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Sample records for human autonomic cardiovascular

  1. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spallone, Vincenza; Ziegler, Dan; Freeman, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) Subcommittee of Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy worked to update CAN guidelines, with regard to epidemiology, clinical impact, diagnosis, usefulness of CAN testing, and management. CAN is the impairment of cardiovascular autonomic control i....... Evidence on the cost-effectiveness of CAN testing is lacking. Apart from the preventive role of intensive glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes, recommendations cannot be given for most therapeutic approaches to CAN. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....... in the setting of diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The prevalence of confirmed CAN is around 20%, and increases up to 65% with age and diabetes duration. Established risk factors for CAN are glycaemic control in type 1 and a combination of hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and glycaemic control...

  2. Anesthesia Management in Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Feride Karacaer

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus and encompasses damage to the autonomic nerve fibers, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. There is an increased mortality and morbidity rate among these patients. A series of cardiovascular reflex tests known as Ewing's battery tests are used for diagnosis cardiac autonomic neuropathy and provide valuable information to the clinical assessment of these patients. As...

  3. Anesthesia Management in Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Karacaer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus and encompasses damage to the autonomic nerve fibers, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. There is an increased mortality and morbidity rate among these patients. A series of cardiovascular reflex tests known as Ewing's battery tests are used for diagnosis cardiac autonomic neuropathy and provide valuable information to the clinical assessment of these patients. As anesthesia has a major influence on perioperative autonomic function, the interplay between cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and anesthesia may result in unexpected haemodynamic instability during surgery and postoperative recovery. A comprehensive preoperative assessment and perioperative cautious monitoring are necessary for successful anesthesia management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(2.000: 140-151

  4. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patients.

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    Maria Eugenia Niño Mantilla

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system is a serious problem in diabetic patients. The cardiovacular autonomic neuropathy is the most important autonomic dysfuntion for it´s implication in the increasesof the mortality rate in diabetis patients. tis ethiopatogenesis is the result of a multifactorial process caused by chronic hyperglycemia, ending up in damage of the autonomic fibers thet innervate the heart and blood vessels, leading to dysfuntional hearth rate control and abnormal vascular dynamics. the associated clinical manifestations include orthotatic hypotension, excecise intolerance, intraoperative cardiovascular liability and silent myocardial ischemia. Being important its recognition, quantitative test to evaluate the cardiovascular funtion, to value its evolution and the effects of the treatment ahould be done, being the most used, the hearth rate response to standing test, and teh valsalva maneuver. the handling of this entity is done improving control of glucose blood levels its the most effective way to prevent the cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patients.

  5. Dose-response study of N,N-dimethyltryptamine in humans. I. Neuroendocrine, autonomic, and cardiovascular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassman, R J; Qualls, C R

    1994-02-01

    To begin applying basic neuropharmacological hypotheses of hallucinogenic drug actions to humans, we generated dose-response data for intravenously administered dimethyltryptamine fumarate's (DMT) neuroendocrine, cardiovascular, autonomic, and subjective effects in a group of experienced hallucinogen users. Dimethyltryptamine, an endogenous mammalian hallucinogen and drug of abuse, was administered intravenously at 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/kg to 11 experienced hallucinogen users, in a double-blind, saline placebo-controlled, randomized design. Treatments were separated by at least 1 week. Peak DMT blood levels and subjective effects were seen within 2 minutes after drug administration, and were negligible at 30 minutes. Dimethyltryptamine dose dependently elevated blood pressure, heart rate, pupil diameter, and rectal temperature, in addition to elevating blood concentrations of beta-endorphin, corticotropin, cortisol, and prolactin. Growth hormone blood levels rose equally in response to all doses of DMT, and melatonin levels were unaffected. Threshold doses for significant effects relative to placebo were also hallucinogenic (0.2 mg/kg and higher). Subjects with five or more exposures to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine demonstrated less robust pupil diameter effects than those with two or fewer exposures. Dimethyltryptamine can be administered safely to experienced hallucinogen users and dose-response data generated for several measures hypothesized under serotonergic modulatory control. Additional studies characterizing the specific mechanisms mediating DMT's biological effects may prove useful in psychopharmacological investigations of drug-induced and endogenous alterations in brain function.

  6. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Reichmann, Heinz

    2010-02-15

    Symptoms of cardiovascular dysautonomia are a common occurrence in Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition to this dysautonomia as part of PD itself, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) can be triggered as a side-effect of drug treatment interacting with the ANS or - if prominent and early - an indication of a different disease such as multiple system atrophy (MSA). Various diagnostic tests are available to demonstrate autonomic failure. While autonomic function tests can differentiate parasympathetic from sympathetic dysfunction, cardiac imaging can define the pathophysiologically involved site of a lesion. Standard tests such as 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements can identify significant autonomic failure which needs treatment. The most frequent and disturbing symptom of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is orthostatic hypotension. Symptoms include generalized weakness, light-headiness, mental "clouding" up to syncope. Factors like heat, food, alcohol, exercise, activities which increase intrathoraric pressure (e.g. defecation, coughing) and certain drugs (e.g. vasodilators) can worsen a probably asymptomatic orthostatic hypotension. Non-medical and medical therapies can help the patient to cope with a disabling symptomatic orthostatic hypotension. Supine hypertension is often associated with orthostatic hypotension. The prognostic role of cardiovagal and baroreflex dysfunction is still not yet known.

  7. Autonomic and endocrine control of cardiovascular function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard; Gordan; Judith; K; Gwathmey; Lai-Hua; Xie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the heart is to contract and pump oxygenated blood to the body and deoxygenated blood to the lungs.To achieve this goal,a normal human heart must beat regularly and continuously for one’s entire life.Heartbeats originate from the rhythmic pacing discharge from the sinoatrial(SA) node within the heart itself.In the absence of extrinsic neural or hormonal influences,the SA node pacing rate would be about 100 beats per minute.Heart rate and cardiac output,however,must vary in response to the needs of the body’s cells for oxygen and nutrients under varying conditions.In order to respond rapidly to the changing requirements of the body’s tissues,the heart rate and contractility are regulated by the nervous system,hormones,and other factors.Here we review how the cardiovascular system is controlled and influenced by not only a unique intrinsic system,but is also heavily influenced by the autonomic nervous system as well as the endocrine system.

  8. Autonomic response to exercise as measured by cardiovascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autonomic response to exercise as measured by cardiovascular variability. ... exercise as measured by heart rate variability, blood pressure variability and ... show increased variability, decreased variability, and no change in variability.

  9. A study of cardiovascular autonomic function in normal pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumana Panja

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate the physiological responses to noninvasive cardiovascular autonomic function tests in normal pregnancy and compare them with non- pregnant controls. Materials and Methods: The study population comprised of 90 apparently healthy, pregnant women divided equally into three groups based on their period of gestation and 30 otherwise healthy, non-pregnant women as controls. The standard autonomic function tests based on cardiovascular reflexes, including heart rate response tests and blood pressure response tests were performed. Result: It was observed that variability of mean between and within all the population groups and controls was significantly different. Multiple comparison analysis revealed a significantly lower Deep Breathing Difference in pregnant subjects, significant difference in Valsalva Ratio in third trimester group, a significantly lower Postural Tachycardia Index only during last trimester and a significantly higher fall in systolic blood pressure on standing only during 1st trimester. A significantly lower alteration in diastolic blood pressure during isometric handgrip in later trimesters and a significant increase in overall cardiovascular autonomic score between and within all groups were also observed. Conclusion: The observations serve to corroborate that the cardiovascular indices in pregnant women are significantly altered in comparison to non-pregnant women, thus highlighting the importance of cardiovascular monitoring during pregnancy. The study also helped to reaffirm the efficacy of simple cardiovascular reflex tests in research on pregnancy physiology.

  10. A Review of Cardiovascular Autonomic Control in Cluster Headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads C J

    2016-01-01

    triggered during periods of parasympathetic dominance. A better understanding of this interaction may provide insight into central autonomic regulation and its role in cluster headache. METHODS: A PubMed search was performed in April 2015 using the search terms "cluster headache," "cardiovascular...

  11. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and subclinical cardiovascular disease in normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Ulrik Madvig; Jensen, Tonny; Køber, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is associated with increased mortality in diabetes. Since CAN often develops in parallel with diabetic nephropathy as a confounder, we aimed to investigate the isolated impact of CAN on cardiovascular disease in normoalbuminuric patients. Fifty......-six normoalbuminuric, type 1 diabetic patients were divided into 26 with (+) and 30 without (-) CAN according to tests of their autonomic nerve function. Coronary artery plaque burden and coronary artery calcium score (CACS) were evaluated using computed tomography. Left ventricular function was evaluated using...... with increased CACS, subclinical left ventricular dysfunction, and increased pulse pressure. In conclusion, CAN in normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients is associated with distinct signs of subclinical cardiovascular disease....

  12. Exercise training changes autonomic cardiovascular balance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, K; Wichi, R B; Jesus, W R A; Moreira, E D; Morris, M; Krieger, E M; Irigoyen, M C

    2004-06-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the influence of exercise training on cardiovascular function in mice. Heart rate, arterial pressure, baroreflex sensitivity, and autonomic control of heart rate were measured in conscious, unrestrained male C57/6J sedentary (n = 8) and trained mice (n = 8). The exercise training protocol used a treadmill (1 h/day; 5 days/wk for 4 wk). Baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated by the tachycardic and bradycardic responses induced by sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively. Autonomic control of heart rate and intrinsic heart rate were determined by use of methylatropine and propranolol. Resting bradycardia was observed in trained mice compared with sedentary animals [485 +/- 9 vs. 612 +/- 5 beats/min (bpm)], whereas mean arterial pressure was not different between the groups (106 +/- 2 vs. 108 +/- 3 mmHg). Baroreflex-mediated tachycardia was significantly enhanced in the trained group (6.97 +/- 0.97 vs. 1.6 +/- 0.21 bpm/mmHg, trained vs. sedentary), whereas baroreflex-mediated bradycardia was not altered by training. The tachycardia induced by methylatropine was significantly increased in trained animals (139 +/- 12 vs. 40 +/- 9 bpm, trained vs. sedentary), whereas the propranolol effect was significantly reduced in the trained group (49 +/- 11 vs. 97 +/- 11 bpm, trained vs. sedentary). Intrinsic heart rate was similar between groups. In conclusion, dynamic exercise training in mice induced a resting bradycardia and an improvement in baroreflex-mediated tachycardia. These changes are likely related to an increased vagal and decreased sympathetic tone, similar to the exercise response observed in humans.

  13. Cardiovascular autonomic adaptation in lunar and martian gravity during parabolic flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, Devy; Vandeput, Steven; Van Huffel, Sabine; Aubert, André E

    2015-06-01

    Weightlessness has a well-known effect on the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. With future missions to Mars in mind, it is important to know what the effect of partial gravity is on the human body. We aim to study the autonomic response of the cardiovascular system to partial gravity levels, as present on the Moon and on Mars, during parabolic flight. ECG and blood pressure were continuously recorded during parabolic flight. A temporal analysis of blood pressure and heart rate to changing gravity was conducted to study the dynamic response. In addition, cardiovascular autonomic control was quantified by means of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) variability measures. Zero and lunar gravity presented a biphasic cardiovascular response, while a triphasic response was noted during martian gravity. Heart rate and blood pressure are positively correlated with gravity, while the general variability of HR and BP, as well as vagal indices showed negative correlations with increasing gravity. However, the increase in vagal modulation during weightlessness is not in proportion when compared to the increase during partial gravity. Correlations were found between the gravity level and modulations in the autonomic nervous system during parabolic flight. Nevertheless, with future Mars missions in mind, more studies are needed to use these findings to develop appropriate countermeasures.

  14. Age Effect on Autonomic Cardiovascular Control in Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Nantcheva**, M. Vukov*** *National Center of Hygiene, Medical Ecology and Nutrition 15 Dimitar Nestorov Blvd. 1431 Sofia, Bulgaria "**Military Medical...cardiovascular derived indices. Most sensitive to aging process from regulation, involve in part autonomic influences. time-domain HRV measures...completing of the mission tasks (15). A components, and baroreflex sensitivity with age (29). number of studies have investigated the impact of the

  15. [Cardiovascular autonomic reflexes on the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjelloun, Ho; Benjelloun, Ha; Aboudrar, S; Coghlan, L; Benomar, M

    2009-02-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is an inadequately understood pathology because its diagnosis is not based on the conventional methods of investigation. The orthostatic test allows to make the diagnosis easily. The objective of this study is to determine cardiovascular autonomic reflexes of 70 patients having POTS. The tests of exploration of the autonomic nervous system practised are: deep breathing, hand grip, mental stress and orthostatic test. The analysis of orthostatic test showed that the increase of the cardiac frequency, relative to the state of "beta" peripheral sympathetic hyperactivity occurred before the 2nd minute in 80% of patients. The POTS was considered "florid" in 43% of patients and had complicated of a rough and severe fall of systolic blood pressure inferior to 70 mmHg in four patients, after the fifth minute of the test. The analysis of the different tests had shown vagal hyperactivity in 63% of patients on deep breathing, in 93% of patients on hand grip and in 100% on orthostatic test. The "alpha" central sympathetic activity was increased in 76% of the cases and "beta" central sympathetic activity was high in 83% of cases. The "alpha" peripheral hyperactivity was observed in 63% of patients on hand grip, and in 44% on orthostatic test. The analysis of cardiovascular autonomic reflexes in patients affected by POTS allowing the determination of their autonomic profile, will contribute probably to a better understanding of this pathology and to a better orientation of its care.

  16. Diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy: Clinicalmanifestations, cardiovascular consequences, diagnosisand treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akif Serhat Balcloglu; Haldun Müderrisoglu

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a frequentchronic complication of diabetes mellitus with potentiallylife-threatening outcomes. CAN is caused by theimpairment of the autonomic nerve fibers regulatingheart rate, cardiac output, myocardial contractility, cardiacelectrophysiology and blood vessel constriction anddilatation. It causes a wide range of cardiac disorders,including resting tachycardia, arrhythmias, intraoperativecardiovascular instability, asymptomatic myocardialischemia and infarction and increased rate of mortalityafter myocardial infarction. Etiological factors associatedwith autonomic neuropathy include insufficient glycemiccontrol, a longer period since the onset of diabetes,increased age, female sex and greater body mass index.The most commonly used methods for the diagnosisof CAN are based upon the assessment of heart ratevariability (the physiological variation in the time intervalbetween heartbeats), as it is one of the first findings inboth clinically asymptomatic and symptomatic patients.Clinical symptoms associated with CAN generally occurlate in the disease process and include early fatigue andexhaustion during exercise, orthostatic hypotension,dizziness, presyncope and syncope. Treatment is basedon early diagnosis, life style changes, optimization ofglycemic control and management of cardiovascular riskfactors. Medical therapies, including aldose reductaseinhibitors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors,prostoglandin analogs and alpha-lipoic acid, have beenfound to be effective in randomized controlled trials.The following article includes the epidemiology, clinicalfindings and cardiovascular consequences, diagnosis,and approaches to prevention and treatment of CAN.

  17. STUDY OF CARDIOVASCULAR AUTONOMIC FUNCTIONS IN CONGENITALLY DEAF CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Majority of congenitally deaf children are at risk of cardiac abnormalities in the form of long QT syndrome which could be due to an intracardiac abnormality or autonomic dysfunction. Altered sympathetic/parasympathetic balance as a result of the absence of auditory stimuli on the autonomic nervous system results in lower mean heart rate in congenitally deaf children. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether the cardiovascular autonomic functions are altered in congenitally deaf children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 30 congenitally deaf children aged between 14 - 18 yrs and 30 age matched controls were included for the study. Parasympathetic activity was assessed by observing the heart rate changes to immediate standing from lying down position, heart rate changes during deep breathing and heart rate changes during valsalva maneuver. Sympathetic activity was assessed by observing blood pressure changes on immediate standing from lying down position and blood pressure changes during sustained hand grip. RESULTS: The results of the present study showed statistically significant decrease in the systolic blood pressure in response to immediate standing among congenitally deaf children suggestive of sympathetic imbalance and an early stage of autonomic dysfunction.

  18. Impact of Restless Legs Syndrome on Cardiovascular Autonomic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertisch, Suzanne M; Muresan, Cristen; Schoerning, Laura; Winkelman, John W; Taylor, J Andrew

    2016-03-01

    To examine whether patients with restless legs syndrome demonstrate specific alterations in cardiovascular autonomic control. Patients with moderate-severe restless legs syndrome (n = 20, 80% female) and controls (n = 20) matched for age, sex, body mass index, and free of hypertension and cardiovascular disease were enrolled. We assessed cardiovagal baroreflex gain via the modified Oxford technique, sympathetically mediated vascular responses to isometric exercise to fatigue, bradycardiac response to Valsalva maneuver, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia during paced breathing. Standard electrocardiography, beat-by-beat arterial pressure, respiration, and popliteal blood flow velocity were recorded continuously. Resting blood pressure and heart rate were similar between groups. However, baroreflex gain averaged 14.3 ± 1.4 msec/mm Hg in restless legs syndrome and was lower than in controls (22.6 ± 3.5 msec/mm Hg, P = 0.04). Hemodynamic responses to isometric exercise were similar between groups, though participants with restless legs syndrome had lower leg blood flow (P leg vascular resistance (P legs syndrome demonstrate compromised cardiovagal control, specific to the arterial baroreflex, with greater peripheral vascular resistance, potentially due to heightened sympathetic outflow. These autonomic alterations may directly relate to the higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease in restless legs syndrome. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  19. Sleep, sleep deprivation, autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaldini, Eleonora; Costantino, Giorgio; Solbiati, Monica; Cogliati, Chiara; Kara, Tomas; Nobili, Lino; Montano, Nicola

    2017-03-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has become a relevant health problem in modern societies. We can be sleep deprived due to lifestyle habits or due to sleep disorders, such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and neurological disorders. One of the common element of sleep disorders is the condition of chronic SD, which has complex biological consequences. SD is capable of inducing different biological effects, such as neural autonomic control changes, increased oxidative stress, altered inflammatory and coagulatory responses and accelerated atherosclerosis. All these mechanisms links SD and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Epidemiological studies have shown that short sleep duration is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, arrhythmias, diabetes and obesity, after adjustment for socioeconomic and demographic risk factors and comorbidities. Thus, an early assessment of a condition of SD and its treatment is clinically relevant to prevent the harmful consequences of a very common condition in adult population.

  20. AUTONOMIC CARDIOVASCULAR REGULATION DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Rebrov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to identify disorders of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA by determining the heart rate variability (HRV, and also establish the relationship of HRV with systemic inflammation and traditional cardiovascular risk factors.Materials and methods. The study included 53 patients with PsA (mean age 43.64 ± 12.1 years, including 48.2 % men, mean disease durationwas 10.32 ± 10.2 years. The control group included 25 healthy volunteers (average age 46.7 ± 12.45 years, 49.1 % – men. Time andfrequency measures of HRV were analyzed. Active PsA was determined by an index DAS4, rate erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen. Patients with clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease, and patients with symptomsof carotid atherosclerosis, detected by duplex study were excluded.Results. Deterioration of HRV in patients with PsA compared with those in patients of the control group, the availability of statistically significant reverse relationship of temporal and spectral parameters of HRV with PsA activity (ESR, CRP, entezit score, DAS4, duration of arthritis, the classical factors of cardiovascular risk were established.Conclusion. Patients with PsA had noted a violation of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in the form of reduced HRV and activation of the sympathetic part of it. Identified changes were associated with activity of systemic inflammation and classical factors of cardiovascular risk.

  1. AUTONOMIC CARDIOVASCULAR REGULATION DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Rebrov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to identify disorders of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA by determining the heart rate variability (HRV, and also establish the relationship of HRV with systemic inflammation and traditional cardiovascular risk factors.Materials and methods. The study included 53 patients with PsA (mean age 43.64 ± 12.1 years, including 48.2 % men, mean disease durationwas 10.32 ± 10.2 years. The control group included 25 healthy volunteers (average age 46.7 ± 12.45 years, 49.1 % – men. Time andfrequency measures of HRV were analyzed. Active PsA was determined by an index DAS4, rate erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen. Patients with clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease, and patients with symptomsof carotid atherosclerosis, detected by duplex study were excluded.Results. Deterioration of HRV in patients with PsA compared with those in patients of the control group, the availability of statistically significant reverse relationship of temporal and spectral parameters of HRV with PsA activity (ESR, CRP, entezit score, DAS4, duration of arthritis, the classical factors of cardiovascular risk were established.Conclusion. Patients with PsA had noted a violation of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in the form of reduced HRV and activation of the sympathetic part of it. Identified changes were associated with activity of systemic inflammation and classical factors of cardiovascular risk.

  2. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Morbid Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sant Anna Junior, Maurício; Carneiro, João Regis Ivar; Carvalhal, Renata Ferreira; Torres, Diego de Faria Magalhães; da Cruz, Gustavo Gavina; Quaresma, José Carlos do Vale; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo; Guimarães, Fernando Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background Morbid obesity is directly related to deterioration in cardiorespiratory capacity, including changes in cardiovascular autonomic modulation. Objective This study aimed to assess the cardiovascular autonomic function in morbidly obese individuals. Methods Cross-sectional study, including two groups of participants: Group I, composed by 50 morbidly obese subjects, and Group II, composed by 30 nonobese subjects. The autonomic function was assessed by heart rate variability in the time domain (standard deviation of all normal RR intervals [SDNN]; standard deviation of the normal R-R intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals [RMSSD]; and the percentage of interval differences of successive R-R intervals greater than 50 milliseconds [pNN50] than the adjacent interval), and in the frequency domain (high frequency [HF]; low frequency [LF]: integration of power spectral density function in high frequency and low frequency ranges respectively). Between-group comparisons were performed by the Student’s t-test, with a level of significance of 5%. Results Obese subjects had lower values of SDNN (40.0 ± 18.0 ms vs. 70.0 ± 27.8 ms; p = 0.0004), RMSSD (23.7 ± 13.0 ms vs. 40.3 ± 22.4 ms; p = 0.0030), pNN50 (14.8 ± 10.4 % vs. 25.9 ± 7.2%; p = 0.0061) and HF (30.0 ± 17.5 Hz vs. 51.7 ± 25.5 Hz; p = 0.0023) than controls. Mean LF/HF ratio was higher in Group I (5.0 ± 2.8 vs. 1.0 ± 0.9; p = 0.0189), indicating changes in the sympathovagal balance. No statistical difference in LF was observed between Group I and Group II (50.1 ± 30.2 Hz vs. 40.9 ± 23.9 Hz; p = 0.9013). Conclusion morbidly obese individuals have increased sympathetic activity and reduced parasympathetic activity, featuring cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. PMID:26536979

  3. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Morbid Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício de Sant Anna Junior

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground:Morbid obesity is directly related to deterioration in cardiorespiratory capacity, including changes in cardiovascular autonomic modulation.Objective:This study aimed to assess the cardiovascular autonomic function in morbidly obese individuals.Methods:Cross-sectional study, including two groups of participants: Group I, composed by 50 morbidly obese subjects, and Group II, composed by 30 nonobese subjects. The autonomic function was assessed by heart rate variability in the time domain (standard deviation of all normal RR intervals [SDNN]; standard deviation of the normal R-R intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals [RMSSD]; and the percentage of interval differences of successive R-R intervals greater than 50 milliseconds [pNN50] than the adjacent interval, and in the frequency domain (high frequency [HF]; low frequency [LF]: integration of power spectral density function in high frequency and low frequency ranges respectively. Between-group comparisons were performed by the Student’s t-test, with a level of significance of 5%.Results:Obese subjects had lower values of SDNN (40.0 ± 18.0 ms vs. 70.0 ± 27.8 ms; p = 0.0004, RMSSD (23.7 ± 13.0 ms vs. 40.3 ± 22.4 ms; p = 0.0030, pNN50 (14.8 ± 10.4 % vs. 25.9 ± 7.2%; p = 0.0061 and HF (30.0 ± 17.5 Hz vs. 51.7 ± 25.5 Hz; p = 0.0023 than controls. Mean LF/HF ratio was higher in Group I (5.0 ± 2.8 vs. 1.0 ± 0.9; p = 0.0189, indicating changes in the sympathovagal balance. No statistical difference in LF was observed between Group I and Group II (50.1 ± 30.2 Hz vs. 40.9 ± 23.9 Hz; p = 0.9013.Conclusion:morbidly obese individuals have increased sympathetic activity and reduced parasympathetic activity, featuring cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction.

  4. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Morbid Obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sant Anna Junior, Maurício de [Programa de Tratamento Multidisciplinar da Obesidade do Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Fisioterapia do Centro Universitário Anhanguera Niterói - UNIAN, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Programa de pós-graduação em Ciências Médicas, Universidade Federal Fluminense - UFF, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carneiro, João Regis Ivar; Carvalhal, Renata Ferreira [Programa de Tratamento Multidisciplinar da Obesidade do Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Torres, Diego de Faria Magalhães [Programa de Tratamento Multidisciplinar da Obesidade do Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Fisioterapia da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cruz, Gustavo Gavina da; Quaresma, José Carlos do Vale [Programa de Tratamento Multidisciplinar da Obesidade do Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo [Divisão de Nefrologia - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal Fluminense - UFF, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Guimarães, Fernando Silva, E-mail: fguimaraes_pg@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Fisioterapia da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Programa de pós-graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação - Centro Universitário Augusto Motta, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-12-15

    Morbid obesity is directly related to deterioration in cardiorespiratory capacity, including changes in cardiovascular autonomic modulation. This study aimed to assess the cardiovascular autonomic function in morbidly obese individuals. Cross-sectional study, including two groups of participants: Group I, composed by 50 morbidly obese subjects, and Group II, composed by 30 nonobese subjects. The autonomic function was assessed by heart rate variability in the time domain (standard deviation of all normal RR intervals [SDNN]; standard deviation of the normal R-R intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals [RMSSD]; and the percentage of interval differences of successive R-R intervals greater than 50 milliseconds [pNN50] than the adjacent interval), and in the frequency domain (high frequency [HF]; low frequency [LF]: integration of power spectral density function in high frequency and low frequency ranges respectively). Between-group comparisons were performed by the Student’s t-test, with a level of significance of 5%. Obese subjects had lower values of SDNN (40.0 ± 18.0 ms vs. 70.0 ± 27.8 ms; p = 0.0004), RMSSD (23.7 ± 13.0 ms vs. 40.3 ± 22.4 ms; p = 0.0030), pNN50 (14.8 ± 10.4 % vs. 25.9 ± 7.2%; p = 0.0061) and HF (30.0 ± 17.5 Hz vs. 51.7 ± 25.5 Hz; p = 0.0023) than controls. Mean LF/HF ratio was higher in Group I (5.0 ± 2.8 vs. 1.0 ± 0.9; p = 0.0189), indicating changes in the sympathovagal balance. No statistical difference in LF was observed between Group I and Group II (50.1 ± 30.2 Hz vs. 40.9 ± 23.9 Hz; p = 0.9013). morbidly obese individuals have increased sympathetic activity and reduced parasympathetic activity, featuring cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction.

  5. The role of serum methylglyoxal on diabetic peripheral and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.S.; Jensen, T.M.; Jensen, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are common diabetic complications and independent predictors of cardiovascular disease. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal has been suggested to play a causal role in the pathogeneses of diabetic peripheral neuropathy...... and possibly diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the cross-sectional association between serum methylglyoxal and diabetic peripheral neuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in a subset of patients in the ADDITION-Denmark study with short-term screen......-detected Type 2 diabetes (duration ~ 5.8 years). METHODS: The patients were well controlled with regard to HbA(1c), lipids and blood pressure. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was assessed by measures of resting heart rate variability and cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy...

  6. The role of serum methylglyoxal on diabetic peripheral and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.S.; Jensen, T.M.; Jensen, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are common diabetic complications and independent predictors of cardiovascular disease. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal has been suggested to play a causal role in the pathogeneses of diabetic peripheral neuropathy...... and possibly diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the cross-sectional association between serum methylglyoxal and diabetic peripheral neuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in a subset of patients in the ADDITION-Denmark study with short-term screen......-detected Type 2 diabetes (duration ~ 5.8 years). METHODS: The patients were well controlled with regard to HbA(1c), lipids and blood pressure. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was assessed by measures of resting heart rate variability and cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy...

  7. Acute exercise adjustments of cardiovascular autonomic control in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Pureza, Demilto Yamagushi; Jorge, Luciana; Sanches, Iris Callado; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Souza, Romeu Rodrigues; De Angelis, Kátia

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the role of cardiovascular autonomic changes in hemodynamics at rest and in response to exercise in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into nondiabetic (ND, n = 8) and diabetic (D, n = 8) groups. Arterial pressure signals were recorded in the basal state and after atropine or propranolol injections at rest, during exercise and during recovery. At rest, vagal tonus was reduced in D (37 ± 3 bpm) in comparison with the ND group (61 ± 9 bpm). Heart rate during exercise was lower in D in relation to ND rats associated with reduced vagal withdrawal in the D group. The D rats had an increase in vagal tonus in the recovery period (49 ± 6 bpm). Exercise-induced hemodynamic adjustment impairment in diabetic rats was associated with reduced cardiac vagal control. The vagal dysfunction was attenuated after aerobic exercise, reinforcing the positive role of this approach in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetics. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Links between Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Garruti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Type 2 diabetes (T2D might occur within metabolic syndrome (MbS. One of the complications of T2D is an impaired (imp cardiovascular autonomic function (CAF. Aims. In subjects with T2D and age ≤ 55 years, the prevalence of impCAF and its relationship with BMI, waist, HbA1c values, MbS, hypertension, and family history of T2D and/or hypertension were analysed. Methods. 180 subjects consecutively undergoing a day hospital for T2D were studied. The IDF criteria were used to diagnose MbS. To detect impCAF, 5 tests for the evaluation of CAF were performed with Cardionomic (Meteda, Italy. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results. The prevalence of impCAF and MbS were 33.9% and 67.8%, respectively. Among diabetics with impCAF, 86.9% had MbS. ImpCAF was significantly associated with MbS, overweight, and HbA1c>7%. Both logistic (P=0.0009 and Poisson (P=0.0113 models showed a positive association between impCAF and MbS. The degree of ImpCAF showed a positive linear correlation with BMI and HbA1c values. Conclusions. The study demonstrates that glycaemic control and overweight influence CAF and that T2D + MbS is more strongly associated with impCAF than isolated T2D. We suggest that MbS not only increases the cardiovascular risk of relatively young subjects with T2D but is also associated with impCAF.

  9. The Human Element and Autonomous Ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauli Ahvenjärvi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The autonomous ship technology has become a “hot” topic in the discussion about more efficient, environmentally friendly and safer sea transportation solutions. The time is becoming mature for the introduction of commercially sensible solutions for unmanned and fully autonomous cargo and passenger ships. Safety will be the most interesting and important aspect in this development. The utilization of the autonomous ship technology will have many effects on the safety, both positive and negative. It has been announced that the goal is to make the safety of an unmanned ship better that the safety of a manned ship. However, it must be understood that the human element will still be present when fully unmanned ships are being used. The shore-based control of a ship contains new safety aspects and an interesting question will be the interaction of manned and unmanned ships in the same traffic area. The autonomous ship technology should therefore be taken into account on the training of seafarers. Also it should not be forgotten that every single control algorithm and rule of the internal decision making logic of the autonomously navigating ship has been designed and coded by a human software engineer. Thus the human element is present also in this point of the lifetime navigation system of the autonomous ship.

  10. Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy Predicts Recurrent Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seon-Ah; Yun, Jae-Seung; Lim, Tae-Seok; Min, Kyoungil; Song, Ki-Ho; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Park, Yong-Moon; Ahn, Yu-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study evaluated the relationship between CAN and recurrent CVD in type 2 diabetes. A total of 206 patients with type 2 diabetes who had a history of CVD within 3 years of enrollment were consecutively recruited from January 2001 to December 2009 and followed-up until December 2015. Cardiovascular autonomic function tests were performed using the following heart rate variability parameters: expiration-to-inspiration ratio, response to Valsalva maneuver and standing. We estimated the recurrence of CVD events during the follow-up period. A total of 159 (77.2%) of the 206 patients enrolled completed the follow up, and 78 (49.1%) patients had recurrent episodes of CVD, with an incidence rate of 75.6 per 1,000 patient-years. The mean age and diabetes duration were 62.5 ± 8.7 and 9.2 ± 6.9 years, respectively. Patients who developed recurrent CVD also exhibited hypertension (P = 0.004), diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.012), higher mean systolic blood pressure (P = 0.006), urinary albumin excretion (P = 0.015), and mean triglyceride level (P = 0.035) than did patients without recurrent CVD. Multivariable Cox hazard regression analysis revealed that definite CAN was significantly associated with an increased risk of recurrent CVD (hazard ratio [HR] 3.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39−6.60; P = 0.005). Definite CAN was an independent predictor for recurrent CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes who had a known prior CVD event. PMID:27741306

  11. An overview of the effect of weight loss on cardiovascular autonomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maser, Raelene E; Lenhard, M James

    2007-08-01

    The prevalence of obesity is rising to epidemic proportions in many countries worldwide. Obesity seriously increases an individual's risk of developing many health problems including diabetes. Diabetes, like obesity, is also in epidemic proportions with 300 million adults predicted to have the disease by 2025. Investigating strategies for the prevention and treatment of obesity and diabetes is vitally important. Autonomic dysfunction is evident in both obesity and diabetes. In persons with diabetes, impaired cardiovascular autonomic activity is characterized by a reduction in parasympathetic tone with a relative increase in sympathetic activity and is specifically associated with a number of clinically significant manifestations including exercise intolerance, intraoperative cardiovascular lability, orthostatic hypotension, silent myocardial ischemia, and increased risk of mortality. In obesity, parasympathetic function is decreased while regional heterogeneity of increased sympathetic activity may occur. Autonomic dysfunction increases cardiovascular workload, hemodynamic stress, serious dysrhythmias, and significant cardiac pathology. Thus, cardiac autonomic imbalance may also be an important link between obesity and increased morbidity and mortality. Beyond the obese and diabetic state, multiple variables associated with these conditions such as insulin, glucose, leptin, adiponectin and free fatty acids have an affect on the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic disturbances, however, appear to be reversible with weight reduction. Since autonomic imbalance is a marker of adverse risk, improvement obtained from weight loss should be beneficial for the health of individuals with obesity and diabetes. This overview will examine the relationship of the autonomic nervous system in obesity and diabetes and explore the effect of weight loss on autonomic function.

  12. Autonomic Modulation by Electrical Stimulation of the Parasympathetic Nervous System: An Emerging Intervention for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Lu, Zhibing; He, Wenbo; Huang, Bing; Jiang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    The cardiac autonomic nervous system has been known to play an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, which increases the parasympathetic activity and suppresses the sympathetic activity, is emerging as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we review the recent literature on autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, including vagus nerve stimulation, transcutaneous auricular vagal stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and ganglionated plexi stimulation, in the treatment of heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias.

  13. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control: effects of posture and autonomic blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, T. J.; Appel, M. L.; Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    We applied system identification to the analysis of fluctuations in heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize quantitatively the physiological mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these variables. We characterized two autonomically mediated coupling mechanisms [the heart rate baroreflex (HR baroreflex) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (ILV-HR)] and two mechanically mediated coupling mechanisms [the blood pressure wavelet generated with each cardiac contraction (circulatory mechanics) and the direct mechanical effects of respiration on blood pressure (ILV-->ABP)]. We evaluated the method in humans studied in the supine and standing postures under control conditions and under conditions of beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic pharmacological blockades. Combined beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade abolished the autonomically mediated couplings while preserving the mechanically mediated coupling. Selective autonomic blockade and postural changes also altered the couplings in a manner consistent with known physiological mechanisms. System identification is an "inverse-modeling" technique that provides a means for creating a closed-loop model of cardiovascular regulation for an individual subject without altering the underlying physiological control mechanisms.

  14. Pilot Investigation of PTSD, Autonomic Reactivity, and Cardiovascular Health in Physically Healthy Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Ashley N.; Aupperle, Robin L.; Sisante, Jason-Flor V.; Wilson, David R.; Billinger, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and combat-related PTSD in particular, has been associated with increased rates of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular-related death. However, less research has examined possible factors that may link PTSD to poorer cardiovascular health in combat veteran populations. The current pilot study investigated whether psychological symptomology and autonomic reactivity to emotional scripts would relate to poorer cardiovascular health in combat veterans without a current diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Male veterans (N = 24), who served in combat since Operation Iraqi Freedom, completed a semi-structured interview and self-report measures to assess psychological symptomology. Autonomic reactivity, measured using heart rate variability (HRV; low to high frequency ratio), was obtained during script-driven imagery of emotional memories. Cardiovascular health was assessed using flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Correlational analyses and discriminant analysis were used to assess the relationship between psychological symptoms (PTSD, depression, anger, as measured via self-report), autonomic reactivity to emotional scripts (HRV), and FMD. Overall, veterans in the current study showed poor cardiovascular health despite their relatively young age and lack of behavioral risk factors, with 15/24 exhibiting impaired FMD (FMD < 5%). Psychological symptomology was not associated with FMD; whereas autonomic reactivity to emotional (compared to neutral) scripts was found to relate to FMD. Autonomic reactivity to negative scripts correctly classified 76.5% of veterans as having impaired versus normative FMD. Results from this pilot study highlight the importance of cardiovascular screening with combat veterans despite psychological diagnosis. Results also support the need for longitudinal research assessing the use of autonomic reactivity to emotionally valenced stimuli as a potential risk factor for poorer

  15. Autonomic dysfunction in diabetes : a consequence of cardiovascular damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefrandt, J D; Smit, A J; Zeebregts, C J; Gans, R O B; Hoogenberg, K H

    2010-01-01

    In 1976, D.J. Ewing showed a clear survival disadvantage for diabetic patients that had 'diabetic autonomic neuropathy', as assessed by heart rate and blood pressure variations during a battery of bedside tests. However, these variations do not solely depend on autonomic nervous system function, but

  16. [Cardiovascular manifestations of human toxocariasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolívar-Mejía, Adrián; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto E; Delgado, Olinda

    2013-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a parasitic infection produced by helminths that cannot reach their adult stage in humans. For their etiological species (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), man is a paratenic host. Infection by such helminths can produce a variety of clinical manifestations, such as: visceral larvae migrans syndrome, ocular larvae migrans syndrome and covert toxocariasis. In the visceral larvae migrans syndrome, the organs that are mainly involved include liver, lungs, skin, nervous system, muscles, kidneys and the heart. Regarding the latter, the importance of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, as well as its clinical relevance, has increasingly begun to be recognized. The current article is based on a systematic information search, focused mainly on the clinical and pathological aspects of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, including its pathophysiology, laboratory findings, diagnosis and therapeutical options, with the objective of highlighting its importance as a zoonosis and its relevance to the fields of cardiovascular medicine in adults and children.

  17. Oligodendroglial alpha-synucleinopathy and MSA-like cardiovascular autonomic failure: experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzdas, Daniela; Stemberger, Sylvia; Gaburro, Stefano; Stefanova, Nadia; Singewald, Nicolas; Wenning, Gregor K

    2013-09-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a fatal, rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease with limited symptomatic treatment options. Discrimination of MSA from other degenerative disorders crucially depends on the presence of early and severe cardiovascular autonomic failure (CAF). We have previously shown that neuropathologic lesions in the central autonomic nuclei similar to the human disease are present in transgenic MSA mice generated by targeted oligodendroglial overexpression of α-syn using the PLP promoter. We here explore whether such lesions result in abnormalities of heart rate variability (HRV) and circadian rhythmicity which are typically impaired in MSA patients. HRV analysis was performed in five month old transgenic PLP-α-syn (tg) MSA mice and age-matched wild type controls. Decreased HRV and alterations in the circadian rhythmicity were detected in the tg MSA group. The number of choline-acetyltransferase-immunoreactive neurons in the nucleus ambiguus was significantly decreased in the tg group, whereas the levels of arginine-vasopressin neurons in the suprachiasmatic and paraventricular nucleus were not affected. Our finding of impaired HRV and circadian rhythmicity in tg MSA mice associated with degeneration of the nucleus ambiguus suggests that a cardinal non-motor feature of human MSA can be reproduced in the mouse model strengthening its role as a valuable testbed for studying selective vulnerability and assessing translational therapies.

  18. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction due to diabetes mellitus: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... form of diabetes autonomic neuropathy, causes abnormalities in heart rate control as ... peripheral vascular dynamics, and may carry an increased risk of mortality. ... The clinical manifestations of CAN include exercise intolerance, orthostatic ...

  19. Metabolic and cardiovascular responses to epinephrine in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Richter, E; Madsbad, S

    1987-01-01

    . To study these responses, we administered epinephrine in a graded intravenous infusion (0.5 to 5 micrograms per minute) to seven diabetic patients without neuropathy, seven diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy, and seven normal subjects. Mean arterial pressure decreased significantly in the patients...... with autonomic neuropathy than in the other groups (P less than 0.05). These findings indicate that several beta-receptor-mediated responses to epinephrine are enhanced in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated.......Norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction, which is mediated by alpha-adrenergic receptors, is accentuated in patients with autonomic neuropathy. In contrast, responses mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors, including vasodilatation and metabolic changes, have not been evaluated in these patients...

  20. The impact of rotigotine on cardiovascular autonomic function in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, Camilla; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Pisani, Valerio; Marfia, Girolama Alessandra; Di Giorgio, Alessandra; Stanzione, Paolo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Stefani, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Dysautonomia can occur in early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) influencing tolerance to dopaminergic therapies. Rotigotine, a non-ergot dopamine agonist, has recently been developed as an effective alternative antiparkinsonian drug, but its influence on the autonomic nervous system was not investigated. Twenty subjects out of 34 consecutive de novo PD patients were submitted to full assessment of cardiovascular autonomic function before and after reaching a stable rotigotine regimen [6 mg/24 h (n = 3) or 8 mg/24 h (n = 17)]. Patients reached significant clinical improvement (-27% on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III) and did not show significant differences in cardiovascular tests compared to baseline data. However, an unexpected trend towards increasing systolic blood pressure after head-up tilt test was detected. Our study demonstrates that rotigotine does not influence cardiovascular autonomic responses in early de novo PD patients. Consequently, it may represent a well-tolerated and efficacious therapeutic option in newly diagnosed PD subjects.

  1. Effects of taurine on cardiovascular and autonomic nervous functions in cold exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Ito, Koichi; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to cold temperature might affect on cardiovascular and autonomic nervous function. Although there are a lot of studies on physiological and pathophysiological responses of taurine, it was poorly understood the effects of taurine on cardiovascular and autonomic nervous function during cold circumstances. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to clarify the possible role of taurine on cardiovascular and autonomic nervous function in rats exposed to cold temperature. For this purpose, heart rate, blood pressure and locomotive activity were recorded from conscious and unrestrained rats using a telemetry system. Moreover, the autonomic nervous function was investigated by power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. After the recovery period of implantation of transmitter, 1% taurine was supplied during experimental period ad libitum. After the 7 days control period, both taurine administrated and control groups of rats were exposed a cold temperature. There were no differences in heart rate, blood pressure and locomotive activity between taurine and control groups before cold exposure. However, parasympathetic nervous function was somewhat predominant in taurine group. Heart rate and blood pressure in both groups increased greatly by cold exposure. Heart rate in taurine group was much higher than that in control group. LF and HF powers were decreased by cold exposure in both groups. Although no differences were observed in LF, decrease of HF in taurine group was greater than that in control group. These results suggested that taurine might provide some reservoir for cardiovascular and autonomic nervous function to cold stress in rats.

  2. Absence of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and vagal pancreatic impairment in idiopathic achalasia of the oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreros, B; Ascaso, J F; Mora, F; Costa, A J; Sanchiz, V; Minguez, M; Benages, A

    2007-08-01

    Extra-oesophageal autonomic dysfunction in idiopathic achalasia is not well documented, due to contradictory results reported. We aimed to study the cardiovascular and pancreatic autonomic function in patients with idiopathic achalasia. Thirty patients with idiopathic achalasia (16M/14F; 34.5 +/- 10.8 years) and 30 healthy volunteers (13M/17F; 34.8 +/- 10.7 years) were prospectively studied. Age >60 years and conditions affecting results of autonomic evaluation were excluded. Both groups underwent the sham feeding test and plasmatic levels of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) were determined by radioimmunoassay (basal, at 5, 10, 20 and 30 min). Cardiovascular parasympathetic (deep breathing, standing, Valsalva) and sympathetic function (postural decrease of systolic blood pressure, Handgrip test) were assessed. Statistical comparison of basal and increase levels of PP and parasympathetic/sympathetic cardiovascular parameters was performed between groups. Basal levels of PP were similar in controls and patients and maximum increase of PP during sham feeding test. A similar rate of abnormal cardiovascular tests was found between groups (P > 0.05). E/I ratio was the mostly impaired parameter (patients: 36.7% vs controls: 20%, P = 0.15, chi-squared test). Autonomic cardiovascular tests and pancreatic response to vagal stimulus are not impaired in patients with primary achalasia of the oesophagus.

  3. Methods of investigation for cardiac autonomic dysfunction in human research studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardi, Luciano; Spallone, Vincenza; Stevens, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This consensus document provides evidence-based guidelines regarding the evaluation of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) for human research studies as a result of the work of the CAN Subcommittee of the Toronto Diabetic Neuropathy Expert Group. The CAN subcommittee critically......, for studying the pathophysiology of CAN and new therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  4. The role of the autonomic nervous system in diabetes and cardiovascular disease: an epidemiological approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hillebrand, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to study the role of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function in the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease using an epidemiological approach. Based on earlier studies it has remained unclear whether impaired ANS function is a risk factor for the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, or merely a consequence of pre-existing disease. The main conclusions of this thesis are that excess body fat, in particular visceral fat, is associa...

  5. Cardiovascular and autonomic response induced by a 20-week ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was a significant decrease in total peripheral resistance and ascending aorta ... and autonomic effects of habitual exercise in young healthy African subjects. ... African National Defence Force (SANDF) were included in the ... includes upper and lower body strength, endurance and .... Statistical analysis. As many of ...

  6. Cardiovascular and autonomic response induced by a 20-week ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies investigating the relationship between exercise and haemodynamic ... Significant (p<0.05) cardiovascular changes included an increase in aerobic capacity ... ejection fraction, and a decrease in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate.

  7. Amplifying human ability through autonomics and machine learning in IMPACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzieciuch, Iryna; Reeder, John; Gutzwiller, Robert; Gustafson, Eric; Coronado, Braulio; Martinez, Luis; Croft, Bryan; Lange, Douglas S.

    2017-05-01

    Amplifying human ability for controlling complex environments featuring autonomous units can be aided by learned models of human and system performance. In developing a command and control system that allows a small number of people to control a large number of autonomous teams, we employ an autonomics framework to manage the networks that represent mission plans and the networks that are composed of human controllers and their autonomous assistants. Machine learning allows us to build models of human and system performance useful for monitoring plans and managing human attention and task loads. Machine learning also aids in the development of tactics that human supervisors can successfully monitor through the command and control system.

  8. Human and equine cardiovascular endocrinology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vekens, Nicky Van Der; Hunter, Ingrid; Gøtze, Jens Peter

    2013-01-01

    important species differences, which can partly be explained by variations in physiology or pathophysiology. Most important are physiological differences in heart rate, cardiovascular response to exercise, food and water intake, and molecular elimination in plasma. Pathological differences are even more...... prominent. In humans, troponins and natriuretic peptides are mostly used for the diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes and heart failure. These cardiac entities, however, are rare in horses. In this species, cardiac biomarkers are rather proposed for the assessment of valvular or myocardial disease...

  9. Cardiovascular autonomic function tests in type 2 diabetes mellitus with micro albuminuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhavana S.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in type2 diabetes (DM. Microalbuminuria (MAis strongly associated with cardiovascular complications in type2 diabetes. Impaired cardiovascular autonomicfunction and increased albumin excretion are related in patients with diabetes. So this study is designed toinvestigate the relationship between cardiovascular autonomic function and microalbuminuria in type2 diabetes.Methods: The study comprised of 180 subjects of age group>50 years, classified into 3 groups of 60 subjects each.DM without MA, DM with MA and controls. The tests performed were 1 Heart rate response to deep breathing,valsalva maneuver and standing; 2 Blood pressure response to standing and to sustained handgrip. Individual testswere given score of 0, 1, or 2 and an overall autonomic test score of 0-10 was obtained.Results: Mean autonomic score in control, DM without MA and DM with MA are 1.97 ± 0.81, 5.73 ± 1.26 and 7.00± 1.80 respectively. The Coefficient of variation (% of control, DM without MA, DM with MA is 41.1, 21.9 and25.7 respectively. A significant difference in autonomic score was observed in the DM without MA (P<0.01 andDM with MA (P<0.01 when compared to controls.Conclusion: In conclusion type2 diabetic individuals should be diagnosed early to prevent disease progression tomicroalbuminuria and thus minimize complications.

  10. The role of the autonomic nervous system in diabetes and cardiovascular disease : an epidemiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrand, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to study the role of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function in the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease using an epidemiological approach. Based on earlier studies it has remained unclear whether impaired ANS function is a risk factor for the

  11. The role of the autonomic nervous system in diabetes and cardiovascular disease : an epidemiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrand, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to study the role of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function in the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease using an epidemiological approach. Based on earlier studies it has remained unclear whether impaired ANS function is a risk factor for the deve

  12. Cardiovascular and autonomic modulation by the central nervous system after aerobic exercise training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Martins-Pinge

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system plays a key role in maintaining homeostasis under normal and pathological conditions. The sympathetic tone, particularly for the cardiovascular system, is generated by sympathetic discharges originating in specific areas of the brainstem. Aerobic exercise training promotes several cardiovascular adjustments that are influenced by the central areas involved in the output of the autonomic nervous system. In this review, we emphasize the studies that investigate aerobic exercise training protocols to identify the cardiovascular adaptations that may be the result of central nervous system plasticity due to chronic exercise. The focus of our study is on some groups of neurons involved in sympathetic regulation. They include the nucleus tractus solitarii, caudal ventrolateral medulla and the rostral ventrolateral medulla that maintain and regulate the cardiac and vascular autonomic tonus. We also discuss studies that demonstrate the involvement of supramedullary areas in exercise training modulation, with emphasis on the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, an important area of integration for autonomic and neuroendocrine responses. The results of these studies suggest that the beneficial effects of physical activity may be due, at least in part, to reductions in sympathetic nervous system activity. Conversely, with the recent association of physical inactivity with chronic disease, these data may also suggest that increases in sympathetic nervous system activity contribute to the increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases associated with a sedentary lifestyle.

  13. Cardiovascular autonomous dysfunction in diabetics: The influence of disease duration, glycoregulation degree and diabetes type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković Vladan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Cardiovascular autonomous neuropathy (CAN in diabetes has not been still defined clinically and aetiopathogenetically. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to determine the influence of disease duration, glycoregulation degree and diabetes type on damage of the cardiovascular part of the autonomous nervous system in our group of patients. METHOD This study included diabetics, (100 patients the same number of patients with diabetes type I and II as well as 20 healthy individuals in the control group. Classic Ewing's cardiovascular tests were used for CAN diagnosis: 1. the cardiovascular response to Valsalva manoeuvre, 2. the cardiovascular response to deep breathing (the so-called E/I ratio, 3. the cardiovascular response to rising (the so-called 30/15 ratio, 4. the test of orthostatic hypotension and 5. the TA response to handgrip. It has been arbitrarily taken that patients, whose score of 'parasympathetic' tests (Valsalva manoeuvre, E/I ratio, 30/15 is equal or bigger than 1.5 (out of possible 3, have damage of the parasympathetic part of the autonomous nervous system while patients, whose score of 'sympathetic tests' (the test of orthostatic hypotension and TA response to hand-grip is equal or bigger than 1 (out of possible 2, have damage of the sympathetic part of the autonomous nervous system. The patients whose total score is equal or bigger than 2 have cardiovascular autonomous neuropathy. The glycoregulation degree is determined by the level of HbA1c. RESULTS There is a statistically significant, positive correlation between the values of the parasympathetic score and disease duration as well as between the total score, that is, CAN and disease duration. The connection between the sympathetic score, that is, damage of the sympathetic part of the autonomous nervous system and disease duration has not been observed. There is a positive correlation between the values of the parasympathetic score and HbA1c. The same pattern

  14. Role of interleukin-6 levels in cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Tetsuji; Takahashi, Naohiko; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Hara, Masahide; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu [Oita University, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Faculty of Medicine, Yuhu, Oita (Japan); Yufu, Kunio; Anan, Futoshi; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Saikawa, Tetsunori [Oita University, Department of Cardiovascular Science, Oita (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    Increased serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is associated with high mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. However, the relationship between IL-6 levels and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether serum IL-6 levels are associated with cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients. Eighty type 2 diabetic patients who did not have organic heart disease were categorized into a high IL-6 group (>2.5 pg/ml, n= 0, age 59{+-}12 years) or a non-high IL-6 group (<2.5 pg/ml, n=40, 61{+-}12 years). Cardiac autonomic function was assessed by baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate variability, plasma norepinephrine concentrations and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. The body mass index values (BMI), fasting insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment index values were higher in the high IL-6 group than in the non-high IL-6 group (p<0.01). Early and delayed {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial uptake values were lower (p<0.01), and the percent washout rate of {sup 123}I-MIBG was higher (p<0.05) in the high IL-6 group than in the non-high IL-6 group. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis revealed that the IL-6 level was independently predicted by the BMI and the myocardial uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG during the delayed phase. The results indicate that elevated IL-6 levels are associated with depressed cardiovascular autonomic function and obesity in type 2 diabetic patients. (orig.)

  15. The role of autonomic cardiovascular neuropathy in pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović-Pejičić Snježana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetes is strongly associated with macrovascular complications, among which ischemic heart disease is the major cause of mortality. Autonomic neuropathy increases the risk of complications, which calls for an early diagnosis. The aim of this study was to determine both presence and extent of cardiac autonomic neuropathy, in regard to the type of diabetes mellitus, as well as its correlation with coronary disease and major cardiovascular risk factors. Material and methods. We have examined 90 subjects, classified into three groups, with 30 patients each: those with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and control group of healthy subjects. All patients underwent cardiovascular tests (Valsalva maneuver, deep breathing test, response to standing, blood pressure response to standing sustained, handgrip test, electrocardiogram, treadmill exercise test and filled out a questionnaire referring to major cardiovascular risk factors: smoking, obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Results. Our results showed that cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was more frequent in type 2 diabetes, manifesting as autonomic neuropathy. In patients with autonomic neuropathy, regardless of the type of diabetes, the treadmill test was positive, i.e. strongly correlating with coronary disease. In regard to coronary disease risk factors, the most frequent correlation was found for obesity and hypertension. Discussion Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is considered to be the principal cause of arteriosclerosis and coronary disease. Our results showed that the occurrence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy increases the risk of coronary disease due to dysfunction of autonomic nervous system. Conclusions. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that significantly correlates with coronary disease. Early diagnosis of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy points to increased cardiovascular risk, providing a basis for preventive

  16. Autonomic and inflammatory consequences of posttraumatic stress disorder and the link to cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudey, Chevelle; Park, Jeanie; Wiaderkiewicz, Jan; Kobayashi, Ihori; Mellman, Thomas A; Marvar, Paul J

    2015-08-15

    Stress- and anxiety-related disorders are on the rise in both military and general populations. Over the next decade, it is predicted that treatment of these conditions, in particular, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), along with its associated long-term comorbidities, will challenge the health care system. Multiple organ systems are adversely affected by PTSD, and PTSD is linked to cancer, arthritis, digestive disease, and cardiovascular disease. Evidence for a strong link between PTSD and cardiovascular disease is compelling, and this review describes current clinical data linking PTSD to cardiovascular disease, via inflammation, autonomic dysfunction, and the renin-angiotensin system. Recent clinical and preclinical evidence regarding the role of the renin-angiotensin system in the extinction of fear memory and relevance in PTSD-related immune and autonomic dysfunction is also addressed.

  17. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control mechanisms: diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Mullen, T. J.; Cohen, R. J.; Freeman, R.

    1999-01-01

    We applied cardiovascular system identification (CSI) to characterize closed-loop cardiovascular regulation in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). The CSI method quantitatively analyzes beat-to-beat fluctuations in noninvasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize four physiological coupling mechanisms, two of which are autonomically mediated (the heart rate baroreflex and the coupling of respiration, measured in terms of ILV, to heart rate) and two of which are mechanically mediated (the coupling of ventricular contraction to the generation of the ABP wavelet and the coupling of respiration to ABP). We studied 37 control and 60 diabetic subjects who were classified as having minimal, moderate, or severe DAN on the basis of standard autonomic tests. The autonomically mediated couplings progressively decreased with increasing severity of DAN, whereas the mechanically mediated couplings were essentially unchanged. CSI identified differences between the minimal DAN and control groups, which were indistinguishable based on the standard autonomic tests. CSI may provide a powerful tool for assessing DAN.

  18. Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy Is Associated With Macrovascular Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jesper; Yderstraede, Knud; Gulichsen, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to identify the presence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in a cohort of individuals with diabetes in outpatient clinics from 4 different parts of Denmark and to explore the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes in relation to CAN. The DAN-Study is a Danish...... multicenter study focusing on diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Over a period of 12 months, 382 type 1 and 271 type 2 individuals with diabetes were tested for CAN. Patients were randomly recruited and tested during normal visits to outpatient clinics at 4 Danish hospitals. The presence of CAN was quantified......, whereas in type 2 CAN was associated with macrovascular risk factors....

  19. Cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses to graded exercise in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Galbo, H; Christensen, N J

    1980-01-01

    Thirteen juvenile diabetics were studied in order to determine if decreased beat-to-beat variation during deep respiration, indicating abnormal autonomic nerve function, imply that cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses are impaired. Patients with decreased beat-to-beat variation had to...... to be more heavily stressed during exercise to reach a certain heart rate or catecholamine level. The relation between other metabolic and hormonal response is discussed....

  20. Effects of various Prāṇāyāma on cardiovascular and autonomic variables

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    L Nivethitha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular functions are controlled by neural factors, temperature, hormones, etc., Of these, neural factors primarily concern the autonomic nervous system, which plays a major role in maintaining and regulating cardiac functions, e.g., blood pressure and heart rate. Prāṇāyāma is one of the most important yogic practices. There are various review articles on Yoga and its effects but, though Prāṇāyāma is a part of yoga, there is lack of review articles. To the best of our knowledge there is no known review article on effect of various Prāṇāyāma on cardiovascular and autonomic variables. To provide a general overview about the effect of various prāṇāyāma (breathing techniques on cardiovascular and autonomic variables. A narrative review was performed based on the available scientific literature. An electronic data search was performed in Medline/PubMed database to review relevant articles, using keywords such as “Prāṇāyāma, Yogic breathing techniques, Unilateral nostril breathing, Alternate nostril breathing, Kapalbhati, Bhastrika and Bhramari Pranayama”. All the relevant articles published from 1988 to 06-04-2016 were included in this review. Slow type of yogic breathing technique was reported to produce beneficial effect on cardiovascular and autonomic variables while fast breathing techniques do not produce such effects. There is lack of consistency in the results of specific nostril yogic breathing techniques and the mechanisms behind the effects of various prāṇāyāma. This review suggests that different types of Prāṇāyāma techniques produce different effects and the mechanisms behind these effects are not fully understood.

  1. Evidence of defective cardiovascular regulation in insulin-dependent diabetic patients without clinical autonomic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, P J; James, M A; Panerai, R B; McNally, P G; Potter, J F; Thurston, H

    1998-12-01

    (1) Autonomic dysfunction is a well recognised complication of diabetes mellitus and early detection may allow therapeutic manoeuvres to reduce the associated mortality and morbidity. We sought to identify early cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy using spectral analysis of heart rate and systolic blood pressure variability. (2) Thirty patients with Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (DM) and 30 matched control subjects were studied. In addition to standard tests of autonomic function, heart rate and systolic blood pressure variability were assessed using power spectral analysis. From the frequency domain analysis of systolic blood pressure and R-R interval, the overall gain of baroreflex mechanisms was assessed. (3) Standard tests of autonomic function were normal in both groups. Total spectral power of R-R interval was reduced in the Type 1 DM group for low-frequency (473 +/- 63 vs. 747 +/- 78 ms2, mean +/- S.E.M., P = 0.002) and high-frequency bands (125 +/- 13 vs. 459+/-90 ms2, P standing (2.9+/-0.9 vs. 7.18+/-1.9 ms/mmHg, P < 0.001). (4) Spectral analysis of cardiovascular variability detects autonomic dysfunction more frequently in Type 1 DM patients than conventional tests, and is suggestive of an abnormality of parasympathetic function. The abnormality of baroreceptor-cardiac reflex sensitivity could be explained by this impairment of parasympathetic function and this may predispose to the development of hypertension and increase the risk of sudden cardiac death. Using spectral analysis methods may allow detection of early diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy and allow therapeutic intervention to slow the progression.

  2. Role of autonomic reflex arcs in cardiovascular responses to air pollution exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Christina M; Hazari, Mehdi S; Farraj, Aimen K

    2015-01-01

    The body responds to environmental stressors by triggering autonomic reflexes in the pulmonary receptors, baroreceptors, and chemoreceptors to maintain homeostasis. Numerous studies have shown that exposure to various gases and airborne particles can alter the functional outcome of these reflexes, particularly with respect to the cardiovascular system. Modulation of autonomic neural input to the heart and vasculature following direct activation of sensory nerves in the respiratory system, elicitation of oxidative stress and inflammation, or through other mechanisms is one of the primary ways that exposure to air pollution affects normal cardiovascular function. Any homeostatic process that utilizes the autonomic nervous system to regulate organ function might be affected. Thus, air pollution and other inhaled environmental irritants have the potential to alter both local airway function and baro- and chemoreflex responses, which modulate autonomic control of blood pressure and detect concentrations of key gases in the body. While each of these reflex pathways causes distinct responses, the systems are heavily integrated and communicate through overlapping regions of the brainstem to cause global effects. This short review summarizes the function of major pulmonary sensory receptors, baroreceptors, and carotid body chemoreceptors and discusses the impacts of air pollution exposure on these systems.

  3. Short-Term Effects of Isotonic Handgrip Exercise on Cardiovascular Autonomic Reactivity in Healthy Young Adolescents

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    Nileshkumar H Patel, Hasmukh D Shah, Wasim A Shaikh, Sushil K Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Background: Exercise is a potent stimulus for sympathetic nervous system activation. But the compliance of people for routine form of exercise for BP control has not been very encouraging. Objective of the study was to determine the short-term effects of isotonic handgrip exercise on cardiovascular autonomic reactivity in healthy adolescents and to find a user friendly exercise which help in reducing blood pressure. Method and Materials: Present study was conducted on 50 young healthy adolescents in the age group of 17–19 years. Isotonic handgrip exercise was performed for 20 minutes at the rate 12 contractions per minute (2 sec contraction/3 sec relaxation at an intensity of 30%MVC using Ball-Squeeze Dynamometer. Vascular sympathetic reactivity and cardiac parasympathetic reactivity were tested at baseline and during recovery period (Immediate- post-exercise and 1 hour–post-exercise. Result: There were no changes in the parameters (Expiration: Inspiration ratio and Valsalva Ratio measuring parasympathetic reactivity. Sympathetic reactivity as evaluated by diastolic blood pressure responses to isometric handgrip test (HGT and cold pressor test (CPT showed no significant decreases. No significant difference was observed in cardiovascular autonomic reactivity during immediate and 1 hr post-exercise recovery in both boys and girls. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the exercise regime under consideration could not produce any short-term beneficial effects with respect to cardiovascular autonomic reactivity."

  4. A STUDY OF CARDIOVASCULAR AUTONOMIC DYSFUNCTION IN ASTHMATIC PATIENTS AND DETERMINE ITS CORRELATION WITH SEVERITY

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    Virendra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Bronchial asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting people of all ages. It is manifested physiologically by a wide spread narrowing of the air passages , which may be relieved spontaneously or as a result of therapy and clinically by paroxysms of dyspnea , cough and wheezing. Airways are richly innervated by autonomic nervous system which plays a part in the control and their secretion. They regulate many aspects of airw ays’ physiology such as smooth muscle , mucus secretions , blood flow , micro vascular permeability and the migration and release of inflammatory cells. These effects are due to the release of neurotransmitters from autonomic nerves. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The present work was undertaken in 50 cases of bronchial asthma attending medical OPD and indoor and they were randomly selected without any bias of age and sex. Criteria for grading of severity of asthma were determined by clinical & Peak expiratory Flow Rat e [PEFR]. A complete general and systemic examination was carried out and they were specifically examined in detail for signs of autonomic dysfunction employing the standard “Ewing - Clarke” battery of five tests for cardiovascular autonomic functions. Three tests were used for parasympathetic function - 1.Heart rate response to Valsalva maneuver 2. Heart rate variation during deep breathing 3. Immediate Heart rate response to standing . And two tests were used for sympathetic function - 1. Blood pressure respon se to standing 2.Blood pressure response to sustained handgrip . OBSERVATIONS: In the present study , 32 patients (64% were tested positive for autonomic dysfunction out of 50 cases. Maximum number of cases 17(94.44% out of 18 with autonomic dysfunction had severe asthma. 15(46.87% out of 32 cases with autonomic dysfunction had mild - moderate asthma. Thus there was an increase in autonomic dysfunction with increased severity of asthma (p<0.001 highly significant. CONCLUSION

  5. A STUDY ON CARDIOVASCULAR AUTONOMIC FUNCTIONS IN CAREGIVERS OF STROKE PATIENTS

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    Ghouse Mubarak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stroke (cerebrovascular accident is an important cause of disability in countries like India and longterm care of these bedridden patients is usually undertaken by the family members. A caregiver is a person who takes responsibility for those who cannot completely care for themselves. Taking care of a chronically ill member in the family usually causes stress to the caregiver causing disturbances in the autonomic function. Thus, the present study is undertaken to find out the effect of longterm caregiving on cardiovascular autonomic functions in a caregiver. MATERIALS AND METHODS 57 caregivers of post-stroke bedridden patients, both male and female, were included in this longitudinal study. Parasympathetic activity was assessed by observing the heart rate changes to immediate standing from lying down position, heart rate changes during deep breathing and heart rate changes during Valsalva manoeuvre. Sympathetic activity was assessed by observing blood pressure changes on immediate standing from lying down position and blood pressure changes during sustained hand grip. RESULTS The results of the present study showed statistically significant decrease in Valsalva ratio, decrease in the heart rate following deep breathing and statistically significant increase in systolic blood pressure in response to immediate standing suggestive of autonomic imbalance. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that longterm caregiving is accompanied by dysfunction of the cardiac autonomic nervous system, and these individuals are more prone to autonomic neuropathy.

  6. Chronic Treatment with Ivabradine Does Not Affect Cardiovascular Autonomic Control in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fernanda C; Paiva, Franciny A; Müller-Ribeiro, Flávia C; Caldeira, Henrique M A; Fontes, Marco A P; de Menezes, Rodrigo C A; Casali, Karina R; Fortes, Gláucia H; Tobaldini, Eleonora; Solbiati, Monica; Montano, Nicola; Dias Da Silva, Valdo J; Chianca, Deoclécio A

    2016-01-01

    A low resting heart rate (HR) would be of great benefit in cardiovascular diseases. Ivabradine-a novel selective inhibitor of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels- has emerged as a promising HR lowering drug. Its effects on the autonomic HR control are little known. This study assessed the effects of chronic treatment with ivabradine on the modulatory, reflex and tonic cardiovascular autonomic control and on the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Male Wistar rats were divided in 2 groups, receiving intraperitoneal injections of vehicle (VEH) or ivabradine (IVA) during 7 or 8 consecutive days. Rats were submitted to vessels cannulation to perform arterial blood pressure (AP) and HR recordings in freely moving rats. Time series of resting pulse interval and systolic AP were used to measure cardiovascular variability parameters. We also assessed the baroreflex, chemoreflex and the Bezold-Jarish reflex sensitivities. To better evaluate the effects of ivabradine on the autonomic control of the heart, we performed sympathetic and vagal autonomic blockade. As expected, ivabradine-treated rats showed a lower resting (VEH: 362 ± 16 bpm vs. IVA: 260 ± 14 bpm, p = 0.0005) and intrinsic HR (VEH: 369 ± 9 bpm vs. IVA: 326 ± 11 bpm, p = 0.0146). However, the chronic treatment with ivabradine did not change normalized HR spectral parameters LF (nu) (VEH: 24.2 ± 4.6 vs. IVA: 29.8 ± 6.4; p > 0.05); HF (nu) (VEH: 75.1 ± 3.7 vs. IVA: 69.2 ± 5.8; p > 0.05), any cardiovascular reflexes, neither the tonic autonomic control of the HR (tonic sympathovagal index; VEH: 0.91± 0.02 vs. IVA: 0.88 ± 0.03, p = 0.3494). We performed the AP, HR and RSNA recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats. The chronic treatment with ivabradine reduced the resting HR (VEH: 364 ± 12 bpm vs. IVA: 207 ± 11 bpm, p ivabradine directly reduces the HR without changing the RSNA modulation and the reflex and tonic autonomic control of the heart.

  7. Chronic treatment with ivabradine does not affect cardiovascular autonomic control in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C. Silva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A low resting heart rate (HR would be of great benefit in cardiovascular diseases. Ivabradine – a novel selective inhibitor of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN channels– has emerged as a promising HR lowering drug. Its effects on the autonomic HR control are little known. This study assessed the effects of chronic treatment with ivabradine on the modulatory, reflex and tonic cardiovascular autonomic control and on the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA. Male Wistar rats were divided in 2 groups, receiving intraperitoneal injections of vehicle (VEH or ivabradine (IVA during 7 or 8 consecutive days. Rats were submitted to vessels cannulation to perform arterial blood pressure (AP and HR recordings in freely moving rats. Time series of resting pulse interval and systolic AP were used to measure cardiovascular variability parameters. We also assessed the baroreflex, chemoreflex and the Bezold-Jarish reflex sensitivities. To better evaluate the effects of ivabradine on the autonomic control of the heart, we performed sympathetic and vagal autonomic blockade. As expected, ivabradine-treated rats showed a lower resting (VEH: 362 ± 16 bpm vs. IVA: 260 ± 14 bpm, p=0.0005 and intrinsic HR (VEH: 369 ± 9 bpm vs. IVA: 326 ± 11bpm, p=0.0146. However, the chronic treatment with ivabradine did not change normalized HR spectral parameters LF (nu (VEH: 24.2 ± 4.6 vs. IVA: 29.8 ± 6.4; p>0.05; HF (nu (VEH: 75.1 ± 3.7 vs. IVA: 69.2 ± 5.8; p>0.05, any cardiovascular reflexes, neither the tonic autonomic control of the HR (sympathovagal index; VEH: 0.91± 0.02 vs. IVA: 0.88 ± 0.03, p=0.3494. We performed the AP, HR and RSNA recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats. The chronic treatment with ivabradine reduced the resting HR (VEH: 364 ± 12 bpm vs. IVA: 207 ± 11 bpm, p<0.0001, without affecting RSNA (VEH: 117 ± 16 vs. IVA: 120 ± 9 spikes/sec, p=0.9100 and mean arterial pressure (VEH: 70 ± 4 vs. IVA: 77 ± 6 mmHg, p=0

  8. Autonomic Imbalance as a Predictor of Metabolic Risks, Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulsin, Lawson R; Horn, Paul S; Perry, Jennifer L; Massaro, Joseph M; D'Agostino, Ralph B

    2015-06-01

    Identifying novel early predictors of metabolic disorders is essential to improving effective primary prevention. The objectives were to examine the contribution of two measures of autonomic imbalance, resting heart rate (RHR) and heart rate variability (HRV), on the development of five metabolic risk outcomes, and on cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and early mortality. This study was a secondary analysis of prospective data from Offspring Cohort participants (N = 1882) in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS). Participants at FHS Exam 3 (1983-1987) with 1) age years 18 or older, and 2) data on RHR, HRV, and five measures of metabolic risk (blood pressure, fasting glucose, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, and body mass index [BMI]) at three follow-up visits over 12 years. We conducted a backward elimination variable selection procedure on a logistic regression model, using baseline RHR, HRV, age, sex, and smoking status to predict the odds of developing a specific metabolic risk. Measures included hyperglycemia, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and high BMI over 12 years; incident diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and early mortality over 20 years. RHR and HRV, along with sex, age, and smoking were significant predictors of high blood pressure, hyperglycemia, and a diagnosis of diabetes within 12 years. RHR and HRV also predicted the development of cardiovascular disease and early mortality for most of the sample. In this community sample two measures of autonomic imbalance predicted multiple poor metabolic outcomes and mortality, making autonomic imbalance a potentially worthy target for intervention studies to reduce risks for cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, and early death.

  9. Executive Cognitive Functioning and Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation in a Population-Based sample of Working Adults

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    Cecilia Ulrika Dagsdotter Stenfors

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Executive cognitive functioning is essential in private and working life and is sensitive to stress and aging. Cardiovascular (CV health factors are related to cognitive decline and dementia, but there is relatively few studies of the role of CV autonomic regulation, a key component in stress responses and risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, and executive processes. An emerging pattern of results from previous studies suggest that different executive processes may be differentially associated with CV autonomic regulationThe aim was thus to study the associations between multiple measures of CV autonomic regulation and measures of different executive cognitive processes. Method: Participants were 119 healthy working adults (79% women, from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. Electrocardiogram was sampled for analysis of heart rate variability measures, including the Standard Deviation of NN, here heart beats (SDNN, root of the mean squares of successive differences (RMSSD, high frequency (HF power band from spectral analyses, and QT variability index (QTVI, a measure of myocardial repolarization patterns. Executive cognitive functioning was measured by 7 neuropsychological tests. The relationships between CV autonomic regulation measures and executive cognitive measures were tested with bivariate and partial correlational analyses, controlling for demographic variables and mental health symptoms.Results: Higher SDNN and RMSSD and lower QTVI were significantly associated with better performance on cognitive tests tapping inhibition, updating, shifting and psychomotor speed. After adjustments for demographic factors however (age being the greatest confounder, only QTVI was clearly associated with these executive tests. No such associations were seen for working memory capacity. Conclusion: Poorer cardiovascular autonomic regulation in terms of lower SDNN & RMSSD and higher QTVI was associated with poorer

  10. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy contributes to sleep apnea in young and lean Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus patients

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    Carolina Castro Porto Silva Janovsky

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is a crescent theme of discussion. In obese patient, it is explained by the excessive central adiposity, including large neck circumference. Its presence in nonobese patients, however, brings back its possible correlation with autonomic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of OSA in young and lean T1DM, with and without cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN. We studied 20 adult, nonobese, type 1 diabetic patients, divided in two groups according to the results of the cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests (CARTs. These two groups (9 with CAN and 11 without CAN were compared to a control group of 22 healthy individuals, matched by age and BMI. A polysomnography was performed and sleep was analyzed. The CAN+ group presented significantly higher prevalence of sleep apnea compared to the other groups (67% CAN+; 23% CAN-; 4,5% controls: CAN+ vs Control; p=0.00017 and CAN+ vs CAN-; p=0.02. As it was expected, the incidence of sleep apnea was correlated with more microarousals during sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness. The CAN- group showed a better sleep efficiency compared to the CAN+ group, demonstrating impaired sleep architecture in diabetics with this chronic complication. In conclusion, sleep apnea could not only be an indication of presence of CAN, but also a contributor to diabetic neuropathy impairment, causing both worse prognosis and reduced quality of life for these patients when not treated.

  11. Oesophageal motility disorders in type 1 diabetes mellitus and their relation to cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascaso, J F; Herreros, B; Sanchiz, V; Lluch, I; Real, J T; Minguez, M; Mora, F; Benages, A

    2006-09-01

    The relationship between cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CVAN) and oesophageal dysfunction in diabetes mellitus has not been well established because reports are contradictory. The aim of this study was to assess oesophageal function and its correlation with CVAN in type 1 diabetic patients without oesophageal symptoms. Forty-six type 1 diabetic patients without oesophageal symptoms (DG) and 34 healthy volunteers (CG) were studied. Both groups underwent CVAN tests and oesophageal manometry and pH-metry. Differences between groups regarding results of cardiovascular autonomic tests and oesophageal studies were statistically analysed. Compared with the CG, the DG group showed insufficient lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) relaxation and a higher percentage of simultaneous waves (P 10%), and the prevalence of simultaneous waves related to the degree of autonomic neuropathy was: 9% of patients without CVAN, 7% of those suspected to have it and 50% of patients with CVAN (P 10%) were the presence of CVAN and duration of diabetes (P < 0.05, logistic regression analysis). Increase in simultaneous waves and impaired relaxation of LOS are more frequent in diabetic patients with CVAN.

  12. EFFECT OF SUKHA PRANAYAMA AND BHASTRIKA PRANAYAMA ON CARDIOVASCULAR AUTONOMIC FUNCTIONS AMONG YOUNG HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS

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    Ghouse

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Practice of Yoga causes several changes in normal physiology. Meditation has positive short and longterm rewards which include a balance of the parasympathetic and sympathetic functions. Cardiovascular autonomic functions are quantified by changes in the heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP in response to some of the physiological stimuli and different types of Pranayamas is known to alter the autonomic function. OBJECTIVES To assess the effects of Sukha Pranayama and Bhastrika Pranayama on cardiovascular autonomic functions in normal healthy medical students. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 male and female young healthy volunteers studying at PES Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Kuppam belonging to age group of 17-22 years were included for the study. Parasympathetic activity was assessed by observing the heart rate changes to immediate standing from lying down position, heart rate changes during deep breathing and heart rate changes during Valsalva manoeuvre using Biopac Student Lab MP30 device. Sympathetic activity was assessed by observing blood pressure changes on immediate standing from lying down position and blood pressure changes during sustained hand grip using sphygmomanometer before and after yoga. RESULTS & CONCLUSION The baseline heart rate and blood pressure response to immediate standing showed a tendency to decrease possibly due to increased vagal tone and decreased sympathetic discharge thereby indicating practice of yogasanas and pranayamas would benefit the young population as it would prepare them in overcoming stress by modulating and optimising sympathetic activities in stressful situations.

  13. Central cardiovascular actions of L-homocysteine microinjected into ventrolateral medullary autonomic areas of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Yumi

    2016-09-01

    Elevated L-homocysteine concentrations in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are related to cardiovascular and neuronal diseases, and could contribute to disease development. However, the central cardiovascular actions of L-homocysteine in two important autonomic regulating areas remain unknown: the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), including pre-sympathetic neurons, and the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM), including interneurons projecting to pre-sympathetic neurons in the RVLM. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to examine the influence of L-homocysteine microinjected into the RVLM and CVLM areas on changes in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate (HR) of anesthetized rats, as well as the influence of ionotropic excitatory amino acid (iEAA) receptors on the central actions of L-homocysteine. L-Homocysteine solutions were microinjected into the RVLM and CVLM, which were defined according to pressor and depressor responses to L-glutamate microinjections, respectively. ABP and HR increased in the RVLM and decreased in the CVLM after microinjection with L-homocysteine, similar to L-glutamate, in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting mediation of EAA receptors. Prior microinjection of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) iEAA receptor antagonist MK801, but not the non-NMDA receptor antagonist CNQX, abolished the observed responses to L-homocysteine in both the RVLM and CVLM. These results indicate the central cardiovascular actions of L-homocysteine via MK801-sensitive receptors of the medullary autonomic neurons in the rat RVLM and CVLM. It remains unknown if the central cardiovascular actions are related to cardiovascular diseases after endogenously and locally augmented L-homocysteine production by disordered metabolism. Further studies on functional significance of L-homocysteine may provide some clue to understand its toxic mechanism.

  14. Mental stress and human cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, Murray

    2017-03-01

    The London physician and neuroanatomist Thomas Willis in the 17th century correctly attributed the source of emotions to the brain, not the heart as believed in antiquity. Contemporary research documents the phenomenon of "triggered" heart disease, when the autonomic nervous system control of the heart by the brain goes awry, producing heart disease of sudden onset, precipitated by acute emotional upheaval. This can take the form of, variously, cardiac arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and sudden death. Chronic psychological distress also can have adverse cardiovascular consequences, in the causal linkage of depressive illness to heart disease, and in the probable causation of atherosclerosis and hypertension by chronic mental stress. In patients with essential hypertension, stress biomarkers are present. The sympathetic nervous system is the usual mediator between these acute and chronic psychological substrates and cardiovascular disease.

  15. Autonomic Circulatory Control during Pregnancy in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with dramatic alterations in maternal hemodynamics, which begin early (i.e., following conception, 4 to 5 weeks of gestation) and are accompanied by changing levels of various pressor hormones and vasoactive metabolites. It has been proposed that these changes occur through autonomic control mechanisms, but the actual role of the autonomic nervous system in pregnancy is poorly understood. New research has shed more light on the links between pregnancy and cardiovascula...

  16. Transcranial Doppler and cardiovascular responses during cardiovascular autonomic tests in migraineurs during and outside attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Boesen, F;

    1995-01-01

    to a head-up tilt test, a cold-pressor test and a Valsalva manoeuvre. The cardiovascular reflexes in response to the Valsalva manoeuvre suggested a mild parasympathetic hypofunction in migraineurs, both those with and those without aura. On the basis of the present results and previous findings by others......, we conclude that mild parasympathetic hypofunctioning with preserved sympathetic functioning is an established finding in migraine both with and without aura....

  17. Autonomic processing of the cardiovascular reflexes in the nucleus tractus solitarii

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    Machado B.H.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS receives afferent projections from the arterial baroreceptors, carotid chemoreceptors and cardiopulmonary receptors and as a function of this information produces autonomic adjustments in order to maintain arterial blood pressure within a narrow range of variation. The activation of each of these cardiovascular afferents produces a specific autonomic response by the excitation of neuronal projections from the NTS to the ventrolateral areas of the medulla (nucleus ambiguus, caudal and rostral ventrolateral medulla. The neurotransmitters at the NTS level as well as the excitatory amino acid (EAA receptors involved in the processing of the autonomic responses in the NTS, although extensively studied, remain to be completely elucidated. In the present review we discuss the role of the EAA L-glutamate and its different receptor subtypes in the processing of the cardiovascular reflexes in the NTS. The data presented in this review related to the neurotransmission in the NTS are based on experimental evidence obtained in our laboratory in unanesthetized rats. The two major conclusions of the present review are that a the excitation of the cardiovagal component by cardiovascular reflex activation (chemo- and Bezold-Jarisch reflexes or by L-glutamate microinjection into the NTS is mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors, and b the sympatho-excitatory component of the chemoreflex and the pressor response to L-glutamate microinjected into the NTS are not affected by an NMDA receptor antagonist, suggesting that the sympatho-excitatory component of these responses is mediated by non-NMDA receptors.

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian S; Jensen, Jan S; Ridderstråle, Martin

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Vitamin B12 deficiency could be associated with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in diabetes patients. We aim to investigate the association between serum levels of vitamin B12 and CAN in type 2 diabetes patients. METHODS: 469 ambulatory type 2 diabetes patients (mean diabetes.......01; 0.43, p=0.038), and a decrease in 5min RHR of 0.25 beats per minute (95% CI -0.47; -0.03, p=0.025). CONCLUSION: Vitamin B12 may be inversely associated with CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes. Confirmatory studies investigating a causal role of vitamin B12 for the development of diabetic CAN...

  19. Executive Cognitive Functioning and Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation in a Population-Based Sample of Working Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfors, Cecilia U. D.; Hanson, Linda M.; Theorell, Töres; Osika, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive cognitive functioning is essential in private and working life and is sensitive to stress and aging. Cardiovascular (CV) health factors are related to cognitive decline and dementia, but there is relatively few studies of the role of CV autonomic regulation, a key component in stress responses and risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and executive processes. An emerging pattern of results from previous studies suggest that different executive processes may be differentially associated with CV autonomic regulation. The aim was thus to study the associations between multiple measures of CV autonomic regulation and measures of different executive cognitive processes. Method: Participants were 119 healthy working adults (79% women), from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. Electrocardiogram was sampled for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) measures, including the Standard Deviation of NN, here heart beats (SDNN), root of the mean squares of successive differences (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power band from spectral analyses, and QT variability index (QTVI), a measure of myocardial repolarization patterns. Executive cognitive functioning was measured by seven neuropsychological tests. The relationships between CV autonomic regulation measures and executive cognitive measures were tested with bivariate and partial correlational analyses, controlling for demographic variables, and mental health symptoms. Results: Higher SDNN and RMSSD and lower QTVI were significantly associated with better performance on cognitive tests tapping inhibition, updating, shifting, and psychomotor speed. After adjustments for demographic factors however (age being the greatest confounder), only QTVI was clearly associated with these executive tests. No such associations were seen for working memory capacity. Conclusion: Poorer CV autonomic regulation in terms of lower SDNN and RMSSD and higher QTVI was associated with poorer executive

  20. Influence of cigarette smoking on human autonomic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermaier, O. N.; Smith, M. L.; Beightol, L. A.; Zukowska-Grojec, Z.; Goldstein, D. S.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although cigarette smoking is known to lead to widespread augmentation of sympathetic nervous system activity, little is known about the effects of smoking on directly measured human sympathetic activity and its reflex control. METHODS AND RESULTS. We studied the acute effects of smoking two research-grade cigarettes on muscle sympathetic nerve activity and on arterial baroreflex-mediated changes of sympathetic and vagal neural cardiovascular outflows in eight healthy habitual smokers. Measurements were made during frequency-controlled breathing, graded Valsalva maneuvers, and carotid baroreceptor stimulation with ramped sequences of neck pressure and suction. Smoking provoked the following changes: Arterial pressure increased significantly, and RR intervals, RR interval spectral power at the respiratory frequency, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Plasma nicotine levels increased significantly, but plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, and neuropeptide Y levels did not change. Peak sympathetic nerve activity during and systolic pressure overshoots after Valsalva straining increased significantly in proportion to increases of plasma nicotine levels. The average carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex relation shifted rightward and downward on arterial pressure and RR interval axes; average gain, operational point, and response range did not change. CONCLUSIONS. In habitual smokers, smoking acutely reduces baseline levels of vagal-cardiac nerve activity and completely resets vagally mediated arterial baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses. Smoking also reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity but augments increases of sympathetic activity triggered by brief arterial pressure reductions. This pattern of autonomic changes is likely to influence smokers' responses to acute arterial pressure reductions importantly.

  1. Pulmonary function tests in type 1 diabetes adolescents with diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďurdík, Peter; Vojtková, Jarmila; Michnová, Zuzana; Turčan, Tomáš; Šujanská, Anna; Kuchta, Milan; Čiljaková, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diabetic complications may afflict all organ tissues including cardiovascular and respiratory system. The aim of the study was to establish if the presence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) was associated with impaired pulmonary function tests in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). 46 adolescents with T1D and 25 healthy subjects at the age 15-19years were enrolled to the study. Basic anthropometric data, diabetes onset and duration, plasma glucose and A1c were established. Pulmonary function tests were measured by spirometry and the presence of CAN was examined by heart rate variability. Adolescents with T1D had significantly lower pulmonary function test parameters - FVC (ppulmonary functions in adolescents with T1D.

  2. Аrterial stiffness and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy relationship in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Nikitich Laptev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AimTo evolve the association between cardiac autonomic function and arterial stiffness in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM.Materials and methods72 T1DM patients aged 7–18 years without history of macrovascular complications or renal disease, including microalbuminuria, were involved in the study. Cardiac function was assessed by the cardiovascular tests and 24-hour ECG monitoring with automatic calculation of QT interval and heart rate variability (HRV parameters. Artery stiffness was assessed by measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV and augmentation index (AI obtained from arterial blood pressure monitoring for 24 hours.ResultsEstimated prevalence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN was 31,9%. CAN+ patients had significantly higher PWV and AI than those without CAN. A negative correlation between PWV and AI with some cardiovascular tests and HRV parameters was observed. In multivariable analysis, AI was independent predictor of autonomic dysfunction defined as number of positive cardiovascular tests, HRV parameters below normal values and prolongation of QT interval (β=0,18; p=0,035.ConclusionCardiac autonomic function is an independent predictor of arterial stiffness, in children and adolescents with T1D without macrovascular and renal complications. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors and arterial stiffness in children and adolescents with T1DM may contribute to the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in adulthood in patients with CAN.

  3. Altered cardiovascular autonomic regulation in overweight children engaged in regular physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, Daniela; de Giacomi, Gaia; Tosi, Fabio; Malacarne, Mara; Respizzi, Stefano; Pagani, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Overweight (OW) and obesity in children are important forerunners of cardiovascular risk, possibly through autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysregulation, while physical exercise exerts a beneficial influence. In this observational study we hypothesise that OW might influence ANS profile even in a population performing high volume of supervised exercise. We study 103 young soccer players, homogeneous in terms of gender (all male), cultural background, school, age (11.2 ± 1 years) and exercise routine, since they all belong to the same soccer club, thus guaranteeing equality of supervised training and similar levels of competitiveness. ANS is evaluated by autoregressive spectral analysis of heart rate and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) variabilities. We estimate also the accumulated weekly Metabolic Equivalents and time spent in sedentary activities. We subdivide the entire population in two subgroups (normal weight and OW) based on the International Obesity Task Force criteria. In OW soccer players (10.7% of total group) we observe an altered profile of autonomic cardiovascular regulation, characterised by higher values of SAP (113 ± 4 vs 100 ± 1 mm Hg, 39.7 ± 3 vs 66.2 ± 10%), higher Low Frequency variability power of SAP (an index of vasomotor sympathetic regulation) (12 ± 3 vs 4.5 mm Hg(2)) and smaller spontaneous baroreflex gain (an index of cardiac vagal regulation) (19 ± 3 vs 33 ± 3 ms/mm Hg) (all (p children subjected to an intense aerobic training.

  4. Cytisine induces autonomic cardiovascular responses via activations of different nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Fan; Lacroix, Carly; Freeling, Jessica

    2010-04-19

    Nicotinic cholinergic receptors mediate autonomic transmission at ganglia. However, whether different subtypes of nicotinic cholinergic receptors expressed in autonomic ganglia elicit distinct roles in mediating sympathetic and parasympathetic regulations remain to be defined. In this study, we observed that different subtypes of nicotinic receptors were responsible for the sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiovascular responses. In urethane anesthetized mice, intravenous injection with cytisine, a non-selective nicotinic agonist, induced a brief but pronounced decrease in heart rate, followed by increases in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. The bradycardic response was blocked by atropine, and the pressor response was blocked by prazosin, confirming that these responses were parasympathetic and sympathetic activities, respectively. Hexamethonium, a ganglionic blocker, blocked both sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. Pretreatment with methyllycaconitine citrate, a selective alpha7 nicotinic receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated cytisine-induced sympathetic response with little effect on the parasympathetic response. In contrast, pretreatment with dihydro-beta-erythroidine hydrobromide, a selective alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptor antagonist, blocked cytisine-induced parasympathetic response but not the sympathetic response. Pretreatment with dihydro-beta-erythroidine hydrobromide also blocked baroreflex associated parasympathetic bradycardic response. Moreover, treatment with nicotine induced a bradycardic response without a significant pressor response, which was also attenuated by dihydro-beta-erythroidine hydrobromide. Collectively, these data suggest that different nicotinic receptors play distinct roles in sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia. Specifically, activations of alpha7 and alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors are involved in cytisine-induced cardiovascular sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, respectively.

  5. Baroreflex deficit blunts exercise training-induced cardiovascular and autonomic adaptations in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Silva, I C; De La Fuente, R N; Mostarda, C; Rosa, K; Flues, K; Damaceno-Rodrigues, N R; Caldini, E G; De Angelis, K; Krieger, E M; Irigoyen, M C

    2010-03-01

    1. Baroreceptors regulate moment-to-moment blood pressure (BP) variations, but their long-term effect on the cardiovascular system remains unclear. Baroreceptor deficit accompanying hypertension contributes to increased BP variability (BPV) and sympathetic activity, whereas exercise training has been associated with an improvement in these baroreflex-mediated changes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the autonomic, haemodynamic and cardiac morphofunctional effects of long-term sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation (SAD) in trained and sedentary spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). 2. Rats were subjected to SAD or sham surgery and were then further divided into sedentary and trained groups. Exercise training was performed on a treadmill (five times per week, 50-70% maximal running speed). All groups were studied after 10 weeks. 3. Sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation in SHR had no effect on basal heart rate (HR) or BP, but did augment BPV, impairing the cardiac function associated with increased cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition. Exercise training reduced BP and HR, re-established baroreflex sensitivity and improved both HR variability and BPV. However, SAD in trained SHR blunted all these improvements. Moreover, the systolic and diastolic hypertensive dysfunction, reduced left ventricular chamber diameter and increased cardiac collagen deposition seen in SHR were improved after the training protocol. These benefits were attenuated in trained SAD SHR. 4. In conclusion, the present study has demonstrated that the arterial baroreflex mediates cardiac disturbances associated with hypertension and is crucial for the beneficial cardiovascular morphofunctional and autonomic adaptations induced by chronic exercise in hypertension.

  6. Physiological basis for human autonomic rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressures, heart periods, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity have been studied intensively in recent years to explore otherwise obscure human neurophysiological mechanisms. The best-studied rhythms are those occurring at breathing frequencies. Published evidence indicates that respiratory fluctuations of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and electrocardiographic R-R intervals result primarily from the action of a central 'gate' that opens during expiration and closes during inspiration. Parallel respiratory fluctuations of arterial pressures and R-R intervals are thought to be secondary to arterial baroreflex physiology: changes in systolic pressure provoke changes in the R-R interval. However, growing evidence suggests that these parallel oscillations result from the influence of respiration on sympathetic and vagal-cardiac motoneurones rather than from baroreflex physiology. There is a rapidly growing literature on the use of mathematical models of low- and high-frequency (respiratory) R-R interval fluctuations in characterizing instantaneous 'sympathovagal balance'. The case for this approach is based primarily on measurements made with patients in upright tilt. However, the strong linear relation between such measures as the ratio of low- to high-frequency R-R interval oscillations and the angle of the tilt reflects exclusively the reductions of the vagal (high-frequency) component. As the sympathetic component does not change in tilt, the low- to high-frequency R-R interval ratio provides no proof that sympathetic activity increases. Moreover, the validity of extrapolating from measurements performed during upright tilt to measurements during supine rest has not been established. Nonetheless, it is clear that measures of heart rate variability provide important prognostic information in patients with cardiovascular diseases. It is not known whether reduced heart rate variability is merely a marker for the severity of disease or a

  7. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy contributes to sleep apnea in young and lean type 1 diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovsky, Carolina Castro Porto Silva; Rolim, Luiz Clemente de Souza Pereira; de Sá, João Roberto; Poyares, Dalva; Tufik, Sergio; Silva, Ademir Baptista; Dib, Sergio Atala

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about association between sleep apnea and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) might give some insight into the pathogenesis of this condition in these patients. In obese patients, excessive central adiposity, including a large neck circumference, can contribute to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Its presence in non-obese patients, however, indicates that it could be correlated with autonomic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of OSA in young and lean T1DM patients with and without CAN. We studied 20 adult, non-obese, T1DM patients who were divided into two groups according to the results of the cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests (CARTs). These two groups (9 with CAN and 11 without CAN) were compared to a control group of 22 healthy individuals, who were matched by age and BMI. A polysomnography was performed and sleep was analyzed. The CAN+ group had a significantly higher prevalence of sleep apnea compared to the other groups (67% CAN+; 23% CAN-; 4.5% controls: CAN+ vs. Control; p = 0.006 and CAN+ vs. CAN-; p = 0.02). The CAN- group had higher sleep efficiency compared to the CAN+ group, demonstrating impaired sleep architecture in diabetics with this chronic complication. In conclusion, OSA may be related to the presence of CAN in young and lean T1DM patients. It could contribute to worse the prognosis and reducing the quality of life of these patients without specific treatment of these conditions.

  8. Cardiovascular autonomic nervous system function and aerobic capacity in type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet eHägglund

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cardiovascular autonomic nervous system (ANS function has been reported in type 1 diabetes patients. ANS function, evaluated by heart rate variability (HRV, systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS, has been linked to aerobic capacity (VO2peak in healthy subjects, but relationship is unknown in type 1 diabetes. We examined cardiovascular ANS function at rest and during function tests, and its relations to VO2peak in type 1 diabetes individuals. Ten type 1 diabetes patients (T1D (34 ± 7 years and 11 healthy control (CON (31 ± 6 years age and leisure-time physical activity-matched men were studied. Autonomic nervous system function was recorded at rest and during active standing and handgrip. Determination of VO2peak was obtained with graded cycle ergometer test. During ANS recordings SBPV, BRS, and resting HRV did not differ between groups, but alpha1 responses to manoeuvres in detrended fluctuation analyses were smaller in T1D (active standing; 32%, handgrip; 20%, medians than in CON (active standing; 71%, handgrip; 54%, p < 0.05. VO2peak was lower in T1D (36 ± 4 ml ∙ kg-1 ∙ min-1 than in CON (45 ± 9 ml ∙ kg-1 ∙ min-1, p < 0.05. Resting HRV measures, RMSSD, HF and SD1 correlated with VO2peak in CON (p < 0.05 and when analysing groups together. These results suggest that T1D had lower VO2peak, weaker HRV response to manoeuvres, but not impaired cardiovascular ANS function at rest compared with CON. Resting parasympathetic cardiac activity correlated with VO2peak in CON but not in T1D. Detrended fluctuation analysis could be a sensitive detector of changes in cardiac ANS function in type 1 diabetes.

  9. Improving Human/Autonomous System Teaming Through Linguistic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    An area of increasing interest for the next generation of aircraft is autonomy and the integration of increasingly autonomous systems into the national airspace. Such integration requires humans to work closely with autonomous systems, forming human and autonomous agent teams. The intention behind such teaming is that a team composed of both humans and autonomous agents will operate better than homogenous teams. Procedures exist for licensing pilots to operate in the national airspace system and current work is being done to define methods for validating the function of autonomous systems, however there is no method in place for assessing the interaction of these two disparate systems. Moreover, currently these systems are operated primarily by subject matter experts, limiting their use and the benefits of such teams. Providing additional information about the ongoing mission to the operator can lead to increased usability and allow for operation by non-experts. Linguistic analysis of the context of verbal communication provides insight into the intended meaning of commonly heard phrases such as "What's it doing now?" Analyzing the semantic sphere surrounding these common phrases enables the prediction of the operator's intent and allows the interface to supply the operator's desired information.

  10. Intelligent (Autonomous) Power Controller Development for Human Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeder, James; Raitano, Paul; McNelis, Anne

    2016-01-01

    As NASAs Evolvable Mars Campaign and other exploration initiatives continue to mature they have identified the need for more autonomous operations of the power system. For current human space operations such as the International Space Station, the paradigm is to perform the planning, operation and fault diagnosis from the ground. However, the dual problems of communication lag as well as limited communication bandwidth beyond GEO synchronous orbit, underscore the need to change the operation methodology for human operation in deep space. To address this need, for the past several years the Glenn Research Center has had an effort to develop an autonomous power controller for human deep space vehicles. This presentation discusses the present roadmap for deep space exploration along with a description of conceptual power system architecture for exploration modules. It then contrasts the present ground centric control and management architecture with limited autonomy on-board the spacecraft with an advanced autonomous power control system that features ground based monitoring with a spacecraft mission manager with autonomous control of all core systems, including power. It then presents a functional breakdown of the autonomous power control system and examines its operation in both normal and fault modes. Finally, it discusses progress made in the development of a real-time power system model and how it is being used to evaluate the performance of the controller and well as using it for verification of the overall operation.

  11. Exercise-induced neuronal plasticity in central autonomic networks: role in cardiovascular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Lisete C; Stern, Javier E

    2009-09-01

    It is now well established that brain plasticity is an inherent property not only of the developing but also of the adult brain. Numerous beneficial effects of exercise, including improved memory, cognitive function and neuroprotection, have been shown to involve an important neuroplastic component. However, whether major adaptive cardiovascular adjustments during exercise, needed to ensure proper blood perfusion of peripheral tissues, also require brain neuroplasticity, is presently unknown. This review will critically evaluate current knowledge on proposed mechanisms that are likely to underlie the continuous resetting of baroreflex control of heart rate during/after exercise and following exercise training. Accumulating evidence indicates that not only somatosensory afferents (conveyed by skeletal muscle receptors, baroreceptors and/or cardiopulmonary receptors) but also projections arising from central command neurons (in particular, peptidergic hypothalamic pre-autonomic neurons) converge into the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) in the dorsal brainstem, to co-ordinate complex cardiovascular adaptations during dynamic exercise. This review focuses in particular on a reciprocally interconnected network between the NTS and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), which is proposed to act as a pivotal anatomical and functional substrate underlying integrative feedforward and feedback cardiovascular adjustments during exercise. Recent findings supporting neuroplastic adaptive changes within the NTS-PVN reciprocal network (e.g. remodelling of afferent inputs, structural and functional neuronal plasticity and changes in neurotransmitter content) will be discussed within the context of their role as important underlying cellular mechanisms supporting the tonic activation and improved efficacy of these central pathways in response to circulatory demand at rest and during exercise, both in sedentary and in trained individuals. We hope this review will stimulate

  12. Long Term High Fat Diet Treatment: An Appropriate Approach to Study the Sex-Specificity of the Autonomic and Cardiovascular Responses to Obesity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Ekeledo, Obioma J; Anderson, Ruchi; Le, Huy B; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    Obesity-related cardiovascular disease (CVD) involves increased sympathetic activity in men and male animals. Although women exhibit increased visceral fat, metabolic disorders, inflammation and CVD with obesity, whether body weight gain affects autonomic control of cardiovascular function in females remain unknown. Due to the lack of adequate model to mimic the human pathology, this study aimed to develop a murine model, which would allow studying the sex-specificity of the response of the autonomic nervous system to obesity and identifying the origin of potential sex-differences. We tested the hypothesis that sexual dimorphisms in the autonomic response to obesity disappear in mice matched for changes in body weight, metabolic and inflammatory disorders. Male and female C57Bl/6 mice were submitted to control (CD) or high fat diet (HFD) for 24 weeks. Female mice gained more adipose mass and lost more lean mass than males but reached similar visceral adipose mass and body weight, as males, at the end of the diet. 24 weeks of HFD matched male and female mice for visceral adiposity, glycaemia, plasma insulin, lipids, and inflammatory cytokines levels, demonstrating the suitability of the model to study human pathology. HFD did not elevate BP, but similarly increased heart rate (HR) in males (CD: 571 ± 9 vs. HFD: 631 ± 14 bpm, P function in males and females, via sex-specific mechanisms and independent of fat distribution, metabolic disorder or inflammation.

  13. Are Changes in Heart Rate Variability During Hypoglycemia Confounded by the Presence of Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy in Patients with Diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cichosz, Simon Lebech; Frystyk, Jan; Tarnow, Lise

    2017-01-01

    remain on how cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) influences these measurable changes. This study aims to examine if changes in HRV during hypoglycemia are confounded by the presence of CAN. METHODS: Twenty-one adults (hereof 13 men) with T1D prone to hypoglycemia were recruited and monitored...

  14. Role of exercise training in cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and mortality in diabetic ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Silvia B C; Flues, Karin; Paulini, Janaina; Mostarda, Cristiano; Rodrigues, Bruno; Souza, Leandro E; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2007-10-01

    Diabetes and menopause markedly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in women. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of exercise training on cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and on total mortality in diabetic female rats undergoing ovarian hormone deprivation. Female Wistar rats were divided into ovariectomized groups: sedentary and trained controls and sedentary and trained diabetic rats (streptozotocin, 50 mg/kg IV). Trained groups were submitted to an exercise training protocol on a treadmill (8 weeks). The baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated by heart rate responses to arterial pressure changes. Heart rate variability was determined using the SD of the basal heart rate. Vagal and sympathetic tonus were evaluated by pharmacological blockade. Diabetes impaired baroreflex sensitivity ( approximately 55%), vagal tonus ( approximately 68%), and heart rate variability ( approximately 38%). Exercise training improved baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability in control and diabetic groups in relation to their sedentary groups. Trained control rats presented increased vagal tonus compared with that of sedentary ones. The sympathetic tonus was reduced in the trained diabetic group as compared with that of other studied groups. Significant correlations were obtained between heart rate variability and vagal tonus with baroreflex sensitivity. Mortality, assessed during the training period, was reduced in trained diabetic (25%) rats compared with mortality in sedentary diabetic rats (60%). Together, these findings suggest that decreases in baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability may be related to increased mortality in female diabetic subjects and that improved autonomic regulation induced by exercise training may contribute to decreased mortality in this population.

  15. Autonomic cardiovascular modulation in masters and young cyclists following high-intensity interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nattai R; Reaburn, Peter R; Doering, Thomas M; Argus, Christos K; Driller, Matthew W

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed at examining the autonomic cardiovascular modulation in well-trained masters and young cyclists following high-intensity interval training (HIT). Nine masters (age 55.6 ± 5.0 years) and eight young cyclists (age 25.9 ± 3.0 years) completed a HIT protocol of 6 x 30 sec at 175% of peak power output, with 4.5-min' rest between efforts. Immediately following HIT, heart rate and R-R intervals were monitored for 30-min during passive supine recovery. Autonomic modulation was examined by i) heart rate recovery in the first 60-sec of recovery (HRR60); ii) the time constant of the 30-min heart rate recovery curve (HRRτ); iii) the time course of the root mean square for successive 30-sec R-R interval (RMSSD30); and iv) time and frequency domain analyses of subsequent 5-min R-R interval segments. No significant between-group differences were observed for HRR60 (P = 0.096) or HRRτ (P = 0.617). However, a significant interaction effect was found for RMSSD30 (P = 0.021), with the master cyclists showing higher RMSSD30 values following HIT. Similar results were observed in the time and frequency domain analyses with significant interaction effects found for the natural logarithm of the RMSSD (P = 0.008), normalised low-frequency power (P = 0.016) and natural logarithm of high-frequency power (P = 0.012). Following high-intensity interval training, master cyclists demonstrated greater post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation compared to young cyclists, indicating that physical training at older ages has significant effects on autonomic function.

  16. Impairment on cardiovascular and autonomic adjustments to maximal isometric exercise tests in offspring of hypertensive parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francica, Juliana V; Heeren, Marcelo V; Tubaldini, Márcio; Sartori, Michelle; Mostarda, Cristiano; Araujo, Rubens C; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare cardiovascular and autonomic responses to a mental stress test and to a maximal isometric exercise test between offspring of normotensive (ON, n = 10) and hypertensive parents (OH, n = 10). Subjects underwent a 3-min Stroop Color Word Test and a maximal isometric exercise test performed in an isokinetic dynamometer with continuous RR interval monitoring. At rest, arterial pressure and heart rate were similar between groups, but there was a significant reduction in total RR interval variance (ON: 5933 ± 493 vs. OH: 2967 ± 390 ms(2)) and an increase in low-high frequency components ratio of heart rate variability (ON: 2.3 ± 0.4 vs. OH: 4.6 ± 0.8) in OH group. In the first minute of the mental stress test and after both tests, the OH group presented increased heart rate as compared with the ON group. After both tests, only the ON group presented an increase in sympathetic component, thus reaching resting values similar to those of the OH group. Our data demonstrated increased resting cardiac sympathetic modulation in offspring of hypertensive parents at similar levels to that observed in offspring of normotensive parents after a mental stress test or a maximal isometric exercise test. Additionally, the exacerbated heart rate responses to these physiological tests in OH subjects may be associated with resting autonomic dysfunction, thus reinforcing these evaluations as important tools for detecting early dysfunctions in this genetically predisposed population.

  17. Heart rate recovery: autonomic determinants, methods of assessment and association with mortality and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peçanha, Tiago; Silva-Júnior, Natan Daniel; Forjaz, Cláudia Lúcia de Moraes

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the primary cause of mortality worldwide. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction seems to be related to the genesis of several CVDs and is also linked to the increased risk of mortality in CVD patients. The quantification of heart rate decrement after exercise - known as heart rate recovery (HRR) - is a simple tool for assessing cardiac autonomic activity in healthy and CVD patients. Furthermore, since The Cleveland Clinic studies, HRR has also been used as a powerful index for predicting mortality. For these reasons, in recent years, the scientific community has been interested in proposing methods and protocols to investigate HRR and understand its underlying mechanisms. The aim of this review is to discuss current knowledge about HRR, including its potential primary and secondary physiological determinants, as well as its role in predicting mortality. Published data show that HRR can be modelled by an exponential curve, with a fast and a slow decay component. HRR may be influenced by population and exercise characteristics. The fast component mainly seems to be dictated by the cardiac parasympathetic reactivation, probably promoted by the deactivation of central command and mechanoreflex inputs immediately after exercise cessation. On the other hand, the slow phase of HRR may be determined by cardiac sympathetic withdrawal, possibly via the deactivation of metaboreflex and thermoregulatory mechanisms. All these pathways seem to be impaired in CVD, helping to explain the slower HRR in such patients and the increased rate of mortality in individuals who present a slower HRR. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Human Centered Autonomous and Assistant Systems Testbed for Exploration Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Mount, Frances; Carreon, Patricia; Torney, Susan E.

    2001-01-01

    The Engineering and Mission Operations Directorates at NASA Johnson Space Center are combining laboratories and expertise to establish the Human Centered Autonomous and Assistant Systems Testbed for Exploration Operations. This is a testbed for human centered design, development and evaluation of intelligent autonomous and assistant systems that will be needed for human exploration and development of space. This project will improve human-centered analysis, design and evaluation methods for developing intelligent software. This software will support human-machine cognitive and collaborative activities in future interplanetary work environments where distributed computer and human agents cooperate. We are developing and evaluating prototype intelligent systems for distributed multi-agent mixed-initiative operations. The primary target domain is control of life support systems in a planetary base. Technical approaches will be evaluated for use during extended manned tests in the target domain, the Bioregenerative Advanced Life Support Systems Test Complex (BIO-Plex). A spinoff target domain is the International Space Station (ISS) Mission Control Center (MCC). Prodl}cts of this project include human-centered intelligent software technology, innovative human interface designs, and human-centered software development processes, methods and products. The testbed uses adjustable autonomy software and life support systems simulation models from the Adjustable Autonomy Testbed, to represent operations on the remote planet. Ground operations prototypes and concepts will be evaluated in the Exploration Planning and Operations Center (ExPOC) and Jupiter Facility.

  19. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Alteration in Cardiovascular Regulation and Function During Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Alterations in cardiovascular regulation and function that occur during and after space flight have been reported. These alterations are manifested, for example, by reduced orthostatic tolerance upon reentry to the earth's gravity from space. However, the precise physiologic mechanisms responsible for these alterations remain to be fully elucidated. Perhaps, as a result, effective countermeasures have yet to be developed. In this project we apply a powerful, new method - cardiovascular system identification (CSI) - for the study of the effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system so that effective countermeasures can be developed. CSI involves the mathematical analysis of second-to-second fluctuations in non-invasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV - respiratory activity) in order to characterize quantitatively the physiologic mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these signals. Through the characterization of all the physiologic mechanisms coupling these signals, CSI provides a model of the closed-loop cardiovascular regulatory state in an individual subject. The model includes quantitative descriptions of the heart rate baroreflex, autonomic function, as well as other important physiologic mechanisms. We are in the process of incorporating beat-to-beat fluctuations of stroke volume into the CSI technique in order to quantify additional physiologic mechanisms such as those involved in control of peripheral vascular resistance and alterations in cardiac contractility. We apply CSI in conjunction with the two general protocols of the Human Studies Core project. The first protocol involves ground-based, human head down tilt bed rest to simulate microgravity and acute stressors - upright tilt, standing and bicycle exercise - to provide orthostatic and exercise challenges. The second protocol is intended to be the same as the first but with the addition of sleep deprivation to determine whether

  20. Sex hormone effects on autonomic mechanisms of thermoregulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkoudian, Nisha; Stachenfeld, Nina

    2016-04-01

    Autonomic mechanisms are fundamental to human physiological thermoregulation, and female reproductive hormones have substantial influences on several aspects of these mechanisms. Of these, the best recognized are the thermoregulatory responses that occur at menopause (hot flushes) and the changes in body temperature within the menstrual cycle which may help couples predict ovulation. Our goal in this brief review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the influences of reproductive hormones on autonomic mechanisms in human thermoregulation. In general, estrogens tend to promote lower body temperatures via augmentation of heat dissipation responses, whereas progesterone tends to promote higher body temperatures. Recent evidence suggests specific influences of estrogens on central autonomic nuclei involved in control of skin blood flow and sweating. Estrogens also augment vasodilation by direct effects on peripheral blood vessels. Influences of progesterone are less well understood, but include both centrally regulated changes in thermoregulatory set-point as well as and peripheral effects, including augmented vasoconstriction in the skin. We conclude with a brief discussion of thermoregulatory adjustments associated with changing hormone levels during menopause, pregnancy and polycystic ovary syndrome. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. A meta-analysis of non-invasive brain stimulation and autonomic functioning: Implications for brain-heart pathways to cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makovac, Elena; Thayer, Julian F; Ottaviani, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Given the intrinsic connection between the brain and the heart, a recent body of research emerged with the aim to influence cardiovascular system functioning by non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) methods such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. Despite the implications of cardiovascular activity modulation for therapeutic purposes, such effects of NIBS have not yet been quantified. The aim of this study was to meta-analyze studies on NIBS effects on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and its variability (HRV). PubMed and Scopus databases were searched for English language studies conducted in humans. Twenty-nine studies were eligible for the analyses. Pooled effect sizes (Hedges' g) were compared. Random effect models were used. NIBS was effective in reducing HR (g=0.17) and enhancing HRV (g=0.30). A marginal effect emerged for BP (g=0.21). Significant moderators were the stimulation technique and the site of stimulation. Results show that NIBS affects cardiovascular and autonomic nervous system activity, confirming a potential pathogenic brain-heart pathway to cardiovascular disease.

  2. Effects of heart rate variability biofeedback on cardiovascular responses and autonomic sympathovagal modulation following stressor tasks in prehypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Sun, P; Wang, S; Lin, G; Wang, T

    2016-02-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is implicated in prehypertension, and previous studies have suggested that therapies that improve modulation of sympathovagal balance, such as biofeedback and slow abdominal breathing, are effective in patients with prehypertension at rest. However, considering that psychophysiological stressors may be associated with greater cardiovascular risk in prehypertensives, it is important to investigate whether heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) results in equivalent effects on autonomic cardiovascular responses control during stressful conditions in prehypertensives. A total of 32 college students with prehypertension were enrolled and randomly assigned to HRV-BF (n=12), slow abdominal breathing (SAB, n=10) or no treatment (control, n=10) groups. Then, a training experiment consisting of 15 sessions was employed to compare the effect of each intervention on the following cardiovascular response indicators before and after intervention: heart rate (HR); heart rate variability (HRV) components; blood volume pulse amplitude (BVPamp); galvanic skin response; respiration rate (RSP); and blood pressure. In addition, the cold pressor test and the mental arithmetic challenge test were also performed over two successive days before and after the invention as well as after 3 months of follow-up. A significant decrease in HR and RSP and a significant increase in BVPamp were observed after the HRV-BF intervention (P<0.001). For the HRV analysis, HRV-BF significantly reduced the ratio of low-frequency power to high-frequency power (the LF/HF ratio, P<0.001) and increased the normalized high-frequency power (HFnm) (P<0.001) during the stress tests, and an added benefit over SAB by improving HRV was also observed. In the 3-month follow-up study, similar effects on RSP, BVPamp, LF/HF and HFnm were observed in the HRV-BF group compared with the SAB group. HRV-BF training contributes to the beneficial effect of reducing the stress-related cardiovascular

  3. Autonomic control of the heart during exercise in humans: role of skeletal muscle afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, James P

    2014-02-01

    What is the topic of this review? The autonomic nervous system plays a key role in bringing about the cardiovascular responses to exercise necessitated by the increased metabolic requirements of the active skeletal muscle. The complex interaction of central and peripheral neural control mechanisms evokes a decrease in parasympathetic activity and an increase sympathetic activity to the heart during exercise. What advances does it highlight? This review presents some of the recent insights provided by human studies into the role of mechanically and metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in the regulation of cardiac autonomic control during exercise. The autonomic responses to exercise are orchestrated by the interactions of several central and peripheral neural mechanisms. This report focuses on the role of peripheral feedback from skeletal muscle afferents in the autonomic control of the heart during exercise in humans. Heart rate responses to passive calf stretch are abolished with cardiac parasympathetic blockade, indicating that the activation of mechanically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle mechanoreceptors) can inhibit cardiac parasympathetic activity and is likely to contribute to the increase in heart rate at the onset of exercise. Recent experiments show that the partial restriction of blood flow to the exercising skeletal muscles, to augment the activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreceptors) in humans, evokes an increase in heart rate that is attenuated with β1-adrenergic blockade, thus suggesting that this response is principally mediated via an increase in cardiac sympathetic activity. Heart rate remains at resting levels during isolated activation of muscle metaboreceptors with postexercise ischaemia following hand grip, unless cardiac parasympathetic activity is inhibited, whereupon a sympathetically mediated increase in heart rate is unmasked. During postexercise ischaemia following leg

  4. Bilateral human-robot control for semi-autonomous UAV navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wopereis, Han W.; Fumagalli, Matteo; Stramigioli, Stefano; Carloni, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a semi-autonomous bilateral control architecture for unmanned aerial vehicles. During autonomous navigation, a human operator is allowed to assist the autonomous controller of the vehicle by actively changing its navigation parameters to assist it in critical situations, such as

  5. Cerebral Hemispheric Lateralization Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis May Affect Interictal Cardiovascular Autonomic Functions in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokia Ghchime

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is linked to the autonomic nervous system dysfunctions. Seizures alter the function of different systems such as the respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and urogenital systems. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possible factors which may be involved in interictal cardiovascular autonomic function in temporal lobe epilepsy with complex partial seizures, and with particular attention to hippocampal sclerosis. The study was conducted in 30 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (19 with left hippocampal sclerosis, 11 with right hippocampal sclerosis. All subjects underwent four tests of cardiac autonomic function: heart rate changes in response to deep breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure variations throughout resting activity and during hand grip, mental stress, and orthostatic tests. Our results show that the right cerebral hemisphere predominantly modulates sympathetic activity, while the left cerebral hemisphere mainly modulates parasympathetic activity, which mediated tachycardia and excessive bradycardia counterregulation, both of which might be involved as a mechanism of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients (SUDEP.

  6. Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Cardiac Autonomic Activity in Healthy Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Ellis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency (≤50nmol/L 25-hydroxy vitamin D is a cardiovascular (CV risk factor that affects approximately one billion people worldwide, particularly those affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD. Individuals with CKD demonstrate abnormal cardiac autonomic nervous system activity, which has been linked to the significant rates of CV-related mortality in this population. Whether vitamin D deficiency has a direct association with regulation of cardiac autonomic activity has never been explored in humans. Methods: Thirty-four (34 healthy, normotensive subjects were studied and categorized based on 25-hydroxy vitamin D deficiency (deficient vs. non-deficient, n = 7 vs. 27, as well as 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D levels (above vs. below 25th percentile, n = 8 vs. 26. Power spectral analysis of electrocardiogram recordings provided measures of cardiac autonomic activity across low frequency (LF and high frequency (HF, representative of vagal contribution bands, representative of the sympathetic and vagal limbs of the autonomic nervous system when transformed to normalized units (nu, respectively, as well as overall cardiosympathovagal balance (LF:HF during graded angiotensin II (AngII challenge (3 ng/kg/min × 30 min, 6 ng/kg/min × 30 min. Results: At baseline, significant suppression of sympathovagal balance was observed in the 25-hydroxy vitamin D-deficient participants (LF:HF, p = 0.02 vs. non-deficient, although no other differences were observed throughout AngII challenge. Participants in the lowest 1,25-dihydroxy VD quartile experienced significant withdrawal of inhibitory vagal control, as well as altered overall sympathovagal balance throughout AngII challenge (HF, mean difference = −6.98 ± 3 nu, p = 0.05; LF:HF, mean difference = 0.34 ± 0.1, p = 0.043 vs. above 25th percentile. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with suppression of resting cardiac autonomic activity, while low 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D levels are

  7. Nitric oxide inhibition in paraventricular nucleus on cardiovascular and autonomic modulation after exercise training in unanesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastelari, Rosiane Batista; de Souza, Hugo Celso Dutra; Lenhard, Adriane; de Aguiar Corrêa, Fernando Morgan; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso

    2011-02-23

    It is well known that regular physical exercise alter cardiac function and autonomic modulation of heart rate variability (HRV). The paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN) is an important site of integration for autonomic and cardiovascular responses, where nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role. The aim of our study was to evaluate the cardiovascular parameters and autonomic modulation by means of spectral analysis after nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition in the PVN in conscious sedentary (S) or swimming trained (ST) rats. After swimming training protocol, adult male Wistar rats, instrumented with guide cannulas to PVN and femoral artery and vein catheters were submitted to mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) recording. At baseline, the physical training induced a resting bradycardia (S: 374±5, ST: 346±1bpm) and promoted adaptations in HRV characterized by an increase in high-frequency oscillations (HF; 26.43±6.91 to 88.96±2.44) and a decrease in low-frequency oscillations (LF; 73.57±6.91 to 11.04±2.44) in normalized units. The microinjection of N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) in the PVN of sedentary and trained rats promoted increase in MAP and HR. l-NAME in the PVN did not significantly alter the spectral parameters of HRV of sedentary animals, however in the trained rats increased LF oscillations (11.04±2.44 to 27.62±6.97) and decreased HF oscillations (88.96±2.44 to 72.38±6.97) in normalized units compared with baseline. Our results suggest that NO in the PVN may collaborate to cardiac autonomic modulation after exercise training.

  8. eNOS gene haplotype is indirectly associated with the recovery of cardiovascular autonomic modulation from exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bruno M; Barbosa, Thales C; Neves, Fabricia J; Sales, Allan K; Rocha, Natalia G; Medeiros, Renata F; Pereira, Felipe S; Garcia, Vinicius P; Cardoso, Fabiane T; Nobrega, Antonio C L

    2014-12-01

    Polymorphisms in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene decrease expression and activation of eNOS in vitro, which is associated with lower post-exercise increase in vasodilator reactivity in vivo. However, it is unknown whether such polymorphisms are associated with other eNOS-related phenotypes during recovery from exercise. Therefore, we investigated the impact of an eNOS haplotype containing polymorphic alleles at loci -786 and 894 on the recovery of cardiovascular autonomic function from exercise. Sedentary, non-obese, healthy subjects were enrolled [n = 107, age 32 ± 1 years (mean ± SEM)]. Resting autonomic modulation (heart rate variability, systolic blood pressure variability, and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity) and vascular reactivity (forearm hyperemic response post-ischemia) were assessed at baseline, 10, 60, and 120 min after a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. Besides, autonomic function was assessed by heart rate recovery (HRR) immediately after peak exercise. Haplotype analysis showed that vagal modulation (i.e., HF n.u.) was significantly higher, combined sympathetic and vagal modulation (i.e., LF/HF) was significantly lower and total blood pressure variability was significantly lower post-exercise in a haplotype containing polymorphic alleles (H2) compared to a haplotype with wild type alleles (H1). HRR was similar between groups. Corroborating previous evidence, H2 had significantly lower post-exercise increase in vasodilator reactivity than H1. In conclusion, a haplotype containing polymorphic alleles at loci -786 and 894 had enhanced recovery of autonomic modulation from exercise, along with unchanged HRR, and attenuated vasodilator reactivity. Then, these results suggest an autonomic compensatory response of a direct deleterious effect of eNOS polymorphisms on the vascular function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cardiovascular disease risks in adult Native and Mexican Americans with a history of alcohol use disorders: association with cardiovascular autonomic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, José R; Gilder, David A; Kalafut, Mary A; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension and obesity are serious health problems that have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We recently showed a relationship between hypertension, obesity and cardiovagal control in a sample of Native and Mexican Americans at high risk of alcohol use disorders (AUD). While studies have shown that Native and Mexican Americans exhibit high rates of AUD, the consequences of AUD on CVD risk factors and their relationship with cardiovascular autonomic control is not well understood in these ethnic groups. This study investigated whether an association could be demonstrated between cardiovascular autonomic control and several CVD risk factors in Native and Mexican American men and women (n = 228) who are literate in English and are residing legally in San Diego County. Participants with lifetime history of AUD showed higher rates of systolic and diastolic hypertension and obesity than participants without lifetime AUD. Lifetime AUD was significantly associated with reduced HR response to deep breathing (HRDB) measure of cardiovagal control, higher current drinking quantity, and obesity. Reduced HRDB was also associated with increased systolic pre-hypertension or hypertension (pre-/hypertension) and with higher diastolic blood pressure in a linear regression model that included several diagnostic and demographic variables. HRDB and time- and frequency-domain measures of cardiovagal control were significantly reduced in participants with diastolic pre-/hypertension. These data suggest that lower cardiovagal control may play a role in the prevalence of systolic and diastolic pre-/hypertension in a community sample with a history of alcohol and substance use disorders.

  10. Cardiovascular, metabolic, and hormonal responses to noradrenaline in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Andersen, P; Hvidberg, A

    1996-01-01

    Denervation hypersensitivity is a well-known phenomenon in patients with autonomic failure. In diabetic autonomic neuropathy hypersensitivity to beta-adrenergic stimulation has been demonstrated. We infused noradrenaline, mainly an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist, in three escalating doses (0.5, 2.......5, and 5 micrograms min-1) in three age and sex matched groups of eight subjects: healthy volunteers, diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy. During steady state in each infusion period we measured heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, hepato-splanchnic blood flow, vascular...... resistance, glucose kinetics, metabolites (beta-hydroxybuturate, glycerol, and lactate), and glucoregulatory hormones (noradrenaline, adrenaline, growth hormone, pancreatic polypeptide, cortisol, and insulin). Systolic and mean blood pressure increased in all groups but diabetic patients with autonomic...

  11. Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost of human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Rouse, Elliott J; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-11-03

    Passive exoskeletons that assist with human locomotion are often lightweight and compact, but are unable to provide net mechanical power to the exoskeletal wearer. In contrast, powered exoskeletons often provide biologically appropriate levels of mechanical power, but the size and mass of their actuator/power source designs often lead to heavy and unwieldy devices. In this study, we extend the design and evaluation of a lightweight and powerful autonomous exoskeleton evaluated for loaded walking in (J Neuroeng Rehab 11:80, 2014) to the case of unloaded walking conditions. The metabolic energy consumption of seven study participants (85 ± 12 kg body mass) was measured while walking on a level treadmill at 1.4 m/s. Testing conditions included not wearing the exoskeleton and wearing the exoskeleton, in both powered and unpowered modes. When averaged across the gait cycle, the autonomous exoskeleton applied a mean positive mechanical power of 26 ± 1 W (13 W per ankle) with 2.12 kg of added exoskeletal foot-shank mass (1.06 kg per leg). Use of the leg exoskeleton significantly reduced the metabolic cost of walking by 35 ± 13 W, which was an improvement of 10 ± 3% (p = 0.023) relative to the control condition of not wearing the exoskeleton. The results of this study highlight the advantages of developing lightweight and powerful exoskeletons that can comfortably assist the body during walking.

  12. Chemokines and Heart Disease: A Network Connecting Cardiovascular Biology to Immune and Autonomic Nervous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Dusi; Alice Ghidoni; Alice Ravera; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Laura Calvillo

    2016-01-01

    Among the chemokines discovered to date, nineteen are presently considered to be relevant in heart disease and are involved in all stages of cardiovascular response to injury. Chemokines are interesting as biomarkers to predict risk of cardiovascular events in apparently healthy people and as possible therapeutic targets. Moreover, they could have a role as mediators of crosstalk between immune and cardiovascular system, since they seem to act as a “working-network” in deep linkage with the a...

  13. Cardiovascular pathology in patients with human immune deficiency virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela-Rodríguez, Germán; Fellow of the American College of Physicians

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection increases both morbidity and mortality by inducing severe immunosupression that generates opportunistic infections. Following use of high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in infected patients, infection-related mortality has decreased and both survival and cardiovascular disease have increased. The etiology of cardiovascular disease could be related to either infection itself, proatherogenic conditions associated with antiretroviral therapy or...

  14. High-Intensity Progressive Resistance Training Increases Strength With No Change in Cardiovascular Function and Autonomic Neural Regulation in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegusuku, Hélcio; Queiroz, Andréia C; Silva, Valdo J; de Mello, Marco T; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Forjaz, Cláudia L

    2015-07-01

    The effects of high-intensity progressive resistance training (HIPRT) on cardiovascular function and autonomic neural regulation in older adults are unclear. To investigate this issue, 25 older adults were randomly divided into two groups: control (CON, N = 13, 63 ± 4 years; no training) and HIPRT (N = 12, 64 ± 4 years; 2 sessions/week, 7 exercises, 2–4 sets, 10–4 RM). Before and after four months, maximal strength, quadriceps cross-sectional area (QCSA), clinic and ambulatory blood pressures (BP), systemic hemodynamics, and cardiovascular autonomic modulation were measured. Maximal strength and QCSA increased in the HIPRT group and did not change in the CON group. Clinic and ambulatory BP, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, stroke volume, heart rate, and cardiac sympathovagal balance did not change in the HIPRT group or the CON group. In conclusion, HIPRT was effective at increasing muscle mass and strength without promoting changes in cardiovascular function or autonomic neural regulation.

  15. The Impact of Early Life Stress on Growth and Cardiovascular Risk: A Possible Example for Autonomic Imprinting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhorn, Reiner; Meint, Sebastian; Willaschek, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress is imprinting regulatory properties with life-long consequences. We investigated heart rate variability in a group of small children with height below the third percentile, who experienced an episode of early life stress due to heart failure or intra uterine growth retardation. These children appear to develop autonomic dysfunction in later life. Compared to the healthy control group heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced on average in a group of 101 children with short stature. Low HRV correlates to groups of children born small for gestational age (SGA), children with cardiac growth failure and children with congenital syndromes, but not to those with constitutional growth delay (CGD), who had normal HRV. Reduced HRV indicated by lower RMSSD and High Frequency (HF)-Power is indicating reduced vagal activity as a sign of autonomic imbalance. It is not short stature itself, but rather the underlying diseases that are the cause for reduced HRV in children with height below the third percentile. These high risk children-allocated in the groups with an adverse autonomic imprinting in utero or infancy (SGA, congenital heart disease and congenital syndromes)-have the highest risk for 'stress diseases' such as cardiovascular disease in later life. The incidence of attention deficit disorder is remarkably high in our group of short children.

  16. Resting heart rate and measures of effort-related cardiac autonomic dysfunction predict cardiovascular events in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafrir, Barak; Azencot, Mali; Dobrecky-Mery, Idit; Lewis, Basil S; Flugelman, Moshe Y; Halon, David A

    2016-08-01

    Autonomic control of the cardiovascular system may be impaired in type 2 diabetes and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Parameters obtained during stress testing may reflect early stages of cardiac autonomic dysfunction and provide prognostic information in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes. We performed maximal exercise treadmill testing in 594 patients with type 2 diabetes without known coronary heart disease. The prognostic significance of physiological parameters associated with autonomic dysfunction was assessed, including chronotropic incompetence (heart rate reserve), abnormal heart rate recovery at 1 minute 100 beats/minute. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to determine the association of exercise parameters with a composite outcome of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction or stroke. Resting heart rate >100 beats/minute was observed in 18% of patients, chronotropic incompetence in 30% and heart rate recovery at 1 minute heart rate ≥100 beats/minute (hazard ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval 1.19-3.26; P = 0.008) and heart rate recovery at 1 minute heart rate recovery are independently and additively associated with long-term mortality, myocardial infarction or stroke in type 2 diabetes without known coronary heart disease. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  17. Cardiovascular implications from untreated human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Lundgren, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with access to antiretroviral medications, as the risk for AIDS has fallen and life expectancy improved. Traditional CVD risk...

  18. Task Refinement for Autonomous Robots using Complementary Corrective Human Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetin Mericli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A robot can perform a given task through a policy that maps its sensed state to appropriate actions. We assume that a hand-coded controller can achieve such a mapping only for the basic cases of the task. Refining the controller becomes harder and gets more tedious and error prone as the complexity of the task increases. In this paper, we present a new learning from demonstration approach to improve the robot's performance through the use of corrective human feedback as a complement to an existing hand-coded algorithm. The human teacher observes the robot as it performs the task using the hand-coded algorithm and takes over the control to correct the behavior when the robot selects a wrong action to be executed. Corrections are captured as new state-action pairs and the default controller output is replaced by the demonstrated corrections during autonomous execution when the current state of the robot is decided to be similar to a previously corrected state in the correction database. The proposed approach is applied to a complex ball dribbling task performed against stationary defender robots in a robot soccer scenario, where physical Aldebaran Nao humanoid robots are used. The results of our experiments show an improvement in the robot's performance when the default hand-coded controller is augmented with corrective human demonstration.

  19. Human skin hypoxia modulates cerebrovascular and autonomic functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Pucci

    Full Text Available Because the skin is an oxygen sensor in amphibians and mice, we thought to confirm this function also in humans. The human upright posture, however, introduces additional functional demands for the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in which cerebral blood flow and autonomic nervous system (ANS function may also be involved. We examined nine males and three females. While subjects were breathing ambient air, at sea level, we changed gases in a plastic body-bag during two conditions of the experiment such as to induce skin hypoxia (with pure nitrogen or skin normoxia (with air. The subjects performed a test of hypoxic ventilatory drive during each condition of the experiment. We found no differences in the hypoxic ventilatory drive tests. However, ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities were modulated by skin hypoxia and the effect was significantly greater on the left than right middle cerebral arteries. We conclude that skin hypoxia modulates ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities and this might impact life styles and tolerance to ambient hypoxia at altitude. Thus the skin in normal humans, in addition to its numerous other functions, is also an oxygen sensor.

  20. An Agent Driven Human-centric Interface for Autonomous Mobile Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    An Agent Driven Human-centric Interface for Autonomous Mobile Robots Donald Sofge, Dennis Perzanowski, Magdalena Bugajska, William Adams...Human-centric, Multimodal, Dynamic Autonomy, CoABS Grid, Mobile Robots 1. INTRODUCTION One of the challenges in implementing dynamically...autonomous behaviors in mobile robots is achieving a truly human-centric interface so that human operators can interact with the robots as naturally as they

  1. Investigating Autonomic Control of the Cardiovascular System: A Battery of Simple Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher D.; Roe, Sean; Tansey, Etain A.

    2013-01-01

    Sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system constantly control the heart (sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions) and blood vessels (predominantly the sympathetic division) to maintain appropriate blood pressure and organ blood flow over sometimes widely varying conditions. This can be adversely affected by…

  2. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Anne Sofie; Tarnow, Lise; Rossing, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) has been associated with a poor prognosis in patients with diabetes. Because CAN is common in patients with diabetic nephropathy, we evaluated the predictive value of CAN in type 1 diabetic patients with and without diabetic nephropathy....

  3. Neuropatia autonômica cardiovascular diabética: fatores de risco, impacto clínico e diagnóstico precoce Diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy: risk factors, clinical impact and early diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Clemente de Souza Pereira Rolim

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A neuropatia autonômica cardiovascular (NAC constitui uma das complicações de maior repercussão clínica do diabete melito (DM e, ao mesmo tempo, está entre as menos diagnosticadas. Nesta revisão, são discutidos os principais fatores de risco para o desenvolvimento e a progressão da NAC nos pacientes com DM, a história natural da neuropatia autonômica e seu impacto na doença cardiovascular do DM, bem como os testes para o diagnóstico precoce e o estadiamento da NAC na prática clínica. A pesquisa bibliográfica teve como base dois bancos de dados: Medline e Tripdatabase, com os seguintes descritores: diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy e cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and diabetes. Os artigos de 1998 a 2007 em inglês e alemão foram selecionados. A NAC em estágios iniciais (precoce e intermediária pode ser diagnosticada e revertida, porém, nos casos avançados (estágio grave, resta apenas o tratamento sintomático. A NAC está associada a um maior índice de morbidade e mortalidade cardiovasculares e pior qualidade de vida nos indivíduos diabéticosCardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN is one of the most clinically significant complications of diabetes mellitus (DM, but one of the least frequently diagnosed. In this review, we discuss the major risk factors for the development and progression of CAN in patients with DM, the natural history of autonomic neuropathy and its impact on cardiovascular disease in DM, as well as the tests for the early diagnosis and staging of CAN in the clinical practice. The bibliographic research was based on two databases: Medline and Tripdatabase, with the following descriptors: diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and diabetes. We selected English and German articles, written between 1998 and 2007. In its initial stages (early and intermediate, CAN may be diagnosed and reversed. However, in advanced cases (severe stage, the only

  4. Embedding Human Expert Cognition Into Autonomous UAS Trajectory Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Pritesh; Meyer, Patrick; Campbell, Duncan

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the inclusion of human expert cognition into autonomous trajectory planning for unmanned aerial systems (UASs) operating in low-altitude environments. During typical UAS operations, multiple objectives may exist; therefore, the use of multicriteria decision aid techniques can potentially allow for convergence to trajectory solutions which better reflect overall mission requirements. In that context, additive multiattribute value theory has been applied to optimize trajectories with respect to multiple objectives. A graphical user interface was developed to allow for knowledge capture from a human decision maker (HDM) through simulated decision scenarios. The expert decision data gathered are converted into value functions and corresponding criteria weightings using utility additive theory. The inclusion of preferences elicited from HDM data within an automated decision system allows for the generation of trajectories which more closely represent the candidate HDM decision preferences. This approach has been demonstrated in this paper through simulation using a fixed-wing UAS operating in low-altitude environments.

  5. Is There an Association Between Markers of Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction at Discharge From Rehabilitation and Participation 1 and 5 Years Later in Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravensbergen, H. J. (Rianne); de Groot, Sonja; Post, Marcel W.; Bongers-Janssen, Helma M.; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Claydon, Victoria E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether physical activity and participation 1 and 5 years after discharge are associated with measures of cardiovascular autonomic function: prevalence of hypotension and reduced peak heart rate at discharge from initial inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation. Des

  6. Allocation of cognitive processing capacity during human autonomic classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, M E; Schell, A M; Beers, J R; Kelly, A

    1982-09-01

    In each of two experiments, allocation of cognitive processing capacity was measured in college-student subjects during autonomic discrimination classical conditioning. A 7.0-sec delay paradigm was used to establish classically conditioned responses to a reinforced visual conditioned stimulus (CS+). Electrodermal responses were the primary measures of autonomic classical conditioning. Allocation of processing capacity was measured by monitoring performance on a secondary reaction-time (RT) task. The auditory secondary-task RT signal was presented before, and 300, 500, 3500, 6500, and 7500 msec following CS onset. The RT signal was also presented following properly and improperly cued shock unconditioned stimuli (UCSs). Significant discrimination classical conditioning was obtained in both experiments. Comparison with control subjects who did not receive the RT signals indicated that the presence of the RT signals did not interfere with the development of classical conditioning. Four principal findings were obtained with the secondary-task RT measure. First, RTs to signals presented during CS+ were consistently slower than RTs to signals presented during CS-. This finding indicates that greater capacity allocation occurred during CS+ than CS- and is consistent with recent cognitive interpretations of classical conditioning. Second, the largest capacity allocation (i.e., slowing of RTs) occurred 300 msec following CS+ onset. This finding is consistent with the notion that subjects are actively processing the signal properties of the CS+ at 300 msec following CS+ onset. Third, presentation of the UCS when improperly cued (following CS-) significantly increased capacity allocation, whereas presentation of the same UCS when properly cued (following CS+) did not affect capacity allocation. These findings indicate that subjects were actively prepared for the UCS following CS+ but not following CS- and that a surprising UCS elicits greater capacity allocation than does an

  7. Origin of heart rate variability and turbulence: an appraisal of autonomic modulation of cardiovascular function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLombardi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of autonomic modulation of sinus node by non-invasive techniques has provided relevant clinical information in patients with several cardiac and non-cardiac diseases and has facilitated the appraisal of neural regulatory mechanisms in normal and diseased subjects. The finding that even during resting conditions the heart period changes on a beat to beat basis and that after a premature ventricular beat there are small variations in RR interval whose measurements may be utilised to evaluate the autonomic modulation of sinus node, has provided unprecedented clinical and pathophysiological information. Heart rate variability (HRV and Heart Rate Turbulence (HRT have been extensively utilised in the clinical setting. To explain the negative predictive value of a reduced HRV it was determined that overall HRV was largely dependent on vagal mechanisms and that a reduction in HRV could reflect an increased sympathetic and a reduced vagal modulation of sinus node; i.e. an autonomic alteration favouring cardiac electrical instability. This initial interpretation was challenged by several findings indicating a greater complexity of the relationship between neural input and sinus node responsiveness as well as the possible interference with non-neural mechanisms.Under controlled conditions, however, the computation of low and high frequency components and of their ratio seems capable of providing adequate information on sympatho-vagal balance in normal subjects as well as in most patients with a preserved left ventricular function, thus providing a unique tool to investigate neural control mechanisms. Analysis on non-linear dynamics of HRV has also been utilised to describe the fractal like characteristic of the variability signal and proven effective to identify patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. A reduction on HRT parameters reflecting reduced baroreflex sensitivity as a likely result of a reduced vagal and of an increased sympathetic

  8. Gender differences in autonomic cardiovascular regulation: spectral, hormonal, and hemodynamic indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. M.; Ziegler, M. G.; Patwardhan, A. R.; Ott, J. B.; Kim, C. S.; Leonelli, F. M.; Knapp, C. F.

    2001-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system drives variability in heart rate, vascular tone, cardiac ejection, and arterial pressure, but gender differences in autonomic regulation of the latter three parameters are not well documented. In addition to mean values, we used spectral analysis to calculate variability in arterial pressure, heart rate (R-R interval, RRI), stroke volume, and total peripheral resistance (TPR) and measured circulating levels of catecholamines and pancreatic polypeptide in two groups of 25 +/- 1.2-yr-old, healthy men and healthy follicular-phase women (40 total subjects, 10 men and 10 women per group). Group 1 subjects were studied supine, before and after beta- and muscarinic autonomic blockades, administered singly and together on separate days of study. Group 2 subjects were studied supine and drug free with the additional measurement of skin perfusion. In the unblocked state, we found that circulating levels of epinephrine and total spectral power of stroke volume, TPR, and skin perfusion ranged from two to six times greater in men than in women. The difference (men > women) in spectral power of TPR was maintained after beta- and muscarinic blockades, suggesting that the greater oscillations of vascular resistance in men may be alpha-adrenergically mediated. Men exhibited muscarinic buffering of mean TPR whereas women exhibited beta-adrenergic buffering of mean TPR as well as TPR and heart rate oscillations. Women had a greater distribution of RRI power in the breathing frequency range and a less negative slope of ln RRI power vs. ln frequency, both indicators that parasympathetic stimuli were the dominant influence on women's heart rate variability. The results of our study suggest a predominance of sympathetic vascular regulation in men compared with a dominant parasympathetic influence on heart rate regulation in women.

  9. Autonomous adrenocorticotropin reaction to stress stimuli in human fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinska-Kaczynska, Katarzyna; Bartkowiak, Robert; Kaczynski, Bartosz; Szymusik, Iwona; Wielgos, Miroslaw

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether human fetuses show ACTH response to stress stimuli, to define the gestational age from which these reactions may be present and to analyze the relationship between hormone concentrations and their changes, both in fetuses and in pregnant women. The study included 81 intrauterine transfusions carried out in 19 pregnant women. 52 procedures were performed directly into the umbilical vein, which is not innervated, so neutral for the fetus (the PCI group) and 29 transfusions into the intrahepatic vein -which puncture is stressful for the fetus (the IHV group). ACTH and cortisol concentrations in fetal and maternal plasma obtained during the procedures were assayed. The initial mean plasma ACTH concentration in the PCI group equaled 18.94pg/mL, but in the IHV group it was significantly higher and amounted 75.17pg/mL (p0.05) and in the PCI group (22.36pg/mL, p>0.05). The observed hormonal response in the IHV group proves the existence of fetal pituitary reaction to stress. The initial fetal ACTH concentration in the IHV group correlated with the number of transfusions performed on a single fetus (R=0.41; p=0.04). No correlation with parity, gestational weeks or the volume of transfused packed red blood cells was found. There was also no correlation between fetal and maternal ACTH concentrations in any group. Presented data suggest that the human fetus shows autonomous ACTH reaction to stress stimulation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of low-dose clonidine on cardiovascular and autonomic variables in adolescents with chronic fatigue: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagermoen, Even; Sulheim, Dag; Winger, Anette; Andersen, Anders M; Gjerstad, Johannes; Godang, Kristin; Rowe, Peter C; Saul, J Philip; Skovlund, Eva; Wyller, Vegard Bruun

    2015-09-10

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a common and disabling condition in adolescence with few treatment options. A central feature of CFS is orthostatic intolerance and abnormal autonomic cardiovascular control characterized by sympathetic predominance. We hypothesized that symptoms as well as the underlying pathophysiology might improve by treatment with the alpha2A-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine. A total of 176 adolescent CFS patients (12-18 years) were assessed for eligibility at a single referral center recruiting nation-wide. Patients were randomized 1:1 by a computer system and started treatment with clonidine capsules (25 μg or 50 μg twice daily, respectively, for body weight below/above 35 kg) or placebo capsules for 9 weeks. Double-blinding was provided. Data were collected from March 2010 until October 2012 as part of The Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial (NorCAPITAL). Effect of clonidine intervention was assessed by general linear models in intention-to-treat analyses, including baseline values as covariates in the model. A total of 120 patients (clonidine group n = 60, placebo group n = 60) were enrolled and started treatment. There were 14 drop-outs (5 in the clonidine group, 9 in the placebo group) during the intervention period. At 8 weeks, the clonidine group had lower plasma norepinephrine (difference = 205 pmol/L, p = 0.05) and urine norepinephrine/creatinine ratio (difference = 3.9 nmol/mmol, p = 0.002). During supine rest, the clonidine group had higher heart rate variability in the low-frequency range (LF-HRV, absolute units) (ratio = 1.4, p = 0.007) as well as higher standard deviation of all RR-intervals (SDNN) (difference = 12.0 ms, p = 0.05); during 20° head-up tilt there were no statistical differences in any cardiovascular variable. Symptoms of orthostatic intolerance did not change during the intervention period. Low-dose clonidine reduces catecholamine levels in adolescent

  11. Autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1980-01-01

    In order to elucidate the physiological significance of autonomic neuropathy in juvenile diabetics, cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic functions have been investigated in three groups of juvenile diabetics: One group had no signs of neuropathy, one group had presumably slight autonomic...... neuropathy (reduced beat-to-beat variation in heart rate during hyperventilation) and one group had clinically severe autonomic neuropathy, defined by presence of orthostatic hypotension. In all three experimental situations we found sympathetic dysfunction causing cardiovascular and/or hormonal...... maladjustments in patients with autonomic neuropathy. Regarding metabolic functions we found normal responses to graded exercise and insulin-induced hypoglycemia in patients with autonomic neuropathy in spite of blunted catecholamine responses, suggesting increased sensitivity of glycogen stores and adipose...

  12. Exercise might improve cardiovascular autonomic regulation in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, Daniela; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Scaramuzza, Andrea; Malacarne, Mara; Gervasi, Federico; Pagani, Massimo

    2013-06-01

    Considering that changes in exercise routines might have relevance in treatment of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus, we sought to assess whether spontaneous modifications to weekly exercise habits might occur in these patients and whether such variations would be accompanied by alterations in autonomic profile. In this observational study, we examined 77 patients (age 15.0 ± 0.6 years.) who in addition to a tailored optimal insulin treatment were invited to perform at least 1 h a day of moderate, aerobic exercise, as suggested by recent guidelines. Patients were studied at baseline (T0) and after 15.8 ± 0.7 months (T1). They were divided into three subgroups according to increased, unchanged and diminished total estimated weekly METs between T0 and T1. Autonomic profile was evaluated by assessing spontaneous baroreflex gain and low-frequency oscillation in arterial pressure, using spectral analysis of RR and systolic arterial pressure time series. Insulin therapy and biochemical data were similar among the 3 groups at T0 and T1, while body mass index standard deviation score was slightly reduced (p performance were improved (alpha index, from 17 ± 1 to 20 ± 2 ms/mmHg, p adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

  13. Detection of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy using exercise testing in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banthia, Smriti; Bergner, Daniel W; Chicos, Alexandru B; Ng, Jason; Pelchovitz, Daniel J; Subacius, Haris; Kadish, Alan H; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated autonomic nervous system function in subjects with diabetes during exercise and recovery. Eighteen type 2 diabetics (age 55±2 years) and twenty healthy controls (age 51±1 years) underwent two 16-min bicycle submaximal ECG stress tests followed by 45 min of recovery. During session #2, atropine (0.04 mg/kg) was administered at peak exercise, and the final two minutes of exercise and entire recovery occurred under parasympathetic blockade. Plasma catecholamines were measured throughout. Parasympathetic effect was defined as the difference between a measured parameter at baseline and after parasympathetic blockade. The parasympathetic effect on the RR interval was blunted (P=.004) in diabetic subjects during recovery. Parasympathetic effect on QT-RR slope during early recovery was diminished in the diabetes group (diabetes 0.13±0.02, control 0.21±0.02, P=.03). Subjects with diabetes had a lower heart rate recovery at 1 min (diabetes 18.5±1.9 bpm, control 27.6±1.5 bpm, Ptype 2 diabetes, even with minimal evidence of CAN using current methodology, altered cardiac autonomic balance is present and can be detected through an exercise-based assessment for CAN. The early post-exercise recovery period in diabetes was characterized by enhanced sympathoexcitation, diminished parasympathetic reactivation and delay in heart rate recovery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Study on a human guidance method for autonomous cruise of indoor robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bao-Zhi; Zhu, Ming

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes a method of human guidance for autonomous cruise of indoor robot. A low-cost robot follows a person in a room and notes the path for autonomous cruise using its monocular vision. A method of video-based object detection and tracking is taken to detect the target by the video received from the robot's camera. The validity of the human guidance method is proved by the experiment.

  15. High and low vitamin D level is associated with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C S; Fleischer, J; Vistisen, D

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the possible association between vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in people with diabetes. Methods: A total of 113 people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes [mean (interquartile range) diabetes duration 22.0 (12–31) years, mean (sd) age 56.2 (13.0) years...... was associated with a decrease of 2.6% (95% CI −5.8;0.1) and 4.1% (95% CI −5.8;−0.5) in the respective outcome measures. Conclusions: High and low vitamin D levels were associated with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in people with diabetes. Future studies should explore this association and the efficacy......, 58% men] underwent vitamin D (D2 and D3) assessment, and were screened for cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy using three cardiovascular reflex tests [heart rate response to deep breathing (E/I ratio), to standing (30/15 ratio) and to the Valsalva manoeuvre] and assessment of 5-min resting heart...

  16. Possible role of the histaminergic system in autonomic and cardiovascular responses to neuropeptide Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida, Mamoru; Shen, Jiao; Nagai, Katsuya

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that neuropeptide Y (NPY) affects blood pressure (BP) in anesthetized rats. Here, we examined the effects of the third cerebral ventricular (3CV) injection of various doses of NPY on renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and BP in anesthetized rats. 3CV injection of NPY suppressed RSNA and BP in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, suppressing effects of NPY on RSNA and BP were eliminated by lateral cerebral ventricular (LCV) preinjection of thioperamide, an antagonist of histaminergic H3-receptor, not diphenhydramine, an antagonist of histaminergic H1-receptor. In addition, 3CV injection of NPY accelerated gastric vagal nerve activity (GVNA) and inhibited brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity (BAT-SNA) of anesthetized rats, and lowered brown adipose tissue temperature (BAT-T) of conscious rats. Thus, these evidences suggest that central NPY affects autonomic nerves containing RSNA, GVNA or BAT-SNA, and BP by mediating central histaminergic H3-receptors.

  17. Circadian rhythm of autonomic cardiovascular control during Mars500 simulated mission to Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigo, Daniel E; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Ogrinz, Barbara; Wan, Li; Simonelli, Guido; Bersenev, Evgeny; Van Den Bergh, Omer; Aubert, André E

    2013-10-01

    The Mars500 project was conceived to gather knowledge about the psychological and physiological effects of living in an enclosed environment during 520 d as would be required for a real mission to Mars. Our objective was to investigate the circadian profile of heart rate variability (HRV) in the context of the Mars500 study. Before, during, and after confinement, 24-h EKG records were obtained from the six crewmembers who participated in the mission. Autonomic activity was evaluated through time and frequency domain indexes of HRV analysis. Circadian rhythmicity was assessed both by averaging hourly HRV along wake and sleep scheduled periods and by fitting a 24-h harmonic to the hourly means. During confinement, wake HRV showed (mean +/- SE) a progressive increase in mean RR interval (from 778 +/- 24 ms to 916 +/- 42 ms), and in the amplitude (values are wavelet power coefficients) of very low (from 13.3 +/- 0.3 to 14.1 +/- 0.2) and high (from 7.8 +/- 0.4 to 8.3 +/- 0.3) frequency components. During sleep, the relative amplitude of the high frequency component of HRV decreased (from 11.8 +/- 1.6 to 9.4 +/- 1.8 normalized units). Overall, sleep-wake differences of HRV showed a progressive decrease of the relative amplitude of the high frequency component. Also, circadian HRV rhythms were dampened during confinement. Data revealed diminished amplitude of the rest-activity pattern of the autonomic nervous system parasympathetic function. Reduced daylight exposure and mood changes could account for this observation.

  18. Cardiovascular autonomic control in patients undergoing left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support and pharmacologic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David; Sandercock, Gavin R H; George, Robert S; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Donovan, Gay; Bougard, Robert; Yacoub, Magdi H; Brodie, David A; Birks, Emma J

    2013-10-09

    The objective of the study is to determine cardiac autonomic control in patients undergoing assessment for and/or LVAD therapy. Heart rate variability (HRV) was measured in 17 explanted LVAD, 17 implanted LVAD and 23 NYHA III-IV classified chronic heart failure (CHF) patients and ten healthy matched controls under three conditions: supine free breathing, standing and supine controlled breathing. Five measures of HRV were assessed: mean R-R interval (mR-R), high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) spectral power, LF in normalised units (LFnu), and LF to HF (LF:HF) ratio. Repeat measures ANOVA showed significant (p < 0.05) differences in HRV between all three conditions within groups. Lower values were observed in CHF for LF(in log natural units) compared with explanted patients (-1.4 [95% CI -2.6 to -0.7], p = 0.04) and controls (-2.1 [-3.5 to -0.7], p = 0.001) and for LF:HF compared with implanted patients under paced breathing conditions (z = -2.7, p = 0.007) and controls in standing (z = -2.9, p = 0.004) and paced breathing conditions (z = -2.3, p = 0.02). However, no significant differences were seen between explanted, implanted and control groups under any condition. Patients implanted with an LVAD and explanted from a LVAD following myocardial recovery demonstrate a more normal dynamic response to autonomic stimuli and have a lower HRV risk profile compared to CHF patients. © 2013.

  19. Multifractal heart rate dynamics in human cardiovascular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Kiyoshi; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Safonov, Leonid; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    Human cardiovascular and/or cardio-respiratory systems are shown to exhibit both multifractal and synchronous dynamics, and we recently developed a nonlinear, physiologically plausible model for the synchronization between heartbeat and respiration (Kotani, et al. Phys. Rev. E 65: 051923, 2002). By using the same model, we now show the multifractality in the heart rate dynamics. We find that beat-to-beat monofractal noise (fractional Brownian motion) added to the brain stem cardiovascular areas results in significantly broader singularity spectra for heart rate through interactions between sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. We conclude that the model proposed here would be useful in studying the complex cardiovascular and/or cardio- respiratory dynamics in humans.

  20. Using autonomous replication to physically and genetically define human origins of replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krysan, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The author previously developed a system for studying autonomous replication in human cells involving the use of sequences from the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome to provide extrachromosomal plasmids with a nuclear retention function. Using this system, it was demonstrated that large fragments of human genomic DNA could be isolated which replicate autonomously in human cells. In this study the DNA sequences which function as origins of replication in human cells are defined physically and genetically. These experiments demonstrated that replication initiates at multiple locations distributed throughout the plasmid. Another line of experiments addressed the DNA sequence requirements for autonomous replication in human cells. These experiments demonstrated that human DNA fragments have a higher replication activity than bacterial fragments do. It was also found, however, that the bacterial DNA sequence could support efficient replication if enough copies of it were present on the plasmid. These findings suggested that autonomous replication in human cells does not depend on extensive, specific DNA sequences. The autonomous replication system which the author has employed for these experiments utilizes a cis-acting sequence from the EBV origin and the trans-acting EBNA-1 protein to provide plasmids with a nuclear retention function. It was therefore relevant to verify that the autonomous replication of human DNA fragments did not depend on the replication activity associated with the EBV sequences utilized for nuclear retention. To accomplish this goal, the author demonstrated that plasmids carrying the EBV sequences and large fragments of human DNA could support long-term autonomous replication in hamster cells, which are not permissive for EBV replication.

  1. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2014-12-02

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions.

  2. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions. PMID:25404329

  3. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of an autonomic neuropathy in the developed world. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy causes a constellation of symptoms and signs affecting cardiovascular, urogenital, gastrointestinal, pupillomotor, thermoregulatory, and sudomotor systems. Several discrete syndromes associated with diabetes cause autonomic dysfunction. The most prevalent of these are: generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy associated with the prediabetic state, treatment-induced painful and autonomic neuropathy, and transient hypoglycemia-associated autonomic neuropathy. These autonomic manifestations of diabetes are responsible for the most troublesome and disabling features of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and result in a significant proportion of the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease.

  4. Cardiovascular and fluid volume control in humans in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norsk, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The human cardiovascular system and regulation of fluid volume are heavily influenced by gravity. When decreasing the effects of gravity in humans such as by anti-orthostatic posture changes or immersion into water, venous return is increased by some 25%. This leads to central blood volume expans...... is of importance for understanding pathophysiology of heart failure, where gravity plays a strong role in fluid and sodium retention.......The human cardiovascular system and regulation of fluid volume are heavily influenced by gravity. When decreasing the effects of gravity in humans such as by anti-orthostatic posture changes or immersion into water, venous return is increased by some 25%. This leads to central blood volume...... on this complex interaction, because it is the only way to completely abolish the effects of gravity over longer periods. Results from space have been unexpected, because astronauts exhibit a fluid and sodium retaining state with activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which subjects during simulations...

  5. Muscle metaboreflex and autonomic regulation of heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, James P; Adlan, Ahmed M; Shantsila, Alena

    2013-01-01

    We elucidated the autonomic mechanisms whereby heart rate (HR) is regulated by the muscle metaboreflex. Eight male participants (22 ± 3 years) performed three exercise protocols: (1) enhanced metaboreflex activation with partial flow restriction (bi-lateral thigh cuff inflation) during leg cycling...

  6. Human++: Wireless autonomous sensor technology for body area networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, V.; Francisco, R. de; Pflug, H.; Santana, J.; Visser, H.; Vullers, R.; Groot, H. de; Gyselinckx, B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in ultra-low-power circuits and energy harvesters are making self-powered body wireless autonomous transducer solutions (WATS) a reality. Power optimization at the system and application level is crucial in achieving ultra-low-power consumption for the entire system. This paper deals

  7. Endothelin-1 supports clonal derivation and expansion of cardiovascular progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Boon-Seng; Ng, Shi-Yan; Wu, Hao; Buac, Kristina; Park, Joo-Hye C; Lian, Xiaojun; Xu, Jiejia; Foo, Kylie S; Felldin, Ulrika; He, Xiaobing; Nichane, Massimo; Yang, Henry; Bu, Lei; Li, Ronald A; Lim, Bing; Chien, Kenneth R

    2016-03-08

    Coronary arteriogenesis is a central step in cardiogenesis, requiring coordinated generation and integration of endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cells. At present, it is unclear whether the cell fate programme of cardiac progenitors to generate complex muscular or vascular structures is entirely cell autonomous. Here we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of vascular progenitors to develop and self-organize into cardiac tissues by clonally isolating and expanding second heart field cardiovascular progenitors using WNT3A and endothelin-1 (EDN1) human recombinant proteins. Progenitor clones undergo long-term expansion and differentiate primarily into endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro, and contribute extensively to coronary-like vessels in vivo, forming a functional human-mouse chimeric circulatory system. Our study identifies EDN1 as a key factor towards the generation and clonal derivation of ISL1(+) vascular intermediates, and demonstrates the intrinsic cell-autonomous nature of these progenitors to differentiate and self-organize into functional vasculatures in vivo.

  8. Asociación de la neuropatía autonómica cardiovascular y el intervalo QT prolongado con la morbimortalidad cardiovascular en pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 Association of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and prolonged QT interval with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Ticse Aguirre

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de evaluar la relación entre la neuropatía autonómica cardiovascular (NACV y el intervalo QT corregido (QTc con la morbimortalidad cardiovascular en pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2, se realizó el seguimiento a 5 años de 67 pacientes que acudieron a consulta externa del Servicio de Endocrinología. Se presentaron eventos cardiovasculares en 16 pacientes; el 82% completó el seguimiento y se encontró que el intervalo QTc prolongado fue la única variable que se asoció de forma significativa a morbimortalidad cardiovascular en el análisis de regresión logística múltiple (RR: 13,56; IC 95%: 2,01-91,36 (p=0,0074.In order to evaluate the relationship between cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and corrected QT interval (QTc with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, we followed up for 5 years 67 patients attending the outpatient Endocrinology Service. 82% completed follow-up and cardiovascular events occurred in 16 patients. We found that long QTc interval was the only variable significantly associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the multiple logistic regression analysis (RR: 13.56, 95% CI: 2.01-91.36 (p = 0.0074.

  9. Grape Polyphenols’ Effects in Human Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuriñe Rasines-Perea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of fruits and vegetables, as well as foods enriched in bioactive compounds and nutraceuticals, has increased due to consumers’ interest in the relevance of food composition for human health. Considerable recent interest has focused on bioactive phenolic compounds in grape, as they possess many biological activities, such as antioxidant, cardioprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammation, anti-ageing and antimicrobial properties. Observational studies indicate that the intake of polyphenol-rich foods improves vascular health, thereby significantly reducing the risk of hypertension, and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Other researchers have described the benefits of a grape polyphenol-rich diet for other types of maladies such as diabetes mellitus. This is a comprehensive review on the consumption of polyphenolic grape compounds, concerning their potential benefits for human health in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

  10. Grape Polyphenols' Effects in Human Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasines-Perea, Zuriñe; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis

    2017-01-01

    The consumption of fruits and vegetables, as well as foods enriched in bioactive compounds and nutraceuticals, has increased due to consumers' interest in the relevance of food composition for human health. Considerable recent interest has focused on bioactive phenolic compounds in grape, as they possess many biological activities, such as antioxidant, cardioprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammation, anti-ageing and antimicrobial properties. Observational studies indicate that the intake of polyphenol-rich foods improves vascular health, thereby significantly reducing the risk of hypertension, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Other researchers have described the benefits of a grape polyphenol-rich diet for other types of maladies such as diabetes mellitus. This is a comprehensive review on the consumption of polyphenolic grape compounds, concerning their potential benefits for human health in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

  11. The Effects Of Sleep On Autonomic Regulation, Cardiovascular Activity, And Cognitive Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Cellini, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is a cyclical behaviour that occurs every day and we spend a significant portion of our life sleeping. While “why do we sleep” remains an unanswered question, we know that sleep is essential for life. Several aspects of our life are dependent on or strictly related to sleep, from molecular and hormonal levels to high-functional behaviours. The main purpose of the present dissertation is to investigate through five experiments two of the most fundamental aspects of human life, cardio...

  12. Skinfold thickness is related to cardiovascular autonomic control as assessed by heart rate variability and heart rate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esco, Michael R; Williford, Henry N; Olson, Michele S

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if heart rate recovery (HRR) and heart rate variability (HRV) are related to maximal aerobic fitness and selected body composition measurements. Fifty men (age = 21.9 ± 3.0 years, height = 180.8 ± 7.2 cm, weight = 80.4 ± 9.1 kg, volunteered to participate in this study. For each subject, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and the sum of skinfolds across the chest, abdomen, and thigh regions (SUMSF) were recorded. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed during a 5-minute period while the subjects rested in a supine position. The following frequency domain parameters of HRV were recorded: normalized high-frequency power (HFnu), and low-frequency to high-frequency power ratio (LF:HF). To determine maximal aerobic fitness (i.e., VO2max), each subject performed a maximal graded exercise test on a treadmill. Heart rate recovery was recorded 1 (HRR1) and 2 (HRR2) minutes during a cool-down period. Mean VO2max and BMI for all the subjects were 49.5 ± 7.5 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) and 24.7 ± 2.2 kg·m(-2), respectively. Although VO2max, WC, and SUMSF was each significantly correlated to HRR and HRV, only SUMSF had a significant independent correlation to HRR1, HRR2, HFnu, LF:HF (p < 0.01). The results of the regression procedure showed that SUMSF accounted for the greatest variance in HRR1, HRR2, HFnu, and LF:HF (p < 0.01). The results of this study suggest that cardiovascular autonomic modulation is significantly related to maximal aerobic fitness and body composition. However, SUMSF appears to have the strongest independent relationship with HRR and HRV, compared to other body composition parameters and VO2max.

  13. Recent genetic discoveries implicating ion channels in human cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Alfred L

    2014-04-01

    The term 'channelopathy' refers to human genetic disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding ion channels or their interacting proteins. Recent advances in this field have been enabled by next-generation DNA sequencing strategies such as whole exome sequencing with several intriguing and unexpected discoveries. This review highlights important discoveries implicating ion channels or ion channel modulators in cardiovascular disorders including cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility, cardiac conduction phenotypes, pulmonary and systemic hypertension. These recent discoveries further emphasize the importance of ion channels in the pathophysiology of human disease and as important druggable targets.

  14. High Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training Improves Deficits of Cardiovascular Autonomic Function in a Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with Moderate Hyperglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth N. Grisé

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Indices of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN in experimental models of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM are often contrary to clinical data. Here, we investigated whether a relatable insulin-treated model of T1DM would induce deficits in cardiovascular (CV autonomic function more reflective of clinical results and if exercise training could prevent those deficits. Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control (C, sedentary T1DM (D, control exercise (CX, or T1DM exercise (DX. Diabetes was induced via multiple low-dose injections of streptozotocin and blood glucose was maintained at moderate hyperglycemia (9–17 mM through insulin supplementation. Exercise training consisted of daily treadmill running for 10 weeks. Compared to C, D had blunted baroreflex sensitivity, increased vascular sympathetic tone, increased serum neuropeptide Y (NPY, and decreased intrinsic heart rate. In contrast, DX differed from D in all measures of CAN (except NPY, including heart rate variability. These findings demonstrate that this T1DM model elicits deficits and exercise-mediated improvements to CV autonomic function which are reflective of clinical T1DM.

  15. A learning-based autonomous driver: emulate human driver's intelligence in low-speed car following

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junqing; Dolan, John M.; Litkouhi, Bakhtiar

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, an offline learning mechanism based on the genetic algorithm is proposed for autonomous vehicles to emulate human driver behaviors. The autonomous driving ability is implemented based on a Prediction- and Cost function-Based algorithm (PCB). PCB is designed to emulate a human driver's decision process, which is modeled as traffic scenario prediction and evaluation. This paper focuses on using a learning algorithm to optimize PCB with very limited training data, so that PCB can have the ability to predict and evaluate traffic scenarios similarly to human drivers. 80 seconds of human driving data was collected in low-speed (car-following scenarios. In the low-speed car-following tests, PCB was able to perform more human-like carfollowing after learning. A more general 120 kilometer-long simulation showed that PCB performs robustly even in scenarios that are not part of the training set.

  16. Respiratory modulation of human autonomic function on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, Dwain L; Cooke, William H; Diedrich, André; Biaggioni, Italo; Buckey, Jay C; Pawelczyk, James A; Ertl, Andrew C; Cox, James F; Kuusela, Tom A; Tahvanainen, Kari U O; Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi; Baisch, Friedhelm J; Levine, Benjamin D; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Robertson, David; Blomqvist, C Gunnar

    2016-10-01

    We studied healthy supine astronauts on Earth with electrocardiogram, non-invasive arterial pressure, respiratory carbon dioxide concentrations, breathing depth and sympathetic nerve recordings. The null hypotheses were that heart beat interval fluctuations at usual breathing frequencies are baroreflex mediated, that they persist during apnoea, and that autonomic responses to apnoea result from changes of chemoreceptor, baroreceptor or lung stretch receptor inputs. R-R interval fluctuations at usual breathing frequencies are unlikely to be baroreflex mediated, and disappear during apnoea. The subjects' responses to apnoea could not be attributed to changes of central chemoreceptor activity (hypocapnia prevailed); altered arterial baroreceptor input (vagal baroreflex gain declined and muscle sympathetic nerve burst areas, frequencies and probabilities increased, even as arterial pressure climbed to new levels); or altered pulmonary stretch receptor activity (major breathing frequency and tidal volume changes did not alter vagal tone or sympathetic activity). Apnoea responses of healthy subjects may result from changes of central respiratory motoneurone activity. We studied eight healthy, supine astronauts on Earth, who followed a simple protocol: they breathed at fixed or random frequencies, hyperventilated and then stopped breathing, as a means to modulate and expose to view important, but obscure central neurophysiological mechanisms. Our recordings included the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, tidal volume, respiratory carbon dioxide concentrations and peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity. Arterial pressure, vagal tone and muscle sympathetic outflow were comparable during spontaneous and controlled-frequency breathing. Compared with spontaneous, 0.1 and 0.05 Hz breathing, however, breathing at usual frequencies (∼0.25 Hz) lowered arterial baroreflex gain, and provoked smaller arterial pressure and R-R interval

  17. Can coefficient of variation of time-domain analysis be valuable for detecting cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in young patients with type 1 diabetes: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razanskaite-Virbickiene, Dovile; Danyte, Evalda; Mockeviciene, Giedre; Dobrovolskiene, Rimante; Verkauskiene, Rasa; Zalinkevicius, Rimantas

    2017-01-19

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) increases morbidity and mortality in diabetes through association with a high risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death, possibly related to silent myocardial ischemia. During the sub-clinical stage, CAN can be detected through reduction in heart rate variability (HRV). The aim of our study was to estimate if the time and frequency-domain analysis can be valuable for detecting CAN in young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). For this case control study of evaluation of cardiovascular autonomic function the 15-25 years age group of patients with duration of T1DM more than 9 years (n = 208, 89 males and 119 females) were selected. 67 patients with confirmed CAN were assigned to the "case group" and 141 patients without CAN served as a control group, the duration of T1DM was similar (15.07 ± 4.89 years vs.13.66 ± 4.02 years; p = 0.06) in both groups. Cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests and time and frequency domains analysis of HRV were performed for all subjects. Time domain measures were significantly lower in CAN group compared with control (p coefficient of variation (CV) were the lowest during deep breathing among T1DM patients with CAN. Receivers operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to compare the accuracies of the parameters of time-domain analysis for diagnosing CAN. We estimated a more reliable cut-off value of parameters of time-domain. The CV values in supine position coefficient of variation (time-domain analysis) especially during deep breathing could be valuable for detecting CAN.

  18. Add-on therapy with a nighttime dose of doxazosin in patients with uncontrolled hypertension: effects on autonomic modulation of the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzik, Przemyslaw; Wykretowicz, Andrzej; Krauze, Tomasz; Piskorski, Jaroslaw; Adamska, Karolina; Milewska, Agata; Wesseling, Karel H; Wysocki, Henryk

    2008-03-01

    This study was designed to determine whether or not the addition of a single nighttime dose of doxazosin in extended-release form (GITS; gastrointestinal therapeutic system) would affect the autonomic modulation of the cardiovascular system in patients with uncontrolled hypertension treated with a multi-drug regimen. Resting 5-min noninvasive finger blood pressure and ECG signals, as well as 24-h Holter ECGs, were recorded in 30 patients with uncontrolled hypertension on multi-drug treatment before and after 16-week add-on therapy with doxazosin GITS. Cardiovascular autonomic modulation was evaluated by spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) and a cross-correlation method for spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in 5-min resting recordings, and by the analysis of Poincaré plots and phase-rectified signal averaging of the duration of cardiac cycles in 24-h ECG recordings. This combined therapy significantly reduced systolic pressure (19.4+/-3.5 mmHg; p<0.0001), diastolic blood pressure (9.4+/-2.0 mmHg; p=0.0003), and pulse pressure (10.0+/-2.8 mmHg; p=0.0021). Concomitantly, there was a significant increase in resting spontaneous BRS (p=0.0191) and increases in 24-h short-term (p=0.0129) and total (p=0.0153) HRV, but with no significant change in heart rate or other measures of HRV. The improvements in HRV and BRS were observed mainly in patients already treated with thiazide diuretics. There was a significant association (r=0.49; p=0.0065) between the degree of change in diastolic blood pressure and short-term HRV caused by the combined treatment. The addition of 4 mg doxazosin GITS to multi-drug antihypertensive therapy is associated with an improvement in cardiovascular autonomic control.

  19. Coconut oil consumption and cardiovascular risk factors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyres, Laurence; Eyres, Michael F; Chisholm, Alexandra; Brown, Rachel C

    2016-04-01

    Coconut oil is being heavily promoted as a healthy oil, with benefits that include support of heart health. To assess the merits of this claim, the literature on the effect of coconut consumption on cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes in humans was reviewed. Twenty-one research papers were identified for inclusion in the review: 8 clinical trials and 13 observational studies. The majority examined the effect of coconut oil or coconut products on serum lipid profiles. Coconut oil generally raised total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to a greater extent than cis unsaturated plant oils, but to a lesser extent than butter. The effect of coconut consumption on the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was often not examined. Observational evidence suggests that consumption of coconut flesh or squeezed coconut in the context of traditional dietary patterns does not lead to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, due to large differences in dietary and lifestyle patterns, these findings cannot be applied to a typical Western diet. Overall, the weight of the evidence from intervention studies to date suggests that replacing coconut oil with cis unsaturated fats would alter blood lipid profiles in a manner consistent with a reduction in risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  20. Continuous glucose monitoring adds information beyond HbA1c in well-controlled diabetes patients with early cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jesper; Laugesen, Esben; Cichosz, Simon Lebech

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Hyperglycemia as evaluated by HbA1c is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) may add information beyond HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes and CAN. METHODS...... analysis didn't change the results. CONCLUSIONS: These findings emphasize the importance of monitoring glucose patterns over 24-h and not only rely on HbA1c as therapeutic target in patients with type 2 diabetes and CAN....

  1. Urgent need for human resources to promote global cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedanthan, Rajesh; Fuster, Valentin

    2011-02-01

    The World Health Organization estimates the existence of a global shortage of over 4 million health-care workers. Given the growing global burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the shortfall in global human resources for health (HRH) is probably even greater than predicted. A critical challenge going forward is to determine how to integrate CVD-related human resource needs into the overall global HRH agenda. We describe the CVD implications of core HRH objectives, including coverage, motivation, and competence, in addition to issues such as health-care worker migration and the need for input from multiple stakeholders to successfully address the current problems. We emphasize gaps in knowledge regarding HRH for global CVD-related care and research opportunities. In light of the current global epidemiologic transition from communicable to noncommunicable diseases, now is the time for the global health community to focus on CVD-related human resource needs.

  2. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: prevalence and estimated risk of coronary heart disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, O; Arildsen, H; Damsgaard, E M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in Type 1 diabetes mellitus in the general population and to assess the relationship between CAN and risk of future coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: The Type 1 diabetes mellitus......-R interval in expiration divided by the shortest in inspiration during deep breathing at 6 breaths min(-1) and taken to express the degree of CAN. A maximal symptom-limited exercise test was carried out and the VA Prognostic Score, indicating risk of cardiovascular death or non-fatal myocardial infarction...... = 0.001). Exercise capacity, rise in systolic blood pressure and heart rate were positively correlated with the E/I ratio. A high VA Prognostic Score was correlated with a low E/I ratio (r = - 0.58, P

  3. Advances in Robotic, Human, and Autonomous Systems for Missions of Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Briggs, Geoffrey A.; Glass, Brian J.; Pedersen, Liam; Kortenkamp, David M.; Wettergreen, David S.; Nourbakhsh, I.; Clancy, Daniel J.; Zornetzer, Steven (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Space exploration missions are evolving toward more complex architectures involving more capable robotic systems, new levels of human and robotic interaction, and increasingly autonomous systems. How this evolving mix of advanced capabilities will be utilized in the design of new missions is a subject of much current interest. Cost and risk constraints also play a key role in the development of new missions, resulting in a complex interplay of a broad range of factors in the mission development and planning of new missions. This paper will discuss how human, robotic, and autonomous systems could be used in advanced space exploration missions. In particular, a recently completed survey of the state of the art and the potential future of robotic systems, as well as new experiments utilizing human and robotic approaches will be described. Finally, there will be a discussion of how best to utilize these various approaches for meeting space exploration goals.

  4. Non-contact radiofrequency-induced reduction of subcutaneous abdominal fat correlates with initial cardiovascular autonomic balance and fat tissue hormones: safety analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumprla, Jiri; Howorka, Kinga; Kolackova, Zuzana; Sovova, Eliska

    2015-01-01

    The non-invasive reduction of subcutaneous abdominal fat became popular in the last decade. Radiofrequency (RF), non-contact, selective-field device Vanquish® has been developed to selectively induce deep fat tissue heating to reduce waist circumference. Our analysis evaluates immediate and sustained effects of this treatment on cardiovascular autonomic function and on selected metabolic parameters. Study design/ patients and methods: A retrospective proof-of-concept analysis of RF treatment effects was conducted in 20 individuals with metabolic syndrome, to reduce the subcutaneous abdominal fat. Four 30-minutes treatment sessions (manufacturer´s standard protocol) were performed in 1-week intervals. Vital signs, ECG, lab screening, body composition, subcutaneous fat thickness and spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) have been examined before, after the 1 (st) and 4 (th) treatment, and at follow-up visits 1 month and 3 months after the treatment. The RF treatment led to a significant reduction of abdominal circumference after the 4 (th) session (p0.59, pfat. While the treatment increases the immediate sympathetic response of the body to deep tissue heating, no sustained change in autonomic function could be recorded at 1 month follow-up. The observed correlation between initial VLF spectral power and waist circumference reduction at follow-up, as well as the association of initial adiponectin values and immediate autonomic response to the treatment might be instrumental for decisions on body contouring strategies.

  5. Impaired autonomic responsiveness of the cardiovascular system of the rat induced by a heat-labile component of Bordetella pertussis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wildt, D J; Kreeftenberg, H G; Nijkamp, F P

    1983-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis vaccination induces severe impairment of the autonomic responsiveness of the cardiovascular system in rats. The vasodilation after beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation with salbutamol as well as the negative chronotropic action induced by the muscarinic receptor stimulant arecoline were inhibited 4 days after vaccination. Moreover, basal blood pressure values appeared to be significantly lower in B. pertussis-vaccinated rats compared with control animals. These effects were dependent upon the bacterial strain used. Differences in pharmacological activity due to strain differences paralleled variations in the content of lymphocytosis-promoting factor of the vaccine. The inhibitory effects were absent after the administration of vaccine heated for 1 h at 80 degrees C, implicating an important role for a heat-labile component, e.g., lymphocytosis-promoting factor, and not for a heat-stable constituent, e.g., endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide). Previous studies indicate that some early biological effects elicited by B. pertussis vaccine can be attributed to lipopolysaccharide, whereas late induced effects are mainly brought about by lymphocytosis-promoting factor. For that reason a role for lipopolysaccharide might be excluded because 5 h after vaccination no disturbances of the autonomic nervous system were observed. We conclude that B. pertussis vaccination induces autonomic hyporesponsiveness due to a heat-labile component that is assumed to be lymphocytosis-promoting factor. PMID:6307869

  6. Designing for Humans in Autonomous Systems: Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    directs its activity towards achieving goals” (Russell and Norvig , 2009, p. 34). The advantage of an executive paradigm is that the human (executive...Frontiers Series. Taylor and Francis: London, 2013; pp 185–208. Russell, S. J.; Norvig , P. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, 3rd ed.; Upper

  7. Holistic Modeling for Human-Autonomous System Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Dekker  and  Woods,  1999;   Hollnagel,  2003;   Klein ,  2000;   Klein ,  et  al.,  1989;  Lewis  and  Wharton,  1997...complexities  of  human  perception,  cognition,   emotions ,   and  decision-­‐making.  Second,  the  CHAS  model  requires

  8. Human-Centered Command and Control of Future Autonomous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    displays revealed by our recent Naïve Realism research in metacognition and visual displays (Smallman & Cook, 2011). The role of the human factors...values as comparisons for real-time values to help monitor. These work-arounds are strikingly similar to strategies used by nuclear plant operators when...monitoring (Mumaw, Roth, Vicente, & Burns, 2000). The development and use of these strategies is indicative of the shortfalls of systems in both

  9. Cardiovascular responses to voluntary and nonvoluntary static exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, D B; Peel, C; Mitchell, J H

    1992-11-01

    We have measured the cardiovascular responses during voluntary and nonvoluntary (electrically induced) one-leg static exercise in humans. Eight normal subjects were studied at rest and during 5 min of static leg extension at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction performed voluntarily and nonvoluntarily in random order. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac output (CO) were determined, and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) and stroke volume (SV) were calculated. HR increased from approximately 65 +/- 3 beats/min at rest to 80 +/- 4 and 78 +/- 6 beats/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. CO increased from 5.1 +/- 0.7 to 6.0 +/- 0.8 and 6.2 +/- 0.8 l/min (P voluntary and nonvoluntary contractions, respectively. PVR and SV did not change significantly during voluntary or nonvoluntary contractions. Thus the cardiovascular responses were not different between voluntary and electrically induced contractions. These results suggest that the increases in CO, HR, SV, MAP, and PVR during 5 min of static contractions can be elicited without any contribution from a central neural mechanism (central command). However, central command could still have an important role during voluntary static exercise.

  10. Evidence for central organization of cardiovascular rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, N; Porta, A; Malliani, A

    2001-06-01

    Spectral analysis of heart rate and arterial pressure variabilities is a powerful noninvasive tool that is increasingly used to infer alterations of cardiovascular autonomic regulation in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as hypertension, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. A most important methodological issue to properly interpret the results obtained by the spectral analysis of cardiovascular variability signals is represented by the attribution of neurophysiological correlates to these spectral components. In this regard, recent application of spectral techniques to the evaluation of the oscillatory properties of sympathetic efferent activity in animals as well as in humans offers a new approach to a better understanding of the relationship between cardiovascular oscillations and autonomic regulation. The data so far collected seem to suggest the presence of a centrally organized neural code, characterized by excitatory and inhibitory neural mechanisms subserving the genesis and the regulation of cardiovascular oscillations concerning the major variables of autonomic regulation.

  11. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  12. cardiovasculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Guerrero

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los aspectos que más discusión ha suscitado en los últimos tiempos entre quienes nos dedicamos al estudio de la emoción tiene que ver con la eventual asociación entre percepción, valoración y respuesta fisiológica. Esto es, siguiendo la máxima aristotélica, cabría cuestionar si las cosas son como son o son como cada quien las percibe. El objetivo de este experimento ha sido establecer la existencia de una conexión entre percepción de control y responsividad cardiovascular. La muestra estudiada ha estado conformada por estudiantes de la Universidad de Castellón; todos ellos han participado de forma voluntaria. La prueba de estrés ha consistido en un examen real de una asignatura troncal de la titulación que cursaban los participantes. Así pues, utilizando una situación de estrés real, hipotetizamos que las respuestas cardiovasculares (medidas a través de la tasa cardiaca, la presión sanguínea sistólica y la presión sanguínea diastólica dependen de la percepción de control que el individuo tiene, o cree tener, sobre la situación.

  13. Can human autonomic classical conditioning occur without contingency awareness? The critical importance of the trial sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kulwinder; Dawson, Michael E; Schell, Anne M; Courtney, Christopher G; Payne, Andrew F H

    2013-04-01

    Most evidence suggests that awareness of the CS-US contingency is necessary for human autonomic conditioning. However, Schultz and Helmstetter (2010) reported unaware skin conductance conditioning using difficult-to-discriminate visual CSs. We sought to replicate these findings with procedures nearly identical to Schultz and Helmstetter among 66 participants. Results replicated the findings of significantly greater autonomic responding to CS+ than CS-; however, participants also demonstrated greater expectancy of shock to CS+ than CS- despite being classified as unaware. The differential expectancy and conditioning occurred only on trials that followed a CS+/CS- alternating sequence. On non-alternating trials, there was significantly higher expectancy and skin conductance responding to CS- compared to CS+. These results indicate that what initially appeared to be unaware differential conditioning was likely due to differential expectancy arising from a predictable trial sequence. These results underscore the critical importance of controlling for trial sequence effects in the study of learning.

  14. Autonomous facial recognition system inspired by human visual system based logarithmical image visualization technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qianwen; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos

    2017-05-01

    Autonomous facial recognition system is widely used in real-life applications, such as homeland border security, law enforcement identification and authentication, and video-based surveillance analysis. Issues like low image quality, non-uniform illumination as well as variations in poses and facial expressions can impair the performance of recognition systems. To address the non-uniform illumination challenge, we present a novel robust autonomous facial recognition system inspired by the human visual system based, so called, logarithmical image visualization technique. In this paper, the proposed method, for the first time, utilizes the logarithmical image visualization technique coupled with the local binary pattern to perform discriminative feature extraction for facial recognition system. The Yale database, the Yale-B database and the ATT database are used for computer simulation accuracy and efficiency testing. The extensive computer simulation demonstrates the method's efficiency, accuracy, and robustness of illumination invariance for facial recognition.

  15. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  16. Model-free causality analysis of cardiovascular variability detects the amelioration of autonomic control in Parkinson's disease patients undergoing mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, Tito; Bari, Vlasta; Marchi, Andrea; Tassin, Stefano; Dalla Vecchia, Laura; Canesi, Margherita; Barbic, Franca; Furlan, Raffaello; Porta, Alberto

    2014-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that causality analysis, applied to the spontaneous beat-to-beat variability of heart period (HP) and systolic arterial pressure (SAP), can identify the improvement of autonomic control linked to plantar mechanical stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). A causality index, measuring the strength of the association from SAP to HP variability, and derived according to the Granger paradigm (i.e. SAP causes HP if the inclusion of SAP into the set of signals utilized to describe cardiovascular interactions improves the prediction of HP series), was calculated using both linear model-based (MB) and nonlinear model-free (MF) approaches. Univariate HP and SAP variability indices in time and frequency domains, and bivariate descriptors of the HP-SAP variability interactions were computed as well. We studied ten PD patients (age range: 57-78 years; Hoehn-Yahr scale: 2-3; six males, four females) without orthostatic hypotension or symptoms of orthostatic intolerance and 'on-time' according to their habitual pharmacological treatment. PD patients underwent recordings at rest in a supine position and during a head-up tilt before, and 24 h after, mechanical stimulation was applied to the plantar surface of both feet. The MF causality analysis indicated a greater involvement of baroreflex in regulating HP-SAP variability interactions after mechanical stimulation. Remarkably, MB causality and more traditional univariate or bivariate techniques could not detect changes in cardiovascular regulation after mechanical stimulation, thus stressing the importance of accounting for nonlinear dynamics in PD patients. Due to the higher statistical power of MF causality we suggest its exploitation to monitor the baroreflex control improvement in PD patients, and we encourage the clinical application of the Granger causality approach to evaluate the modification of the autonomic control in relation to the application of a pharmacological treatment, a

  17. Age-related changes in cardiovascular system, autonomic functions, and levels of BDNF of healthy active males: role of yogic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rameswar; Singh, Som Nath; Chatterjee, Abhirup; Saha, Mantu

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with decline in cardiovascular, autonomic function, and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). Reports are scanty regarding whether yoga can improve age-related degenerative changes in healthy active men. This study is designed to appraise the role of yoga in improving age-related degenerative changes in cardiometabolic risk profile, autonomic function, stress, and BDNF. Healthy active males of three age groups (20-29, 30-39, and 40-49 years) were randomly assigned to practice yoga daily 1 h for 3 months. Significantly higher values of heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), load in heart (DoP), myocardial oxygen consumption (RPP), and total cholesterol (TC) were noted in senior age group. HR, BP, DoP, RPP, and TC decreased significantly following yogic practice. High frequency (HF), total power (TP), all time domain variables of heart rate variability (HRV), and skin conductance (SC) were significantly decreased with advancement of age. HF, TP, and time domain parameters of HRV and SC increased significantly following yogic practice. Higher levels of catecholamines and low frequency (LF) power of HRV was noted with advancement of age. Levels of catecholamines and LF significantly decreased following yogic practice. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level raised in senior age group. BDNF, serotonin, and dopamine were low in higher age group. Significant decrement of cortisol; ACTH; and increment in serotonin, dopamine, and BDNF was noted following yogic practice. This study revealed that yogic practices might help in the prevention of age-related degeneration by changing cardiometabolic risk factors, autonomic function, and BDNF in healthy male.

  18. The effects of cardiovascular exercise on human memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roig, Marc; Nordbrandt, Sasja; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the evidence for the use of cardiovascular exercise to improve memory and explored potential mechanisms. Data from 29 and 21 studies including acute and long-term cardiovascular interventions were retrieved. Meta-analyses revealed that acute exercise had moderate (SMD=0.26; 95% CI=0.0...

  19. Characterization of human chromosomal DNA sequences which replicate autonomously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, J F; Norbury, C J; Tuite, M F; Dobson, M J; Mills, J S; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1984-01-01

    We have characterised two restriction fragments, isolated from a "shotgun" collection of human DNA, which function as autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional domains of these fragments have been defined by subcloning and exonuclease (BAL 31) deletion analysis. Both fragments contain two spatially distinct domains. One is essential for high frequency transformation and is termed the Replication Sequence (RS) domain, the other, termed the Replication Enhancer (RE) domain, has no inherent replication competence but is essential for ensuring maximum function of the RS domain. The nucleotide sequence of these domains reveals several conserved sequences one of which is strikingly similar to the yeast ARS consensus sequence. PMID:6320114

  20. Adrenergic receptor polymorphisms and autonomic nervous system function in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Koichiro; Matsunaga, Tetsuro; Adachi, Tetsuya; Aoki, Norihiko; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Tsuda, Kinsuke

    2006-09-01

    Adrenergic receptors (ARs) are cell-surface G-protein-coupled receptors for catecholamines. They are essential components of the sympathetic nervous system, organized within the autonomic nervous system (ANS), which controls various physiological functions, including energy homeostasis and metabolism of glucose and lipids. An impairment of ANS function in metabolism is considered to be one of the pathological states associated with human obesity and related metabolic diseases; thus, alterations in AR function might be implicated in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Several studies have suggested an association between obesity phenotypes and some AR polymorphisms. In vitro and human clinical studies indicate that some of these polymorphisms have functional and pathophysiological significance, including the linkage to ANS function. This review summarizes present knowledge of AR polymorphisms related to human obesity, and their association with ANS function.

  1. Clinical models of cardiovascular regulation after weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D.; Jacob, G.; Ertl, A.; Shannon, J.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1996-01-01

    After several days in microgravity, return to earth is attended by alterations in cardiovascular function. The mechanisms underlying these effects are inadequately understood. Three clinical disorders of autonomic function represent possible models of this abnormal cardiovascular function after spaceflight. They are pure autonomic failure, baroreflex failure, and orthostatic intolerance. In pure autonomic failure, virtually complete loss of sympathetic and parasympathetic function occurs along with profound and immediate orthostatic hypotension. In baroreflex failure, various degrees of debuffering of blood pressure occur. In acute and complete baroreflex failure, there is usually severe hypertension and tachycardia, while with less complete and more chronic baroreflex impairment, orthostatic abnormalities may be more apparent. In orthostatic intolerance, blood pressure fall is minor, but orthostatic symptoms are prominent and tachycardia frequently occurs. Only careful autonomic studies of human subjects in the microgravity environment will permit us to determine which of these models most closely reflects the pathophysiology brought on by a period of time in the microgravity environment.

  2. Sympathetic rhythms and cardiovascular oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, N; Cogliati, C; Dias da Silva, V J; Gnecchi-Ruscone, T; Malliani, A

    2001-07-20

    Spectral analysis of heart rate and arterial pressure variabilities is a powerful noninvasive tool, which is increasingly used to infer alterations of cardiovascular autonomic regulation in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions, such as hypertension, myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. A most important methodological issue to properly interpret the results obtained by the spectral analysis of cardiovascular variability signals is represented by the attribution of neurophysiological correlates to these spectral components. In this regard, recent applications of spectral techniques to the evaluation of the oscillatory properties of sympathetic efferent activity in animals, as well as in humans, offer a new approach to a better understanding of the relationship between cardiovascular oscillations and autonomic regulation.

  3. 心电图对功能性心血管疾病自主神经功能评价的意义%Significance of electrocardiogram in the evaluation of the autonomic nerve function in functional cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽萍; 王成

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system(ANS) activity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease,including organic cardiovascular disease(such as hypertension,coronary artery disease,etc) and functional cardiovascular disease (such as vasovagal syncope,postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome,etc).Many methods was used to evaluate ANS function.Heart rate variability is a widely accepted method to assess cardiac autonomic nerve function.Autonomic nervous affected cardiac action potential and let electrocardiogram changes.Through the sympathetic and parasympathetic neurotransmitters which acting on the corresponding receptors.Electrocardiogram changes reflects autonomic nervous function.Present researches suggest that electrocardiogram has an important significance in the evaluation of autonomic nerve function in functional cardiovascular disease.%自主神经系统对心血管疾病的发生发展起重要调节作用,包括器质性心血管疾病(如高血压、冠状动脉粥样硬化性心脏病等)及功能性心血管疾病(如血管迷走性晕厥、体位性心动过速综合征等).评估自主神经功能的方法有很多,心率变异性分析是公认的评估心脏自主神经功能的方法.自主神经系统通过交感神经和副交感神经作用于相应受体,影响心肌动作电位导致心电图变化.因此,心电图能反映心脏自主神经功能变化,对功能性心血管疾病的自主神经功能评估具有重要意义.

  4. Metabotropic glutamate2/3 receptor agonism facilitates autonomic recovery after pharmacological panic challenge in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agorastos, Agorastos; Demiralay, Cüneyt; Stiedl, Oliver; Muhtz, Christoph; Wiedemann, Klaus; Kellner, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) are suggested to modulate anxiety, arousal, and stress including autonomic control. However, no study has investigated mGluR2/3-related effects on baseline autonomic activity and reactivity to emotional challenge in humans as yet. Using a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled, cross-over study design, we investigated the influence of a 1-week treatment with the mGluR2/3 agonist LY544344, prodrug of LY354740, on autonomic reactivity to a cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) panic challenge in eight healthy young men. The main outcome measures were time and frequency domain heart rate variability parameters during baseline, CCK-4 challenge, and recovery. There was no evidence for LY544344-mediated effects on baseline and CCK-4 challenge vagal activity, but a significantly lower recovery low frequency (%) and low frequency/high frequency ratio in the LY544344 group, suggesting enhanced autonomic recovery. This pilot study provides first human data indicating that mGluR2/3 agonism is involved in autonomic responsiveness, suggesting an important role of mGluR2/3 in central autonomic regulation.

  5. Wearable wireless sensor platform for studying autonomic activity and social behavior in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Richard Ribón; Amemori, Ken-ichi; Goodwin, Matthew; Graybiel, Ann M

    2012-01-01

    A portable system has been designed to enable remote monitoring of autonomic nervous system output in non-human primates for the purpose of studying neural function related to social behavior over extended periods of time in an ambulatory setting. In contrast to prior systems which only measure heart activity, are restricted to a constrained laboratory setting, or require surgical attachment, our system is comprised of a multi-sensor self-contained wearable vest that can easily be transferred from one subject to another. The vest contains a small detachable low-power electronic sensor module for measuring electrodermal activity (EDA), electrocardiography (ECG), 3-axis acceleration, and temperature. The wireless transmission is implemented using a standard Bluetooth protocol and a mobile phone, which enables freedom of movement for the researcher as well as for the test subject. A custom Android software application was created on the mobile phone for viewing and recording live data as well as creating annotations. Data from up to seven monkeys can be recorded simultaneously using the mobile phone, with the option of real-time upload to a remote web server. Sample data are presented from two rhesus macaque monkeys showing stimulus-induced response in the laboratory as well as long-term ambulatory data collected in a large monkey cage. This system enables new possibilities for studying underlying mechanisms between autonomic brain function and social behavior with connection to human research in areas such as autism, substance abuse, and mood disorders.

  6. Cardiovascular effects of recombinant human erythropoietin in predialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, J; Torralbo, A; Martin, P; Rodrigo, J; Herrero, J A; Barrientos, A

    1997-04-01

    Treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has solved the problem of anemia in patients on dialysis. However, its application to predialysis patients has raised some doubts about its effects on the progression of renal disease and on blood pressure (BP) and hemodynamic regulation. We have prospectively studied over at least 6 months a group of 11 predialysis patients receiving rHuEPO treatment (initial dose, 1,000 U subcutaneously three times a week). Clinical assessment and biochemical and hematologic measurements were made once every 2 weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, echocardiography, and determination of neurohumoral mediators of hemodynamics were performed once every 3 months. An adequate hematologic response was found (hemoglobin, 11.7 +/- 0.4 g/dL v 9 +/- 0.3 g/dL) without changes in the progression of renal disease. A decrease in cardiac output and an increase in total peripheral resistance was seen as anemia improved. A trend toward decreased left ventricular (LV) thickness and a significant decrease in LV mass index (from 178.2 +/- 20.6 g/m2 to 147.3 +/- 20.6 g/m2) were observed. Blood pressure control did not improve; moreover, in some patients an increase in systolic values was detected by ambulatory BP. Casual BP remained seemingly stable. Sequential determinations of neurohumoral mediators of hemodynamic substances (endothelin, renin, norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine) failed to explain these results. Ambulatory BP reveals a worse control in some patients who were previously hypertensive and confirms the utility of this technique in the assessment of patients under erythropoietin treatment. The trend toward LV hypertrophy regression without improved BP control confirms the role of anemia among the multiple factors leading to LV hypertrophy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and opens therapeutic possibilities. Better control of BP may avoid a potential offsetting of beneficial effects that correcting anemia would

  7. Expression of a humanized viral 2A-mediated lux operon efficiently generates autonomous bioluminescence in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Xu

    Full Text Available Expression of autonomous bioluminescence from human cells was previously reported to be impossible, suggesting that all bioluminescent-based mammalian reporter systems must therefore require application of a potentially influential chemical substrate. While this was disproven when the bacterial luciferase (lux cassette was demonstrated to function in a human cell, its expression required multiple genetic constructs, was functional in only a single cell type, and generated a significantly reduced signal compared to substrate-requiring systems. Here we investigate the use of a humanized, viral 2A-linked lux genetic architecture for the efficient introduction of an autobioluminescent phenotype across a variety of human cell lines.The lux cassette was codon optimized and assembled into a synthetic human expression operon using viral 2A elements as linker regions. Human kidney, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines were both transiently and stably transfected with the humanized operon and the resulting autobioluminescent phenotype was evaluated using common imaging instrumentation. Autobioluminescent cells were screened for cytotoxic effects resulting from lux expression and their utility as bioreporters was evaluated through the demonstration of repeated monitoring of single populations over a prolonged period using both a modified E-SCREEN assay for estrogen detection and a classical cytotoxic compound detection assay for the antibiotic Zeocin. Furthermore, the use of self-directed bioluminescent initiation in response to target detection was assessed to determine its amenability towards deployment as fully autonomous sensors. In all cases, bioluminescent measurements were supported with traditional genetic and transcriptomic evaluations.Our results demonstrate that the viral 2A-linked, humanized lux genetic architecture successfully produced autobioluminescent phenotypes in all cell lines tested without the induction of cytotoxicity

  8. Regulating autonomic nerve system:a new field of anti-inflammatory therapy for cardiovascular diseases%调节自主神经系统:心血管疾病抗炎治疗的新领域

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马度芳; 姜萍; 杨金龙; 李晓

    2015-01-01

    The role of chronic inflammation and autonomic neuropathy in the crucial underlying process con -tributing to the initiation and the progression of various cardiovascular diseases is well established .It is well known that the immune system is innervated by the autonomic nervous system , and the inflammatory reaction and immune reaction are re-gulated by the autonomic nerve system .Vagus nerve depresses inflammatory reaction via cholinergic anti-inflammatory path-way (CAP), while sympathetic nervous system has bidirectional regulation of pro-inflammation and anti-inflammation, which are affected by several factors such as the concentration of neurotransmitters or types of receptors .In this paper , we reviewed different effects of CAP and sympathetic nervous system on cardiovascular inflammatory reaction .Activation of CAP and regaining normal sympathetic function will improve the chronic inflammation in the process of cardiovascular disea -ses.Low-toxic and selective α7nAchR agonist is expected to be applied in cardiovascular diseases to alleviate chronic in -flammation .

  9. The combined effects of capsaicin, green tea extract and chicken essence tablets on human autonomic nervous system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ki Ok; Moritani, Toshio

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether combined capsaicin, green tea, and chicken essence tablets (CCGC) enhance human autonomic nervous activities (ANS) associated with thermogenic sympathetic activity without any adverse effect on the cardiac depolarization-repolarization period. Six healthy males (25.2 +/-1.7 y) volunteered for this experiment. Autonomic nervous activities were examined 5-min at rest per 30-min for total 1.5 h after consuming chicken or CCGC or placebo tablets at random on separate days. Using heart rate variability power spectral analysis, we assessed human autonomic nervous activities. In comparison to chicken essence or placebo tablets, it was observed that the consumption of CCGC significantly increased human autonomic nervous activities [Total power representing over-all ANS activity; CCGC trial 160.2 (50.0) vs. placebo 92.8 (53.3)%, p chicken 130.5 (52.9)%, p chicken essence or placebo tablets. Therefore, these results suggest that combined capsaicin, green tea, and chicken essence tablets may be a beneficial food ingredient improving human autonomic nervous activities, particularly thermogenic sympathetic activity as a modulator of energy metabolism without any adverse effects on cardiac electrical stability.

  10. Anatomic Localization and Autonomic Modulation of AV Junctional Rhythm in Failing Human Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vadim V.; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Kostecki, Geran; Hucker, William J.; Glukhov, Alexey V.; Wuskell, Joseph P.; Loew, Leslie M.; Moazami, Nader; Efimov, Igor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background The structure-function relationship in the atrioventricular junction (AVJ) of various animal species has been investigated in detail, however less is known about the human AVJ. In this study, we performed high-resolution optical mapping of the human AVJ (n=6) to define its pacemaker properties and response to autonomic stimulation. Methods and Results Isolated, coronary-perfused AVJ preparations from failing human hearts (n=6, 53±6 years) were optically mapped using the near-infrared, voltage-sensitive dye, di-4-ANBDQBS, with isoproterenol (Iso, 1 μM) and acetylcholine (ACh, 1μM). An algorithm detecting multiple components of optical action potentials was used to reconstruct multi-layered intramural AVJ activation and to identify specialized slow and fast conduction pathways (SP and FP). The anatomical origin and propagation of pacemaker activity was verified via histology. Spontaneous AVJ rhythms of 29±11 bpm (n=6) originated in the nodal-His region (NH, n=3) and/or the proximal His bundle (H, n=4). Iso accelerated the AVJ rhythm to 69±12 bpm (n=5); shifted the leading pacemaker to the transitional cell (TC) regions near the FP and SP (n=4) and/or coronary sinus (n=2); and triggered reentrant arrhythmias (n=2). ACh (n=4) decreased the AVJ rhythm to 18±4 bpm; slowed FP/SP conduction leading to block between the AVJ and atrium; and shifted the pacemaker to either the TC or TC/NH (bifocal activation). Conclusions We have demonstrated that the AVJ pacemaker in failing human hearts is located in the NH or H-regions and can be modified with autonomic stimulation. Moreover, we found that both the FP and SP are involved in anterograde and retrograde conduction. PMID:21646375

  11. 2型糖尿病外周感觉神经病变和心自主神经病变关系的研究%Relationship between peripheral neuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛奔; 苏恒; 李超; 张云; 薛元明

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨T2DM外周感觉神经病变和心自主神经病变之间的关系. 方法 选取T2DM患者148例,采集临床资料,测定FPG、HbA1c及LDL-C等生化指标;进行定量感觉神经检查(以色列TSA-Ⅱ定量感觉神经测定仪),结合临床症状评价糖尿病外周感觉神经病变;进行心血管反射试验检查,结合临床症状评价糖尿病心自主神经病变. 结果 外周感觉神经病变的患病率为28%,心自主神经病变的患病率为10%;无外周感觉神经病变的患者中心自主神经病变的患病率为6%,存在外周感觉神经病变的患者中心自主神经病变的患病率为21%;与对照组相比,外周感觉神经病变组和心自主神经病变组的病程较长,FPG、HbA1 c及LDL-C水平较高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05). 结论 糖尿病心自主神经病变可发生于无外周感觉神经病变的患者;病程、FPG、HbA1c及LDL-C可能为糖尿病外周感觉神经病变和心自主神经病变的危险因素.%Objective To investigate the relationship between diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. Methods The clinical data of 148 T2DM patients was collected and the biochemical indices, including FPG, HbA1c, and LDL-C of these patients, were determined. The diabetic peripheral neuropathy was diagnosed according to the quantitative sensory test (Neurosensory Analyzer Model TSA-Ⅱ) and clinical symptoms. The diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was estimated with cardiovascular reflex test and clinical symptoms. Results The prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy was 28% and that of the cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was 10% . In the patients without diabetic peripheral neuropathy, the prevalence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was 6%, while in those with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, the prevalence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was 21%. Compared with the control group, the disease

  12. Fuzzy Decision-Making Fuser (FDMF for Integrating Human-Machine Autonomous (HMA Systems with Adaptive Evidence Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI creates a direct communication pathway between the human brain and an external device or system. In contrast to patient-oriented BCIs, which are intended to restore inoperative or malfunctioning aspects of the nervous system, a growing number of BCI studies focus on designing auxiliary systems that are intended for everyday use. The goal of building these BCIs is to provide capabilities that augment existing intact physical and mental capabilities. However, a key challenge to BCI research is human variability; factors such as fatigue, inattention, and stress vary both across different individuals and for the same individual over time. If these issues are addressed, autonomous systems may provide additional benefits that enhance system performance and prevent problems introduced by individual human variability. This study proposes a human-machine autonomous (HMA system that simultaneously aggregates human and machine knowledge to recognize targets in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP task. The HMA focuses on integrating an RSVP BCI with computer vision techniques in an image-labeling domain. A fuzzy decision-making fuser (FDMF is then applied in the HMA system to provide a natural adaptive framework for evidence-based inference by incorporating an integrated summary of the available evidence (i.e., human and machine decisions and associated uncertainty. Consequently, the HMA system dynamically aggregates decisions involving uncertainties from both human and autonomous agents. The collaborative decisions made by an HMA system can achieve and maintain superior performance more efficiently than either the human or autonomous agents can achieve independently. The experimental results shown in this study suggest that the proposed HMA system with the FDMF can effectively fuse decisions from human brain activities and the computer vision techniques to improve overall performance on the RSVP recognition task. This

  13. Mitochondria and Cardiovascular Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Old age is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Several lines of evidence in experimental animal models have indicated the central role of mitochondria both in lifespan determination and cardiovascular aging. In this article we review the evidence supporting the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and biogenesis as well as the crosstalk between mitochondria and cellular signaling in cardiac and vascular aging. Intrinsic cardiac aging in the murine model closely recapitulates age-related cardiac changes in humans (left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction), while the phenotype of vascular aging include endothelial dysfunction, reduced vascular elasticity and chronic vascular inflammation. Both cardiac and vascular aging involve neurohormonal signaling (e.g. renin-angiotensin, adrenergic, insulin-IGF1 signaling) and cell-autonomous mechanisms. The potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in aging and cardiovascular diseases are also discussed, with a focus on mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants, calorie restriction, calorie restriction mimetics and exercise training. PMID:22499901

  14. Deciphering Human Cell-Autonomous Anti-HSV-1 Immunity in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Studer, Lorenz; Smith, Gregory; Notarangelo, Luigi; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Zhang, Shen-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a common virus that can rarely invade the human central nervous system (CNS), causing devastating encephalitis. The permissiveness to HSV-1 of the various relevant cell types of the CNS, neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia cells, as well as their response to viral infection, has been extensively studied in humans and other animals. Nevertheless, human CNS cell-based models of anti-HSV-1 immunity are of particular importance, as responses to any given neurotropic virus may differ between humans and other animals. Human CNS neuron cell lines as well as primary human CNS neurons, astrocytes, and microglia cells cultured/isolated from embryos or cadavers, have enabled the study of cell-autonomous anti-HSV-1 immunity in vitro. However, the paucity of biological samples and their lack of purity have hindered progress in the field, which furthermore suffers from the absence of testable primary human oligodendrocytes. Recently, the authors have established a human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-based model of anti-HSV-1 immunity in neurons, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, astrocytes, and neural stem cells, which has widened the scope of possible in vitro studies while permitting in-depth explorations. This mini-review summarizes the available data on human primary and iPSC-derived CNS cells for anti-HSV-1 immunity. The hiPSC-mediated study of anti-viral immunity in both healthy individuals and patients with viral encephalitis will be a powerful tool in dissecting the disease pathogenesis of CNS infections with HSV-1 and other neurotropic viruses.

  15. A Formal Investigation of the Organization of Guidance Behavior: Implications for Humans and Autonomous Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhaodan

    Guidance behavior generated either by artificial agents or humans has been actively studied in the fields of both robotics and cognitive science. The goals of these two fields are different. The former is the automatic generation of appropriate or even optimal behavior, while the latter is the understanding of the underlying mechanism. Their challenges, though, are closely related, the most important one being the lack of a unified, formal and grounded framework where the guidance behavior can be modeled and studied. This dissertation presents such a framework. In this framework, guidance behavior is analyzed as the closed-loop dynamics of the whole agent-environment system. The resulting dynamics give rise to interaction patterns. The central points of this dissertation are that: first of all, these patterns, which can be explained in terms of symmetries that are inherent to the guidance behavior, provide building blocks for the organization of behavior; second, the existence of these patterns and humans' organization of their guidance behavior based on these patterns are the reasons that humans can generate successful behavior in spite of all the complexities involved in the planning and control. This dissertation first gives an overview of the challenges existing in both scientific endeavors, such as human and animal spatial behavior study, and engineering endeavors, such as autonomous guidance system design. It then lays out the foundation for our formal framework, which states that guidance behavior should be interpreted as the collection of the closed-loop dynamics resulting from the agent's interaction with the environment. The following, illustrated by examples of three different UAVs, shows that the study of the closed-loop dynamics should not be done without the consideration of vehicle dynamics, as is the common practice in some of the studies in both autonomous guidance and human behavior analysis. The framework, the core concepts of which are

  16. Toward an In Vivo Neuroimaging Template of Human Brainstem Nuclei of the Ascending Arousal, Autonomic, and Motor Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Edlow, Brian L.; Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Brown, Emery N.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Bruce R. Rosen; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Brainstem nuclei (Bn) in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, sleep, and cranial nerve function, and they have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies. However, an in vivo delineation of most human Bn has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. To precisely identify several human Bn in vivo, we employed a 7...

  17. Effects of Music Therapy on the Cardiovascular and Autonomic Nervous System in Stress-Induced University Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Soon; Jeong, Hyeon Cheol; Yim, Jong Eun; Jeon, Mi Yang

    2016-01-01

    Stress is caused when a particular relationship between the individual and the environment emerges. Specifically, stress occurs when an individual's abilities are challenged or when one's well-being is threatened by excessive environmental demands. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of music therapy on stress in university students. Randomized controlled trial. Sixty-four students were randomly assigned to the experimental group (n = 33) or the control group (n = 31). Music therapy. Initial measurement included cardiovascular indicators (blood pressure and pulse), autonomic nervous activity (standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN], normalized low frequency, normalized high frequency, low/high frequency), and subjective stress. After the first measurement, participants in both groups were exposed to a series of stressful tasks, and then a second measurement was conducted. The experimental group then listened to music for 20 minutes and the control group rested for 20 minutes. A third and final measurement was then taken. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the first or second measurement. However, after music therapy, the experimental group and the control group showed significant differences in all variables, including systolic blood pressure (p = .026), diastolic blood pressure (p = .037), pulse (p stress (p = .026). Classical music tends to relax the body and may stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system. These results suggest music therapy as an intervention for stress reduction.

  18. Cardiovascular alterations at different stages of hypertension development during ethanol consumption: Time-course of vascular and autonomic changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crestani, Carlos C. [Department of Natural Active Principles and Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Univ. Estadual Paulista—UNESP (Brazil); Lopes da Silva, Andréia [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Scopinho, América A. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ruginsk, Silvia G.; Uchoa, Ernane T. [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Correa, Fernando M.A. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Elias, Lucila L.K.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Resstel, Leonardo B.M., E-mail: leoresstel@yahoo.com.br [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of the present work was to establish a time-course correlation between vascular and autonomic changes that contribute to the development of hypertension during ethanol ingestion in rats. For this, male Wistar rats were subjected to the intake of increasing ethanol concentrations in their drinking water during four weeks. Ethanol effects were investigated at the end of each week. Mild hypertension was already observed at the first week of treatment, and a progressive blood pressure increase was observed along the evaluation period. Increased pressor response to phenylephrine was observed from first to fourth week. α{sub 1}-adrenoceptor protein in the mesenteric bed was enhanced at the first week, whereas β{sub 2}-adrenoceptor protein in the aorta was reduced after the second week. In the third week, ethanol intake facilitated the depressor response to sodium nitroprusside, whereas in the fourth week it reduced nitrate content in aorta and increased it plasma. The bradycardic component of the baroreflex was impaired, whereas baroreflex tachycardia was enhanced at the third and fourth weeks. AT{sub 1A} receptor and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) mRNAs in the nucleus tractus solitarius were increased at the fourth week. These findings suggest that increased vascular responsiveness to vasoconstrictor agents is possibly a link factor in the development and maintenance of the progressive hypertension induced by ethanol consumption. Additionally, baroreflex changes are possibly mediated by alterations in angiotensinergic mechanisms and CNP content within the brainstem, which contribute to maintaining the hypertensive state in later phases of ethanol ingestion. Facilitated vascular responsiveness to nitric oxide seems to counteract ethanol-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Mild hypertension was observed during the entire period of ethanol ingestion. • Ethanol facilitated vascular reactivity to vasoactive agents. • Changes in baroreflex activity

  19. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Price, Sarah L.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17β-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety. PMID:26516295

  20. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Price, Sarah L.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-05-01

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17β-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety.

  1. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  2. Cardiovascular Effects of the Essential Oil of Croton argyrophylloides in Normotensive Rats: Role of the Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Santos, Thayane Rebeca; de Siqueira, Rodrigo José Bezerra; Duarte, Gloria Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of the essential oil of Croton argyrophylloides Muell. Arg. (EOCA) were investigated in normotensive rats. In saline-pretreated anesthetized or conscious rats, intravenous (i.v.) injection of the EOCA induced dose-dependent hypotension. Dose-dependent tachycardia was observed only in conscious rats. In anesthetized rats, cervical bivagotomy failed to enhance EOCA-induced hypotension but unmasked significant bradycardia. In conscious rats, i.v. pretreatment with methylatropine, but not with atenolol or L-NAME, reduced both hypotensive and tachycardiac responses to EOCA. However, hexamethonium pretreatment reverted the EOCA-induced tachycardia into significant bradycardia without affecting the hypotension. In aortic ring preparations precontracted with phenylephrine, EOCA induced a concentration-dependent relaxation that was significantly reduced by vascular endothelium removal and pretreatment with atropine, indomethacin, or glibenclamide but remained unaffected by pretreatment with L-NAME or TEA. It is concluded that i.v. treatment with EOAC decreased blood pressure probably through an active vascular relaxation rather than withdrawal of sympathetic tone. Muscarinic receptor stimulation, liberation of the endothelium-derived prostacyclin, and opening KATP channels are partially involved in the aortic relaxation induced by EOCA and in turn in the mediation of EOCA-induced hypotension. EOCA-induced tachycardia in conscious rats appears to be mediated reflexly through inhibition of vagal drive to the heart. PMID:27956919

  3. Influence of yearlong training on the state of cardiovascular, autonomic nervous system and physical performance in female 400 meters runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. L. Mikhalyuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the research – identification and comparison of heart rate variability, central hemodynamics and physical performance in 400 meters runners from the III category to masters of sports of international class (MSIC in the annual cycle of the training process. Materials and methods. The study included 22 female athletes, 400 meters runners between the ages of 14 and 27 years (mean age – 16.8 ± 0.67 years, running experience – from 2 to 13 years (average – 4.4 ± 0.68 years in the preparatory and competitive periods. Body length and weight of athletes were 167.9 ± 0.91 cm and 52.5 ± 0.98 kg, respectively. For the analysis of the autonomic regulation of cardiac activity mathematical methods of HRV analysis were used. Analysis and evaluation of periodic components of heart rate were carried out by means of the research of spectral parameters of autocorrelation functions. Determination of physical performance was carried out under the practical standard on the cycle ergometer. It was established that in high class sportswomen (n=12 and ones with qualifications of the II–III category (n=10 in the competitive period there were strengthening of parasympathetic effects of ANS, transformation of eukinetic circulation type (CT into hypokinetic CT and absence of sportswomen with hyperkinetic CT. In high class sportswomen there were significant increase of the relative value of physical working capacity (PWC170/kg by 12.33% and tendency to increase of index of functional state (IFS by 9.46%, in sportswomen with qualifications of II–III category PWC170/kg significantly increased by 19.26%, and IFS by 17.87%. Correlation analysis conducted in both periods in the group and separately in high class sportswomen and ones with qualifications of II–III category found the relationship indicating that the increase of PWC170/kg and IFS is associated with the prevalence of hypokinetic CT and parasympathetic ANS influences. In the competitive period

  4. Expression of a Humanized Viral 2A-Mediated lux Operon Efficiently Generates Autonomous Bioluminescence in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.; Close, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of autonomous bioluminescence from human cells was previously reported to be impossible, suggesting that all bioluminescent-based mammalian reporter systems must therefore require application of a potentially influential chemical substrate. While this was disproven when the bacterial luciferase (lux) cassette was demonstrated to function in a human cell, its expression required multiple genetic constructs, was functional in only a single cell type, and generated a significantly reduced signal compared to substrate-requiring systems. Here we investigate the use of a humanized, viral 2A-linked lux genetic architecture for the efficient introduction of an autobioluminescent phenotype across a variety of human cell lines. Methodology/Principal Findings The lux cassette was codon optimized and assembled into a synthetic human expression operon using viral 2A elements as linker regions. Human kidney, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines were both transiently and stably transfected with the humanized operon and the resulting autobioluminescent phenotype was evaluated using common imaging instrumentation. Autobioluminescent cells were screened for cytotoxic effects resulting from lux expression and their utility as bioreporters was evaluated through the demonstration of repeated monitoring of single populations over a prolonged period using both a modified E-SCREEN assay for estrogen detection and a classical cytotoxic compound detection assay for the antibiotic Zeocin. Furthermore, the use of self-directed bioluminescent initiation in response to target detection was assessed to determine its amenability towards deployment as fully autonomous sensors. In all cases, bioluminescent measurements were supported with traditional genetic and transcriptomic evaluations. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that the viral 2A-linked, humanized lux genetic architecture successfully produced autobioluminescent phenotypes in all cell lines

  5. Challenges in Modelling Hypoglycaemia-Associated Autonomic Failure: A Review of Human and Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Senthilkumaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent insulin-induced hypoglycaemia is a major limitation to insulin treatment in diabetes patients leading to a condition called hypoglycaemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF. HAAF is characterised by reduced sympathoadrenal response to subsequent hypoglycaemia thereby predisposing the patients to severe hypoglycaemia that can lead to coma or even death. Despite several attempts being made, the mechanism of HAAF is yet to be clearly established. In order for the mechanism of HAAF to be elucidated, establishing a human/animal model of the phenomenon is the foremost requirement. Several research groups have attempted to reproduce the phenomenon in diabetic and nondiabetic humans and rodents and reported variable results. The success of the phenomenon is marked by a significant reduction in plasma adrenaline response to subsequent hypoglycaemic episode relative to that of the antecedent hypoglycaemic episode. A number of factors such as the insulin dosage, route of administration, fasting conditions, blood sampling methods and analyses, depth, duration, and number of antecedent hypoglycaemic episodes can impact the successful reproduction of the phenomenon and thus have to be carefully considered while developing the protocol. In this review, we have outlined the protocols followed by different research groups to reproduce the phenomenon in diabetic and nondiabetic humans and rodents including our own observations in rats and discussed the factors that have to be given careful consideration in reproducing the phenomenon successfully.

  6. Endothelin converting-enzyme-1 mRNA expression in human cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohnemeier, H; Pinto, YM; Horkay, F; Toth, M; Juhasz-Nagy, A; Orzechowski, HD; Bohm, M; Paul, M

    1998-01-01

    Endothelin-1 converting-enzyme (ECE-1) cleaves the precursor, big-endothelin-1, to the active peptide endothelin-1. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ECE-1 mRNA expression is modified in human cardiovascular disease. Tissue samples from the left human atrium were analyzed for ECE-1 ex

  7. Robust Intelligence (RI) under uncertainty: Mathematical foundations of autonomous hybrid (human-machine-robot) teams, organizations and systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lawless, William F.

    2013-01-01

    To develop a theory of Robust Intelligence (RI), we continue to advance our theory of interdependence on the efficient and effective control of systems of autonomous hybrid teams composed of robots, machines and humans working interchangeably. As is the case with humans, we believe that RI is less likely to be achieved by individual computational agents; instead, we propose that a better path to RI is with interdependent agents. However, unlike conventional computational models where agents a...

  8. Patient-specific modeling of human cardiovascular system elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossovich, Leonid Yu.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Polienko, Asel V.; Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.; Murylev, Vladimir V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: The research is aimed at development of personalized medical treatment. Algorithm was developed for patient-specific surgical interventions of the cardiovascular system pathologies. Methods: Geometrical models of the biological objects and initial and boundary conditions were realized by medical diagnostic data of the specific patient. Mechanical and histomorphological parameters were obtained with the help mechanical experiments on universal testing machine. Computer modeling of the studied processes was conducted with the help of the finite element method. Results: Results of the numerical simulation allowed evaluating the physiological processes in the studied object in normal state, in presence of different pathologies and after different types of surgical procedures.

  9. Gravitational effects on human cardiovascular responses to isometric muscle contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde-Petersen, Flemmig; Suzuki, Yoji; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    Isometric exercise induces profound cardiovascular adaptations increasing mean arterial pressure and heart rate. We investigated effects of simulated +Gz and -Gz respectively on the central and peripheral cardiovascular system. Sustained handgrip exercise was performed at 40% of maximum for 2 minutes in five subjects. This maneuver increased mean arterial pressure by 40-45 mm Hg both during head out water immersion which simulates weightlessness, as well as bedrest during -25, 0, and +25 degrees tilt from the horizontal. Lower body negative pressure (-60 mm Hg for 10 min) attenuated the response to handgrip exercise to 30 mm Hg. It also increased the heart rate minimally by about 20 beats per minute while the water immersion, as well as head up, head down and horizontal bedrest showed increments of about 50 beats per min. It was concluded that the response to isometric contraction is mediated through the high pressure baroreceptors, because similar responses were seen during stresses producing a wide variation in central venous pressure. During lower body negative pressure the increased sympathetic nervous activity itself increased resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure. The responses to static exercise were, therefore, weaker.

  10. Using a human cardiovascular-respiratory model to characterize cardiac tamponade and pulsus paradoxus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Deepa; Luo, Chuan; Ma, Tony S; Clark, John W

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac tamponade is a condition whereby fluid accumulation in the pericardial sac surrounding the heart causes elevation and equilibration of pericardial and cardiac chamber pressures, reduced cardiac output, changes in hemodynamics, partial chamber collapse, pulsus paradoxus, and arterio-venous acid-base disparity. Our large-scale model of the human cardiovascular-respiratory system (H-CRS) is employed to study mechanisms underlying cardiac tamponade and pulsus paradoxus. The model integrates hemodynamics, whole-body gas exchange, and autonomic nervous system control to simulate pressure, volume, and blood flow. Methods We integrate a new pericardial model into our previously developed H-CRS model based on a fit to patient pressure data. Virtual experiments are designed to simulate pericardial effusion and study mechanisms of pulsus paradoxus, focusing particularly on the role of the interventricular septum. Model differential equations programmed in C are solved using a 5th-order Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme. MATLAB is employed for waveform analysis. Results The H-CRS model simulates hemodynamic and respiratory changes associated with tamponade clinically. Our model predicts effects of effusion-generated pericardial constraint on chamber and septal mechanics, such as altered right atrial filling, delayed leftward septal motion, and prolonged left ventricular pre-ejection period, causing atrioventricular interaction and ventricular desynchronization. We demonstrate pericardial constraint to markedly accentuate normal ventricular interactions associated with respiratory effort, which we show to be the distinct mechanisms of pulsus paradoxus, namely, series and parallel ventricular interaction. Series ventricular interaction represents respiratory variation in right ventricular stroke volume carried over to the left ventricle via the pulmonary vasculature, whereas parallel interaction (via the septum and pericardium) is a result of

  11. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    In diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy plasma noradrenaline concentration, used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity, is low. This decrease is, however, only found in patients with a long duration of diabetes with clinically severe autonomic neuropathy. This apparent insensitivity...... of plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors...

  12. Impact of the human circadian system, exercise, and their interaction on cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Frank A J L; Hu, Kun; Evoniuk, Heather; Kelly, Erin E; Malhotra, Atul; Hilton, Michael F; Shea, Steven A

    2010-11-23

    The risk of adverse cardiovascular events peaks in the morning (≈9:00 AM) with a secondary peak in the evening (≈8:00 PM) and a trough at night. This pattern is generally believed to be caused by the day/night distribution of behavioral triggers, but it is unknown whether the endogenous circadian system contributes to these daily fluctuations. Thus, we tested the hypotheses that the circadian system modulates autonomic, hemodynamic, and hemostatic risk markers at rest, and that behavioral stressors have different effects when they occur at different internal circadian phases. Twelve healthy adults were each studied in a 240-h forced desynchrony protocol in dim light while standardized rest and exercise periods were uniformly distributed across the circadian cycle. At rest, there were large circadian variations in plasma cortisol (peak-to-trough ≈85% of mean, peaking at a circadian phase corresponding to ≈9:00 AM) and in circulating catecholamines (epinephrine, ≈70%; norepinephrine, ≈35%, peaking during the biological day). At ≈8:00 PM, there was a circadian peak in blood pressure and a trough in cardiac vagal modulation. Sympathetic variables were consistently lowest and vagal markers highest during the biological night. We detected no simple circadian effect on hemostasis, although platelet aggregability had two peaks: at ≈noon and ≈11:00 PM. There was circadian modulation of the cardiovascular reactivity to exercise, with greatest vagal withdrawal at ≈9:00 AM and peaks in catecholamine reactivity at ≈9:00 AM and ≈9:00 PM. Thus, the circadian system modulates numerous cardiovascular risk markers at rest as well as their reactivity to exercise, with resultant profiles that could potentially contribute to the day/night pattern of adverse cardiovascular events.

  13. A comparison of autonomic responses in humans induced by two simulation models of weightlessness: lower body positive pressure and 6 degrees head-down tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Q; Sugiyama, Y; Kamiya, A; Mano, T

    2000-04-12

    Six-degree head-down tilt (HDT) is well accepted as an effective weightlessness model in humans. However, some researchers utilized lower body positive pressure (LBPP) to simulate the cardiovascular and renal effects of a decreased gravitational stress. In order to determine whether LBPP was a suitable model for simulated weightlessness, we compared the differences between these two methods. Ten healthy males, aged 21-41 years, were subjected to graded LBPP at 10, 20 and 30 mmHg, as well as 6 degrees HDT. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was microneurographically recorded from the tibial nerve along with cardiovascular variables. We found that MSNA decreased by 27% to a similar extent both at low levels of LBPP (10 and 20 mmHg) and HDT. However, at a high level of LBPP (30 mmHg), MSNA tended to increase. Mean arterial pressure was elevated significantly by 11% (10 mmHg) at 30 mmHg LBPP, but remained unchanged at low levels of LBPP and HDT. Heart rate did not change during the entire LBPP and HDT procedures. Total peripheral resistance markedly increased by 36% at 30 mmHg LBPP, but decreased by 9% at HDT. Both stroke volume and cardiac output tended to decrease at 30 mmHg LBPP, but increased at HDT. These results suggest that although both LBPP and HDT induce fluid shifts from the lower body toward the thoracic compartment, autonomic responses are different, especially at LBPP greater than 20 mmHg. We note that high levels of LBPP (>20 mmHg) activate not only cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflexes, but also intramuscular mechanoreflexes, while 6 degrees HDT only activates cardiopulmonary baroreflexes. We conclude that LBPP is not a suitable model for simulated weightlessness in humans.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Cardiorhythmography as a Method of Study of Human's Cardiovascular System Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protasov, E. A.; Ryzhkova, A. V.

    In this article a highly sensitive method for graphic recording of cardiogram by detecting the signal of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of human finger has been developed and signals directly related to movement of blood ejected by the heart into the vessels have been studied. Changes in the behavior of signals depending on the condition of the cardiovascular system of person have been discovered.

  15. Effects of supine, prone, and lateral positions on cardiovascular and renal variables in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pump, Bettina; Talleruphuus, Ulrik; Christensen, Niels Juel

    2002-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that changing the direction of the transverse gravitational stress in horizontal humans modulates cardiovascular and renal variables. On different study days, 14 healthy males were placed for 6 h in either the horizontal supine or prone position following 3 h of being...... ml, P variables, whereas left atrial diameter increased (32 +/- 1 to 35 +/- 1 mm, P

  16. Modelling progressive autonomic failure in MSA: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemberger, Sylvia; Wenning, Gregor K

    2011-05-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a fatal late-onset α-synucleinopathy that presents with features of ataxia, Parkinsonism, and pyramidal dysfunction in any combination. Over the last decade, efforts have been made to develop preclinical MSA testbeds for novel interventional strategies. The main focus has been on murine analogues of MSA-linked motor features and their underlying brainstem, cerebellar and basal ganglia pathology. Although progressive autonomic failure (AF) is a prominent clinical feature of patients with MSA, reflecting a disruption of both central and peripheral autonomic networks controlling cardiovascular, respiratory, urogenital, gastrointestinal and sudomotor functions, attempts of modelling this aspect of the human disease have been limited. However, emerging evidence suggests that AF-like features may occur in transgenic MSA models reflecting α-synucleinopathy lesions in distributed autonomic networks. Further research is needed to fully characterize both autonomic and motor features in optimized preclinical MSA models.

  17. Reliable Autonomous Surface Mobility (RASM) in Support of Human Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC and Carnegie Mellon University have formed a partnership to commercially develop rover-autonomy technologies into Reliable Autonomous Surface...

  18. Deciphering the Molecular Basis of Human Cardiovascular Disease through Network Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephen Y.; White, Kevin; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review This review introduces the fundamental concepts of network medicine and explores the feasibility and potential impact of network-based methods on predicting and ameliorating individual manifestations of human cardiovascular disease. Recent findings Complex cardiovascular diseases rarely result from an abnormality in a single molecular effector, but, rather, nearly always are the net result of multiple pathobiological pathways that interact through an interconnected network. In the post-genomic era, a framework has emerged of the potential complexity of the interacting pathways that govern molecular actions in the human cell. As a result, network approaches have been developed to understand more comprehensively those interconnections that influence human disease. “Network medicine” has already led to tangible discoveries of novel disease genes and pathways as well as improved mechanisms for rational drug development. Summary As methodologies evolve, network medicine may better capture the complexity of human pathogenesis and, thus, re-define personalized disease classification and therapies. PMID:22382498

  19. Prospective isolation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors that integrate into human fetal heart tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardehali, Reza; Ali, Shah R; Inlay, Matthew A; Abilez, Oscar J; Chen, Michael Q; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Yazawa, Masayuki; Gong, Yongquan; Nusse, Roeland; Drukker, Micha; Weissman, Irving L

    2013-02-26

    A goal of regenerative medicine is to identify cardiovascular progenitors from human ES cells (hESCs) that can functionally integrate into the human heart. Previous studies to evaluate the developmental potential of candidate hESC-derived progenitors have delivered these cells into murine and porcine cardiac tissue, with inconclusive evidence regarding the capacity of these human cells to physiologically engraft in xenotransplantation assays. Further, the potential of hESC-derived cardiovascular lineage cells to functionally couple to human myocardium remains untested and unknown. Here, we have prospectively identified a population of hESC-derived ROR2(+)/CD13(+)/KDR(+)/PDGFRα(+) cells that give rise to cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro at a clonal level. We observed rare clusters of ROR2(+) cells and diffuse expression of KDR and PDGFRα in first-trimester human fetal hearts. We then developed an in vivo transplantation model by transplanting second-trimester human fetal heart tissues s.c. into the ear pinna of a SCID mouse. ROR2(+)/CD13(+)/KDR(+)/PDGFRα(+) cells were delivered into these functioning fetal heart tissues: in contrast to traditional murine heart models for cell transplantation, we show structural and functional integration of hESC-derived cardiovascular progenitors into human heart.

  20. The effects of exercise and training on human cardiovascular reflex control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, S E; Bell, C

    2000-07-01

    During physical activity, there is a graded withdrawal of vagal cardiac tone and a graded increase in sympathetic cardiac and vasomotor tone, initiated through both central command from the somatic motor cortex and muscle chemoreceptive and mechanoreceptive inputs. In parallel, there is an upward resetting of the operating point of the arterial baroreflex, with preserved reflex sensitivity. In contrast to the traditional interpretation that blood flow through exercising muscle is independent of vasomotor neural influences because of the dominance of local dilator metabolites, recent evidence suggests that both constrictor and dilator sympathetic neural influences may be involved in determining absolute levels of perfusion. Post-exercise, there is a period of relative hypotension that is associated with decreased peripheral resistance. Some, but not all, evidence indicates a causal role for reduced sympathetic drive. Chronic exercise training appears to reduce resting sympathetic activity, with parallel changes in the gain of a variety of cardiovascular autonomic reflexes initiated from cardiovascular sites. These changes may be attributable at least partly to masking of arterial baroreflexes by the impact of elevated blood volume on low-pressure baroreceptors. The reductions in sympathetic drive that follow training are more pronounced in patients with essential hypertension than in normotensive individuals and are likely to underlie the anti-hypertensive effect of exercise.

  1. Development and Execution of Autonomous Procedures Onboard the International Space Station to Support the Next Phase of Human Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisert, Susan; Rodriggs, Michael; Moreno, Francisco; Korth, David; Gibson, Stephen; Lee, Young H.; Eagles, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Now that major assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) is complete, NASA's focus has turned to using this high fidelity in-space research testbed to not only advance fundamental science research, but also demonstrate and mature technologies and develop operational concepts that will enable future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. The ISS as a Testbed for Analog Research (ISTAR) project was established to reduce risks for manned missions to exploration destinations by utilizing ISS as a high fidelity micro-g laboratory to demonstrate technologies, operations concepts, and techniques associated with crew autonomous operations. One of these focus areas is the development and execution of ISS Testbed for Analog Research (ISTAR) autonomous flight crew procedures intended to increase crew autonomy that will be required for long duration human exploration missions. Due to increasing communications delays and reduced logistics resupply, autonomous procedures are expected to help reduce crew reliance on the ground flight control team, increase crew performance, and enable the crew to become more subject-matter experts on both the exploration space vehicle systems and the scientific investigation operations that will be conducted on a long duration human space exploration mission. These tests make use of previous or ongoing projects tested in ground analogs such as Research and Technology Studies (RATS) and NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO). Since the latter half of 2012, selected non-critical ISS systems crew procedures have been used to develop techniques for building ISTAR autonomous procedures, and ISS flight crews have successfully executed them without flight controller involvement. Although the main focus has been preparing for exploration, the ISS has been a beneficiary of this synergistic effort and is considering modifying additional standard ISS procedures that may increase crew efficiency, reduce operational costs, and

  2. Development and Execution of Autonomous Procedures Onboard the International Space Station to Support the Next Phase of Human Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisert, Susan; Rodriggs, Michael; Moreno, Francisco; Korth, David; Gibson, Stephen; Lee, Young H.; Eagles, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Now that major assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) is complete, NASA's focus has turned to using this high fidelity in-space research testbed to not only advance fundamental science research, but also demonstrate and mature technologies and develop operational concepts that will enable future human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. The ISS as a Testbed for Analog Research (ISTAR) project was established to reduce risks for manned missions to exploration destinations by utilizing ISS as a high fidelity micro-g laboratory to demonstrate technologies, operations concepts, and techniques associated with crew autonomous operations. One of these focus areas is the development and execution of ISS Testbed for Analog Research (ISTAR) autonomous flight crew procedures intended to increase crew autonomy that will be required for long duration human exploration missions. Due to increasing communications delays and reduced logistics resupply, autonomous procedures are expected to help reduce crew reliance on the ground flight control team, increase crew performance, and enable the crew to become more subject-matter experts on both the exploration space vehicle systems and the scientific investigation operations that will be conducted on a long duration human space exploration mission. These tests make use of previous or ongoing projects tested in ground analogs such as Research and Technology Studies (RATS) and NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO). Since the latter half of 2012, selected non-critical ISS systems crew procedures have been used to develop techniques for building ISTAR autonomous procedures, and ISS flight crews have successfully executed them without flight controller involvement. Although the main focus has been preparing for exploration, the ISS has been a beneficiary of this synergistic effort and is considering modifying additional standard ISS procedures that may increase crew efficiency, reduce operational costs, and

  3. Loss of NF1 expression in human endothelial cells promotes autonomous proliferation and altered vascular morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshika Bajaj

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis is a well known familial tumor syndrome, however these patients also suffer from a number of vascular anomalies. The loss of NFl from the endothelium is embryonically lethal in mouse developmental models, however little is known regarding the molecular regulation by NF1 in endothelium. We investigated the consequences of losing NF1 expression on the function of endothelial cells using shRNA. The loss of NF1 was sufficient to elevate levels of active Ras under non-stimulated conditions. These elevations in Ras activity were associated with activation of downstream signaling including activation of ERK, AKT and mTOR. Cells knocked down in NF1 expression exhibited no cellular senescence. Rather, they demonstrated augmented proliferation and autonomous entry into the cell cycle. These proliferative changes were accompanied by enhanced expression of cyclin D, phosphorylation of p27(KIP, and decreases in total p27(KIP levels, even under growth factor free conditions. In addition, NF1-deficient cells failed to undergo normal branching morphogenesis in a co-culture assay, instead forming planar islands with few tubules and branches. We find the changes induced by the loss of NF1 could be mitigated by co-expression of the GAP-related domain of NF1 implicating Ras regulation in these effects. Using doxycycline-inducible shRNA, targeting NF1, we find that the morphogenic changes are reversible. Similarly, in fully differentiated and stable vascular-like structures, the silencing of NF1 results in the appearance of abnormal vascular structures. Finally, the proliferative changes and the abnormal vascular morphogenesis are normalized by low-dose rapamycin treatment. These data provide a detailed analysis of the molecular and functional consequences of NF1 loss in human endothelial cells. These insights may provide new approaches to therapeutically addressing vascular abnormalities in these patients while underscoring a critical role for

  4. Effects of chiral fragrances on human autonomic nervous system parameters and self-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberger, E; Hongratanaworakit, T; Böhm, C; Weber, R; Buchbauer, G

    2001-03-01

    The effects of chiral fragrances (enantiomers of limonene and carvone) on the human autonomic nervous system (ANS) and on self-evaluation were studied in 20 healthy volunteers. Each fragrance was administered to each subject by inhalation using an A-A-B design. Individuals were tested in four separate sessions; in one session one fragrance was administered. ANS parameters recorded were skin temperature, skin conductance, breathing rate, pulse rate, blood oxygen saturation and systolic as well as diastolic blood pressure. Subjective experience was assessed in terms of mood, calmness and alertness on visual analog scales. In addition, fragrances were rated in terms of pleasantness, intensity and stimulating property. Inhalation of (+)-limonene led to increased systolic blood pressure, subjective alertness and restlessness. Inhalation of (-)-limonene caused an increase in systolic blood pressure but had no effects on psychological parameters. Inhalation of (-)-carvone caused increases in pulse rate, diastolic blood pressure and subjective restlessness. After inhalation of (+)-carvone increased levels of systolic as well as diastolic blood pressure were observed. Correlational analyses revealed that changes in both ANS parameters and self-evaluation were in part related to subjective evaluation of the odor and suggest that both pharmacological and psychological mechanisms are involved in the observed effects. In conclusion, the present study indicates that: (i) prolonged inhalation of fragrances influences ANS parameters as well as mental and emotional conditions; (ii) effects of fragrances are in part based on subjective evaluation of odor; (iii) chirality of odor molecules seems to be a central factor with respect to the biological activity of fragrances.

  5. Effect of Hinoki and Meniki Essential Oils on Human Autonomic Nervous System Activity and Mood States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Jung; Kumar, K J Senthil; Chen, Yu-Ting; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Chien, Shih-Chang; Chang, Shang-Tzen; Chu, Fang-Hua; Wang, Sheng-Yang

    2015-07-01

    Meniki (Chamecyparis formosensis) and Hinoki (C. obtusa) are precious conifers with excellent wood properties and distinctive fragrances that make these species popular in Taiwan for construction, interiors and furniture. In the present study, the compositions of essential oils prepared from Meniki and Hinoki were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Thirty-six compounds were identified from the wood essential oil of Meniki, including Δ-cadinene, γ-cadinene, Δ-cadinol, α-muurolene, calamenene, linalyl acetate and myrtenol; 29 compounds were identified from Hinoki, including α-terpineol, α-pinene, Δ-cadinene, borneol, terpinolene, and limonene. Next, we examined the effect of Meniki and Hinoki essential oils on human autonomic nervous system activity. Sixteen healthy adults received Meniki or Hinoki by inhalation for 5 min, and the physiological and psychological effects were examined. After inhaling Meniki essential oil, participant's systolic blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were decreased, and diastolic blood pressure increased. In addition, sympathetic nervous activity (SNS) was significantly decreased, and parasympathetic activity (PSNS) was significantly increased. On the other hand, after inhaling Hinoki essential oil, systolic blood pressure, heart rate and PSNS were decreased, whereas SNA was increased. Indeed, both Meniki and Hinoki essential oils increased heart rate variability (HRV) in tested adults. Furthermore, in the Profile of Mood States (POMS) test, both Meniki and Hinoki wood essential oils stimulated a pleasant mood status. Our results strongly suggest that Meniki and Hinoki essential oils could be suitable agents for the development of regulators of sympathetic nervous system dysfunctions.

  6. [Characteristics of the acute phase reaction in humans with various types of autonomic nervous system regulation during simulated hyperthermia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikov, A V; Dorofeĭkov, V V; Freĭdlin, T S; Freĭdlin, I S; Shustov, E B; Shcherbak, I G; Iastrebov, D Iu

    2000-01-01

    Depending on the type of autonomous regulation, differences in basic levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) were revealed under conditions of hyperthermia in healthy subjects aged 19-21. A parasympathetic type of autonomous regulation corresponded to higher initial levels of proinflammatory cytokinesis, whereas a dominating sympathetic type corresponded to lower levels of the IL-1 beta and TNF alpha. The subjects with the latter type of regulation revealed an increase in the IL-1 beta TNF alpha combined with a higher heat tolerance. The subjects with the former type of regulation revealed a lower heat tolerance. The increase in the alpha2-macroglobulin appeared to be a most typical acute phase response of the human body to hyperthermia.

  7. SIRPA, VCAM1 and CD34 identify discrete lineages during early human cardiovascular development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhys J.P. Skelton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of human cardiogenesis would benefit from a detailed cell lineage fate map akin to that established for the haematopoietic lineages. Here we sought to define cell lineage relationships based on the expression of NKX2-5 and the cell surface markers VCAM1, SIRPA and CD34 during human cardiovascular development. Expression of NKX2-5GFP was used to identify cardiac progenitors and cardiomyocytes generated during the differentiation of NKX2-5GFP/w human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. Cardiovascular cell lineages sub-fractionated on the basis of SIRPA, VCAM1 and CD34 expression were assayed for differentiation potential and gene expression. The NKX2-5posCD34pos population gave rise to endothelial cells that rapidly lost NKX2-5 expression in culture. Conversely, NKX2-5 expression was maintained in myocardial committed cells, which progressed from being NKX2-5posSIRPApos to NKX2-5posSIRPAposVCAM1pos. Up-regulation of VCAM1 was accompanied by the expression of myofilament markers and reduced clonal capacity, implying a restriction of cell fate potential. Combinatorial expression of NKX2-5, SIRPA, VCAM1 and CD34 can be used to define discrete stages of cardiovascular cell lineage differentiation. These markers identify specific stages of cardiomyocyte and endothelial lineage commitment and, thus provide a scaffold for establishing a fate map of early human cardiogenesis.

  8. A literature review on cardiovascular risk in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: implications for clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansueto Gomes Neto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In recent years, there has been growing concern about an increasing rate of cardiovascular diseases in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, which could be associated with side effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy. It is likely that the metabolic disorders related to anti-human immunodeficiency virus treatment will eventually translate into a increased cardiovascular risk in patients submitted to such regimens. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than human immunodeficiency virus infected patients not receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, or the general population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a computer-based search in representative databases, and also performed manual tracking of citations in selected articles. RESULT: The available evidence suggests an excess risk of cardiovascular events in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons compared to non-human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy is associated with increased levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and morphological signs of cardiovascular diseases. Some evidence suggested that human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals on highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens are at increased risk of dyslipidemia, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction, particularly if the highly active antiretroviral therapy regimen contains a protease inhibitor. CONCLUSION: Physicians must weigh the cardiovascular risk against potential benefits when prescribing highly active antiretroviral therapy. Careful cardiac screening is warranted for patients who are being evaluated for, or who are receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens, particularly for those with known underlying cardiovascular risk

  9. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Afford New Opportunities in Inherited Cardiovascular Disease Modeling

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    Daniel R. Bayzigitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis are required to create more effective and safer methods of their therapy. The studies can be carried out only when model systems that fully recapitulate pathological phenotype seen in patients are used. Application of laboratory animals for cardiovascular disease modeling is limited because of physiological differences with humans. Since discovery of induced pluripotency generating induced pluripotent stem cells has become a breakthrough technology in human disease modeling. In this review, we discuss a progress that has been made in modeling inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, studying molecular mechanisms of the diseases, and searching for and testing drug compounds using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

  10. Cardiovascular risk protection from the Mediterranean diet and olive oil. A transcriptomic update in humans

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    S. Carrión

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the human studies that explore the benefits of the Mediterranean diet and olive oil, based on gene expression analysis. We summarized consistent human transcriptomic studies on cardiovascular risk, based on TMD and olive oil interventions, with real life doses and conditions. A literature review was carried out leading up to February 2016. The results show that the TMD, specially supplemented with virgin olive oil, produces beneficial changes in the transcriptomic response of relevant genes in cardiovascular risk such as CAT, GPX1 and SIRT2. p65 and MCP-1, IL1B, IL6, CXCL1, INF-γ, ARHGAP15 and IL7R, which are involved in inflammation; and ABCA1, SR-B1, PPARBP, PPARα, PPARγ, PPARδ, CD-36 and COX-1, which play an important role in cholesterol efflux. The available data illustrate a transcriptomic effect on atherosclerosis, inflammation and oxidative stress pathways as well as the mentioned genes.

  11. NATO's targeting process: ensuring human control over (and lawful use of) 'autonomous' weapons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, M.; Williams, A.P.; Scharre, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of the use of so-called autonomous weapon systems has raised significant legal and moral concerns. This chapter contributes to the debate by providing an alternative perspective to the current dominant focus on the technological capabilities of future weapons. The author argues that

  12. [Air pollution and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Guy; Witberg, Guy; Danenberg, Haim

    2007-10-01

    Cardiovascular atherothrombosis is the most common cause of death globally, with several well-known risk factors. Air pollution is a byproduct of fuel combustion by motor vehicles, power plants and industrial factories. It is composed of gases, fluids and particulate matter (PM) of different sizes, which include basic carbon, organic carbonic molecules and metals such as vanadium, nickel, zinc and iron. These particles are subdivided by their median size, a major contributing factor for their capability to enter the human body through the respiratory system. Most of the epidemiological studies have shown correlation between acute and long-term exposure to air pollution elements and cardiovascular morbidity in general, and angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction specifically. Physiological studies have found different arrhythmias as the etiologic cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality following exposure to air pollution. A major finding was a decline in heart rate variability, a phenomenon known as endangering for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in patients after acute myocardial infarction. To date, several pathways have been proposed, including a hypercoagulable state following an inflammatory response, cardiac nervous autonomic disequilibrium, endothelial dysfunction with blood vessel contraction and direct toxic impact on cardiac muscle. Additional research is needed for clarifying the pathophysiological pathways by which air pollution affects the cardiovascular system. That might allow forthcoming with preventive measures and correct treatment, and hence a decrease in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Another important target is dose-outcome correlation curves for safety threshold calculation as a basis for air pollution regulations.

  13. Autonomic disorders in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensch, E; Jost, W H

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease leading to disseminated lesions of the central nervous system resulting in both somatomotor and autonomic disturbances. These involve the central centers of the autonomic nervous system, as well as the automatic control and pathway systems. All autonomic functions may be disordered individually or in combined form. There is no other disease with a clinical picture so multifaceted. Besides cardiovascular dysfunctions disorders of bladder and rectum have become apparent. Somatomotor and autonomic disturbances occur with similar frequency; however the focused exam often heavily favors somatomotor symptoms. Autonomic disturbances should primarily be taken into account on history taking and clinical examination. Individual diagnosis and treatment is a secondary feature. Impairments of the autonomic nervous systems in multiple sclerosis are frequently overlooked.

  14. Autonomic Disorders in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lensch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease leading to disseminated lesions of the central nervous system resulting in both somatomotor and autonomic disturbances. These involve the central centers of the autonomic nervous system, as well as the automatic control and pathway systems. All autonomic functions may be disordered individually or in combined form. There is no other disease with a clinical picture so multifaceted. Besides cardiovascular dysfunctions disorders of bladder and rectum have become apparent. Somatomotor and autonomic disturbances occur with similar frequency; however the focused exam often heavily favors somatomotor symptoms. Autonomic disturbances should primarily be taken into account on history taking and clinical examination. Individual diagnosis and treatment is a secondary feature. Impairments of the autonomic nervous systems in multiple sclerosis are frequently overlooked.

  15. [Autonomic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, T; Penzlin, A I; Illigens, B M W

    2013-07-01

    Autonomic neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that involve damage of small peripheral autonomic Aδ- and C-fibers. Causes of autonomic nerve fiber damage are disorders such as diabetes mellitus and HIV-infection. Predominant symptoms of autonomic neuropathy are orthostatic hypotension, gastro-intestinal problems, urogenital dysfunction, and cardiac arrhythmia, which can severely impair the quality of life in affected patients. Furthermore, autonomic neuropathies can be induced by autoimmune diseases such as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, hereditary disorders such as the lysosomal storage disorder Fabry disease and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, as well as certain toxins and drugs.

  16. Cardiac autonomic functions and the emergence of violence in a highly realistic model of social conflict in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozsef eHaller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the multitude of factors that can transform human social interactions into violent conflicts, biological features received much attention in recent years as correlates of decision making and aggressiveness especially in critical situations. We present here a highly realistic new model of human aggression and violence, where genuine acts of aggression are readily performed and which at the same time allows the parallel recording of biological concomitants. Particularly, we studied police officers trained at the International Training Centre (Budapest, Hungary, who are prepared to perform operations under extreme conditions of stress. We found that aggressive arousal can transform a basically peaceful social encounter into a violent conflict. Autonomic recordings show that this change is accompanied by increased heart rates, which was associated earlier with reduced cognitive complexity of perceptions (attentional myopia and promotes a bias towards hostile attributions and aggression. We also observed reduced heart rate variability in violent subjects, which is believed to signal a poor functioning of prefrontal-subcortical inhibitory circuits and reduces self-control. Importantly, these autonomic particularities were observed already at the beginning of social encounters i.e. before aggressive acts were initiated, suggesting that individual characteristics of the stress-response define the way in which social pressure affects social behavior, particularly the way in which this develops into violence. Taken together, these findings suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are valuable external symptoms of internal motivational states and decision making processes, and raise the possibility that behavior under social pressure can be predicted by the individual characteristics of stress responsiveness.

  17. Autonomous exoskeleton reduces metabolic cost of human walking during load carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Rouse, Elliott J; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-05-09

    Many soldiers are expected to carry heavy loads over extended distances, often resulting in physical and mental fatigue. In this study, the design and testing of an autonomous leg exoskeleton is presented. The aim of the device is to reduce the energetic cost of loaded walking. In addition, we present the Augmentation Factor, a general framework of exoskeletal performance that unifies our results with the varying abilities of previously developed exoskeletons. We developed an autonomous battery powered exoskeleton that is capable of providing substantial levels of positive mechanical power to the ankle during the push-off region of stance phase. We measured the metabolic energy consumption of seven subjects walking on a level treadmill at 1.5 m/s, while wearing a 23 kg vest. During the push-off portion of the stance phase, the exoskeleton applied positive mechanical power with an average across the gait cycle equal to 23 ± 2 W (11.5 W per ankle). Use of the autonomous leg exoskeleton significantly reduced the metabolic cost of walking by 36 ± 12 W, which was an improvement of 8 ± 3% (p = 0.025) relative to the control condition of not wearing the exoskeleton. In the design of leg exoskeletons, the results of this study highlight the importance of minimizing exoskeletal power dissipation and added limb mass, while providing substantial positive power during the walking gait cycle.

  18. Toward an In Vivo Neuroimaging Template of Human Brainstem Nuclei of the Ascending Arousal, Autonomic, and Motor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Edlow, Brian L; Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Brown, Emery N; Kinney, Hannah C; Rosen, Bruce R; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-12-01

    Brainstem nuclei (Bn) in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, sleep, and cranial nerve function, and they have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies. However, an in vivo delineation of most human Bn has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. To precisely identify several human Bn in vivo, we employed a 7 Tesla scanner equipped with multi-channel receive-coil array, which provided high magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity, and a multi-contrast (diffusion fractional anisotropy and T2-weighted) echo-planar-imaging approach, which provided complementary contrasts for Bn anatomy with matched geometric distortions and resolution. Through a combined examination of 1.3 mm(3) multi-contrast anatomical images acquired in healthy human adults, we semi-automatically generated in vivo probabilistic Bn labels of the ascending arousal (median and dorsal raphe), autonomic (raphe magnus, periaqueductal gray), and motor (inferior olivary nuclei, two subregions of the substantia nigra compatible with pars compacta and pars reticulata, two subregions of the red nucleus, and, in the diencephalon, two subregions of the subthalamic nucleus) systems. These labels constitute a first step toward the development of an in vivo neuroimaging template of Bn in standard space to facilitate future clinical and research investigations of human brainstem function and pathology. Proof-of-concept clinical use of this template is demonstrated in a minimally conscious patient with traumatic brainstem hemorrhages precisely localized to the raphe Bn involved in arousal.

  19. Toward an In Vivo Neuroimaging Template of Human Brainstem Nuclei of the Ascending Arousal, Autonomic, and Motor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschi, Nicola; Edlow, Brian L.; Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Brown, Emery N.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brainstem nuclei (Bn) in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, sleep, and cranial nerve function, and they have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies. However, an in vivo delineation of most human Bn has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. To precisely identify several human Bn in vivo, we employed a 7 Tesla scanner equipped with multi-channel receive-coil array, which provided high magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity, and a multi-contrast (diffusion fractional anisotropy and T2-weighted) echo-planar-imaging approach, which provided complementary contrasts for Bn anatomy with matched geometric distortions and resolution. Through a combined examination of 1.3 mm3 multi-contrast anatomical images acquired in healthy human adults, we semi-automatically generated in vivo probabilistic Bn labels of the ascending arousal (median and dorsal raphe), autonomic (raphe magnus, periaqueductal gray), and motor (inferior olivary nuclei, two subregions of the substantia nigra compatible with pars compacta and pars reticulata, two subregions of the red nucleus, and, in the diencephalon, two subregions of the subthalamic nucleus) systems. These labels constitute a first step toward the development of an in vivo neuroimaging template of Bn in standard space to facilitate future clinical and research investigations of human brainstem function and pathology. Proof-of-concept clinical use of this template is demonstrated in a minimally conscious patient with traumatic brainstem hemorrhages precisely localized to the raphe Bn involved in arousal. PMID:26066023

  20. Human Plasma Lipidome Is Pleiotropically Associated with Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtani, Manju; Kent, Jack W.; Wong, Gerard; Weir, Jacquelyn M.; Barlow, Christopher K.; Diego, Vincent; Almeida, Marcio; Dyer, Thomas D.; Göring, Harald H.H.; Almasy, Laura; Mahaney, Michael C.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Meikle, Peter J.; Blangero, John; Curran, Joanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death in the United States and is associated with a high economic burden. Prevention of CVD focuses on controlling or improving the lipid profile of patients at risk. The human lipidome is made up of thousands of ubiquitous lipid species. By studying biologically simple canonical lipid species, we investigated whether the lipidome is genetically redundant and whether its genetic influences can provide clinically relevant clues of CVD risk. Methods and Results We performed a genetic study of the human lipidome in 1,212 individuals from 42 extended Mexican American families. High-throughput mass spectrometry enabled rapid capture of precise lipidomic profiles, providing 319 unique species. Using variance-component based heritability analyses and bivariate trait analyses, we detected significant genetic influences on each lipid assayed. Median heritability of the plasma lipid species was 0.37. Hierarchical clustering based on complex genetic correlation patterns identified 12 genetic clusters that characterized the plasma lipidome. These genetic clusters were differentially but consistently associated with risk factors of CVD, including central obesity, obesity, type 2 diabetes, raised serum triglycerides and metabolic syndrome. Also these clusters consistently predicted occurrence of cardiovascular deaths during follow-up. Conclusions The human plasma lipidome is heritable. Shared genetic influences reduce the dimensionality of the human lipidome into clusters that are associated with risk factors of CVD. PMID:25363705

  1. Vital Signs Evaluation of Human Behaviour via an Autonomous Body Area Network System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, S.; Takayama, S.

    2016-11-01

    Enhancing Quality of Life (QOL) has long been an explicit and implicit goal for individuals, nations, and the world. QOL involves diverse multidimensional factors spanning wealth, physical health, social well-being, and international relationships. This study presents a definition of QOL combining the measurement of health-related QOL with an autonomous Body Area Network System (BANs). A method of evaluating vital signs is performed and linked to physical intensity assistance in exercise. Specifically, BAN acts as a supportive system which can assist a user in monitoring his or her body's parameters, providing real-time feedbacks and dynamically sharing information from any location to one or more users.

  2. A novel signal acquisition platform of human cardiovascular information with noninvasive method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longcong; Cai, Shaoxi; Li, Bo; Jiang, Qifeng; Ke, Ming; Zhao, Yi; Chen, Sijia; Zou, Misha

    2017-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are considered the major cause of death worldwide, so more researchers pay more and more attention to the development of a non-invasive method to obtain as much cardiovascular information (CVI) as possible for early screening and diagnosing. It is known that considerable brain information could be probed by a variety of stimuli (such as video, light, and sound). Therefore, it is quite possible that much more CVI could be extracted via giving the human body some special interrelated stimulus. Based on this hypothesis, we designed a novel signal platform to acquire more CVI with a special stimulus, which is to give a gradual decrease and a different settable constant pressure to six air belts placed on two-side brachia, wrists, and ankles, respectively. During the stimulating process, the platform is able to collect 24-channel dynamic signals related with CVI synchronously. Moreover, to improve the measurement accuracy of signal acquisition, a high precision reference chip and a software correction are adopted in this platform. Additionally, we have also shown some collection instances and analysis results in this paper for its reliability. The results suggest that our platform can not only be applied on study in a deep-going way of relationship between collected signals and CVDs but can also serve as the basic tool for developing a new noninvasive cardiovascular function detection instrument and system that can be used both at home and in the hospital.

  3. Modeling Cardiovascular Diseases with Patient-Specific Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Paul W.; Diecke, Sebastian; Matsa, Elena; Sharma, Arun; Wu, Haodi; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of cardiomyocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides a source of cells that accurately recapitulate the human cardiac pathophysiology. The application of these cells allows for modeling of cardiovascular diseases, providing a novel understanding of human disease mechanisms and assessment of therapies. Here, we describe a stepwise protocol developed in our laboratory for the generation of hiPSCs from patients with a specific disease phenotype, long-term hiPSC culture and cryopreservation, differentiation of hiPSCs to cardiomyocytes, and assessment of disease phenotypes. Our protocol combines a number of innovative tools that include a codon-optimized mini intronic plasmid (CoMiP), chemically defined culture conditions to achieve high efficiencies of reprogramming and differentiation, and calcium imaging for assessment of cardiomyocyte phenotypes. Thus, this protocol provides a complete guide to use a patient cohort on a testable cardiomyocyte platform for pharmacological drug assessment. PMID:25690476

  4. Non-contact radiofrequency-induced reduction of subcutaneous abdominal fat correlates with initial cardiovascular autonomic balance and fat tissue hormones: safety analysis [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4pj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Pumprla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The non-invasive reduction of subcutaneous abdominal fat became popular in the last decade. Radiofrequency (RF, non-contact, selective-field device Vanquish® has been developed to selectively induce deep fat tissue heating to reduce waist circumference. Our analysis evaluates immediate and sustained effects of this treatment on cardiovascular autonomic function and on selected metabolic parameters. Study design/patients and methods: A retrospective proof-of-concept analysis of RF treatment effects was conducted in 20 individuals with metabolic syndrome, to reduce the subcutaneous abdominal fat. Four 30-minutes treatment sessions (manufacturer´s standard protocol were performed in 1-week intervals. Vital signs, ECG, lab screening, body composition, subcutaneous fat thickness and spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV have been examined before, after the 1st and 4th treatment, and at follow-up visits 1 month and 3 months after the treatment. Results: The RF treatment led to a significant reduction of abdominal circumference after the 4th session (p0.59, p<0.04. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that the selective-field RF treatment is safe and efficient for reduction of subcutaneous abdominal fat. While the treatment increases the immediate sympathetic response of the body to deep tissue heating, no sustained change in autonomic function could be recorded at 1 month follow-up. The observed correlation between initial VLF spectral power and waist circumference reduction at follow-up, as well as the association of initial adiponectin values and immediate autonomic response to the treatment might be instrumental for decisions on body contouring strategies.

  5. Autonomic disbalance their relationship with the cardiovascular hiperreactivity, the resistance to the insulin and the high blood pressure. Desequilibrio autonómico simpático su relación con la hiperreactividad cardiovascular, la resistencia a la insulina y a la hipertensión arterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosvel Curbelo Pérez

    Full Text Available During many years has been debated the paper of the Autonomous Nervous System in the development of the arterial hypertension, in passing it constitutes one of the important theories that physiologists. Recently some authors have involved the activity of that system with the resistance to the insulin and with other important aspects that influence in the appearance of arterial hypertension. The objective of this work is to contribute new theoretical elements that link the changes of the activity of the Autonomous Nervous System with the presence of cardiovascular hipereactivity and sustained arterial hypertension.

    Durante muchos años se ha debatido sobre el papel del Sistema Nervioso Autónomo en el desarrollo de la hipertensión arterial, de paso constituye una de las teorías importantes que plantean fisiólogos y estudiosos. Más recientemente algunos autores han involucrado la actividad de ese sistema con la resistencia a la insulina y con otros aspectos importantes que influyen en la aparición de hipertensión arterial. El objetivo de este trabajo es aportar nuevos elementos teóricos que vinculan los cambios de la actividad del Sistema Nervioso Autónomo con la presencia de hiperreactividad cardiovascular e hipertensión arterial sostenida.

  6. Cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: A true or perceived risk?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shima; Shahbaz; Marcella; Manicardi; Giovanni; Guaraldi; Paolo; Raggi

    2015-01-01

    After the successful introduction of highly active antiretroviral agents the survival of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) in developed countries has increased substantially. This has allowed the surfacing of several chronic diseases among which cardiovascular disease(CVD) is prominent. The pathogenesis of CVD in HIV is complex and involves a combination of traditional and HIV related factors. An accurate assessment of risk of CVD in these patients is still elusive and as a consequence the most appropriate preventive and therapeutic interventions remain controversial.

  7. Autonomic disturbances in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazzi, Giuseppe; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Maggi, Leonardo Serra; Donadio, Vincenzo; Vetrugno, Roberto; Liguori, Rocco; Zoccoli, Giovanna; Poli, Francesca; Pizza, Fabio; Pagotto, Uberto; Ferri, Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Narcolepsy is a clinical condition characterized mainly by excessive sleepiness and cataplexy. Hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis complete the narcoleptic tetrad; disrupted night sleep, automatic behaviors and weight gain are also usual complaints. Different studies focus on autonomic changes or dysfunctions among narcoleptic patients, such as pupillary abnormalities, fainting spells, erectile dysfunction, night sweats, gastric problems, low body temperature, systemic hypotension, dry mouth, heart palpitations, headache and extremities dysthermia. Even if many studies lack sufficient standardization or their results have not been replicated, a non-secondary involvement of the autonomic nervous system in narcolepsy is strongly suggested, mainly by metabolic and cardiovascular findings. Furthermore, the recent discovery of a high risk for overweight and for metabolic syndrome in narcoleptic patients represents an important warning for clinicians in order to monitor and follow them up for their autonomic functions. We review here studies on autonomic functions and clinical disturbances in narcoleptic patients, trying to shed light on the possible contribute of alterations of the hypocretin system in autonomic pathophysiology.

  8. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Cardiovascular Risks Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) evaluated several cardiovascular risks associated with space flight along with the ongoing and emerging plans to study these issues and potentially propose and/or develop countermeasures. The areas of focus included: 1) The risk of cardiac rhythm problems during prolonged space flight, and 2) Issues related to the risk of orthostatic intolerance during re-exposure to gravity. An emerging area of concern is radiation associated vascular injury. The risk of cardiac rhythm disturbances has emerged based on case reports only. No systematic study of this risk has been published. However, concerns about this risk are heightened by the age range of astronauts, the structural changes in the heart that occur during space flight, and the potential shifts in fluids and electrolytes. The current plan is to use prolonged Holter monitor EKG records made as part of the "Integrated Cardiovascular SMO" in space to determine more about the frequency and magnitude of this problem and to link this data to complementary data from the nutrition group on electrolytes. The SRP was supportive of this approach. The SRP also felt that any data related to cardiovascular risk in space should be better coordinated with the medical screening data that all astronauts undergo at regular intervals. Additionally, while there are potential privacy issues related to this suggestion, many of the current barriers to better coordination of experimental and clinical data appear to reflect longstanding cultural traditions at NASA that need rethinking. The risk of orthostatic intolerance during re-exposure to gravity was seen by the SRP as an area supported by a wealth of published physiological evidence. The SRP also felt that moving forward with the planned approach to countermeasures was reasonable and that extensive additional hypothesis testing on the physiology of orthostatic intolerance was not needed at this time. There was support for developing

  9. Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Wood, Margie L.; Brown, Troy E.; Fortner, G. William

    1999-01-01

    Spaceflight causes adaptive changes in cardiovascular function that may deleteriously affect crew health and safety. Over the last three decades, symptoms of cardiovascular changes have ranged from postflight orthostatic tachycardia and decreased exercise capacity to serious cardiac rhythm disturbances during extravehicular activities (EVA). The most documented symptom of cardiovascular dysfunction, postflight orthostatic intolerance, has affected a significant percentage of U.S. Space Shuttle astronauts. Problems of cardiovascular dysfunction associated with spaceflight are a concern to NASA. This has been particularly true during Shuttle flights where the primary concern is the crew's physical health, including the pilot's ability to land the Orbiter, and the crew's ability to quickly egress and move to safety should a dangerous condition arise. The study of astronauts during Shuttle activities is inherently more difficult than most human research. Consequently, sample sizes have been small and results have lacked consistency. Before the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP), there was a lack of normative data on changes in cardiovascular parameters during and after spaceflight. The EDOMP for the first time allowed studies on a large enough number of subjects to overcome some of these problems. There were three primary goals of the Cardiovascular EDOMP studies. The first was to establish, through descriptive studies, a normative data base of cardiovascular changes attributable to spaceflight. The second goal was to determine mechanisms of cardiovascular changes resulting from spaceflight (particularly orthostatic hypotension and cardiac rhythm disturbances). The third was to evaluate possible countermeasures. The Cardiovascular EDOMP studies involved parallel descriptive, mechanistic, and countermeasure evaluations.

  10. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R

    2014-01-01

    In humans, maximal aerobic power (VO2 max ) is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (Q), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function...... and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, Q and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax...... and RAP (P exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit VO2 max in healthy...

  11. Cross-spectral coherence between geomagnetic disturbance and human cardiovascular variables at non-societal frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y; Hillman, D C; Otsuka, K; Bingham, C; Breus, T K; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    1994-01-01

    A 35-year-old cardiologist monitored himself with an automatic ABPM-630 (Colin Electronics) monitor, mostly at 15-minute intervals around-the-clock for three years with a few interruptions. In this subject with a family history of high blood pressure and stroke, a cross-spectral analysis revealed a statistically significant coherence at 27.7 days between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate vs. the geomagnetic disturbance index, Kp. A lesser peak in coherence was found for systolic blood pressure with Kp at a trial period of 4.16 days (P = 0.046). These results suggest that changes in geomagnetism may influence the human circulation, at least in the presence of familial cardiovascular disease risk, and they may do so at frequencies that have no precise human-made cyclic worldwide match.

  12. Autonomic neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  13. B-vitamin Supplementation Mitigates Effects of Fine Particles on Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction and Inflammation: A Pilot Human Intervention Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jia; Trevisi, Letizia; Urch, Bruce; Lin, Xinyi; Speck, Mary; Coull, Brent A.; Liss, Gary; Thompson, Aaron; Wu, Shaowei; Wilson, Ander; Koutrakis, Petros; Silverman, Frances; Gold, Diane R.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2017-04-01

    Ambient fine particle (PM2.5) pollution triggers acute cardiovascular events. Individual-level preventions are proposed to complement regulation in reducing the global burden of PM2.5-induced cardiovascular diseases. We determine whether B vitamin supplementation mitigates PM2.5 effects on cardiac autonomic dysfunction and inflammation in a single-blind placebo-controlled crossover pilot trial. Ten healthy adults received two-hour controlled-exposure-experiment to sham under placebo, PM2.5 (250 μg/m3) under placebo, and PM2.5 (250 μg/m3) under B-vitamin supplementation (2.5 mg/d folic acid, 50 mg/d vitamin B6, and 1 mg/d vitamin B12), respectively. At pre-, post-, 24 h-post-exposure, we measured resting heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) with electrocardiogram, and white blood cell (WBC) counts with hematology analyzer. Compared to sham, PM2.5 exposure increased HR (3.8 bpm, 95% CI: 0.3, 7.4; P = 0.04), total WBC count (11.5%, 95% CI: 0.3%, 24.0%; P = 0.04), lymphocyte count (12.9%, 95% CI: 4.4%, 22.1%; P = 0.005), and reduced low-frequency power (57.5%, 95% CI: 2.5%, 81.5%; P = 0.04). B-vitamin supplementation attenuated PM2.5 effect on HR by 150% (P = 0.003), low-frequency power by 90% (P = 0.01), total WBC count by 139% (P = 0.006), and lymphocyte count by 106% (P = 0.02). In healthy adults, two-hour PM2.5 exposure substantially increases HR, reduces HRV, and increases WBC. These effects are reduced by B vitamin supplementation.

  14. Critical analysis of autoregressive and fast Fourier transform markers of cardiovascular variability in rats and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.J.J. Silva

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in physiological and pathological conditions, and has been extensively evaluated by parametric and non-parametric spectral analysis. To compare the results obtained with fast Fourier transform (FFT and the autoregressive (AR method, we performed a comprehensive comparative study using data from humans and rats during pharmacological blockade (in rats, a postural test (in humans, and in the hypertensive state (in both humans and rats. Although postural hypotension in humans induced an increase in normalized low-frequency (LFnu of systolic blood pressure, the increase in the ratio was detected only by AR. In rats, AR and FFT analysis did not agree for LFnu and high frequency (HFnu under basal conditions and after vagal blockade. The increase in the LF/HF ratio of the pulse interval, induced by methylatropine, was detected only by FFT. In hypertensive patients, changes in LF and HF for systolic blood pressure were observed only by AR; FFT was able to detect the reduction in both blood pressure variance and total power. In hypertensive rats, AR presented different values of variance and total power for systolic blood pressure. Moreover, AR and FFT presented discordant results for LF, LFnu, HF, LF/HF ratio, and total power for pulse interval. We provide evidence for disagreement in 23% of the indices of blood pressure and heart rate variability in humans and 67% discordance in rats when these variables are evaluated by AR and FFT under physiological and pathological conditions. The overall disagreement between AR and FFT in this study was 43%.

  15. Autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1983-01-01

    The diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy is often difficult to establish, since clinical symptoms generally appear late in the course of the disease, and may be non-specific. A number of recently developed quantifiable and reproducible autonomic nerve function tests are reviewed, with emphasis on th...

  16. Variables influencing cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, L; Shively, M; Verderber, A

    1991-07-01

    Two studies are reviewed, one regarding the effects of music therapy on psychophysiologic stress in coronary care unit patients and one regarding the effects of age and gender on cardiovascular autonomic reactivity in healthy adults. Music therapy is determined to be safe for coronary care unit patients and effective in modulating the psychophysiologic manifestations of stress. The second study suggests that age--gender interactions may influence autonomic cardiovascular responsiveness. It is suggested that older adults be taught methods to reduce straining, so that rapid transient changes in blood pressure are avoided.

  17. Energy Autonomous Wireless Sensing System Enabled by Energy Generated during Human Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yang; Ruan, Tingwen; Chew, Zheng Jun; Zhu, Meiling

    2016-11-01

    Recently, there has been a huge amount of work devoted to wearable energy harvesting (WEH) in a bid to establish energy autonomous wireless sensing systems for a range of health monitoring applications. However, limited work has been performed to implement and test such systems in real-world settings. This paper reports the development and real-world characterisation of a magnetically plucked wearable knee-joint energy harvester (Mag-WKEH) powered wireless sensing system, which integrates our latest research progresses in WEH, power conditioning and wireless sensing to achieve high energy efficiency. Experimental results demonstrate that with walking speeds of 3∼7 km/h, the Mag-WKEH generates average power of 1.9∼4.5 mW with unnoticeable impact on the wearer and is able to power the wireless sensor node (WSN) with three sensors to work at duty cycles of 6.6%∼13%. In each active period of 2 s, the WSN is able to measure and transmit 482 readings to the base station.

  18. Spatial relationship of organized rotational and focal sources in human atrial fibrillation to autonomic ganglionated plexi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykaner, Tina; Zografos, Theodoros A; Zaman, Junaid A B; Pantos, Ioannis; Alhusseini, Mahmood; Navara, Rachita; Krummen, David E; Narayan, Sanjiv M; Katritsis, Demosthenes G

    2017-08-01

    One approach to improve ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is to focus on physiological targets including focal or rotational sources or ganglionic plexi (GP). However, the spatial relationship between these potential mechanisms has never been studied. We tested the hypothesis that rotors and focal sources for AF may co-localize with ganglionated plexi (GP). We prospectively identified locations of AF rotors and focal sources, and correlated these to GP sites in 97 consecutive patients (age 59.9±11.4, 73% persistent AF). AF was recorded with 64-pole catheters with activation/phase mapping, and related to anatomic GP sites on electroanatomic maps. AF sources arose in 96/97 (99%) patients for 2.6±1.4 sources per patient (left atrium: 1.7±0.9 right atrium: 1.1±0.8), each with an area of 2-3cm(2). On area analyses, the probability of an AF source randomly overlapping a GP area was 26%. Left atrial sources were seen in 94 (97%) patients, in whom ≥1 source co-localized with GP in 75 patients (80%; psources were more likely to colocalize with left vs right GPs (p65, diabetes; psources in the left atrium often colocalize with regions of autonomic innervation. Studies should define if the role of AF sources differs by their anatomical location. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nutritional Genomics and the Mediterranean Diet’s Effects on Human Cardiovascular Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Fitó

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The synergies and cumulative effects among different foods and nutrients are what produce the benefits of a healthy dietary pattern. Diets and dietary patterns are a major environmental factor that we are exposed to several times a day. People can learn how to control this behavior in order to promote healthy living and aging, and to prevent diet-related diseases. To date, the traditional Mediterranean diet has been the only well-studied pattern. Stroke incidence, a number of classical risk factors including lipid profile and glycaemia, emergent risk factors such as the length of telomeres, and emotional eating behavior can be affected by genetic predisposition. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet could exert beneficial effects on these risk factors. Our individual genetic make-up should be taken into account to better prevent these traits and their subsequent consequences in cardiovascular disease development. In the present work, we review the results of nutritional genomics explaining the role of the Mediterranean diet in human cardiovascular disease. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary to extract knowledge from large-scale data.

  20. Nutritional Genomics and the Mediterranean Diet’s Effects on Human Cardiovascular Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitó, Montserrat; Konstantinidou, Valentini

    2016-01-01

    The synergies and cumulative effects among different foods and nutrients are what produce the benefits of a healthy dietary pattern. Diets and dietary patterns are a major environmental factor that we are exposed to several times a day. People can learn how to control this behavior in order to promote healthy living and aging, and to prevent diet-related diseases. To date, the traditional Mediterranean diet has been the only well-studied pattern. Stroke incidence, a number of classical risk factors including lipid profile and glycaemia, emergent risk factors such as the length of telomeres, and emotional eating behavior can be affected by genetic predisposition. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet could exert beneficial effects on these risk factors. Our individual genetic make-up should be taken into account to better prevent these traits and their subsequent consequences in cardiovascular disease development. In the present work, we review the results of nutritional genomics explaining the role of the Mediterranean diet in human cardiovascular disease. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary to extract knowledge from large-scale data. PMID:27089360

  1. In Vitro Epigenetic Reprogramming of Human Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells into Functionally Competent Cardiovascular Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio, Matteo; Meraviglia, Viviana; Nanni, Simona; Barbuti, Andrea; Scavone, Angela; DiFrancesco, Dario; Farsetti, Antonella; Pompilio, Giulio; Colombo, Gualtiero I.; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.

    2012-01-01

    Adult human cardiac mesenchymal-like stromal cells (CStC) represent a relatively accessible cell type useful for therapy. In this light, their conversion into cardiovascular precursors represents a potential successful strategy for cardiac repair. The aim of the present work was to reprogram CStC into functionally competent cardiovascular precursors using epigenetically active small molecules. CStC were exposed to low serum (5% FBS) in the presence of 5 µM all-trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA), 5 µM Phenyl Butyrate (PB), and 200 µM diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETA/NO), to create a novel epigenetically active cocktail (EpiC). Upon treatment the expression of markers typical of cardiac resident stem cells such as c-Kit and MDR-1 were up-regulated, together with the expression of a number of cardiovascular-associated genes including KDR, GATA6, Nkx2.5, GATA4, HCN4, NaV1.5, and α-MHC. In addition, profiling analysis revealed that a significant number of microRNA involved in cardiomyocyte biology and cell differentiation/proliferation, including miR 133a, 210 and 34a, were up-regulated. Remarkably, almost 45% of EpiC-treated cells exhibited a TTX-sensitive sodium current and, to a lower extent in a few cells, also the pacemaker If current. Mechanistically, the exposure to EpiC treatment introduced global histone modifications, characterized by increased levels of H3K4Me3 and H4K16Ac, as well as reduced H4K20Me3 and H3s10P, a pattern compatible with reduced proliferation and chromatin relaxation. Consistently, ChIP experiments performed with H3K4me3 or H3s10P histone modifications revealed the presence of a specific EpiC-dependent pattern in c-Kit, MDR-1, and Nkx2.5 promoter regions, possibly contributing to their modified expression. Taken together, these data indicate that CStC may be epigenetically reprogrammed to acquire molecular and biological properties associated with competent cardiovascular precursors. PMID:23284745

  2. In vitro epigenetic reprogramming of human cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells into functionally competent cardiovascular precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Vecellio

    Full Text Available Adult human cardiac mesenchymal-like stromal cells (CStC represent a relatively accessible cell type useful for therapy. In this light, their conversion into cardiovascular precursors represents a potential successful strategy for cardiac repair. The aim of the present work was to reprogram CStC into functionally competent cardiovascular precursors using epigenetically active small molecules. CStC were exposed to low serum (5% FBS in the presence of 5 µM all-trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA, 5 µM Phenyl Butyrate (PB, and 200 µM diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETA/NO, to create a novel epigenetically active cocktail (EpiC. Upon treatment the expression of markers typical of cardiac resident stem cells such as c-Kit and MDR-1 were up-regulated, together with the expression of a number of cardiovascular-associated genes including KDR, GATA6, Nkx2.5, GATA4, HCN4, NaV1.5, and α-MHC. In addition, profiling analysis revealed that a significant number of microRNA involved in cardiomyocyte biology and cell differentiation/proliferation, including miR 133a, 210 and 34a, were up-regulated. Remarkably, almost 45% of EpiC-treated cells exhibited a TTX-sensitive sodium current and, to a lower extent in a few cells, also the pacemaker I(f current. Mechanistically, the exposure to EpiC treatment introduced global histone modifications, characterized by increased levels of H3K4Me3 and H4K16Ac, as well as reduced H4K20Me3 and H3s10P, a pattern compatible with reduced proliferation and chromatin relaxation. Consistently, ChIP experiments performed with H3K4me3 or H3s10P histone modifications revealed the presence of a specific EpiC-dependent pattern in c-Kit, MDR-1, and Nkx2.5 promoter regions, possibly contributing to their modified expression. Taken together, these data indicate that CStC may be epigenetically reprogrammed to acquire molecular and biological properties associated with competent cardiovascular precursors.

  3. Integrating autonomous distributed control into a human-centric C4ISR environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    This paper considers incorporating autonomy into human-centric Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) environments. Specifically, it focuses on identifying ways that current autonomy technologies can augment human control and the challenges presented by additive autonomy. Three approaches to this challenge are considered, stemming from prior work in two converging areas. In the first, the problem is approached as augmenting what humans currently do with automation. In the alternate approach, the problem is approached as treating humans as actors within a cyber-physical system-of-systems (stemming from robotic distributed computing). A third approach, combines elements of both of the aforementioned.

  4. Multistructure index in revealing complexity of regulatory mechanisms of human cardiovascular system at rest and orthostatic stress in healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiec, Danuta; Graff, Beata; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2017-02-01

    Biological regulation is sufficiently complex to pose an enduring challenge for characterization of both its equilibrium and transient non-equilibrium dynamics. Two univariate but coupled observables, heart rate and systolic blood pressure, are commonly characterized in the benchmark example of the human cardiovascular regulatory system. Asymmetric distributions of accelerations and decelerations of heart rate, as well as rises and falls in systolic blood pressure, recorded in humans during a head-up tilt test provide insights into the dynamics of cardiovascular response to a rapid, controlled deregulation of the system's homeostasis. The baroreflex feedback loop is assumed to be the fundamental physiological mechanism for ensuring homeostatic blood supply to distant organs at rest and during orthostatic stress, captured in a classical beat-to-beat autoregressive model of baroreflex by de Boer et al. (1987). For model corroboration, a multistructure index statistic is proposed, seamlessly evaluating the size spectrum of magnitudes of neural reflexes such as baroreflex, responsible for maintaining the homeostatic dynamics. The multistructure index exposes a distinctly different dynamics of multiscale asymmetry between results obtained from real-life signals recorded from healthy subjects and those simulated using both the classical and perturbed versions of the model. Nonlinear effects observed suggest the pronounced presence of complex mechanisms resulting from baroreflex regulation when a human is at rest, which is aggravated in the system's response to orthostatic stress. Using our methodology of multistructure index, we therefore show a marked difference between model and real-life scenarios, which we attribute to multiscale asymmetry of non-linear origin in real-life signals, which we are not reproducible by the classical model.

  5. Mobile Autonomous Humanoid Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Tyree, K. S.; Goza, S. M.; Huber, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile autonomous humanoid robot is assisting human co-workers at the Johnson Space Center with tool handling tasks. This robot combines the upper body of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robonaut system with a Segway(TradeMark) Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid perfect for aiding human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereo vision to locate human team mates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form human assistant behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  6. Coffee and cardiovascular disease: in vitro, cellular, animal, and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonita, Jennifer Stella; Mandarano, Michael; Shuta, Donna; Vinson, Joe

    2007-03-01

    Coffee is a commonly consumed beverage with potential health benefits. This review will focus on cardiovascular disease. There are three preparations of coffee that are commonly consumed and thus worthy of examination; boiled unfiltered coffee, filtered coffee, and decaffeinated coffee. Coffee has over a thousand chemicals, many formed during the roasting process. From a physiological point of view, the potential bioactives are caffeine, the diterpenes cafestol and kahweol found in the oil, and the polyphenols, most notably chlorogenic acid. We will examine coffee and its bioactives and their connection with and effect on the risk factors which are associated with heart disease such as lipids, blood pressure, inflammation, endothelial function, metabolic syndrome and potentially protective in vivo antioxidant activity. These will be critically examined by means of in vitro studies, cell experiments, animal supplementation, epidemiology, and the most definitive evidence, human trials.

  7. Vascular hyperpolarization in human physiology and cardiovascular risk conditions and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, F; Tesauro, M; Cardillo, C

    2017-01-01

    Hyperpolarization causing smooth muscle relaxation contributes to the maintenance of vascular homeostasis, particularly in small-calibre arteries and arterioles. It may also become a compensatory vasodilator mechanism upregulated in states with impaired nitric oxide (NO) availability. Bioassay of vascular hyperpolarization in the human circulation has been hampered by the complexity of mechanisms involved and the limited availability of investigational tools. Firm evidence, however, supports the notion that hyperpolarization participates in the regulation of resting vasodilator tone and vascular reactivity in healthy subjects. In addition, an enhanced endothelium-derived hyperpolarization contributes to both resting and agonist-stimulated vasodilation in a variety of cardiovascular risk conditions and disease. Thus, hyperpolarization mediated by epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and H2 O2 has been observed in coronary arterioles of patients with coronary artery disease. Similarly, ouabain-sensitive and EETs-mediated hyperpolarization has been observed to compensate for NO deficiency in patients with essential hypertension. Moreover, in non-hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors and in hypercholesterolaemia, KCa channel-mediated vasodilation appears to be activated. A novel paradigm establishes that perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an additional regulator of vascular tone/function and endothelium is not the only agent in vascular hyperpolarization. Indeed, some PVAT-derived relaxing substances, such as adiponectin and angiotensin 1-7, may exert anticontractile and vasodilator actions by the opening of KCa channels in smooth muscle cells. Conversely, PVAT-derived factors impair coronary vasodilation via differential inhibition of some K(+) channels. In view of adipose tissue abnormalities occurring in human obesity, changes in PVAT-dependent hyperpolarization may be relevant for vascular dysfunction also in this condition.

  8. Autonomic symptoms in idiopathic REM behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Oertel, Wolfgang; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2014-01-01

    , and sexual dysfunction. Our results show that compared to control subjects with a similar overall age and sex distribution, patients with iRBD experience significantly more problems with gastrointestinal, urinary, and cardiovascular functioning. The most prominent differences in severity of autonomic......Patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) are at very high risk of developing neurodegenerative synucleinopathies, which are disorders with prominent autonomic dysfunction. Several studies have documented autonomic dysfunction in iRBD, but large-scale assessment of autonomic...

  9. Proportionality and Autonomous Weapons Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, J.

    2015-01-01

    Given the swift technologic development, it may be expected that the availability of the first truly autonomous weapons systems is fast approaching. Once they are deployed, these weapons will use artificial intelligence to select and attack targets without further human intervention. Autonomous

  10. Proportionality and Autonomous Weapons Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, J.

    2015-01-01

    Given the swift technologic development, it may be expected that the availability of the first truly autonomous weapons systems is fast approaching. Once they are deployed, these weapons will use artificial intelligence to select and attack targets without further human intervention. Autonomous weap

  11. Autonomic dysreflexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common cause of autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is spinal cord injury. The nervous system of people with AD over-responds to the types of stimulation that do not bother healthy people. Other causes ...

  12. Autonomous search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous combinatorial search (AS) represents a new field in combinatorial problem solving. Its major standpoint and originality is that it considers that problem solvers must be capable of self-improvement operations. This is the first book dedicated to AS.

  13. Autonomic Involvement in Subacute and Chronic Immune-Mediated Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, Anna; Stancanelli, Claudia; Vita, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic function can be impaired in many disorders in which sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric arms of the autonomic nervous system are affected. Signs and symptoms of autonomic involvement are related to impairment of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, urogenital, thermoregulatory, sudomotor, and pupillomotor autonomic functions. Availability of noninvasive, sensitive, and reproducible tests can help to recognize these disorders and to better understand specific mechanisms of some, potentially treatable, immune-mediated autonomic neuropathies. This paper describes autonomic involvement in immune-mediated neuropathies with a subacute or chronic course. PMID:23853716

  14. Parvovirus B19 promoter at map unit 6 confers autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to adeno-associated virus 2 in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X S; Yoder, M C; Zhou, S Z; Srivastava, A

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic human parvovirus B19 is an autonomously replicating virus with a remarkable tropism for human erythroid progenitor cells. Although the target cell specificity for B19 infection has been suggested to be mediated by the erythrocyte P-antigen receptor (globoside), a number of nonerythroid cells that express this receptor are nonpermissive for B19 replication. To directly test the role of expression from the B19 promoter at map unit 6 (B19p6) in the erythroid cell specificity of B19, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), in which the authentic AAV promoter at map unit 5 (AAVp5) was replaced by the B19p6 promoter. Although the wild-type (wt) AAV requires a helper virus for its optimal replication, we hypothesized that inserting the B19p6 promoter in a recombinant AAV would permit autonomous viral replication, but only in erythroid progenitor cells. In this report, we provide evidence that the B19p6 promoter is necessary and sufficient to impart autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to AAV in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells. Thus, expression from the B19p6 promoter plays an important role in post-P-antigen receptor erythroid-cell specificity of parvovirus B19. The AAV-B19 hybrid vector system may also prove to be useful in potential gene therapy of human hemoglobinopathies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8618912

  15. Effects of Chinese Liquors on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Healthy Young Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Sheng Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To elucidate whether consumption of two Chinese liquors, tea-flavor liquor (TFL and traditional Chinese liquor (TCL have protective effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors in healthy human subjects. Methods. Forty-five healthy subjects (23 men, 22 women, aged 23–28, were recruited and randomized into two groups: TFL and TCL, and consumed 30 mL/day (45% (v/v alcohol of either liquor for 28 days. Results. Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C/LDL-C and apolipoprotein A1 were significantly increased, and total cholesterol (TC and TC/HDL-C were significantly decreased after the intervention in both groups (P<0.05. Serum uric acid (P=0.004 for TFL, P=0.001 for TCL, glucose (P<0.001 for TFL, P<0.001 for TCL and endothelial adhesion molecules (P<0.05 were significantly decreased after the intervention. ADP-induced whole blood platelet aggregation was also significantly decreased after the intervention in both TFL and TCL groups (P<0.05. Conclusions. TFL and TCL consumption had protective effects on CVD risk factors in young humans. However, the results were valid only for 28 days, and that the possibility of adverse effect (liver, kidney of chronic alcohol consumption should be considered.

  16. Functional imaging of the human brainstem during somatosensory input and autonomic output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Anthony Henderson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past half a century, many experimental animal investigations have explored the role of various brainstem regions in a variety of conditions. Despite the accumulation of a considerable body of knowledge in primarily anaesthetized preparations, relatively few investigations have explored brainstem function in awake humans. It is important that human brainstem function is explored given that many neurological conditions, from obstructive sleep apnea, chronic pain and hypertension, likely involve significant changes in the processing of information within the brainstem. Recent advances in the collection and processing of magnetic resonance images, has resulted in the possibility of exploring brainstem activity changes in awake healthy individuals and in those with various clinical conditions. We and others have begun to explore changes in brainstem activity in humans during a number of challenges, including during cutaneous and muscle pain, as well as during challenges that evoke increases in sympathetic activity. More recently we have successfully recorded sympathetic nerve activity concurrently with fMRI of the brainstem, which will allow us, for the first time to explore brainstem sites directly responsible for conditions such as hypertension. Since many conditions will involve changes in brainstem function and structure, defining brainstem changes will likely result in a greater ability to develop more effective treatment regimes.

  17. Cell-autonomous correction of ring chromosomes in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershteyn, Marina; Hayashi, Yohei; Desachy, Guillaume; Hsiao, Edward C.; Sami, Salma; Tsang, Kathryn M.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Ring chromosomes are structural aberrations commonly associated with birth defects, mental disabilities and growth retardation. Rings form after fusion of the long and short arms of a chromosome, and are sometimes associated with large terminal deletions. Owing to the severity of these large aberrations that can affect multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have been proposed. During cell division, ring chromosomes can exhibit unstable behaviour leading to continuous production of aneuploid progeny with low viability and high cellular death rate. The overall consequences of this chromosomal instability have been largely unexplored in experimental model systems. Here we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient fibroblasts containing ring chromosomes with large deletions and found that reprogrammed cells lost the abnormal chromosome and duplicated the wild-type homologue through the compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD) mechanism. The karyotypically normal iPSCs with isodisomy for the corrected chromosome outgrew co-existing aneuploid populations, enabling rapid and efficient isolation of patient-derived iPSCs devoid of the original chromosomal aberration. Our results suggest a fundamentally different function for cellular reprogramming as a means of `chromosome therapy' to reverse combined loss-of-function across many genes in cells with large-scale aberrations involving ring structures. In addition, our work provides an experimentally tractable human cellular system for studying mechanisms of chromosomal number control, which is of critical relevance to human development and disease.

  18. Autonomic control of heart rate by metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas; Hartwich, Doreen

    2010-01-01

    moderate (PEI-M) and high (PEI-H) intensity isometric handgrip performed at 25% and 40% maximum voluntary contraction, under control (no drug), parasympathetic blockade (glycopyrrolate) and beta-adrenergic blockade (metoprolol or propranalol) conditions, while beat-to-beat HR and BP were continuously...... was similarly increased from rest during PEI-M and further elevated during PEI-H (P Collectively, these findings suggest that the muscle metaboreflex increases cardiac SNA during PEI in humans; however, it requires a robust muscle metaboreflex activation to offset the influence...

  19. Autonomic Regulation of Splanchnic Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Fraser

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the autonomic nervous system in circulatory regulation of the splanchnic organs (stomach, small intestine, colon, liver, pancreas and spleen is reviewed. In general, the sympathetic nervous system is primarily involved in vasoconstriction, while the parasympathetic contributes to vasodilation. Vasoconstriction in the splanchnic circulation appears to be mediated by alpha-2 receptors and vasodilation by activation of primary afferent nerves with subsequent release of vasodilatory peptides, or by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. As well, an important function of the autonomic nervous system is to provide a mechanism by which splanchnic vascular reserve can be mobilized during stress to maintain overall cardiovascular homeostasis.

  20. A Study on Human Oriented Autonomous Distributed Manufacturing System —Real-time Scheduling Method Based on Preference of Human Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamura, Koji; Kuwahara, Shinya; Tanimizu, Yoshitaka; Sugimura, Nobuhiro

    Recently, new distributed architectures of manufacturing systems are proposed, aiming at realizing more flexible control structures of the manufacturing systems. Many researches have been carried out to deal with the distributed architectures for planning and control of the manufacturing systems. However, the human operators have not yet been discussed for the autonomous components of the distributed manufacturing systems. A real-time scheduling method is proposed, in this research, to select suitable combinations of the human operators, the resources and the jobs for the manufacturing processes. The proposed scheduling method consists of following three steps. In the first step, the human operators select their favorite manufacturing processes which they will carry out in the next time period, based on their preferences. In the second step, the machine tools and the jobs select suitable combinations for the next machining processes. In the third step, the automated guided vehicles and the jobs select suitable combinations for the next transportation processes. The second and third steps are carried out by using the utility value based method and the dispatching rule-based method proposed in the previous researches. Some case studies have been carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Comparison of dynamic of autonomic control indices in cardiovascular system under the treatment by ACE inhibitor (Enalapril and beta-blocker (Metoprolol in patients with hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Kiselev

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was to compare the influence of Enalapril and Metoprolol on synchronization of 0.1 Hz-regulation of heart and blood microcirculation. 42 patients aged 49±9 years old with hypertension I, II were included in the study. 0.1 Hz-oscillations in heart rate variability (HRV and blood microcirculation were registered during the passive orthostatic sign while breathing spontaneously. The duration of each test was 10 minutes. Synchronization was estimated as a phase difference between 0.1 Hz-rhythms in heart rate and in filling of blood microcirculation. Quantitative measures of synchronization were also estimated. In addition frequency values of HRV spectrum in LF- and HF-ranges were assessed. Enalapril and Metoprolol had comparable effect on blood pressure reduction. Treatment with both Enalapril and Metoprolol in patients with significant vegetative dysfunction resulted in repair of functional interaction between 0.1 Hz-regulation of heart and blood microcirculation. Enalapril was preferred in hypertensive patients with prevalence of disorders of vegetative regulation of blood microcirculation. Metoprolol influenced positively on 0,1 Hz-rhythm synchronization in patients with predominance of heart vegetative regulation dysfunction and in patients with sympathicotonia. In patients with hypertension and initially normal level of synchronization of 0.1 Hz-mechanisms treatment with Enalapril or Metoprolol caused functional dissociation. Differentiated approach to the choice of hypertensive therapy should consider individual peculiarities of system vegetative dysfunction. The level of synchronization of 0.1 Hz-rhythms in cardiovascular system should especially be evaluated initially and during the treatment

  2. Autonomous Robot Navigation in Human-Centered Environments Based on 3D Data Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Peter; Strand, Marcus; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2007-12-01

    Efficient navigation of mobile platforms in dynamic human-centered environments is still an open research topic. We have already proposed an architecture (MEPHISTO) for a navigation system that is able to fulfill the main requirements of efficient navigation: fast and reliable sensor processing, extensive global world modeling, and distributed path planning. Our architecture uses a distributed system of sensor processing, world modeling, and path planning units. In this arcticle, we present implemented methods in the context of data fusion algorithms for 3D world modeling and real-time path planning. We also show results of the prototypic application of the system at the museum ZKM (center for art and media) in Karlsruhe.

  3. Autonomous Robot Navigation in Human-Centered Environments Based on 3D Data Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Dillmann

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient navigation of mobile platforms in dynamic human-centered environments is still an open research topic. We have already proposed an architecture (MEPHISTO for a navigation system that is able to fulfill the main requirements of efficient navigation: fast and reliable sensor processing, extensive global world modeling, and distributed path planning. Our architecture uses a distributed system of sensor processing, world modeling, and path planning units. In this arcticle, we present implemented methods in the context of data fusion algorithms for 3D world modeling and real-time path planning. We also show results of the prototypic application of the system at the museum ZKM (center for art and media in Karlsruhe.

  4. Cardiac Structure and Function in Humans: A New Cardiovascular Physiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Su; Burleson, Paul D.; Passo, Stanley; Messina, Edward J.; Levine, Norman; Thompson, Carl I.; Belloni, Francis L.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Ojaimi, Caroline; Kaley, Gabor; Hintze, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    As the traditional cardiovascular control laboratory has disappeared from the first-year medical school curriculum, we have recognized the need to develop another "hands-on" experience as a vehicle for wide-ranging discussions of cardiovascular control mechanisms. Using an echocardiograph, an automatic blood pressure cuff, and a reclining bicycle,…

  5. Cardiac Structure and Function in Humans: A New Cardiovascular Physiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Su; Burleson, Paul D.; Passo, Stanley; Messina, Edward J.; Levine, Norman; Thompson, Carl I.; Belloni, Francis L.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Ojaimi, Caroline; Kaley, Gabor; Hintze, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    As the traditional cardiovascular control laboratory has disappeared from the first-year medical school curriculum, we have recognized the need to develop another "hands-on" experience as a vehicle for wide-ranging discussions of cardiovascular control mechanisms. Using an echocardiograph, an automatic blood pressure cuff, and a reclining bicycle,…

  6. Autonomic Dysfunction in Early Breast Cancer: Incidence, Clinical Importance, and Underlying Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction represents a loss of normal autonomic control of the cardiovascular system associated with both sympathetic nervous system overdrive and reduced efficacy of the parasympathetic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction is a strong predictor of future coronary heart disease, vascular disease and sudden cardiac death. In the current review, we will discuss the clinical importance of autonomic dysfunction as a cardiovascular risk marker among breast cancer patients. We will rev...

  7. Fundamentals of laser light interaction with human tissue, especially in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haina, D; Landthaler, M

    1988-06-01

    The absorption of single photons in the molecules of biological tissue can induce various reactions. For the most medical laser applications the transformation from radiation energy into heat is relevant. The laser beam is used for coagulation or vaporization of tissue. The changes in tissue, which are created by light of different wavelengths depends on the thermal and optical properties (absorption and scatting) of tissue but also on the parameters of irradiation. As an example measurements from human skin are discussed. In the cardiovascular system laser light must have a clearly defined effect. Atherosclerotic plaques of different consistence have to be vaporized without damage of the vessel walls. From different reasons the usual medical CW-lasers, Argon-laser, CO2-laser and Nd:YAG-laser, are not optimal for direct ablation of arterial occlusions. In order to mimize reocclusion the walls of the channels have to be completely smooth and free of coagulation necrosis. This can be obtained by short laser pulses. Selection of a light wavelength, which is stronger absorbed in atherosclerotic plaques than in vessel walls and additional selective staining are two ways to reduce the risk of damaging the vessel walls.

  8. Human induced hepatic lineage-oriented stem cells: autonomous specification of human iPS cells toward hepatocyte-like cells without any exogenous differentiation factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ishikawa

    Full Text Available Preparing targeted cells for medical applications from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs using growth factors, compounds, or gene transfer has been challenging. Here, we report that human induced hepatic lineage-oriented stem cells (hiHSCs were generated and expanded as a new type of hiPSC under non-typical coculture with feeder cells in a chemically defined hiPSC medium at a very high density. Self-renewing hiHSCs expressed markers of both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and hepatocytes. Those cells were highly expandable, markedly enhancing gene expression of serum hepatic proteins and cytochrome P450 enzymes with the omission of FGF-2 from an undefined hiPSC medium. The hepatic specification of hiHSCs was not attributable to the genetic and epigenetic backgrounds of the starting cells, as they were established from distinct donors and different types of cells. Approximately 90% of hiHSCs autonomously differentiated to hepatocyte-like cells, even in a defined minimum medium without any of the exogenous growth factors necessary for hepatic specification. After 12 days of this culture, the differentiated cells significantly enhanced gene expression of serum hepatic proteins (ALB, SERPINA1, TTR, TF, FABP1, FGG, AGT, RBP4, and AHSG, conjugating enzymes (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, GSTA2, and GSTA5, transporters (SULT2A1, SLC13A5, and SLCO2B1, and urea cycle-related enzymes (ARG1 and CPS1. In addition, the hepatocyte-like cells performed key functions of urea synthesis, albumin secretion, glycogen storage, indocyanine green uptake, and low-density lipoprotein uptake. The autonomous hepatic specification of hiHSCs was due to their culture conditions (coculture with feeder cells in a defined hiPSC medium at a very high density in self-renewal rather than in differentiation. These results suggest the feasibility of preparing large quantities of hepatocytes as a convenient and inexpensive hiPSC differentiation. Our study also suggests the

  9. Cardiovascular physiology and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Narayana S; Svatikova, Anna; Somers, Virend K

    2003-05-01

    Sleep is a natural periodic suspension of consciousness during which processes of rest and restoration occur. The cognitive, reparative and regenerative accompaniments of sleep appear to be essential for maintenance of health and homeostasis. This brief overview will examine the cardiovascular responses to normal and disordered sleep, and their physiologic and pathologic implications. In the past, sleep was believed to be a passive state. The tableau of sleep as it unfolds is anything but a passive process. The brain's activity is as complex as wakefulness, never "resting" during sleep. Following the demise of the 'passive theory of sleep' (the reticular activating system is fatigued during the waking day and hence becomes inactive), there arose the 'active theory of sleep' (sleep is due to an active general inhibition of the brain) (1). Hess demonstrated the active nature of sleep in cats, inducing "physiological sleep" with electrical stimulation of the diencephalon (2). Classical experiments of transection of the cat brainstem (3) at midpontine level inhibited sleep completely, implying that centers below this level were involved in the induction of sleep (1, 4). For the first time, measurement of sleep depth without awakening the sleeper using the electroencephalogram (EEG) was demonstrated in animals by Caton and in humans, by Berger (1). This was soon followed by discovery of the rapid eye movement sleep periods (REM) by Aserinski and Kleitman (5), demonstration of periodical sleep cycles and their association with REM sleep (6, 7). Multiple studies and steady discoveries (4) made polysomnography, with its ability to perform simultaneous whole night recordings of EEG, electromyogram (EMG), and electrooculogram (EOC), a major diagnostic tool in study of sleep disorders. This facility has been of further critical importance in allowing evaluation of the interaction between sleep and changes in hemodynamics and autonomic cardiovascular control. Consequently the

  10. Human thermal bioclimatic conditions associated with acute cardiovascular syndromes in Crete Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleta, Anastasia G.; Nastos, Panagiotis T.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the association between bioclimatic conditions and daily counts of admissions for non-fatal acute cardiovascular (acute coronary syndrome, arrhythmia, decompensation of heart failure) syndromes (ACS) registered by the two main hospitals in Heraklion, Crete Island, during a five-year period 2008-2012. The bioclimatic conditions analyzed are based on human thermal bioclimatic indices such as the Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET) and the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI). Mean daily meteorological parameters, such as air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and cloudiness, were acquired from the meteorological station of Heraklion (Hellenic National Meteorological Service). These parameters were used as input variables in modeling the aforementioned thermal indices, in order to interpret the grade of the thermo-physiological stress. The PET and UTCI analysis was performed by the use of the radiation and bioclimate model, "RayMan", which is well-suited to calculate radiation fluxes and human biometeorological indices. Generalized linear models (GLM) were applied to time series of daily numbers of outpatients with ACS against bioclimatic variations, after controlling for possible confounders and adjustment for season and trends. The interpretation of the results of this analysis suggests a significant association between cold weather and increased coronary heart disease incidence, especially in the elderly and males. Additionally, heat stress plays an important role in the configuration of daily ACS outpatients, even in temperate climate, as that in Crete Island. In this point it is worth mentioning that Crete Island is frequently affected by Saharan outbreaks, which are associated in many cases with miscellaneous phenomena, such as Föhn winds - hot and dry winds - causing extreme bioclimatic conditions (strong heat stress). Taking into consideration the projected increased ambient temperature in the future, ACS

  11. Simulated Microgravity Exerts an Age-Dependent Effect on the Differentiation of Cardiovascular Progenitors Isolated from the Human Heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania I Fuentes

    Full Text Available Microgravity has a profound effect on cardiovascular function, however, little is known about the impact of microgravity on progenitors that reside within the heart. We investigated the effect of simulated microgravity exposure on progenitors isolated from the neonatal and adult human heart by quantifying changes in functional parameters, gene expression and protein levels after 6-7 days of 2D clinorotation. Utilization of neonatal and adult cardiovascular progenitors in ground-based studies has provided novel insight into how microgravity may affect cells differently depending on age. Simulated microgravity exposure did not impact AKT or ERK phosphorylation levels and did not influence cell migration, but elevated transcripts for paracrine factors were identified in neonatal and adult cardiovascular progenitors. Age-dependent responses surfaced when comparing the impact of microgravity on differentiation. Endothelial cell tube formation was unchanged or increased in progenitors from adults whereas neonatal cardiovascular progenitors showed a decline in tube formation (p<0.05. Von Willebrand Factor, an endothelial differentiation marker, and MLC2v and Troponin T, markers for cardiomyogenic differentiation, were elevated in expression in adult progenitors after simulated microgravity. DNA repair genes and telomerase reverse transcriptase which are highly expressed in early stem cells were increased in expression in neonatal but not adult cardiac progenitors after growth under simulated microgravity conditions. Neonatal cardiac progenitors demonstrated higher levels of MESP1, OCT4, and brachyury, markers for early stem cells. MicroRNA profiling was used to further investigate the impact of simulated microgravity on cardiovascular progenitors. Fifteen microRNAs were significantly altered in expression, including microRNAs-99a and 100 (which play a critical role in cell dedifferentiation. These microRNAs were unchanged in adult cardiac progenitors

  12. Hjertefrekvensvariationer til vurdering af det autonome nervesystem. En oversigt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T L; Kambskar, G; Mehlsen, J

    1997-01-01

    activity in the different branches of the autonomic nervous system. In the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy, short-term forced variations in heart rate are employed in order to describe the dynamic capacity of the parasympathetic nervous system. In the subsequent data-analysis several different principles......Analysis of heart rate variability is increasingly used for testing the function of the autonomic nervous system in cardiovascular disease and for the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy. In cardiovascular disease, long-term data collection (several hours) is primarily used to describe the static...

  13. Clustering of cardiovascular risk factors mimicking the human metabolic syndrome X in eNOS null mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, S; Hugli, O; Egli, M; Vollenweider, P.; Burcelin, R.; Nicod, P; Thorens, B.; Scherrer, U

    2003-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The metabolic syndrome comprises a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors but the underlying mechanism is not known. Mice with targeted disruption of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) are hypertensive and insulin resistant. We wondered, whether eNOS deficiency in mice is associated with a phenotype mimicking the human metabolic syndrome. METHODS AND RESULTS: In addition to arterial pressure and insulin sensitivity (euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp), we measured t...

  14. A New Approach to Teaching Human Cardiovascular Physiology Using Doppler Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looker, T.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the principles of the Doppler ultrasound technique and reviews its potential applications to the teaching of cardiovascular physiology. Identifies the instrumentation needed for this technique; provides examples and illustrations of the waveforms from the ultrasound blood velocimeter. (ML)

  15. Nano-analytical electron microscopy reveals fundamental insights into human cardiovascular tissue calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzo, Sergio; Gentleman, Eileen; Cloyd, Kristy L; Chester, Adrian H; Yacoub, Magdi H; Stevens, Molly M

    2013-06-01

    The accumulation of calcified material in cardiovascular tissue is thought to involve cytochemical, extracellular matrix and systemic signals; however, its precise composition and nanoscale architecture remain largely unexplored. Using nano-analytical electron microscopy techniques, we examined valves, aortae and coronary arteries from patients with and without calcific cardiovascular disease and detected spherical calcium phosphate particles, regardless of the presence of calcific lesions. We also examined lesions after sectioning with a focused ion beam and found that the spherical particles are composed of highly crystalline hydroxyapatite that crystallographically and structurally differs from bone mineral. Taken together, these data suggest that mineralized spherical particles may play a fundamental role in calcific lesion formation. Their ubiquitous presence in varied cardiovascular tissues and from patients with a spectrum of diseases further suggests that lesion formation may follow a common process. Indeed, applying materials science techniques to ectopic and orthotopic calcification has great potential to lend critical insights into pathophysiological processes underlying calcific cardiovascular disease.

  16. [Autonomic nervous system in diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emdin, M

    2001-08-01

    Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia have a primary role in determining the early functional and later anatomic changes at the level of the autonomic pathways controlling the circulation, and besides in directly influencing cardiac and vascular cellular targets and feed-back baroreceptor system sensitivity to neurohumoral modulation in patients with diabetes mellitus. The basic mechanisms of dysfunction and damage, and the clinical and prognostic value of diabetic cardiovascular dysautonomia are discussed together with the diagnostic apparatus and the possible therapeutic approaches.

  17. Cardiovascular pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Renier; Hochfeld, Warren E; Dodgen, Tyren M; Ker, James; Pepper, Michael S

    2012-03-01

    Human genetic variation in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as more complex structural variations such as insertions, deletions and copy number variants, is partially responsible for the clinical variation seen in response to pharmacotherapeutic drugs. This affects the likelihood of experiencing adverse drug reactions and also of achieving therapeutic success. In this paper, we review key studies in cardiovascular pharmacogenetics that reveal genetic variations underlying the outcomes of drug treatment in cardiovascular disease. Examples of genetic associations with drug efficacy and toxicity are described, including the roles of genetic variability in pharmacokinetics (e.g. drug metabolizing enzymes) and pharmacodynamics (e.g. drug targets). These findings have functional implications that could lead to the development of genetic tests aimed at minimizing drug toxicity and optimizing drug efficacy in cardiovascular medicine.

  18. [Autonomic neuropathy: a high risk complication for type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina; Marques Junior, Wilson; Foss, Milton Cesar

    2008-03-01

    The pathological alteration of the nervous system in diabetic patients is extensive and frequently severe. The prevalence of the diabetic neuropathy reach high levels with the evolution of the diabetes, often showing frequencies higher than 50% in several groups of patients. The neurological lesion in this pathological situation is extensive in the diabetic patient, including widely the peripheral nervous system with its components sensory, motor and autonomic: with typical symptoms and in accordance with the pathogenesis of metabolic origin and/or microvascular disease. The autonomic nervous system is a main regulator of many systems in the human body. Then its lesion can promote significant alterations in the function of the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital system, that can be related to increased motality. This review anlyses the abnormalities related to lesion of the autonomic nervous system, particularly in type 1 diabetic patients, trying to characterize the risk of morbidity and mortality.

  19. Prevalencia de diabetes mellitus y factores de riesgo cardiovascular en la población adulta de la Comunidad de Madrid: estudio PREDIMERC Prevalence of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors in the adult population of the autonomous region of Madrid (Spain: the PREDIMERC study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Gil Montalbán

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la prevalencia de diabetes y los principales factores de riesgo cardiovascular en la población adulta de la Comunidad de Madrid. Material y método: Estudio transversal de base poblacional en el año 2007. Se seleccionó una muestra aleatoria representativa de la población de 30-74 años, con un tamaño muestral fijo para cada estrato de edad, ponderando los resultados según la estructura por edad de la Comunidad de Madrid. Se realizó una encuesta telefónica. Posteriormente, en el centro de salud se efectuó la exploración física y la extracción de sangre en ayunas para determinar la glucemia, el colesterol y las fracciones lipídicas. Resultados: Se incluyeron 2.268 personas con una edad media de 48,3 años; el 52% eran mujeres. La tasa de respuesta fue del 56,4%. El 8,1% (intervalo de confianza del 95% [IC95%]: 7,0-8,9 de la población presenta diabetes y el 5,9% (IC95%: 4,8-6,1 una glucemia basal alterada. El 29,3% (IC95%: 27,3-31,5 tiene hipertensión arterial y el 23,3% (IC 95%: 21,4-25,2 hipercolesterolemia. El 22,8% (IC95%: 20,8-25,0 presenta sobrepeso de grado II, el 21,7% (IC95%: 19,8-23,6 obesidad y el 23,9% (IC95%: 21,8-26,1 obesidad abdominal. El 85,5% (IC95%: 83,1-87,1 eran sedentarios en tiempo libre y el 28,4% (IC95%: 26,3-30,3 fumadores. Conclusiones: La prevalencia de diabetes mellitus en la Comunidad de Madrid se sitúa en una posición intermedia con respecto a otras comunidades autónomas. Los principales factores de riesgo cardiovascular tienen una elevada prevalencia. El sobrepeso de grado II y la obesidad, que afectan a 4,5 de cada 10 adultos, representan una prioridad de intervención en la prevención de la diabetes y la enfermedad cardiovascular.Objective: To describe the prevalence of diabetes and major cardiovascular risk factors in the adult population of the autonomous region of Madrid (Spain. Material and method: A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 2007. A random

  20. A Comprehensive TALEN-Based Knockout Library for Generating Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Models for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakikes, Ioannis; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Cepeda, Diana A; Lee, Jaecheol; Diecke, Sebastian; Hendel, Ayal; Itzhaki, Ilanit; Ameen, Mohamed; Shrestha, Rajani; Wu, Haodi; Ma, Ning; Shao, Ning-Yi; Seeger, Timon; Woo, Nicole A; Wilson, Kitchener D; Matsa, Elena; Porteus, Matthew H; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Wu, Joseph C

    2017-02-28

    Rationale: Targeted genetic engineering using programmable nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is a valuable tool for precise, site-specific genetic modification in the human genome. Objective: The emergence of novel technologies such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and nuclease-mediated genome editing represent a unique opportunity for studying cardiovascular diseases in vitro. Methods and Results: By incorporating extensive literature and database searches, we designed a collection of TALEN constructs to knockout (KO) eighty-eight human genes that are associated with cardiomyopathies and congenital heart diseases. The TALEN pairs were designed to induce double-strand DNA break near the starting codon of each gene that either disrupted the start codon or introduced a frameshift mutation in the early coding region, ensuring faithful gene KO. We observed that all the constructs were active and disrupted the target locus at high frequencies. To illustrate the general utility of the TALEN-mediated KO technique, six individual genes (TNNT2, LMNA/C, TBX5, MYH7, ANKRD1, and NKX2.5) were knocked out with high efficiency and specificity in human iPSCs. By selectively targeting a dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)-causing mutation (TNNT2 p.R173W) in patient-specific iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes (iPSC-CMs), we demonstrated that the KO strategy ameliorates the DCM phenotype in vitro. In addition, we modeled the Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) in iPSC-CMs in vitro and uncovered novel pathways regulated by TBX5 in human cardiac myocyte development. Conclusions: Collectively, our study illustrates the powerful combination of iPSCs and genome editing technology for understanding the biological function of genes and the pathological significance of genetic variants in human cardiovascular diseases. The methods, strategies, constructs and iPSC lines developed in this study provide a validated, readily available resource for cardiovascular

  1. Neurotrophin presence in human coronary atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome: a role for NGF and BDNF in cardiovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaldakov, George N; Fiore, Marco; Stankulov, Ivan S; Manni, Luigi; Hristova, Mariyana G; Antonelli, Alessia; Ghenev, Peter I; Aloe, Luigi

    2004-01-01

    The development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is a common comorbidity in patients with the metabolic syndrome, a concurrence of cardiovascular risk factors in one individual. While multiple growth factors and adipokines are identified in atherosclerotic lesions, as well as neurotrophins implicated in both cardiac ischemia and lipid and glucose metabolism, the potential role of neurotrophins in human coronary atherosclerosis and in the metabolic syndrome still remains to be elucidated. Here we describe and discuss our results that represent a novel attempt to study the cardiovascular and metabolic biology of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and mast cells (MC). The local amount of NGF, the immunolocalization of p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) and the number of MC were correlatively examined in coronary vascular wall and in the surrounding subepicardial adipose tissue, obtained from autopsy cases in humans with advanced coronary atherosclerosis. We also analyzed the plasma levels of NGF, BDNF and leptin and the number of MC in biopsies from abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in patients with a severe form of the metabolic syndrome. The results demonstrate that NGF levels are decreased in atherosclerotic coronary vascular tissue but increased in the subepicardial adipose tissue, whereas both tissues express a greater number of MC and a stronger p75NTR immunoreactivity, compared to controls. Metabolic syndrome patients display a significant hyponeurotrophinemia and an increased number of adipose MC; the later correlates with elevated plasma leptin levels. In effect, we provide the first evidence for (i) an altered presence of NGF, p75NTR and MC in both coronary vascular and subepicardial adipose tissue in human coronary atherosclerosis, and (ii) a significant decrease in plasma NGF and BDNF levels and an elevated amount of plasma leptin and adipose MC in metabolic syndrome patients. Together our findings suggest that

  2. Autonomous cure of damaged human intestinal epithelial cells by TLR2 and TLR4-dependent production of IL-22 in response to Spirulina polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Akira; Konishi, Yuko; Taguchi, Takahiro; Fukuoka, Satoshi; Kawaguchi, Tokuichi; Noda, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Keiji

    2013-12-01

    In order to analyze the damage of human epithelial cells, we used human quasi-normal FPCK-1-1 cells derived from a colonic polyp in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis as a monolayer, which is co-cultured with peptidoglycan (PGN)-stimulated THP-1 cells. Co-cultured FPCK-1-1 cells showed a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and the lower level of claudin-2. When Spirulina complex polysaccharides were added one day before the start of the co-culture, there was no decrease of TER and claudin-2 (early phase damage). In contrast, when Spirulina complex polysaccharides were added to FPCK-1-1 cells after the level of TER had decreased, there was no recovery at the level of claudin-2, though the TER level recovered (late phase damage). The mucosa reconstitution is suggested to be involved in the recovery from the damaged status. Interestingly, autonomous recovery of FPCK-1-1 cells from both the early and late phase damage requires the production of IL-22, because anti-IL-22 antibodies inhibited recovery in these cases. Antibodies against either TLR2 or TLR4 inhibited the production of IL-22 from FPCK-1-1 colon epithelial cells, suggesting that signals through TLR2 and TLR4 are necessary for autonomous recovery of FPCK-1-1 colon epithelial cells by producing IL-22. In conclusion, we have established a useful model for the study of intestinal damage and recovery using human colon epithelial cells and our data suggest that damage to human colon epithelial cells can, at least in part, be recovered by the autonomous production of IL-22 in response to Spirulina complex polysaccharides. © 2013.

  3. Acute effects of tai chi exercise on cardiac autonomic function in healthy adults with tai chi experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsaria, Pratik; Li, Hongtao; Waite, Gabi N; Moga, Margaret M; Kingsley, Derek J; Geib, Roy W

    2012-01-01

    About 1 in 3 American adults have cardiovascular disease associated with risk factors such as physical inactivity, obesity, and stress. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is considered a non-invasive procedure for analyzing cardiovascular autonomic influence. Depressed HRV has been linked to abnormal cardiovascular autonomic modulation.

  4. Dendritic Cells and Their Role in Cardiovascular Diseases: A View on Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja-Theresa Dieterlen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs are key to the immunological response, with different functions ascribed ranging from cellular immune activation to induction of tolerance. Such immunological responses are involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases, with DCs shown to play a role in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and heart failure and most notably following heart transplantation. A better understanding of the interplay between the immune system and cardiovascular diseases will therefore be critical for developing novel therapeutic treatments as well as innovative monitoring tools for disease progression. As such, the present review will provide an overview of DCs involvement in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases and how targeting these cells may have beneficial effects for the prognosis of patients.

  5. Technologies for highly miniaturized autonomous sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baert, K.; Gyselinckx, B.; Torfs, T.; Leonov, V.; Yazicioglu, F.; Brebels, S.; Donnay, S.; Vanfleteren, J.; Beyne, E.; Hoof, C. van

    2006-01-01

    Recent results of the autonomous sensor research program HUMAN++ will be summarized in this paper. The research program aims to achieve highly miniaturized and (nearly) autonomous sensor systems that assist our health and comfort. Although the application examples are dedicated to human monitoring/a

  6. Autonomous Airship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin POSPÍŠILÍK

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a project of attaching the autonomous monitoring system to a small helium airship. The airship is capable of independent operating inside a closed hall, being driven by means of ultrasonic detectors. It is accommodated to carry different monitoring units providing students with the opportunity to process various experiments and measurements. In the first experiment, the airship will carry WiFi router, camera and IP Relay by means of which the pertinent control of the airship through external web interface is enabled, independently on the ultrasonic detecting system.

  7. Autonomous Search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Decades of innovations in combinatorial problem solving have produced better and more complex algorithms. These new methods are better since they can solve larger problems and address new application domains. They are also more complex which means that they are hard to reproduce and often harder to fine-tune to the peculiarities of a given problem. This last point has created a paradox where efficient tools are out of reach of practitioners. Autonomous search (AS) represents a new research field defined to precisely address the above challenge. Its major strength and originality consist in the

  8. Developmental origins of cardiovascular disease: Impact of early life stress in humans and rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M O; Cohn, D M; Loria, A S

    2017-03-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesizes that environmental insults during childhood programs the individual to develop chronic disease in adulthood. Emerging epidemiological data strongly supports that early life stress (ELS) given by the exposure to adverse childhood experiences is regarded as an independent risk factor capable of predicting future risk of cardiovascular disease. Experimental animal models utilizing chronic behavioral stress during postnatal life, specifically maternal separation (MatSep) provides a suitable tool to elucidate molecular mechanisms by which ELS increases the risk to develop cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. The purpose of this review is to highlight current epidemiological studies linking ELS to the development of cardiovascular disease and to discuss the potential molecular mechanisms identified from animal studies. Overall, this review reveals the need for future investigations to further clarify the molecular mechanisms of ELS in order to develop more personalized therapeutics to mitigate the long-term consequences of chronic behavioral stress including cardiovascular and heart disease in adulthood.

  9. Human microbiome as therapeutic intervention target to reduce cardiovascular disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopen, Annefleur M.; Groen, Albert K.; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The absolute burden of cardiovascular risk remains high despite currently available preventive and therapeutic options. In search for novel therapeutic leads, mounting evidence has linked the gut microbiota as well as their metabolites to the development of cardiometabolic diseases

  10. Human microbiome as therapeutic intervention target to reduce cardiovascular disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopen, Annefleur M.; Groen, Albert K.; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The absolute burden of cardiovascular risk remains high despite currently available preventive and therapeutic options. In search for novel therapeutic leads, mounting evidence has linked the gut microbiota as well as their metabolites to the development of cardiometabolic diseases

  11. Effect of sex on the cardiovascular response to adrenaline in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouwenberg, B.J.J.W.; Rietjens, S.J.; Smits, P.; Galan, B.E. de

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular responsiveness to stress conditions differs between men and women. It is not known to what extent this observation is explained by differences in the release of stress hormones like adrenaline, or by differences in the response to adrenaline. Therefore, we quantified the hemodynamic r

  12. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Eijsvogels, T.M.; Bouts, Y.M.; Maiorana, A.J.; Naylor, L.H.; Scholten, R.R.; Spaanderman, M.E.; Pugh, C.J.; Sprung, V.S.; Schreuder, T.H.; Jones, H.; Cable, T.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk fa

  13. Targeted overexpression of human alpha-synuclein in oligodendroglia induces lesions linked to MSA-like progressive autonomic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemberger, Sylvia; Poewe, Werner; Wenning, Gregor K; Stefanova, Nadia

    2010-08-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare neurodegenerative disease of undetermined cause manifesting with progressive autonomic failure (AF), cerebellar ataxia and parkinsonism due to neuronal loss in multiple brain areas associated with (oligodendro)glial cytoplasmic alpha-synuclein (alpha SYN) inclusions (GCIs). Using proteolipid protein (PLP)-alpha-synuclein (alpha SYN) transgenic mice we have previously reported parkinsonian motor deficits triggered by MSA-like alpha SYN inclusions. We now extend these observations by demonstrating degeneration of brain areas that are closely linked to progressive AF and other non-motor symptoms in MSA, in (PLP)-alpha SYN transgenic mice as compared to age-matched non-transgenic controls. We show delayed loss of cholinergic neurons in nucleus ambiguus at 12 months of age as well as early neuronal loss in laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and Onuf's nucleus at 2 months of age associated with alpha SYN oligodendroglial overexpression. We also report that neuronal loss triggered by MSA-like alpha SYN inclusions is absent up to 12 months of age in the thoracic intermediolateral cell column suggesting a differential dynamic modulation of alpha SYN toxicity within the murine autonomic nervous system. Although the spatial and temporal evolution of central autonomic pathology in MSA is unknown our findings corroborate the utility of the (PLP)-alpha SYN transgenic mouse model as a testbed for the study of oligodendroglial alpha SYN mediated neurodegeneration replicating both motor and non-motor aspects of MSA.

  14. In vivo functional connectome of human brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, autonomic and motor systems by high spatial resolution 7 Tesla fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Eichner, Cornelius; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Setsompop, Kawin; Brown, Emery N.; Hamalainen, Matti S.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Object To map the in vivo human functional connectivity of several brainstem nuclei with the rest of the brain by using seed-based correlation of ultra-high magnetic field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods We used the recently developed template of 11 brainstem nuclei derived from multi-contrast structural MRI at 7 Tesla as seed regions to determine their connectivity to the rest of the brain. To achieve this, we utilized the increased contrast-to-noise ratio of 7 Tesla fMRI compared to 3 Tesla and the time efficient simultaneous multi-slice imaging to cover the brain with high spatial resolution (1.1 mm-isotropic nominal resolution) while maintaining a short repetition time (2.5 s). Results The delineated Pearson’s correlation-based functional connectivity diagrams (connectomes) of 11 brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, motor and autonomic systems from 12 controls are presented and discussed in the context of existing histology and animal work. Conclusion Considering that the investigated brainstem nuclei play a crucial role in several vital functions, the delineated preliminary connectomes might prove useful for future in vivo research and clinical studies of human brainstem function and pathology, including disorders of consciousness, sleep disorders, autonomic disorders, Parkinson’s disease and other motor disorders. PMID:27126248

  15. In vivo functional connectome of human brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, autonomic, and motor systems by high spatial resolution 7-Tesla fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Eichner, Cornelius; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Setsompop, Kawin; Brown, Emery N; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Rosen, Bruce R; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to map the in vivo human functional connectivity of several brainstem nuclei with the rest of the brain by using seed-based correlation of ultra-high magnetic field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. We used the recently developed template of 11 brainstem nuclei derived from multi-contrast structural MRI at 7 Tesla as seed regions to determine their connectivity to the rest of the brain. To achieve this, we used the increased contrast-to-noise ratio of 7-Tesla fMRI compared with 3 Tesla and time-efficient simultaneous multi-slice imaging to cover the brain with high spatial resolution (1.1-mm isotropic nominal resolution) while maintaining a short repetition time (2.5 s). The delineated Pearson's correlation-based functional connectivity diagrams (connectomes) of 11 brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, motor, and autonomic systems from 12 controls are presented and discussed in the context of existing histology and animal work. Considering that the investigated brainstem nuclei play a crucial role in several vital functions, the delineated preliminary connectomes might prove useful for future in vivo research and clinical studies of human brainstem function and pathology, including disorders of consciousness, sleep disorders, autonomic disorders, Parkinson's disease, and other motor disorders.

  16. Arguments for and proposed tests of a revised S-R contiguity-reinforcement theory of human Pavlovian autonomic conditioning: some contra-cognitive claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furedy, J J

    1988-10-01

    One of the consequences of the cognitive paradigm shift is that human Pavlovian autonomic conditioning of responses like the GSR has been considered to be a mere epiphenomenon or index of an underlying cognitive process. The paper begins by reviewing evidence against three such reductionist, cognitive accounts, and then proposes a revision of an S-R theory of classical conditioning that was first put forward in the early sixties. The revision is designed to increase the S-R theory's testability, and this increase is demonstrated by indicating four sets of experimental arrangements where the revised S-R theory forbids certain outcomes, and does so in a way that differentiates it from other competing theories. In this way we can proceed to begin the task of determining the boundary conditions of both cognitive and non-cognitive accounts of human Pavlovian autonomic conditioning, instead of engaging in territorial struggles between those accounts, struggles whose outcome is determined by changing Zeitgeist considerations rather than evidential ones.

  17. Autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eVerrotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population.

  18. The influence of the human microbiome and probiotics on cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Grace; MacDonald, Kyle; Reid, Gregor; Burton, Jeremy P

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death worldwide. Of the many etiological factors, microorganisms constitute one. From the local impact of the gut microbiota on energy metabolism and obesity, to the distal association of periodontal disease with coronary heart disease, microbes have a significant impact on cardiovascular health. In terms of the ability to modulate or influence the microbes, probiotic applications have been considered. These are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a benefit on the host. While a number of reports have established the beneficial abilities of certain probiotic bacterial strains to reduce cholesterol and hypertension, recent research suggests that their use could be more widely applied. This review presents an up-to-date summary of the known associations of the microbiome with CVD, and potential applications of probiotic therapy.

  19. Patterns of Senescence in Human Cardiovascular Fitness: VO2max in Subsistence and Industrialized Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisor, Anne C.; Gurven, Michael; Blackwell, Aaron D.; Kaplan, Hillard; Yetish, Gandhi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study explores whether cardiovascular fitness levels and senescent decline are similar in the Tsimane of Bolivia and Canadians, as well as other subsistence and industrialized populations. Among Tsimane, we examine whether morbidity predicts lower levels and faster decline of cardiovascular fitness, or whether their lifestyle (e.g., high physical activity) promotes high levels and slow decline. Alternatively, high activity levels and morbidity might counterbalance such that Tsimane fitness levels and decline are similar to those in industrialized populations. Methods Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was estimated using a step test heart rate method for 701 participants. We compared these estimates to the Canadian Health Measures Survey and previous studies in industrialized and subsistence populations. We evaluated whether health indicators and proxies for market integration were associated with VO2max levels and rate of decline for the Tsimane. Results The Tsimane have significantly higher levels of VO2max and slower rates of decline than Canadians; initial evidence suggests differences in VO2max levels between other subsistence and industrialized populations. Low hemoglobin predicts low VO2max for Tsimane women while helminth infection predicts high VO2max for Tsimane men, though results might be specific to the VO2max scaling parameter used. No variables tested interact with age to moderate decline. Conclusions The Tsimane demonstrate higher levels of cardiovascular fitness than industrialized populations, but levels similar to other subsistence populations. The high VO2max of Tsimane is consistent with their high physical activity and few indicators of cardiovascular disease, measured in previous studies. PMID:24022886

  20. Dendritic Cells and Their Role in Cardiovascular Diseases: A View on Human Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Maja-Theresa Dieterlen; Katja John; Hermann Reichenspurner; Mohr, Friedrich W.; Barten, Markus J.

    2016-01-01

    The antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) are key to the immunological response, with different functions ascribed ranging from cellular immune activation to induction of tolerance. Such immunological responses are involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases, with DCs shown to play a role in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and heart failure and most notably following heart transplantation. A better understanding of the interplay between the immune system and car...

  1. EFFECT OF CHIA SEED (SALVIA HISPANICA L.) CONSUMPTION ON CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN HUMANS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Ferreira, Cynthia; dd Sousa Fomes, Lucilia de Fátima; da Silva, Gilze Espirito Santo; Rosa, Glorimar

    2015-11-01

    chia is a seed rich in such nutrients as proteins, n-3 fatty acids and especially alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), minerals, fibers and antioxidants. Efforts have been made to assess whether human consumption of chia can reduce cardiovascular risk factors; however, it has not been established as effective and the findings of the few studies to have looked into the matter are inconsistent. to systematize the findings of studies assessing the effect the consumption of chia seed, either milled or whole, has in the prevention/control of cardiovascular risk factors in humans. this is a systematic literature review (SLR) with no meta-analysis. The articles scrutinizedwere identified in the electronic databases Lilacs, Medline (Pub- Med version), Cochrane, Scielo, Scopus, and Web of Science under the keywords"dyslipidemia" or "dislipidemia", "hyperlipidemia" or "hiperlipidemia", "obesity" or "obesidade", "salvia"or"salviahispanica", "Lamiaceae" or "chia", "hypertension" or "hipertensão", "hypertrygliceridemia" or "hipertrigliceridemia", and "riscocardiovascular" or "cardiovascularrisk." We chose for our selection English-, Portuguese- or Spanish-language articles about clinical trials on humans and published within the last ten years. The biases of risk analysis were carried out considering 6 of the 8 criteria of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions Version 5.1. seven studies (n = 200) fit our inclusion criteria. Of the chosen clinical trials, only one was not randomized. Five of the studies were blind experiments. Two of the studies were acute trials, both of them randomized. Of the chia seed interventions, one study showed a significant drop in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and inflammatory markers, yet there was no change in body mass, lipid profile or blood sugar. In four of the studies reviewed there was a significant spike in ALA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), with no significant change to other parameters. In the acute trials, post

  2. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel J; Eijsvogels, Thijs; Bouts, Yvette M; Maiorana, Andrew J; Naylor, Louise H; Scholten, Ralph R; Spaanderman, Marc E A; Pugh, Christopher J A; Sprung, Victoria S; Schreuder, Tim; Jones, Helen; Cable, Tim; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-08-15

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to exercise-induced changes in artery function. We pooled data from our laboratories involving 182 subjects who underwent supervised, large-muscle group, endurance-type exercise training interventions with pre-/posttraining measures of flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) to assess artery function. All studies adopted an identical FMD protocol (5-min ischemia, distal cuff inflation), contemporary echo-Doppler methodology, and observer-independent automated analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors contributing to changes in FMD%. We found that cardiopulmonary fitness improved, and weight, body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased after training, while FMD% increased in 76% of subjects (P cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly related to changes in FMD% (P > 0.05). In conclusion, we found that, while some subjects do not demonstrate increases following exercise training, improvement in FMD% is present in those with lower pretraining body weight and endothelial function. Moreover, exercise training-induced change in FMD% did not correlate with changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors, indicating that some cardioprotective effects of exercise training are independent of improvement in risk factors.

  3. Autonomic dysfunction in early breast cancer: Incidence, clinical importance, and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoski, Susan G; Jones, Lee W; Krone, Ronald J; Stein, Phyllis K; Scott, Jessica M

    2015-08-01

    Autonomic dysfunction represents a loss of normal autonomic control of the cardiovascular system associated with both sympathetic nervous system overdrive and reduced efficacy of the parasympathetic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction is a strong predictor of future coronary heart disease, vascular disease, and sudden cardiac death. In the current review, we will discuss the clinical importance of autonomic dysfunction as a cardiovascular risk marker among breast cancer patients. We will review the effects of antineoplastic therapy on autonomic function, as well as discuss secondary exposures, such as psychological stress, sleep disturbances, weight gain/metabolic derangements, and loss of cardiorespiratory fitness, which may negatively impact autonomic function in breast cancer patients. Lastly, we review potential strategies to improve autonomic function in this population. The perspective can help guide new therapeutic interventions to promote longevity and cardiovascular health among breast cancer survivors.

  4. The Cardiovascular Research Grid (CVRG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CardioVascular Research Grid (CVRG) project is creating an infrastructure for sharing cardiovascular data and data analysis tools. CVRG tools are developed using...

  5. Acupuncture Effect and Central Autonomic Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Qian Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is a therapeutic technique and part of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. Acupuncture has clinical efficacy on various autonomic nerve-related disorders, such as cardiovascular diseases, epilepsy, anxiety and nervousness, circadian rhythm disorders, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS and subfertility. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that acupuncture can control autonomic nerve system (ANS functions including blood pressure, pupil size, skin conductance, skin temperature, muscle sympathetic nerve activities, heart rate and/or pulse rate, and heart rate variability. Emerging evidence indicates that acupuncture treatment not only activates distinct brain regions in different kinds of diseases caused by imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic activities, but also modulates adaptive neurotransmitter in related brain regions to alleviate autonomic response. This review focused on the central mechanism of acupuncture in modulating various autonomic responses, which might provide neurobiological foundations for acupuncture effects.

  6. Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesiewicz, Theresa A.; Baker, Matthew J.; Wahba, Mervat; Hauser, Robert A.

    2003-03-01

    Autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), affects 70% to 80% of patients, and causes significant morbidity and discomfort. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction symptoms in PD include sexual dysfunction, swallowing and gastrointestinal disorders, bowel and bladder abnormalities, sleep disturbances, and derangements of cardiovascular regulation, particularly, orthostatic hypotension. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in PD may be caused by an underlying degenerative process that affects the autonomic ganglia, brainstem nuclei, and hypothalamic nuclei. Anti-parkinsonian medications can cause or worsen symptoms of ANS dysfunction. The care of a PD patient with ANS dysfunction relies on its recognition and directed treatment, including coordinated care between the neurologist and appropriate subspecialist. Pharmacotherapy may be useful to treat orthostasis, gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual dysfunction.

  7. Tracer application in cardiovascular imaging: a Triple Jump, Chapter 7 : In: Autonomic Innervation of the Heart, Edited by R.H.J.A. Slart, R.A. Tio, P.H. Elsinga and M. Schwaiger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roo, F. Michelle; Hilgerink, Koen; Kosterink, Johannes; Luurtsema, Geert; Woerdenbag, Herman; Boersma, Hendrikus; Slart, Riemer; Tio, Rene; Elsinga, Philipus; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Next to aspects related to the imaging techniques, the quality of the used cardiovascular tracer is of major importance to produce reliable images, leading to accurate diagnoses as well as outcome of research and imaging-correlated treatment. We have built up this chapter on cardiovascular imaging a

  8. Decreased myocardial perfusion reserve in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskiran, Mustafa; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Verner

    2002-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for increased cardiovascular mortality in diabetic autonomic neuropathy are unknown. To investigate the effect of autonomic neuropathy on myocardial function, we performed dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance perfusion imaging during baseline...... conditions and after Dipyridamole-induced vasodilatation in nine type 1 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy (AN+), defined by cardiovascular tests, as well as in 10 type 1 diabetic patients without autonomic neuropathy (AN-) and 10 healthy control subjects. Baseline myocardial perfusion index (K...... blood pressure response to Dipyridamole and myocardial perfusion reserve index. We conclude that type 1 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy have a decreased myocardial perfusion reserve capacity when challenged with a vasodilatator, a finding that may in part be the pathophysiological substrate...

  9. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

    2007-11-30

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are avilable to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions.

  10. Cardiovascular performance with E. coli challenges in a canine model of human sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natanson, C.; Danner, R.L.; Fink, M.P.; MacVittie, T.J.; Walker, R.I.; Conklin, J.J.; Parrillo, J.E. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA) Naval Medical Research Institute and Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA) Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester (USA))

    1988-03-01

    The authors investigated cardiovascular dysfunction by injecting lethal and nonlethal bacterial challenges into conscious dogs. E coli bacteria of varying numbers were placed in a peritoneal clot. Cardiovascular function was studied with simultaneous radionuclide scans and thermodilution cardiac outputs. In surviving animals, the number of bacteria in the clot increased as the corresponding systolic cardiac function decreased. Cardiac function was measured by left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and LV function curves. Furthermore, the diastolic volume-pressure relationship of survivors shifted progressively to the right. This increase in LV size was associated with maintenance of measures of cardiac performance at similar levels. Death occurred only in the group with the highest bacterial dose. Compared with survivors receiving the same number of bacterial, nonsurvivors had a decrease in LV size, a leftward shift in LV diastolic volume-pressure relationship, and a decrease in both LVSWI and SVI. Data from survivors suggest that increasing the number of bacteria produces changes in myocardial compliance and contractility. These changes increase LV size (preload), a major determinant of cardiac performance that possibility enhances survival.

  11. Effects of bioactive constituents in functional cocoa products on cardiovascular health in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarriá, Beatriz; Martínez-López, Sara; Sierra-Cinos, José Luis; Garcia-Diz, Luis; Goya, Luis; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Cocoa manufacturers are producing novel products increasing polyphenols, methylxanthines or dietary fibre to improve purported health benefits. We attempt to explain the contribution of cocoa bioactive compounds to cardiovascular effects observed in previous studies, placing particular emphasis on methylxanthines. We focused on a soluble cocoa product rich in dietary fibre (DFCP) and a product rich in polyphenols (PPCP). Effects of regularly consuming DFCP (providing daily 10.17 g, 43.8 mg and 168.6 mg of total-dietary-fibre, flavanols and methylxanthines, respectively) as well as PPCP (providing daily 3.74 g, 45.3 mg and 109.8 mg of total-dietary-fibre, flavanols and methylxanthines, respectively) on cardiovascular health were assessed in two controlled, cross-over studies in free-living normocholesterolemic and moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects. Both products increased HDL-cholesterol concentrations, whereas only DFCP decreased glucose and IL-1β levels in all subjects. Flavanols appeared to be responsible for the increase in HDL-cholesterol, whereas insoluble-dietary-fibre and theobromine in DFCP were associated with the hypoglycemic and anti-inflammatory effects observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Patient-specific system for prognosis of surgical treatment outcomes of human cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kalinin, Aleksey A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Kossovich, Elena L.; Kossovich, Leonid Y.; Menishova, Liyana R.; Polienko, Asel V.

    2015-03-01

    Object of study: Improvement of life quality of patients with high stroke risk ia the main goal for development of system for patient-specific modeling of cardiovascular system. This work is dedicated at increase of safety outcomes for surgical treatment of brain blood supply alterations. The objects of study are common carotid artery, internal and external carotid arteries and bulb. Methods: We estimated mechanical properties of carotid arteries tissues and patching materials utilized at angioplasty. We studied angioarchitecture features of arteries. We developed and clinically adapted computer biomechanical models, which are characterized by geometrical, physical and mechanical similarity with carotid artery in norm and with pathology (atherosclerosis, pathological tortuosity, and their combination). Results: Collaboration of practicing cardiovascular surgeons and specialists in the area of Mathematics and Mechanics allowed to successfully conduct finite-element modeling of surgical treatment taking into account various features of operation techniques and patching materials for a specific patient. Numerical experiment allowed to reveal factors leading to brain blood supply decrease and atherosclerosis development. Modeling of carotid artery reconstruction surgery for a specific patient on the basis of the constructed biomechanical model demonstrated the possibility of its application in clinical practice at approximation of numerical experiment to the real conditions.

  13. Management Approaches to Hypertension in Autonomic Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Amy C.; Biaggioni, Italo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review Supine hypertension is a common finding in autonomic failure that can worsen orthostatic hypotension and predispose to end-organ damage. This review focuses on non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches to manage hypertension in these patients, in the face of disabling orthostatic hypotension. Recent Findings The hypertension of autonomic failure can be driven by sympathetic dependent or independent mechanisms, depending on the site of autonomic lesions. Management of supine hypertension should include simple non-pharmacologic approaches including avoiding the supine position during the daytime and head-up tilt at night. Most patients, however, require pharmacologic treatment. Several antihypertensive therapies lower night-time pressure in autonomic failure, but none improve nocturnal volume depletion or morning orthostatic tolerance. Regardless, treatment may still be beneficial in some patients but must be determined on an individual basis, considering disease type and overnight monitoring. Further, doses must be carefully titrated as these patients are hypersensitive to depressor agents due to loss of baroreceptor reflexes. Summary Autonomic failure provides a unique opportunity to study blood pressure regulation independent of autonomic influences. Understanding mechanisms driving supine hypertension will have important implications for the treatment of autonomic failure and will improve our knowledge of cardiovascular regulation in other populations, including essential hypertension and elderly hypertensives with comorbid orthostatic hypotension. PMID:22801444

  14. Quantitative Autonomic Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Novak, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Disorders associated with dysfunction of autonomic nervous system are quite common yet frequently unrecognized. Quantitative autonomic testing can be invaluable tool for evaluation of these disorders, both in clinic and research. There are number of autonomic tests, however, only few were validated clinically or are quantitative. Here, fully quantitative and clinically validated protocol for testing of autonomic functions is presented. As a bare minimum the clinical autonomic laboratory shoul...

  15. LC-MS/MS method for the determination of several drugs used in combined cardiovascular therapy in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Oskar; Iriarte, Gorka; Rico, Estitxu; Ferreirós, Nerea; Maguregui, Miren Itxaso; Alonso, Rosa Maria; Jiménez, Rosa Maria

    2010-10-15

    A simple, fast and validated method is reported for the simultaneous analysis, in human plasma, of several drugs usually combined in cardiovascular therapy (atenolol, bisoprolol, hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone, salicylic acid, enalapril and its active metabolite enalaprilat, valsartan and fluvastatin) using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI), working in multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Separation of analytes and internal standard (pravastatin) was performed on a Luna C18(2) (150mm×4.6mm, 3μm) column using a gradient elution mode with a run time of 15min. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of acetonitrile and water containing 0.01% formic acid and 10mM ammonium formate at pH 4.1. Sample treatment consisted of a simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile, enabling a fast analysis. The method showed good linearity, precision (RSD% values between 0.7% and 12.7%) and accuracy (relative error values between 0.9% and 14.0%). Recoveries were within 68-106% range and the ion-suppression was not higher than 22% for any analyte. The method was successfully applied to plasma samples obtained from patients under combined cardiovascular treatment.

  16. Exercise aggravates cardiovascular risks and mortality in rats with disrupted nitric oxide pathway and treated with recombinant human erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziri, Fayçal; Binda, Delphine; Touati, Sabeur; Pellegrin, Maxime; Berthelot, Alain; Touyz, Rhian M; Laurant, Pascal

    2011-08-01

    Chronic administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) can generate serious cardiovascular side effects such as arterial hypertension (HTA) in clinical and sport fields. It is hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) can protect from noxious cardiovascular effects induced by chronic administration of rHuEPO. On this base, we studied the cardiovascular effects of chronic administration of rHuEPO in exercise-trained rats treated with an inhibitor of NO synthesis (L-NAME). Rats were treated or not with rHuEPO and/or L-NAME during 6 weeks. During the same period, rats were subjected to treadmill exercise. The blood pressure was measured weekly. Endothelial function of isolated aorta and small mesenteric arteries were studied and the morphology of the latter was investigated. L-NAME induced hypertension (197 ± 6 mmHg, at the end of the protocol). Exercise prevented the rise in blood pressure induced by L-NAME (170 ± 5 mmHg). However, exercise-trained rats treated with both rHuEPO and L-NAME developed severe hypertension (228 ± 9 mmHg). Furthermore, in these exercise-trained rats treated with rHuEPO/L-NAME, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was markedly impaired in isolated aorta (60% of maximal relaxation) and small mesenteric arteries (53%). L-NAME hypertension induced an internal remodeling of small mesenteric arteries that was not modified by exercise, rHuEPO or both. Vascular ET-1 production was not increased in rHuEPO/L-NAME/training hypertensive rats. Furthermore, we observed that rHuEPO/L-NAME/training hypertensive rats died during the exercise or the recovery period (mortality 51%). Our findings suggest that the use of rHuEPO in sport, in order to improve physical performance, represents a high and fatal risk factor, especially with pre-existing cardiovascular risk.

  17. Multiscale model of the human cardiovascular system: Description of heart failure and comparison of contractility indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosta, S; Negroni, J; Lascano, E; Dauby, P C

    2017-02-01

    A multiscale model of the cardiovascular system is presented. Hemodynamics is described by a lumped parameter model, while heart contraction is described at the cellular scale. An electrophysiological model and a mechanical model were coupled and adjusted so that the pressure and volume of both ventricles are linked to the force and length of a half-sarcomere. Particular attention was paid to the extreme values of the sarcomere length, which must keep physiological values. This model is able to reproduce healthy behavior, preload variations experiments, and ventricular failure. It also allows to compare the relevance of standard cardiac contractility indices. This study shows that the theoretical gold standard for assessing cardiac contractility, namely the end-systolic elastance, is actually load-dependent and therefore not a reliable index of cardiac contractility.

  18. Effects of ritanserin on the behavioral, neuroendocrine, and cardiovascular responses to meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibyl, J P; Krystal, J H; Price, L H; Woods, S W; D'Amico, C; Heninger, G R; Charney, D S

    1991-09-01

    Ten healthy male subjects were administered i.v. meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (MCPP) (0.1 mg/kg) after oral ritanserin (5-10 mg), a putative 5HT1c/5HT2 (serotonin) antagonist, or placebo. Behavioral responses, cardiovascular effects, and neuroendocrine responses (cortisol, growth hormone, and prolactin) were measured serially for 4 hours after MCPP infusion. Premedication with ritanserin attenuated the MCPP-induced increases in self-rated anxiety and prolactin, and completely antagonized MCPP cortisol elevations. In contrast, ritanserin did not significantly alter growth hormone response to MCPP. These findings suggest a role for 5-HT1c/5-HT2 receptors in the endocrine and behavioral responses to the mixed serotonin agonist MCPP in humans.

  19. Effect of cocoa/chocolate ingestion on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and its relevance to cardiovascular health and disease in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Kevin D

    2012-11-15

    Prospective studies indicate that high intake of dietary flavanols, such as those contained in cocoa/chocolate, are associated with reduced rates of cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in humans. Numerous mechanisms may underlie these associations such as favorable effects of flavanols on blood pressure, platelet aggregation, thrombosis, inflammation, and the vascular endothelium. The brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) technique has emerged as a robust method to quantify endothelial function in humans. Collectively, the preponderance of evidence indicates that FMD is a powerful surrogate measure for firm cardiovascular endpoints, such as cardiovascular-related mortality, in humans. Thus, literally thousands of studies have utilized this technique to document group differences in FMD, as well as to assess the effects of various interventions on FMD. In regards to the latter, numerous studies indicate that both acute and chronic ingestion of cocoa/chocolate increases FMD in humans. Increases in FMD after cocoa/chocolate ingestion appear to be dose-dependent such that greater increases in FMD are observed after ingestion of larger quantities. The mechanisms underlying these responses are likely diverse, however most data suggest an effect of increased nitric oxide bioavailability. Thus, positive vascular effects of cocoa/chocolate on the endothelium may underlie (i.e., be linked mechanistically to) reductions in cardiovascular risk in humans.

  20. Wnt/β-Catenin Stimulation and Laminins Support Cardiovascular Cell Progenitor Expansion from Human Fetal Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson-Broberg, Agneta; Rodin, Sergey; Bulatovic, Ivana; Ibarra, Cristián; Löfling, Marie; Genead, Rami; Wärdell, Eva; Felldin, Ulrika; Granath, Carl; Alici, Evren; Le Blanc, Katarina; Smith, C I Edvard; Salašová, Alena; Westgren, Magnus; Sundström, Erik; Uhlén, Per; Arenas, Ernest; Sylvén, Christer; Tryggvason, Karl; Corbascio, Matthias; Simonson, Oscar E; Österholm, Cecilia; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik

    2016-04-12

    The intrinsic regenerative capacity of human fetal cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has not been fully characterized. Here we demonstrate that we can expand cells with characteristics of cardiovascular progenitor cells from the MSC population of human fetal hearts. Cells cultured on cardiac muscle laminin (LN)-based substrata in combination with stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway showed increased gene expression of ISL1, OCT4, KDR, and NKX2.5. The majority of cells stained positive for PDGFR-α, ISL1, and NKX2.5, and subpopulations also expressed the progenitor markers TBX18, KDR, c-KIT, and SSEA-1. Upon culture of the cardiac MSCs in differentiation media and on relevant LNs, portions of the cells differentiated into spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle-like cells. Our protocol for large-scale culture of human fetal cardiac MSCs enables future exploration of the regenerative functions of these cells in the context of myocardial injury in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Wnt/β-Catenin Stimulation and Laminins Support Cardiovascular Cell Progenitor Expansion from Human Fetal Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Månsson-Broberg

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic regenerative capacity of human fetal cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs has not been fully characterized. Here we demonstrate that we can expand cells with characteristics of cardiovascular progenitor cells from the MSC population of human fetal hearts. Cells cultured on cardiac muscle laminin (LN-based substrata in combination with stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway showed increased gene expression of ISL1, OCT4, KDR, and NKX2.5. The majority of cells stained positive for PDGFR-α, ISL1, and NKX2.5, and subpopulations also expressed the progenitor markers TBX18, KDR, c-KIT, and SSEA-1. Upon culture of the cardiac MSCs in differentiation media and on relevant LNs, portions of the cells differentiated into spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle-like cells. Our protocol for large-scale culture of human fetal cardiac MSCs enables future exploration of the regenerative functions of these cells in the context of myocardial injury in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Climate Changes and Human Health: A Review of the Effect of Environmental Stressors on Cardiovascular Diseases Across Epidemiology and Biological Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, Paolo; Di Giosia, Paolo; Petrarca, Marco; Lattanzio, Francesco; Stamerra, Cosimo Andrea; Ferri, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is rapidly affecting all the regions of our planet. The most relevant example is global warming, which impacts on the earth's ecosystems, threatening human health. Other effects include extreme variations in temperature and increases in air pollution. These events may negatively impact mortality and morbidity for cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we discuss the main effects of climate changes on cardiovascular diseases, reporting the epidemiological evidences and the biological mechanisms linking climate change consequences to hypertension, diabetes, ischemic heart diseases, heart failure and stroke. Up to now, findings suggest that humans acclimate under different weather conditions, even though extreme temperatures and higher levels of air pollution can influence health-related outcomes. In these cases, climate change adversely affects cardiovascular system and the high-risk subjects for cardiovascular diseases are those more exposed. Finally, we examine climate change implications on publich health and suggest adaptation strategies to monitor the high-risk population, and reduce the amount of hospital admissions associated to these events. Such interventions may minimize the costs of public health and reduce the mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Autonomous Control, Climate and Environmental Changes Effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autonomous Control, Climate and Environmental Changes Effects on Trypanosomiasis in ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... benefits of increased production, improved human health must exceed the costs of control.

  4. Autonomous Landing on Moving Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Mendoza Chavez, Gilberto

    2016-08-01

    This thesis investigates autonomous landing of a micro air vehicle (MAV) on a nonstationary ground platform. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs) are becoming every day more ubiquitous. Nonetheless, many applications still require specialized human pilots or supervisors. Current research is focusing on augmenting the scope of tasks that these vehicles are able to accomplish autonomously. Precise autonomous landing on moving platforms is essential for self-deployment and recovery of MAVs, but it remains a challenging task for both autonomous and piloted vehicles. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is a widely used and effective scheme to control constrained systems. One of its variants, output-feedback tube-based MPC, ensures robust stability for systems with bounded disturbances under system state reconstruction. This thesis proposes a MAV control strategy based on this variant of MPC to perform rapid and precise autonomous landing on moving targets whose nominal (uncommitted) trajectory and velocity are slowly varying. The proposed approach is demonstrated on an experimental setup.

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Oxidative Stress, and Cardiovascular Disease: Evidence from Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Joachim Eisele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a frequent disease mainly affecting obese people and caused by repetitive collapse of the upper airways during sleep. The increased morbidity and mortality of OSA are mainly thought to be the consequence of its adverse effects on cardiovascular (CV health. In this context, oxidative stress induced by nocturnal intermittent hypoxia has been identified to play a major role. This is suggested by biomarker studies in OSA patients showing excessively generated reactive oxygen species from leukocytes, reduced plasma levels of nitrite and nitrate, increased lipid peroxidation, and reduced antioxidant capacity. Biopsy studies complement these findings by demonstrating reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression and increased nitrotyrosine immunofluorescence in the vasculature of these patients. Furthermore, oxidative stress in OSA correlates with surrogate markers of CV disease such as endothelial function, intima-media thickness, and high blood pressure. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy reverses oxidative stress in OSA. The same may be true for antioxidants; however, more studies are needed to clarify this issue.

  6. Phase synchronization of oscillations in cardiovascular and respiratory systems in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankanag, Arina V.; Grinevich, Andrey A.; Tikhonova, Irina V.; Chaplygina, Alina V.; Chemeris, Nikolay K.

    2017-04-01

    Phase synchronization between blood flow oscillations of left and right forearm skin sites, heart rate variability (HRV) and breath rate were studied from healthy volunteers at rest. The degree of synchronization between the phases of the analyzed signals was estimated from the value of the wavelet phase coherence. High medians of values of phase wavelet coherence function were obtained for the endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic and cardiac intervals. Significant phase synchronization were demonstrated between HRV and skin blood flow oscillations in both left and right forearms in a wide frequency range from 0.04 to 0.4 Hz. Six participants exhibited low phase synchronization (rate and HRV, while nine participants had high phase synchronization (> 0.5). This distribution was not affected by the sex or sympathovagal status of volunteers. Participants with low phase synchronization between breath rate and HRV featured low phase synchronization (rate and blood flow oscillations in both forearms. Contrariwise, in subjects with high phase synchronization between respiratory rhythm and HRV both low and high phase synchronization between breath rate and blood flow oscillations in both forearms was observed. The results obtained allow us to suggest that the organism possesses a mechanism mediating the synchronization of blood flow oscillations in the skin microvasculature with all other periodical processes across the cardiovascular system, in particular, with HRV and breath rate over a wide frequency range.

  7. [Consensus statement on metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risks in patients with human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo Rodríguez, Rosa; Galindo Puerto, María José; Dueñas, Carlos; Gómez Candela, Carmen; Estrada, Vicente; Villar, Noemí G P; Locutura, Jaime; Mariño, Ana; Pascua, Javier; Palacios, Rosario; von Wichmman, Miguel Ángel; Álvarez, Julia; Asensi, Victor; Lopez Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Negredo, Eugenia; Ortega, Enrique; Pedrol, Enric; Gutiérrez, Félix; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Martínez Chamorro, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    This consensus document is an update of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk (CVR) guidelines for HIV-infected patients. This document has been approved by an expert panel of GEAM, SPNS and GESIDA after reviewing the results of efficacy and safety of clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in biomedical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. Recommendation strength and the evidence in which they are supported are based on the GRADE system. A healthy lifestyle is recommended, no smoking and at least 30min of aerobic exercise daily. In diabetic patients the same treatment as non-HIV infected patients is recommended. HIV patients with dyslipidemia should be considered as high CVR, thus its therapeutic objective is an LDL less than 100mg/dL. The antihypertensive of ACE inhibitors and ARAII families are better tolerated and have a lower risk of interactions. In HIV-patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome and elevated transaminases with no defined etiology, the recommended is to rule out a hepatic steatosis Recommendations for action in hormone alterations are also updated. These new guidelines update previous recommendations regarding all those metabolic disorders involved in CVR. Hormone changes and their management and the impact of metabolic disorders on the liver are also included. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Human epicardial adipose tissue expresses a pathogenic profile of adipocytokines in patients with cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sudhesh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Inflammation contributes to cardiovascular disease and is exacerbated with increased adiposity, particularly omental adiposity; however, the role of epicardial fat is poorly understood. Methods For these studies the expression of inflammatory markers was assessed in epicardial fat biopsies from coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG patients using quantitative RT-PCR. Further, the effects of chronic medications, including statins, as well as peri-operative glucose, insulin and potassium infusion, on gene expression were also assessed. Circulating resistin, CRP, adiponectin and leptin levels were determined to assess inflammation. Results The expression of adiponectin, resistin and other adipocytokine mRNAs were comparable to that in omental fat. Epicardial CD45 expression was significantly higher than control depots (p Conclusion Epicardial and omental fat exhibit a broadly comparable pathogenic mRNA profile, this may arise in part from macrophage infiltration into the epicardial fat. This study highlights that chronic inflammation occurs locally as well as systemically potentially contributing further to the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease.

  9. Towards human exploration of space: the THESEUS review series on cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal research priorities

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, André E.; André E. Larina, Irina; Momken, Iman; Blanc, Stéphane; White, Olivier; Prisk, Kim; Linnarsson, Dag

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The THESEUS project (Towards Human Exploration of Space: aEUropean Strategy) was initiated within the seventh FrameworkProgramme by the European Commission. This project aimed toprovide a cross-cutting, life science-based roadmap for Europe’sstrategy towards human exploration of space, especially for deepspace missions and its relevance to applications on Earth. Toaddress these challenges, relevance of space research on thecardiovascular system, the lungs and kidneys, ...

  10. Spectral components of human cardiovascular responses to step changes in Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) before and after 22 hour of 6 deg head down bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, C. F.; Evans, J. M.; Grande, K. J.; Murphy, C. D.; Patwardhan, A. R.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in autonomic outflow to peripheral organs during the development of bedrest induced orthostatic intolerance have not been determined. Recent studies have indicated that spectral analysis provides an indirect assessment of these changes. Eight male subjects were studied before and after 22 hours of 6 degree head down bedrest plus Lasix (40 mg. P.P.). Cardiovascular spectra (using an autoregressive technique) were determined for heart rate (HR, ECG), arterial pressure (AP, Finapres), radial artery flow (RF, Hokansen) and respiration rate (RR, BoMed). Spectra were obtained from 2.5 minute segments during control, lower body negative pressure (minus 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 mmHg) and recovery. Bedrest increased HR spectra power in the low frequency (.001 to .041 Hz) range, increased RF power in the low and mid (.04 to .18 Hz) range and increased AP power in the high (.18 to .50 Hz) frequency range. Increasing levels of lower body negative pressure decreased HR power and increased RF power in the high frequency range and decreased AP power in the low frequency range. Since spectral power of HR in the high frequency range has been shown to indicate parasympathetically mediated regulation and power in the low and mid frequency ranges indicates a sympathetic / parasympathetic mixture, then both bedrest and lower body negative pressure appeared to shift sympathetic / parasympathetic balance toward sympathetic regulation of HR. The interpretation of the spectral content of AP and RF with respect to their autonomic origins remains unclear.

  11. Autoimmune autonomic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeon, Andrew; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune autonomic disorders occur because of an immune response directed against sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric ganglia, autonomic nerves, or central autonomic pathways. In general, peripheral autoimmune disorders manifest with either generalized or restricted autonomic failure, whereas central autoimmune disorders manifest primarily with autonomic hyperactivity. Some autonomic disorders are generalized, and others are limited in their anatomic extent, e.g., isolated gastrointestinal dysmotility. Historically, these disorders were poorly recognized, and thought to be neurodegenerative. Over the last 20 years a number of autoantibody biomarkers have been discovered that have enabled the identification of certain patients as having an autoimmune basis for either autonomic failure or hyperactivity. Peripheral autoimmune autonomic disorders include autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG), paraneoplastic autonomic neuropathy, and acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. AAG manifests with acute or subacute onset of generalized or selective autonomic failure. Antibody targeting the α3 subunit of the ganglionic-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α3gAChR) is detected in approximately 50% of cases of AAG. Some other disorders are characterized immunologically by paraneoplastic antibodies with a high positive predictive value for cancer, such as antineuronal nuclear antibody, type 1 (ANNA-1: anti-Hu); others still are seronegative. Recognition of an autoimmune basis for autonomic disorders is important, as their manifestations are disabling, may reflect an underlying neoplasm, and have the potential to improve with a combination of symptomatic and immune therapies.

  12. [Autonomic peripheral neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David; Cauquil, Cecile; Lozeron, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms of dysautonomic disturbances are varied and mostly acquired. They can result from lesions of sympathetic or parasympathetic vegetative fibers located in the peripheral contingent, or in the somatic contingent by demyelination or axonal loss; or more rarely by cellular bodies in the sympathetic or parasympathetic ganglia. Several chronic peripheral neuropathies can be associated with dysautonomia. Only some causes need to be known because they can be clinically significant. Dysautonomia may be seen during chronic acquired neuropathies but also acute or subacute ones. The most frequent cause in the world is the dysautonomia of the diabetes; it affects all the systems; the cardiovascular dysfunction has an impact on the prognosis for survival when it is severe. Hereditary autonomic neuropathies are rare; they can declare themselves very early during the Riley-Day syndrome or very late during amyloid polyneuropathies due to transthyretin gene mutation. The diagnosis can be confirmed by molecular biology. The dysautonomia is frequent and often severe. These neuropathies justify symptomatic treatment to improve quality of life. For some of them, a specific treatment can be proposed to treat the causal affection to try to stop the progression of the disease.

  13. Exercise protects the cardiovascular system: effects beyond traditional risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael J; Green, Daniel J

    2009-12-01

    In humans, exercise training and moderate to high levels of physical activity are protective against cardiovascular disease. In fact they are 40% more protective than predicted based on the changes in traditional risk factors (blood lipids, hypertension, diabetes etc.) that they cause. In this review, we highlight the positive effects of exercise on endothelial function and the autonomic nervous system. We also ask if these effects alone, or in combination, might explain the protective effects of exercise against cardiovascular disease that appear to be independent of traditional risk factor modification. Our goal is to use selected data from our own work and that of others to stimulate debate on the nature and cause of the 'risk factor gap' associated with exercise and physical activity.

  14. 肠易激综合征亚型患者具有肠道和躯体高敏感,自主心血管功能紊乱以及肠道低浓度炎症%Visceral and somatic hypersensitivity, autonomic cardiovascular dysfunction and low-grade inflammation in a subset of irritable bowel syndrome patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang LIU; Bei-ni LIU; Shuo CHEN; Miao WANG; Yang LIU; Yan-li ZHANG; Shu-kun YAO

    2014-01-01

    研究目的:明确腹泻型肠易激综合征患者是否具有肠道和躯体高敏感、自主心血管功能紊乱以及肠道低浓度炎症。  创新要点:发现腹泻型肠易激综合征患者具有自主心血管功能紊乱和肠道低浓度炎症(这两方面在之前研究中尚存争议)。此外,发现腹泻型肠易激综合征患者的肠道高敏感和躯体高敏感、肠道高敏感和自主心血管功能紊乱、躯体高敏感和自主心血管紊乱之间存在相关性,为患者的治疗提供参考。  研究方法:2013年9月至2014年5月,62名腹泻型肠易激综合征患者和20名健康志愿者参与到了本研究。所有受试者接受并顺利完成了相关检查和问卷填写。利用恒压器(渐至极限法)检查我们发现腹泻型肠易激综合征患者具有肠道高敏感。同时,采用冷水刺激法和缺血刺激法探明腹泻型肠易激综合征患者具有躯体高敏感。  重要结论:腹泻型肠易激综合征患者具有肠道和躯体高敏感、自主心血管功能紊乱以及肠道低浓度炎症。肠道高敏感和躯体高敏感、肠道高敏感和自主心血管功能紊乱、躯体高敏感和自主心血管紊乱之间存在相关性。%The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is complex and not ful y understood, so the aim of this study was to evaluate whether visceral and somatic hypersensitivity, autonomic cardiovascular dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation of the gut wal are associated with diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS). Sixty-two patients with D-IBS and 20 control subjects participated in the study. Using the ascending method of limits (AML) protocol, we demonstrated that D-IBS patients had significantly lower sensory thresholds compared with healthy controls (P<0.001). Using diverse methods, especial y the ischemic sensitivity test, for the first time in China, we confirmed that D-IBS patients have somatic hypersensitivity. They

  15. Differential Patterns and Determinants of Cardiac Autonomic Nerve Dysfunction during Endotoxemia and Oral Fat Load in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Ziegler

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system (ANS plays an important role in regulating the metabolic homeostasis and controlling immune function. ANS alterations can be detected by reduced heart rate variability (HRV in conditions like diabetes and sepsis. We determined the effects of experimental conditions mimicking inflammation and hyperlipidemia on HRV and heart rate (HR in relation to the immune, metabolic, and hormonal responses resulting from these interventions. Sixteen lean healthy subjects received intravenous (i.v. low-dose endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], i.v. fat, oral fat, and i.v. glycerol (control for 6 hours, during which immune, metabolic, hormonal, and five HRV parameters (pNN50, RMSSD, low-frequency (LF and high-frequency (HF power, and LF/HF ratio were monitored and energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity (M-value were assessed. LPS infusion induced an increase (AUC in HR and LF/HF ratio and decline in pNN50 and RMSSD, while oral fat resulted in elevated HR and a transient (hours 1-2 decrease in pNN50, RMSSD, and HF power. During LPS infusion, ΔIL-1ra levels and ΔIL-1ra and ΔIL-1ß gene expression correlated positively with ΔLF/HF ratio and inversely with ΔRMSSD. During oral fat intake, ΔGLP-1 tended to correlate positively with ΔHR and inversely with ΔpNN50 and ΔRMSSD. Following LPS infusion, lipid oxidation correlated positively with HR and inversely with pNN50 and RMSSD, whereas HRV was not related to M-value. In conclusion, suppression of vagal tone and sympathetic predominance during endotoxemia are linked to anti-inflammatory processes and lipid oxidation but not to insulin resistance, while weaker HRV changes in relation to the GLP-1 response are noted during oral fat load.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01054989.

  16. Differential Patterns and Determinants of Cardiac Autonomic Nerve Dysfunction during Endotoxemia and Oral Fat Load in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Dan; Strom, Alexander; Strassburger, Klaus; Nowotny, Bettina; Zahiragic, Lejla; Nowotny, Peter J.; Carstensen-Kirberg, Maren; Herder, Christian; Szendroedi, Julia; Roden, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) plays an important role in regulating the metabolic homeostasis and controlling immune function. ANS alterations can be detected by reduced heart rate variability (HRV) in conditions like diabetes and sepsis. We determined the effects of experimental conditions mimicking inflammation and hyperlipidemia on HRV and heart rate (HR) in relation to the immune, metabolic, and hormonal responses resulting from these interventions. Sixteen lean healthy subjects received intravenous (i.v.) low-dose endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), i.v. fat, oral fat, and i.v. glycerol (control) for 6 hours, during which immune, metabolic, hormonal, and five HRV parameters (pNN50, RMSSD, low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) power, and LF/HF ratio) were monitored and energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity (M-value) were assessed. LPS infusion induced an increase (AUC) in HR and LF/HF ratio and decline in pNN50 and RMSSD, while oral fat resulted in elevated HR and a transient (hours 1-2) decrease in pNN50, RMSSD, and HF power. During LPS infusion, ΔIL-1ra levels and ΔIL-1ra and ΔIL-1ß gene expression correlated positively with ΔLF/HF ratio and inversely with ΔRMSSD. During oral fat intake, ΔGLP-1 tended to correlate positively with ΔHR and inversely with ΔpNN50 and ΔRMSSD. Following LPS infusion, lipid oxidation correlated positively with HR and inversely with pNN50 and RMSSD, whereas HRV was not related to M-value. In conclusion, suppression of vagal tone and sympathetic predominance during endotoxemia are linked to anti-inflammatory processes and lipid oxidation but not to insulin resistance, while weaker HRV changes in relation to the GLP-1 response are noted during oral fat load. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01054989 PMID:25893426

  17. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  18. Human postmortem device retrieval and analysis--orthopaedic, cardiovascular, and dental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, J; Brott, B; Eberhardt, A

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of decades of analyzing implant devices, tissues, and clinical records from revision surgical explants (called device failure), studies now include postmortem donors and in situ conditions (called success). A key issue has been information exchange from an interdisciplinary team where basic physical and biological studies complement details of the clinical conditions for each device. Overall, the summary information has shown that most revisions were based on factors associated with the patient health, disease, and compliance, with few outcomes directly correlated with technology and device-specific factors. However, because of the large numbers of devices implanted annually (millions), any sampling that reveals adverse circumstances could result in a high level of importance and the need for additional studies of this type. Experience from prior retrieval and analysis demonstrates significant value where peer reviewed results from investigations have altered the discipline and have improved the quality and longevity of health care associated with implanted devices. This report summarizes completed and ongoing studies of cardiovascular, dental, and orthopaedic systems. Endovascular stents from autopsies showed damage including fretting and corrosion from overlapping and intersecting conditions, plus some corrosion and element transfers to tissues from individual stents. Studies are proposed to increase numbers to evaluate clinical significance. Dental implants from postmortem donors that functioned more than 10 years provided evaluations of cobalt alloy devices and calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes originally investigated in the 1970s. Tissue integration and stability correlated with data from prior laboratory in vitro and in vivo investigations. Studies of articulation and fixation from orthopaedic total joint arthroplasties showed some limitations related to surface changes of YTZ zirconia, specific damage due to implantation procedures, which

  19. Influences of hydration on post-exercise cardiovascular control in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkoudian, Nisha; Halliwill, John R; Morgan, Barbara J; Eisenach, John H; Joyner, Michael J

    2003-10-15

    Dehydration is known to decrease orthostatic tolerance and cause tachycardia, but little is known about the cardiovascular control mechanisms involved. To test the hypothesis that arterial baroreflex sensitivity increases during exercise-induced dehydration, we assessed arterial baroreflex responsiveness in 13 healthy subjects (protocol 1) at baseline (PRE-EX) and 1 h after (EX-DEH) 90 min of exercise to cause dehydration, and after subsequent intravenous rehydration with saline (EX-REH). Six of these subjects were studied a second time (protocol 2) with intravenous saline during exercise to prevent dehydration. We measured heart rate, central venous pressure and arterial pressure during all trials, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during the post-exercise trials. Baroreflex responses were assessed using sequential boluses of nitroprusside and phenylephrine (modified Oxford technique). After exercise in protocol 1 (EX-DEH), resting blood pressure was decreased and resting heart rate was increased. Cardiac baroreflex gain, assessed as the responsiveness of heart rate or R-R interval to changes in systolic pressure, was diminished in the EX-DEH condition (9.17 +/- 1.06 ms mmHg-1 vs. PRE-EX: 18.68 +/- 2.22 ms mmHg-1, P exercise did not alter the increase in HR post-exercise or the decrease in baroreflex gain (EX-REH: 10.20 +/- 1.43 ms mmHg-1; P > 0.10 vs. EX-DEH). Saline infusion during exercise (protocol 2) resulted in less of a post-exercise decrease in blood pressure and a smaller change in cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. Saline infusion caused a decrease in MSNA in protocol 1. We conclude that exercise-induced dehydration causes post-exercise changes in the baroreflex control of blood pressure that may contribute to, rather than offset, orthostatic intolerance.

  20. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system.

  1. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans: insight from right atrial pacing during maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R; Secher, N H; González-Alonso, J; Mortensen, S P

    2014-01-15

    In humans, maximal aerobic power (VO2 max ) is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (Q), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, Q and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax) and remained unchanged until exhaustion. SV initially increased, plateaued and then decreased before exhaustion (P rate pressure product and RAP (P heart can be paced to a higher HR than observed during maximal exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit VO2 max in healthy individuals. A limited left ventricular filling and possibly altered contractility reduce SV during atrial pacing, whereas a plateau in LVFP appears to restrict Q close to VO2 max .

  2. Cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus-infection as a cause of hospitalization: a case-series in a General Hospital in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Rodríguez, Germán; Mezones-Holguín, Edward; Mendo-Urbina, Fernando; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in the context of human immunodeficiency virus infection has become a major clinical concern in recent years. In the current report we assess hospitalizations due to cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus patients in a Social Security reference hospital in Peru. A retrospective study was carried out between January 1996 and December 2012 in a General Hospital in Lima, Peru. We included 26 patients hospitalized due to cardiovascular disease. Mean age was 46.3 years (SD 12.5), predominantly male (57.7%). Ten patients (38.4%) were in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome stages. Seventeen (65.4%) received high-active-antiretroviral therapy. Eleven (42.3%) had cardiac involvement and 15 (57.7%) had non-cardiac vascular involvement. The most frequent causes of cardiac involvement were pericardial effusion and myocardial infarction. On the other hand, deep vein thrombosis and stroke were the most frequent for non-cardiac vascular involvement. Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of hospitalization in Peruvian human immunodeficiency virus patients, with differences between immunosuppression stages. Further studies analyzing associated factors are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. [Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximova, M Yu; Piradov, M A; Suanova, E T; Sineva, N A

    2015-01-01

    Review of literature on the trigeminal autonomic cephalgias are presented. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias are primary headaches with phenotype consisting of trigeminal pain with autonomic sign including lacrimation, rhinorrhea and miosis. Discussed are issues of classification, pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of this headache. Special attention is paid to cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, SUNCT syndrome, hemicrania continua.

  4. Sequential use of human-derived medium supplements favours cardiovascular tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, Paul W. Riem; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Soekhradj-Soechit, R. Sarita; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Kluin, Jolanda; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2012-01-01

    For clinical application of tissue engineering strategies, the use of animal-derived serum in culture medium is not recommended, because it can evoke immune responses in patients. We previously observed that human platelet-lysate (PL) is favourable for cell expansion, but generates weaker tissue as

  5. Sequential use of human-derived medium supplements favours cardiovascular tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, Paul W. Riem; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Soekhradj-Soechit, R. Sarita; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Kluin, Jolanda; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2012-01-01

    For clinical application of tissue engineering strategies, the use of animal-derived serum in culture medium is not recommended, because it can evoke immune responses in patients. We previously observed that human platelet-lysate (PL) is favourable for cell expansion, but generates weaker tissue as

  6. Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra R. Raol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile intelligent autonomous systems (MIAS is a fast emerging research area. Although it can be regarded as a general R&D area, it is mainly directed towards robotics. Several important subtopics within MIAS research are:(i perception and reasoning, (ii mobility and navigation,(iii haptics and teleoperation, (iv image fusion/computervision, (v modelling of manipulators, (vi hardware/software architectures for planning and behaviour learning leadingto robotic architecture, (vii vehicle-robot path and motionplanning/control, (viii human-machine interfaces for interaction between humans and robots, and (ix application of artificial neural networks (ANNs, fuzzy logic/systems (FLS,probabilistic/approximate reasoning (PAR, Bayesian networks(BN and genetic algorithms (GA to the above-mentioned problems. Also, multi-sensor data fusion (MSDF playsvery crucial role at many levels of the data fusion process:(i kinematic fusion (position/bearing tracking, (ii imagefusion (for scene recognition, (iii information fusion (forbuilding world models, and (iv decision fusion (for tracking,control actions. The MIAS as a technology is useful for automation of complex tasks, surveillance in a hazardousand hostile environment, human-assistance in very difficultmanual works, medical robotics, hospital systems, autodiagnosticsystems, and many other related civil and military systems. Also, other important research areas for MIAScomprise sensor/actuator modelling, failure management/reconfiguration, scene understanding, knowledge representation, learning and decision-making. Examples ofdynamic systems considered within the MIAS would be:autonomous systems (unmanned ground vehicles, unmannedaerial vehicles, micro/mini air vehicles, and autonomousunder water vehicles, mobile/fixed robotic systems, dexterousmanipulator robots, mining robots, surveillance systems,and networked/multi-robot systems, to name a few.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(1, pp.3-4,

  7. Cardiac autonomic nervous system activity in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liatis, Stavros; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Katsilambros, Nikolaos

    2004-08-01

    The development of obesity is caused by a disturbance of energy balance, with energy intake exceeding energy expenditure. As the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has a role in the regulation of both these variables, it has become a major focus of investigation in the fields of obesity pathogenesis. The enhanced cardiac sympathetic drive shown in most of the studies in obese persons might be due to an increase in their levels of circulating insulin. The role of leptin needs further investigation with studies in humans. There is a blunted response of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity in obese subjects after consumption of a carbohydrate-rich meal as well as after insulin administration. This might be due to insulin resistance. It is speculated that increased SNS activity in obesity may contribute to the development of hypertension in genetically susceptible individuals. It is also speculated that the increase in cardiac SNS activity under fasting conditions in obesity may be associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  8. Rosuvastatin increases extracellular adenosine formation in humans in vivo: a new perspective on cardiovascular protection.

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, P; Oyen, W.J.G.; Dekker, D.; Broek, P.H.H. van den; Wouters, C.W.; Boerman, O.C.; Scheffer, G. J.; Smits, P; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Statins may increase extracellular adenosine formation from adenosine monophosphate by enhancing ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. This theory was tested in humans using dipyridamole-induced vasodilation as a read-out for local adenosine formation. Dipyridamole inhibits the transport of extracellular adenosine into the cytosol resulting in increased extracellular adenosine and subsequent vasodilation. In addition, we studied the effect of statin therapy in a forearm model of ischemia-...

  9. A module of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptional network containing primitive and differentiation markers is related to specific cardiovascular health variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Leni; Anghelina, Mirela; Kantor, Taylor; Jones, Desiree; Ramadan, Enass; Xiang, Yang; Huang, Kun; Kolipaka, Arunark; Malarkey, William; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Mohler, Peter J; Quyyumi, Arshed; Moldovan, Nicanor I

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), including rare circulating stem and progenitor cells (CSPCs), have important yet poorly understood roles in the maintenance and repair of blood vessels and perfused organs. Our hypothesis was that the identities and functions of CSPCs in cardiovascular health could be ascertained by analyzing the patterns of their co-expressed markers in unselected PBMC samples. Because gene microarrays had failed to detect many stem cell-associated genes, we performed quantitative real-time PCR to measure the expression of 45 primitive and tissue differentiation markers in PBMCs from healthy and hypertensive human subjects. We compared these expression levels to the subjects' demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, including vascular stiffness. The tested marker genes were expressed in all of samples and organized in hierarchical transcriptional network modules, constructed by a bottom-up approach. An index of gene expression in one of these modules (metagene), defined as the average standardized relative copy numbers of 15 pluripotency and cardiovascular differentiation markers, was negatively correlated (all ptranscriptional network. Furthermore, the coordinated gene expression in these modules can be linked to cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical cardiovascular disease; thus, this measure may be useful for their diagnosis and prognosis.

  10. Autonomic evaluation of hepatitis C virus infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Mattos Coutinho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There are few studies reporting the association between hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and disautonomia. We have evaluated the autonomic cardiovascular function in 12 patients with sensory small-fiber polyneuropathy infected by HCV. The mean age was 49±13 years old. The mean infection time was 9.6 years in six (50% patients. Thermal and pinprick hypoesthesia was observed in distal legs in all patients. Autonomic symptoms were referred by eight (66.7% patients. Among patients with abnormal autonomic cardiovascular test, five (41.7% showed abnormal results in two or more tests. Valsalva maneuver was abnormal in seven (58.3% patients. We can consider that there is an association of both parasympathetic and sympathetic efferent cardiovascular dysfunction in this group of patients.

  11. Anxiety Disorders and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Christopher M; Daunis, Daniel J; Lokko, Hermioni N; Campbell, Kirsti A; Huffman, Jeff C

    2016-11-01

    Anxiety and its associated disorders are common in patients with cardiovascular disease and may significantly influence cardiac health. Anxiety disorders are associated with the onset and progression of cardiac disease, and in many instances have been linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, including mortality. Both physiologic (autonomic dysfunction, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, changes in platelet aggregation) and health behavior mechanisms may help to explain the relationships between anxiety disorders and cardiovascular disease. Given the associations between anxiety disorders and poor cardiac health, the timely and accurate identification and treatment of these conditions is of the utmost importance. Fortunately, pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions for the management of anxiety disorders are generally safe and effective. Further study is needed to determine whether interventions to treat anxiety disorders ultimately impact both psychiatric and cardiovascular health.

  12. Naltrexone but Not Ketanserin Antagonizes the Subjective, Cardiovascular, and Neuroendocrine Effects of Salvinorin-A in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, Ana Elda; Valle, Marta; Addy, Peter H.; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Puntes, Montserrat; Coimbra, Jimena; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Garrido, Maite; González, Mireia; Claramunt, Judit; Barker, Steven; Lomnicka, Izabela; Waguespack, Marian; Johnson, Matthew W.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Salvinorin-A is a terpene found in the leaves of the plant Salvia divinorum. When administered to humans, salvinorin-A induces an intense but short-lasting modified state of awareness, sharing features with those induced by the classical serotonin-2A receptor agonist psychedelics. However, unlike substances such as psilocybin or mescaline, salvinorin-A shows agonist activity at the kappa-opioid receptor rather than at the serotonin-2A receptor. Here, we assessed the involvement of kappa-opioid receptor and serotonin-2A agonism in the subjective, cardiovascular, and neuroendocrine effects of salvinorin-A in humans. Methods: We conducted a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study with 2 groups of 12 healthy volunteers with experience with psychedelic drugs. There were 4 experimental sessions. In group 1, participants received the following treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, naltrexone+placebo, and naltrexone+salvinorin-A. Naltrexone, a nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist, was administered at a dose of 50mg orally. In group 2, participants received the treatment combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+salvinorin-A, ketanserin+placebo, and ketanserin+salvinorin-A. Ketanserin, a selective serotonin-2A antagonist, was administered at a dose of 40mg orally. Results: Inhalation of 1mg of vaporized salvinorin-A led to maximum plasma concentrations at 1 and 2 minutes after dosing. When administered alone, salvinorin-A severely reduced external sensory perception and induced intense visual and auditory modifications, increased systolic blood pressure, and cortisol and prolactin release. These effects were effectively blocked by naltrexone, but not by ketanserin. Conclusions: Results support kappa opioid receptor agonism as the mechanism of action underlying the subjective and physiological effects of salvinorin-A in humans and rule out the involvement of a serotonin-2A-mediated mechanism. PMID:26874330

  13. Intelligent autonomous systems 12. Vol. 2. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sukhan [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of). College of Information and Communication Engineering; Yoon, Kwang-Joon [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyungsuck [Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jangmyung (eds.) [Pusan National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Electronics Engineering

    2013-02-01

    Recent research in Intelligent and Autonomous Systems. Volume 2 of the proceedings of the 12th International Conference IAS-12, held June 26-29, 2012, jeju Island, Korea. Written by leading experts in the field. Intelligent autonomous systems are emerged as a key enabler for the creation of a new paradigm of services to humankind, as seen by the recent advancement of autonomous cars licensed for driving in our streets, of unmanned aerial and underwater vehicles carrying out hazardous tasks on-site, and of space robots engaged in scientific as well as operational missions, to list only a few. This book aims at serving the researchers and practitioners in related fields with a timely dissemination of the recent progress on intelligent autonomous systems, based on a collection of papers presented at the 12th International Conference on Intelligent Autonomous Systems, held in Jeju, Korea, June 26-29, 2012. With the theme of ''Intelligence and Autonomy for the Service to Humankind, the conference has covered such diverse areas as autonomous ground, aerial, and underwater vehicles, intelligent transportation systems, personal/domestic service robots, professional service robots for surgery/rehabilitation, rescue/security and space applications, and intelligent autonomous systems for manufacturing and healthcare. This volume 2 includes contributions devoted to Service Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction and Autonomous Multi-Agent Systems and Life Engineering.

  14. Hospital and community surveys reveal the severe public health problem and socio-economic impact of human echinococcosis in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y R; Williams, G M; Craig, P S; Sun, T; Yang, S K; Cheng, L; Vuitton, D A; Giraudoux, P; Li, X; Hu, S; Liu, X; Pan, X; McManus, D P

    2006-06-01

    A comprehensive study of human echinococcosis (caused by Echinococcus granulosus or E. multilocularis), including assessment of hospital records, community surveys and patient follow-up, was conducted in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region (NHAR), China. In contrast to hospital records that showed 96% of echinococcosis cases were caused by cystic echinococcosis (CE), 56% of cases detected in active community surveys were caused by alveolar echinococcosis (AE). The AE and CE cases co-existed frequently in the same village, even occurring in the same patient. A serious public health problem caused by echinococcosis was evident in southern NHAR, typified by: a long diagnostic history for both AE and CE (7.5 years) compared with a shorter treatment history (4.7 years); a significant mortality rate (39%) caused by AE in one surveyed village, where patients had no previous access to treatment; family aggregation of CE and AE cases; a high proportion of both AE (62.5%) and CE (58%) in females; a high rate of recurrent surgery (30%) for CE demonstrated by surgical records; and frequent symptomatic recurrences (51%) because of discontinuous or sporadic access to chemotherapy for AE. The disease burden for both human AE and CE is thus very severe among these rural communities in NHAR, and this study provides the first attempt to determine the costs of morbidity and surgical intervention of human CE and AE cases both at the hospital and community level in this setting. This information may be useful for assessing the cost effectiveness of designing effective public health programs to control echinococcosis in this and other endemic areas in China and elsewhere.

  15. Human serum levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in Uyghurs from Sinkiang-Uighur Autonomous Region, China: background levels study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiao-Wen; Qian, Zhengmin; Vaughn, Michael; Xian, Hong; Elder, Keith; Rodemich, Eugene; Bao, Jia; Jin, Yi-He; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2015-03-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), are a family of commonly used industrial chemicals whose persistence and ubiquity in blood samples of humans and wildlife have become a growing concern. Despite PFOS and PFOA having been found in human blood and tissue samples from occupationally exposed workers and the general worldwide population, little systematic knowledge has accrued with respect to exposure levels in Uyghurs in the Sinkiang-Uighur Autonomous Region of China, which is predominantly agricultural and pastoral. Our goal was to provide background data for biological monitoring in the general population of this region. In this study, 110 self-reported healthy human serum samples were collected from nonoccupationally exposed Uyghurs volunteers and analyzed by microbore HPLC-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Among the 110 blood specimens, PFOS was detected in 102 samples (93%) and ranged from the lower limit of quantification of 0.01 to 22.63 μg/L with a median of 1.93 μg/L (interquartile range 1.00-3.43 μg/L). The median was higher among males (2.39 μg/L; interquartile range 1.23-4.40 μg/L) than that among females (1.20 μg/L; interquartile range 0.83-2.77 μg/L). No significant difference was observed with respect to age. The concentration of PFOA was lower than that of PFOS and was found only in seven samples (6%) at concentrations above the limit of quantification. This study is the first investigation to reveal serum PFOS and PFOA levels in the general population of Uyghurs. PFOS and PFOA concentrations found in the present investigation were lower than those found in recent studies consisting of subjects from different geographic locations (PFOS 5.0-44.7 μg/L, PFOA 1.5-10 μg/L).

  16. The autonomic laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, P. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve.

  17. Neuropeptides in cardiovascular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1984-12-01

    Neuropeptides can affect cardiovascular function in various ways. They can serve as cotransmitters in the autonomic nervous system; for example, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is released with acetylcholine and neuropeptide Y with norepinephrine from postganglionic neurons. Substance P and, presumably, other peptides can can affect cardiovascular function when released near blood vessels by antidromically conducted impulses in branches of stimulated sensory neurons. In the central nervous system, many different neuropeptides appear to function as transmitters or contransmittes in the neural pathways that regulate the cardiovascular system. In addition neuropeptides such as vasopressin and angiotensin II also circulate as hormones that are involved in cardiovascular control. Large doses of exogenous vasopressin are required to increase blood pressure in normal animals because the increase in total peripheral resistance produced by the hormones is accompanied by a decrease in cardiac output. However, studies with synthetic peptides that selectively antagonize the vasopressor action of vasopressin indicate that circulating vasopressin is important in maintaining blood pressure when animals are hypovolemic due to dehydration, haemorrhage or adrenocortical insufficiency. VIP dilates blood vessels and stimulates renin secretion by a direct action on the juxtaglomerular cells. Renin secretion is stimulated when the concentration of VIP in plasma exceeds 75 pmol/litre, and higher values are seen in a number of conditions. Neostigmine, a drug which increases the secretion of endogenous VIP, also increases renin secretion, and this increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Thus, VIP may be a physiologically significant renin stimulating hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lindner, Robert R; Murray, Claire E; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian L; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W M; Dickey, John

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21cm absorption spectra from the 21cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the HI line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the up...

  19. Epidermal mechano-acoustic sensing electronics for cardiovascular diagnostics and human-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhao; Norton, James J. S.; Qazi, Raza; Zou, Zhanan; Ammann, Kaitlyn R.; Liu, Hank; Yan, Lingqing; Tran, Phat L.; Jang, Kyung-In; Lee, Jung Woo; Zhang, Douglas; Kilian, Kristopher A.; Jung, Sung Hee; Bretl, Timothy; Xiao, Jianliang; Slepian, Marvin J.; Huang, Yonggang; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Rogers, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Physiological mechano-acoustic signals, often with frequencies and intensities that are beyond those associated with the audible range, provide information of great clinical utility. Stethoscopes and digital accelerometers in conventional packages can capture some relevant data, but neither is suitable for use in a continuous, wearable mode, and both have shortcomings associated with mechanical transduction of signals through the skin. We report a soft, conformal class of device configured specifically for mechano-acoustic recording from the skin, capable of being used on nearly any part of the body, in forms that maximize detectable signals and allow for multimodal operation, such as electrophysiological recording. Experimental and computational studies highlight the key roles of low effective modulus and low areal mass density for effective operation in this type of measurement mode on the skin. Demonstrations involving seismocardiography and heart murmur detection in a series of cardiac patients illustrate utility in advanced clinical diagnostics. Monitoring of pump thrombosis in ventricular assist devices provides an example in characterization of mechanical implants. Speech recognition and human-machine interfaces represent additional demonstrated applications. These and other possibilities suggest broad-ranging uses for soft, skin-integrated digital technologies that can capture human body acoustics. PMID:28138529

  20. Association Between Autonomic Impairment and Structural Deficit in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Pei-Chin; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Yang, I-Hsiao; Yu, Chiun-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Che

    2016-03-01

    Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) have impaired autonomic function and altered brain structure. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship of gray matter volume (GMV) determined by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to autonomic impairment in patients with PD. Whole-brain VBM analysis was performed on 3-dimensional T1-weighted images in 23 patients with PD and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. The relationship of cardiovascular autonomic function (determined by survey) to baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) (determined from changes in heart rate and blood pressure during the early phase II of the Valsalva maneuver) was tested using least-squares regression analysis. The differences in GMV, autonomic parameters, and clinical data were correlated after adjusting for age and sex. Compared with controls, patients with PD had low BRS, suggesting worse cardiovascular autonomic function, and smaller GMV in several brain locations, including the right amygdala, left hippocampal formation, bilateral insular cortex, bilateral caudate nucleus, bilateral cerebellum, right fusiform, and left middle frontal gyri. The decreased GMVs of the selected brain regions were also associated with increased presence of epithelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the circulation. In patients with PD, decrease in cardiovascular autonomic function and increase in circulating EPC level are associated with smaller GMV in several areas of the brain. Because of its possible role in the modulation of the circulatory EPC pool and baroreflex control, the left hippocampal formation may be a bio-target for disease-modifying therapy and treatment monitoring in PD.

  1. Interaction of selected vasodilating beta-blockers with adrenergic receptors in human cardiovascular tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monopoli, A.; Forlani, A.; Bevilacqua, M.; Vago, T.; Norbiato, G.; Bertora, P.; Biglioli, P.; Alamanni, F.; Ongini, E. (Essex Italia, Subsidiary of Schering-Plough, Milan)

    1989-07-01

    beta- And alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist properties of bufuralol, carvedilol, celiprolol, dilevalol, labetalol, and pindolol were investigated in human myocardium and mammary artery using binding techniques and functional studies. In myocardial membranes, beta-adrenoceptor antagonists showed monophasic competition isotherms for (125I)pindolol binding with high affinity (Ki from 1-100 nM), except for celiprolol which displayed a biphasic competition isotherm (pKi = 6.4 +/- 0.06 for beta 1- and 4.8 +/- 0.07 for beta 2-adrenoceptors). Drug interactions with alpha 1-adrenoceptors were evaluated in human mammary artery by (3H)prazosin binding and by measuring contractile responses to norepinephrine (NE). Labetalol and carvedilol showed a moderate affinity for alpha 1-adrenoceptors (pKi = 6.2 +/- 0.01 and 6.1 +/- 0.06, respectively), and inhibited NE-induced contractions (pA2 = 6.93 +/- 0.23 and 8.64 +/- 0.24, respectively). Dilevalol, bufuralol, and pindolol displayed weak effect both in binding (Ki in micromolar range) and functional experiments (pA2 = 5.98, 5.54, and 6.23, respectively). Celiprolol did not show antagonist properties up to 100 microM in functional studies, but displayed a slight affinity for alpha 1-adrenoceptors in binding studies. The data indicate that the vasodilating activity of these beta-adrenoceptor antagonists is caused in some instances by an alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonism (labetalol, carvedilol), whereas for the others alternative mechanisms should be considered.

  2. Cardiovascular responses to intravenous administration of human hemokinin-1 and its truncated form hemokinin-1(4-11) in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zi-Qing; Fu, Cai-Yun; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Rui

    2008-08-20

    Human hemokinin-1 and its carboxy-terminal fragment human hemokinin-1(4-11) have been recently identified as the members of the tachykinin family. The peripheral cardiovascular effects of these two tachykinin peptides were investigated in anesthetized rats. Lower doses of human hemokinin-1 (0.1-3 nmol/kg) injected intravenously (i.v.) induced depressor response, whereas higher doses (10 and 30 nmol/kg) caused biphasic (depressor and pressor) responses. The depressor response is primarily due to the action on endothelial tachykinin NK(1) receptor to release endothelium-derived relaxing factor (NO) and vagal reflex was absent in this modulation. The pressor response is mediated through the activation of tachykinin NK(1) receptor to release catecholamines from sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla. Moreover, human hemokinin-1 injected i.v. produced a dose-dependent tachycardia response along with blood pressure responses and the activation of sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla are involved in the tachycardia response. Human hemokinin-1(4-11) only lowered mean arterial pressure dose-dependently (0.1-30 nmol/kg) and the mechanisms involved in the depressor response are similar to that of human hemokinin-1. Additionally, human hemokinin-1(4-11) could also produce tachycardia response dose-dependently and the mechanisms involved in the tachycardia response are similar to that of human hemokinin-1 except that bilateral adrenalectomy could not affect the tachycardia markedly, indicating that the tachycardia induced by human hemokinin-1(4-11) is primarily due to the stimulation of sympathetic ganglia. In a word, to a certain extent, human hemokinin-1(4-11) is the active fragment of human hemokinin-1, however, the differences between human hemokinin-1 and hemokinin-1(4-11) involved in the effects of cardiovascular system suggest that the divergent amino acid residues at the N-terminus of human hemokinin-1 produced different activation properties for tachykinin NK(1

  3. Air pollution and its impact on the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Paris Colombini

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great medical advances, cardiovascular disease remains one of the major causes of mortality worldwide, especially in industrialized countries. It develops as a result of countless complex interactions between genetic factors such as those related to age, sex, family history, weight, and post-menopausal status in women; and to environment-related factors such as cigarette smoking, alcohol use, eating habits, physical activity, and others. For more than a decade, several epidemiological studies have demonstrated the existence of a consistent association between air pollution and increased risk for cardiovascular events, that is, not only cardiovascular death, but also acute myocardial infarction and arrhythmias. Experimental studies in different animal species, observational studies in humans, as well as in vitro cellular and acellular models attempt to elucidate the probable biological mechanisms that lend plausibility to these associations, but they fail to do it clearly, since the severity and progression of cardiovascular disease are much more affected than is its induction. However, some effects resulting from the exposure to different air pollutants have been evidenced and the most significant of which involve pulmonary and systemic inflammatory response, blood clotting disorders, promotion and potentiation of the atherosclerotic process, and cardiac autonomic dysfunction.

  4. Regulation of autonomic nervous system in space and magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Petrov, V. M.; Chernikova, A. G.

    Variations in the earth's magnetic field and magnetic storms are known to be a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disorders. The main ``targets'' for geomagnetic perturbations are the central nervous system and the neural regulation of vascular tone and heart rate variability. This paper presents the data about effect of geomagnetic fluctuations on human body in space. As a method for research the analysis of heart rate variability was used, which allows evaluating the state of the sympathetic and parasympathetic parts of the autonomic nervous system, vasomotor center and subcortical neural centers activity. Heart rate variability data were analyzed for 30 cosmonauts at the 2-nd day of space flight on transport spaceship Soyuz (32nd orbit). There were formed three groups of cosmonauts: without magnetic storm (n=9), on a day with magnetic storm (n=12) and 1-2 days after magnetic storm (n=9). The present study was the first to demonstrate a specific impact of geomagnetic perturbations on the system of autonomic circulatory control in cosmonauts during space flight. The increasing of highest nervous centers activity was shown for group with magnetic storms, which was more significant on 1-2 days after magnetic storm. The use of discriminate analysis allowed to classify indicated three groups with 88 % precision. Canonical variables are suggested to be used as criterions for evaluation of specific and non-specific components of cardiovascular reactions to geomagnetic perturbations. The applied aspect of the findings from the present study should be emphasized. They show, in particular, the need to supplement the medical monitoring of cosmonauts with predictions of probable geomagnetic perturbations in view of the prevention of unfavorable states appearances if the adverse reactions to geomagnetic perturbations are added to the tension experienced by regulatory systems during various stresses situations (such as work in the open space).

  5. Transdermal absorption of (-)-linalool induces autonomic deactivation but has no impact on ratings of well-being in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberger, Eva; Redhammer, Sandra; Buchbauer, Gerhard

    2004-10-01

    Essential lavender oil has a long tradition as a mild sedative in herbal medicine. Relaxing effects after inhalation have also been demonstrated for one of its main constituents, (-)-linalool. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the effects of this monoterpenoid alcohol on human physiological parameters (blood oxygen saturation, breathing rate, eye-blink rate, pulse rate, skin conductance, skin temperature, surface electromyogram as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure) and assessments of subjective well-being. (-)-Linalool was applied to 14 healthy subjects by percutaneous administration. Inhalation of the fragrance was prevented by means of breathing masks. (-)-Linalool induced deactivation with respect to physiology, that is, a decrease of systolic blood pressure and a smaller decrease of skin temperature, compared to a corresponding control group receiving a placebo, but had no effects on subjective evaluation of well-being.

  6. Preliminary assessment of cardiac short term safety and efficacy of manganese chloride for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalaf Jose M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manganese based agents are intracellular and accumulate inside myocytes allowing for different imaging strategies compared to gadolinium contrasts. While previous agents release manganese very slowly in the circulation, MnCl2 allows for rapid Mn2+ uptake in myocytes, creating a memory effect that can be potentially explored. Data on animal models are very encouraging but the safety and efficacy of this approach in humans has not yet been investigated. Therefore, our objectives were to study the safety and efficacy of a rapid infusion of manganese chloride (MnCl2 for cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in humans. Methods Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent a CMR scan on a 1.5 T scanner. Before the infusion, cardiac function was calculated and images of a short axis mid-ventricular slice were obtained using a 2D and 3D gradient-echo inversion recovery (GRE-IR sequence, a phase-sensitive IR sequence and a single breath-hold segmented IR prepared steady-state precession acquisition for T1 calculations. MnCl2 was infused over three minutes at a total dose of 5 μMol/kg. Immediately after the infusion, and at 15 and 30 minutes later, new images were obtained and cardiac function re-evaluated. Results There was a significant decrease in T1 values compared to baseline, sustained up to 30 minutes after the MnCl2 infusion (pre,839 ± 281 ms; 0 min, 684 ± 99; 15 min, 714 ± 168; 30 min, 706 ± 172, P = 0.003. The 2D and 3D GRE-IR sequence showed the greatest increase in signal-to-noise ratio compared to the other sequences (baseline 6.6 ± 4.2 and 9.7 ± 5.3; 0 min, 11.3 ± 4.1 and 15.0 ± 8.7; 15 min, 10.8 ± 4.0 and 16.9 ± 10.2; 30 min, 10.6 ± 5.2 and 16.5 ± 8.3, P 2 with no major adverse events, despite all reporting transient facial flush. Conclusions In the short term, MnCl2 appears safe for human use. It effectively decreases myocardium T1, maintaining this effect for a relatively long period of time and allowing for the

  7. Suggestive evidence of a multi-cytokine resistin pathway in humans and its role on cardiovascular events in high-risk individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzaghi, Claudia; Marucci, Antonella; Antonucci, Alessandra; De Bonis, Concetta; Ortega Moreno, Lorena; Salvemini, Lucia; Copetti, Massimiliano; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Di Paola, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    In cells and tissues resistin affects IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and TNF-α expression, thus suggesting the existence of a multi-cytokine “resistin pathway”. We investigated whether such pathway does exist in humans and, if so, if it is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Serum cytokines were measured in 280 healthy subjects from the Gargano Study 2 (GS2) whose BMI, waist circumference, HOMAIR, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure data were available and in 353 patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease from the Gargano Heart Study (GHS)-prospective design (follow-up 5.4 ± 2.5 years; 71 MACE). In GS2, cytokines mRNA levels in white blood cells were also measured. In GS2, resistin mRNA was correlated with all cytokines expression (all p eRPS) and serum (sRPS) resistin pathway scores (excluding IL-12) were each other correlated (p < 0.001) and both associated with cardiovascular risk factors (all p < 0.01). In GHS, sRPS was independently associated with MACE (HR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.10–1.90). Our data indicate the existence of a resistin pathway, which is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and which strongly and independently predicts MACE. PMID:28290549

  8. Quantitative autonomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Peter

    2011-07-19

    Disorders associated with dysfunction of autonomic nervous system are quite common yet frequently unrecognized. Quantitative autonomic testing can be invaluable tool for evaluation of these disorders, both in clinic and research. There are number of autonomic tests, however, only few were validated clinically or are quantitative. Here, fully quantitative and clinically validated protocol for testing of autonomic functions is presented. As a bare minimum the clinical autonomic laboratory should have a tilt table, ECG monitor, continuous noninvasive blood pressure monitor, respiratory monitor and a mean for evaluation of sudomotor domain. The software for recording and evaluation of autonomic tests is critical for correct evaluation of data. The presented protocol evaluates 3 major autonomic domains: cardiovagal, adrenergic and sudomotor. The tests include deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, head-up tilt, and quantitative sudomotor axon test (QSART). The severity and distribution of dysautonomia is quantitated using Composite Autonomic Severity Scores (CASS). Detailed protocol is provided highlighting essential aspects of testing with emphasis on proper data acquisition, obtaining the relevant parameters and unbiased evaluation of autonomic signals. The normative data and CASS algorithm for interpretation of results are provided as well.

  9. Burnout versus work engagement in their effects on 24-hour ambulatory monitored cardiac autonomic function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.P. van Doornen (Lorenz); J.H. Houtveen (Jan); S. Langelaan (Saar); A.B. Bakker (Arnold); W. van Rhenen (Willem); W.B. Schaufeli (Wilmar)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBurnout has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This relationship may be mediated by a stress-related disruption in cardiac autonomic activity. The aim of the present study was to assess cardiac autonomic activity (sympathetic and parasympathetic) during a work

  10. Analysis of Autonomic Nervous System Functional Age and Heart Rate Variability in Mine Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasicko T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heavy working conditions and many unpropitious factors influencing workers health participate in development of various health disorders, among other autonomic cardiovascular regulation malfunction. The aim of this study is to draw a comparison of autonomic nervous system functional age and heart rate variability changes between workers with and without mining occupational exposure.

  11. Childhood Psychopathology and Autonomic Dysregulation: Exploring the Links Using Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2007-01-01

    Changes in cardiovascular reactivity have been used as a psychophysiological marker of various emotional states in both children and adults. Recent decades have seen increasing use of heart rate variability as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic function and of central processes involved in autonomic function regulation. Developmental…

  12. Introduction: Cardiovascular physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Niels; Kurths, Jürgen; Ditto, William; Bauernschmitt, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The number of patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases increases unproportionally high with the increase of the human population and aging, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, the challenge of cardiovascular physics is to develop high-sophisticated methods which are able to, on the one hand, supplement and replace expensive medical devices and, on the other hand, improve the medical diagnostics with decreasing the patient's risk. Cardiovascular physics-which interconnects medicine, physics, biology, engineering, and mathematics-is based on interdisciplinary collaboration of specialists from the above scientific fields and attempts to gain deeper insights into pathophysiology and treatment options. This paper summarizes advances in cardiovascular physics with emphasis on a workshop held in Bad Honnef, Germany, in May 2005. The meeting attracted an interdisciplinary audience and led to a number of papers covering the main research fields of cardiovascular physics, including data analysis, modeling, and medical application. The variety of problems addressed by this issue underlines the complexity of the cardiovascular system. It could be demonstrated in this Focus Issue, that data analyses and modeling methods from cardiovascular physics have the ability to lead to significant improvements in different medical fields. Consequently, this Focus Issue of Chaos is a status report that may invite all interested readers to join the community and find competent discussion and cooperation partners.

  13. [Clinical features of oral lesions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Guangxi autonomous region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Xiangzhi; Jiang, Lanlan; Lu, Xiangchan; Liu, Wei; Wu, Nianning; Tao, Renchuan

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the features of oral lesions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). A total of 127 HIV-seropositive patients were interviewed for health information and examined for their HIV-related oral lesions according to the EC Clearing House Criteria on Oral Problems related to HIV-Infection (1992). The examinations were conducted by dental specialist and HIV specialist. The CD4 T cell count in peripheral blood of the patients was tested by flow cytometry. The patients were divided into HIV- infected group (42) and AIDS group (85) according to CDC Classification System for HIV- Infected Adults and Adolescents (revised in 1993). Chi-square test was used to test the relationship between systemic disease and oral lesions, and the difference of the prevalence of oral lesions between the two groups. Among the 127 patients, oral candidiasis (51/127), oral hairy leukoplakia (24/127) were common oral manifestation. There was no relationship between the oral manifestation and systemic disease (P = 0.397). The occurrence of oral lesions and oral candidiasis was significantly different between the two groups (χ² = 7.684, P = 0.006; χ² = 14.410, P < 0.001). The CD4 count was related to the prevalence of oral lesions (P = 0.006) and oral candidasis (P = 0.003). Most oral lesions appeared before the appearance of systemic disease. Oral candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia were the most common lesions.Oral lesions had no relationship with systemic disease but could be still an indicator for disease progress.

  14. Role of the autonomic nervous system and neuropeptides in the development of obesity in humans: targets for therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Jerry R; Campbell, Lesley V

    2008-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes have reached epidemic proportions worldwide. These metabolic disorders, particularly obesity, are characterised by increased basal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity but an impaired sympathetic response to certain stimuli, such as insulin. Although targeting the SNS may seem an attractive avenue for the pharmacological prevention and treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders, it remains unknown whether changes in SNS tone are primary and contribute to the development of these metabolic conditions or whether they develop secondary to the obese state. This question can be answered by the study of insulin-resistant individuals prior to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using this model, it has been shown that early insulin resistance is associated with increased SNS activity in genetically-predisposed humans. It has been suggested that in insulin-resistant states, hyperinsulinaemia is the initiating factor that increases sympathetic neural activity. Over time, adrenoreceptor down-regulation and/or reduced sensitivity are likely to develop, resulting in reduced sympathetic responsiveness. In the postprandial state, this will lead to impaired diet-induced thermogenesis and post-prandial fat oxidation, promoting the accumulation of body fat. More recent evidence demonstrates that stress-induced SNS overactivity up-regulates Neuropeptide Y, an orexigenic hormone, and its Y2 receptor, in visceral adipose tissue, the fat depot most strongly linked to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. There is evidence that SNS overactivity specifically contributes to the development of abdominal obesity via this pathway, which could represent a novel target for the prevention and treatment of abdominal obesity and related metabolic consequences.

  15. Semi-Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vision The Semi-Autonomous Systems Lab focuses on developing a comprehensive framework for semi-autonomous coordination of networked robotic systems. Semi-autonomous...

  16. Semi-Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — VisionThe Semi-Autonomous Systems Lab focuses on developing a comprehensive framework for semi-autonomous coordination of networked robotic systems. Semi-autonomous...

  17. Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilshøj, Mads; Bøgh, Simon; Nielsen, Oluf Skov

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications. Design/methodology/approach - Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper investiga......Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications. Design/methodology/approach - Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper......; sustainability, configuration, adaptation, autonomy, positioning, manipulation and grasping, robot-robot interaction, human-robot interaction, process quality, dependability, and physical properties. Findings - The concise yet comprehensive review provides both researchers (academia) and practitioners (industry...... Manipulation (AIMM)....

  18. Tracked robot controllers for climbing obstacles autonomously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Isabelle

    2009-05-01

    Research in mobile robot navigation has demonstrated some success in navigating flat indoor environments while avoiding obstacles. However, the challenge of analyzing complex environments to climb obstacles autonomously has had very little success due to the complexity of the task. Unmanned ground vehicles currently exhibit simple autonomous behaviours compared to the human ability to move in the world. This paper presents the control algorithms designed for a tracked mobile robot to autonomously climb obstacles by varying its tracks configuration. Two control algorithms are proposed to solve the autonomous locomotion problem for climbing obstacles. First, a reactive controller evaluates the appropriate geometric configuration based on terrain and vehicle geometric considerations. Then, a reinforcement learning algorithm finds alternative solutions when the reactive controller gets stuck while climbing an obstacle. The methodology combines reactivity to learning. The controllers have been demonstrated in box and stair climbing simulations. The experiments illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for crossing obstacles.

  19. Autonomic html interface generator for web applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bassil, Youssef; 10.5121/ijwest.2012.3104

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in computing systems have led to a new digital era in which every area of life is nearly interrelated with information technology. However, with the trend towards large-scale IT systems, a new challenge has emerged. The complexity of IT systems is becoming an obstacle that hampers the manageability, operability, and maintainability of modern computing infrastructures. Autonomic computing popped up to provide an answer to these ever-growing pitfalls. Fundamentally, autonomic systems are self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing, and self-protecting; hence, they can automate all complex IT processes without human intervention. This paper proposes an autonomic HTML web-interface generator based on XML Schema and Style Sheet specifications for self-configuring graphical user interfaces of web applications. The goal of this autonomic generator is to automate the process of customizing GUI web-interfaces according to the ever-changing business rules, policies, and operating environment with th...

  20. Stress, depression and cardiovascular dysregulation: a review of neurobiological mechanisms and the integration of research from preclinical disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, Angela J; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2009-01-01

    Bidirectional associations between mood disorders and cardiovascular diseases are extensively documented. However, the precise physiological and biochemical mechanisms that underlie such relationships are not well understood. This review focuses on the neurobiological processes and mediators that are common to both mood and cardiovascular disorders. The discussion places an emphasis on the role of exogenous stressors in addition to: (a) neuroendocrine and neurohumoral changes involving dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, (b) immune alterations including activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, (c) autonomic and cardiovascular dysregulation including increased sympathetic drive, withdrawal of parasympathetic tone, cardiac rate and rhythm disturbances, and altered baroreceptor reflex function, (d) central neurotransmitter system dysfunction involving the dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin systems, and (e) behavioral changes including fatigue and physical inactivity. The review also discusses experimental investigations using preclinical disease models to elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the link between mood disorders and cardiovascular disease. These include: (a) the chronic mild stress model of depression, (b) a model of congestive heart failure, (c) a model of cardiovascular deconditioning, (d) pharmacological manipulations of body fluid and sodium balance, and (e) pharmacological manipulations of the central serotonergic system. In combination with an extensive human research literature, the investigation of mechanisms underlying mood and cardiovascular regulation using animal models will enhance understanding the association between depression and cardiovascular disease. This will ultimately promote the development of better treatments and interventions for individuals with co-morbid psychological and somatic pathologies.

  1. Artificial neural interfaces for bionic cardiovascular treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Toru; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    An artificial nerve, in the broad sense, may be conceptualized as a physical and logical interface system that reestablishes the information traffic between the central nervous system and peripheral organs. Studies on artificial nerves targeting the autonomic nervous system are in progress to explore new treatment strategies for several cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we will review our research targeting the autonomic nervous system to treat cardiovascular diseases. First, we identified the rule for decoding native sympathetic nerve activity into a heart rate using transfer function analysis, and established a framework for a neurally regulated cardiac pacemaker. Second, we designed a bionic baroreflex system to restore the baroreflex buffering function using electrical stimulation of the celiac ganglion in a rat model of orthostatic hypotension. Third, based on the hypothesis that autonomic imbalance aggravates chronic heart failure, we implanted a neural interface into the right vagal nerve and demonstrated that intermittent vagal stimulation significantly improved the survival rate in rats with chronic heart failure following myocardial infarction. Although several practical problems need to be resolved, such as those relating to the development of electrodes feasible for long-term nerve activity recording, studies of artificial neural interfaces with the autonomic nervous system have great possibilities in the field of cardiovascular treatment. We expect further development of artificial neural interfaces as novel strategies to cope with cardiovascular diseases resistant to conventional therapeutics.

  2. Testing for autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1984-01-01

    Autonomic neuropathy is a common complication in long-term diabetes, about 30% of the patients showing measurable signs of autonomic dysfunction after 10 years duration of disease. The diagnosis is often difficult to establish because clinical symptoms generally occur late in the course...

  3. Social factors and cardiovascular morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Eric John

    2017-03-01

    Recent progress in population health at aggregate level, measured by life expectancy, has been accompanied by lack of progress in reducing the difference in health prospects between groups defined by social status. Cardiovascular disease is an important contributor to this undesirable situation. The stepwise gradient of higher risk with lower status is accounted for partly by social gradients in health behaviors. The psychosocial hypothesis provides a stronger explanation, based on social patterning of living and working environments and psychological assets that individuals develop during childhood. Three decades of research based on Whitehall II and other cohort studies provide evidence for psychosocial pathways leading to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Job stress is a useful paradigm because exposure is long term and depends on occupational status. Studies of social-biological translation implicate autonomic and neuroendocrine function among the biological systems that mediate between chronic adverse psychosocial exposures and increased cardiometabolic risk and cardiovascular disease incidence.

  4. Exercise improves cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgari, Christina; Pagoni, Stamatina; Vinik, Aaron; Poirier, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Physical activity is a key element in the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes. Regular physical activity efficiently supports diet-induced weight loss, improves glycemic control, and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Furthermore, physical activity positively affects lipid profile, blood pressure, reduces the rate of cardiovascular events and associated mortality, and restores the quality of life in type 2 diabetes. However, recent studies have documented that a high percentage of the cardiovascular benefits of exercise cannot be attributed solely to enhanced cardiovascular risk factor modulation. Obesity in concert with diabetes is characterized by sympathetic overactivity and the progressive loss of cardiac parasympathetic influx. These are manifested via different pathogenetic mechanisms, including hyperinsulinemia, visceral obesity, subclinical inflammation and increased thrombosis. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy is an underestimated risk factor for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity and diabetes. The same is true for the role of physical exercise in the restoration of the heart cardioprotective autonomic modulation in these individuals. This review addresses the interplay of cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes, and focuses on the importance of exercise in improving cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [The influence of frequency and blockade of the autonomic nervous system on the functional behaviour of the human conduction system. Part A: Conduction velocity (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, M; Luckmann, E; Narula, O S

    1976-01-01

    32 patients were studied by His-bundle recordings to examine the extent to which frequency and autonomic nervous system influence the conduction velocity in the subdivisions (atrium, AV-node, His-Purkinje system) of the normal PR-interval. The measurements were performed during sinus rhythm and three electrically induced atrial frequencies before and after intravenous administration of 1 mg Atropine (15 patients) and 0.4 mg Visken (17 patients). In influencing the atrial conduction velocity frequency dominates the blockade of both components of the autonomic nervous system. Increase in frequency lengthens the intraatrial conduction time. Blockade of parasympathicus and sympathicus does not significantly influence the changes in intraatrial conduction velocity induced by increase of frequency. Patients with prolonged intraatrial conduction respond in the same way to cycle length shortening and blockade of the autonomic tone as patients with normal conduction. The results are discussed with respect to acetylcholine and catecholamine influence on the electrophysiological properties of the atrial myocardium. The AV-node is the part of the conduction system most sensitive to the influence of both cycle length shortening and blockade of the autonomic nervous system. Artificially induced cycle length shortening prolongs the intranodal conduction time to a different individual level for each patient. Blockade of the parasympathicus not only shortens this interval but also reduces the steepness of the AH-time induced by atrial pacing. Blockade of the sympathicus has the opposite effect. The most likely explanation for these results is the abolishing of the functional dissociation within the AV-node by blocking the autonomic influence on this structure. The conduction velocity in the His-Purkinje system is influenced neither by atrial pacing nor by blockade of both components of the autonomic nervous system.

  6. Genetic analysis of the cardiac methylome at single nucleotide resolution in a model of human cardiovascular disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle D Johnson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic marks such as cytosine methylation are important determinants of cellular and whole-body phenotypes. However, the extent of, and reasons for inter-individual differences in cytosine methylation, and their association with phenotypic variation are poorly characterised. Here we present the first genome-wide study of cytosine methylation at single-nucleotide resolution in an animal model of human disease. We used whole-genome bisulfite sequencing in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, a model of cardiovascular disease, and the Brown Norway (BN control strain, to define the genetic architecture of cytosine methylation in the mammalian heart and to test for association between methylation and pathophysiological phenotypes. Analysis of 10.6 million CpG dinucleotides identified 77,088 CpGs that were differentially methylated between the strains. In F1 hybrids we found 38,152 CpGs showing allele-specific methylation and 145 regions with parent-of-origin effects on methylation. Cis-linkage explained almost 60% of inter-strain variation in methylation at a subset of loci tested for linkage in a panel of recombinant inbred (RI strains. Methylation analysis in isolated cardiomyocytes showed that in the majority of cases methylation differences in cardiomyocytes and non-cardiomyocytes were strain-dependent, confirming a strong genetic component for cytosine methylation. We observed preferential nucleotide usage associated with increased and decreased methylation that is remarkably conserved across species, suggesting a common mechanism for germline control of inter-individual variation in CpG methylation. In the RI strain panel, we found significant correlation of CpG methylation and levels of serum chromogranin B (CgB, a proposed biomarker of heart failure, which is evidence for a link between germline DNA sequence variation, CpG methylation differences and pathophysiological phenotypes in the SHR strain. Together, these results will

  7. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dickey, John, E-mail: rlindner@astro.wisc.edu [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  9. [The influence of frequency and blockade of the autonomic nervous system on the functional behaviour of the human conduction system. Part B: Refractory periods (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, M; Luckmann, E; Narula, O S

    1976-01-01

    32 patients were studied by His-bundle-electrocardiogram and programmed atrial stimulation to examine to which extent frequency and autonomic tone participate in influencing the effective (ERP) and functional (FRP) refractory periods of the atrium and AV-node. The measurements were performed during three electrically induced atrial frequencies before and after intravenous injection of 1 mg Atropine (15 patients) and 0.4 mg Visken (17 patients). For the atrium, frequency dominates the blockade of both components of the autonomic nervous system in influencing both refractory periods. Increase in frequency shortens both ERP and FRP of the atriu. The blockade of parasympathicus and sympathicus does not significantly influence the changes in atrial ERP and FRP induced by atrial pacing. The AV-node responses most sensitive to both pacing induced cycle length shortening and blockade of the autonomic tone. Cycle length shortening prolongs the nodal ERP. the FRP is either shortened or prolonged. Blockade of the parasympathicus shortens both nodal ERP and FRP. Blockade of the sympathicus lengthens both parameters. This behaviour of both refractory periods in response to atrial pacing and blockade of the autonomic tone are discussed with respect to the "gate mechanism" in the conduction system. In the majority of patients blockade of the parasympathicus shifts the "gate" from the AV-node to the atrium. Blockade of the sympathicus has the opposite effect in some cases.

  10. Effect of serotonin receptor blockade on endocrine and cardiovascular responses to head-up tilt in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, S; Secher, N H; Knigge, U

    1993-01-01

    Effects of blockade of serotonin (5-HT) receptors on the integrated cardiovascular and endocrine adaptations during head-up tilt were investigated in normal men. In control experiments 50 degrees head-up tilt increased heart rate (HR), total peripheral resistance (TPR), plasma renin activity (PRA...

  11. Cardiovascular Effects Caused by Increasing Concentrations of Diesel Exhaust in Middle-Aged Healthy GSTM1 Null Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT Objectives: Epidemiological studies have shown an association between the incidence of adverse cardiovascular effects and exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM). Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major contributor to ambient PM in urban areas. This study was designed to e...

  12. A module of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptional network containing primitive and differentiation markers is related to specific cardiovascular health variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leni Moldovan

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, including rare circulating stem and progenitor cells (CSPCs, have important yet poorly understood roles in the maintenance and repair of blood vessels and perfused organs. Our hypothesis was that the identities and functions of CSPCs in cardiovascular health could be ascertained by analyzing the patterns of their co-expressed markers in unselected PBMC samples. Because gene microarrays had failed to detect many stem cell-associated genes, we performed quantitative real-time PCR to measure the expression of 45 primitive and tissue differentiation markers in PBMCs from healthy and hypertensive human subjects. We compared these expression levels to the subjects' demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, including vascular stiffness. The tested marker genes were expressed in all of samples and organized in hierarchical transcriptional network modules, constructed by a bottom-up approach. An index of gene expression in one of these modules (metagene, defined as the average standardized relative copy numbers of 15 pluripotency and cardiovascular differentiation markers, was negatively correlated (all p<0.03 with age (R2 = -0.23, vascular stiffness (R2 = -0.24, and central aortic pressure (R2 = -0.19 and positively correlated with body mass index (R2 = 0.72, in women. The co-expression of three neovascular markers was validated at the single-cell level using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. The overall gene expression in this cardiovascular module was reduced by 72±22% in the patients compared with controls. However, the compactness of both modules was increased in the patients' samples, which was reflected in reduced dispersion of their nodes' degrees of connectivity, suggesting a more primitive character of the patients' CSPCs. In conclusion, our results show that the relationship between CSPCs and vascular function is encoded in modules of the PBMCs transcriptional

  13. Studies of nontarget-mediated distribution of human full-length IgG1 antibody and its FAb fragment in cardiovascular and metabolic-related tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Pia; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Svensson, Lena; Ahnmark, Andrea; Flodin, Christine; Wanag, Ewa; Screpanti-Sundqvist, Valentina; Gennemark, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of full-length nontargeted antibody and its antigen-binding fragment (FAb) were evaluated for a range of tissues primarily of interest for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Mice were intravenously injected with a dose of 10 mg/kg of either human IgG1or its FAb fragment; perfused tissues were collected at a range of time points over 3 weeks for the human IgG1 antibody and 1 week for the human FAb antibody. Tissues were homogenized and antibody concentrations were measured by specific immunoassays on the Gyros system. Exposure in terms of maximum concentration (Cmax ) and area under the curve was assessed for all nine tissues. Tissue exposure of full-length antibody relative to plasma exposure was found to be between 1% and 10%, except for brain (0.2%). Relative concentrations of FAb antibody were the same, except for kidney tissue, where the antibody concentration was found to be ten times higher than in plasma. However, the absolute tissue uptake of full-length IgG was significantly higher than the absolute tissue uptake of the FAb antibody. This study provides a reference PK state for full-length whole and FAb antibodies in tissues related to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases that do not include antigen or antibody binding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Inherited autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Hilz, Max J

    2003-12-01

    Inherited autonomic neuropathies are a rare group of disorders associated with sensory dysfunction. As a group they are termed the "hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies" (HSAN). Classification of the various autonomic and sensory disorders is ongoing. In addition to the numerical classification of four distinct forms proposed by Dyck and Ohta (1975), additional entities have been described. The best known and most intensively studied of the HSANs are familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN type III) and congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (HSAN type IV). Diagnosis of the HSANs depends primarily on clinical examinations and specific sensory and autonomic assessments. Pathologic examinations are helpful in confirming the diagnosis and in differentiating between the different disorders. In recent years identification of specific genetic mutations for some disorders has aided diagnosis. Replacement or definitive therapies are not available for any of the disorders so that treatment remains supportive and directed toward specific symptoms.

  15. Control of respiratory and cardiovascular functions by leptin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, M.; Werner, I.F.; Zoccal, D.B.; Menani, J.V.; Colombari, E.; Hall, J.E.; da Silva, A.A.; do Carmo, J.M.; Colombari, D.S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone produced by adipose tissue, acts in brain centers that control critical physiological functions such as metabolism, breathing and cardiovascular regulation. The importance of leptin for respiratory control is evident by the fact that leptin deficient mice exhibit impaired ventilatory responses to carbon dioxide (CO2), which can be corrected by intracerebroventricular leptin replacement therapy. Leptin is also recognized as an important link between obesity and hypertension. Humans and animal models lacking either leptin or functional leptin receptors exhibit many characteristics of the metabolic syndrome, including hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and visceral adiposity, but do not exhibit increased sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and have normal to lower blood pressure (BP) compared to lean controls. Even though previous studies have extensively focused on the brain sites and intracellular signaling pathways involved in leptin effects on food intake and energy balance, the mechanisms that mediate the actions of leptin on breathing and cardiovascular function are only beginning to be elucidated. This mini-review summarizes recent advances on the effects of leptin on cardiovascular and respiratory control with emphasis on the neural control of respiratory function and autonomic activity. PMID:25645056

  16. Cardiac autonomic profile in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, M; Yazisiz, V; Basarici, I; Avci, A B; Erbasan, F; Belgi, A; Terzioglu, E

    2010-03-01

    Neurological involvement is a well-documented issue in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, little is known about the involvement of the autonomic nervous system. This study was conducted to investigate autonomic nervous system dysfunction in patients with RA and SLE. Twenty-six RA patients, 38 SLE patients and 40 healthy controls were recruited from our in- and out-patient departments. Heart rate variability (HRV) parameters (the power of the high- [HF] and low-frequency [LF] band of haemodynamic time series, the ratio between low- and high-frequency components [LF/HF ratio], the power spectral density), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and beat-to-beat blood pressures were assessed by a novel non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring tool (Task Force Monitor [TFM], CNSystems Medizintechnik GmbH, Graz, Austria). Autonomic nervous system dysfunction was determined according to classical Ewing autonomic test battery. Furthermore, we implemented a secondary autonomic test score by modifying the Ewing test battery with additional criteria. Both the classical and modified Ewing test batteries have revealed that the frequencies of autonomic neuropathy were significantly higher in patient groups compared with controls (p disease duration, disease activity and autoantibody positivity. Consequently, we believe that further large-scale studies investigating cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in rheumatic diseases should be carried out to verify our findings and manifest clinical consequences beyond these results.

  17. Autonomic cardiac innervation

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targe...

  18. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  19. Status of cardiovascular issues related to space flight: Implications for future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A

    2009-10-01

    Compromised cardiovascular performance, occurrence of serious cardiac dysrhythmias, cardiac atrophy, orthostatic intolerance, reduced aerobic capacity, operational impacts of regular physical exercise, and space radiation are risks of space flight to the cardiovascular system identified in the 2007 NASA Human Integrated Research Program. An evidence-based approach to identify the research priorities needed to resolve those cardiovascular risks that could most likely compromise the successful completion of extended-duration space missions is presented. Based on data obtained from astronauts who have flown in space, there is no compelling experimental evidence to support significant occurrence of autonomic or vascular dysfunction, cardiac dysrhythmias, or manifestation of asymptomatic cardiovascular disease. The operational impact of prolonged daily exercise and space radiation needs to be defined. In contrast, data from the literature support the notion that the highest probability of occurrence and operational impact with space flight involving cardiovascular risks to astronaut health, safety and operational performance are reduced orthostatic tolerance and aerobic capacity, the resource cost of effective countermeasures, and the potential effects of space radiation. Future research should focus on these challenges.

  20. Adverse Impact of Sleep Restriction and Circadian Misalignment on Autonomic Function in Healthy Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Daniela; Carter, Jason R; Van Cauter, Eve; Leproult, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    Insufficient sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances have been each associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in epidemiological studies, but experimental evidence for a causal link is scarce. The present study compares the impact of circadian misalignment (CM) to circadian alignment (CA) on human autonomic function using a nonrandomized parallel group design to achieve the same total sleep time in both conditions. After baseline assessments (3 days with 10-hour bedtimes), 26 healthy young adults were assigned to sleep restriction (SR; eight 5-hour bedtimes) with either fixed nocturnal bedtimes (CA; n=13) or bedtimes delayed by 8.5 hours on 4 of the 8 days (CM; n=13). Daytime ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate (HR; CA, n=11; CM, n=10) and 24-hour urinary norepinephrine levels (CA, n=13; CM, n=13) were assessed at baseline and the end of SR. Nocturnal HR and HR variability were analyzed during sleep at baseline and during the fourth and seventh nights of SR (CA, n=8; CM, n=12). SR resulted in a significant increase in daytime HR in both groups, without changes in blood pressure. SR increased 24-hour urinary norepinephrine in the CM group (30±4 versus 21±2 μg), but not in the circadian alignment group (group×condition, P=0.005). In contrast to the lack of detectable impact of CM on daytime autonomic function, SR with CM elicited greater increases in nocturnal HR, as well as greater reductions in vagal indices of HR variability, than SR without CM (group×condition, P<0.05). In conclusion, SR and CM both result in impaired autonomic function that could lead, under chronic conditions, to enhanced cardiovascular risk.

  1. Autonomous Lawnmower using FPGA implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nabihah; Lokman, Nabill bin; Helmy Abd Wahab, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, there are various types of robot have been invented for multiple purposes. The robots have the special characteristic that surpass the human ability and could operate in extreme environment which human cannot endure. In this paper, an autonomous robot is built to imitate the characteristic of a human cutting grass. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to control the movements where all data and information would be processed. Very High Speed Integrated Circuit (VHSIC) Hardware Description Language (VHDL) is used to describe the hardware using Quartus II software. This robot has the ability of avoiding obstacle using ultrasonic sensor. This robot used two DC motors for its movement. It could include moving forward, backward, and turning left and right. The movement or the path of the automatic lawn mower is based on a path planning technique. Four Global Positioning System (GPS) plot are set to create a boundary. This to ensure that the lawn mower operates within the area given by user. Every action of the lawn mower is controlled by the FPGA DE' Board Cyclone II with the help of the sensor. Furthermore, Sketch Up software was used to design the structure of the lawn mower. The autonomous lawn mower was able to operate efficiently and smoothly return to coordinated paths after passing the obstacle. It uses 25% of total pins available on the board and 31% of total Digital Signal Processing (DSP) blocks.

  2. Clocks and cardiovascular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Haines, Philip; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in central and peripheral tissues enable the temporal synchronization and organization of molecular and physiological processes of rhythmic animals, allowing optimum functioning of cells and organisms at the most appropriate time of day. Disruption of circadian rhythms, from external or internal forces, leads to widespread biological disruption and is postulated to underlie many human conditions, such as the incidence and timing of cardiovascular disease. Here, we describe in vivo and in vitro methodology relevant to studying the role of circadian rhythms in cardiovascular function and dysfunction PMID:25707279

  3. Dissociated emergent-response system and fine-processing system in human neural network and a heuristic neural architecture for autonomous humanoid robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaodan

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the functional connectivity of the primary sensory system with resting state fMRI and applied such knowledge into the design of the neural architecture of autonomous humanoid robots. Correlation and Granger causality analyses were utilized to reveal the functional connectivity patterns. Dissociation was within the primary sensory system, in that the olfactory cortex and the somatosensory cortex were strongly connected to the amygdala whereas the visual cortex and the auditory cortex were strongly connected with the frontal cortex. The posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were found to maintain constant communication with the primary sensory system, the frontal cortex, and the amygdala. Such neural architecture inspired the design of dissociated emergent-response system and fine-processing system in autonomous humanoid robots, with separate processing units and another consolidation center to coordinate the two systems. Such design can help autonomous robots to detect and respond quickly to danger, so as to maintain their sustainability and independence.

  4. Gross anatomical study on the human myocardial bridges with special reference to the spatial relationship among coronary arteries, cardiac veins, and autonomic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yuko; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Kageyama, Ikuo; Aizawa, Yukio; Kumaki, Katsuji; Miki, Akinori; Terashima, Toshio

    2016-04-01

    Coronary arteries are frequently covered by cardiac muscles. This arrangement is termed a myocardial bridge. Previous studies have shown that myocardial bridges can cause myocardial ischemic diseases or cardiac arrhythmia, but the relevant pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. We examined 60 hearts from Japanese cadavers macroscopically to clarify the spatial relationships among coronary arteries, cardiac veins and autonomic nerves. We found 86 myocardial bridges in 47 hearts from the 60 cadavers examined (78.3%). Next, we dissected out nine hearts with myocardial bridges in detail under the operating microscope. We found no additional branches of coronary arteries on the myocardial bridge surfaces. However, the cardiac veins, which usually accompany the coronary arteries, ran independently on the myocardial bridge surfaces in the same region. Cardiac autonomic nerves comprised two rami: one was associated with the coronary artery under the myocardial bridge and the other ran on the surface of the bridge. Such spatial relationships among the coronary arteries, cardiac veins and cardiac autonomic nerves at the myocardial bridges are quite similar to those in mouse embryo hearts.

  5. Dissociated Emergent-Response System and Fine-Processing System in Human Neural Network and a Heuristic Neural Architecture for Autonomous Humanoid Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodan Yan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the functional connectivity of the primary sensory system with resting state fMRI and applied such knowledge into the design of the neural architecture of autonomous humanoid robots. Correlation and Granger causality analyses were utilized to reveal the functional connectivity patterns. Dissociation was within the primary sensory system, in that the olfactory cortex and the somatosensory cortex were strongly connected to the amygdala whereas the visual cortex and the auditory cortex were strongly connected with the frontal cortex. The posterior cingulate cortex (PCC and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC were found to maintain constant communication with the primary sensory system, the frontal cortex, and the amygdala. Such neural architecture inspired the design of dissociated emergent-response system and fine-processing system in autonomous humanoid robots, with separate processing units and another consolidation center to coordinate the two systems. Such design can help autonomous robots to detect and respond quickly to danger, so as to maintain their sustainability and independence.

  6. Control algorithms for autonomous robot navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1985-09-20

    This paper examines control algorithm requirements for autonomous robot navigation outside laboratory environments. Three aspects of navigation are considered: navigation control in explored terrain, environment interactions with robot sensors, and navigation control in unanticipated situations. Major navigation methods are presented and relevance of traditional human learning theory is discussed. A new navigation technique linking graph theory and incidental learning is introduced.

  7. Autonomous Learning from a Social Cognitive Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Rhea, Nancy E.

    2006-01-01

    The current perspective of autonomous learning defines it as the agentive exhibition of resourcefulness, initiative, and persistence in self-directed learning. As a form of human agency, it has been argued in the literature that this perspective should be consistent with Bandura's (1986) Social Cognitive Theory (SCT). The purpose of this article…

  8. Autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using “PNEUMOCARD”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Funtova, I. I.; Diedrich, A.; Chernikova, A. G.; Drescher, J.; Baranov, V. M.; Tank, J.

    2009-10-01

    Investigations of blood pressure, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) during long term space flights on board the "ISS" have shown characteristic changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Therefore, alterations of the autonomic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for in- and post-flight disturbances. The device "Pneumocard" was developed to further investigate autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory function aboard the ISS. The hard-software diagnostic complex "Pneumocard" was used during in-flight experiment aboard ISS for autonomic function testing. ECG, photoplethysmography, respiration, transthoracic bioimpedance and seismocardiography were assessed in one male cosmonaut (flight lengths six month). Recordings were made prior to the flight, late during flight, and post-flight during spontaneous respiration and controlled respiration at different rates. HR remained stable during flight. The values were comparable to supine measurements on earth. Respiratory frequency and blood pressure decreased during flight. Post flight HR and BP values increased compared to in-flight data exceeding pre-flight values. Cardiac time intervals did not change dramatically during flight. Pulse wave transit time decreased during flight. The maximum of the first time derivative of the impedance cardiogram, which is highly correlated with stroke volume was not reduced in-flight. Our results demonstrate that autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using "Pneumocard" is feasible and generates data of good quality. Despite the decrease in BP, pulse wave transit time was found reduced in space as shown earlier. However, cardiac output did not decrease profoundly in the investigated cosmonaut. Autonomic testing during space flight detects individual changes in cardiovascular control and may add important information to standard medical control. The recent plans to support a flight to Mars, makes these kinds of observations all the more relevant

  9. Autonomous Evolutionary Information Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Traditional information systems are passive, i.e., data orknowledge is created , retrieved, modified, updated, and deleted only in response to operations issued by users or application programs, and the systems only can execute queries or t ransactions explicitly submitted by users or application programs but have no ab ility to do something actively by themselves. Unlike a traditional information system serving just as a storehouse of data or knowledge and working passively a ccording to queries or transactions explicitly issued by users and application p rograms, an autonomous evolutionary information system serves as an autonomous a nd evolutionary partner of its users that discovers new knowledge from its datab ase or knowledge-base autonomously, cooperates with its users in solving proble m s actively by providing the users with advices, and has a certain mechanism to i mprove its own state of “knowing” and ability of “working”. This paper semi nall y defines what is an autonomous evolutionary information system, explain why aut onomous evolutionary information systems are needed, and presents some new issue s, fundamental considerations, and research directions in design and development of autonomous evolutionary information systems.

  10. Cardiac autonomic testing and treating heart disease. 'A clinical perspective'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. DePace

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Coronary heart disease (CHD is a major health concern, affecting nearly half the middle-age population and responsible for nearly one-third of all deaths. Clinicians have several major responsibilities beyond diagnosing CHD, such as risk stratification of patients for major adverse cardiac events (MACE and treating risks, as well as the patient. This second of a two-part review series discusses treating risk factors, including autonomic dysfunction, and expected outcomes. Methods Therapies for treating cardiac mortality risks including cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN, are discussed. Results While risk factors effectively target high-risk patients, a large number of individuals who will develop complications from heart disease are not identified by current scoring systems. Many patients with heart conditions, who appear to be well-managed by traditional therapies, experience MACE. Parasympathetic and Sympathetic (P&S function testing provides more information and has the potential to further aid doctors in individualizing and titrating therapy to minimize risk. Advanced autonomic dysfunction (AAD and its more severe form cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy have been strongly associated with an elevated risk of cardiac mortality and are diagnosable through autonomic testing. This additional information includes patient-specific physiologic measures, such as sympathovagal balance (SB. Studies have shown that establishing and maintaining proper SB minimizes morbidity and mortality risk. Conclusions P&S testing promotes primary prevention, treating subclinical disease states, as well as secondary prevention, thereby improving patient outcomes through (1 maintaining wellness, (2 preventing symptoms and disorder and (3 treating subclinical manifestations (autonomic dysfunction, as well as (4 disease and symptoms (autonomic neuropathy.

  11. Autonomous driving technical, legal and social aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Gerdes, J; Lenz, Barbara; Winner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    This book takes a look at fully automated, autonomous vehicles and discusses many open questions: How can autonomous vehicles be integrated into the current transportation system with diverse users and human drivers? Where do automated vehicles fall under current legal frameworks? What risks are associated with automation and how will society respond to these risks? How will the marketplace react to automated vehicles and what changes may be necessary for companies? Experts from Germany and the United States define key societal, engineering, and mobility issues related to the automation of vehicles. They discuss the decisions programmers of automated vehicles must make to enable vehicles to perceive their environment, interact with other road users, and choose actions that may have ethical consequences. The authors further identify expectations and concerns that will form the basis for individual and societal acceptance of autonomous driving. While the safety benefits of such vehicles are tremendous, the auth...

  12. Ozone and cardiovascular injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainaldi Giuseppe

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Air pollution is increasingly recognized as an important and modifiable determinant of cardiovascular diseases in urban communities. The potential detrimental effects are both acute and chronic having a strong impact on morbidity and mortality. The acute exposure to pollutants has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, heart failure and life-threatening arrhythmias. The long-terms effects are related to the lifetime risk of death from cardiac causes. The WHO estimates that air pollution is responsible for 3 million premature deaths each year. The evidence supporting these data is very strong nonetheless, epidemiologic and observational data have the main limitation of imprecise measurements. Moreover, the lack of clinical experimental models makes it difficult to demonstrate the individual risk. The other limitation is related to the lack of a clear mechanism explaining the effects of pollution on cardiovascular mortality. In the present review we will explore the epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence of the effects of ozone on cardiovascular diseases. The pathophysiologic consequences of air pollutant exposures have been extensively investigated in pulmonary systems, and it is clear that some of the major components of air pollution (e.g. ozone and particulate matter can initiate and exacerbate lung disease in humans 1. It is possible that pulmonary oxidant stress mediated by particulate matter and/or ozone (O3 exposure can result in downstream perturbations in the cardiovasculature, as the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems are intricately associated, and it is well documented that specific environmental toxins (such as tobacco smoke 2 introduced through the lungs can initiate and/or accelerate cardiovascular disease development. Indeed, several epidemiologic studies have proved that there is an association between PM and O3 and the increased incidence of cardiovascular morbidity

  13. Autonomous surveillance for biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdak, Raja; Elfes, Alberto; Kusy, Branislav; Tews, Ashley; Hu, Wen; Hernandez, Emili; Kottege, Navinda; Sikka, Pavan

    2015-04-01

    The global movement of people and goods has increased the risk of biosecurity threats and their potential to incur large economic, social, and environmental costs. Conventional manual biosecurity surveillance methods are limited by their scalability in space and time. This article focuses on autonomous surveillance systems, comprising sensor networks, robots, and intelligent algorithms, and their applicability to biosecurity threats. We discuss the spatial and temporal attributes of autonomous surveillance technologies and map them to three broad categories of biosecurity threat: (i) vector-borne diseases; (ii) plant pests; and (iii) aquatic pests. Our discussion reveals a broad range of opportunities to serve biosecurity needs through autonomous surveillance. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiovascular responses during a submaximal exercise test in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, A.D.; Groothuis, J.T.; Nimwegen, M. van; Scheer, E.S. van der; Borm, G.F.; Bloem, B.R.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Munneke, M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are physically less active than controls, and autonomic dysfunction may contribute to this sedentary lifestyle. Specifically, an altered cardiovascular response to physical effort may restrict physical activities. OBJECTIVE: To assess the

  15. [Peripheral arterial disease and cardiovascular risk factors among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus: a comparison between hospital out-patients and patients in a prison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri Pont, Marta; Borrallo Almansa, Rosa Maria; Almada Rivas, Guido; Carbó Díez, Miriam; Solé Arnau, Rosa; García Restoy, Enric

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients is more frequent than in the general population. Peripheral arterial disease measured by ankle-brachial index (ABI) and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) is not well known in all groups of HIV-infected patients. Transversal study of HIV-infected patients >45 years, seen as outpatients in hospital (HO) in 2008 and patients institutionalized in a prison in 2009. Cardiovascular risk factors, information on the HIV infection and healthy lifestyles were evaluated. ABI was measured at rest and was considered pathological when a value ≤ 0.9 or ≥ 1.3 was obtained. We included 71 patients (mean age of 50.6 ± 6.9 years, 86% male), 32 HO and 39 in prison. The most prevalent CVRF was smoking (80.2%) followed by an altered lipid profile (63.3%). The evolution time of HIV infection was 13.1 ± 7.1 years. 74.6% of patients didn't follow a heart-healthy diet and 25% were sedentary. The ABI was low in 7 cases (9.8%) and ≥ 1.3 in one. Patients in prison were younger, the rate of smokers and of individuals with low HDL were higher, the time of evolution of the HIV infections was longer and they were less adherent to a heart-healthy diet than in HO, reaching in all cases statistical significance (P<.05). In our study there is a high prevalence of altered ABI. The most common CVRF is smoking, followed by the alteration of lipids. Patients in prison are more likely to be smokers, to have low HDL and they are less adherence to a heart-healthy diet. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone on visceral fat, metabolic, and cardiovascular indices in human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Takara L; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2015-04-01

    Increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is associated with reductions in endogenous GH secretion, possibly as a result of hyperinsulinemia, increased circulating free fatty acid, increased somatostatin tone, and reduced ghrelin. Reduced GH may, in turn, further exacerbate visceral fat accumulation because of decreased hormone-sensitive lipolysis in this depot. Data from multiple populations demonstrate that both reduced GH and increased VAT appear to contribute independently to dyslipidemia, increased systemic inflammation, and increased cardiovascular risk. The reductions in GH in states of visceral adiposity are characterized by reduced basal and pulsatile GH secretion with intact pulse frequency. Treatment with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) provides a means to reverse these abnormalities, increasing endogenous basal and pulsatile GH secretion without altering pulse frequency. This review describes data from HIV-infected individuals and individuals with general obesity showing that treatment with GHRH significantly reduces visceral fat, ameliorates dyslipidemia, and reduces markers of cardiovascular risk. Further research is needed regarding the long-term efficacy and safety of this treatment modality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiovascular determinants of maximal oxygen consumption in upright and supine posture at the end of prolonged bed rest in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringard, Aurélien; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Adami, Alessandra; De Roia, Gabriela; Lador, Frédéric; Lucini, Daniela; Pizzinelli, Paolo; Capelli, Carlo; Ferretti, Guido

    2010-06-30

    We tested the hypothesis that, after bed rest, maximal oxygen consumption ( VO₂max ) decreases more upright than supine, because of adequate cardiovascular response supine, but not upright. On 9 subjects, we determined VO₂max and maximal cardiac output (Q ) upright and supine, before and after (reambulation day upright, the following day supine) 35-day bed rest, by classical steady state protocol. Oxygen consumption, heart rate (f(H)) and stroke volume (Q(st)) were measured by a metabolic cart, electrocardiography and Modelflow from pulse pressure profiles, respectively. We computed Q as f(H) times Q(st), and systemic oxygen flow ( QaO₂) as Q. times arterial oxygen concentration, obtained after haemoglobin and arterial oxygen saturation measurements. Before bed rest, all parameters at maximal exercise were similar upright and supine. After bed rest, VO₂max was lower (pcardiovascular response (i) did not affect VO₂max supine, (ii) partially explained the VO₂max decrease upright, and (iii) caused the VO₂max differences between postures. We speculate that impaired peripheral oxygen transfer and/or utilisation may explain the VO₂max decrease supine and the fraction of VO₂max decrease upright unexplained by cardiovascular responses.

  18. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  19. Simple Autonomous Chaotic Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jessica; Sprott, J.

    2010-03-01

    Over the last several decades, numerous electronic circuits exhibiting chaos have been proposed. Non-autonomous circuits with as few as two components have been developed. However, the operation of such circuits relies on the non-ideal behavior of the devices used, and therefore the circuit equations can be quite complex. In this paper, we present two simple autonomous chaotic circuits using only opamps and linear passive components. The circuits each use one opamp as a comparator, to provide a signum nonlinearity. The chaotic behavior is robust, and independent of nonlinearities in the passive components. Moreover, the circuit equations are among the algebraically simplest chaotic systems yet constructed.

  20. Orthostatic stress is necessary to maintain the dynamic range of cardiovascular control in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisch, J. F.; Wolfram, G.; Beck, L.; Drummer, C.; Stormer, I.; Buckey, J.; Blomqvist, G.

    2000-01-01

    In the upright position, gravity fills the low-pressure systems of human circulation with blood and interstitial fluid in the sections below the diaphragm. Without gravity one pressure component in the vessels disappears and the relationship between hydrostatic pressure and oncotic pressure, which regulates fluid passage across the capillary endothelium in the terminal vascular bed, shifts constantly. The visible consequences of this are a puffy face and "bird" legs. The plasma volume shrinks in space and the range of cardiovascular control is reduced. When they stand up for the first time after landing, 30-50% of astronauts suffer from orthostatic intolerance. It remains unclear whether microgravity impairs cardiovascular reflexes, or whether it is the altered volume status that causes the cardiovascular instability following space flight. Lower body negative pressure was used in several space missions to stimulate the cardiovascular reflexes before, during and after a space flight. The results show that cardiovascular reflexes are maintained in microgravity. However, the astronauts' volume status changed in space, towards a volume-retracted state, as measurements of fluid-regulating hormones have shown. It can be hypothesized that the control of circulation and body fluid homeostasis in humans is adapted to their upright posture in the Earth's gravitational field. Autonomic control regulates fluid distribution to maintain the blood pressure in that posture, which most of us have to cope with for two-thirds of the day. A determined amount of interstitial volume is necessary to maintain the dynamic range of cardiovascular control in the upright posture; otherwise orthostatic intolerance may occur more often.

  1. Evaluation of autonomic functions in subclinical hypothyroid and hypothyroid patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti S Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autonomic dysfunction may contribute to cardiovascular morbidity in subclinical hypothyroid patients. It is controversial whether the abnormality exists in sympathetic or the parasympathetic function. It is also not known whether the severity of autonomic dysfunction is related to the degree of thyroid deficiency. Design of Study: Prospective case control. Materials and Methods: Autonomic functions based on heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP responses to various maneuvers were evaluated and scored in twenty two subclinical hypothyroid patients, 30-50 years and compared with twenty hypothyroid patients. Biochemical estimation of TSH, fT 3 , fT 4 , TPO antibody was done. Result: Sympathetic function abnormalities were seen in 82% subclinical hypothyroid patients and 85%hypothyroid patients when one test was abnormal. Parasympathetic dysfunction was also recorded in eight patients in both groups. When two abnormal tests were used as the selection criteria sympathetic function abnormality was observed in about 41% subclinical hypothyroid and 65% hypothyroid patients. There were no intergroup differences in autonomic functions, score and TPO levels. The TSH levels were not related to type or degree of autonomic dysfunction. Systolic BP in both groups and diastolic BP in hypothyroid patients were higher with lower thyroxine levels but the patients were normotensive. Conclusion: Autonomic dysfunction of comparable degree was seen in subclinical hypothyroid and hypothyroid patients. Sympathetic function abnormality was more common although decreased parasympathetic function reactivity was also present. These abnormalities were unrelated to TSH levels.

  2. Abnormal Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Mice Lacking ASIC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Feng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3−/− mice. Asic3−/− mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3−/− mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3−/− mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Effect of mitochondrial, APOE, ACE and NOS3 gene polymorphisms on cardiovascular risk factors among the Vaqueiros de Alzada, a Northern Spain human isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Pedro; Gómez, Juan; Corao, Ana I; De Canga, Julio; Coto, Eliecer

    2014-01-01

    The Vaqueiros de Alzada are a human isolate from Asturias, a Northern Spain region. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of Vaqueiros. To determine whether the Vaqueiros and non-Vaqueiros from the same region have different genetic backgrounds, this study analysed nine mtDNA polymorphisms that define the common European mitochondrial haplogroups in a cohort of Vaqueiros (n = 60) and non-Vaqueiros (n = 110). Haplogroup H was the most frequent in Vaqueiros (42%) and non-Vaqueiros (46%). A total of 37% Vaqueiros were H1, compared to 31% of the non-Vaqueiros. This study also genotyped the two groups for three polymorphisms at the NOS3. APOE and ACE genes, that have previously been linked to risk of cardiovascular diseases. Allele and genotype frequencies did not differ between Vaqueiros and non-Vaqueiros. In addition, none of these polymorphisms were related to risk of hypertension, diabetes or hypercholesterolaemia in the two groups. The data suggested that Vaqueiros share the main haplogroup distribution as their non-Vaqueiros neighbours and other Cantabrian populations. In addition, no effect of the mitochondrial, NOS3. APOE and ACE polymorphisms on cardiovascular risk factors was observed.

  4. Cardiovascular parasympathetic nervous system dysfunction in female rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, P V; Neelambikai, N; Mahesh, Arjun; Govindarajan, K

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic dysfunction has been reported in patients with (rheumatoid arthritis) RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) like connective tissue disorders and it may be due to the vasculitis of vasa nervorum and secondary amyloidosis. The pathogenesis may also have an immune component that affects autonomic functions. In the present study, three standard cardiovascular parasympathetic function tests were performed in 207 RA patients and in 106 healthy controls. 14.45% patients were presented with symptoms related to cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. Heart rate variation to deep breathing (DBD), standing (30:15 ratio), Valsalva ratio (VR) were found to be significantly reduced in RA patients and was weakly associated with female RA patients (r = 0.165, p = 0.018) and was not correlated to disease duration, RF positivity & severity of the disease. In conclusion, this study has confirmed the presence of significant subclinical cardiovascular parasympathetic nervous dysfunction in RA patients and its positive association with female gender. Hence, inclusion of cardiovascular autonomic function tests in the routine clinical examination may be helpful in the early detection of autonomic dysfunction in RA.

  5. Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be reversible or progressive. Anatomy of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system is the part of ... organs they connect with. Function of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system controls internal body processes ...

  6. Fish oil and olive oil supplements attenuate the adverse cardiovascular effects of concentrated ambient air pollution particles exposure in healthy middle-aged adult human volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to ambient levels of air pollution increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Advanced age is among the factors associated with susceptibility to the adverse effects of air pollution. Dietary fatty acid supplementation has been shown to decrease cardiovascular ris...

  7. Fish oil and olive oil supplements attenuate the adverse cardiovascular effects of concentrated ambient air pollution particles exposure in healthy middle-aged adult human volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to ambient levels of air pollution increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Advanced age is among the factors associated with susceptibility to the adverse effects of air pollution. Dietary fatty acid supplementation has been shown to decrease cardiovascular ris...

  8. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattsmier, George; Stetson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto- Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the

  9. Experimental Autonomous Vehicle Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole; Andersen, Nils Axel

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the requirements for and a prototype configuration of a software architecture for control of an experimental autonomous vehicle. The test bed nature of the system is emphasised in the choice of architecture making re-configurability, data logging and extendability simple...

  10. Autonomous Hexapod Spider Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Nisha; Pandey, Bishwajeet; Hussain, Dil muhammed Akbar

    2017-01-01

    Robotics world is changing very rapidly in today’s scenario. One of its unique applications is hexapod robots (walking leg robots). These types of robots can walk on uneven surfaces and can be used for spying purpose in various forms of industries. This paper represents the autonomous feature of ...

  11. Autonomous component carrier selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Pedersen, Klaus; Mogensen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    in local areas, basing our study case on LTE-Advanced. We present extensive network simulation results to demonstrate that a simple and robust interference management scheme, called autonomous component carrier selection allows each cell to select the most attractive frequency configuration; improving...

  12. Autonomous Forest Fire Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breejen, E. den; Breuers, M.; Cremer, F.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Roos, M.; Schutte, K.; Vries, J.S. de

    1998-01-01

    Forest fire detection is a very important issue in the pre-suppression process. Timely detection allows the suppression units to reach the fire in its initial stages and this will reduce the suppression costs considerably. The autonomous forest fire detection principle is based on temporal contrast

  13. Plant Watering Autonomous Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Nagaraja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Now days, due to busy routine life, people forget to water their plants. In this paper, we present a completely autonomous and a cost-effective system for watering indoor potted plants placed on an even surface. The system comprises of a mobile robot and a temperature-humidity sensing module. The system is fully adaptive to any environment and takes into account the watering needs of the plants using the temperature-humidity sensing module. The paper describes the hardware architecture of the fully automated watering system, which uses wireless communication to communicate between the mobile robot and the sensing module. This gardening robot is completely portable and is equipped with a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID module, a microcontroller, an on-board water reservoir and an attached water pump. It is capable of sensing the watering needs of the plants, locating them and finally watering them autonomously without any human intervention. Mobilization of the robot to the potted plant is achieved by using a predefined path. For identification, an RFID tag is attached to each potted plant. The paper also discusses the detailed implementation of the system supported with complete circuitry. Finally, the paper concludes with system performance including the analysis of the water carrying capacity and time requirements to water a set of plants.

  14. RESEARCH ON MOTIVATION MODEL BASED BEHAVIOUR SELECTION OF AUTONOMOUS VIRTUAL HUMAN%基于动机模型的自主性虚拟人行为选择研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐冰; 刘肖健

    2012-01-01

    Research on autonomous virtual human is a new field that integrates artificial life and computer animation together. But as a result, people' s psychological activity is a whole process, all of these parameters are interdependent and mutually influential, such as motivation, perception and so on, and current research is still local and limited. In this paper, a selection mechanism for autonomous behaviour of virtual human controlled by a simplified inhibition and fatigue model is proposed based on motivation model and use for reference on Maslow Theory. Experiments show that our method well solves the problem that how the virtual human makes arbitration and selection on behaviour among mutually inhibited behaviours in dynamic virtual environment with limited resources. Experiments also prove that this study can be applied to intelligent interaction and other fields.%自主性虚拟人的研究是人工生命和计算机动画交叉融合的新领域.但是由于人的心理活动是一个整体的过程,动机、感知等这些参数都是互有联系和影响的,目前的研究仍然只是局部和有限的.借鉴马斯洛理论,基于动机模型框架提出一种简化的抑制和疲劳模型控制的虚拟人自主行为选择机制,实验结果表明,该方法较好地解决了在资源有限的动态虚拟环境中,虚拟人如何在多个相互抑制的行为之间对行为进行仲裁和选择.经实验证明,该研究可以应用于智能交互领域.

  15. Haemodynamic responses to exercise, ATP infusion and thigh compression in humans: insight into the role of muscle mechanisms on cardiovascular function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Alonso, J.; Mortensen, S.P.; Jeppesen, Tina Dysgaard

    2008-01-01

    increased blood flow (DeltaLBF 0.5-0.7 l min(-1)) without altering (.)Q, MAP or (.)VO2. These findings suggest that the skeletal muscle pump is not obligatory for sustaining venous return, central venous pressure,stroke volume and (.)Q or maintaining muscle blood flow during one-legged exercise in humans......The muscle pump and muscle vasodilatory mechanism are thought to play important roles in increasing and maintaining muscle perfusion and cardiac output ((.)Q) during exercise, but their actual contributions remain uncertain. To evaluate the role of the skeletal muscle pump and vasodilatation...... on cardiovascular function during exercise, we determined leg and systemic haemodynamic responses in healthy men during (1) incremental one-legged knee-extensor exercise, (2) step-wise femoral artery ATP infusion at rest, (3) passive exercise (n=10), (4)femoral vein or artery ATP infusion (n=6), and (5) cyclic...

  16. Autonomous System Technologies for Resilient Airspace Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Vincent E.; Le Vie, Lisa R.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing autonomous systems within the aircraft cockpit begins with an effort to understand what autonomy is and developing the technology that encompasses it. Autonomy allows an agent, human or machine, to act independently within a circumscribed set of goals; delegating responsibility to the agent(s) to achieve overall system objective(s). Increasingly Autonomous Systems (IAS) are the highly sophisticated progression of current automated systems toward full autonomy. Working in concert with humans, these types of technologies are expected to improve the safety, reliability, costs, and operational efficiency of aviation. IAS implementation is imminent, which makes the development and the proper performance of such technologies, with respect to cockpit operation efficiency, the management of air traffic and data communication information, vital. A prototype IAS agent that attempts to optimize the identification and distribution of "relevant" air traffic data to be utilized by human crews during complex airspace operations has been developed.

  17. Ocular accommodation and cognitive demand: An additional indicator besides pupil size and cardiovascular measures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaschinski Wolfgang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to assess accommodation as a possible indicator of changes in the autonomic balance caused by altered cognitive demand. Accounting for accommodative responses from a human factors perspective may be motivated by the interest of designing virtual image displays or by establishing an autonomic indicator that allows for remote measurement at the human eye. Heart period, pulse transit time, and the pupillary response were considered as reference for possible closed-loop accommodative effects. Cognitive demand was varied by presenting monocularly numbers at a viewing distance of 5 D (20 cm which had to be read, added or multiplied; further, letters were presented in a "n-back" task. Results Cardiovascular parameters and pupil size indicated a change in autonomic balance, while error rates and reaction time confirmed the increased cognitive demand during task processing. An observed decrease in accommodation could not be attributed to the cognitive demand itself for two reasons: (1 the cognitive demand induced a shift in gaze direction which, for methodological reasons, accounted for a substantial part of the observed accommodative changes. (2 Remaining effects disappeared when the correctness of task processing was taken into account. Conclusion Although the expectation of accommodation as possible autonomic indicator of cognitive demand was not confirmed, the present results are informative for the field of applied psychophysiology noting that it seems not to be worthwhile to include closed-loop accommodation in future studies. From a human factors perspective, expected changes of accommodation due to cognitive demand are of minor importance for design specifications – of, for example, complex visual displays.

  18. The Link Between Stress Disorders and Autonomic Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasna eSabharwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease of muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Patients afflicted with muscular dystrophy exhibit autonomic dysfunction along with cognitive impairment, severe depression, sadness, and anxiety. Although the psychological aspects of cardiovascular disorders and stress disorders are well known, the physiological mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood, particularly in muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the goal of this perspective is to highlight the importance of autonomic dysfunction and psychological stress disorders in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy. This article will for the first time - (i outline autonomic mechanisms that are common to both psychological stress and cardiovascular disorders in muscular dystrophy; (ii propose therapies that would improve behavioral and autonomic functions in muscular dystrophy.

  19. Reducing indoor air pollution by air conditioning is associated with improvements in cardiovascular health among the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Liu, I-Jung; Chen, Hua-Wei; Chuang, Kai-Jen

    2013-10-01

    Indoor air pollution is associated with cardiovascular effects, however, little is known about the effects of improving indoor air quality on cardiovascular health. The aim of this study was to explore whether improving indoor air quality through air conditioning can improve cardiovascular health in human subjects. We recruited a panel of 300 healthy subjects from Taipei, aged 20 and over, to participate in six home visits each, to measure a variety of cardiovascular endpoints, including high sensitivity-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), fibrinogen in plasma and heart rate variability (HRV). Indoor particles and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured simultaneously at the participant's home during each visit. Three exposure conditions were investigated in this study: participants were requested to keep their windows open during the first two visits, close their windows during the next two visits, and close the windows and turn on their air conditioners during the last two visits. We used linear mixed-effects models to associate the cardiovascular endpoints with individual indoor air pollutants. The results showed that increases in hs-CRP, 8-OHdG and fibrinogen, and decreases in HRV indices were associated with increased levels of indoor particles and total VOCs in single-pollutant and two-pollutant models. The effects of indoor particles and total VOCs on cardiovascular endpoints were greatest during visits with the windows open. During visits with the air conditioners turned on, no significant changes in cardiovascular endpoints were observed. In conclusion, indoor air pollution is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, blood coagulation and autonomic dysfunction. Reductions in indoor air pollution and subsequent improvements in cardiovascular health can be achieved by closing windows and turning on air conditioners at home. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiac autonomic reactivity and salivary cortisol in men and women exposed to social stressors : relationship with individual ethological profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sgoifo, A; Braglia, F; Costoli, T; Musso, E; Meerlo, P; Ceresini, G; Troisi, A

    2003-01-01

    The degree of cardiovascular stress responsivity and its possible implications for the onset and progression of cardiovascular pathologies seem to be linked to the individual strategy of behavioral coping with stressors. This study was designed to investigate the relationship among cardiac autonomic

  1. Cardiac autonomic reactivity and salivary cortisol in men and women exposed to social stressors : relationship with individual ethological profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sgoifo, A; Braglia, F; Costoli, T; Musso, E; Meerlo, P; Ceresini, G; Troisi, A

    2003-01-01

    The degree of cardiovascular stress responsivity and its possible implications for the onset and progression of cardiovascular pathologies seem to be linked to the individual strategy of behavioral coping with stressors. This study was designed to investigate the relationship among cardiac autonomic

  2. Cough reflex sensitivity in adolescents with diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is one of the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus which can involve one or more organ systems. DAN without apparent symptoms is more often in childhood and adolescence. While heart rate variability (HRV) and Ewing's battery of cardiovascular tests are regarded as a gold standard for the diagnosis of DAN, the examination of cough reflex sensitivity (CRS) is another possibility. The aim of this study was to compare HRV and CRS in chi...

  3. Autonomic nervous system and risk factors for vascular disease. Effects of autonomic unbalance in schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scigliano, Giulio; Ronchetti, Gabriele; Girotti, Floriano

    2008-02-01

    Alterations of the cardiovascular system and of the glucose and lipid metabolism can represent important factors of vascular risk. The autonomic nervous system, through its two efferent branches, the parasympatheticcholinergic and the sympathetic-adrenergic, plays an important role in the control of the cardiovascular activity and of the glucose and lipid metabolism, and its impaired working can interfere with these functions. An increased sympathetic activity and an increased frequency of diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension and obesity have been reported in untreated schizophrenic patients, and a further worsening of these vascular risk factors has been signalled as a side effect of treatment with neuroleptic drugs. The opposite is observed in Parkinson's disease, where the reduced autonomic activity induced by the illness is associated with a decreased frequency of vascular risk factors, and their occurrence is further reduced by the treatment with dopaminergic drugs.

  4. Autonomous Infrastructure for Observatory Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, R.

    This is an era of rapid change from ancient human-mediated modes of astronomical practice to a vision of ever larger time domain surveys, ever bigger "big data", to increasing numbers of robotic telescopes and astronomical automation on every mountaintop. Over the past decades, facets of a new autonomous astronomical toolkit have been prototyped and deployed in support of numerous space missions. Remote and queue observing modes have gained significant market share on the ground. Archives and data-mining are becoming ubiquitous; astroinformatic techniques and virtual observatory standards and protocols are areas of active development. Astronomers and engineers, planetary and solar scientists, and researchers from communities as diverse as particle physics and exobiology are collaborating on a vast range of "multi-messenger" science. What then is missing?

  5. Carbon dioxide inhalation as a human experimental model of panic: the relationship between emotions and cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, Nicole K; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Goossens, Liesbet; De Cort, Klara; Griez, Eric J; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Steinbusch, Harry W M; van den Hove, Daniël L A; Schruers, Koen R J

    2013-10-01

    Inhaling carbon dioxide (CO2)-enriched air induces fear and panic symptoms resembling real-life panic attacks, the hallmark of panic disorder. The present study aimed to describe the emotional and cardiovascular effects evoked by inhaling CO2, taking shortcomings of previous studies into account. Healthy volunteers underwent a double inhalation of 0, 9, 17.5, and 35% CO2, according to a randomized, cross-over design. In addition to fear, discomfort, and panic symptom ratings, blood pressure and heart rate were continuously monitored. Results showed a dose-dependent increase in all self-reports. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure rose with increasing CO2 concentration, whereas heart rate results were less consistent. Diastolic blood pressure and heart rate variation correlated with fear and discomfort. Based on this relationship and the observation that the diastolic blood pressure most accurately mimicked the degree of self-reported emotions, it might serve as a putative biomarker to assess the CO2-reactivity in the future.

  6. Assessment of the cardiovascular and gastrointestinal autonomic complications of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Christina; Brock, Birgitte; Pedersen, Anne Grave

    2016-01-01

    The global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing; arguably as a consequence of changes in diet, lifestyle and the trend towards urbanization. Unsurprisingly, the incidence of both micro and macrovascular complications of diabetes mirrors this increasing prevalence. Amongst the complicatio...

  7. Autonomous robotic sweeper

    OpenAIRE

    Kržišnik, Domen

    2015-01-01

    There is already a wide range of personal/domestic robots on the market capable of performing various tasks. We haven't however been able to find any commercially available robots designed for effectively performing the task of backyard sweeping. This thesis presents the process and end result of planning, assembly and programming of an autonomous robot, capable of performing the above mentioned task. We first analyze robots with similar functions, including robotic vacuum cleaners and lawn m...

  8. Autonomous Undersea Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    less expensive sensor systems for a variety of applications, including measurement of physical characteristics of the ocean, threat detection, and...multiple autonomous environmental sensors within an acoustic modem-based infrastructure capable of communicating to and from the sensors and to and...networks, and telesonar with high speed platforms. This effort is concentrating on the development and demonstration of the two modem- based sensors . We

  9. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, M; Goadsby, P J

    2016-01-01

    The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headache disorders characterised by lateralized symptoms: prominent headache and ipsilateral cranial autonomic features, such as conjunctival injection, lacrimation and rhinorrhea. The TACs are: cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT)/short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic features (SUNA) and hemicrania continua (HC). Their diagnostic criteria are outlined in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition-beta (ICHD-IIIb). These conditions are distinguished by their attack duration and frequency, as well as response to treatment. HC is continuous and by definition responsive to indomethacin. The main differential when considering this headache is chronic migraine. Other TACs are remarkable for their short duration and must be distinguished from other short-lasting painful conditions, such as trigeminal neuralgia and primary stabbing headache. Cluster headache is characterised by exquisitely painful attacks that occur in discrete episodes lasting 15-180 min a few times a day. In comparison, PH occurs more frequently and is of shorter duration, and like HC is responsive to indomethacin. SUNCT/SUNA is the shortest duration and highest frequency TAC; attacks can occur over a hundred times every day.

  10. Urotensin II in cardiovascular regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser D Russell

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Fraser D RussellSchool of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health and Education, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular function is modulated by neuronal transmitters, circulating hormones, and factors that are released locally from tissues. Urotensin II (UII is an 11 amino acid peptide that stimulates its’ obligatory G protein coupled urotensin II receptors (UT to modulate cardiovascular function in humans and in other animal species, and has been implicated in both vasculoprotective and vasculopathic effects. For example, tissue and circulating concentrations of UII have been reported to increase in some studies involving patients with atherosclerosis, heart failure, hypertension, preeclampsia, diabetes, renal disease and liver disease, raising the possibility that the UT receptor system is involved in the development and/or progression of these conditions. Consistent with this hypothesis, administration of UT receptor antagonists to animal models of cardiovascular disease have revealed improvements in cardiovascular remodelling and hemodynamics. However, recent studies have questioned this contributory role of UII in disease, and have instead postulated a protective effect on the cardiovascular system. For example, high concentrations of circulating UII correlated with improved clinical outcomes in patients with renal disease or myocardial infarction. The purpose of this review is to consider the regulation of the cardiovascular system by UII, giving consideration to methodologies for measurement of plasma concentrations, sites of synthesis and triggers for release.Keywords: urotensin II, cardiovascular disease, heart failure, hypertension

  11. Impact of autonomic dysfunctions on the quality of life in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomic, Svetlana; Rajkovaca, Ines; Pekic, Vlasta; Salha, Tamer; Misevic, Sanja

    2017-03-01

    Autonomic dysfunctions are part of a spectrum of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of autonomic dysfunctions and their influence on the quality of life (QoL) in PD patients, adjusted for age, sex, disease duration and motor symptoms. Patients were evaluated for motor function (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, UPDRS part III), disease stage (Hoehn and Yahr scale, H&Y scale), autonomic dysfunction (Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease, Autonomic, SCOPA-AUT) and QoL (Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39, PDQ-39). Urinary, gastrointestinal and sexual autonomic dysfunctions were most frequently reported, while the most severe symptoms were reported for sexual and urinary systems. Age and motor symptoms did not correlate with autonomic dysfunction, while disease duration correlated with cardiovascular dysfunction. There were sex differences on the thermoregulation subscale. All types of autonomic dysfunction influenced QoL, mostly gastrointestinal and thermoregulatory dysfunctions, except for sexual one. Many aspects of QoL (activity of daily living, emotion, cognitive functions, communication and social support) except for stigma and mobility were affected by autonomic dysfunctions. Age, disease duration, sex and motor symptoms were not found to affect global QoL scores, but had detrimental effects on different PDQ-39 dimensions. Autonomic dysfunctions influence QoL in more aspects than motor symptoms, age, disease duration and sex. Patients tend to be more stigmatized with motor than non-motor symptoms.

  12. Unmanned air vehicle: autonomous takeoff and landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K. L.; Gitano-Briggs, Horizon Walker

    2010-03-01

    UAVs are increasing in popularity and sophistication due to the demonstrated performance which cannot be attained by manned aircraft1. These developments have been made possible by development of sensors, instrumentation, telemetry and controls during the last few decades. UAVs are now common in areas such as aerial observation and as communication relays3. Most UAVs, however, are still flown by a human pilot via remote control from a ground station. Even the existing autonomous UAVs often require a human pilot to handle the most difficult tasks of take off and landing2 (TOL). This is mainly because the navigation of the airplane requires observation, constant situational assessment and hours of experience from the pilot himself4. Therefore, an autonomous takeoff and landing system (TLS) for UAVs using a few practical design rules with various sensors, instrumentation, etc has been developed. This paper details the design and modeling of the UAV TLS. The model indicates that the UAV's TLS shows promising stability.

  13. The Potential of GMP-Compliant Platelet Lysate to Induce a Permissive State for Cardiovascular Transdifferentiation in Human Mediastinal Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Siciliano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs are considered eligible candidates for cardiovascular stem cell therapy applications due to their cardiac transdifferentiation potential and immunotolerance. Over the years, the in vitro culture of ADMSCs by platelet lysate (PL, a hemoderivate containing numerous growth factors and cytokines derived from platelet pools, has allowed achieving a safe and reproducible methodology to obtain high cell yield prior to clinical administration. Nevertheless, the biological properties of PL are still to be fully elucidated. In this brief report we show the potential ability of PL to induce a permissive state of cardiac-like transdifferentiation and to cause epigenetic modifications. RTPCR results indicate an upregulation of Cx43, SMA, c-kit, and Thy-1 confirmed by immunofluorescence staining, compared to standard cultures with foetal bovine serum. Moreover, PL-cultured ADMSCs exhibit a remarkable increase of both acetylated histones 3 and 4, with a patient-dependent time trend, and methylation at lysine 9 on histone 3 preceding the acetylation. Expression levels of p300 and SIRT-1, two major regulators of histone 3, are also upregulated after treatment with PL. In conclusion, PL could unravel novel biological properties beyond its routine employment in noncardiac applications, providing new insights into the plasticity of human ADMSCs.

  14. The Effect of Dietary Supplementation of Green Tea Catechins on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Markers in Humans: A Systematic Review of Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah O. Lau

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Green tea catechins (GTCs are secondary plant metabolites that have been associated with health benefits in human trials. As such, they have the potential to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD risk; however, results are not consistent. This systematic review of the published data assessed the putative effect of GTCs supplementation on anthropometric, blood pressure, and biochemical measures associated with CVD risk. It was conducted in accordance with the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA guidelines exploring four major electronic databases (MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Scopus. Studies were included if they were published in peer-reviewed journals in English from 1990 until October 2015, and were human double-blind randomized and placebo-controlled trials (RCTs. From 122,428 articles initially identified, after two levels of screening, seven studies met the inclusion criteria. The review revealed consistent and significant (p ≤ 0.05 reductions in body mass index (BMI, blood pressure and plasma lipids; however, this effect would have been less if between-group effects had been considered. The current evidence base also has considerable methodological limitations due to suboptimal statistical methods used in data analyses. Future research efforts must aim to rectify this paucity of evidence with well-designed and well-reported prospective studies.

  15. The Potential of GMP-Compliant Platelet Lysate to Induce a Permissive State for Cardiovascular Transdifferentiation in Human Mediastinal Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Camilla; Chimenti, Isotta; Bordin, Antonella; Ponti, Donatella; Iudicone, Paola; Peruzzi, Mariangela; Rendina, Erino Angelo; Calogero, Antonella; Pierelli, Luca; Ibrahim, Mohsen; De Falco, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) are considered eligible candidates for cardiovascular stem cell therapy applications due to their cardiac transdifferentiation potential and immunotolerance. Over the years, the in vitro culture of ADMSCs by platelet lysate (PL), a hemoderivate containing numerous growth factors and cytokines derived from platelet pools, has allowed achieving a safe and reproducible methodology to obtain high cell yield prior to clinical administration. Nevertheless, the biological properties of PL are still to be fully elucidated. In this brief report we show the potential ability of PL to induce a permissive state of cardiac-like transdifferentiation and to cause epigenetic modifications. RTPCR results indicate an upregulation of Cx43, SMA, c-kit, and Thy-1 confirmed by immunofluorescence staining, compared to standard cultures with foetal bovine serum. Moreover, PL-cultured ADMSCs exhibit a remarkable increase of both acetylated histones 3 and 4, with a patient-dependent time trend, and methylation at lysine 9 on histone 3 preceding the acetylation. Expression levels of p300 and SIRT-1, two major regulators of histone 3, are also upregulated after treatment with PL. In conclusion, PL could unravel novel biological properties beyond its routine employment in noncardiac applications, providing new insights into the plasticity of human ADMSCs. PMID:26495284

  16. Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and other autonomic disorders in antiphospholipid (Hughes) syndrome (APS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, J R; Blitshteyn, S; Shoenfeld, Y; Hughes, G R V

    2014-06-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune hypercoagulable disorder that has been shown to cause a large number of cardiac and neurological manifestations. Two recent studies have demonstrated abnormalities in cardiovascular autonomic function testing in APS patients without other cardiovascular or autoimmune disease. However, an association between autonomic disorders such as postural tachycardia syndrome and APS has not previously been described. Data were obtained by retrospective chart review. We identified 15 patients who have been diagnosed with APS and an autonomic disorder. The median age of the patients at the time of data analysis was 39 years. The autonomic disorders seen in these patients included postural tachycardia syndrome, neurocardiogenic syncope and orthostatic hypotension. The majority of patients (14/15) were female and the majority (14/15) had non-thrombotic neurological manifestations of APS, most commonly migraine, memory loss and balance disorder. Many also had livedo reticularis (11/15) and Raynaud's phenomenon (nine of 15). In some patients, the autonomic manifestations improved with anticoagulation and/or anti-platelet therapy; in others they did not. Two patients with postural tachycardia syndrome who failed to improve with the usual treatment of APS have been treated with intravenous immunoglobulin with significant improvement in their autonomic symptoms. We believe that autonomic disorders in APS may represent an important clinical association with significant implications for treatment. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Autonomic and sensory nerve dysfunction in primary biliary cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katalin Keresztes; Ildikó Istenes; Aniko Folhoffer; Peter L Lakatos; Andrea Horvath; Timea Csak; Peter Varga; Peter Kempler; Ferenc Szalay

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Cardiovascular autonomic and peripheral sensory neuropathy is a known complication of chronic alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver diseases. We aimed to assess the prevalence and risk factors for peripheral sensory nerve and autonomic dysfunction using sensitive methods in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC).METHODS: Twenty-four AMA M2 positive female patients with clinical, biochemical and histological evidence of PBC and 20 age matched healthy female subjects were studied.Five standard cardiovascular reflex tests and 24-h heart rate variability (HRV) analysis were performed to define autonomic function. Peripheral sensory nerve function on median and peroneal nerves was characterized by current perception threshold (CPT), measured by a neuroselective diagnostic stimulator (Neurotron, Baltimore, MD).RESULTS: Fourteen of 24 patients (58%) had at least one abnormal cardiovascular reflex test and thirteen (54%)had peripheral sensory neuropathy. Lower heart rate response to deep breathing (P = 0.001), standing (P = 0.03)and Valsalva manoeuvre (P = 0.01), and more profound decrease of blood pressure after standing (P = 0.03) was found in PBC patients than in controls. As a novel finding we proved that both time domain and frequency domain parameters of 24-h HRV were significantly reduced in PBC patients compared to controls. Each patient had at least one abnormal parameter of HRV. Lower CPT values indicated hyperaesthesia as a characteristic feature at peroneal nerve testing at three frequencies (2000 Hz: P = 0.005;250 Hz: P = 0.002; 5 Hz: P = 0.004) in PBC compared to controls. Correlation of autonomic dysfunction with the severity and duration of the disease was observed. Lower total power of HRV correlated with lower CPT values at median nerve testing at 250 Hz (P = 0.0001) and at 5 Hz (P = 0.002), as well as with those at peroneal nerve testing at 2000 Hz (P = 0.01).CONCLUSION: Autonomic and sensory nerve dysfunctions are frequent in PBC. Twenty

  18. Formal Assurance for Cognitive Architecture Based Autonomous Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha; Eskridge, Thomas; Neogi, Natasha; Carvalho, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Autonomous systems are designed and deployed in different modeling paradigms. These environments focus on specific concepts in designing the system. We focus our effort in the use of cognitive architectures to design autonomous agents to collaborate with humans to accomplish tasks in a mission. Our research focuses on introducing formal assurance methods to verify the behavior of agents designed in Soar, by translating the agent to the formal verification environment Uppaal.

  19. Autonomic nerve development contributes to prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, John; McVary, Kevin

    2013-11-01

    In a significant translational study, Magnon et al. investigated the role that the autonomic nervous system plays in the development and spread of prostate cancer in both mice and human models. The study shows different roles for both branches of the autonomic nervous system, with the sympathetic system promoting early stages of tumorigenesis, and the parasympathetic system promoting cancer dissemination. This information could lead to important new foundations for treatment, therapies and management of prostate cancer.

  20. Angiographic Features and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients With First-Time Acute Coronary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Mathiasen, Anders B; Worck, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    A matched cohort study was conducted comparing patients with first-time acute coronary syndromes infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to non-HIV-infected patients with and without diabetes matched for smoking, gender, and type of acute coronary syndrome who underwent first-time coronary...

  1. Air pollution and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, J Braz

    2009-06-01

    Air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent experimental and epidemiologic studies show that particulate matter (PM) air pollution with PM10 or inhalable (thoracic) particles (mean aerodynamic diameter particles (aerodynamic diameter biological mechanisms responsible for adverse cardiovascular outcomes associated with PM have been described, including the release of pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory mediators from the lungs into the circulation, autonomic nervous system imbalance, and the direct actions on the heart and vasculature of ultrafine particles translocated into the systemic circulation. The induction of oxidative stress by these particles may be central to all of these putative pathways that trigger coagulation and thrombosis, increased heart rate and reduced heart rate variability, endothelial dysfunction, arterial vasoconstriction, apoptosis, and hypertension. In chronic exposures these alterations favor the development and progression of atherosclerosis and possibly of hypertension in the long term, and in the short term acute exposures contribute to plaque instability, affect various traditional risk factors and trigger acute cardiovascular events (myocardial ischemia and infarction, stroke, heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden death), particularly in high-risk subjects. There are currently also significant concerns with the risks of engineered nanoparticles.

  2. Targeting the autonomic nervous system: measuring autonomic function and novel devices for heart failure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh C; Rosen, Stuart D; Lindsay, Alistair; Hayward, Carl; Lyon, Alexander R; di Mario, Carlo

    2013-12-10

    Neurohumoral activation, in which enhanced activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is a key component, plays a pivotal role in heart failure. The neurohumoral system affects several organs and currently our knowledge of the molecular and systemic pathways involved in the neurohumoral activation is incomplete. All the methods of assessing the degree of activation of the autonomic system have limitations and they are not interchangeable. The methods considered include noradrenaline spillover, microneurography, radiotracer imaging and analysis of heart rate and blood pressure (heart rate variability, baroreceptor sensitivity, heart rate turbulence). Despite the difficulties, medications that affect the ANS have been shown to improve mortality in heart failure and the mechanism is related to attenuation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system. However, limitations of compliance with medication, side effects and inadequate SNS attenuation are issues of concern with the pharmacological approach. The newer device based therapies for sympathetic modulation are showing encouraging results. As they directly influence the autonomic nervous system, more mechanistic information can be gleaned if appropriate investigations are performed at the time of the outcome trials. However, clinicians should be reminded that the ANS is an evolutionary survival mechanism and therefore there is a need to proceed with caution when trying to completely attenuate its effects. So our enthusiasm for the application of these devices in heart failure should be controlled, especially as none of the devices have trial data powered to assess effects on mortality or cardiovascular events. © 2013.

  3. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, W W; Angle, C R; Willcockson, N K; Padula, M A; Korn, T

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a "frog shop" for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6-10 years before and 1.2-3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m3 in 29% and 0.2 mg/m3 in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR' interval) and the rates of change at low frequency (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency (0.15-0.40 Hz). MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used. The five frog shop workers had abnormal sympathovagal balance with decreased high frequency variability (increased ln LF/ln HF). Seven of the eight workers had symptoms of autonomic dysfunction and significantly decreased heart rate variability (rMSSD) but these did not distinguish the relative exposure. Mood or affect was disturbed in all with associated changes in short-term memory and attention in four of the subjects. There were no significant correlations with serum or urine manganese. Power spectrum analysis of 24-h ambulatory ECG indicating a decrease in parasympathetic high frequency activation of heart rate variability may provide a sensitive index of central autonomic dysfunction reflecting increased exposure to manganese, although the contribution of exposures to solvents and other metals cannot be excluded. Neurotoxicity due to the gouging

  4. Demonstration of a semi-autonomous hybrid brain-machine interface using human intracranial EEG, eye tracking, and computer vision to control a robotic upper limb prosthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, David P; Hotson, Guy; Katyal, Kapil D; Wester, Brock A; Fifer, Matthew S; McGee, Timothy G; Harris, Andrew; Johannes, Matthew S; Vogelstein, R Jacob; Ravitz, Alan D; Anderson, William S; Thakor, Nitish V; Crone, Nathan E

    2014-07-01

    To increase the ability of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) to control advanced prostheses such as the modular prosthetic limb (MPL), we are developing a novel system: the Hybrid Augmented Reality Multimodal Operation Neural Integration Environment (HARMONIE). This system utilizes hybrid input, supervisory control, and intelligent robotics to allow users to identify an object (via eye tracking and computer vision) and initiate (via brain-control) a semi-autonomous reach-grasp-and-drop of the object by the MPL. Sequential iterations of HARMONIE were tested in two pilot subjects implanted with electrocorticographic (ECoG) and depth electrodes within motor areas. The subjects performed the complex task in 71.4% (20/28) and 67.7% (21/31) of trials after minimal training. Balanced accuracy for detecting movements was 91.1% and 92.9%, significantly greater than chance accuracies (p system improvements implemented for the second subject. Our hybrid-BMI design prevented all but one baseline false positive from initiating the system. The novel approach demonstrated in this proof-of-principle study, using hybrid input, supervisory control, and intelligent robotics, addresses limitations of current BMIs.

  5. The human autonomous karyotype and the origins of prenatal testing: children, pregnant women and early Down's syndrome cytogenetics, Madrid 1962-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesmases, María Jesús

    2014-09-01

    Through their ability to reveal and record abnormal chromosomes, whether inherited or accidentally altered, chromosomal studies, known as karyotyping, became the basis upon which medical genetics was constructed. The techniques involved became the visual evidence that confirmed a medical examination and were configured as a material culture for redefining health and disease, or the normal and the abnormal, in cytological terms. I will show that the study of foetal cells obtained by amniocentesis led to the stabilisation of karyotyping in its own right, while also keeping pregnant women under the vigilant medical eye. In the absence of any other examination, prenatal diagnosis by foetal karyotyping became autonomous from the foetal body. Although medical cytogenetics was practiced on an individual basis, data collected about patients over time contributed to the construction of population figures regarding birth defects. I study this complex trajectory by focussing on a Unit for Cytogenetics created in 1962 at the Clínica de la Concepción in Madrid. I incorporate the work and training of the clinicians who created the unit, and worked there as well as at other units in the large new hospitals of the national health care system built in Madrid during the mid-1960s and early 1970s.

  6. Effects of automation and task load on task switching during human supervision of multiple semi-autonomous robots in a dynamic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, P N; Parasuraman, R

    2010-08-01

    The present study assessed the impact of task load and level of automation (LOA) on task switching in participants supervising a team of four or eight semi-autonomous robots in a simulated 'capture the flag' game. Participants were faster to perform the same task than when they chose to switch between different task actions. They also took longer to switch between different tasks when supervising the robots at a high compared to a low LOA. Task load, as manipulated by the number of robots to be supervised, did not influence switch costs. The results suggest that the design of future unmanned vehicle (UV) systems should take into account not simply how many UVs an operator can supervise, but also the impact of LOA and task operations on task switching during supervision of multiple UVs. The findings of this study are relevant for the ergonomics practice of UV systems. This research extends the cognitive theory of task switching to inform the design of UV systems and results show that switching between UVs is an important factor to consider.

  7. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    , which includes the cardiac centre and controls autonomic functions, and therefore autonomic dysfunction may be experienced early in the disease course. Sleep disturbances are also common non-motor complications of PD, and therefore PD patients undergo polysomnography at the Danish Center for Sleep...... Medicine to assess the sleep disturbances. The aim of this PhD dissertation was to: 1) Develop a method to investigate autonomic changes during sleep in neurodegenerative diseases, and apply this method on PD, iRBD and narcolepsy patients to evaluate the autonomic function in these diseases. 2) Validate...... the method by applying standardized methods to measure the autonomic function based on heart rate variability (HRV) measures. 3) Based on the results, assess the validity of autonomic dysfunction as an early marker of a neurodegenerative disease. 4) Evaluate the influence of hypocretin loss in narcolepsy...

  8. Cardiovascular physiology and diseases of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariaut, Romain

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews what is known about the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular diseases in the pet rabbit. Current knowledge is based on anecdotal reports, derived from research data using the rabbit as an animal model of human cardiovascular diseases, but most importantly canine and feline cardiology. It is likely that, as cardiovascular diseases are more often recognized, more specific information will soon become available for the treatment of the pet rabbit with cardiac disease.

  9. Preventive Effects of Catechins on Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qiang Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Catechins are polyphenolic phytochemicals with many important physiological activities that play a multifaceted health care function in the human body, especially in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. In this paper, various experimental and clinical studies have revealed the role of catechins in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders, and we review the preventive effects of catechins on cardiovascular disease from the following aspects: Regulating lipid metabolism, regulating blood lipid metabolism, vascular endothelial protection, and reducing blood pressure.

  10. Radar based autonomous sensor module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Most surveillance systems combine camera sensors with other detection sensors that trigger an alert to a human operator when an object is detected. The detection sensors typically require careful installation and configuration for each application and there is a significant burden on the operator to react to each alert by viewing camera video feeds. A demonstration system known as Sensing for Asset Protection with Integrated Electronic Networked Technology (SAPIENT) has been developed to address these issues using Autonomous Sensor Modules (ASM) and a central High Level Decision Making Module (HLDMM) that can fuse the detections from multiple sensors. This paper describes the 24 GHz radar based ASM, which provides an all-weather, low power and license exempt solution to the problem of wide area surveillance. The radar module autonomously configures itself in response to tasks provided by the HLDMM, steering the transmit beam and setting range resolution and power levels for optimum performance. The results show the detection and classification performance for pedestrians and vehicles in an area of interest, which can be modified by the HLDMM without physical adjustment. The module uses range-Doppler processing for reliable detection of moving objects and combines Radar Cross Section and micro-Doppler characteristics for object classification. Objects are classified as pedestrian or vehicle, with vehicle sub classes based on size. Detections are reported only if the object is detected in a task coverage area and it is classified as an object of interest. The system was shown in a perimeter protection scenario using multiple radar ASMs, laser scanners, thermal cameras and visible band cameras. This combination of sensors enabled the HLDMM to generate reliable alerts with improved discrimination of objects and behaviours of interest.

  11. Angiotensin peptides and central autonomic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz, Debra I; Arnold, Amy C; Nautiyal, Manisha; Isa, Katsunori; Shaltout, Hossam A; Tallant, E Ann

    2011-04-01

    Aging, hypertension, and fetal-programmed cardiovascular disease are associated with a functional deficiency of angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) in the brain dorsomedial medulla. The resulting unrestrained activity of Ang II in brainstem regions negatively impacts resting mean arterial pressure, sympathovagal balance, and baroreflex sensitivity for control of heart rate. The differential effects of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) may be related to the cellular sources of these peptides as well as different precursor pathways. Long-term alterations of the brain renin-angiotensin system may influence signaling pathways including phosphoinositol-3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase and their downstream mediators, and as a consequence may influence metabolic function. Differential regulation of signaling pathwa