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Sample records for human b-lymphocyte response

  1. Resveratrol Alters Proliferative Responses and Apoptosis in Human Activated B Lymphocytes In Vitro

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    We hypothesized that resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes, peanuts, and berries would modulate B lymphocyte proliferation, immunoglobulin synthesis, and apoptosis after activation with T-cell dependent pokeweed mitogen. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from the blood of ...

  2. Influence of prevaccination immunity on the human B-lymphocyte response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Kristensen, K; Henrichsen, J

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether preexisting immunity to components of a polysaccharide-protein conjugate influences the B-lymphocyte response to vaccination with the conjugate. Thirty-two healthy adults were vaccinated once or twice with a conjugate (PRP-D) consisting...... of circulating PRP and DT antibody-secreting cells (AbSC) (postvaccination days 6 to 9). The B-cell responses (antibody response and AbSC) to both PRP and DT correlated positively with prevaccination levels of anti-DT. DT AbSC appeared earlier (peak, day 7) than PRP AbSC (peak, day 8). Individuals whose PRP Ab......SC peaked early (day 7) had higher prevaccination anti-DT levels than those who peaked later (P less than 0.05). In contrast, the prevaccination levels of anti-PRP did not correlate significantly with the magnitude of the antibody or AbSC response and did not affect the kinetics of the AbSC. Following...

  3. FcgammaRIIb expression on human germinal center B lymphocytes.

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    Macardle, Peter J; Mardell, Carolyn; Bailey, Sheree; Wheatland, Loretta; Ho, Alice; Jessup, Claire; Roberton, Donal M; Zola, Heddy

    2002-12-01

    IgG antibody can specifically suppress the antibody response to antigen. This has been explained by the hypothesis that signaling through the B cell antigen receptor is negatively modulated by the co-ligation of immunoglobulin with the receptor for IgG, FcgammaRIIb. We hypothesized that inhibitory signaling through FcgammaRIIb would be counter-productive in germinal center cells undergoing selection by affinity maturation, since these cells are thought to receive a survival/proliferative signal by interacting with antigen displayed on follicular dendritic cells. We have identified and characterized a population of B lymphocytes with low/negative FcgammaRIIb expression that are present in human tonsil. Phenotypically these cells correspond to germinal center B cells and comprise both centroblast and centrocyte populations. In examining expression at the molecular level we determined that these B cells do not express detectable mRNA for FcgammaRIIb. We examined several culture conditions to induce expression of FcgammaRIIb on germinal center cells but could not determine conditions that altered expression. We then examined the functional consequence of cross-linking membrane immunoglobulin and the receptor for IgG on human B lymphocytes. Our results cast some doubt on the value of anti-IgG as a model for antigen-antibody complexes in studying human B cell regulation.

  4. 2-Methoxyestradiol induce the conversion of human peripheral blood memory B lymphocytes into plasma cells.

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    Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Drouin, Mathieu; Proulx, Maryse; Jung, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME), an end-metabolite of 17beta-estradiol, is an antiproliferative agent that is currently being tested in clinical trials for cancer treatment. We hereby report that sub-cytotoxic concentrations of 2ME influence the in vitro proliferation of human peripheral blood B lymphocytes. More surprisingly, we have observed that 2ME induces the conversion of CD138(-) B lymphocytes into CD138(+) cells of phenotype similar to immunoglobulin (Ig)-secreting plasma cells. Normal human B lymphocytes expressing CD138 increased in response to 2ME in a dose-dependent fashion, from 2% at baseline up to 31% in cells cultured in the presence of 0.75 microM 2ME. Moreover, most of the converted cells were also CD27(+) and secreted high levels of IgG (151 microg/10(6)cells/24h). IEF studies revealed that conversion occurred in a polyclonal manner. We then exploited this effect of 2ME to gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern changes in transcription factors involved in plasma cells differentiation. Plasma cells generated by 2ME treatment of normal human B lymphocytes expressed elevated levels of IRF4 and reduced levels of Pax5 and Bcl-6. Similarly, levels of XBP-1 and Blimp-1 transcripts were increased. Our results suggest that the differentiation of peripheral blood B lymphocytes into plasma cells requires a similar modulation of transcription factors expression that for tonsil and bone marrow B lymphocytes.

  5. Influence of prevaccination immunity on the human B-lymphocyte response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Kristensen, K; Henrichsen, J

    1991-01-01

    of Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (PRP) and diphtheria toxoid (DT), and the response was related to the prevaccination levels of PRP and DT antibodies. Positive correlations were found between increases in plasma PRP (median, 32.0 micrograms/ml) and DT (1.14 IU/ml) antibodies and numbers...... of circulating PRP and DT antibody-secreting cells (AbSC) (postvaccination days 6 to 9). The B-cell responses (antibody response and AbSC) to both PRP and DT correlated positively with prevaccination levels of anti-DT. DT AbSC appeared earlier (peak, day 7) than PRP AbSC (peak, day 8). Individuals whose PRP Ab......SC peaked early (day 7) had higher prevaccination anti-DT levels than those who peaked later (P less than 0.05). In contrast, the prevaccination levels of anti-PRP did not correlate significantly with the magnitude of the antibody or AbSC response and did not affect the kinetics of the AbSC. Following...

  6. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of human newborns' B lymphocytes.

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    Durandy, A; Thuillier, L; Forveille, M; Fischer, A

    1990-01-01

    It has been demonstrated two major facts concerning human newborns' B lymphocytes: 1) they differentiate poorly into Ig-producing cells and 2) they express CD5 and CD1c membrane proteins. We have further analyzed human newborns' B cell characteristics and found that approximately half of them express activation Ag, i.e., 4F2 and IL-2R, both associated in significant proportions with CD23 and Bac-1. These membrane Ag were found both on CD5(+) and CD5(-) B cells. Newborns' B cells do not exhibit other activation markers because they express surface IgD, and because their size, RNA, and DNA contents do not differ from those of adults' B cells, indicating that they are in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Newborns' B cell proliferation can be induced by rIL-2, rIL-4, low m.w. B cell growth factor, and by Staphylococcus aureus protein A. It is presently difficult to build a hypothesis accounting for all the specific findings made on newborns' B cells. It is not known for instance whether CD5(+) and (-) B cells belong to distinct subsets as suggested by the fluorescence intensity curve obtained with an anti-CD5 antibody or to distinct stages in a unique pattern of B cell maturation during fetal and newborn life. This may indicate that partially activated B cells actually produce natural polyspecific autoantibodies of the IgM isotype found in newborns' human serum.

  7. Kinetics of circulating B lymphocytes in human myeloma

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    Boccadoro, M.; Gavarotti, P.; Fossati, G.; Massaia, M.; Pileri, A.; Durie, B.G.

    1983-04-01

    The tritiated thymidine labeling index (LI%) of peripheral B lymphocytes was studied in eight myeloma patients using simultaneous immunofluorescence and autoradiography. The LI% values were low (0.3%-5.1%), but significantly increased as compared to normal controls. In addition, there was excellent correlation between the LI% values and myeloma disease activity: lowest LI% values were observed in remission patients and the highest at the time of relapse. Simultaneous LI% evaluation of bone marrow myeloma cells in five patients gave concordant results, indicating the same kinetic behavior in both these compartments, particularly in the relapse phase. These data indicate both that circulating B lymphocytes include the neoplastic clone and that these B lymphocytes and bone marrow myeloma cells have similar kinetics.

  8. Interaction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with human B-lymphocytes

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    Klein, George, E-mail: Georg.Klein@ki.se [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology (MTC), Box 280, S171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Klein, Eva; Kashuba, Elena [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology (MTC), Box 280, S171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-05-21

    Epstein-Barr virus, EBV, and humans have a common history that reaches back to our primate ancestors. The virus co-evolved with man and has established a largely harmless and highly complex co-existence. It is carried as silent infection by almost all human adults. A serendipitous discovery established that it is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis. Still, EBV became known first in 1964, in a rare, geographically prevalent malignant lymphoma of B-cell origin, Burkitt lymphoma BL. Its association with a malignancy prompted intensive studies and its capacity to immortalize B-lymphocytes in vitro was soon demonstrated. Consequently EBV was classified therefore as a potentially tumorigenic virus. Despite of this property however, the virus carrier state itself does not lead to malignancies because the transformed cells are recognized by the immune response. Consequently the EBV induced proliferation of EBV carrying B-lymphocytes is manifested only under immunosuppressive conditions. The expression of EBV encoded genes is regulated by the cell phenotype. The virus genome can be found in malignancies originating from cell types other than the B-lymphocyte. Even in the EBV infected B-cell, the direct transforming capacity is restricted to a defined window of differentiation. A complex interaction between virally encoded proteins and B-cell specific cellular proteins constitute the proliferation inducing program. In this short review we touch upon aspects which are the subject of our present work. We describe the mechanisms of some of the functional interactions between EBV encoded and cellular proteins that determine the phenotype of latently infected B-cells. The growth promoting EBV encoded genes are not expressed in the virus carrying BL cells. Still, EBV seems to contribute to the etiology of this tumor by modifying events that influence cell survival and proliferation. We describe a possible growth promoting mechanism in the genesis of Burkitt lymphoma

  9. Early B lymphocyte development: Similarities and differences in human and mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michiko; Ichii; Kenji; Oritani; Yuzuru; Kanakura

    2014-01-01

    B lymphocytes differentiate from hematopoietic stem cells through a series of distinct stages. Early B cell development proceeds in bone marrow until immature B cells migrate out to secondary lymphoid tissues, such as a spleen and lymph nodes, after completion of immunoglobulin heavy and light chain rearrangement. Although the information about the regulation by numerous factors, including signaling molecules, transcription factors, epigenetic changes and the microenvironment, could provide the clinical application, our knowledge on human B lymphopoiesis is limited. However, with great methodological advances, significant progress for understanding B lymphopoiesis both in human and mouse has been made. In this review, we summarize the experimental models for studies about human adult B lymphopoiesis, and the role of microenvironment and signaling molecules, such as cytokines, transforming growth factor-β superfamily, Wnt family and Notch family, with point-by-point comparison between human and mouse.

  10. Generation and characterization of human B lymphocyte stimulator blocking monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Weiliang; Zhang, Jianjun; Pei, Lili; Fang, Shuping; Liu, Honghao; Wang, Ruixue; Su, Yunpeng

    2016-09-01

    The cytokine, B lymphocyte stimulator (Blys) is essential for activation and proliferation of B cells and is involved in the pathogenesis of B-cell mediated autoimmune diseases. Based on its essential activity, Blys may be a potential therapeutic target for human autoimmune diseases. In this article, we have described the development of a novel humanized anti-Blys antibody, NMB04, that binds with high affinity and specificity to both soluble and membrane bound Blys. This monoclonal antibody has the potential to block Blys binding to all its three receptors, TACI, BCMA and BR-3. Further in vivo studies revealed that NMB04 possessed more potent inhibitory activity against human Blys as compared to an existing antibody, Belimumab. Therefore, NMB04 may have potential as a therapeutic candidate targeting autoimmune diseases.

  11. Effect of insulin and glucose on adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes.

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    Kocbuch, Katarzyna; Sakowicz-Burkiewicz, Monika; Grden, Marzena; Szutowicz, Andrzej; Pawelczyk, Tadeusz

    2009-01-01

    In diabetes several aspects of immunity are altered, including the immunomodulatory action of adenosine. Our study was undertaken to investigate the effect of different glucose and insulin concentrations on activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes line SKW 6.4. The activity of adenosine deaminase in the cytosolic fraction was very low and was not affected by different glucose concentration, but in the membrane fraction of cells cultured with 25 mM glucose it was decreased by about 35% comparing to the activity in cells maintained in 5 mM glucose, irrespective of insulin concentration. The activities of 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NT) and ecto-5'-NT in SKW 6.4 cells depended on insulin concentration, but not on glucose. Cells cultured with 10(-8) M insulin displayed an about 60% lower activity of cytosolic 5'-NT comparing to cells maintained at 10(-11) M insulin. The activity of ecto-5'-NT was decreased by about 70% in cells cultured with 10(-8) M insulin comparing to cells grown in 10(-11) M insulin. Neither insulin nor glucose had an effect on adenosine kinase (AK) activity in SKW 6.4 cells or in human B cells isolated from peripheral blood. The extracellular level of adenosine and inosine during accelerated catabolism of cellular ATP depended on glucose, but not on insulin concentration. Concluding, our study demonstrates that glucose and insulin differentially affect the activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes, but changes in those activities do not correlate with the adenosine level in cell media during accelerated ATP catabolism, implying that nucleoside transport is the primary factor determining the extracellular level of adenosine.

  12. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance the Differentiation of Human Switched Memory B Lymphocytes into Plasma Cells in Serum-Free Medium

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    Gervais-St-Amour, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of human B lymphocytes into plasma cells is one of the most stirring questions with regard to adaptive immunity. However, the terminal differentiation and survival of plasma cells are still topics with much to be discovered, especially when targeting switched memory B lymphocytes. Plasma cells can migrate to the bone marrow in response to a CXCL12 gradient and survive for several years while secreting antibodies. In this study, we aimed to get closer to niches favoring plasma cell survival. We tested low oxygen concentrations and coculture with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from human bone marrow. Besides, all cultures were performed using an animal protein-free medium. Overall, our model enables the generation of high proportions of CD38+CD138+CD31+ plasma cells (≥50%) when CD40-activated switched memory B lymphocytes were cultured in direct contact with mesenchymal stem cells. In these cultures, the secretion of CXCL12 and TGF-β, usually found in the bone marrow, was linked to the presence of MSC. The level of oxygen appeared less impactful than the contact with MSC. This study shows for the first time that expanded switched memory B lymphocytes can be differentiated into plasma cells using exclusively a serum-free medium. PMID:27872867

  13. Effect of in vitro x-irradiation on human peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes

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    Prusek, W. (Szpital Wojewodzki, Wroclaw (Poland)); Astaldi, G. (The Blood Research Foundation Centre, Tortona (Italy))

    1979-01-01

    The effect of in vitro irradiation with increasing in logarythmic progress X-ray doses on lymphocyte viability and on T and B lymphocyte populations was studied in normal adults, patients with myasthenia gravis and in patients undergoing long-term steroid therapy. Decrease in numbers of lymphocytes carrying T or B lymphocyte surface markers was higher than the viable cell loss. The decrease showed no linear correlation with X-ray doses applied, which might reflect the existence of radioresistant T and B lymphocytes. A higher so-called early radiosensitivity of B lymphocytes was demonstrated. In patients with myasthenia gravis early radioresistance of T lymphocytes was detected. In patients undergoing long-term steroid therapy, an increase in numbers of cells lacking markers of any of lymphocyte populations was found in parallel with a decrease in T lymphocyte number which, in these patients, showed a higher radiosensitivity.

  14. Platelet-Activating Factor Antagonists Decrease Follicular Dendritic-Cell Stimulation of Human B Lymphocytes

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    Halickman Isaac

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both B-lymphoblastoid cell lines and tonsillar B lymphocytes express receptors for platelet-activating factor (PAF. In lymph node germinal centres, B lymphocytes interact with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs, which present antigen-containing immune complexes to B lymphocytes. FDCs have phenotypic features that are similar to those of stromal cells and monocytes and may therefore be a source of lipid mediators. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the PAF antagonist WEB 2170 on the activation of tonsillar B lymphocytes by FDCs. FDCs were isolated from tonsils by Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA gradient centrifugation. After being cultured for 6 to 10 days, they were incubated with freshly isolated B cells in the presence or absence of the specific PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. B-lymphocyte proliferation was assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation, and immunoglobulin (Ig G and IgM secretion was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. WEB 2170 (10-6 to 10-8 M inhibited [3H]-thymidine incorporation by up to 35% ± 3%. Moreover, the secretion of IgG and IgM was inhibited by up to 50% by WEB 2170 concentrations ranging from 10-6 to 10-8 M. There was no evidence of toxicity by trypan blue staining, and the addition of WEB 2170 to B cells in the absence of FDCs did not inhibit the spontaneous production of IgG or IgM. The effect of the PAF antagonist is primarily on B lymphocytes, as reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction detected little PAF receptor messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA from FDCs. These data suggest that endogenous production of PAF may be important in the interaction of B lymphocytes with FDCs.

  15. Inhibition of antigen receptor-dependent Ca(2+) signals and NF-AT activation by P2X7 receptors in human B lymphocytes.

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    Pippel, Anja; Beßler, Björn; Klapperstück, Manuela; Markwardt, Fritz

    2015-04-01

    One of the first intracellular signals after antigen binding by the antigen receptor of B lymphocytes is the increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which is followed by several intracellular signaling events like the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-AT controlling the fate of B lymphocytes after their activation. Extracellular ATP, which is released from cells under several pathological conditions, is considered a danger-associated signal serving as an immunomodulator. We investigated the interaction of antigen receptor (BCR) and P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) activation on [Ca(2+)]i signaling and on nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-AT in human B lymphocytes. Although the P2X7R is an ATP-gated Ca(2+)-permeable ion channel, P2X7R activation inhibits the BCR-mediated [Ca(2+)]i responses. This effect is mimicked by cell membrane depolarization induced by an increase in the extracellular K(+) concentration or by application of the Na(+) ionophore gramicidin, but is abolished by stabilization of the membrane potential using the K(+) ionophore valinomycin, by extracellular Mg(2+), which is known to inhibit P2X7R-dependent effects, or by replacing Na(+) by the less P2X7R-permeable Tris(+) ion. Furthermore, P2X7R activation by ATP inhibits the BCR-dependent translocation of the transcription factor NF-ATc1 to the nucleus. We therefore conclude that extracellular ATP via the P2X7R mediates inhibitory effects on B cell activation. This may be of relevance for understanding of the activation of the BCR under pathological conditions and for the development of therapeutic strategies targeting human B lymphocytes or P2X7 receptors.

  16. Differential regulation of voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channels in human B lymphocytes.

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    Partiseti, M; Choquet, D; Diu, A; Korn, H

    1992-06-01

    The expression and characteristics of K+ channels of human B lymphocytes were studied by using single and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. They were gated by depolarization (voltage-gated potassium current, IKv, 11-20 pS) and by an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration (calcium-activated potassium current, IKCa, 26 pS), respectively. The level of expression of these channels was correlated with the activational status of the cell. Both conductances are blocked by tetraethylammonium, verapamil, and charybdotoxin, and are insensitive to apamin; 4-aminopyridine blocks IK, preferentially. We used a protein kinase C activator (PMA) or antibodies to membrane Ig (anti-mu) to activate resting splenocytes in culture. Although IKv was recorded in the majority of the resting lymphocytic population, less than 20% of the activated cells expressed this conductance. However, in this subset the magnitude of IKv was 20-fold larger than in resting cells. On the other hand, IKCa was detected in nearly one half of the resting cells, whereas all activated cells expressed this current. The magnitude of IKCa was, on average, 30 times larger in activated than in nonactivated cells. These results probably reflect that during the course of activation 1) the number of voltage-dependent K+ channels per cell decreases and increases in a small subset and 2) the number of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels per cell increases in all cells. We suggest that the expression of functional Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K+ channels are under the control of different regulatory signals.

  17. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M;

    2001-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes activate the alternative pathway of complement via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), that binds hydrolysed C3 (iC3) and thereby promotes the formation of a membrane-bound C3 convertase. We have investigated whether this might lead to the generation of a C5...... convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...... the alternative pathway. Blockade of the CR2 ligand-binding site with the monoclonal antibody FE8 resulted in 56 +/- 13% and 71 +/- 9% inhibition of the C3-fragment and MAC deposition, respectively, whereas the monoclonal antibody HB135, directed against an irrelevant CR2 epitope, had no effect. Blockade...

  18. Belimumab: anti-BLyS human monoclonal antibody, anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody, BmAb, human monoclonal antibody to B-lymphocyte stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Belimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of B-lymphocyte stimulator, or BLyS. Belimumab is in phase III trials for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has completed a phase II trial in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); the product may also have potential in the treatment of other autoimmune disorders. In May 2001, Cambridge Antibody Technology (now MedImmune) completed its discovery programme and Human Genome Sciences identified belimumab as a candidate for clinical development. More than 1000 distinct human antibodies specific to BLyS were characterized by the collaboration.B-lymphocyte stimulator is a naturally occurring protein discovered by Human Genome Sciences that stimulates B-lymphocytes to develop into mature B cells. Laboratory studies have indicated that higher than normal levels of B-lymphocyte stimulator may contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as SLE and RA. Human Genome Sciences (HGS) and Cambridge Antibody Technology signed a collaborative agreement in August 1999 to study the B-lymphocyte stimulator as a human protein target. HGS is also developing other BLyS products. In March 2000, HGS and Cambridge Antibody Technology expanded their agreement into a 10-year collaboration and product development alliance, providing Human Genome Sciences with the right to use the antibody technology of Cambridge Antibody Technology to fully develop human antibodies for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Cambridge Antibody Technology will receive royalty payments on product sales from HGS, as well as the development and milestone payments it has already received. Belimumab will be manufactured in Human Genome Sciences' manufacturing facility, located in Rockville, MD, USA. HGS holds commercial rights to the drug. In July 2005, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) exercised its co-development and co-promotion option to belimumab. In an agreement made in June 1996, HGS had

  19. Human CD38hiCD138⁺ plasma cells can be generated in vitro from CD40-activated switched-memory B lymphocytes.

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    Maïga, Rayelle Itoua; Bonnaure, Guillaume; Rochette, Josiane Tremblay; Néron, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    B lymphocyte differentiation into long-lived plasma cells is the keystone event for the production of long-term protective antibodies. CD40-CD154 and CD27-CD70 interactions are involved in human B lymphocyte differentiation into CD38(hi)CD138(+) cells in vivo as well as in vitro. In this study, we have compared these interactions in their capacity to drive switched-memory B lymphocytes differentiation into CD38(hi)CD138(+) plasma cells. The targeted B lymphocytes were isolated from human peripheral blood, expanded for 19 days, and then submitted to CD70 or CD154 interactions for 14 days. The expanded B lymphocytes were constitutively expressing CD39, whereas CD31's expression was noticed only following the in vitro differentiation step (day 5) and was exclusively present on the CD38(hi) cell population. Furthermore, the generated CD38(hi)CD138(+) cells showed a higher proportion of CD31(+) cells than the CD38(hi)CD138(-) cells. Besides, analyses done with human blood and bone marrow plasma cells showed that in vivo and de novo generated CD38(hi)CD138(+) cells have a similar CD31 expression profile but are distinct according to their reduced CD39 expression level. Overall, we have evidences that in vitro generated plasma cells are heterogeneous and appear as CD39(+) precursors to the ones present in bone marrow niches.

  20. Human severe combined immunodeficiency disease: phenotypic and functional characteristics of peripheral B lymphocytes.

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    Gougeon, M L; Drean, G; Le Deist, F; Dousseau, M; Fevrier, M; Diu, A; Theze, J; Griscelli, C; Fischer, A

    1990-11-01

    Human severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) includes an X-chromosome-linked type characterized by a complete absence of mature T cells, hypogammaglobulinemia but normal or elevated number of B cells, suggesting that the disease results from a block in early T cell differentiation. It has been shown that B cells from obligate carrier women of this disorder exhibit the preferential use of the nonmutant X chromosome as the active X (as shown for T cells), suggesting that the SCID gene product has a direct effect on B cells as well as on T cells. To examine this question, we analyzed the phenotypic and functional characteristics of peripheral B cells from nine infants with SCID. We found a constant absence of spontaneously expressed activation Ag on B cell membrane from all SCID patients tested which contrasts with the phenotypic pattern exhibited by age-matched infants whom all cells bearing surface Ig express the 4F2 Ag and to a lesser extent the transferrin receptor. Concurrently, B cells from SCID patients have a profound impairment in their responses to stimuli that induce in vitro B cell proliferation and differentiation. Although rIL-2 and low-Mr B cell growth factor are potent inducers of proliferation on age-matched infants' B cells, they are poorly efficient in inducing proliferation of anti-mu-activated SCID B cells. This impairment is not related to the resting B cell phenotype of SCID B cells as shown by comparison with normal resting B cells. Furthermore, we observed an apparent block in B cell differentiation inasmuch as neither rIL-2 nor rIL-6 could support SAC-activated SCID B cell differentiation, both lymphokines being very efficient in inducing SAC-activated age-matched infants' B cell or purified resting B cell differentiation. These results suggest that the SCID gene defect has a direct effect on B cells and is required during B cell maturation.

  1. Effect of cholinomimetics and adrenomimetics on proliferation of mouse B lymphocytes during primary immune response to protein antigen

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    Ado, A.D.; Dontsov, V.I.; Gol' dshtein, M.M.

    1985-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the effect of neurotransmitters on proliferation of B lymphocytes induced by specific antigen. Experiments were carried out on female mice. To estimate proliferative activity, lymphocytes enriched with B cells were incubated in medium 199 for 2 h at 37 degrees C in a dose of 2.10/sup 6/-5.10/sup 6/ cells with 2 microCi of /sup 3/H-(methyl)-thymidine. The effect of acetylcholine on incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into B lymphocytes of mice immunized with different doses of antigen during culture is shown. Discordance of effects of adrenalin and acetylcholine on incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into B lymphocytes of mice immunized with different doses of ovalbumin is also shown.

  2. Novel Strategy for Phenotypic Characterization of Human B Lymphocytes from Precursors to Effector Cells by Flow Cytometry.

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    Clavarino, Giovanna; Delouche, Noémie; Vettier, Claire; Laurin, David; Pernollet, Martine; Raskovalova, Tatiana; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal; Jacob, Marie-Christine

    A precise identification and phenotypic characterization of human B-cell subsets is of crucial importance in both basic research and medicine. In the literature, flow cytometry studies for the phenotypic characterization of B-lymphocytes are mainly focused on the description of a particular cell stage, or of specific cell stages observed in a single type of sample. In the present work, we propose a backbone of 6 antibodies (CD38, CD27, CD10, CD19, CD5 and CD45) and an efficient gating strategy to identify, in a single analysis tube, a large number of B-cell subsets covering the whole B-cell differentiation from precursors to memory and plasma cells. Furthermore, by adding two antibodies in an 8-color combination, our approach allows the analysis of the modulation of any cell surface marker of interest along B-cell differentiation. We thus developed a panel of seven 8-colour antibody combinations to phenotypically characterize B-cell subpopulations in bone marrow, peripheral blood, lymph node and cord blood samples. Beyond qualitative information provided by biparametric representations, we also quantified antigen expression on each of the identified B-cell subsets and we proposed a series of informative curves showing the modulation of seventeen cell surface markers along B-cell differentiation. Our approach by flow cytometry provides an efficient tool to obtain quantitative data on B-cell surface markers expression with a relative easy-to-handle technique that can be applied in routine explorations.

  3. Expression of IL-4 receptor on human T and B lymphocytes.

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    Zola, H; Flego, L; Weedon, H

    1993-08-01

    The expression of the interleukin-4 receptor on human blood and tonsil lymphocytes has been studied using a monoclonal antibody and high-sensitivity immunofluorescence flow cytometry. While no receptor expression could be detected on circulating or tonsil T cells, a subset of B cells was shown to express the receptor. The IL-4R-positive B cells in tonsil had a phenotype suggesting that they included both germinal centre B cells and B cells outside the germinal centre. The subset of B cells in the blood that expressed the receptor included CD23-positive B cells. Activation of tonsil B cells using anti-IgM, IL-4, IL-2, or combinations of these reagents led to increases in IL-4R expression, but these changes were small compared to changes in the expression of IL-2R p55 (CD25), a known marker of activation. Similarly, activation of T cells led to low-level expression of IL-4R, with IL-4 itself up-regulating IL-4R, especially in CD4 cells. The majority of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia samples were positive for IL-4R expression, whilst most other leukemic samples were negative.

  4. Studying the replication history of human B lymphocytes by real-time quantitative (RQ)-PCR.

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    van Zelm, Menno C; Berkowska, Magdalena A; van Dongen, Jacques J M

    2013-01-01

    The cells of the adaptive immune system, B and T lymphocytes, each generate a unique antigen receptor through V(D)J recombination of their immunoglobulin (Ig) and T cell receptor (TCR) loci, respectively. Such rearrangements join coding elements to form a coding joint and delete the intervening DNA as circular excision products containing the signal joint. These excision circles are stable structures that cannot replicate and have no function in the cell. Since the coding joint in the genome is replicated with each cell division, the ratio between coding joints and signal joints in a population of B cells can be used as a measure for proliferation. This chapter describes a real-time quantitative (RQ-)PCR-based approach to quantify proliferation through calculating the ratio between coding joints and signal joints of the frequently occurring intronRSS-Kde rearrangements in the IGK light chain locus. The approach is useful to study basic B-cell biology as well as abnormal proliferation in human diseases.

  5. Macropinocytosis is responsible for the uptake of pathogenic and non-pathogenic mycobacteria by B lymphocytes (Raji cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Pérez Blanca Estela

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The classical roles of B cells include the production of antibodies and cytokines and the generation of immunological memory, these being key factors in the adaptive immune response. However, their role in innate immunity is currently being recognised. Traditionally, B cells have been considered non-phagocytic cells; therefore, the uptake of bacteria by B cells is not extensively documented. In this study, we analysed some of the features of non-specific bacterial uptake by B lymphocytes from the Raji cell line. In our model, B cells were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB, Mycobacterium smegmatis (MSM, and Salmonella typhimurium (ST. Results Our observations revealed that the Raji B cells were readily infected by the three bacteria that were studied. All of the infections induced changes in the cellular membrane during bacterial internalisation. M. smegmatis and S. typhimurium were able to induce important membrane changes that were characterised by abundant filopodia and lamellipodia formation. These membrane changes were driven by actin cytoskeletal rearrangements. The intracellular growth of these bacteria was also controlled by B cells. M. tuberculosis infection also induced actin rearrangement-driven membrane changes; however, the B cells were not able to control this infection. The phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA treatment of B cells induced filopodia and lamellipodia formation, the production of spacious vacuoles (macropinosomes, and the fluid-phase uptake that is characteristic of macropinocytosis. S. typhimurium infection induced the highest fluid-phase uptake, although both mycobacteria also induced fluid uptake. A macropinocytosis inhibitor such as amiloride was used and abolished the bacterial uptake and the fluid-phase uptake that is triggered during the bacterial infection. Conclusions Raji B cells can internalise S. typhimurium and mycobacteria through an active process, such as

  6. Dual functions of interferon regulatory factors 7C in Epstein-Barr virus-mediated transformation of human B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhao

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection is associated with several human malignancies. Interferon (IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7 has several splicing variants, and at least the major splicing variant (IRF-7A has oncogenic potential and is associated with EBV transformation processes. IRF-7C is an alternative splicing variant with only the DNA-binding domain of IRF-7. Whether IRF-7C is present under physiological conditions and its functions in viral transformation are unknown. In this report, we prove the existence of IRF-7C protein and RNA in certain cells under physiological conditions, and find that high levels of IRF-7C are associated with EBV transformation of human primary B cells in vitro as well as EBV type III latency. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1 stimulates IRF-7C expression in B lymphocytes. IRF-7C has oncogenic potential in rodent cells and partially restores the growth properties of EBV-transformed cells under a growth-inhibition condition. A tumor array experiment has identified six primary tumor specimens with high levels of IRF-7C protein--all of them are lymphomas. Furthermore, we show that the expression of IRF-7C is apparently closely associated with other IRF-7 splicing variants. IRF-7C inhibits the function of IRF-7 in transcriptional regulation of IFN genes. These data suggest that EBV may use splicing variants of IRF-7 for its transformation process in two strategies: to use oncogenic properties of various IRF-7 splicing variants, but use one of its splicing variants (IRF-7C to block the IFN-induction function of IRF-7 that is detrimental for viral transformation. The work provides a novel relation of host/virus interactions, and has expanded our knowledge about IRFs in EBV transformation.

  7. B Lymphocyte Stimulator (BLyS) Is Expressed in Human Adipocytes In Vivo and Is Related to Obesity but Not to Insulin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Nike Müller; Schulte, Dominik M.; Susann Hillebrand; Kathrin Türk; Jochen Hampe; Clemens Schafmayer; Mario Brosch; Witigo von Schönfels; Markus Ahrens; Rainald Zeuner; Schröder, Johann O.; Matthias Blüher; Christian Gutschow; Sandra Freitag-Wolf; Marta Stelmach-Mardas

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation and metabolism have been shown to be evolutionary linked and increasing evidence exists that pro-inflammatory factors are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Until now, most data suggest that within adipose tissue these factors are secreted by cells of the innate immune system, e. g. macrophages. In the present study we demonstrate that B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) is increased in human obesity. In contrast to several pro-inflammatory factors, we found ...

  8. [Evolution and phylogeny of B lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio-Piedras, Fabiola; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    B lymphocytes are one of the most important cell types involved in the immune response of mammals. The origin and evolution of this cellular type is unknown, but the B lymphocyte bona fide appeared first in fish. In this review we analize the principal components of the immune response of invertebrates, their phylogenetic distribution and the permancence of some properties that allowed the emergence of the B lymphocyte. We started from the idea that many of the components that characterize the B lymphocyte are found distributed among the invertebrates, however, it is in the B lymphocyte, where all these components that give this type of cell its identity, converged. The actual knowledge we have in regards of the lymphocytes comes, in the most part, from physiological studies in mammals, being the mice the more representative. The origin of the B lymphocyte, its alternative mechanisms for generating receptor diversity, its immune effector response, and the generation of memory, require an evolutionary and multidisiplinary approach for its study.

  9. T cell immunity using transgenic B lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloni, Mara; Rizzi, Marta; Castiglioni, Paola; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive immunity exists in all vertebrates and plays a defense role against microbial pathogens and tumors. T cell responses begin when precursor T cells recognize antigen on specialized antigen-presenting cells and differentiate into effector cells. Currently, dendritic cells are considered the only cells capable of stimulating T lymphocytes. Here, we show that mature naïve B lymphocytes can be genetically programmed by using nonviral DNA and turned into powerful antigen-presenting cells with a dual capacity of synthesis and presentation of antigen to T cells in vivo. A single i.v. injection of transgenic lymphocytes activates T cell responses reproducibly and specifically even at very low cell doses (102). We also demonstrate that T cell priming can occur in the absence of dendritic cells and results in immunological memory with protective effector functions. These findings disclose aspects in the regulation of adaptive immunity and indicate possibilities for vaccination against viruses and cancer in humans.

  10. The classical and alternative pathways of complement activation play distinct roles in spontaneous C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2004-01-01

    The contributions of the classical (CP) and alternative (AP) pathways of complement activation to the spontaneous deposition of C3 fragments and the formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC) on human B lymphocytes, were assessed by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with autologous ...... of MAC formation was also found to be highly pathway dependent, with the AP being about 15-fold more efficient at initiating this process than the CP. A model accounting for the effectiveness of the AP in both preserving C3 fragment integrity and initiating MAC is presented....

  11. A single autosomal gene defect severely limits IgG but not IgM responses in B lymphocyte-deficient A/WySnJ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D J; Hanson, K D; Carman, J A; Hayes, C E

    1992-02-01

    Antigen-stimulated B lymphocytes either differentiate into IgM-secreting plasma cells or into memory B cells that secrete other immunoglobulin isotypes upon antigen restimulation. The mechanisms that generate and maintain memory B cells are poorly understood. Previously, we described a severe B lymphocyte deficiency in adult strain A/WySnJ mice compared to subline A/J. Here we show that the single, autosomal co-dominant locus responsible for the deficiency also diminishes IgG-secreting B cell formation without interfering with IgM-secreting plasma cell differentiation. A/WySnJ secondary IgG1 responses to the protein antigens hemocyanin, bovine gamma-globulin, ovalbumin, lysozyme and beta-galactosidase were 6- to 50-fold lower than A/J responses. The defect also decreased secondary IgG2a and IgG3 responses, and primary IgG1 and IgG2a responses. The reduced A/WySnJ secondary IgG1 response was not due to differential response kinetics or dose responsiveness, and could not be augmented to A/J levels by repeated immunizations. Serum IgG1, IgG2a and IgG3 levels from nonimmune A/WySnJ mice were similarly reduced. The secondary IgG1 response and splenic B cell percentage showed significant positive correlation (r = 0.72) in F2 mice, suggesting that a single locus controlled both traits. In contrast, A/WySnJ mice made good primary IgM responses to hemocyanin, beta-galactosidase, and the thymus-independent antigen trinitrophenyl-Ficoll. The A/WySnJ splenic adherent cells were competent in antigen-presenting function, and A/WySnJ immune T cells proliferated in response to antigen and provided the requisite B cell stimulatory signals for an IgG1 response. Together, our results suggest that A/WySnJ mice have a genetic lesion that causes a selective IgG immune response dysfunction. The absence of IgG-secreting cell precursors or a defect in precursor activation or differentiation are two possible mechanisms which could precipitate a selective IgG response dysfunction. We propose

  12. Ex vivo analysis of human memory B lymphocytes specific for A and B influenza hemagglutinin by polychromatic flow-cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monia Bardelli

    Full Text Available Understanding the impact that human memory B-cells (MBC, primed by previous infections or vaccination, exert on neutralizing antibody responses against drifted influenza hemagglutinin (HA is key to design best protective vaccines. A major obstacle to these studies is the lack of practical tools to analyze HA-specific MBCs in human PBMCs ex vivo. We report here an efficient method to identify MBCs carrying HA-specific BCR in frozen PBMC samples. By using fluorochrome-tagged recombinant HA baits, and vaccine antigens from mismatched influenza strains to block BCR-independent binding, we developed a protocol suitable for quantitative, functional and molecular analysis of single MBCs specific for HA from up to two different influenza strains in the same tube. This approach will permit to identify the naive and MBC precursors of plasmablasts and novel MBCs appearing in the blood following infection or vaccination, thus clarifying the actual contribution of pre-existing MBCs in antibody responses against novel influenza viruses. Finally, this protocol can allow applying high throughput deep sequencing to analyze changes in the repertoire of HA⁺ B-cells in longitudinal samples from large cohorts of vaccinees and infected subjects with the ultimate goal of understanding the in vivo B-cell dynamics driving the evolution of broadly cross-protective antibody responses.

  13. Enhanced immunogenicity of pneumococcal surface adhesin A (PsaA in mice via fusion to recombinant human B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mambula Salamatu S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily of ligands that mediates its action through three known receptors. BLyS has been shown to enhance the production of antibodies against heterologous antigens when present at elevated concentrations, supporting an immunostimulatory role for BLyS in vivo. Methods We constructed a fusion protein consisting of human BLyS and Pneumococcal Surface Adhesin A (PsaA and used this molecule to immunize mice. The immunostimulatory attributes mediated by BLyS in vivo were evaluated by characterizing immune responses directed against PsaA. Results The PsaA-BLyS fusion protein was able to act as a co-stimulant for murine spleen cell proliferation induced with F(ab'2 fragments of anti-IgM in vitro in a fashion similar to recombinant BLyS, and immunization of mice with the PsaA-BLyS fusion protein resulted in dramatically elevated serum antibodies specific for PsaA. Mice immunized with PsaA admixed with recombinant BLyS exhibited only modest elevations in PsaA-specific responses following two immunizations, while mice immunized twice with PsaA alone exhibited undetectable PsaA-specific serum antibody responses. Sera obtained from PsaA-BLyS immunized mice exhibited high titers of IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3, but no IgA, while mice immunized with PsaA admixed with BLyS exhibited only elevated titers of IgG1 following two immunizations. Splenocytes from PsaA-BLyS immunized mice exhibited elevated levels of secretion of IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5, and a very modest but consistent elevation of IFN-γ following in vitro stimulation with PsaA. In contrast, mice immunized with either PsaA admixed with BLyS or PsaA alone exhibited modestly elevated to absent PsaA-specific recall responses for the same cytokines. Mice deficient for one of the three receptors for BLyS designated Transmembrane activator, calcium modulator, and cyclophilin ligand [CAML] interactor (TACI exhibited

  14. Mite allergen Der-p2 triggers human B lymphocyte activation and Toll-like receptor-4 induction.

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    Jaw Ji Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Allergic disease can be characterized as manifestations of an exaggerated inflammatory response to environmental allergens triggers. Mite allergen Der-p2 is one of the major allergens of the house dust mite, which contributes to TLR4 expression and function in B cells in allergic patients. However, the precise mechanisms of Der-p2 on B cells remain obscure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effects of Der-p2 on proinflammatory cytokines responses and Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4-related signaling in human B cells activation. We demonstrated that Der-p2 activates pro-inflammatory cytokines, TLR4 and its co-receptor MD2. ERK inhibitor PD98059 significantly enhanced TLR4/MD2 expression in Der-p2-treated B cells. Der-p2 markedly activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 and decreased p38 phosphorylation in B cells. MKP-1-siRNA downregulated TLR4/MD2 expression in Der-p2-treated B cells. In addition, Der-p2 significantly up-regulated expression of co-stimulatory molecules and increased B cell proliferation. Neutralizing Der-p2 antibody could effectively abrogate the Der-p2-induced B cell proliferation. Der-p2 could also markedly induce NF-κB activation in B cells, which could be counteracted by dexamethasone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results strongly suggest that Der-p2 is capable of triggering B cell activation and MKP-1-activated p38/MAPK dephosphorylation-regulated TLR4 induction, which subsequently enhances host immune, defense responses and development of effective allergic disease therapeutics in B cells.

  15. B Lymphocyte Stimulator (BLyS) is expressed in human adipocytes in vivo and is related to obesity but not to insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Nike; Schulte, Dominik M; Hillebrand, Susann; Türk, Kathrin; Hampe, Jochen; Schafmayer, Clemens; Brosch, Mario; von Schönfels, Witigo; Ahrens, Markus; Zeuner, Rainald; Schröder, Johann O; Blüher, Matthias; Gutschow, Christian; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; Stelmach-Mardas, Marta; Saggau, Carina; Schreiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation and metabolism have been shown to be evolutionary linked and increasing evidence exists that pro-inflammatory factors are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Until now, most data suggest that within adipose tissue these factors are secreted by cells of the innate immune system, e. g. macrophages. In the present study we demonstrate that B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) is increased in human obesity. In contrast to several pro-inflammatory factors, we found the source of BLyS in human adipose tissue to be the adipocytes rather than immune cells. In grade 3 obese human subjects, expression of BLyS in vivo in adipose tissue is significantly increased (pr = 0.43, panti-BLyS antibody belimumab. Since BLyS is known to promote B-cell proliferation and immunoglobulin secretion, the present data suggest that adipocytes of grade 3 obese human subjects are able to activate the adaptive immune system, suggesting that in metabolic inflammation in humans both, innate and adaptive immunity, are of pathophysiological relevance.

  16. The distinctive germinal center phase of IgE+ B lymphocytes limits their contribution to the classical memory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms involved in the maintenance of memory IgE responses are poorly understood, and the role played by germinal center (GC) IgE+ cells in memory responses is particularly unclear. IgE B cell differentiation is characterized by a transient GC phase, a bias towards the plasma cell (PC) fate,...

  17. B Lymphocyte Stimulator (BLyS is expressed in human adipocytes in vivo and is related to obesity but not to insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nike Müller

    Full Text Available Inflammation and metabolism have been shown to be evolutionary linked and increasing evidence exists that pro-inflammatory factors are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Until now, most data suggest that within adipose tissue these factors are secreted by cells of the innate immune system, e. g. macrophages. In the present study we demonstrate that B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS is increased in human obesity. In contrast to several pro-inflammatory factors, we found the source of BLyS in human adipose tissue to be the adipocytes rather than immune cells. In grade 3 obese human subjects, expression of BLyS in vivo in adipose tissue is significantly increased (p<0.001. Furthermore, BLyS serum levels are elevated in grade 3 human obesity (862.5+222.0 pg/ml vs. 543.7+60.7 pg/ml in lean controls, p<0.001 and are positively correlated to the BMI (r = 0.43, p<0.0002. In the present study, bariatric surgery significantly altered serum BLyS concentrations. In contrast, weight loss due to a very-low-calorie-formula-diet (800 kcal/d had no such effect. To examine metabolic activity of BLyS, in a translational research approach, insulin sensitivity was measured in human subjects in vivo before and after treatment with the human recombinant anti-BLyS antibody belimumab. Since BLyS is known to promote B-cell proliferation and immunoglobulin secretion, the present data suggest that adipocytes of grade 3 obese human subjects are able to activate the adaptive immune system, suggesting that in metabolic inflammation in humans both, innate and adaptive immunity, are of pathophysiological relevance.

  18. Enhancement of terminal B lymphocyte differentiation in vitro by fibroblast-like stromal cells from human spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibinski, G; Skibinska, A; Stewart, G D; James, K

    1998-12-01

    Stromal elements are major components of lymphoid tissues contributing to both tissue architecture and function. In this study we report on the phenotype and function of fibroblast-like stromal cells obtained from human spleen. These cells express high levels of CD44 and ICAM-1 and moderate levels of VLA-4, VCAM, CD40 and CD21. They fail to express endothelial, epithelial, lymphocyte and monocyte/macrophage markers. We show that these cells interact with B cell blasts induced in vitro by anti-CD40 and anti-mu stimulation. As a result of these interactions both IL-6 and IgG secretion into culture medium is increased. The enhanced secretion of IgG is partly inhibited by abolishing B cell blaststromal cell contact or by anti-IL-6, anti-VCAM or anti-CD49d antibodies. Our studies also suggest that the ability of stromal cells to promote B cell survival is most likely the underlying mechanism of the enhanced immunoglobulin secretion. Comparison of stromal cells from different lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs revealed that bone marrow- and spleen-derived stromal cells are the most effective in promoting B cell blast differentiation.

  19. SUBTYPES OF B LYMPHOCYTES IN PATIENTS WITH AUTOIMMUNE HEMOCYTOPENIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-min Xing; Hai-rong Jia; Juan Sun; Chong-li Yang; Zong-hong Shao; Rong Fu; Hong Liu; Jun Shi; Lie Bai; Mei-feng Tu; Hua-quan Wang; Zhen-zhu Cui

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the quantities of bone marrow CD5+ B lymphocytes in the patients with autoimmune hemocytopenia and the relationship between quantities of CD5+ B lymphocytes and clinical or laboratorial parameters.Methods Quantities of CD5+ B lymphocytes in the bone marrow of 14 patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) or Evans syndrome, 22 immunorelated pancytopenia (IRP) patients, and 10 normal controls were assayed by flow cytometry. The correlation between their clinical or laboratorial parameters and CD5+ B lymphocytes was analyzed.Results The quantity of CD5+B lymphocytes of AIHA/Evans syndrome (34. 64% ± 19. 81% ) or IRP patients (35.81% ±16.83% ) was significantly higher than that of normal controls (12.00% ±1.97% , P<0. 05). However, there was no significant difference between AIHA/Evans syndrome and IRP patients (P > 0. 05). In all hemocytopenic patients, the quantity of bone marrow CD5+ B lymphocytes showed significantly negative correlation with serum complement C3 level (r = - 0. 416, P< 0. 05). In the patients with AIHA/Evans syndrome, the quantity of bone marrow CD5+ B lymphocytes showed significantly positive correlation with serum indirect bilirubin level (r = 1. 00, P<0. 05). In Evans syndrome patients, the quantity of CD5+ B lymphocytes in bone marrow showed significantly positive correlation with platelet-associated immunoglobulin G (r = 0. 761, P< 0. 05) and platelet-associated immunoglobulin M (r = 0. 925, P< 0. 05). The quantity of CD5+ B lymphocytes in bone marrow of all hemocytopenic patients showed significantly negative correlation with treatment response (tau-b = - 0. 289, P< 0. 05), but had no correlation with colony forming unit-erythroid ( r = - 0. 205, P > 0. 05 ) or colony forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage colonies ( r = -0.214, P>0.05).Conclusions The quantity of bone marrow CD5+ B lymphocytes in the patients with autoimmune hemocytopenia significantly increases and is correlated with disease

  20. Stress, Cortisol, and B-Lymphocytes: A Novel Approach to Understanding Academic Stress and Immune Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Bonnie A; Murphy, Karly Mary; Albano, Denise L; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2016-01-01

    Animal and human in vitro models suggest that stress-related B lymphocyte decrements are due to high levels of glucocorticoids which cause apoptosis of pre-B-cells as they emerge from the bone marrow. The present study sought to explore the relationships among distress, salivary cortisol and human B lymphocytes in vivo. Distress (perceived stress, negative affect, depressive symptoms), lymphocyte phenotype, and salivary cortisol were assessed among first year graduate students (n=22) and a community control sample (n= 30) at the start of classes in the fall and the week immediately before spring preliminary exams. Compared to controls, students reported greater distress on all measures at each time point except baseline perceived stress. Hierarchical linear regression with necessary control variables was used to assess the effect of student status on the three measures of distress, the four measures of lymphocyte phenotype, and cortisol AUC and CAR over time (T1-T2). Student status was associated with a significant decrease in CD19+ B lymphocytes and flattened cortisol awakening response (CAR). Change in CAR was associated with the decrease in CD19+ B lymphocytes. Results indicated that there are significant associations among student status, flattening of CAR, and decrements in CD19+ lymphocytes. PMID:26644211

  1. Stress, cortisol, and B lymphocytes: a novel approach to understanding academic stress and immune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Bonnie A; Murphy, Karly M; Albano, Denise L; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2016-01-01

    Animal and human in vitro models suggest that stress-related B lymphocyte decrements are due to high levels of glucocorticoids which cause apoptosis of pre-B-cells as they emerge from the bone marrow. The present study sought to explore the relationships among distress, salivary cortisol, and human B lymphocytes in vivo. Distress (perceived stress, negative affect, depressive symptoms), lymphocyte phenotype, and salivary cortisol were assessed among first-year graduate students (n = 22) and a community control sample (n = 30) at the start of classes in the fall and the week immediately before spring preliminary exams. Compared to controls, students reported greater distress on all measures at each time point except baseline perceived stress. Hierarchical linear regression with necessary control variables was used to assess the effect of student status on the three measures of distress, the four measures of lymphocyte phenotype, and cortisol AUC and CAR over time (T1-T2). Student status was associated with a significant decrease in CD19 + B lymphocytes and flattened cortisol awakening response (CAR). Change in CAR was associated with the decrease in CD19 + B lymphocytes. Results indicated that there are significant associations among student status, flattening of CAR, and decrements in CD19 + lymphocytes.

  2. Growing B Lymphocytes in a Three-Dimensional Culture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. H. David; Bottaro, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) culture system for growing long-lived B lymphocytes has been invented. The capabilities afforded by the system can be expected to expand the range of options for immunological research and related activities, including testing of immunogenicity of vaccine candidates in vitro, generation of human monoclonal antibodies, and immunotherapy. Mature lymphocytes, which are the effectors of adaptive immune responses in vertebrates, are extremely susceptible to apoptotic death, and depend on continuous reception of survival-inducing stimulation (in the forms of cytokines, cell-to-cell contacts, and antigen receptor signaling) from the microenvironment. For this reason, efforts to develop systems for long-term culture of functional, non-transformed and non-activated mature lymphocytes have been unsuccessful until now. The bone-marrow microenvironment supports the growth and differentiation of many hematopoietic lineages, in addition to B-lymphocytes. Primary bone-marrow cell cultures designed to promote the development of specific cell types in vitro are highly desirable experimental systems, amenable to manipulation under controlled conditions. However, the dynamic and complex network of stromal cells and insoluble matrix proteins is disrupted in prior plate- and flask-based culture systems, wherein the microenvironments have a predominantly two-dimensional (2D) character. In 2D bone-marrow cultures, normal B-lymphoid cells become progressively skewed toward precursor B-cell populations that do not retain a normal immunophenotype, and such mature B-lymphocytes as those harvested from the spleen or lymph nodes do not survive beyond several days ex vivo in the absence of mitogenic stimulation. The present 3D culture system is a bioreactor that contains highly porous artificial scaffolding that supports the long-term culture of bone marrow, spleen, and lymph-node samples. In this system, unlike in 2D culture systems, B-cell subpopulations developing

  3. HIV感染者中B细胞免疫应答的研究进展%Progress of B lymphocyte responses among HIV-infected individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王万海; 徐建青; 张晓燕

    2011-01-01

    HIV disease is associated with abnormalities in all major lymphocyte populations, including B cells, which ultimately results in severe exhaustion of several lymphocyte functions and increased susceptibility to secondary and opportunistic infections. Among these cells, B lymphocytes are severely damaged and show signs of phenotypic and functional alterations. In parallel to the polyclonal B cell activation and hypergammaglobulinemia,B cells from patients show impaired reactivity to immunisation and poorly inducible antibody responses. Thus, a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of B-cell abnormalities in HIV disease can potentially lead to new strategies for improving antibody responses against opportunistic pathogens that afflict HIV-infected individuals and against HIV itself, in the context of both HIV infection and an antibody-based HIV vaccine.%HIV感染引起了免疫系统慢性持续的活化而造成免疫细胞哑群的异常及其功能的耗竭(包括B淋巴细胞),使得宿主二次感染和机会性感染的易感性增加.B细胞的异常不仅出现在其表型及亚群上,更体现在功能的改变.伴随着B细胞的多克隆活化和高免疫球蛋白血症的出现,B细胞还表现出了对外源抗原无反应性及产生抗体的异常等功能缺陷方面的特征.对此,深入了解HIV感染过程中B细胞异常的致病机制,以期为今后通过改善HIV患者的体液反应来预防其机会感染的发生并为以抗体为基础的HIV疫苗研究策略提供有益的参考.

  4. The potential impact of low dose ionizing γ-radiation on immune response activity up-regulated by Ikaros in IM-9 B lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim Sung Jn; Jang, Seon A; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Cha Soon; Nam, Seon Young; Jeong, Mee Seon; Jin, Young Woo [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    The biological effects of low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) remain insufficiently understood. We examined for the scientific evidence to show the biological effects of LDIR using radiation-sensitive immune cells. We found that Ikaros protein was responded to low dose-dependent effects of gamma radiation in IM-9 B lymphocytes. Ikaros encodes zinc finger transcription factors that is important regulators of a hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) progression to the B lymphoid lineage development, differentiation and proliferation. In this study, we observed that cell proliferation was enhanced from 10% to 20% by LDIR (0.05 Gy) in IM-9 B lymphocytes. The Ikaros protein was phosphorylated in its serine/threonine (S/T) region and decreased its DNA binding activity in the cells exposed to LDIR. We found that Ikaros phosphorylation was up-regulated by CK2/AKT pathway and the residues of ser-304 and ser-306 in Ikaros was phosphorylated by LDIR. We also observed that Ikaros protein was localized from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after LDIR and bound with Autotaxin (ENPP2, ATX) protein, stimulating proliferation, migration and survival of immune cells. In addition, we found that the lysoPLD activity of ATX was dependent on Ikaros-ATX binding activity. These results indicate that the Ikaros is an important regulator of immune activation. Therefore, we suggest that low dose ionizing radiation can be considered as a beneficial effects, stimulating the activation of immune cells.

  5. ROLE OF B LYMPHOCYTE AND ITS SUBPOPULATIONS IN PATHOGENESIS OF IMMUNORELATED PANCYTOPENIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To measure the quantities and apoptosis-related protein levels of B lymphocyte in the patients with immunorelated pancytopenia (IRP) and explore the action of B lymphocyte in the pathogenic mechanism of IRP.Methods Quantities of whole B lymphocytes and CD5 + B lymphocytes as well as the expressions of Fas and Bcl-2in B lymphocytes in 35 patients with untreated IRP, 15 IRP patients in complete remission (CR), and 10 normal controls were assayed by flow cytometry.Results The percentages of B lymphocyte and CD5 + B lymphocyte were significantly higher in untreated IRP patients than in CR IRP patients and normal controls ( P < 0. 05 ), and there was no significant difference between the latter two groups (P > 0. 05). There was no significant difference of Fas expression in B lymphocyte among three groups (P >0. 05). The expression of Bcl-2 in B lymphocyte was significantly higher in untreated patients than in CR patients or normal controls (P <0. 01 ), and significantly higher in CR patients than in normal controls (P <0. 01 ). The apoptosisrelated index was significantly lower in untreated patients than in CR patients or normal controls ( P < 0. 05 ), and significantly lower in CR patients than in normal controls ( P < 0. 05 ). The percentage of B lymphocyte was positively correlated with post-treated response time ( r = 0. 53, P < 0. 01 ).Conclusion The production of auto-antibodies in IRP patients probably has some relationship with the abnormal quantities of B lymphocyte and its subpopulations as well as with the inhibition of B lymphocyte apoptosis.

  6. The peripheral blood compartment in patients with Graves' disease: activated T lymphocytes and increased transitional and pre-naive mature B lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Weerd, K; Van Hagen, P M; Schrijver, B; Kwekkeboom, D J; De Herder, W W; Ten Broek, M R J; Postema, P T E; Van Dongen, J J M; Staal, F J T; Dik, W A

    2013-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease that involves aberrant B and T lymphocyte responses. Detailed knowledge about lymphocyte subpopulation composition will therefore enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of GD and might support the development of new immunomodulatory treatment approaches. The aim of this study was to gain detailed insight into the composition of the peripheral blood lymphocyte compartment in GD before and during anti-thyroid drug therapy. Major B and T lymphocyte subpopulations were investigated by flow cytometry in peripheral blood from newly diagnosed GD patients (n = 5), GD patients treated with anti-thyroid drugs (n = 4), patients with recurrent GD (n = 7) and healthy controls (HC; n = 10). In GD patients, numbers of activated T lymphocytes [human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR)+ and CD25+] were increased. The B lymphocyte compartment in GD was characterized by significantly higher numbers of transitional (CD38highCD27−, P < 0·03) and pre-naive mature (CD38lowCD27−IgD+CD5+, P < 0·04) B lymphocytes, while memory populations were slightly decreased. The increased numbers of CD5+, transitional and pre-naive mature B lymphocytes correlated positively with fT4 plasma levels. GD is associated with increased numbers of activated T lymphocytes and transitional and pre-naive mature CD5+ B lymphocytes within the peripheral blood. The increase in CD5+ B lymphocytes was due mainly to an increase in transitional and pre-naive mature B lymphocytes. Increased fT4 plasma levels might be associated with this increase in transitional and pre-naive mature CD5+ B lymphocytes. PMID:23901889

  7. Properties of a specific interleukin 1 (IL 1) receptor on human Epstein Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes. Identity of receptor for IL 1-. cap alpha. and IL 1-. beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, K.; Akahoshi, T.; Yamada, M.; Furutani, Y.; Oppenheim, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The properties of specific human interleukin 1 (IL 1) receptors on human Epstein Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes (EBV-B) were studied. Purified human IL 1-..beta.. from a myelomonocytic cell line (THP-1) was labeled with /sup 125/I. Among four EBV-B cell lines tested, a pre-B cell type (VDS-O) specifically bound the highest amount of /sup 125/I-IL 1-..beta... The binding of /sup 125/I-IL 1-..beta.. to VDS-O cells was inhibited by F(ab)'/sub 2/ fragments of anti-human IL 1 and recombinant human IL 1-..cap alpha.., as well as by unlabeled human IL 1-..beta.. but not by recombinant lymphotoxin, recombinant tumor necrosis factor, or phorbol myristic acid, suggesting that IL 1-..cap alpha.. and IL 1-..beta.. bind specifically to the same receptor. The m.w. of IL 1 receptor on human EBV-B cells was estimated to be 60,000 by both the chemical cross-linking method and high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The isoelectric point of solubilized human IL 1 receptor was 7.3 on HPLC chromatofocusing. The evidence of existence of IL 1 receptor on human EBV-B cells additionally supports the hypothesis that IL 1 may be an autocrine signal for these cells.

  8. Soluble mediators can replace helper T cells in the activation of resting B lymphocytes: evidence for a human B cell activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Février, M; Moreau, J L; Gougeon, M L; Abadie, A; Thèze, J

    1988-01-01

    We were interested in studying the participation of T cell-derived soluble factors in the early steps of B cell activation. Thus supernatants containing such factors were obtained following activation of human T cell clones and their effects on isolated B cells investigated. These supernatants induced activation, blastogenesis and proliferation of purified resting human B cells. Our results strongly suggest the existence of a B cell Activating Factor (BCAF) of apparent molecular weight (m.w.) of 12,000-15,000 daltons which acts directly on resting B cells and replaces helper T cells in B cell activation.

  9. Induction of DNA repair synthesis in human monocytes/B-lymphocytes compared with T-lymphocytes after exposure to N-acetoxy-N-acetylaminofluorene and dimethylsulfate in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Ryder, L P; Wassermann, K

    1992-01-01

    We have explored the induction of DNA repair synthesis in monocyte/B- and T-lymphocyte enriched cell fractions from 12 different human mononuclear blood cell populations. Unscheduled DNA synthesis was measured in monocyte/B- and T-cells after exposure to the DNA-damaging agents dimethylsulfate (D...

  10. CX3CR1 is expressed by human B lymphocytes and mediates [corrected] CX3CL1 driven chemotaxis of tonsil centrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Corcione

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fractalkine/CX(3CL1, a surface chemokine, binds to CX(3CR1 expressed by different lymphocyte subsets. Since CX(3CL1 has been detected in the germinal centres of secondary lymphoid tissue, in this study we have investigated CX(3CR1 expression and function in human naïve, germinal centre and memory B cells isolated from tonsil or peripheral blood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate unambiguously that highly purified human B cells from tonsil and peripheral blood expressed CX(3CR1 at mRNA and protein levels as assessed by quantitative PCR, flow cytometry and competition binding assays. In particular, naïve, germinal centre and memory B cells expressed CX(3CR1 but only germinal centre B cells were attracted by soluble CX(3CL1 in a transwell assay. CX(3CL1 signalling in germinal centre B cells involved PI3K, Erk1/2, p38, and Src phosphorylation, as assessed by Western blot experiments. CX(3CR1(+ germinal centre B cells were devoid of centroblasts and enriched for centrocytes that migrated to soluble CX(3CL1. ELISA assay showed that soluble CX(3CL1 was secreted constitutively by follicular dendritic cells and T follicular helper cells, two cell populations homing in the germinal centre light zone as centrocytes. At variance with that observed in humans, soluble CX(3CL1 did not attract spleen B cells from wild type mice. OVA immunized CX(3CR1(-/- or CX(3CL1(-/- mice showed significantly decreased specific IgG production compared to wild type mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose a model whereby human follicular dendritic cells and T follicular helper cells release in the light zone of germinal centre soluble CX(3CL1 that attracts centrocytes. The functional implications of these results warrant further investigation.

  11. Antibody responses to allergen Lol pIV are suppressed following adoptive transfer of B lymphocytes from the internal image anti-idiotypic antibody-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, E M; Kisil, F T

    1995-10-01

    An internal image anti-idiotypic antibody, designated B1/1, was generated against an idiotope (Id91) of the monoclonal antibody (mAb91) specific for Lol pIV. The administration of B1/1 in PBS, at doses ranging from 100 ng to 100 micrograms/mouse, to syngeneic Balb/c mice resulted in the suppression of the formation of anti-Lol pIV antibodies that possessed the Id91. Spleen cells obtained from the mice 2 weeks after the treatment with B1/1 (25 micrograms/mouse) were adoptively transferred intravenously into the syngeneic recipients which were challenged intraperitoneally with Lol pIV in alum 2 hr after the transfer. The recipients were boosted with Lol pIV 14 days later. It was demonstrated that the transfer of splenic B cells (but not of T cells) from B1/1-treated donors induced a significant suppression of not only the level of IgE and IgG antibodies to Lol pIV, but also the level of antibodies possessing the Id91. Treatment of the B cells with mAb91 plus complement abrogated their ability to transfer the suppression. This study indicates that the treatment with the anti-Id B1/1 generated B cells that were characterized, serologically, as possessing the anti-Id-like antibodies on their surface and were responsible for transferring the suppression of the formation of antibodies to allergen Lol pIV and the expression of Id91.

  12. Glucose-dependent de Novo Lipogenesis in B Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufort, Fay J.; Gumina, Maria R.; Ta, Nathan L.; Tao, Yongzhen; Heyse, Shannon A.; Scott, David A.; Richardson, Adam D.; Seyfried, Thomas N.; Chiles, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterially derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates naive B lymphocytes to differentiate into immunoglobulin (Ig)-secreting plasma cells. Differentiation of B lymphocytes is characterized by a proliferative phase followed by expansion of the intracellular membrane secretory network to support Ig production. A key question in lymphocyte biology is how naive B cells reprogram metabolism to support de novo lipogenesis necessary for proliferation and expansion of the endomembrane network in response to LPS. We report that extracellularly acquired glucose is metabolized, in part, to support de novo lipogenesis in response to LPS stimulation of splenic B lymphocytes. LPS stimulation leads to increased levels of endogenous ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), and this is accompanied by increased ACLY enzymatic activity. ACLY produces cytosolic acetyl-CoA from mitochondrially derived citrate. Inhibition of ACLY activity in LPS-stimulated B cells with the selective inhibitor 2-hydroxy-N-arylbenzenesulfonamide (compound-9; C-9) blocks glucose incorporation into de novo lipid biosynthesis, including cholesterol, free fatty acids, and neutral and acidic phospholipids. Moreover, inhibition of ACLY activity in splenic B cells results in inhibition of proliferation and defective endomembrane expansion and reduced expression of CD138 and Blimp-1, markers for plasma-like B cell differentiation. ACLY activity is also required for LPS-induced IgM production in CH12 B lymphoma cells. These data demonstrate that ACLY mediates glucose-dependent de novo lipogenesis in response to LPS signaling and identify a role for ACLY in several phenotypic changes that define plasma cell differentiation. PMID:24469453

  13. Independent expression of the two paralogous CCL4 genes in monocytes and B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Honczarenko, Marek; Sloan, Steven R

    2004-01-01

    The CCL4 chemokine is secreted by a variety of cells following stimulation. CCL4 affects several different types of cells that are important for acute inflammatory responses and are critical for the development of specific immune responses to foreign antigens. The human genome contains two genes for the CCL4 chemokine. Although highly homologous, the two genes encode slightly different proteins. We analyzed the mRNA expressed in monocytes and B lymphocytes and found that while monocytes express predominantly one CCL4 gene, known as ACT-2, peripheral blood B lymphocytes express a mixture of ACT-2 and the second CCL4 gene, lymphocyte activating gene-1 ( LAG-1). Although peripheral blood B cells, CD27(-) B cells, and CD27(+) B cells all express a mixture of LAG-1 and ACT-2, the B-cell lines that were studied regulate the two genes independently. RL, SU-DHL-6, and REH cells predominantly express LAG-1. These studies demonstrate that monocytes and B cells utilize different mechanisms to regulate expression of the two CCL4 genes and suggest that the two genes may not have identical activities.

  14. Spondylarthritis in the absence of B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Dominique; Kruithof, Elli; Breban, Maxime; Tak, Paul P

    2008-03-01

    The highly effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis by B cell depletion and the presence of B cells in the peripheral and axial lesions of patients with spondylarthritis (SpA) raise the question as to whether B lymphocytes could also be an appropriate therapeutic target in the latter disease. We describe 2 male HLA-B27-positive patients who had active SpA despite absence of B cells. One patient developed SpA with sacroiliitis and asymmetric oligoarthritis after having been diagnosed as having severe Bruton agammaglobulinemia. Since extensive investigations excluded an infectious origin of the SpA, this case illustrates that functional B cells and/or gamma globulins are not strictly required for SpA pathogenesis. The second patient had severe axial and peripheral SpA that was treated successfully with etanercept. After discontinuation of etanercept treatment because of non-Hodgkin's B cell lymphoma, both axial and peripheral SpA symptoms relapsed rapidly, and this exacerbation of articular disease activity was not modulated by successful B cell depletion therapy for the lymphoma. Although case reports have obvious limitations, our clinical observations provide evidence that active SpA can occur in the absence of functional mature B cells and thus emphasize the need for systematic studies of the exact role and function of B lymphocytes in this disease.

  15. T- and B-lymphocyte chimerism in the marmoset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niblack, G.D.; Kateley, J.R.; Gengozian, N.

    1977-01-01

    Marmosets are natural blood chimeras, this condition resulting from the high frequency of fraternal twinning and the consistent development of placental vascular anastomoses between the two embryos. Identification of chimerism by sex-chromosome analysis of cultured blood lymphocytes provided a means of determining the proportion of chimerism among T and B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were enriched for T or B cells by filtration through a nylon column (yields >95% T-cells) or inactivation of T lymphocytes by treatment with a goat anti-marmoset thymocyte antiserum in the presence of complement (yields >95% B cells). Mitogenic stimulation of these separated, enriched cell populations yielded metaphase plates which could be scored for percentage male and female cells. Tests on five different blood chimeras showed the T- and B-lymphocyte chimerism to be the same. Stimulation of blood lymphocytes with cells from another species of marmoset in a mixed lymphocyte culture test revealed the chimeric T-cell response (i.e., host and co-twin cells) to be similar to that obtained with a mitogenic lectin. The demonstration of equivalent T- and B-cell chimerism in these animals suggests derivation of these cells from a common stem cell pool and the response of both T-cell populations to an antigenic stimulus in proportions similar to their percentage chimerism suggests complete immunologic tolerance exists in this species for co-twin histocompatibility antigens.

  16. Activation-induced cell death in B lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Upon encountering the antigen (Ag), the immune system can either develop a specific immune response or enter a specific state of unresponsiveness, tolerance. The response of B cells to their specific Ag can be activation and proliferation, leading to the immune response, or anergy and activation-induced cell death (AICD), leading to tolerance. AICD in B lymphocytes is a highly regulated event initiated by crosslinking of the B cell receptor (BCR). BCR engagement initiates several signaling events such as activation of PLCγ, Ras, and PI3K, which generally speaking, lead to survival However, in the absence of survival signals (CD40 or IL-4R engagement), BCR crosslinking can also promote apoptotic signal transduction pathways such as activation of effector caspases, expression of pro-apoptotic genes, and inhibition of pro-survival genes. The complex interplay between survival and death signals determines the B cell fate and, consequently, the immune response.

  17. B-lymphocytes as key players in chemical-induced asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa De Vooght

    Full Text Available T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes are key players in allergic asthma, with B-lymphocytes producing antigen-specific immunoglobulins E (IgE. We used a mouse model of chemical-induced asthma and transferred B-lymphocytes from sensitized animals into naïve wild type mice, B-lymphocyte knock-out (B-KO mice or severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice. On days 1 and 8, BALB/c mice were dermally sensitized with 0.3% toluene diisocyanate (TDI (20 µl/ear. On day 15, mice were euthanized and the auricular lymph nodes isolated. B-lymphocytes (CD19(+ were separated from the whole cell suspension and 175,000 cells were injected in the tail vein of naïve wild type, B-KO or SCID mice. Three days later, the mice received a single oropharyngeal challenge with 0.01% TDI (20 µl or vehicle (acetone/olive oil (AOO (controls. Airway reactivity to methacholine and total and differential cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid were measured 24 hours after challenge. B-lymphocytes of AOO or TDI-sensitized mice were characterized for the expression of surface markers and production of cytokines. We found that transfer of B-cells obtained from mice dermally sensitized to toluene diisocyanate (TDI into naïve wild type mice, B-KO mice or SCID mice led, within three days, to an acute asthma-like phenotype after an airway challenge with TDI. This response was specific and independent of IgE. These B-lymphocytes showed antigen presenting capacities (CD80/CD86 and CD40 and consisted of B effector (Be2- (IL-4 and Be1-lymphocytes (IFN-γ. The transferred B-lymphocytes were visualized near large airways, 24 hours after TDI challenge. Thus, B-lymphocytes can provoke an asthmatic response without the action of T-lymphocytes and without major involvement of IgE.

  18. Circulating human B and plasma cells. Age-associated changes in counts and detailed characterization of circulating normal CD138- and CD138+ plasma cells. : Blood B-lymphocytes and plasma cells in adults

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Generation of B and plasma cells involves several organs with a necessary cell trafficking between them. A detailed phenotypic characterization of four circulating B-cell subsets (immature-, naïve-, memory- B-lymphocytes and plasma cells) of 106 healthy adults was realized by multiparametric flow cytometry. We show that CD10, CD27 and CD38 is the minimal combination of subsetting markers allowing unequivocal identification of immature (CD10(+)CD27(-)CD38(+), 6+/-6 cell...

  19. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Guérin, Coralie; Vilar, José; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6Chi monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cell–selective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  20. TRPML cation channels regulate the specialized lysosomal compartment of vertebrate B-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yumei; Dayalu, Rashmi; Matthews, Sharon A; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2006-12-01

    B-lymphocytes possess a specialized lysosomal compartment, the regulated transformation of which has been implicated in B-cell antigen presentation. Members of the mucolipin (TRPML) family of cation channels have been implicated in regulated vesicular transport in several tissues, but a role for TRPML function in lymphocyte vesicular transport physiology has not been previously described. To address the role of TRPML proteins in lymphocyte vesicular transport, we analyzed the lysosomal compartment in cultured B-lymphocytes engineered to lack TRPML1 or after expression of N- or C-terminal GFP fusion proteins of TRPML1 or TRPML2. Consistent with previous analyses of lymphocytes derived from human patients with mutations in TRPML1, we were not able to detect abnormalities in the lysosomes of TRPML1-deficient DT40 B-lymphocytes. However, while N-terminal GFP fusions of TRPML2 localized to normal appearing lysosomes, C-terminal GFP fusions of either TRPML1 or TRPML2 acted to antagonize endogenous TRPML function, localizing to large vesicular structures, the histological properties of which were indistinguishable from the enlarged lysosomes observed in affected tissues of TRPML1-deficient humans. Endocytosed B-cell receptors were delivered to these enlarged lysosomes, demonstrating that a TRPML-dependent process is required for normal regulation of the specialized lysosome compartment of vertebrate B-lymphocytes.

  1. Caspase-3-dependent Cell Death in B lymphocyte Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pyocyanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni Susilowati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate cellular responses of B lymphocyte to the exposure of pyocyanin and the role of caspase-3 in its molecular mechanism. Methods: B lymphocytes (Raji cells were cultured overnight prior to the experiments. Cell culture in five replications were then exposed to various concentrations of pyocyanin and incubated for 24 h in antibiotics-free medium. MTT assay was performed to analyze the cytotoxicity effect of pyocyanin. In separated experiments, the cells were cultured with pyocyanin and addressed for cell morphological analysis using phase contrast microscope. To study the mechanism involved in pyocyanin-induced cellular damage, immunocytochemical analysis was run for the identification of active caspase-3 protein expression. Results: The results of this study showed that cell viability was decreased in pcyocyanin-treated groups. Statistical analysis using ANOVA (p < 0.05 demonstrated significant different between groups with significant value of 0.000. Pyocyanin induced cell death on B lymphocyte in dose-dependent manner. Nuclear fragmentation was observed in pyocyanin-induced cell death; furthermore, caspase-3 was expressed clearly in cell cytoplasm after 24 h incubation. Conclusion: It is concluded that pyocyanin is capable of inducing cell death on B lymphocyte. Caspase-3 may play important role in the molecular mechanism of pyocyanin-induced cell death.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i2.403

  2. Expression of molecules involved in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation by synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J C; Leigh, R D; Cambridge, G

    1997-06-01

    The synovitis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of few pathological lesions in which B lymphocyte accumulation progresses to the extent of germinal centre formation. The present study was designed to assess the ability of synovial fibroblasts to express molecules implicated in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation, both in vivo, and in response to cytokines in vitro. Normal and diseased synovia were examined by indirect immunofluorescence. In all tissues synovial intimal fibroblasts showed co-expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and complement decay-accelerating factor (DAF) comparable to that of follicular dendritic cells (FDC), but not complement receptor 2 (CR2). In rheumatoid synovia, subintimal cells showed variable expression of VCAM-1 and DAF, with bright co-expression of VCAM-1, DAF and CR2 in lymphoid follicle centres. B lymphocytes, some of which were proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive, were present in contact with subintimal cells expressing VCAM-1 with or without DAF or CR2. B lymphocytes were rarely present in the intimal layer, and, where present, showed fragmentation. In vitro, synovial fibroblasts exposed to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in combination with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) showed enhanced expression of VCAM-1, in comparison with fibroblasts from skin and lung and, unlike skin and lung fibroblasts, also expressed DAF and CR2. These findings support the hypothesis that synovial targeting in RA involves an enhanced ability of synovial fibroblasts to support B lymphocyte survival. This appears to be dependent, not on the constitutive expression of VCAM-1 and DAF on intimal cells, but on the increased ability of subintimal cells to respond to proinflammatory cytokines, perhaps critically in the expression of VCAM-1.

  3. Analysis of the antigen- and mitogen-induced differentiation of B lymphocytes from asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive male homosexuals. Discrepancy between T cell-dependent and T cell-independent activation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.P. Teeuwsen; T. Logtenberg (Ton); C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); J. Goudsmit (Jaap); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab); J.M.A. Lange (Joep)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractFive asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive ; male homosexuals were immunized with the recall antigens tetanus toxoid (TT) and the three types of poliovirus present in diphtheria, tetanus, and polio vaccine. Four weeks after immunization, the in vivo response to boo

  4. NFAT1 transcription factor regulates cell cycle progression and cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Leonardo K; Carrossini, Nina; Sécca, Cristiane; Kroll, José E; DaCunha, Déborah C; Faget, Douglas V; Carvalho, Lilian D S; de Souza, Sandro J; Viola, João P B

    2016-09-01

    The NFAT family of transcription factors has been primarily related to T cell development, activation, and differentiation. Further studies have shown that these ubiquitous proteins are observed in many cell types inside and outside the immune system, and are involved in several biological processes, including tumor growth, angiogenesis, and invasiveness. However, the specific role of the NFAT1 family member in naive B cell proliferation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NFAT1 transcription factor controls Cyclin E expression, cell proliferation, and tumor growth in vivo. Specifically, we show that inducible expression of NFAT1 inhibits cell cycle progression, reduces colony formation, and controls tumor growth in nude mice. We also demonstrate that NFAT1-deficient naive B lymphocytes show a hyperproliferative phenotype and high levels of Cyclin E1 and E2 upon BCR stimulation when compared to wild-type B lymphocytes. NFAT1 transcription factor directly regulates Cyclin E expression in B cells, inhibiting the G1/S cell cycle phase transition. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that low levels of NFAT1 correlate with high expression of Cyclin E1 in different human cancers, including Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas (DLBCL). Together, our results demonstrate a repressor role for NFAT1 in cell cycle progression and Cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes, and suggest a potential function for NFAT1 protein in B cell malignancies.

  5. Lipid raft-dependent plasma membrane repair interferes with the activation of B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Heather; Castro-Gomes, Thiago; Corrotte, Matthias; Tam, Christina; Maugel, Timothy K; Andrews, Norma W; Song, Wenxia

    2015-12-21

    Cells rapidly repair plasma membrane (PM) damage by a process requiring Ca(2+)-dependent lysosome exocytosis. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) released from lysosomes induces endocytosis of injured membrane through caveolae, membrane invaginations from lipid rafts. How B lymphocytes, lacking any known form of caveolin, repair membrane injury is unknown. Here we show that B lymphocytes repair PM wounds in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Wounding induces lysosome exocytosis and endocytosis of dextran and the raft-binding cholera toxin subunit B (CTB). Resealing is reduced by ASM inhibitors and ASM deficiency and enhanced or restored by extracellular exposure to sphingomyelinase. B cell activation via B cell receptors (BCRs), a process requiring lipid rafts, interferes with PM repair. Conversely, wounding inhibits BCR signaling and internalization by disrupting BCR-lipid raft coclustering and by inducing the endocytosis of raft-bound CTB separately from BCR into tubular invaginations. Thus, PM repair and B cell activation interfere with one another because of competition for lipid rafts, revealing how frequent membrane injury and repair can impair B lymphocyte-mediated immune responses.

  6. Stimulation of rat B-lymphocyte proliferation by corticotropin-releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillis, J P; Park, A; Rubin-Fletter, P; Turck, C; Dallman, M F; Payan, D G

    1989-07-01

    The mitogenic effect of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on rat lymphocytes was investigated. When rat splenocytes were cultured for 48 hr with CFR, a dose-dependent increase in incorporation of 3H-thymidine (3H-Tdr) was observed, with a maximal response at 10 nM CRF. Comparison of the proliferative effect of CRF on enriched populations of B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or macrophages revealed that only B lymphocytes responded following treatment with CRF. When lymphocytes derived from different lymphoid tissues were compared, CRF had a greater proliferative effect on lymphocytes derived from gut-associated lymphoid tissue (mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches) than on lymphocytes from spleen or inguinal lymph nodes; CRF had no effect on thymocytes. Synthetic fragments of CRF were used to determine which portions of the peptide are recognized by lymphocytes. The C-terminal fragments alpha-helical CRF9-41 and CRF21-41 were as potent as native CRF in stimulating B-lymphocyte proliferation, whereas CRF1-20 did not stimulate proliferation. The activity of these peptides suggests that CRF stimulates lymphocyte proliferation by cellular recognition of structural determinants in the C-terminal one-half of the peptide.

  7. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 in normal and malignant B lymphocytes by 15-deoxy-Δ12, 14-prostaglandin J2 requires Nrf2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancos, Simona; Baglole, Carolyn J.; Rahman, Irfan; Phipps, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in response to oxidative stress and is believed to be a cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory enzyme. It is unknown whether normal or malignant human B lineage cells express HO-1. 15-deoxy-Δ12, 14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) is an interesting electrophilic lipid mediator able to increase oxidative stress in B cells. Here, we tested normal and malignant human B lineage cells for their ability to express HO-1 in response to 15d-PGJ2, as well as the signaling pathways required for HO-1 expression. 15d-PGJ2 potently induced HO-1 protein expression in normal and malignant B cells. Malignant B cells exhibited a greater induction of HO-1 protein compared to normal B lymphocytes. Using siRNA directed against the transcription factor Nrf2 and B cells isolated from Nrf2-deficient mice, we show that HO-1 induction by 15d-PGJ2 is dependent on Nrf2. These results show that, compared to normal B lymphocytes, malignant B cells have a greater capacity to increase their HO-1 protein levels in response to 15d-PGJ2. We speculate that the ability to highly express HO-1 by malignant B cells could confer a survival advantage. PMID:20064636

  8. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 in normal and malignant B lymphocytes by 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) requires Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancos, Simona; Baglole, Carolyn J; Rahman, Irfan; Phipps, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in response to oxidative stress and is believed to be a cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory enzyme. It is unknown whether normal or malignant human B-lineage cells express HO-1. 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) is an interesting electrophilic lipid mediator able to increase oxidative stress in B cells. Here, we tested normal and malignant human B-lineage cells for their ability to express HO-1 in response to 15d-PGJ(2), as well as the signaling pathways required for HO-1 expression. 15d-PGJ(2) potently induced HO-1 protein expression in normal and malignant B cells. Malignant B cells exhibited a greater induction of HO-1 protein compared to normal B lymphocytes. Using siRNA directed against the transcription factor Nrf2 and B cells isolated from Nrf2-deficient mice, we show that HO-1 induction by 15d-PGJ(2) is dependent on Nrf2. These results show that, compared to normal B lymphocytes, malignant B cells have a greater capacity to increase their HO-1 protein levels in response to 15d-PGJ(2). We speculate that the ability to highly express HO-1 by malignant B cells could confer a survival advantage.

  9. Syk Inhibition with Fostamatinib Leads to Transitional B Lymphocyte Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Paul M.; Wei, Chungwen; Roger, James; Schaefer-Cutillo, Julia; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Jung, John; Sanz, Iñaki; Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Cell signaling initiated by the B cell receptor is critical to normal development of B lymphocytes, most notably at the transitional B cell stage. Inhibition of this signaling pathway with the syk inhibitor, fostamatinib, has produced significant efficacy in lymphoid malignancies and autoimmune conditions. Here, we demonstrate that short-term use of fostamatinib impairs B lymphocyte development at the transitional stage without affecting mature B cell populations. Additionally, IL-10 producing B cells remained relatively constant throughout the treatment period. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of action of B cell receptor inhibition in autoimmune disease. As the development of agents targeting B cell receptor signaling proceeds, monitoring for long-term consequences as well as functional evaluation of B cell subsets may further improve our understanding of this rapidly growing class of novel agents. PMID:22284392

  10. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: NoD.Bld.20.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.B-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Sistema imunitário - parte II: fundamentos da resposta imunológica mediada por linfócitos T e B Immune system - part II: basis of the immunological response mediated by T and B lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Mesquita Júnior

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O sistema imunológico é constituído por uma intrincada rede de órgãos, células e moléculas, e tem por finalidade manter a homeostase do organismo, combatendo as agressões em geral. A imunidade inata atua em conjunto com a imunidade adaptativa e caracteriza-se pela rápida resposta à agressão, independentemente de estímulo prévio, sendo a primeira linha de defesa do organismo. Seus mecanismos compreendem barreiras físicas, químicas e biológicas, componentes celulares e moléculas solúveis. A primeira defesa do organismo frente a um dano tecidual envolve diversas etapas intimamente integradas e constituídas pelos diferentes componentes desse sistema. A presente revisão tem como objetivo resgatar os fundamentos dessa resposta, que apresenta elevada complexidade e é constituída por diversos componentes articulados que convergem para a elaboração da resposta imune adaptativa. Destacamos algumas etapas: reconhecimento molecular dos agentes agressores; ativação de vias bioquímicas intracelulares que resultam em modificações vasculares e teciduais; produção de uma miríade de mediadores com efeitos locais e sistêmicos no âmbito da ativação e proliferação celulares, síntese de novos produtos envolvidos na quimioatração e migração de células especializadas na destruição e remoção do agente agressor, e finalmente a recuperação tecidual com o restabelecimento funcional do tecido ou órgão.The immune system consists of an intricate network of organs, cells, and molecules responsible for maintaining the body's homeostasis and responding to aggression in general. Innate immunity operates in conjunction with adaptive immunity and is characterized by rapid response to aggression, regardless of previous stimulus, being the organism first line of defense. Its mechanisms include physical, chemical and biological barriers, cellular components, as well as soluble molecules. The organism first line of defense against

  17. Involvement of suppressive B-lymphocytes in the mechanism of tolerogenic dendritic cell reversal of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caro, Valentina; Phillips, Brett; Engman, Carl; Harnaha, Jo; Trucco, Massimo; Giannoukakis, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to identify immune cell populations, in addition to Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells, that participate in the mechanisms of action of tolerogenic dendritic cells shown to prevent and reverse type 1 diabetes in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse strain. Co-culture experiments using tolerogenic dendritic cells and B-cells from NOD as well as transgenic interleukin-10 promoter-reporter mice along with transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells and CD19+ B-cells into NOD and transgenic mice, showed that these dendritic cells increased the frequency and numbers of interleukin-10-expressing B-cells in vitro and in vivo. The expansion of these cells was a consequence of both the proliferation of pre-existing interleukin-10-expressing B-lymphocytes and the conversion of CD19+ B-lymphcytes into interleukin-10-expressing cells. The tolerogenic dendritic cells did not affect the suppressive activity of these B-cells. Furthermore, we discovered that the suppressive murine B-lymphocytes expressed receptors for retinoic acid which is produced by the tolerogenic dendritic cells. These data assist in identifying the nature of the B-cell population increased in response to the tolerogenic dendritic cells in a clinical trial and also validate very recent findings demonstrating a mechanistic link between human tolerogenic dendritic cells and immunosuppressive regulatory B-cells.

  18. Involvement of suppressive B-lymphocytes in the mechanism of tolerogenic dendritic cell reversal of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Di Caro

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to identify immune cell populations, in addition to Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells, that participate in the mechanisms of action of tolerogenic dendritic cells shown to prevent and reverse type 1 diabetes in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD mouse strain. Co-culture experiments using tolerogenic dendritic cells and B-cells from NOD as well as transgenic interleukin-10 promoter-reporter mice along with transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells and CD19+ B-cells into NOD and transgenic mice, showed that these dendritic cells increased the frequency and numbers of interleukin-10-expressing B-cells in vitro and in vivo. The expansion of these cells was a consequence of both the proliferation of pre-existing interleukin-10-expressing B-lymphocytes and the conversion of CD19+ B-lymphcytes into interleukin-10-expressing cells. The tolerogenic dendritic cells did not affect the suppressive activity of these B-cells. Furthermore, we discovered that the suppressive murine B-lymphocytes expressed receptors for retinoic acid which is produced by the tolerogenic dendritic cells. These data assist in identifying the nature of the B-cell population increased in response to the tolerogenic dendritic cells in a clinical trial and also validate very recent findings demonstrating a mechanistic link between human tolerogenic dendritic cells and immunosuppressive regulatory B-cells.

  19. Vitamin D3 Suppresses Class II Invariant Chain Peptide Expression on Activated B-Lymphocytes: A Plausible Mechanism for Downregulation of Acute Inflammatory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar K. Danner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Class II invariant chain peptide (CLIP expression has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in the regulation of B cell function after nonspecific polyclonal expansion. Several studies have shown vitamin D3 helps regulate the immune response. We hypothesized that activated vitamin D3 suppresses CLIP expression on activated B-cells after nonspecific activation or priming of C57BL/6 mice with CpG. This study showed activated vitamin D3 actively reduced CLIP expression and decreased the number of CLIP+ B-lymphocytes in a dose and formulation dependent fashion. Flow cytometry was used to analyze changes in mean fluorescent intensity (MFI based on changes in concentration of CLIP on activated B-lymphocytes after treatment with the various formulations of vitamin D3. The human formulation of activated vitamin D (calcitriol had the most dramatic reduction in CLIP density at an MFI of 257.3 [baseline of 701.1 (P value = 0.01]. Cholecalciferol and alfacalcidiol had no significant reduction in MFI at 667.7 and 743.0, respectively. Calcitriol seemed to best reduce CLIP overexpression in this ex vivo model. Bioactive vitamin D3 may be an effective compliment to other B cell suppression therapeutics to augment downregulation of nonspecific inflammation associated with many autoimmune disorders. Further study is necessary to confirm these findings.

  20. B lymphocytes not required for progression from insulitis to diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, B; Zhang, M D; Slattery, R M

    2001-12-01

    Previous studies have implicated B lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. While it is clear that B lymphocytes are necessary, it has not been clear at which stage of disease they play a role; early, late or both. To clarify when B lymphocytes are needed, T lymphocytes were transferred from 5-week-old NOD female mice to age-matched NOD/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) recipient mice. NOD/SCID mice, which lack functionally mature T and B lymphocytes, do not normally develop insulitis or insulin-dependent diabetes melitus (IDDM). The NOD/SCID mice that received purified T lymphocytes from 5-week-old NOD mice subsequently developed insulitis and diabetes even though they did not have detectable B lymphocytes. This suggests that while B lymphocytes may be essential for an initial priming event they are not requisite for disease progression in the NOD mouse.

  1. Functional capabilities of marmoset T and B lymphocytes in primary in vitro antibody formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickerson, D.A.; Gengozian, N.

    1981-01-15

    In vitro tests of T- and B-lymphocyte function of two marmoset species, Saguinus fuscicollis and Saguinus oedipus, were examined to explore the lower immune response profile previously reported for S. o. oedipus. Experiments with trinitrophenyl-lipopolysaccharide (TNP-LPS) revealed peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from both species capable of antibody formation. This response was both T cell and monocyte independent; indeed, removal of T cells led to an enhanced response, indicating a regulatory role for this cell in each species. Studies with the nonmitogenic form of TNP-LPS, trinitrophenyl-base-hydrolyzed-lipopolysaccharide, revealed that plaque-forming cells could be obtained from S. fuscicollis PBL while S. o. oedipus PBL were unresponsive. This report also demonstrates that hemopoietic chimerism, a feature common to all marmosets, has a negative influence on antibody-forming capabilities.

  2. Radioadaptive response in human B- and CD8{sup +} T-lymphocytes as measured by the acridine orange stained micronuclei technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.S.; Choi, J.M.; Yang, K.H.; Kim, C.S.; Lim, Y.K.; Kim, C.S. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Corporation, Radiation Health Research Institute, Seoul (Korea); Woon, J.H. [National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service, Anyang (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    To investigate (1) the radiosensitive of B- versus T- lymphocytes and (2) the possible application of their sensitivity for adaptive response after treating with an adapting plus a challenge dose. In the present experiments, micronucleus analysis was performed in B- and CD8{sup +} matured T-lymphocytes of eight healthy volunteers exposed to {gamma}-rays. The number of radio-induced micronuclei was significantly higher in B-lymphocytes compared to T-lymphocytes in the dose range from 10 to 100cGy. To investigate adaptive response, whole blood samples were irradiated in vitro with a pretreatment dose of 1cGy {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-irradiation. Six hours after their initiation, groups of cultures were subsequently exposed to a challenge dose of 100cGy {gamma}-irradiation. Following stimulation with PHA and PWM for T- and B-lymphocyte cultivation, lymphocytes were fixed at 72 hours and stained with acridine orange dye. B-lymphocytes exhibited a greater induction of adaptive response than those of CD8{sup +} matured T-lymphocytes, and when pretreated with 1cGy significantly fewer micronuclei induced by the challenge dose of 100cGy {gamma}-irradiation. The results suggest that the lower dose pretreatments are able to induce a significantly higher adaptive response in human B-lymphocytes, and this adaptive response may result from the DNA repair mechanism, which may lead to less residual damage. (author)

  3. ATP11c is critical for phosphatidylserine internalization and B lymphocyte differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabas, Mehmet; Teh, Charis E.; Frankenreiter, Sandra; Lal, Dennis; Roots, Carla M.; Whittle, Belinda; Andrews, Daniel T.; Zhang, Yafei; Teoh, Narci C.; Sprent, Jonathan; Tze, Lina E.; Kucharska, Edyta M.; Kofler, Jennifer; Farell, Geoffrey C.; Bröer, Stefan; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Enders, Anselm

    2011-01-01

    Subcompartments of the plasma membrane are believed to be critical for lymphocyte responses but few genetic tools exist to test their function. Here we describe a new X-linked B cell deficiency syndrome in mice caused by mutations in Atp11c, a member of the P4 ATPase family thought to serve as flippases concentrating aminophospholipids in the cytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes. Defective ATP11c decreased the rate of phosphatidylserine translocation in pro-B cells, greatly reduced pre-B and B cell numbers independent of Bcl2-inhibited apoptosis or immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and abolished pre-B cell expansion in response to an Il7 transgene. The only other abnormalities noted were anemia, hyperbilirubinemia and hepatocellular carcinoma. These results identify an intimate connection between phospholipid transport and B lymphocyte function. PMID:21423173

  4. Rapid analysis of rearranged kappa light chain genes of circulating polysaccharide-specific B lymphocytes by means of immunomagnetic beads and the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs, L; Barington, T; Madsen, HO

    1993-01-01

    of the B lymphocytes activated in vivo. Here, we present a method for rapid analysis of the rearranged kappa light chain genes used by human circulating antigen-specific B lymphocytes. After vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) conjugated with protein, the Hib......CP-specific B lymphocytes were isolated by antigen-coated immunomagnetic beads. After the purification, at least 98% of the immunoglobulin-secreting recovered cells were HibCP specific. The RNA was isolated and amplified by cDNA synthesis using a kappa constant region primer followed by polymerase chain...... reaction (PCR) using in addition a degenerate kappa light chain signal peptide region primer. The PCR product was cloned into the M13mp18 phage. The cloning efficiency was 100-600 clones/ml of blood. Of the 86 clones sequenced, 90% represented rearranged kappa light chain genes from different antibody...

  5. Rapid analysis of rearranged kappa light chain genes of circulating polysaccharide-specific B lymphocytes by means of immunomagnetic beads and the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs, L; Barington, T; Madsen, HO

    1993-01-01

    reaction (PCR) using in addition a degenerate kappa light chain signal peptide region primer. The PCR product was cloned into the M13mp18 phage. The cloning efficiency was 100-600 clones/ml of blood. Of the 86 clones sequenced, 90% represented rearranged kappa light chain genes from different antibody......CP-specific B lymphocytes were isolated by antigen-coated immunomagnetic beads. After the purification, at least 98% of the immunoglobulin-secreting recovered cells were HibCP specific. The RNA was isolated and amplified by cDNA synthesis using a kappa constant region primer followed by polymerase chain...... of the B lymphocytes activated in vivo. Here, we present a method for rapid analysis of the rearranged kappa light chain genes used by human circulating antigen-specific B lymphocytes. After vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) conjugated with protein, the Hib...

  6. Tumor-infiltrating B lymphocytes as an efficient source of highly specific immunoglobulins recognizing tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelliccia Angela

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is much evidence that tumor cells elicit a humoral immune response in patients. In most cases, the presence of antibodies in peripheral blood is detected only in small proportion of patients with tumors overexpressing the corresponding antigen. In the present study, we analyzed the significance of local humoral response provided by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer patients. Methods The ability of a patient's immune system to produce specific antibodies inside tumor tissue, capable of recognizing tumor cells, was explored through analysis of the oligoclonality of antibodies derived from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and construction of a series of recombinant antibody libraries in scFv format, derived from breast tumor-infiltrating B lymphocytes. These libraries and one from peripheral blood lymphocytes of a single breast cancer patient were panned against three purified surface tumor antigens, such as CEA, MUC1 and ED-B domain, and against intact MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. Results Application of novel display vector, pKM19, allowed isolation of a large panel of breast cancer-specific antibodies against known tumor antigens, as well as against breast carcinoma cells. Reactivity of novel scFvs was confirmed by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence staining and flow cytometry. We demonstrated that seven of ten primary breast tumor specimens, obtained using discarded surgical material, could be exploited as an appropriate source for generation of phage display libraries, giving highly specific antitumor antibodies which recognize heterologous tumor cells. Conclusion Local humoral immune response within tumor tissue in breast cancer patients frequently has an oligoclonal character. Efficient selection of specific antitumor antibodies from recombinant antibody libraries, derived from such oligoclonal tumor-infiltrated B lymphocytes, indicates the presence of natural immune response against tumor antigens

  7. PHENOTYPIC PROFILE OF B-LYMPHOCYTES IN WOMEN WITH CHRONIC ENDOMETRITIS AND ADNEXITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Savchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate phenotypic profile of B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of the patients with chronic endometritis and adnexitis. The study involved 89 women in their reproductive age (18 to 45 years with chronic endometritis (48 cases and adnexitis (41 cases. Ninety-eight healthy agematched women participated as a control group. Phenotypic B-cell subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry performed with direct immunofluorescent staining of peripheral cells from whole blood using the following antibody panel: CD5-FITC/CD23-PE/CD19-ECD/CD45-PC5/CD27-PC7. A significantly reduced B-lymphocyte content was revealed in peripheral blood of women with chronic endometritis and adnexitis. The reduced cell numbers occurred due to reduced B2 (main fraction of B-lymphocytes and as B1 cells (minor fraction which determines insufficient reactivity of specific humoral immune response, including immune reactions at the mucous membranes. However, percentage of B2-lymphocytes was decreased only in endometriosis, whereas patients with adnexitis showed decrease in both relative and absolute counts of this B cell subpopulation. A decreased content of naive B-cells in the peripheral blood is another feature of the B cell phenotypic profile in chronic endometritis and adnexitis. Moreover, the drop of the naive B-cell levels in patients with adnexitis proved to be more pronounced than in persons with endometritis. Expression of CD23- antigen (a low-affinity receptor for IgE has been investigated as a functional marker of B cells. All the studied peripheral B cell subpopulations expressing CD23 were decreased in the patients with chronic endometritis. The numbers of different B cell fractions expressing CD23 antigen were also reduced in the women with chronic adnexitis as compared to the levels detected in patients with chronic endometritis. Alterations of the B-cell immunity were more pronounced in chronic adnexitis, due to more extensive

  8. Expression of activated molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongli; Xu, Wenyan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Huaquan; Fu, Rong; Wu, Yuhong; Qu, Wen; Wang, Guojin; Guan, Jing; Song, Jia; Xing, Limin; Shao, Zonghong

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the expression of activation molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)/Evans patients. The expression of CD80, CD86, and CD69 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was detected using flow cytometry in 30 AIHA/Evans patients, 18 normal controls (NC) and nine chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in untreated patients was higher than that in remission patients (P 0.05), but lower than those of CD5(-)B lymphocytes in remission patients and NC (P 0.05). CD80 and CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was negatively correlated with hemoglobin (HB), C3, C4 (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with reticulocyte (Ret) (P < 0.05). CD69 on CD5(+) and CD5(-)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than those of AIHA/Evans patients and NC (P < 0.05). The active molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of AIHA/Evans patients differ from those on CD5(-) and clonal CD5(+)B lymphocytes.

  9. B lymphocyte depletion with the monoclonal antibody rituximab in Graves' disease: a controlled pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus H; Bonnema, Steen J

    2007-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a common TSH receptor autoantibody (TRAb)-mediated disorder. Because B lymphocytes are important self-antigen presenting cells and precursors for antibody-secreting plasma cells, temporary B-lymphocyte depletion with the monoclonal antibody rituximab (RTX) might be of bene...

  10. Expression of the fusion protein of human soluble B lymphocyte stimulator and diphtheria toxin in E. coli and its biological activity%人sBAFF-DT388融合蛋白在大肠杆菌中的表达及其活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱月婷; 焦玉莲; 崔彬; 张捷; 游力; 赵跃然

    2011-01-01

    Objective To prepare the fusion protein of human soluble B lymphocyte stimulator and diphtheria toxin (hsBAFF-DT388) in E. coli and investigate its targeted activity to human B cells. Methods The hsBAFF-DT388 gene was optimized in advance and inserted into the clone vector pMD19-T. The fragment of the hsBAFF-DT388 fusion gene was separated from the plasmid pUC57-hsBAFF-DT388 by PCR according to hsBAFF-DT388 gene order. The recombinant was screened with colony PCR, restriction map analysis and DNA sequencing. The recombinant vector was digested by restriction enzymes, and then inserted into the expression vector pCold Ⅱ. The positive recombinant expression vector was identified by colony PCR and restriction map analysis. The recombinant strain was induced by IPTG. The recombinant protein was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot, and then purified by Ni2 + -NTA affmity chromatography. Biological activity of the purified protein was detected by cell fluoresce and MTT assay. Results Expression level of the recombinant protein accounted for 40% of total bacterial proteins of E. coli, and the recombinant protein could bind with BAFF receptor-positive cells and had a cytotoxic effect on human B cells ( Hmy2. CIR). Conclusion The fusion protein expression vector of hsBAFF-DT388 was successfully constructed and the recombinant protein with selective cytotoxicity against B cell was obtained, which may establish a solid foundation for further study of the therapy for B cell malignancies and autoimmune diseases.%目的 制备人B淋巴细胞刺激因子-白喉毒素融合蛋白(hsBAFF-DT388),探讨其靶向B细胞活性.方法 根据优化合成的hsBAFF-DT388基因序列设计引物,PCR扩增目的 基因并插入克隆载体pMDl9-T,采用菌落PCR、酶谱分析及DNA测序鉴定阳性克隆,重组克隆载体经双酶切后插入表达载体pColdⅡ,并鉴定重组表达载体.重组菌株经ITPG诱导,SDS-PAGE分析及Western blot鉴定,经Ni2+-NTA层析柱纯化,

  11. Anergy in self-directed B lymphocytes: A statistical mechanics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliari, Elena; Barra, Adriano; Del Ferraro, Gino; Guerra, Francesco; Tantari, Daniele

    2015-06-21

    Self-directed lymphocytes may evade clonal deletion at ontogenesis but still remain harmless due to a mechanism called clonal anergy. For B-lymphocytes, two major explanations for anergy developed over the last decades: according to Varela theory, anergy stems from a proper orchestration of the whole B-repertoire, such that self-reactive clones, due to intensive feed-back from other clones, display strong inertia when mounting a response. Conversely, according to the model of cognate response, self-reacting cells are not stimulated by helper lymphocytes and the absence of such signaling yields anergy. Through statistical mechanics we show that helpers do not prompt activation of a sub-group of B-cells: remarkably, the latter are just those broadly interacting in the idiotypic network. Hence Varela theory can finally be reabsorbed into the prevailing framework of the cognate response model. Further, we show how the B-repertoire architecture may emerge, where highly connected clones are self-directed as a natural consequence of ontogenetic learning.

  12. Circulating B-lymphocytes as potential biomarkers of tuberculosis infection activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Sebina

    Full Text Available Accurate biomarkers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection activity would significantly improve early diagnosis, treatment and management of M. tuberculosis infection. We hypothesised that circulating B-lymphocytes may be useful biomarkers of tuberculosis (TB infection status in highly TB-endemic settings. Ex-vivo and in-vitro mycobacteria-specific B-cell ELISPOT assays were used to examine the plasmablast (PB and memory B-cell (MBC responses in the peripheral blood of adult, healthy, community controls (n = 151 and of active TB patients (n = 48 living in Uganda. Frequencies of mycobacteria-specific PBs were markedly higher in active TB patients compared to healthy controls, and, conversely, MBCs were markedly higher in the healthy controls compared to active TB patients. In addition, the community controls with evidence of latent TB infection had higher peripheral blood PB and MBC responses than those without evidence of TB infection. These data demonstrate that peripheral blood B-cell responses are differentially modulated during latent and active M. tuberculosis infection, and suggest that the PB to MBC ratio may be a useful biomarker of TB infection activity.

  13. Immunostimulant activity of noni (Morinda citrifolia) on T and B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Smita; Mengi, Sushma

    2010-07-01

    Morinda citrifolia Linn (Rubiaceae) is a traditional medicinal herb that has been purported to be beneficial in the treatment of infections due to its immune enhancing properties. However, detailed studies highlighting the effect of different compounds isolated from the plant on the immune system are lacking. In this study, the stimulatory effects of the extracts and fractions of M. citrifolia fruits on important components of the adaptive immune system such as T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes were studied. The effects of the plant extracts on lymphocytes were assessed by in vitro (MTT assay) and in vivo (cell mediated immune response) techniques. Results of the MTT study indicated that the hydroalcoholic (0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL) and aqueous extracts (0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL) significantly (p citrifolia fruits on B-cells was measured by the delayed type hypersensitivity method. The study revealed that the hydroalcoholic extract (200 mg/kg) and fraction F I (40 mg/kg) significantly increased the humoral response to the extent of 33.33 and 35.12%, respectively. The results of this study confirm the cellular and humoral immunostimulant properties of M. citrifolia fruits and justify its usage in traditional medicine.

  14. Classical scrapie prions in ovine blood are associated with B lymphocytes and platelet-rich plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dassanayake Rohana P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical scrapie is a naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of sheep and goats characterized by cellular accumulation of abnormal isoforms of prion protein (PrPSc in the central nervous system and the follicles of peripheral lymphoid tissues. Previous studies have shown that the whole blood and buffy coat blood fraction of scrapie infected sheep harbor prion infectivity. Although PrPSc has been detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, plasma, and more recently within a subpopulation of B lymphocytes, the infectivity status of these cells and plasma in sheep remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether circulating PBMCs, B lymphocytes and platelets from classical scrapie infected sheep harbor prion infectivity using a sheep bioassay. Results Serial rectal mucosal biopsy and immunohistochemistry were used to detect preclinical infection in lambs transfused with whole blood or blood cell fractions from preclinical or clinical scrapie infected sheep. PrPSc immunolabeling was detected in antemortem rectal and postmortem lymphoid tissues from recipient lambs receiving PBMCs (15/15, CD72+ B lymphocytes (3/3, CD21+ B lymphocytes (3/3 or platelet-rich plasma (2/3 fractions. As expected, whole blood (11/13 and buffy coat (5/5 recipients showed positive PrPSc labeling in lymphoid follicles. However, at 549 days post-transfusion, PrPSc was not detected in rectal or other lymphoid tissues in three sheep receiving platelet-poor plasma fraction. Conclusions Prion infectivity was detected in circulating PBMCs, CD72+ pan B lymphocytes, the CD21+ subpopulation of B lymphocytes and platelet-rich plasma of classical scrapie infected sheep using a sheep bioassay. Combining platelets with B lymphocytes might enhance PrPSc detection levels in blood samples.

  15. T and B lymphocytes in the marmoset: a natural haemopoietic chimera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niblack, G.D.; Gengozian, N.

    1976-01-01

    The thymus-derived (T) lymphocyte and bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocyte populations of the marmoset were characterized using specific cell surface markers. Approximately 85% of the thymocytes formed rosettes with neuraminidase-treated sheep erythrocytes (E/sub n/). The percentage (approximately 69%) of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) forming rosettes with E/sub n/ was the same as that which stained with fluorescently labelled goat anti-marmoset thymocyte serum (ATS). These two assays identified the same cell population since treatment of cells with ATS and complement resulted in a concomitant decrease in E/sub n/ rosette formation. Marmoset PBL also formed rosettes with human erythrocytes sensitized with antibody and complement (HEAC); since the percentage (approximately 20%) HEAC rosette was the same as that of cells stained with fluorescently labelled goat anti-marmoset IgG, these cells were considered to be B cells. A small percentage of cells (aproximately 1.5%) possessed both types of receptors. The mean percentages of T and B cells present in PBL of single-born, presumably non-chimeric animals, were the same as that of isosexual and heterosexual chimeras.

  16. Anergy in self-directed B lymphocytes from a statistical mechanics perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Agliari, Elena; Del Ferraro, Gino; Guerra, Francesco; Tantari, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    The ability of the adaptive immune system to discriminate between self and non-self mainly stems from the ontogenic clonal-deletion of lymphocytes expressing strong binding affinity with self-peptides. However, some self-directed lymphocytes may evade selection and still be harmless due to a mechanism called clonal anergy. As for B lymphocytes, two major explanations for anergy developed over three decades: according to "Varela theory", it stems from a proper orchestration of the whole B-repertoire, in such a way that self-reactive clones, due to intensive interactions and feed-back from other clones, display more inertia to mount a response. On the other hand, according to the `two-signal model", which has prevailed nowadays, self-reacting cells are not stimulated by helper lymphocytes and the absence of such signaling yields anergy. The first result we present, achieved through disordered statistical mechanics, shows that helper cells do not prompt the activation and proliferation of a certain sub-group of ...

  17. B lymphocyte-specific c-Myc expression stimulates early and functional expansion of the vasculature and lymphatics during lymphomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, Alanna; Mezquita, Pau; Brandvold, Kimberly A; Farr, Andrew; Iritani, Brian M

    2003-12-01

    Expression of the c-myc proto-oncogene is deregulated in many human cancers. We examined the role of c-Myc in stimulating angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in a highly metastatic murine model of Burkitt's lymphoma (E micro -c-myc), where c-Myc is expressed exclusively in B lymphocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis of bone marrow and lymph nodes from young (preneoplastic) E micro -c-myc transgenic mice revealed increased growth of blood vessels, which are functional by dye flow assay. Lymphatic sinuses also increased in size and number within the lymph nodes, as demonstrated by immunostaining for with a lymphatic endothelial marker 10.1.1. The 10.1.1 antibody recognizes VEGFR-2- and VEGFR-3-positive lymphatic sinuses and vessels within lymph nodes, and also recognizes lymphatic vessels in other tissues. Subcutaneously injected dye traveled more efficiently through draining lymph nodes in E micro -c-myc mice, indicating that these hypertrophic lymphatic sinuses increase lymph flow. Purified B lymphocytes and lymphoid tissues from E micro -c-myc mice expressed increased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by immunohistochemical or immunoblot assays, which could promote blood and lymphatic vessel growth through interaction with VEGFR-2, which is expressed on the endothelium of both vessel types. These results indicate that constitutive c-Myc expression stimulates angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, which may promote the rapid growth and metastasis of c-Myc-expressing cancer cells, respectively.

  18. SPONTANEOUS IMMUNOGLOBULIN-SYNTHESIZING ACTIVITY OF B LYMPHOCYTES IN INFLAMMATORY RHEUMATIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.T. T. Mamasaidov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of present work was to evaluate clinical significance of B-lymphocytes spontaneous antibody-synthesizing activity by B-lymphocytes (LASA in patients with rheumatic inflammatory diseases (RD, i.e., reactive arthritis (ReA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Significantly higher LASA levels were revealed in the patients with ReA, AS, RA, and SLE, as compared with healthy persons and patients with osteoarthrosis. Clinical significance of LASA indexes and their changes may reflect manifestation and degree of immunological activities in ReA, AS, RA, and SLE.

  19. Killer B Lymphocytes and their Fas Ligand Positive Exosomes as Inducers of Immune Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Karl Lundy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Induction of immune tolerance is a key process by which the immune system is educated to modulate reactions against benign stimuli such as self-antigens and commensal microbes. Understanding and harnessing the natural mechanisms of immune tolerance may become an increasingly useful strategy for treating many types of allergic and autoimmune diseases, as well as for improving the acceptance of solid organ transplants. Our laboratory and others have been interested in the natural ability of some B lymphocytes to express the death-inducing molecule Fas ligand (FasL, and their ability to kill T helper (TH lymphocytes. We have recently shown that experimental transformation of human B cells by a non-replicative variant of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV consistently resulted in high expression of functional FasL protein. The production and release of FasL+ exosomes that co-expressed MHC Class II molecules and had the capacity to kill antigen-specific TH cells was also observed. Several lines of evidence indicate that FasL+ B cells and FasL+MHCII+ exosomes have important roles in natural immune tolerance and have a great deal of therapeutic potential. Taken together, these findings suggest that EBV-immortalized human B lymphoblastoid cell lines could be used as cellular factories for FasL+ exosomes, which would be employed to therapeutically establish and/or regain immune tolerance toward specific antigens. The goals of this review are to summarize current knowledge of the roles of FasL+ B cells and exosomes in immune regulation, and to suggest methods of manipulating killer B cells and FasL+ exosomes for clinical purposes.

  20. 乳源β Casein 125肽的基本特征及促B淋巴细胞增殖作用%Basic characteristics of a human milk-derived peptide β-Casein-125 and its effect on B lymphocyte proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘贵友; 万俊; 肖文

    2016-01-01

    The biologic characteristics of β⁃Casein⁃125 peptide were analyzed by Uniprot, SABLE, ProtParam tool and other online databases. The content ofβ⁃Casein⁃125 in colostrum, transition milk and mature milk was mesured by mass spectrometry technology. Furthermore, the effect of β⁃Casein⁃125 peptide in B lymphocyte proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. The online databases showed that stability coefficient, aliphatic index and grand average of hydropathicity of β⁃Casein⁃125 were 111�43, 111�43 and 0�471, respectively. It indicated that β⁃Casein⁃125 is a hydrophobic stable peptide. The content of β⁃Casein⁃125 was significantly decreased with lactation time, detected by mass spectrometry technology. Moreover, β⁃Casein⁃125 could across the cell membrane of mouse B lymphocytes, and promote their proliferation. β⁃Casein⁃125, a hydrophobic peptide with high stability, could promote lymphocyte proliferation. It was indicated thatβ⁃Casein⁃125 played a critial role in promoting the neonatal immune system maturation.%利用Uniprot、SABLE、ProtParam tool等在线数据库分析β Casein 125肽生物学特征;利用质谱定量技术检测β Casein 125肽在初乳、过渡乳和成熟乳中的含量变化;利用细胞增殖实验方法揭示β Casein 125肽在促进B淋巴细胞增殖中的作用。结果表明:β Casein 125肽的稳定性系数为111�43,脂肪指数和亲水性分别为111�43和0�471,属于疏水性稳定型多肽。质谱定量分析发现:β Casein 125肽含量随泌乳时间变化含量显著降低。β Casein 125肽不仅可以顺利进入小鼠B淋巴细胞,并且可显著促进细胞增殖。β Casein 125肽具有高稳定性和疏水性的特征,可以促进淋巴细胞增殖,提示该肽可能在新生儿免疫系统建立中发挥重要作用。

  1. Alterations in sensitivity to estrogen, dihydrotestosterone, and xenogens in B-lymphocytes from children with autism spectrum disorder and their unaffected twins/siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Martyn A; Gist, Taylor L; Baskin, David S

    2013-01-01

    It has been postulated that androgen overexposure in a susceptible person leads to excessive brain masculinization and the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) phenotype. In this study, the responses to estradiol (E2), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) on B-lymphocytes from ASD subjects and controls are compared. B cells were obtained from 11 ASD subjects, their unaffected fraternal twins, and nontwin siblings. Controls were obtained from a different cell bank. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and sodium 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction levels were measured after incubation with different concentrations of E2, DHT, and DDE. XTT/LDH ratio, representative of mitochondria number per cell, was calculated. E2, DHT, and DDE all cause "U"-shaped growth curves, as measured by LDH levels. ASD B cells show less growth depression compared to siblings and controls (P ratios (P < 0.01) when compared to external controls, whereas siblings had values of XTT/LDH between ASD and external controls. B-lymphocytes from people with ASD exhibit a differential response to E2, DHT, and hormone disruptors in regard to cell growth and mitochondrial upregulation when compared to non-ASD siblings and external controls. Specifically, ASD B-lymphocytes show significantly less growth depression and less mitochondrial upregulation when exposed to these effectors. A mitochondrial deficit in ASD individuals is implied.

  2. Alterations in Sensitivity to Estrogen, Dihydrotestosterone, and Xenogens in B-Lymphocytes from Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Unaffected Twins/Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn A. Sharpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been postulated that androgen overexposure in a susceptible person leads to excessive brain masculinization and the autism spectrum disorder (ASD phenotype. In this study, the responses to estradiol (E2, dihydrotestosterone (DHT, and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE on B-lymphocytes from ASD subjects and controls are compared. B cells were obtained from 11 ASD subjects, their unaffected fraternal twins, and nontwin siblings. Controls were obtained from a different cell bank. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and sodium 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT reduction levels were measured after incubation with different concentrations of E2, DHT, and DDE. XTT/LDH ratio, representative of mitochondria number per cell, was calculated. E2, DHT, and DDE all cause “U”-shaped growth curves, as measured by LDH levels. ASD B cells show less growth depression compared to siblings and controls (P<0.01. They also have reduced XTT/LDH ratios (P<0.01 when compared to external controls, whereas siblings had values of XTT/LDH between ASD and external controls. B-lymphocytes from people with ASD exhibit a differential response to E2, DHT, and hormone disruptors in regard to cell growth and mitochondrial upregulation when compared to non-ASD siblings and external controls. Specifically, ASD B-lymphocytes show significantly less growth depression and less mitochondrial upregulation when exposed to these effectors. A mitochondrial deficit in ASD individuals is implied.

  3. Tc-99m-labeled Rituximab for Imaging B Lymphocyte Infiltration in Inflammatory Autoimmune Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, G.; Anzola, K. L.; Podesta, E.; Lagana, B.; Del Mastro, C.; Dierckx, R. A.; Scopinaro, F.; Signore, A.

    2012-01-01

    The rationale of the present study was to radiolabel rituximab with 99m-technetium and to image B lymphocytes infiltration in the affected tissues of patients with chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases, in particular, the candidates to be treated with unlabelled rituximab, in order to provide a r

  4. Is there a difference between T- and B-lymphocyte morphology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strokotov, D.I.; Yurkin, M.A.; Gilev, K.V.; van Bockstaele, D.R.; Hoekstra, A.G.; Rubtsov, N.B.; Maltsev, V.P.

    2009-01-01

    We characterize T- and B-lymphocytes from several donors, determining cell diameter, ratio of nucleus to cell diameter, and refractive index of the nucleus and cytoplasm for each individual cell. We measure light-scattering profiles with a scanning flow cytometer and invert the signals using a coate

  5. Unexpected and persistent depletion of B lymphocytes CD20 following a minimum dose of anti-CD20 antibody (Rituximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bruzzese

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Rituximab is a chemeric murine/human anti-B lymphocyte antigen CD20 monoclonal antibody used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis resistant to treatment by one or more anti TNF-alpha therapies (1. The recommended dose for an efficient depletion of the B CD 20 lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis is two infusions of 1000 mg, with the second infusion being administered two weeks after the first. At this dose, one obtains a rapid and persistent depletion of CD 20 cells, with repopulation occurring, on the average, in about eight months (2. Here, we present a case of a woman treated with only 50 mg of rituximab, who underwent both a rapid and pronounced reduction of B CD 20 lymphocytes...

  6. Targeting of chemical mutagens to differentiating B-lymphocytes in vivo: detection by direct DNA labeling and sister chromatid exchange induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, S.E.; Nanna, U.C.; Dietert, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    In vivo systems for analyzing mutagen interactions with a specific differentiating cell population are rare. Taking advantage of the unique anatomical features of the bursa of Fabricius in the chicken, the authors explored the possibility of targeting chemical mutagens to a defined differentiating cell population in the animal, namely, the B-lymphocytes series. Such cells are known to be the targets for the oncogene-activating avian leukosis virus. Targeting of chemicals to cells of the bursa was demonstrated by application of the DNA-specific fluorochrome 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to the anal lips of neonatal chicks. Bright nuclear fluorescence of cells in the bursa demonstrated to occur within minutes after the application of 500..mu..l of DAPI. DAPI labeling of nuclei was detected up to several days after a single application. No nuclear labeling was exhibited in cells of neighboring tissues. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)(10..mu..l) was applied to the anal lips of day-old chicks to study dose-response kinetics for mutagen targeting to DNA of dividing B-lymphocytes in the bursa. Since the mitotic index was found to be quite high (25-30%) in the bursa, chromosome analysis was used to assay for genome damage. Sister chromatid exchange frequencies of 3.9, 7.3, and 9.0 (baseline 2.5) per cell were obtained at MMS dosages per animal of 50 ..mu..g, 100..mu..g, and 200..mu..g, respectively. These results indicate the rapid and quantitative localization of DNA-binding chemicals to cells of the bursa, particularly the resident B-lymphocytes. The bursa should be a useful system for studying mutagen-DNA interactions in the differentiating B-lymphocyte and subsequent influences on the development of immunity and lymphoproliferative disease.

  7. B淋巴细胞在心血管疾病中的作用%The role of B lymphocytes in cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迟迪; 孙勇; 李阳; 刘向兰; 朱静怡; 曹瑞; 于波; 吴健

    2016-01-01

    B淋巴细胞来源于骨髓多能干细胞,通过分泌抗体、提呈抗原,提供协同刺激信号及分泌细胞因子等方式在体液免疫应答过程中发挥重要功能.现有证据表明,B淋巴细胞的成熟,活化,以及分泌抗体等作用可以对心血管系统产生重要影响.本文综合近期的研究,对B淋巴细胞在冠心病、心力衰竭以及扩张型心肌病中的作用及其机制进行综述.%B lymphocytes derive from bone marrow pluripotent stem cells,they play an important role in the process of humoral immune response by secreting antibodies,presenting antigens,providing costimulating signals and secre- ting cytokines etc.Existing evidence demonstrates that maturation,activation and antibody secretion effects of B lymphocytes have important influence on cardiovascular system.The present article synthesize recent researches, made a review about effect and its mechanisms of B lymphocytes in coronary heart disease,heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy.

  8. An experimental system for determining the influence of microgravity on B lymphocyte activation and cell fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, D. W.; Zimmermann, U.; Klinman, N. R.; Gessner, P.; Humphreys, R. C.; Emmons, S. P.; Neil, G. A.

    The influence of microgravity on lymphocyte activation is central to the understanding of immunological function in space. Moreover, the adaptation of groundbased technologies to microgravity conditions presents opportunities for biotechnological applications including high efficiency production of antibody forming hybridomas. Because the emerging technology of microgravity hybridoma generation is dependent upon activation and cultivation of B lymphocytes during flight, we have adapted mitogen-driven B lymphocyte stimulation and culture that allows for the in vitro generation of large numbers of antibody forming cells suitable for cell fusion over a period of 1-2 weeks. We believe that this activation and cultivation system can be flown on near-term space flights to test fundamental hypotheses about mammalian cell activation, cell fusion, metabolism, secretion, growth, and bio-separation.

  9. Is there a difference between T- and B-lymphocyte morphology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strokotov, Dmitry I; Yurkin, Maxim A; Gilev, Konstantin V; van Bockstaele, Dirk R; Hoekstra, Alfons G; Rubtsov, Nikolay B; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2009-01-01

    We characterize T- and B-lymphocytes from several donors, determining cell diameter, ratio of nucleus to cell diameter, and refractive index of the nucleus and cytoplasm for each individual cell. We measure light-scattering profiles with a scanning flow cytometer and invert the signals using a coated sphere as an optical model of the cell and by relying on a global optimization technique. The main difference in morphology of T- and B-lymphocytes is found to be the larger mean diameters of the latter. However, the difference is smaller than the natural biological variability of a single cell. We propose nuclear inhomogeneity as a possible reason for the deviation of measured light-scattering profiles from real lymphocytes from those obtained from the coated sphere model.

  10. Regulation of Mitochondria Function by TRAF3 in B Lymphocytes and B Cell Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Aim 2. To identify novel TRAF3- interacting proteins in mitochondria of B lymphocytes 1 PI: Ping Xie, PhD Considering that TRAF3 does not...mitochondrial proteins. To test this, we propose to identify novel mitochondrial TRAF3- interacting proteins using biochemical affinity purification...mitochondrial TRAF3- interacting proteins : 100% completed. 2c. Mass spectrometry-based sequencing of purified proteins: 100% completed. 2d. Proteomic

  11. B-lymphocyte reconstitution after repeated rituximab treatment in a child with steroid-dependent autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther de Vries

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the detailed long-term reconstitution of B-lymphocyte subpopulations, immunoglobulins, and specific antibody production after two courses of rituximab in a young, previously healthy girl with steroid-dependent autoimmune hemolytic anemia. B-lymphocyte subpopulations were surprisingly normal directly after reconstitution. However, there was a slower reconstitution after the second rituximab course, especially of non-switched and switched memory B-lymphocytes, and a temporary decline in IgM below age-matched reference values.

  12. Elevated D8/17 expression on B lymphocytes, a marker of rheumatic fever, measured with flow cytometry in tic disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Bijzet, J; Limburg, PC; Steenhuis, MP; Troost, PW; Oosterhoff, MD; Korf, J; Kallenberg, CGM; Minderaa, RB

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Elevated D8/17 expression on B lymphocytes is a known susceptibility marker of rheumatic fever. Previous studies have reported higher than usual D8/ 17 expression on B lymphocytes of patients with tic disorders. The purpose of this study was to assess D8/17 expression on B lymphocytes of

  13. Imatinib treatment induces CD5+ B lymphocytes and IgM natural antibodies with anti-leukemic reactivity in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Catellani

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate is a first line treatment of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and of a rare form of gastrointestinal stromal cancer, where the response to the drug is also linked to the immune system activation with production of antineoplastic cytokines. In this study, forty patients in the chronic phase of disease, treated with imatinib mesylate, were analyzed. Bone marrow aspirates were drawn at diagnosis, after 3, 6, 12, 18 months for haematological, cytofluorimetric, cytogenetic, biomolecular evaluation and cytokine measurement. Responder and non responder patients were defined according to the European LeukemiaNet recommendations. In responder patients (n = 32, the percentage of bone marrow CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ lymphocytes, and the plasma levels of IgM, were significantly higher, at 3 months and up to 9 months, than in non responders. These IgM reacted with O-linked sugars expressed by leukemic cells and could induce tumor cell apoptosis. In responder patients the stromal-derived factor-1 and the B-lymphocyte-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family significantly raised in the bone marrow after imatinib administration, together with the bone morphogenetic proteins-2 and -7. All patients with high number of CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ cells and high stromal-derived factor-1 and B lymphocyte activating factor levels, underwent complete cytogenetic and/or molecular remission by 12 months. We propose that CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ lymphocytes producing anti-carbohydrate antibodies with anti-tumor activity, might contribute to the response to imatinib treatment. As in multivariate analysis bone marrow CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ cells and stromal-derived factor-1 and B-lymphocyte-activating factor levels were significantly related to cytogenetical and molecular changes, they might contribute to the definition of the pharmacological response.

  14. The glycoprotein isolated from vesicular stomatitis virus is mitogenic for mouse B lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    The glycoprotein (G protein) of VSV was purified from the intact virion by Triton X-100 extraction. The isolated G protein has been shown to be a T cell-independent, B lymphocyte mitogen and polyclonal activator. Neither G protein nor the intact virion are stimulatory for murine T lymphocytes. The greater the density of G protein in lipid vesicles or the degree of aggregation of isolated G protein, the more highly stimulatory it is for murine splenocytes. As G protein is spread out in artific...

  15. [Comparative characteristics of 2 methods of separating mouse T- and B-lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudin, V M; Fedorovskaia, M I

    1975-10-01

    The results of separation of T- and B-cells of the C3H/Sn and AKR/j micr lymph nodes with AKR-anti-theta3H and C3H-thetaAKR isosera and cellular immunosorbents containing the antigen-antibody complexes were analyzed in this work. The strain differences in the theta+-cells (T-lymphocytes) level were demonstrated in the untreated mice of the noted strains. Populations enriched by B-lymphocytes under different methods of separation differed somewhat in composition. The cellular immunosorption had many advantages in comparison with the cytotoxic-immune sera used for the T- and B-cell separation.

  16. Probing human response times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Anders

    2004-07-01

    In a recent preprint (Dialog in e-mail traffic, preprint cond-mat/0304433), the temporal dynamics of an e-mail network has been investigated by Eckmann, Moses and Sergi. Specifically, the time period between an e-mail message and its reply were recorded. It will be shown here that their data agrees quantitatively with the frame work proposed to explain a recent experiment on the response of “internauts” to a news publication (Physica A 296(3-4) (2001) 539) despite differences in communication channels, topics, time-scale and socio-economic characteristics of the two population. This suggest a generalized response time distribution ∼ t-1 for human populations in the absence of deadlines with important implications for psychological and social studies as well the study of dynamical networks.

  17. An optimized B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) antagonist peptide inhibits the interaction of BLyS with BCMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Feng; Wu, Zhen; Feng, Jian-Nan; Li, Yan; Shen, Bei-Fen; Sun, Jian

    2013-04-01

    B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) antagonists are new therapeutic reagents for treating the autoimmune diseases. Peptibodies can inhibit the bioactivity of BLyS, the same as other BLyS antagonists: decoyed BLyS receptors and anti-BLyS antibodies. In this study, a new optimized BLyS antagonist peptide was designed according to our previous work by the computer-aided homology modeling. Competitive ELISA showed that the peptide at 100 μg/ml could inhibit 54 % of the BCMA-Fc binding to BLyS. To maintain its stability and spatial conformation, the peptide was fused to human IgG1 Fc to form a peptide-Fc fusion protein-a novel peptibody by gene engineering. ELISA indicated that the peptibody could bind with BLyS in dosage-dependent manner as BCMA-Fc did. This study highlights the possibility of designing and optimizing BLyS antagonist peptides with high biopotency by the computer-aided design. Thus, these peptides could neutralize BLyS activity and be potential antagonists to treat autoimmune diseases related with BLyS overexpression.

  18. Change of T, B lymphocyte subsets and Th1/Th2 indexes of patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Hua Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze and investigate the change state of T, B lymphocyte subsets and Th1/Th2 indexes of patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion. Methods: A total of 92 patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion in our hospital from June 2013 to July 2015 were selected as the observation group and 92 women with health delivery history at the same time were selected as the control group,then the peripheral blood T, B lymphocyte subsets and Th1/Th2 indexes of two groups were detected and compared and the peripheral blood T, B lymphocyte subsets and Th1/Th2 indexes of patients with different gestational age at abortion and abortion times were compared too. Results:The peripheral blood T, B lymphocyte subsets and Th1/Th2 indexes of observation group and control group all had obvious differences,and those blood indexes levels' differences of patients with different gestational age at abortion and abortion times were obvious too, all P<0.05 and the differences were significant. Conclusions: The T, B lymphocyte subsets and Th1/Th2 indexes of patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion show abnormal state and the differences of detection results of patients with different gestational age at abortion and abortion times are relatively obvious,so those indexes should be monitored and improved intentinonally.

  19. B-Lymphocytes from a Population of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Unaffected Siblings Exhibit Hypersensitivity to Thimerosal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn A. Sharpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of thimerosal containing vaccines in the development of autism spectrum disorder (ASD has been an area of intense debate, as has the presence of mercury dental amalgams and fish ingestion by pregnant mothers. We studied the effects of thimerosal on cell proliferation and mitochondrial function from B-lymphocytes taken from individuals with autism, their nonautistic twins, and their nontwin siblings. Eleven families were examined and compared to matched controls. B-cells were grown with increasing levels of thimerosal, and various assays (LDH, XTT, DCFH, etc. were performed to examine the effects on cellular proliferation and mitochondrial function. A subpopulation of eight individuals (4 ASD, 2 twins, and 2 siblings from four of the families showed thimerosal hypersensitivity, whereas none of the control individuals displayed this response. The thimerosal concentration required to inhibit cell proliferation in these individuals was only 40% of controls. Cells hypersensitive to thimerosal also had higher levels of oxidative stress markers, protein carbonyls, and oxidant generation. This suggests certain individuals with a mild mitochondrial defect may be highly susceptible to mitochondrial specific toxins like the vaccine preservative thimerosal.

  20. A proteomic investigation of B lymphocytes in an autistic family: a pilot study of exposure to natural rubber latex (NRL) may lead to autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Zhao, Xin-liang; Ju, Weina; Zou, Xiao-bing; Huo, Li-rong; Yan, Wu; Zou, Jun-hua; Yan, Guo-di; Jenkins, Edmund C; Brown, W Ted; Zhong, Nanbert

    2011-03-01

    Autism is a multi-factorial neurodevelopmental disorder. We have investigated the molecular mechanism involved in a Chinese family with autism by a proteomic approach. Antibody chips containing 500 spots of human protein antibodies were used to screen for differentially expressed proteins in the peripheral B lymphocytes between autistic and non-autistic siblings in this family. Four proteins relevant to immuno-pathway, including IKKα that was up-regulated and Tyk2, EIF4G1 and PRKCI that were down-regulated, were identified differentially expressed in autistic versus non-autistic siblings. Western blot analysis and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction validated the differential expression of these four proteins. Based on the function of these differentially expressed proteins, relevant studies on immunoglobulin E (IgE) level, nuclear factor kappa B signaling activation and cell cycle were conducted in both autistic and non-autistic children of this family. Considering the fact that the family members were in close contact with natural rubber latex (NRL) and that IgE-mediated cross-reactions could be triggered by Hevea brasiliensis (Hev-b) proteins in NRL, we hypothesize that immune reactions triggered by close contact with NRL might influence the functions of B lymphocytes by altering expression of certain proteins identified in our experiments thus contributing to the occurrence of autism.

  1. Human sexual response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    The human sexual response to sexually arousing stimuli is a motivational incentive-based cycle comprising subjective experience and physiologic changes. Clinical and empirical data support a circular model of overlapping phases of variable order. Brain imaging data of sexual arousal identify areas of cerebral activation and inhibition reflecting a complex network of cognitive, motivational, emotional, and autonomic components. Psychologic and biologic factors influence the brain's appraisal and processing of sexual stimuli to allow or disallow subsequent arousal. The sexual and non-sexual outcomes influence motivation to future sexual intimacy. Variability is marked both between individuals and within a person's sexual life, influenced by multiple factors, including stage of life cycle, mental health, and relationship happiness. Neurologic disease can interrupt the cycle at many points: by limiting motivation, reducing ability to attend to and feel sexual stimuli, and accomplishing the movements needed to stimulate and experience intercourse. Impairments to genital congestion, penile erection, and orgasm may also occur. Disease-associated changes to the interpersonal relationship and self-image plus frequently comorbid depression will tend to lessen motivation and temper the brain's appraisal of sexual stimuli, so precluding arousal. Therapy begins by explaining the sexual response cycle, clarifying the points of interruption in the patient's own cycle so as to guide treatment.

  2. Localization of T and B Lymphocytes to the White Pulp of the Spleen is Independent of L-, E-, and P-Selectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell H. Grayson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available T and B cell interactions are thought to be of prime importance in the generation of a humoral immune response. These interactions are thought to take place in the secondary lymphoid organs. The largest of which is the spleen. While the pathways involved in lymphocyte migration into other secondary lymphoid organs have been unraveled, very little is understood about T and B cell migration to the spleen. We report that adoptively transferred T lymphocytes appear more rapidly within the lymphoid compartment of the spleen than do B lymphocytes. Indeed, half of the transferred T lymphocytes in the spleen appear within the white pulp by 1.4 hours. B lymphocytes take nearly 4.3 hours to achieve the same level of accumulation. In addition, T lymphocyte arrival is fucoidan sensitive, while B cells are not affected by this polysaccharide. Finally, we show that neither L-, E-, or P-selectin appears to play a significant role in the accumulation of lymphocytes in the white pulp.

  3. The loss of Gnai2 and Gnai3 in B cells eliminates B lymphocyte compartments and leads to a hyper-IgM like syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il-Young Hwang

    Full Text Available B lymphocytes are compartmentalized within lymphoid organs. The organization of these compartments depends upon signaling initiated by G-protein linked chemoattractant receptors. To address the importance of the G-proteins Gαi2 and Gαi3 in chemoattractant signaling we created mice lacking both proteins in their B lymphocytes. While bone marrow B cell development and egress is grossly intact; mucosal sites, splenic marginal zones, and lymph nodes essentially lack B cells. There is a partial block in splenic follicular B cell development and a 50-60% reduction in splenic B cells, yet normal numbers of splenic T cells. The absence of Gαi2 and Gαi3 in B cells profoundly disturbs the architecture of lymphoid organs with loss of B cell compartments in the spleen, thymus, lymph nodes, and gastrointestinal tract. This results in a severe disruption of B cell function and a hyper-IgM like syndrome. Beyond the pro-B cell stage, B cells are refractory to chemokine stimulation, and splenic B cells are poorly responsive to antigen receptor engagement. Gαi2 and Gαi3 are therefore critical for B cell chemoattractant receptor signaling and for normal B cell function. These mice provide a worst case scenario of the consequences of losing chemoattractant receptor signaling in B cells.

  4. Modulation of B lymphocyte function by an aqueous fraction of the ethanol extract of Cissampelos sympodialis Eichl (Menispermaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Alexandre-Moreira

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Cissampelos sympodialis Eichl species are used in folk medicine for the treatment of asthma, arthritis and rheumatism. In the present study, we investigated the immunomodulatory effect of an aqueous fraction of a 70% (v/v ethanol extract of C. sympodialis leaves on B lymphocyte function. The hydroalcoholic extract inhibited the in vitro proliferative response of resting B cells induced by LPS (IC50 = 17.2 µg/ml, anti-delta-dextran (IC50 = 13.9 µg/ml and anti-IgM (IC50 = 24.3 µg/ml but did not affect the anti-MHC class II antibody-stimulated proliferative response of B cell blasts obtained by stimulation with IL-4 and anti-IgM. Incubation with the hydroalcoholic extract used at 50 µg/ml induced a 700% increase in intracellular cAMP levels. IgM secretion by resting B cells (obtained from normal mice and polyclonally activated B cells (obtained from Trypanosoma cruzi-infected animals was inhibited by the hydroalcoholic extract. The latter were more sensitive to the hydroalcoholic extract since 6.5 µg/ml induced a 20% inhibition in the response of cells from normal mice while it inhibited the response of B cells from infected animals by 75%. The present data indicate that the alcoholic extract of C. sympodialis inhibited B cell function through an increase in intracellular cAMP levels. The finding that the hydroalcoholic extract inhibited immunoglobulin secretion suggests a therapeutic use for the extract from C. sympodialis in conditions associated with unregulated B cell function and enhanced immunoglobulin secretion. Finally, the inhibitory effect of the hydroalcoholic extract on B cells may indicate an anti-inflammatory effect of this extract.

  5. Deletion of Cmu genes in mouse B lymphocytes upon stimulation with LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch, A; Sablitzky, F

    1983-01-01

    Mouse B lymphocytes can be activated polyclonally by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to differentiate into plasmablasts. Within several days many cells perform immunoglobulin (Ig) class switching in vitro. We have purified LPS blasts expressing IgM or only IgG3 on the cell surface and analysed the DNA of these cells by Southern hybridisation blotting to detect rearrangement or deletion of CH genes. Quantitative evaluation of the Southern blots suggests that populations of surface IgG3+ (sIgG3+) cells from 6-day and sIgM+ cells from 8-day-old cultures contain only about half as many Cmu genes as spleen cells. Cmu deletion is nearly complete in populations of sIgG3+ cells from 9-day-old cultures. Therefore, upon stimulation with LPS, within a few days Cmu is deleted in most sIgG3+ cells from both chromosomes.

  6. Adrenal steroidogenesis after B lymphocyte depletion therapy in new-onset Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Simon H S; Mitchell, Anna L; Bennett, Stuart; King, Phil; Chandran, Sukesh; Nag, Sath; Chen, Shu; Smith, Bernard Rees; Isaacs, John D; Vaidya, Bijay

    2012-10-01

    A diagnosis of Addison's disease means lifelong dependence on daily glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid therapy and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality as well as a risk of unexpected adrenal crisis. The objective of the study was to determine whether immunomodulatory therapy at an early stage of autoimmune Addison's disease could lead to preservation or improvement in adrenal steroidogenesis. This was an open-label, pilot study of B lymphocyte depletion therapy in new-onset idiopathic primary adrenal failure. Doses of iv rituximab (1 g) were given on d 1 and 15, after pretreatment with 125 mg iv methylprednisolone. Six patients (aged 17-47 yr; four females) were treated within 4 wk of the first diagnosis of idiopathic primary adrenal failure. Dynamic testing of adrenal function was performed every 3 months for at least 12 months. Serum cortisol levels declined rapidly and were less than 100 nmol/liter (3.6 μg/dl) in all patients by 3 months after B lymphocyte depletion. Serum cortisol and aldosterone concentrations remained low in five of the six patients throughout the follow-up period. However, a single patient had sustained improvement in both serum cortisol [peak 434 nmol/liter (15.7 μg/dl)] and aldosterone [peak 434 pmol/liter (15.7 ng/dl)] secretion. This patient was able to discontinue steroid medications 15 months after therapy and remains well, with improving serum cortisol levels 27 months after therapy. New-onset autoimmune Addison's disease should be considered as a potentially reversible condition in some patients. Future studies of immunomodulation in autoimmune Addison's disease may be warranted.

  7. Circulating monocytes and B-lymphocytes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, Sven Magnus; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Background Individuals with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have altered number and distribution of retinal macrophages and show changes in circulating antibodies. We wanted to investigate the corresponding precursors, with subpopulations. We therefore measured monocyte and B-lymphocyte populations in individuals with neovascular AMD. Design This was an observational case–control study. Participants or samples A total of 31 individuals with neovascular AMD and 30 healthy age-matched controls were included. Methods Patients and controls were interviewed, and ophthalmological examination included visual acuity assessment using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) chart, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), slit-lamp examination and fundus photography. Moreover, venous blood was drawn and prepared for flow cytometry. Cells were gated and measured for surface markers. Main outcome measures Relative amounts of monocytes and B-lymphocytes with subsets, as well as selected surface markers, were measured. Results The two groups did not significantly differ in age, smoking history, body mass index, physical activity or C-reactive protein (CRP). Total monocytes (percentage of all leukocytes) were lower in the neovascular AMD group (median 5.5%) compared with the level in the control group (6.5%; P-value: 0.028). The percentage of intermediate monocytes positive for cluster of differentiation 11b (CD11b) was lower for AMD patients (99.4%) compared with 100% for the control group (P-value: 0.032). Conclusion We observed lower numbers of monocytes, which show a potentially impaired ability to migrate across the endothelial wall in patients with neovascular AMD. These subtle changes could potentially lead to an imbalance in the recruitment of macrophages into the retina during disease development. PMID:28176950

  8. Carbon nanotube-mediated delivery of nucleic acids does not result in non-specific activation of B lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Dong [Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Doughty, Cheryl A [Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Potocky, Terra B [Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Dufort, Fay J [Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Huang Zhongping [NanoLab, Incorporated, Newton, MA 02458 (United States); Blair, Derek [Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Kempa, Krzysztof [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Ren, Z F [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Chiles, Thomas C [Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)

    2007-09-12

    The efficient delivery of genes and proteins into primary mammalian cells and tissues has represented a formidable challenge. Recent advances in the research of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offer much promise for their use as delivery platforms into mammalian cells. Ideally, CNT-mediated applications should not result in cellular toxicity nor perturb cellular homeostasis (e.g., result in non-specific activation of primary cells). It is therefore critical to evaluate the impact of CNT exposure on the cellular metabolism, proliferation and survival of primary mammalian cells. We investigated the compatibility of a recently developed CNT-mediated delivery method, termed nanospearing, with primary ex vivo cultures of B lymphocytes. Several parameters were evaluated to assess the impact of CNTs on naive B lymphocytes, including cell survival, activation, proliferation and intracellular signal transduction. Our results indicate that nanospearing does not result in the activation of naive primary B lymphocytes nor alter survival in ex vivo cultures. Herein, B cells exposed to CNTs were capable of responding to extrinsic pro-survival signals such as interleukin-4 and signaling by the B-cell antigen receptor in a manner similar to that of B cells cultured in the absence of CNTs. Our study demonstrates the biocompatibility of the CNT-mediated nanospearing procedure with respect to primary B lymphocytes.

  9. Enteroantigen (eAg)-binding B lymphocytes in the mouse - phenotype, distribution, function and eAg-specific antibody secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venning, Freja Albjerg; Trempenau, Mette Louise; Schmidt, Esben

    2013-01-01

    Studies reporting beneficial effects of B lymphocytes in autoimmune diseases have been accumulating and a regulatory role for certain B cell subsets is hence getting more and more recognition. Recently, B cells were shown to exhibit a regulatory effect in a T cell transfer model of colitis. Here,...

  10. Circulating monocytes and B-lymphocytes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector SM

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sven Magnus Hector,1 Torben Lykke Sørensen1,2 1Clinical Eye Research Unit, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, 2Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Background: Individuals with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD have altered number and distribution of retinal macrophages and show changes in circulating antibodies. We wanted to investigate the corresponding precursors, with subpopulations. We therefore measured monocyte and B-lymphocyte populations in individuals with neovascular AMD.Design: This was an observational case–control study.Participants or samples: A total of 31 individuals with neovascular AMD and 30 healthy age-matched controls were included.Methods: Patients and controls were interviewed, and ophthalmological examination included visual acuity assessment using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS chart, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, slit-lamp examination and fundus photography. Moreover, venous blood was drawn and prepared for flow cytometry. Cells were gated and measured for surface markers.Main outcome measures: Relative amounts of monocytes and B-lymphocytes with subsets, as well as selected surface markers, were measured.Results: The two groups did not significantly differ in age, smoking history, body mass index, physical activity or C-reactive protein (CRP. Total monocytes (percentage of all leukocytes were lower in the neovascular AMD group (median 5.5% compared with the level in the control group (6.5%; P-value: 0.028. The percentage of intermediate monocytes positive for cluster of differentiation 11b (CD11b was lower for AMD patients (99.4% compared with 100% for the control group (P-value: 0.032.Conclusion: We observed lower numbers of monocytes, which show a potentially impaired ability to migrate across the endothelial wall in patients with neovascular AMD. These subtle changes could potentially lead to an

  11. The effect of feed supplementation with Zakarpacki zeolite (clinoptilolite) on percentages of T and B lymphocytes and cytokine concentrations in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Lukasz; Stepien-Pysniak, Dagmara; Gradzki, Zbigniew; Kapica, Malgorzata; Gacek, Agata

    2017-07-01

    The available literature lacks information on the effect of Zakarpacki zeolite (clinoptilolite) on the immune system of poultry. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of this zeolite on selected indicators of the immune response in poultry by evaluating the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD) surface molecules on T and B lymphocytes and the concentration of IL-2 and IL-10 in the blood. Ninety one-day-old Ross 308 broiler chicks were used in the study. The birds were divided into 3 groups of 30 each. The same basic diet was used in all groups, but groups II and III received a feed additive in the form of 2% and 3% zeolite. Blood samples were collected from all birds on the 40th day of observations. Weight gain in the birds in both experimental groups was significantly higher, and no clinical symptoms of disease were observed. The percentage of CD4+CD25+ T and B lymphocytes was higher in both groups receiving zeolite, but the percentage of CD8+CD25+ T lymphocytes was higher only in the group receiving 3% zeolite. There were no differences between the groups in the percentage of cells with CD3+ and MHC Class II expression. Higher serum concentrations of IL-2 and IL-10 were noted only in group III. The use of zeolites enhances antigen presentation and leads to increased Th1 and Th2 response. Excessive supply of zeolite in the feed leads to a local inflammatory response, which may cause damage to the intestinal barrier. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  12. Corruption of Human Follicular B-Lymphocyte Trafficking by a B-Cell Superantigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhis, Gwenoline; Viau, Muriel; Badr, Gamal; Richard, Yolande; Zouali, Moncef

    2012-01-01

    Protein A (SpA) of Staphylococcus aureus is known to target the paratope of immunoglobulins expressing VH3 genes, and to delete marginal zone B cells and B-1a in vivo. We have discovered that SpA endows S. aureus with the potential to subvert B-cell trafficking in the host. We found that SpA, whose Fc-binding site has been inactivated, binds essentially to naïve B cells and induces a long-lasting decrease in CXCR4 expression and in B-cell chemotaxis to CXCL12. Competition experiments indicated that SpA does not interfere with binding of CXCR4 ligands and does not directly bind to CXCR4. This conclusion is strongly supported by the inability of SpA to modulate clathrin-mediated CXCR4 internalization, which contrasts with the potent effect of anti-immunoglobin M (IgM) antibodies. Microscopy and biochemical experiments confirmed that SpA binds to the surface IgM/IgD complex and induces its clathrin-dependent internalization. Concomitantly, the SpA-induced signaling leads to protein kinase C–dependent CXCR4 downmodulation, suggesting that SpA impairs the recycling of CXCR4, a postclathrin process that leads to either degradation into lysozomes or de novo expression at the cell surface. In addition to providing novel insight into disruption of B-cell trafficking by an infectious agent, our findings may have therapeutic implications. Because CXCR4 has been associated with cancer metastasis and with certain autoimmune diseases, SpA behaves as an evolutionary tailored highly specific, chemokine receptor inhibitor that may have value in addition to conventional cytotoxic therapy in patients with various malignancies and immune-mediated diseases. PMID:22367177

  13. A complex relationship between TRAF3 and non-canonical NF-κB2 activation in B lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Wai Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The adaptor protein TRAF3 restrains BAFF receptor (BAFFR and CD40-mediated activation of the NF-κB2 pathway in B cells. Mice lacking TRAF3 specifically in B cells revealed the critical role of TRAF3 in restraining homeostatic B cell survival. Furthermore, loss- of-function mutations of the traf3 gene have been associated with human B cell malignancies, especially multiple myeloma (MM. It has been proposed that receptor-induced TRAF3 degradation leads to stabilization of the NF-B inducing kinase NIK, and subsequent NF-κB2 activation. However, it is unclear how receptor-mediated TRAF3 degradation or loss of function contributes to B cell-specific NF-κB2 activation. In the current study, we employed two complementary models to address this question. One utilized a mutant traf3 gene found in a human MM-derived cell line called LP1. The LP1 mutant TRAF3 protein lacks the TRAF-N and TRAF-C domains. Consistent with the paradigm described, expression of LP1 TRAF3 in B cells promoted higher basal levels of NF-κB2 activation compared to Wt TRAF3. However, LP1 did not associate with TRAF2, CD40, or BAFFR, and no LP1 degradation was observed following receptor engagement. Interestingly, LP1 showed enhanced NIK association. Thus, TRAF3 degradation becomes dispensable to activate NF-κB2 when it is unable to associate with TRAF2. In a second model, we examined several mutant forms of BAFFR that are unable to induce NF-κB2 activation in B cells. Signaling to B cells by each of these BAFFR mutants, however, induced levels of TRAF3 degradation similar to those induced by Wt BAFFR. Thus, in B cells, receptor-mediated TRAF3 degradation is not sufficient to promote NF-B2 activation. We thus conclude that there is not a simple linear relationship in B lymphocytes between relative levels of cellular TRAF3, induced TRAF3 degradation, NIK activation and NF-B2 activation.

  14. 骨髓间充质干细胞对异体外周血B淋巴细胞的免疫调节作用%The immunoregulatory effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on allogeneic peripheral B lymphocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武令启; 白海; 王存邦; 杨小亮; 赵强; 杨义武; 林梅

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the immunoregulatory effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on allogeneic peripheral B lymphocytes in vitro. Methods MSCs were isolated and cultured from bone marrow by gradient centrifugation. Mononuclear cells were isolated routinely from peripheral blood, then monocytes were eliminated by L-leucine methy ester method. Remained T lymphocytes were eliminated by AET-SRBC rosette method. The action of MSCs and its supernatant on B lymphocytes proliferation in the presence of anti-human IgM goat antibodies (anti-IgM) was investigated by MTT. The IgG, IgM in the supernatant were detected by ELISA. The percent of apoptosis B lymphocytes, co-cultured with MSCs for 24 or 48h, was assayed by FACS. Results MSCs and its supernatant inhibited B lymphocytes proliferation and Ig secretion. The inhibitory effect depended on the amount of MSCs and condition of its supernatant. The date of FACS indicated that the apoptosis ratio of B lymphocytes, co-cultured with MSCs for different times, were non-significant. The inhibitory effect of MSCs on B lymphocytes was temporary and reversible. Conclusion MSCs have immunoregulatory effects on B lymphocytes, and its mechanisms are complex, not only correlating with the concentration of MSCs but also the action between cells and the secretory cytokine of MSCs.%目的 探讨骨髓间充质干细胞(mesenchymal stem cells, MSC)在体外对异体外周血B淋巴细胞的免疫调节作用.方法 用密度梯度离心法从骨髓中分离、培养MSC,从外周血中分离单个核细胞,L-亮氨酸甲酯去除单核细胞,以2-氨乙基硫脲溴化物(AET)处理绵羊红细胞(SRBC)的花环形成法,去除T淋巴细胞获得纯化的B淋巴细胞.用羊抗人IgM单克隆抗体(anti-IgM)刺激与或未与MSC或其培养上清共培养3d的B淋巴细胞,应用MTT法测8淋巴细胞的增殖,ELISA法测培养上清中免疫球蛋白IgG、lgM的产生,应用流式细胞术分别检测与MSC共培养24、48h

  15. Transcompartmental inflammatory responses in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plovsing, Ronni R; Berg, Ronan M G; Evans, Kevin A;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcompartmental signaling during early inflammation may lead to propagation of disease to other organs. The time course and the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. We aimed at comparing acute transcompartmental inflammatory responses in humans following...... measured. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: IV endotoxin elicited a systemic inflammatory response with a time-dependent increase and peak in tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and leukocyte counts (all p ...-α, interleukin-6, and albumin (all p inflammatory response was observed after 2-4 hours, with no change in plasma tumor necrosis factor-α. CONCLUSIONS: Acute lung or systemic inflammation in humans is followed by a transcompartmental proinflammatory response, the degree and differential...

  16. Crosstalk between B lymphocytes, microbiota and the intestinal epithelium governs immunity versus metabolism in the gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulzhenko, Natalia; Morgun, Andrey; Hsiao, William; Battle, Michele; Yao, Michael; Gavrilova, Oksana; Orandle, Marlene; Mayer, Lloyd; Macpherson, Andrew J; McCoy, Kathy D; Fraser-Liggett, Claire; Matzinger, Polly

    2014-01-01

    Using a systems biology approach, we discovered and dissected a three-way interaction between the immune system, the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota. We found that, in the absence of B cells, or of IgA, and in the presence of the microbiota, the intestinal epithelium launches its own protective mechanisms, upregulating interferon-inducible immune response pathways and simultaneously repressing Gata4-related metabolic functions. This shift in intestinal function leads to lipid malabsorption and decreased deposition of body fat. Network analysis revealed the presence of two interconnected epithelial-cell gene networks, one governing lipid metabolism and another regulating immunity, that were inversely expressed. Gene expression patterns in gut biopsies from individuals with common variable immunodeficiency or with HIV that also have intestinal malabsorption were very similar to those of the B cell–deficient mice, providing a possible explanation for a longstanding enigmatic association between immunodeficiency and defective lipid absorption in humans. PMID:22101768

  17. DNA from protozoan parasites Babesia bovis, Trypanosoma cruzi, and T. brucei is mitogenic for B lymphocytes and stimulates macrophage expression of interleukin-12, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, L K; Kegerreis, K A; Suarez, C E; Roditi, I; Corral, R S; Bertot, G M; Norimine, J; Brown, W C

    2001-04-01

    The activation of innate immune responses by genomic DNA from bacteria and several nonvertebrate organisms represents a novel mechanism of pathogen recognition. We recently demonstrated the CpG-dependent mitogenic activity of DNA from the protozoan parasite Babesia bovis for bovine B lymphocytes (W. C. Brown, D. M. Estes, S. E. Chantler, K. A. Kegerreis, and C. E. Suarez, Infect. Immun. 66:5423-5432, 1998). However, activation of macrophages by DNA from protozoan parasites has not been demonstrated. The present study was therefore conducted to determine whether DNA from the protozan parasites B. bovis, Trypanosoma cruzi, and T. brucei activates macrophages to secrete inflammatory mediators associated with protective immunity. DNA from Escherichia coli and all three parasites stimulated B-lymphocyte proliferation and increased macrophage production of interleukin-12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and nitric oxide (NO). Regulation of IL-12 and NO production occurred at the level of transcription. The amounts of IL-12, TNF-alpha, and NO induced by E. coli and protozoal DNA were strongly correlated (r2 > 0.9) with the frequency of CG dinucleotides in the genome, and immunostimulation by DNA occurred in the order E. coli > or = T. cruzi > T. brucei > B. bovis. Induction of inflammatory mediators by E. coli, T. brucei, and B. bovis DNA was dependent on the presence of unmethylated CpG dinucleotides. However, at high concentrations, E. coli and T. cruzi DNA-mediated macrophage activation was not inhibited following methylation. The recognition of protozoal DNA by B lymphocytes and macrophages may provide an important innate defense mechanism to control parasite replication and promote persistent infection.

  18. Protein kinase C-associated kinase is not required for the development of peripheral B lymphocyte populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Stewart T; Cariappa, Annaiah; Liu, Haoyuan; Boboila, Cristian; Shi, Hai Ning; Holland, Pamela M; Peschon, Jacques J; Pillai, Shiv

    2006-04-01

    Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK; DIK/RIP4) is an ankyrin-repeat containing serine/threonine receptor-interacting protein (RIP)-family kinase that can activate NFkappaB, and is required for keratinocyte development. In earlier studies, the expression of a catalytically inactive mutant of PKK in the B cell lineage resulted in a marked decrease in peripheral B cells in the spleen and a severe reduction of B-1 B cells. Here we explore the consequences of a null mutation in PKK with respect to the generation of peripheral B cell lineages and the activation of NFkappaB. We show that PKK is not required for the production of B cells in the bone marrow or for the development and maintenance of all mature B lymphocyte populations. We also show that PKK is not required for the activation of NFkappaB downstream of the BCR, CD40, or TLR-4 in B cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the loss of this RIP-family kinase does not compromise B lymphocyte development and maintenance, but leaves open the possibility that PKK may have a redundant role in these processes.

  19. Accumulation of CD5(+)CD19(+) B lymphocytes expressing PD-1 and PD-1L in hypertrophied pharyngeal tonsils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlasiuk, Paulina; Niedzielski, Artur; Skorka, Katarzyna; Karczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Zaleska, Joanna; Zajac, Malgorzata; Putowski, Maciej; Pac-Kozuchowska, Elzbieta; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof

    2016-11-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is one of the most important inhibitory co-receptors expressed predominantly on activated T and B lymphocytes whose expression could be sustained by permanent antigenic stimulation accompanying chronic or recurrent tonsillitis. The expression of PD-1 and PD-1L was analyzed using flow cytometry on hypertrophied tonsils collected from 57 children. We observed high expression of PD-1 and PD-1L on certain lymphocytes subpopulations of hypertrophied tonsils; among T cells, the expression of PD-1 on protein level was higher on CD4(+) cells (70.3 %) than on CD8(+) cells (35 %). Interestingly, a limited expression of PD-1 was observed on CD19(+) B lymphocytes (6.5 %), while CD5(+)CD19(+) B cells overexpressed PD-1 (52.5 %). Moreover, the expression of PD-1L was also higher on CD5(+)CD19(+) B cells (16.5 %) than on CD19(+) B cells (3.5 %) and on CD4(+) T cells (20 %) than on CD8(+) T cells (10 %). PD-1 and PD-1L expressions correlated only on CD5(+)CD19(+) cells. In conclusion, high expression of PD-1 and PD-1L on T and B cells could represent hallmark of immune system adaptation to chronic antigenic exposition in patients with tonsillitis.

  20. Anti-B lymphocyte immunotherapy is associated with improvement of periodontal status in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coat, Juliette; Demoersman, Julien; Beuzit, Sébastien; Cornec, Divi; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Saraux, Alain; Pers, Jacques-Olivier

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis present many similar features. The benefits of anti-B lymphocyte therapy (rituximab) on reducing tissue resorption in RA prompted us to assess its potential efficacy on the periodontal status of patients with RA treated with rituximab. Periodontal status was assessed in 21 subjects with RA, divided into two groups: Group I consisted in 11 subjects assessed before their first infusion of rituximab and again 6 months later. Five of them were also assessed for up to 4 years after their first rituximab infusion. The 10 subjects in group II had received more than two courses of two rituximab infusions at the time of periodontal assessment. Pocket depth and attachment loss were significantly decreased 6 months after treatment with rituximab in group I. The periodontal status of the five subjects from group I followed for up to 48 months after rituximab treatment was improved irrespective of the clinical parameter observed. Patients from group II had a better periodontal status than patients from group I before treatment with rituximab. Anti-B lymphocyte therapy could be beneficial to improve periodontitis suggesting a major role of B cells in this disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Costimulation of resting B lymphocytes alters the IL-4-activated IRS2 signaling pathway in a STAT6 independent manner: implications for cell survival and proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    IL-4 is an important B cell survival and growth factor.IL-4 induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS2 in resting B lymphocytes and in LPS- or CD40L-activated blasts.Phosphorylated IRS2 coprecipitated with the p85 subunit of PI 3' kinase in both resting and activated cells.By contrast,association of phosphorylated IRS2 with GRB2 was not detected in resting B cells after IL-4 treatment although both proteins were expressed.However,IL-4 induced association of IRS2 with GRB2 in B cell blasts.The pattern of IL-4-induced recruitment of p85 and GRB2 to IRS2 observed in B cells derived from STAT6 null mice was identical to that observed for normal mice.While IL-4 alone does not induce activation of MEK,a MEK1 inhibitor suppressed the IL-4-induced proliferative response of LPS-activated B cell blasts.These results demonstrate that costimulation of splenic B cells alters IL-4-induced signal transduction independent of STAT6 leading to proliferation.Furthermore,proliferation induced by IL-4 in LPS-activated blasts is dependent upon the MAP kinase pathway.

  2. Human BLyS facilitates engraftment of human PBL derived B cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelyn R Schmidt

    Full Text Available The production of fully immunologically competent humanized mice engrafted with peripheral lymphocyte populations provides a model for in vivo testing of new vaccines, the durability of immunological memory and cancer therapies. This approach is limited, however, by the failure to efficiently engraft human B lymphocytes in immunodeficient mice. We hypothesized that this deficiency was due to the failure of the murine microenvironment to support human B cell survival. We report that while the human B lymphocyte survival factor, B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS/BAFF enhances the survival of human B cells ex vivo, murine BLyS has no such protective effect. Although human B cells bound both human and murine BLyS, nuclear accumulation of NF-kappaB p52, an indication of the induction of a protective anti-apoptotic response, following stimulation with human BLyS was more robust than that induced with murine BLyS suggesting a fundamental disparity in BLyS receptor signaling. Efficient engraftment of both human B and T lymphocytes in NOD rag1(-/- Prf1(-/- immunodeficient mice treated with recombinant human BLyS is observed after adoptive transfer of human PBL relative to PBS treated controls. Human BLyS treated recipients had on average 40-fold higher levels of serum Ig than controls and mounted a de novo antibody response to the thymus-independent antigens in pneumovax vaccine. The data indicate that production of fully immunologically competent humanized mice from PBL can be markedly facilitated by providing human BLyS.

  3. Regulation of Mitochondria Function by TRAF3 in B Lymphocytes and B Cell Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    rich region (PRR), several TRAF-interacting motifs, and a C-terminal transmem- brane domain, which anchors the protein on the outer membranes of...signaling complexes at mitochondrial outer membranes [123,124,128,129]. These signalingy cytokines TRAF4 6 MAPKs AP-1 ARD9 MDP MAVS TRAF3? Viral...2 FUBP2_HUMAN 3 7.5 No 82 Q9P0L0 Vesicle -associated membrane protein-associated protein A VAPA_HUMAN 3 6 No 83 Q15181 Inorganic pyrophosphatase

  4. Fetal Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Fails to Fully Regenerate the B-Lymphocyte Compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Waters, Jeffrey; Phillips, Megan; Yamamoto, Ryo; Long, Brian R; Yang, Yang; Gerstein, Rachel; Stoddart, Cheryl A; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2016-01-12

    B cells are key components of cellular and humoral immunity and, like all lymphocytes, are thought to originate and renew from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, our recent single-HSC transfer studies demonstrate that adult bone marrow HSCs do not regenerate B-1a, a subset of tissue B cells required for protection against pneumonia, influenza, and other infections. Since B-1a are regenerated by transfers of fetal liver, the question arises as to whether B-1a derive from fetal, but not adult, HSCs. Here we show that, similar to adult HSCs, fetal HSCs selectively fail to regenerate B-1a. We also show that, in humanized mice, human fetal liver regenerates tissue B cells that are phenotypically similar to murine B-1a, raising the question of whether human HSC transplantation, the mainstay of such models, is sufficient to regenerate human B-1a. Thus, our studies overtly challenge the current paradigm that HSCs give rise to all components of the immune system.

  5. The rationale for B lymphocyte depletion in Graves' disease. Monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody therapy as a novel treatment option

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus H; Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2006-01-01

    We have reviewed the immunology of thyroid autoimmunity with special reference to the importance of B lymphocytes (B cells) in thyroidal and extrathyroidal Graves' disease (GD), thus providing a framework for the hypothesis that B cell depletion may be beneficial in GD. Additionally, after review...

  6. Ellagic acid, a polyphenolic compound, selectively induces ROS-mediated apoptosis in cancerous B-lymphocytes of CLL patients by directly targeting mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Ahmad; Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi; Sadeghi, Leila; Mohseni, Alireza; Seydi, Enayatollah; Pirahmadi, Nahal; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effects ofellagic acid (EA) on the cytotoxicity, B-lymphocytes isolated from CLL patients and healthy individuals. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the percentage of apoptosis versus necrosis, intracellular active oxygen radicals (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the caspase-3 activity and then mitochondria were isolated from both groups B-lymphocytes and parameters of mitochondrial toxicity was investigated. Based on our results EA decreased the percentage of viable cells and induced apoptosis. EA increased ROS formation, mitochondria swelling, MMP decrease and cytochrome c release in mitochondria isolated from CLL BUT NOT healthy B-lymphocytes while pre-treatment with cyclosporine A and Butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT) prevented these effects. Our results suggest that EA can act as an anti cancer candidate by directly and selectively targeting mitochondria could induce apoptosis through mitochondria pathway with increasing ROS production which finally ends in cytochrome c release, caspase 3 activation and apoptosis in cancerous B-lymphocytes isolated from CLL patients. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. B Lymphocyte Subpopulation Defined by a Rat Monoclonal Antibody, 14G8

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    Bethesda. MO). Proprtis an exresion f mmbrae atigns (, 2 In The goat anti-p antiserum from which the specifically purified antibodies and xpresio of embane...cell * Independent responses in B-cell defective CsA/N mice to Brucella abortus cycle by ProPiumn iodide staining. J. Cell. Bil. 66:188. and to TNP

  8. Gpr97 is essential for the follicular versus marginal zone B-lymphocyte fate decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J-J; Zhang, L-L; Zhang, Hong-x; Shen, C-L; Lu, S-y; Kuang, Y; Wan, Y-h; Wang, W-g; Yan, H-m; Dang, S-y; Fei, J; Jin, X-l; Wang, Z-g

    2013-10-10

    Gpr97 is an orphan adhesion GPCR and is highly conserved among species. Up to now, its physiological function remains largely unknown. Here, we show that Gpr97 deficiency results in an extensive reduction in B220(+) lymphocytes in mice. More intensive analyses reveal an expanded marginal zone but a decreased follicular B-cell population in Gpr97(-/-)spleen, which displays disorganized architecture characterized by diffuse, irregular B-cell areas and the absence of discrete perifollicular marginal and mantle zones. In vivo functional studies reveal that the mutant mice could generate antibody responses to T cell-dependent and independent antigens, albeit enhanced response to the former and weakened response to the latter. By screening for the molecular events involved in the observed phenotypes, we found that lambda 5 expression is downregulated and its upstream inhibitor Aiolos is increased in the spleen of mutant mice, accompanied by significantly enhanced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of cAMP response element-binding protein. Interestingly, increased constitutive Nf-κb p50/p65 expression and activity were observed in Gpr97(-/-) spleen, implicating a crucial role of Gpr97 in regulating Nf-κb activity. These findings uncover a novel biological function of Gpr97 in regulating B-cell development, implying Gpr97 as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of immunological disorders.

  9. Primary B Lymphocytes Infected with Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Can Be Expanded In Vitro and Are Recognized by LANA-Specific CD4+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Samantha M.; Sabbah, Shereen; Brulois, Kevin F.; Jung, Jae U.; Bell, Andrew I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has tropism for B lymphocytes, in which it establishes latency, and can also cause lymphoproliferative disorders of these cells manifesting as primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). T cell immunity is vital for the control of KSHV infection and disease; however, few models of B lymphocyte infection exist to study immune recognition of such cells. Here, we developed a model of B lymphocyte infection with KSHV in which infected tonsillar B lymphocytes were expanded by providing mitogenic stimuli and then challenged with KSHV-specific CD4+ T cells. The infected cells expressed viral proteins found in PELs, namely, LANA and viral IRF3 (vIRF3), albeit at lower levels, with similar patterns of gene expression for the major latency, viral interleukin 6 (vIL-6), and vIRF3 transcripts. Despite low-level expression of open reading frame 50 (ORF50), transcripts for the immune evasion genes K3 and K5 were detected, with some downregulation of cell surface-expressed CD86 and ICAM. The vast majority of infected lymphocytes expressed IgM heavy chains with Igλ light chains, recapitulating the features seen in infected cells in MCD. We assessed the ability of the infected lymphocytes to be targeted by a panel of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-matched CD4+ T cells and found that LANA-specific T cells restricted to different epitopes recognized these infected cells. Given that at least some KSHV latent antigens are thought to be poor targets for CD8+ T cells, we suggest that CD4+ T cells are potentially important effectors for the in vivo control of KSHV-infected B lymphocytes. IMPORTANCE KSHV establishes a latent reservoir within B lymphocytes, but few models exist to study KSHV-infected B cells other than the transformed PEL cell lines, which have likely accrued mutations during the transformation process. We developed a model of KSHV-infected primary B lymphocytes that

  10. Triptolide inhibits proliferation of Epstein–Barr virus-positive B lymphocytes by down-regulating expression of a viral protein LMP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Heng [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Guo, Wei [Department of Pathology and Physiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Long, Cong; Wang, Huan; Wang, Jingchao [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Sun, Xiaoping, E-mail: xsun6@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • Triptolide inhibits proliferation of EBV-positive lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. • Triptolide reduces expression of LMP1 by decreasing its transcription level. • Triptolide inhibits ED-L1 promoter activity. - Abstract: Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infects various types of cells and mainly establishes latent infection in B lymphocytes. The viral latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) plays important roles in transformation and proliferation of B lymphocytes infected with EBV. Triptolide is a compound of Tripterygium extracts, showing anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and anti-cancer activities. In this study, it is determined whether triptolide inhibits proliferation of Epstein–Barr virus-positive B lymphocytes. The CCK-8 assays were performed to examine cell viabilities of EBV-positive B95-8 and P3HR-1 cells treated by triptolide. The mRNA and protein levels of LMP1 were examined by real time-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The activities of two LMP1 promoters (ED-L1 and TR-L1) were determined by Dual luciferase reportor assay. The results showed that triptolide inhibited the cell viability of EBV-positive B lymphocytes, and the over-expression of LMP1 attenuated this inhibitory effect. Triptolide decreased the LMP1 expression and transcriptional levels in EBV-positive B cells. The activity of LMP1 promoter ED-L1 in type III latent infection was strongly suppressed by triptolide treatment. In addition, triptolide strongly reduced growth of B95-8 induced B lymphoma in BALB/c nude mice. These results suggest that triptolide decreases proliferation of EBV-induced B lymphocytes possibly by a mechanism related to down-regulation of the LMP1 expression.

  11. Reactivation of persistent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes secretion of thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAbs) in EBV-infected B lymphocytes with TRAbs on their surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Keiko; Nakayama, Yuji; Higaki, Katsumi; Ochi, Marika; Kanai, Kyosuke; Matsushita, Michiko; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masako; Murakami, Ichiro; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Nanba, Eiji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous virus that infects most adults latently. It persists in B lymphocytes and reactivates occasionally. Graves' disease is an autoimmune hyperthyroidism caused by thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAbs). We have reported that Graves' disease patients and healthy controls have EBV-infected lymphocytes that have TRAbs on their surface (TRAb(+)EBV(+) cells) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). EBV reactivation is known to be associated with plasma cell differentiation and antibody production of B cells. In this study, we investigated whether TRAb(+)EBV(+) cells really produce TRAbs or not when persistent EBV is reactivated. We cultured PBMCs from 12 Graves' disease patients and 12 healthy controls for several days with cyclosporine A to expand the EBV-infected cell population, and then compared TRAb levels between EBV reactivation by 33 °C culture and EBV nonreactivation by 37 °C culture of PBMCs. Flow cytometry confirmed that all samples at day 0 (reactivation starting point) contained TRAb(+)EBV(+) cells. During 33 °C culture, EBV-reactivated cells with EBV-gp350/220 expression increased from about 1 to 4%. We quantified TRAb levels in culture fluids by radio-receptor assay, and detected an increased concentration for at least one sampling point at 33 °C (from days 0 to 12) for all patients and healthy controls. TRAb levels were significantly higher in supernatants of 33 °C culture than of 37 °C culture, and also significantly higher in supernatants from patients than those from controls. This study revealed TRAb production from TRAb(+)EBV(+) cells in response to reactivation induction of persistent EBV in different efficiencies between patients and controls.

  12. Zinc-finger protein ZFP318 is essential for expression of IgD, the alternatively spliced Igh product made by mature B lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Anselm; Short, Alanna; Miosge, Lisa A.; Bergmann, Hannes; Sontani, Yovina; Bertram, Edward M.; Whittle, Belinda; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Yoshida, Kaoru; Sjollema, Geoff; Field, Matthew A.; Andrews, T. Daniel; Hagiwara, Hiromi; Goodnow, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    IgD and IgM are produced by alternative splicing of long primary RNA transcripts from the Ig heavy chain (Igh) locus and serve as the receptors for antigen on naïve mature B lymphocytes. IgM is made selectively in immature B cells, whereas IgD is coexpressed with IgM when the cells mature into follicular or marginal zone B cells, but the transacting factors responsible for this regulated change in splicing have remained elusive. Here, we use a genetic screen in mice to identify ZFP318, a nuclear protein with two U1-type zinc fingers found in RNA-binding proteins and no known role in the immune system, as a critical factor for IgD expression. A point mutation in an evolutionarily conserved lysine-rich domain encoded by the alternatively spliced Zfp318 exon 10 abolished IgD expression on marginal zone B cells, decreased IgD on follicular B cells, and increased IgM, but only slightly decreased the percentage of B cells and did not decrease expression of other maturation markers CD21, CD23, or CD62L. A targeted Zfp318 null allele extinguished IgD expression on mature B cells and increased IgM. Zfp318 mRNA is developmentally regulated in parallel with IgD, with little in pro-B cells, moderate amounts in immature B cells, and high levels selectively in mature follicular B cells. These findings identify ZFP318 as a crucial factor regulating the expression of the two major antibody isotypes on the surface of most mature B cells. PMID:24616512

  13. Benefit from B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in chronic fatigue syndrome. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øystein Fluge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a disease of unknown aetiology. Major CFS symptom relief during cancer chemotherapy in a patient with synchronous CFS and lymphoma spurred a pilot study of B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab, which demonstrated significant clinical response in three CFS patients. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study (NCT00848692, 30 CFS patients were randomised to either Rituximab 500 mg/m(2 or saline, given twice two weeks apart, with follow-up for 12 months. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was not detected in any of the patients. The responses generally affected all CFS symptoms. Major or moderate overall response, defined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score during follow-up, was seen in 10 out of 15 patients (67% in the Rituximab group and in two out of 15 patients (13% in the Placebo group (p = 0.003. Mean response duration within the follow-up period for the 10 responders to Rituximab was 25 weeks (range 8-44. Four Rituximab patients had clinical response durations past the study period. General linear models for repeated measures of Fatigue scores during follow-up showed a significant interaction between time and intervention group (p = 0.018 for self-reported, and p = 0.024 for physician-assessed, with differences between the Rituximab and Placebo groups between 6-10 months after intervention. The primary end-point, defined as effect on self-reported Fatigue score 3 months after intervention, was negative. There were no serious adverse events. Two patients in the Rituximab group with pre-existing psoriasis experienced moderate psoriasis worsening. CONCLUSION: The delayed responses starting from 2-7 months after Rituximab treatment, in spite of rapid B-cell depletion, suggests that CFS is an autoimmune disease and may be consistent with the gradual elimination of autoantibodies preceding

  14. Regulatory B lymphocyte functions should be considered in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Audrey; Renaudineau, Yves; Bagacean, Cristina; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe; Bordron, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by an abnormal expansion of mature B cells in the bone marrow and their accumulation in blood and secondary lymphoid organs. Tumor CLL cells share expression of various surface molecules with many subsets of B cells and have several common characteristics with regulatory B cells (B regs). However, the identification of B regs and their role in CLL remain elusive. The aim of this review is to summarize recent works regarding the regulatory and phenotypic characteristic of B regs and their associated effects on the immune system. It is also meant to highlight their potential importance with regards to the immunotherapeutic response.

  15. Mutations, kataegis, and translocations in B lymphocytes: towards a mechanistic understanding of AID promiscuous activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas, Rafael; Basu, Uttiya; Yewdell, William T.; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Robbiani, Davide F.; Di Noia, Javier M.

    2016-01-01

    As B cells engage in the immune response they express the deaminase AID to initiate the hypermutation and recombination of immunoglobulin genes, which are crucial processes for the efficient recognition and disposal of pathogens, However, AID must be tightly controlled in B cells to minimize off-targeting mutations, which can drive chromosomal translocations and the development of B cell malignancies, such as lymphomas. Recent genomic and biochemical analyses have begun to unravel the crucial question of how AID-mediated deamination is targeted outside immunoglobulin genes. Here, we discuss the transcriptional and topological features that are emerging as key drivers of AID promiscuous activity. PMID:26898111

  16. Enhanced Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase Activity in Peripheral Blood B Lymphocytes From Patients With Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneth, Odilia B J; Verstappen, Gwenny M P; Paulissen, Sandra M J; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W; Rip, Jasper; Lukkes, Melanie; van Hamburg, Jan Piet; Lubberts, Erik; Bootsma, Hendrika; Kroese, Frans G M; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2017-06-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) transmits crucial survival signals from the B cell receptor (BCR) in B cells. Pharmacologic BTK inhibition effectively diminishes disease symptoms in mouse models of autoimmunity; conversely, transgenic BTK overexpression induces systemic autoimmunity in mice. We undertook this study to investigate BTK expression and activity in human B cells in the context of autoimmune disease. Using intracellular flow cytometry, we quantified BTK expression and phosphorylation in subsets of peripheral blood B cells from 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 26 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS), and matched healthy controls. In circulating B cells, BTK protein expression levels correlated with BTK phosphorylation. BTK expression was up-regulated upon BCR stimulation in vitro and was significantly higher in CD27+ memory B cells than in CD27-IgD+ naive B cells. Importantly, BTK protein and phospho-BTK were significantly increased in B cells from anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive RA patients but not in B cells from ACPA-negative RA patients. BTK was increased both in naive B cells and in memory B cells and correlated with frequencies of circulating CCR6+ Th17 cells. Likewise, BTK protein was increased in B cells from a major fraction of patients with primary SS and correlated with serum rheumatoid factor levels and parotid gland T cell infiltration. Interestingly, targeting T cell activation in patients with primary SS using the CTLA-4Ig fusion protein abatacept restored BTK protein expression in B cells to normal levels. These data indicate that autoimmune disease in humans is characterized by enhanced BTK activity, which is linked not only to autoantibody formation but also to T cell activity. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Adaptive differentiation of H-2- and Igh-restricted B lymphocyte in tetraparental bone marrow chimera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H.; Bitoh, S.; Fujimoto, S.

    1987-01-15

    Immunization of BALB/c mice with MOPC-104E myeloma protein induced idiotype-specific enhancing B cells that acted on anti-dextran antibody producing B cells. The enhancing cells have the surface phenotype of B cells. With the use of several H-2 or Igh congenic mice, it was found that the cooperation among B cells was controlled by both the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and Igh. The capability to generate enhancing B cell activity was analyzed by using tetraparental bone marrow chimeras. (C57BL/6 X BALB/c)F1 mice, for example, were lethally irradiated and were reconstituted with C57BL/6 and BALB/c bone marrow cells. Nine to 12 wk after the reconstitution, the chimeras were immunized with the myeloma protein and were tested for their enhancing B cell activity. After the removal of C57BL/6 origin cells by treatment with anti-H-2b + complement, residual cells exhibited enhancing B cell activity on BALB.B, as well as BALB/c antidextran antibody response. This indicates that the generation of H-2-restricted, idiotype-specific enhancing B cell activity differentiated adaptively so as to recognize foreign MHC as self under chimeric conditions. On the other hand, splenic B cells treated with anti-H-2d + complement did not enhance the responses of BALB/c or BALB.B. Even in a chimeric environment, the B cells of C57BL/6 origin could not obtain the ability to generate enhancing B cell activity upon immunization of the idiotype. The results described here, taken in conjunction with our previous studies, suggest that the Ig heavy chain gene(s) predominantly control the Igh restriction properties of enhancing B cells, and the capability of MHC recognition by B cells is selected under chimeric conditions.

  18. Expression and purification of a soluble B lymphocyte stimulator mutant modified with the T-helper cell epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huiguang; Fu, Weiling; Li, Rongfen; Chen, Linfeng; Ji, Qing; Zhang, Li; Huang, Gang; He, Fengtian

    2006-10-01

    The DNA encoding soluble B lymphocyte stimulator (134-285 amino acids, sBLyS) mutant with residues 217-224 replaced by two glycines (named msBLyS) was constructed. The sequence encoding a foreign immunodominant T-helper epitope from ovalbumin (OVA) was then coupled to the 5'-end of msBLyS cDNA. After being sequenced, the recombinant DNA was ligated into the prokaryotic expression vector pQE-80L. The recombinant protein was produced in E. coli DH5alpha after induction with IPTG with the yield of more than 40% of total bacterial protein. The recombinant protein was purified with Ni-NTA chromatography and Sepharcryl S200 chromatography to a purity of more than 98%. The BALB/c mice, immunized with the recombinant protein, produced anti-BLyS antibodies at a high level, which indicated that the recombinant BLyS mutant modified with T-helper epitope elicited polyclonal antibodies with cross-reactivity with BLyS in vivo. This recombinant protein may therefore be used as immune inhibitor of BLyS for treating BLyS -associated autoimmune diseases.

  19. Decreased Frequency of Circulating Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein B Lymphocytes in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Elong Ngono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is no evidence for a role of anti-MOG antibodies in adult MS, no information on B lymphocytes with MOG-committed BCR is available. We report here on the frequency of anti-MOG B cells forming rosettes with polystyrene beads (BBR covalently bound to the extracellular domain of rhMOG in 38 relapsing-remitting patients (RRMS and 50 healthy individuals (HI. We show a substantial proportion of circulating anti-MOG-BBR in both RRMS and HI. Strikingly, MOG-specific B cells frequencies were lower in MS than in HI. Anti-MOG antibodies measured by a cell-based assay were not different between MS patients and controls, suggesting a specific alteration of anti-MOG B cells in MS. Although anti-MOG-BBR were higher in CNS fluid than in blood, no difference was observed between MS and controls. Lower frequency of MOG-BBR in MS was not explained by an increased apoptosis, but a trend for lower proliferative capacity was noted. Despite an efficient B cell transmigration across brain derived endothelial cells, total and anti-MOG B cells transmigration was similar between MS and HI. The striking alteration in MOG-specific B cells, independent of anti-MOG antibody titers, challenges our view on the role of MOG-specific B cells in MS.

  20. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaozhen; Collins, Christopher M; Mendel, Justin B; Iwakoshi, Neal N; Speck, Samuel H

    2009-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency) account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners) that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus reactivation by

  1. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Liang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus

  2. B lymphocyte stimulator levels in systemic lupus erythematosus: higher circulating levels in African American patients and increased production after influenza vaccination in patients with low baseline levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterhouse, Lauren L; Crowe, Sherry R; Niewold, Timothy B; Merrill, Joan T; Roberts, Virginia C; Dedeke, Amy B; Neas, Barbara R; Thompson, Linda F; Guthridge, Joel M; James, Judith A

    2011-12-01

    To examine the relationship between circulating B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) levels and humoral responses to influenza vaccination in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, as well as the effect of vaccination on BLyS levels, and to investigate clinical and serologic features of SLE that are associated with elevated BLyS levels. Clinical history, disease activity measurements, and blood specimens were collected from 60 SLE patients at baseline and after influenza vaccination. Sera were tested for BLyS levels, lupus-associated autoantibodies, serum interferon-α (IFNα) activity, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D), and humoral responses to influenza vaccination. Thirty percent of the SLE patients had elevated BLyS levels, with African American patients having higher BLyS levels than white patients (P = 0.006). Baseline BLyS levels in patients were not correlated with humoral responses to influenza vaccination (P = 0.863), and BLyS levels increased postvaccination only in the subset of patients with BLyS levels in the lowest quartile (P = 0.0003). Elevated BLyS levels were associated with increased disease activity, as measured by the SLE Disease Activity Index, physician's global assessment, and Systemic Lupus Activity Measure in white patients (P = 0.035, P = 0.016, and P = 0.018, respectively), but not in African Americans. Elevated BLyS levels were also associated with anti-nuclear RNP (P = 0.0003) and decreased 25(OH)D (P = 0.018). Serum IFNα activity was a significant predictor of elevated BLyS in a multivariate analysis (P = 0.002). Our findings indicate that African American patients with SLE have higher BLyS levels regardless of disease activity. Humoral response to influenza vaccination is not correlated with baseline BLyS levels in SLE patients, and only those patients with low baseline BLyS levels demonstrate an increased BLyS response after vaccination. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Comparative In Vitro Immune Stimulation Analysis of Primary Human B Cells and B Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Belle, Kristien; Herman, Jean; Boon, Louis; Waer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    B cell specific immunomodulatory drugs still remain an unmet medical need. Utilisation of validated simplified in vitro models would allow readily obtaining new insights in the complexity of B cell regulation. For this purpose we investigated which human B lymphocyte stimulation assays may be ideally suited to investigate new B lymphocyte immunosuppressants. Primary polyclonal human B cells underwent in vitro stimulation and their proliferation, production of immunoglobulins (Igs) and of cytokines, and expression of cell surface molecules were analysed using various stimuli. ODN2006, a toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist, was the most potent general B cell stimulus. Subsequently, we investigated on which human B cell lines ODN2006 evoked the broadest immunostimulatory effects. The Namalwa cell line proved to be the most responsive upon TLR9 stimulation and hence may serve as a relevant, homogeneous, and stable B cell model in an in vitro phenotypic assay for the discovery of new targets and inhibitors of the B cell activation processes. As for the read-out for such screening assay, it is proposed that the expression of activation and costimulatory surface markers reliably reflects B lymphocyte activation. PMID:28116319

  4. [B lymphocyte ontogeny].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandrán, Juan Carlos; Pelayo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    The B cell development from hematopoietic stem cells is a continuous and highly regulated process where multiple differentiation potentials are gradually lost while acquiring lineage specialized functions. At 50 years of the B cell discovery, the current knowledge of its early differentiation largely derive from the isolation and characterization of bone marrow early progenitor cells initiating the lymphoid program, and from the definition of transcriptional activity patterns that control cell fate decisions. Of particular relevance has been the intercommunication between B cell precursors and key components of the hematopoietic microenvironment, both for generation of novel models integrating all regulatory elements of this complex process, and for the understanding of this branch of the adaptive immune system in disease settings. This review provides an overview of the complex process of lymphoid differentiation: from the hierarchical organization and biological characteristics of primitive cells involved in its earliest stages, to the principles governing its interdependence with the hematopoietic microenvironment.

  5. CCR7 is mainly expressed in teleost gills, where it defines an IgD+IgM- B lymphocyte subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Rosario; Bromage, Erin; Abós, Beatriz; Pignatelli, Jaime; González Granja, Aitor; Luque, Alfonso; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-02-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR7, the receptor for both CCL19 and CCL21 chemokines, regulates the recruitment and clustering of circulating leukocytes to secondary lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. Even though teleost fish do not have either of these secondary lymphoid structures, we have recently reported a homolog to CCR7 in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the present work, we have studied the distribution of leukocytes bearing extracellular CCR7 in naive adult tissues by flow cytometry, observing that among the different leukocyte populations, the highest numbers of cells with membrane (mem)CCR7 were recorded in the gill (7.5 ± 2% CCR7(+) cells). In comparison, head kidney, spleen, thymus, intestine, and peripheral blood possessed CCR7(+) cells. When CCR7 was studied at early developmental stages, we detected a progressive increase in gene expression and protein CCR7 levels in the gills throughout development. Surprisingly, the majority of the CCR7(+) cells in the gills were not myeloid cells and did not express membrane CD8, IgM, nor IgT, but expressed IgD on the cell surface. In fact, most IgD(+) cells in the gills expressed CCR7. Intriguingly, the IgD(+)CCR7(+) population did not coexpress memIgM. Finally, when trout were bath challenged with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, the number of CCR7(+) cells significantly decreased in the gills while significantly increased in head kidney. These results provide evidence of the presence of a novel memIgD(+)memIgM(-) B lymphocyte subset in trout that expresses memCCR7 and responds to viral infections. Similarities with IgD(+)IgM(-) subsets in mammals are discussed.

  6. Multiparameter flow cytometry to detect hematogones and to assess B-lymphocyte clonality in bone marrow samples from patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Carulli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematogones are precursors of B-lymphocytes detected in small numbers in the bone marrow. Flow cytometry is the most useful tool to identify hematogones and, so far, 4-color methods have been published. In addition, flow cytometry is used in the diagnosis and follow-up of lymphomas. We developed a flow cytometric 7-color method to enumerate hematogones and to assess B-lymphocyte clonality for routine purposes. We evaluated 171 cases of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, either at diagnosis or in the course of follow-up. By our diagnostic method, which was carried out by the combination K/l/CD20/CD19/CD10/CD45/CD5, we were able to detect hematogones in 97.6% of samples and to distinguish normal B-lymphocytes, neoplastic lymphocytes and hematogones in a single step. The percentage of hematogones showed a significant inverse correlation with the degree of neoplastic infiltration and, when bone marrow samples not involved by disease were taken into consideration, resulted higher in patients during follow-up than in patients evaluated at diagnosis.

  7. Progression in the study on the phagocytosis function of B lymphocyte%B淋巴细胞吞噬功能研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高杨; 高继鑫; 刘玉峰

    2009-01-01

    以往的观点认为只有巨噬细胞、单核细胞、粒细胞和树突状细胞是专职的吞噬细胞,而B细胞作为免疫系统的抗体产生细胞,虽然能够产生特异的免疫球蛋白与抗原结合,却不具备吞噬能力.但最近的研究指出硬骨鱼类(彩虹鳟鱼)和两栖类(爪蟾)的B细胞可以吞噬颗粒抗原,首次揭示了进化上较为原始的B细胞同样具有吞噬能力.众多研究提示哺乳动物B-1 B细胞很可能具有吞噬能力.%It was accepted in the past that only these cells such as macrophage, histoleucocyte, granular cell and dendritic cell are phagocytes, while B lymphocyte has no ability to phagocytize, although it can generate specific immune globulin for antigen binding. However recent studies indicate that B lymphocyte of osteichthyes (trout) and amphibia (xenopus laevis) can phagocytize particulate antigen, these studies for the first time re-vealed that relatively archaic B lymphocyte has ability to phagocytize too. Numerous studies reveal that B-1 cell in mammalian probably has ability to phagocytize.

  8. [Immune response genes products in human physiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaitov, R M; Alekseev, L P

    2012-09-01

    Current data on physiological role of human immune response genes' proteomic products (antigens) are discussed. The antigens are specified by a very high level of diversity that mediates a wide specter ofphysiological functions. They actually provide integrity and biological stability of human as species. These data reveal new ideas on many pathological processes as well as drafts new approaches for prophylaxis and treatment.

  9. T-cell response in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Kemp, K; Ismail, A

    1999-01-01

    In the present communication we provide evidence for the existence of a Th1/Th2 dichotomy in the T-cell response to Leishmania antigens in human leishmaniasis. Our data suggest that the pattern of IL-4 and IFN-gamma response is polarised in these patients. Lymphocytes from individuals recovered......+. Furthermore, IL-10 plays an important role in the development of post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) from VL. The balance between the parasitic-specific T-cell response plays an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of Leishmania infections in humans....

  10. Effect of radiation on cell interactions with respect to the phenomenon of inactivation on non-syngeneic stem cells. A radiation-induced change in B-lymphocyte function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, R.V.; Dozmorov, I.M.; Lutsenko, G.V.; Nikolaeva, I.S.; Rudneva, T.B. (Institut Biofiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    A study was made of the changes in the mode of interaction between T- and B-lymphocytes of mouse lymph nodes with respect to the phenomenon of inactivation of non-syngeneic haemopoietic stem cells. It was shown that irradiation of B-lymphocytes with doses of 77.4-232.2 mC/kg changes their helper activity into a suppressor activity with regard to T-cell-killers having a low electrophoretic mobility.

  11. The rationale for B lymphocyte depletion in Graves' disease. Monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody therapy as a novel treatment option

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus H; Hasselbalch, Hans K;

    2006-01-01

    We have reviewed the immunology of thyroid autoimmunity with special reference to the importance of B lymphocytes (B cells) in thyroidal and extrathyroidal Graves' disease (GD), thus providing a framework for the hypothesis that B cell depletion may be beneficial in GD. Additionally, after...... reviewing the efficacy and safety in other autoimmune diseases, we propose that treatment with the B cell-depleting agent Rituximab may become a clinically relevant treatment option in selected cases of GD, particularly when complicated with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy....

  12. Human Metapneumovirus Antagonism of Innate Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyong Bao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is a recently identified RNA virus belonging to the Paramyxoviridae family, which includes several major human and animal pathogens. Epidemiological studies indicate that hMPV is a significant human respiratory pathogen with worldwide distribution. It is associated with respiratory illnesses in children, adults, and immunocompromised patients, ranging from upper respiratory tract infections to severe bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Interferon (IFN represents a major line of defense against virus infection, and in response, viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN production as well as IFN signaling. Although the strategies of IFN evasion are similar, the specific mechanisms by which paramyxoviruses inhibit IFN responses are quite diverse. In this review, we will present an overview of the strategies that hMPV uses to subvert cellular signaling in airway epithelial cells, the major target of infection, as well as in primary immune cells.

  13. Expression of TLR-7, MyD88, NF-kB and INF-α in B lymphocytes of Mayan Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo eValencia Pacheco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease involving multiple organs. It is currently accepted that several genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors contributing to its development. Innate immunity may have a great influence in autoimmunity through Toll-like receptors (TLR. TLR-7 recognizing single-strand RNA has been involved in SLE. Its activation induces intracellular signal with attraction of MyD88 and NF-kB, leading to IFN-α synthesis which correlate with disease activity. Objective: To assess the expression of TLR-7, MyD88 and NF-kB in mononuclear cells of Mayan women with SLE. Methods: One hundred patients with SLE and one hundred healthy controls, all them Mayan women, were included. TLR-7 was analyzed on B and T lymphocytes, and MyD88 and NF-kB only in B lymphocytes. Serum INF-α level was evaluated by ELISA. Results: Significant expression (p < 0.0001 of TLR-7 in B and T lymphocytes and serum IFN-α increased (p = 0.034 was observed in patients. MyD88 and NF-kB were also increased in B lymphocytes of patients. TLR-7 and NF-kB expression correlated, but no correlation with INF-α and disease activity was detected. Conclusion: Data support the role of TLR-7 and signal proteins in the pathogenesis of SLE in the Mayan population of Yucatán.

  14. Methylation changes of SIRT1, KLF4, DAPK1 and SPG20 in B-lymphocytes derived from follicular and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzi, Raffaele; Zanetti, Eleonora; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Tamagnini, Ione; Valli, Riccardo; Braglia, Luca; Merli, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    Diffuse large-B cell lymphomas (DLBCL) and follicular lymphomas (FL) are the most represented subtypes among mature B-cell neoplasms and originate from malignant B lymphocytes. Methylation represents one of the major epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is a class III lysine-deacetylase playing several functions and considered to be a context-dependent tumor promoter. We present the quantitative methylation, gene expression and tissue distribution of SIRT1 and some key mediators related to lymphoma pathogenesis in B lymphocytes purified from biopsies of follicular hyperplasias, FL and DLBCL. SIRT1 mRNA levels are higher in FL than follicular hyperplasias and DLBCL. B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) positively correlates with SIRT1. SIRT1 promoter shows a methylation decrease in the order: follicular hyperplasia - FL - DLBCL. Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), Death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) and Spastic Paraplegia 20 (SPG20) methylation increase significantly in FL and DLBCL compared to follicular hyperplasias. Gene expression of DAPK1 and SPG20 inversely correlates with their degree of methylation. Our findings evidence a positive correlation between SIRT1 and BCL6 expression increase in FL. SIRT1 methylation decreases in FL and DLBCL accordingly and this parallels the increase of KLF4, DAPK1 and SPG20 methylation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. 鸡盲肠扁桃体中B淋巴细胞的发育%Development of B lymphocytes in caecal tonsil of chicken

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨树宝; 张英楠; 高晶晶; 张延林; 杨丽华; 栾维民

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence,migration,tissue localization and quantity changes of IgM~+, IgG~+ and IgA~+ B lymphocytes in chicken caecal tonsil were examined using the IgM, IgG and IgA monoclonal antibodies by immunohistochemical method. The results showed that IgM~+ cells first appeared in caecal tonsil from em-bryonic on day 20, both IgG~+ and IgA~+ cells appeared at 1-day-old. B lymphocytes mainly distributed in lamina propria under epithelium before 4-day-old; B lymphocytes were mainly distributed in middle and su-perior part mucous layer, whereafter they uniformly distributed in the whole mucous layer. The germinal centers which were composed by B lymphocytes appeared in the lamina propria at 14-day-old, but clear-cut germinal centers resided in the middle and inferior part of lamina propria at 21-day-old,and there were nu-merous IgM~+, IgG~+ and IgA~+ cells in germinal centers. B lymphocytes kept increasing with the increase of age,and reached stable at 35-day-old. Among the three type cells,IgM~+ cells were the most and IgG~+ cells were the least all the time. The results confirmed that the humoral immune function of caecal tonsil in chicken strengthened quickly after hatching,and reached the mature level at 35-day-old.%通过免疫组织化学方法,应用IgM、IgG和IgA单克隆抗体研究了IgM~+、IgG~+和IgA~+B淋巴细胞在鸡盲肠扁桃体中的出现、迁移、组织定位分布以及数量变化规律等一系列发育过程.结果显示,IgM~+细胞在胚胎20日龄时开始出现,而IgG~+和IgA~+细胞均在雏鸡出壳后1日龄时出现.在定位分布变化上,4日龄之前,B淋巴细胞主要分布在黏膜上皮下固有层中;4~7日龄时,B淋巴细胞则主要分布在黏膜固有层的中上部区域,随后各日龄B淋巴细胞均匀地分布在黏膜固有层中;14日龄时,黏膜固有层中出现主要由B淋巴细胞组成的生发中心,21日龄时可见轮廓更清晰的生发中心存在于黏膜固有层中下部区域,并且生发中心

  16. Skeletal muscle responses to unweighting in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Gary A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of earth-based studies is presented emphasizing the data on muscular strength and size derived from experiments under simulated microgravity. The studies involve the elimination of weight-bearing responsibility of lower-limb human musculature to simulate the unweighting effects of space travel in the absence of exercise. Reference is given to bedrest and unilateral lower-limb suspension, both of which provide data that demonstrate the decreased strength of the knee extensors of 20-25 percent. The response is related to the decrease in cross-sectional area of the knee extensors which is a direct indication of muscle-fiber atrophy. Most of the effects of unweighting are associated with extensor muscles in the lower limbs and not with postural muscles. Unweighting is concluded to cause significant adaptations in the human neuromuscular system that require further investigation.

  17. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  18. Genomics based analysis of interactions between developing B-lymphocytes and stromal cells reveal complex interactions and two-way communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryder David

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of functional genomics has largely increased our understanding of cell biology and promises to help the development of systems biology needed to understand the complex order of events that regulates cellular differentiation in vivo. One model system clearly dependent on the integration of extra and intra cellular signals is the development of B-lymphocytes from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. This developmental pathway involves several defined differentiation stages associated with specific expression of genes including surface markers that can be used for the prospective isolation of the progenitor cells directly from the bone marrow to allow for ex vivo gene expression analysis. The developmental process can be simulated in vitro making it possible to dissect information about cell/cell communication as well as to address the relevance of communication pathways in a rather direct manner. Thus we believe that B-lymphocyte development represents a useful model system to take the first steps towards systems biology investigations in the bone marrow. Results In order to identify extra cellular signals that promote B lymphocyte development we created a database with approximately 400 receptor ligand pairs and software matching gene expression data from two cell populations to obtain information about possible communication pathways. Using this database and gene expression data from NIH3T3 cells (unable to support B cell development, OP-9 cells (strongly supportive of B cell development, pro-B and pre-B cells as well as mature peripheral B-lineage cells, we were able to identify a set of potential stage and stromal cell restricted communication pathways. Functional analysis of some of these potential ways of communication allowed us to identify BMP-4 as a potent stimulator of B-cell development in vitro. Further, the analysis suggested that there existed possibilities for progenitor B cells to send signals to

  19. Delegating responsibilities in human-robot teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKoven, Elyon A. M.; Bechtel, Bob; Zaientz, Jack; Lisse, Sean; Murphy, Anne K. G.

    2006-05-01

    Trends in combat technology research point to an increasing role for uninhabited vehicles and other robotic elements in modern warfare tactics. However, real-time control of multiple uninhabited battlefield robots and other semi-autonomous systems, in diverse fields of operation, is a difficult problem for modern warfighters that, while identified, has not been adequately addressed. Soar Technology is applying software agent technology to simplify demands on the human operator. Our goal is to build intelligent systems capable of finding the best balance of control between the human and autonomous system capabilities. We are developing an Intelligent Control Framework (ICF) from which to create agent-based systems that are able to dynamically delegate responsibilities across multiple robotic assets and the human operator. This paper describes proposed changes to our ICF architecture based on principles of human-machine teamwork derived from collaborative discourse theory. We outline the principles and the new architecture, and give examples of the benefits that can be realized from our approach.

  20. Expression of B7-related protein-1 on B lymphocytes in peripheral blood from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and its relationship with disease activity%SLE患者外周血B细胞B7RP-1的表达及其与疾病活动度的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国平; 潘海峰; 李文先; 张滔; 李静; 朱青青; 叶冬青

    2009-01-01

    Objeetive To explore the differentiation of B lymphocytes and expression of B7-related protein-1 (B7RP-1)on B lymphocytes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE).Methods Three-color immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometric assay were used to analyze the frequency of three types of B lymphocytes,I.e.,plasma cells,memory B lyphocytes and naive B lymphocytes,as well as the expression of B7RP-1 on these cells in peripheral blood from 23 patients with SLE and 16 normal human controls.Clinical data of these patients with SLE were collected.and SLE disease activi index(SLEDAI)was also evaluated.The relationship was assessed between the expression of B7RP-1 and SLEDAI.Results The frequency of plasma cells was highest in patients with active SLE.followed by patients with inactive SLE and normal human controls(P<0.01).A significant decrease was observed in the frequency of memory B lymphocytes in patients with active SLE compared with normal controls (P<0.01),but no significant difference was found between patients with inactive SLE and those with active SLE(P>0.05).Regarding the frequency of naive B lymphocytes,there was no significant difierence among the three groups.Increased frequency of plasma cells was also noted in patients with lupus nephritis(LN)compared with those without LN [(6.15±3.12)%vs(3.31±1.41)%,P<0.05 ],but no significant difierence was found with regard to the frequency of memory or naive B lymphocytes between these two groups.The expression rate Of B7RP-1 was significantly lower on total lymphocytes from patients with SLE than from normal human controls (46.51%vs 63.75%,P<0.05),which was the case with B7RP-1 on plasma cells,memory B lyphocytes and naive B lymphocytes (all P<0.01),whereas no significant difierence was found between patients with inactive SLE and active SLE or between patients with and without LN.In addition.no correlation was found between the expression of B7RP-1 and SLEDAI(r=0.035,P>0.05).Conclusions In

  1. Corporate Social Responsibility and Human Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2006-01-01

    rather than public regulation. The UN Global Compact and the UN Norms on human rights responsibilities for transnational and other corporations are discussed as examples of changes in international UN based regulation of corporations in relation to CSR topics, and as examples of network governance......Taking its point of departure in the aims of the United Nations, the article discusses challenges to international law making and the UN in the relatively immediate future in view of the increasing role and influence of corporations. This is done addressing challenges posed by globalisation...

  2. A Rare Case of Waldenström Macroglobulinemia/Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma with Light Chain Discrepancy between B Lymphocyte Population and Serum Paraprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Hur, Mina; Kim, Hanah; Moon, Hee-Won; Yun, Yeo-Min; Kim, Sung Yong; Lee, Mark Hong

    2015-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a subset of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma with bone marrow involvement, monotypic immunoglobulin (Ig) M and a light chain of neoplastic cells. A 68-year-old woman presented with fever, nausea, vomiting, and pancytopenia. Her serum albumin/globulin ratio was reversed, and monoclonal gammopathy of IgM, lambda type (23.20%, 1.58 g/dL) was detected. In her bone marrow, increased small lymphocytes were admixed with plasmacytoid lymphocytes and plasma cells. She was diagnosed as having lymphoplasmacytic variant of WM. Immunohistochemical stains and flow cytometic analysis revealed two distinct populations; monoclonal B cells (kappa+) and abnormal plasma cells (CD19-/CD56+/lambda+). She expired 19 days after admission due to septic shock. This is a rare case of WM exhibiting a light chain discrepancy between monoclonal B lymphocytes and paraprotein-secreting plasma cells. Light chain restriction may occur distinctly between lymphocyte and plasma cell populations in WM.

  3. Human response to vibration in residential environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, David C; Woodcock, James; Peris, Eulalia; Condie, Jenna; Sica, Gennaro; Moorhouse, Andrew T; Steele, Andy

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the main findings of a field survey conducted in the United Kingdom into the human response to vibration in residential environments. The main aim of this study was to derive exposure-response relationships for annoyance due to vibration from environmental sources. The sources of vibration considered in this paper are railway and construction activity. Annoyance data were collected using questionnaires conducted face-to-face with residents in their own homes. Questionnaires were completed with residents exposed to railway induced vibration (N = 931) and vibration from the construction of a light rail system (N = 350). Measurements of vibration were conducted at internal and external positions from which estimates of 24-h vibration exposure were derived for 1073 of the case studies. Sixty different vibration exposure descriptors along with 6 different frequency weightings were assessed as potential predictors of annoyance. Of the exposure descriptors considered, none were found to be a better predictor of annoyance than any other. However, use of relevant frequency weightings was found to improve correlation between vibration exposure and annoyance. A unified exposure-response relationship could not be derived due to differences in response to the two sources so separate relationships are presented for each source.

  4. Entropy Generation Analysis of Human Thermal Stress Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Boregowda, Satish C.; Choate, Robert E.; Rodney Handy

    2012-01-01

    The present study involves application of an open system entropy generation formulation to analyze human thermal stress responses. The time-series human thermal stress response data are obtained by conducting a simulation using a validated finite-element human thermal model (FEHTM). These simulated human thermal response data are used as an input to the entropy generation expression to obtain human entropy generation (HEG) values. The effects of variables such as air temperature, relative hum...

  5. Immunophenotypic lymphocyte profiles in human african trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Boda

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is a deadly vector-born disease caused by an extracellular parasite, the trypanosome. Little is known about the cellular immune responses elicited by this parasite in humans. We used multiparameter flow cytometry to characterize leukocyte immunophenotypes in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 33 HAT patients and 27 healthy controls identified during a screening campaign in Angola and Gabon. We evaluated the subsets and activation markers of B and T lymphocytes. Patients had a higher percentage of CD19+ B lymphocytes and activated B lymphocytes in the blood than did controls, but lacked activated CD4+ T lymphocytes (CD25+. Patients displayed no increase in the percentage of activated CD8+ T cells (HLA-DR+, CD69+ or CD25+, but memory CD8 T-cell levels (CD8+CD45RA2 were significantly lower in patients than in controls, as were effector CD8 T-cell levels (CD8+CD45RA+CD62L2. No relationship was found between these blood immunophenotypes and disease severity (stage 1 vs 2. However, CD19+ B-cell levels in the CSF increased with disease severity. The patterns of T and B cell activation in HAT patients suggest that immunomodulatory mechanisms may operate during infection. Determinations of CD19+ B-cell levels in the CSF could improve disease staging.

  6. Homeostatic 'bystander' proliferation of human peripheral blood B cells in response to polyclonal T-cell stimulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiulewicz, Aleksandra; Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Pietruczuk, Krzysztof; Frąckowiak, Joanna; Fulop, Tamas; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of maintenance of adequate numbers of B lymphocytes and of protective levels of immunoglobulins in the absence of antigenic (re)stimulation remain not fully understood. Meanwhile, our results presented here show that both peripheral blood naive and memory B cells can be activated strongly and non-specifically (in a mitogen-like fashion) in 5-day in vitro cultures of anti-CD3- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy people. This polyclonal, bystander activation of the B cells includes multiple divisions of most of them (assessed here by the flow cytometric technique of dividing cell tracking) and significant antibody [immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG] secretion. Observed proliferation of the CD19(+) B cells depends on contact with stimulated T helper (Th) cells (via CD40-CD40L interaction) and on the response of B cells to secreted interleukins IL-5, IL-10 and IL-4, and is correlated with the levels of these Th-derived molecules, while it does not involve the ligation of the BCR/CD19 complex. We suggest that the effect might reflect the situation occurring in vivo as the homeostatic proliferation of otherwise non-stimulated, peripheral B lymphocytes, providing an always ready pool for efficient antibody production to any new (or cognate) antigen challenge.

  7. Regulation of B lymphocytes and plasma cells by innate immune mechanisms and stromal cells in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseda, Damian; Bonami, Rachel H; Crofford, Leslie J

    2014-06-01

    B cells mediate multiple functions that influence immune and inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis. Production of a diverse array of autoantibodies can happen at different stages of the disease, and are important markers of disease outcome. In turn, the magnitude and quality of acquired humoral immune responses is strongly dependent on signals delivered by innate immune cells. Additionally, the milieu of cells and chemokines that constitute a niche for plasma cells rely strongly on signals provided by stromal cells at different anatomical locations and times. The chronic inflammatory state therefore importantly impacts the developing humoral immune response and its intensity and specificity. We focus this review on B cell biology and the role of the innate immune system in the development of autoimmunity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  9. B lymphocytes induce the formation of follicular dendritic cell clusters in a lymphotoxin alpha-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y X; Huang, G; Wang, Y; Chaplin, D D

    1998-04-06

    Lymphotoxin (LT)alpha is expressed by activated T cells, especially CD4(+) T helper type 1 cells, and by activated B and natural killer cells, but the functions of this molecule in vivo are incompletely defined. We have previously shown that follicular dendritic cell (FDC) clusters and germinal centers (GCs) are absent from the peripheral lymphoid tissues of LTalpha-deficient (LTalpha-/-) mice. LTalpha-/- mice produce high levels of antigen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)M, but very low levels of IgG after immunization with sheep red blood cells. We show here that LTalpha-expressing B cells are essential for the recovery of primary, secondary, and memory humoral immune responses in LTalpha-/- mice. It is not necessary for T cells to express LTalpha to support these immune functions. Importantly, LTalpha-expressing B cells alone are essential and sufficient for the formation of FDC clusters. Once these clusters are formed by LTalpha-expressing B cells, then LTalpha-deficient T cells can interact with B cells to generate GCs and productive class-switched antibody responses. Thus, B cells themselves provide an essential signal that induces and maintains the lymphoid microenvironment essential for GC formation and class-switched Ig responses.

  10. Effects of heat stress on peripheral T and B lymphocyte profiles and IgG and IgM serum levels in broiler chickens vaccinated for Newcastle disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Bruno Takashi Bueno; Calefi, Atilio Sersun; Costola-de-Souza, Carolina; Quinteiro-Filho, Wanderley Moreno; da Silva Fonseca, Juliana Garcia; de Paula, Viviane Ferraz; Palermo-Neto, João

    2015-10-01

    Multiple factors, such as environment, nutritional status, and disease, induce stress in animals during livestock production. It has been shown that poultry exposed to stressors for prolonged periods had decreases in their performance parameters, mortality and decreased host resistance to pathogenic agents. It seems that early age stress may have long-lasting impact and could possibly modify the expression of their genetic potential on growth performance and immunity. This study aimed to discuss the effects of early-age heat stress on the blood lymphocyte phenotypes (B and T lymphocytes) and plasma immunoglobulin levels (IgM and IgG) in chickens vaccinated against paramixovirus of the Newcastle (NC) disease (LaSota strain). For this purpose, 96 male chickens (Cobb) were divided into 4 groups: 1) control (C), 2) heat-stressed (HS), 3) control vaccinated (C/V), and 4) heat-stressed and Vaccinated (HS/V). The NC vaccine was administered twice on experimental day (ED) 7 and ED14, and the heat stress (38 ± 1°C) was applied from ED2 to ED6. The data showed that HS increased the corticosterone serum levels in the HS group compared with the control groups (C and C/V groups). At ED7, increased concentrations of IgM were observed in birds in the HS and HS/V groups compared with C and C/V animals; chickens from the HS/V group presented increased IgG levels compared with those in the birds of the C group. The heat stress shifted the immune cell profile from B-lymphocyte to a T-cytotoxic and T-helper lymphocyte profile, and this immune cell pattern persisted until the end of the study period. It was concluded that heat stress immunomodulated the immune function response of the chickens to the NC disease vaccine challenge. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Multiple dysfunctions in developmental and activational stages of T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes and monocytes in ARC and AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sei, Y; Tsang, P H; Petrella, R J; Bekesi, J G

    1987-11-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes from ARC and AIDS patients were examined before and after phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation by dual color flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies which identify developmental and activational stages of T lymphocytes, B cells and monocytes. There was a persistent elevation in the total number of circulating Ia+ lymphocytes with progressive selection for B1+ Ia+ lymphocytes and T suppressor cells and a concurrent reduction in the antigen-presenting monocytes. Following PHA stimulation there was a marked decrease in all subsets of Ia+ lymphocytes and monocytes. These results indicate (a) multicellular dysfunctions in the immunosurveillance mechanisms in AIDS, and (b) that many functional subsets of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were already activated and therefore poorly responsive to additional antigenic or mitogenic stimuli.

  12. Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κB Ligand (RANKL) Protein Expression by B Lymphocytes Contributes to Ovariectomy-induced Bone Loss*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Melda; Xiong, Jinhu; Chen, Xinrong; Thostenson, Jeff D.; Almeida, Maria; Manolagas, Stavros C.; O'Brien, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Production of the cytokine receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) by lymphocytes has been proposed as a mechanism by which sex steroid deficiency causes bone loss. However, there have been no studies that functionally link RANKL expression in lymphocytes with bone loss in this condition. Herein, we examined whether RANKL expression in either B or T lymphocytes contributes to ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice. Mice harboring a conditional RANKL allele were crossed with CD19-Cre or Lck-Cre mice to delete RANKL in B or T lymphocytes, respectively. Deletion of RANKL from either cell type had no impact on bone mass in estrogen-replete mice up to 7 months of age. However, mice lacking RANKL in B lymphocytes were partially protected from the bone loss caused by ovariectomy. This protection occurred in cancellous, but not cortical, bone and was associated with a failure to increase osteoclast numbers in the conditional knock-out mice. Deletion of RANKL from T lymphocytes had no impact on ovariectomy-induced bone loss. These results demonstrate that lymphocyte RANKL is not involved in basal bone remodeling, but B cell RANKL does contribute to the increase in osteoclasts and cancellous bone loss that occurs after loss of estrogen. PMID:22782898

  13. RUSSIAN EXPERIENCE WITH USING MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO B-LYMPHOCYTES (RITUXIMAB IN SYSTEMIC VASCULITIDES ASSOCIATED WITH NEUTROPHIL CYTOPLASMIC ANTIBODIES (PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF THE RUSSIAN REGISTER NORMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Beketova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, Russia registered officially the indications for the use of monoclonal antibodies to B-lymphocytes (rituximab, RTM in systemic vasculitides associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA-SV. This communication presents the preliminary results of the Russian register of the RTM application in autoimmune diseases (NORMA that has included 50 patients with ANCA-SV treated in 14 cities of the Russian Federation. Twenty-five of 50 (50% patients received repeated courses of RTM. RTM has demonstrated a high efficacy and a good profile of treatment safety in patients with ANCA-SV in real-life national clinical practice. Among 25 patients who had been followed up for over 12 months, the remission was achieved in 92% of cases, a decrease in the ANCA-SV activity was observed in 8%. The efficacy of RTM increased when performing repeated courses, while it has been noted that the positive results can be obtained by prescribing a repeated course of RTM at a reduced dose (500–1000 mg. Prescription of the repeated courses was primarily required in patients with granulomatosis and polyangiitis affecting the lungs. Care should be taken when combining RTM treatment with cytostatics (primarily with cyclophosphamide because of the risk of secondary immunodeficiency and infectious adverse events (AE, which have been the most frequent serious AE (12% in patients with ANCA-SV.

  14. Enlarged colitogenic T cell population paradoxically supports colitis prevention through the B-lymphocyte-dependent peripheral generation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Canto, Fábio Barrozo; Campos, Sylvia Maria Nicolau; Granato, Alessandra; da Silva, Rafael F; de Paiva, Luciana Souza; Nóbrega, Alberto; Bellio, Maria; Fucs, Rita

    2016-06-29

    Intestinal inflammation can be induced by the reconstitution of T/B cell-deficient mice with low numbers of CD4(+) T lymphocytes depleted of CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg). Using RAG-knockout mice as recipients of either splenocytes exclusively depleted of CD25(+) cells or FACS-purified CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(-) T cells, we found that the augmentation of potentially colitogenic naïve T cell numbers in the inoculum was unexpectedly beneficial for the suppression of colon disease and maintenance of immune homeostasis. Protection against T cell-mediated colitis correlated with a significant increment in the frequency of peripherally-induced CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T (pTreg) cells, especially in the mesenteric lymph nodes, an effect that required the presence of B cells and CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(+) cells in physiological proportions. Our findings support a model whereby the interplay between B lymphocytes and a diversified naïve T cell repertoire is critical for the generation of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) pTreg cells and colitis suppression.

  15. Summary of human responses to ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppanen, Olli A.; Fisk, William J.

    2004-06-01

    The effects of ventilation on indoor air quality and health is a complex issue. It is known that ventilation is necessary to remove indoor generated pollutants from indoor air or dilute their concentration to acceptable levels. But, as the limit values of all pollutants are not known, the exact determination of required ventilation rates based on pollutant concentrations and associated risks is seldom possible. The selection of ventilation rates has to be based also on epidemiological research (e.g. Seppanen et al., 1999), laboratory and field experiments (e.g. CEN 1996, Wargocki et al., 2002a) and experience (e.g. ECA 2003). Ventilation may also have harmful effects on indoor air quality and climate if not properly designed, installed, maintained and operated as summarized by Seppdnen (2003). Ventilation may bring indoors harmful substances that deteriorate the indoor environment. Ventilation also affects air and moisture flow through the building envelope and may lead to moisture problems that deteriorate the structures of the building. Ventilation changes the pressure differences over the structures of building and may cause or prevent the infiltration of pollutants from structures or adjacent spaces. Ventilation is also in many cases used to control the thermal environment or humidity in buildings. Ventilation can be implemented with various methods which may also affect health (e.g. Seppdnen and Fisk, 2002, Wargocki et al., 2002a). In non residential buildings and hot climates, ventilation is often integrated with air-conditioning which makes the operation of ventilation system more complex. As ventilation is used for many purposes its health effects are also various and complex. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on positive and negative effects of ventilation on health and other human responses. The focus of the paper is on office-type working environment and residential buildings. In the industrial premises the problems of air quality are usually

  16. A Commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It" (McPhail 2013), the author discusses how McPhail's paper examines human rights teaching principles, the question of why corporations and business schools should respect and teach human rights, and how business…

  17. A Commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It" (McPhail 2013), the author discusses how McPhail's paper examines human rights teaching principles, the question of why corporations and business schools should respect and teach human rights, and how business…

  18. B淋巴细胞刺激因子对慢性特发性荨麻疹患者产生抗FcεRI抗体和抗IgE抗体的影响%Influence of B lymphocyte stimulator on the production of anti-FcεRI and anti-IgE antibodies by B lymphocytes from patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康尔恂; 李杰; 孙丽伟; 韩春玉; 闫丽萍; 杨建

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨B淋巴细胞刺激因子(BlyS)能否刺激慢性特发性荨麻疹(CIU)患者B淋巴细胞产生抗FcεRI抗体或抗IgE抗体.方法 设CIU患者组和健康对照组.ELISA法测定血清中BlyS、抗FcεRI抗体和抗IgE抗体水平,分离培养受试者外周血B淋巴细胞,在培养液中加入BlyS,检测培养液中抗FcεRI抗体和抗IgE抗体水平,分析BlyS与抗FcεRI抗体和抗IgE抗体产生的相关性.结果 CIU患者血清BlyS水平显著高于健康对照组(t=3.04,P< 0.01),抗FcεRI抗体和抗IgE抗体水平均显著高于健康对照组(t=3.51,P<0.01;t=3.29,P< 0.01).CIU患者血清中抗FcεRI抗体和抗IgE抗体水平与BlyS水平呈正相关(r=0.93,P<0.01;r=0.91,P< 0.01);CIU患者外周血B淋巴细胞培养液中加入有效浓度BlyS后,B淋巴细胞培养液中抗FcεRI抗体和抗IgE抗体水平均显著高于不加BlyS的空白对照(t=3.67,P< 0.01;t=3.56,P< 0.01),2种抗体在培养液中的水平与BlyS浓度呈正相关(r=0.96,P< 0.01;r=0.91,P< 0.01);抗FcεRI抗体和抗IgE抗体在CIU患者血清与培养液中的检出符合率分别为94.76%和87.84%.结论 CIU患者血液中BlyS水平增高可刺激B淋巴细胞产生抗FcεRI抗体或抗IgE抗体,可能与CIU发病有关.%Objective To explore if B lymphocyte stimulator (BlyS) stimulates B lymphocytes from patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) to produce anti-high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) or anti-IgE antibodies.Methods Totally,300 CIU patients and 300 health controls were enrolled in this study.Blood samples were obtained from these subjects.Peripheral blood B lymphocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro for 72 hours.Then,BlyS of various concentrations (2,4,8,16 ng/ml) was added to the culture medium of B lymphocytes followed by another 72-hour culture.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to determine the serum levels of BlyS,anti-FcεRI and anti-IgE antibodies,as well as the supernatant levels of anti

  19. B lymphocytes in neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey L; O'Connor, Kevin C; Bar-Or, Amit; Zamvil, Scott S; Hemmer, Bernhard; Tedder, Thomas F; von Büdingen, H-Christian; Stuve, Olaf; Yeaman, Michael R; Smith, Terry J; Stadelmann, Christine

    2015-06-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of the CNS that predominantly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves. A majority (approximately 75%) of patients with NMO are seropositive for autoantibodies against the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4). These autoantibodies are predominantly IgG1, and considerable evidence supports their pathogenicity, presumably by binding to AQP4 on CNS astrocytes, resulting in astrocyte injury and inflammation. Convergent clinical and laboratory-based investigations have indicated that B cells play a fundamental role in NMO immunopathology. Multiple mechanisms have been hypothesized: AQP4 autoantibody production, enhanced proinflammatory B cell and plasmablast activity, aberrant B cell tolerance checkpoints, diminished B cell regulatory function, and loss of B cell anergy. Accordingly, many current off-label therapies for NMO deplete B cells or modulate their activity. Understanding the role and mechanisms whereby B cells contribute to initiation, maintenance, and propagation of disease activity is important to advancing our understanding of NMO pathogenesis and developing effective disease-specific therapies.

  20. 一个自闭症家系的B淋巴细胞周期研究%Altered Cell Cycle of B Lymphocytes from an Autistic Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申晨; 邹小兵; 邹俊华; 申阿东; 钟南

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解自闭症儿童的B淋巴细胞的细胞周期是否存在变异,为寻找自闭症的生物标志物并进一步为揭示自闭症的发病机制奠定基础.方法 运用B淋巴细胞建系、淋巴细胞培养、细胞周期检测以及统计学分析的方法,对一个汉族自闭症家系进行研究.该家系由父母及6个子女组成,父母表现型正常,而其中3名子女为自闭症患儿,3名为非自闭症儿童.结果 分析显示,B淋巴细胞的细胞周期在自闭症儿童组(相对于非自闭症儿童组)出现了S期细胞比例的增加和G0/G1期细胞比例的减少,同时代表增殖能力的“S期+G2/M期”的细胞比例也出现显著增加.结论 细胞周期的变化依赖于细胞内调控机制的改变,可能涉及到多种细胞周期蛋白的表达和调控变化,自闭症患儿存在B淋巴细胞细胞周期变异这一现象为进一步揭示自闭症的发病机制提供了线索.此外,如果本研究结果能够在大样本中得到肯定,则可作为自闭症的生物标志物用于疾病辅助诊断而具有良好的临床应用价值.%Objective To discover whether the cell cycle of B lymphocyte from autistic children were different from inartistic children. Methods One family including parents, three autistic children and three non-autistic children was involved in this study. The B lymphoblastoma cell construction, cell culture and cell cycle detection by flow cytometry (FCM) were carried out. Results FCM analysis showed that the percentage of G0/G1 phase cells decreased but that of S phase cells increased in autistic children compared with non-autistic siblings. The cell percentage of "S +G2/M" phase which represents cell proliferation also increased significantly in autistic children. Conclusion Alteration of cell cycle is the result of the intracellular regulating, which may involve variety changes of protein expression and regulation. The phenomenon that autistic children had alerted B lymphocyte cell

  1. Monoclonal B lymphocytes with the characteristics of "indolent" chronic lymphocytic leukemia are present in 3.5% of adults with normal blood counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstron, Andy C; Green, Michael J; Kuzmicki, Anita; Kennedy, Ben; Fenton, James A L; Evans, Paul A S; O'Connor, Sheila J M; Richards, Stephen J; Morgan, Gareth J; Jack, Andrew S; Hillmen, Peter

    2002-07-15

    Molecular and cellular markers associated with malignant disease are frequently identified in healthy individuals. The relationship between these markers and clinical disease is not clear, except where a neoplastic cell population can be identified as in myeloma/monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS). We have used the distinctive phenotype of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells to determine whether low levels of these cells can be identified in individuals with normal complete blood counts. CLL cells were identified by 4-color flow cytometric analysis of CD19/CD5/CD79b/CD20 expression in 910 outpatients over 40 years old. These outpatients were age- and sex-matched to the general population with normal hematologic parameters and no evident history of malignant disease. CLL phenotype cells were detectable in 3.5% of individuals at low level (median, 0.013; range, 0.002- 1.458 x 10(9) cells/L), and represented a minority of B lymphocytes (median, 11%; range, 3%-95%). Monoclonality was demonstrated by immunoglobulin light-chain restriction in all cases with CLL phenotype cells present and confirmed in a subset of cases by consensus-primer IgH-polymerase chain reaction. As in clinical disease, CLL phenotype cells were detected with a higher frequency in men (male-to-female ratio, 1.9:1) and elderly individuals (2.1% of 40- to 59-year-olds versus 5.0% of 60- to 89-year-olds, P =.01). The neoplastic cells were identical to good-prognosis CLL, being CD5+23+20(wk)79b(wk)11a(-)22(wk)sIg(wk)CD38-, and where assessed had a high degree (4.8%-6.6%) of IgH somatic hypermutation. The monoclonal CLL phenotype cells present in otherwise healthy individuals may represent a very early stage of indolent CLL and should be useful in elucidating the mechanisms of leukemogenesis.

  2. Differential expression of adhesion molecules and chemokines between nasal and small intestinal mucosae: implications for T- and sIgA+ B-lymphocyte recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Dorothée; Chevaleyre, Claire; Wang, CaiHong; Berri, Mustapha; Zhang, XiaoMei; Nicaise, Laetitia; Meurens, François; Salmon, Henri

    2007-12-01

    Nasal and small intestinal mucosae are the first sites of contact with infectious agents and the sites of T-cell-mediated and secreted immunoglobulin A (IgA)-mediated defences against pathogens. We investigated the factors controlling the infiltration of CD3(+) T lymphocytes and surface IgA(+) (sIgA(+)) B lymphocytes into swine epithelium and lamina propria (LP) within and between these two mucosal effector sites. Vascular addressins, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 were reciprocally expressed in both mucosae. Strong expression of alpha(4)beta(1) relative to alpha(4)beta(7) was characteristic of CD3(+) T cells in nasal mucosa LP and epithelium and of sIgA(+) cells in nasal mucosa epithelium. The same profile was observed on corresponding blood cells. Conversely, higher levels of integrins beta(7) and alpha(4)beta(7) than alpha(4)beta(1) were characteristic of CD3(+) T cells and sIgA(+) cells in the small intestine. However, about 40% of the LP-activated sIgA(+) cells displayed sIgA(high), integrin alpha(4) and integrin alpha(4) expression. Whereas CCL19, CXCL12, CCL21 and CCL28 messenger RNAs were similarly expressed in both mucosae, CCL25 messenger RNA was only expressed in the small intestine. Thus, the nasal and small intestine mucosae represent separate compartments for infiltration by CD3(+) T cells and sIgA(+) effector cells, with the exception of a population of small intestine activated sIgA(+) cells, which may gain access to both mucosae.

  3. Analysis of Ig V{sub H} region genes encoding IgE antibodies in splenic B lymphocytes of a patient with asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, R.E.; Chapman, C.J.; Stevenson, F.K. [Southampton Univ. Hospitals (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-05-15

    An atopic patient with hypersensitivity against house dust mite died as a result of an asthmatic attack. A portion of the spleen was obtained and was used to analyze the spectrum of Ig heavy chain V regions involved in encoding IgE Abs. A nested PCR technique generated 14 cloned V{sub H} sequences that had distinct CDR3 regions; 5 of 14 were derived from the minor V{sub H}5 family, and the remainder derived from the larger families, V{sub H}3 (6 of 14) and V{sub H}4 (3 of 14). One of the V{sub H}3-derived sequences was present as a repeated sequence in three clones. A control PCR with the same V{sub H} primers in combination with J{sub H} primers yielded only 1 of 13 sequences from V{sub H}5, indicating preferential V{sub H}5 usage only for IgE. Analysis of V{sub H}5-C{epsilon} sequences revealed usage of a single gene, DP73, with extensive mutations and several {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} containing common replacement amino acids. However, there was no concentration of replacement mutations in the CDRs, which conventionally would indicate a role for Ag selection. The V{sub H}3 and V{sub H}4 genes in combination with C{epsilon} also harbored extensive somatic mutations. From these findings in splenic B lymphocytes, and those of a previous study of blood lymphocytes, it seems that preferential usage of V{sub H}5 genes and extensive somatic hypermutation are characteristic of B cells synthesizing IgE in patients with allergic disease. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Increased Fas and Bcl-2 Expression on Peripheral Blood T and B Lymphocytes from Juvenile-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, but not from Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis and Juvenile Dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadete L. Liphaus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Defective regulation of apoptosis may play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Fas and Bcl-2 proteins are involved in the control of apoptosis. The aims of this study were to determine the expression of Fas antigen and Bcl-2 protein on peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes from patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM. Thirty-eight patients with JSLE, 19 patients with JRA, 10 patients with JDM and 25 healthy controls entered the study. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were stained for lymphocyte markers CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19 and for Fas and Bcl-2 molecules. Expressions were measured by three-color flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal–Wallis test. Percentages of freshly isolated T lymphocytes positively stained for Fas protein from JSLE patients were significantly increased compared to healthy controls, patients with JRA and patients with JDM. Percentages of B lymphocytes positive for Fas from JSLE patients were higher than healthy controls and JRA patients. In addition, Fas expression on T cells from patients with JRA was increased compared to JDM patients. Otherwise, Fas expression on T and B cells from JRA and JDM patients were similar to healthy controls. MFI of Bcl-2 positive T lymphocytes from JSLE patients were significantly increased compared to healthy controls and JRA patients. MFI of Bcl-2 protein on B lymphocytes from JSLE patients was similar to healthy controls and patients with JRA and JDM. Bcl-2 expression did not differ between JRA and JDM patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, increased expression of Fas and Bcl-2 proteins observed in circulating T and B lymphocytes from patients with JSLE, but not from patients with JRA and JDM, suggests that abnormalities of apoptosis may be related to the pathogenesis of JSLE and probably are not a result of chronic inflammation.

  5. Increased Fas and Bcl-2 expression on peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes from juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus, but not from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liphaus, Bernadete L; Kiss, Maria H B; Carrasco, Solange; Goldenstein-Schainberg, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    Defective regulation of apoptosis may play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Fas and Bcl-2 proteins are involved in the control of apoptosis. The aims of this study were to determine the expression of Fas antigen and Bcl-2 protein on peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes from patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Thirty-eight patients with JSLE, 19 patients with JRA, 10 patients with JDM and 25 healthy controls entered the study. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stained for lymphocyte markers CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19 and for Fas and Bcl-2 molecules. Expressions were measured by three-color flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Percentages of freshly isolated T lymphocytes positively stained for Fas protein from JSLE patients were significantly increased compared to healthy controls, patients with JRA and patients with JDM. Percentages of B lymphocytes positive for Fas from JSLE patients were higher than healthy controls and JRA patients. In addition, Fas expression on T cells from patients with JRA was increased compared to JDM patients. Otherwise, Fas expression on T and B cells from JRA and JDM patients were similar to healthy controls. MFI of Bcl-2 positive T lymphocytes from JSLE patients were significantly increased compared to healthy controls and JRA patients. MFI of Bcl-2 protein on B lymphocytes from JSLE patients was similar to healthy controls and patients with JRA and JDM. Bcl-2 expression did not differ between JRA and JDM patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, increased expression of Fas and Bcl-2 proteins observed in circulating T and B lymphocytes from patients with JSLE, but not from patients with JRA and JDM, suggests that abnormalities of apoptosis may be related to the pathogenesis of JSLE and probably are not a result of chronic inflammation.

  6. B lymphocyte differentiation in lethally irradiated and reconstituted mice. I. The effect of strontium-89 induced bone marrow aplasia on the recovery of the B cell compartment in the spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozing, J.; Buurman, W.A.; Benner, R.

    1976-06-01

    The influence of /sup 89/Sr-treatment on the recovery of the B cell compartment in lethally irradiated, fetal liver reconstituted mice was studied by means of membrane fluorescence, /sup 89/Sr is a bone-seeking radio-isotope which causes in a dose of 3 ..mu..Ci /sup 89/Sr/g body weight a depletion of all nucleated cells, including immunoglobulin-bearing (B) cells, of the bone marrow. Treatment of irradiated and fetal liver reconstituted mice with 3 ..mu..Ci /sup 89/Sr/g body weight immediately and at 17 days after irradiation and reconstitution prevented recovery of the nucleated cell population, including B cells, in the bone marrow. In the spleen of such mice both nucleated cells and B cells reappeared at day 7 and 14 respectively. The B cell population in the spleen did not recover up to normal values during the experimental period of 45 days. It is concluded that B cell differentiation in lethally irradiated, fetal liver reconstituted mice can take place outside the bone marrow. The efficiency of this extra-medullary differentiation is discussed. The conclusion was drawn that mice with a /sup 89/Sr-induced bone marrow aplasia are able to generate B lymphocytes. Consequently the bone marrow microenvironment seems not to be obligate to the differentiation of B lymphocytes. The peripheral lymphoid organs of such mice were found to be unable to compensate completely for the absence of B lymphocyte production in the bone marrow.

  7. Human Trafficking, Globalisation and Transnational Feminist Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T-D. Truong (Thanh-Dam)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a historical overview of feminist frameworks for analysis and advocacy on human trafficking. It traces the major differences and similarities in the forms of knowledge produced since the Anti-White Slavery campaigns nearly two centuries ago. It highlights how institut

  8. Human Trafficking, Globalisation and Transnational Feminist Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T-D. Truong (Thanh-Dam)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a historical overview of feminist frameworks for analysis and advocacy on human trafficking. It traces the major differences and similarities in the forms of knowledge produced since the Anti-White Slavery campaigns nearly two centuries ago. It highlights how institut

  9. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G; Mindrinos, Michael N; Baker, Henry V; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C; López, Cecilia M; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B; Billiar, Timothy R; West, Michael A; Jeschke, Marc G; Klein, Matthew B; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Brownstein, Bernard H; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E; Mason, Philip H; Cobb, J Perren; Rahme, Laurence G; Lowry, Stephen F; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Herndon, David N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R(2) between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases.

  10. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  11. Human response to an individually controlled microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Knudsen, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    The response of 48 subjects to an individually controlled microenvironment was studied at room air temperatures of 20 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 26 degrees C An individually controlled system (ICS) comprising personalized ventilation, an under-desk air terminal device supplying cool air, a chair...... who are comfortable with their microenvironment....

  12. Human response times in a graphic environment

    CERN Document Server

    Yule, A

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the results obtained from measuring the response times of the users of an interactive graphics system available on the CERN central computers is presented. These results are then used to find an optimum time to wait before rolling the user's program to disc.

  13. Bioethics: New Responsibility for Human Service Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Rebecca

    The paper highlights the poignancy with which problems and issues surface as the fields of special education and bioethics (the combination of ethics and the life sciences) intersect, and touches upon professionals' responsibility for protection of the persons in their care. (Author/SBH)

  14. Human Trafficking, Globalisation and Transnational Feminist Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Truong, Thanh-Dam

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a historical overview of feminist frameworks for analysis and advocacy on human trafficking. It traces the major differences and similarities in the forms of knowledge produced since the Anti-White Slavery campaigns nearly two centuries ago. It highlights how institutional and moral considerations – especially concerning the treatment of the female body as an instrument – have played a role in shaping the conceptual possibilities and directions of politics for ...

  15. Civil society response to human trafficking in South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Yousaf

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In South Asia civil society organisations have led the way in encouraging governments to address the problem of human trafficking. A coordinated regional response by both governments and civil society organisations is urgently required.

  16. Human Respiratory Responses during High Performance Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    6SZ United Kingdom (c) Copyright (C) Controller BHSO London 1987 Sunwmiy The respiratory responses of experienced militar , pilots have been...40 Merrifield J T, Flick C A. In-flight oxygen measurement equipment. Air Standardization Co-ordinating Committee : Aerospace Medico ! & Life Support...Flugrad Reyjavik ITALY Aeronautica Militare Ufficic del Delegate Nazionale alTAGARD 3 Piarzale Adenauer 00 i 44 Roms/EUR LUXEMBOURG See

  17. Diffusion Based Modeling of Human Brain Response to External Stimuli

    CERN Document Server

    Namazi, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Human brain response is the overall ability of the brain in analyzing internal and external stimuli in the form of transferred energy to the mind/brain phase-space and thus, making the proper decisions. During the last decade scientists discovered about this phenomenon and proposed some models based on computational, biological, or neuropsychological methods. Despite some advances in studies related to this area of the brain research there was less effort which have been done on the mathematical modeling of the human brain response to external stimuli. This research is devoted to the modeling of human EEG signal, as an alert state of overall human brain activity monitoring, due to receiving external stimuli, based on fractional diffusion equation. The results of this modeling show very good agreement with the real human EEG signal and thus, this model can be used as a strong representative of the human brain activity.

  18. Immune responses to chlamydial antigens in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, L; Kerlan, R; Senyk, G; Stites, D P; Juster, R P; Jawetz, E

    1982-01-01

    Antibody titer, lymphocyte stimulation and leukocyte migration inhibition with chlamydial antigens were determined repeatedly over many months on human subjects. The volunteers were retrospectively placed into four groups on the basis of clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic criteria. Group A consisted of persons with proven or probable chlamydial infection, including an illness confirmed by chlamydial isolation or seroconversion, or a clinically compatible illness with positive serologic results. Group B were sexual partners or close contacts of group A individuals. Group C were laboratory workers with prolonged exposure to viable chlamydiae or their antigens. Group D included persons of comparable age as those in groups A and B, but lacking a history of symptomatic chlamydial infection or of contact with chlamydiae. Individual cases illustrated the rise of antibody and some cell mediated immunity reactions (CMI) with active chlamydial infection. By contrast, laboratory exposure resulted in elevation of CMI but not of antibody. Statistical analysis of the results in 46 volunteers tested repeatedly indicated a strong association of specific antibody with lymphocyte stimulation, but not with leukocyte migration inhibition. Regression analysis suggested that the type of exposure markedly influenced the relationship between antibody and lymphocyte stimulation. Measurement of immunotype-specific antibody titer by microimmunofluorescence (or an equally sensitive method) remains the best laboratory indicator of past chlamydial infection. Neither antibody nor CMI can, as yet, be definitely related to resistance to re-infection in humans.

  19. Hepatitis C virus in human B lymphocytes transformed by Epstein-Barr virus in vitro by in situ reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Lin Cheng; Bao Ling Liu; Yi Zhang; Wen Bin Tong; Zheng Yan; Bai Fang Feng

    2001-01-01

    AIM To study persistence and replication ofheltitis C virus (HCV) in patients' peripheralblood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultured invitro.METHODS Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was usedto transform the hepatitis C virus from a HCVpositive patient to permanent lymphoblastoidcell lines (LCL). Positive and negative HCV RNAstrands of the cultured cells and growth mediawere detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction ( RT-PCR ) eachmonth. Core and NS5 proteins of HCV werefurther tested using immunohistochemical SPmethod and in situ RT-PCR.RESULTS HCV RNA positive strands wereconsistently detected the cultured cells for oneyear. The negative-strand RNA in LCL cells andthe positive-strand RNA in supernatants wereobserved intermittently. Immunohistochemicalresults medicated expression of HCV NS3 and Cproteins in LCL cytoplasm mostly. The positivesignal of PCR product was dark blue and mainlylocalized to the LCL cytoplasm. The RT-PCRsignal was eliminated by overnight RNasedigestion but not DNase digestion.CONCLUSION HCV may exist and remainfunctional in a cultured cell line for a longperiod.

  20. Effects of prolactin on the proliferation of human B lymphocytes%催乳素对人B淋巴细胞增殖功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙翔; 孙清河; 王辉

    2006-01-01

    目的探讨催乳素(PRL)对B淋巴细胞生长的调节作用.方法将生理浓度(10ng·ml-1)的PRL加到IM-9细胞中培养72h,以MTT比色分析法检测细胞增殖情况.结果空白对照组、脂多糖(LPS)组、PRL组、LPS+PRL组、LPS+溴隐停(Br)组、LPS+PRL+Br组A值分别为1.00±0.09、1.11±0.14、1.21±0.23、1.38±0.44、0.95±0.14、0.89±0.11.与空白对照组比较,PRL(t=2.689,P<0.01)、LPS(t=2.292,P<0.05)均能促进IM-9细胞的增殖;与LPS组相比,加入Br后对IM-9细胞的增殖有抑制作用(t=2.556,P<0.05);与LPS-PRL组相比,加入Br后对IM-9细胞的增殖亦有抑制作用(t=3.417,P<0.01).结论人PRL能明显地促进IM-9细胞的增殖,Br对IM-9细胞的增殖有抑制作用.

  1. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing...... a subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes......) bearing CR1, however, markedly reduced both C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation. Our data suggest that C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation on B lymphocytes in vivo may involve both AP and classical pathway activation, with CR1 contributing significantly to the latter. On the other hand...

  2. Gustofacial and olfactofacial responses in human adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Romy; Ellgring, Heiner; Macht, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Adults' facial reactions in response to tastes and odors were investigated in order to determine whether differential facial displays observed in newborns remain stable in adults who exhibit a greater voluntary facial control. Twenty-eight healthy nonsmokers (14 females) tasted solutions of PROP (bitter), NaCl (salty), citric acid (sour), sucrose (sweet), and glutamate (umami) differing in concentration (low, medium, and high) and smelled different odors (banana, cinnamon, clove, coffee, fish, and garlic). Their facial reactions were video recorded and analyzed using the Facial Action Coding System. Adults' facial reactions discriminated between stimuli with opponent valences. Unpleasant tastes and odors elicited negative displays (brow lower, upper lip raise, and lip corner depress). The pleasant sweet taste elicited positive displays (lip suck), whereas the pleasant odors did not. Unlike newborns, adults smiled with higher concentrations of some unpleasant tastes that can be regarded as serving communicative functions. Moreover, adults expressed negative displays with higher sweetness. Except for the "social" smile in response to unpleasant tastes, adults' facial reactions elicited by tastes and odors mostly correspond to those found in newborns. In conclusion, adults' facial reactions to tastes and odors appear to remain stable in their basic displays; however, some additional reactions might reflect socialization influences.

  3. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Stephen P; Bartek, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    , signal its presence and mediate its repair. Such responses, which have an impact on a wide range of cellular events, are biologically significant because they prevent diverse human diseases. Our improving understanding of DNA-damage responses is providing new avenues for disease management....

  4. Male-line transgenerational responses in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembrey, Marcus E

    2010-12-01

    Genomic imprinting establishes the principle of epigenetic marks placed in one generation influencing gene expression in the next generation. This led to speculation that epigenetic gametic inheritance might underlie a form of transgenerational adaptation to major environmental challenges, such that exposures in one generation correlate with outcomes in the next generation(s). An ongoing collaboration between Umeå University, Sweden and the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Childhood, Bristol University, UK has documented transgenerational correlations between food supply during the early life of the paternal grandparents and the grandchild's longevity, including associations with cardiovascular and diabetic deaths, and correlations between the onset of paternal smoking in mid-childhood and the body mass index of future sons. Whilst the mediating molecular mechanism(s) is unknown, the sex-specific transmission patterns and exposure-sensitive periods suggest a pre-evolved transgenerational response mechanism.

  5. Human response to an individually controlled microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Knudsen, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    The response of 48 subjects to an individually controlled microenvironment was studied at room air temperatures of 20 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 26 degrees C An individually controlled system (ICS) comprising personalized ventilation, an under-desk air terminal device supplying cool air, a chair...... with convectively heated backrest, an under-desk radiant heating panel, and a floor-heating panel were used. The temperature of the air supplied from the personalized ventilation and the under-desk device was 20 degrees C The subjects were provided with control of the flow rate and direction of the personalized air...... at a room temperature of 22 degrees C without ICS. Thus, ICS will increase the number of satisfied occupants when applied in practice. The design and control of the ICS, as well as the background air distribution in a room, should be carefully considered in order to obtain the maximum number of occupants...

  6. Effects of benzene inhalation on lymphocyte subpopulations and immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, K

    1986-08-01

    To clarify the immunotoxicity of benzene, the effects of benzene inhalation on T and B lymphocytes and immune responses in mice were examined. BALB/c male mice were exposed to 50 or 200 ppm benzene vapor, 6 hr/day for 7 or 14 consecutive days. T and B lymphocytes, in blood and spleen, were detected by the cytotoxicity assay with anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody and the membrane immunofluorescence test with anti-immunoglobulin antibody, respectively. Humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells was determined by the hemolytic plaque-forming cell assay. Cell-mediated immune response was measured by contact sensitivity (CS) to picryl chloride. The activity of suppressor cells was evaluated in spleen by the suppressive effect on passive transfer of CS. The ratio and absolute number of T and B lymphocytes in blood and spleen were depressed after a 7-day exposure at 50 ppm benzene. The depression of B lymphocytes was dose dependent and more intense than that of T lymphocytes. The ability to form antibodies was suppressed by benzene at all exposure levels, but the CS response was resistant to benzene inhalation and rather enhanced at 200 ppm exposure for 14 days. The activity of suppressor cells could not be detected at this dose level. These data show that benzene inhalation effects on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses are a result of the selective toxicity of benzene to B lymphocytes and suppressor T cells.

  7. Human immune responses during schistosomiasis mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Gazzinelli

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies of immune responses as they occur in patients with schistosomiasis appear to progress relative to corrent technological advances, and to advance despite the understandable inability to pursue in vivo manipulations in this host/parasite system. Emphasis is most often placed on making immunological comparisons between such patient groups as reinfected/non-reinfected, intestinals/hepatosplenic, high/low intensities of infection, infected/uninfected within endemic areas, and those born of infected/uninfected mothers. Based on these types of comparisons, reasonable conjectures can be made regarding the immunological occurrences during this chronic exposure condition. Some consideration is now being given to the immune mechanisms of some of the observations made, and while some of these must then be carried back to experimental models for further manipulation-based analysis, new technological developments continue to assist in the field/bench ability to ask questions that might assist our understanding to a point where this knowledge can be applied to shaping developmental approaches to vaccine development and the goal of alleviating morbidity.O estudo da resposta imune de pacientes com esquistossomose progride em função do avanço tecnológico, apesar das dificuldades de manipulação in vivo deste complexo sistema parasita-hospedeiro. A ênfase nos estudos tem sido mais freqüentemente dirigida para comparações entre grupos característicos de indivíduos, tais como infectado/não infectado, reinfectado/ não reinfectado, assintomático/hepato-esplênico, com intensidade de infecção alta/baixa, etc. Baseado nessas comparações tem-se obtido informações que permitem conjecturas razoáveis com relação à regulação imunológica, susceptibilidade e resistência e até mesmo considerações sôbre mecanismos, que têm sido mais apropriadamente analisados, entretanto, em sistemas experimentais. Tais estudos têm como finalidade a

  8. Modulation of stimulus contrast on the human pupil orienting response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chin-An; Munoz, Douglas P

    2014-09-01

    The sudden appearance of a novel stimulus initiates a series of responses to orient the body for appropriate actions, including not only shifts of gaze and attention, but also transient pupil dilation. Modulation of pupil dynamics by stimulus properties is less understood, although its effects on other components of orienting have been extensively explored. Microstimulation of the superior colliculus evoked transient pupil dilation, and the initial component of pupil dilation evoked by microstimulation was similar to that elicited by the presentation of salient sensory stimuli, suggesting a coordinated role of the superior colliculus on this behavior, although evidence in humans is yet to be established. To examine pupil orienting responses in humans, we presented visual stimuli while participants fixated on a central visual spot. Transient pupil dilation in humans was elicited after presentation of a visual stimulus in the periphery. The evoked pupil responses were modulated systematically by stimulus contrast, with faster and larger pupil responses triggered by higher contrast stimuli. The pupil response onset latencies for high contrast stimuli were similar to those produced by the light reflex and significantly faster than the darkness reflex, suggesting that the initial component of pupil dilation is probably mediated by inhibition of the parasympathetic pathway. The contrast modulation was pronounced under different levels of baseline pupil size. Together, our results demonstrate visual contrast modulation on the orienting pupil response in humans.

  9. Hemifield dependence of responses to colour in human fusiform gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Francisco; Relova, José Luis; Prieto, Angel; Peleteiro, Manuel; Romero, Maria C

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the hemifield dependence of visually evoked responses to colour in the human fusiform gyrus we recorded evoked potentials from subdural electrodes in a patient suffering from occipital epilepsy. The responses in the fusiform gyrus show a strong hemifield dependence and discriminate the onset from the offset of the stimulus. Additionally, we found responses to squares made of random dots, whereas no responses were found to squares with a homogeneous bright surface. Our findings further support the idea that the fusiform gyrus is related to colour and pattern perception. However, the hemifield dependence we found may indicate that further processing is required in order to combine information from both visual hemifields.

  10. Humanized mouse model for assessing the human immune response to xenogeneic and allogeneic decellularized biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Raymond M; Johnson, Todd D; He, Jingjin; Rong, Zhili; Wong, Michelle; Nigam, Vishal; Behfar, Atta; Xu, Yang; Christman, Karen L

    2017-06-01

    Current assessment of biomaterial biocompatibility is typically implemented in wild type rodent models. Unfortunately, different characteristics of the immune systems in rodents versus humans limit the capability of these models to mimic the human immune response to naturally derived biomaterials. Here we investigated the utility of humanized mice as an improved model for testing naturally derived biomaterials. Two injectable hydrogels derived from decellularized porcine or human cadaveric myocardium were compared. Three days and one week after subcutaneous injection, the hydrogels were analyzed for early and mid-phase immune responses, respectively. Immune cells in the humanized mouse model, particularly T-helper cells, responded distinctly between the xenogeneic and allogeneic biomaterials. The allogeneic extracellular matrix derived hydrogels elicited significantly reduced total, human specific, and CD4(+) T-helper cell infiltration in humanized mice compared to xenogeneic extracellular matrix hydrogels, which was not recapitulated in wild type mice. T-helper cells, in response to the allogeneic hydrogel material, were also less polarized towards a pro-remodeling Th2 phenotype compared to xenogeneic extracellular matrix hydrogels in humanized mice. In both models, both biomaterials induced the infiltration of macrophages polarized towards a M2 phenotype and T-helper cells polarized towards a Th2 phenotype. In conclusion, these studies showed the importance of testing naturally derived biomaterials in immune competent animals and the potential of utilizing this humanized mouse model for further studying human immune cell responses to biomaterials in an in vivo environment.

  11. HCV infection and morphologic study in B lymphocytes of patient with hepatitis C%丙型肝炎病毒对人B淋巴细胞系的感染及其形态学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚鹏; 陈良标; 胡学玲; 陈佩兰; 胡大荣

    2001-01-01

    目的 研究HCV对人B淋巴细胞的感染,建立HCV感染的丙型肝炎患者B淋巴细胞模型(CBCL),并进行HCV的形态学研究。方法用EB病毒转化B细胞建立B细胞系,以逆转录多聚酶链反应(RT-PCR)、免疫组织化学、原位杂交方法检测B细胞系上清液及细胞内的HCV抗原及HCV RNA,并通过电镜对HCV进行形态学研究。结果细胞系上清液中HCV RNA呈阳性,细胞内HCV抗原及HCV RNA均呈阳性,电镜观察结果发现细胞内存在65nm和110nm圆球型病毒颗粒,并可见病毒芽生形成现象。结论 HCV可感染人B细胞并在其中复制。病毒在感染细胞胞质空泡部位合成和组装,以芽生方式进入胞质空泡内形成病毒颗粒。%Objective To study HCV infection in B lymphocytes of patients with hepatitis C and to establish a B cell line with HCV infection and observe the hepatitis C virus like particles. Methods A B lymphoblastoid cell line was established by Epstein-Barr virus induced transformation directly from peripheral blood mononuclecyte cells of a patient with hepatitis C. The HCV antigen and HCV RNA were detected by immunohistochemical technique. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization and HCV particle were detected by electron microscopy. Results Positive HCV RNA was found in supernatants of B cell line. HCV Ag and HCV RNA were also showed positive. Electron microscopy observed HCV spherical virus like particles with a diameter of approximately 65 nm and 110nm and the "bud mutation"of HCV in the cytoplasmic vesicles of B lymphocytes. Conclusion HCV could infect B lymphocytes and replicate in the cell line. HCV particles are formed by "bud mutation" of HCV in the cytoplasmic vesicles of B-lymphocytes.

  12. Thermodynamic Modeling and Analysis of Human Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boregowda, S. C.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    A novel approach based on the second law of thermodynamics is developed to investigate the psychophysiology and quantify human stress level. Two types of stresses (thermal and mental) are examined. A Unified Stress Response Theory (USRT) is developed under the new proposed field of study called Engineering Psychophysiology. The USRT is used to investigate both thermal and mental stresses from a holistic (human body as a whole) and thermodynamic viewpoint. The original concepts and definitions are established as postulates which form the basis for thermodynamic approach to quantify human stress level. An Objective Thermal Stress Index (OTSI) is developed by applying the second law of thermodynamics to the human thermal system to quantify thermal stress or dis- comfort in the human body. The human thermal model based on finite element method is implemented. It is utilized as a "Computational Environmental Chamber" to conduct series of simulations to examine the human thermal stress responses under different environmental conditions. An innovative hybrid technique is developed to analyze human thermal behavior based on series of human-environment interaction simulations. Continuous monitoring of thermal stress is demonstrated with the help of OTSI. It is well established that the human thermal system obeys the second law of thermodynamics. Further, the OTSI is validated against the experimental data. Regarding mental stress, an Objective Mental Stress Index (OMSI) is developed by applying the Maxwell relations of thermodynamics to the combined thermal and cardiovascular system in the human body. The OMSI is utilized to demonstrate the technique of monitoring mental stress continuously and is validated with the help of series of experimental studies. Although the OMSI indicates the level of mental stress, it provides a strong thermodynamic and mathematical relationship between activities of thermal and cardiovascular systems of the human body.

  13. Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

    2007-08-01

    Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

  14. Humpback Dolphin (Genus Sousa) Behavioural Responses to Human Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwetz, Sarah; Lundquist, David; Würsig, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Humpback dolphins (genus Sousa) use shallow, near-shore waters throughout their range. This coastal distribution makes them vulnerable to recreational and commercial disturbances, especially near heavily populated and industrialized areas. Most research focusing on Sousa and human activities has emphasized direct impacts and threats, involving injury and death, with relatively little focus on indirect effects on dolphins, such as changes in behaviour that may lead to deleterious effects. Understanding behaviour is important in resolving human-wildlife conflict and is an important component of conservation. This chapter gives an overview of animal behavioural responses to human activity with examples from diverse taxa; reviews the scientific literature on behavioural responses of humpback dolphins to human activity throughout their range, including marine vessel traffic, dolphin tourism, cetacean-fishery interactions, noise pollution, and habitat alteration; and highlights information and data gaps for future humpback dolphin research to better inform behaviour-based management decisions that contribute to conservation efforts.

  15. Neural Correlates of the Cortisol Awakening Response in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Boehringer, Andreas; Tost, Heike; Haddad, Leila; Lederbogen, Florian; Wüst, Stefan; Schwarz, Emanuel; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The cortisol rise after awakening (cortisol awakening response, CAR) is a core biomarker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation related to psychosocial stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders. However, the neural regulation of the CAR has not been examined in humans. Here, we studied neural regulation related to the CAR in a sample of 25 healthy human participants using an established psychosocial stress paradigm together with multimodal functional and structural (vox...

  16. Modeling human response errors in synthetic flight simulator domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntuen, Celestine A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a control theoretic approach to modeling human response errors (HRE) in the flight simulation domain. The human pilot is modeled as a supervisor of a highly automated system. The synthesis uses the theory of optimal control pilot modeling for integrating the pilot's observation error and the error due to the simulation model (experimental error). Methods for solving the HRE problem are suggested. Experimental verification of the models will be tested in a flight quality handling simulation.

  17. Aversive Pavlovian Responses Affect Human Instrumental Motor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoli, Francesco; Pavone, Enea Francesco; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    In neuroscience and psychology, an influential perspective distinguishes between two kinds of behavioral control: instrumental (habitual and goal-directed) and Pavlovian. Understanding the instrumental-Pavlovian interaction is fundamental for the comprehension of decision-making. Animal studies (as those using the negative auto-maintenance paradigm), have demonstrated that Pavlovian mechanisms can have maladaptive effects on instrumental performance. However, evidence for a similar effect in humans is scarce. In addition, the mechanisms modulating the impact of Pavlovian responses on instrumental performance are largely unknown, both in human and non-human animals. The present paper describes a behavioral experiment investigating the effects of Pavlovian conditioned responses on performance in humans, focusing on the aversive domain. Results showed that Pavlovian responses influenced human performance, and, similar to animal studies, could have maladaptive effects. In particular, Pavlovian responses either impaired or increased performance depending on modulator variables such as threat distance, task controllability, punishment history, amount of training, and explicit punishment expectancy. Overall, these findings help elucidating the computational mechanisms underlying the instrumental-Pavlovian interaction, which might be at the base of apparently irrational phenomena in economics, social behavior, and psychopathology. PMID:23060738

  18. Aversive Pavlovian responses affect human instrumental motor performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eRigoli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In neuroscience and psychology, an influential perspective distinguishes between two kinds of behavioural control: instrumental (habitual and goal-directed and Pavlovian. Understanding the instrumental-Pavlovian interaction is fundamental for the comprehension of decision-making. Animal studies (as those using the negative auto-maintenance paradigm, have demonstrated that Pavlovian mechanisms can have maladaptive effects on instrumental performance. However, evidence for a similar effect in humans is scarce. In addition, the mechanisms modulating the impact of Pavlovian responses on instrumental performance are largely unknown, both in human and non-human animals. The present paper describes a behavioural experiment investigating the effects of Pavlovian conditioned responses on performance in humans, focusing on the aversive domain. Results showed that Pavlovian responses influenced human performance, and, similar to animal studies, could have maladaptive effects. In particular, Pavlovian responses either impaired or increased performance depending on modulator variables such as threat distance, task controllability, punishment history, amount of training, and explicit punishment expectancy. Overall, these findings help elucidating the computational mechanisms underlying the instrumental-Pavlovian interaction, which might be at the base of apparently irrational phenomena in economics, social behaviour, and psychopathology.

  19. Complement Receptor Type 1 Suppresses Human B Cell Functions in SLE Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariann Kremlitzka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement receptors (CRs play an integral role in innate immunity and also function to initiate and shape the adaptive immune response. Our earlier results showed that complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35 is a potent inhibitor of the B cell receptor- (BCR- induced functions of human B lymphocytes. Here we show that this inhibition occurs already at the initial steps of B cell activation since ligation of CR1 reduces the BCR-induced phosphorylation of key signaling molecules such as Syk and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs. Furthermore, our data give evidence that although B lymphocytes of active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients express lower level of CR1, the inhibitory capacity of this complement receptor is still maintained and its ligand-induced clustering results in significant inhibition of the main B cell functions, similar to that found in the case of healthy individuals. Since we have found that reduced CR1 expression of SLE patients does not affect the inhibitory capacity of the receptor, our results further support the therapeutical potential of CD35 targeting the decrease of B cell activation and autoantibody production in autoimmune patients.

  20. Ovarian response to recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arce, Joan-Carles; Andersen, Anders Nyboe; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the dose-response relationship of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH; FE 999049) with respect to ovarian response in patients undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment; and prospectively study the influence of initial antimüllerian hormone (AMH) concentrat......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the dose-response relationship of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH; FE 999049) with respect to ovarian response in patients undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment; and prospectively study the influence of initial antimüllerian hormone (AMH......) concentrations. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, AMH-stratified (low: 5.0-14.9 pmol/L [0.7-infertility centers in four countries. PATIENT(S): Two hundred sixty-five women aged ≤37 years. INTERVENTION(S): Controlled...

  1. SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE HUMAN RESOURCE POLICIES AND PRACTICES: ACADEMICAND PROFESSIONAL VALIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrena-Martínez, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the measurement and validation of socially responsible human resource policiesfrom academic and professional points of view. Corporate Social responsibility (CSR has made greatprogress in recent years in the theoretical realm, showing its importance through different perspectivessuch as the institutional theory, the stakeholder approach, the theory of legitimacy, and the process ofshared value. However, from an empirical standpoint, more research is needed to provide new indicatorsand evidence of testing socially responsible policies on business performance. This paper aims to devise aset of socially responsible human resource policies, demonstrate the validation of their content throughseveral practices, and review the analysis of their relative weights thanks to the contribution of a panelof academic experts and a professional pretest, conducted in large Spanish companies.

  2. Einstein, social responsibility of physicists and human rights in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li-Zhi

    2005-03-01

    Since Einstein first visited Shanghai on 1922, he was deeply and constantly concerned about the cases of injustice, suppression, and human rights abuses in China. The strong sense of social responsibility shown by Einstein is an illustrious role model for Chinese intellectual, especially physicists, who advocate the universal principle of human rights. I will briefly review this history. I will also briefly report what have been done and is doing by Chinese physicists in the long and difficult journey toward democracy and human rights of China.

  3. Alloimmune Responses of Humanized Mice to Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel G. Kooreman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in using embryonic stem cell (ESC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC derivatives for tissue regeneration. However, an increased understanding of human immune responses to stem cell-derived allografts is necessary for maintaining long-term graft persistence. To model this alloimmunity, humanized mice engrafted with human hematopoietic and immune cells could prove to be useful. In this study, an in-depth analysis of graft-infiltrating human lymphocytes and splenocytes revealed that humanized mice incompletely model human immune responses toward allogeneic stem cells and their derivatives. Furthermore, using an “allogenized” mouse model, we show the feasibility of reconstituting immunodeficient mice with a functional mouse immune system and describe a key role of innate immune cells in the rejection of mouse stem cell allografts.

  4. Leishmania major infection in humanized mice induces systemic infection and provokes a nonprotective human immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kathrin Wege

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania (L. species are the causative agent of leishmaniasis. Due to the lack of efficient vaccine candidates, drug therapies are the only option to deal with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Unfortunately, chemotherapeutic interventions show high toxicity in addition to an increased risk of dissemination of drug-resistant parasites. An appropriate laboratory animal based model is still missing which allows testing of new drug strategies in the context of human immune cells in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Humanized mice were infected subcutaneously with stationary phase promastigote L. major into the footpad. The human immune response against the pathogen and the parasite host interactions were analyzed. In addition we proved the versatility of this new model to conduct drug research studies by the inclusion of orally given Miltefosine. We show that inflammatory human macrophages get infected with Leishmania parasites at the site of infection. Furthermore, a Leishmania-specific human-derived T cell response is initiated. However, the human immune system is not able to prevent systemic infection. Thus, we treated the mice with Miltefosine to reduce the parasitic load. Notably, this chemotherapy resulted in a reduction of the parasite load in distinct organs. Comparable to some Miltefosine treated patients, humanized mice developed severe side effects, which are not detectable in the classical murine model of experimental leishmaniasis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study describes for the first time L. major infection in humanized mice, characterizes the disease development, the induction of human adaptive and innate immune response including cytokine production and the efficiency of Miltefosine treatment in these animals. In summary, humanized mice might be beneficial for future preclinical chemotherapeutic studies in systemic (visceral leishmaniasis allowing the investigation of human immune response, side effects of the drug

  5. Seasonal changes in human immune responses to malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Theander, T G

    1993-01-01

    Cellular as well as humorol immune responses to malaria antigens fluctuate in time in individuals living in molono-endemic areas, particularly where malaria transmission is seasonal. The most pronounced changes are seen in association with clinical attacks, but osymptomatic infection can also lead...... to apparent immune depression. However, recent data have shown that seasonal variation in cellular immune responses may occur even in the absence of detectable porositaemia. Here, Lars Hviid and Thor G. Theonder review the seasonal variation in human immune responses to malaria, and discuss its possible...

  6. Response of neotropical bat assemblages to human land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Rodrigo; Badano, Ernesto I; Moreno, Claudia E

    2013-10-01

    Neotropical bats are sensitive to human-induced habitat changes, and some authors believe bats can be used as bioindicators. In the literature, however, the results are disparate. Some results show bat diversity deceases as disturbance increases, whereas others indicate no effect. Determining the general response patterns of bats when they encounter different degrees of human-induced disturbance across the Neotropics would help to determine their usefulness as bioindicators. In a series of meta-analyses, we compared the occurrence frequency of bat species between well-preserved forests and human-use areas. We obtained data through an extensive review of published peer-reviewed articles, theses, and reports. The overall effect size indicated that human-use areas harbored more bat species than well-preserved forests. Different response patterns emerged when meta-analyses were conducted separately by family, feeding habit, vegetation stratum, and conservation status. Our results suggest that bat assemblages display strong responses to forest loss and land-use change and that the direction and magnitude of these responses depends on the bat group under study and the type of disturbance. Our results are consistent with the idea that bats are useful for assessing the effects of habitat changes in the Neotropics. However, with our meta-analyses we could not detect fine differences in bat feeding habits, especially within Phyllostomidae, or elucidate the effect of landscape configuration. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. Sex hormones and the immune response in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Annechien; Heineman, Maas Jan; Faas, Marijke M.

    2005-01-01

    In addition to their effects on sexual differentiation and reproduction, sex hormones appear to influence the immune system. This results in a sexual dimorphism in the immune response in humans: for instance, females produce more vigorous cellular and more vigorous humoral immune reactions, are more

  8. Immediate hypersensitivity responses in the immunopathogenesis of human onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, E A

    1985-01-01

    It is not clear what role immediate hypersensitivity immune responses have in the pathogenesis of human onchocerciasis, but it is certain that these responses are prominent both in the course of natural infection and during the Mazzotti reactions that follow treatment with diethylcarbamazine. In humans, the levels of total serum IgE associated with onchocerciasis are as high or higher than those associated with almost any helminth infection, although specific IgE antibodies to Onchocerca volvulus appear to be a small and still poorly characterized fraction of the total serum IgE. Evidence about the relationship of these prominent IgE responses in patients with onchocerciasis to the onchocercal skin disease that manifests as pruritus and papular eruptions is conflicting, but in a guinea pig model of ocular pathology induced by onchocerca microfilariae evidence for the pathogenetic importance of IgE and immediate hypersensitivity is much less equivocal. The suggestive findings from this model make it imperative to carry out similar studies of Onchocerca-affected human eyes to determine whether immediate hypersensitivity responses play a similar critical role in the pathogenesis of the ocular lesions in humans.

  9. Human Trafficking in Nepal: Post-Earthquake Risk and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, Bishal; Keeling, June; Kallestrup, Per

    2016-09-15

    As Nepal mourns the 1-year commemoration of the April 2015 earthquake and its aftershocks that killed more than 8500 people and left thousands injured and displaced, other more hidden repercussions of the resultant chaotic environment need attention: the increased risk of human trafficking. Considering that natural disasters provide a milieu for this illicit trade, there is a need for a robust response from stakeholders such as donors, civil society organizations, and government organizations against human trafficking following disasters such as the Nepal earthquake. Responsibility to prevent and fight trafficking should be explicitly included in the mandate of relief and rehabilitation mechanisms set up at the national level to coordinate the disaster relief response, serving to support populations in both rural and urban areas. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 2).

  10. Collective response of human populations to large-scale emergencies

    CERN Document Server

    Bagrow, James P; Barabási, Albert-László; 10.1371/journal.pone.0017680

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response.

  11. Collective response of human populations to large-scale emergencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Bagrow

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response.

  12. The immune response of the human brain to abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Anton; Cervenka, Simon; Jonsson Fagerlund, Malin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surgery launches a systemic inflammatory reaction that reaches the brain and associates with immune activation and cognitive decline. Although preclinical studies have in part described this systemic-to-brain signaling pathway, we lack information on how these changes appear in humans....... This study examines the short- and long-term impact of abdominal surgery on the human brain immune system by positron emission tomography (PET) in relation to blood immune reactivity, plasma inflammatory biomarkers, and cognitive function. METHODS: Eight males undergoing prostatectomy under general...... to change in [(11) C]PBR28 binding (p = 0.027). INTERPRETATION: This study translates preclinical data on changes in the brain immune system after surgery to humans, and suggests an interplay between the human brain and the inflammatory response of the peripheral innate immune system. These findings may...

  13. Anticipating Human Activities Using Object Affordances for Reactive Robotic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppula, Hema S; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human perception is anticipation, which we use extensively in our day-to-day activities when interacting with other humans as well as with our surroundings. Anticipating which activities will a human do next (and how) can enable an assistive robot to plan ahead for reactive responses. Furthermore, anticipation can even improve the detection accuracy of past activities. The challenge, however, is two-fold: We need to capture the rich context for modeling the activities and object affordances, and we need to anticipate the distribution over a large space of future human activities. In this work, we represent each possible future using an anticipatory temporal conditional random field (ATCRF) that models the rich spatial-temporal relations through object affordances. We then consider each ATCRF as a particle and represent the distribution over the potential futures using a set of particles. In extensive evaluation on CAD-120 human activity RGB-D dataset, we first show that anticipation improves the state-of-the-art detection results. We then show that for new subjects (not seen in the training set), we obtain an activity anticipation accuracy (defined as whether one of top three predictions actually happened) of 84.1, 74.4 and 62.2 percent for an anticipation time of 1, 3 and 10 seconds respectively. Finally, we also show a robot using our algorithm for performing a few reactive responses.

  14. Social responsibility of nursing in policies of health humanization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Trentini

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: new conceptions of the world have focused on restructuring health policies and designing a new healthcare model.Objective: to reflect on the humanization policy as part of health promotion with emphasis on nursing care.Content: The article mentions paradigm changes and refers to the biomedical model and the new condition of diversity in models of care practices for health promotion and co-responsibility of nursing in generating and sustaining the humanization of nursing care. It rethinks strategies and commitment to co-responsibility by nursing staff in promoting population health. Participation of nurses in promoting humanization care has shown signs of development in its acceptance, bonding healthcare service professionals and its users. An interview-conversation as a strategy for collecting information is highlighted, whether to care or to research based on a humanization framework.Conclusions: Sensitive listening, modality of dialogue, and the conversational interview method are relationship techniques and means to acquire skills for policy development in humanizing care in health promotion.

  15. Modulation of Human Immune Response by Fungal Biocontrol Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinovas, Cibele; de Oliveira Mendes, Tiago A.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Lima-Santos, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Although the vast majority of biological control agents is generally regarded as safe for humans and environment, the increased exposure of agriculture workers, and consumer population to fungal substances may affect the immune system. Those compounds may be associated with both intense stimulation, resulting in IgE-mediated allergy and immune downmodulation induced by molecules such as cyclosporin A and mycotoxins. This review discusses the potential effects of biocontrol fungal components on human immune responses, possibly associated to infectious, inflammatory diseases, and defective defenses. PMID:28217107

  16. Are Children with Autism More Responsive to Animated Characters? A Study of Interactions with Humans and Human-Controlled Avatars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Elizabeth J.; Williams, Diane L.; Hodgins, Jessica K.; Lehman, Jill F.

    2014-01-01

    Few direct comparisons have been made between the responsiveness of children with autism to computer-generated or animated characters and their responsiveness to humans. Twelve 4-to 8-year-old children with autism interacted with a human therapist; a human-controlled, interactive avatar in a theme park; a human actor speaking like the avatar; and…

  17. Microarray analysis of human epithelial cell responses to bacterial interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Jeffrey J; Lamont, Richard J; Handfield, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Host-pathogen interactions are inherently complex and dynamic. The recent use of human microarrays has been invaluable to monitor the effects of various bacterial and viral pathogens upon host cell gene expression programs. This methodology has allowed the host response transcriptome of several cell lines to be studied on a global scale. To this point, the great majority of reports have focused on the response of immune cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells. These studies revealed that the immune response to microbial pathogens is tailored to different microbial challenges. Conversely, the paradigm for epithelial cells has--until recently--held that the epithelium mostly served as a relatively passive physical barrier to infection. It is now generally accepted that the epithelial barrier contributes more actively to signaling events in the immune response. In light of this shift, this review will compare transcriptional profiling data from studies that involved host-pathogen interactions occurring with epithelial cells. Experiments that defined both a common core response, as well as pathogen-specific host responses will be discussed. This review will also summarize the contributions that transcriptional profiling analysis has made to our understanding of bacterial physio-pathogensis of infection. This will include a discussion of how host transcriptional responses can be used to infer the function of virulence determinants from bacterial pathogens interacting with epithelial mucosa. In particular, we will expand upon the lessons that have been learned from gastro-intestinal and oral pathogens, as well as from members of the commensal flora.

  18. Brain connectivity reflects human aesthetic responses to music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Matthew E.; Ellis, Robert J.; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    Humans uniquely appreciate aesthetics, experiencing pleasurable responses to complex stimuli that confer no clear intrinsic value for survival. However, substantial variability exists in the frequency and specificity of aesthetic responses. While pleasure from aesthetics is attributed to the neural circuitry for reward, what accounts for individual differences in aesthetic reward sensitivity remains unclear. Using a combination of survey data, behavioral and psychophysiological measures and diffusion tensor imaging, we found that white matter connectivity between sensory processing areas in the superior temporal gyrus and emotional and social processing areas in the insula and medial prefrontal cortex explains individual differences in reward sensitivity to music. Our findings provide the first evidence for a neural basis of individual differences in sensory access to the reward system, and suggest that social–emotional communication through the auditory channel may offer an evolutionary basis for music making as an aesthetically rewarding function in humans. PMID:26966157

  19. Modulation of human immune responses by bovine interleukin-10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerco den Hartog

    Full Text Available Cytokines can be functionally active across species barriers. Bovine IL-10 has an amino acid sequence identity with human IL-10 of 76.8%. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether bovine IL-10 has immunomodulatory activities on human monocytes and dendritic cells. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy donors, and used directly or allowed to differentiate to dendritic cells under the influence of IL-4 and GM-CSF. Recombinant bovine IL-10 inhibited TLR induced activation of monocytes, and dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced activation of monocyte-derived DCs comparable to human IL-10. By using blocking antibodies to either bovine IL-10 or the human IL-10 receptor it was demonstrated that inhibition of monocyte activation by bovine IL-10 was dependent on binding of bovine IL-10 to the human IL-10R. These data demonstrate that bovine IL-10 potently inhibits the activation of human myeloid cells in response to TLR activation. Bovine IL-10 present in dairy products may thus potentially contribute to the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis and allergy, enhance mucosal tolerance induction and decrease intestinal inflammation and may therefore be applicable in infant foods and in immunomodulatory diets.

  20. The impact of skin colour on human photobiological responses

    OpenAIRE

    Fajuyigbe, Damilola; Young, Antony R.

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exerts both beneficial and adverse effects on human skin. Epidemiological studies show a lower incidence of skin cancer in people with pigmented skins compared to fair skins. This is attributed to photoprotection by epidermal melanin, as is the poorer vitamin D status of those with darker skins. We summarize a wide range of photobiological responses across different skin colours including DNA damage and immunosuppression. Some studies show the gen...

  1. Tirasemtiv amplifies skeletal muscle response to nerve activation in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen,Richard; Saikali, Khalil G; Chou, Willis; Alan J Russell; Chen, Michael M.; Vijayakumar, Vipin; Stoltz, Randall R.; Baudry, Stephane; Enoka, Roger M.; Morgans, David J; Wolff, Andrew A.; Malik, Fady I

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In this study we tested the hypothesis that tirasemtiv, a selective fast skeletal muscle troponin activator that sensitizes the sarcomere to calcium, could amplify the response of muscle to neuromuscular input in humans. Methods: Healthy men received tirasemtiv and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, 4-period, crossover design. The deep fibular nerve was stimulated transcutaneously to activate the tibialis anterior muscle and produce dorsiflexion of the foot. The force–freque...

  2. Human neuronal cell protein responses to Nipah virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sharifah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV, a recently discovered zoonotic virus infects and replicates in several human cell types. Its replication in human neuronal cells, however, is less efficient in comparison to other fully susceptible cells. In the present study, the SK-N-MC human neuronal cell protein response to NiV infection is examined using proteomic approaches. Results Method for separation of the NiV-infected human neuronal cell proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE was established. At least 800 protein spots were resolved of which seven were unique, six were significantly up-regulated and eight were significantly down-regulated. Six of these altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS and confirmed using MS/MS. The heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F, guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 and cytochrome bc1 were present in abundance in the NiV-infected SK-N-MC cells in contrast to hnRNPs H and H2 that were significantly down-regulated. Conclusion Several human neuronal cell proteins that are differentially expressed following NiV infection are identified. The proteins are associated with various cellular functions and their abundance reflects their significance in the cytopathologic responses to the infection and the regulation of NiV replication. The potential importance of the ratio of hnRNP F, and hnRNPs H and H2 in regulation of NiV replication, the association of the mitochondrial protein with the cytopathologic responses to the infection and induction of apoptosis are highlighted.

  3. Auditory event-related response in visual cortex modulates subsequent visual responses in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naue, Nicole; Rach, Stefan; Strüber, Daniel; Huster, Rene J; Zaehle, Tino; Körner, Ursula; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2011-05-25

    Growing evidence from electrophysiological data in animal and human studies suggests that multisensory interaction is not exclusively a higher-order process, but also takes place in primary sensory cortices. Such early multisensory interaction is thought to be mediated by means of phase resetting. The presentation of a stimulus to one sensory modality resets the phase of ongoing oscillations in another modality such that processing in the latter modality is modulated. In humans, evidence for such a mechanism is still sparse. In the current study, the influence of an auditory stimulus on visual processing was investigated by measuring the electroencephalogram (EEG) and behavioral responses of humans to visual, auditory, and audiovisual stimulation with varying stimulus-onset asynchrony (SOA). We observed three distinct oscillatory EEG responses in our data. An initial gamma-band response around 50 Hz was followed by a beta-band response around 25 Hz, and a theta response around 6 Hz. The latter was enhanced in response to cross-modal stimuli as compared to either unimodal stimuli. Interestingly, the beta response to unimodal auditory stimuli was dominant in electrodes over visual areas. The SOA between auditory and visual stimuli--albeit not consciously perceived--had a modulatory impact on the multisensory evoked beta-band responses; i.e., the amplitude depended on SOA in a sinusoidal fashion, suggesting a phase reset. These findings further support the notion that parameters of brain oscillations such as amplitude and phase are essential predictors of subsequent brain responses and might be one of the mechanisms underlying multisensory integration.

  4. Alternative Responses to the Human Resource Challenge for CBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huib Cornielje

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This commentary outlines some ways of understanding CBR and offers corresponding suggestions for responding to the contemporary human resource challenge it is faced with. It is argued that CBR exists within an increasingly complex reality, characterised by new challenges, new approaches to development and numerous international principles and guidelines.  In response, the authors advocate the use of multiple research methods, participatory action and contextualised ways of addressing human resource issues.  They suggest that new understandings are required, for future CBR workers to be enablers of people with disabilities, agents of change in communities and societies, and champions of human rights.  The complex reality of CBR suggests the need for a CBR cadre which is capable of creative and reflective reasoning.  This might be achieved through the participatory development of contextualised training curricula, practical hands-on learning, the use of mentoring, and an emphasis on reflection and adaptability.

  5. Serotonin modulates striatal responses to fairness and retaliation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, MJ; Apergis-Schoute, AM; Herrmann, B; Lieberman, MD; Müller, U; Robbins, TW; Clark, L

    2013-01-01

    Humans are willing to incur personal costs to punish others who violate social norms. Such ‘costly punishment’ is an important force for sustaining human cooperation, but the causal neurobiological determinants of punishment decisions remain unclear. Using a combination of behavioral, pharmacological and neuroimaging techniques, we show that manipulating the serotonin system in humans alters costly punishment decisions by modulating responses to fairness and retaliation in the striatum. Following dietary depletion of the serotonin precursor tryptophan, participants were more likely to punish those who treated them unfairly, and were slower to accept fair exchanges. Neuroimaging data revealed activations in the ventral and dorsal striatum that were associated with fairness and punishment, respectively. Depletion simultaneously reduced ventral striatal responses to fairness and increased dorsal striatal responses during punishment, an effect that predicted its influence on punishment behavior. Finally, we provide behavioral evidence that serotonin modulates specific retaliation, rather than general norm enforcement: depleted participants were more likely to punish unfair behavior directed toward themselves, but not unfair behavior directed toward others. Our findings demonstrate that serotonin modulates social value processing in the striatum, producing context-dependent effects on social behavior. PMID:23426678

  6. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  7. Neurobiological determinism: human freedom of choice and criminal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbaniok, Frank; Laubacher, Arja; Hardegger, Judith; Rossegger, Astrid; Endrass, Jérôme; Moskvitin, Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    Several authors have argued that criminal behavior is generally caused by neurobiological deficits. This assumption not only questions the concept of free will and a person's responsibility for his or her own actions but also the principle of guilt in criminal law. When critically examining the current state of research, it becomes apparent that the results are not sufficient to support the existence of a universally valid neurobiological causality of criminal behavior. Moreover, the assumption of total neurobiological determination of human behavior and the impossibility of individual responsibility are characterized by both faulty empiricism and methodical misconceptions. The principle of relative determinism and the analysis of the offender's behavior at the time of the offense thus remain the central and cogent approach to the assessment of criminal responsibility.

  8. Immunological responses against human papilloma virus and human papilloma virus induced laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitose, Shun-ichi; Sakazaki, T; Ono, T; Kurita, T; Mihashi, H; Nakashima, T

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the local immune status in the larynx in the presence of infection or carcinogenesis associated with human papilloma virus. Cytological samples (for human papilloma virus detection) and laryngeal secretions (for immunoglobulin assessment) were obtained from 31 patients with laryngeal disease, during microscopic laryngeal surgery. On histological examination, 12 patients had squamous cell carcinoma, four had laryngeal papilloma and 15 had other benign laryngeal disease. Cytological samples were tested for human papilloma virus DNA using the Hybrid Capture 2 assay. High risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected in 25 per cent of patients (three of 12) with laryngeal cancer. Low risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected only in three laryngeal papilloma patients. The mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A in human papilloma virus DNA positive patients were more than twice those in human papilloma virus DNA negative patients. A statistically significant difference was observed between the secretory immunoglobulin A concentrations in the two groups. Patients with laryngeal cancer had higher laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type, compared with patients with benign laryngeal disease. The study assessed the mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type in the 12 laryngeal cancer patients, comparing human papilloma virus DNA positive patients (n = 3) and human papilloma virus DNA negative patients (n = 9); the mean concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A tended to be greater in human papilloma virus DNA positive cancer patients, compared with human papilloma virus DNA negative cancer patients. These results suggest that the local laryngeal immune response is activated by infection or carcinogenesis due to human papilloma virus. The findings strongly suggest that secretory IgA has inhibitory activity

  9. CD4 binding to major histocompatibility complex class II antigens induces LFA-1-dependent and -independent homotypic adhesion of B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas, G S; Cambier, J C; Tedder, T F

    1992-01-01

    T helper cells recognize processed antigen (Ag) in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens present on the surface of B cells and other Ag-presenting cells. This interaction is mediated through the T cell receptor complex with associate recognition of class II molecules by the CD4 molecule. In this study, the binding of a soluble recombinant CD4/Ig heavy chain fusion protein (CD4-gamma 3) or monoclonal antibody (mAb) to class II antigens on human B cells was shown to induce rapid and specific homotypic adhesion of B cells and most B lymphoblastoid cell lines. mAb reactive with CD4 inhibited CD4-gamma 3-induced adhesion and a mutant B lymphoblastoid cell line deficient in class II antigens failed to respond. Induction of homotypic adhesion was dependent on energy metabolism and a functional cytoskeleton, and class II+ pre-B cells did not exhibit adhesion in response to these stimuli, suggesting that cross-linking of class II molecules generated a transmembrane signal and did not simply aggregate cells. In addition, MHC class II-induced adhesion was Fc receptor independent, as 15 mAb of different Ig isotypes reactive with HLA-D or HLA-DQ gene products induced adhesion. Anti-class II mAb and CD4-gamma 3 were able to induce adhesion at concentrations as low as 10 ng/ml and 100 ng/ml, respectively. Suboptimal stimulation of B cell lines through HLA-D antigens induced homotypic adhesion that was dependent on the activation of LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18), and which could be blocked by specific mAb. However, at greater signal strengths, adhesion was not blocked by mAb against the known adhesion receptors, suggesting the induction of a novel adhesion pathway. Consistent with this, homotypic adhesion induced by engagement of MHC class II antigens was observed with LFA-1-deficient B cell lines, and was independent of CD49d or CD18 expression. Thus, the direct engagement of B cell class II antigens by CD4 is likely to generate transmembrane signals which

  10. Neandertal versus Modern Human Dietary Responses to Climatic Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zaatari, Sireen; Grine, Frederick E; Ungar, Peter S; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The Neandertal lineage developed successfully throughout western Eurasia and effectively survived the harsh and severely changing environments of the alternating glacial/interglacial cycles from the middle of the Pleistocene until Marine Isotope Stage 3. Yet, towards the end of this stage, at the time of deteriorating climatic conditions that eventually led to the Last Glacial Maximum, and soon after modern humans entered western Eurasia, the Neandertals disappeared. Western Eurasia was by then exclusively occupied by modern humans. We use occlusal molar microwear texture analysis to examine aspects of diet in western Eurasian Paleolithic hominins in relation to fluctuations in food supplies that resulted from the oscillating climatic conditions of the Pleistocene. There is demonstrable evidence for differences in behavior that distinguish Upper Paleolithic humans from members of the Neandertal lineage. Specifically, whereas the Neandertals altered their diets in response to changing paleoecological conditions, the diets of Upper Paleolithic humans seem to have been less affected by slight changes in vegetation/climatic conditions but were linked to changes in their technological complexes. The results of this study also indicate differences in resource exploitation strategies between these two hominin groups. We argue that these differences in subsistence strategies, if they had already been established at the time of the first contact between these two hominin taxa, may have given modern humans an advantage over the Neandertals, and may have contributed to the persistence of our species despite habitat-related changes in food availabilities associated with climate fluctuations.

  11. Neandertal versus Modern Human Dietary Responses to Climatic Fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sireen El Zaatari

    Full Text Available The Neandertal lineage developed successfully throughout western Eurasia and effectively survived the harsh and severely changing environments of the alternating glacial/interglacial cycles from the middle of the Pleistocene until Marine Isotope Stage 3. Yet, towards the end of this stage, at the time of deteriorating climatic conditions that eventually led to the Last Glacial Maximum, and soon after modern humans entered western Eurasia, the Neandertals disappeared. Western Eurasia was by then exclusively occupied by modern humans. We use occlusal molar microwear texture analysis to examine aspects of diet in western Eurasian Paleolithic hominins in relation to fluctuations in food supplies that resulted from the oscillating climatic conditions of the Pleistocene. There is demonstrable evidence for differences in behavior that distinguish Upper Paleolithic humans from members of the Neandertal lineage. Specifically, whereas the Neandertals altered their diets in response to changing paleoecological conditions, the diets of Upper Paleolithic humans seem to have been less affected by slight changes in vegetation/climatic conditions but were linked to changes in their technological complexes. The results of this study also indicate differences in resource exploitation strategies between these two hominin groups. We argue that these differences in subsistence strategies, if they had already been established at the time of the first contact between these two hominin taxa, may have given modern humans an advantage over the Neandertals, and may have contributed to the persistence of our species despite habitat-related changes in food availabilities associated with climate fluctuations.

  12. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (TFH) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of TFH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on TFH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate TFH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing TFH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138(+) plasma and IgD(-)CD27(+) memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented TFH cell development. Added to TFH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on TFH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control TFH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the TFH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the TFH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A study of T CD4, CD8 and B lymphocytes in narcoleptic patients Estudo dos linfócitos T CD4, CD8 e B em pacientes com narcolepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Morgadinho Santos Coelho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleep and cataplexy. Little is known about the possible difference in pathophysiology between patients with or without cataplexy. OBJECTIVE: To quantify T CD4, T CD8 and B lymphocytes in subgroups of patients with narcolepsy and the presence or absence of the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele between groups. METHOD: Our study was prospective and controlled (transversal with 22 narcoleptic patients and 23 health control subjects. Patients underwent an all-night polysomnographic recording (PSG and a multiple sleep latency Test (MSLT. The histocompatibility antigen allele (HLA-DQB1*0602, T CD4, CD8 and B lymphocytes were quantified in control subjects and in narcoleptics. RESULTS: The HLA-DQB1*0602 allele was identified in 10 (62.5% of our 16 cataplexic subjects and in 2 (33.3% of the 6 patients without cataplexy (p=0.24. In control subjects, HLA-DQB1*0602 allele was identified in 5 (20%. A significant decrease in T CD4 and B lymphocytes was found in narcoleptic patients with recurrent cataplexy when compared with our patients without cataplexy. CONCLUSION: Autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis were associated with a decrease in sub-group of T CD4 and B lymphocytes. A drop in B lymphocytes count in reumathoid arthritis might, it is posited, be correlated to the presence of HLA-DRB1 allele along with an overall worsened outcome of the affliction. The theory of an increase in consumption of B lymphocytes over the maturation phase has likewise been put forward. Our study reinforces the view that narcolepsy should be considered from an immunological perspective.A narcolepsia é caracterizada por sonolência excessiva diurna e cataplexia. Pouco se sabe sobre as diferenças fisiopatológicas entre pacientes com e sem cataplexia. OBJETIVO: Quantificar os linfócitos T CD4, T CD8 e B e a presença do alelo HLA-DQB1*0602 nos subgrupos de pacientes com narcolepsia. MÉTODO: O

  14. Human Capital information: generating intangibles and social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Tejedo Romero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intangible resources have become the most important in the process of generating business' wealth in a sustainable way, namely the Human Capital. However, the success and survival of the companies is subject to the approval of its stakeholders. This means that companies take steps to ensure that their actions are perceived as legitimate, and one way is by providing voluntary information. Therefore, under the framework of the Theory of Legitimacy and Stakeholders, our goal is to analyze how Spanish companies are voluntarily reporting on its Human Capital in annual reports, information about the generation of intangibles (knowledge and social responsibility. Thus, using the methodology of content analysis, the empirical evidence shows that companies are reporting relatively little information on topics related to Human Capital being the topics related to training and development of employees the most disclosure. However, with regard to social responsibility, there is a rising trend to provide information concerning the policy of equality and diversity, risk prevention and the relationship between employers and employees.

  15. Crossing Thresholds - Human Responses to Tsunami Forcing in the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, J. R.; Chague-Goff, C.

    2014-12-01

    The 11 March 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami caused widespread devastation to coastal communities in Japan. This event however was merely the latest in a long line of similar occurrences throughout the Pacific over time. All the recent large tsunamis have had their predecessors, and a growing database of palaeotsunamis in the Pacific suggests that several past events have been either similar in magnitude or greater than their historical counterparts. Not only are we gathering data concerning Pacific palaeotsunamis but we are also identifying contemporaneous punctuated histories of changing human settlement patterns across the Pacific. In particular, the almost two millennia 'long pause' in eastward Polynesian migration and the abandonment of long distance sea-voyaging in the 15th century. It is suggested that large palaeotsunamis and their generating mechanisms forced major societal responses. Given the unquestioned impacts of recent tsunamis on human societies, it is reasonable to suggest that past societal responses can be used as proxies for contemporaneous environmental forcing in those parts of the world where independent evidence of the effects of these events is still being gathered. In the Pacific there are a range of responses that extend well beyond the abandonment of long distance sea-voyaging such as the outbreak of region-wide conflict and the associated abandonment of settlements in exposed (coastal) locations. The contemporaneity of these effects across a vast region requires a driver that is external to particular island groups. Given that this must have impacted coastal resources severely and enduringly, the only possibility is that this driver was of oceanic origin. This hypothesis is compelling when considered alongside the growing database of more conventional lines of evidence. The question therefore is how well are similar threshold responses recognised throughout the World? Are there similar region-wide responses that have been pigeonholed under the

  16. Enhancement by platelets of oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, K.K.; Powell, J.; Johnson, K.J.; Ward, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    When human blood neutrophils were incubated with immune complexes (consisting of IgG antibody) in the presence of platelets, there was a 2 to 10 fold enhancement in the generation of O-/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. This enhancement phenomenon was proportional to the dose of immune complex added and the number of platelets present. The response was not agonist specific since similar enhancement also occurred with the following agonists: phorbol myristate acetate, opsonized zymosan particles and the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-met-leu-phe. The platelet related phenomenon of enhanced O-/sub 2/ generation could not be reproduced by the addition of serotonin, histamine or platelet-derived growth factor and was not affected by prior treatment of platelets with cyclooxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin, piroxicam) or lipoxygenase inhibitors (nafazatrom, BW755C or nordihydroguaiaretic acid). However, activation of platelets by thrombin caused release into the platelet supernatant fluid of a factor that, only in the presence of immune complexes, caused enhanced O-/sub 2/ responses to neutrophils. These data indicate that platelets potentiate oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils and suggest a mechanisms by which platelets may participate in tissue injury which is mediated by oxygen radical products from activated neutrophils.

  17. Humanized Mouse Model of Ebola Virus Disease Mimics the Immune Responses in Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Brian H; Spengler, Jessica R; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Khristova, Marina L; Sealy, Tara K; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Dodd, Kimberly A; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Sanders, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-03-01

    Animal models recapitulating human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are critical for insights into virus pathogenesis. Ebola virus (EBOV) isolates derived directly from human specimens do not, without adaptation, cause disease in immunocompetent adult rodents. Here, we describe EVD in mice engrafted with human immune cells (hu-BLT). hu-BLT mice developed EVD following wild-type EBOV infection. Infection with high-dose EBOV resulted in rapid, lethal EVD with high viral loads, alterations in key human antiviral immune cytokines and chemokines, and severe histopathologic findings similar to those shown in the limited human postmortem data available. A dose- and donor-dependent clinical course was observed in hu-BLT mice infected with lower doses of either Mayinga (1976) or Makona (2014) isolates derived from human EBOV cases. Engraftment of the human cellular immune system appeared to be essential for the observed virulence, as nonengrafted mice did not support productive EBOV replication or develop lethal disease. hu-BLT mice offer a unique model for investigating the human immune response in EVD and an alternative animal model for EVD pathogenesis studies and therapeutic screening.

  18. Quantifying human response capabilities towards tsunami threats at community level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J.; Mück, M.; Zosseder, K.; Wegscheider, S.; Taubenböck, H.; Strunz, G.; Muhari, A.; Anwar, H. Z.; Birkmann, J.; Gebert, N.

    2009-04-01

    Decision makers at the community level need detailed information on tsunami risks in their area. Knowledge on potential hazard impact, exposed elements such as people, critical facilities and lifelines, people's coping capacity and recovery potential are crucial to plan precautionary measures for adaptation and to mitigate potential impacts of tsunamis on society and the environment. A crucial point within a people-centred tsunami risk assessment is to quantify the human response capabilities towards tsunami threats. Based on this quantification and spatial representation in maps tsunami affected and safe areas, difficult-to-evacuate areas, evacuation target points and evacuation routes can be assigned and used as an important contribution to e.g. community level evacuation planning. Major component in the quantification of human response capabilities towards tsunami impacts is the factor time. The human response capabilities depend on the estimated time of arrival (ETA) of a tsunami, the time until technical or natural warning signs (ToNW) can be received, the reaction time (RT) of the population (human understanding of a tsunami warning and the decision to take appropriate action), the evacuation time (ET, time people need to reach a safe area) and the actual available response time (RsT = ETA - ToNW - RT). If RsT is larger than ET, people in the respective areas are able to reach a safe area and rescue themselves. Critical areas possess RsT values equal or even smaller ET and hence people whin these areas will be directly affected by a tsunami. Quantifying the factor time is challenging and an attempt to this is presented here. The ETA can be derived by analyzing pre-computed tsunami scenarios for a respective area. For ToNW we assume that the early warning center is able to fulfil the Indonesian presidential decree to issue a warning within 5 minutes. RT is difficult as here human intrinsic factors as educational level, believe, tsunami knowledge and experience

  19. Nuclear responses to depletion of mitochondrial DNA in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K; Neufer, P D; Williams, R S

    1995-11-01

    The derivation of human cell lines devoid of mitochondrial (mt) DNA (rho 0) provides an opportunity to study nuclear responses to a chronic impairment of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Expression of several nuclear genes is induced in human rho 0 cells, including those encoding integral proteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane, intermediate filaments, and ribosomes. In contrast to conditions in which mitochondrial respiration is altered acutely, expression of heat shock proteins and immediate early genes is not induced. Mitochondria from rho 0 cells maintain a transmembrane electrochemical potential and are distributed within the cytoplasm of these cells in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells. We conclude that a chronic deficiency of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation produced by elimination of mtDNA is associated with a different pattern of gene induction than that provoked by other acute or subacute conditions that impair mitochondrial respiration or create energy demands in excess of mitochondrial respiratory capacity.

  20. Human responses to bright light of different durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anne-Marie; Santhi, Nayantara; St Hilaire, Melissa; Gronfier, Claude; Bradstreet, Dayna S; Duffy, Jeanne F; Lockley, Steven W; Kronauer, Richard E; Czeisler, Charles A

    2012-07-01

    Light exposure in the early night induces phase delays of the circadian rhythm in melatonin in humans. Previous studies have investigated the effect of timing, intensity, wavelength, history and pattern of light stimuli on the human circadian timing system. We present results from a study of the duration–response relationship to phase-delaying bright light. Thirty-nine young healthy participants (16 female; 22.18±3.62 years) completed a 9-day inpatient study. Following three baseline days, participants underwent an initial circadian phase assessment procedure in dim light (bright light pulse (∼10,000 lux) of 0.2 h, 1.0 h, 2.5 h or 4.0 h duration during a 4.5 h controlled-posture episode centred in a 16 h wake episode. After another 8 h sleep episode, participants completed a second circadian phase assessment. Phase shifts were calculated from the difference in the clock time of the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) between the initial and final phase assessments. Exposure to varying durations of bright light reset the circadian pacemaker in a dose-dependent, non-linear manner. Per minute of exposure, the 0.2 h duration was over 5 times more effective at phase delaying the circadian pacemaker (1.07±0.36 h) as compared with the 4.0 h duration (2.65±0.24 h). Acute melatonin suppression and subjective sleepiness also had a dose-dependent response to light exposure duration. These results provide strong evidence for a non-linear resetting response of the human circadian pacemaker to light duration.

  1. Transcriptional responses of human epidermal keratinocytes to Oncostatin-M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finelt, Nika; Gazel, Alix; Gorelick, Steven; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2005-08-21

    Oncostatin-M (OsM) plays an important role in inflammatory and oncogenic processes in skin, including psoriasis and Kaposi sarcoma. However, the molecular responses to OsM in keratinocytes have not been explored in depth. Here we show the results of transcriptional profiling in OsM-treated primary human epidermal keratinocytes, using high-density DNA microarrays. We find that OsM strongly and specifically affects the expression of many genes, in particular those involved with innate immunity, angiogenesis, adhesion, motility, tissue remodeling, cell cycle and transcription. The timing of the responses to OsM comprises two waves, early at 1h, and late at 48 h, with much fewer genes regulated in the intervening time points. Secreted cytokines and growth factors and their receptors, as well as nuclear transcription factors, are primary targets of OsM regulation, and these, in turn, effect the secondary changes.

  2. Monitoring human melanocytic cell responses to piperine using multispectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Phillips, Kevin G.; Sonka, Julia; Yelma, Aznegashe; Reddy, Neha; Vanka, Meenakshi; Thuillier, Philippe; Soumyanath, Amala; Jacques, Steven

    2011-03-01

    Vitiligo is a depigmentary disease characterized by melanocyte loss attributed most commonly to autoimmune mechanisms. Currently vitiligo has a high incidence (1% worldwide) but a poor set of treatment options. Piperine, a compound found in black pepper, is a potential treatment for the depigmentary skin disease vitiligo, due to its ability to stimulate mouse epidermal melanocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The present study investigates the use of multispectral imaging and an image processing technique based on local contrast to quantify the stimulatory effects of piperine on human melanocyte proliferation in reconstructed epidermis. We demonstrate the ability of the imaging method to quantify increased pigmentation in response to piperine treatment. The quantization of melanocyte stimulation by the proposed imaging technique illustrates the potential use of this technology to quickly assess therapeutic responses of vitiligo tissue culture models to treatment non-invasively.

  3. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration.

  4. The effect of music on the human stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam V Thoma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Music listening has been suggested to beneficially impact health via stress-reducing effects. However, the existing literature presents itself with a limited number of investigations and with discrepancies in reported findings that may result from methodological shortcomings (e.g. small sample size, no valid stressor. It was the aim of the current study to address this gap in knowledge and overcome previous shortcomings by thoroughly examining music effects across endocrine, autonomic, cognitive, and emotional domains of the human stress response. METHODS: Sixty healthy female volunteers (mean age = 25 years were exposed to a standardized psychosocial stress test after having been randomly assigned to one of three different conditions prior to the stress test: 1 relaxing music ('Miserere', Allegri (RM, 2 sound of rippling water (SW, and 3 rest without acoustic stimulation (R. Salivary cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA, heart rate (HR, respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA, subjective stress perception and anxiety were repeatedly assessed in all subjects. We hypothesized that listening to RM prior to the stress test, compared to SW or R would result in a decreased stress response across all measured parameters. RESULTS: The three conditions significantly differed regarding cortisol response (p = 0.025 to the stressor, with highest concentrations in the RM and lowest in the SW condition. After the stressor, sAA (p=0.026 baseline values were reached considerably faster in the RM group than in the R group. HR and psychological measures did not significantly differ between groups. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that music listening impacted the psychobiological stress system. Listening to music prior to a standardized stressor predominantly affected the autonomic nervous system (in terms of a faster recovery, and to a lesser degree the endocrine and psychological stress response. These findings may help better understanding the

  5. The Effect of Music on the Human Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Myriam V.; La Marca, Roberto; Brönnimann, Rebecca; Finkel, Linda; Ehlert, Ulrike; Nater, Urs M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Music listening has been suggested to beneficially impact health via stress-reducing effects. However, the existing literature presents itself with a limited number of investigations and with discrepancies in reported findings that may result from methodological shortcomings (e.g. small sample size, no valid stressor). It was the aim of the current study to address this gap in knowledge and overcome previous shortcomings by thoroughly examining music effects across endocrine, autonomic, cognitive, and emotional domains of the human stress response. Methods Sixty healthy female volunteers (mean age = 25 years) were exposed to a standardized psychosocial stress test after having been randomly assigned to one of three different conditions prior to the stress test: 1) relaxing music (‘Miserere’, Allegri) (RM), 2) sound of rippling water (SW), and 3) rest without acoustic stimulation (R). Salivary cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), subjective stress perception and anxiety were repeatedly assessed in all subjects. We hypothesized that listening to RM prior to the stress test, compared to SW or R would result in a decreased stress response across all measured parameters. Results The three conditions significantly differed regarding cortisol response (p = 0.025) to the stressor, with highest concentrations in the RM and lowest in the SW condition. After the stressor, sAA (p=0.026) baseline values were reached considerably faster in the RM group than in the R group. HR and psychological measures did not significantly differ between groups. Conclusion Our findings indicate that music listening impacted the psychobiological stress system. Listening to music prior to a standardized stressor predominantly affected the autonomic nervous system (in terms of a faster recovery), and to a lesser degree the endocrine and psychological stress response. These findings may help better understanding the

  6. The effect of music on the human stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Myriam V; La Marca, Roberto; Brönnimann, Rebecca; Finkel, Linda; Ehlert, Ulrike; Nater, Urs M

    2013-01-01

    Music listening has been suggested to beneficially impact health via stress-reducing effects. However, the existing literature presents itself with a limited number of investigations and with discrepancies in reported findings that may result from methodological shortcomings (e.g. small sample size, no valid stressor). It was the aim of the current study to address this gap in knowledge and overcome previous shortcomings by thoroughly examining music effects across endocrine, autonomic, cognitive, and emotional domains of the human stress response. Sixty healthy female volunteers (mean age = 25 years) were exposed to a standardized psychosocial stress test after having been randomly assigned to one of three different conditions prior to the stress test: 1) relaxing music ('Miserere', Allegri) (RM), 2) sound of rippling water (SW), and 3) rest without acoustic stimulation (R). Salivary cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), subjective stress perception and anxiety were repeatedly assessed in all subjects. We hypothesized that listening to RM prior to the stress test, compared to SW or R would result in a decreased stress response across all measured parameters. The three conditions significantly differed regarding cortisol response (p = 0.025) to the stressor, with highest concentrations in the RM and lowest in the SW condition. After the stressor, sAA (p=0.026) baseline values were reached considerably faster in the RM group than in the R group. HR and psychological measures did not significantly differ between groups. Our findings indicate that music listening impacted the psychobiological stress system. Listening to music prior to a standardized stressor predominantly affected the autonomic nervous system (in terms of a faster recovery), and to a lesser degree the endocrine and psychological stress response. These findings may help better understanding the beneficial effects of music on the human body.

  7. Neural response to emotional stimuli during experimental human endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Jennifer S; Grigoleit, Jan-Sebastian; Lichte, Philipp; Kobbe, Philipp; Rosenberger, Christina; Banner, Christina; Wolf, Oliver T; Engler, Harald; Oberbeck, Reiner; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Bingel, Ulrike; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2013-09-01

    Increases in peripheral cytokines during acute inflammation may affect various neuropsychological functions. The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to investigate the effects of acute endotoxemia on mood and the neural response to emotionally aversive visual stimuli in healthy human subjects. In a double-blind, randomized crossover study, 18 healthy males received a bolus injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.4 ng/kg) or saline. Plasma levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol as well as mood ratings were analyzed together with the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response during the presentation of aversive versus neutral pictures. Endotoxin administration induced pronounced transient increases in plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-10, and cortisol. Positive mood was decreased and state anxiety increased. In addition, activation of right inferior orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in response to emotional visual stimuli was significantly increased in the LPS condition. Increased prefrontal activation during the presentation of emotional material may reflect enhanced cognitive regulation of emotions as an adaptive response during an acute inflammation. These findings may have implications for the putative role of inflammatory processes in the pathophysiology of depression.

  8. Linearity of dose-response relationships for human carcinogenic exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.H. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    The shape of dose-response relationships is a critical factor in considering cancer risks for the work place and environmental exposure to carcinogens. Markedly different risk estimates result from assumptions of linearity versus sublinear and threshold assumptions. This paper presents evidence that the relationship between the relative risk of development of cancer and the dose rate to carcinogenic exposures is frequently linear with no evidence for thresholds. Dose-response relationships from four studies of asbestos and lung cancer were examined, all of which were consistent with a linear relationship. Analysis of the relationship between the relative risk of lung cancer and exposure to nickel in a smelter study, selected because of relatively good exposure data, demonstrated a close agreement with a linear relationship. The relationship between the level of arsenic in drinking wter and the prevalence of skin cancer also was linear for males in the highest prevalence age group in Taiwan, although there was some evidence of sublinearity for females and younger persons. Also, the relationships between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and the relative risk of lung cancer was very close to linear in many studies. The analysis of these and other studies involving human exposure to carcinogens provides empirical evidence for linearity when the response variable is a rate ratio measure, rather than a risk difference measure. Linearity in dose-response is biologically plausible, without invoking a one-hit model. Except in special circumstances. the epidemiological evidence supports linear extrapolation of cancer relative risks.

  9. Is the Money Responsible? : Financial institutions’ human rights responsibilities along a supply chain.

    OpenAIRE

    Wikström, Linnea

    2016-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a topic of rising importance in the current human rights discussion. As multinational supply chains have a growing impact on people’ lives, both in more developed and developing countries the question of how to regulate the behaviour of the companies that engage in these supply chains becomes increasingly important. States have tried to do this through both national and international law, by introducing hard law regulations as well as voluntary framewo...

  10. Specific high-affinity binding sites for a synthetic gliadin heptapeptide of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payan, D.G.; Horvath, K.; Graf, L.

    1987-03-23

    The synthetic peptide containing residues 43-49 of ..cap alpha..-gliadin, the major protein component of gluten, has previously been shown to inhibit the production of lymphokine activities by mononuclear leukocytes. The authors demonstrate using radiolabeled ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) that human peripheral blood lymphocytes express approximately 20,000-25,000 surface receptors for this peptide, with a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 20 nM. In addition, binding is inhibited by naloxone and an enkephalin analog, thus confirming the functional correlate which demonstrates inhibition by these agents of ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) functional effects. Furthermore, B-lymphocytes bind specifically a greater amount of (/sup 125/I)..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) than T-lymphocytes. The lymphocyte ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) receptor may play an important role in mediating the immunological response to ..cap alpha..-gliadin. 16 references, 4 figures.

  11. Human Macrophage Response to L. (Viannia) panamensis: Microarray Evidence for an Early Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Ricardo; Ettinger, Nicholas A.; Tikhonova, Irina; Alexander, Neal D.; Valderrama, Liliana; Hager, Janet; Wilson, Mary E.; Lin, Aiping; Zhao, Hongyu; Saravia, Nancy G.; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous findings indicate that susceptibility to Leishmania (Viannia) panamensis infection of monocyte-derived macrophages from patients and asymptomatically infected individuals were associated with the adaptive immune response and clinical outcome. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the basis for this difference we examined differential gene expression of human monocyte-derived macrophages following exposure to L. (V.) panamensis. Gene activation profiles were determined using macrophages from healthy volunteers cultured with or without stationary phase promastigotes of L. (V.) panamensis. Significant changes in expression (>1.5-fold change; p<0.05; up- or down-regulated) were identified at 0.5, 4 and 24 hours. mRNA abundance profiles varied over time, with the highest level of activation occurring at earlier time points (0.5 and 4 hrs). In contrast to observations for other Leishmania species, most significantly changed mRNAs were up- rather than down-regulated, especially at early time points. Up-regulated transcripts over the first 24 hours belonged to pathways involving eicosanoid metabolism, oxidative stress, activation of PKC through G protein coupled receptors, or mechanism of gene regulation by peroxisome proliferators via PPARα. Additionally, a marked activation of Toll-receptor mediated pathways was observed. Comparison with published microarray data from macrophages infected with L. (Leishmania) chagasi indicate differences in the regulation of genes involved in signaling, motility and the immune response. Conclusions Results show that the early (0.5 to 24 hours) human monocyte-derived macrophage response to L. (Viannia) panamensis is not quiescent, in contrast to published reports examining later response times (48–96 hours). Early macrophage responses are important for the developing cellular response at the site of infection. The kinetics and the mRNA abundance profiles induced by L. (Viannia) panamensis illustrate the

  12. Behavioral responses associated with a human-mediated predator shelter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Shannon

    Full Text Available Human activities in protected areas can affect wildlife populations in a similar manner to predation risk, causing increases in movement and vigilance, shifts in habitat use and changes in group size. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates that in certain situations ungulate species may actually utilize areas associated with higher levels of human presence as a potential refuge from disturbance-sensitive predators. We now use four-years of behavioral activity budget data collected from pronghorn (Antilocapra americana and elk (Cervus elephus in Grand Teton National Park, USA to test whether predictable patterns of human presence can provide a shelter from predatory risk. Daily behavioral scans were conducted along two parallel sections of road that differed in traffic volume--with the main Teton Park Road experiencing vehicle use that was approximately thirty-fold greater than the River Road. At the busier Teton Park Road, both species of ungulate engaged in higher levels of feeding (27% increase in the proportion of pronghorn feeding and 21% increase for elk, lower levels of alert behavior (18% decrease for pronghorn and 9% decrease for elk and formed smaller groups. These responses are commonly associated with reduced predatory threat. Pronghorn also exhibited a 30% increase in the proportion of individuals moving at the River Road as would be expected under greater exposure to predation risk. Our findings concur with the 'predator shelter hypothesis', suggesting that ungulates in GTNP use human presence as a potential refuge from predation risk, adjusting their behavior accordingly. Human activity has the potential to alter predator-prey interactions and drive trophic-mediated effects that could ultimately impact ecosystem function and biodiversity.

  13. Oxidative Stress Responses in the Human Fungal Pathogen, Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra da Silva Dantas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, causing approximately 400,000 life-threatening systemic infections world-wide each year in severely immunocompromised patients. An important fungicidal mechanism employed by innate immune cells involves the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, there is much interest in the strategies employed by C. albicans to evade the oxidative killing by macrophages and neutrophils. Our understanding of how C. albicans senses and responds to ROS has significantly increased in recent years. Key findings include the observations that hydrogen peroxide triggers the filamentation of this polymorphic fungus and that a superoxide dismutase enzyme with a novel mode of action is expressed at the cell surface of C. albicans. Furthermore, recent studies have indicated that combinations of the chemical stresses generated by phagocytes can actively prevent C. albicans oxidative stress responses through a mechanism termed the stress pathway interference. In this review, we present an up-date of our current understanding of the role and regulation of oxidative stress responses in this important human fungal pathogen.

  14. Brain connectivity reflects human aesthetic responses to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Matthew E; Ellis, Robert J; Schlaug, Gottfried; Loui, Psyche

    2016-06-01

    Humans uniquely appreciate aesthetics, experiencing pleasurable responses to complex stimuli that confer no clear intrinsic value for survival. However, substantial variability exists in the frequency and specificity of aesthetic responses. While pleasure from aesthetics is attributed to the neural circuitry for reward, what accounts for individual differences in aesthetic reward sensitivity remains unclear. Using a combination of survey data, behavioral and psychophysiological measures and diffusion tensor imaging, we found that white matter connectivity between sensory processing areas in the superior temporal gyrus and emotional and social processing areas in the insula and medial prefrontal cortex explains individual differences in reward sensitivity to music. Our findings provide the first evidence for a neural basis of individual differences in sensory access to the reward system, and suggest that social-emotional communication through the auditory channel may offer an evolutionary basis for music making as an aesthetically rewarding function in humans. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Effects of Morphine, Fentanyl and Tramadol on Human Immune Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhihen; GAO Feng; TIAN Yuke

    2006-01-01

    Morphine has been reported to suppress human immune response. We aimed to observe the effects of morphine, fentanyl and tramadol on NF- κ B and IL-2 from both laboratory and clinical perspective. Jurkat cells were incubated with ten times clinically relevant concentrations of morphine,fentanyl and tramadol before being stimulated with PMA. NF- κ B binding activity and IL-2 levels were measured. In the clinical study, 150 consenting patients were randomized into 3 groups according to the analgesics used in them, namely, group morphine (M), group fentanyl (F) and group tramadol (T). IL-2 was measured preoperatively and 1, 3 and 24 h after operation. Consequently, NF-κ B activation was suppressed by morphine and fentanyl but not by tramadol. IL-2 was significantly decreased by morphine and fentanyl but not by tramadol in vitro. In the PCA patients, IL-2 was decreased in group M and increased in group F postoperatively. Whereas in group T, IL-2 was unchanged 1 h after operation but was significantly elevated 3 and 24 h after operation. Our results showed that the inhibition of morphine on IL-2 was most probably related to its suppression on NF-κ B. Fentanyl had different effects on human immune response in vitro and in vivo. Tramadol may have immune enhancing effect.

  16. kappa+lambda+ dual receptor B cells are present in the human peripheral repertoire

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    It is a common notion that mature B lymphocytes express either kappa or lambda light (L) chains, although the mechanism that leads to such isotypic exclusion is still debated. We have investigated the extent of L chain isotypic exclusion in normal human peripheral blood B lymphocytes. By three-color staining with anti-CD19, anti-kappa, and anti-lambda antibodies we could estimate that 0.2-0.5% of peripheral blood B cells from healthy adults express both kappa and lambda on the cell surface. T...

  17. Oxidized DNA induces an adaptive response in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyuk, Svetlana V., E-mail: svet.kostyuk@gmail.com [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tabakov, Viacheslav J.; Chestkov, Valerij V.; Konkova, Marina S.; Glebova, Kristina V.; Baydakova, Galina V.; Ershova, Elizaveta S.; Izhevskaya, Vera L. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baranova, Ancha, E-mail: abaranov@gmu.edu [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Center for the Study of Chronic Metabolic Diseases, School of System Biology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Veiko, Natalia N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • We describe the effects of gDNAOX on human fibroblasts cultivated in serum withdrawal conditions. • gDNAOX evokes an adaptive response in human fibroblasts. • gDNAOX increases the survival rates in serum starving cell populations. • gDNAOX enhances the survival rates in cell populations irradiated at 1.2 Gy dose. • gDNAOX up-regulates NRF2 and inhibits NF-kappaB-signaling. - Abstract: Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells contains a substantial proportion of oxidized nucleotides, thus, forming cfDNA{sup OX}. The levels of cfDNA{sup OX} are increased in the serum of patients with chronic diseases. Oxidation of DNA turns it into a stress signal. The samples of genomic DNA (gDNA) oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}in vitro (gDNA{sup OX}) induce effects similar to that of DNA released from damaged cells. Here we describe the effects of gDNA{sup OX} on human fibroblasts cultivated in the stressful conditions of serum withdrawal. In these cells, gDNA{sup OX} evokes an adaptive response that leads to an increase in the rates of survival in serum starving cell populations as well as in populations irradiated at the dose of 1.2 Gy. These effects are not seen in control populations of fibroblasts treated with non-modified gDNA. In particular, the exposure to gDNA{sup OX} leads to a decrease in the expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 and an increase in levels of PSNA, a decrease in the proportion of subG1- and G2/M cells, a decrease in proportion of cells with double strand breaks (DSBs). Both gDNA{sup OX} and gDNA suppress the expression of DNA sensors TLR9 and AIM2 and up-regulate nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (NRF2), while only gDNA{sup OX} inhibits NF-κB signaling. gDNA{sup OX} is a model for oxidized cfDNA{sup OX} that is released from the dying tumor cells and being carried to the distant organs. The systemic effects of oxidized DNA have to be taken into account when treating tumors. In particular, the damaged DNA

  18. Injury Response of Resected Human Brain Tissue In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwer, Ronald W H; Sluiter, Arja A; Balesar, Rawien A; Baaijen, Johannes C; de Witt Hamer, Philip C; Speijer, Dave; Li, Yichen; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-07-01

    Brain injury affects a significant number of people each year. Organotypic cultures from resected normal neocortical tissue provide unique opportunities to study the cellular and neuropathological consequences of severe injury of adult human brain tissue in vitro. The in vitro injuries caused by resection (interruption of the circulation) and aggravated by the preparation of slices (severed neuronal and glial processes and blood vessels) reflect the reaction of human brain tissue to severe injury. We investigated this process using immunocytochemical markers, reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Essential features were rapid shrinkage of neurons, loss of neuronal marker expression and proliferation of reactive cells that expressed Nestin and Vimentin. Also, microglia generally responded strongly, whereas the response of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes appeared to be more variable. Importantly, some reactive cells also expressed both microglia and astrocytic markers, thus confounding their origin. Comparison with post-mortem human brain tissue obtained at rapid autopsies suggested that the reactive process is not a consequence of epilepsy. © 2014 International Society of Neuropathology.

  19. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations.

  20. Glucocorticoids boost stimulus-response memory formation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenzel, Friederike M; Wolf, Oliver T; Schwabe, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Stress affects memory beyond hippocampus-dependent spatial or episodic memory processes. In particular, stress may influence also striatum-dependent stimulus-response (S-R) memory processes. Rodent studies point to an important role of glucocorticoids in the modulation of S-R memory. However, whether glucocorticoids influence S-R memory processes in humans is still unknown. Therefore, we examined in the current experiment the impact of glucocorticoids on the formation of S-R memories in humans. For this purpose, healthy men and women received either hydrocortisone or a placebo 45 min before completing an S-R association learning task and an S-R navigation task. In addition, participants performed also a virtual spatial navigation task and a spatial navigation task in a real environment. Memory of all four learning tasks was tested one week later. Our data showed that hydrocortisone before learning enhanced memory of the S-R association learning task. Moreover, hydrocortisone enhanced the memory of the virtual spatial navigation task, mainly in women. Memory performance in the other tasks remained unaffected by hydrocortisone. These findings provide first evidence that glucocorticoids may facilitate S-R memory formation processes in humans.

  1. Human Responses to Climate Variability: The Case of South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, M.; Licker, R.; Mastrorillo, M.; Bohra-Mishra, P.; Estes, L. D.; Cai, R.

    2014-12-01

    Climate variability has been associated with a range of societal and individual outcomes including migration, violent conflict, changes in labor productivity, and health impacts. Some of these may be direct responses to changes in mean temperature or precipitation or extreme events, such as displacement of human populations by tropical cyclones. Others may be mediated by a variety of biological, social, or ecological factors such as migration in response to long-term changes in crops yields. Research is beginning to elucidate and distinguish the many channels through which climate variability may influence human behavior (ranging from the individual to the collective, societal level) in order to better understand how to improve resilience in the face of current variability as well as future climate change. Using a variety of data sets from South Africa, we show how climate variability has influenced internal (within country) migration in recent history. We focus on South Africa as it is a country with high levels of internal migration and dramatic temperature and precipitation changes projected for the 21st century. High poverty rates and significant levels of rain-fed, smallholder agriculture leave large portions of South Africa's population base vulnerable to future climate change. In this study, we utilize two complementary statistical models - one micro-level model, driven by individual and household level survey data, and one macro-level model, driven by national census statistics. In both models, we consider the effect of climate on migration both directly (with gridded climate reanalysis data) and indirectly (with agricultural production statistics). With our historical analyses of climate variability, we gain insights into how the migration decisions of South Africans may be influenced by future climate change. We also offer perspective on the utility of micro and macro level approaches in the study of climate change and human migration.

  2. Acute Exercise Modulates Feature-selective Responses in Human Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Tom; Elliott, James C; Serences, John T; Giesbrecht, Barry

    2017-04-01

    An organism's current behavioral state influences ongoing brain activity. Nonhuman mammalian and invertebrate brains exhibit large increases in the gain of feature-selective neural responses in sensory cortex during locomotion, suggesting that the visual system becomes more sensitive when actively exploring the environment. This raises the possibility that human vision is also more sensitive during active movement. To investigate this possibility, we used an inverted encoding model technique to estimate feature-selective neural response profiles from EEG data acquired from participants performing an orientation discrimination task. Participants (n = 18) fixated at the center of a flickering (15 Hz) circular grating presented at one of nine different orientations and monitored for a brief shift in orientation that occurred on every trial. Participants completed the task while seated on a stationary exercise bike at rest and during low- and high-intensity cycling. We found evidence for inverted-U effects; such that the peak of the reconstructed feature-selective tuning profiles was highest during low-intensity exercise compared with those estimated during rest and high-intensity exercise. When modeled, these effects were driven by changes in the gain of the tuning curve and in the profile bandwidth during low-intensity exercise relative to rest. Thus, despite profound differences in visual pathways across species, these data show that sensitivity in human visual cortex is also enhanced during locomotive behavior. Our results reveal the nature of exercise-induced gain on feature-selective coding in human sensory cortex and provide valuable evidence linking the neural mechanisms of behavior state across species.

  3. Changes in human lymphocyte subpopulations in tonsils and regional lymph nodes of human head and neck squamous carcinoma compared to control lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Femandez África

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphoid tissues constitute basic structures where specific immune responses take place. This leads to the development of germinal centres (GCs, migration of cells and the generation of memory cells. Here, we have compared human tumour reactive lymph nodes and tonsils with control lymph nodes. Results The study by flow cytometry shows that in control lymph nodes the majority of cells were naive T-lymphocytes (CD45RA+/CD7+. In reactive nodes, although the percentage of CD45RO+ T cells remains constant, there is an increase in the number of B-lymphocytes, and a reduction in naive T cells. The percentage of cells expressing CD69 was similar in reactive nodes and in controls. In both cases, we have found two populations of B cells of either CD69- or CD69dull. Two populations of T cells, which are either negative for CD69 or express it in bright levels (CD69bright, were also found. The analysis of tissue sections by confocal microscopy revealed differences between control, tonsils and tumor reactive lymph nodes. In control lymph nodes, CD19 B cells are surrounded by a unique layer of CD69bright/CD45RO+ T cells. GCs from tonsils and from tumour reactive nodes are mainly constituted by CD19 B cells and have four distinct layers. The central zone is composed of CD69- B cells surrounded by CD69bright/CD45RO+ T cells. The mantle region has basically CD69dull B-lymphocytes and, finally, there is an outer zone with CD69-/CD45RO+ T cells. Conclusions Human secondary lymphoid organs react with an increase in the proportion of B lymphocytes and a decrease in the number of CD45RA+ T cells (naive. In tonsils, this is due to chronic pathogen stimulation, whereas in lymph nodes draining head and neck carcinomas the reaction is prompted by surrounded tumors. During this process, secondary lymphoid organs develop secondary follicles with a special organization of T and B cells in consecutive layers, that are described here by confocal microscopy

  4. Glucocorticoids enhance the in vivo migratory response of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Mark P; Pioli, Patricia A; Collins, Jane; Barr, Fiona; Metzler, Sara; Sites, Brian D; Guyre, Paul M

    2016-05-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are best known for their potent anti-inflammatory effects. However, an emerging model for glucocorticoid (GC) regulation of in vivo inflammation also includes a delayed, preparatory effect that manifests as enhanced inflammation following exposure to an inflammatory stimulus. When GCs are transiently elevated in vivo following exposure to a stressful event, this model proposes that a subsequent period of increased inflammatory responsiveness is adaptive because it enhances resistance to a subsequent stressor. In the present study, we examined the migratory response of human monocytes/macrophages following transient in vivo exposure to stress-associated concentrations of cortisol. Participants were administered cortisol for 6h to elevate in vivo cortisol levels to approximate those observed during major systemic stress. Monocytes in peripheral blood and macrophages in sterile inflammatory tissue (skin blisters) were studied before and after exposure to cortisol or placebo. We found that exposure to cortisol induced transient upregulation of monocyte mRNA for CCR2, the receptor for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) as well as for the chemokine receptor CX3CR1. At the same time, mRNA for the transcription factor IκBα was decreased. Monocyte surface expression of CCR2 but not CX3CR1 increased in the first 24h after cortisol exposure. Transient exposure to cortisol also led to an increased number of macrophages and neutrophils in fluid derived from a sterile inflammatory site in vivo. These findings suggest that the delayed, pro-inflammatory effects of cortisol on the human inflammatory responses may include enhanced localization of effector cells at sites of in vivo inflammation.

  5. Psychophysiological responses to pain identify reproducible human clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Coen, Steven J; Kano, Michiko; Paine, Peter A; Shwahdi, Mustafa; Jafari, Jafar; Kishor, Jessin; Worthen, Sian F; Rossiter, Holly E; Kumari, Veena; Williams, Steven C R; Brammer, Michael; Giampietro, Vincent P; Droney, Joanne; Riley, Julia; Furlong, Paul L; Knowles, Charles H; Lightman, Stafford L; Aziz, Qasim

    2013-11-01

    Pain is a ubiquitous yet highly variable experience. The psychophysiological and genetic factors responsible for this variability remain unresolved. We hypothesised the existence of distinct human pain clusters (PCs) composed of distinct psychophysiological and genetic profiles coupled with differences in the perception and the brain processing of pain. We studied 120 healthy subjects in whom the baseline personality and anxiety traits and the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotype were measured. Real-time autonomic nervous system parameters and serum cortisol were measured at baseline and after standardised visceral and somatic pain stimuli. Brain processing reactions to visceral pain were studied in 29 subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The reproducibility of the psychophysiological responses to pain was assessed at year. In group analysis, visceral and somatic pain caused an expected increase in sympathetic and cortisol responses and activated the pain matrix according to fMRI studies. However, using cluster analysis, we found 2 reproducible PCs: at baseline, PC1 had higher neuroticism/anxiety scores (P ≤ 0.01); greater sympathetic tone (Ppain, less stimulus was tolerated (P ≤ 0.01), and there was an increase in parasympathetic tone (P ≤ 0.05). The 5-HTTLPR short allele was over-represented (P ≤ 0.005). PC2 had the converse profile at baseline and during pain. Brain activity differed (P ≤ 0.001); greater activity occurred in the left frontal cortex in PC1, whereas PC2 showed greater activity in the right medial/frontal cortex and right anterior insula. In health, 2 distinct reproducible PCs exist in humans. In the future, PC characterization may help to identify subjects at risk for developing chronic pain and may reduce variability in brain imaging studies.

  6. The Principle of Responsibility towards the Human Non-Presence or the Non-Human Presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana TEREC-VLAD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The responsibility towards oneself and towards each other was analysed by philosophers such as Heidegger, Jonas, etc., and is based on care. If Heidegger brings forward the concept of caring for each other, Jonas believes that the prospective ethics based on responsibility should guide the behaviour of present individuals for the future generation. In the context of new technologies in genetic engineering, molecular biology and genetic editing, we consider it appropriate to bring into discussion that a new form of Kant’s categorical imperative is needed to guide the behaviour of all, to ensure the welfare planet-wide, not only for the human generations to come, but also of the non-human generations.

  7. T-cell responses to dengue virus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurane, Ichiro; Matsutani, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A

    2011-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Dengue virus infection induces specific CD4+CD8- and CD8+CD4- T cells in humans. In primary infection, T-cell responses to DENV are serotype cross-reactive, but the highest response is to the serotype that caused the infection. The epitopes recognized by DENV-specific T cells are located in most of the structural and non-structural proteins, but NS3 is the protein that is most dominantly recognized. In patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) caused by secondary DENV infection, T cells are highly activated in vivo. These highly activated T cells are DENV-specific and oligoclonal. Multiple kinds of lymphokines are produced by the activated T cells, and it has been hypothesized that these lymphokines are responsible for induction of plasma leakage, one of the most characteristic features of DHF. Thus, T-cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of DHF and in the recovery from DENV infection.

  8. Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to early antigen(s) of human cytomegalovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Waner, J L; Kong, N; Biano, S

    1983-01-01

    The lymphocytes of asymptomatic, seropositive donors demonstrated blastogenic responses to early antigens of human cytomegalovirus whether or not antibodies to early antigens were detectable. The lymphocytes of six of nine patients with active cytomegalovirus infections gave stimulation indexes of greater than or equal to 2.00 with antigens of productively infected cells, whereas only two patients demonstrated comparable stimulation indexes with early antigens. Four patients with stimulation ...

  9. Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to early antigen(s) of human cytomegalovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Waner, J L; Kong, N; Biano, S

    1983-01-01

    The lymphocytes of asymptomatic, seropositive donors demonstrated blastogenic responses to early antigens of human cytomegalovirus whether or not antibodies to early antigens were detectable. The lymphocytes of six of nine patients with active cytomegalovirus infections gave stimulation indexes of greater than or equal to 2.00 with antigens of productively infected cells, whereas only two patients demonstrated comparable stimulation indexes with early antigens. Four patients with stimulation ...

  10. The immune response of the human brain to abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Anton; Cervenka, Simon; Jonsson Fagerlund, Malin; Rasmussen, Lars S; Zetterberg, Henrik; Erlandsson Harris, Helena; Stridh, Pernilla; Christensson, Eva; Granström, Anna; Schening, Anna; Dymmel, Karin; Knave, Nina; Terrando, Niccolò; Maze, Mervyn; Borg, Jacqueline; Varrone, Andrea; Halldin, Christer; Blennow, Kaj; Farde, Lars; Eriksson, Lars I

    2017-04-01

    Surgery launches a systemic inflammatory reaction that reaches the brain and associates with immune activation and cognitive decline. Although preclinical studies have in part described this systemic-to-brain signaling pathway, we lack information on how these changes appear in humans. This study examines the short- and long-term impact of abdominal surgery on the human brain immune system by positron emission tomography (PET) in relation to blood immune reactivity, plasma inflammatory biomarkers, and cognitive function. Eight males undergoing prostatectomy under general anesthesia were included. Prior to surgery (baseline), at postoperative days 3 to 4, and after 3 months, patients were examined using [(11) C]PBR28 brain PET imaging to assess brain immune cell activation. Concurrently, systemic inflammatory biomarkers, ex vivo blood tests on immunoreactivity to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, and cognitive function were assessed. Patients showed a global downregulation of gray matter [(11) C]PBR28 binding of 26 ± 26% (mean ± standard deviation) at 3 to 4 days postoperatively compared to baseline (p = 0.023), recovering or even increasing after 3 months. LPS-induced release of the proinflammatory marker tumor necrosis factor-α in blood displayed a reduction (41 ± 39%) on the 3rd to 4th postoperative day, corresponding to changes in [(11) C]PBR28 distribution volume. Change in Stroop Color-Word Test performance between postoperative days 3 to 4 and 3 months correlated to change in [(11) C]PBR28 binding (p = 0.027). This study translates preclinical data on changes in the brain immune system after surgery to humans, and suggests an interplay between the human brain and the inflammatory response of the peripheral innate immune system. These findings may be related to postsurgical impairments of cognitive function. Ann Neurol 2017;81:572-582. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  11. Cytokine response of human THP-1 macrophages to Trichomonas tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govro, Emily J; Stuart, Melissa K

    2016-10-01

    Trichomonas tenax is a protozoan that inhabits the oral cavity of humans, most often those with poor oral hygiene. Although T. tenax is widely considered a commensal, recent studies have suggested a pathogenic role for the protozoan in persons with periodontitis. Here we investigated the capacity of T. tenax to induce pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in human macrophages, with the idea that elicitation of inflammation may be one mechanism by which T. tenax contributes to oral pathology. Human THP-1 cells differentiated to the macrophage phenotype (dTHP-1) were incubated with live or sonicated T. tenax at trophozoite:dTHP-1 ratios of 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20. Culture media removed from the wells after 4, 8, and 16 h of stimulation were assayed by ELISA for tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-8, and the immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-10. Live T. tenax trophozoites failed to induce production of any of the cytokines tested, regardless of trophozoite:dTHP-1 cell ratio or length of co-incubation. T. tenax lysates stimulated interleukin-8 synthesis, but only after 16 h of incubation at the 1:5 trophozoite:dTHP-1 cell ratio. These results suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokine synthesis by human macrophages in direct response to T. tenax contributes little to oral pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Health and Human Rights: New challenges for social responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie London

    2009-11-01

    . Finally, it is shown how the portfolio of social responsiveness activities in the health and human rights envelope has offered significant and novel mutual benefits to the University and the community.

  13. Human immune system mice: current potential and limitations for translational research on human antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Patton, John; Manser, Tim

    2011-12-01

    It has recently become possible to generate chimeric mice durably engrafted with many components of the human immune system (HIS mice). We have characterized the maturation and function of the B cell compartment of HIS mice. The antibody response of HIS mice to T cell-dependent B cell antigens is limited, and contributing factors may be the general immaturity of the B cell compartment, infrequent helper T cells selected on human MHC class II antigens, and incomplete reconstitution of secondary lymphoid organs and their microenvironments. In contrast, HIS mice generate protective antibody responses to the bacterium Borrelia hermsii, which acts as a T cell-independent antigen in mice, but do not respond to purified polysaccharide antigens (PPS). We speculate that the anti-B. hermsii response of HIS mice is derived from an abundant B cell subset that may be analogous to B1 B cells in mice. We suggest that failure of HIS mice to respond to PPS is due to the lack of a B cell subset that may originate from adult bone marrow and is highly dependent on human interleukin-7 for development.

  14. Characterization of human antiviral adaptive immune responses during hepatotropic virus infection in HLA-transgenic human immune system mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billerbeck, Eva; Horwitz, Joshua A; Labitt, Rachael N; Donovan, Bridget M; Vega, Kevin; Budell, William C; Koo, Gloria C; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2013-08-15

    Humanized mice have emerged as a promising model to study human immunity in vivo. Although they are susceptible to many pathogens exhibiting an almost exclusive human tropism, human immune responses to infection remain functionally impaired. It has recently been demonstrated that the expression of HLA molecules improves human immunity to lymphotropic virus infections in humanized mice. However, little is known about the extent of functional human immune responses in nonlymphoid tissues, such as in the liver, and the role of HLA expression in this context. Therefore, we analyzed human antiviral immunity in humanized mice during a hepatotropic adenovirus infection. We compared immune responses of conventional humanized NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient (NSG) mice to those of a novel NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient strain transgenic for both HLA-A*0201 and a chimeric HLA-DR*0101 molecule. Using a firefly luciferase-expressing adenovirus and in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we demonstrate a human T cell-dependent partial clearance of adenovirus-infected cells from the liver of HLA-transgenic humanized mice. This correlated with liver infiltration and activation of T cells, as well as the detection of Ag-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. When infected with a hepatitis C virus NS3-expressing adenovirus, HLA-transgenic humanized mice mounted an HLA-A*0201-restricted hepatitis C virus NS3-specific CD8(+) T cell response. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the generation of partial functional antiviral immune responses against a hepatotropic pathogen in humanized HLA-transgenic mice. The adenovirus reporter system used in our study may serve as simple in vivo method to evaluate future strategies for improving human intrahepatic immune responses in humanized mice.

  15. Expression of B lymphocyte activating factor in decidual and chorionic membranes of women with early spontaneous abortion and its significance%胚胎停育患者蜕膜和绒毛组织中B淋巴细胞刺激因子的表达及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高艳萍; 郝冬梅

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨胚胎停育患者蜕膜和绒毛组织中B淋巴细胞刺激因子(BAFF)的表达与胚胎停育的关系.方法 随机选择早孕胚胎停育患者30例作为实验组,正常早孕人工流产者30例为对照组.用免疫组化(二步法)法测定蜕膜及绒毛中BAFF的表达情况.结果 BAFF在所有标本中都有表达,但胚胎停育组蜕膜中BAFF的表达均低于对照组(P<0.05),胚胎停育组蜕膜血管内皮中则无表达.结论 BAFF与胚胎停育有一定的关联,可能是导致胚胎停育的原因之一.%Objective To study the correlation between the expression of B lymphocyte activating factor in decidual and chorionic membranes and early spontaneous abortion. Methods Thirty women with early spontaneous abortion served as an experimental group and 30 women who had artificial abortion for normal early pregnancy served as a control group. Expression of B lymphocyte activating factor in decidual and chorionic membranes was detected by immunohistochemistry. Results B lymphocyte activating factor was expressed in all samples of decidual and chorionic membranes. However, its expression level in decidual membrane was lower in experimental group than in control group(P<0.05). B lymphocyte activating factor was not expressed in angioendothelium of experimental group. Conclusion B lymphocyte activating factor is associated with early spontaneous abortion and may be one of the reasons for early spontaneous abortion.

  16. The fractional viscoelastic response of human breast tissue cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, B.; Babahosseini, H.; Mahmoodi, S. N.; Agah, M.

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical response of a living cell is notoriously complicated. The complex, heterogeneous characteristics of cellular structure introduce difficulties that simple linear models of viscoelasticity cannot overcome, particularly at deep indentation depths. Herein, a nano-scale stress-relaxation analysis performed with an atomic force microscope reveals that isolated human breast cells do not exhibit simple exponential relaxation capable of being modeled by the standard linear solid (SLS) model. Therefore, this work proposes the application of the fractional Zener (FZ) model of viscoelasticity to extract mechanical parameters from the entire relaxation response, improving upon existing physical techniques to probe isolated cells. The FZ model introduces a new parameter that describes the fractional time-derivative dependence of the response. The results show an exceptional increase in conformance to the experimental data compared to that predicted by the SLS model, and the order of the fractional derivative (α) is remarkably homogeneous across the populations, with a median value of 0.48 ± 0.06 for the malignant population and 0.51 ± 0.07 for the benign. The cells’ responses exhibit power-law behavior and complexity not associated with simple relaxation (SLS, α = 1) that supports the application of a fractional model. The distributions of some of the FZ parameters also preserve the distinction between the malignant and benign sample populations seen from the linear model and previous results while including the contribution of fast-relaxation behavior. The resulting viscosity, measured by a composite relaxation time, exhibits considerably less dispersion due to residual error than the distribution generated by the linear model and therefore serves as a more powerful marker for cell differentiation.

  17. Human papillomavirus typing of warts and response to cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomson, N; Sterling, J; Ahmed, I; Hague, J; Berth-Jones, J

    2011-09-01

    Cutaneous warts are common and caused by a number of different types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs). The aim of this study was to investigate the HPV types causing common warts and to determine any association between the HPV type and the duration of warts and response to cryotherapy. Eighty wart samples from 76 immunocompetent patients were taken from warts by paring prior to cryotherapy and analysed by in situ hybridization (ISH) with HPV probes specific to HPV 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 57 and PCR analysis using degenerate cutaneous HPV primers with subsequent DNA sequencing. Each patient's details, including site, duration and response of the wart to cryotherapy were recorded. Cryotherapy was performed at 2 week intervals for a maximum of 12 weeks. An HPV type was identified in 65 samples. The majority of warts (58 samples) were typed as HPV 2/27/57 by ISH and/or PCR. Three of the 18 samples that were HPV negative with ISH were HPV positive by PCR. Response to treatment did not correlate with HPV type, duration or location. In the 21 wart parings taken from patients aged 16 and under, response to treatment did not correlate with HPV type but warts of shorter duration were more likely to resolve with cryotherapy treatment than longer standing lesions. This study demonstrates that HPV type can be determined from wart parings. HPV-2 related viruses are the prevalent HPV types causing common warts on the hands and feet in this population. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  18. Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda: A Commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Jane

    2013-01-01

    In her commentary of McPhail's 2013 article "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It: Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda," Jane Andrew begins by highlighting a number of McPhail's primary arguments. She points out that McPhail sets out to achieve two things…

  19. Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda: A Commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Jane

    2013-01-01

    In her commentary of McPhail's 2013 article "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It: Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda," Jane Andrew begins by highlighting a number of McPhail's primary arguments. She points out that McPhail sets out to achieve two things…

  20. Mu suppression and human movement responses to the Rorschach test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Jaime A; Giromini, Luciano; Porcelli, Piero; Parolin, Laura; Viglione, Donald J

    2011-03-30

    Electroencephalographic μ wave suppression was investigated using all 10 static, ambiguous Rorschach stimuli. In an earlier study using four Rorschach stimuli, the two stimuli that elicited feelings of movement were associated with μ suppression. In this study, we replicated this relationship using all 10 Rorschach stimuli while overcoming a number of other earlier limitations. The results strongly support the hypothesis that internal representation of the feeling of movement is sufficient to suppress the μ rhythm even when minimal external cues are present. This outcome increases the generalizability and ecological validity of this approach and gives support to the traditional interpretation of the Rorschach human movement responses as being associated with cognitive functioning, empathy, and social cognition.

  1. Medial olivocochlear efferent reflex inhibition of human cochlear nerve responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenhan, J T; Wilson, U S; Hancock, K E; Guinan, J J

    2016-03-01

    Inhibition of cochlear amplifier gain by the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent system has several putative roles: aiding listening in noise, protection against damage from acoustic overexposure, and slowing age-induced hearing loss. The human MOC reflex has been studied almost exclusively by measuring changes in otoacoustic emissions. However, to help understand how the MOC system influences what we hear, it is important to have measurements of the MOC effect on the total output of the organ of Corti, i.e., on cochlear nerve responses that couple sounds to the brain. In this work we measured the inhibition produced by the MOC reflex on the amplitude of cochlear nerve compound action potentials (CAPs) in response to moderate level (52-60 dB peSPL) clicks from five, young, normal hearing, awake, alert, human adults. MOC activity was elicited by 65 dB SPL, contralateral broadband noise (CAS). Using tympanic membrane electrodes, approximately 10 h of data collection were needed from each subject to yield reliable measurements of the MOC reflex inhibition on CAP amplitudes from one click level. The CAS produced a 16% reduction of CAP amplitude, equivalent to a 1.98 dB effective attenuation (averaged over five subjects). Based on previous reports of efferent effects as functions of level and frequency, it is possible that much larger effective attenuations would be observed at lower sound levels or with clicks of higher frequency content. For a preliminary comparison, we also measured MOC reflex inhibition of DPOAEs evoked from the same ears with f2's near 4 kHz. The resulting effective attenuations on DPOAEs were, on average, less than half the effective attenuations on CAPs.

  2. Trichothecene mycotoxins activate inflammatory response in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankkunen, Päivi; Rintahaka, Johanna; Aalto, Annika; Leino, Marina; Majuri, Marja-Leena; Alenius, Harri; Wolff, Henrik; Matikainen, Sampsa

    2009-05-15

    Damp building-related illnesses have caused concern for years in many countries. Although the problem is extensive, the knowledge of the immunological reactions behind damp building-related illnesses is still quite limited. Trichothecene mycotoxins form one major group of toxins, which possibly contribute to the illnesses. Stachybotrys chartarum is a well-known, but also controversial damp building mold and many strains of this mold are capable of producing trichothecenes. In this report, we have examined the effect of S. chartarum and trichothecene mycotoxins on the proinflammatory cytokine response in human macrophages. As a result, satratoxin-positive S. chartarum activated inflammasome-associated caspase-1, which is needed for proteolytic processing of IL-1beta and IL-18. Furthermore, purified trichothecene mycotoxins, roridin A, verrucarin A, and T-2 toxin activated caspase-1, and these mycotoxins also strongly enhanced LPS-dependent secretion of IL-1beta and IL-18. The satratoxin-positive strain of S. chartarum and the trichothecenes also triggered the activation of caspase-3, which is an effector caspase of apoptosis. Satratoxin-negative S. chartarum was not able to activate either caspase-1 or caspase-3. In conclusion, our results indicate that human macrophages sense trichothecene mycotoxins as a danger signal, which activates caspase-1, and further enables the secretion of IL-1beta and IL-18 from the LPS-primed cells.

  3. The suppression of innate immune response by human rhinovirus C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Li-Li; Yuan, Xin-Hui; Shao, Chang-Sheng; Li, Mao-Zhong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Hui-Min; Xie, Guang-Cheng; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Yuan, Yue; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Sun, Xiao-Man; Zhang, Qing; Xin, Yan; Li, Dan-di; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2017-08-12

    Rhinovirus C (RV-C), a newly identified group of human rhinoviruses (RVs), is associated with exacerbation of severe asthma. The type I interferon (IFN) response induced by this virus and the mechanisms of evasion of IFN-mediated innate immunity for RV-C remain unclear. In this study, we constructed a full-length cDNA clone of RV-C (LZ651) from a clinical sample. IFN-β mRNA and protein levels were not elevated in differentiated Human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells at the air-liquid interface infected with RV-C, except in the early stage of infection. The ability to attenuate IFN-β activation was ascribed to 3C(pro) of RV-C, and the 40-His site of 3C(pro) played an important role. Furthermore, RIG-I was degraded by 3C(pro) in a caspase-dependent manner and 3C(pro) cleaved MAVS at 148 Q/A, which inhibited IFN signaling. Taken together, our results demonstrate the mechanism by which RV-C circumvents the production of type I IFN in infected cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.peter@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Rehli, Michael, E-mail: michael.rehli@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Singer, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.singer@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Renner-Sattler, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.renner-sattler@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Kreutz, Marina, E-mail: marina.kreutz@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  5. CD40 signaling drives B lymphocytes into an intermediate memory-like state, poised between naïve and plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Mala; Priya, G Krishna; Ramesh, P; Madhavi, M B; Rath, Satyajit; Bal, Vineeta; George, Anna; Vaidya, Tushar

    2014-10-01

    Immunological memory comprising of antigen-specific B and T cells contributes to the acquisition of long-term resistance to pathogens. Interactions between CD40 on B cells and CD40L on T cells are responsible for several aspects of acquired immune responses including generation of memory B cells. In order to gain insights into events leading to memory B cell formation, we analyzed the genome-wide expression profile of murine naive B cells stimulated in the presence of anti-CD40. We have identified over 8,000 genes whose expression is altered minimally 1.5-fold at least at one time point over a 3-day time course. The array analysis indicates that changes in expression level of maximum number of these genes occur within 24 h of anti-CD40 treatment. In parallel, we have studied the events following CD40 ligation by examining the expression of known regulators of naive B cell to plasma cell transition, including Pax5 and BLIMP1. The expression profile of these regulatory genes indicates firstly, that CD40 signaling activates naïve B cells to a phenotype that is intermediate between the naive and plasma cell stages of the B cell differentiation. Secondly, the major known regulator of plasma cell differentiation, BLIMP1, gets irreversibly downregulated upon anti-CD40 treatment. Additionally, our data reveal that CD40 signaling mediated BLIMP1 downregulation occurs by non-Pax5/non-Bcl6 dependent mechanisms, indicating novel mechanisms at work that add to the complexity of understanding of B cell master regulatory molecules like BLIMP1 and Pax5.

  6. Comparison of Biodynamic Responses in Standing and Seated Human Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUMOTO, Y.; GRIFFIN, M. J.

    2000-12-01

    The dynamic responses of the human body in a standing position and in a sitting position have been compared. The apparent mass and transmissibilities to the head, six locations along the spine, and the pelvis were measured with eight male subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration. In both postures, the principal resonance in the apparent mass occurred in the range 5-6 Hz, with slightly higher frequencies and lower apparent mass in the standing posture. There was greater transmission of vertical vibration to the pelvis and the lower spine and greater relative motion within the lower spine in the standing posture than in the sitting posture at the principal resonance and at higher frequencies. Transmissibilities from the supporting surface (floor or seat) to the thoracic region had similar magnitudes for both standing and sitting subjects. The lumbar spine has less lordosis and may be more compressed and less flexible in the sitting posture than in the standing posture. This may have reduced the relative motions between lumbar vertebrae and both the supporting vibrating surface and the other vertebrae in the sitting posture. The characteristics of the vibration transmitted to the pelvis may have differed in the two postures due to different transmission paths. Increased forward rotation of the pelvis in the standing posture may have caused the differences in responses of the pelvis and the lower spine that were observed between the two postures.

  7. Cardiovascular responses to voluntary and nonvoluntary static exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, D B; Peel, C; Mitchell, J H

    1992-11-01

    We have measured the cardiovascular responses during voluntary and nonvoluntary (electrically induced) one-leg static exercise in humans. Eight normal subjects were studied at rest and during 5 min of static leg extension at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction performed voluntarily and nonvoluntarily in random order. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac output (CO) were determined, and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) and stroke volume (SV) were calculated. HR increased from approximately 65 +/- 3 beats/min at rest to 80 +/- 4 and 78 +/- 6 beats/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. CO increased from 5.1 +/- 0.7 to 6.0 +/- 0.8 and 6.2 +/- 0.8 l/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. PVR and SV did not change significantly during voluntary or nonvoluntary contractions. Thus the cardiovascular responses were not different between voluntary and electrically induced contractions. These results suggest that the increases in CO, HR, SV, MAP, and PVR during 5 min of static contractions can be elicited without any contribution from a central neural mechanism (central command). However, central command could still have an important role during voluntary static exercise.

  8. Human arm posture prediction in response to isometric endpoint forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudabadi Farahani, Saeed; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark; Rasmussen, John

    2015-11-26

    The ability to predict the musculoskeletal response to external loads has multiple applications for the design of machines with a human interface and for the prediction of outcomes of musculoskeletal interventions. In this study, we applied an inverse-inverse dynamics technique to investigate its ability to predict arm posture in response to isometric hand forces. For each subject, we made a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model using the AnyBody Modelling System (AMS). Then, we had each subject-specific model hold a weight anteriorly to the right shoulder joint at a distance of half of the arm length. We selected the glenohumeral abduction angle (GHAA) as the only free parameter. Subsequently, we used inverse-inverse dynamics to find the optimal GHAA that minimised a performance criterion with physiological constraints. In this study, we investigated the performance of two different objective functions: summation of squared muscle activity (SSMA) and summation of squared normalised joint torques (SSNJT). To validate the simulation results, arm posture responses to different isometric downward hand forces were measured for six healthy male subjects. Five trials were performed for each loading condition. The results showed that, with an increase in hand load, there was a reduced GHAA in all subjects. Another interesting finding was that self-selected postures for lighter tasks varied more than postures for heavier tasks for all subjects. To understand this, we investigated the curvature of the objective function as a function of the load and observed an increased curvature with increased load. This may explain the reduced intra-subject variations observed for increasing loads.

  9. Human auditory steady state responses to binaural and monaural beats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, D W F; Taylor, P

    2005-03-01

    Binaural beat sensations depend upon a central combination of two different temporally encoded tones, separately presented to the two ears. We tested the feasibility to record an auditory steady state evoked response (ASSR) at the binaural beat frequency in order to find a measure for temporal coding of sound in the human EEG. We stimulated each ear with a distinct tone, both differing in frequency by 40Hz, to record a binaural beat ASSR. As control, we evoked a beat ASSR in response to both tones in the same ear. We band-pass filtered the EEG at 40Hz, averaged with respect to stimulus onset and compared ASSR amplitudes and phases, extracted from a sinusoidal non-linear regression fit to a 40Hz period average. A 40Hz binaural beat ASSR was evoked at a low mean stimulus frequency (400Hz) but became undetectable beyond 3kHz. Its amplitude was smaller than that of the acoustic beat ASSR, which was evoked at low and high frequencies. Both ASSR types had maxima at fronto-central leads and displayed a fronto-occipital phase delay of several ms. The dependence of the 40Hz binaural beat ASSR on stimuli at low, temporally coded tone frequencies suggests that it may objectively assess temporal sound coding ability. The phase shift across the electrode array is evidence for more than one origin of the 40Hz oscillations. The binaural beat ASSR is an evoked response, with novel diagnostic potential, to a signal that is not present in the stimulus, but generated within the brain.

  10. IMMEDIATE HUMAN PULP RESPONSE TO ETHANOL-WET BONDING TECHNIQUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Débora Lopes Salles; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Pashley, David Henry; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the short-term response of human pulps to ethanol-wet bonding technique associated with an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Methods Deep class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of 17 sound premolars scheduled for extraction for orthodontics. The teeth were assigned into three groups: Ethanol-wet bonding (G1), water-wet bonding (G2) and calcium hydroxide (G3, control). Two teeth were used as intact control. After acid-etching, the cavities from G1 were filled with 100% ethanol for 60s and blot-dried before the application of Single Bond 2. In G2, the cavities were filled with distilled water for 60s previously to adhesive application and in G3, the cavity floor was lined with calcium hydroxide before etching and bonding. All cavities were restored with resin composite. The teeth were extracted 48h after the clinical procedures. From each tooth 6 μm-thick serial sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H/E) and Masson's trichrome. Bacteria microleakage was assessed using Brown & Brenn. All sections were blindly evaluated and scored for five histological features. Results Mean remaining dentin thickness was 463±65μm (G1); 425±184μm (G2); and 348±194μm (G3). Similar pulp reactions followed ethanol- or water-wet bonding techniques. Slight inflammatory responses and disruption of the odontoblast layer related to the cavity floor were seen in all groups. Stained bacteria were not detected in any cavities. Normal pulp tissue was observed in G3 except for one case. Conclusions After 48 h, ethanol-wet bonding technique applied on deep cavities prepared in vital teeth does not increase pulpal damage compared to water-wet bonding technique. Clinical significance Ethanol-wet bonding has been considered an experimental technique that may increase resin-dentin bond durability. This study reported the in vivo response of human pulp tissue when 100% ethanol was applied previously to an etch-and-rinse simplified adhesive

  11. A humanized mouse model of anaphylactic peanut allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Oliver T; Stranks, Amanda J; Tamayo, Jaciel M; Koleoglou, Kyle J; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Oettgen, Hans C

    2017-01-01

    Food allergy is a growing health problem with very limited treatment options. Investigation of the immunologic pathways underlying allergic sensitization to foods in humans has been greatly constrained by the limited availability of intestinal tissue and gut-resident immune cells. Although mouse models have offered insights into pathways of food sensitization, differences between rodent and human immune physiology limit the extension of these findings to our understanding of human disease. We sought to develop a strategy for the generation of mice with humanized adaptive immune systems, complete with tissue engraftment by human mast cells that are competent to mount specific IgE-mediated responses and drive systemic anaphylaxis on ingestion challenge. Nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mice lacking the cytokine receptor common gamma chain (γc(-/-)) and carrying a human stem cell factor transgene were engrafted with human hematopoietic stem cells. The impact of peanut (PN) feeding and IgE neutralization on the development of immune responses, mast cell homeostasis, and anaphylactic food allergy was assessed in these animals. Humanized nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient common gamma chain-deficient stem cell factor (huNSG) mice exhibited robust engraftment with functional human T and B lymphocytes and human mast cells were found in significant numbers in their tissues, including the intestinal mucosa. Following gavage feeding with PN, they mounted specific antibody responses, including PN-specific IgE. When enterally challenged with PN, they exhibited mast-cell-mediated systemic anaphylaxis, as indicated by hypothermia and increases in plasma tryptase levels. Anti-IgE (omalizumab) treatment ablated this anaphylactic response. huNSG mice provide a novel tool for studying food allergy and IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. B-lymphocyte aggregation in the lung tissue is a pathogenic factor in experimental infection caused by Mycobacterium avium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Linge

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When infecting the lungs with Mycobacterium avium of B6 line mice genetically susceptible to this infection the compact aggregates (follicles of B-lymphocytes are formed with the peak at the 11-13th week after the infection. Physiological role of these cellular accumulations remained unclear. Having applied segregative genetic analysis to allele conglutination of Slc11a1 gene with two signs – quantity of mycobacteria and accumulation of B-cellular follicles to the F2 mice from crossing (В6 × I/St, one managed to find out that the quantity and size of follicles directly correlate with M. avium replication in the lungs. Thus this type of the lung tissue infiltration does not protect the host from infection and it is a pathogenic factor.

  13. 小儿特发性血小板减少性紫癜外周血T、B淋巴细胞观察%The observation of T and B lymphocyte in peripheral of infantile idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白文杰; 翟凤兰

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To detect the ratio changes of subgroup T lymphocyte and B lymphocyte in infants with ITP. Methods:Manufacturing single nucleus cell with lymphocyte, separate liquid, adding antibody after thermal cultivation and calculatingthe percentage of positive cells using inmuno-fluorescence method. Results: There are no statistie differences between the ITPpatients' T3、T4 and the healthy contral' s there are statistie differences between the ITP patients' T8、 B groups and the healthycontral' s. Conclusion: The patients of infantile ITP may have humoral and cellular immunity factional disorder.%目的:检测ITP患儿T淋巴细胞亚群及B细胞的比值变化。方法:采用荧光免疫法用淋巴细胞分离液配制单个细胞,温育后加入抗体,计算阳性百分率。结果:患儿组T3、T4与健康组差异不显著,T8及B细胞患儿组与健康组差异有显著性。结论:ITP患儿可出现细胞免疫及体液免疫功能紊乱。

  14. Selective chemotaxis of subsets of B lymphocytes from gut-associated lymphoid tissue and its implications for the recruitment of mucosal plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czinn, S J; Lamm, M E

    1986-05-15

    As they differentiate, precursor cells from the gut-associated lymphoid tissue are known to travel via the lymphatic system to the blood and then preferentially to home to various mucosal and exocrine sites such as the lamina propria of the gut and the lactating mammary gland, where they give rise to IgA-secreting plasma cells. The present study, directed at the mechanism by which the circulating precursors of mucosal IgA plasma cells selectively lodge in characteristic locations, explored the hypothesis that such homing is due to a locally produced chemotactic factor and that milk might be a source of such a factor. Subsets of lymphocytes bearing particular surface markers and purified by panning from lymph nodes of mice were examined in a micropore chemotaxis assay to search for the presence of chemotactic activity in mouse milk. The globulin fraction of whey was shown to contain a nondialyzable factor that is chemotactic for IgA (and also IgG)-positive lymphocytes when these are obtained from mesenteric lymph nodes as a source of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue. Lymphocytes from peripheral lymph nodes, nonmucosal associated, were unaffected as were surface IgM-positive lymphocytes and T lymphocytes obtained from mesenteric nodes. Chemotactic activity for IgA lymphocytes was undetectable in mouse serum. The data are consistent with the idea that precursors of mucosal IgA plasma cells home to mucosal and exocrine sites in response to a specific chemotactic factor elaborated by local differentiated epithelial cells.

  15. Molecular Mechanism of B Lymphocyte Activation and the Associated Diseases%B淋巴细胞活化分子事件及相关病理机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐银胜; 易骏阳; 高一仁; 刘册; 徐利玲; 刘万里

    2014-01-01

    B cells are important immune cells for humoral immune responses.B cell activation is a critical step for antibody production in response to pathogen invasion.In this review,we focused on the recent achievements in B cell studies using high-resolution high-speed live cell imaging techniques.These studies substantially improve our understanding of the molecular events governing the initiation of B cell activation.We summarized the recent studies about tonic B cell receptor (BCR) signaling which is thought to be responsible for B cell survival.We proposed several models to explain the origin of tonic BCR signaling.Meanwhile,we described the BCR signaling pathway driven by antigen stimulation,and discussed the possible mechanisms initiating B cell activation.Especially,we described how the high-resolution high-speed live cell imaging techniques help scientists to capture the dynamic events during B cell activation.Moreover,we discussed the molecular nature of the memory B cell with special focus placed on the roles of the evolutionarily conserved IgG cytoplasmic tail in memory antibody responses.Abnormal regulation of BCR activation may lead to diseases.In this regard,we discussed the recent findings in the last part of this review and also summarized the relationship of the mutation in the BCR inhibitory co-receptor FcγRⅡB and autoimmune diseases.Furthermore,we discussed the relationship between the mutation in BCR signaling molecules and B cell tumor.This work improves our understanding about B cell diseases and may benefit the clinical therapy.%B细胞是体液免疫的重要执行细胞,其活化是机体产生保护性抗体的关键步骤.目前人们对B细胞早期活化的动态分子事件和信号起始机制等仍然未知.本文将重点总结超高清成像技术和高速高分辨率活体成像技术在B细胞领域的应用,这些研究将帮助人们理解B细胞早期活化的机制.本文系列总结了静息态下维持B

  16. Distinctive effects of the Epstein-Barr virus family of repeats on viral latent gene promoter activity and B-lymphocyte transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed K M; Saito, Satoru; Shibata, Sachiko; Takada, Kenzo; Kanda, Teru

    2009-09-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human B-lymphotropic gamma herpesvirus, contains multiple repetitive sequences within its genome. A group of repetitive sequences, known as the family of repeats (FR), contains multiple binding sites for the viral trans-acting protein EBNA-1. The FR sequences are important for viral genome maintenance and for the regulation of the promoter involved in viral latent gene expression. It has been reported that a palindromic sequence with a putative secondary structure exists at the 3' end of the FR in the genome of the EBV B95-8 strain and that this palindromic sequence has been deleted from the FR of the commonly used EBV miniplasmids. For the first time, we cloned an EBV B95-8 DNA fragment containing the full-length FR, which enabled us to examine the functional difference between full-length and deleted FRs. The full-length FR, like the deleted FR, functioned as a transcriptional enhancer of the viral latent gene promoter, but that transactivation was significantly attenuated in the case of the full-length FR. No significant enhancement of replication was observed when the deleted FR was replaced with the full-length FR in an EBV miniplasmid. By contrast, when the same set of FR sequences were tested in the context of the complete EBV genome, the full-length FR resulted in more-efficient B-cell transformation than the deleted FR. We propose that the presence of the full-length FR contributes to the precise regulation of the viral latent promoter and increases the efficiency of B-cell transformation.

  17. Amniotic fluid elicits appetitive responses in human newborns: fatty acids and appetitive responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Carlos M; Gutiérrez-García, Ana G; Mendoza-López, Remedios; Rodríguez-Landa, Juan Francisco; Bernal-Morales, Blandina; Díaz-Marte, Cynthia

    2013-04-01

    In humans, maternal cues guide newborns to the maternal breast, and transitional cues may be present in maternal-fetal fluids. The aim of the present study was to determine the consistent presence of sensorial cues in three maternal-fetal fluids--amniotic fluid, colostrum, and milk--and test the ability of these cues to produce appetitive responses in newborns. In the analytical study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) detected eight fatty acids consistently present in the amniotic fluid, colostrum, and milk from 12 healthy volunteers, but we do not find a mammalian pheromone, identified in another mammalian species (rabbits), in another 30 volunteers. In the behavioral study, we explored the ability of amniotic fluid or its fatty acids to produce appetitive responses in 19 human newborns fluid or an artificial fatty acid mixture produced a longer duration of facial reactions that suggested appetitive (sucking) movements compared with respective vehicles (i.e., propylene glycol or centrifuged amniotic fluid with a low fatty acid content verified by GC-MS). We conclude that the fatty acids contained in amniotic fluid may constitute a transitional sensorial cue that guides newborns to the maternal breast.

  18. Rac1/p21-activated kinase pathway controls retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and E2F transcription factor activation in B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaldua, Natalia; Llavero, Francisco; Artaso, Alain; Gálvez, Patricia; Lacerda, Hadriano M; Parada, Luis A; Zugaza, José L

    2016-02-01

    Small GTPases of the Ras superfamily are capable of activating E2F-dependent transcription leading to cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, using immortalized chicken DT40 B cell lines to investigate the role of the Vav/Rac signalling cascade on B cell proliferation, it is shown that the proliferative response triggered by B cell receptor activation is dramatically reduced in the absence of Vav3 expression. Analysis of this proliferative defect shows that in the absence of Vav3 expression, retinoblastoma protein (RB) phosphorylation and the subsequent E2F activation do not take place. By combining pharmacological and genetic approaches, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2) were identified as the key regulatory signalling molecules upstream of the Vav3/Rac pathway leading to RB phosphorylation and E2F transcription factor activation. Additionally, vav3(-/-) and plcγ2(-/-) DT40 B cells were not able to activate the RB-E2F complex wild-type phenotype when these genetically modified cells were transfected with constitutively active forms of RhoA or Cdc42. However, when these knockout cells were transfected with different constitutively active versions of PLCγ, Vav or Rac1, not only activation of the RB-E2F complex wild-type phenotype was recovered but also the cellular proliferation. Furthermore, by evaluating the effect of two known effector mutants of Rac1 (Rac1(Q61L/F37A) and Rac1(Q61L/Y40C) ), the RB-E2F complex activation dependency on p21-activated kinase (PAK) and protein kinase Cε (PKCε) activities was established, being independent of both actin cytoskeleton reorganization and Ras activity. These results suggest that PAK1 and PKCε may be potential therapeutic targets to stop uncontrolled B cell proliferation mediated by the Vav/Rac pathway.

  19. 24 CFR 7.14 - Responsibilities of the Office of Human Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Human Resources. 7.14 Section 7.14 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of... Reprisal Responsibilities § 7.14 Responsibilities of the Office of Human Resources. In accordance with guidelines issued by the Assistant Secretary for Administration, Human Resources Officers shall: (a)...

  20. Resolution of outcome-induced response conflict by humans after extended training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, S.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Fletcher, P.C.; Dickinson, A.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of incongruent discrimination learning, where the outcome event of one response acts as the discriminative stimulus for the opposite response, suggest that humans rely on habitual stimulus-response (S-R) associations when outcome-response (O-R) associations would cause response conflict. Her

  1. Activated human neutrophil response to perfluorocarbon nanobubbles: oxygen-dependent and -independent cytotoxic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Yang, Li-Jia; Fang, Jia-You

    2011-06-10

    Nanobubbles, a type of nanoparticles with acoustically active properties, are being utilized as diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles to better understand, detect, and treat human diseases. The objective of this work was to prepare different nanobubble formulations and investigate their physicochemical characteristics and toxic responses to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-activated human neutrophils. The nanobubbles were prepared using perfluoropentane and coconut oil as the respective core and shell, with soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) and/or cationic surfactants as the interfacial layers. The cytotoxic effect of the nanobubbles on neutrophils was determined by extracellular O₂(.)⁻ release, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and elastase release. Particle sizes of the nanobubbles with different percentages of perfluorocarbon, oil, and surfactants in ranged 186-432 nm. The nanobubbles were demonstrated to inhibit the generation of superoxide and intracellular ROS. The cytotoxicity of nanobubbles may be mainly associated with membrane damage, as indicated by the high LDH leakage. Systems with Forestall (FE), a cationic surfactant, or higher SPC contents exhibited the greatest LDH release by 3-fold compared to the control. The further addition of an oil component reduced the cytotoxicity induced by the nanobubbles. Exposure to most of the nanobubble formulations upregulated elastase release by activated neutrophils. Contrary to this result, stearylamine (SA)-containing systems slightly but significantly suppressed elastase release. FE and SA in a free form caused stronger responses by neutrophils than when they were incorporated into nanobubbles. In summary, exposure to nanobubbles resulted in a formulation-dependent toxicity toward human neutrophils that was associated with both oxygen-dependent and -independent pathways. Clinicians should therefore exercise caution when using nanobubbles in patients

  2. Human rhinovirus induced cytokine/chemokine responses in human airway epithelial and immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Rajan

    Full Text Available Infections with human rhinovirus (HRV are commonly associated with acute upper and lower respiratory tract disease and asthma exacerbations. The role that HRVs play in these diseases suggests it is important to understand host-specific or virus-specific factors that contribute to pathogenesis. Since species A HRVs are often associated with more serious HRV disease than species B HRVs, differences in immune responses they induce should inform disease pathogenesis. To identify species differences in induced responses, we evaluated 3 species A viruses, HRV 25, 31 and 36 and 3 species B viruses, HRV 4, 35 and 48 by exposing human PBMCs to HRV infected Calu-3 cells. To evaluate the potential effect of memory induced by previous HRV infection on study responses, we tested cord blood mononuclear cells that should be HRV naïve. There were HRV-associated increases (significant increase compared to mock-infected cells for one or more HRVs for IP-10 and IL-15 that was unaffected by addition of PBMCs, for MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IFN-α, and HGF only with addition of PBMCs, and for ENA-78 only without addition of PBMCs. All three species B HRVs induced higher levels, compared to A HRVs, of MIP-1α and MIP-1β with PBMCs and ENA-78 without PBMCs. In contrast, addition of CBMCs had less effect and did not induce MIP-1α, MIP-1β, or IFN-α nor block ENA-78 production. Addition of CBMCs did, however, increase IP-10 levels for HRV 35 and HRV 36 infection. The presence of an effect with PBMCs and no effect with CBMCs for some responses suggest differences between the two types of cells possibly because of the presence of HRV memory responses in PBMCs and not CBMCs or limited response capacity for the immature CBMCs relative to PBMCs. Thus, our results indicate that different HRV strains can induce different patterns of cytokines and chemokines; some of these differences may be due to differences in memory responses induced by past HRV infections, and other differences

  3. Abortive lytic Epstein–Barr virus replication in tonsil-B lymphocytes in infectious mononucleosis and a subset of the chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerner AM

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A Martin Lerner,1 Safedin Beqaj21Department of Medicine, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Rochester, MI, USA; 2Pathology Inc, Torrance, CA, USAAbstract: A systematic 2001–2007 review of 142 chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS patients identified 106 CFS patients with elevated serum IgG antibodies to the herpesviruses Epstein–Barr virus (EBV, cytomegalovirus, or human herpesvirus (HHV 6 in single or multiple infections, with no other co-infections detected. We named these 106 patients group-A CFS. Eighty-six of these 106 group-A CFS patients (81% had elevated EBV early antibody, early antigen (diffuse, serum titers. A small group of six patients in the group-A EBV subset of CFS, additionally, had repetitive elevated-serum titers of antibody to the early lytic replication-encoded proteins, EBV dUTPase, and EBV DNA polymerase. The presence of these serum antibodies to EBV dUTPase and EBV DNA polymerase indicated EBV abortive lytic replication in these 6 CFS patients. None of 20 random control people (age- and sex-matched, with blood drawn at a commercial laboratory had elevated serum titers of antibody to EBV dUTPase or EBV DNA polymerase (P < 0.01. This finding needs verification in a larger group of EBV CFS subset patients, but if corroborated, it may represent a molecular marker for diagnosing the EBV subset of CFS. We review evidence that EBV abortive lytic replication with unassembled viral proteins in the blood may be the same in infectious mononucleosis (IM and a subset of CFS. EBV-abortive lytic replication in tonsil plasma cells is dominant in IM. No complete lytic virion is in the blood of IM or CFS patients. Complications of CFS and IM include cardiomyopathy and encephalopathy. Circulating abortive lytic-encoded EBV proteins (eg, EBV dUTPase, EBV DNA polymerase, and others may be common to IM and CFS. The intensity and duration of the circulating EBV-encoded proteins might differentiate the IM and EBV subsets of CFS

  4. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The cellular inflammatory response in human spinal cords after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jennifer C; Norenberg, Michael D; Ramsay, David A; Dekaban, Gregory A; Marcillo, Alexander E; Saenz, Alvaro D; Pasquale-Styles, Melissa; Dietrich, W Dalton; Weaver, Lynne C

    2006-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) provokes an inflammatory response that generates substantial secondary damage within the cord but also may contribute to its repair. Anti-inflammatory treatment of human SCI and its timing must be based on knowledge of the types of cells participating in the inflammatory response, the time after injury when they appear and then decrease in number, and the nature of their actions. Using post-mortem spinal cords, we evaluated the time course and distribution of pathological change, infiltrating neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes, and microglial activation in injured spinal cords from patients who were 'dead at the scene' or who survived for intervals up to 1 year after SCI. SCI caused zones of pathological change, including areas of inflammation and necrosis in the acute cases, and cystic cavities with longer survival (Zone 1), mantles of less severe change, including axonal swellings, inflammation and Wallerian degeneration (Zone 2) and histologically intact areas (Zone 3). Zone 1 areas increased in size with time after injury whereas the overall injury (size of the Zones 1 and 2 combined) remained relatively constant from the time (1-3 days) when damage was first visible. The distribution of inflammatory cells correlated well with the location of Zone 1, and sometimes of Zone 2. Neutrophils, visualized by their expression of human neutrophil alpha-defensins (defensin), entered the spinal cord by haemorrhage or extravasation, were most numerous 1-3 days after SCI, and were detectable for up to 10 days after SCI. Significant numbers of activated CD68-immunoreactive ramified microglia and a few monocytes/macrophages were in injured tissue within 1-3 days of SCI. Activated microglia, a few monocytes/macrophages and numerous phagocytic macrophages were present for weeks to months after SCI. A few CD8(+) lymphocytes were in the injured cords throughout the sampling intervals. Expression by the inflammatory cells of the oxidative

  6. 肾组织B淋巴细胞浸润及其异位淋巴样组织形成在狼疮肾炎诊治中的意义%Patterns of B Lymphocytes Infiltration in Kidney from Patients with Lupus Nephritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙康霞; 董光富; 张晓; 张光峰

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal B-cell infiltration-associated ELT formation may be one of the key process in the pathogenesis of LN patients with a longer disease duration and poor response to conventional combination therapy with high-dose GC and IS.Prohibition of B lymphocytes aggregation in the kidney may be one of the key therapeutic targets for the treatment of refractory LN.%目的:了解肾组织中B淋巴细胞浸润及其相关异位淋巴样组织( ectopic lymphoid organ, ELT)形成在狼疮肾炎( lupus nephritis, LN)诊治中的临床意义。方法收集2009年1月至2013年12月在广东省人民医院住院的89例LN患者,入选病例连续肾组织切片免疫组织化学法检测CD20+、 CD3+、 CD21+细胞共表达。结果89例LN患者中,光镜病理分析显示B、 T淋巴细胞分布以肾间质为主77例(86.5%),肾小管周围为主9例,肾小球周围为主3例;CD20+细胞组69例(77.5%), CD20-细胞组20例(22.5%)。 B细胞组[(21.8±9.9)个月]较非B细胞组[(9.8±6.2)个月]平均病程明显增加(P=0.045);治疗6个月LN完全缓解(complete remission, CR)率B细胞组(63.8%)与非B细胞组(90%)比较差异有统计学意义(P=0.047);但总缓解率两组间差异无统计学意义(P=0.241)。免疫组化显示B、 T淋巴细胞浸润模式中,出现三种类型:0、1和2类,2类ELT形成为主要模式,占51例(73.9%),无3类;2类ELT形成LN患者病程[(24.4±10.2)个月]较0类病程[(9.8±6.2)个月]和1类病程[(16.4±7.8)个月]明显延长,差异具有统计学意义( P=0.017和P=0.039);相较Ⅴ型LN患者,Ⅲ型和Ⅳ型LN患者中, ELT分布三类型比例之间差异有统计学意义,其中2类ELT分布比例较0或1类明显增多,差异具有统计学意义(Ⅲ型: P=0.013;Ⅳ型: P=0.001)。结论 B细胞异常浸润及其ELT形成可能是长病程和难治性LN患者发病机制

  7. Influence of Fragrances on Human Psychophysiological Activity: With Special Reference to Human Electroencephalographic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandhasamy Sowndhararajan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fragrances such as perfumes and room fresheners on the psychophysiological activities of humans has been known for a long time, and its significance is gradually increasing in the medicinal and cosmetic industries. A fragrance consists of volatile chemicals with a molecular weight of less than 300 Da that humans perceive through the olfactory system. In humans, about 300 active olfactory receptor genes are devoted to detecting thousands of different fragrance molecules through a large family of olfactory receptors of a diverse protein sequence. The sense of smell plays an important role in the physiological effects of mood, stress, and working capacity. Electrophysiological studies have revealed that various fragrances affected spontaneous brain activities and cognitive functions, which are measured by an electroencephalograph (EEG. The EEG is a good temporal measure of responses in the central nervous system and it provides information about the physiological state of the brain both in health and disease. The EEG power spectrum is classified into different frequency bands such as delta (0.5–4 Hz, theta (4–8 Hz, alpha (8–13 Hz, beta (13–30 Hz and gamma (30–50 Hz, and each band is correlated with different features of brain states. A quantitative EEG uses computer software to provide the topographic mapping of the brain activity in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital brain regions. It is well known that decreases of alpha and beta activities and increases of delta and theta activities are associated with brain pathology and general cognitive decline. In the last few decades, many scientific studies were conducted to investigate the effect of inhalation of aroma on human brain functions. The studies have suggested a significant role for olfactory stimulation in the alteration of cognition, mood, and social behavior. This review aims to evaluate the available literature regarding the influence of fragrances on the

  8. Hsp60 response in experimental and human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Colangeli, Roberto; Orban, Gergely; Pierucci, Massimo; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Lo Bello, Margherita; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Bucchieri, Fabio; Pomara, Cristoforo; Valentino, Mario; Muscat, Richard; Benigno, Arcangelo; Zummo, Giovanni; de Macario, Everly Conway; Cappello, Francesco; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Macario, Alberto J L

    2015-03-24

    The mitochondrial chaperonin Hsp60 is a ubiquitous molecule with multiple roles, constitutively expressed and inducible by oxidative stress. In the brain, Hsp60 is widely distributed and has been implicated in neurological disorders, including epilepsy. A role for mitochondria and oxidative stress has been proposed in epileptogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here, we investigated the involvement of Hsp60 in TLE using animal and human samples. Hsp60 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus, measured by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, was increased in a rat model of TLE. Hsp60 was also increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons somata and neuropil and hippocampus proper (CA3, CA1) of the epileptic rats. We also determined the circulating levels of Hsp60 in epileptic animals and TLE patients using ELISA. The epileptic rats showed circulating levels of Hsp60 higher than controls. Likewise, plasma post-seizure Hsp60 levels in patients were higher than before the seizure and those of controls. These results demonstrate that Hsp60 is increased in both animals and patients with TLE in affected tissues, and in plasma in response to epileptic seizures, and point to it as biomarker of hippocampal stress potentially useful for diagnosis and patient management.

  9. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IMPACTS ON SUSTAINABLE HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Anstätt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to critically analyze the findings of the first, recently published, studies about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR impacts on Sustainable Human Development (SHD. We aim at deriving conclusions for effective CSR strategies and at identifying consequences for management and research. As CSR claims to create value for corporations and for society, we argue that the people-centered Capability Approach (CA is promising to provide neglected and much needed insights how corporate activities affect individuals and communities. Based on a survey of recent literature addressing CSR impacts on SHD, we highlight CSR potentials to improve average well-being in multiple dimensions of SHD. Moreover, we critically assess challenges and limitations of CSR as a strategy to preserve and foster SHD. For instance, studies have shown that, despite CSR-driven well-being increases, social capital, relational capabilities and collective agency may become challenged by corporate strategies. Moreover, corporate environmental impacts have been found to be less often addressed by both, companies and SHD researchers. Resulting inequality and fairness issues have been identified as causes of violence against corporations even in the presence of total well-being improvements. We conclude that companies should strategically take into account a comprehensive range of factors driving and hampering SHD to account for their whole portfolio of corporate opportunities and risks. This requires evaluating CSR impacts instead of only focusing on CSR inputs and outputs. Thereby, corporations can mitigate their risks, improve their stakeholder trust and strengthen their competitiveness.

  10. Studying the immune response to human viral infections using zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Michelle F; Sullivan, Con; Kim, Carol H

    2014-09-01

    Humans and viruses have a long co-evolutionary history. Viral illnesses have and will continue to shape human history: from smallpox, to influenza, to HIV, and beyond. Animal models of human viral illnesses are needed in order to generate safe and effective antiviral medicines, adjuvant therapies, and vaccines. These animal models must support the replication of human viruses, recapitulate aspects of human viral illnesses, and respond with conserved immune signaling cascades. The zebrafish is perhaps the simplest, most commonly used laboratory model organism in which innate and/or adaptive immunity can be studied. Herein, we will discuss the current zebrafish models of human viral illnesses and the insights they have provided. We will highlight advantages of early life stage zebrafish and the importance of innate immunity in human viral illnesses. We will also discuss viral characteristics to consider before infecting zebrafish with human viruses as well as predict other human viruses that may be able to infect zebrafish.

  11. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  12. Human surrogate neck response to +Gz vertical impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, L. van; Uittenbogaard, J.

    2011-01-01

    For the evaluation of impact scenarios with a substantial vertical component, the performance of current human surrogates - the RID 3D hardware dummy and two numerical human models - was evaluated. Volunteer tests with 10G and 6G pulses were compared to reconstructed tests with human surrogates.

  13. Human surrogate neck response to +Gz vertical impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, L. van; Uittenbogaard, J.

    2011-01-01

    For the evaluation of impact scenarios with a substantial vertical component, the performance of current human surrogates - the RID 3D hardware dummy and two numerical human models - was evaluated. Volunteer tests with 10G and 6G pulses were compared to reconstructed tests with human surrogates. Add

  14. A high-affinity human monoclonal IgM antibody reacting with multiple strains of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, SA; Birkelund, Svend; Borrebaeck, CA

    1990-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies were produced against Mycoplasma hominis by in vitro immunization of peripheral blood lymphocytes from a healthy seropositive donor using low amounts of antigen (5 ng/ml). The immune B lymphocytes were subsequently immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus transformation...

  15. JAK3 maps to human chromosome 19p12 within a cluster of protooncogenes and transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, S.M.G.; Gordon, L.A.; Mohrenweiser, H.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lai, Koon Siew [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    The gene for the most recently discoverd member of a family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, JAK3, was mapped to human chromosome 19p12 using polymerase chain reaction. JAK3 plays a role in the interleukin (IL)-2 signaling pathway that regulates T and B lymphocyte development and proliferation. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Reindeer and caribou (Rangifer tarandus response towards human activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eigil Reimers

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the question of how human activities and infrastructure influence reindeer/caribou’s (Rangifer tarandus behaviour and habitat use and review studies based on current methodologies. Anthropogenic activities have a direct affect on Rangifer behaviour through the senses hearing, sight and smell, and all of these are important tools for behavioural risk assessment. Short term indirect responses, such as habituation, sensitisation, avoidance, and displacement, develop through neutral, positive or negative associations towards stimulus in terms of Rangifer’s ability to experience, learn, and remember. Long term behavioural responses develop through interaction with predators and, for reindeer, also domestication. A survey of the literature dealing with behavioural studies reveals that although Rangifer in most cases retreat from anthropogenic activities, comfort distances (i.e. distances beyond which animal behaviour or activity are not influenced are relatively short. In most cases, energetic implications appear moderate and small compared to other natural, biotic influences such as disturbance (and death caused by insect and/or predator harassment. Unless obstructing access, physical constructions of various kinds apparently have limited effects on Rangifer behaviour or habitat use. On the other hand, constructions that do obstruct or limit access and recreational or other motorized and non-motorized activities appear to have stronger impacts on avoidance and redistribution of Rangifer. Behavioural effects that might decrease survival and reproduction include retreat from favourable habitat near disturbance sources and reduction of time spent feeding with resulting energy depletion over time. Rangifer habitat use, habitat avoidance, and feeding preferences are governed by a complexity of natural interacting factors. Domestication, habituation and sensitisation are essential in shaping Rangifer’s adaptability, and should be included

  17. Increased proinflammatory responses from asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells in response to rhinovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Nicholas JC

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exacerbations of asthma are associated with viral respiratory tract infections, of which rhinoviruses (RV are the predominant virus type. Airway smooth muscle is important in asthma pathogenesis, however little is known about the potential interaction of RV and human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM. We hypothesised that rhinovirus induction of inflammatory cytokine release from airway smooth muscle is augmented and differentially regulated in asthmatic compared to normal HASM cells. Methods HASM cells, isolated from either asthmatic or non-asthmatic subjects, were infected with rhinovirus. Cytokine production was assayed by ELISA, ICAM-1 cell surface expression was assessed by FACS, and the transcription regulation of IL-6 was measured by luciferase activity. Results RV-induced IL-6 release was significantly greater in HASM cells derived from asthmatic subjects compared to non-asthmatic subjects. This response was RV specific, as 5% serum- induced IL-6 release was not different in the two cell types. Whilst serum stimulated IL-8 production in cells from both subject groups, RV induced IL-8 production in only asthmatic derived HASM cells. The transcriptional induction of IL-6 was differentially regulated via C/EBP in the asthmatic and NF-κB + AP-1 in the non-asthmatic HASM cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates augmentation and differential transcriptional regulation of RV specific innate immune response in HASM cells derived from asthmatic and non-asthmatics, and may give valuable insight into the mechanisms of RV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  18. HIV/AIDS患者外周血B细胞数量以及TLR9 mRNA表达水平的研究%B lymphocyte counts and Toil-like receptor 9 mRNA expression on cell from HIV-1 infected patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙宏; 姜拥军; 尚红; 耿文清; 崔华露; 赵敏; 韩晓旭; 张子宁; 刘静; 代娣; 王亚男

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨HIV-1感染后外周血B细胞数量的变化,以及B细胞TLR9 mRNA表达水平与HIV-1感染疾病进展的关系.方法 采集HIV/AIDS患者EDTA抗凝静脉血,荧光抗体染色后用流式细胞仪检测HIV/AIDS患者B细胞数量.密度梯度离心法分离外周血单个核细胞,应用MACS磁珠分选系统分选CD19+B细胞,并采用荧光定量实时PCR技术检测B细胞TLR9 mRNA水平.结果 HIV/AIDS患者B细胞数量显著低于健康对照组(P<0.01),与CD4+T细胞数量呈正相关(r=0.534,P=0.006).HIV/AIDS患者外周血B细胞TIR9 mRNA的表达明显低于健康对照组(P=0.023),与CD4+T细胞数量呈正相关(r=0.390,P=0.040).结论 HIV感染可降低HIV/AIDS患者外周血B细胞数量以及B细胞TLR9 mRNA的表达量,B细胞数量和B细胞TLR9 mRNA的表达量均可能与疾病进展相关.%Objective To study the B lymphocytes counts and the expression of TLR9 mRNA on B lymphocytes in peripheral blood from Chinese HIV-infected patients.Methods The cells from peripheral blood were stained with antibodies labeled with fluorescence and B lymphocytes were counted with flow cytometry.Using the method of magnetic activated cell sorting and real-time PCR,the expression of TLR9 mRNA was measured.Results The B lymphocytes counts in HIV/AIDS patients was significantly lower than that of healthy controls(P <0.01).The B lymphocytes counts in HIV/AIDS patients positively correlated with the CD4 +T cells counts(r =0.534,P = 0.006).The expression of TLR9 mRNA on B lymphocytes in HIV/AIDS patients was significantly lower than that of healthy controls(P =0.023),and positively correlated with the CD4 + T cells counts(r = 0.390,P = 0.040).Conclusion The B lymphocytes counts and the expression of TLR9 mRNA on B lymphocytes in Chinese HIV/AIDS patients were decreased due to HIV infection,which may correlate with disease progression.

  19. Current human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and its response in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Lai-Yi

    2012-01-01

    The first patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was identified in 1985; since then, as of October 31, 2010, a total accumulative number of 370 000 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS have been reported. The estimated number of patients living with HIV (PLHIV) in China was 740 000 in 2009. Although China is still a low-HIV prevalence region (rate of 0.057%), the epidemic has spread more widely from the high-risk groups to the general population. This paper covers five topics of importance, i.e., current trends of the HIV epidemic; HIV-1 subtype diversity; emergence of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR); the country's response to the disease; and future challenges and additional actions needed. This paper emphasizes sexual transmission as the predominant route of transmission and it being spread more frequently among men who have sex with men; the epidemic being concentrated over particular areas in China. We also discuss the fact that diverse HIV-1 subtypes have been found throughout the entire country and that recombinant subtypes became predominant. We also explore other topics such as the possibility of HIVDR, including primary and secondary resistance, with the use of free highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART); the integrated strategy of HIVDR surveillance and individual clinical HIVDR testing as a new attempt in China. For many years both policy-makers and professionals (including non-governmental organizations) have expressed strong commitment to prevention, control, and care of HIV/sexual transmission infection (STI), promoted the research and conducted different actions to slow the rising trend of the HIV epidemics. Although China is facing many challenges, its citizens need to be persistent on continuing the campaign of the State Council titled "Information of Strengthening Work on Prevention and Control of AIDS".

  20. Enhancement of radiation response in human hepatocarcinoma cells by Metformin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Joon; Jung, Won Gyun [Division of heavy ion clinical research, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Hoon; Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Mi Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Metformin (1, 1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride), the most widely used drug to treat type 2 diabetic patients under benefit good tolerability profile and low cost, has sparked keen interest as potential anticancer agent. Preclinical studies showed that the primary mechanism of action of metformin is through its ability to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin inhibits complex 1 in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to an increase in the AMP-to-ATP ratio, then, phospholylated AMPK increase energy generation or suppress energy consumption and then, inhibits cell growth. However, important caveat in direct action theory of metformin is that millimorlar range, effective dose for inhibition tumor cell growth in vitro, cannot be achieved in patients. This is probably because metformin enter cells through the organic cation transporters OCT1 and OCT2, which is lowly expressed in human cells except liver and adipose cells. dependent pathway rather than through direct effects of the tumor cells. We analyzed combination effect of metformin and radiation focusing to HCC cell lines, which theoretically express high organic cation transporters, producing high centration of metformin in tumor cells. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether metformin had anti-tumor effects when combined with radiation as radiosensitizer in HCC. The results showed that metformin increased radiosensitizing efficacy in HCC cells , as well as in Huh7 xenograft mouse models. Interestingly, metformin effectively sensitizes IR-induced apoptosis in HCC through upregulation of cleaved PARP and caspase3 and increase synergically on DNA damage response with combined treatment.HCC, suggesting potential usefulness of combined therapy of metformin together with radiation for HCC cancer therapy.

  1. Predicting Metapopulation Responses To Conservation In Human-Dominated Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary S. Ladin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Loss of habitat to urbanization is a primary cause of population declines as human-dominated landscapes expand at increasing rates. Understanding how the relative effects of different conservation strategies is important to slow population declines for species in urban landscapes. We studied the wood thrush Hylocichla mustelina, a declining forest-breeding Neotropical migratory species, and umbrella species for forest-breeding songbirds, within the urbanized mid-Atlantic United States. We integrated 40 years of demographic data with contemporary metapopulation model simulations of breeding wood thrushes to predict population responses to differing conservation scenarios. We compared four conservation scenarios over a 30-year time period (2014–2044 representing A current observed state (Null, B replacing impervious surface with forest (Reforest, C reducing brown-headed cowbird Molothrus ater parasitism pressure (Cowbird removal, and D simultaneous reforesting and cowbird removal. Compared to the Null scenario, the Reforest scenario increased mean annual population trends by 54 % , the Remove cowbirds scenario increased mean annual population trends by 38 %, and the scenario combining reforestation and cowbird removal increased mean annual population trends by 98 %. Mean annual growth rates (λ per site were greater in the Reforest (λ = 0.94 and Remove cowbirds (λ = 0.92 compared to the Null (λ = 0.88 model scenarios. However, only by combining the positive effects of reforestation and cowbird removal did wood thrush populations stop declining (λ = 1.00. Our results suggest that independently replacing impervious surface with forest habitat around forest patches and removing cowbirds may slow current negative population trends. Furthermore, conservation efforts that combine reforestation and cowbird removal may potentially benefit populations of wood thrushes and other similarly forest-breeding songbird species within urbanized fragmented

  2. Integrating human responses to climate change into conservation vulnerability assessments and adaptation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Sean L; Venter, Oscar; Jones, Kendall R; Watson, James E M

    2015-10-01

    The impact of climate change on biodiversity is now evident, with the direct impacts of changing temperature and rainfall patterns and increases in the magnitude and frequency of extreme events on species distribution, populations, and overall ecosystem function being increasingly publicized. Changes in the climate system are also affecting human communities, and a range of human responses across terrestrial and marine realms have been witnessed, including altered agricultural activities, shifting fishing efforts, and human migration. Failing to account for the human responses to climate change is likely to compromise climate-smart conservation efforts. Here, we use a well-established conservation planning framework to show how integrating human responses to climate change into both species- and site-based vulnerability assessments and adaptation plans is possible. By explicitly taking into account human responses, conservation practitioners will improve their evaluation of species and ecosystem vulnerability, and will be better able to deliver win-wins for human- and biodiversity-focused climate adaptation.

  3. Plasmodium falciparum infection causes proinflammatory priming of human TLR responses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCall, M.B.B.; Netea, M.G.; Hermsen, C.C.; Jansen, T.; Jacobs, L.; Golenbock, D.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    TLRs are a major group of pattern recognition receptors that are crucial in initiating innate immune responses and are capable of recognizing Plasmodium ligands. We have investigated TLR responses during acute experimental P. falciparum (P.f.) infection in 15 malaria-naive volunteers. TLR-4 response

  4. The human rights responsibilities of multinational tobacco companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, M E

    2005-08-01

    This article explores various strategies which could be used to hold the tobacco industry accountable for human rights violations precipitated by its conduct. First, a brief overview of the international human rights regime and the tobacco related jurisprudence issued by human rights treaty bodies is provided. The article then explains how tobacco control advocates could promote more systematic consideration of governments' tobacco related human rights violations by reconceptualising the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in the language of rights. The feasibility of using the existing human rights framework to target the tobacco industry directly is analysed with the conclusion that this approach has serious limitations. Emerging human rights norms, which have greater potential to affect the industry's conduct, are presented. Finally, given the questionable authoritativeness of these norms, alternative ways that they could be employed to hold tobacco companies accountable for the rights related consequences of their activities are proposed.

  5. Worms under stress: C. elegans stress response and its relevance to complex human disease and aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Sanchez, M.; Snoek, L.B.; Bono, de M.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Many organisms have stress response pathways, components of which share homology with players in complex human disease pathways. Research on stress response in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans has provided detailed insights into the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying complex human d

  6. Quantitative Methods in Toxicology for Human Dose-Response Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer HJ; Jansen EHJM; Zeilmaker MJ; van Kranen HJ; Kroese ED; TOX; LCM

    1995-01-01

    Het proces van de humane risicoschatting kan verdeeld worden in risico-identificatie, vaststellen van dosis-respons relaties, vaststellen van blootstelling en risico-karakterisering. In de humane risicoschatting worden kwantitatieve methoden en modellen toegepast. Welk model dient te worden toegep

  7. MCF-7 human mammary adenocarcinoma cells exhibit augmented responses to human insulin on a collagen IV surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Listov-Saabye, Nicolai; Jensen, Marianne Blirup; Kiehr, Benedicte;

    2009-01-01

    was significantly more mitogenic than native insulin, validating the ability of the assay to identify hypermitogenic human insulin analogs. With MCF-7 cells on a collagen IV surface, the ranking of mitogens was maintained, but fold mitogenic responses and dynamic range and steepness of dose-response curves were...

  8. Regulatory T cells in human lymphatic filariasis: stronger functional activity in microfilaremics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Wammes

    Full Text Available Infection with filarial parasites is associated with T cell hyporesponsiveness, which is thought to be partly mediated by their ability to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs during human infections. This study investigates the functional capacity of Tregs from different groups of filarial patients to suppress filaria-specific immune responses during human filariasis. Microfilaremic (MF, chronic pathology (CP and uninfected endemic normal (EN individuals were selected in an area endemic for Brugia timori in Flores island, Indonesia. PBMC were isolated, CD4CD25(hi cells were magnetically depleted and in vitro cytokine production and proliferation in response to B. malayi adult worm antigen (BmA were determined in total and Treg-depleted PBMC. In MF subjects BmA-specific T and B lymphocyte proliferation as well as IFN-gamma, IL-13 and IL-17 responses were lower compared to EN and CP groups. Depletion of Tregs restored T cell as well as B cell proliferation in MF-positives, while proliferative responses in the other groups were not enhanced. BmA-induced IL-13 production was increased after Treg removal in MF-positives only. Thus, filaria-associated Tregs were demonstrated to be functional in suppressing proliferation and possibly Th2 cytokine responses to BmA. These suppressive effects were only observed in the MF group and not in EN or CP. These findings may be important when considering strategies for filarial treatment and the targeted prevention of filaria-induced lymphedema.

  9. Genetic polymorphisms and lipid response to dietary changes in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weggemans, R.M.; Zock, P.L.; Ordovas, J.M.; Ramos-Galluzzi, J.; Katan, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies on the effects of genetic polymorphisms on the serum cholesterol response to dietary treatments were often inconsistent and frequently involved small numbers of subjects. We studied the effect of 10 genetic polymorphisms on the responses of serum cholesterol to saturated and trans f

  10. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism...

  11. Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It: Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Preamble to the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UNDHR) calls on every organ of society to teach and educate for the promotion of the rights it contains. However, few if any business schools have any systematic or critical human rights content in their accounting and business curricula. This oversight is increasingly problematic as…

  12. Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It: Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Preamble to the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UNDHR) calls on every organ of society to teach and educate for the promotion of the rights it contains. However, few if any business schools have any systematic or critical human rights content in their accounting and business curricula. This oversight is increasingly problematic as…

  13. Human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in relation to access to medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hunt, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Although access to medicines is a vital feature of the right to the highest attainable standard of health ("right to health"), almost two billion people lack access to essential medicines, leading to immense avoidable suffering. While the human rights responsibility to provide access to medicines lies mainly with States, pharmaceutical companies also have human rights responsibilities in relation to access to medicines. This article provides an introduction to these responsibilities. It briefly outlines the new UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and places the human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in this context. The authors draw from the work of the first UN Special Rapporteur on the right to the highest attainable standard of health, in particular the Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies in Relation to Access to Medicines that he presented to the UN General Assembly in 2008, and his UN report on GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). While the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights are general human rights standards applicable to all business entities, the Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies consider the specific human rights responsibilities of one sector (pharmaceutical companies) in relation to one area of activity (access to medicines). The article signals the human rights responsibilities of all pharmaceutical companies, with particular attention to patent-holding pharmaceutical companies. Adopting a right-to-health "lens," the article discusses GSK and accountability. The authors argue that human rights should shape pharmaceutical companies' policies, and provide standards in relation to which pharmaceutical companies could, and should, be held accountable. They conclude that it is now crucial to devise independent, accessible, transparent, and effective mechanisms to monitor pharmaceutical companies and hold them publicly accountable for their human rights responsibilities.

  14. Classical and alternative activation and metalloproteinase expression occurs in foam cell macrophages in male and female ApoE null mice in the absence of T- and B-lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Mo Hayes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rupture of advanced atherosclerotic plaques accounts for most life-threatening myocardial infarctions. Classical (M1 and alternative (M2 macrophage activation could promote atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture by increasing production of proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. Lymphocyte-derived cytokines may be essential for generating M1 and M2 phenotypes in plaques, although this has not been rigorously tested until now.Methods and Results: We validated the expression of M1 markers (iNOS and COX-2 and M2 markers (arginase-1, Ym-1 and CD206 and then measured MMP mRNA levels in mouse macrophages during classical and alternative activation in vitro. We then compared mRNA expression of these genes ex vivo in foam cells from subcutaneous granulomas in fat-fed immune-competent ApoE knockout and immune-compromised ApoE/Rag-1 double knockout mice, which lack all T and B cells. Furthermore, we performed immunohistochemistry in subcutaneous granulomas and in aortic root and brachiocephalic artery atherosclerotic plaques to measure the extent of M1/M2 marker and MMP protein expression in vivo. Classical activation of mouse macrophages with bacterial lipopolysaccharide in vitro increased MMPs-13, -14 and -25 but decreased MMP-19 and TIMP-2 mRNA expressions. Alternative activation with IL-4 increased MMP-19 expression. Foam cells in subcutaneous granulomas expressed all M1/M2 markers and MMPs at ex vivo mRNA and in vivo protein levels, irrespective of Rag-1 genotype. There were also similar percentages of foam cell macrophages carrying M1/M2 markers and MMPs in atherosclerotic plaques from ApoE knockout and ApoE/Rag-1 double knockout mice. Conclusions: Classical and alternative activation leads to distinct MMP expression patterns in mouse macrophages in vitro. M1 and M2 polarization in vivo occurs in the absence of T and B lymphocytes in either granuloma or plaque foam cell macrophages.

  15. T、B淋巴细胞功能对流行性牛白血病发生发展的影响%The Relationship Between the Function of T、B Lymphocytes and the Pathogenesis of Enzootic Bovine Leukosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王选年; 潘耀谦; 康晓迪; 张改平

    2001-01-01

    本文回顾了T、B淋巴细胞功能与牛白血病发生发展的相关性。阐明了感染BLV牛B细胞淋巴瘤细胞除了来源于B1a(CD5+CD11b+)细胞,也可来源于B1b(CD5- CD11b+)及常规B2(CD5 -CD11b-)细胞。探讨了T细胞功能对牛白血病的发生发展的影响,指出IL-1 2表达下降和IL -10表达增加可能导致了B细胞淋巴肉瘤的形成,Ⅰ型和Ⅱ型细胞因子的不平衡引起了BLV的发展。同时讨论了B-T细胞的相互作用在BLV感染时疾病阶段性发展过程中的作用。%This review focuses on the relationship between the function of T、B lymp hocytes and the pathogenesis of Enzootic Bovine Leukosis. In BLV infection anima l, the phenotypes of B-cells lymphoma can be derived from B1a(CD5+CD11 b+), B1b(C D5-CD11b+) and conventional B2(CD5-CD11b-)cells. Co mbined with previous findi ngs the data suggests that the decrease of IL-12 and the increase of IL-10 res ult in the formation of B-cell lymphosarcoma, and the imbalance of phenotype Ⅰ and Ⅱ cytokines causes the progression of Bovine Leukemia. M eanwhile, the interaction of B and T cells could contribute to the polyclonal ac tivation and proliferation of B lymphocytes in BLV infectea animals.

  16. 中医药治疗干燥综合征及对 B 淋巴细胞的影响%Effect of Chinese medicine on Sjogren's syndrome and its B lymphocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏莎; 纪伟

    2015-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome (SS ) belongs to the category of “dryness syndrome” in traditional Chinese medicine ,it often occurs duo to yin deficiency and dryness-heat together with obstruction of collaterals by blood stasis ,therefore ,the methods of nourishing yin along with promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis are often used in the treatment ,which have achieved good effect clinically .The modern medical science thinks that the etiology of SS is unknown ,but it mainly charac-terized by B lymphocytic infiltration of exocrine glands .In recent years ,the treatment of Chinese medicine on SS is more popular ,in order to make deep discussion of its mechanism of action ,more and more clinical and experimental studies have begun to discuss its effect on B cells ,and this will also become one of the hot research of traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of SS in the futrue .%干燥综合征(Sjogren's syndrome ,SS )归属于中医“燥证”范畴,多因阴虚燥热、瘀血阻络而发病,因此治疗上常采用养阴生津、活血祛瘀的方法,临床取得了良好的疗效。现代医学认为,SS的病因不明,但主要以B淋巴细胞(简称B细胞)浸润外分泌腺为特征。近年来,中医药对SS的治疗越发普遍,为了进一步明确其作用机制,越来越多的临床研究和实验研究已开始探讨其对B细胞的影响,这将成为今后研究中医药治疗SS的热点之一。

  17. Human circulating influenza-CD4+ ICOS1+IL-21+ T cells expand after vaccination, exert helper function, and predict antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spensieri, Fabiana; Borgogni, Erica; Zedda, Luisanna; Bardelli, Monia; Buricchi, Francesca; Volpini, Gianfranco; Fragapane, Elena; Tavarini, Simona; Finco, Oretta; Rappuoli, Rino; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Galli, Grazia; Castellino, Flora

    2013-08-27

    Protection against influenza is mediated by neutralizing antibodies, and their induction at high and sustained titers is key for successful vaccination. Optimal B cells activation requires delivery of help from CD4(+) T lymphocytes. In lymph nodes and tonsils, T-follicular helper cells have been identified as the T cells subset specialized in helping B lymphocytes, with interleukin-21 (IL-21) and inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS1) playing a central role for this function. We followed the expansion of antigen-specific IL-21(+) CD4(+) T cells upon influenza vaccination in adults. We show that, after an overnight in vitro stimulation, influenza-specific IL-21(+) CD4(+) T cells can be measured in human blood, accumulate in the CXCR5(-)ICOS1(+) population, and increase in frequency after vaccination. The expansion of influenza-specific ICOS1(+)IL-21(+) CD4(+) T cells associates with and predicts the rise of functionally active antibodies to avian H5N1. We also show that blood-derived CXCR5(-)ICOS1(+) CD4(+) T cells exert helper function in vitro and support the differentiation of influenza specific B cells in an ICOS1- and IL-21-dependent manner. We propose that the expansion of antigen-specific ICOS1(+)IL-21(+) CD4(+) T cells in blood is an early marker of vaccine immunogenicity and an important immune parameter for the evaluation of novel vaccination strategies.

  18. Association between nicotine withdrawal and reward responsiveness in humans and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergadia, Michele L; Der-Avakian, Andre; D'Souza, Manoranjan S; Madden, Pamela A F; Heath, Andrew C; Shiffman, Saul; Markou, Athina; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2014-11-01

    Reward-related disturbances after withdrawal from nicotine are hypothesized to contribute to relapse to tobacco smoking but mechanisms underlying and linking such processes remain largely unknown. To determine whether withdrawal from nicotine affects reward responsiveness (ie, the propensity to modulate behavior as a function of prior reinforcement experience) across species using translational behavioral assessments in humans and rats. Experimental studies used analogous reward responsiveness tasks in both humans and rats to examine whether reward responsiveness varied in (1) an ad libitum smoking condition compared with a 24-hour acute nicotine abstinence condition in 31 human smokers with (n = 17) or without (n = 14) a history of depression; (2) rats 24 hours after withdrawal from chronic nicotine (n = 19) or saline (n = 20); and (3) rats following acute nicotine exposure after withdrawal from either chronic nicotine or saline administration. Performance on a reward responsiveness task under nicotine and nonnicotine conditions. In both human smokers and nicotine-treated rats, reward responsiveness was significantly reduced after 24-hour withdrawal from nicotine (P responsiveness were greater in those with a history of depression. In rats previously exposed to chronic nicotine, acute nicotine reexposure long after withdrawal potentiated reward responsiveness (P responsiveness to natural rewards and to experience potentiated nicotine-induced reward responsiveness. Moreover, demonstration of behavioral homology across humans and rodents provides a strong translational framework for the investigation and development of clinical treatments targeting reward responsiveness deficits during early withdrawal of nicotine.

  19. Human responses to the geophysical daily, annual and lunar cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Russell G; Roenneberg, Till

    2008-09-09

    Collectively the daily, seasonal, lunar and tidal geophysical cycles regulate much of the temporal biology of life on Earth. The increasing isolation of human societies from these geophysical cycles, as a result of improved living conditions, high-quality nutrition and 24/7 working practices, have led many to believe that human biology functions independently of them. Yet recent studies have highlighted the dominant role that our circadian clock plays in the organisation of 24 hour patterns of behaviour and physiology. Preferred wake and sleep times are to a large extent driven by an endogenous temporal program that uses sunlight as an entraining cue. The alarm clock can drive human activity rhythms but has little direct effect on our endogenous 24 hour physiology. In many situations, our biology and our society appear to be in serious opposition, and the damaging consequences to our health under these circumstances are increasingly recognised. The seasons dominate the lives of non-equatorial species, and until recently, they also had a marked influence on much of human biology. Despite human isolation from seasonal changes in temperature, food and photoperiod in the industrialised nations, the seasons still appear to have a small, but significant, impact upon when individuals are born and many aspects of health. The seasonal changes that modulate our biology, and how these factors might interact with the social and metabolic status of the individual to drive seasonal effects, are still poorly understood. Lunar cycles had, and continue to have, an influence upon human culture, though despite a persistent belief that our mental health and other behaviours are modulated by the phase of the moon, there is no solid evidence that human biology is in any way regulated by the lunar cycle.

  20. Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Response to Heavy Particle Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill

    2012-07-01

    A battery of non-oncogenically immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) are being used to examine the molecular changes that lead to lung carcinogenesis after exposure to heavy particles found in the free space environment. The goal is to ultimately identify biomarkers of radioresponse that can be used for prediction of carcinogenic risk for fatal lung cancer. Our initial studies have focused on the cell line HBEC3 KT and the isogenic variant HBEC3 KTR53, which overexpresses the RASv12 mutant and where p53 has been knocked down by shRNA, and is considered to be a more oncogenically progressed variant. We have previously described the response of HBEC3 KT at the cellular and molecular level, however, the focus here is on the rate of cellular transformation after HZE radiation exposure and the molecular changes in transformed cells. When comparing the two cell lines we find that there is a maximum rate of cellular transformation at 0.25 Gy when cells are exposed to 1 GeV Fe particles, and, for the HBEC3 KTR53 there are multiple pathways upregulated that promote anchorage independent growth including the mTOR pathway, the TGF-1 pathway, RhoA signaling and the ERK/MAPK pathway as early as 2 weeks after radiation. This does not occur in the HBEC3 KT cell line. Transformed HBEC3 KT cells do not show any morphologic or phenotypic changes when grown as cell cultures. HBEC3 KTR53 cells on the other hand show substantial changes in morphology from a cobblestone epithelial appearance to a mesenchymal appearance with a lack of contact inhibition. This epithelial to mesenchymal change in morphology is accompanied by the expression of vimentin and a reduction in the expression of E-cadherin, which are hallmarks of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Interestingly, for HBEC3 KT transformed cells there are no mutations in the p53 gene, 2 of 15 clones were found to be heterozygous for the RASV12 mutation, and 3 of 15 clones expressed high levels of BigH3, a TGFB-responsive

  1. Human operant learning under concurrent reinforcement of response variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maes, J.H.R.; Goot, M.H. van der

    2006-01-01

    This study asked whether the concurrent reinforcement of behavioral variability facilitates learning to emit a difficult target response. Sixty students repeatedly pressed sequences of keys, with an originally infrequently occurring target sequence consistently being followed by positive feedback. T

  2. The B-cell stimulatory cytokines BLyS and APRIL are elevated in human periodontitis and are required for B-cell–dependent bone loss in experimental murine periodontitis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Toshiharu; AlSarhan, Mohammed; Benakanakere, Manjunatha R.; Maekawa, Tomoki; Kinane, Denis F.; Cancro, Michael P.; Korostoff, Jonathan M.; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-01-01

    B-lineage cells (B lymphocytes and plasma cells) predominate in the inflammatory infiltrate of human chronic periodontitis. However, their role in disease pathogenesis and the factors responsible for their persistence in chronic lesions are poorly understood. In this regard, two cytokines of the TNF ligand superfamily, namely a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), are important for the survival, proliferation, and maturation of B cells. We thus hypothesized that APRIL and/or BLyS are upregulated in periodontitis and contribute to induction of periodontal bone loss. This hypothesis was addressed in both human and mouse experimental systems. We show that, relative to healthy controls, the expression of APRIL and BLyS mRNA and protein was upregulated in natural and experimental periodontitis in humans and mice, respectively. The elevated expression of these cytokines correlated with increased numbers of B cells/plasma cells in both species. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS partially colocalized with kappa light chain-expressing B lineage cells at the epithelial-connective tissue interface. Ligature-induced periodontitis resulted in significantly less bone loss in B cell-deficient mice compared to wild-type controls. Ab-mediated neutralization of APRIL or BLyS diminished the number of B cells in the gingival tissue and inhibited bone loss in wild-type but not in B cell-deficient mice. In conclusion, B cells and specific cytokines involved in their growth and differentiation contribute to periodontal bone loss. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS have been identified as potential therapeutic targets in periodontitis. PMID:26150532

  3. The B Cell-Stimulatory Cytokines BLyS and APRIL Are Elevated in Human Periodontitis and Are Required for B Cell-Dependent Bone Loss in Experimental Murine Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Toshiharu; AlSarhan, Mohammed; Benakanakere, Manjunatha R; Maekawa, Tomoki; Kinane, Denis F; Cancro, Michael P; Korostoff, Jonathan M; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-08-15

    B-lineage cells (B lymphocytes and plasma cells) predominate in the inflammatory infiltrate of human chronic periodontitis. However, their role in disease pathogenesis and the factors responsible for their persistence in chronic lesions are poorly understood. In this regard, two cytokines of the TNF ligand superfamily, a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), are important for the survival, proliferation, and maturation of B cells. Thus, we hypothesized that APRIL and/or BLyS are upregulated in periodontitis and contribute to induction of periodontal bone loss. This hypothesis was addressed in both human and mouse experimental systems. We show that, relative to healthy controls, the expression of APRIL and BLyS mRNA and protein was upregulated in natural and experimental periodontitis in humans and mice, respectively. The elevated expression of these cytokines correlated with increased numbers of B cells/plasma cells in both species. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS partially colocalized with κ L chain-expressing B-lineage cells at the epithelial-connective tissue interface. Ligature-induced periodontitis resulted in significantly less bone loss in B cell-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls. Ab-mediated neutralization of APRIL or BLyS diminished the number of B cells in the gingival tissue and inhibited bone loss in wild-type, but not in B cell-deficient, mice. In conclusion, B cells and specific cytokines involved in their growth and differentiation contribute to periodontal bone loss. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS have been identified as potential therapeutic targets in periodontitis.

  4. Innate immune interferon responses to human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rose; Towers, Greg; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2012-07-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) responses represent the canonical host innate immune response to viruses, which serves to upregulate expression of antiviral restriction factors and augment adaptive immune defences. There is clear evidence for type I IFN activity in both acute and chronic HIV-1 infection in vivo, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells have been identified as one important source for these responses, through innate immune detection of viral RNA by Toll-like receptor 7. In addition, new insights into the molecular mechanisms that trigger induction of type I IFNs suggest innate immune receptors for viral DNA may also mediate these responses. It is widely recognised that HIV-1 restriction factors share the characteristic of IFN-inducible expression, and that the virus has evolved to counteract these antiviral mechanisms. However, in some target cells, such as macrophages, IFN can still effectively restrict virus. In this context, HIV-1 shows the ability to evade innate immune recognition and thereby avoid induction of type I IFN in order to successfully establish productive infection. The relative importance of evasion of innate immune detection and evasion of IFN-inducible restriction in the natural history of HIV-1 infection is not known, and the data suggest that type I IFN responses may play a role in both viral control and in the immunopathogenesis of progressive disease. Further study of the relationship between HIV-1 infection and type I IFN responses is required to unravel these issues and inform the development of novel therapeutics or vaccine strategies.

  5. Corporate social responsibility, social contract, corporate personhood and human rights law: understanding the emerging responsibilities of modern corporations

    OpenAIRE

    Amao, Olufemi

    2008-01-01

    Copyright @ 2008 Olufemi Amao. The social contract theory has been advanced as a theoretical basis for explaining the emerging practice of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) by corporations. Since the 17th century the social contract concept has also been used to justify human rights. The concept is the constitutional foundation of many western states starting with England, US and France. Business ethicists and philosophers have tried to construct and analyse the social responsibility o...

  6. Vertical torque responses to vestibular stimulation in standing humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Raymond F

    2011-08-15

    The effects of electrical vestibular stimulation upon movement and perception suggest two evoked sensations: head roll and inter-aural linear acceleration. The head roll vector causes walking subjects to turn in a direction dependent on head pitch, requiring generation of torque around a vertical axis. Here the effect of vestibular stimulation upon vertical torque (T(z)) was investigated during quiet stance. With the head tilted forward, square-wave stimuli applied to the mastoid processes evoked a polarity-specific T(z) response accompanied by trunk yaw. Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) was used to investigate the effect of head pitch with greater precision; the SVS–T(z) cross-correlation displayed a modulation pattern consistent with the head roll vector and this was also reflected by changes in coherence at 2–3 Hz. However, a separate response at 7–8 Hz was unaffected by head pitch. Head translation (rather than rotation) had no effect upon this high frequency response either, suggesting it is not caused by a sense of body rotation induced by an inter-aural acceleration vector offset from the body. Instead, high coherence between medio-lateral shear force and T(z) at the same frequency range suggests it is caused by mechanical coupling to evoked medio-lateral sway. Consistent with this explanation, the 7–8 Hz response was attenuated by 90 deg head roll or yaw, both of which uncouple the inter-aural axis from the medio-lateral sway axis. These results demonstrate two vertical torque responses to electrical vestibular stimulation in standing subjects. The high frequency response can be attributed to mechanical coupling to evoked medio-lateral sway. The low frequency response is consistent with a reaction to a sensation of head roll, and provides a novel method for investigating proprioceptive-vestibular interactions during stance.

  7. Sustained CD8+ T-cell responses induced after acute parvovirus B19 infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norbeck, Oscar; Isa, Adiba; Pöhlmann, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Murine models have suggested that CD8+ T-cell responses peak early in acute viral infections and are not sustained, but no evidence for humans has been available. To address this, we longitudinally analyzed the CD8+ T-cell response to human parvovirus B19 in acutely infected individuals. We...... observed striking CD8+ T-cell responses, which were sustained or even increased over many months after the resolution of acute disease, indicating that CD8+ T cells may play a prominent role in the control of parvovirus B19 and other acute viral infections of humans, including potentially those generated...

  8. Inter-specific variation in avian responses to human disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel T. Blumstein; Esteban Fernandez-Juricic; Patrick A. Zollner; Susan C. Garity

    2005-01-01

    1. Increasing urbanization and recreational activities around and within biodiversity hotspots require an understanding of how to reduce the impacts of human disturbance on more than a single species; however, we lack a general framework to study multiple species. One approach is to expand on knowledge about the theory of anti-predator behaviour to understand and...

  9. MURINE IMMUNE RESPONSES TO HUMAN SPERM ANTIGENS FOLLOWING DIFFERENT IMMUNIZATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MALan; CAOXiao-Mei; BENKun-Long; CHENYun-Liang

    1989-01-01

    Clinical and experimental investigations have shown that secretory IgA antibodies to human sperm may bc one of the most important factors in immunological infertility. Studies on the effects of these antibodies on sperm function arc helpful to understand the role of

  10. Task-Dependent V1 Responses in Human Retinitis Pigmentosa

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda,Yoichiro; Horiguchi, Hiroshi; Dumoulin, Serge O.; Furuta, Ayumu; Miyauchi, Satoru; Nakadomari, Satoshi; Brian A Wandell

    2010-01-01

    The presence of large-scale reorganization in adult human V1 may have important implications for visual restoration therapy and rehabilitation. New measurements in patients with retinitis pigmentosa and prior data from patients with macular degeneration can be explained without assuming a large-scale reorganization that includes the development of new feed-forward connections.

  11. Human-Robot Emergency Response - Experimental Platform and Preliminary Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-28

    Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Leuven, Belgium, May 16–21 1998, pp. 3715–3720. [13] itseez, “ Opencv ,” http...function and camshift function in OpenCV [13]. In each image obtained form cameras, we first calculate back projection of a histogram model of a human. In

  12. Prokineticin 1 Induces Inflammatory Response in Human Myometrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorowiec, Marta R.; Catalano, Rob D.; Norman, Jane E.; Denison, Fiona C.; Jabbour, Henry N.

    2011-01-01

    The infiltration of human myometrium and cervix with leukocytes and the formation of a pro-inflammatory environment within the uterus have been associated with the initiation of both term and preterm parturition. The mechanism regulating the onset of this pro-inflammatory cascade is not fully elucidated. We demonstrate that prokineticin 1 (PROK1) is up-regulated in human myometrium and placenta during labor. The expression of PROK1 receptor remains unchanged during labor and is abundantly expressed in the myometrium. Gene array analysis identified 65 genes up-regulated by PROK1 in human myometrium, mainly cytokines and chemokines, including IL-1β, chemokine C-C motif ligand 3, and colony-stimulating factor 3. In addition, we demonstrate that PROK1 increases the expression of chemokine C-C motif ligand 20, IL-6, IL-8, prostaglandin synthase 2, and prostaglandin E2 and F2α secretion. The treatment of myometrial explants with 100 ng/mL of lipopolysaccharide up-regulates the expression of PROK1, PROK1 receptor, and inflammatory mediators. The infection of myometrial explants with lentiviral microRNA targeting PROK1, preceding treatment with lipopolysaccharide, reduces the expression of inflammatory genes. We propose that PROK1 is a novel inflammatory mediator that can contribute to the onset of human parturition at term and partially mediate premature onset of inflammatory pathways during bacterial infection. PMID:21983634

  13. Connecting Corporate Human Rights Responsibilities and State Obligations under the UN Guiding Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Taking its point of departure in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGP), this chapter discusses the complementarity between Pillars One on the State Duty to Respect and Pillar Two the Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights. It does this through HRDD and communicat......Taking its point of departure in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGP), this chapter discusses the complementarity between Pillars One on the State Duty to Respect and Pillar Two the Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights. It does this through HRDD...

  14. CD47 agonist peptides induce programmed cell death in refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells via PLCγ1 activation: evidence from mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Carolina Martinez-Torres

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, the most common adulthood leukemia, is characterized by the accumulation of abnormal CD5+ B lymphocytes, which results in a progressive failure of the immune system. Despite intense research efforts, drug resistance remains a major cause of treatment failure in CLL, particularly in patients with dysfunctional TP53. The objective of our work was to identify potential approaches that might overcome CLL drug refractoriness by examining the pro-apoptotic potential of targeting the cell surface receptor CD47 with serum-stable agonist peptides.In peripheral blood samples collected from 80 patients with CLL with positive and adverse prognostic features, we performed in vitro genetic and molecular analyses that demonstrate that the targeting of CD47 with peptides derived from the C-terminal domain of thrombospondin-1 efficiently kills the malignant CLL B cells, including those from high-risk individuals with a dysfunctional TP53 gene, while sparing the normal T and B lymphocytes from the CLL patients. Further studies reveal that the differential response of normal B lymphocytes, collected from 20 healthy donors, and leukemic B cells to CD47 peptide targeting results from the sustained activation in CLL B cells of phospholipase C gamma-1 (PLCγ1, a protein that is significantly over-expressed in CLL. Once phosphorylated at tyrosine 783, PLCγ1 enables a Ca2+-mediated, caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD pathway that is not down-modulated by the lymphocyte microenvironment. Accordingly, down-regulation of PLCγ1 or pharmacological inhibition of PLCγ1 phosphorylation abolishes CD47-mediated killing. Additionally, in a CLL-xenograft model developed in NOD/scid gamma mice, we demonstrate that the injection of CD47 agonist peptides reduces tumor burden without inducing anemia or toxicity in blood, liver, or kidney. The limitations of our study are mainly linked to the affinity of the peptides targeting CD47

  15. Antibody response to Salmonella typhi lw human Schistosomiasis mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Imaculada Muniz-Junqueira

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibody response to Salmonella typhi O and H antigens was evaluated in 24 individuals with either hepatointestinal or hepatosplenic schistosomiasis mansoni before and after typhoid vaccination, and compared with that of non-infected controls. Before vaccination, Schistosoma-infected patients showed a higher frequency of positive antibody to O antigen and the same frequency to H antigen when compared with that of healthy individuals. However, those with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis showed higher titres of antibody to H antigen than those with hepatointestinal disease or healthy individuals. Infected subjects, particularly those with hepatointestinal disease, showed a decreased response after typhoid vaccine. Tins diminished ability to mount an immune response towards typhoid antigens dining schistosomiasis may interfere ivith the clearance of the bacteria from blood stream and, therefore, play a role in the prolonged survival of salmonella as obsewed in some patients with chronic salmonellosis associated with schistosomiasis.

  16. Beryllium-induced immune response in C3H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Bice, D.E.; Nikula, K.J. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Studies conducted at ITRI over the past several years have investigated whether Beagle dogs, monkeys, and mice are suitable models for human chronic beryllium-induced lung disease (CBD). Recent studies have focused on the histopathological and immunopathological changes occurring in A/J and C3H/HeJ mice acutely exposed by inhalation to Be metal. Lung lesions in both strains of mice included focal lymphocyte aggregates comprised primarily of B lymphocytes and lesser amounts of T-helper lymphocytes and microgranulomas consisting chiefly of macrophages and T-helper lymphocytes. The distribution of proliferating cells within the microgranulomas was similar to the distribution of T-helper cells. These results strongly suggested that A/J and C3H/HeJ mice responded to inhaled Be metal in a fashion similar to humans in terms of pulmonary lesions and the apparent in situ proliferation of T-helper cells. Results of these studies confirm lymphocyte involvement in the pulmonary response to inhaled Be metal.

  17. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  18. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Regulates Myogenic Responsiveness in Human Resistance Arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Hui

    Full Text Available We recently identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P signaling and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR as prominent regulators of myogenic responsiveness in rodent resistance arteries. However, since rodent models frequently exhibit limitations with respect to human applicability, translation is necessary to validate the relevance of this signaling network for clinical application. We therefore investigated the significance of these regulatory elements in human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries. Mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries were isolated from patient tissue specimens collected during colonic or cardiac bypass surgery. Pressure myography assessments confirmed endothelial integrity, as well as stable phenylephrine and myogenic responses. Both human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries (i express critical S1P signaling elements, (ii constrict in response to S1P and (iii lose myogenic responsiveness following S1P receptor antagonism (JTE013. However, while human mesenteric arteries express CFTR, human skeletal muscle resistance arteries do not express detectable levels of CFTR protein. Consequently, modulating CFTR activity enhances myogenic responsiveness only in human mesenteric resistance arteries. We conclude that human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries are a reliable and consistent model for translational studies. We demonstrate that the core elements of an S1P-dependent signaling network translate to human mesenteric resistance arteries. Clear species and vascular bed variations are evident, reinforcing the critical need for further translational study.

  19. Lymphoreticular cells in human brain tumours and in normal brain.

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation, using various rosetting assays of cell suspensions prepared by mechanical disaggregation or collagenase digestion, demonstrated lymphoreticular cells in human normal brain (cerebral cortex and cerebellum) and in malignant brain tumours. The study revealed T and B lymphocytes and their subsets (bearing receptors for Fc(IgG) and C3) in 5/14 glioma suspensions, comprising less than 15% of the cell population. Between 20-60% of cells in tumour suspensions morphologicall...

  20. Dose-response relationship for light intensity and ocular and electroencephalographic correlates of human alertness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajochen, C.; Zeitzer, J. M.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Light can elicit both circadian and acute physiological responses in humans. In a dose response protocol men and women were exposed to illuminances ranging from 3 to 9100 lux for 6.5 h during the early biological night after they had been exposed to dose response curve. Half of the maximum alerting response to bright light of 9100 lux was obtained with room light of approximately 100 lux. This sensitivity to light indicates that variations in illuminance within the range of typical, ambient, room light (90-180 lux) can have a significant impact on subjective alertness and its electrophysiologic concomitants in humans during the early biological night.

  1. Cerebrovascular response to acute metabolic acidosis in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, M.T.P. van de; Colier, W.N.J.M.; Kersten, B.T.P.; Oeseburg, B.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the cerebrovascular response (delta CBV/delta PaCO2) during baseline metabolic conditions and acute metabolic acidosis. METHODS: 15 healthy subjects, 5 m, 10 f, 56 +/- 10 yrs were investigated. For acidification, NH4Cl was given orally. CBV was measured using Near Infrared

  2. Form and Space Diversity in Human Habitats: Perceptual Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyron, Bernard

    1971-01-01

    To test perceptual responses, 120 subjects viewed 12 experimental and one controlled housing environments. Three levels of building form diversity were combined with four levels of space diversity in the experimental environments. Results indicated that amount of visual coverage of the field of view increased significantly with increases in both…

  3. Physiological responses to exposure to carbon dioxide and human bioeffluents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Wargocki, Pawel; Lian, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Present paper describes physiological responses as a result of exposures to CO2 (between 500 ppm to 3,000 ppm) with and without bioeffluents. Twenty-five subjects participated. They were exposed in the climate chamber for 255 minutes in groups of five at a time. During exposure, they performed di...

  4. Gravitational effects on human cardiovascular responses to isometric muscle contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde-Petersen, Flemmig; Suzuki, Yoji; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    Isometric exercise induces profound cardiovascular adaptations increasing mean arterial pressure and heart rate. We investigated effects of simulated +Gz and -Gz respectively on the central and peripheral cardiovascular system. Sustained handgrip exercise was performed at 40% of maximum for 2 minutes in five subjects. This maneuver increased mean arterial pressure by 40-45 mm Hg both during head out water immersion which simulates weightlessness, as well as bedrest during -25, 0, and +25 degrees tilt from the horizontal. Lower body negative pressure (-60 mm Hg for 10 min) attenuated the response to handgrip exercise to 30 mm Hg. It also increased the heart rate minimally by about 20 beats per minute while the water immersion, as well as head up, head down and horizontal bedrest showed increments of about 50 beats per min. It was concluded that the response to isometric contraction is mediated through the high pressure baroreceptors, because similar responses were seen during stresses producing a wide variation in central venous pressure. During lower body negative pressure the increased sympathetic nervous activity itself increased resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure. The responses to static exercise were, therefore, weaker.

  5. Hemopexin activity is associated with angiotensin II responsiveness in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, Jan A.; Lely, Anna T.; Borghuis, Theo; Faas, Marijke M.; van Goor, Harry; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephanus; Bakker, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hemopexin, an acute phase protein, can downregulate the angiotensin (ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) in vitro. Whether hemopexin is involved in the responsiveness to ang II in vivo is unknown. Therefore, we tested whether variations in endogenous hemopexin activity are associated with th

  6. The science of human security: a response from political science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David

    2008-01-01

    The concept of human security has developed in significance in the last decade to the point that its meaning and validity is hotly contested in the field of international relations, security, and development studies. A key consideration relates to its ambiguity at best and its amorphousness at worst. Medical scholarship proposes approaches that may render more meaningful the concept. However, collaboration and co-operation between political scientists and medical practitioners offers even greater potential to this vital programme. The latter offer the technical and methodological skills and approaches lacking in political science, whilst the former develop political frameworks to shift the causal focus towards human, institutional and structural agency in mass avoidable global civilian mortality.

  7. Measuring Human Performance within Computer Security Incident Response Teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClain, Jonathan T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Silva, Austin Ray [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Avina, Glory Emmanuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forsythe, James C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Human performance has become a pertinen t issue within cyber security. However, this research has been stymied by the limited availability of expert cyber security professionals. This is partly attributable to the ongoing workload faced by cyber security professionals, which is compound ed by the limited number of qualified personnel and turnover of p ersonnel across organizations. Additionally, it is difficult to conduct research, and particularly, openly published research, due to the sensitivity inherent to cyber ope rations at most orga nizations. As an alternative, the current research has focused on data collection during cyb er security training exercises. These events draw individuals with a range of knowledge and experience extending from seasoned professionals to recent college gradu ates to college students. The current paper describes research involving data collection at two separate cyber security exercises. This data collection involved multiple measures which included behavioral performance based on human - machine transactions and questionnaire - based assessments of cyber security experience.

  8. Cortical depth-dependent temporal dynamics of the BOLD response in the human brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siero, Jeroen CW; Petridou, Natalia; Hoogduin, Hans; Luijten, Peter R; Ramsey, Nick F

    2011-01-01

    .... In this study, we characterize the temporal dynamics of the hemodynamic response (HDR) across cortical depth in the human primary motor and visual cortex, at 7T and using very short stimuli and with high spatial and temporal resolution...

  9. A Study of the Characteristics of Human-Pilot Control Response to Simulated Aircraft Lateral Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Donald C

    1954-01-01

    Report presents the results of studies made in an attempt to provide information on the control operations of the human pilot. These studies included an investigation of the ability of pilots to control simulated unstable yawing oscillations, a study of the basic characteristics of human-pilot control response, and a study to determine whether and to what extent pilot control response can be represented in an analytical form.

  10. Vaccines against Human Carcinomas: Strategies to Improve Antitumor Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Palena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple observations in preclinical and clinical studies support a role for the immune system in controlling tumor growth and progression. Various components of the innate and adaptive immune response are able to mediate tumor cell destruction; however, certain immune cell populations can also induce a protumor environment that favors tumor growth and the development of metastasis. Moreover, tumor cells themselves are equipped with various mechanisms that allow them to evade surveillance by the immune system. The goal of cancer vaccines is to induce a tumor-specific immune response that ultimately will reduce tumor burden by tipping the balance from a protumor to an antitumor immune environment. This review discusses common mechanisms that govern immune cell activation and tumor immune escape, and some of the current strategies employed in the field of cancer vaccines aimed at enhancing activation of tumor-specific T-cells with concurrent reduction of immunosuppression.

  11. Immunological Responses against SARS-Coronavirus Infection in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojun Xu; Xiao-Ming Gao

    2004-01-01

    Since the outbreak of a SARS epidemic last year, significant advances have been made on our understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between the SARS coronavirus (CoV) and the immune system. Strong humoral responses have been found in most patients following SARS-CoV infection, with high titers of neutralizing Abspresent in their convalescent sera. The nucleocapsid (N) and spike (S) proteins of SARS-CoV appear to be the dominant antigens recognized by serum Abs. CD4+ T cell responses against the N protein have been observed in SARS patients and an HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope in the S protein has been identified.It is likely that the immune responses induced by SARS-CoV infection could also cause pathological damage to the host, especially in the case of proinflammatory cytokines. There is also evidence suggesting that SARS-CoV might be able to directly invade cells of the immune system. Our understanding on the interaction between SARS-CoV, the immune system and local tissues is essential to future diagnosis, control and treatment of this very contagious disease.

  12. Immunological Responses against SARS-Coronavirus Infection in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaojunXu; Xiao-MingGao

    2004-01-01

    Since the outbreak of a SARS epidemic last year, significant advances have been made on our understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between the SARS coronavirus (CoV) and the immune system. Strong humoral responses have been found in most patients following SARS-CoV infection, with high titers of neutralizing Abs present in their convalescent sera. The nucleocapsid (N) and spike (S) proteins of SARS-CoV appear to be the dominant antigens recognized by serum Abs. CD4+ T cell responses against the N protein have been observed in SARS patients and an HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope in the S protein has been identified. It is likely that the immune responses induced by SARS-CoV infection could also cause pathological damage to the host, especially in the case of proinflammatory cytokines. There is also evidence suggesting that SARS-CoV might be able to directly invade cells of the immune system. Our understanding on the interaction between SARS-CoV, the immune system and local tissues is essential to future diagnosis, control and treatment of this very contagious disease. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):119-122.

  13. Cytokines and dysregulation of the immune response in human malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fátima C. Alves

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The dysregulation of the immune response by malaria parasite has been considered as a possible constraint to the effectiveness of malaria vaccination. In spite of the important role interleukin-I (IL-1 in malaria are lacking. We found that only 2 out of 35 subjectswith acute malaria showed increased levels of serum IL-1 alpha by enzyme immunoassay. To assess whether IL-1 could interfere with T- lymphocyte responses, blood mononuclear cells from patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, or healthy subjects were cultured with phytohemagglutinin, and lymphocyte proliferation measured 72h later by 3H-thymidine incorporation. Our data showed that T-lymphocyte responses are depressed both in P. falciparum (10,500 ñ 2,900 and P. vivax malaria (13,000 ñ 3,300, as compared to that of healthy individuals (27,000 ñ 3,000. Addition of IL-1 partially reserved depression of malaria lymphocytes, but had no effect on normal cells. On the other hand, T-lymphocytes from malaria infected-subjects presented a minimal decrease in proliferation, when cultured in the presence of exogenous PGE2. These data indicate the occurrence of two defects of immunoregulation in malaria: a deficiency of IL-1 production by monocytes/macrophages, and an increased resistance of lymphocytes to the antiproliferative effect of PGE2.

  14. The human antibody response to the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey C Perley

    Full Text Available Vaccine-induced human antibodies to surface components of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumonia are correlated with protection. Monoclonal antibodies to surface components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also protective in animal models. We have characterized human antibodies that bind to the surface of live M. tuberculosis.Plasma from humans with latent tuberculosis (TB infection (n = 23, active TB disease (n = 40, and uninfected controls (n = 9 were assayed by ELISA for reactivity to the live M. tuberculosis surface and to inactivated M. tuberculosis fractions (whole cell lysate, lipoarabinomannan, cell wall, and secreted proteins.When compared to uninfected controls, patients with active TB disease had higher antibody titers to the surface of live M. tuberculosis (Δ = 0.72 log10, whole cell lysate (Δ = 0.82 log10, and secreted proteins (Δ = 0.62 log10, though there was substantial overlap between the two groups. Individuals with active disease had higher relative IgG avidity (Δ = 1.4 to 2.6 to all inactivated fractions. Surprisingly, the relative IgG avidity to the live M. tuberculosis surface was lower in the active disease group than in uninfected controls (Δ =  -1.53, p = 0.004. Patients with active disease had higher IgG than IgM titers for all inactivated fractions (ratios, 2.8 to 10.1, but equal IgG and IgM titers to the live M. tuberculosis surface (ratio, 1.1. Higher antibody titers to the M. tuberculosis surface were observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 0.55 log10, p = 0.008, foreign-born (Δ = 0.61 log10, p = 0.004, or HIV-seronegative (Δ = 0.60 log10, p = 0.04. Higher relative IgG avidity scores to the M. tuberculosis surface were also observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 1.12, p < 0.001 and foreign-born (Δ = 0.87, p = 0.01.Humans with active TB disease produce antibodies to the surface of M. tuberculosis with low avidity and with a low IgG/IgM ratio

  15. The Human Antibody Response to the Surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, Casey C.; Frahm, Marc; Click, Eva M.; Dobos, Karen M.; Ferrari, Guido; Stout, Jason E.; Frothingham, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccine-induced human antibodies to surface components of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumonia are correlated with protection. Monoclonal antibodies to surface components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also protective in animal models. We have characterized human antibodies that bind to the surface of live M. tuberculosis. Methods Plasma from humans with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (n = 23), active TB disease (n = 40), and uninfected controls (n = 9) were assayed by ELISA for reactivity to the live M. tuberculosis surface and to inactivated M. tuberculosis fractions (whole cell lysate, lipoarabinomannan, cell wall, and secreted proteins). Results When compared to uninfected controls, patients with active TB disease had higher antibody titers to the surface of live M. tuberculosis (Δ = 0.72 log10), whole cell lysate (Δ = 0.82 log10), and secreted proteins (Δ = 0.62 log10), though there was substantial overlap between the two groups. Individuals with active disease had higher relative IgG avidity (Δ = 1.4 to 2.6) to all inactivated fractions. Surprisingly, the relative IgG avidity to the live M. tuberculosis surface was lower in the active disease group than in uninfected controls (Δ = –1.53, p = 0.004). Patients with active disease had higher IgG than IgM titers for all inactivated fractions (ratios, 2.8 to 10.1), but equal IgG and IgM titers to the live M. tuberculosis surface (ratio, 1.1). Higher antibody titers to the M. tuberculosis surface were observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 0.55 log10, p = 0.008), foreign-born (Δ = 0.61 log10, p = 0.004), or HIV-seronegative (Δ = 0.60 log10, p = 0.04). Higher relative IgG avidity scores to the M. tuberculosis surface were also observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 1.12, p<0.001) and foreign-born (Δ = 0.87, p = 0.01). Conclusions/Significance Humans

  16. Paroxetine suppresses recombinant human P2X7 responses

    OpenAIRE

    Dao-Ung, Phuong; Skarratt, Kristen; Fuller, Stephen; Stokes, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    P2X7 receptor (P2X7) activity may link inflammation to depressive disorders. Genetic variants of human P2X7 have been linked with major depression and bipolar disorders, and the P2X7 knockout mouse has been shown to exhibit anti-depressive-like behaviour. P2X7 is an ATP-gated ion channel and is a major regulator of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) secretion from monocytes and microglia. We hypothesised that antidepressants may elicit their mood enhancing effects in part vi...

  17. Response to "The Shaky Legal Foundations of the Global Human Rights Education Project"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbitts, Felisa

    2015-01-01

    This article is a response to "The Shaky Legal Foundations of the Global Human Rights Education Project," an article written by Barend Vlaardingerbroek, in which Vlaardingerbroek characterizes current practices of human rights education (HRE) as having an overriding agenda of activism, one that can draw on an ideologically-driven…

  18. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  19. Analysis of rear-end impact response using mathematical human modeling and volunteer tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van; Ono, K.; Kaneoka, K.

    2001-01-01

    At TNO multi-directional mathematical human body models have been developed. The objective of this study was to simulate the rigid seat and standard seat JARI rear-impact sled tests using the MADYMO 50th percentile male model. The head and neck response of this human model and the volunteers were co

  20. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  1. Human and animal studies: portals into the whole body and whole population response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human and animal studies: portals into the whole body and whole population response Michael C. Madden1 and Brett Winters21US Environmental Protection Agency and 2University of North Carolina Human Studies Facility, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA Studies involving collection and...

  2. Human protein status modulates brain reward responses to food cues1–3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffioen-Roose, S.; Smeets, P.A.M.; Heuvel, van den E.M.; Boesveldt, S.; Finlayson, G.; Graaf, de C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Protein is indispensable in the human diet, and its intake appears tightly regulated. The role of sensory attributes of foods in protein intake regulation is far from clear. Objective: We investigated the effect of human protein status on neural responses to different food cues with the

  3. The Socio-ecological Fit of Human Responses to Environmental Degradation: An Integrated Assessment Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briassoulis, Helen

    2015-12-01

    The scientific and policy interest in the human responses to environmental degradation usually focuses on responses sensu stricto and `best practices' that potentially abate degradation in affected areas. The transfer of individual, discrete instruments and `best practices' to different contexts is challenging, however, because socio-ecological systems are complex and environmental degradation is contextual and contingent. To sensibly assess the effectiveness of formal and informal interventions to combat environmental degradation, the paper proposes an integrative, non-reductionist analytic, the `response assemblage', for the study of `responses-in-context,' i.e., products of human decisions to utilize environmental resources to satisfy human needs in socio-ecological systems. Response assemblages are defined as geographically and historically unique, provisional, open, territorial wholes, complex compositions emerging from processes of assembling biophysical and human components, including responses sensu stricto, from affected focal and other socio-ecological systems, to serve human goals, one of which may be combatting environmental degradation. The degree of match among the components, called the socio- ecological fit of the response assemblage, indicates how effectively their contextual and contingent interactions maintain the socio-ecological resilience, promote sustainable development, and secure the continuous provision of ecosystem services in a focal socio-ecological system. The paper presents a conceptual approach to the analysis of the socio-ecological fit of response assemblages and details an integrated assessment methodology synthesizing the resilience, assemblage, and `problem of fit' literature. Lastly, it summarizes the novelty, value, and policy relevance of conceptualizing human responses as response assemblages and of the integrated assessment methodology, reconsiders `best practices' and suggests selected future research directions.

  4. The Socio-ecological Fit of Human Responses to Environmental Degradation: An Integrated Assessment Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briassoulis, Helen

    2015-12-01

    The scientific and policy interest in the human responses to environmental degradation usually focuses on responses sensu stricto and 'best practices' that potentially abate degradation in affected areas. The transfer of individual, discrete instruments and 'best practices' to different contexts is challenging, however, because socio-ecological systems are complex and environmental degradation is contextual and contingent. To sensibly assess the effectiveness of formal and informal interventions to combat environmental degradation, the paper proposes an integrative, non-reductionist analytic, the 'response assemblage', for the study of 'responses-in-context,' i.e., products of human decisions to utilize environmental resources to satisfy human needs in socio-ecological systems. Response assemblages are defined as geographically and historically unique, provisional, open, territorial wholes, complex compositions emerging from processes of assembling biophysical and human components, including responses sensu stricto, from affected focal and other socio-ecological systems, to serve human goals, one of which may be combatting environmental degradation. The degree of match among the components, called the socio-ecological fit of the response assemblage, indicates how effectively their contextual and contingent interactions maintain the socio-ecological resilience, promote sustainable development, and secure the continuous provision of ecosystem services in a focal socio-ecological system. The paper presents a conceptual approach to the analysis of the socio-ecological fit of response assemblages and details an integrated assessment methodology synthesizing the resilience, assemblage, and 'problem of fit' literature. Lastly, it summarizes the novelty, value, and policy relevance of conceptualizing human responses as response assemblages and of the integrated assessment methodology, reconsiders 'best practices' and suggests selected future research directions.

  5. DMPD: Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-13. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534111 Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-1...):575-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-...4 and IL-13. PubmedID 10534111 Title Differential responses of human monocytes an

  6. The commerce of human body parts: an Eastern Orthodox response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, P H

    2000-08-01

    The Orthodox Church teaches that the bodies of those in Christ are to be regarded as sanctified by the hearing of the Word and faithful participation in the Sacraments, most particularly the Holy Eucharist; because of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit the consecrated bodies of Christians do not belong to them but to Christ; with respect to the indwelling Holy Spirit there is no difference between the bodies of Christians before and after death; whether before or after death, the Christian body is also to receive the same veneration; and notwithstanding the physical corruptions that the body endures by reason of death, there remains a strict continuity between the body in which the Christian dies and the body in which the Christian will rise again. That is to say, it is the very same reality that is sown in corruption and will be raised in incorruption. Given such consideration, the notion of "selling" and integral part of a human being is simply outside the realm of rational comprehension. Indeed, it is profoundly repugnant to those Orthodox Christian sentiments that are formed and nourished by the Church's sacramental teaching and liturgical worship. One does not sell or purchase that which has been consecrated in those solemn ways that the Church consecrates the human body.

  7. Human psychometric and taste receptor responses to steviol glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellfritsch, Caroline; Brockhoff, Anne; Stähler, Frauke; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Thomas

    2012-07-11

    Steviol glycosides, the sweet principle of Stevia Rebaudiana (Bertoni) Bertoni, have recently been approved as a food additive in the EU. The herbal non-nutritive high-potency sweeteners perfectly meet the rising consumer demand for natural food ingredients in Europe. We have characterized the organoleptic properties of the most common steviol glycosides by an experimental approach combining human sensory studies and cell-based functional taste receptor expression assays. On the basis of their potency to elicit sweet and bitter taste sensations, we identified glycone chain length, pyranose substitution, and the C16 double bond as the structural features giving distinction to the gustatory profile of steviol glycosides. A comprehensive screening of 25 human bitter taste receptors revealed that two receptors, hTAS2R4 and hTAS2R14, mediate the bitter off-taste of steviol glycosides. For some test substances, e.g., stevioside, we observed a decline in sweet intensity at supra-maximum concentrations. This effect did not arise from allosteric modulation of the hTAS1R2/R3 sweet taste receptor but might be explained by intramolecular cross-modal suppression between the sweet and bitter taste component of steviol glycosides. These results might contribute to the production of preferentially sweet and least bitter tasting Stevia extracts by an optimization of breeding and postharvest downstream processing.

  8. An In vitro Model to Study Immune Responses of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.; Habets, M.N.; Ahout, I.M.L.; Jans, J.; Jonge, M.I. de; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Ferwerda, G.

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infections present a broad spectrum of disease severity, ranging from mild infections to life-threatening bronchiolitis. An important part of the pathogenesis of severe disease is an enhanced immune response leading to immunopathology. Here, we describe a

  9. An In vitro Model to Study Immune Responses of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.; Habets, M.N.; Ahout, I.M.L.; Jans, J.; Jonge, M.I. de; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Ferwerda, G.

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infections present a broad spectrum of disease severity, ranging from mild infections to life-threatening bronchiolitis. An important part of the pathogenesis of severe disease is an enhanced immune response leading to immunopathology. Here, we describe a pro

  10. Human mucosal in vivo transcriptome responses to three lactobacilli indicate how probiotics may modulate human cellular pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarlen, van P.; Troost, F.J.; Meer, van der C.; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Brummer, R.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria, specific representatives of bacterial species that are a common part of the human microbiota, are proposed to deliver health benefits to the consumer by modulation of intestinal function through largely unknown molecular mechanisms. To explore in vivo mucosal responses of healthy

  11. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning...... and mitochondrial DNA processes. The study population was 1089 long-lived and 736 middle-aged Danes. A self-contained set-based test of all SNPs displayed association with longevity (P-value=9.9 × 10-5), supporting that the overall pathway could affect longevity. Investigation of the nine sub-processes using...

  12. Diverting attention suppresses human amygdala responses to faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eMorawetz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies disagree as to whether the processing of emotion-laden visual stimuli is dependent upon the availability of attentional resources or entirely capacity-free. Two main factors have been proposed to be responsible for the discrepancies: the differences in the perceptual attentional demands of the tasks used to divert attentional resources from emotional stimuli and the spatial location of the affective stimuli in the visual field. To date, no neuroimaging report addressed these two issues in the same set of subjects. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate the effects of high and low attentional load as well as different stimulus locations on face processing in the amygdala using fMRI to provide further evidence for one of the two opposing theories. We were able for the first time to directly test the interaction of attentional load and spatial location. The results revealed a strong attenuation of amygdala activity when the attentional load was high. The eccentricity of the emotional stimuli did not affect responses in the amygdala and no interaction effect between attentional load and spatial location was found. We conclude that the processing of emotional stimuli in the amygdala is strongly dependent on the availability of attentional resources without a preferred processing of stimuli presented in the periphery and provide firm evidence for the concept of the attentional load theory of emotional processing in the amygdala.

  13. The human ocular torsion position response during yaw angular acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S T; Curthoys, I S; Moore, S T

    1995-07-01

    Recent results by Wearne [(1993) Ph.D. thesis] using the scleral search-coil method of measuring eye position indicate that changes in ocular torsion position (OTP) occur during yaw angular acceleration about an earth vertical axis. The present set of experiments, using an image processing method of eye movement measurement free from the possible confound of search coil slippage, demonstrates the generality and repeatability of this phenomenon and examines its possible causes. The change in torsion position is not a linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR) response to interaural linear acceleration stimulation of the otoliths, but rather the effect is dependent on the characteristics of the angular acceleration stimulus, commencing at the onset and decaying at the offset of the angular acceleration. In the experiments reported here, the magnitude of the angular acceleration stimulus was varied and the torsion position response showed corresponding variations. We consider that the change in torsion position observed during angular acceleration is most likely to be due to activity of the semicircular canals.

  14. Acute effects of cocaine and cannabis on response inhibition in humans: an ERP investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronk, D.B.; De Bruijn, E.R.; van Wel, J.H.; Ramaekers, J.G.; Verkes, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Substance abuse has often been associated with alterations in response inhibition in humans. Not much research has examined how the acute effects of drugs modify the neurophysiological correlates of response inhibition, or how these effects interact with individual variation in trait levels of impul

  15. Human T cell responses to the ESAT-6 antigen from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Demissie, A; Eguale, T;

    1999-01-01

    Human T cell responses to ESAT-6 and eight synthetic overlapping peptides were investigated in tuberculosis (TB) patients and control subjects from regions of high and low endemicity for TB. ESAT-6 was recognized by 65% of all tuberculin purified protein derivative-responsive TB patients, whereas...

  16. A Pilot Study of Phase-Evoked Acoustic Responses From the Ears of Human Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Dewey, James; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2015-01-01

    cochlear excitation revealing properties of the nonlinearity responsible for OAE generation. To explore the temporal properties of OAEs further, we studied acoustic responses from the ears of nine young, normal-hearing human subjects to abrupt changes in the phase of pure tones. The measurement paradigm...

  17. Maturation of the human fetal startle response: evidence for sex-specific maturation of the human fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Claudia; Davis, Elysia Poggi; Class, Quetzal A; Gierczak, Matt; Pattillo, Carol; Glynn, Laura M; Sandman, Curt A

    2009-10-01

    Despite the evidence for early fetal experience exerting programming influences on later neurological development and health risk, very few prospective studies of human fetal behavior have been reported. In a prospective longitudinal study, fetal nervous system maturation was serially assessed by monitoring fetal heart rate (FHR) responses to vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) in 191 maternal/fetal dyads. Responses were not detected at 26 weeks gestational age (GA). Sex-specific, age-characteristic changes in the FHR response to VAS were observed by 31 weeks' GA. Males showed larger responses and continued to exhibit maturational changes until 37 weeks' GA, females however, presented with a mature FHR startle response by 31 weeks' GA. The results indicate that there are different rates of maturation in the male and female fetuses that may have implications for sex-specific programming influences.

  18. Maturation of the human fetal startle response: Evidence for sex-specific maturation of the human fetus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Claudia; Davis, Elysia Poggi; Class, Quetzal A.; Gierczak, Matt; Pattillo, Carol; Glynn, Laura M.; Sandman, Curt A.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the evidence for early fetal experience exerting programming influences on later neurological development and health risk, very few prospective studies of human fetal behavior have been reported. In a prospective longitudinal study, fetal nervous system maturation was serially assessed by monitoring fetal heart rate (FHR) responses to vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) in 191 maternal/fetal dyads. Responses were not detected at 26 weeks gestational age (GA). Sex-specific, age-characteristic changes in the FHR response to VAS were observed by 31 weeks’ GA. Males showed larger responses and continued to exhibit maturational changes until 37 weeks’ GA, females however, presented with a mature FHR startle response by 31 weeks’ GA. The results indicate that there are different rates of maturation in the male and female fetus that may have implications for sex-specific programming influences. PMID:19726143

  19. Human factors regulation in response to advanced reactor design trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Innes, L.; Harrison, F. (Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)); Rhodes, W. (Rhodes Associates Inc., Willowdale, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the direction being taken in the Canadian regulatory program to guide the incorporation of human factors principles, knowledge, information, and methods in activities such as those that address the design and implementation of the advanced control room (ACR) in nuclear power plants. Within the current activity in the international nuclear industry aimed at the development of ACR concepts, the steps that are being taken to develop design review guidelines for ACRs, such as the work sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission are filling an identified important need. The salient feature of most ACR projects is the increased use of digital technology for the analysis, synthesis, management, and display of information. The greatly increased functionality of the devices that can be introduced during such projects allows changes to be made at the design and implementation stages that are not necessarily based on prior function allocation or task analyses.

  20. Human response to ductless personalized ventilation coupled with displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalewski, Mariusz; Veselý, Michal; Melikov, Arsen K.

    2012-01-01

    A human subject experiment was carried out to investigate the extent to which ductless personalized ventilation (DPV) in conjunction with displacement ventilation can improve perceived air quality (PAQ) and thermal comfort at elevated room air temperature in comparison with displacement ventilation...... alone. The experimental conditions comprised displacement ventilation alone (room air temperature of 23 °C, 26 °C, 29 °C) and DPV with displacement ventilation (26 °C, 29 °C), both operating at supply air temperatures 3, 5 or 6K lower than room air temperature, as well as mixing ventilation (23 °C, 3 K......). During one hour exposure participants answered questionnaires regarding PAQ and thermal comfort. PAQ was significantly better with DPV than without DPV at the same background conditions. Thermal comfort improved when DPV was used. Combining DPV with displacement ventilation showed the potential...

  1. Human monocyte differentiation stage affects response to arachidonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Alvarez, Elizabeth; Pelaez, Carlos A; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    AA-induced cell death mechanisms acting on human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), U937 promonocytes and PMA-differentiated U937 cells were studied. Arachidonic acid induced apoptosis and necrosis in monocytes and U937 cells but only apoptosis in MDM and U937D cells. AA increased both types of death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells and increased the percentage of TNFalpha+ cells and reduced IL-10+ cells. Experiments blocking these cytokines indicated that AA-mediated death was TNFalpha- and IL-10-independent. The differences in AA-mediated cell death could be explained by high ROS, calpain and sPLA-2 production and activity in monocytes. Blocking sPLA-2 in monocytes and treatment with antioxidants favored M. tuberculosis control whereas AA enhanced M. tuberculosis growth in MDM. Such evidence suggested that AA-modulated effector mechanisms depend on mononuclear phagocytes' differentiation stage.

  2. Sequence features responsible for intron retention in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakabe Noboru

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the least common types of alternative splicing is the complete retention of an intron in a mature transcript. Intron retention (IR is believed to be the result of intron, rather than exon, definition associated with failure of the recognition of weak splice sites flanking short introns. Although studies on individual retained introns have been published, few systematic surveys of large amounts of data have been conducted on the mechanisms that lead to IR. Results TTo understand how sequence features are associated with or control IR, and to produce a generalized model that could reveal previously unknown signals that regulate this type of alternative splicing, we partitioned intron retention events observed in human cDNAs into two groups based on the relative abundance of both isoforms and compared relevant features. We found that a higher frequency of IR in human is associated with individual introns that have weaker splice sites, genes with shorter intron lengths, higher expression levels and lower density of both a set of exon splicing silencers (ESSs and the intronic splicing enhancer GGG. Both groups of retained introns presented events conserved in mouse, in which the retained introns were also short and presented weaker splice sites. Conclusion Although our results confirmed that weaker splice sites are associated with IR, they showed that this feature alone cannot explain a non-negligible fraction of events. Our analysis suggests that cis-regulatory elements are likely to play a crucial role in regulating IR and also reveals previously unknown features that seem to influence its occurrence. These results highlight the importance of considering the interplay among these features in the regulation of the relative frequency of IR.

  3. Antibody response to Salmonella typhi lw human Schistosomiasis mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Imaculada Muniz-Junqueira

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibody response to Salmonella typhi O and H antigens was evaluated in 24 individuals with either hepatointestinal or hepatosplenic schistosomiasis mansoni before and after typhoid vaccination, and compared with that of non-infected controls. Before vaccination, Schistosoma-infected patients showed a higher frequency of positive antibody to O antigen and the same frequency to H antigen when compared with that of healthy individuals. However, those with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis showed higher titres of antibody to H antigen than those with hepatointestinal disease or healthy individuals. Infected subjects, particularly those with hepatointestinal disease, showed a decreased response after typhoid vaccine. Tins diminished ability to mount an immune response towards typhoid antigens dining schistosomiasis may interfere ivith the clearance of the bacteria from blood stream and, therefore, play a role in the prolonged survival of salmonella as obsewed in some patients with chronic salmonellosis associated with schistosomiasis.A resposta de anticorpos para os antígenos O e H da Salmonella typhi foi avaliada em 24 indivíduos com esquistossomose hepatointestinal ou hepatoesplênica antes e apôs vacinação antitifoídica, e comparada com a resposta de indivíduos controles normais. Antes da vacinação, pacientes esquistossomóticos mostraram uma maior frequência de anticoipos positivos para o antígeno O e a mesma frequência de anticoipos positivos para o antígeno H quando comparada com aquela de indivíduos controles normais. Porém, aqueles com esquistossomose hepatoesplênica mostraram títulos maiores de anticoipos para o antígeno H do que aqueles com a forma hepatointestinal da doença ou os indivíduos controles normais. Pacientes esquistossomóticos, particularmente aqueles com a forma hepatointestinal, mostraram uma menor resposta após a vacinação antitifoídica. Esta menor capacidade para apresentar uma resposta imune para ant

  4. Bystander T cells in human immune responses to dengue antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwannasaen Duangchan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of T cell activation in dengue infection have focused on restriction of specific T cell receptors (TCRs and classical MHC molecules. However, bystander T cell activation, which is TCR independent, occurs via cytokines in other viral infections, both in vitro and in vivo, and enables T cells to bypass certain control checkpoints. Moreover, clinical and pathological evidence has pointed to cytokines as the mediators of dengue disease severity. Therefore, we investigated bystander T cell induction by dengue viral antigen. Results Whole blood samples from 55 Thai schoolchildren aged 13-14 years were assayed for in vitro interferon-gamma (IFN-γ induction in response to inactivated dengue serotype 2 antigen (Den2. The contribution of TCR-dependent and independent pathways was tested by treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA, which inhibits TCR-dependent activation of T cells. ELISA results revealed that approximately 72% of IFN-γ production occurred via the TCR-dependent pathway. The major IFN-γ sources were natural killer (NK (mean ± SE = 55.2 ± 3.3, CD4+T (24.5 ± 3.3 and CD8+T cells (17.9 ± 1.5, respectively, as demonstrated by four-color flow cytometry. Interestingly, in addition to these cells, we found CsA-resistant IFN-γ producing T cells (CD4+T = 26.9 ± 3.6% and CD8+T = 20.3 ± 2.1% implying the existence of activated bystander T cells in response to dengue antigen in vitro. These bystander CD4+ and CD8+T cells had similar kinetics to NK cells, appeared after 12 h and were inhibited by anti-IL-12 neutralization indicating cytokine involvement. Conclusions This study described immune cell profiles and highlighted bystander T cell activation in response to dengue viral antigens of healthy people in an endemic area. Further studies on bystander T cell activation in dengue viral infection may reveal the immune mechanisms that protect or enhance pathogenesis of secondary dengue infection.

  5. THE ROLE OF HUMAN RESOURCES IN PROMOTING THE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    IOAN PASTOR; CAMELIA-OLIVIA ILIES

    2011-01-01

    In a global economy, organizations have the responsibility to demonstrate and promote corporate social responsibility. Long-term sustainability demands that organizations rethink their business goals and objectives from focusing on making a profit to corporate citizenship. Human resource managers play a critical role – that of leading and educating their companies regarding the importance of corporate social responsability while at the same time strategically implementing healthy management p...

  6. Strain-Related Differences in the Immune Response: Relevance to Human Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kyra J

    2016-08-01

    There are significant differences in the immune response and in the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases among rodent strains. It would thus be expected that the contribution of the immune response to cerebral ischemic injury would also differ among rodent strains. More importantly, there are significant differences between the immune responses of rodents and humans. All of these factors are likely to impact the successful translation of immunomodulatory therapies from experimental rodent models to patients with stroke.

  7. Neural Markers of Responsiveness to the Environment in Human Sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrillon, Thomas; Poulsen, Andreas Trier; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-01-01

    could be related to modulation in sleep depth. InREMsleep, however, this relationship was reversed.Wetherefore propose that, in REM sleep, endogenously generated processes compete with the processing of external input. Sleep can thus be seen as a self-regulated process in which external information can......Sleep is characterized by a loss of behavioral responsiveness. However, recent research has shown that the sleeping brain is not completely disconnected from its environment. How neural activity constrains the ability to process sensory information while asleep is yet unclear. Here, we instructed...... by Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZc), a measure shown to track arousal in sleep and anesthesia. Neural activity related to the semantic content of stimuli was conserved in light non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. However, these processes were suppressed in deep NREM sleep and, importantly, also in REM sleep...

  8. Humanity and Social Responsibility, Solidarity, and Social Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola-Launonen, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    This article discusses the suggestion of having the notion of solidarity as the foundational value for welfare scheme reforms. Solidarity is an emerging concept in bioethical deliberations emphasizing the need for value-oriented discussion in revising healthcare structures, and the notion has been contrasted with liberal justice and rights. I suggest that this contrast is unnecessary, flawed, and potentially counterproductive. As necessary as the sense of solidarity is in a society, it is an insufficient concept to secure the goals related to social responsibility. The discussion on solidarity is also based on a questionable sense of nostalgia. Furthermore, solidarity and liberal justice share essential objectives concerning welfare schemes; therefore, the question arises whether the proper comparison should in the first place be within justice and solidarity.

  9. Hallucinogenic drugs attenuate the subjective response to alcohol in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Sean P; Archambault, Jennifer; Engelberg, Marla J; Pihl, Robert O

    2000-10-01

    This study investigated possible interactions between alcohol and hallucinogens in 22 lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and/or psilocybin users through retrospective structured interviews. Of those who had used LSD with alcohol, 86;7 per cent reported a complete blockade of subjective alcohol effects, while the remaining cases reported a diminished response. In addition, 60 per cent of respondents who had used alcohol and psilocybin together reported a partial antagonism of subjective alcohol effects.T-test analyses revealed that LSD's antagonism of alcohol effects were significantly greater than those associated with psilocybin. It is proposed that LSD's effect on alcohol intoxication may involve interactions with various serotonergic and/or dopaminergic receptor systems. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Is human hepatocellular carcinoma a hormone-responsive tumor?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Massimo Di Maio; Bruno Daniele; Sandra Pignata; Ciro Gallo; Ermelinda De Maio; Alessandro Morabito; Maria Carmela Piccirillo; Francesco Perrone

    2008-01-01

    Before the positive results recently obtained with multitarget tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, there was no standard systemic treatment for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sex hormones receptors are expressed in a significant proportion of HCC samples. Following preclinical and epidemiological studies supporting a relationship between sex hormones and HCC tumorigenesis, several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) tested the efficacy of the anti-estrogen tamoxifen as systemic treatment. Largest among these trials showed no survival advantage from the administration of tamoxifen, and the recent Cochrane systematic review produced a completely negative result. This questions the relevance of estrogen receptor-mediated pathways in HCC. However, a possible explanation for these disappointing results is the lack of proper patients selection according to sex hormones receptors expression, but unfortunately the interaction between this expression and efficacy of tamoxifen has not been studied adequately. It has been also proposed that negative results might be explained if tamoxifen acts in HCC via an estrogen receptor-independent pathway, that requires higher doses than those usually administered, but an Asian RCT conducted to assess dose-response effect was completely negative. Interesting, preliminaryresults have been obtained when hormonal treatment (tamoxifen or megestrol) has been selected according to the presence of wild-type or variant estrogen receptors respectively, but no large RCTs are available to support this strategy. Negative results have been obtained also with anti-androgen therapy. In conclusion, there is no robust evidence to consider HCC a hormone-responsive tumor. Hormonal treatments should not be part of the current management of HCC.

  11. Gastroenteric hormone responses to hedonic eating in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Perillo, Donato; Canestrelli, Benedetta; Maj, Mario

    2013-08-01

    Hedonic eating differentiates from homeostatic eating on two main aspects: the first one is that eating occurs when there is no need for calorie ingestion and the second one is that the food is consumed exclusively for its gustatory and rewarding properties. Gastroeneteric hormones such as ghrelin, colecystokinin-33 (CCK) and peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36) are known to play a pivotal role in the homeostatic control of food intake. To the contrary, their role in hedonic eating has been never investigated. Here we report peripheral responses of CCK, PYY3-36 and ghrelin to the consumption of food for pleasure in well-nourished satiated healthy subjects. Plasma levels of CCK, PYY3-36 and ghrelin were measured in 7 satiated healthy subjects before and after ad libitum consumption of both a highly pleasurable food (hedonic eating) and an isoenergetic non-pleasurable food (non-hedonic eating). The consumption of food for pleasure was associated to a significantly increased production of the hunger hormone ghrelin and a significantly decreased secretion of the satiety hormone CCK. No significant changes in plasma PYY3-36 levels occurred in the two eating conditions. These preliminary data demonstrate that in hedonic eating the peripheral hunger signal represented by ghrelin secretion is enhanced while the satiety signal of CCK production is decreased. This could be responsible for the persistence of peripheral cues allowing a continued eating as well as for the activation of endogenous reward mechanisms, which can drive food consumption in spite of no energy need, only for reward. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Human Sympathetic Nervous System Response to Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, Rose Marie; Lane, Lynda D.; Shiavi, Richard; Robertson, David

    2003-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is an important part of the autonomic (or automatic) nervous system. When an individual stands up, the sympathetic nervous system speeds the heart and constricts blood vessels to prevent a drop in blood pressure. A significant number of astronauts experience a drop in blood pressure when standing for prolonged periods after they return from spaceflight. Difficulty maintaining blood pressure with standing is also a daily problem for many patients. Indirect evidence available before the Neurolab mission suggested the problem in astronauts while in space might be due partially to reduced sympathetic nervous system activity. The purpose of this experiment was to identify whether sympathetic activity was reduced during spaceflight. Sympathetic nervous system activity can be determined in part by measuring heart rate, nerve activity going to blood vessels, and the release of the hormone norepinephrine into the blood. Norepinephrine is a neurotransmitter discharged from active sympathetic nerve terminals, so its rate of release can serve as a marker of sympathetic nervous system action. In addition to standard cardiovascular measurements (heart rate, blood pressure), we determined sympathetic nerve activity as well as norepinephrine release and clearance on four crewmembers on the Neurolab mission. Contrary to our expectation, the results demonstrated that the astronauts had mildly elevated resting sympathetic nervous system activity in space. Sympathetic nervous system responses to stresses that simulated the cardiovascular effects of standing (lower body negative pressure) were brisk both during and after spaceflight. We concluded that, in the astronauts tested, the activity and response of the sympathetic nervous system to cardiovascular stresses appeared intact and mildly elevated both during and after spaceflight. These changes returned to normal within a few days.

  13. Human Adolescent Phase Response Curves to Bright White Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Eastman, Charmane I

    2017-08-01

    Older adolescents are particularly vulnerable to circadian misalignment and sleep restriction, primarily due to early school start times. Light can shift the circadian system and could help attenuate circadian misalignment; however, a phase response curve (PRC) to determine the optimal time for receiving light and avoiding light is not available for adolescents. We constructed light PRCs for late pubertal to postpubertal adolescents aged 14 to 17 years. Participants completed 2 counterbalanced 5-day laboratory sessions after 8 or 9 days of scheduled sleep at home. Each session included phase assessments to measure the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light-dark (wake-sleep) cycle (2 h dim [~20 lux] light, 2 h dark). In one session, intermittent bright white light (~5000 lux; four 20-min exposures) was alternated with 10 min of dim room light once per day for 3 consecutive days. The time of light varied among participants to cover the 24-h day. For each individual, the phase shift to bright light was corrected for the free-run derived from the other laboratory session with no bright light. One PRC showed phase shifts in response to light start time relative to the DLMO and another relative to home sleep. Phase delay shifts occurred around the hours corresponding to home bedtime. Phase advances occurred during the hours surrounding wake time and later in the afternoon. The transition from delays to advances occurred at the midpoint of home sleep. The adolescent PRCs presented here provide a valuable tool to time bright light in adolescents.

  14. 泌乳素对人B淋巴细胞HLA-DR表达的影响%Effects of prolactin on the expression of HLA-DR of human B lymphocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪兴; 李娜; 石瑛

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨泌乳素(PRL)与B淋巴细胞功能的关系.方法以生理浓度(10ng·ml-1)的人PRL刺激培养IM-9细胞系,并设置未刺激组、脂多糖(LPS)刺激组、PRL刺激组、LPS+PRL刺激组、LPS+溴隐停(Brc)刺激组和LPS+PRL+Brc刺激组;采用免疫细胞化学S-P染色法检测不同刺激组B淋巴细胞HLA-DR的表达情况.结果LPS刺激组和PRL刺激组HLA-DR的平均光密度(MOD)与未刺激组相比有明显增加(P<0.05);LPS+PRL刺激组HLA-DR的MOD与LPS、PRL刺激组相比明显增加(P<0.01);LPS+Brc刺激组HLA-DR的MOD与LPS刺激组与LPS+PRL+Brc刺激组相比均明显降低(P<0.05).结论PRL对B淋巴细胞有活化作用.

  15. Scale dependent behavioral responses to human development by a large predator, the puma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmers, Christopher C; Wang, Yiwei; Nickel, Barry; Houghtaling, Paul; Shakeri, Yasaman; Allen, Maximilian L; Kermish-Wells, Joe; Yovovich, Veronica; Williams, Terrie

    2013-01-01

    The spatial scale at which organisms respond to human activity can affect both ecological function and conservation planning. Yet little is known regarding the spatial scale at which distinct behaviors related to reproduction and survival are impacted by human interference. Here we provide a novel approach to estimating the spatial scale at which a top predator, the puma (Puma concolor), responds to human development when it is moving, feeding, communicating, and denning. We find that reproductive behaviors (communication and denning) require at least a 4× larger buffer from human development than non-reproductive behaviors (movement and feeding). In addition, pumas give a wider berth to types of human development that provide a more consistent source of human interference (neighborhoods) than they do to those in which human presence is more intermittent (arterial roads with speeds >35 mph). Neighborhoods were a deterrent to pumas regardless of behavior, while arterial roads only deterred pumas when they were communicating and denning. Female pumas were less deterred by human development than males, but they showed larger variation in their responses overall. Our behaviorally explicit approach to modeling animal response to human activity can be used as a novel tool to assess habitat quality, identify wildlife corridors, and mitigate human-wildlife conflict.

  16. Global changes in biogeochemical cycles in response to human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Berrien, III; Melillo, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of our research was to characterize biogeochemical cycles at continental and global scales in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This characterization applied to both natural ecosystems and those disturbed by human activity. The primary elements of interest were carbon and nitrogen and the analysis sought to quantify standing stocks and dynamic cycling processes. The translocation of major nutrients from the terrestrial landscape to the atmosphere (via trace gases) and to fluvial systems (via leaching, erosional losses, and point source pollution) were of particular importance to this study. Our aim was to develop the first generation of Earth System Models. Our research was organized around the construction and testing of component biogeochemical models which treated terrestrial ecosystem processes, aquatic nutrient transport through drainage basins, and trace gas exchanges at the continental and global scale. A suite of three complementary models were defined within this construct. The models were organized to operate at a 1/2 degree latitude by longitude level of spatial resolution and to execute at a monthly time step. This discretization afforded us the opportunity to understand the dynamics of the biosphere down to subregional scales, while simultaneously placing these dynamics into a global context.

  17. Introduction: Human response to environmental decline at the forest frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Alger

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientific insights about the places where the greatest environmental costs (and human welfare losses might be avoided has too frequently been misperceived as knowledge about which policy interventions are effective in the extremely varied contexts where these losses can occur. This forum demonstrates the behavioral consequences that can occur when protected areas are expanded to slow deforestation and highlights a need to better understand the behavioral changes that deforestation, infrastructure development, and malaria emergence prompt in tropical areas. Facilitation of this awareness will require the integration of rigorous social and ecological science in an interdisciplinary context. This work should be aimed at understanding the opportunity costs of economic drivers, such as soybean expansion, logging, mining, hunting, and wildlife trade, in order to scale the countervailing incentives that are incorporated into common property institutions or economic instruments. To get ahead of the curve of worsening environmental degradation and the poverty traps that occur at the forest edge requires special attention to the scientific evaluation of policies that create incentives for environmental stewardship in the varied contexts of the tropical forest frontier.

  18. Response of human rheumatoid arthritis osteoblasts and osteoclasts to adiponectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumbholz, Grit; Junker, Susann; Meier, Florian M P; Rickert, Markus; Steinmeyer, Jürgen; Rehart, Stefan; Lange, Uwe; Frommer, Klaus W; Schett, Georg; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neumann, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Adiponectin is an effector molecule in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, e.g. by inducing cytokines and matrix degrading enzymes in synovial fibroblasts. There is growing evidence that adiponectin affects osteoblasts and osteoclasts although the contribution to the aberrant bone metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis is unclear. Therefore, the adiponectin effects on rheumatoid arthritis-derived osteoblasts and osteoclasts were evaluated. Adiponectin and its receptors were examined in bone tissue. Primary human osteoblasts and osteoclasts were stimulated with adiponectin and analysed using realtime polymerase chain-reaction and immunoassays. Effects on matrix-production by osteoblasts and differentiation and resorptive activity of osteoclasts were examined. Immunohistochemistry of rheumatoid arthritis bone tissue showed adiponectin expression in key cells of bone remodelling. Adiponectin altered gene expression and cytokine release in osteoblasts and increased IL-8 secretion by osteoclasts. Adiponectin inhibited osterix and induced osteoprotegerin mRNA in osteoblasts. In osteoclasts, MMP-9 and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase expression was increased. Accordingly, mineralisation capacity of osteoblasts decreased whereas resorptive activity of osteoclasts increased. The results confirm the proinflammatory potential of adiponectin and support the idea that adiponectin influences rheumatoid arthritis bone remodelling through alterations in osteoblast and osteoclast.

  19. Transcriptional Analysis of Normal Human Fibroblast Responses to Microgravity Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongqing Liu; Eugenia Wang

    2008-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism (s) of how spaceflight affects cellular signaling pathways, quiescent normal human WI-38 fibroblasts were flown on the STS-93 space shuttle mission. Subsequently, RNA samples from the space flown and ground-control cells were used to construct two cDNA libraries, which were then processed for suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify spaceflight-specific gene expression. The SSH data show that key genes related to oxidative stress, DNA repair, and fatty acid oxidation are activated by spaceflight, suggesting the induction of cellular oxidative stress. This is further substantiated by the up-regulation of neuregulin 1 and the calcium-binding protein calmodulin 2. Another obvious stress sign is that spaceflight evokes the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling pathways, along with up-regulating several G1-phase cell cycle traverse genes. Other genes showing up regulation of expression are involved in protein synthesis and pro-apoptosis, as well as pro-survival. Interactome analysis of functionally related genes shows that c-Myc is the "hub" for those genes showing significant changes. Hence, our results suggest that microgravity travel may impact changes in gene expression mostly associated with cellular stress signaling, directing cells to either apoptotic death or premature senescence.

  20. Bridging the species divide: transgenic mice humanized for type-I interferon response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Harari

    Full Text Available We have generated transgenic mice that harbor humanized type I interferon receptors (IFNARs enabling the study of type I human interferons (Hu-IFN-Is in mice. These "HyBNAR" (Hybrid IFNAR mice encode transgenic variants of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 with the human extracellular domains being fused to transmembrane and cytoplasmic segments of mouse sequence. B16F1 mouse melanoma cells harboring the HyBNAR construct specifically bound Hu-IFN-Is and were rendered sensitive to Hu-IFN-I stimulated anti-proliferation, STAT1 activation and activation of a prototypical IFN-I response gene (MX2. HyBNAR mice were crossed with a transgenic strain expressing the luciferase reporter gene under the control of the IFN-responsive MX2 promoter (MX2-Luciferase. Both the HyBNAR and HyBNAR/MX2-Luciferase mice were responsive to all Hu-IFN-Is tested, inclusive of IFNα2A, IFNβ, and a human superagonist termed YNSα8. The mice displayed dose-dependent pharmacodynamic responses to Hu-IFN-I injection, as assessed by measuring the expression of IFN-responsive genes. Our studies also demonstrated a weak activation of endogenous mouse interferon response, especially after high dose administration of Hu-IFNs. In sharp contrast to data published for humans, our pharmacodynamic readouts demonstrate a very short-lived IFN-I response in mice, which is not enhanced by sub-cutaneous (SC injections in comparison to other administration routes. With algometric differences between humans and mice taken into account, the HyBNAR mice provides a convenient non-primate pre-clinical model to advance the study of human IFN-Is.

  1. Fractional Diffusion Based Modelling and Prediction of Human Brain Response to External Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Namazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human brain response is the result of the overall ability of the brain in analyzing different internal and external stimuli and thus making the proper decisions. During the last decades scientists have discovered more about this phenomenon and proposed some models based on computational, biological, or neuropsychological methods. Despite some advances in studies related to this area of the brain research, there were fewer efforts which have been done on the mathematical modeling of the human brain response to external stimuli. This research is devoted to the modeling and prediction of the human EEG signal, as an alert state of overall human brain activity monitoring, upon receiving external stimuli, based on fractional diffusion equations. The results of this modeling show very good agreement with the real human EEG signal and thus this model can be used for many types of applications such as prediction of seizure onset in patient with epilepsy.

  2. Heart rate responses provide an objective evaluation of human disturbance stimuli in breeding birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberg, Ursula; Mattern, Thomas; Seddon, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Intuition is a poor guide for evaluating the effects of human disturbance on wildlife. Using the endangered Yellow-eyed penguin, Megadyptes antipodes, as an example, we show that heart rate responses provide an objective tool to evaluate human disturbance stimuli and encourage the wider use of this simple and low-impact approach. Yellow-eyed penguins are a flagship species for New Zealand's wildlife tourism; however, unregulated visitor access has recently been associated with reduced breeding success and lower first year survival. We measured heart rate responses of Yellow-eyed penguins via artificial eggs to evaluate a range of human stimuli regularly occurring at their breeding sites. We found the duration of a stimulus to be the most important factor, with elevated heart rate being sustained while a person remained within sight. Human activity was the next important component; a simulated wildlife photographer, crawling slowly around during his stay, elicited a significantly higher heart rate response than an entirely motionless human spending the same time at the same distance. Stimuli we subjectively might perceive as low impact, such as the careful approach of a 'wildlife photographer', resulted in a stronger response than a routine nest-check that involved lifting a bird up to view nest contents. A single, slow-moving human spending 20 min within 2 m from the nest may provoke a response comparable to that of 10 min handling a bird for logger deployment. To reduce cumulative impact of disturbance, any human presence in the proximity of Yellow-eyed penguins needs to be kept at a minimum. Our results highlight the need for objective quantification of the effects of human disturbance in order to provide a sound basis for guidelines to manage human activity around breeding birds.

  3. What is human in humans? Responses from biology, anthropology, and philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibeau, Gilles

    2011-08-01

    Genomics has brought biology, medicine, agriculture, psychology, anthropology, and even philosophy to a new threshold. In this new context, the question about "what is human in humans" may end up being answered by geneticists, specialists of technoscience, and owners of biotech companies. The author defends, in this article, the idea that humanity is at risk in our age of genetic engineering, biotechnologies, and market-geared genetic research; he also argues that the values at the very core of our postgenomic era bring to its peak the science-based ideology that has developed since the time of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Harvey; finally, it shows that the bioindustry has invented a new genomythology that goes against the scientific evidence produced by the research in human sciences in which life is interpreted as a language.

  4. Increased proinflammatory responses from asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells in response to rhinovirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliver, Brian G G; Johnston, Sebastian L; Baraket, Melissa; Burgess, Janette K; King, Nicholas J C; Roth, Michael; Lim, Sam; Black, Judith L

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exacerbations of asthma are associated with viral respiratory tract infections, of which rhinoviruses (RV) are the predominant virus type. Airway smooth muscle is important in asthma pathogenesis, however little is known about the potential interaction of RV and human airway smooth muscl

  5. Human Dendritic Cell Response Signatures Distinguish 1918, Pandemic, and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Boris M; Thakar, Juilee; Albrecht, Randy A; Avey, Stefan; Zaslavsky, Elena; Marjanovic, Nada; Chikina, Maria; Fribourg, Miguel; Hayot, Fernand; Schmolke, Mirco; Meng, Hailong; Wetmur, James; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Kleinstein, Steven H; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2015-10-01

    Influenza viruses continue to present global threats to human health. Antigenic drift and shift, genetic reassortment, and cross-species transmission generate new strains with differences in epidemiology and clinical severity. We compared the temporal transcriptional responses of human dendritic cells (DC) to infection with two pandemic (A/Brevig Mission/1/1918, A/California/4/2009) and two seasonal (A/New Caledonia/20/1999, A/Texas/36/1991) H1N1 influenza viruses. Strain-specific response differences included stronger activation of NF-κB following infection with A/New Caledonia/20/1999 and a unique cluster of genes expressed following infection with A/Brevig Mission/1/1918. A common antiviral program showing strain-specific timing was identified in the early DC response and found to correspond with reported transcript changes in blood during symptomatic human influenza virus infection. Comparison of the global responses to the seasonal and pandemic strains showed that a dramatic divergence occurred after 4 h, with only the seasonal strains inducing widespread mRNA loss. Continuously evolving influenza viruses present a global threat to human health; however, these host responses display strain-dependent differences that are incompletely understood. Thus, we conducted a detailed comparative study assessing the immune responses of human DC to infection with two pandemic and two seasonal H1N1 influenza strains. We identified in the immune response to viral infection both common and strain-specific features. Among the stain-specific elements were a time shift of the interferon-stimulated gene response, selective induction of NF-κB signaling by one of the seasonal strains, and massive RNA degradation as early as 4 h postinfection by the seasonal, but not the pandemic, viruses. These findings illuminate new aspects of the distinct differences in the immune responses to pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All

  6. Match mismatch processes underlie human hippocampal responses to associative novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Dharshan; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2007-08-08

    The hippocampus has long been proposed to play a critical role in novelty detection through its ability to act as a comparator between past and present experience. A recent study provided evidence for this hypothesis by characterizing hippocampal responses to sequence novelty, a type of associative novelty where familiar items appear in a new temporal order. Here, we ask whether a hippocampal match-mismatch (i.e., comparator) mechanism operates selectively to identify the violation of predictions within the temporal domain or instead also underlies the processing of associative novelty in other domains (e.g., spatial). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a repetition paradigm in which subjects viewed sequences of objects presented in distinct locations on the screen and performed an incidental target detection task. The left hippocampus exhibited a pattern of activity consistent with that of an associative match-mismatch detector, with novelty signals generated only in conditions where one contextual component was novel and the other repeated. In contrast, right hippocampal activation signaled the presence of objects in familiar locations. Our results suggest that hippocampal match-mismatch computations constitute a general mechanism underpinning the processing of associative novelty. These findings support a model in which hippocampal mismatch signals rely critically on the recall of previous experience, a process that only occurs when novel sensory inputs overlap significantly with stored representations. More generally, the current study also offers insights into how the hippocampus automatically represents the spatiotemporal context of our experiences, a function that may relate to its role in episodic memory.

  7. Plasma matrix metalloproteinase-9 response to downhill running in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, M C; Allen, D L; Byrnes, W C

    2014-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is a proteolytic enzyme capable of degrading proteins of the muscle extracellular matrix. Systemic levels of MMP-9 or its inhibitor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), have the potential to serve as blood markers of exercise-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this study was to determine if an eccentrically-dominated task, downhill running (DHR), produces changes in plasma MMP-9 or TIMP-1 and examine the relationship between MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels and indirect indicators of muscle damage. Subjects were sedentary (SED, n=12) or had a history of concentrically-biased training (CON, n=9). MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were measured before (Pre-Ex), immediately after (Post-Ex), and 1-, 2-, 4-, and 7-days post-DHR (-10°), and compared to discomfort ratings, creatine kinase activity and strength loss. At 1-day Post-Ex, discomfort increased (5.6 ± 7.8 to 45.5 ± 19.9 mm; 0-100 mm scale), strength decreased (-6.9 ± 1.6%) and CK increased (162.9 ± 177.2%). MMP-9 was modestly but significantly increased at Post-Ex in both CONC and SED (32.7 ± 33.6%) and at 4-days in SED (66.9 ± 88.1%), Individual responses were variable, however. There were no correlations between MMPs and discomfort ratings, plasma CK or strength. While plasma MMP-9 changes may be detectable in the systemic circulation after DHR, they are small and do not correspond to other markers of damage. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Are drug companies living up to their human rights responsibilities? Moving toward assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Gruskin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND TO THE DEBATE: The human rights responsibilities of drug companies have been considered for years by nongovernmental organizations, but were most sharply defined in a report by the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to health, submitted to the United Nations General Assembly in August 2008. The "Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies in relation to Access to Medicines" include responsibilities for transparency, management, monitoring and accountability, pricing, and ethical marketing, and against lobbying for more protection in intellectual property laws, applying for patents for trivial modifications of existing medicines, inappropriate drug promotion, and excessive pricing. Two years after the release of the Guidelines, the PLoS Medicine Debate asks whether drug companies are living up to their human rights responsibilities. Sofia Gruskin and Zyde Raad from the Harvard School of Public Health say more assessment is needed of such responsibilities; Geralyn Ritter, Vice President of Global Public Policy and Corporate Responsibility at Merck & Co. argues that multiple stakeholders could do more to help States deliver the right to health; and Paul Hunt and Rajat Khosla introduce Mr. Hunt's work as the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to the highest attainable standard of health, regarding the human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies and access to medicines.

  9. Are drug companies living up to their human rights responsibilities? The Merck perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geralyn S Ritter

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND TO THE DEBATE: The human rights responsibilities of drug companies have been considered for years by nongovernmental organizations, but were most sharply defined in a report by the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to health, submitted to the United Nations General Assembly in August 2008. The "Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies in relation to Access to Medicines" include responsibilities for transparency, management, monitoring and accountability, pricing, and ethical marketing, and against lobbying for more protection in intellectual property laws, applying for patents for trivial modifications of existing medicines, inappropriate drug promotion, and excessive pricing. Two years after the release of the Guidelines, the PLoS Medicine Debate asks whether drug companies are living up to their human rights responsibilities. Sofia Gruskin and Zyde Raad from the Harvard School of Public Health say more assessment is needed of such responsibilities; Geralyn Ritter, Vice President of Global Public Policy and Corporate Responsibility at Merck & Co. argues that multiple stakeholders could do more to help States deliver the right to health; and Paul Hunt and Rajat Khosla introduce Mr. Hunt's work as the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to the highest attainable standard of health, regarding the human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies and access to medicines.

  10. Actin-myosin contractility is responsible for the reduced viability of dissociated human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guokai; Hou, Zhonggang; Gulbranson, Daniel R; Thomson, James A

    2010-08-06

    Human ESCs are the pluripotent precursor of the three embryonic germ layers. Human ESCs exhibit basal-apical polarity, junctional complexes, integrin-dependent matrix adhesion, and E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion, all characteristics shared by the epiblast epithelium of the intact mammalian embryo. After disruption of epithelial structures, programmed cell death is commonly observed. If individualized human ESCs are prevented from reattaching and forming colonies, their viability is significantly reduced. Here, we show that actin-myosin contraction is a critical effector of the cell death response to human ESC dissociation. Inhibition of myosin heavy chain ATPase, downregulation of myosin heavy chain, and downregulation of myosin light chain all increase survival and cloning efficiency of individualized human ESCs. ROCK inhibition decreases phosphorylation of myosin light chain, suggesting that inhibition of actin-myosin contraction is also the mechanism through which ROCK inhibitors increase cloning efficiency of human ESCs.

  11. Human T cell responses induced by vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Boesen, H; Pedersen, B K

    1997-01-01

    depending on the prevaccination sensitivity to PPD. Previously sensitized donors mounted a potent and highly accelerated recall response within the first week of BCG vaccination. Nonsensitized donors, in contrast, exhibited a gradually increasing responsiveness to mycobacterial Ags, reaching maximal levels...... have studied in vitro cell-mediated immune responses primed by BCG vaccination in 22 healthy Danish donors with different levels of in vitro purified protein derivative (PPD) reactivity before vaccination. The study demonstrated a markedly different development of reactivity to mycobacterial Ags...... important data on potentially protective immune responses in humans and suggest a careful evaluation of prevaccination sensitivity when investigating vaccine-induced immunity....

  12. Immunoproteomic analysis of human serological antibody responses to vaccination with whole-cell pertussis vaccine (WCV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Zhang Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pertussis (whooping cough caused by Bordetella pertussis (B.p, continues to be a serious public health threat. Vaccination is the most economical and effective strategy for preventing and controlling pertussis. However, few systematic investigations of actual human immune responses to pertussis vaccines have been performed. Therefore, we utilized a combination of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry to reveal the entire antigenic proteome of whole-cell pertussis vaccine (WCV targeted by the human immune system as a first step toward evaluating the repertoire of human humoral immune responses against WCV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunoproteomic profiling of total membrane enriched proteins and extracellular proteins of Chinese WCV strain 58003 identified a total of 30 immunoreactive proteins. Seven are known pertussis antigens including Pertactin, Serum resistance protein, chaperonin GroEL and two OMP porins. Sixteen have been documented to be immunogenic in other pathogens but not in B.p, and the immunogenicity of the last seven proteins was found for the first time. Furthermore, by comparison of the human and murine immunoproteomes of B.p, with the exception of four human immunoreactive proteins that were also reactive with mouse immune sera, a unique group of antigens including more than 20 novel immunoreactive proteins that uniquely reacted with human immune serum was confirmed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is the first time that the repertoire of human serum antibody responses against WCV was comprehensively investigated, and a small number of previously unidentified antigens of WCV were also found by means of the classic immunoproteomic strategy. Further research on these newly identified predominant antigens of B.p exclusively against humans will not only remarkably accelerate the development of diagnostic biomarkers and subunit vaccines but also provide detailed insight

  13. A Return to the Human in Humanism: A Response to Hansen's Humanistic Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    In his extension of the humanistic vision, Hansen (2012) recommends that counseling practitioners and scholars adopt operations that are consistent with his definition of a multiple-perspective philosophy. Alternatively, the author of this article believes that Hansen has reduced the capacity of the human to interpret meaning through quantitative…

  14. Guillain-Barré综合征患者B淋巴细胞辅助受体CD l9表达的研究%Expression of CO-receptor CD 1 9 on peripheral B lymphocytes in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁学谦; 朱太卿; 张莉峰; 王慧贞; 王焕荣; 王爱丽; 张东锋

    2011-01-01

    目的 本研究通过检测Guillain-Barre综合征(GBS)患者外周血单个核细胞CD l9蛋白的表达,探讨CD l9与GBS及其严重程度之间的关系.方法 利用流式细胞术检测GBS组(36例)和正常对照组(20例)的CD l9蛋白表达,按病程将GBS组分为急性期亚组与恢复期亚组,并分析与疾病严重程度之间的关系.结果 与正常对照组221±78个比较,GBS组742±128个B细胞数量显著升高,差异有统计学意义(P0.05).与恢复期GBS组87.27±6.04%比较,急性期GBS组81.20+5.25%CD l9+CD20+无明显差异(P>0.05).与轻症GBS组632+68个比较,重症GBS组797+130个B细胞数量无明显差异(P>0.05).与轻症GBS组82.53+5.03%比较,重症GBS组85.84+6.77%CD l9+CD20+无明显差异(P>0.05).结论 CD l9在GBS中表达显著升高,但与病程和病情严重程度无关.%Objective To explore the corlation between the expression of CD19 and the severity of GBS. The expression of CD19 of B lymphocyte in peripheral blood mononuclear cells( PBMNCs )of the disease was tested.Methods GBS group( 36 cases )and healthy controls( HC )group( 20 cases )were investigated. The expression of CD 19 on peirpheral B lymphocytes were examined by flow cytometry. According to course of disease, GBS group was divided into acute subgroup and recovery subgroup. Furthermore, the corelation between the expression of CD 19 and the severity of the disease was analyzed. Results Compared with HC group[ 221 + 78 ], B lymphocyte numbers[ 742 + 128 ]were significantly higher( P < 0. 01 ). Compared with HC group[ 62.21 + 7. 85% ], the CD 19 + CD20+ increased significantly ( P <0.0 1 )in GBS group[ 83.92 +6.23% ]. Compared with recovery subgroup[ 686 + 108 ],B lymphocyte numbers were of no significant differences( P > 0.05 )in the acute subgroup[ 810 + 124 ]. Compared with recovery subgroup[ 87.27 + 6.04% ], the CD19 + CD20 + was of no significant differences( P > 0.05 ) in the acute subgroup[ 81.20 + 5.251% ]. Compared with mild

  15. Human infant faces provoke implicit positive affective responses in parents and non-parents alike.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Paolo Senese

    Full Text Available Human infants' complete dependence on adult caregiving suggests that mechanisms associated with adult responsiveness to infant cues might be deeply embedded in the brain. Behavioural and neuroimaging research has produced converging evidence for adults' positive disposition to infant cues, but these studies have not investigated directly the valence of adults' reactions, how they are moderated by biological and social factors, and if they relate to child caregiving. This study examines implicit affective responses of 90 adults toward faces of human and non-human (cats and dogs infants and adults. Implicit reactions were assessed with Single Category Implicit Association Tests, and reports of childrearing behaviours were assessed by the Parental Style Questionnaire. The results showed that human