workers per 1,000 population, whereas each clinic has between 2.5 and 3.9 health workers per 1,000 population. By reorganizing and training the workforce with a rigorous and up-to-date curriculum, EHOs and CBHOs present a viable solution for improving health service coverage to the underserved population. Despite the chronic conflict in Burma/Myanmar, this report provides evidence of the substantive

  14. Basic and clinical immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  15. BMP (Basic Metabolic Panel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Send Us Your Feedback Choose ... Screen Chem 7 SMA 7 SMAC7 Formal Name Basic Metabolic Panel This article was last reviewed on ...

  16. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions ...

  17. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  18. Basic BASIC; An Introduction to Computer Programming in BASIC Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, James S.

    With the increasing availability of computer access through remote terminals and time sharing, more and more schools and colleges are able to introduce programing to substantial numbers of students. This book is an attempt to incorporate computer programming, using BASIC language, and the teaching of mathematics. The general approach of the book…

  19. Value Formation of Basic Anthropological Connectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. Human beings live and thrive in surroundings based on the human condition of certain basic anthropological connectivities. Amongst the vital political life tasks can be mentioned the ones of establishing, maintaining and critically/conformably developing these basic conditions and their......Abstract. Human beings live and thrive in surroundings based on the human condition of certain basic anthropological connectivities. Amongst the vital political life tasks can be mentioned the ones of establishing, maintaining and critically/conformably developing these basic conditions...... and their political value formations. In this regard, the interdisciplinary contribution of Psychology is to explore how humans as active participants can and will participate in handling such value tasks. The article presents a general, theoretical, political-psychological model, which unites precisely these two...

  20. Characterization of the basic charge variants of a human IgG1: effect of copper concentration in cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschak, Timothy; Boyd, Daniel; Lu, Franklin; Derfus, Gayle; Kluck, Brian; Nogal, Bartek; Emery, Craig; Summers, Christie; Zheng, Kai; Bayer, Robert; Amanullah, Ashraf; Yan, Boxu

    2011-01-01

    We report a case study of an IgG1 with a unique basic charge variant profile caused by C-terminal proline amidation on either one or two heavy chains. The proline amidation was sensitive to copper ion concentration in the production media during cell culture: the higher the Cu ( 2+) ion concentration, the higher the level of proline amidation detected. This conclusion was supported by the analysis of samples that revealed direct correlation between the proline amidation level observed from peptide maps and the level of basic peaks measured by imaged capillary isoelectric focusing and a pH gradient ion-exchange chromatography method. The importance of these observations to therapeutic antibody production is discussed.

  1. Beginning Visual Basic 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Thearon

    2010-01-01

    A focused, step-by-step approach to Visual Basic for new programmers. What better way to get started with Visual Basic than with this essential Wrox beginner's guide? Beginning Microsoft Visual Basic 2010 not only shows you how to write Windows applications, Web applications with ASP.NET, and Windows mobile and embedded CE apps with Visual Basic 2010, but you'll also get a thorough grounding in the basic nuts-and-bolts of writing good code. You'll be exposed to the very latest VB tools and techniques with coverage of both the Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4 releases. Plus, the book walks you ste

  2. Human Rights and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria: How Does a Large Funder of Basic Health Services Meet the Challenge of Rights-Based Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Ralf; Csete, Joanne; Lim, Hyeyoung; Timberlake, Susan; Smith, Matthew

    2017-12-01

    The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria was created to greatly expand access to basic services to address the three diseases in its name. From its beginnings, its governance embodied some human rights principles: civil society is represented on its board, and the country coordination mechanisms that oversee funding requests to the Global Fund include representatives of people affected by the diseases. The Global Fund's core strategies recognize that the health services it supports would not be effective or cost-effective without efforts to reduce human rights-related barriers to access and utilization of health services, particularly those faced by socially marginalized and criminalized persons. Basic human rights elements were written into Global Fund grant agreements, and various technical support measures encouraged the inclusion in funding requests of programs to reduce human rights-related barriers. A five-year initiative to provide intensive technical and financial support for the scaling up of programs to reduce these barriers in 20 countries is ongoing.

  3. 42 CFR 408.80 - Basic rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basic rules. 408.80 Section 408.80 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PREMIUMS FOR SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE Direct Remittance: Group Payment § 408.80 Basic rules. (a...

  4. 45 CFR 17.2 - Basic policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basic policy. 17.2 Section 17.2 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF ADVERSE INFORMATION TO NEWS MEDIA § 17.2 Basic policy. All adverse information release to news media shall be factual in content and...

  5. 42 CFR 438.602 - Basic rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basic rule. 438.602 Section 438.602 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Certifications and Program Integrity § 438.602 Basic rule. As a condition...

  6. 42 CFR 418.301 - Basic rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basic rules. 418.301 Section 418.301 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Payment for Hospice Care § 418.301 Basic rules. (a) Medicare payment for covered...

  7. Journal of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences (ISSN - 2278-960X, Online - 2320-2041) is a peer-reviewed journal published on behalf of the Society of Reproductive Biologists of Nigeria. The journal publishes articles relating to all aspects of Basic Medical Sciences of the Reproductive system of humans and ...

  8. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Outpatient Procedures PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Basic Stand Alone (BSA) Outpatient Procedures Public Use Files (PUF) with information from Medicare outpatient claims. The CMS BSA...

  9. Basic Stand Alone Carrier Line Items PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Basic Stand Alone (BSA) Carrier Line Items Public Use Files (PUF) with information from Medicare Carrier claims. The CMS BSA Carrier Line...

  10. Basics of Bayesian Learning - Basically Bayes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    Tutorial presented at the IEEE Machine Learning for Signal Processing Workshop 2006, Maynooth, Ireland, September 8, 2006. The tutorial focuses on the basic elements of Bayesian learning and its relation to classical learning paradigms. This includes a critical discussion of the pros and cons....... The theory is illustrated by specific models and examples....

  11. Basic digital signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Lockhart, Gordon B

    1985-01-01

    Basic Digital Signal Processing describes the principles of digital signal processing and experiments with BASIC programs involving the fast Fourier theorem (FFT). The book reviews the fundamentals of the BASIC program, continuous and discrete time signals including analog signals, Fourier analysis, discrete Fourier transform, signal energy, power. The text also explains digital signal processing involving digital filters, linear time-variant systems, discrete time unit impulse, discrete-time convolution, and the alternative structure for second order infinite impulse response (IIR) sections.

  12. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  13. How Managers Fail to Meet Basic Employee Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Store Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Too often basic employee needs go unmet due to poor human relations practices and ineffective work management techniques. Managers can avoid the common mistakes listed, and meet the needs identified in this report by restudying basic management concepts. (JMD)

  14. Exponentiation: A New Basic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brent

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, the basic operations of school mathematics have been identified as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Notably, these operations are "basic," not because they are foundational to mathematics knowledge, but because they were vital to a newly industrialized and market-driven economy several hundred years…

  15. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, ... Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord ...

  16. HAUSA, BASIC COURSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HODGE, CARLETON T.; AND OTHERS

    A DISCUSSION OF THE LINGUISTIC AND PRACTICAL IMPORTANCE OF HAUSA (A LANGUAGE OF WEST AFRICA) ACCOMPANIES A TEXT WHICH CONSISTS OF BASIC SENTENCES, NOTES, AND GRAMMATICAL DRILLS. THE BASIC SENTENCES ARE DIALOGS TO BE MEMORIZED, AND THEIR ENGLISH RENDERINGS ARE MEANT TO BE SITUATIONAL EQUIVALENTS, NOT LITERAL TRANSLATIONS. THE NOTES EXPLAIN…

  17. Finding Basic Writing's Place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan-Rabideau, Mary P.; Brossell, Gordon

    1995-01-01

    Posits that basic writing serves a vital function by providing writing support for at-risk students and serves the needs of a growing student population that universities accept yet feel needs additional writing instruction. Concludes that the basic writing classroom is the most effective educational support for at-risk students and their writing.…

  18. Basic Electronics I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, L. Paul

    Designed for use in basic electronics programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of twenty-nine units of instruction in five major content areas: Orientation, Basic Principles of Electricity/Electronics, Fundamentals of Direct Current, Fundamentals of Alternating Current, and Applying for a Job. Each instructional unit includes some or all of…

  19. Nuclear multifragmentation: Basic concepts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-05-02

    May 2, 2014 ... Abstract. We present a brief overview of nuclear multifragmentation reaction. Basic formalism of canonical thermodynamical model based on equilibrium statistical mechanics is described. This model is used to calculate basic observables of nuclear multifragmentation like mass distribution, fragment ...

  20. Hurdles in Basic Science Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina J. Perry

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past century there have been incredible advances in the field of medical research, but what hinders translation of this knowledge into effective treatment for human disease? There is an increasing focus on the failure of many research breakthroughs to be translated through the clinical trial process and into medical practice. In this mini review, we will consider some of the reasons that findings in basic medical research fail to become translated through clinical trials and into basic medical practices. We focus in particular on the way that human disease is modeled, the understanding we have of how our targets behave in vivo, and also some of the issues surrounding reproducibility of basic research findings. We will also look at some of the ways that have been proposed for overcoming these issues. It appears that there needs to be a cultural shift in the way we fund, publish and recognize quality control in scientific research. Although this is a daunting proposition, we hope that with increasing awareness and focus on research translation and the hurdles that impede it, the field of medical research will continue to inform and improve medical practice across the world.

  1. Criminal policy: Basic concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovašević Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary literature on law, politicology and security, there have been various attempts in both scientific and applied disciplines to define the notion and content of the crime suppression policy. The differences underlying these diverse views are based on the different starting points, i.e. whether the criminal policy is perceived as: 1] a scientific (academic] discipline; b] a practical daily activity of competent state authorities and other relevant bodies; 3] an activity of combating crime as a set of most dangerous human behaviors which imperil the most important personal assets and social values; and 4] an activity aimed at suppressing all types of illegal behavior (felonies, misdemeanors, delinquency, economic crimes, etc]. Some authors view the policy of crime suppression as a scientific discipline which provides for the appropriate use of existing tools in combating crime. Concurrently, on the basis of defined body of knowledge and analysis, the science (including some sciences outside the field of law] suggests relevant measures for efficient suppression of crime. Another conception is based on the idea that criminal policy has a dual meaning, i.e. that it may be understood as: 1] a practical social activity aimed at accomplishing the envisaged goals (also known as a practical dimension of crime policy], and 2] a scientific discipline which explores, analyses and proposes measures of social reaction towards criminal behavior. In practice, criminal policy encompasses a system of purposeful, consciously planned and coordinated social activities aimed at preventing crime and protecting the society at large. When perceived in this way, criminal policy is the basic element of the general public policy in a specific society. Just like the criminal law of an individual state, criminal policy is based on specific principles (governing rules].

  2. Basic stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Iremonger, M J

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Stress Analysis aims to help students to become proficient at BASIC programming by actually using it in an important engineering subject. It also enables the student to use computing as a means of learning stress analysis because writing a program is analogous to teaching-it is necessary to understand the subject matter. The book begins by introducing the BASIC approach and the concept of stress analysis at first- and second-year undergraduate level. Subsequent chapters contain a summary of relevant theory, worked examples containing computer programs, and a set of problems. Topics c

  3. Quantum electronics basic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fain, V M; Sanders, J H

    1969-01-01

    Quantum Electronics, Volume 1: Basic Theory is a condensed and generalized description of the many research and rapid progress done on the subject. It is translated from the Russian language. The volume describes the basic theory of quantum electronics, and shows how the concepts and equations followed in quantum electronics arise from the basic principles of theoretical physics. The book then briefly discusses the interaction of an electromagnetic field with matter. The text also covers the quantum theory of relaxation process when a quantum system approaches an equilibrium state, and explai

  4. Regulating with imagery and the complexity of basic emotions. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marcel; Kuchinke, Lars

    2015-06-01

    Literature, music and the arts have long attested to the complexity of human emotions. Hitherto, psychological and biological theories of emotions have largely neglected this rich heritage. In their review Koelsch and colleagues [1] have embarked upon the pioneering endeavour of integrating the diverse perspectives in emotion research. Noting that the focus of prior neurobiological theories relies mainly on animal studies, the authors sought to complement this body of research with a model of complex ("moral") emotions in humans (henceforth: complex emotions). According to this novel framework, there are four main interacting affective centres in the brain. Each centre is associated with a dominant affective function, such as ascending activation (brainstem), pain/pleasure (diencephalon), attachment-related affects (hippocampus) or moral emotions and unconscious cognitive appraisal (orbitofrontal cortex). Furthermore, language is ascribed a key role in (a) the communication of subjective feeling (reconfiguration) and (b) in the conscious regulation of emotions (by means of logic and rational thought).

  5. Purification from a human hepatoma cell line of a basic fibroblast growth factor-like molecule that stimulates capillary endothelial cell plasminogen activator production, DNA synthesis, and migration.

    OpenAIRE

    Presta, M; Moscatelli, D; Joseph-Silverstein, J; Rifkin, D B

    1986-01-01

    A 17,500-dalton protein which stimulates plasminogen activator production in cultured bovine capillary endothelial cells has been purified from a SK-Hep-1 human hepatoma cell lysate by using heparin affinity chromatography and fast protein-liquid ion exchange chromatography. The purified molecule stimulated plasminogen activator production in a dose-dependent manner between 0.01 and 1 ng/ml. It also stimulated collagenase synthesis, DNA synthesis, and motility in capillary endothelial cells i...

  6. A project to develop an adult basic vocational education and training programme as a contribution towards the development of human and social capital in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Kathryn E

    2008-01-01

    In 1992, the Government of Botswana appointed a National Commission to review the education system and advise how it could promote human resource development to address the country’s socio-economic challenges. The Commission identified the need to diversify the labour market and shift towards occupational groupings based on skills, attitudes and competence. However, fifteen years on, Botswana’s dependence on diamond mining, coupled with immigration from neighbouring countries and a mismatch o...

  7. The effect of dimerizing domains and basic residues on in vitro and in vivo assembly of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus and Human immunodeficiency virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Böhmová, Karolína; Hadravová, Romana; Štokrová, Jitka; Tůma, R.; Ruml, T.; Pichová, Iva; Rumlová, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 4 (2010), s. 1977-1988 ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA ČR GA204/09/1388 Grant - others:EUROCORES(XE) ERAS-CT-2003-980409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Mason-Pfizer Monkey Virus * Human Immunodeficiency Virus * assembly * NC Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.189, year: 2010

  8. Dopamine D[sub 2] receptor SPECT imaging; Basic in vivo characteristics and clinical applications of [sup 123]I-IBZM in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Hiroshi; Ichise, Masanori; Ballinger, J.R.; Kirsh, J.C. (Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada)); Fornazzari, L.

    1993-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the utility of kit formulation, the basic in vivo charactristics, and clinical usefulness of dopamine D[sub 2] receptor imaging with [sup 123]I-(S)-(-)-3-iodo-2-hydroxy-6-methoxy-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrodinyl)methyl]-benzamide ([sup 123]I-IBZM). We studied 22 normal controls, 3 early symptomatic Huntington's disease patients, and 1 patient with visual hallucination on and off neuroleptics. [sup 123]I-IBZM could be conveniently prepared with a high degree of purity from a kit, but with relatively low radiochemical yield. We demonstrated [sup 123]I-IBZM receptor binding equilibrium by performing serial SPECT scanning in a normal volunteer. The basal ganglia/frontal cortex (BG/FC) ratios plateaued after the specific binding reached equilibrium approximately 60 minutes after injection. The BG/FC ratio declined significantly with age. The ratios for the Huntington's disease patients were significantly lower than those for normal controls. The images of the patient off neuroleptic therapy showed dramatically increased BG activity compared with those obtained while on therapy. The BG/FC ratio provides an estimate of B[sub max]/K[sub d] and hence the receptor density. It appears important to perform SPECT early in the equilibrium phase and at a fixed time after injection to obtain significantly high signal to noise ratios. [sup 123]I-IBZM is an ideal tracer for SPECT including a rotating gamma camera type which can provide estimates of the receptor density objectively by calculating the BG/FC ratio, and is a promising agent for the investigation of dopamine D[sub 2] receptors in clinical conditions. (author).

  9. Responsiveness to 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP is associated with salivary levels of two specific basic proline-rich proteins in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Cabras

    Full Text Available Thiourea tasting can be predictive of individual differences in bitter taste responses, general food preferences and eating behavior, and could be correlated with saliva chemical composition. We investigated the possible relationship between PROP bitter taste responsiveness and the salivary proteome in subjects genotyped for TAS2R38 and gustin gene polymorphisms. Taste perception intensity evoked by PROP and NaCl solutions was measured in sixty-three volunteers (21 males, 42 females, age 25±3 y to establish their PROP taster status, and 24 PROP super-tasters and 21 nontasters were selected to participate in the study. TAS2R38 and gustin gene molecular analysis were performed using PCR techniques. Qualitative and quantitative determination of salivary proteins was performed by HPLC-ESI-MS before and after PROP taste stimulation. PROP super-tastings was strongly associated with the 'taster' variant (PAV haplotype of TAS2R38 and the A allele of rs2274333 polymorphism in the gustin gene and nontasting was associated with the minor alleles at both loci. ANOVA revealed that basal levels of II-2 and Ps-1 proteins, belonging to the basic proline-rich protein (bPRPs family, were significantly higher in PROP super-taster than in nontaster un-stimulated saliva, and that PROP stimulation elicited a rapid increase in the levels of these same proteins only in PROP super-taster saliva. These data show for the first time that responsiveness to PROP is associated with salivary levels of II-2 peptide and Ps-1 protein, which are products of the PRB1 gene. These findings suggest that PRB1, in addition to TAS2R38 and gustin, could contribute to individual differences in thiourea sensitivity, and the expression of the PROP phenotype as a complex genetic trait.

  10. Powassan (POW) Virus Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Related Topics For International Travelers Powassan (POW) Virus Basics Download this fact sheet formatted for print: ... POW) Virus Fact Sheet (PDF) What is Powassan virus? Powassan (POW) virus is a flavivirus that is ...

  11. Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » Patient & Caregiver Education Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke Table of Contents Introduction What ... Americans are protecting their most important asset—their brain. Are you? Stroke ranks as the fourth leading ...

  12. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, ... Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation Psychological Realities after Spinal Cord Injury Toby Huston, ...

  13. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, ... Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation Psychological Realities after Spinal Cord Injury Toby Huston, ...

  14. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of ... injury? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By ...

  15. Basic Information about Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Environment Contact Us Share Basic Information about Mercury On this page: What is mercury? Emissions of ... Consumer products that traditionally contain mercury What is Mercury? Mercury is a naturally-occurring chemical element found ...

  16. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

  17. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  18. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  19. Basic Financial Accounting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Karsten

    This textbook on Basic Financial Accounting is targeted students in the economics studies at universities and business colleges having an introductory subject in the external dimension of the company's economic reporting, including bookkeeping, etc. The book includes the following subjects...

  20. Physical Activity Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Physical Activity Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir How much physical activity do you need? Regular physical activity helps improve ...

  1. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Treatment: The Basics Last Reviewed: January 18, 2018 ...

  2. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  3. Basics of Probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Probiotics The Basics of Probiotics Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Millions ... the facts? Photo courtest of Pixabay What Are Probiotics? Probiotics are live microorganisms (such as bacteria) that ...

  4. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Adult Injuries ... Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the Patient After Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, ...

  5. Video Screen Capture Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  6. Transportation Emissions: some basics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontovas, Christos A.; Psaraftis, Harilaos N.

    2016-01-01

    . The main purpose of this chapter is to introduce some basic concepts that are relevant in the quest of green transportation logistics. First, we present the basics of estimating emissions from transportation activities, the current statistics and future trends, as well as the total impact of air emissions...... of the energy efficiency gap and examines why governments and companies may forego cost-effective investments in energy efficiency, even though they could significantly reduce energy consumption at a lower cost....

  7. Constructional physics with BASIC. Bauphysik mit BASIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemens, U.T.

    1984-01-01

    According to the 1977 Thermal Insulation Ordinance, thermal, insulation measures must be planned already in the first licensing stage. The necessary calculations are facilitated by computer systems. The standard constructional physics data for calculations of thermal insulation and diffusion can be directly accessed in existing data storages, so that only the specific data of the envisaged project must be entered. Further, there is a computer program for determining the reverberation time in 6 different frequency ranges in static room acoustics. After a review of the program package 'Calculation of Thermal Insulation' with its subroutines for walls, windows and outside doors, roofs and ceilings, foundations and other structural components tables are presented with details of 7 different programs. 2 programs for reverberation time calculation are also described in detail. The programming language employed was BASIC-II.

  8. Integrating the SE and HCI models in the human factors engineering cycle for re-engineering Computerized Physician Order Entry systems for medications: basic principles illustrated by a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernonville, Stéphanie; Kolski, Christophe; Leroy, Nicolas; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine

    2010-04-01

    The integration of Human Factors is still insufficient in the design and implementation phases of complex interactive systems such as Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) systems. One of the problems is that human factors specialists have difficulties to communicate their data and to have them properly understood by the computer scientists in the design and implementation phases. This paper presents a solution to this problem based on the creation of common documentation supports using Software Engineering (SE) and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) methods. The integration of SE and HCI methods and models is an interesting means for modelling an organization's activities, with software applications being part of these activities. Integrating these SE and HCI methods and models allows case studies to be seen from the technical, organizational and ergonomic perspectives, and also makes it easier to compare current and future work situations. The exploitation of these techniques allows the creation of common work supports that can be easily understandable by computer scientists and relevant for re-engineering or design. In this paper, the basic principles behind such communication supports are described and illustrated by a real case study. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. "I think they're all basically the same": parents' perceptions of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine compared with other adolescent vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbajo, A; Hansen, C E; North, A L; Okoloko, E; Niccolai, L M

    2016-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is recommended for routine administration at ages 11-12 years. However, uptake is lower than for other vaccines that are also routinely recommended for adolescents (MCV4 and Tdap). Understanding parental perceptions of HPV vaccine compared with other vaccines may help to inform strategies to increase uptake. Parents and caregivers (n = 45) of adolescents ages 10-18 years from a low-income, ethnic minority population participated in a qualitative study. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded for emergent themes. Many participants perceived the HPV vaccine to be similar to other routine vaccines. Noted similarities included the vaccines' ability to prevent disease, similar methods of administration and belief in health care providers' recommendation. Some parents noted the greater benefit of HPV vaccine in preventing cancer, which was viewed as a serious disease. Parents also noted the different mode of transmission (sexual) for HPV, which evoked mixed opinions. Overall, most participants viewed the HPV vaccine in a positive light and similar to other adolescent vaccines with the added benefit of cancer prevention. Strategies that treat all three vaccines equally such as presenting them similarly as a 'bundle' to parents or considering policy initiatives such as school entry requirements might help increase raise coverage for HPV vaccine. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Basic Electromagnetism and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Moliton, André

    2007-01-01

    Basic Electromagnetism and Materials is the product of many years of teaching basic and applied electromagnetism. This textbook can be used to teach electromagnetism to a wide range of undergraduate science majors in physics, electrical engineering or materials science. However, by making lesser demands on mathematical knowledge than competing texts, and by emphasizing electromagnetic properties of materials and their applications, this textbook is uniquely suited to students of materials science. Many competing texts focus on the study of propagation waves either in the microwave or optical domain, whereas Basic Electromagnetism and Materials covers the entire electromagnetic domain and the physical response of materials to these waves. Professor André Moliton is Director of the Unité de Microélectronique, Optoélectronique et Polymères (Université de Limoges, France), which brings together three groups studying the optoelectronics of molecular and polymer layers, micro-optoelectronic systems for teleco...

  11. Spectroscopic imaging: basic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoch, Antonin; Jiru, Filip; Bunke, Jürgen

    2008-08-01

    Spectroscopic imaging (SI) is a method that enables the measurement of the spatial distribution of metabolite concentrations in tissue. In this paper, an overview of measurement and processing techniques for SI is given. First, the basic structure of SI pulse sequences is introduced and the concepts of k-space, point spread function and spatial resolution are described. Then, special techniques are presented for the purpose of eliminating spurious signals and reducing measurement time. Finally, basic post-processing of SI data and the methods for viewing the results of SI measurement are summarized.

  12. Comprehensive basic mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Veena, GR

    2005-01-01

    Salient Features As per II PUC Basic Mathematics syllabus of Karnataka. Provides an introduction to various basic mathematical techniques and the situations where these could be usefully employed. The language is simple and the material is self-explanatory with a large number of illustrations. Assists the reader in gaining proficiency to solve diverse variety of problems. A special capsule containing a gist and list of formulae titled ''REMEMBER! Additional chapterwise arranged question bank and 3 model papers in a separate section---''EXAMINATION CORNER''.

  13. Basic Electron Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, B. J.; Morgan, G. J.; Howson, M. A.

    This chapter will take you through a simple introduction to transport theory covering the Boltzmann equation, the Fuchs-Sondheimer model for thin films, the normal magnetoresistance and quantum interference effects in metals with strong electron scattering. At the end of the chapter we will also introduce you to a number of the basic techniques involved in electron transport measurements. All of this is by way of introduction to basic transport properties common to all metals. In later chapters these ideas will be developed and applied to systems in which spin dependent transport is important.

  14. Basic semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Chihiro

    2001-01-01

    This book presents a detailed description of the basic physics of semiconductors. All the important equations describing the properties of these materials are derived without the help of other textbooks. The reader is assumed to have only a basic command of mathematics and some elementary semiconductor physics. The text covers a wide range of important semiconductor phenomena, from the simple to the advanced. Examples include recent progress in semiconductor quantum structures such as two-dimensional electron-gas systems, ballistic transport, the quantum Hall effect, the Landauer formula, the Coulomb blockade and the single-electron transistor.

  15. Basic set theory

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Azriel

    2002-01-01

    An advanced-level treatment of the basics of set theory, this text offers students a firm foundation, stopping just short of the areas employing model-theoretic methods. Geared toward upper-level undergraduate and graduate students, it consists of two parts: the first covers pure set theory, including the basic motions, order and well-foundedness, cardinal numbers, the ordinals, and the axiom of choice and some of it consequences; the second deals with applications and advanced topics such as point set topology, real spaces, Boolean algebras, and infinite combinatorics and large cardinals. An

  16. Basic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Landsberg, PT

    2013-01-01

    Since Volume 1 was published in 1982, the centres of interest in the basic physics of semiconductors have shifted. Volume 1 was called Band Theory and Transport Properties in the first edition, but the subject has broadened to such an extent that Basic Properties is now a more suitable title. Seven chapters have been rewritten by the original authors. However, twelve chapters are essentially new, with the bulk of this work being devoted to important current topics which give this volume an almost encyclopaedic form. The first three chapters discuss various aspects of modern band theory and the

  17. Foundation of Basic Arithmetic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 2. Foundation of Basic Arithmetic. Jasbir S Chahal. General Article Volume 11 Issue 2 February 2006 pp 6-16. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/02/0006-0016. Keywords. Different ...

  18. Foundations of Basic Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 7. Foundations of Basic Geometry. Jasbir S Chahal. General Article Volume 11 Issue 7 July 2006 pp 30-41. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/07/0030-0041. Keywords. Area ...

  19. Mastering the basics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monique Turkenburg

    2011-01-01

    Original title: De basis meester Language and arithmetic/mathematics are basic skills, but it can no longer be taken for granted that school pupils and students have a good mastery of them. This publication describes current thinking in the educational field about devoting more attention to

  20. Burmese Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    These five volumes, comprising 65 lesson units, follow the Defense Language Institute audiolingual approach and general format. New materials, introduced in "basic dialogs," are followed by colloquial and literal translations, word lists, and in later lessons, by a variety of drills and reading exercises. A consonant chart and a transcribed list…

  1. Teaching Basic Caregiver Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Susan, Ed.; Harrah, Doris, Ed.

    This instructor's guide provides materials for a nursing skills course designed to teach basic home nursing skills to families who plan to care for a chronically ill or elderly family member at home. It may be taught by a registered nurse with knowledge of all areas or by a team, with each instructor concentrating on his/her area of expertise.…

  2. Basics of SCI Rehabilitation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family ...

  3. Foundation of Basic Arithmetic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 1. Foundation of Basic Arithmetic. Jasbir S Chahal. General Article Volume 11 Issue 1 January 2006 pp 8-20. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/01/0008-0020. Keywords. Roman ...

  4. Basic Exchange Rate Theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.M. van Marrewijk (Charles)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis four-chapter overview of basic exchange rate theories discusses (i) the elasticity and absorption approach, (ii) the (long-run) implications of the monetary approach, (iii) the short-run effects of monetary and fiscal policy under various economic conditions, and (iv) the transition

  5. Basic physics for all

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, B N

    2012-01-01

    This is a simple, concise book for both student and non-physics students, presenting basic facts in straightforward form and conveying fundamental principles and theories of physics. This book will be helpful as a supplement to class teaching and to aid those who have difficulty in mastering concepts and principles.

  6. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  7. Basic Tuberculosis Facts

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-12

    In this podcast, Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses basic TB prevention, testing, and treatment information.  Created: 3/12/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/12/2012.

  8. Basic Microfluidics Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2015-01-01

    ,000 m−1, which is a huge difference and has a large impact on flow behavior. In this chapter the basic microfluidic theory will be presented, enabling the reader to gain a comprehensive understanding of how liquids behave at the microscale, enough to be able to engage in design of micro systems...

  9. Lippincott Basic Reading Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterey Peninsula Unified School District, Monterey, CA.

    This program, included in "Effective Reading Programs...," serves 459 students in grades 1-3 at 15 elementary schools. The program employs a diagnostic-prescriptive approach to instruction in a nongraded setting through the use of the Lippincott Basic Reading program. When a child enters the program, he is introduced to a decoding…

  10. YORUBA, BASIC COURSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    STEVICK, EARL W.; AND OTHERS

    A BASIC COURSE IN YORUBA, A LANGUAGE OF WEST AFRICA, IS PROVIDED IN THIS TEXT. THE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH TAPE RECORDINGS AND IS DIVIDED INTO THREE PARTS--(1) THREE SERIES OF TONE DRILLS WHICH CONCENTRATE ON THE TONE PATTERNS OF SHORT VOWELS IN SHORT UTTERANCES, THE TONE PATTERNS OF LONG OR DOUBLE VOWELS IN SHORT UTTERANCES, AND THE…

  11. Greek Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This course in Modern Greek, consisting of 100 lesson units in 13 volumes, is one of the Defense Language Institute's Basic Course Series. The course is designed to train native English language speakers to Level 3 proficiency in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing Modern Greek. (Level 5 is native-speaker proficiency.) Lesson units…

  12. Basic SPSS tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotenhuis, H.F. te; Matthijssen, A.C.B.

    2015-01-01

    This supplementary book for the social, behavioral, and health sciences helps readers with no prior knowledge of IBM® SPSS® Statistics, statistics, or mathematics learn the basics of SPSS. Designed to reduce fear and build confidence, the book guides readers through point-and-click sequences using

  13. Assessing Basic Fact Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Gina; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors share a variety of ways to formatively assess basic fact fluency. The define fluency, raise some issues related to timed testing, and then share a collection of classroom-tested ideas for authentic fact fluency assessment. This article encourages teachers to try a variety of alternative assessments from this sampling,…

  14. Basic Pneumatics. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessehaye, Michael

    This instructor's guide is designed for use by industrial vocational teachers in teaching a course on basic pneumatics. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: an introduction to pneumatics (including the operation of a service station hoist); fundamentals and physical laws; air compressors (positive displacement compressors;…

  15. Basic Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    Basic concepts of nuclear structures, radiation, nuclear reactions, and health physics are presented in this text, prepared for naval officers. Applications to the area of nuclear power are described in connection with pressurized water reactors, experimental boiling water reactors, homogeneous reactor experiments, and experimental breeder…

  16. Czech Basic Course: Folklore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This booklet is designed for use in the advanced phase of the Defense Language Institute's "Basic Course" in Czech. It is used in the advanced phase as a part of cultural background information. Reading selections, with vocabulary lists, include: (1) ethnography; (2) incantations and spells; (3) proverbs, sayings, and weather lore; (4) fairy tales…

  17. Arabidopsis RSS1 Mediates Cross-Talk Between Glucose and Light Signaling During Hypocotyl Elongation Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjul; Gupta, Aditi; Singh, Dhriti; Khurana, Jitendra P; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2017-11-23

    Plants possess exuberant plasticity that facilitates its ability to adapt and survive under challenging environmental conditions. The developmental plasticity largely depends upon cellular elongation which is governed by a complex network of environmental and phytohormonal signals. Here, we report role of glucose (Glc) and Glc-regulated factors in controlling elongation growth and shade response in Arabidopsis. Glc controls shade induced hypocotyl elongation in a dose dependent manner. We have identified a Glc repressed factor REGULATED BY SUGAR AND SHADE1 (RSS1) encoding for an atypical basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein of unknown biological function that is required for normal Glc actions. Phenotype analysis of mutant and overexpression lines suggested RSS1 to be a negative regulator of elongation growth. RSS1 affects overall auxin homeostasis. RSS1 interacts with the elongation growth-promoting proteins HOMOLOG OF BEE2 INTERACTING WITH IBH 1 (HBI1) and BR ENHANCED EXPRESSION2 (BEE2) and negatively affects the transcription of their downstream targets such as YUCs, INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID INDUCIBLE (IAAs), LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED1 (HFR1), HOMEOBOX PROTEIN 2 (ATHB2), XYLOGLUCAN ENDOTRANSGLUCOSYLASE/HYDROLASES (XTHs) and EXPANSINS. We propose, Glc signals might maintain optimal hypocotyl elongation under multiple signals such as light, shade and phytohormones through the central growth regulatory bHLH/HLH module.

  18. An anther development F-box (ADF) protein regulated by tapetum degeneration retardation (TDR) controls rice anther development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Li, Yixing; Song, Shufeng; Deng, Huafeng; Li, Na; Fu, Xiqin; Chen, Guanghui; Yuan, Longping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we reported that a F-box protein, OsADF, as one of the direct targets of TDR , plays a critical role in rice tapetum cell development and pollen formation. The tapetum, the innermost sporophytic tissue of anther, plays an important supportive role in male reproduction in flowering plants. After meiosis, tapetal cells undergo programmed cell death (PCD) and provide nutrients for pollen development. Previously we showed that tapetum degeneration retardation (TDR), a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, can trigger tapetal PCD and control pollen wall development during anther development. However, the comprehensive regulatory network of TDR remains to be investigated. In this study, we cloned and characterized a panicle-specific expression F-box protein, anther development F-box (OsADF). By qRT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, we further confirmed that OsADF expressed specially in tapetal cells from stage 9 to stage 12 during anther development. In consistent with this specific expression pattern, the RNAi transgenic lines of OsADF exhibited abnormal tapetal degeneration and aborted microspores development, which eventually grew pollens with reduced fertility. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the TDR, a key regulator in controlling rice anther development, could regulate directly the expression of OsADF by binding to E-box motifs of its promoter. Therefore, this work highlighted the possible regulatory role of TDR, which regulates tapetal cell development and pollen formation via triggering the possible ADF-mediated proteolysis pathway.

  19. Transcriptome-wide analysis of jasmonate-treated BY-2 cells reveals new transcriptional regulators associated with alkaloid formation in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuping; Yan, Pengcheng; Yi, Che; Li, Wenzheng; Chai, Yuhui; Fei, Lingling; Gao, Ping; Zhao, Heping; Wang, Yingdian; Timko, Michael P; Wang, Bingwu; Han, Shengcheng

    2017-08-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are well-known regulators of stress, defence, and secondary metabolism in plants, with JA perception triggering extensive transcriptional reprogramming, including both activation and/or repression of entire metabolic pathways. We performed RNA sequencing based transcriptomic profiling of tobacco BY-2 cells before and after treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) to identify novel transcriptional regulators associated with alkaloid formation. A total of 107,140 unigenes were obtained through de novo assembly, and at least 33,213 transcripts (31%) encode proteins, in which 3419 transcription factors (TFs) were identified, representing 72 gene families, as well as 840 transcriptional regulators (TRs) distributed among 19 gene families. After MeJA treatment BY-2 cells, 7260 differentially expressed transcripts were characterised, which include 4443 MeJA-upregulated and 2817 MeJA-downregulated genes. Of these, 227 TFs/TRs in 36 families were specifically upregulated, and 102 TFs/TRs in 38 families were downregulated in MeJA-treated BY-2 cells. We further showed that the expression of 12 ethylene response factors and four basic helix-loop-helix factors increased at the transcriptional level after MeJA treatment in BY-2 cells and displayed specific expression patterns in nic mutants with or without MeJA treatments. Our data provide a catalogue of transcripts of tobacco BY-2 cells and benefit future study of JA-modulated regulation of secondary metabolism in tobacco. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. The Origin, Development and Molecular Diversity of Rodent Olfactory Bulb Glutamatergic Neurons Distinguished by Expression of Transcription Factor NeuroD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roybon, Laurent; Mastracci, Teresa L; Li, Joyce; Stott, Simon R W; Leiter, Andrew B; Sussel, Lori; Brundin, Patrik; Li, Jia-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Production of olfactory bulb neurons occurs continuously in the rodent brain. Little is known, however, about cellular diversity in the glutamatergic neuron subpopulation. In the central nervous system, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1 (ND1) is commonly associated with glutamatergic neuron development. In this study, we utilized ND1 to identify the different subpopulations of olfactory bulb glutamategic neurons and their progenitors, both in the embryo and postnatally. Using knock-in mice, transgenic mice and retroviral transgene delivery, we demonstrate the existence of several different populations of glutamatergic olfactory bulb neurons, the progenitors of which are ND1+ and ND1- lineage-restricted, and are temporally and regionally separated. We show that the first olfactory bulb glutamatergic neurons produced - the mitral cells - can be divided into molecularly diverse subpopulations. Our findings illustrate the complexity of neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb and that seemingly homogenous neuronal populations can consist of multiple subpopulations with unique molecular signatures of transcription factors and expressing neuronal subtype-specific markers.

  1. The Origin, Development and Molecular Diversity of Rodent Olfactory Bulb Glutamatergic Neurons Distinguished by Expression of Transcription Factor NeuroD1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Roybon

    Full Text Available Production of olfactory bulb neurons occurs continuously in the rodent brain. Little is known, however, about cellular diversity in the glutamatergic neuron subpopulation. In the central nervous system, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1 (ND1 is commonly associated with glutamatergic neuron development. In this study, we utilized ND1 to identify the different subpopulations of olfactory bulb glutamategic neurons and their progenitors, both in the embryo and postnatally. Using knock-in mice, transgenic mice and retroviral transgene delivery, we demonstrate the existence of several different populations of glutamatergic olfactory bulb neurons, the progenitors of which are ND1+ and ND1- lineage-restricted, and are temporally and regionally separated. We show that the first olfactory bulb glutamatergic neurons produced - the mitral cells - can be divided into molecularly diverse subpopulations. Our findings illustrate the complexity of neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb and that seemingly homogenous neuronal populations can consist of multiple subpopulations with unique molecular signatures of transcription factors and expressing neuronal subtype-specific markers.

  2. Thylacine 1 is expressed segmentally within the paraxial mesoderm of the Xenopus embryo and interacts with the Notch pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, D B; Jen, W C; Kotecha, S; Towers, N; Kintner, C; Mohun, T J

    1998-06-01

    The presomitic mesoderm of vertebrates undergoes a process of segmentation in which cell-cell interactions mediated by the Notch family of receptors and their associated ligands are involved. The vertebrate homologues of Drosophila &Dgr ; are expressed in a dynamic, segmental pattern within the presomitic mesoderm, and alterations in the function of these genes leads to a perturbed pattern of somite segmentation. In this study we have characterised Thylacine 1 which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix class transcription activator. Expression of Thylacine is restricted to the presomitic mesoderm, localising to the anterior half of several somitomeres in register with domains of X-Delta-2 expression. Ectopic expression of Thylacine in embryos causes segmentation defects similar to those seen in embryos in which Notch signalling is altered, and these embryos also show severe disruption in the expression patterns of the marker genes X-Delta-2 and X-ESR5 within the presomitic mesoderm. Finally, the expression of Thylacine is altered in embryos when Notch signalling is perturbed. These observations suggest strongly that Thylacine 1 has a role in the segmentation pathway of the Xenopus embryo, by interacting with the Notch signalling pathway.

  3. Drosophila Hey is a target of Notch in asymmetric divisions during embryonic and larval neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monastirioti, Maria; Giagtzoglou, Nikolaos; Koumbanakis, Konstantinos A; Zacharioudaki, Evanthia; Deligiannaki, Myrto; Wech, Irmgard; Almeida, Mara; Preiss, Anette; Bray, Sarah; Delidakis, Christos

    2010-01-01

    bHLH-O proteins are a subfamily of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factors characterized by an 'Orange' protein-protein interaction domain. Typical members are the Hairy/E(spl), or Hes, proteins, well studied in their ability, among others, to suppress neuronal differentiation in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Hes proteins are often effectors of Notch signalling. In vertebrates, another bHLH-O protein group, the Hey proteins, have also been shown to be Notch targets and to interact with Hes. We have studied the single Drosophila Hey orthologue. We show that it is primarily expressed in a subset of newly born neurons, which receive Notch signalling during their birth. Unlike in vertebrates, however, Hey is not expressed in precursor cells and does not block neuronal differentiation. It rather promotes one of two alternative fates that sibling neurons adopt at birth. Although in the majority of cases Hey is a Notch target, it is also expressed independently of Notch in some lineages, most notably the larval mushroom body. The availability of Hey as a Notch readout has allowed us to study Notch signalling during the genesis of secondary neurons in the larval central nervous system.

  4. A Novel Soybean ERF Transcription Factor, GmERF113, Increases Resistance to Phytophthora sojae Infection in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanling; Chang, Xin; Qi, Dongyue; Dong, Lidong; Wang, Guangjin; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Cheng, Qun; Chen, Xi; Han, Dan; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora root and stem rot of soybean caused by the oomycete Phytophthora sojae, is a destructive disease worldwide. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) play important roles in regulating plant biotic and abiotic stress tolerance. In this study, a new ERF gene, GmERF113, was isolated from the highly resistant soybean 'Suinong 10.' Sequence analysis suggested that the protein encoded by GmERF113 contained a conserved AP2/ERF domain of 58 amino acid and belonged to the B-4 subgroup of the ERF subfamily. Expression of GmERF113 was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethylene, and methyl jasmonate. GmERF113 protein localized to the nucleus when transiently expressed in Arabidopsis protoplasts, could bind to the GCC-box, and acted as a transcription activator. In addition, a region of the full-length GmERF113, GmERF113-II, interacted with a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (GmbHLH) in yeast cells. Full-length GmERF113 also interacted with GmbHLH in planta. GmERF113-overexpressing transgenic plants in susceptible cultivar 'Dongnong 50' soybean exhibited increased resistance to P. sojae and positively regulated the expression of the pathogenesis-related genes, PR1 and PR10-1. These results indicate that GmERF113 may play a crucial role in the defense of soybean against P. sojae infection.

  5. The Birth of a Black Rice Gene and Its Local Spread by Introgression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Tetsuo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Oguchi, Taichi; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Tanabe, Noriko; Ebana, Kaworu; Yano, Masahiro; Izawa, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The origin and spread of novel agronomic traits during crop domestication are complex events in plant evolution. Wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) has red grains due to the accumulation of proanthocyanidins, whereas most cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) varieties have white grains induced by a defective allele in the Rc basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene. Although the events surrounding the origin and spread of black rice traits remain unknown, varieties with black grains due to anthocyanin accumulation are distributed in various locations throughout Asia. Here, we show that the black grain trait originated from ectopic expression of the Kala4 bHLH gene due to rearrangement in the promoter region. Both the Rc and Kala4 genes activate upstream flavonol biosynthesis genes, such as chalcone synthase and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase, and downstream genes, such as leucoanthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase, to produce the respective specific pigments. Genome analysis of 21 black rice varieties as well as red- and white-grained landraces demonstrated that black rice arose in tropical japonica and its subsequent spread to the indica subspecies can be attributed to the causal alleles of Kala4. The relatively small size of genomic fragments of tropical japonica origin in some indica varieties indicates that refined introgression must have occurred by natural crossbreeding in the course of evolution of the black trait in rice. PMID:26362607

  6. Repression by PRDM13 is critical for generating precision in neuronal identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Rahul K; Ma, Zhenzhong; Borromeo, Mark D; Chang, Joshua C

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms that activate some genes while silencing others are critical to ensure precision in lineage specification as multipotent progenitors become restricted in cell fate. During neurodevelopment, these mechanisms are required to generate the diversity of neuronal subtypes found in the nervous system. Here we report interactions between basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional activators and the transcriptional repressor PRDM13 that are critical for specifying dorsal spinal cord neurons. PRDM13 inhibits gene expression programs for excitatory neuronal lineages in the dorsal neural tube. Strikingly, PRDM13 also ensures a battery of ventral neural tube specification genes such as Olig1, Olig2 and Prdm12 are excluded dorsally. PRDM13 does this via recruitment to chromatin by multiple neural bHLH factors to restrict gene expression in specific neuronal lineages. Together these findings highlight the function of PRDM13 in repressing the activity of bHLH transcriptional activators that together are required to achieve precise neuronal specification during mouse development. PMID:28850031

  7. Scaffold protein enigma homolog 1 overcomes the repression of myogenesis activation by inhibitor of DNA binding 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Miyuki; Ito, Jumpei; Koyama, Riko; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Maturana, Andrés D

    2016-05-27

    Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) is a scaffold protein for signaling proteins and transcription factors. Previously, we reported that ENH1 overexpression promotes the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ENH1 in the C2C12 cells differentiation remains elusive. ENH1 was shown to inhibit the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells by sequestering Inhibitor of DNA binding protein 2 (Id2) in the cytosol. Id2 is a repressor of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors activity and prevents myogenesis. Here, we found that ENH1 overcome the Id2 repression of C2C12 cells myogenic differentiation and that ENH1 overexpression promotes mice satellite cells activation, the first step toward myogenic differentiation. In addition, we show that ENH1 interacted with Id2 in C2C12 cells and mice satellite cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ENH1 plays an important role in the activation of myogenesis through the repression of Id2 activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Scaffold protein enigma homolog 1 overcomes the repression of myogenesis activation by inhibitor of DNA binding 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatani, Miyuki [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan); Ito, Jumpei [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, 102-0083 (Japan); Koyama, Riko [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan); Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka, 567-0047 (Japan); Niimi, Tomoaki [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan); Kuroda, Shun' ichi [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan); The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka, 567-0047 (Japan); Maturana, Andrés D., E-mail: maturana@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8106 (Japan)

    2016-05-27

    Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) is a scaffold protein for signaling proteins and transcription factors. Previously, we reported that ENH1 overexpression promotes the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ENH1 in the C2C12 cells differentiation remains elusive. ENH1 was shown to inhibit the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells by sequestering Inhibitor of DNA binding protein 2 (Id2) in the cytosol. Id2 is a repressor of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors activity and prevents myogenesis. Here, we found that ENH1 overcome the Id2 repression of C2C12 cells myogenic differentiation and that ENH1 overexpression promotes mice satellite cells activation, the first step toward myogenic differentiation. In addition, we show that ENH1 interacted with Id2 in C2C12 cells and mice satellite cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ENH1 plays an important role in the activation of myogenesis through the repression of Id2 activity. -- Highlights: •Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) is a scaffold protein. •ENH1 binds to inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2) in myoblasts. •ENH1 overexpression overcomes the Id2's repression of myogenesis. •The Id2-ENH1 complex play an important role in the activation of myogenesis.

  9. The execution of the transcriptional axis mutant p53, E2F1 and ID4 promotes tumor neo-angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontemaggi, Giulia; Dell'Orso, Stefania; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Shay, Tal; Melucci, Elisa; Fazi, Francesco; Terrenato, Irene; Mottolese, Marcella; Muti, Paola; Domany, Eytan; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Strano, Sabrina; Blandino, Giovanni

    2009-10-01

    ID4 (inhibitor of DNA binding 4) is a member of a family of proteins that function as dominant-negative regulators of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. Growing evidence links ID proteins to cell proliferation, differentiation and tumorigenesis. Here we identify ID4 as a transcriptional target of gain-of-function p53 mutants R175H, R273H and R280K. Depletion of mutant p53 protein severely impairs ID4 expression in proliferating tumor cells. The protein complex mutant p53-E2F1 assembles on specific regions of the ID4 promoter and positively controls ID4 expression. The ID4 protein binds to and stabilizes mRNAs encoding pro-angiogenic factors IL8 and GRO-alpha. This results in the increase of the angiogenic potential of cancer cells expressing mutant p53. These findings highlight the transcriptional axis mutant p53, E2F1 and ID4 as a still undefined molecular mechanism contributing to tumor neo-angiogenesis.

  10. Development of Molecular Markers for Iron Metabolism Related Genes in Lentil and Their Expression Analysis under Excess Iron Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, Debjyoti; McPhee, Kevin; Kumar, Shiv

    2017-01-01

    Multiple genes and transcription factors are involved in the uptake and translocation of iron in plants from soil. The sequence information about iron uptake and translocation related genes is largely unknown in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.). This study was designed to develop iron metabolism related molecular markers for Ferritin-1, BHLH-1 (Basic helix loop helix), or FER-like transcription factor protein and IRT-1 (Iron related transporter) genes using genome synteny with barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). The second objective of this study was to analyze differential gene expression under excess iron over time (2 h, 8 h, 24 h). Specific molecular markers were developed for iron metabolism related genes (Ferritin-1, BHLH-1, IRT-1) and validated in lentil. Gene specific markers for Ferritin-1 and IRT-1 were used for quantitative PCR (qPCR) studies based on their amplification efficiency. Significant differential expression of Ferritin-1 and IRT-1 was observed under excess iron conditions through qPCR based gene expression analysis. Regulation of iron uptake and translocation in lentil needs further characterization. Greater emphasis should be given to development of conditions simulating field conditions under external iron supply and considering adult plant physiology.

  11. Disease-related growth factor and embryonic signaling pathways modulate an enhancer of TCF21 expression at the 6q23.2 coronary heart disease locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint L Miller

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD is the leading cause of mortality in both developed and developing countries worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have now identified 46 independent susceptibility loci for CHD, however, the biological and disease-relevant mechanisms for these associations remain elusive. The large-scale meta-analysis of GWAS recently identified in Caucasians a CHD-associated locus at chromosome 6q23.2, a region containing the transcription factor TCF21 gene. TCF21 (Capsulin/Pod1/Epicardin is a member of the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor family, and regulates cell fate decisions and differentiation in the developing coronary vasculature. Herein, we characterize a cis-regulatory mechanism by which the lead polymorphism rs12190287 disrupts an atypical activator protein 1 (AP-1 element, as demonstrated by allele-specific transcriptional regulation, transcription factor binding, and chromatin organization, leading to altered TCF21 expression. Further, this element is shown to mediate signaling through platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFR-β and Wilms tumor 1 (WT1 pathways. A second disease allele identified in East Asians also appears to disrupt an AP-1-like element. Thus, both disease-related growth factor and embryonic signaling pathways may regulate CHD risk through two independent alleles at TCF21.

  12. SUMOylation of AhR modulates its activity and stability through inhibiting its ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xinrong; Bi, Hailian; Chang, Alan K; Zang, Ming-Xi; Wang, Miao; Ao, Xiang; Li, Shen; Pan, Hongming; Guo, Qianping; Wu, Huijian

    2012-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that belongs to the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) Per-Arnt-Sim homology domain (PAS) family. AhR can be activated by 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2, 3, 7, 8-TCDD) and once activated, it promotes the abnormal expression of cytochrome P450, leading to several diseases, including cancer. In this study, we showed that AhR is subjected to post-translational modification by SUMOylation and this modification could be reversed by SENP1. Two SUMOylation sites were identified, one in the bHLH domain (K63) and the other in the TAD domain (K510) of AhR. Substitution of either K63 or K510 with arginine resulted in reduced SUMOylation for AhR. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with TCDD led to a reduced level of SUMOylated AhR in a time-dependent manner, and this occurred mainly in the nucleus. SUMOylation of AhR enhanced its stability through inhibiting its ubiquitination. Moreover, SUMOylation also repressed the transactivation activity of AhR and this could be reversed by TCDD. These results suggested that SUMOylation of AhR might play an important role in the regulation of its function, and TCDD may activate the transcriptional activity of AhR through downregulating its SUMOylation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The ABORTED MICROSPORES Regulatory Network Is Required for Postmeiotic Male Reproductive Development in Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Yang, Caiyun; Yuan, Zheng; Zhang, Dasheng; Gondwe, Martha Y.; Ding, Zhiwen; Liang, Wanqi; Zhang, Dabing; Wilson, Zoe A.

    2010-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS) gene encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that is required for tapetal cell development and postmeiotic microspore formation. However, the regulatory role of AMS in anther and pollen development has not been fully defined. Here, we show by microarray analysis that the expression of 549 anther-expressed genes was altered in ams buds and that these genes are associated with tapetal function and pollen wall formation. We demonstrate that AMS has the ability to bind in vitro to DNA containing a 6-bp consensus motif, CANNTG. Moreover, 13 genes involved in transportation of lipids, oligopeptides, and ions, fatty acid synthesis and metabolism, flavonol accumulation, substrate oxidation, methyl-modification, and pectin dynamics were identified as direct targets of AMS by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The functional importance of the AMS regulatory pathway was further demonstrated by analysis of an insertional mutant of one of these downstream AMS targets, an ABC transporter, White-Brown Complex homolog, which fails to undergo pollen development and is male sterile. Yeast two-hybrid screens and pull-down assays revealed that AMS has the ability to interact with two bHLH proteins (AtbHLH089 and AtbHLH091) and the ATA20 protein. These results provide insight into the regulatory role of the AMS network during anther development. PMID:20118226

  14. The heterologous expression of a chrysanthemum TCP-P transcription factor CmTCP14 suppresses organ size and delays senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Qu, Yixin; Wang, Haibin; Wang, Jingjing; Song, Aiping; Hu, Yueheng; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Fadi

    2017-06-01

    TCP transcription factors are important for plant growth and development, but their activity in chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) has not been thoroughly explored. Here, a chrysanthemum TCP-P sequence, which encodes a protein harboring the conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) motif, was shown to be related phylogenetically to the Arabidopsis thaliana gene AtTCP14. A yeast-one hybrid assay showed that the encoding protein had no transcriptional activation ability, and a localization experiment indicated that it was localized in the nucleus. Transcription profiling established that the gene was most active in the stem and leaf. Its heterologous expression in A. thaliana down-regulated certain cell cycle-related genes, reduced the size of various organs and increased the chlorophyll and carotenoid contents of the leaf which led to delayed senescence and a prolonged flowering period. Moreover, by screening the cDNA library of chrysanthemum, we found that the CmTCP14 can interact with CmFTL2 and some CmDELLAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Clock upregulates intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression and promotes mononuclear cells adhesion to endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yinghua; Meng, Dan; Sun, Ning; Zhu, Zhu; Zhao, Ran; Lu, Chao; Chen, Sifeng; Hua, Luchun; Qian, Ruizhe

    2014-01-10

    Clock is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that plays important role in circadian rhythms of various physiological functions. Previous study showed that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was reduced in the liver tissues of Clock mutant mice. However, how Clock regulates ICAM-1 expression and whether Clock affects cell adhesion function remain unknown. In the present study, we found that exogenous expression of Clock upregulated the gene expressions of ICAM-1 and other adhesion-related genes including VCAM1 and CCL-2, and increased the transcriptional activity of ICAM-1 in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell lines. In contrast, loss of Clock decreased these gene expressions and ICAM-1 transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that Clock binds to the E-box-like enhancer of ICAM-1 gene. ICAM-1 gene showed rhythmic expression in endothelial cells after serum shock in vitro, suggesting ICAM-1 may be a Clock-controlled gene. Clock regulates the adhesion of mononuclear cells to endothelial cells via ICAM-1. Together, our findings show that Clock is a positive regulator of ICAM-1, and promotes the adhesion of mononuclear cells to endothelial cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure and Dimerization Properties of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor PAS-A Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dalei; Potluri, Nalini; Kim, Youngchang

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that binds to xenobiotics and responds by regulating the expression of gene programs required for detoxification and metabolism. AHR and its heterodimerization partner aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) belong to the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)–PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) family of transcription factors. Here we report the 2.55-Å-resolution crystal structure of the mouse AHR PAS-A domain, which represents the first AHR-derived protein structure. The AHR PAS-A domain forms a helix-swapped homodimer in the crystal and also in solution. Through a detailed mutational analysis of all interface residues, we identified several hydrophobic residues that are important for AHR dimerization and function. Our crystallographic visualization of AHR PAS-A dimerization leads us to propose a mode of heterodimerization with ARNT that is supported by both biochemical and cell-based data. Our studies also highlight the residues of other mammalian bHLH-PAS proteins that are likely involved in their homo- or heterodimerization. PMID:24001774

  17. MAGED1 is a novel regulator of a select subset of bHLH PAS transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Adrienne E; Peet, Daniel J; Whitelaw, Murray L

    2016-09-01

    Transcription factors of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) family generally have critical and nonredundant biological roles, but some bHLH PAS proteins compete for common cofactors or recognise similar DNA elements. Identifying factors that regulate function of bHLH PAS proteins, particularly in cells where multiple family members are coexpressed, is important for understanding bHLH PAS factor biology. This study identifies and characterises a novel interaction between melanoma-associated antigen D1 (MAGED1) and select members of the bHLH PAS transcription factor family. MAGED1 binds and positively regulates the transcriptional activity of family members SIM1, SIM2, NPAS4 and ARNT2, but does not interact with AhR, HIF1α and ARNT. This interaction is mediated by PAS repeat regions which also form the interface for bHLH PAS dimerisation, and accordingly MAGED1 is not found in complex with bHLH PAS dimers. We show that MAGED1 does not affect bHLH PAS protein levels and cannot be acting as a coactivator of transcriptionally active heterodimers, but rather appears to interact with nascent bHLH PAS proteins in the cytoplasm to enhance their function prior to nuclear import. As a selective regulator, MAGED1 may play an important role in the biology of these specific factors and in general bHLH PAS protein dynamics. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Border-cell migration requires integration of spatial and temporal signals by the BTB protein Abrupt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Anna C-C; Chang, Yu-Chiuan; Bai, Jianwu; Montell, Denise

    2009-05-01

    During development, elaborate patterns of cell differentiation and movement must occur in the correct locations and at the proper times. Developmental timing has been studied less than spatial pattern formation, and the mechanisms integrating the two are poorly understood. Border-cell migration in the Drosophila ovary occurs specifically at stage 9. Timing of the migration is regulated by the steroid hormone ecdysone, whereas spatial patterning of the migratory population requires localized activity of the JAK-STAT pathway. Ecdysone signalling is patterned spatially as well as temporally, although the mechanisms are not well understood. In stage 9 egg chambers, ecdysone signalling is highest in anterior follicle cells including the border cells. We identify the gene abrupt as a repressor of ecdysone signalling and border-cell migration. Abrupt protein is normally lost from border-cell nuclei during stage 9, in response to JAK-STAT activity. This contributes to the spatial pattern of the ecdysone response. Abrupt attenuates ecdysone signalling by means of a direct interaction with the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain of the P160 ecdysone receptor coactivator Taiman (Tai). Taken together, these findings provide a molecular mechanism by which spatial and temporal cues are integrated.

  19. ThMYC4E, candidate Blue aleurone 1 gene controlling the associated trait in Triticum aestivum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Li, Shiming; Zhang, Kunpu; Chen, Wenjie; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Daowen; Liu, Dengcai; Liu, Baolong; Zhang, Huaigang

    2017-01-01

    Blue aleurone is a useful and interesting trait in common wheat that was derived from related species. Here, transcriptomes of blue and white aleurone were compared for isolating Blue aleurone 1 (Ba1) transferred from Thinopyrum ponticum. In the genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis, only a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, ThMYC4E, had a higher transcript level in blue aleurone phenotype, and was homologous to the genes on chromosome 4 of Triticum aestivum. ThMYC4E carried the characteristic domains (bHLH-MYC_N, HLH and ACT-like) of a bHLH transcription factor, and clustered with genes regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis upon phylogenetic analysis. The over-expression of ThMYC4E regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis with the coexpression of the MYB transcription factor ZmC1 from maize. ThMYC4E existed in the genomes of the addition, substitution and near isogenic lines with the blue aleurone trait derived from Th. ponticum, and could not be detected in any germplasm of T. urartu, T. monococcum, T. turgidum, Aegilops tauschii or T. aestivum, with white aleurone. These results suggested that ThMYC4E was candidate Ba1 gene controlling the blue aleurone trait in T. aestivum genotypes carrying Th. ponticum introgression. The ThMYC4E isolation aids in better understanding the genetic mechanisms of the blue aleurone trait and in its more effective use during wheat breeding.

  20. EsxB, a secreted protein from B acillus anthracis forms two distinct helical bundles: Structure of Secreted EsxB and its Variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yao [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Tan, Kemin [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Department of Biosciences, Structural Biology Center, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Chhor, Gekleng [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Butler, Emily K. [Howard Taylor Ricketts Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Department of Microbiology, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Jedrzejczak, Robert P. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Missiakas, Dominique [Howard Taylor Ricketts Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Department of Microbiology, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Joachimiak, Andrzej [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Department of Biosciences, Structural Biology Center, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637

    2015-07-03

    The EsxB protein from Bacillus anthracis belongs to the WXG100 family, a group of proteins secreted by a specialized secretion system. We have determined the crystal structures of recombinant EsxB and discovered that the small protein (~10 kDa), comprised of a helix-loop-helix (HLH) hairpin, is capable of associating into two different helical bundles. The two basic quaternary assemblies of EsxB are an antiparallel (AP) dimer and a rarely observed bisecting U (BU) dimer. This structural duality of EsxB is believed to originate from the heptad repeat sequence diversity of the first helix of its HLH hairpin, which allows for two alternative helix packing. The flexibility of EsxB and the ability to form alternative helical bundles underscore the possibility that this protein can serve as an adaptor in secretion and can form hetero-oligomeric helix bundle(s) with other secreted members of the WXG100 family, such as EsxW. The highly conserved WXG motif is located within the loop of the HLH hairpin and is mostly buried within the helix bundle suggesting that its role is mainly structural. The exact functions of the motif, including a proposed role as a secretion signal, remain unknown.

  1. Correct timing of proliferation and differentiation is necessary for normal inner ear development and auditory hair cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopecky, Benjamin J; Jahan, Israt; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2013-02-01

    Hearing restoration through hair cell regeneration will require revealing the dynamic interactions between proliferation and differentiation during development to avoid the limited viability of regenerated hair cells. Pax2-Cre N-Myc conditional knockout (CKO) mice highlighted the need of N-Myc for proper neurosensory development and possible redundancy with L-Myc. The late-onset hair cell death in the absence of early N-Myc expression could be due to mis-regulation of genes necessary for neurosensory formation and maintenance, such as Neurod1, Atoh1, Pou4f3, and Barhl1. Pax2-Cre N-Myc L-Myc double CKO mice show that proliferation and differentiation are linked together through Myc and in the absence of both Mycs, altered proliferation and differentiation result in morphologically abnormal ears. In particular, the organ of Corti apex is re-patterned into a vestibular-like organization and the base is truncated and fused with the saccule. These data indicate that therapeutic approaches to restore hair cells must take into account a dynamic interaction of proliferation and differentiation regulation of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors in attempts to stably replace lost cochlear hair cells. In addition, our data indicate that Myc is an integral component of the evolutionary transformation process that resulted in the organ of Corti development. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Twist-2 controls myeloid lineage development and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Sharabi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factors play critical roles in lymphoid and erythroid development; however, little is known about their role in myeloid lineage development. In this study, we identify the bHLH transcription factor Twist-2 as a key negative regulator of myeloid lineage development, as manifested by marked increases in mature myeloid populations of macrophages, neutrophils, and basophils in Twist-2-deficient mice. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that Twist-2 inhibits the proliferation as well as differentiation of granulocyte macrophage progenitors (GMP by interacting with and inhibiting the transcription factors Runx1 and C/EBPalpha. Moreover, Twist-2 was found to have a contrasting effect on cytokine production: inhibiting the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-12 (IL-12 and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma while promoting the regulatory cytokine IL-10 by myeloid cells. The data from further analyses suggest that Twist-2 activates the transcription factor c-Maf, leading to IL-10 expression. In addition, Twist-2 was found to be essential for endotoxin tolerance. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineages, as well as the function and inflammatory responses of mature myeloid cells.

  3. HAND proteins: molecular mediators of cardiac development and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D

    1999-01-01

    Congenital heart defects are the clinical manifestation of anomalies in embryonic cardiac development. Such defects occur in distinct regions or chambers of the heart. A molecular framework in which to consider cardiac development and congenital heart disease in a segmental fashion has begun to emerge. dHAND and eHAND are two related basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that are expressed in a complementary fashion in the developing right and left ventricles, respectively. They are also expressed in the neural crest-derived cardiac outflow tract and aortic arch arteries. Targeted mutations of dHAND and eHAND in mice have revealed novel pathways of organogenesis in mesodermal and neural crest derivatives. dHAND mutants exhibit hypoplasia of the right ventricle, branchial arches, and aortic arch arteries. The distinct nature of cardiac defects in dHAND mutants provides an entry into dissecting molecular pathways governing morphogenesis of specific components of the heart. Congenital heart disease is considered as a defect in segmental development of the heart and the role of dHAND and eHAND in regulating such developmental pathways in normal and abnormal cardiogenesis is examined.

  4. Upstream stimulatory factors, USF1 and USF2 are differentially expressed during Xenopus embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimi, Takahiko J; Aruga, Jun

    2008-07-01

    Upstream stimulatory factors (USF) 1 and 2 are members of the basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor family. They are considered to play critical roles in cell-cycle regulation and chromatin remodeling. Their gene expression patterns are considered ubiquitous but have not been fully investigated in terms of embryogenesis. We examined the expression of the genes encoding USF1 and USF2 in Xenopus laevis during embryonic development. Expression of both genes was first detected as maternal transcripts and was observed continuously throughout development. However, in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the two genes were expressed differentially. In the late blastula, both genes were expressed in the blastocoel roof and marginal zone. At the gastrula stage, USF2 was strongly expressed in the sensorial layer of the ectoderm and in the mesoderm, whereas USF1 expression was hardly detectable. From the neurula stage onward, expression of both genes was markedly enhanced in the neural tissues, neural crest, eye and otic vesicle. However, spatial expression of the genes within the neural tube differed in that the strongest USF1 signals were observed in the lateral region of the basal plate and the strongest USF2 ones in the dorsal region of the neural tube. Expression of the two genes occurred in different mesoderm derivatives at the tailbud stage (USF1, somite; USF2, pronephros and lateral plate mesoderm of the tail region). USF1 was expressed in the notochord of the early neurula, but was lost at the stage.

  5. Regulation of Jasmonate-Mediated Stamen Development and Seed Production by a bHLH-MYB Complex in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Tiancong; Huang, Huang; Song, Susheng; Xie, Daoxin

    2015-06-01

    Stamens are the plant male reproductive organs essential for plant fertility. Proper development of stamens is modulated by environmental cues and endogenous hormone signals. Deficiencies in biosynthesis or perception of the phytohormone jasmonate (JA) attenuate stamen development, disrupt male fertility, and abolish seed production in Arabidopsis thaliana. This study revealed that JA-mediated stamen development and seed production are regulated by a bHLH-MYB complex. The IIIe basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor MYC5 acts as a target of JAZ repressors to function redundantly with other IIIe bHLH factors such as MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 in the regulation of stamen development and seed production. The myc2 myc3 myc4 myc5 quadruple mutant exhibits obvious defects in stamen development and significant reduction in seed production. Moreover, these IIIe bHLH factors interact with the MYB transcription factors MYB21 and MYB24 to form a bHLH-MYB transcription complex and cooperatively regulate stamen development. We speculate that the JAZ proteins repress the bHLH-MYB complex to suppress stamen development and seed production, while JA induces JAZ degradation and releases the bHLH-MYB complex to subsequently activate the expression of downstream genes essential for stamen development and seed production. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  6. CCAR1 is required for Ngn3-mediated endocrine differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chung-Kuang [Department of Life Science, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lai, Yi-Chyi [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Yung-Fu; Chen, Hau-Ren [Department of Life Science, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiang, Ming-Ko, E-mail: biomkc@ccu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify CCAR1 to directly interact with Ngn3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CCAR1 is co-localized with Ngn3 in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CCAR1 cooperates with Ngn3 in activating NeuroD expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CCAR1 is required for Ngn3-mediated PANC-1 transdifferentiation. -- Abstract: Neurogenin3 (Ngn3) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that specifies pancreatic endocrine cell fates during pancreas development. It can also initiate a transdifferentiation program when expressed in pancreatic exocrine and ductal cells. However, how Ngn3 initiates a transcriptional cascade to achieve endocrine differentiation is still poorly understood. Here, we show that cell cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1), which is a transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors, also interacts with Ngn3. The association between Ngn3 and CCAR1 was verified by pull-down assays and co-immunoprecipitation analyses. Using gene reporter assays, we found that CCAR1 is essential for Ngn3 to activate the expression of the reporter genes containing the NeuroD promoter. Moreover, down-regulation of endogenous CCAR1 in the PANC-1 pancreatic ductal cell line inhibits the transdifferentiation program initiated by Ngn3. CCAR1 is, therefore, a novel partner of Ngn3 in mediating endocrine differentiation.

  7. Two Direct Targets of Cytokinin Signaling Regulate Symbiotic Nodulation in Medicago truncatula[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Federico; Brault-Hernandez, Marianne; Laffont, Carole; Huault, Emeline; Brault, Mathias; Plet, Julie; Moison, Michael; Blanchet, Sandrine; Ichanté, Jean Laurent; Chabaud, Mireille; Carrere, Sébastien; Crespi, Martin; Chan, Raquel L.; Frugier, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Cytokinin regulates many aspects of plant development, and in legume crops, this phytohormone is necessary and sufficient for symbiotic nodule organogenesis, allowing them to fix atmospheric nitrogen. To identify direct links between cytokinins and nodule organogenesis, we determined a consensus sequence bound in vitro by a transcription factor (TF) acting in cytokinin signaling, the nodule-enhanced Medicago truncatula Mt RR1 response regulator (RR). Among genes rapidly regulated by cytokinins and containing this so-called RR binding site (RRBS) in their promoters, we found the nodulation-related Type-A RR Mt RR4 and the Nodulation Signaling Pathway 2 (NSP2) TF. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that RRBS cis-elements in the RR4 and NSP2 promoters are essential for expression during nodule development and for cytokinin induction. Furthermore, a microRNA targeting NSP2 (miR171 h) is also rapidly induced by cytokinins and then shows an expression pattern anticorrelated with NSP2. Other primary targets regulated by cytokinins depending on the Cytokinin Response1 (CRE1) receptor were a cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX1) and a basic Helix-Loop-Helix TF (bHLH476). RNA interference constructs as well as insertion of a Tnt1 retrotransposon in the bHLH gene led to reduced nodulation. Hence, we identified two TFs, NSP2 and bHLH476, as direct cytokinin targets acting at the convergence of phytohormonal and symbiotic cues. PMID:23023168

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis and Classification of the Fungal bHLH Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailsbery, Joshua K.; Atchley, William R.; Dean, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    The basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) domain is an essential highly conserved DNA-binding domain found in many transcription factors in all eukaryotic organisms. The bHLH domain has been well studied in the Animal and Plant Kingdoms but has yet to be characterized within Fungi. Herein, we obtained and evaluated the phylogenetic relationship of 490 fungal-specific bHLH containing proteins from 55 whole genome projects composed of 49 Ascomycota and 6 Basidiomycota organisms. We identified 12 major groupings within Fungi (F1–F12); identifying conserved motifs and functions specific to each group. Several classification models were built to distinguish the 12 groups and elucidate the most discerning sites in the domain. Performance testing on these models, for correct group classification, resulted in a maximum sensitivity and specificity of 98.5% and 99.8%, respectively. We identified 12 highly discerning sites and incorporated those into a set of rules (simplified model) to classify sequences into the correct group. Conservation of amino acid sites and phylogenetic analyses established that like plant bHLH proteins, fungal bHLH–containing proteins are most closely related to animal Group B. The models used in these analyses were incorporated into a software package, the source code for which is available at www.fungalgenomics.ncsu.edu. PMID:22114358

  9. Origins and Evolution of Stomatal Development1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The fossil record suggests stomata-like pores were present on the surfaces of land plants over 400 million years ago. Whether stomata arose once or whether they arose independently across newly evolving land plant lineages has long been a matter of debate. In Arabidopsis, a genetic toolbox has been identified that tightly controls stomatal development and patterning. This includes the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, FAMA, and ICE/SCREAMs (SCRMs), which promote stomatal formation. These factors are regulated via a signaling cascade, which includes mobile EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) peptides to enforce stomatal spacing. Mosses and hornworts, the most ancient extant lineages to possess stomata, possess orthologs of these Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stomatal toolbox genes, and manipulation in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens has shown that the bHLH and EPF components are also required for moss stomatal development and patterning. This supports an ancient and tightly conserved genetic origin of stomata. Here, we review recent discoveries and, by interrogating newly available plant genomes, we advance the story of stomatal development and patterning across land plant evolution. Furthermore, we identify potential orthologs of the key toolbox genes in a hornwort, further supporting a single ancient genetic origin of stomata in the ancestor to all stomatous land plants. PMID:28356502

  10. Stomatal Development in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Dong, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Stomata consist of two guard cells that function as turgor-operated valves that regulate gas exchange in plants. In Arabidopsis, a dedicated cell lineage is initiated and undergoes a series of cell divisions and cell-state transitions to produce a stoma. A set of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates the transition and differentiation events through the lineage, while the placement of stomata relative to each other is controlled by intercellular signaling via peptide ligands, transmembrane receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) modules. Some genes involved in regulating stomatal differentiation or density are also involved in hormonal and environmental stress responses, which may provide a link between modulation of stomatal development or function in response to changes in the environment. Premitotic polarlylocalized proteins provide an added layer of regulation, which can be addressed more thoroughly with the identification of additional proteins in this pathway. Linking the networks that control stomatal development promises to bring advances to our understanding of signal transduction, cell polarity, and cell-fate specification in plants. PMID:23864836

  11. A functional genomics strategy reveals clockwork orange as a transcriptional regulator in the Drosophila circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akira; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Yamada, Rikuhiro G; Houl, Jerry; Uno, Kenichiro D; Kasukawa, Takeya; Dauwalder, Brigitte; Itoh, Taichi Q; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Ueda, Ryu; Hardin, Paul E; Tanimura, Teiichi; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2007-07-01

    The Drosophila circadian clock consists of integrated autoregulatory feedback loops, making the clock difficult to elucidate without comprehensively identifying the network components in vivo. Previous studies have adopted genome-wide screening for clock-controlled genes using high-density oligonucleotide arrays that identified hundreds of clock-controlled genes. In an attempt to identify the core clock genes among these candidates, we applied genome-wide functional screening using an RNA interference (RNAi) system in vivo. Here we report the identification of novel clock gene candidates including clockwork orange (cwo), a transcriptional repressor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix ORANGE family. cwo is rhythmically expressed and directly regulated by CLK-CYC through canonical E-box sequences. A genome-wide search for its target genes using the Drosophila genome tiling array revealed that cwo forms its own negative feedback loop and directly suppresses the expression of other clock genes through the E-box sequence. Furthermore, this negative transcriptional feedback loop contributes to sustaining a high-amplitude circadian oscillation in vivo. Based on these results, we propose that the competition between cyclic CLK-CYC activity and the adjustable threshold imposed by CWO keeps E-box-mediated transcription within the controllable range of its activity, thereby rendering a Drosophila circadian clock capable of generating high-amplitude oscillation.

  12. The clockwork orange Drosophila protein functions as both an activator and a repressor of clock gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richier, Benjamin; Michard-Vanhée, Christine; Lamouroux, Annie; Papin, Christian; Rouyer, François

    2008-04-01

    The Drosophila clock relies on transcriptional feedback loops that generate daily oscillations of the clock gene expression at mRNA and protein levels. In the evening, the CLOCK (CLK) and CYCLE (CYC) basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) PAS-domain transcription factors activate the expression of the period (per) and timeless (tim) genes. Posttranslational modifications delay the accumulation of PER and TIM, which inhibit CLK/CYC activity in the late night. We show here that a null mutant of the clockwork orange (cwo) gene encoding a bHLH orange-domain putative transcription factor displays long-period activity rhythms. cwo loss of function increases cwo mRNA levels but reduces mRNA peak levels of the 4 described CLK/CYC targets, inducing an almost complete loss of their cycling. In addition, the absence of CWO induces alterations of PER and CLK phosphorylation cycles. Our results indicate that, in vivo, CWO modulates clock gene expression through both repressor and activator transcriptional functions.

  13. Development of inner ear afferent connections: forming primary neurons and connecting them to the developing sensory epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    The molecular and cellular origin of the primary neurons of the inner ear, the vestibular and spiral neurons, is reviewed including how they connect to the specific sensory epithelia and what the molecular nature of their survival is. Primary neurons of the ear depend on a single basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) protein for their formation, neurogenin 1 (ngn1). An immediate downstream gene is the bHLH gene neuronal differentiation (NeuroD). Targeted null mutations of ngn1 results in absence of primary neuron formation; targeted null mutation of NeuroD results in loss of almost all spiral and many vestibular neurons. NeuroD and a later expressed gene, Brn3a, play a role in pathfinding to and within sensory epithelia. The molecular nature of this pathfinding property is unknown. Reduction of hair cells in ngn1 null mutations suggests a clonal relationship with primary neurons. This relationship may play some role in specifying the identity of hair cells and the primary neurons that connect with them. Primary neuron neurites growth to sensory epithelia is initially independent of trophic factors released from developing sensory epithelia, but becomes rapidly dependent on those factors. Null mutations of specific neurotrophic factors lose distinct primary neuron populations which undergo rapid embryonic cell death.

  14. Elicitor-induced transcription factors for metabolic reprogramming of secondary metabolism in Medicago truncatula

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    Dixon Richard A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure of Medicago truncatula cell suspension cultures to pathogen or wound signals leads to accumulation of various classes of flavonoid and/or triterpene defense molecules, orchestrated via a complex signalling network in which transcription factors (TFs are essential components. Results In this study, we analyzed TFs responding to yeast elicitor (YE or methyl jasmonate (MJ. From 502 differentially expressed TFs, WRKY and AP2/EREBP gene families were over-represented among YE-induced genes whereas Basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH family members were more over-represented among the MJ-induced genes. Jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ transcriptional regulators were highly induced by MJ treatment. To investigate potential involvement of WRKY TFs in signalling, we expressed four Medicago WRKY genes in tobacco. Levels of soluble and wall bound phenolic compounds and lignin were increased in all cases. WRKY W109669 also induced tobacco endo-1,3-β-glucanase (NtPR2 and enhanced the systemic defense response to tobacco mosaic virus in transgenic tobacco plants. Conclusion These results confirm that Medicago WRKY TFs have broad roles in orchestrating metabolic responses to biotic stress, and that they also represent potentially valuable reagents for engineering metabolic changes that impact pathogen resistance.

  15. The Transcription Factor Hand1 Is Involved In Runx2-Ihh-Regulated Endochondral Ossification.

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    Lindsay E Laurie

    Full Text Available The developing long bone is a model of endochondral ossification that displays the morphological layers of chondrocytes toward the ossification center of the diaphysis. Indian hedgehog (Ihh, a member of the hedgehog family of secreted molecules, regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, as well as osteoblast differentiation, through the process of endochondral ossification. Here, we report that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand1, which is expressed in the cartilage primordia, is involved in proper osteogenesis of the bone collar via its control of Ihh production. Genetic overexpression of Hand1 in the osteochondral progenitors resulted in prenatal hypoplastic or aplastic ossification in the diaphyses, mimicking an Ihh loss-of-function phenotype. Ihh expression was downregulated in femur epiphyses of Hand1-overexpressing mice. We also confirmed that Hand1 downregulated Ihh gene expression in vitro by inhibiting Runx2 transactivation of the Ihh proximal promoter. These results demonstrate that Hand1 in chondrocytes regulates endochondral ossification, at least in part through the Runx2-Ihh axis.

  16. The Transcription Factor Hand1 Is Involved In Runx2-Ihh-Regulated Endochondral Ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, Lindsay E; Kokubo, Hiroki; Nakamura, Masataka; Saga, Yumiko; Funato, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The developing long bone is a model of endochondral ossification that displays the morphological layers of chondrocytes toward the ossification center of the diaphysis. Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a member of the hedgehog family of secreted molecules, regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, as well as osteoblast differentiation, through the process of endochondral ossification. Here, we report that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand1, which is expressed in the cartilage primordia, is involved in proper osteogenesis of the bone collar via its control of Ihh production. Genetic overexpression of Hand1 in the osteochondral progenitors resulted in prenatal hypoplastic or aplastic ossification in the diaphyses, mimicking an Ihh loss-of-function phenotype. Ihh expression was downregulated in femur epiphyses of Hand1-overexpressing mice. We also confirmed that Hand1 downregulated Ihh gene expression in vitro by inhibiting Runx2 transactivation of the Ihh proximal promoter. These results demonstrate that Hand1 in chondrocytes regulates endochondral ossification, at least in part through the Runx2-Ihh axis.

  17. bHLH Transcription factors inhibitors for cancer therapy: general features for in silico drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigelny, I F; Kouznetsova, V L; Pingle, S C; Kesari, S

    2014-01-01

    Numerous basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TF) have been found to play important roles in tumor growth and progression. Elucidation of the common features of these TFs can pave the road to possible therapeutic intervention. The existing studies of possible inhibition of these TFs are concentrated on the development of peptides or small molecules that inhibit their dimerization or prevent their DNA binding. The bHLH TFs have striking similarity in many functionally important regions, such as the helical regions of TFs that interact with each other during dimerization and have complementary sets of residues on both sides of a dimer. These are hydrophobic residues along with anionic and cationic residues with complementary charges. Such complementarity also exists in other contact regions of the bHLH TFs. They also have a very specific set of positively charged residues on the surface, which would contact DNA. Such specificity defines a common concept for an in silico design of bHLH TFs inhibitors for a number of existing and important cancer-related TFs.

  18. Twist1 Controls a Cell-Specification Switch Governing Cell Fate Decisions within the Cardiac Neural Crest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincentz, Joshua W.; Firulli, Beth A.; Lin, Andrea; Spicer, Douglas B.; Howard, Marthe J.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent progenitor cells that can generate both ectodermal cell types, such as neurons, and mesodermal cell types, such as smooth muscle. The mechanisms controlling this cell fate choice are not known. The basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor Twist1 is expressed throughout the migratory and post-migratory cardiac neural crest. Twist1 ablation or mutation of the Twist-box causes differentiation of ectopic neuronal cells, which molecularly resemble sympathetic ganglia, in the cardiac outflow tract. Twist1 interacts with the pro-neural factor Sox10 via its Twist-box domain and binds to the Phox2b promoter to repress transcriptional activity. Mesodermal cardiac neural crest trans-differentiation into ectodermal sympathetic ganglia-like neurons is dependent upon Phox2b function. Ectopic Twist1 expression in neural crest precursors disrupts sympathetic neurogenesis. These data demonstrate that Twist1 functions in post-migratory neural crest cells to repress pro-neural factors and thereby regulate cell fate determination between ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. PMID:23555309

  19. Growth-promoting and tumourigenic activity of c-Myc is suppressed by Hhex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfil, V; Blazquez, M; Serrano, F; Castell, J V; Bort, R

    2015-06-04

    c-Myc transcription factor is a key protein involved in cellular growth, proliferation and metabolism. c-Myc is one of the most frequently activated oncogenes, highlighting the need to identify intracellular molecules that interact directly with c-Myc to suppress its function. Here we show that Hhex is able to interact with the basic region/helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper of c-Myc. Knockdown of Hhex increases proliferation rate in hepatocellular carcinoma cells, whereas Hhex expression cell-autonomously reduces cell proliferation rate in multiple cell lines by increasing G1 phase length through a c-Myc-dependent mechanism. Global transcriptomic analysis shows that Hhex counter-regulates multiple c-Myc targets involved in cell proliferation and metabolism. Concomitantly, Hhex expression leads to reduced cell size, lower levels of cellular RNA, downregulation of metabolism-related genes, decreased sensitivity to methotrexate and severe reduction in the ability to form tumours in nude mouse xenografts, all indicative of decreased c-Myc activity. Our data suggest that Hhex is a novel regulator of c-Myc function that limits c-Myc activity in transformed cells.

  20. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Enhance Neuronal Differentiation in Cultured Rat Neural Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Katakura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs can induce neurogenesis and recovery from brain diseases. However, the exact mechanisms of the beneficial effects of PUFAs have not been conclusively described. We recently reported that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA induced neuronal differentiation by decreasing Hes1 expression and increasing p27kip1 expression, which causes cell cycle arrest in neural stem cells (NSCs. In the present study, we examined the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and arachidonic acid (AA on differentiation, expression of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors (Hes1, Hes6, and NeuroD, and the cell cycle of cultured NSCs. EPA also increased mRNA levels of Hes1, an inhibitor of neuronal differentiation, Hes6, an inhibitor of Hes1, NeuroD, and Map2 mRNA and Tuj-1-positive cells (a neuronal marker, indicating that EPA induced neuronal differentiation. EPA increased the mRNA levels of p21cip1 and p27kip1, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which indicated that EPA induced cell cycle arrest. Treatment with AA decreased Hes1 mRNA but did not affect NeuroD and Map2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, AA did not affect the number of Tuj-1-positive cells or cell cycle progression. These results indicated that EPA could be involved in neuronal differentiation by mechanisms alternative to those of DHA, whereas AA did not affect neuronal differentiation in NSCs.

  1. ThMYC4E, candidate Blue aleurone 1 gene controlling the associated trait in Triticum aestivum.

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    Na Li

    Full Text Available Blue aleurone is a useful and interesting trait in common wheat that was derived from related species. Here, transcriptomes of blue and white aleurone were compared for isolating Blue aleurone 1 (Ba1 transferred from Thinopyrum ponticum. In the genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis, only a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor, ThMYC4E, had a higher transcript level in blue aleurone phenotype, and was homologous to the genes on chromosome 4 of Triticum aestivum. ThMYC4E carried the characteristic domains (bHLH-MYC_N, HLH and ACT-like of a bHLH transcription factor, and clustered with genes regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis upon phylogenetic analysis. The over-expression of ThMYC4E regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis with the coexpression of the MYB transcription factor ZmC1 from maize. ThMYC4E existed in the genomes of the addition, substitution and near isogenic lines with the blue aleurone trait derived from Th. ponticum, and could not be detected in any germplasm of T. urartu, T. monococcum, T. turgidum, Aegilops tauschii or T. aestivum, with white aleurone. These results suggested that ThMYC4E was candidate Ba1 gene controlling the blue aleurone trait in T. aestivum genotypes carrying Th. ponticum introgression. The ThMYC4E isolation aids in better understanding the genetic mechanisms of the blue aleurone trait and in its more effective use during wheat breeding.

  2. Molecular cloning and its expression of trachealess gene (As-trh) during development in brine shrimp, Artemia sinica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Qing; Hou, Lin; Yi, Nan; Zhang, Riu-Feng; Zou, Xiang-Yang; Xiao, Qin; Guo, Ran

    2012-02-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix-PAS (bHLH-PAS) family transcription factors are implicated in multiple developmental and physiological regulatory processes. Herein, a full-length cDNA encoding a bHLH-PAS domain transcription factor trachealess gene (designated as As-trh) was cloned and characterized from brine shrimp (Artemia sinica) for the first time. The full-length cDNA of As-trh was 2,698 bp with a 2,319 bp open reading frame encoding a deduced protein of 772 amino acid polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 86.02 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.87. Sequence alignment revealed that As-trh had high homology with other species trh gene, including the D-trh gene in Drosophila melanogaster and Bm-trh in Bombyx mori. The early and persistent expression of As-trh in the naupliar stages by whole-mount embryonic in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry suggest that As-trh functions very early in the salt gland and may be required continuously in this tissue. Later in development, expression of As-trh begins to decrease and disappear in salt gland of the older nauplius and appears in the thoracic epipods of the sub-adult Artemia. These results indicated that As-trh might play an important role in osmoregulatiory organ development from the larvae stages through adult stages.

  3. Id1 induces apoptosis through inhibition of RORgammat expression

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    Sun Xiao-Hong

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Basic helix-loop-helix E proteins are transcription factors that play crucial roles in T cell development by controlling thymocyte proliferation, differentiation and survival. E protein functions can be repressed by their naturally occurring inhibitors, Id proteins (Id1-4. Transgenic expression of Id1 blocks T cell development and causes massive apoptosis of developing thymocytes. However, the underlying mechanisms are not entirely understood due to relatively little knowledge of the target genes regulated by E proteins. Results We designed a unique strategy to search for genes directly controlled by E proteins and found RORγt to be a top candidate. Using microarray analyses and reverse-transcriptase PCR assays, we showed that Id1 expression diminished RORγt mRNA levels in T cell lines and primary thymocytes while induction of E protein activity restored RORγt expression. E proteins were found to specifically bind to the promoter region of RORγt, suggesting their role in activating transcription of the gene. Functional significance of E protein-controlled RORγt expression was established based on the finding that RORγt rescued apoptosis caused by Id1 overexpression. Furthermore, expression of RORγt prevented Id1-induced p38 MAP kinase hyper-activation. Conclusion These results suggest that E protein-dependent RORγt gene expression aids the survival of developing thymocytes, which provides a possible explanation for the massive apoptosis found in Id1 transgenic mice.

  4. Endosulfan inhibiting the meiosis process via depressing expressions of regulatory factors and causing cell cycle arrest in spermatogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang-Zi; Zhang, Lian-Shuang; Wei, Jia-Liu; Ren, Li-Hua; Zhang, Jin; Jing, Li; Yang, Man; Wang, Ji; Sun, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Xian-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Endosulfan is a persistent organic pollutant and widely used in agriculture as a pesticide. It is present in air, water, and soil worldwide; therefore, it is a health risk affecting especially the reproductive system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of endosulfan in the reproductive system. To investigate the effect of endosulfan on meiosis process, 32 rats were divided into four groups, treated with 0, 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg/day endosulfan, respectively, and sacrificed after the 21 days of treatments. Results show that endosulfan caused the reductions in sperm concentration and motility rate, which resulted into an increased in sperm abnormality rate; further, endosulfan induced downregulation of spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (Sohlh1) which controls the switch on meiosis in mammals, as well cyclin A1, cyclin-dependent kinases 1 (CDK1), and cyclin-dependent kinases 2 (CDK2). In vitro, endosulfan induced G2/M phase arrest in the spermatogenic cell cycle and caused proliferation inhibition. Moreover, endosulfan induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in vivo and vitro. The results suggested that endosulfan could inhibit the start of meiosis by downregulating the expression of Sohlh1 and induce G2/M phase arrest of cell cycle by decreasing the expression of cyclin A1, CDK1, and CDK2 via oxidative damage, which inhibits the meiosis process, and therefore decrease the amount of sperm.

  5. Tomato Male sterile 1035 is essential for pollen development and meiosis in anthers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hee-Jin; Kang, Jin-Ho; Zhao, Meiai; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Choi, Hak-Soon; Bae, Jung Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Joung, Young-Hee; Choi, Doil; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2014-12-01

    Male fertility in flowering plants depends on proper cellular differentiation in anthers. Meiosis and tapetum development are particularly important processes in pollen production. In this study, we showed that the tomato male sterile (ms10(35)) mutant of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) exhibited dysfunctional meiosis and an abnormal tapetum during anther development, resulting in no pollen production. We demonstrated that Ms10(35) encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is specifically expressed in meiocyte and tapetal tissue from pre-meiotic to tetrad stages. Transgenic expression of the Ms10(35) gene from its native promoter complemented the male sterility of the ms10(35) mutant. In addition, RNA-sequencing-based transcriptome analysis revealed that Ms10(35) regulates 246 genes involved in anther development processes such as meiosis, tapetum development, cell-wall degradation, pollen wall formation, transport, and lipid metabolism. Our results indicate that Ms10(35) plays key roles in regulating both meiosis and programmed cell death of the tapetum during microsporogenesis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. Antioxidant Functions of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

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    Cornelia Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR is a transcription factor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix/PER-ARNT-SIM family. It is activated by a variety of ligands, such as environmental contaminants like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or dioxins, but also by naturally occurring compounds and endogenous ligands. Binding of the ligand leads to dimerization of the AhR with aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT and transcriptional activation of several xenobiotic phase I and phase II metabolizing enzymes. It is generally accepted that the toxic responses of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, dioxins, and structurally related compounds are mediated by activation of the AhR. A multitude of studies indicate that the AhR operates beyond xenobiotic metabolism and exerts pleiotropic functions. Increasing evidence points to a protective role of the AhR against carcinogenesis and oxidative stress. Herein, I will highlight data demonstrating a causal role of the AhR in the antioxidant response and present novel findings on potential AhR-mediated antioxidative mechanisms.

  7. CD26-mediated regulation of periostin expression contributes to migration and invasion of malignant pleural mesothelioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiya, Eriko [Department of Therapy Development and Innovation for Immune Disorders and Cancers, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, 2-1-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kei, E-mail: kohnuma@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Therapy Development and Innovation for Immune Disorders and Cancers, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, 2-1-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Yamazaki, Hiroto; Hatano, Ryo; Iwata, Satoshi; Okamoto, Toshihiro [Department of Therapy Development and Innovation for Immune Disorders and Cancers, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, 2-1-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Dang, Nam H. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Road, Box 100278, Room MSB M410A, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Yamada, Taketo [Department of Pathology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Morimoto, Chikao [Department of Therapy Development and Innovation for Immune Disorders and Cancers, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, 2-1-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD26-expressing MPM cells upregulate production of periostin. • The intracytoplasmic region of CD26 mediates the upregulation of periostin. • CD26 expression leads to nuclear translocation of Twist1 via phosphorylation of Src. • Secreted periostin enhances migration and invasion of MPM cells. - Abstract: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive malignancy arising from mesothelial lining of pleura. It is generally associated with a history of asbestos exposure and has a very poor prognosis, partly due to the lack of a precise understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with its malignant behavior. In the present study, we expanded on our previous studies on the enhanced motility and increased CD26 expression in MPM cells, with a particular focus on integrin adhesion molecules. We found that expression of CD26 upregulates periostin secretion by MPM cells, leading to enhanced MPM cell migratory and invasive activity. Moreover, we showed that upregulation of periostin expression results from the nuclear translocation of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Twist1, a process that is mediated by CD26-associated activation of Src phosphorylation. While providing new and profound insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in MPM biology, these findings may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for MPM.

  8. Distinct functions for different scl isoforms in zebrafish primitive and definitive hematopoiesis.

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    Feng Qian

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The stem-cell leukemia (SCL, also known as TAL1 gene encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is essential for the initiation of primitive and definitive hematopoiesis, erythrocyte and megakarocyte differentiation, angiogenesis, and astrocyte development. Here we report that the zebrafish produces, through an alternative promoter site, a novel truncated scl (tal1 isoform, scl-beta, which manifests a temporal and spatial expression distinct from the previously described full-length scl-alpha. Functional analysis reveals that while scl-alpha and -beta are redundant for the initiation of primitive hematopoiesis, these two isoforms exert distinct functions in the regulation of primitive erythroid differentiation and definitive hematopoietic stem cell specification. We further demonstrate that differences in the protein expression levels of scl-alpha and -beta, by regulating their protein stability, are likely to give rise to their distinct functions. Our findings suggest that hematopoietic cells at different levels of hierarchy are likely governed by a gradient of the Scl protein established through temporal and spatial patterns of expression of the different isoforms.

  9. OsMYC2 mediates numerous defence-related transcriptional changes via jasmonic acid signalling in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Satoshi; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Miyamoto, Koji; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki; Tsujii, Yoshimasa; Okada, Kazunori

    2017-05-06

    Jasmonic acid (JA) plays central roles in various events in plants, especially defence against pathogens and insects. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor MYC2 has attracted attention as a master regulator of JA signalling in dicotyledonous plants. However, how MYC2 functions in monocotyledonous plants, including agriculturally important crops such as cultivated rice, has been poorly understood. To elucidate the comprehensive effects of rice MYC2 (OsMYC2) on the JA-inducible transcriptional modifications, we performed RNA-sequencing by using OsMYC2-knockdown plants (osmyc2RNAi). In osmyc2RNAi, JA-inducible expression of many defence-related genes, for example chitinases and proteinase inhibitors, was compromised. Decrease in JA-dependent activation of the biosynthetic pathways of specialised metabolites, especially defence compounds, was also evident in the osmyc2RNAi line. Furthermore, a substantial change was noted in the expression of distinct types of transcription factors, such as MYB-type factors, likely depicting the importance of OsMYC2 in not only defence responses but also other morphogenetic events. Our findings provide fundamental information to understand the overall functions of MYC2 in JA signalling in monocotyledonous plants, which might yield agricultural benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The bHLH transcription factor BIS1 controls the iridoid branch of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid pathway in Catharanthus roseus.

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    Van Moerkercke, Alex; Steensma, Priscille; Schweizer, Fabian; Pollier, Jacob; Gariboldi, Ivo; Payne, Richard; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Miettinen, Karel; Espoz, Javiera; Purnama, Purin Candra; Kellner, Franziska; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; O'Connor, Sarah E; Rischer, Heiko; Memelink, Johan; Goossens, Alain

    2015-06-30

    Plants make specialized bioactive metabolites to defend themselves against attackers. The conserved control mechanisms are based on transcriptional activation of the respective plant species-specific biosynthetic pathways by the phytohormone jasmonate. Knowledge of the transcription factors involved, particularly in terpenoid biosynthesis, remains fragmentary. By transcriptome analysis and functional screens in the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle), the unique source of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid (MIA)-type anticancer drugs vincristine and vinblastine, we identified a jasmonate-regulated basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor from clade IVa inducing the monoterpenoid branch of the MIA pathway. The bHLH iridoid synthesis 1 (BIS1) transcription factor transactivated the expression of all of the genes encoding the enzymes that catalyze the sequential conversion of the ubiquitous terpenoid precursor geranyl diphosphate to the iridoid loganic acid. BIS1 acted in a complementary manner to the previously characterized ethylene response factor Octadecanoid derivative-Responsive Catharanthus APETALA2-domain 3 (ORCA3) that transactivates the expression of several genes encoding the enzymes catalyzing the conversion of loganic acid to the downstream MIAs. In contrast to ORCA3, overexpression of BIS1 was sufficient to boost production of high-value iridoids and MIAs in C. roseus suspension cell cultures. Hence, BIS1 might be a metabolic engineering tool to produce sustainably high-value MIAs in C. roseus plants or cultures.

  11. Coordinated transcriptional regulation of isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthetic pathway enzymes in plastids by phytochrome-interacting factor 5.

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    Mannen, Kazuto; Matsumoto, Takuro; Takahashi, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Yuta; Tsukagoshi, Masanori; Sano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sakurai, Nozomu; Shibata, Daisuke; Koyama, Tanetoshi; Nakayama, Toru

    2014-01-10

    All isoprenoids are derived from a common C5 unit, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). In plants, IPP is synthesized via two distinct pathways; the cytosolic mevalonate pathway and the plastidial non-mevalonate (MEP) pathway. In this study, we used a co-expression analysis to identify transcription factors that coordinately regulate the expression of multiple genes encoding enzymes in the IPP biosynthetic pathway. Some candidates showed especially strong correlations with multiple genes encoding MEP-pathway enzymes. We report here that phytochrome-interacting factor 5 (PIF5), a basic-helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, functions as a positive regulator of the MEP pathway. Its overexpression in T87 suspension cultured cells resulted in increased accumulation of chlorophylls and carotenoids. Detailed analyses of carotenoids by HPLC indicated that some carotenoid biosynthetic pathways were concomitantly up-regulated, possibly as a result of enhanced IPP metabolic flow. Our results also revealed other PIF family proteins that play different roles from that of PIF5 in IPP metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Conditional deletion of neurogenin-3 using Nkx2.1iCre results in a mouse model for the central control of feeding, activity and obesity

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    Neal Anthwal

    2013-09-01

    The ventral hypothalamus acts to integrate visceral and systemic information to control energy balance. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor neurogenin-3 (Ngn3 is required for pancreatic β-cell development and has been implicated in neuronal development in the hypothalamus. Here, we demonstrate that early embryonic hypothalamic inactivation of Ngn3 (also known as Neurog3 in mice results in rapid post-weaning obesity that is associated with hyperphagia and reduced energy expenditure. This obesity is caused by loss of expression of Pomc in Pomc- and Cart-expressing (Pomc/Cart neurons in the arcuate nucleus, indicating an incomplete specification of anorexigenic first order neurons. Furthermore, following the onset of obesity, both the arcuate and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei become insensitive to peripheral leptin treatment. This conditional mouse mutant therefore represents a novel model system for obesity that is associated with hyperphagia and underactivity, and sheds new light upon the roles of Ngn3 in the specification of hypothalamic neurons controlling energy balance.

  13. Crystal Structure of Tetrameric Arabidopsis MYC2 Reveals the Mechanism of Enhanced Interaction with DNA

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    Teng-fei Lian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Jasmonates (JAs are essential plant hormones that play important roles in the regulation of plant growth and the response to environmental stress. In the JA signaling pathway, the core transcription factors are a class of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH proteins, including MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4, that have different regulatory capacities. Here, we report the 2.7 Å crystal structure of the MYC2 bHLH domain complexed with G-box DNA, showing a cis-tetrameric structure. Biochemical assays confirmed that full-length MYC2 forms a stable homo-tetramer both in solution and in DNA-bound states, whereas MYC3 forms only a homodimer. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC assays demonstrated that tetramerization enhanced DNA binding affinity, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay indicated DNA looping potential of tetrameric MYC2. Luciferase assay further confirmed the importance of tetramerization in transcriptional regulation. Our studies provide a mechanistic explanation for the regulatory differences of MYC transcription factors.

  14. Neurog1 Genetic Inducible Fate Mapping (GIFM) Reveals the Existence of Complex Spatiotemporal Cyto-Architectures in the Developing Cerebellum.

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    Obana, Edwin A; Lundell, Travis G; Yi, Kevin J; Radomski, Kryslaine L; Zhou, Qiong; Doughty, Martin L

    2015-06-01

    Neurog1 is a pro-neural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor expressed in progenitor cells located in the ventricular zone and subsequently the presumptive white matter tracts of the developing mouse cerebellum. We used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM) with a transgenic Neurog1-CreER allele to characterize the contributions of Neurog1 lineages to cerebellar circuit formation in mice. GIFM reveals Neurog1-expressing progenitors are fate-mapped to become Purkinje cells and all GABAergic interneuron cell types of the cerebellar cortex but not glia. The spatiotemporal sequence of GIFM is unique to each neuronal cell type. GIFM on embryonic days (E) 10.5 to E12.5 labels Purkinje cells with different medial-lateral settling patterns depending on the day of tamoxifen delivery. GIFM on E11.5 to P7 labels interneurons and the timing of tamoxifen administration correlates with the final inside-to-outside resting position of GABAergic interneurons in the cerebellar cortex. Proliferative status and long-term BrdU retention of GIFM lineages reveals Purkinje cells express Neurog1 around the time they become post-mitotic. In contrast, GIFM labels mitotic and post-mitotic interneurons. Neurog1-CreER GIFM reveals a correlation between the timing of Neurog1 expression and the spatial organization of GABAergic neurons in the cerebellar cortex with possible implications for cerebellar circuit assembly.

  15. Two direct targets of cytokinin signaling regulate symbiotic nodulation in Medicago truncatula.

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    Ariel, Federico; Brault-Hernandez, Marianne; Laffont, Carole; Huault, Emeline; Brault, Mathias; Plet, Julie; Moison, Michael; Blanchet, Sandrine; Ichanté, Jean Laurent; Chabaud, Mireille; Carrere, Sébastien; Crespi, Martin; Chan, Raquel L; Frugier, Florian

    2012-09-01

    Cytokinin regulates many aspects of plant development, and in legume crops, this phytohormone is necessary and sufficient for symbiotic nodule organogenesis, allowing them to fix atmospheric nitrogen. To identify direct links between cytokinins and nodule organogenesis, we determined a consensus sequence bound in vitro by a transcription factor (TF) acting in cytokinin signaling, the nodule-enhanced Medicago truncatula Mt RR1 response regulator (RR). Among genes rapidly regulated by cytokinins and containing this so-called RR binding site (RRBS) in their promoters, we found the nodulation-related Type-A RR Mt RR4 and the Nodulation Signaling Pathway 2 (NSP2) TF. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that RRBS cis-elements in the RR4 and NSP2 promoters are essential for expression during nodule development and for cytokinin induction. Furthermore, a microRNA targeting NSP2 (miR171 h) is also rapidly induced by cytokinins and then shows an expression pattern anticorrelated with NSP2. Other primary targets regulated by cytokinins depending on the Cytokinin Response1 (CRE1) receptor were a cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX1) and a basic Helix-Loop-Helix TF (bHLH476). RNA interference constructs as well as insertion of a Tnt1 retrotransposon in the bHLH gene led to reduced nodulation. Hence, we identified two TFs, NSP2 and bHLH476, as direct cytokinin targets acting at the convergence of phytohormonal and symbiotic cues.

  16. Intrinsic Disorder of the C-Terminal Domain of Drosophila Methoprene-Tolerant Protein.

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    Marta Kolonko

    Full Text Available Methoprene tolerant protein (Met has recently been confirmed as the long-sought juvenile hormone (JH receptor. This protein plays a significant role in the cross-talk of the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E and JH signalling pathways, which are important for control of insect development and maturation. Met belongs to the basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH-PAS family of transcription factors. In these proteins, bHLH domains are typically responsible for DNA binding and dimerization, whereas the PAS domains are crucial for the choice of dimerization partner and the specificity of target gene activation. The C-terminal region is usually responsible for the regulation of protein complex activity. The sequence of the Met C-terminal region (MetC is not homologous to any sequence deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB and has not been structurally characterized to date. In this study, we show that the MetC exhibits properties typical for an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP. The final averaged structure obtained with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS experiments indicates that intrinsically disordered MetC exists in an extended conformation. This extended shape and the long unfolded regions characterise proteins with high flexibility and dynamics. Therefore, we suggest that the multiplicity of conformations adopted by the disordered MetC is crucial for its activity as a biological switch modulating the cross-talk of different signalling pathways in insects.

  17. Program Specificity for Ptf1a in Pancreas versus Neural Tube Development Correlates with Distinct Collaborating Cofactors and Chromatin Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, David M.; Borromeo, Mark D.; Deering, Tye G.; Casey, Bradford H.; Savage, Trisha K.; Mayer, Paul R.; Hoang, Chinh; Tung, Kuang-Chi; Kumar, Manonmani; Shen, Chengcheng; Swift, Galvin H.

    2013-01-01

    The lineage-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Ptf1a is a critical driver for development of both the pancreas and nervous system. How one transcription factor controls diverse programs of gene expression is a fundamental question in developmental biology. To uncover molecular strategies for the program-specific functions of Ptf1a, we identified bound genomic regions in vivo during development of both tissues. Most regions bound by Ptf1a are specific to each tissue, lie near genes needed for proper formation of each tissue, and coincide with regions of open chromatin. The specificity of Ptf1a binding is encoded in the DNA surrounding the Ptf1a-bound sites, because these regions are sufficient to direct tissue-restricted reporter expression in transgenic mice. Fox and Sox factors were identified as potential lineage-specific modifiers of Ptf1a binding, since binding motifs for these factors are enriched in Ptf1a-bound regions in pancreas and neural tube, respectively. Of the Fox factors expressed during pancreatic development, Foxa2 plays a major role. Indeed, Ptf1a and Foxa2 colocalize in embryonic pancreatic chromatin and can act synergistically in cell transfection assays. Together, these findings indicate that lineage-specific chromatin landscapes likely constrain the DNA binding of Ptf1a, and they identify Fox and Sox gene families as part of this process. PMID:23754747

  18. Development of pro-angiogenic engineered transcription factors for the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebar, Edward J

    2004-07-01

    Gene therapies that use engineered transcription factors to regulate a patient's own endogenous genetic loci offer several advantages over cDNA-based approaches, including the capacity to upregulate all splice variants of a therapeutic gene. Currently, two engineered transcription factors are being developed for use in gene-mediated revascularisation therapies of cardiovascular disease. Both proteins target a powerful, constitutive transcriptional activation module to a defined sequence in the promoter region of vascular endothelial growth factor-A via linkage to an appropriately specific DNA-binding domain, either the basic helix-loop-helix motif of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) or a designed zinc finger protein. Both factors activate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A in cellular studies and induce angiogenesis in animal models of cardiovascular disease. Phase I studies are underway for the HIF-1alpha-based factor and are expected to commence for the zinc finger protein-based factor by the second half of 2004.

  19. Characterization of FaSPT, a SPATULA gene encoding a bHLH transcriptional factor from the non-climacteric strawberry fruit.

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    Tisza, Viktória; Kovács, László; Balogh, Andrea; Heszky, László; Kiss, Erzsébet

    2010-01-01

    The involvement of basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors in essential physiological and developmental processes is well established. Although a lot of animal bHLH proteins were characterized functionally, much less bHLHs of plant origin have been studied so far. Using a cDNA-AFLP approach, a ripening-related SPATULA gene was identified from strawberry fruit (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.), which encodes a bHLH protein. It is an orthologue of an Arabidopsis SPATULA protein, which has an important role in carpel and fruit development. Our experiments revealed that FaSPT is repressed by auxin in green fruits, and shows different expression patterns in receptacles at various stages of fruit ripening by ethylene treatment. Moreover, we applied a reverse genetic tool to elucidate the in planta function of FaSPT in early fruit development. To our knowledge, this work is the first report for the characterization of a SPATULA gene from a non-climacteric fruit. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. SUMO modification of Stra13 is required for repression of cyclin D1 expression and cellular growth arrest.

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    Yaju Wang

    Full Text Available Stra13, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor is involved in myriad biological functions including cellular growth arrest, differentiation and senescence. However, the mechanisms by which its transcriptional activity and function are regulated remain unclear. In this study, we provide evidence that post-translational modification of Stra13 by Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO dramatically potentiates its ability to transcriptionally repress cyclin D1 and mediate G(1 cell cycle arrest in fibroblast cells. Mutation of SUMO acceptor lysines 159 and 279 located in the C-terminal repression domain has no impact on nuclear localization; however, it abrogates association with the co-repressor histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1, attenuates repression of cyclin D1, and prevents Stra13-mediated growth suppression. HDAC1, which promotes cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression, antagonizes Stra13 sumoylation-dependent growth arrest. Our results uncover an unidentified regulatory axis between Stra13 and HDAC1 in progression through the G(1/S phase of the cell cycle, and provide new mechanistic insights into regulation of Stra13-mediated transcriptional repression by sumoylation.