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Sample records for human auditory brainstem

  1. Mode-locking neurodynamics predict human auditory brainstem responses to musical intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerud, Karl D; Almonte, Felix V; Kim, Ji Chul; Large, Edward W

    2014-02-01

    The auditory nervous system is highly nonlinear. Some nonlinear responses arise through active processes in the cochlea, while others may arise in neural populations of the cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and higher auditory areas. In humans, auditory brainstem recordings reveal nonlinear population responses to combinations of pure tones, and to musical intervals composed of complex tones. Yet the biophysical origin of central auditory nonlinearities, their signal processing properties, and their relationship to auditory perception remain largely unknown. Both stimulus components and nonlinear resonances are well represented in auditory brainstem nuclei due to neural phase-locking. Recently mode-locking, a generalization of phase-locking that implies an intrinsically nonlinear processing of sound, has been observed in mammalian auditory brainstem nuclei. Here we show that a canonical model of mode-locked neural oscillation predicts the complex nonlinear population responses to musical intervals that have been observed in the human brainstem. The model makes predictions about auditory signal processing and perception that are different from traditional delay-based models, and may provide insight into the nature of auditory population responses. We anticipate that the application of dynamical systems analysis will provide the starting point for generic models of auditory population dynamics, and lead to a deeper understanding of nonlinear auditory signal processing possibly arising in excitatory-inhibitory networks of the central auditory nervous system. This approach has the potential to link neural dynamics with the perception of pitch, music, and speech, and lead to dynamical models of auditory system development.

  2. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Schönwiesner, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  3. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lehmann

    Full Text Available Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  4. Rapid Increase in Neural Conduction Time in the Adult Human Auditory Brainstem Following Sudden Unilateral Deafness.

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    Maslin, M R D; Lloyd, S K; Rutherford, S; Freeman, S; King, A; Moore, D R; Munro, K J

    2015-10-01

    Individuals with sudden unilateral deafness offer a unique opportunity to study plasticity of the binaural auditory system in adult humans. Stimulation of the intact ear results in increased activity in the auditory cortex. However, there are no reports of changes at sub-cortical levels in humans. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate changes in sub-cortical activity immediately before and after the onset of surgically induced unilateral deafness in adult humans. Click-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to stimulation of the healthy ear were recorded from ten adults during the course of translabyrinthine surgery for the removal of a unilateral acoustic neuroma. This surgical technique always results in abrupt deafferentation of the affected ear. The results revealed a rapid (within minutes) reduction in latency of wave V (mean pre = 6.55 ms; mean post = 6.15 ms; p < 0.001). A latency reduction was also observed for wave III (mean pre = 4.40 ms; mean post = 4.13 ms; p < 0.001). These reductions in response latency are consistent with functional changes including disinhibition or/and more rapid intra-cellular signalling affecting binaurally sensitive neurons in the central auditory system. The results are highly relevant for improved understanding of putative physiological mechanisms underlying perceptual disorders such as tinnitus and hyperacusis.

  5. Rate and adaptation effects on the auditory evoked brainstem response in human newborns and adults.

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    Lasky, R E

    1997-09-01

    Auditory evoked brainstem response (ABR) latencies increased and amplitudes decreased with increasing stimulus repetition rate for human newborns and adults. The wave V latency increases were larger for newborns than adults. The wave V amplitude decreases were smaller for newborns than adults. These differences could not be explained by developmental differences in frequency responsivity. The transition from the unadapted to the fully adapted response was less rapid in newborns than adults at short (= 10 ms) inter stimulus intervals (ISIs). At longer ISIs (= 20 ms) there were no developmental differences in the transition to the fully adapted response. The newborn transition occurred in a two stage process. The rapid initial stage observed in adults and newborns was complete by about 40 ms. A second slower stage was observed only in newborns although it has been observed in adults in other studies (Weatherby and Hecox, 1982; Lightfoot, 1991; Lasky et al., 1996). These effects were replicated at different stimulus intensities. After the termination of stimulation the return to the wave V unadapted response took nearly 500 ms in newborns. Neither the newborn nor the adult data can be explained by forward masking of one click on the next click. These results indicate human developmental differences in adaptation to repetitive auditory stimulation at the level of the brainstem.

  6. Short GSM mobile phone exposure does not alter human auditory brainstem response

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    Thuróczy György

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are about 1.6 billion GSM cellular phones in use throughout the world today. Numerous papers have reported various biological effects in humans exposed to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones. The aim of the present study was to advance our understanding of potential adverse effects of the GSM mobile phones on the human hearing system. Methods Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR was recorded with three non-polarizing Ag-AgCl scalp electrodes in thirty young and healthy volunteers (age 18–26 years with normal hearing. ABR data were collected before, and immediately after a 10 minute exposure to 900 MHz pulsed electromagnetic field (EMF emitted by a commercial Nokia 6310 mobile phone. Fifteen subjects were exposed to genuine EMF and fifteen to sham EMF in a double blind and counterbalanced order. Possible effects of irradiation was analyzed by comparing the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after genuine/sham EMF exposure. Results Paired sample t-test was conducted for statistical analysis. Results revealed no significant differences in the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after 10 minutes of genuine/sham EMF exposure. Conclusion The present results suggest that, in our experimental conditions, a single 10 minute exposure of 900 MHz EMF emitted by a commercial mobile phone does not produce measurable immediate effects in the latency of auditory brainstem waves I, III and V.

  7. The auditory brainstem is a barometer of rapid auditory learning.

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    Skoe, E; Krizman, J; Spitzer, E; Kraus, N

    2013-07-23

    To capture patterns in the environment, neurons in the auditory brainstem rapidly alter their firing based on the statistical properties of the soundscape. How this neural sensitivity relates to behavior is unclear. We tackled this question by combining neural and behavioral measures of statistical learning, a general-purpose learning mechanism governing many complex behaviors including language acquisition. We recorded complex auditory brainstem responses (cABRs) while human adults implicitly learned to segment patterns embedded in an uninterrupted sound sequence based on their statistical characteristics. The brainstem's sensitivity to statistical structure was measured as the change in the cABR between a patterned and a pseudo-randomized sequence composed from the same set of sounds but differing in their sound-to-sound probabilities. Using this methodology, we provide the first demonstration that behavioral-indices of rapid learning relate to individual differences in brainstem physiology. We found that neural sensitivity to statistical structure manifested along a continuum, from adaptation to enhancement, where cABR enhancement (patterned>pseudo-random) tracked with greater rapid statistical learning than adaptation. Short- and long-term auditory experiences (days to years) are known to promote brainstem plasticity and here we provide a conceptual advance by showing that the brainstem is also integral to rapid learning occurring over minutes.

  8. DEVELOPING ‘STANDARD NOVEL ‘VAD’ TECHNIQUE’ AND ‘NOISE FREE SIGNALS’ FOR SPEECH AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSES FOR HUMAN SUBJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ranganadh Narayanam*

    2016-01-01

    In this research as a first step we have concentrated on collecting non-intra cortical EEG data of Brainstem Speech Evoked Potentials from human subjects in an Audiology Lab in University of Ottawa. The problems we have considered are the most advanced and most essential problems of interest in Auditory Neural Signal Processing area in the world: The first problem is the Voice Activity Detection (VAD) in Speech Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABR); The second problem is to identify the best De-...

  9. Neurodynamics, tonality, and the auditory brainstem response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Edward W; Almonte, Felix V

    2012-04-01

    Tonal relationships are foundational in music, providing the basis upon which musical structures, such as melodies, are constructed and perceived. A recent dynamic theory of musical tonality predicts that networks of auditory neurons resonate nonlinearly to musical stimuli. Nonlinear resonance leads to stability and attraction relationships among neural frequencies, and these neural dynamics give rise to the perception of relationships among tones that we collectively refer to as tonal cognition. Because this model describes the dynamics of neural populations, it makes specific predictions about human auditory neurophysiology. Here, we show how predictions about the auditory brainstem response (ABR) are derived from the model. To illustrate, we derive a prediction about population responses to musical intervals that has been observed in the human brainstem. Our modeled ABR shows qualitative agreement with important features of the human ABR. This provides a source of evidence that fundamental principles of auditory neurodynamics might underlie the perception of tonal relationships, and forces reevaluation of the role of learning and enculturation in tonal cognition.

  10. Context-Dependent Encoding in the Human Auditory Brainstem Relates to Hearing Speech in Noise: Implications for Developmental Dyslexia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Hornickel, Jane; Skoe, Erika; Nicol, Trent; Kraus, Nina

    2009-01-01

    We examined context-dependent encoding of speech in children with and without developmental dyslexia by measuring auditory brainstem responses to a speech syllable presented in a repetitive or variable context...

  11. Prediction of Human's Ability in Sound Localization Based on the Statistical Properties of Spike Trains along the Brainstem Auditory Pathway

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    Ram Krips

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The minimum audible angle test which is commonly used for evaluating human localization ability depends on interaural time delay, interaural level differences, and spectral information about the acoustic stimulus. These physical properties are estimated at different stages along the brainstem auditory pathway. The interaural time delay is ambiguous at certain frequencies, thus confusion arises as to the source of these frequencies. It is assumed that in a typical minimum audible angle experiment, the brain acts as an unbiased optimal estimator and thus the human performance can be obtained by deriving optimal lower bounds. Two types of lower bounds are tested: the Cramer-Rao and the Barankin. The Cramer-Rao bound only takes into account the approximation of the true direction of the stimulus; the Barankin bound considers other possible directions that arise from the ambiguous phase information. These lower bounds are derived at the output of the auditory nerve and of the superior olivary complex where binaural cues are estimated. An agreement between human experimental data was obtained only when the superior olivary complex was considered and the Barankin lower bound was used. This result suggests that sound localization is estimated by the auditory nuclei using ambiguous binaural information.

  12. Brainstem auditory evoked response: application in neurology

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    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available The tecnique that we use for eliciting brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs is described. BAERs are a non-invasive and reliable clinical test when carefully performed. This test is indicated in the evaluation of disorders which may potentially involve the brainstem such as coma, multiple sclerosis posterior fossa tumors and others. Unsuspected lesions with normal radiologic studies (including CT-scan can be revealed by the BAER.

  13. Air pollution is associated with brainstem auditory nuclei pathology and delayed brainstem auditory evoked potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; D’Angiulli, Amedeo; Kulesza, Randy J.; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Osnaya, Norma; Romero, Lina; Keefe, Sheyla; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane M.; Avila-Ramirez, Jose; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; González-González, Luis Oscar

    2011-01-01

    We assessed brainstem inflammation in children exposed to air pollutants by comparing brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) and blood inflammatory markers in children age 96.3± 8.5 months from highly polluted (n=34) versus a low polluted city (n=17). The brainstems of nine children with accidental deaths were also examined. Children from the highly polluted environment had significant delays in wave III (t(50)=17.038; p

  14. Effects of Caffeine on Auditory Brainstem Response

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    Saleheh Soleimanian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Blocking of the adenosine receptor in central nervous system by caffeine can lead to increasing the level of neurotransmitters like glutamate. As the adenosine receptors are present in almost all brain areas like central auditory pathway, it seems caffeine can change conduction in this way. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on latency and amplitude of auditory brainstem response(ABR.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 43 normal 18-25 years old male students were participated. The subjects consumed 0, 2 and 3 mg/kg BW caffeine in three different sessions. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before and 30 minute after caffeine consumption. The results were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxone test to assess the effects of caffeine on auditory brainstem response.Results: Compared to control group the latencies of waves III,V and I-V interpeak interval of the cases decreased significantly after 2 and 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption. Wave I latency significantly decreased after 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption(p<0.01. Conclusion: Increasing of the glutamate level resulted from the adenosine receptor blocking brings about changes in conduction in the central auditory pathway.

  15. Auditory processing in the brainstem and audiovisual integration in humans studied with fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slabu, Lavinia Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a powerful technique because of the high spatial resolution and the noninvasiveness. The applications of the fMRI to the auditory pathway remain a challenge due to the intense acoustic scanner noise of approximately 110 dB SPL. The auditory system cons

  16. Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Stuttering

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    Ali Akbar Tahaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory processing deficits have been hypothesized as an underlying mechanism for stuttering. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal responses in subjects with persistent developmental stuttering (PDS at the higher level of the central auditory system using speech stimuli. Recently, the potential usefulness of speech evoked auditory brainstem responses in central auditory processing disorders has been emphasized. The current study used the speech evoked ABR to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with PDS have specific auditory perceptual dysfunction. Objectives. To determine whether brainstem responses to speech stimuli differ between PDS subjects and normal fluent speakers. Methods. Twenty-five subjects with PDS participated in this study. The speech-ABRs were elicited by the 5-formant synthesized syllable/da/, with duration of 40 ms. Results. There were significant group differences for the onset and offset transient peaks. Subjects with PDS had longer latencies for the onset and offset peaks relative to the control group. Conclusions. Subjects with PDS showed a deficient neural timing in the early stages of the auditory pathway consistent with temporal processing deficits and their abnormal timing may underlie to their disfluency.

  17. Modeling human auditory evoked brainstem responses based on nonlinear cochlear processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, James; Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    (ABR) to transient sounds and frequency following responses (FFR) to tones. The model includes important cochlear processing stages (Zilany and Bruce, 2006) such as basilar-membrane (BM) tuning and compression, inner hair-cell (IHC) transduction, and IHC auditory-nerve (AN) synapse adaptation...

  18. LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE SHAPES PROCESSING OF PITCH RELEVANT INFORMATION IN THE HUMAN BRAINSTEM AND AUDITORY CORTEX: ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE.

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    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T

    2014-12-01

    Pitch is a robust perceptual attribute that plays an important role in speech, language, and music. As such, it provides an analytic window to evaluate how neural activity relevant to pitch undergo transformation from early sensory to later cognitive stages of processing in a well coordinated hierarchical network that is subject to experience-dependent plasticity. We review recent evidence of language experience-dependent effects in pitch processing based on comparisons of native vs. nonnative speakers of a tonal language from electrophysiological recordings in the auditory brainstem and auditory cortex. We present evidence that shows enhanced representation of linguistically-relevant pitch dimensions or features at both the brainstem and cortical levels with a stimulus-dependent preferential activation of the right hemisphere in native speakers of a tone language. We argue that neural representation of pitch-relevant information in the brainstem and early sensory level processing in the auditory cortex is shaped by the perceptual salience of domain-specific features. While both stages of processing are shaped by language experience, neural representations are transformed and fundamentally different at each biological level of abstraction. The representation of pitch relevant information in the brainstem is more fine-grained spectrotemporally as it reflects sustained neural phase-locking to pitch relevant periodicities contained in the stimulus. In contrast, the cortical pitch relevant neural activity reflects primarily a series of transient temporal neural events synchronized to certain temporal attributes of the pitch contour. We argue that experience-dependent enhancement of pitch representation for Chinese listeners most likely reflects an interaction between higher-level cognitive processes and early sensory-level processing to improve representations of behaviorally-relevant features that contribute optimally to perception. It is our view that long

  19. State-dependent variations in brainstem auditory evoked responses in human subjects.

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    Sersen, E A; Majkowski, J; Clausen, J; Heaney, G M

    1984-12-01

    BAERs from 16 subjects during 3 sessions varied in the latency or amplitude of some components depending upon level of arousal as indicated by EEG patterns. There was a general tendency for activation to produce the fastest responses with the largest amplitudes and for drowsiness to produce the slowest responses with the smallest amplitudes. The latency of P2 was significantly prolonged during drowsiness, relative to those during relaxation or activation. For right-ear stimulation, P5 latency was longest during drowsiness, and shortest during activation while for left-ear stimulation the shortest latency occurred during relaxation. The amplitudes of Wave II and Wave VII were significantly smaller during drowsiness than during activation. Although the differences were below the level of clinical significance, the data indicate a modification in the characteristics of brainstem transmission as a function of concurrent activity in other brain areas.

  20. Hearing Restoration with Auditory Brainstem Implant

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    NAKATOMI, Hirofumi; MIYAWAKI, Satoru; KIN, Taichi; SAITO, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    Auditory brainstem implant (ABI) technology attempts to restore hearing in deaf patients caused by bilateral cochlear nerve injury through the direct stimulation of the brainstem, but many aspects of the related mechanisms remain unknown. The unresolved issues can be grouped into three topics: which patients are the best candidates; which type of electrode should be used; and how to improve restored hearing. We evaluated our experience with 11 cases of ABI placement. We found that if at least seven of eleven electrodes of the MED-EL ABI are effectively placed in a patient with no deformation of the fourth ventricle, open set sentence recognition of approximately 20% and closed set word recognition of approximately 65% can be achieved only with the ABI. Appropriate selection of patients for ABI placement can lead to good outcomes. Further investigation is required regarding patient selection criteria and methods of surgery for effective ABI placement. PMID:27464470

  1. Changes of brainstem auditory and somatosensory evoked

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jian

    2000-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the characteristics and clinical value of evoked potentials in late infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy. Methods: Brainstem auditory, and somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded in 6 patients, and compared with the results of CT scan. Results: All of the 6 patients had abnormal results of BAEP and MNSEP. The main abnormal parameters in BAEP were latency prolongation in wave I, inter-peak latency prolongation in Ⅰ-Ⅲ and Ⅰ-Ⅴ. The abnormal features of MNSEP were low amplitude and absence of wave N9, inter-Peak latency prolongation in Ng-N13 and N13-N20, but no significant change of N20 amplitude. The results also revealed that abnormal changes in BAEP and MNSEP were earlier than that in CT. Conclusion: The detection of BAEP and MNSEP in late infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy might early reveal the abnormality of conductive function in nervous system and might be a useful method in diagnosis.

  2. Impairments in musical abilities reflected in the auditory brainstem: evidence from congenital amusia.

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    Lehmann, Alexandre; Skoe, Erika; Moreau, Patricia; Peretz, Isabelle; Kraus, Nina

    2015-07-01

    Congenital amusia is a neurogenetic condition, characterized by a deficit in music perception and production, not explained by hearing loss, brain damage or lack of exposure to music. Despite inferior musical performance, amusics exhibit normal auditory cortical responses, with abnormal neural correlates suggested to lie beyond auditory cortices. Here we show, using auditory brainstem responses to complex sounds in humans, that fine-grained automatic processing of sounds is impoverished in amusia. Compared with matched non-musician controls, spectral amplitude was decreased in amusics for higher harmonic components of the auditory brainstem response. We also found a delayed response to the early transient aspects of the auditory stimulus in amusics. Neural measures of spectral amplitude and response timing correlated with participants' behavioral assessments of music processing. We demonstrate, for the first time, that amusia affects how complex acoustic signals are processed in the auditory brainstem. This neural signature of amusia mirrors what is observed in musicians, such that the aspects of the auditory brainstem responses that are enhanced in musicians are degraded in amusics. By showing that gradients of music abilities are reflected in the auditory brainstem, our findings have implications not only for current models of amusia but also for auditory functioning in general.

  3. Preparation and Culture of Chicken Auditory Brainstem Slices

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Jason T.; Seidl, Armin H.; Rubel, Edwin W; Barria, Andres

    2011-01-01

    The chicken auditory brainstem is a well-established model system that has been widely used to study the anatomy and physiology of auditory processing at discreet periods of development 1-4 as well as mechanisms for temporal coding in the central nervous system 5-7.

  4. The auditory brainstem response in two lizard species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brittan-Powell, Elizabeth F; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Tang, Yezhong

    2010-01-01

    Although lizards have highly sensitive ears, it is difficult to condition them to sound, making standard psychophysical assays of hearing sensitivity impractical. This paper describes non-invasive measurements of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in both Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko; nocturnal...... in most bird species....

  5. [Speech evoked auditory brainstem response and cognitive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M; Wang, N Y

    2016-12-07

    Speech evoked auditory brainstem response(s-ABR)is evoked by compound syllable, and those stimulus are similar to the daily language which convey both semantic information and non-semantic information. Speech coding program can take place at brainstem. As a new method, s-ABR may reveal the mystery of speech coding program. Many tests have proved that s-ABR is somehow related to cognitive ability. We mainly illustrated the possibility of grading the cognitive ability using s-ABR, the abnormal test result from those cognitive disorders, and the family factors that contribute to cognitive disorder.

  6. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldonate, J; Mercuri, C; Reta, J; Biurrun, J; Bonell, C; Gentiletti, G; Escobar, S; Acevedo, R [Laboratorio de Ingenieria en Rehabilitacion e Investigaciones Neuromusculares y Sensoriales (Argentina); Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Ruta 11 - Km 10, Oro Verde, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  7. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

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    Aldonate, J.; Mercuri, C.; Reta, J.; Biurrun, J.; Bonell, C.; Gentiletti, G.; Escobar, S.; Acevedo, R.

    2007-11-01

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  8. Construction of Hindi Speech Stimuli for Eliciting Auditory Brainstem Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mohammad Shamim; Rangasayee, R

    2016-12-01

    Speech-evoked auditory brainstem responses (spABRs) provide considerable information of clinical relevance to describe auditory processing of complex stimuli at the sub cortical level. The substantial research data have suggested faithful representation of temporal and spectral characteristics of speech sounds. However, the spABR are known to be affected by acoustic properties of speech, language experiences and training. Hence, there exists indecisive literature with regards to brainstem speech processing. This warrants establishment of language specific speech stimulus to describe the brainstem processing in specific oral language user. The objective of current study is to develop Hindi speech stimuli for recording auditory brainstem responses. The Hindi stop speech of 40 ms containing five formants was constructed. Brainstem evoked responses to speech sound |da| were gained from 25 normal hearing (NH) adults having mean age of 20.9 years (SD = 2.7) in the age range of 18-25 years and ten subjects (HI) with mild SNHL of mean 21.3 years (SD = 3.2) in the age range of 18-25 years. The statistically significant differences in the mean identification scores of synthesized for speech stimuli |da| and |ga| between NH and HI were obtained. The mean, median, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and 95 % confidence interval for the discrete peaks and V-A complex values of electrophysiological responses to speech stimulus were measured and compared between NH and HI population. This paper delineates a comprehensive methodological approach for development of Hindi speech stimuli and recording of ABR to speech. The acoustic characteristic of stimulus |da| was faithfully represented at brainstem level in normal hearing adults. There was statistically significance difference between NH and HI individuals. This suggests that spABR offers an opportunity to segregate normal speech encoding from abnormal speech processing at sub cortical level, which implies that

  9. Brainstem auditory evoked potential abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Sharat Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus represents a syndrome complex in which multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system, are affected. Aim: The study was conducted to determine the changes in the brainstem auditory evoked potentials in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 126 diabetic males, aged 35-50 years, and 106 age-matched, healthy male volunteers. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials were recorded and the results were analyzed statistically using student′s unpaired t-test. The data consisted of wave latencies I, II, III, IV, V and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V, separately for both ears. Results: The latency of wave IV was significantly delayed only in the right ear, while the latency of waves III, V and interpeak latencies III-V, I-V showed a significant delay bilaterally in diabetic males. However, no significant difference was found between diabetic and control subjects as regards to the latency of wave IV unilaterally in the left ear and the latencies of waves I, II and interpeak latency I-III bilaterally. Conclusion: Diabetes patients have an early involvement of central auditory pathway, which can be detected with fair accuracy with auditory evoked potential studies.

  10. THE EFFECTS OF SALICYLATE ON AUDITORY EVOKED POTENTIAL AMPLITWDE FROM THE AUDITORY CORTEX AND AUDITORY BRAINSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian Sawka; SUN Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus has often been studied using salicylate in animal models as they are capable of inducing tempo-rary hearing loss and tinnitus. Studies have recently observed enhancement of auditory evoked responses of the auditory cortex (AC) post salicylate treatment which is also shown to be related to tinnitus like behavior in rats. The aim of this study was to observe if enhancements of the AC post salicylate treatment are also present at structures in the brainstem. Four male Sprague Dawley rats with AC implanted electrodes were tested for both AC and auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings pre and post 250 mg/kg intraperitone-al injections of salicylate. The responses were recorded as the peak to trough amplitudes of P1-N1 (AC), ABR wave V, and ABR waveⅡ. AC responses resulted in statistically significant enhancement of ampli-tude at 2 hours post salicylate with 90 dB stimuli tone bursts of 4, 8, 12, and 20 kHz. Wave V of ABR re-sponses at 90 dB resulted in a statistically significant reduction of amplitude 2 hours post salicylate and a mean decrease of amplitude of 31%for 16 kHz. WaveⅡamplitudes at 2 hours post treatment were signifi-cantly reduced for 4, 12, and 20 kHz stimuli at 90 dB SPL. Our results suggest that the enhancement chang-es of the AC related to salicylate induced tinnitus are generated superior to the level of the inferior colliculus and may originate in the AC.

  11. The impact of severity of hypertension on auditory brainstem responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdev Lal Goyal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auditory brainstem response is an objective electrophysiological method for assessing the auditory pathways from the auditory nerve to the brainstem. The aim of this study was to correlate and to assess the degree of involvement of peripheral and central regions of brainstem auditory pathways with increasing severity of hypertension, among the patients of essential hypertension. Method: This study was conducted on 50 healthy age and sex matched controls (Group I and 50 hypertensive patients (Group II. Later group was further sub-divided into - Group IIa (Grade 1 hypertension, Group IIb (Grade 2 hypertension, and Group IIc (Grade 3 hypertension, as per WHO guidelines. These responses/potentials were recorded by using electroencephalogram electrodes on a root-mean-square electromyography, EP MARC II (PC-based machine and data were statistically compared between the various groups by way of one-way ANOVA. The parameters used for analysis were the absolute latencies of Waves I through V, interpeak latencies (IPLs and amplitude ratio of Wave V/I. Result: The absolute latency of Wave I was observed to be significantly increased in Group IIa and IIb hypertensives, while Wave V absolute latency was highly significantly prolonged among Group IIb and IIc, as compared to that of normal control group. All the hypertensives, that is, Group IIa, IIb, and IIc patients were found to have highly significant prolonged III-V IPL as compared to that of normal healthy controls. Further, intergroup comparison among hypertensive patients revealed a significant prolongation of Wave V absolute latency and III-V IPL in Group IIb and IIc patients as compared to Group IIa patients. These findings suggest a sensory deficit along with synaptic delays, across the auditory pathways in all the hypertensives, the deficit being more markedly affecting the auditory processing time at pons to midbrain (IPL III-V region of auditory pathways among Grade 2 and 3

  12. Relation between derived-band auditory brainstem response latencies and behavioral frequency selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Christoforidis, Dimitrios; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Derived-band click-evoked auditory brainstem responses ABRs were obtained for normal-hearing NH and sensorineurally hearing-impaired HI listeners. The latencies extracted from these responses, as a function of derived-band center frequency and click level, served as objective estimates of cochlear...... selectivity in human listeners and offer a window to better understand how hearing impairment affects the spatiotemporal cochlear response pattern....

  13. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children with lead exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia de Freitas Alvarenga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Earlier studies have demonstrated an auditory effect of lead exposure in children, but information on the effects of low chronic exposures needs to be further elucidated. Objective: To investigate the effect of low chronic exposures of the auditory system in children with a history of low blood lead levels, using an auditory electrophysiological test. Methods: Contemporary cross-sectional cohort. Study participants underwent tympanometry, pure tone and speech audiometry, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions, and brainstem auditory evoked potentials, with blood lead monitoring over a period of 35.5 months. The study included 130 children, with ages ranging from 18 months to 14 years, 5 months (mean age 6 years, 8 months ± 3 years, 2 months. Results: The mean time-integrated cumulative blood lead index was 12 µg/dL (SD ± 5.7, range:2.433. All participants had hearing thresholds equal to or below 20 dBHL and normal amplitudes of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. No association was found between the absolute latencies of waves I, III, and V, the interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, and I-V, and the cumulative lead values. Conclusion: No evidence of toxic effects from chronic low lead exposures was observed on the auditory function of children living in a lead contaminated area.

  14. Synaptic plasticity in inhibitory neurons of the auditory brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kevin J; Trussell, Laurence O

    2011-04-01

    There is a growing appreciation of synaptic plasticity in the early levels of auditory processing, and particularly of its role in inhibitory circuits. Synaptic strength in auditory brainstem and midbrain is sensitive to standard protocols for induction of long-term depression, potentiation, and spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Differential forms of plasticity are operative at synapses onto inhibitory versus excitatory neurons within a circuit, and together these could serve to tune circuits involved in sound localization or multisensory integration. Such activity-dependent control of synaptic function in inhibitory neurons may also be expressed after hearing loss and could underlie persistent neuronal activity in patients with tinnitus. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Synaptic Plasticity & Interneurons'.

  15. Modeling auditory evoked brainstem responses to transient stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten; Harte, James

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative model is presented that describes the formation of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to tone pulses, clicks and rising chirps as a function of stimulation level. The model computes the convolution of the instantaneous discharge rates using the “humanized” nonlinear auditory...... of tone-pulse evoked wave-V latency with frequency but underestimates the level dependency of the tone-pulse as well as click-evoked latency values. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts the nonlinear wave-V amplitude behavior in response to the chirp stimulation both as a function of chirp sweeping...... rate and level. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that the pattern of ABR generation is strongly affected by the nonlinear and dispersive processes in the cochlea....

  16. Organization of the auditory brainstem in a lizard, Gekko gecko. I. Auditory nerve, cochlear nuclei, and superior olivary nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Y. Z.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Carr, C. E.

    2012-01-01

    We used tract tracing to reveal the connections of the auditory brainstem in the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko). The auditory nerve has two divisions, a rostroventrally directed projection of mid- to high best-frequency fibers to the nucleus angularis (NA) and a more dorsal and caudal projection of lo...... of auditory connections in lizards and archosaurs but also different processing of low- and high-frequency information in the brainstem. J. Comp. Neurol. 520:17841799, 2012. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc...

  17. Auditory Brainstem Responses in Children Treated with Cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kamali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In view of improvement in therapeutic outcome of cancer treatment in children resulting in increased survival rates and the importance of hearing in speech and language development, this research project was intended to assess the effects of cisplatin group on hearing ability in children aged 6 months to 12 years.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, hearing of 10 children on cisplatin group medication for cancer who met the inclusion criteria was examined by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABR using the three stimulants of click and 4 and 8 kHz tone bursts. All children were examined twice: before drug administration and within 72 hours after receiving the last dose. Then the results were compared with each other.Results: There was a significant difference between hearing thresholds before and after drug administration (p<0.05. Right and left ear threshold comparison revealed no significant difference.Conclusion: Ototoxic effects of cisplatin group were confirmed in this study. Insignificant difference observed in comparing right and left ear hearing thresholds could be due to small sample size. auditory brainstem responses test especially with frequency specificity proved to be a useful method in assessing cisplatin ototoxicity.

  18. AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSES IN SENILE PRESBYCUSIS PATIENTS OVER 90 YEARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Aiting; LIANG Sichao; ZHANG Ruining; GUO Weiwei; ZHOU Qiyou; JI Fei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of auditory brainstem response (ABR) in presbycusis patients el-der than 90 years. Methods Fourteen presbycusis patients elder than 90 years (presbycusis group, 91.1.4 ± 1.3 years, 26 ears) and 9 normal-hearing young adults (control group, 22.7 ± 1.2 years, 18 ears) participated in the study. Alternative click-evoked ABRs were recorded in both groups. The peak latency (PL) of peak I,Ⅲ, and V, and the inter-peak latency (IPI) of I-Ⅲ,Ⅲ-V, and I-V were compared between groups. Results In elder presbycusis patients, the occurrence rate of peak I andⅢwere both 76.9%, and that of peak V was 84.6%. In presbycusis group, the peak latencies of I, Ⅲ, V were significantly longer than that of control group (P<0.001). There was no significant difference between groups in the IPI of peak I-IⅢ (P=0.298, peakⅢ-V (P=0.254) and peak I-V (P=0.364). Conclusions Auditory brainstem responses in presbycusis pa-tients elder than 90 years showed worse wave differentiation.

  19. Development of Brainstem-Evoked Responses in Congenital Auditory Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tillein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare the development of the auditory system in hearing and completely acoustically deprived animals, naive congenitally deaf white cats (CDCs and hearing controls (HCs were investigated at different developmental stages from birth till adulthood. The CDCs had no hearing experience before the acute experiment. In both groups of animals, responses to cochlear implant stimulation were acutely assessed. Electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses (E-ABRs were recorded with monopolar stimulation at different current levels. CDCs demonstrated extensive development of E-ABRs, from first signs of responses at postnatal (p.n. day 3 through appearance of all waves of brainstem response at day 8 p.n. to mature responses around day 90 p.n.. Wave I of E-ABRs could not be distinguished from the artifact in majority of CDCs, whereas in HCs, it was clearly separated from the stimulus artifact. Waves II, III, and IV demonstrated higher thresholds in CDCs, whereas this difference was not found for wave V. Amplitudes of wave III were significantly higher in HCs, whereas wave V amplitudes were significantly higher in CDCs. No differences in latencies were observed between the animal groups. These data demonstrate significant postnatal subcortical development in absence of hearing, and also divergent effects of deafness on early waves II–IV and wave V of the E-ABR.

  20. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses across diving bird species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sara E.; Berlin, Alicia; Carr, Catherine E; Olsen, Glenn H.; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Ketten, Darlene R

    2015-01-01

    There is little biological data available for diving birds because many live in hard-to-study, remote habitats. Only one species of diving bird, the black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), has been studied in respect to auditory capabilities (Wever et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 63:676–680, 1969). We, therefore, measured in-air auditory threshold in ten species of diving birds, using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The average audiogram obtained for each species followed the U-shape typical of birds and many other animals. All species tested shared a common region of the greatest sensitivity, from 1000 to 3000 Hz, although audiograms differed significantly across species. Thresholds of all duck species tested were more similar to each other than to the two non-duck species tested. The red-throated loon (Gavia stellata) and northern gannet (Morus bassanus) exhibited the highest thresholds while the lowest thresholds belonged to the duck species, specifically the lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis). Vocalization parameters were also measured for each species, and showed that with the exception of the common eider (Somateria mollisima), the peak frequency, i.e., frequency at the greatest intensity, of all species' vocalizations measured here fell between 1000 and 3000 Hz, matching the bandwidth of the most sensitive hearing range.

  1. Brainstem auditory-evoked potentials in two meditative mental states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Practicing mental repetition of "OM" has been shown to cause significant changes in the middle latency auditory-evoked potentials, which suggests that it facilitates the neural activity at the mesencephalic or diencephalic levels. Aims: The aim of the study was to study the brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEP in two meditation states based on consciousness, viz. dharana, and dhyana. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects were selected, with ages ranging from 20 to 55 years (M=29.1; ±SD=6.5 years who had a minimum of 6 months experience in meditating "OM". Each subject was assessed in four sessions, i.e. two meditation and two control sessions. The two control sessions were: (i ekagrata, i.e. single-topic lecture on meditation and (ii cancalata, i.e. non-targeted thinking. The two meditation sessions were: (i dharana, i.e. focusing on the symbol "OM" and (ii dhyana, i.e. effortless single-thought state "OM". All four sessions were recorded on four different days and consisted of three states, i.e. pre, during and post. Results: The present results showed that the wave V peak latency significantly increased in cancalata, ekagrata and dharana, but no change occurred during the dhyana session. Conclusions: These results suggested that information transmission along the auditory pathway is delayed during cancalata, ekagrata and dharana, but there is no change during dhyana. It may be said that auditory information transmission was delayed at the inferior collicular level as the wave V corresponds to the tectum.

  2. Auditory and audio-visual processing in patients with cochlear, auditory brainstem, and auditory midbrain implants: An EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierholz, Irina; Finke, Mareike; Kral, Andrej; Büchner, Andreas; Rach, Stefan; Lenarz, Thomas; Dengler, Reinhard; Sandmann, Pascale

    2017-04-01

    There is substantial variability in speech recognition ability across patients with cochlear implants (CIs), auditory brainstem implants (ABIs), and auditory midbrain implants (AMIs). To better understand how this variability is related to central processing differences, the current electroencephalography (EEG) study compared hearing abilities and auditory-cortex activation in patients with electrical stimulation at different sites of the auditory pathway. Three different groups of patients with auditory implants (Hannover Medical School; ABI: n = 6, CI: n = 6; AMI: n = 2) performed a speeded response task and a speech recognition test with auditory, visual, and audio-visual stimuli. Behavioral performance and cortical processing of auditory and audio-visual stimuli were compared between groups. ABI and AMI patients showed prolonged response times on auditory and audio-visual stimuli compared with NH listeners and CI patients. This was confirmed by prolonged N1 latencies and reduced N1 amplitudes in ABI and AMI patients. However, patients with central auditory implants showed a remarkable gain in performance when visual and auditory input was combined, in both speech and non-speech conditions, which was reflected by a strong visual modulation of auditory-cortex activation in these individuals. In sum, the results suggest that the behavioral improvement for audio-visual conditions in central auditory implant patients is based on enhanced audio-visual interactions in the auditory cortex. Their findings may provide important implications for the optimization of electrical stimulation and rehabilitation strategies in patients with central auditory prostheses. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2206-2225, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The role of the auditory brainstem in processing musically-relevant pitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin M. Bidelman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging work has shed light on the cerebral architecture involved in processing the melodic and harmonic aspects of music. Here, recent evidence is reviewed illustrating that subcortical auditory structures contribute to the early formation and processing of musically-relevant pitch. Electrophysiological recordings from the human brainstem and population responses from the auditory nerve reveal that nascent features of tonal music (e.g., consonance/dissonance, pitch salience, harmonic sonority are evident at early, subcortical levels of the auditory pathway. The salience and harmonicity of brainstem activity is strongly correlated with listeners’ perceptual preferences and perceived consonance for the tonal relationships of music. Moreover, the hierarchical ordering of pitch intervals/chords described by the Western music practice and their perceptual consonance is well-predicted by the salience with which pitch combinations are encoded in subcortical auditory structures. While the neural correlates of consonance can be tuned and exaggerated with musical training, they persist even in the absence of musicianship or long-term enculturation. As such, it is posited that the structural foundations of musical pitch might result from innate processing performed by the central auditory system. A neurobiological predisposition for consonant, pleasant sounding pitch relationships may be one reason why these pitch combinations have been favored by composers and listeners for centuries. It is suggested that important perceptual dimensions of music emerge well before the auditory signal reaches cerebral cortex and prior to attentional engagement. While cortical mechanisms are no doubt critical to the perception, production, and enjoyment of music, the contribution of subcortical structures implicates a more integrated, hierarchically organized network underlying music processing within the brain.

  4. The role of the auditory brainstem in processing musically relevant pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging work has shed light on the cerebral architecture involved in processing the melodic and harmonic aspects of music. Here, recent evidence is reviewed illustrating that subcortical auditory structures contribute to the early formation and processing of musically relevant pitch. Electrophysiological recordings from the human brainstem and population responses from the auditory nerve reveal that nascent features of tonal music (e.g., consonance/dissonance, pitch salience, harmonic sonority) are evident at early, subcortical levels of the auditory pathway. The salience and harmonicity of brainstem activity is strongly correlated with listeners' perceptual preferences and perceived consonance for the tonal relationships of music. Moreover, the hierarchical ordering of pitch intervals/chords described by the Western music practice and their perceptual consonance is well-predicted by the salience with which pitch combinations are encoded in subcortical auditory structures. While the neural correlates of consonance can be tuned and exaggerated with musical training, they persist even in the absence of musicianship or long-term enculturation. As such, it is posited that the structural foundations of musical pitch might result from innate processing performed by the central auditory system. A neurobiological predisposition for consonant, pleasant sounding pitch relationships may be one reason why these pitch combinations have been favored by composers and listeners for centuries. It is suggested that important perceptual dimensions of music emerge well before the auditory signal reaches cerebral cortex and prior to attentional engagement. While cortical mechanisms are no doubt critical to the perception, production, and enjoyment of music, the contribution of subcortical structures implicates a more integrated, hierarchically organized network underlying music processing within the brain.

  5. Auditory Brainstem Responses and EMFs Generated by Mobile Phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khullar, Shilpa; Sood, Archana; Sood, Sanjay

    2013-12-01

    There has been a manifold increase in the number of mobile phone users throughout the world with the current number of users exceeding 2 billion. However this advancement in technology like many others is accompanied by a progressive increase in the frequency and intensity of electromagnetic waves without consideration of the health consequences. The aim of our study was to advance our understanding of the potential adverse effects of GSM mobile phones on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). 60 subjects were selected for the study and divided into three groups of 20 each based on their usage of mobile phones. Their ABRs were recorded and analysed for latency of waves I-V as well as interpeak latencies I-III, I-V and III-V (in ms). Results revealed no significant difference in the ABR parameters between group A (control group) and group B (subjects using mobile phones for maximum 30 min/day for 5 years). However the latency of waves was significantly prolonged in group C (subjects using mobile phones for 10 years for a maximum of 30 min/day) as compared to the control group. Based on our findings we concluded that long term exposure to mobile phones may affect conduction in the peripheral portion of the auditory pathway. However more research needs to be done to study the long term effects of mobile phones particularly of newer technologies like smart phones and 3G.

  6. Neuropathological changes in auditory brainstem nuclei in cattle with experimentally induced bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, S; Okada, H; Arai, S; Yokoyama, T; Mohri, S

    2011-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is characterized by the appearance of spongy lesions in the brain, particularly in the brainstem nuclei. This study evaluated the degenerative changes observed in the central auditory brainstem of BSE-challenged cattle. The neuropathological changes in the auditory brainstem nuclei were assessed by determining the severity of vacuolation and the presence of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Sixteen female Holstein-Friesian calves, 2-4 months of age, were inoculated intracerebrally with BSE agent. BSE-challenged animals developed the characteristic clinical signs of BSE approximately 18 months post inoculation (mpi) and advanced neurological signs after 22 mpi. Before the appearance of clinical signs (i.e. at 3, 10, 12 and 16 mpi), vacuolar change was absent or mild and PrP(Sc) deposition was minimal in the auditory brainstem nuclei. The two cattle sacrificed at 18 and 19 mpi had no clinical signs and showed mild vacuolar degeneration and moderate amounts of PrP(Sc) accumulation in the auditory brainstem pathway. In the animals challenged with BSE agent that developed clinical sings (i.e. after 20 mpi), spongy changes were more prominent in the nucleus of the inferior colliculus compared with the other nuclei of the auditory brainstem and the medial geniculate body. Neuropathological changes characterized by spongy lesions accompanied by PrP(Sc) accumulation in the auditory brainstem nuclei of BSE-infected cattle may be associated with hyperacusia.

  7. Type-2 diabetes mellitus and auditory brainstem response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheelu S Siddiqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus (DM causes pathophysiological changes at multiple organ system. With evoked potential techniques, the brain stem auditory response represents a simple procedure to detect both acoustic nerve and central nervous system pathway damage. The objective was to find the evidence of central neuropathy in diabetes patients by analyzing brainstem audiometry electric response obtained by auditory evoked potentials, quantify the characteristic of auditory brain response in long standing diabetes and to study the utility of auditory evoked potential in detecting the type, site, and nature of lesions. Design: A total of 25 Type-2 DM [13 (52% males and 12 (48% females] with duration of diabetes over 5 years and aged over 30 years. The brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA was performed by universal smart box manual version 2.0 at 70, 80, and 90 dB. The wave latency pattern and interpeak latencies were estimated. This was compared with 25 healthy controls (17 [68%] males and 8 [32%] females. Result: In Type-2 DM, BERA study revealed that wave-III representing superior olivary complex at 80 dB had wave latency of (3.99 ± 0.24 ms P < 0.001, at 90 dB (3.92 ± 0.28 ms P < 0.001 compared with control. The latency of wave III was delayed by 0.39, 0.42, and 0.42 ms at 70, 80, and 90 dB, respectively. The absolute latency of wave V representing inferior colliculus at 70 dB (6.05 ± 0.27 ms P < 0.001, at 80 dB (5.98 ± 0.27 P < 0.001, and at 90 dB (6.02 ± 0.30 ms P < 0.002 compared with control. The latency of wave-V was delayed by 0.48, 0.47, and 0.50 ms at 70, 80, and 90 dB, respectively. Interlatencies I-III at 70 dB (2.33 ± 0.22 ms P < 0.001, at 80 dB (2.39 ± 0.26 ms P < 0.001, while at 90 dB (2.47 ± 0.25 ms P < 0.001 when compared with control. Interlatencies I-V at 70 dB (4.45 ± 0.29 ms P < 0.001 at 80 dB (4.39 ± 0.34 ms P < 0.001, and at 90 dB (4.57 ± 0.31 ms P < 0.001 compared with control. Out of 25 Type-2 DM, 13 (52

  8. Speech Auditory Brainstem Response through hearing aid stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellier, Ludovic; Veuillet, Evelyne; Vesson, Jean-François; Bouchet, Patrick; Caclin, Anne; Thai-Van, Hung

    2015-07-01

    Millions of people across the world are hearing impaired, and rely on hearing aids to improve their everyday life. Objective audiometry could optimize hearing aid fitting, and is of particular interest for non-communicative patients. Speech Auditory Brainstem Response (speech ABR), a fine electrophysiological marker of speech encoding, is presently seen as a promising candidate for implementing objective audiometry; yet, unlike lower-frequency auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) such as cortical AEPs or auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), aided-speech ABRs (i.e., speech ABRs through hearing aid stimulation) have almost never been recorded. This may be due to their high-frequency components requesting a high temporal precision of the stimulation. We assess here a new approach to record high-quality and artifact-free speech ABR while stimulating directly through hearing aids. In 4 normal-hearing adults, we recorded speech ABR evoked by a /ba/ syllable binaurally delivered through insert earphones for quality control or through hearing aids. To assess the presence of a potential stimulus artifact, recordings were also done in mute conditions with the exact same potential sources of stimulus artifacts as in the main runs. Hearing aid stimulation led to artifact-free speech ABR in each participant, with the same quality as when using insert earphones, as shown with signal-to-noise (SNR) measurements. Our new approach consisting in directly transmitting speech stimuli through hearing aids allowed for a perfect temporal precision mandatory in speech ABR recordings, and could thus constitute a decisive step in hearing impairment investigation and in hearing aid fitting improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Amplitude and phase equalization of stimuli for click evoked auditory brainstem responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutelmann, Rainer; Laumen, Geneviève; Tollin, Daniel; Klump, Georg M

    2015-01-01

    Although auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), the sound-evoked brain activity in response to transient sounds, are routinely measured in humans and animals there are often differences in ABR waveform morphology across studies. One possible reason may be the method of stimulus calibration. To explore this hypothesis, click-evoked ABRs were measured from seven ears in four Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) using three common spectrum calibration strategies: Minimum phase filter, linear phase filter, and no filter. The results show significantly higher ABR amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio, and better waveform resolution with the minimum phase filtered click than with the other strategies.

  10. Methylmercury Exposure Reduces the Auditory Brainstem Response of Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata )

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolf, Sarah E; Swaddle, John P; Cristol, Daniel A; Buchser, William J

    2017-01-01

    ...) by studying their auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). Zebra finches exposed to mercury exhibited elevated hearing thresholds, decreased amplitudes, and longer latencies in the ABR, the first evidence of mercury-induced hearing impairment in birds...

  11. A comparison of commercially available auditory brainstem response stimuli at a neurodiagnostic intensity level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keesling, Devan A; Parker, Jordan Paige; Sanchez, Jason Tait

    2017-01-01

    iChirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) yield a larger wave V amplitude at low intensity levels than traditional broadband click stimuli, providing a reliable estimation of hearing sensitivity...

  12. The Role of the Auditory Brainstem in Processing Linguistically-Relevant Pitch Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, the brainstem has been neglected as a part of the brain involved in language processing. We review recent evidence of language-dependent effects in pitch processing based on comparisons of native vs. nonnative speakers of a tonal language from electrophysiological recordings in the auditory brainstem. We argue that there is enhancing…

  13. Auditory brainstem potentials in children with protein energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaş, Dursun; Caksen, Hüseyin; Sar, Sakir; Tombul, Temel; Kisli, Mesude; Tuncer, Oğuz; Yuca, Köksal; Yilmaz, Cahide

    2005-07-01

    In this study, auditory brainstem potentials (ABPs) were studied in children with protein energy malnutrition (PEM) to determine the effects of PEM on the developing brain in children. A total of 31 children, aged 3-36 months with moderate/severe PEM and 25 healthy children, aged 3-48 months were included in the study. Nutritional status of the children was assessed by the Gomez classification. Recordings of ABPs were performed by using Nihon Kohden Neuropack 2 device. Of 31 children, 22 (71%) had severe malnutrition, 9 (29%) had moderate malnutrition. Additionally, 8 (26%) and 9 (29%) children had iron deficiency anemia and hypoalbuminemi, respectively. There were significant differences in the mean latencies of the waves I-V on the right and left ears and in the mean interpeak latencies (IPLs) of the waves III-V and I-V on the right ear between the study and control groups (Pmalnutrition and iron deficiency anemia. We think that more extensive studies should be performed to determine whether or not there was a relationship between these parameters.

  14. A case study of the changes in the speech-evoked auditory brainstem response associated with auditory training in children with auditory processing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, Sridhar; Forrester, Jennifer; Rutledge, Casey; Holmes, Georgia W

    2013-04-01

    Studies related to plasticity and learning-related phenomena have primarily focused on higher-order processes of the auditory system, such as those in the auditory cortex and limited information is available on learning- and plasticity-related processes in the auditory brainstem. A clinical electrophysiological test of speech-evoked ABR known as BioMARK has been developed to evaluate brainstem responses to speech sounds in children with language learning disorders. Fast ForWord (FFW) was used as an auditory intervention program in the current study and pre- intervention and post-intervention speech-evoked ABR (BioMARK) measures were compared in 2 school-aged children with auditory processing disorders (APD). Significant changes were noted from pre-intervention to post-intervention and reflect plasticity in the auditory brainstem's neural activity to speech stimuli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The temporal relationship between the brainstem and primary cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, N A

    1995-10-01

    Many methods are employed in order to define more precisely the generators of an evoked potential (EP) waveform. One technique is to compare the timing of an EP whose origin is well established with that of one whose origin is less certain. In the present article, the latency of the primary cortical auditory evoked potential (PCAEP) was compared to each of the seven subcomponents which compose the brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP). The data for this comparison was derived from a retrospective analysis of previous recordings of the PCAEP and BAEP. Central auditory conduction time (CACT) was calculated by subtracting the latency of the cochlear nucleus BAEP component (wave III) from that of the PCAEP. It was found that CACT in humans is 12 msec which is more than double that of central somatosensory conduction time. The interpeak latencies between BAEP waves V, VI, and VII and the PCAEP were also calculated. It was deduced that all three waves must have an origin rather more caudally within the central auditory system than is commonly supposed. In addition, it is demonstrated that the early components of the middle latency AEP (No and Na) largely reside within the time domain between the termination of the BAEP components and the PCAEP which would be consistent with their being far field reflections of midbrain and subcortical auditory activity. It is concluded that as the afferent volley ascends the central auditory pathways, it generates not a sequence of high frequency BAEP responses but rather a succession of slower post-synaptic waves. The only means of reconciling the timing of the BAEP waves with that of the PCAEP is to assume that the generation of all the BAEP components must be largely restricted to a quite confined region within the auditory nerve and the lower half of the pons.

  16. Low-frequency versus high-frequency synchronisation in chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Gøtsche-Rasmussen, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the frequency specific contribution to the auditory brainstem response (ABR) of chirp stimuli. Frequency rising chirps were designed to compensate for the cochlear traveling wave delay, and lead to larger wave-V amplitudes than for click stimuli as more auditory nerve fibr...

  17. Brainstem auditory-evoked potential in Boxer dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Isa Poci Palumbo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem auditory-evoked potential (BAEP has been widely used for different purposes in veterinary practice and is commonly used to identify inherited deafness and presbycusis. In this study, 43 Boxer dogs were evaluated using the BAEP. Deafness was diagnosed in 3 dogs (2 bilateral and 1 unilateral allowing the remaining 40 Boxers to be included for normative data analysis including an evaluation on the influence of age on the BAEP. The animals were divided into 2 groups of 20 Boxers each based on age. The mean age was 4.54 years (range, 1-8 in group I, and 9.83 years (range, 8.5-12 in group II. The mean latency for I, III, and V waves were 1.14 (±0.07, 2.64 (±0.11, and 3.48 (±0.10 ms in group I, and 1.20 (±0.12, 2.73 (±0.15, and 3.58 (±0.22 ms in group II, respectively. The mean inter-peak latencies for the I-III, III-V and I-V intervals were 1.50 (±0.15, 0.84 (±0.15, and 2.34 (±0.11 ms in group I, and 1.53 (±0.16, 0.85 (±0.15, and 2.38 (±0.19 ms in group II, respectively. Latencies of waves I and III were significant different between group I and II. For the I-III, III-V and I-V intervals, no significant differences were observed between the 2 groups. As far as we know, this is the first normative study of BAEP obtained from Boxer dogs.

  18. IMAGING WHITE MATTER IN HUMAN BRAINSTEM

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    Anastasia A Ford

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The human brainstem is critical for the control of many life-sustaining functions, such as consciousness, respiration, sleep, and transfer of sensory and motor information between the brain and the spinal cord. Most of our knowledge about structure and organization of white and gray matter within the brainstem is derived from ex vivo dissection and histology studies. However, these methods cannot be applied to study structural architecture in live human participants. Tractography from diffusion-weighted MRI may provide valuable insights about white matter organization within the brainstem in vivo. However, this method presents technical challenges in vivo due to susceptibility artifacts, functionally dense anatomy, as well as pulsatile and respiratory motion. To investigate the limits of MR tractography, we present results from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI of an intact excised human brainstem performed at 11.1T using isotropic resolution of 0.333, 1, and 2 mm, with the latter reflecting resolution currently used clinically. At the highest resolution, the dense fiber architecture of the brainstem is evident, but the definition of structures degrades as resolution decreases. In particular, the inferred corticopontine/corticospinal tracts (CPT/CST, superior (SCP and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP, and medial lemniscus (ML pathways are clearly discernable and follow known anatomical trajectories at the highest spatial resolution. At lower resolutions, the CST/CPT, SCP, and MCP pathways are artificially enlarged due to inclusion of collinear and crossing fibers not inherent to these three pathways. The inferred ML pathways appear smaller at lower resolutions, indicating insufficient spatial information to successfully resolve smaller fiber pathways. Our results suggest that white matter tractography maps derived from the excised brainstem can be used to guide the study of the brainstem architecture using diffusion MRI in vivo.

  19. Auditory Rehabilitation in Rhesus Macaque Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with Auditory Brainstem Implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Min Wang; Zhi-Jun Yang; Fu Zhao; Bo Wang; Xing-Chao Wang; Pei-Ran Qu; Pi-Nan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Background:The auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) have been used to treat deafness for patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 and nontumor patients.The lack of an appropriate animal model has limited the study of improving hearing rehabilitation by the device.This study aimed to establish an animal model of ABI in adult rhesus macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta).Methods:Six adult rhesus macaque monkeys (M.mulatta) were included.Under general anesthesia,a multichannel ABI was implanted into the lateral recess of the fourth ventricle through the modified suboccipital-retrosigmoid (RS) approach.The electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) waves were tested to ensure the optimal implant site.After the operation,the EABR and computed tomography (CT) were used to test and verify the effectiveness via electrophysiology and anatomy,respectively.The subjects underwent behavioral observation for 6 months,and the postoperative EABR was tested every two weeks from the 1st month after implant surgery.Result:The implant surgery lasted an average of 5.2 h,and no monkey died or sacrificed.The averaged latencies of peaks Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅳ were 1.27,2.34 and 3.98 ms,respectively in the ABR.One-peak EABR wave was elicited in the operation,and one-or two-peak waves were elicited during the postoperative period.The EABR wave latencies appeared to be constant under different stimulus intensities;however,the amplitudes increased as the stimulus increased within a certain scope.Conclusions:It is feasible and safe to implant ABIs in rhesus macaque monkeys (M.mulatta) through a modified suboccipital RS approach,and EABR and CT are valid tools for animal model establishment.In addition,this model should be an appropriate animal model for the electrophysiological and behavioral study of rhesus macaque monkey with ABI.

  20. Auditory evoked potentials and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in evaluation of brainstem lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Anita; Nesek Mađarić, Vesna; Starčević, Katarina; Krbot Skorić, Magdalena; Gabelić, Tereza; Adamec, Ivan; Habek, Mario

    2013-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the roles of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), auditory evoked potentials (AEP) and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) in the evaluation of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS). Altogether 32 patients with the diagnosis of MS participated in the study. The following data was collected from all patients: age, gender, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, brainstem functional system score (BSFS) (part of the EDSS evaluating brainstem symptomatology), and involvement of the brainstem on the brain MRI. AEP and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) were studied in all patients. BSFS, MRI, AEP, oVEMP and cVEMP involvement of the brainstem was evident in 9 (28.1%), 14 (43.8%), 7 (21.9%), 12 (37.5%) and 10 (31.0%) patients, respectively. None of the tests used showed statistically significant advantage in the detection of brainstem lesions. When combining oVEMP and cVEMP 18 (56.3%) patients showed brainstem involvement. This combination showed brainstem involvement in greater percentage than BSFS or AEP, with statistical significance (p=0.035 and p=0.007, respectively). VEMP is a reliable method in detection of brainstem involvement in MS. It is comparable with MRI, but superior to clinical examination or AEP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cochlear Responses and Auditory Brainstem Response Functions in Adults with Auditory Neuropathy/ Dys-Synchrony and Individuals with Normal Hearing

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    Zahra Jafari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Physiologic measures of cochlear and auditory nerve function may be of assis¬tance in distinguishing between hearing disorders due primarily to auditory nerve impairment from those due primarily to cochlear hair cells dysfunction. The goal of present study was to measure of co-chlear responses (otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response in some adults with auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony and subjects with normal hearing. Materials and Methods: Patients were 16 adults (32 ears in age range of 14-30 years with auditory neu¬ropathy/ dys-synchrony and 16 individuals in age range of 16-30 years from both sexes. The results of transient otoacoustic emissions, cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response measures were compared in both groups and the effects of age, sex, ear and degree of hearing loss were studied. Results: The pure-tone average was 48.1 dB HL in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony group and the fre¬quency of low tone loss and flat audiograms were higher among other audiogram's shapes. Transient oto¬acoustic emissions were shown in all auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony people except two cases and its average was near in both studied groups. The latency and amplitude of the biggest reversed co-chlear microphonics response were higher in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients than control peo¬ple significantly. The correlation between cochlear microphonics amplitude and degree of hearing loss was not significant, and age had significant effect in some cochlear microphonics measures. Audi-tory brainstem response had no response in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients even with low stim¬uli rates. Conclusion: In adults with speech understanding worsen than predicted from the degree of hearing loss that suspect to auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony, the frequency of low tone loss and flat audiograms are higher. Usually auditory brainstem response is absent in

  2. Modulation of auditory brainstem responses by serotonin and specific serotonin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papesh, Melissa A; Hurley, Laura M

    2016-02-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin is found throughout the auditory system from the cochlea to the cortex. Although effects of serotonin have been reported at the level of single neurons in many brainstem nuclei, how these effects correspond to more integrated measures of auditory processing has not been well-explored. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the effects of serotonin on far-field auditory brainstem responses (ABR) across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and intensities. Using a mouse model, we investigated the consequences of systemic serotonin depletion, as well as the selective stimulation and suppression of the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors, on ABR latency and amplitude. Stimuli included tone pips spanning four octaves presented over a forty dB range. Depletion of serotonin reduced the ABR latencies in Wave II and later waves, suggesting that serotonergic effects occur as early as the cochlear nucleus. Further, agonists and antagonists of specific serotonergic receptors had different profiles of effects on ABR latencies and amplitudes across waves and frequencies, suggestive of distinct effects of these agents on auditory processing. Finally, most serotonergic effects were more pronounced at lower ABR frequencies, suggesting larger or more directional modulation of low-frequency processing. This is the first study to describe the effects of serotonin on ABR responses across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and amplitudes, and it presents an important step in understanding how serotonergic modulation of auditory brainstem processing may contribute to modulation of auditory perception.

  3. Evidence for Atypical Auditory Brainstem Responses in Young Children with Suspected Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Daphne Ari-Even; Muchnik, Chava; Shabtai, Esther; Hildesheimer, Minka; Henkin, Yael

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to characterize the auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) of young children with suspected autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and compare them with the ABRs of children with language delay and with clinical norms. Method: The ABRs of 26 children with suspected ASDs (21 males, five females; mean age 32.5 mo) and an age-…

  4. The Impact of Clinical History on the Threshold Estimation of Auditory Brainstem Response Results for Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitoun, Maha; Cumming, Steven; Purcell, Alison; O'Brien, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the impact of patient clinical history on audiologists' performance when interpreting auditory brainstem response (ABR) results. Method: Fourteen audiologists' accuracy in estimating hearing threshold for 16 infants through interpretation of ABR traces was compared on 2 occasions at least 5 months apart. On the 1st…

  5. Satisfaction and quality of life in users of auditory brainstem implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Nayara Freitas; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt; Magalhães, Ana Tereza De Matos; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; De Brito, Rubens Vuono; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate satisfaction and quality of life of users of Auditory Implant Brainstem. Methods This is a cross-sectional and descriptive study conducted at Divisão de Clínica Otorrinolaringológica of Hospital das Clínicas of Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. For the research, 19 users of an Auditory Brainstem Implant answered the following questionnaires: KINDLR (Questionnaire for Measuring Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents), for children and adolescents, their parents and/or caregivers; WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, for adult participants; and the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire culturally adapted to Brazilian Portuguese. Results The quality of life of children using Auditory Brainstem Implant from the perspective of their parents showed global results above average, as for most domains, except for the emotional well-being domain. Adults showed results above average for all domains. Regarding satisfaction with the device, the adult users of auditory brainstem implant were satisfied in general, except with regard to personal image. The parents of the children showed dissatisfaction in all subscales, except for the subscale of services and cost. Conclusion The results indicated that although patients are dissatisfied with the device in some aspects, overall the quality of life was rated as good for most of the aspects assessed.

  6. Developmental alterations of the auditory brainstem centers--pathogenetic implications in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzi, Anna M; Ottaviani, Giulia; Matturri, Luigi

    2015-10-15

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), despite the success of campaigns to reduce its risks, is the leading cause of infant death in the Western world. Even though the pathogenesis remains unexplained, brainstem abnormalities of the neuronal network that mediates breathing and protective responses to asphyxia, particularly in the arousal phase from sleep, are believed to play a fundamental role. This is the first study to identify, in SIDS, developmental defects of specific brainstem centers involved in hearing pathways, particularly in the cochlear and vestibular nuclei, in the superior olivary complex and in the inferior colliculus, suggesting a possible influence of the acoustic system on respiratory activity. In 49 SIDS cases and 20 controls an in-depth anatomopathological examination of the autonomic nervous system was performed, with the main aim of detecting developmental alterations of brainstem structures controlling both the respiratory and auditory activities. Overall, a significantly higher incidence of cytoarchitectural alterations of both the auditory and respiratory network components were observed in SIDS victims compared with matched controls. Even if there is not sufficient evidence to presume that developmental defects of brainstem auditory structures can affect breathing, our findings, showing that developmental deficit in the control respiratory areas are frequently accompanied by alterations of auditory structures, highlight an additional important element for the understanding the pathogenetic mechanism of SIDS.

  7. Auditory brainstem responses predict auditory nerve fiber thresholds and frequency selectivity in hearing impaired chinchillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kenneth S; Kale, Sushrut; Scheidt, Ryan E; Heinz, Michael G

    2011-10-01

    Noninvasive auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) are commonly used to assess cochlear pathology in both clinical and research environments. In the current study, we evaluated the relationship between ABR characteristics and more direct measures of cochlear function. We recorded ABRs and auditory nerve (AN) single-unit responses in seven chinchillas with noise-induced hearing loss. ABRs were recorded for 1-8 kHz tone burst stimuli both before and several weeks after 4 h of exposure to a 115 dB SPL, 50 Hz band of noise with a center frequency of 2 kHz. Shifts in ABR characteristics (threshold, wave I amplitude, and wave I latency) following hearing loss were compared to AN-fiber tuning curve properties (threshold and frequency selectivity) in the same animals. As expected, noise exposure generally resulted in an increase in ABR threshold and decrease in wave I amplitude at equal SPL. Wave I amplitude at equal sensation level (SL), however, was similar before and after noise exposure. In addition, noise exposure resulted in decreases in ABR wave I latency at equal SL and, to a lesser extent, at equal SPL. The shifts in ABR characteristics were significantly related to AN-fiber tuning curve properties in the same animal at the same frequency. Larger shifts in ABR thresholds and ABR wave I amplitude at equal SPL were associated with greater AN threshold elevation. Larger reductions in ABR wave I latency at equal SL, on the other hand, were associated with greater loss of AN frequency selectivity. This result is consistent with linear systems theory, which predicts shorter time delays for broader peripheral frequency tuning. Taken together with other studies, our results affirm that ABR thresholds and wave I amplitude provide useful estimates of cochlear sensitivity. Furthermore, comparisons of ABR wave I latency to normative data at the same SL may prove useful for detecting and characterizing loss of cochlear frequency selectivity.

  8. Improved outcomes in auditory brainstem implantation with the use of near-field electrical compound action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalà, Marco; Colletti, Liliana; Colletti, Giacomo; Colletti, Vittorio

    2014-12-01

    To compare the outcomes (auditory threshold and open-set speech perception at 48-month follow-up) of a new near-field monitoring procedure, electrical compound action potential, on positioning the auditory brainstem implant electrode array on the surface of the cochlear nuclei versus the traditional far-field electrical auditory brainstem response. Retrospective study. Tertiary referral center. Among the 202 patients with auditory brainstem implants fitted and monitored with electrical auditory brainstem response during implant fitting, 9 also underwent electrical compound action potential recording. These subjects were matched retrospectively with a control group of 9 patients in whom only the electrical auditory brainstem response was recorded. Electrical compound action potentials were obtained using a cotton-wick recording electrode located near the surface of the cochlear nuclei and on several cranial nerves. Significantly lower potential thresholds were observed with the recording electrode located on the cochlear nuclei surface compared with the electrical auditory brainstem response (104.4 ± 32.5 vs 158.9 ± 24.2, P = .0030). Electrical brainstem response and compound action potentials identified effects on the neighboring cranial nerves on 3.2 ± 2.4 and 7.8 ± 3.2 electrodes, respectively (P = .0034). Open-set speech perception outcomes at 48-month follow-up had improved significantly in the near- versus far-field recording groups (78.9% versus 56.7%; P = .0051). Electrical compound action potentials during auditory brainstem implantation significantly improved the definition of the potential threshold and the number of auditory and extra-auditory waves generated. It led to the best coupling between the electrode array and cochlear nuclei, significantly improving the overall open-set speech perception. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  9. Investigation of auditory brainstem function in elderly diabetic patients with presbycusis.

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    Kovacií, Jelena; Lajtman, Zoran; Ozegović, Ivan; Knezević, Predrag; Carić, Tomislav; Vlasić, Ana

    2009-01-01

    We performed brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) examinations in 100 patients older than 60 years and having type I diabetes mellitus and presbycusis. The aim of our investigation was to compare the BAEP results of this group with those of healthy controls with presbycusis and to look for possible correlations between alteration of the auditory brainstem function and the aging of elderly diabetic patients. Absolute and interpeak latencies of all waves were prolonged significantly in the study group of diabetic patients. The amplitudes of all waves I through V were diminished in the study group as compared to those in the control group, with statistical significance present for all waves. Analysis of the latencies (waves I, II, I, and V), interpeak latencies (I-V), and amplitudes (I, II, III, and V) of BAEP revealed a significant difference between those of diabetics and those of healthy elderly controls with presbycusis. These data support a hypothesis that there is a brainstem neuropathy in diabetes mellitus that can be assessed with auditory brainstem response testing even in the group of elderly patients with sensorineural hearing loss.

  10. Towards an optimal paradigm for simultaneously recording cortical and brainstem auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2015-02-15

    Simultaneous recording of brainstem and cortical event-related brain potentials (ERPs) may offer a valuable tool for understanding the early neural transcription of behaviorally relevant sounds and the hierarchy of signal processing operating at multiple levels of the auditory system. To date, dual recordings have been challenged by technological and physiological limitations including different optimal parameters necessary to elicit each class of ERP (e.g., differential adaptation/habitation effects and number of trials to obtain adequate response signal-to-noise ratio). We investigated a new stimulus paradigm for concurrent recording of the auditory brainstem frequency-following response (FFR) and cortical ERPs. The paradigm is "optimal" in that it uses a clustered stimulus presentation and variable interstimulus interval (ISI) to (i) achieve the most ideal acquisition parameters for eliciting subcortical and cortical responses, (ii) obtain an adequate number of trials to detect each class of response, and (iii) minimize neural adaptation/habituation effects. Comparison between clustered and traditional (fixed, slow ISI) stimulus paradigms revealed minimal change in amplitude or latencies of either the brainstem FFR or cortical ERP. The clustered paradigm offered over a 3× increase in recording efficiency compared to conventional (fixed ISI presentation) and thus, a more rapid protocol for obtaining dual brainstem-cortical recordings in individual listeners. We infer that faster recording of subcortical and cortical potentials might allow more complete and sensitive testing of neurophysiological function and aid in the differential assessment of auditory function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-sensory integration in brainstem and auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Koehler, Seth D; Shore, Susan E

    2012-11-16

    Tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of a physical sound stimulus. It is thought to arise from aberrant neural activity within central auditory pathways that may be influenced by multiple brain centers, including the somatosensory system. Auditory-somatosensory (bimodal) integration occurs in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), where electrical activation of somatosensory regions alters pyramidal cell spike timing and rates of sound stimuli. Moreover, in conditions of tinnitus, bimodal integration in DCN is enhanced, producing greater spontaneous and sound-driven neural activity, which are neural correlates of tinnitus. In primary auditory cortex (A1), a similar auditory-somatosensory integration has been described in the normal system (Lakatos et al., 2007), where sub-threshold multisensory modulation may be a direct reflection of subcortical multisensory responses (Tyll et al., 2011). The present work utilized simultaneous recordings from both DCN and A1 to directly compare bimodal integration across these separate brain stations of the intact auditory pathway. Four-shank, 32-channel electrodes were placed in DCN and A1 to simultaneously record tone-evoked unit activity in the presence and absence of spinal trigeminal nucleus (Sp5) electrical activation. Bimodal stimulation led to long-lasting facilitation or suppression of single and multi-unit responses to subsequent sound in both DCN and A1. Immediate (bimodal response) and long-lasting (bimodal plasticity) effects of Sp5-tone stimulation were facilitation or suppression of tone-evoked firing rates in DCN and A1 at all Sp5-tone pairing intervals (10, 20, and 40 ms), and greater suppression at 20 ms pairing-intervals for single unit responses. Understanding the complex relationships between DCN and A1 bimodal processing in the normal animal provides the basis for studying its disruption in hearing loss and tinnitus models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tinnitus Neuroscience.

  12. Alterations in peripheral and central components of the auditory brainstem response: a neural assay of tinnitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Lowe

    Full Text Available Chronic tinnitus, or "ringing of the ears", affects upwards of 15% of the adult population. Identifying a cost-effective and objective measure of tinnitus is needed due to legal concerns and disability issues, as well as for facilitating the effort to assess neural biomarkers. We developed a modified gap-in-noise (GIN paradigm to assess tinnitus in mice using the auditory brainstem response (ABR. We then compared the commonly used acoustic startle reflex gap-prepulse inhibition (gap-PPI and the ABR GIN paradigm in young adult CBA/CaJ mice before and after administrating sodium salicylate (SS, which is known to reliably induce a 16 kHz tinnitus percept in rodents. Post-SS, gap-PPI was significantly reduced at 12 and 16 kHz, consistent with previous studies demonstrating a tinnitus-induced gap-PPI reduction in this frequency range. ABR audiograms indicated thresholds were significantly elevated post-SS, also consistent with previous studies. There was a significant increase in the peak 2 (P2 to peak 1 (P1 and peak 4 (P4 to P1 amplitude ratios in the mid-frequency range, along with decreased latency of P4 at higher intensities. For the ABR GIN, peak amplitudes of the response to the second noise burst were calculated as a percentage of the first noise burst response amplitudes to quantify neural gap processing. A significant decrease in this ratio (i.e. recovery was seen only at 16 kHz for P1, indicating the presence of tinnitus near this frequency. Thus, this study demonstrates that GIN ABRs can be used as an efficient, non-invasive, and objective method of identifying the approximate pitch and presence of tinnitus in a mouse model. This technique has the potential for application in human subjects and also indicates significant, albeit different, deficits in temporal processing in peripheral and brainstem circuits following drug induced tinnitus.

  13. The relationship between auditory brainstem response, nerve conduction studies, and metabolic risk factors in type II diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have reported a correlation between auditory brainstem response (ABR) findings and nerve conduction studies (NCSs). The correlation between ABR findings and the metabolic profile of these patients is not well documented in previous studies. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of the disturbed metabolic profile (hyperglyceridemia and hyperlipidemia) in diabetic patients on the peripheral nervous system as well as the auditory brainstem response. ...

  14. The maturation state of the auditory nerve and brainstem in rats exposed to lead acetate and supplemented with ferrous sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucki, Fernanda; Morata, Thais C; Duarte, Josilene L; Ferreira, Maria Cecília F; Salgado, Manoel H; Alvarenga, Kátia F

    2017-01-23

    The literature has reported the association between lead and auditory effects, based on clinical and experimental studies. However, there is no consensus regarding the effects of lead in the auditory system, or its correlation with the concentration of the metal in the blood. To investigate the maturation state of the auditory system, specifically the auditory nerve and brainstem, in rats exposed to lead acetate and supplemented with ferrous sulfate. 30 weanling male rats (Rattus norvegicus, Wistar) were distributed into six groups of five animals each and exposed to one of two concentrations of lead acetate (100 or 400mg/L) and supplemented with ferrous sulfate (20mg/kg). The maturation state of the auditory nerve and brainstem was analyzed using Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential before and after lead exposure. The concentration of lead in blood and brainstem was analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. We verified that the concentration of Pb in blood and in brainstem presented a high correlation (r=0.951; pferrous sulfate supplementation reduced significantly the concentration of lead in blood and brainstem for the group exposed to the lowest concentration of lead (100mg/L), but not for the group exposed to the higher concentration (400mg/L). This study indicate that the lead acetate can have deleterious effects on the maturation of the auditory nerve and brainstem (cochlear nucleus region), as detected by the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials, and the ferrous sulphate can partially amend this effect. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Infant Prematurity on Auditory Brainstem Response at Preschool Age

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    Sara Hasani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preterm birth is a risk factor for a number of conditions that requires comprehensive examination. Our study was designed to investigate the impact of preterm birth on the processing of auditory stimuli and brain structures at the brainstem level at a preschool age.   Materials and Methods: An auditory brainstem response (ABR test was performed with low rates of stimuli in 60 children aged 4 to 6 years. Thirty subjects had been born following a very preterm labor or late-preterm labor and 30 control subjects had been born following a full-term labor.   Results: Significant differences in the ABR test result were observed in terms of the inter-peak intervals of the I–III and III–V waves, and the absolute latency of the III wave (P

  16. Assembly of the auditory circuitry by a Hox genetic network in the mouse brainstem.

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    Maria Di Bonito

    Full Text Available Rhombomeres (r contribute to brainstem auditory nuclei during development. Hox genes are determinants of rhombomere-derived fate and neuronal connectivity. Little is known about the contribution of individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes to auditory sensorimotor circuitry. Here, we show that r4 contributes to functionally linked sensory and motor components, including the ventral nucleus of lateral lemniscus, posterior ventral cochlear nuclei (VCN, and motor olivocochlear neurons. Assembly of the r4-derived auditory components is involved in sound perception and depends on regulatory interactions between Hoxb1 and Hoxb2. Indeed, in Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 mutant mice the transmission of low-level auditory stimuli is lost, resulting in hearing impairments. On the other hand, Hoxa2 regulates the Rig1 axon guidance receptor and controls contralateral projections from the anterior VCN to the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, a circuit involved in sound localization. Thus, individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes control the assembly of distinct functionally segregated sub-circuits in the developing auditory brainstem.

  17. Assembly of the auditory circuitry by a Hox genetic network in the mouse brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonito, Maria; Narita, Yuichi; Avallone, Bice; Sequino, Luigi; Mancuso, Marta; Andolfi, Gennaro; Franzè, Anna Maria; Puelles, Luis; Rijli, Filippo M; Studer, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    Rhombomeres (r) contribute to brainstem auditory nuclei during development. Hox genes are determinants of rhombomere-derived fate and neuronal connectivity. Little is known about the contribution of individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes to auditory sensorimotor circuitry. Here, we show that r4 contributes to functionally linked sensory and motor components, including the ventral nucleus of lateral lemniscus, posterior ventral cochlear nuclei (VCN), and motor olivocochlear neurons. Assembly of the r4-derived auditory components is involved in sound perception and depends on regulatory interactions between Hoxb1 and Hoxb2. Indeed, in Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 mutant mice the transmission of low-level auditory stimuli is lost, resulting in hearing impairments. On the other hand, Hoxa2 regulates the Rig1 axon guidance receptor and controls contralateral projections from the anterior VCN to the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, a circuit involved in sound localization. Thus, individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes control the assembly of distinct functionally segregated sub-circuits in the developing auditory brainstem.

  18. Somatostatin and leu-enkephalin in the rat auditory brainstem during fetal and postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kungel, M; Friauf, E

    1995-05-01

    A transient expression of the neuropeptide somatostatin has been described in several brain areas during early ontogeny and several opioid peptides, such as leu-enkephalin, have also been found in the brain at this stage in development. It is therefore believed that somatostatin and leu-enkephalin may play a role in neural maturation. The aim of the present study was to describe the spatiotemporal pattern of somatostatin and leu-enkephalin immunoreactivity in the auditory brainstem nuclei of the developing rat and to correlate it with other developmental events. In order to achieve this goal, we applied peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemistry to rat brains between embryonic day (E) 17 and adulthood. Somatostatin immunoreactivity (SIR) was found in all nuclei of the auditory brainstem, yet it was temporally restricted in most nuclei. SIR appeared prenatally and reached maximum levels around postnatal day (P) 7, when great numbers of immunoreactive neurons were present in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) and in the lateral lemniscus. At that time relatively low numbers of cells were labeled in the dorsal cochlear nucleus, the lateral superior olive (LSO), and the inferior colliculus (IC). During the same period, when somata in the VCN were somatostatin-immunoreactive (SIR), a dense network of labeled fibers was also present in the LSO, the medial superior olive (MSO), and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). As these nuclei receive direct input from VCN neurons, and as the distribution and morphology of the somatostatinergic fibers in the superior olivary complex (SOC) was like that of axons from VCN neurons, these findings suggest a transient somatostatinergic connection within the auditory system. Aside from the LSO, MSO, and MNTB, labeled fibers were found to a smaller extent in all other auditory brainstem nuclei. After P7, the SIR decreased and only a few immunoreactive elements were found in the adult auditory brainstem nuclei, indicating

  19. Effect of noise pollution on hearing in auto-rickshaw drivers: A brainstem auditory-evoked potentials study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupendra Marotrao Gathe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Auditory brainstem response is the most important tool in differential diagnosis and degree of hearing impairment. Many studies have been carried out to ascertain the effects of noise on human beings but very less on the transportation workers; hence, considering the need of time and use of brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEP, this study was conducted to analyze the effect of noise pollution on auto-rickshaw drivers (ARDs. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate I, II, III, IV, and V wave latencies in ARDs and comparing it with control subjects in Central India. Settings and Design: This was a case-control study done on ARDs as participants and compared it with normal healthy individual BAEP pattern. Materials and Methods: We recorded BAEP from fifty healthy control subjects and fifty ARDs from the community of same sex and geographical setup. The absolute latencies were measured and compared. Recording was done using RMS EMG EP MARK II machine manufactured by RMS recorders and Medicare system, Chandigarh. Statistical Analysis Used: All the data related with subjects were filled in Excel sheet and analyzed with the help of EPI 6.0 info software with Student′s t-test. Results: There were prolongations of all absolute wave latencies of II, III, IV, and V in the ARDs as compared to control subjects. Conclusions: The prolongation of all absolute latencies of II, III, IV, and V suggests abnormality in brainstem auditory pathway mainly affecting the retrocochlear pathways in group of ARDs (noise exposure >10 years than other group who had exposed for <10 years and is more significant on the right ear than left.

  20. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (ppain modulation circuitry provides a framework for the future investigations into the neural mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of persistent pain conditions thought to involve altered analgesic circuitry.

  1. Lateral asymmetry and reduced forward masking effect in early brainstem auditory evoked responses in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källstrand, Johan; Nehlstedt, Sara Fristedt; Sköld, Mia Ling; Nielzén, Sören

    2012-04-30

    Individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia show deficiencies of basic neurophysiological sorting mechanisms. This study further investigated this issue, focusing on the two phenomena, laterality of coding and auditory forward masking. A specific audiometric method for use in psychiatry was the measuring set up to register brain stem audiograms (ABRs). A sample of 49 schizophrenic patients was compared with three control groups consisting of healthy reference subjects (n=49), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients (n=29), Asperger syndrome (AS) patients (n=13) and drug-induced psychotic patients (n=14). Schizophrenic patients showed significant abnormal laterality of brainstem activity in wave II of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in comparison with all other study groups. Forward masking effects in the superior olive complex were coded significantly differently by schizophrenic patients compared to control groups except for the AS group. The results suggest deficits in the coding of auditory stimuli in the lower parts of the auditory pathway in schizophrenia and indicate that increased peripheral lateral asymmetry and forward masking aberrances could be neurophysiological markers for the disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Källstrand

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Johan Källstrand1, Olle Olsson2, Sara Fristedt Nehlstedt1, Mia Ling Sköld1, Sören Nielzén21SensoDetect AB, Lund, Sweden; 2Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, SwedenAbstract: Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs elicited by forward masking in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome (AS. Sixteen AS subjects were included in the forward masking experiment and compared to three control groups consisting of healthy individuals (n = 16, schizophrenic patients (n = 16 and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients (n = 16, respectively, of matching age and gender. The results showed that the AS subjects exhibited abnormally low activity in the early part of their ABRs that distinctly separated them from the three control groups. Specifically, wave III amplitudes were significantly lower in the AS group than for all the control groups in the forward masking condition (P < 0.005, which was not the case in the baseline condition. Thus, electrophysiological measurements of ABRs to complex sound stimuli (eg, forward masking may lead to a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiology of AS. Future studies may further point to specific ABR characteristics in AS individuals that separate them from individuals diagnosed with other neurodevelopmental diseases.Keywords: asperger syndrome, auditory brainstem response, forward masking, psychoacoustics

  3. The auditory brainstem response to complex sounds: a potential biomarker for guiding treatment of psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Tarasenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits limit psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia. For many patients, cognitive remediation approaches have yielded encouraging results. Nevertheless, therapeutic response is variable, and outcome studies consistently identify individuals who respond minimally to these interventions. Biomarkers that can assist in identifying patients likely to benefit from particular forms of cognitive remediation are needed. Here we describe an event-related potential (ERP biomarker – the auditory brainstem response to complex sounds (cABR – that appears to be particularly well-suited for predicting response to at least one form of cognitive remediation that targets auditory information processing. Uniquely, the cABR quantifies the fidelity of sound encoded at the level of the brainstem and midbrain. This ERP biomarker has revealed auditory processing abnormalities in various neurodevelopmental disorders, correlates with functioning across several cognitive domains, and appears to be responsive to targeted auditory training. We present preliminary cABR data from 18 schizophrenia patients and propose further investigation of this biomarker for predicting and tracking response to cognitive interventions.

  4. Characteristics of brainstem auditory evoked potentials of students studying folk dance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxiang Li; Yuzhen Zhu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Previous experiments have demonstrated that brainstem auditory evoked potential is affected by exercise,exercise duration,and frequency. OBJECTIVE:Comparing the brainstem auditory evoked potential of students studying folk dance to students studying other subjects.DESIGN:Observational contrast study. SETTING:Physical Education College,Shandong Normal University PARTICIPANTS:Fifty-five female students were enrolled at Shandong Normal University between September and December in 2005,including 21 students that studied folk dance and 34 students that studied other subjects.The age of the folk dance students averaged(19±1)years and dance training length was(6.0 ±1.5)years.The students that studied other subjects had never taken part in dance training or other physical training,and their age averaged(22±1)years,body height averaged(162±5)cm,body mass averaged(51 ±6)kg.All subjects had no prior ear disease or history of other neurological disorders.All students provided informed consent for the experimental project. METHODS:The neural electricity tester,NDI-200(Shanghai Poseidon Medical Electronic Instrument Factory)was used to examine and record Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential values of the subjects during silence,as well as to transversally analyze the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential values.The electrode positions were cleaned and degreased with soapy water,followed by ethanol.The selected bipolar electrodes were situated on the head:recording electrodes were placed at the Baihui acupoint,and the reference electrode was placed at the mastoid of the measured ear,with grounding electrodes in the center of the forehead.Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential values were elicited by monaural stimulation of a "click" though an earphone; the other ear was sheltered by the white noise.The click intensity was 102 db,the stimulation frequency was 30 Hz,the bandpass filters were 1 000-3 000 Hz,the sensitivity was 5 μV,and a total of 2 000 sweeps were

  5. Musical training heightens auditory brainstem function during sensitive periods in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eSkoe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Experience has a profound influence on how sound is processed in the brain. Yet little is known about how enriched experiences interact with developmental processes to shape neural processing of sound. We examine this question as part of a large cross-sectional study of auditory brainstem development involving more than 700 participants, 213 of whom were classified as musicians. We hypothesized that experience-dependent processes piggyback on developmental processes, resulting in a waxing-and-waning effect of experience that tracks with the undulating developmental baseline. This hypothesis led to the prediction that experience-dependent plasticity would be amplified during periods when developmental changes are underway (i.e., early and later in life and that the peak in experience-dependent plasticity would coincide with the developmental apex for each subcomponent of the auditory brainstem response. Consistent with our predictions, we reveal that musicians have heightened response features at distinctive times in the life span that coincide with periods of developmental change and climax. The effect of musicianship is also quite specific: we find that only select components of auditory brainstem activity are affected, with musicians having heightened function for onset latency, high frequency phase-locking, and response consistency, and with little effect observed for other measures, including lower frequency phase-locking and non-stimulus-related activity. By showing that musicianship imparts a neural signature that is especially evident during childhood and old age, our findings reinforce the idea that the nervous system’s response to sound is chiseled by how a person interacts with his specific auditory environment, with the effect of the environment wielding its greatest influence during certain privileged windows of development.

  6. A human brainstem glioma xenograft model enabled for bioluminescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hashizume, Rintaro; Ozawa, Tomoko; Dinca, Eduard B.; Banerjee, Anuradha; Prados, Michael D.; James, Charles D.; Gupta, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    Despite the use of radiation and chemotherapy, the prognosis for children with diffuse brainstem gliomas is extremely poor. There is a need for relevant brainstem tumor models that can be used to test new therapeutic agents and delivery systems in pre-clinical studies. We report the development of a brainstem-tumor model in rats and the application of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for monitoring tumor growth and response to therapy as part of this model. Luciferase-modified human glioblastoma...

  7. Abnormal Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR Findings in a Near-Normal Hearing Child with Noonan Syndrome

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    Bahram Jalaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noonan syndrome (NS is a heterogeneous genetic disease that affects many parts of the body. It was named after Dr. Jacqueline Anne Noonan, a paediatric cardiologist.Case Report: We report audiological tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR findings in a 5-year old Malay boy with NS. Despite showing the marked signs of NS, the child could only produce a few meaningful words. Audiological tests found him to have bilateral mild conductive hearing loss at low frequencies. In ABR testing, despite having good waveform morphology, the results were atypical. Absolute latency of wave V was normal but interpeak latencies of wave’s I-V, I-II, II-III were prolonged. Interestingly, interpeak latency of waves III-V was abnormally shorter.Conclusion:Abnormal ABR results are possibly due to abnormal anatomical condition of brainstem and might contribute to speech delay.

  8. Speech-evoked auditory brainstem responses in children with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koravand, Amineh; Al Osman, Rida; Rivest, Véronique; Poulin, Catherine

    2017-08-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate subcortical auditory processing in children with sensorineural hearing loss. Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABRs) were recorded using click and speech/da/stimuli. Twenty-five children, aged 6-14 years old, participated in the study: 13 with normal hearing acuity and 12 with sensorineural hearing loss. No significant differences were observed for the click-evoked ABRs between normal hearing and hearing-impaired groups. For the speech-evoked ABRs, no significant differences were found for the latencies of the following responses between the two groups: onset (V and A), transition (C), one of the steady-state wave (F), and offset (O). However, the latency of the steady-state waves (D and E) was significantly longer for the hearing-impaired compared to the normal hearing group. Furthermore, the amplitude of the offset wave O and of the envelope frequency response (EFR) of the speech-evoked ABRs was significantly larger for the hearing-impaired compared to the normal hearing group. Results obtained from the speech-evoked ABRs suggest that children with a mild to moderately-severe sensorineural hearing loss have a specific pattern of subcortical auditory processing. Our results show differences for the speech-evoked ABRs in normal hearing children compared to hearing-impaired children. These results add to the body of the literature on how children with hearing loss process speech at the brainstem level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of Auditory Brainstem Response in Noise Induced Tinnitus and Non-Tinnitus Control Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassem Mohammadkhani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Tinnitus is an unpleasant sound which can cause some behavioral disorders. According to evidence the origin of tinnitus is not only in peripheral but also in central auditory system. So evaluation of central auditory system function is necessary. In this study Auditory brainstem responses (ABR were compared in noise induced tinnitus and non-tinnitus control subjects.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study is conducted in 60 cases in two groups including of 30 noise induced tinnitus and 30 non-tinnitus control subjects. ABRs were recorded ipsilateraly and contralateraly and their latencies and amplitudes were analyzed.Results: Mean interpeak latencies of III-V (p= 0.022, I-V (p=0.033 in ipsilatral electrode array and mean absolute latencies of IV (p=0.015 and V (p=0.048 in contralatral electrode array were significantly increased in noise induced tinnitus group relative to control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded from that there are some decrease in neural transmission time in brainstem and there are some sign of involvement of medial nuclei in olivery complex in addition to lateral lemniscus.

  10. Brainstem auditory-evoked responses with and without sedation in autism and Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sersen, E A; Heaney, G; Clausen, J; Belser, R; Rainbow, S

    1990-04-15

    Brainstem auditory-evoked responses (BAER) were obtained from 46 control, 16 Down's syndrome, and 48 autistic male subjects. Six Down's syndrome and 37 autistic subjects were tested with sedation. Sedated and unsedated Down's syndrome subjects displayed shorter absolute and interpeak latencies for early components of the BAER whereas the sedated autistic group showed longer latencies for the middle and late components. The prolongation of latencies in the sedated autistic group was unrelated to age or intellectual level. Although individuals requiring sedation may have a higher probability of neurological impairment, an effect of sedation on the BAER cannot be ruled out.

  11. Auditory Brainstem Gap Responses Start to Decline in Middle Age Mice: A Novel Physiological Biomarker for Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tanika T.; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P.; Frisina, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    The CBA/CaJ mouse strain's auditory function is normal during the early phases of life and gradually declines over its lifespan, much like human age-related hearing loss (ARHL), but on a mouse life cycle “time frame”. This pattern of ARHL is relatively similar to that of most humans: difficult to clinically diagnose at its onset, and currently not treatable medically. To address the challenge of early diagnosis, CBA mice were used for the present study to analyze the beginning stages and functional onset biomarkers of ARHL. The results from Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) audiogram and Gap-in-noise (GIN) ABR tests were compared for two groups of mice of different ages, young adult and middle age. ABR peak components from the middle age group displayed minor changes in audibility, but had a significantly higher prolonged peak latency and decreased peak amplitude in response to temporal gaps in comparison to the young adult group. The results for the younger subjects revealed gap thresholds and recovery rates that were comparable to previous studies of auditory neural gap coding. Our findings suggest that age-linked degeneration of the peripheral and brainstem auditory system is already beginning in middle age, allowing for the possibility of preventative biomedical or hearing protection measures to be implemented as a possibility for attenuating further damage to the auditory system due to ARHL. PMID:25307161

  12. Auditory brainstem gap responses start to decline in mice in middle age: a novel physiological biomarker for age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tanika T; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P; Frisina, Robert D

    2015-07-01

    The auditory function of the CBA/CaJ mouse strain is normal during the early phases of life and gradually declines over its lifespan, much like human age-related hearing loss (ARHL) but within the "time frame" of a mouse life cycle. This pattern of ARHL is similar to that of most humans: difficult to diagnose clinically at its onset and currently not treatable medically. To address the challenge of early diagnosis, we use CBA mice to analyze the initial stages and functional onset biomarkers of ARHL. The results from Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) audiogram and Gap-in-noise (GIN) ABR tests were compared for two groups of mice of different ages, namely young adult and middle age. ABR peak components from the middle age group displayed minor changes in audibility but had a significantly higher prolonged peak latency and decreased peak amplitude in response to temporal gaps in comparison with the young adult group. The results for the younger subjects revealed gap thresholds and recovery rates that were comparable with previous studies of auditory neural gap coding. Our findings suggest that age-linked degeneration of the peripheral and brainstem auditory system begins in middle age, allowing for the possibility of preventative biomedical or hearing protection measures to be implemented in order to attenuate further damage to the auditory system attributable to ARHL.

  13. Sedation of children for auditory brainstem response using ketamine-midazolam-atropine combination - a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocskai, Tímea; Németh, Adrienne; Bogár, Lajos; Pytel, József

    2013-12-01

    Authors investigated sedation quality in children for auditory brainstem response testing. Two-hundred and seventy-six sedation procedures were retrospectively analyzed using recorded data focusing on efficacy of sedation and complications. Intramuscular ketamine-midazolam-atropine combination was administered on sedation preceded by narcotic suppository as pre-medication. On using the combination vital parameters remained within normal range, the complication rate was minimal. Pulse rate, arterial blood pressure and pulse oxymetry readings were stable, hypoventilation developed in 4, apnoea in none of the cases, post-sedation agitation occurred in 3 and nausea and/or vomiting in 2 cases. Repeated administration of narcotic agent was necessary in a single case only. Our practice is suitable for the sedation assisting hearing examinations in children. It has no influence on the auditory brainstem testing, the conditions necessary for the test can be met entirely with minimal side-effects. Our practice provides a more lasting sedation time in children during the examination hence there is no need for the repetition of the narcotics.

  14. Hearing outcomes after loss of brainstem auditory evoked potentials during microvascular decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Krishnaiah, Balaji; Habeych, Miguel E; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Crammond, Donald J

    2015-04-01

    The primary aim of this paper is to study the pre-operative characteristics, intra-operative changes and post-operative hearing outcomes in patients after complete loss of wave V of the brainstem auditory evoked potential. We retrospectively analyzed the brainstem auditory evoked potential data of 94 patients who underwent microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm at our institute. Patients were divided into two groups - those with and those without loss of wave V. The differences between the two groups and outcomes were assessed using t-test and chi-squared tests. In our study 23 (24%) patients out of 94 had a complete loss of wave V, with 11 (48%) patients experiencing transient loss and 12 (52%) patients experiencing permanent loss. The incidence of hearing loss in patients with no loss of wave V was 5.7% and 26% in patients who did experience wave V loss. The incidence of hearing change in patients with no loss of wave V was 12.6% and 30.43% in patients who did experience wave V loss. Loss of wave V during the procedure or at the end of procedure significantly increases the odds of hearing loss. Hearing change is a significant under-reported clinical condition after microvascular decompression in patients who have loss of wave V.

  15. Unilateral and bilateral brainstem auditory-evoked response abnormalities in 900 Dalmatian dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, T A; Nelson, H J; Williams, D C; Willits, N

    1992-01-01

    In a survey of 900 Dalmatian dogs, brainstem auditory-evoked responses (BAER) and clinical observations were used to determine the incidence and sex distribution of bilateral and unilateral BAER abnormalities and their association with heterochromia iridis (HI). To assess the efficacy of BAER testing in guiding breeding programs, data from 749 dogs (subgroup A), considered to be a sample of the population at large, were compared with data from a subgroup (subgroup B; n = 151) in which selection of breeding stock had been based on BAER testing from the beginning of the 4-year survey. Brainstem auditory-evoked responses were elicited by applying click stimuli unilaterally, while applying a white noise masking sound to the contralateral ear. Under these conditions, BAER were either normal, unilaterally absent, or bilaterally absent. Dogs with bilaterally absent BAER were clinically deaf; dogs with unilaterally absent BAER were not clinically deaf but appeared dependent on their BAER-normal ears for their auditory-cued behavior. Dogs with unilaterally absent BAER often were misidentified as normal by uninformed observers. Among the 900 dogs, 648 (72.0%) were normal, 189 (21.0%) had unilateral absence of BAER, and 63 (7.0%) had bilateral absence of BAER or were clinically deaf and assumed to have bilaterally absent BAER (n = 4). Total incidence in the population sampled was assumed to be higher, because some bilaterally affected dogs that would have been members of subgroup A undoubtedly did not come to our attention. Among females, 24.0% were unilaterally abnormal and 8.2% were bilaterally abnormal whereas, among males, 17.8% were unilaterally abnormal and 5.7% were bilaterally abnormal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Brainstem auditory evoked responses in an equine patient population: part I--adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, M; Holliday, T A; Nieto, J E; Williams, D C

    2014-01-01

    Brainstem auditory evoked response has been an underused diagnostic modality in horses as evidenced by few reports on the subject. To describe BAER findings, common clinical signs, and causes of hearing loss in adult horses. Study group, 76 horses; control group, 8 horses. Retrospective. BAER records from the Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory were reviewed from the years of 1982 to 2013. Peak latencies, amplitudes, and interpeak intervals were measured when visible. Horses were grouped under disease categories. Descriptive statistics and a posthoc Bonferroni test were performed. Fifty-seven of 76 horses had BAER deficits. There was no breed or sex predisposition, with the exception of American Paint horses diagnosed with congenital sensorineural deafness. Eighty-six percent (n = 49/57) of the horses were younger than 16 years of age. The most common causes of BAER abnormalities were temporohyoid osteoarthropathy (THO, n = 20/20; abnormalities/total), congenital sensorineural deafness in Paint horses (17/17), multifocal brain disease (13/16), and otitis media/interna (4/4). Auditory loss was bilateral and unilateral in 74% (n = 42/57) and 26% (n = 15/57) of the horses, respectively. The most common causes of bilateral auditory loss were sensorineural deafness, THO, and multifocal brain disease whereas THO and otitis were the most common causes of unilateral deficits. Auditory deficits should be investigated in horses with altered behavior, THO, multifocal brain disease, otitis, and in horses with certain coat and eye color patterns. BAER testing is an objective and noninvasive diagnostic modality to assess auditory function in horses. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  17. Musical training orchestrates coordinated neuroplasticity in auditory brainstem and cortex to counteract age-related declines in categorical vowel perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Alain, Claude

    2015-01-21

    Musicianship in early life is associated with pervasive changes in brain function and enhanced speech-language skills. Whether these neuroplastic benefits extend to older individuals more susceptible to cognitive decline, and for whom plasticity is weaker, has yet to be established. Here, we show that musical training offsets declines in auditory brain processing that accompanying normal aging in humans, preserving robust speech recognition late into life. We recorded both brainstem and cortical neuroelectric responses in older adults with and without modest musical training as they classified speech sounds along an acoustic-phonetic continuum. Results reveal higher temporal precision in speech-evoked responses at multiple levels of the auditory system in older musicians who were also better at differentiating phonetic categories. Older musicians also showed a closer correspondence between neural activity and perceptual performance. This suggests that musicianship strengthens brain-behavior coupling in the aging auditory system. Last, "neurometric" functions derived from unsupervised classification of neural activity established that early cortical responses could accurately predict listeners' psychometric speech identification and, more critically, that neurometric profiles were organized more categorically in older musicians. We propose that musicianship offsets age-related declines in speech listening by refining the hierarchical interplay between subcortical/cortical auditory brain representations, allowing more behaviorally relevant information carried within the neural code, and supplying more faithful templates to the brain mechanisms subserving phonetic computations. Our findings imply that robust neuroplasticity conferred by musical training is not restricted by age and may serve as an effective means to bolster speech listening skills that decline across the lifespan. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351240-10$15.00/0.

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging of the inferior colliculus and brainstem auditory-evoked potentials in preterm infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, Milla; Lehtonen, Liisa; Lapinleimu, Helena [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology and Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Johansson, Reijo [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Turku (Finland); Jaeaeskelaeinen, Satu K. [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Turku (Finland); Kujari, Harry [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Pathology, Turku (Finland); Haataja, Leena [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Paediatric Neurology, Turku (Finland)

    2009-08-15

    Preterm and low-birth-weight infants have an increased risk of sensorineural hearing loss. Brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEP) are an effective method to detect subtle deficits in impulse conduction in the auditory pathway. Abnormalities on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been shown to be associated with perinatal white-matter injury and reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) has been reported in patients with sensorineural hearing loss. To evaluate the possibility of a correlation between BAEP and DTI of the inferior colliculus in preterm infants. DTI at term age and BAEP measurements were performed on all very-low-birth-weight or very preterm study infants (n=56). FA and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the inferior colliculus were measured from the DTI. Shorter BAEP wave I, III, and V latencies and I-III and I-V intervals and higher wave V amplitude correlated with higher FA of the inferior colliculus. The association between the DTI findings of the inferior colliculus and BAEP responses suggests that DTI can be used to assess the integrity of the auditory pathway in preterm infants. (orig.)

  19. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källstrand, Johan; Olsson, Olle; Nehlstedt, Sara Fristedt; Sköld, Mia Ling; Nielzén, Sören

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by forward masking in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome (AS). Sixteen AS subjects were included in the forward masking experiment and compared to three control groups consisting of healthy individuals (n = 16), schizophrenic patients (n = 16) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients (n = 16), respectively, of matching age and gender. The results showed that the AS subjects exhibited abnormally low activity in the early part of their ABRs that distinctly separated them from the three control groups. Specifically, wave III amplitudes were significantly lower in the AS group than for all the control groups in the forward masking condition (P < 0.005), which was not the case in the baseline condition. Thus, electrophysiological measurements of ABRs to complex sound stimuli (eg, forward masking) may lead to a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiology of AS. Future studies may further point to specific ABR characteristics in AS individuals that separate them from individuals diagnosed with other neurodevelopmental diseases. PMID:20628629

  20. A novel method of brainstem auditory evoked potentials using complex verbal stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia N Kouni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The click and tone-evoked auditory brainstem responses are widely used in clinical practice due to their consistency and predictability. More recently, the speech-evoked responses have been used to evaluate subcortical processing of complex signals, not revealed by responses to clicks and tones. Aims: Disyllable stimuli corresponding to familiar words can induce a pattern of voltage fluctuations in the brain stem resulting in a familiar waveform, and they can yield better information about brain stem nuclei along the ascending central auditory pathway. Materials and Methods: We describe a new method with the use of the disyllable word "baba" corresponding to English "daddy" that is commonly used in many other ethnic languages spanning from West Africa to the Eastern Mediterranean all the way to the East Asia. Results: This method was applied in 20 young adults institutionally diagnosed as dyslexic (10 subjects or light dyslexic (10 subjects who were matched with 20 sex, age, education, hearing sensitivity, and IQ-matched normal subjects. The absolute peak latencies of the negative wave C and the interpeak latencies of A-C elicited by verbal stimuli "baba" were found to be significantly increased in the dyslexic group in comparison with the control group. Conclusions: The method is easy and helpful to diagnose abnormalities affecting the auditory pathway, to identify subjects with early perception and cortical representation abnormalities, and to apply the suitable therapeutic and rehabilitation management.

  1. Implementation of a nation-wide automated auditory brainstem response hearing screening programme in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straaten, H.L.M. van; Hille, E.T.M.; Kok, J.H.; Verkerk, P.H.; Baerts, W.; Bunkers, C.M.; Smink, E.W.A.; Elburg, R.M. van; Kleine, M.J.K. de; Ilsen, A.; Maingay-Visser, A.P.G.F.; Vries, L.S. de; Weisglas-Kuperus, N.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: As part of a future national neonatal hearing screening programme in the Netherlands, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) hearing screening was implemented in seven neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The objective was to evaluate key outcomes of this programme: participation rate,

  2. Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Kensi M.; Stuart, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps in neonates and adults. Method Thirty-two neonates with no physical or neurologic challenges and 20 adults with normal hearing participated. ABRs were acquired with a starting intensity of 30 dB normal hearing level…

  3. Effect of High-Pass Filtering on the Neonatal Auditory Brainstem Response to Air- and Bone-Conducted Clicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Andrew; Yang, Edward Y.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous 3- channel recorded auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were obtained from 20 neonates with various high-pass filter settings and low intensity levels. Results support the advocacy of less restrictive high-pass filtering for neonatal and infant ABR screening to air-conducted and bone-conducted clicks. (Author/JDD)

  4. Processamento auditivo e potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco cerebral (BERA Auditory precessing and auditory brainstem response (ABR

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    Marcela Pfeiffer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar relação existente entre os potenciais auditivos de tronco cerebral e a avaliação comportamental do processamento auditivo. MÉTODOS: foi realizada em um grupo de 60 meninas residentes de Paraíba do Sul na idade de nove a 12 anos com limiares tonais dentro dos padrões de normalidade e timpanometria tipo A com presença dos reflexos acústicos. Os testes utilizados para a avaliação comportamental do processamento auditivo foram: avaliação simplificada do processamento auditivo, teste de fala no ruído, teste de dissílabos alternados e teste dicótico não verbal. Após a avaliação do processamento auditivo, as crianças foram subdivididas em dois grupos, G1 (sem alteração no processamento auditivo e G2 (com alteração no processamento auditivo e submetidas aos potenciais auditivos de tronco cerebral. Os parâmetros utilizados na comparação dos dois grupos foram: latência absoluta das ondas I, III e V; latência interpicos das ondas I-III, I-V, III-V; diferença interaural da latência interpico I-V; e diferença interaural da latência da onda V. RESULTADOS: foram encontradas diferenças estatísticas nos parâmetros de latência interpico das ondas I-V na orelha esquerda (p=0,009, diferença interaural da latência interpico de ondas I-V (p=0,020 e diferença da latência interpico de ondas I e V da orelha direita para a esquerda entre os grupos G1 e G2 (p=0,025. CONCLUSÃO: foi possível encontrar relação dos potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco cerebral com a avaliação comportamental do processamento auditivo nos parâmetros de latência interpico entre as ondas I e V da orelha esquerda e diferença interaural da latência interpico I-V na orelha esquerda.PURPOSE: to investigate the correlation of auditory brainstem response (ABR and behavioral auditory processing evaluation. METHODS: sixty girls, from Paraíba do Sul, ranging from 9 to 12-year-old were evaluated. In order to take part in the study

  5. Outcomes following Pediatric Auditory Brainstem Implant Surgery: Early Experiences in a North American Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puram, Sidharth V; Barber, Samuel R; Kozin, Elliott D; Shah, Parth; Remenschneider, Aaron; Herrmann, Barbara S; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Barker, Fred G; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-07-01

    There are no approved Food and Drug Administration indications for pediatric auditory brainstem implant (ABI) surgery in the United States. Our prospective case series aims to determine the safety and feasibility of ABI surgery in pediatric patients age, 2.52 ± 0.39 years). Four patients underwent ABI surgery (age, 19.2 ± 3.43 months), including 4 primary procedures and 1 revision for device failure. Spontaneous device failure occurred in another subject postoperatively. No major/minor complications occurred, including cerebrospinal fluid leak, facial nerve injury, hematoma, and nonauditory stimulation. All subjects detected sound with environmental awareness, and several demonstrated babbling and mimicry. Poor durability of older implants underscores need for updated technology. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  6. Aberrant lateralization of brainstem auditory evoked responses by individuals with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miezejeski, C M; Heaney, G; Belser, R; Sersen, E A

    1994-01-01

    Brainstem auditory evoked response latencies were studied in 80 males (13 with Down syndrome, 23 with developmental disability due to other causes, and 44 with no disability). Latencies for waves P3 and P5 were shorter for the Down syndrome than for the other groups, though at P5, as compared to latencies for the nondisabled group, the difference was not significant. The pattern of left versus right ear responses in the Down syndrome group differed from those of the other groups. This finding was related to research noting decreased lateralization of and decreased ability at receptive and expressive language among people with Down syndrome. Some individuals required sedation. A lateralized effect of sedation was noted.

  7. Longer brainstem auditory evoked response latencies of individuals with fragile X syndrome related to sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miezejeski, C M; Heaney, G; Belser, R; Brown, W T; Jenkins, E C; Sersen, E A

    1997-04-18

    Brainstem auditory evoked response latencies were studies in 75 males (13 with fragile X syndrome, 18 with mental retardation due to other causes, and 44 with no disability). Latency values were obtained for each ear for the positive deflections of waves I (P1), III (P3), and V (P5). Some individuals with mental retardation required sedation. Contrary to previous report, latencies obtained for individuals with fragile X did not differ from those obtained for persons without mental retardation. Persons receiving sedation, whether or not their retardation was due to fragile X, had longer latencies for wave P5 than persons who did not receive sedation. This effect of sedation may also explain the previously reported increased latencies for persons with fragile X.

  8. Gap prepulse inhibition and auditory brainstem evoked potentials as objective measures for tinnitus in guinea pigs.

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    Susanne eDehmel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus or ringing of the ears is a subjective phantom sensation necessitating behavioral models that objectively demonstrate the existence and quality of the tinnitus sensation. The gap detection test uses the acoustic startle response elicited by loud noise pulses and its gating or suppression by preceding sub-startling prepulses. Gaps in noise bands serve as prepulses, assuming that ongoing tinnitus masks the gap and results in impaired gap detection. This test has shown its reliability in rats, mice, and gerbils. No data exists for the guinea pig so far, although gap detection is similar across mammals and the acoustic startle response is a well-established tool in guinea pig studies of psychiatric disorders and in pharmacological studies. Here we investigated the startle behavior and prepulse inhibition (PPI of the guinea pig and showed that guinea pigs have a reliable startle response that can be suppressed by 15 ms gaps embedded in narrow noise bands preceding the startle noise pulse. After recovery of auditory brainstem response (ABR thresholds from a unilateral noise over-exposure centered at 7 kHz, guinea pigs showed diminished gap-induced reduction of the startle response in frequency bands between 8 and 18 kHz. This suggests the development of tinnitus in frequency regions that showed a temporary threshold shift (TTS after noise over-exposure. Changes in discharge rate and synchrony, two neuronal correlates of tinnitus, should be reflected in altered ABR waveforms, which would be useful to objectively detect tinnitus and its localization to auditory brainstem structures. Therefore we analyzed latencies and amplitudes of the first five ABR waves at suprathreshold sound intensities and correlated ABR abnormalities with the results of the behavioral tinnitus testing. Early ABR wave amplitudes up to N3 were increased for animals with tinnitus possibly stemming from hyperactivity and hypersynchrony underlying the tinnitus percept.

  9. Modeling binaural responses in the auditory brainstem to electric stimulation of the auditory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand; Colburn, H Steven

    2015-02-01

    Bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) provide improvements in sound localization and speech perception in noise over unilateral CIs. However, the benefits arise mainly from the perception of interaural level differences, while bilateral CI listeners' sensitivity to interaural time difference (ITD) is poorer than normal. To help understand this limitation, a set of ITD-sensitive neural models was developed to study binaural responses to electric stimulation. Our working hypothesis was that central auditory processing is normal with bilateral CIs so that the abnormality in the response to electric stimulation at the level of the auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) is the source of the limited ITD sensitivity. A descriptive model of ANF response to both acoustic and electric stimulation was implemented and used to drive a simplified biophysical model of neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO). The model's ITD sensitivity was found to depend strongly on the specific configurations of membrane and synaptic parameters for different stimulation rates. Specifically, stronger excitatory synaptic inputs and faster membrane responses were required for the model neurons to be ITD-sensitive at high stimulation rates, whereas weaker excitatory synaptic input and slower membrane responses were necessary at low stimulation rates, for both electric and acoustic stimulation. This finding raises the possibility of frequency-dependent differences in neural mechanisms of binaural processing; limitations in ITD sensitivity with bilateral CIs may be due to a mismatch between stimulation rate and cell parameters in ITD-sensitive neurons.

  10. Neonate Auditory Brainstem Responses to CE-Chirp and CE-Chirp Octave Band Stimuli II: Versus Adult Auditory Brainstem Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Kensi M; Stuart, Andrew

    The purpose of the study was to examine the differences in auditory brainstem response (ABR) latency and amplitude indices to the CE-Chirp stimuli in neonates versus young adults as a function of stimulus level, rate, polarity, frequency and gender. Participants were 168 healthy neonates and 20 normal-hearing young adults. ABRs were obtained to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band stimuli. The effects of stimulus level, rate, and polarity were examined with air-conducted CE-Chirps. The effect of stimulus level was also examined with bone-conducted CE-Chirps and CE-Chirp octave band stimuli. The effect of gender was examined across all stimulus manipulations. In general, ABR wave V amplitudes were significantly larger (p CE-Chirp stimuli with all stimulus manipulations. For bone-conducted CE-Chirps, infants had significantly shorter wave V latencies than adults at 15 dB nHL and 45 dB nHL (p = 0.02). Adult wave V amplitude was significantly larger for bone-conducted CE-Chirps only at 30 dB nHL (p = 0.02). The effect of gender was not statistically significant across all measures (p > 0.05). Significant differences in ABR latencies and amplitudes exist between newborns and young adults using CE-Chirp stimuli. These differences are consistent with differences to traditional click and tone burst stimuli and reflect maturational differences as a function of age. These findings continue to emphasize the importance of interpreting ABR results using age-based normative data.

  11. Study of the correlation of brainstem auditory evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging in children with spastic cerebral palsy

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    Fobe, Lisete Pessoa de Oliveira [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina]. E-mail: lispessoa@yahoo.com

    1999-12-01

    Central auditory evaluation in 21 children with cerebral palsy was done with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) and correlated with brain magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI); 12 boys and 9 girls between 5 and 12 years old were studied. All children had follow-up at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo. The control group was done with 17 children, 10 boys and 7 girls (mean age 8.06 years, SD 2.27 years). The BAEP abnormalities were: decrease of latency of wave V; decrease of latency III-V and I-IV intervals at the right side. All patients has MRI supratentorial abnormalities and 11 had brainstem atrophy. The MRI pathologic findings were: ventricular enlargement (n=17 or 80.95%), cortical/subcortical atrophy (n=15 or 71.42%), left brainstem atrophy (n=11 or 52.38%), periventricular leukomalacia (n=10 or 47.61%), infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory (n=6 or 28.57%), and malformations such as schizencephaly and colpocephaly (n=5 or 23.80%). The findings of the decrease latencies in children with cerebral palsy suggest the contribution of decussating auditory fibers at the lower and upper pons and midbrain, the lack of homogeneity of the surrounding volume of the conductor fibres and the presence of several concurrently active potential generators sources, should be facilitating mechanisms for the nervous input to brainstem. (author)

  12. Correlation between auditory brainstem recordings and morphology as seen through the scanning electron microscope

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    Hultcrantz, M.

    1988-09-01

    Pregnant CBA/CBA mice were exposed to 0.5, 1 and 2 Grey (Gy), (1 Gy = 100 rad) in single doses with whole body gamma-irradiation on the 12th, 13th and 16th gestational days, respectively. The animals were tested at an age of one month for vestibular and cochlear function. Thereafter the inner ears were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. A morphological analysis with cytocochleograms was performed. Morphological changes in the vestibular part showed gross malformations in the cristae ampullares. Hair cells of type I seemed to be more severely changed than hair cells type II. The macula utriculi also showed malformations of the otoconia. All these changes were more pronounced when the irradiation was given early during pregnancy and with the highest doses used, except the otoconia which were more injured when irradiated day 16 of gestation. No disturbances of the equilibrium reflexes were noted. In the cochlea a dose-dependent, time-related damage pattern was demonstrated with pathological changes of outer (OHC) and inner (IHC) hair cells. When tested electrophysiologically for auditory function with auditory brainstem recordings (ABR), elevated thresholds were revealed different in shape depending on when during pregnancy irradiation took place. A good correlation existed between the morphological changes as seen in the cytocochleograms and the functional changes documented with the ABR.

  13. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in a case of 'Manto syndrome', or spasmodic torticollis with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disertori, B; Ducati, A; Piazza, M; Pavani, M

    1982-12-01

    A case of spasmodic torticollis with thoracic outlet syndrome observed for over 18 months is presented and discussed. Maximal head rotation (determining backward gaze) was associated with compression of the brachial plexus between the scaleni muscles and motor, sensory and trophic troubles in the hand. This new syndrome is called after the diviner Manto, quoted by Dante Alighieri in his 'Divina Commedia' (Inferno, XX, 52-56). The etiology was ascribed to subacute toxic effects of methylparathion. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEPs) demonstrated severe brainstem involvement, maximal in the mesencephalic structures. Clinical and neurophysiological data improved on treatment with L-5-hydroxytryptophan. Finally, BAEPs returned to normal.

  14. Auditory Brainstem Response Wave Amplitude Characteristics as a Diagnostic Tool in Children with Speech Delay with Unknown Causes

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    Susan Abadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Speech delay with an unknown cause is a problem among children. This diagnosis is the last differential diagnosis after observing normal findings in routine hearing tests. The present study was undertaken to determine whether auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli are different between normally developing children and children suffering from delayed speech with unknown causes. In this cross-sectional study, we compared click auditory brainstem responses between 261 children who were clinically diagnosed with delayed speech with unknown causes based on normal routine auditory test findings and neurological examinations and had >12 months of speech delay (case group and 261 age- and sex-matched normally developing children (control group. Our results indicated that the case group exhibited significantly higher wave amplitude responses to click stimuli (waves I, III, and V than did the control group (P=0.001. These amplitudes were significantly reduced after 1 year (P=0.001; however, they were still significantly higher than those of the control group (P=0.001. The significant differences were seen regardless of the age and the sex of the participants. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups considering the latency of waves I, III, and V. In conclusion, the higher amplitudes of waves I, III, and V, which were observed in the auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli among the patients with speech delay with unknown causes, might be used as a diagnostic tool to track patients’ improvement after treatment.

  15. Auditory brainstem response changes during exposure to GSM-900 radiation: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaprana, Antigoni E; Chimona, Theognosia S; Papadakis, Chariton E; Velegrakis, Stylianos G; Vardiambasis, Ioannis O; Adamidis, Georgios; Velegrakis, George A

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the possible electrophysiological time-related changes in auditory pathway during mobile phone electromagnetic field exposure. Thirty healthy rabbits were enrolled in an experimental study of exposure to GSM-900 radiation for 60 min and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded at regular time-intervals during exposure. The study subjects were radiated via an adjustable power and frequency radio transmitter for GSM-900 mobile phone emission simulation, designed and manufactured according to the needs of the experiment. The mean absolute latency of waves III-V showed a statistically significant delay (p < 0.05) after 60, 45 and 15 min of exposure to electromagnetic radiation of 900 MHz, respectively. Interwave latency I-III was found to be prolonged after 60 min of radiation exposure in correspondence to wave III absolute latency delay. Interwave latencies I-V and III-V were found with a statistically significant delay (p < 0.05) after 30 min of radiation. No statistically significant delay was found for the same ABR parameters in recordings from the ear contralateral to the radiation source at 60 min radiation exposure compared with baseline ABR. The ABR measurements returned to baseline recordings 24 h after the exposure to electromagnetic radiation of 900 MHz. The prolongation of interval latencies I-V and III-V indicates that exposure to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phone can affect the normal electrophysiological activity of the auditory system, and these findings fit the pattern of general responses to a stressor.

  16. Evaluation of otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses for hearing screening of high risk infants

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    Tania Nazir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the present study is the assessment of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs for hearing screening of high risk infants. Study Design: Prospective, hospital-based. Materials and Methods: Distortion product OAEs (DPOAEs and brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA recordings were obtained for 30 controls and 100 infants with one or more high risk factors, in a sound treated room and the results were interpreted. ABR peak latencies, amplitudes, and waveform morphology in high risk infants were compared with those in control group. DPOAE as screening test was evaluated in terms of various parameters with BERA/ABR taken as gold standard. Results: Absolute latencies of Wave I and Wave V and interpeak latency of I-V were significantly prolonged in high risk group as compared to control group. The most common causes to contribute significantly for hearing impairment were found to be hyperbilirubinemia, birth asphyxia, meningitis/septicemia. DPOAE when compared with ABR taken as gold standard showed that sensitivity of the test was 87.7% (74.5%-94.9% and specificity was 74.5% (60.0%-85.2%. Positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.2%-86.6% and negative predictive value of the test was 86% (71.9%-94.3%. Positive likelihood ratio was 0.29 (0.18-0.46 and negative likelihood ratio was 6.08 (2.82-13.09. Conclusion : ABR/BERA, though highly reliable, is a tedious and time consuming test. DPOAE is a simple and rapid test with relatively higher acceptability but low sensitivity and specificity; therefore, limits its role as independent screening test. DPOAE-ABR test series is an effective way to screen all the high risk infants at the earliest.

  17. Long-term evolution of brainstem electrical evoked responses to sound after restricted ablation of the auditory cortex.

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    Verónica Lamas

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to assess the top-down control of sound processing in the auditory brainstem of rats. Short latency evoked responses were analyzed after unilateral or bilateral ablation of auditory cortex. This experimental paradigm was also used towards analyzing the long-term evolution of post-lesion plasticity in the auditory system and its ability to self-repair. METHOD: Auditory cortex lesions were performed in rats by stereotactically guided fine-needle aspiration of the cerebrocortical surface. Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABR were recorded at post-surgery day (PSD 1, 7, 15 and 30. Recordings were performed under closed-field conditions, using click trains at different sound intensity levels, followed by statistical analysis of threshold values and ABR amplitude and latency variables. Subsequently, brains were sectioned and immunostained for GAD and parvalbumin to assess the location and extent of lesions accurately. RESULTS: Alterations in ABR variables depended on the type of lesion and post-surgery time of ABR recordings. Accordingly, bilateral ablations caused a statistically significant increase in thresholds at PSD1 and 7 and a decrease in waves amplitudes at PSD1 that recover at PSD7. No effects on latency were noted at PSD1 and 7, whilst recordings at PSD15 and 30 showed statistically significant decreases in latency. Conversely, unilateral ablations had no effect on auditory thresholds or latencies, while wave amplitudes only decreased at PSD1 strictly in the ipsilateral ear. CONCLUSION: Post-lesion plasticity in the auditory system acts in two time periods: short-term period of decreased sound sensitivity (until PSD7, most likely resulting from axonal degeneration; and a long-term period (up to PSD7, with changes in latency responses and recovery of thresholds and amplitudes values. The cerebral cortex may have a net positive gain on the auditory pathway response to sound.

  18. Experiences from Cochlear Implantation and Auditory Brainstem Implantation in Adults and Children : Electrophysiological Measurements, Hearing Outcomes and Patient Satisfaction

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    Lundin, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) and auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) are prostheses for hearing used in patients with profound hearing impairment. A CI requires an operational cochlear nerve to function in contrast to an ABI. ABIs were initially designed for adult patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), suffering from bilateral vestibular schwannomas. Now ABIs are also used for patients, both adults and children, with congenital cochlear malformations, cochlear nerve hypoplasia/aplasia, and c...

  19. Auditory brainstem responses to clicks and tone bursts in C57 BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scimemi, P; Santarelli, R; Selmo, A; Mammano, F

    2014-08-01

    In auditory research, hearing function of mouse mutants is assessed in vivo by evoked potential recording. Evaluation of the response parameters should be performed with reference to the evoked responses recorded from wild-type mice. This study reports normative data calculated on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) obtained from 20 wild-type C57 BL/6J mice at a postnatal age between 21 and 45 days. Acoustic stimuli consisted tone bursts at 8, 14, 20, 26, 32 kHz, and clicks. Each stimulus was delivered in free field at stimulation intensity starting from a maximum of 100 dB peak equivalent SPL (dB peSPL) at decreasing steps of 10 dB with a repetition rate of 13/sec. Evoked responses were recorded by needle electrodes inserted subcutaneously. At high intensity stimulation, five response waveforms, each consisting of a positive peak and a subsequent negative valley, were identified within 7 msec, and were labelled with sequential capital Roman numerals from I to V. Peak IV was the most robust and stable at low intensities for both tone burst and click stimuli, and was therefore utilized to estimate hearing thresholds. Both latencies and amplitudes of ABR peaks showed good reproducibility with acceptable standard deviations. Mean wave IV thresholds measured across all animals ranged from a maximum of 23 dB peSPL for clicks to a minimum of 7 dB peSPL for 20 kHz-tone burst stimuli. Statistical analysis of the distribution of latencies and amplitudes of peaks from I to V performed for each stimulus type yielded a normative data set which was utilised to obtain the most consistent fitting-curve model. This could serve as a reference for further studies on murine models of hearing loss.

  20. Effect of the ketamine/xylazine anesthetic on the auditory brainstem response of adult gerbils

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    J.P. Lima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The auditory brainstem response (ABR is a test widely used to assess the integrity of the brain stem. Although it is considered to be an auditory-evoked potential that is influenced by the physical characteristics of the stimulus, such as rate, polarity and type of stimulus, it may also be influenced by the change in several parameters. The use of anesthetics may adversely influence the value of the ABR wave latency. One of the anesthetics used for e ABR assessment, especially in animal research, is the ketamine/xylazine combination. Our objective was to determine the influence of the ketamine/xylazine anesthetic on the ABR latency values in adult gerbils. The ABRs of 12 adult gerbils injected with the anesthetic were collected on three consecutive days, or a total of six collections, namely: pre-collection and A, B, C, D, and E collections. Before each collection the gerbil was injected with a dose of ketamine (100 mg/kg/xylazine (4 mg/kg. For the capture of the ABR, 2000 click stimuli were used with rarefaction polarity and 13 stimuli per second, 80 dBnHL intensity and in-ear phones. A statistically significant difference was observed in the latency of the V wave in the ABR of gerbils in the C and D collections compared to the pre-, A and E collections, and no difference was observed between the pre-, A, B, and E collections. We conclude that the use of ketamine/xylazine increases the latency of the V wave of the ABR after several doses injected into adult gerbils; thus clinicians should consider the use of this substance in the assessment of ABR.

  1. Correlations between word intelligibility under reverberation and speech auditory brainstem responses in elderly listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihira, H; Shiraishi, K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between speech auditory brainstem responses (speech ABRs) and word intelligibility under reverberation in elderly adults. Word intelligibility for words under four reverberation times (RTs) of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5s, and speech ABRs to the speech syllable/da/ were obtained from 30 elderly listeners. Root mean square (RMS) amplitudes and discrete Fourier transform (DFT) amplitudes were calculated for ADD and SUB responses in the speech ABRs. No significant correlations were found between the word intelligibility scores under reverberation and the ADD response components. However, in the SUB responses we found that the DFT amplitudes associated with H4-SUB, H5-SUB, H8-SUB, H9-SUB and H10-SUB significantly correlated with the word intelligibility scores for words under reverberation. With Bonferroni correction, the DFT amplitudes for H5-SUB and the intelligibility scores for words with the RT of 0.5s and 1.5s were significant. Word intelligibility under reverberation in elderly listeners is related to their ability to encode the temporal fine structure of speech. The results expand knowledge about subcortical responses of elderly listeners in daily-life listening situations. The SUB responses of speech ABR could be useful as an objective indicator to predict word intelligibility under reverberation. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a Chirp Stimulus PC-Based Auditory Brainstem Response Audiometer

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    Ali AL-Afsaa

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing losses during infancy and childhood have many negative future effects and impacts on the child life and productivity. The earlier detection of hearing losses, the earlier medical intervention and then the greater benefit of remediation will be. During this research a PC-based audiometer is designed and, currently, the audiometer prototype is in its final development steps. It is based on the auditory brainstem response (ABR method. Chirp stimuli instead of traditional click stimuli will be used to invoke the ABR signal. The stimulus is designed to synchronize the hair cells movement when it spreads out over the cochlea. In addition to the available hardware utilization (PC and PCI board, the efforts confined to design and implement a hardware prototype and to develop a software package that enables the system to behave as ABR audiometer. By using such a method and chirp stimulus, it is expected to be able to detect hearing impairment (sensorineural in the first few days of the life and conduct hearing test at low frequency of stimulus. Currently, the intended chirp stimulus has been successfully generated and the implemented module is able to amplify a signal (on the order of ABR signal to a recordable level. Moreover, a NI-DAQ data acquisition board has been chosen to implement the PC-prototype interface.

  3. A Comparison of Commercially Available Auditory Brainstem Response Stimuli at a Neurodiagnostic Intensity Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesling, Devan A; Parker, Jordan Paige; Sanchez, Jason Tait

    2017-02-01

    iChirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) yield a larger wave V amplitude at low intensity levels than traditional broadband click stimuli, providing a reliable estimation of hearing sensitivity. However, advantages of iChirp stimulation at high intensity levels are unknown. We tested to see if high-intensity (i.e., 85 dBnHL) iChirp stimulation results in larger and more reliable ABR waveforms than click. Using the commercially available Intelligent Hearing System SmartEP platform, we recorded ABRs from 43 normal hearing young adults. We report that absolute peak latencies were more variable for iChirp and were ~3 ms longer: the latter of which is simply due to the temporal duration of the signal. Interpeak latencies were slightly shorter for iChirp and were most evident between waves I-V. Interestingly, click responses were easier to identify and peak-to-trough amplitudes for waves I, III and V were significantly larger than iChirp. These differences were not due to residual noise levels. We speculate that high intensity iChirp stimulation reduces neural synchrony and conclude that for retrocochlear evaluations, click stimuli should be used as the standard for ABR neurodiagnostic testing.

  4. Synchronized Progression of Prestin Expression and Auditory Brainstem Response during Postnatal Development in Rats

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    Jianfeng Hang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prestin is the motor protein expressed in the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs of mammalian inner ear. The electromotility of OHCs driven by prestin is responsible for the cochlear amplification which is required for normal hearing in adult animals. Postnatal expression of prestin and activity of OHCs may contribute to the maturation of hearing in rodents. However, the temporal and spatial expression of prestin in cochlea during the development is not well characterized. In the present study, we examined the expression and function of prestin from the OHCs in apical, middle, and basal turns of the cochleae of postnatal rats. Prestin first appeared at postnatal day 6 (P6 for basal turn, P7 in middle turn, and P9 for apical turn of cochlea. The expression level increased progressively over the next few days and by P14 reached the mature level for all three segments. By comparison with the time course of the development of auditory brainstem response for different frequencies, our data reveal that prestin expression synchronized with the hearing development. The present study suggests that the onset time of hearing may require the expression of prestin and is determined by the mature function of OHCs.

  5. Notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps for objective audiometry using auditory brainstem responses

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    Farah I. Corona-Strauss

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown recently that chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs show better performance than click stimulations, especially at low intensity levels. In this paper we present the development, test, and evaluation of a series of notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps. ABRs were collected in healthy young control subjects using the developed stimuli. Results of the analysis of the corresponding ABRs using a time-scale phase synchronization stability (PSS measure are also reported. The resultant wave V amplitude and latency measures showed a similar behavior as for values reported in literature. The PSS of frequency specific chirp-evoked ABRs reflected the presence of the wave V for all stimulation intensities. The scales that resulted in higher PSS are in line with previous findings, where ABRs evoked by broadband chirps were analyzed, and which stated that low frequency channels are better for the recognition and analysis of chirp-evoked ABRs. We conclude that the development and test of the series of notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps allowed the assessment of frequency specific ABRs, showing an identifiable wave V for different intensity levels. Future work may include the development of a faster automatic recognition scheme for these frequency specific ABRs.

  6. Gender Disparities in Speech-evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaei, Bahram; Zakaria, Mohd Normani; Mohd Azmi, Mohd Hafiz Afifi; Nik Othman, Nik Adilah; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi

    2017-04-01

    Gender disparities in speech-evoked auditory brainstem response (speech-ABR) outcomes have been reported, but the literature is limited. The present study was performed to further verify this issue and determine the influence of head size on speech-ABR results between genders. Twenty-nine healthy Malaysian subjects (14 males and 15 females) aged 19 to 30 years participated in this study. After measuring the head circumference, speech-ABR was recorded by using synthesized syllable /da/ from the right ear of each participant. Speech-ABR peaks amplitudes, peaks latencies, and composite onset measures were computed and analyzed. Significant gender disparities were noted in the transient component but not in the sustained component of speech-ABR. Statistically higher V/A amplitudes and less steeper V/A slopes were found in females. These gender differences were partially affected after controlling for the head size. Head size is not the main contributing factor for gender disparities in speech-ABR outcomes. Gender-specific normative data can be useful when recording speech-ABR for clinical purposes.

  7. Electroencephalogram and brainstem auditory evoked potential in 539 patients with central coordination disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijia Zhang; Hua Yan; Paoqiu Wang; Jihong Hu; Hongtao Zhou; Rong Qin

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroencephalogram (EEG) and brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) are objective non-invasive means of measuring brain electrophysiology.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the value of EEG and BAEP in early diagnosis, treatment and prognostic evaluation of central coordination disorder.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This case analysis study was performed at the Rehabilitation Center of Hunan Children's Hospital from January 2002 to January 2006.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 593 patients with severe central coordination disorder, comprising 455 boys and 138 girls, aged 1--6 months were enrolled for this study.METHODS: EEG was monitored using electroencephalography. BAEP was recorded using a Keypoint electromyogram device. Intelligence was tested by professionals using the Gesell scale.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) The rate of abnormal EEG and BAEP, (2) correlation of abnormalities of EEG and BAEP with associated injuries, (3) correlation of abnormalities of EEG and BAEP with high risk factors.RESULTS: The rate of abnormal EEG was 68.6% (407/593 patients), and was increased in patients who also had mental retardation (P < 0.05). The rate of abnormal BAEP was 21.4% (127/593 patients). These 127 patients included 67 patients (52.8%) with peripheral auditory damage and 60 patients (47.2%) with central and mixed auditory damage. The rate of abnormal BAEP was significantly increased in patients who also had mental retardation (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that asphyxia (P < 0.05), jaundice,preterm delivery, low birth weight and the umbilical cord around the neck were closely correlated with abnormal EEG in patients with central coordination disorder. Intracranial hemorrhage, jaundice (P < 0.05),low birth weight and intrauterine infection (P < 0.05) were closely correlated with abnormal BAEP in patients with central coordination disorder.CONCLUSION: Central coordination disorder is often associated with abnormal EEG and BAEP. The rate of EEG or BAEP abnormality

  8. Auditory brainstem responses of CBA/J mice with neonatal conductive hearing losses and treatment with GM1 ganglioside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, M K; Pippin, G W; Weaver, K E; Kirsch, J P; Webster, D B

    1995-07-01

    Exogenous administration of GM1 ganglioside to CBA/J mice with a neonatal conductive hearing loss ameliorates the atrophy of spiral ganglion neurons, ventral cochlear nucleus neurons, and ventral cochlear nucleus volume. The present investigation demonstrates the extent of a conductive loss caused by atresia and tests the hypothesis that GM1 ganglioside treatment will ameliorate the conductive hearing loss. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded from four groups of seven mice each: two groups received daily subcutaneous injections of saline (one group had normal hearing; the other had a conductive hearing loss); the other two groups received daily subcutaneous injections of GM1 ganglioside (one group had normal hearing; the other had a conductive hearing loss). In mice with a conductive loss, decreases in hearing sensitivity were greatest at high frequencies. The decreases were determined by comparing mean ABR thresholds of the conductive loss mice with those of normal hearing mice. The conductive hearing loss induced in the mice in this study was similar to that seen in humans with congenital aural atresias. GM1 ganglioside treatment had no significant effect on ABR wave I thresholds or latencies in either group.

  9. Comparison of the developmental changes of the brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) in taurine-supplemented and taurine-deficient kittens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecalle-Sandoval, M H; Heaney, G; Sersen, E; Sturman, J A

    1991-01-01

    A similar development of the brainstem auditory evoked response is present in taurine-supplemented and taurine-deficient kittens between the second postnatal week and the third month of life. Between birth and the second postnatal week kittens from mothers fed the 1% taurine diet showed earlier maturation of the brainstem auditory evoked response as indicated by lower threshold, shorter P1 latency and shorter central conduction time when compared to the kittens from mothers fed the 0.05% taurine diet. These results suggest an important role of taurine in the anatomical and functional development of the auditory system.

  10. The effect of lead on brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹朝春; 赵正言; 唐兰芳; 陈志敏; 杜立中

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine whether lead affects brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) in low-to-moderate lead exposed children. Methods BAEPs were recorded from 114 asymptomatic children aged 1-6 years. Average values were calculated for peak latency (PL) and amplitude (Amp). Whole blood lead (PbB) levels were assessed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. Based on their PbB levels, subjects were divided into low lead (PbB<100 μg/L) and high lead subgroups (PbB ≥100 μg/L). Results The PbB levels of the 114 subjects ranged from 32.0 to 380.0 μg/L in a positively skewed distribution. The median of PbB levels was 90.0 μg/L while the arithmetic average was 88.0 μg/L. Of the subjects, 43.0% (49/114) had levels equal to or greater than 100 μg/L. Bilateral PLs Ⅰ, Ⅴ, and Ⅲ of the left ear in the high lead subgroup were significantly longer than those in the low lead subgroup (P<0.05). A positive correlation was found between PbB levels and bilateral PLs Ⅰ, Ⅴ and Ⅲ of the left ear (P<0.05), after controlling for age and gender as confounding factors. A significant and positive correlation between PbB levels and PL Ⅰ of the left ear, even when PbB levels were lower than 100 μg/L, in the low subgroup (r=0.295, P=0.019) was also found.Conclusions Lead poisoning in children younger than 6 years old is a very serious problem to which close attention should be paid. The indications that lead prolongs partial PLs may imply that lead, even at PbB levels lower than 100 μg/L, impairs both the peripheral and the central portions of the auditory system. BAEPs may be a sensitive detector of subclinical lead exposure effects on the nervous system in children.

  11. [Brainstem auditory evoked potentials and somatosensory evoked potentials in Chiari malformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncho, Dulce; Poca, María A; Minoves, Teresa; Ferré, Alejandro; Rahnama, Kimia; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2013-06-16

    Introduccion. La malformacion de Chiari (MC) incluye una serie de anomalias congenitas que tienen como comun denominador la ectopia de las amigdalas del cerebelo por debajo del foramen magno, lo que puede condicionar fenomenos compresivos del troncoencefalo, la medula espinal alta y los nervios craneales, alterando las respuestas de los potenciales evocados auditivos del tronco cerebral (PEATC) y de los potenciales evocados somatosensoriales (PESS). Sin embargo, las indicaciones de ambas exploraciones en las MC han sido motivo de estudio en un numero limitado de publicaciones, centradas en series cortas y heterogeneas de pacientes. Objetivo. Revisar los hallazgos de los PEATC y los PESS en los estudios publicados en pacientes con MC tipo 1 (MC-1) o tipo 2 (MC-2), y su indicacion en el diagnostico, tratamiento y seguimiento, especialmente en la MC-1. Desarrollo. Es un estudio de revision realizado mediante analisis de los estudios publicados en Medline desde 1966, localizados mediante PubMed, utilizando combinaciones de las palabras clave 'Chiari malformation', 'Arnold-Chiari malformation', 'Chiari type 1 malformation', 'Arnold-Chiari type 1 malformation', 'evoked potentials', 'brainstem auditory evoked potentials' y 'somatosensory evoked potentials', asi como informacion de pacientes con MC-1 valorados en los servicios de neurocirugia y neurofisiologia clinica del Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron. Conclusiones. Los hallazgos mas comunes de los PESS son la reduccion en la amplitud cortical para el nervio tibial posterior, la reduccion o ausencia del potencial cervical del nervio mediano y el aumento del intervalo N13-N20. En el caso de los PEATC, los hallazgos mas frecuentes descritos son el aumento del intervalo I-V y la alteracion periferica o coclear.

  12. Autism spectrum disorders and the amplitude of auditory brainstem response wave I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mariline; Marques, Cristina; Nóbrega Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Raquel; Coutinho, Miguel Bebiano; Almeida E Sousa, Cecília

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have an increased number of wave I abnormal amplitudes in auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) than age- and sex-matched typically developing children. This analytical case-control study compared patients with ASDs between the ages of 2 and 6 years and children who had a language delay not associated with any other pathology. Amplitudes of ABR waves I and V; absolute latencies (ALs) of waves I, III, and V; and interpeak latencies (IPLs) I-III, III-IV, and I-V at 90 dB were compared between ASD patients and normally developing children. The study enrolled 40 children with documented ASDs and 40 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Analyses of the ABR showed that children with ASDs exhibited higher amplitudes of wave 1 than wave V (35%) more frequently than the control group (10%), and this difference between groups reached statistical significance by Chi-squared analysis. There were no significant differences in ALs and IPLs between ASD children and matched controls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case-control study testing the amplitudes of ABR wave I in ASD children. The reported results suggest a potential for the use of ABR recordings in children, not only for the clinical assessment of hearing status, but also for the possibility of using amplitude of ABR wave I as an early marker of ASDs allowing earlier diagnosis and intervention. Autism Res 2017. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials with the use of acoustic clicks and complex verbal sounds in young adults with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouni, Sophia N; Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Ziavra, Nausika; Koutsojannis, Constantinos

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic signals are transmitted through the external and middle ear mechanically to the cochlea where they are transduced into electrical impulse for further transmission via the auditory nerve. The auditory nerve encodes the acoustic sounds that are conveyed to the auditory brainstem. Multiple brainstem nuclei, the cochlea, the midbrain, the thalamus, and the cortex constitute the central auditory system. In clinical practice, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to simple stimuli such as click or tones are widely used. Recently, complex stimuli or complex auditory brain responses (cABRs), such as monosyllabic speech stimuli and music, are being used as a tool to study the brainstem processing of speech sounds. We have used the classic 'click' as well as, for the first time, the artificial successive complex stimuli 'ba', which constitutes the Greek word 'baba' corresponding to the English 'daddy'. Twenty young adults institutionally diagnosed as dyslexic (10 subjects) or light dyslexic (10 subjects) comprised the diseased group. Twenty sex-, age-, education-, hearing sensitivity-, and IQ-matched normal subjects comprised the control group. Measurements included the absolute latencies of waves I through V, the interpeak latencies elicited by the classical acoustic click, the negative peak latencies of A and C waves, as well as the interpeak latencies of A-C elicited by the verbal stimulus 'baba' created on a digital speech synthesizer. The absolute peak latencies of waves I, III, and V in response to monoaural rarefaction clicks as well as the interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, and I-V in the dyslexic subjects, although increased in comparison with normal subjects, did not reach the level of a significant difference (p<0.05). However, the absolute peak latencies of the negative wave C and the interpeak latencies of A-C elicited by verbal stimuli were found to be increased in the dyslexic group in comparison with the control group (p=0.0004 and p=0.045, respectively

  14. Characteristics of brainstem auditory evoked potential of neonates with mild or moderate hyperbilirubinemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) has been widely used to evaluate the functional integrity and development of injured auditory system and brain, especially to objectively evaluate the function of auditory system and brain stem of very young babies, such as neonates and sick babies.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of BAEP of neonates with hyperbilirubinemia, and to investigate the relationship of bilirubin concentration and BAEP.DESIGN: An observation experiment.SETTING: Department of Pediatrics, the 309 Clinical Division, General Hospital of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-eight neonates with mild or moderate hyperbilirubinemia exhibiting jaundice within 24 hours after born, who received the treatment in the Department of Pediatrics, the 309 Clinical Division, General Hospital of Chinese PLA between January 2004 and May 2007, were recruited in this study. The involved neonates, 31 boys and 27 girls, had gestational age of 37 to 46 weeks. They had no history of birth asphyxia, and were scored 8 to 10 points when born. Written informed consents of examination and treatment were obtained from the guardians of the neonates. This study was approved by the Hospital Ethics Committee. According to serum total bilirubin value, the neonates were assigned into 3 groups: low-concentration bilirubin group (n =16), moderate-concentration bilirubin group (n =27) and high-concentration bilirubin group (n =15). According to mean daily bilirubin increase, the subjects were sub-assigned into bilirubin rapid increase group (n =39) and bilirubin slow increase group (n =19).METHODS: After admission, all the neonates received drug treatment. Meanwhile, their 116 ears were examined with a myoelectricity evoked potential equipment (KEYPOINT) in latency, wave duration,amplitude and wave shape differentiation of each wave of BAEP. BAEP abnormal type was observed and abnormal rate of BAEP was calculated.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Abnormal rate and abnormal type of BAEP

  15. Auditory Brainstem Response in Term and Preterm Infants with Neonatal Complications: The Importance of the Sequential Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva, Daniela da

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Literature data are not conclusive as to the influence of neonatal complications in the maturational process of the auditory system observed by auditory brainstem response (ABR in infants at term and preterm. Objectives Check the real influence of the neonatal complications in infants by the sequential auditory evaluation. Methods Historical cohort study in a tertiary referral center. A total of 114 neonates met inclusion criteria: treatment at the Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening Program of the local hospital; at least one risk indicator for hearing loss; presence in both evaluations (the first one after hospital discharge from the neonatal unit and the second one at 6 months old; all latencies in ABR and transient otoacoustic emissions present in both ears. Results The complications that most influenced the ABR findings were Apgar scores less than 6 at 5 minutes, gestational age, intensive care unit stay, peri-intraventricular hemorrhage, and mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Sequential auditory evaluation is necessary in premature and term newborns with risk indicators for hearing loss to correctly identify injuries in the auditory pathway.

  16. Anesthesia mumps resulting in temporary facial nerve paralysis after the auditory brainstem implantation in a 3-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdek, Ali; Bayır, Ömer; Işık, Murat Eray; Tatar, Emel Çadallı; Saylam, Güleser; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    An acute transient sialadenitis of the major salivary glands in the early postoperative period is called 'anesthesia mumps'. It has been reported in different surgical procedures especially in neurosurgical procedures. Anesthesia mumps develops very fast after the extubation period but it usually regresses with no sequelae within a few hours. However, sometimes serious complication can occur such as respiratory distress. In this report, we present a 3-year-old girl with an anesthesia mumps and facial palsy occurring after successful auditory brainstem implantation and we discuss the cause and the management of this rare complication in this report.

  17. Neonatal hearing screening of high-risk infants using automated auditory brainstem response: a retrospective analysis of referral rates.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGurgan, I J

    2013-10-07

    The past decade has seen the widespread introduction of universal neonatal hearing screening (UNHS) programmes worldwide. Regrettably, such a programme is only now in the process of nationwide implementation in the Republic of Ireland and has been largely restricted to one screening modality for initial testing; namely transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of employing a different screening protocol which utilises an alternative initial test, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR), on referral rates to specialist audiology services.

  18. Recording of electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses (E-ABR) with an integrated stimulus generator in Matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmer, Andreas; Peter, Otto; Baumann, Uwe

    2008-08-30

    Electrical auditory brainstem responses (E-ABRs) of subjects with cochlear implants are used for monitoring the physiologic responses of early signal processing of the auditory system. Additionally, E-ABR measurements allow the diagnosis of retro-cochlear diseases. Therefore, E-ABR should be available in every cochlear implant center as a diagnostic tool. In this paper, we introduce a low-cost setup designed to perform an E-ABR as well as a conventional ABR for research purposes. The distributable form was developed with Matlab and the Matlab Compiler (The Mathworks Inc.). For the ABR, only a PC with a soundcard, conventional system headphones, and an EEG pre-amplifier are necessary; for E-ABR, in addition, an interface to the cochlea implant is required. For our purposes, we implemented an interface for the Combi 40+/Pulsar implant (MED-EL, Innsbruck).

  19. Relating the Variability of Tone-Burst Otoacoustic Emission and Auditory Brainstem Response Latencies to the Underlying Cochlear Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Sarah; Shera, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Forward and reverse cochlear latency and its relation to the frequency tuning of the auditory filters can be assessed using tone bursts (TBs). Otoacoustic emissions (TBOAEs) estimate the cochlear roundtrip time, while auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to the same stimuli aim at measuring the auditory filter buildup time. Latency ratios are generally close to two and controversy exists about the relationship of this ratio to cochlear mechanics. We explored why the two methods provide different estimates of filter buildup time, and ratios with large inter-subject variability, using a time-domain model for OAEs and ABRs. We compared latencies for twenty models, in which all parameters but the cochlear irregularities responsible for reflection-source OAEs were identical, and found that TBOAE latencies were much more variable than ABR latencies. Multiple reflection-sources generated within the evoking stimulus bandwidth were found to shape the TBOAE envelope and complicate the interpretation of TBOAE latency and TBOAE/ABR ratios in terms of auditory filter tuning. PMID:27175040

  20. Metabolic presbycusis: differential changes in auditory brainstem and otoacoustic emission responses with chronic furosemide application in the gerbil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, David M; Schmiedt, Richard A

    2004-03-01

    Auditory characteristics of metabolic or strial presbycusis were investigated using an animal model in which young adult Mongolian gerbils ( Meriones unguiculates) were implanted with an osmotic pump supplying furosemide continuously to the round window. This model causes chronic lowering of the endocochlear potential (EP) and results in auditory responses very similar to those seen in quiet-aged gerbils (Schmiedt et al., J. Neurosci. 22:9643-9650, 2002). Auditory function was examined up to one week post-implant by measurement of auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Emission "threshold" was defined as the stimulus level required to reach a criterion emission amplitude. Comparing all responses on a "threshold-shift diagram," where emission threshold increases were plotted versus ABR threshold increases, the following results were obtained: (1) On average, the increase of the emission threshold was about 55% of the increase in ABR threshold, with comparatively little scatter. (2) The main dysfunction in metabolic presbycusis appears to be a decrease in the gain of the cochlear amplifier, combined with an additional, smaller increase in neural threshold, both effects caused by a chronically low EP. (3) For ABR threshold increases over 20 dB, the points for the chronic low-EP condition were largely separate from those previously found for permanent acoustic damage. The threshold-shift diagram therefore provides a method for noninvasive differential diagnosis of two common hearing dysfunctions.

  1. Brainstem auditory evoked response characteristics in normal-hearing subjects with chronic tinnitus and in non-tinnitus group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadman Nemati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: While most of the people with tinnitus have some degrees of hearing impairment, a small percent of patients admitted to ear, nose and throat clinics or hearing evaluation centers are those who complain of tinnitus despite having normal hearing thresholds. This study was performed to better understanding of the reasons of probable causes of tinnitus and to investigate possible changes in the auditory brainstem function in normal-hearing patients with chronic tinnitus.Methods: In this comparative cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study, 52 ears (26 with and 26 without tinnitus were examined. Components of the auditory brainstem response (ABR including wave latencies and wave amplitudes were determined in the two groups and analyzed using appropriate statistical methods.Results: The mean differences between the absolute latencies of waves I, III and V was less than 0.1 ms between the two groups that was not statistically significant. Also, the interpeak latency values of waves I-III, III-V and I-V in both groups had no significant difference. Only, the V/I amplitude ratio in the tinnitus group was significantly higher (p=0.04.Conclusion: The changes observed in amplitude of waves, especially in the latter ones, can be considered as an indication of plastic changes in neuronal activity and its possible role in generation of tinnitus in normal-hearing patients.

  2. Evaluation of auditory brain-stem evoked response in middle: Aged type 2 diabetes mellitus with normal hearing subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debadatta Mahallik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is commonly metabolic disorders of carbohydrate in which blood glucose levels are abnormally high due to relative or absolute insulin deficiency. In addition, it is characterized by abnormal metabolism of fat, protein resulting from insulin deficit or insulin action, or both. There are two broad categories of DM are designated as type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes is due to predominantly insulin resistance with relative insulin deficiency noninsulin-dependent DM. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than insulin-dependent DM. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess, if there is any abnormality in neural conduction in auditory brain-stem pathway in type 2 DM patients having normal hearing sensitivity when compared to age-matched healthy populations. Materials and Methods: This study included middle - aged 25 subjects having normal hearing with diabetes type 2 mellitus. All were submitted to the full audiological history taking, otological examination, basic audiological evaluation and auditory brain-stem response audiometry which was recorded in both ears, followed by calculation of the absolute latencies of wave I, III and V, as well as interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, I-V. Results: Type 2 DM patients showed significant prolonged absolute latencies of I, III (P = 0.001 and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V in left ear (P = 0.001 and absolute latencies of I, V (P = 0.001, interpeak latencies III-V was statistically significant in right ear. Conclusions: The prolonged absolute latencies and interpeak latencies suggests abnormal neural firing synchronization or in the transmission in the auditory pathways in normal hearing type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  3. Functional imaging of the human brainstem during somatosensory input and autonomic output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Anthony Henderson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past half a century, many experimental animal investigations have explored the role of various brainstem regions in a variety of conditions. Despite the accumulation of a considerable body of knowledge in primarily anaesthetized preparations, relatively few investigations have explored brainstem function in awake humans. It is important that human brainstem function is explored given that many neurological conditions, from obstructive sleep apnea, chronic pain and hypertension, likely involve significant changes in the processing of information within the brainstem. Recent advances in the collection and processing of magnetic resonance images, has resulted in the possibility of exploring brainstem activity changes in awake healthy individuals and in those with various clinical conditions. We and others have begun to explore changes in brainstem activity in humans during a number of challenges, including during cutaneous and muscle pain, as well as during challenges that evoke increases in sympathetic activity. More recently we have successfully recorded sympathetic nerve activity concurrently with fMRI of the brainstem, which will allow us, for the first time to explore brainstem sites directly responsible for conditions such as hypertension. Since many conditions will involve changes in brainstem function and structure, defining brainstem changes will likely result in a greater ability to develop more effective treatment regimes.

  4. Temporal Resolution of ChR2 and Chronos in an Optogenetic-based Auditory Brainstem Implant Model: Implications for the Development and Application of Auditory Opsins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hight, A. E.; Kozin, Elliott D.; Darrow, Keith; Lehmann, Ashton; Boyden, Edward; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary auditory brainstem implant (ABI) performance is limited by reliance on electrical stimulation with its accompanying channel cross talk and current spread to non-auditory neurons. A new generation ABI based on optogenetic-technology may ameliorate limitations fundamental to electrical neurostimulation. The most widely studied opsin is channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2); however, its relatively slow kinetic properties may prevent the encoding of auditory information at high stimulation rates. In the present study, we compare the temporal resolution of light-evoked responses of a recently developed fast opsin, Chronos, to ChR2 in a murine ABI model. Viral mediated gene transfer via a posterolateral craniotomy was used to express Chronos or ChR2 in the mouse nucleus (CN). Following a four to six week incubation period, blue light (473 nm) was delivered via an optical fiber placed directly on the surface of the infected CN, and neural activity was recorded in the contralateral inferior colliculus (IC). Both ChR2 and Chronos evoked sustained responses to all stimuli, even at high driven rates. In addition, optical stimulation evoked excitatory responses throughout the tonotopic axis of the IC. Synchrony of the light-evoked response to stimulus rates of 14–448 pulses/s was higher in Chronos compared to ChR2 mice (p<0.05 at 56, 168, and 224 pulses/s). Our results demonstrate that Chronos has the ability to drive the auditory system at higher stimulation rates than ChR2 and may be a more ideal opsin for manipulation of auditory pathways in future optogenetic-based neuroprostheses. PMID:25598479

  5. Auditory brain-stem response, CT and MR imaging in a family with classical type Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiomi, M.; Ookuni, H.; Sugita, T.

    1987-05-01

    A family in which 5 males in successive generations were clinically suspected to be affected with the classical X-linked recessive form of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is presented. Two brothers and their maternal uncle were examined by one of the authors (MS). In two brothers, aged 3 years and 2 years, the disease became obvious within a month after birth with nystagmus and head tremor. Head control and sitting were achieved at the age of 18 months at which time they began to speak. They could not stand nor walk without support. They had dysmetria, weakness and hyper-reflexia of lower extremities, and mild mental retardation. Their maternal uncle, aged 37 years, showed psychomotor retardation from birth and subsequently developed spastic paraplegia. He had been able to walk with crutches until adolescence. He had dysmetria, scanning speech, athetoid posture of fingers and significant intellectual deficits. Auditory brainstem response in both brothers revealed well defined waves I and II, low amplitude wave III and an absence of all subsequent components. CT demonstrated mild cerebral atrophy in the elder brother and was normal in the younger brother, but in their uncle, CT showed atrophy of the brainstem, cerebellum and cerebrum, and low density of the white matter of the centrum semiovale. MRI was performed in both brothers. Although the brainstem, the internal capsule and the thalamus were myelinated, the myelination in the subcortical white matter was restricted to periventricular regions on IR sequence scans. On SE sequence, the subcortical white matter was imaged as a brighter area than the cerebral cortex. These results demonstrate that the degree of myelination in these patients was roughly equal to that of 3-to 6-month old infants.

  6. Gap prepulse inhibition and auditory brainstem-evoked potentials as objective measures for tinnitus in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmel, Susanne; Eisinger, Daniel; Shore, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Tinnitus or ringing of the ears is a subjective phantom sensation necessitating behavioral models that objectively demonstrate the existence and quality of the tinnitus sensation. The gap detection test uses the acoustic startle response elicited by loud noise pulses and its gating or suppression by preceding sub-startling prepulses. Gaps in noise bands serve as prepulses, assuming that ongoing tinnitus masks the gap and results in impaired gap detection. This test has shown its reliability in rats, mice, and gerbils. No data exists for the guinea pig so far, although gap detection is similar across mammals and the acoustic startle response is a well-established tool in guinea pig studies of psychiatric disorders and in pharmacological studies. Here we investigated the startle behavior and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the guinea pig and showed that guinea pigs have a reliable startle response that can be suppressed by 15 ms gaps embedded in narrow noise bands preceding the startle noise pulse. After recovery of auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds from a unilateral noise over-exposure centered at 7 kHz, guinea pigs showed diminished gap-induced reduction of the startle response in frequency bands between 8 and 18 kHz. This suggests the development of tinnitus in frequency regions that showed a temporary threshold shift (TTS) after noise over-exposure. Changes in discharge rate and synchrony, two neuronal correlates of tinnitus, should be reflected in altered ABR waveforms, which would be useful to objectively detect tinnitus and its localization to auditory brainstem structures. Therefore, we analyzed latencies and amplitudes of the first five ABR waves at suprathreshold sound intensities and correlated ABR abnormalities with the results of the behavioral tinnitus testing. Early ABR wave amplitudes up to N3 were increased for animals with tinnitus possibly stemming from hyperactivity and hypersynchrony underlying the tinnitus percept. Animals that did not

  7. Brain-stem auditory evoked responses during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: Predicting post-operative hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramnarayan Ramachandran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The importance of brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring in reducing hearing loss during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia is now accepted. However the extent of the changes in the pattern of these potentials and the safe limits to which these changes are relevant in reducing postoperative hearing loss have not been established. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify these changes and relate these to the postoperative hearing loss. Settings and Design: This study was done at the Walton Centre for neurology and neurosurgery, Liverpool, United Kingdom. The study was designed to give a measure of the change in the wave pattern following microvascular decompression and relate it to postoperative hearing loss. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients undergoing microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia had preoperative and postoperative hearing assessments and intraoperative brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square tests. Results: It was found that the wave V latency was increased by more than 0.9ms in nine patients, eight of whom suffered significant postoperative hearing loss as demonstrated by audiometry. It was also seen that progressive decrease in amplitude of wave V showed progressive hearing loss with 25% loss when amplitude fell by 50 and 100% loss when wave V was lost completely. However most of the patients did not have a clinically manifest hearing loss. Conclusions: A per-operative increase in the latency of wave V greater than 0.9 ms and a fall of amplitude of wave V of more than 50% indicates a risk to hearing.

  8. Auditory brainstem responses for click and CE-chirp stimuli in individuals with and without occupational noise exposure

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    Zeena Venkatacheluvaiah Pushpalatha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Encoding of CE-chirp and click stimuli in auditory system was studied using auditory brainstem responses (ABRs among individuals with and without noise exposure. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of two groups. Group 1 (experimental group consisted of 20 (40 ears individuals exposed to occupational noise with hearing thresholds within 25 dB HL. They were further divided into three subgroups based on duration of noise exposure (0–5 years of exposure-T1, 5–10 years of exposure-T2, and >10 years of exposure-T3. Group 2 (control group consisted of 20 individuals (40 ears. Absolute latency and amplitude of waves I, III, and V were compared between the two groups for both click and CE-chirp stimuli. T1, T2, and T3 groups were compared for the same parameters to see the effect of noise exposure duration on CE-chirp and click ABR. Result: In Click ABR, while both the parameters for wave III were significantly poorer for the experimental group, wave V showed a significant decline in terms of amplitude only. There was no significant difference obtained for any of the parameters for wave I. In CE-Chirp ABR, the latencies for all three waves were significantly prolonged in the experimental group. However, there was a significant decrease in terms of amplitude in only wave V for the same group. Discussion: Compared to click evoked ABR, CE-Chirp ABR was found to be more sensitive in comparison of latency parameters in individuals with occupational noise exposure. Monitoring of early pathological changes at the brainstem level can be studied effectively by using CE-Chirp stimulus in comparison to click stimulus. Conclusion: This study indicates that ABR’s obtained with CE-chirp stimuli serves as an effective tool to identify the early pathological changes due to occupational noise exposure when compared to click evoked ABR.

  9. Maturation of auditory brainstem projections and calyces in the congenitally deaf (dn/dn) mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssoufian, Monique; Couchman, Kiri; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Paolini, Antonio G; Walmsley, Bruce

    2008-01-20

    The deaf dn/dn mouse is a valuable model of human congenital deafness. In this study we used the lipophylic dye DiA to trace auditory nerve and cochlear nucleus projections in the dn/dn mouse. In both normal and deaf mice, the ipsilateral projections from the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) to the lateral superior olive (LSO), and the contralateral projections from the AVCN to the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) were intact. With age, there was a noted increase in the fenestration of the endbulb and calyx of Held, and this morphological maturation was also observed in the deaf mice, although there was a significant difference in total endbulb volume at P20 between normal and deaf mice. However, total calyceal volume was not significantly different between normal and deaf mice. There was electrophysiological evidence of in vivo spontaneous ventral cochlear nucleus activity in normal and deaf animals, indicating that this activity may be responsible for the appropriate connectivity in the deaf mice. Our results indicate that congenital deafness caused by the dn/dn mutation does not result in aberrant projections between the AVCN and the ipsilateral MNTB and contralateral LSO but can cause abnormalities in endbulb size.

  10. Evaluation of brainstem auditory evoked potential in type 2 diabetes mellitus individuals

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    Rathnavel Kumaran Murugesan

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: These data reveal that there was a delay in both the latencies and IPLs which signifies the involvement of both the peripheral and central nervous system. The early diagnosis of brainstem defects may lead to improvement in treatment modalities of DM and decrease its morbidity. Thus BAEP might be used as a non- invasive tool to assess diabetic neuropathy. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(9.000: 3939-3944

  11. Mapping tonotopy in human auditory cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Pim; Langers, Dave R M; Moore, BCJ; Patterson, RD; Winter, IM; Carlyon, RP; Gockel, HE

    2013-01-01

    Tonotopy is arguably the most prominent organizational principle in the auditory pathway. Nevertheless, the layout of tonotopic maps in humans is still debated. We present neuroimaging data that robustly identify multiple tonotopic maps in the bilateral auditory cortex. In contrast with some earlier

  12. Automated auditory brainstem response: Its efficacy as a screening tool for neonatal hearing screening in the postnatal ward

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    Chavakula Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This observational study was carried out to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MB11 BERAphone® , when used for neonatal hearing screening in a postnatal ward setting in comparison against the gold standard, auditory brainstem response (ABR. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven consecutive newborns (74 ears who either unilaterally or bilaterally failed hearing screening with MB11 BERAphone in the postnatal ward were recruited and a second screening with BERAphone was performed after 1 week along with confirmatory testing using ABR. Results: MB11 BERAphone showed sensitivity of 92.9%, specificity of 50%, positive predictive value of 30.23%, and negative predictive value of 96.77% for the diagnosis of hearing loss. The prevalence of confirmed hearing impairment was 18.9%. The rate of unilateral impairment was 10.8%, and the rate of bilateral impairment was 13.5%. The average ambient noise levels in the postnatal ward setting was 62.1 dB. Conclusion: Although the sensitivity of MB11 BERAphone is good, the specificity is significantly lower when the test is performed in the postnatal ward setting with high ambient noise. Neonates who fail the two-step screening should undergo auditory response for confirming the diagnosis of hearing loss.

  13. Abnormalities in Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Sheep with Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies and Lack of a Clear Pathological Relationship

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    Timm Konold

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE, which causes neurological signs in sheep but confirmatory diagnosis is usually made postmortem on examination of the brain for TSE-associated markers like vacuolar changes and disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether testing of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs at two different sound levels could aid in the clinical diagnosis of TSEs in sheep naturally or experimentally infected with different TSE strains [classical and atypical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE] and whether any BAEP abnormalities were associated with TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways.BAEPs were recorded from 141 clinically healthy sheep of different breeds and ages that tested negative for TSEs on postmortem tests to establish a reference range and to allow comparison with 30 sheep clinically affected or exposed to classical scrapie without disease confirmation (test group 1 and 182 clinically affected sheep with disease confirmation (test group 2. Abnormal BAEPs were found in seven sheep (23% of group 1 and 42 sheep (23% of group 2. The proportion of sheep with abnormalities did not appear to be influenced by TSE strain or prion protein gene polymorphisms. When the magnitude of TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways was compared between a subset of 12 sheep with and 12 sheep without BAEP abnormalities in group 2, no significant differences in the total PrPSc or vacuolation scores in the auditory pathways could be found. However, the data suggested that there was a difference in the PrPSc scores depending on the TSE strain because PrPSc scores were significantly higher in sheep with BAEP abnormalities infected with classical and L-type BSE but not with classical scrapie.The results indicated that BAEPs may be abnormal in sheep infected with TSEs but the test is not specific for TSEs, and that neither vacuolation nor Pr

  14. Abnormalities in Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Sheep with Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies and Lack of a Clear Pathological Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konold, Timm; Phelan, Laura J.; Cawthraw, Saira; Simmons, Marion M.; Chaplin, Melanie J.; González, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Scrapie is transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), which causes neurological signs in sheep, but confirmatory diagnosis is usually made postmortem on examination of the brain for TSE-associated markers like vacuolar changes and disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc). The objective of this study was to evaluate whether testing of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) at two different sound levels could aid in the clinical diagnosis of TSEs in sheep naturally or experimentally infected with different TSE strains [classical and atypical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)] and whether any BAEP abnormalities were associated with TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways. BAEPs were recorded from 141 clinically healthy sheep of different breeds and ages that tested negative for TSEs on postmortem tests to establish a reference range and to allow comparison with 30 sheep clinically affected or exposed to classical scrapie (CS) without disease confirmation (test group 1) and 182 clinically affected sheep with disease confirmation (test group 2). Abnormal BAEPs were found in 7 sheep (23%) of group 1 and 42 sheep (23%) of group 2. The proportion of sheep with abnormalities did not appear to be influenced by TSE strain or PrPSc gene polymorphisms. When the magnitude of TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways was compared between a subset of 12 sheep with and 12 sheep without BAEP abnormalities in group 2, no significant differences in the total PrPSc or vacuolation scores in the auditory pathways could be found. However, the data suggested that there was a difference in the PrPSc scores depending on the TSE strain because PrPSc scores were significantly higher in sheep with BAEP abnormalities infected with classical and L-type BSE, but not with CS. The results indicated that BAEPs may be abnormal in sheep infected with TSEs but the test is not specific for TSEs and that neither vacuolation nor PrPSc accumulation appears to be

  15. Sensorineural hearing loss with brainstem auditory evoked responses changes in homozygote and heterozygote sickle cell patients in Guadeloupe (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic-Bateman, L; Hedreville, R

    2006-08-01

    This prospective study involved 79 homozygote and heterozygote sickle cell anaemia patients (16 to 50 years old) and a control group of 40 people.All patients underwent ENT, audiological and brainstem auditory evoked responses (BSER) examinations in order to evaluate the incidence of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), to identify the changes at the level of the cochlear nerve and the central pathways, and to determine the most vulnerable group, in order to intervene with early prevention and rehabilitation for this condition.A hearing loss of greater than 20 dB at two or more frequencies was found in 36 (45.57 per cent) sickle cell patients (19 (47.22 per cent) HbSC patients and 17 (43.59 per cent) HbSS patients) and three (7.5 per cent) members of the control group. Homozygote and heterozygote patients, as well as both sexes, were equally affected. Bilateral hearing loss occurred in 19 (52.78 per cent) patients, unilateral right-sided hearing loss in five (13.89 per cent) patients and unilateral left-sided hearing loss in 12 (33.33 per cent) patients. Brainstem auditory evoked potential demonstrated a prolonged I-V (III-V) interpeak latency in 13 (25.35 per cent) sickle cell patients (11 men (eight with HbSS) and two women). The hearing loss in HbSS patients was neural in nature and of earlier onset; the hearing loss in HbSC patients was usually cochlear in nature and of later onset. Despite high medical standards and 100 per cent social security cover, the high incidence of SNHL in our sickle cell affected patients (the majority with the Benin haplotype) was probably due to their specific haematological profile and to the original geographical distribution of the disease in the tropics. Our results highlight the necessity for early and regular hearing assessment of sickle cell patients, including BSER examination, especially in male patients with SNHL.

  16. Piracetam-induced changes on the brainstem auditory response in anesthetized juvenile rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Report of two clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand-Rivera, A; Gonzalez-Pina, R; Hernandez-Godinez, B; Ibanez-Contreras, A; Bueno-Nava, A; Alfaro-Rodriguez, A

    2012-10-01

    We describe two clinical cases and examine the effects of piracetam on the brainstem auditory response in infantile female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We found that the interwave intervals show a greater reduction in a 3-year-old rhesus monkey compared to a 1-year-old rhesus monkey. In this report, we discuss the significance of these observations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses and behavioral estimates of hearing sensitivity in Lemur catta and Nycticebus coucang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsier, Marissa A; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2010-03-01

    Primates depend on acoustic signals and cues to avoid predators, locate food, and share information. Accordingly, the structure and function of acoustic stimuli have long been emphasized in studies of primate behavioral and cognitive ecology. Yet, few studies have addressed how well primates hear such stimuli; indeed, the auditory thresholds of most primate species are unknown. This empirical void is due in part to the logistic and economic challenges attendant on traditional behavioral testing methods. Technological advances have produced a safe and cost-effective alternative-the auditory brainstem response (ABR) method, which can be utilized in field conditions, on virtually any animal species, and without subject training. Here we used the ABR and four methods of threshold determination to construct audiograms for two strepsirrhine primates: the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) and slow loris (Nycticebus coucang). Next, to verify the general efficacy of the ABR method, we compared our results to published behaviorally-derived audiograms. We found that the four ABR threshold detection methods produced similar results, including relatively elevated thresholds but similarly shaped audiograms compared to those derived behaviorally. The ABR and behavioral absolute thresholds were significantly correlated, and the frequencies of best sensitivity and high-frequency limits were comparable. However, at frequencies Lemur, the ABR 10-dB range starting points were more than 2 octaves higher than the behavioral points. Finally, a comparison of ABR- and behaviorally-derived audiograms from various animal taxa demonstrates the widespread efficacy of the ABR for estimating frequency of best sensitivity, but otherwise suggests caution; factors such as stimulus properties and threshold definition affect results. We conclude that the ABR method is a promising technique for estimating primate hearing sensitivity, but that additional data are required to explore its efficacy for

  18. Brainstem evoked auditory potentials with speech stimulus in the auditory processing disorder Potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco encefálico com estímulo de fala no transtorno do processamento auditivo

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    Renata Filippini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the clinical use of click stimuli to assess auditory function at the brainstem is already established, and numerous research projects use such stimuli to study human hearing, little is known about the auditory processing of a complex stimulus like speech. AIM: This study aimed at validating the speech stimulus as an effective method to evaluate speech auditory processing, to help us better understand its disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS:This prospective clinical study tested 20 subjects with Auditory Processing Disorders (APD and 20 subjects with normal development (ND - control group using the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials with clicks and speech stimuli. The latter is based on first 40ms of the spoken syllable /da/. RESULTS: No differences were observed between the groups regarding the click stimulus. However, with the speech stimulus the APD group presented latency delay and lower amplitudes when compared to the ND group. CONCLUSION: Speech stimulus proved to be more sensitive for the evaluation of Auditory Processing Disorders, showing possible alterations in synchronicity and speech processing neural input speed, especially as to the linguistic information of the latter.Embora o uso clínico do estímulo clique na avaliação da função auditiva no tronco encefálico já esteja bastante difundido e uma variedade de pesquisas use tal estímulo no estudo da audição humana, pouco se sabe a respeito do processamento auditivo de estímulos complexos como a fala. OBJETIVO: O presente estudo buscou validar o estímulo de fala como método efetivo de avaliação do processamento auditivo da fala. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODO: Neste estudo clínico prospectivo, 20 sujeitos portadores de transtorno do processamento auditivo (TPA - grupo estudo e 20 sujeitos com desenvolvimento típico (DT - grupo controle foram testados quanto aos Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Tronco Encefálico para estímulo clique e para estímulo de fala, o qual

  19. Auditory brainstem responses to CE-Chirp® stimuli for normal ears and those with sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu-Hee; Jang, Hyun-Kyung; Chang, Sun O; Jung, Hyunseo; Lee, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of the characteristic differences between click-and CE-Chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) in normal hearing and sensorineural hearing loss. A prospective study. Ears with normal hearing and with sensorineural hearing loss were evaluated. Pure-tone audiometry and click-and CE-Chirp evoked ABRs exams were conducted for all ears. Visual detection levels, wave-V amplitudes, and latencies of the ABRs were assessed. Twenty-two ears with normal hearing and 22 ears with sloping type sensorineural hearing loss were examined. In normal-hearing ears, mean amplitudes were larger for CE-chirps than for clicks at all intensities until 80 dB nHL, at which the amplitudes dropped off, presumably due to upward spread of excitation. In ears with sensorineural hearing loss, however the drop-off was less significant at 80 dB nHL. Comparisons with pure-tone audiometry findings revealed ABRs to CE-Chirps to correlate at 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz, and to clicks at 1, 2, 3, and 4 kHz. The CE-Chirp has advantages over clicks for examining normal ears. However, under high-level stimulation, these advantages are no longer present. In ears with sensorineural hearing loss, the upward spread of excitation is less prominent. The CE-Chirps results correlate significantly to low frequency audiometric findings at 0.5 kHz, while clicks do not.

  20. Effect of the Level of Anesthesia on the Auditory Brainstem Response in the Emei Music Frog (Babina daunchina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianguo; Zhu, Bicheng; Fang, Guangzhan; Smith, Ed; Brauth, Steven E.; Tang, Yezhong

    2017-01-01

    Anesthesia is known to affect the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in mice, rats, birds and lizards. The present study investigated how the level of anesthesia affects ABR recordings in an amphibian species, Babina daunchina. To do this, we compared ABRs evoked by tone pip stimuli recorded from 35 frogs when Tricaine methane sulphonate (MS-222) anesthetic immersion times varied from 0, 5 and 10 minutes after anesthesia induction at sound frequencies between 0.5 and 6 kHz. ABR thresholds increased significantly with immersion time across the 0.5 kHz to 2.5 kHz frequency range, which is the most sensitive frequency range for hearing and the main frequency range of male calls. There were no significant differences for anesthetic levels across the 3 kHz to 6 kHz range. ABR latency was significantly longer in the 10 min group than in the 0 and 5 min groups at frequencies of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.5 kHz, while ABR latency did not differ across the 3 kHz to 4 kHz range and at 2.0 kHz. Taken together, these results show that the level of anesthesia affects the amplitude, threshold and latency of ABRs in frogs. PMID:28056042

  1. Preoperative characteristics of auditory brainstem response in acoustic neuroma with useful hearing: importance as a preliminary investigation for intraoperative monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Noritaka; Murakami, Shingo; Takahashi, Mariko; Yamada, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We classified the results of preoperative auditory brainstem response (ABR) in 121 patients with useful hearing and considered the utility of preoperative ABR as a preliminary assessment for intraoperative monitoring. Wave V was confirmed in 113 patients and was not confirmed in 8 patients. Intraoperative ABR could not detect wave V in these 8 patients. The 8 patients without wave V were classified into two groups (flat and wave I only), and the reason why wave V could not be detected may have differed between the groups. Because high-frequency hearing was impaired in flat patients, an alternative to click stimulation may be more effective. Monitoring cochlear nerve action potential (CNAP) may be useful because CNAP could be detected in 4 of 5 wave I only patients. Useful hearing was preserved after surgery in 1 patient in the flat group and 2 patients in wave I only group. Among patients with wave V, the mean interaural latency difference of wave V was 0.88 ms in Class A (n = 57) and 1.26 ms in Class B (n = 56). Because the latency of wave V is already prolonged before surgery, to estimate delay in wave V latency during surgery probably underestimates cochlear nerve damage. Recording intraoperative ABR is indispensable to avoid cochlear nerve damage and to provide information for surgical decisions. Confirming the condition of ABR before surgery helps to solve certain problems, such as choosing to monitor the interaural latency difference of wave V, CNAP, or alternative sound-evoked ABR.

  2. Evaluation of deafness in American Paint Horses by phenotype, brainstem auditory-evoked responses, and endothelin receptor B genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdesian, K Gary; Williams, D Colette; Aleman, Monica; Lecouteur, Richard A; Madigan, John E

    2009-11-15

    To evaluate deafness in American Paint Horses by phenotype, clinical findings, brainstem auditory-evoked responses (BAERs), and endothelin B receptor (EDNBR) genotype. Case series and case-control studies. 14 deaf American Paint Horses, 20 suspected-deaf American Paint Horses, and 13 nondeaf American Paint Horses and Pintos. Horses were categorized on the basis of coat color pattern and eye color. Testing for the EDNBR gene mutation (associated with overo lethal white foal syndrome) and BAERs was performed. Additional clinical findings were obtained from medical records. All 14 deaf horses had loss of all BAER waveforms consistent with complete deafness. Most horses had the splashed white or splashed white-frame blend coat pattern. Other patterns included frame overo and tovero. All of the deaf horses had extensive head and limb white markings, although the amount of white on the neck and trunk varied widely. All horses had at least 1 partially heterochromic iris, and most had 2 blue eyes. Ninety-one percent (31/34) of deaf and suspected-deaf horses had the EDNBR gene mutation. Deaf and suspected-deaf horses were used successfully for various performance events. All nondeaf horses had unremarkable BAER results. Veterinarians should be aware of deafness among American Paint Horses, particularly those with a splashed white or frame overo coat color pattern, blend of these patterns, or tovero pattern. Horses with extensive head and limb markings and those with blue eyes appeared to be at particular risk.

  3. Broadband onset inhibition can suppress spectral splatter in the auditory brainstem.

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    Martin J Spencer

    Full Text Available In vivo intracellular responses to auditory stimuli revealed that, in a particular population of cells of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL of rats, fast inhibition occurred before the first action potential. These experimental data were used to constrain a leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF model of the neurons in this circuit. The post-synaptic potentials of the VNLL cell population were characterized using a method of triggered averaging. Analysis suggested that these inhibited VNLL cells produce action potentials in response to a particular magnitude of the rate of change of their membrane potential. The LIF model was modified to incorporate the VNLL cells' distinctive action potential production mechanism. The model was used to explore the response of the population of VNLL cells to simple speech-like sounds. These sounds consisted of a simple tone modulated by a saw tooth with exponential decays, similar to glottal pulses that are the repeated impulses seen in vocalizations. It was found that the harmonic component of the sound was enhanced in the VNLL cell population when compared to a population of auditory nerve fibers. This was because the broadband onset noise, also termed spectral splatter, was suppressed by the fast onset inhibition. This mechanism has the potential to greatly improve the clarity of the representation of the harmonic content of certain kinds of natural sounds.

  4. Dopamine in the Auditory Brainstem and Midbrain: Co-localization with Amino Acid Neurotransmitters and Gene Expression following Cochlear Trauma

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    Avril Genene eHolt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA modulates the effects of amino acid neurotransmitters, including GABA and glutamate, in motor, visual, olfactory and reward systems (Hnasko et al., 2010; Stuber et al., 2010; Hnasko and Edwards, 2012. The results suggest that DA may play a similar modulatory role in the auditory pathways. Previous studies have shown that deafness results in decreased GABA release, changes in excitatory neurotransmitter levels, and increased spontaneous neuronal activity within brainstem regions related to auditory function. Modulation of the expression and localization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate limiting enzyme in the production of DA in the IC following cochlear trauma has been previously reported (Tong et al., 2005. In the current study the possibility of co-localization of TH with amino acid neurotransmitters (AANs was examined. Changes in the gene expression of TH were compared with changes in the gene expression of markers for AANs in the cochlear nucleus (CN and IC to determine whether those deafness related changes occur concurrently. The results indicate that bilateral cochlear ablation significantly reduced TH gene expression in the CN after two months while in the IC the reduction in TH was observed at both three days and two months following ablation. Furthermore, in the CN, glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2 and the GABA transporter (GABAtp were also significantly reduced only after two months. However, in the IC, DA receptor 1 (DRDA1, vesicular glutamate transporters 2 and 3 (vGluT2, vGluT3, GABAtp and GAD67 were reduced in expression both at the three day and two month time points. A close relationship between the distribution of TH and several of the AANs was determined in both the CN and the IC. In addition, GlyT2 and vGluT3 each co-localized with TH within IC somata and dendrites. Therefore, the results of the current study suggest that DA is spatially well positioned to influence the effects of AANs on auditory neurons.

  5. Effects of glutamate on distortion-product otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Qing; SUN Jian-he; SHAN Xi-zheng; LI Xing-qi

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate changes in evoked potentials and structure of the guinea pig cochleae during whole cochlear perfusion with glutamate. Methods CM, CAP, DPOAE, and ABR were recorded as indicators of cochlear functions during whole cochlear perfusion. The morphology of the cochlea was studied via transmission electron microscopy. Results There were no significant changes in DPOAE amplitude before and after glutamate perfusion. CM I/O function remained nonlinear during perfusion. ABR latencies were delayed following glutamate perfusion. The average CAP threshold was elevated 35 dB SPL following glutamate perfusion.. The OHCs appeared normal, but the IHCs and afferent dendrites showed cytoplasmic blebs after glutamate perfusion. Conclusions While being a primary amino acid neurotransmitter at the synapses between hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons, excessive glutamate is neurotoxic and can destroy IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons. The technique used in this study can also be used to build an animal model of auditory neuropathy.

  6. 窒息新生儿脑干诱发电位的检测价值%The Value of Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential in Asphyxia Neonatorum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秋玲

    2011-01-01

    围生期窒息后可引起听神经通路细胞的缺血/再灌注损伤,从而影响听觉功能.脑干听觉诱发电位可反映脑神经和脑听觉通路不同部位所引起的生物电活动,因其客观、准确、重复性好、无损伤性、受干扰因素少而受到儿科工作者重视.对可能累及到中枢神经系统功能失调及听力障碍的儿科疾病具有早期诊断和判断预后的临床参考价值.%The ischemic reperfusion of injury of nerve cell in auditory pathway can be caued by perinatal asphyxia. And the injury can affect hearing. Brainstem auditory evoked potential can reflect the bioelectric activity of cranial nerves and cerebral auditory pathway. Because it have not only good objectivity, precision and reproducibility , but also it have no damage and few interference factors, brainstem auditory evoked potential was thought highly by pediatrician. It has the clinical reference value of early diagnosis and the judgment of prognosis in pediatrie disease of central dysautonomia and dysacusis.

  7. Sensory deprivation regulates the development of the hyperpolarization-activated current in auditory brainstem neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassfurth, Benjamin; Magnusson, Anna K; Grothe, Benedikt; Koch, Ursula

    2009-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are highly expressed in the superior olivary complex, the primary locus for binaural information processing. This hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) regulates the excitability of neurons and enhances the temporally precise analysis of the binaural acoustic cues. By using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we examined the properties of I(h) current in neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) before and after hearing onset. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that I(h) currents are actively regulated by sensory input activity by performing bilateral and unilateral cochlear ablations before hearing onset, resulting in a chronic auditory deprivation. The results show that after hearing onset, I(h) currents are rapidly upregulated in LSO neurons, but change only marginally in neurons of the MNTB. We also found a striking difference in maximal current density, voltage dependence and activation time constant between the LSO and the MNTB in mature-like animals. Following bilateral cochlear ablations before hearing onset, the I(h) currents were scaled up in the LSO and scaled down in the MNTB. Consequently, in the LSO this resulted in a depolarized resting membrane potential and a lower input resistance of these neurons. This type of activity-dependent homeostatic change could thus result in an augmented response to the remaining inputs.

  8. Phonological Processing In Human Auditory Cortical Fields

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    David L Woods

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We used population-based cortical-surface analysis of functional magnetic imaging (fMRI data to characterize the processing of consonant-vowel-consonant syllables (CVCs and spectrally-matched amplitude-modulated noise bursts (AMNBs in human auditory cortex as subjects attended to auditory or visual stimuli in an intermodal selective attention paradigm. Average auditory cortical field (ACF locations were defined using tonotopic mapping in a previous study. Activations in auditory cortex were defined by two stimulus-preference gradients: (1 Medial belt ACFs preferred AMNBs and lateral belt and parabelt fields preferred CVCs. This preference extended into core ACFs with medial regions of primary auditory cortex (A1 and rostral field (R preferring AMNBs and lateral regions preferring CVCs. (2 Anterior ACFs showed smaller activations but more clearly defined stimulus preferences than did posterior ACFs. Stimulus preference gradients were unaffected by auditory attention suggesting that different ACFs are specialized for the automatic processing of different spectrotemporal sound features.

  9. Otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Do otoacoustic emissions have prognostic value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Amiridavan

    2006-11-01

    prognostic factor in SSNHL, hence we recommend performing TEOAE in every patient with SSNHL. KEY WORDS: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss, pure tone audiometry, otoacoustic emissions, overall correlation, signal to noise ratio (S/N ratio, auditory brainstem responses, Interpeak latencies, retrocochlear lesion.

  10. Conventional and cross-correlation brain-stem auditory evoked responses in the white leghorn chick: rate manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, R.; Jones, S.; Jones, T.

    1994-01-01

    Rate-dependent changes in the chick brain-stem auditory evoked response (BAER) using conventional averaging and a cross-correlation technique were investigated. Five 15- to 19-day-old white leghorn chicks were anesthetized with Chloropent. In each chick, the left ear was acoustically stimulated. Electrical pulses of 0.1-ms duration were shaped, attenuated, and passed through a current driver to an Etymotic ER-2 which was sealed in the ear canal. Electrical activity from stainless-steel electrodes was amplified, filtered (300-3000 Hz) and digitized at 20 kHz. Click levels included 70 and 90 dB peSPL. In each animal, conventional BAERs were obtained at rates ranging from 5 to 90 Hz. BAERs were also obtained using a cross-correlation technique involving pseudorandom pulse sequences called maximum length sequences (MLSs). The minimum time between pulses, called the minimum pulse interval (MPI), ranged from 0.5 to 6 ms. Two BAERs were obtained for each condition. Dependent variables included the latency and amplitude of the cochlear microphonic (CM), wave 2 and wave 3. BAERs were observed in all chicks, for all level by rate combinations for both conventional and MLS BAERs. There was no effect of click level or rate on the latency of the CM. The latency of waves 2 and 3 increased with decreasing click level and increasing rate. CM amplitude decreased with decreasing click level, but was not influenced by click rate for the 70 dB peSPL condition. For the 90 dB peSPL click, CM amplitude was uninfluenced by click rate for conventional averaging. For MLS BAERs, CM amplitude was similar to conventional averaging for longer MPIs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  11. Analysis of brain-stem auditory evoked potential and visual evoked potential in patients with Parkinson disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiaorong Deng; Jianzhong Deng; Yanmin Zhao; Xiaohai Yan; Pin Chen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the development of neuroelectrophysiology, it had been identified that all kinds of evoked potentials might reflect the functional status of corresponding pathway. Evoked potentials recruited in the re search of PD, it can be known whether other functional pathway of nervous system is impaired. OBJECTIVE: To observe whether brainstem auditory and visual passageway are impaired in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), and compare with non-PD patients concurrently. DESIGN: A non-randomized concurrent controlled observation. SETTINGS: Henan Provincial Tumor Hospital; Anyang District Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-two cases of PD outpatients and inpatients, who registered in the Department of Neurology, Anyang District Hospital from October 1997 to February 2006, were enrolled as the PD group, including 20 males and 12 females, aged 50-72 years old. Inclusive criteria: In accordance with the diagnostic criteria of PD recommended by the dyskinesia and PD group of neurology branch of Chinese Medical Association. Patients with diseases that could cause Parkinson syndrome were excluded by CT scanning or MRI examination. Meanwhile, 30 cases with non-neurological disease were selected from the Department of Internal Medicine of our hospital as the control group, including 19 males and 11 females, aged 45-70 years old. Including criteria: Without history of neurological disease or psychiatric disease; showing normal image on CT. And PD, Parkinson syndrome and Parkinsonism-plus were excluded by professional neurologist. All the patients were informed and agreed with the examination and clinical observation. METHODS: The electrophysiological examination and clinical observation of the PD patients and controls were conducted. The Reporter type 4-channel evoked potential machine (Italy) was used to check brain-stem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Why to be examined was explained to test taker. BAEP recording electrode was plac

  12. A new method for analyzing auditory brain-stem response waveforms using a moving-minimum subtraction procedure of digitized analog recordings

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    Källstr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Johan Källstrand,1 Tommy Lewander,2 Eva Baghdassarian,2,3 Sören Nielzén4 1SensoDetect AB, Lund, 2Department of Neuroscience, Medical Faculty, Uppsala University, 3Department of Psychiatry, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, 4Department of Psychiatry, Medical Faculty, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden Abstract: The auditory brain-stem response (ABR waveform comprises a set of waves (labeled I–VII recorded with scalp electrodes over 10 ms after an auditory stimulation with a brief click sound. Quite often, the waves are fused (confluent and baseline-irregular and sloped, making wave latencies and wave amplitudes difficult to establish. In the present paper, we describe a method, labeled moving-minimum subtraction, based on digitization of the analog ABR waveform (154 data points/ms in order to achieve alignment of the ABR response to a straight baseline, often with clear baseline separation of waves and resolution of fused waves. Application of the new method to groups of patients showed marked differences in ABR waveforms between patients with schizophrenia versus patients with adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder versus healthy controls. The findings show promise regarding the possibility to identify ABR markers to be used as biomarkers as support for clinical diagnoses of these and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Keywords: auditory brain-stem response, digitization, moving-minimum subtraction method, baseline alignment, schizophrenia, ADHD

  13. Lifelong expression of apolipoprotein D in the human brainstem: correlation with reduced age-related neurodegeneration.

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    Ana Navarro

    Full Text Available The lipocalin apolipoprotein D (Apo D is upregulated in peripheral nerves following injury and in regions of the central nervous system, such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, during aging and progression of certain neurological diseases. In contrast, few studies have examined Apo D expression in the brainstem, a region necessary for survival and generally less prone to age-related degeneration. We measured Apo D expression in whole human brainstem lysates by slot-blot and at higher spatial resolution by quantitative immunohistochemistry in eleven brainstem nuclei (the 4 nuclei of the vestibular nuclear complex, inferior olive, hypoglossal nucleus, oculomotor nucleus, facial motor nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, and Roller`s nucleus. In contrast to cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, apolipoprotein D was highly expressed in brainstem tissue from subjects (N = 26, 32-96 years of age with no history of neurological disease, and expression showed little variation with age. Expression was significantly stronger in somatomotor nuclei (hypoglossal, oculomotor, facial than visceromotor or sensory nuclei. Both neurons and glia expressed Apo D, particularly neurons with larger somata and glia in the periphery of these brainstem centers. Immunostaining was strongest in the neuronal perinuclear region and absent in the nucleus. We propose that strong brainstem expression of Apo D throughout adult life contributes to resistance against neurodegenerative disease and age-related degeneration, possibly by preventing oxidative stress and ensuing lipid peroxidation.

  14. Functional properties of human auditory cortical fields

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    David L Woods

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available While auditory cortex in non-human primates has been subdivided into multiple functionally-specialized auditory cortical fields (ACFs, the boundaries and functional specialization of human ACFs have not been defined. In the current study, we evaluated whether a widely accepted primate model of auditory cortex could explain regional tuning properties of fMRI activations on the cortical surface to attended and nonattended tones of different frequency, location, and intensity. The limits of auditory cortex were defined by voxels that showed significant activations to nonattended sounds. Three centrally-located fields with mirror-symmetric tonotopic organization were identified and assigned to the three core fields of the primate model while surrounding activations were assigned to belt fields following procedures similar to those used in macaque fMRI studies. The functional properties of core, medial belt, and lateral belt field groups were then analyzed. Field groups were distinguished by tonotopic organization, frequency selectivity, intensity sensitivity, contralaterality, binaural enhancement, attentional modulation, and hemispheric asymmetry. In general, core fields showed greater sensitivity to sound properties than did belt fields, while belt fields showed greater attentional modulation than core fields. Significant distinctions in intensity sensitivity and contralaterality were seen between adjacent core fields A1 and R, while multiple differences in tuning properties were evident at boundaries between adjacent core and belt fields. The reliable differences in functional properties between fields and field groups suggest that the basic primate pattern of auditory cortex organization is preserved in humans. A comparison of the sizes of functionally-defined ACFs in humans and macaques reveals a significant relative expansion in human lateral belt fields implicated in the processing of speech.

  15. Comparison of cochlear delay estimates using otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, James; Pigasse, Gilles; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    delay non-invasively in normal-hearing humans. Tone bursts at nine frequencies from 0.5 to 8 kHz served as stimuli, with care taken to quantify possible bias due to the use of tone bursts with different rise times. BM delays are estimated from the ABR latency estimates by subtracting the neural...... and synaptic delays. This allows a comparison between individual OAE and BM delays over a large frequency range in the same subjects, and offers support to the theory that OAEs are reflected from a tonotopic place and carried back to the cochlear base via a reverse traveling wave....

  16. Potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco encefálico em frentistas Auditory brainstem response in gas station attendants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenita da Silva Quevedo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A ototoxidade dos solventes orgânicos pode atingir o sistema auditivo a nível coclear e retrococlear. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a integridade neurofisiológica do sistema auditivo até tronco cerebral por meio do PEATE. MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo. Estudados frentistas de três postos de gasolina da cidade de Santa Maria/RS. A amostra ficou composta por 21 sujeitos, que foram avaliados por meio de potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco encefálico. RESULTADOS: Alteração nas latências absolutas das ondas I e III e em todas as latências interpicos, na orelha direita. Na orelha esquerda houve alteração na latência absoluta de todas as ondas, e em todos os intervalos interpicos. Alteração na diferença interaural da onda V foi verificada em 19% dos sujeitos. No grupo exposto há mais de cinco anos, foram estatisticamente significantes o número de sujeitos com alteração: no intervalo interpico I-V da orelha direita; na latência absoluta da onda I e no intervalo interpico III-V da orelha esquerda. CONCLUSÃO: A exposição a combustíveis pode causar alterações no sistema auditivo central.Ototoxicity of organic solvents can affect the hearing system up to the cochlea level and the central structures of hearing. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the neurophysiological integrity of the hearing system in subjects exposed to fuels using ABR. METHOD: Prospective study. We evaluated attendants from three gas stations in Santa Maria/RS. The sample had 21 subjects, who were evaluated by auditory brainstem response. RESULTS: We found an alteration in the absolute latencies of Waves I and III and in all the interpeak latencies, in the right ear. In the left ear there was a change in the absolute latencies of all Waves, and in all the interpeak intervals. A change in the interaural difference of Wave V was found in 19% of the individuals. In the group exposed for more than five years, there were subjects with a statistically significant changes: in the I

  17. A Cochlear Implant Performance Prognostic Test Based on Electrical Field Interactions Evaluated by eABR (Electrical Auditory Brainstem Responses.

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    Nicolas Guevara

    Full Text Available Cochlear implants (CIs are neural prostheses that have been used routinely in the clinic over the past 25 years. They allow children who were born profoundly deaf, as well as adults affected by hearing loss for whom conventional hearing aids are insufficient, to attain a functional level of hearing. The "modern" CI (i.e., a multi-electrode implant using sequential coding strategies has yielded good speech comprehension outcomes (recognition level for monosyllabic words about 50% to 60%, and sentence comprehension close to 90%. These good average results however hide a very important interindividual variability as scores in a given patients' population often vary from 5 to 95% in comparable testing conditions. Our aim was to develop a prognostic model for patients with unilateral CI. A novel method of objectively measuring electrical and neuronal interactions using electrical auditory brainstem responses (eABRs is proposed.The method consists of two measurements: 1 eABR measurements with stimulation by a single electrode at 70% of the dynamic range (four electrodes distributed within the cochlea were tested, followed by a summation of these four eABRs; 2 Measurement of a single eABR with stimulation from all four electrodes at 70% of the dynamic range. A comparison of the eABRs obtained by these two measurements, defined as the monaural interaction component (MIC, indicated electrical and neural interactions between the stimulation channels. Speech recognition performance without lip reading was measured for each patient using a logatome test (64 "vowel-consonant-vowel"; VCV; by forced choice of 1 out of 16. eABRs were measured in 16 CI patients (CIs with 20 electrodes, Digisonic SP; Oticon Medical ®, Vallauris, France. Significant correlations were found between speech recognition performance and the ratio of the amplitude of the V wave of the eABRs obtained with the two measurements (Pearson's linear regression model, parametric correlation: r

  18. NOISE-INDUCED TOUGHENING EFFECT IN WISTAR RATS: ENHANCED AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSES ARE RELATED TO CALRETININ AND NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE UPREGULATION.

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    Juan Carlos eAlvarado

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate conditioning noise exposure may reduce a subsequent noise-induced threshold shift. Although this toughening effect helps to protect the auditory system from a subsequent traumatic noise exposure, the mechanisms that regulate this protective process are not fully understood yet. Accordingly, the goal of the present study was to characterize physiological processes associated with ‘toughening’ and to determine their relationship to metabolic changes in the cochlea and cochlear nucleus (CN. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR were evaluated in Wistar rats before and after exposures to a sound conditioning protocol consisting of a broad-band white noise of 118 dB SPL for 1h every 72h, 4 times. After the last ABR evaluation, animals were perfused and their cochleae and brains removed and processed for the activity markers calretinin (CR and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. Toughening was demonstrated by a progressively faster recovery of the threshold shift, as well as wave amplitudes and latencies over time. Immunostaining revealed an increase in CR and nNOS levels in the spiral ganglion, spiral ligament and CN in noise-conditioned rats. Overall, these results suggest that the protective mechanisms of the auditory toughening effect initiate in the cochlea and extend to the central auditory system. Such phenomenon might be in part related to an interplay between CR and nitric oxide signalling pathways, and involve an increased cytosolic calcium buffering capacity induced by the noise conditioning protocol.

  19. The human premotor oculomotor brainstem system - can it help to understand oculomotor symptoms in Huntington's disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, U.; Heinsen, H.; Brunt, E. R.; Landwehrmeyer, B.; Den Dunnen, W. F. A.; Gierga, K.; Deller, T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in oculomotor research has enabled new insights into the functional neuroanatomy of the human premotor oculomotor brainstem network. In the present review, we provide an overview of its functional neuroanatomy and summarize the broad range of oculomotor dysfunctions that may occur in

  20. Auditory perception of a human walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, David; Campbell, Megan E J

    2014-01-01

    When one hears footsteps in the hall, one is able to instantly recognise it as a person: this is an everyday example of auditory biological motion perception. Despite the familiarity of this experience, research into this phenomenon is in its infancy compared with visual biological motion perception. Here, two experiments explored sensitivity to, and recognition of, auditory stimuli of biological and nonbiological origin. We hypothesised that the cadence of a walker gives rise to a temporal pattern of impact sounds that facilitates the recognition of human motion from auditory stimuli alone. First a series of detection tasks compared sensitivity with three carefully matched impact sounds: footsteps, a ball bouncing, and drumbeats. Unexpectedly, participants were no more sensitive to footsteps than to impact sounds of nonbiological origin. In the second experiment participants made discriminations between pairs of the same stimuli, in a series of recognition tasks in which the temporal pattern of impact sounds was manipulated to be either that of a walker or the pattern more typical of the source event (a ball bouncing or a drumbeat). Under these conditions, there was evidence that both temporal and nontemporal cues were important in recognising theses stimuli. It is proposed that the interval between footsteps, which reflects a walker's cadence, is a cue for the recognition of the sounds of a human walking.

  1. High-resolution MR imaging of the human brainstem in vivo at 7 Tesla

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    Andreas eDeistung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The human brainstem, which comprises a multitude of axonal nerve fibers and nuclei, plays an important functional role in the human brain. Depicting its anatomy non-invasively with high spatial resolution may thus in turn help to better relate normal and pathological anatomical variations to medical conditions as well as neurological and peripheral functions. We explored the potential of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at 7T for depicting the intricate anatomy of the human brainstem in vivo by acquiring and generating images with multiple contrasts: T2-weighted images, quantitative maps of longitudinal relaxation rate (R1-maps and effective transverse relaxation rate (R2*-maps, magnetic susceptibility maps, and direction-encoded track-density images. Images and quantitative maps were compared with histological stains and anatomical atlases to identify nerve nuclei and nerve fibers. Among the investigated contrasts, susceptibility maps displayed the largest number of brainstem structures. Contrary to R1 maps and T2-weighted images, which showed rather homogeneous contrast, R2* maps, magnetic susceptibility maps and track-density images clearly displayed a multitude of smaller and larger fiber bundles. Several brainstem nuclei were identifiable in sections covering the pons and medulla oblongata, including the spinal trigeminal and the reticulotegmental nucleus on magnetic susceptibility maps as well as the inferior olive on R1, R2*, and susceptibility maps. The substantia nigra and red nuclei were visible in all contrasts. In conclusion, high-resolution, multi-contrast MR imaging at 7 Tesla is a versatile tool to non-invasively assess the individual anatomy and tissue composition of the human brainstem.

  2. Increase of Kv3.1b expression in avian auditory brainstem neurons correlates with synaptogenesis in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenzel, Thomas; Wirth, Marcus J; Luksch, Harald; Wagner, Hermann; Mey, Jörg

    2009-12-11

    In the auditory system voltage-activated currents mediated by potassium channels Kv1.1 and Kv3.1b and their interaction with sodium inward currents play a crucial role for computational function. However, it is unresolved how these potassium channels are developmentally regulated. We have therefore combined a biochemical investigation of Kv1.1 and Kv3.1b protein expression with electrophysiological recordings of membrane currents to characterize neuronal differentiation in the auditory brain stem of the chick. Differentiation in vitro was compared with cells prepared from corresponding embryonic stages in vivo. Using a computer model based on the empirical data we were then able to predict physiological properties of developing auditory brain stem neurons. In vivo Kv3.1b expression increased strongly between E10 and E14, a time of functional synaptogenesis in the auditory brainstem. We also found this increase of expression in vitro, again coinciding with synaptogenesis in the cultures. Whole-cell patch recordings revealed a corresponding increase of the (Kv3.1-like) high threshold potassium current. In contrast, Kv1.1 protein expression failed to increase in vitro, and changes in (Kv1.1-like) low threshold potassium current with time in culture were not significant. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that sodium inward currents increased with cultivation time. Thus, our data suggest that Kv3.1b expression occurs with the onset of functional synaptogenesis, while a different signal, absent from cultures of dissociated auditory brain stem, is needed for Kv1.1 expression. A biophysical model constructed with parameters from our recordings was used to investigate the functional impact of the currents mediated by these channels. We found that during development both high and low threshold potassium currents need to be increased in a concerted manner with the sodium conductance for the neurons to exhibit fast and phasic action potential firing and a narrow time

  3. Auditory coding of human movement kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinken, Pia M; Kröger, Daniela; Fehse, Ursula; Schmitz, Gerd; Brock, Heike; Effenberg, Alfred O

    2013-01-01

    Although visual perception is dominant on motor perception, control and learning, auditory information can enhance and modulate perceptual as well as motor processes in a multifaceted manner. During last decades new methods of auditory augmentation had been developed with movement sonification as one of the most recent approaches expanding auditory movement information also to usually mute phases of movement. Despite general evidence on the effectiveness of movement sonification in different fields of applied research there is nearly no empirical proof on how sonification of gross motor human movement should be configured to achieve information rich sound sequences. Such lack of empirical proof is given for (a) the selection of suitable movement features as well as for (b) effective kinetic-acoustical mapping patterns and for (c) the number of regarded dimensions of sonification. In this study we explore the informational content of artificial acoustical kinematics in terms of a kinematic movement sonification using an intermodal discrimination paradigm. In a repeated measure design we analysed discrimination rates of six everyday upper limb actions to evaluate the effectiveness of seven different kinds of kinematic-acoustical mappings as well as short-term learning effects. The kinematics of the upper limb actions were calculated based on inertial motion sensor data and transformed into seven different sonifications. Sound sequences were randomly presented to participants and discrimination rates as well as confidence of choice were analysed. Data indicate an instantaneous comprehensibility of the artificial movement acoustics as well as short-term learning effects. No differences between different dimensional encodings became evident thus indicating a high efficiency for intermodal pattern discrimination for the acoustically coded velocity distribution of the actions. Taken together movement information related to continuous kinematic parameters can be

  4. The relationship between auditory brainstem response, nerve conduction studies, and metabolic risk factors in type II diabetes mellitus

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    Noha M Abo-Elfetoh

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem dysfunction and ABR changes are common in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. These changes are significantly correlated to NCS parameters on one hand and serum HbA1c% and lipid profile (total cholesterol and triglycerides on the other hand.

  5. Referências anatômicas na cirurgia do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral Anatomical landmarks in auditory brainstem implant surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Vuono Brito Neto

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O implante auditivo de tronco cerebral é uma opção os pacientes surdos que não têm a integridade das vias auditivas preservada. A cirurgia, por sua complexidade anatômica e funcional, requer treinamento específico em laboratório de anatomia por parte do cirurgião. OBJETIVOS: Estudar a anatomia cirúrgica da cirurgia do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Estudo anatômico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Neste estudo dissecamos cadáver fresco preparado com solução corante injetada nas artérias e veias intra-cranianas. O local de inserção do eletrodo do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral foi estudado através do acesso translabiríntico. RESULTADOS: A técnica cirúrgica utilizada para a implantação do eletrodo de tronco cerebral é semelhante à utilizada na remoção do shwannoma vestibular. O complexo de núcleo coclear, composto pelo núcleo coclear ventral e dorsal, é o local para a colocação do eletrodo. O núcleo coclear ventral é o principal núcleo de transmissão de impulsos neurais do VIII par e seus axônios formam a principal via ascendente do nervo coclear. Tanto o núcleo ventral como o dorsal não são visíveis durante a cirurgia e sua localização depende de identificação de estruturas anatômicas adjacentes. CONCLUSÃO: A região de implantação do eletrodo do implante auditivo de tronco cerebral apresenta referências anatômicas que permitem sua fácil identificação durante a cirurgia.Auditory brainstem implant (ABI is an option for deaf patients who do not have the whole auditory pathways preserved. The surgery, because of its anatomical and functional complexity, requires specific training of the surgeon in an anatomy lab. AIM: To study the surgical anatomy of the auditory brainstem implant surgery. STUDY DESIGN: Anatomic study. MATERIAL AND METHOD: In the present study, we dissected a fresh cadaver prepared with a dye solution injected into the arteries and intracranial veins. The

  6. Effect of prenatal loud music and noise on total number of neurons and glia, neuronal nuclear area and volume of chick brainstem auditory nuclei, field L and hippocampus: a stereological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Tania; Palanisamy, Pradeep; Nag, T C; Roy, T S; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2013-06-01

    The present study explores whether prenatal patterned and unpatterned sound of high sound pressure level (110 dB) has any differential effect on the morphology of brainstem auditory nuclei, field L (auditory cortex analog) and hippocampus in chicks (Gallus domesticus). The total number of neurons and glia, mean neuronal nuclear area and total volume of the brainstem auditory nuclei, field L and hippocampus of post-hatch day 1 chicks were determined in serial, cresyl violet-stained sections, using stereology software. All regions studied showed a significantly increased total volume with increase in total neuron number and mean neuronal nuclear area in the patterned music stimulated group as compared to control. Contrastingly the unpatterned noise stimulated group showed an attenuated volume with reduction in the total neuron number. The mean neuronal nuclear area was significantly reduced in the auditory nuclei and hippocampus but increased in the field L. Glial cell number was significantly increased in both experimental groups, being highest in the noise group. The brainstem auditory nuclei and field L showed an increase in glia to neuron ratio in the experimental groups as compared to control. In the hippocampus the ratio remained unaltered between control and music groups, but was higher in the noise group. It is thus evident that though the sound pressure level in both experimental groups was the same there were differential changes in the morphological parameters of the brain regions studied, indicating that the characteristics of the sound had a role in mediating these effects.

  7. Neurochemical dynamics of acute orofacial pain in the human trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Nuno M P; Hock, Andreas; Wyss, Michael; Ettlin, Dominik A; Brügger, Mike

    2017-09-04

    The trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex is the first central relay structure mediating orofacial somatosensory and nociceptive perception. Animal studies suggest a substantial involvement of neurochemical alterations at such basal CNS levels in acute and chronic pain processing. Translating this animal based knowledge to humans is challenging. Human related examining of brainstem functions are challenged by MR related peculiarities as well as applicability aspects of experimentally standardized paradigms. Based on our experience with an MR compatible human orofacial pain model, the aims of the present study were twofold: 1) from a technical perspective, the evaluation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T regarding measurement accuracy of neurochemical profiles in this small brainstem nuclear complex and 2) the examination of possible neurochemical alterations induced by an experimental orofacial pain model. Data from 13 healthy volunteers aged 19-46 years were analyzed and revealed high quality spectra with significant reductions in total N-acetylaspartate (N-acetylaspartate + N-acetylaspartylglutamate) (-3.7%, p = 0.009) and GABA (-10.88%, p = 0.041) during the pain condition. These results might reflect contributions of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate in neuronal activity-dependent physiologic processes and/or excitatory neurotransmission, whereas changes in GABA might indicate towards a reduction in tonic GABAergic functioning during nociceptive signaling. Summarized, the present study indicates the applicability of (1)H-MRS to obtain neurochemical dynamics within the human trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. Further developments are needed to pave the way towards bridging important animal based knowledge with human research to understand the neurochemistry of orofacial nociception and pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 窒息状态下ABR及其脑干功能的实验研究%Experimental study of the auditory brainstem response and brainstem function in apnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张榕; 林才朱; 殷羽白

    2001-01-01

    目的 通过观察豚鼠在窒息状态下ABR电位变化及其脑干功能的自然转归,探讨听觉通路损伤程度和临床意义。方法 听觉诱发电位仪和心电脉搏氧饱和度监测仪检测3组不同窒息时限的豚鼠的ABR各波潜伏期及波间期,氧饱和度(SO2)及心率(HR)等。结果 波Ⅴ最易受缺氧的影响,波Ⅲ次之,波Ⅰ最后消失和最早恢复。窒息时限影响脑干功能,导致1组和2组的各波潜伏期和波间期差有统计学上的意义。窒息时间超过5min30s,实验豚鼠均死亡。结论 ABR可作为窒息状态下判断脑功能及脑死亡的重要辅助指标。应争分夺秒抢救窒息并及时处理心脑的损害。%Objective To find some reasonable signs for hearing pathway injury during different apnea times in guinea pigs by using the change of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and brainstem function. Methods Twenty-six guinea pigs divided into 3 groups were tested with ABR audiometer and electrocaidio-pules-SO2 monitor during different apnea times. Results Wave Ⅴ was the most easily affected in apnea, Wave Ⅲ was also easily affected, and Wave Ⅰ was less affected. The time of apnea over 330 seconds caused the death of all the experimetal guinea pigs. Conclusion ABR may be used as an important measure to monitor the brainstem function during apnea. It is important to deal with the situation of the brain and heart as soon as possible.

  9. Mapping of alpha-neo-endorphin- and neurokinin B-immunoreactivity in the human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Ewing; Mangas, Arturo; Salinas, Pablo; Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Narváez, José Angel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the distribution of alpha-neo-endorphin- or neurokinin B-immunoreactive fibres and cell bodies in the adult human brainstem with no prior history of neurological or psychiatric disease. A low density of alpha-neo-endorphin-immunoreactive cell bodies was only observed in the medullary central gray matter and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (gelatinosa part). Alpha-neo-endorphin-immunoreactive fibres were moderately distributed throughout the human brainstem. A high density of alpha-neo-endorphin-immunoreactive fibres was found only in the solitary nucleus (caudal part), in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (caudal part), and in the gelatinosa part of the latter nucleus. Neurokinin B-immunoreactive cell bodies (low density) were found in the periventricular central gray matter, the reticular formation of the pons and in the superior colliculus. The distribution of the neurokinin-immunoreactive fibres was restricted. In general, for both neuropeptides the density of the immunoreactive fibres was low. In the human brainstem, the proenkephalin system was more widely distributed than the prodynorphin system, and the preprotachykinin A system (neurokinin A) was more widely distributed than the preprotachykinin B system (neurokinin B).

  10. Auditory brainstem response latency in forward masking, a marker of sensory deficits in listeners with normal hearing thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehraei, Golbarg; Paredes Gallardo, Andreu; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2017-01-01

    In rodent models, acoustic exposure too modest to elevate hearing thresholds can nonetheless cause auditory nerve fiber deafferentation, interfering with the coding of supra-threshold sound. Low-spontaneous rate nerve fibers, important for encoding acoustic information at supra-threshold levels......-V latency changes with increasing masker-to-probe intervals. In the same listeners, behavioral forward masking detection thresholds were measured. We hypothesized that 1) auditory nerve fiber deafferentation increases forward masking thresholds and increases wave-V latency and 2) a preferential loss of low...... behaviorally. Further, the amount of wave-V latency change with masker-to-probe interval was positively correlated with the rate of change in forward masking detection thresholds. Although we cannot rule out central contributions, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that auditory nerve fiber...

  11. Biomedical Simulation Models of Human Auditory Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicak, Mehmet M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed acoustic engineering models that explore noise propagation mechanisms associated with noise attenuation and transmission paths created when using hearing protectors such as earplugs and headsets in high noise environments. Biomedical finite element (FE) models are developed based on volume Computed Tomography scan data which provides explicit external ear, ear canal, middle ear ossicular bones and cochlea geometry. Results from these studies have enabled a greater understanding of hearing protector to flesh dynamics as well as prioritizing noise propagation mechanisms. Prioritization of noise mechanisms can form an essential framework for exploration of new design principles and methods in both earplug and earcup applications. These models are currently being used in development of a novel hearing protection evaluation system that can provide experimentally correlated psychoacoustic noise attenuation. Moreover, these FE models can be used to simulate the effects of blast related impulse noise on human auditory mechanisms and brain tissue.

  12. Tonotopic organization of human auditory association cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansino, S; Williamson, S J; Karron, D

    1994-11-07

    Neuromagnetic studies of responses in human auditory association cortex for tone burst stimuli provide evidence for a tonotopic organization. The magnetic source image for the 100 ms component evoked by the onset of a tone is qualitatively similar to that of primary cortex, with responses lying deeper beneath the scalp for progressively higher tone frequencies. However, the tonotopic sequence of association cortex in three subjects is found largely within the superior temporal sulcus, although in the right hemisphere of one subject some sources may be closer to the inferior temporal sulcus. The locus of responses for individual subjects suggests a progression across the cortical surface that is approximately proportional to the logarithm of the tone frequency, as observed previously for primary cortex, with the span of 10 mm for each decade in frequency being comparable for the two areas.

  13. Human Auditory Processing: Insights from Cortical Event-related Potentials

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    Alexandra P. Key

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human communication and language skills rely heavily on the ability to detect and process auditory inputs. This paper reviews possible applications of the event-related potential (ERP technique to the study of cortical mechanisms supporting human auditory processing, including speech stimuli. Following a brief introduction to the ERP methodology, the remaining sections focus on demonstrating how ERPs can be used in humans to address research questions related to cortical organization, maturation and plasticity, as well as the effects of sensory deprivation, and multisensory interactions. The review is intended to serve as a primer for researchers interested in using ERPs for the study of the human auditory system.

  14. Functional sex differences in human primary auditory cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruytjens, Liesbet; Georgiadis, Janniko R.; Holstege, Gert; Wit, Hero P.; Albers, Frans W. J.; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background We used PET to study cortical activation during auditory stimulation and found sex differences in the human primary auditory cortex (PAC). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 10 male and 10 female volunteers while listening to sounds (music or white noise) and during a bas

  15. Functional sex differences in human primary auditory cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruytjens, Liesbet; Georgiadis, Janniko R.; Holstege, Gert; Wit, Hero P.; Albers, Frans W. J.; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background We used PET to study cortical activation during auditory stimulation and found sex differences in the human primary auditory cortex (PAC). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 10 male and 10 female volunteers while listening to sounds (music or white noise) and during a

  16. 孤独症患儿听性脑干反应结果分析%Auditory Brainstem Responses in Children with Autism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晶; 刘维荣; 曾祥丽

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨孤独症患儿听性脑干反应(ABR)的特点.方法 对12例孤独症患儿分别进行声导抗、畸变产物耳声发射(DPOAE)、40 Hz相关电位及听性脑干反应(ABR)测试,并对其中3例ABR异常者进行分析.结果 12例双耳均为A型鼓室导抗图,双耳同侧及对侧声反射均可引出,DPOAE均可正常引出,40 Hz相关电位500、1000 Hz阈值均≤25 dB nHL;12例ABR反应阈均正常,其中9例波形分化好,重复性好,各波潜伏期及波间期正常;3例ABR表现异常:1例双耳波Ⅱ以后各波潜伏期延长;1例双耳Ⅰ-Ⅲ波间期延长;1例双耳波Ⅰ潜伏期正常,波Ⅲ后各波潜伏期、波间期缩短.结论 部分孤独症患儿虽中耳及耳蜗功能正常,但其脑干及下丘之间中枢听传导通路可能异常,故对孤独症患者应常规行听功能检测.%Objective To study the characteristics of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) in children with Autism. Methods Acoustic impedance, otoacoustic emission(OAE) > 40 Hz auditory event related potential and auditory brainstem responses were recorded in 12 children with autism. Among of these, 3 cases of ABR were abnormal. Results The Type A tympanograms were found in 12 children. The ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic reflexes and distortion product acoustic emission(DPOAE) were elicited. The thresholds of ABR were normal. The incubation period and wave interphase of all waves was normal. 3 cases of ABR were abnormal. 1 case of incubation periods of all waves were prolonged after wave II. 1 case of I-III wave interphase was prolonged. 1 case of incubation period of wave I was normal, incubation periods and wave interphases of all waves were prolonged after wave III were shorter. Conclusion Although middle ears and cochlea of Autistic children may be normal, the auditory pathway of those children may be abnormal. Therefore, appropriate central auditory processing testing may be needed.

  17. Auditory peripersonal space in humans: a case of auditory-tactile extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Làdavas, E; Pavani, F; Farnè, A

    2001-01-01

    Animal experiments have shown that the spatial correspondence between auditory and tactile receptive fields of ventral pre-motor neurons provides a map of auditory peripersonal space around the head. This allows neurons to localize a near sound with respect to the head. In the present study, we demonstrated the existence of an auditory peripersonal space around the head in humans. In a right-brain damaged patient with tactile extinction, a sound delivered near the ipsilesional side of the head extinguished a tactile stimulus delivered to the contralesional side of the head (cross-modal auditory-tactile extinction). In contrast, when an auditory stimulus was presented far from the head, cross-modal extinction was dramatically reduced. This spatially specific cross-modal extinction was found only when a complex sound like a white noise burst was presented; pure tones did not produce spatially specific cross-modal extinction. These results show a high degree of functional similarity between the characteristics of the auditory peripersonal space representation in humans and monkeys. This similarity suggests that analogous physiological substrates might be responsible for coding this multisensory integrated representation of peripersonal space in human and non-human primates.

  18. Tracing the emergence of categorical speech perception in the human auditory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Moreno, Sylvain; Alain, Claude

    2013-10-01

    Speech perception requires the effortless mapping from smooth, seemingly continuous changes in sound features into discrete perceptual units, a conversion exemplified in the phenomenon of categorical perception. Explaining how/when the human brain performs this acoustic-phonetic transformation remains an elusive problem in current models and theories of speech perception. In previous attempts to decipher the neural basis of speech perception, it is often unclear whether the alleged brain correlates reflect an underlying percept or merely changes in neural activity that covary with parameters of the stimulus. Here, we recorded neuroelectric activity generated at both cortical and subcortical levels of the auditory pathway elicited by a speech vowel continuum whose percept varied categorically from /u/ to /a/. This integrative approach allows us to characterize how various auditory structures code, transform, and ultimately render the perception of speech material as well as dissociate brain responses reflecting changes in stimulus acoustics from those that index true internalized percepts. We find that activity from the brainstem mirrors properties of the speech waveform with remarkable fidelity, reflecting progressive changes in speech acoustics but not the discrete phonetic classes reported behaviorally. In comparison, patterns of late cortical evoked activity contain information reflecting distinct perceptual categories and predict the abstract phonetic speech boundaries heard by listeners. Our findings demonstrate a critical transformation in neural speech representations between brainstem and early auditory cortex analogous to an acoustic-phonetic mapping necessary to generate categorical speech percepts. Analytic modeling demonstrates that a simple nonlinearity accounts for the transformation between early (subcortical) brain activity and subsequent cortical/behavioral responses to speech (>150-200 ms) thereby describing a plausible mechanism by which the

  19. Inhibition in the Human Auditory Cortex.

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    Koji Inui

    Full Text Available Despite their indispensable roles in sensory processing, little is known about inhibitory interneurons in humans. Inhibitory postsynaptic potentials cannot be recorded non-invasively, at least in a pure form, in humans. We herein sought to clarify whether prepulse inhibition (PPI in the auditory cortex reflected inhibition via interneurons using magnetoencephalography. An abrupt increase in sound pressure by 10 dB in a continuous sound was used to evoke the test response, and PPI was observed by inserting a weak (5 dB increase for 1 ms prepulse. The time course of the inhibition evaluated by prepulses presented at 10-800 ms before the test stimulus showed at least two temporally distinct inhibitions peaking at approximately 20-60 and 600 ms that presumably reflected IPSPs by fast spiking, parvalbumin-positive cells and somatostatin-positive, Martinotti cells, respectively. In another experiment, we confirmed that the degree of the inhibition depended on the strength of the prepulse, but not on the amplitude of the prepulse-evoked cortical response, indicating that the prepulse-evoked excitatory response and prepulse-evoked inhibition reflected activation in two different pathways. Although many diseases such as schizophrenia may involve deficits in the inhibitory system, we do not have appropriate methods to evaluate them; therefore, the easy and non-invasive method described herein may be clinically useful.

  20. Neonate Auditory Brainstem Responses to CE-Chirp and CE-Chirp Octave Band Stimuli I: Versus Click and Tone Burst Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Kensi M; Stuart, Andrew

    The purpose of the study was to generate normative auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave component peak latency and amplitude values for neonates with air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band stimuli (i.e., 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz). A second objective was to compare neonate ABRs to CE-Chirp stimuli with ABR responses to traditional click and tone burst stimuli with the same stimulus parameters. Participants were 168 healthy neonates. ABRs were obtained to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirp and click stimuli and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band and tone burst stimuli. The effects of stimulus level, rate, and polarity were examined with air-conducted CE-Chirps and clicks. The effect of stimulus level was also examined with bone-conducted CE-Chirps and clicks and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band stimuli. In general, ABR wave V amplitudes to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirp stimuli were significantly larger (p CE-Chirp and CE-Chirp octave band stimuli relative to traditional click and tone burst stimuli. ABRs to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps and CE-Chirp octave band stimuli may be valuable in the assessment of newborn infants. However, the prognostic value of such stimuli needs to be validated.

  1. An anatomical and functional topography of human auditory cortical areas

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    Michelle eMoerel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI throughout the last decades have enabled the detailed anatomical and functional inspection of the human brain non-invasively, to date there is no consensus regarding the precise subdivision and topography of the areas forming the human auditory cortex. Here, we propose a topography of the human auditory areas based on insights on the anatomical and functional properties of human auditory areas as revealed by studies of cyto- and myelo-architecture and fMRI investigations at ultra-high magnetic field (7 Tesla. Importantly, we illustrate that - whereas a group-based approach to analyze functional (tonotopic maps is appropriate to highlight the main tonotopic axis - the examination of tonotopic maps at single subject level is required to detail the topography of primary and non-primary areas that may be more variable across subjects. Furthermore, we show that considering multiple maps indicative of anatomical (i.e. myelination as well as of functional properties (e.g. broadness of frequency tuning is helpful in identifying auditory cortical areas in individual human brains. We propose and discuss a topography of areas that is consistent with old and recent anatomical post mortem characterizations of the human auditory cortex and that may serve as a working model for neuroscience studies of auditory functions.

  2. An anatomical and functional topography of human auditory cortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Formisano, Elia

    2014-01-01

    While advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) throughout the last decades have enabled the detailed anatomical and functional inspection of the human brain non-invasively, to date there is no consensus regarding the precise subdivision and topography of the areas forming the human auditory cortex. Here, we propose a topography of the human auditory areas based on insights on the anatomical and functional properties of human auditory areas as revealed by studies of cyto- and myelo-architecture and fMRI investigations at ultra-high magnetic field (7 Tesla). Importantly, we illustrate that-whereas a group-based approach to analyze functional (tonotopic) maps is appropriate to highlight the main tonotopic axis-the examination of tonotopic maps at single subject level is required to detail the topography of primary and non-primary areas that may be more variable across subjects. Furthermore, we show that considering multiple maps indicative of anatomical (i.e., myelination) as well as of functional properties (e.g., broadness of frequency tuning) is helpful in identifying auditory cortical areas in individual human brains. We propose and discuss a topography of areas that is consistent with old and recent anatomical post-mortem characterizations of the human auditory cortex and that may serve as a working model for neuroscience studies of auditory functions.

  3. Temporal envelope processing in the human auditory cortex: response and interconnections of auditory cortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourévitch, Boris; Le Bouquin Jeannès, Régine; Faucon, Gérard; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2008-03-01

    Temporal envelope processing in the human auditory cortex has an important role in language analysis. In this paper, depth recordings of local field potentials in response to amplitude modulated white noises were used to design maps of activation in primary, secondary and associative auditory areas and to study the propagation of the cortical activity between them. The comparison of activations between auditory areas was based on a signal-to-noise ratio associated with the response to amplitude modulation (AM). The functional connectivity between cortical areas was quantified by the directed coherence (DCOH) applied to auditory evoked potentials. This study shows the following reproducible results on twenty subjects: (1) the primary auditory cortex (PAC), the secondary cortices (secondary auditory cortex (SAC) and planum temporale (PT)), the insular gyrus, the Brodmann area (BA) 22 and the posterior part of T1 gyrus (T1Post) respond to AM in both hemispheres. (2) A stronger response to AM was observed in SAC and T1Post of the left hemisphere independent of the modulation frequency (MF), and in the left BA22 for MFs 8 and 16Hz, compared to those in the right. (3) The activation and propagation features emphasized at least four different types of temporal processing. (4) A sequential activation of PAC, SAC and BA22 areas was clearly visible at all MFs, while other auditory areas may be more involved in parallel processing upon a stream originating from primary auditory area, which thus acts as a distribution hub. These results suggest that different psychological information is carried by the temporal envelope of sounds relative to the rate of amplitude modulation.

  4. Functional sex differences in human primary auditory cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruytjens, Liesbet [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department Otorhinolaryngology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Georgiadis, Janniko R. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Groningen (Netherlands); Holstege, Gert [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Uroneurology, Groningen (Netherlands); Wit, Hero P. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Groningen (Netherlands); Albers, Frans W.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department Otorhinolaryngology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Willemsen, Antoon T.M. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2007-12-15

    We used PET to study cortical activation during auditory stimulation and found sex differences in the human primary auditory cortex (PAC). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 10 male and 10 female volunteers while listening to sounds (music or white noise) and during a baseline (no auditory stimulation). We found a sex difference in activation of the left and right PAC when comparing music to noise. The PAC was more activated by music than by noise in both men and women. But this difference between the two stimuli was significantly higher in men than in women. To investigate whether this difference could be attributed to either music or noise, we compared both stimuli with the baseline and revealed that noise gave a significantly higher activation in the female PAC than in the male PAC. Moreover, the male group showed a deactivation in the right prefrontal cortex when comparing noise to the baseline, which was not present in the female group. Interestingly, the auditory and prefrontal regions are anatomically and functionally linked and the prefrontal cortex is known to be engaged in auditory tasks that involve sustained or selective auditory attention. Thus we hypothesize that differences in attention result in a different deactivation of the right prefrontal cortex, which in turn modulates the activation of the PAC and thus explains the sex differences found in the activation of the PAC. Our results suggest that sex is an important factor in auditory brain studies. (orig.)

  5. Acoustic trauma slows AMPA receptor‐mediated EPSCs in the auditory brainstem, reducing GluA4 subunit expression as a mechanism to rescue binaural function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilati, Nadia; Linley, Deborah M.; Selvaskandan, Haresh; Uchitel, Osvaldo; Hennig, Matthias H.; Kopp‐Scheinpflug, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Key points Lateral superior olive (LSO) principal neurons receive AMPA receptor (AMPAR) ‐ and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)‐mediated EPSCs and glycinergic IPSCs.Both EPSCs and IPSCs have slow kinetics in prehearing animals, which during developmental maturation accelerate to sub‐millisecond decay time‐constants. This correlates with a change in glutamate and glycine receptor subunit composition quantified via mRNA levels.The NMDAR‐EPSCs accelerate over development to achieve decay time‐constants of 2.5 ms. This is the fastest NMDAR‐mediated EPSC reported.Acoustic trauma (AT, loud sounds) slow AMPAR‐EPSC decay times, increasing GluA1 and decreasing GluA4 mRNA.Modelling of interaural intensity difference suggests that the increased EPSC duration after AT shifts interaural level difference to the right and compensates for hearing loss.Two months after AT the EPSC decay times recovered to control values.Synaptic transmission in the LSO matures by postnatal day 20, with EPSCs and IPSCs having fast kinetics. AT changes the AMPAR subunits expressed and slows the EPSC time‐course at synapses in the central auditory system. Abstract Damaging levels of sound (acoustic trauma, AT) diminish peripheral synapses, but what is the impact on the central auditory pathway? Developmental maturation of synaptic function and hearing were characterized in the mouse lateral superior olive (LSO) from postnatal day 7 (P7) to P96 using voltage‐clamp and auditory brainstem responses. IPSCs and EPSCs show rapid acceleration during development, so that decay kinetics converge to similar sub‐millisecond time‐constants (τ, 0.87 ± 0.11 and 0.77 ± 0.08 ms, respectively) in adult mice. This correlated with LSO mRNA levels for glycinergic and glutamatergic ionotropic receptor subunits, confirming a switch from Glyα2 to Glyα1 for IPSCs and increased expression of GluA3 and GluA4 subunits for EPSCs. The NMDA receptor (NMDAR)‐EPSC decay τ accelerated from >40 ms in

  6. Effect of neonatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway by recording auditory brainstem responses in newborn piglets: a new experimentation model to study the perinatal hypoxic-ischemic damage on the auditory system.

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    Francisco Jose Alvarez

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-ischemia (HI is a major perinatal problem that results in severe damage to the brain impairing the normal development of the auditory system. The purpose of the present study is to study the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the auditory pathway by recording auditory brain responses in a novel animal experimentation model in newborn piglets.Hypoxia-ischemia was induced to 1.3 day-old piglets by clamping 30 minutes both carotid arteries by vascular occluders and lowering the fraction of inspired oxygen. We compared the Auditory Brain Responses (ABRs of newborn piglets exposed to acute hypoxia/ischemia (n = 6 and a control group with no such exposure (n = 10. ABRs were recorded for both ears before the start of the experiment (baseline, after 30 minutes of HI injury, and every 30 minutes during 6 h after the HI injury.Auditory brain responses were altered during the hypoxic-ischemic insult but recovered 30-60 minutes later. Hypoxia/ischemia seemed to induce auditory functional damage by increasing I-V latencies and decreasing wave I, III and V amplitudes, although differences were not significant.The described experimental model of hypoxia-ischemia in newborn piglets may be useful for studying the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway.

  7. Os efeitos da polaridade do estímulo nos Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Tronco Encefálico Polarity stimulation effects on brainstem auditory evoked potentials

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    Janaina Patricio de Lima

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Os Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Tronco Encefálico (PEATE são considerados potenciais exógenos, ou seja, as respostas obtidas são altamente dependentes da característica do estímulo utilizado para evocá-los. OBJETIVO: Averiguar a influência da polaridade do estímulo clique na pesquisa dos PEATE em diferentes intensidades, utilizando-se fone de inserção. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: 33 indivíduos, idade entre 18 e 28 anos, sem alteração auditiva foram submetidos à pesquisa dos PEATE, com estímulo clique nas polaridades de rarefação, condensação e alternada, em diferentes intensidades. RESULTADOS: As latências absolutas da onda V mostraram-se menores na polaridade de rarefação quando comparadas às demais e na intensidade de 80 dBnHL houve diferença significante entre a rarefação e as demais polaridades para as latências interpicos III-V e I-V. Houve alta correlação entre as polaridades de condensação e alternada para as latências absolutas e interpicos na intensidade de 80 dBnHL. CONCLUSÃO: A polaridade do estímulo clique influência significativamente nos PEATE. Na rotina em que se utiliza o fone TDH 39, com apresentação de polaridade alternada, sugere-se que o uso da polaridade de condensação seja mais adequado para efeitos de comparação padronizada, devido à maior semelhança das latências encontradas nesse estudo com fone de inserção.Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials are considered exogenous potentials, that is, the responses obtained are highly dependent upon the characteristic of the stimulus used to evoke them. AIM: To investigate the influence of the click stimulus polarity in the study of Brainstem Evoked Response Audiometry (BERA at different intensities, using insertion-canal earphones. TYPE OF STUDY: Clinical. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 33 individuals, aged between 18 and 28, with no auditory alteration were submitted to BERA testing, with click stimulus on the

  8. Age-related decline in Kv3.1b expression in the mouse auditory brainstem correlates with functional deficits in the medial olivocochlear efferent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettel, Martha L; Zhu, Xiaoxia; O'Neill, William E; Frisina, Robert D

    2007-06-01

    Kv3.1b channel protein is widely distributed in the mammalian auditory brainstem, but studies have focused mainly on regions critical for temporal processing, including the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) and anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN). Because temporal processing declines with age, this study was undertaken to determine if the expression of Kv3.1b likewise declines, and if changes are specific to these nuclei. Immunocytochemistry using an anti-Kv3.1b antibody was performed, and the relative optical density of cells and neuropil was determined from CBA/CaJ mice of four age groups. Declines in expression in AVCN, MNTB, and lateral superior olive (35, 26, and 23%) were found, but changes were limited to neuropil. Interestingly, cellular optical density declines were found in superior paraolivary nucleus, ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body, and lateral nucleus of the trapezoid body (24, 29, and 26%), which comprise the medial olivocochlear (MOC) feedback system. All declines occurred by middle age (15 months old). No age-related changes were found in the remaining regions of cochlear nucleus or in the inferior colliculus. Contralateral suppression of distortion-product otoacoustic emission amplitudes of age-matched littermates also declined by middle age, suggesting a correlation between Kv3.1 expression and MOC function. In search of more direct evidence for such a correlation, Kv3.1b knockout mice were examined. Knockouts show poor MOC function as compared to +/+ and +/- genotypes. Thus, Kv3.1b expression declines in MOC neurons by middle age, and these changes appear to correlate with functional declines in efferent activity in both middle-aged CBA mice and Kv3.1b knockout mice.

  9. AN ANALYSIS AND COMPARISON OF BRAINSTEM AUDITORY EVOKED POTENTIALS AMONG SOUTH INDIAN MIDDLE-AGED AND ELDERLY SUBJECTS AND PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Ch. Venkatasubbaiah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Despite the evidence that the incidence of hearing impairment is higher in type 2 diabetes subjects, very little is known about the nature and characteristics of this disability and the specific mechanisms leading to the hearing problems in diabetic adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS 40 patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus were included in the study and grouped as patients aged 35 to 58 years (A and aged above 58 years (B; 40 patients were taken as control group with similar age grouping; 35 to 58 years (C above 58 years (D. Pure Tone Audiometry (PTA test was conducted according to the ASHA guidelines. Objective hearing evaluation was done by BERA (Brainstem Evoked Response Audiometry. RESULTS Higher degree of Hearing Loss (HL was observed in DM patients in all frequencies from 500 HZ to 10 KHZ in comparison to nonDM patients and it was statistically significant. Slower rate peaks occurred at I, III and V waves in elderly DM patients when compared to the elderly control group. (Peak I and V (p <0.001. Similarly, in the middle-aged group peaks I, III and V occurred at a significantly slower rate in the DM group when compared to the non-DM group (p <0.001. Interpeak latencies at 21.1 rate for peak III-V and peak I-V were consistently longer among the diabetics groups of two age groups when compared to the control group (p <0.001. Similar results were obtained at 63.3 rates in the elderly and middle-aged group. CONCLUSION In the earlier course of Type 2 Diabetes, though the person may be asymptomatic degenerative changes may begin to appear in the central auditory pathway and result in significant HL, which could be detected with early investigation to elicit of Brain Stem evoked potentials.

  10. Expression of the postsynaptic scaffold PSD-95 and development of synaptic physiology during giant terminal formation in the auditory brainstem of the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyer, David; Fensky, Luisa; Hilverling, Anna Maria; Kurth, Stefanie; Kuenzel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    In the avian nucleus magnocellularis (NM) endbulb of Held giant synapses develop from temporary bouton terminals. The molecular regulation of this process is not well understood. Furthermore, it is unknown how the postsynaptic specialization of the endbulb synapses develops. We therefore analysed expression of the postsynaptic scaffold protein PSD-95 during the transition from bouton-to-endbulb synapses. PSD-95 has been implicated in the regulation of the strength of glutamatergic synapses and could accordingly be of functional relevance for giant synapse formation. PSD-95 protein was expressed at synaptic sites in embryonic chicken auditory brainstem and upregulated between embryonic days (E)12 and E16. We applied immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy to quantify pre-and postsynaptic protein signals during bouton-to-endbulb transition. Giant terminal formation progressed along the tonotopic axis in NM, but was absent in low-frequency NM. We found a tonotopic gradient of postsynaptic PSD-95 signals in NM. Furthermore, PSD-95 immunosignals showed the greatest increase between E12 and E15, temporally preceding the bouton-to-endbulb transition. We then applied whole-cell electrophysiology to measure synaptic currents elicited by synaptic terminals during bouton-to-endbulb transition. With progressing endbulb formation postsynaptic currents rose more rapidly and synapses were less susceptible to short-term depression, but currents were not different in amplitude or decay-time constant. We conclude that development of presynaptic specializations follows postsynaptic development and speculate that the early PSD-95 increase could play a functional role in endbulb formation. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of Aging on Inner Ear Morphology in Dogs in Relation to Brainstem Responses to Toneburst Auditory Stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Haar, G.; de Groot, J. C. M. J.; Venker-van Haagen, A. J.; van Sluijs, F. J.; Smoorenburg, G. F.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common form of hearing loss in humans and is increasingly recognized in dogs. Cochlear lesions in dogs with ARHL are similar to those in humans and the severity of the histological changes is reflected in tone audiograms. Ten geriatric dogs (mean age: 12.7

  12. Localisation of glycine receptors in the human forebrain, brainstem, and cervical spinal cord: an immunohistochemical review

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    Kristin Baer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors for glycine (GlyR are heteropentameric chloride ion channels that are comprised of four functional subunits, alpha1-3 and beta and that facilitate fast-response, inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian brain and spinal cord. We have investigated the distribution of GlyRs in the human forebrain, brainstem, and cervical spinal cord using immunohistochemistry at light and confocal laser scanning microscopy levels. This review will summarize the present knowledge on the GlyR distribution in the human brain using our established immunohistochemical techniques. The results of our immunohistochemical labeling studies demonstrated GlyR immunoreactivity (IR throughout the human basal ganglia, substantia nigra, various pontine regions, rostral medulla oblongata and the cervical spinal cord present as intense and abundant punctate IR along the membranes of the neuronal soma and dendrites. This work is part of a systematic study of inhibitory neurotransmitter receptor distribution in the human CNS, and provides a basis for additional detailed physiological and pharmacological studies on the inter-relationship of GlyR, GABAAR and gephyrin in the human brain. This basic mapping exercise, we believe, will provide important baselines for the testing of future pharmacotherapies and drug regimes that modulate neuroinhibitory systems. These findings provide new information for understanding the complexity of glycinergic functions in the human brain, which will translate into the contribution of inhibitory mechanisms in paroxysmal disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Epilepsy, Huntington's and Parkinson’s Disease and Motor Neuron Disease.

  13. The effects of polarity of click stimulation on auditory brainstem responses (ABR in patients with cochlear and retro-cochlear disorders in Amiralam and Resalat Hospitals 1995-97

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltani AH

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auditory brainstem response (A.B.R is one of the most important electrophysiological tests in evaluating of auditory system, especially for diagnosing of auditory nerve and brainstem disorders. It is a non-invasive test and has reliability and validity characteristic. There is no contra-indication for this test. One of the most important of stimulation parameters of A.B.R is click polarity (rarefaction, condensation and alternative. Some of the investigators believed that different polarities have no effects on A.B.R are affected by different polarities. Materials and Methods: In this study, the results of ABR of 148 patients (296 ears were compared with three different polarities of rarefaction, condensation and alternative half click stimuli. The cases were categorized in three groups of normal (60 cases, cochlear (62 cases and retro-cochlear (17 cases. This classification were done according to the hearing level in pure tone audiometry results in three frequencies of 1000, 2000, 4000 Hz and to the site of the their disorders. The mean absolute latencies of waves I, III and V were obtained for each polarity. Inter-peak latency (I.P.L of wave also measured in three groups (normal, cochlear and retro-cochlear. Results: The results were showed a significant difference between absolute latency of wave I among different polarities on three above mentioned groups (P0.05. Conclusion: It was concluded that rarefaction polarity has better and more stable results of ABR tests.

  14. Myosin VIIA, important for human auditory function, is necessary for Drosophila auditory organ development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokol V Todi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myosin VIIA (MyoVIIA is an unconventional myosin necessary for vertebrate audition [1]-[5]. Human auditory transduction occurs in sensory hair cells with a staircase-like arrangement of apical protrusions called stereocilia. In these hair cells, MyoVIIA maintains stereocilia organization [6]. Severe mutations in the Drosophila MyoVIIA orthologue, crinkled (ck, are semi-lethal [7] and lead to deafness by disrupting antennal auditory organ (Johnston's Organ, JO organization [8]. ck/MyoVIIA mutations result in apical detachment of auditory transduction units (scolopidia from the cuticle that transmits antennal vibrations as mechanical stimuli to JO. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using flies expressing GFP-tagged NompA, a protein required for auditory organ organization in Drosophila, we examined the role of ck/MyoVIIA in JO development and maintenance through confocal microscopy and extracellular electrophysiology. Here we show that ck/MyoVIIA is necessary early in the developing antenna for initial apical attachment of the scolopidia to the articulating joint. ck/MyoVIIA is also necessary to maintain scolopidial attachment throughout adulthood. Moreover, in the adult JO, ck/MyoVIIA genetically interacts with the non-muscle myosin II (through its regulatory light chain protein and the myosin binding subunit of myosin II phosphatase. Such genetic interactions have not previously been observed in scolopidia. These factors are therefore candidates for modulating MyoVIIA activity in vertebrates. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that MyoVIIA plays evolutionarily conserved roles in auditory organ development and maintenance in invertebrates and vertebrates, enhancing our understanding of auditory organ development and function, as well as providing significant clues for future research.

  15. Toward an In Vivo Neuroimaging Template of Human Brainstem Nuclei of the Ascending Arousal, Autonomic, and Motor Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Edlow, Brian L.; Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Brown, Emery N.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Bruce R. Rosen; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Brainstem nuclei (Bn) in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, sleep, and cranial nerve function, and they have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies. However, an in vivo delineation of most human Bn has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. To precisely identify several human Bn in vivo, we employed a 7...

  16. Hierarchical processing of auditory objects in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhbinder Kumar

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the computational architecture used by the brain during the analysis of the spectral envelope of sounds, an important acoustic feature for defining auditory objects. Dynamic causal modelling and Bayesian model selection were used to evaluate a family of 16 network models explaining functional magnetic resonance imaging responses in the right temporal lobe during spectral envelope analysis. The models encode different hypotheses about the effective connectivity between Heschl's Gyrus (HG, containing the primary auditory cortex, planum temporale (PT, and superior temporal sulcus (STS, and the modulation of that coupling during spectral envelope analysis. In particular, we aimed to determine whether information processing during spectral envelope analysis takes place in a serial or parallel fashion. The analysis provides strong support for a serial architecture with connections from HG to PT and from PT to STS and an increase of the HG to PT connection during spectral envelope analysis. The work supports a computational model of auditory object processing, based on the abstraction of spectro-temporal "templates" in the PT before further analysis of the abstracted form in anterior temporal lobe areas.

  17. Effects of aging on brainstem responses to toneburst auditory stimuli : A cross-sectional and longitudinal study in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Haar, G.; Venker-van Haagen, A. J.; Van den Brorn, W. E.; van Sluijs, F. J.; Smoorenburg, G. F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: It is assumed that the hearing of dogs becomes impaired with advancing age, but little is known about the prevalence and electrophysiologic characteristics of presbycusis in this species. Hypothesis: As in humans, hearing in dogs becomes impaired with aging across the entire frequency ra

  18. Representation of speech in human auditory cortex: is it special?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinschneider, Mitchell; Nourski, Kirill V; Fishman, Yonatan I

    2013-11-01

    Successful categorization of phonemes in speech requires that the brain analyze the acoustic signal along both spectral and temporal dimensions. Neural encoding of the stimulus amplitude envelope is critical for parsing the speech stream into syllabic units. Encoding of voice onset time (VOT) and place of articulation (POA), cues necessary for determining phonemic identity, occurs within shorter time frames. An unresolved question is whether the neural representation of speech is based on processing mechanisms that are unique to humans and shaped by learning and experience, or is based on rules governing general auditory processing that are also present in non-human animals. This question was examined by comparing the neural activity elicited by speech and other complex vocalizations in primary auditory cortex of macaques, who are limited vocal learners, with that in Heschl's gyrus, the putative location of primary auditory cortex in humans. Entrainment to the amplitude envelope is neither specific to humans nor to human speech. VOT is represented by responses time-locked to consonant release and voicing onset in both humans and monkeys. Temporal representation of VOT is observed both for isolated syllables and for syllables embedded in the more naturalistic context of running speech. The fundamental frequency of male speakers is represented by more rapid neural activity phase-locked to the glottal pulsation rate in both humans and monkeys. In both species, the differential representation of stop consonants varying in their POA can be predicted by the relationship between the frequency selectivity of neurons and the onset spectra of the speech sounds. These findings indicate that the neurophysiology of primary auditory cortex is similar in monkeys and humans despite their vastly different experience with human speech, and that Heschl's gyrus is engaged in general auditory, and not language-specific, processing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  19. Modulating human auditory processing by transcranial electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eHeimrath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES has become a valuable research tool for the investigation of neurophysiological processes underlying human action and cognition. In recent years, striking evidence for the neuromodulatory effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS, and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS has emerged. However, while the wealth of knowledge has been gained about tES in the motor domain and, to a lesser extent, about its ability to modulate human cognition, surprisingly little is known about its impact on perceptual processing, particularly in the auditory domain. Moreover, while only a few studies systematically investigated the impact of auditory tES, it has already been applied in a large number of clinical trials, leading to a remarkable imbalance between basic and clinical research on auditory tES. Here, we review the state of the art of tES application in the auditory domain focussing on the impact of neuromodulation on acoustic perception and its potential for clinical application in the treatment of auditory related disorders.

  20. Differences in auditory timing between human and nonhuman primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.; Merchant, H.

    2014-01-01

    The gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis is proposed as an alternative interpretation to the auditory timing mechanisms discussed in Ackermann et al.'s article. This hypothesis accommodates the fact that the performance of nonhuman primates is comparable to humans in single-interval tasks (such

  1. Mapping the distribution of serotonin transporter in the human brainstem with high-resolution PET: Validation using postmortem autoradiography data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, P; Schain, M; Varnäs, K; Halldin, C; Farde, L; Varrone, A

    2016-06-01

    The human brainstem is a complex structure with several small nuclei and neural pathways of interest in the pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In common with other monoaminergic systems, serotoninergic neurons originate from a group of nuclei located in the brainstem. The present study was designed to validate a user-independent approach for a detailed in vivo quantification of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) availability in the human brainstem using a template-based approach that consisted of three steps. First, 3T-MR images and parametric binding potential (BPND) [(11)C]MADAM images of ten healthy subjects were used to generate a PET template of 5-HTT availability. In the second step, volumes of interest (VOIs) for different brainstem nuclei were obtained using a method in which VOIs are initially delineated on MRI images using anatomical landmarks and then are finally tailored on the distribution of 5-HTT binding using a thresholding approach applied to the 5-HTT template. In the final step, the VOIs were transformed and applied individually to BPND images of 16 healthy subjects (14M/2F, 20-64years). The in vivo distribution of BPND values obtained with the template-based method were in good agreement with an individual-based approach taken as gold standard. Results were also in agreement with 5-HTT quantification using in vitro binding data obtained with autoradiography (ARG) studies using [(3)H]MADAM. The proposed template-based method can be applied to PET data acquired in several CNS disorders in which serotonin neurons in the brainstem might be affected.

  2. Application of auditory brainstem response and pure tone audiometry in early diagnosis of acoustic neuroma%听性脑干反应和纯音听阈在听神经瘤早期诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵赋; 武丽; 王博; 杨智君; 王振民; 王兴朝; 李朋; 张晶; 刘丕楠

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨采用听性脑干反应和纯音听阈对早期诊断听神经瘤的临床应用价值.方法 回顾性分析了111例听神经瘤患者的临床资料、纯音听阈、听性脑干反应及增强磁共振结果,采用线性回归分析纯音听阈均值与肿瘤体积、病程是否存在相关性,采用卡方检验分析不同肿瘤体积在听性脑干反应异常发生率上是否存在差异.结果 听神经瘤引起感音神经性耳聋,纯音听阈均值与病程存在显著地相关性(P=0.000);听性脑干反应诊断听神经瘤的敏感度和特异度分别为98.2%和93.6%,肿瘤最大径>3 cm与≤3 cm两组,在患侧和对侧Ⅲ~Ⅳ波间期异常发生率上,差异均具有统计学意义(P值分别为0.038和0.045).结论 听性脑干反应联合纯音测听是早期诊断听神经瘤的有效方法.%Objective To investigate the clinical application value of using auditory brainstem response and pure tone audiometry for early diagnosis of acoustic neuroma.Methods The clinical data,the results of pure tone audiometry,auditory brainstem response,and enhanced MRI in 111 patients with acoustic neuroma were analyzed retrospectively.Linear regression analysis was used to analyze the correlation between the nean value of pure tone audiometry and the neuroma volune or course of disease.Chi-squared test was used to analyze the whether there were differences in the different neuroma volumes on the incidence of abnormal auditory brainstem response.Results Acoustic neuroma caused sensorineural deafness.There was a significant correlation between the mean value of pure tone audiometry and the course of disease (P =0.000).The sensitivity and specificity of auditory brainstem response for the diagnosis of acoustic neuroma were 98.2% and 93.6% respectively.The maximum diameters of neuromas were divided into 2 groups:> 3 cm or ≤3 cm.There were significant differences on the abnormal incidence of the Ⅲ to Ⅴ wave intervals of the

  3. Cortical oscillations in auditory perception and speech: evidence for two temporal windows in human auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan eLuo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural sounds, including vocal communication sounds, contain critical information at multiple time scales. Two essential temporal modulation rates in speech have been argued to be in the low gamma band (~20-80 ms duration information and the theta band (~150-300 ms, corresponding to segmental and syllabic modulation rates, respectively. On one hypothesis, auditory cortex implements temporal integration using time constants closely related to these values. The neural correlates of a proposed dual temporal window mechanism in human auditory cortex remain poorly understood. We recorded MEG responses from participants listening to non-speech auditory stimuli with different temporal structures, created by concatenating frequency-modulated segments of varied segment durations. We show that these non-speech stimuli with temporal structure matching speech-relevant scales (~25 ms and ~200 ms elicit reliable phase tracking in the corresponding associated oscillatory frequencies (low gamma and theta bands. In contrast, stimuli with non-matching temporal structure do not. Furthermore, the topography of theta band phase tracking shows rightward lateralization while gamma band phase tracking occurs bilaterally. The results support the hypothesis that there exists multi-time resolution processing in cortex on discontinuous scales and provide evidence for an asymmetric organization of temporal analysis (asymmetrical sampling in time, AST. The data argue for a macroscopic-level neural mechanism underlying multi-time resolution processing: the sliding and resetting of intrinsic temporal windows on privileged time scales.

  4. Hyperekplexia and trismus due to brainstem encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, M.; Humphrey, P.; Tedman, B.; Steiger, M.

    1998-01-01

    The brainstem is said to be the generator of pathological startle responses due to reticular reflex myoclonus or hyperekplexia. A patient with facial weakness, nystagmus, and pyramidal tract signs had generalised reflex spasms in response to auditory, visual and tactile stimuli which clinically and neurophysiologically resembled hyperekplexia. The case is unusual because as well as hyperekplexia, the patient's initial presentation was with an equally rare manifestation of brainstem pathology—brainstem mediated trismus. The causes of brainstem trismus and exaggerated startle responses are discussed with respect to their underlying mechanisms. 

 PMID:9667574

  5. Natural auditory scene statistics shapes human spatial hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, Cesare V; Knorre, Katharina; Ernst, Marc O

    2014-04-22

    Human perception, cognition, and action are laced with seemingly arbitrary mappings. In particular, sound has a strong spatial connotation: Sounds are high and low, melodies rise and fall, and pitch systematically biases perceived sound elevation. The origins of such mappings are unknown. Are they the result of physiological constraints, do they reflect natural environmental statistics, or are they truly arbitrary? We recorded natural sounds from the environment, analyzed the elevation-dependent filtering of the outer ear, and measured frequency-dependent biases in human sound localization. We find that auditory scene statistics reveals a clear mapping between frequency and elevation. Perhaps more interestingly, this natural statistical mapping is tightly mirrored in both ear-filtering properties and in perceived sound location. This suggests that both sound localization behavior and ear anatomy are fine-tuned to the statistics of natural auditory scenes, likely providing the basis for the spatial connotation of human hearing.

  6. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  7. Searching for the optimal stimulus eliciting auditory brainstem responses in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fobel, Oliver; Dau, Torsten

    2004-01-01

    functions fitted to tone-burst-evoked ABR wave-V data over a wide range of stimulus levels and frequencies [Neely et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 83(2), 652–656 (1988)]. In this case, a set of level-dependent chirps was generated. The chirp-evoked responses, particularly wave-V amplitude and latency, were...... compared to click responses and to responses obtained with the original chirp as defined in Dau et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107(3), 1530–1540 (2000)], referred to here as the M-chirp since it is based on a (linear) cochlea model. The main hypothesis was that, at low and medium stimulation levels, the O......- and A-chirps might produce a larger response than the original M-chirp whose parameters were essentially derived from high-level BM data. The main results of the present study are as follows: (i) All chirps evoked a larger wave-V amplitude than the click stimulus indicating that for the chirps a broader...

  8. 正常豚鼠听性脑干反应与听性稳态反应的对比%Comparison of auditory brainstem response and auditory steady-state response in normal guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢慧琴; 王海涛; 周枫; 黄利芬

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the difference of the threshold of normal guinea pigs between auditory brainstem response (ABR) and auditory steady state response (ASSR), and provide a theoretical basis for hearing research on guinea pigs.Methods 12 guinea pigs (24 ears) with normal hearing sedated by pentobarbital sodium were selected for the ABR and ASSR tests.The click- ABR stimulation rate was 11.1 beats/s, and the Ⅱ wave thresholds were recorded as the ABR response threshold.The carrier frequencies (CF) of ASSR were 0.5,1,2,3,4 and 6 kHz, the modulation frequency (MF) was 154 Hz, and the threshold of each carrier frequency was recorded.Results The threshold of ASSR was higher than that of ABR at 0.5-4 kHz CF in normal guinea pigs( P <0.01 ), but no significant difference was found at 6 kHz CF(P >0.05).Conclusion There are significant differences in most thresholds of ASSR and ABR in normal guinea pigs.However, there is no significant difference at 6 kHz CF.Therefore, the differences caused by different CF of ASSR must be noted when assessing the heating of guinea pigs.%目的 比较正常豚鼠听性脑干反应(ABR)和听性稳态反应(ASSR)阈值的差异,为利用豚鼠进行听力学研究提供理论依据.方法 选正常听力豚鼠12只(24耳),在戊巴比妥钠镇静状态下,分别行ABR和ASSR测试.ABR为click刺激声,刺激率为11.1次/s,记录ABR的Ⅱ渡反应阈值.ASSR载波频率(CF)为0.5、1、2、3、4、6 kHz,调制频率(MF)为154 Hz,记录各载频的反应阅值.结果 正常豚鼠ASSR反应阈值高于ABR反应阈值,CF:0.5.4 kHz时.ABR与ASSR阈值间有统计学差异(P0.05).结论 正常豚鼠ABR与ASSR阈值间存在较大差值,但ABR与6 kHz的ASSR阈值间无显著差异.故对豚鼠进行听阈评估时,要注意两者间由于ASSR载波频率不同所引起的差异.

  9. Neural correlates of consonance, dissonance, and the hierarchy of musical pitch in the human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan

    2009-10-21

    Consonant and dissonant pitch relationships in music provide the foundation of melody and harmony, the building blocks of Western tonal music. We hypothesized that phase-locked neural activity within the brainstem may preserve information relevant to these important perceptual attributes of music. To this end, we measured brainstem frequency-following responses (FFRs) from nonmusicians in response to the dichotic presentation of nine musical intervals that varied in their degree of consonance and dissonance. Neural pitch salience was computed for each response using temporally based autocorrelation and harmonic pitch sieve analyses. Brainstem responses to consonant intervals were more robust and yielded stronger pitch salience than those to dissonant intervals. In addition, the ordering of neural pitch salience across musical intervals followed the hierarchical arrangement of pitch stipulated by Western music theory. Finally, pitch salience derived from neural data showed high correspondence with behavioral consonance judgments (r = 0.81). These results suggest that brainstem neural mechanisms mediating pitch processing show preferential encoding of consonant musical relationships and, furthermore, preserve the hierarchical pitch relationships found in music, even for individuals without formal musical training. We infer that the basic pitch relationships governing music may be rooted in low-level sensory processing and that an encoding scheme that favors consonant pitch relationships may be one reason why such intervals are preferred behaviorally.

  10. Toward an In Vivo Neuroimaging Template of Human Brainstem Nuclei of the Ascending Arousal, Autonomic, and Motor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Edlow, Brian L; Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Brown, Emery N; Kinney, Hannah C; Rosen, Bruce R; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-12-01

    Brainstem nuclei (Bn) in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, sleep, and cranial nerve function, and they have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies. However, an in vivo delineation of most human Bn has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. To precisely identify several human Bn in vivo, we employed a 7 Tesla scanner equipped with multi-channel receive-coil array, which provided high magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity, and a multi-contrast (diffusion fractional anisotropy and T2-weighted) echo-planar-imaging approach, which provided complementary contrasts for Bn anatomy with matched geometric distortions and resolution. Through a combined examination of 1.3 mm(3) multi-contrast anatomical images acquired in healthy human adults, we semi-automatically generated in vivo probabilistic Bn labels of the ascending arousal (median and dorsal raphe), autonomic (raphe magnus, periaqueductal gray), and motor (inferior olivary nuclei, two subregions of the substantia nigra compatible with pars compacta and pars reticulata, two subregions of the red nucleus, and, in the diencephalon, two subregions of the subthalamic nucleus) systems. These labels constitute a first step toward the development of an in vivo neuroimaging template of Bn in standard space to facilitate future clinical and research investigations of human brainstem function and pathology. Proof-of-concept clinical use of this template is demonstrated in a minimally conscious patient with traumatic brainstem hemorrhages precisely localized to the raphe Bn involved in arousal.

  11. Toward an In Vivo Neuroimaging Template of Human Brainstem Nuclei of the Ascending Arousal, Autonomic, and Motor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschi, Nicola; Edlow, Brian L.; Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Brown, Emery N.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brainstem nuclei (Bn) in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, sleep, and cranial nerve function, and they have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies. However, an in vivo delineation of most human Bn has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. To precisely identify several human Bn in vivo, we employed a 7 Tesla scanner equipped with multi-channel receive-coil array, which provided high magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity, and a multi-contrast (diffusion fractional anisotropy and T2-weighted) echo-planar-imaging approach, which provided complementary contrasts for Bn anatomy with matched geometric distortions and resolution. Through a combined examination of 1.3 mm3 multi-contrast anatomical images acquired in healthy human adults, we semi-automatically generated in vivo probabilistic Bn labels of the ascending arousal (median and dorsal raphe), autonomic (raphe magnus, periaqueductal gray), and motor (inferior olivary nuclei, two subregions of the substantia nigra compatible with pars compacta and pars reticulata, two subregions of the red nucleus, and, in the diencephalon, two subregions of the subthalamic nucleus) systems. These labels constitute a first step toward the development of an in vivo neuroimaging template of Bn in standard space to facilitate future clinical and research investigations of human brainstem function and pathology. Proof-of-concept clinical use of this template is demonstrated in a minimally conscious patient with traumatic brainstem hemorrhages precisely localized to the raphe Bn involved in arousal. PMID:26066023

  12. Complex-tone pitch representations in the human auditory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Federica

    ) listeners and the effect of musical training for pitch discrimination of complex tones with resolved and unresolved harmonics. Concerning the first topic, behavioral and modeling results in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) indicated that temporal envelope cues of complex tones...... for the individual pitch-discrimination abilities, the musically trained listeners still allocated lower processing effort than did the non-musicians to perform the task at the same performance level. This finding suggests an enhanced pitch representation along the auditory system in musicians, possibly as a result......Understanding how the human auditory system processes the physical properties of an acoustical stimulus to give rise to a pitch percept is a fascinating aspect of hearing research. Since most natural sounds are harmonic complex tones, this work focused on the nature of pitch-relevant cues...

  13. The Analysis of Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Deaf and Dumb Children%450例聋哑病残儿脑干听觉诱发电位分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄梅香; 陆洪英

    2002-01-01

    目的观察聋哑病残儿脑干听觉诱发电位(brainstem auditory evoked potentials,BAEPs)的变化,并初步探讨BAEPs在病残儿鉴定中的应用.方法采用皮肤表面电极引导,用DANTEC CATNATA诱发电位仪记录BAEPs.结果 450例聋哑病残儿900只耳中,846只耳BAEPs波形有不同程度的分化异常.结论 BAEPs是检测儿童客观听力的可靠方法,可为病残儿医学鉴定提供可靠的依据.

  14. Interaction between auditory and visual stimulus relating to the vowel sounds in the auditory cortex in humans: a magnetoencephalographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Kensaku; Watanabe, Shoko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2004-03-11

    We investigated the interaction between auditory and visual stimulus relating to the vowel sounds in the auditory cortex in humans, using magnetoencephalography. We compared the difference in the main component, M100 generated in the auditory cortex, in terms of peak latency, amplitude, dipole location and moment, following the vowel sound_/a/_between two conditions: (1) showing a face with closed mouth; and (2) showing the same face with mouth movement appearing to pronounce/a/using an apparent motion method. We found no significant difference in the M100 component between the two conditions within or between the right and left hemispheres. These findings indicated that the vowel sound perception in the auditory cortex, at least in the primary processing stage, was not affected by viewing mouth movement.

  15. Brainstem disconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, Curtis; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L. [University of California Davis, Medical Center and UC Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Jocson, Jennifer [University of California Davis, Medical Center and UC Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Brainstem disconnection is a very rare neonatal abnormality, with only seven cases reported. We report a unique case of a neonate who presented at delivery with hypertonia, dysmorphic facial features, and respiratory distress, as well as numerous musculoskeletal and genitourinary abnormalities. MRI of the brain showed disconnection between the pons and medulla with cerebellar hypoplasia and absent cerebellar peduncles. It aided in the description of the neurological and vascular anomalies associated with this diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. A computational model of human auditory signal processing and perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten Løve; Ewert, Stephan D.; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    A model of computational auditory signal-processing and perception that accounts for various aspects of simultaneous and nonsimultaneous masking in human listeners is presented. The model is based on the modulation filterbank model described by Dau et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 2892 (1997......)] but includes major changes at the peripheral and more central stages of processing. The model contains outer- and middle-ear transformations, a nonlinear basilar-membrane processing stage, a hair-cell transduction stage, a squaring expansion, an adaptation stage, a 150-Hz lowpass modulation filter, a bandpass...

  17. Click evoked auditory brainstem response in congenital heart diseases in children%先天性心脏病患儿短声诱发听性脑干反应的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周苏萍; 纪宏志; 李宏向; 张纪芸; 段晓辉; 张广福; 杨文东

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of congenital heart disease (CHD) on the development of brainstem in children .Method: The auditory brainstem response(ABR) was studied and compared with normal control. Results: In the study group aged under 12 months, latent period(LP) of wave I in cyanotic congenital heart disease(CCHD) was normal, and interpeak latency(IPL) from waves I to V was prolonged, while they were all prolonged in non- cyanotic congenital heart disease (NCCHD ). In the group aged 4 to 6 years, LP of wave I and IPL of waves Ⅰ~ V in NCCHD patients and CCHD patients without repeated hypoxia were normal while IPL of waves Ⅰ~ V in CCHD patients with repeated hypoxia was evidently prolonged. The abnormality rate was 2.3 %. Conclusion: C-HD do not delay the development of brainstem, but ischemia attacks may harm brainstem function, so early intervention is needed for ischemia attack patients.%探讨先天性心脏病(先心病)对患儿脑干发育的影响。方法:探讨先心病患儿听性脑干反应 (ABR),并以正常儿为对照组。结果:年龄<12月,青紫型先心病(CCHD)患儿Ⅰ波潜伏期(LP)正常,Ⅰ~V 波峰间潜伏期(IPL)较正常儿显著延长,非青紫型先心病(NCCHD)患儿Ⅰ波LP、Ⅰ~V波IPL均显著延长;4 ~6岁者NCCHD和CCHD无反复缺氧发作者LP和Ⅰ~V波IPL与正常儿无差异,CCHD反复缺氧发作者Ⅰ ~V波IPL较正常儿显著延长,异常率2.3%。结论:先心病不延迟婴儿期脑干发育,缺氧发作可损害脑干功 能,对缺氧发作者应尽早进行干预。

  18. Brainstem as a developmental gateway to social attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, Ronny; Dital, Ayelet; Ramon, Dan; Yarmolovsky, Jessica; Gidron, Maor; Kuint, Jacob

    2017-05-15

    Evolution preserves social attention due to its key role in supporting survival. Humans are attracted to social cues from infancy, but the neurobiological mechanisms for the development of social attention are unknown. An evolutionary-based, vertical-hierarchical theoretical model of self-regulation suggests that neonatal brainstem inputs are key for the development of well-regulated social attention. Neonates born preterm (N = 44, GA 34 w.) were recruited and diagnosed at birth as a function of their auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABR). Participants enrolled in a prospective 8-year-long, double-blind, follow-up study comparing participants with brainstem dysfunctions and well-matched controls. Groups had comparable fetal, neonatal, and familial characteristics. Methods incorporated EEG power analysis and gaze tracking during the Attention Network Test (ANT, four cue types, and two targets) and a Triadic Gaze Engagement task (TGE, three social cue levels). Results showed that neonatal brainstem compromise is related to long-term changes in Alpha- and Theta-band power asymmetries (p < .034, p < .016, respectively), suggesting suppressed bottom-up input needed to alert social attention. Gaze tracking indicated dysregulated arousal-modulated attention (p < .004) and difficulty in gaze engagement to socially neutral compared to nonsocial cues (p < .012). Integrating models of Autism and cross-species data with current long-term follow-up of infants with discrete neonatal brainstem dysfunction suggests neonatal brainstem input as a gateway for bottom-up regulation of social attention. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  19. Brain responses to violet, blue, and green monochromatic light exposures in humans: prominent role of blue light and the brainstem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Vandewalle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Relatively long duration retinal light exposure elicits nonvisual responses in humans, including modulation of alertness and cognition. These responses are thought to be mediated in part by melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells which are more sensitive to blue light than violet or green light. The contribution of the melanopsin system and the brain mechanisms involved in the establishment of such responses to light remain to be established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We exposed 15 participants to short duration (50 s monochromatic violet (430 nm, blue (473 nm, and green (527 nm light exposures of equal photon flux (10(13ph/cm(2/s while they were performing a working memory task in fMRI. At light onset, blue light, as compared to green light, increased activity in the left hippocampus, left thalamus, and right amygdala. During the task, blue light, as compared to violet light, increased activity in the left middle frontal gyrus, left thalamus and a bilateral area of the brainstem consistent with activation of the locus coeruleus. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support a prominent contribution of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells to brain responses to light within the very first seconds of an exposure. The results also demonstrate the implication of the brainstem in mediating these responses in humans and speak for a broad involvement of light in the regulation of brain function.

  20. The auditory representation of speech sounds in human motor cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Connie; Hamilton, Liberty S; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    In humans, listening to speech evokes neural responses in the motor cortex. This has been controversially interpreted as evidence that speech sounds are processed as articulatory gestures. However, it is unclear what information is actually encoded by such neural activity. We used high-density direct human cortical recordings while participants spoke and listened to speech sounds. Motor cortex neural patterns during listening were substantially different than during articulation of the same sounds. During listening, we observed neural activity in the superior and inferior regions of ventral motor cortex. During speaking, responses were distributed throughout somatotopic representations of speech articulators in motor cortex. The structure of responses in motor cortex during listening was organized along acoustic features similar to auditory cortex, rather than along articulatory features as during speaking. Motor cortex does not contain articulatory representations of perceived actions in speech, but rather, represents auditory vocal information. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12577.001 PMID:26943778

  1. Phase locked neural activity in the human brainstem predicts preference for musical consonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bones, Oliver; Hopkins, Kathryn; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Plack, Christopher J

    2014-05-01

    When musical notes are combined to make a chord, the closeness of fit of the combined spectrum to a single harmonic series (the 'harmonicity' of the chord) predicts the perceived consonance (how pleasant and stable the chord sounds; McDermott, Lehr, & Oxenham, 2010). The distinction between consonance and dissonance is central to Western musical form. Harmonicity is represented in the temporal firing patterns of populations of brainstem neurons. The current study investigates the role of brainstem temporal coding of harmonicity in the perception of consonance. Individual preference for consonant over dissonant chords was measured using a rating scale for pairs of simultaneous notes. In order to investigate the effects of cochlear interactions, notes were presented in two ways: both notes to both ears or each note to different ears. The electrophysiological frequency following response (FFR), reflecting sustained neural activity in the brainstem synchronised to the stimulus, was also measured. When both notes were presented to both ears the perceptual distinction between consonant and dissonant chords was stronger than when the notes were presented to different ears. In the condition in which both notes were presented to the both ears additional low-frequency components, corresponding to difference tones resulting from nonlinear cochlear processing, were observable in the FFR effectively enhancing the neural harmonicity of consonant chords but not dissonant chords. Suppressing the cochlear envelope component of the FFR also suppressed the additional frequency components. This suggests that, in the case of consonant chords, difference tones generated by interactions between notes in the cochlea enhance the perception of consonance. Furthermore, individuals with a greater distinction between consonant and dissonant chords in the FFR to individual harmonics had a stronger preference for consonant over dissonant chords. Overall, the results provide compelling evidence

  2. Cortical influences on brainstem circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Andrew M; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2016-07-01

    Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) is a powerful endogenous analgesic mechanism which can completely inhibit incoming nociceptor signals at the primary synapse. The circuitry responsible for CPM lies within the brainstem and involves the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis (SRD). While the brainstem is critical for CPM, the cortex can significantly modulate its expression, likely via the brainstem circuitry critical for CPM. Since higher cortical regions such as the anterior, mid-cingulate, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices are activated by noxious stimuli and show reduced activations during other analgesic responses, we hypothesized that these regions would display reduced responses during CPM analgesia. Furthermore, we hypothesized that functional connectivity strength between these cortical regions and the SRD would be stronger in those that express CPM analgesia compared with those that do not. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine sites recruited during CPM expression and their influence on the SRD. A lack of CPM analgesia was associated with greater signal intensity increases during each test stimulus in the presence of the conditioning stimulus compared to test stimuli alone in the mid-cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and increased functional connectivity with the SRD. In contrast, those subjects exhibiting CPM analgesia showed no change in the magnitude of signal intensity increases in these cortical regions or strength of functional connectivity with the SRD. These data suggest that during multiple or widespread painful stimuli, engagement of the prefrontal and cingulate cortices prevents the generation of CPM analgesia, raising the possibility altered responsiveness in these cortical regions underlie the reduced CPM observed in individuals with chronic pain. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2630-2644, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Electric auditory brainstem response (E-ABR in cochlear implant children: Effect of age at implantation and duration of implant use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithreen Mohammed Said Abdelsalam

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: A well-established EABR was obtained in cochlear implant children with proper parameters. The characterizations of the EABR waves including wave latencies and threshold were extracted at different electrodes. The EABR test proves to be an effective method to evaluate the functions of the auditory pathway in children after cochlear implantation.

  4. In vivo functional connectome of human brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, autonomic and motor systems by high spatial resolution 7 Tesla fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Eichner, Cornelius; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Setsompop, Kawin; Brown, Emery N.; Hamalainen, Matti S.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Object To map the in vivo human functional connectivity of several brainstem nuclei with the rest of the brain by using seed-based correlation of ultra-high magnetic field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods We used the recently developed template of 11 brainstem nuclei derived from multi-contrast structural MRI at 7 Tesla as seed regions to determine their connectivity to the rest of the brain. To achieve this, we utilized the increased contrast-to-noise ratio of 7 Tesla fMRI compared to 3 Tesla and the time efficient simultaneous multi-slice imaging to cover the brain with high spatial resolution (1.1 mm-isotropic nominal resolution) while maintaining a short repetition time (2.5 s). Results The delineated Pearson’s correlation-based functional connectivity diagrams (connectomes) of 11 brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, motor and autonomic systems from 12 controls are presented and discussed in the context of existing histology and animal work. Conclusion Considering that the investigated brainstem nuclei play a crucial role in several vital functions, the delineated preliminary connectomes might prove useful for future in vivo research and clinical studies of human brainstem function and pathology, including disorders of consciousness, sleep disorders, autonomic disorders, Parkinson’s disease and other motor disorders. PMID:27126248

  5. In vivo functional connectome of human brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, autonomic, and motor systems by high spatial resolution 7-Tesla fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Eichner, Cornelius; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Setsompop, Kawin; Brown, Emery N; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Rosen, Bruce R; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to map the in vivo human functional connectivity of several brainstem nuclei with the rest of the brain by using seed-based correlation of ultra-high magnetic field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. We used the recently developed template of 11 brainstem nuclei derived from multi-contrast structural MRI at 7 Tesla as seed regions to determine their connectivity to the rest of the brain. To achieve this, we used the increased contrast-to-noise ratio of 7-Tesla fMRI compared with 3 Tesla and time-efficient simultaneous multi-slice imaging to cover the brain with high spatial resolution (1.1-mm isotropic nominal resolution) while maintaining a short repetition time (2.5 s). The delineated Pearson's correlation-based functional connectivity diagrams (connectomes) of 11 brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, motor, and autonomic systems from 12 controls are presented and discussed in the context of existing histology and animal work. Considering that the investigated brainstem nuclei play a crucial role in several vital functions, the delineated preliminary connectomes might prove useful for future in vivo research and clinical studies of human brainstem function and pathology, including disorders of consciousness, sleep disorders, autonomic disorders, Parkinson's disease, and other motor disorders.

  6. The Brainstem Tau Cytoskeletal Pathology of Alzheimer's Disease : A Brief Historical Overview and Description of its Anatomical Distribution Pattern, Evolutional Features, Pathogenetic and Clinical Relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, Udo; Stratmann, Katharina; Heinsen, Helmut; Del Turco, Domenico; Seidel, Kay; Dunnen, den Wilfred; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2016-01-01

    The human brainstem is involved in the regulation of the sleep/waking cycle and normal sleep architectonics and is crucial for the performance of a variety of somatomotor, vital autonomic, oculomotor, vestibular, auditory, ingestive and somatosensory functions. It harbors the origins of the ascendin

  7. Functional outcome of auditory implants in hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, S; Saccoccio, A; Giacomini, P G; Ottaviani, F

    2007-01-01

    The auditory implant provides a new mechanism for hearing when a hearing aid is not enough. It is the only medical technology able to functionally restore a human sense i.e. hearing. The auditory implant is very different from a hearing aid. Hearing aids amplify sound. Auditory implants compensate for damaged or non-working parts of the inner ear because they can directly stimulate the acoustic nerve. There are two principal types of auditory implant: the cochlear implant and the auditory brainstem implant. They have common basic characteristics, but different applications. A cochlear implant attempts to replace a function lost by the cochlea, usually due to an absence of functioning hair cells; the auditory brainstem implant (ABI) is a modification of the cochlear implant, in which the electrode array is placed directly into the brain when the acoustic nerve is not anymore able to carry the auditory signal. Different types of deaf or severely hearing-impaired patients choose auditory implants. Both children and adults can be candidates for implants. The best age for implantation is still being debated, but most children who receive implants are between 2 and 6 years old. Earlier implantation seems to perform better thanks to neural plasticity. The decision to receive an implant should involve a discussion with many medical specialists and an experienced surgeon.

  8. 年龄对言语诱发 ABR 的频率跟随反应影响%The Effects of Aging on Frequency Following Response in Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝文洋; 商莹莹; 倪道凤; 姜鸿; 徐春晓; 高志强; 王素菊; 李奉蓉; 赵翠霞

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was to record the speech evoked auditory brainstem response (s-ABR) of normal hearing young and aged people ,then compared the frequency following responses (FFR) of s-ABR between the two groups ,in order to explore the contribution of FFR on revealing possible aging mechanisms of central audi‐tory system .Methods Twelve normal hearing young adults and aged people respectively (24 ears) were enrolled and s-ABRs (syllable/da/) were recorded using a SmartEP auditory evoked potential system .Results The comparison of waveforms between the two groups showed that the wave latencies of transient responses in the aged group was longer than that of young group ,while the wave latencies of the sustained response ,FFR ,were of no significant differences .The amplitudes of FFR waves in the aged group were lower than those of in the young group .The FFR spectrum analysis showed that the relative energy of each formant for the aged group was lower than that of in the young group and for some formants .Moreover ,for the aged group ,formant frequency differences between FFR and stimulus signal were greater than the young group .Conclusion Compared with young people ,the FFR of aged peo‐ple showed lower amplitudes and less accuracy ,meaning that aging can lead to the weakness of the brainstem neurons'spectral encoding ability .It may be one of the mechanisms causing the reduction of speech recognition in presbycusis patients .%目的:分析听力正常青年人与老年人之间言语诱发听性脑干反应(speech evoked auditory brainstem response ,s-ABR)的频率跟随反应(frequency following response ,FFR)差异,探讨其在揭示听觉系统老化机制中的作用。方法应用SmartEP听觉诱发电位系统对听力正常青年人(18~25岁)与老年人(60~70岁)各12例(24耳)进行言语声信号/da/诱发的s-ABR检测,比较两组s -ABR波形图及频谱图、FFR各波潜伏期及共振峰等。结

  9. Tinnitus alters resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) in human auditory and non-auditory brain regions as measured by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Juan, Juan; Hu, Xiao-Su; Issa, Mohamad; Bisconti, Silvia; Kovelman, Ioulia; Kileny, Paul; Basura, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Tinnitus, or phantom sound perception, leads to increased spontaneous neural firing rates and enhanced synchrony in central auditory circuits in animal models. These putative physiologic correlates of tinnitus to date have not been well translated in the brain of the human tinnitus sufferer. Using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) we recently showed that tinnitus in humans leads to maintained hemodynamic activity in auditory and adjacent, non-auditory cortices. Here we used fNIRS technology to investigate changes in resting state functional connectivity between human auditory and non-auditory brain regions in normal-hearing, bilateral subjective tinnitus and controls before and after auditory stimulation. Hemodynamic activity was monitored over the region of interest (primary auditory cortex) and non-region of interest (adjacent non-auditory cortices) and functional brain connectivity was measured during a 60-second baseline/period of silence before and after a passive auditory challenge consisting of alternating pure tones (750 and 8000Hz), broadband noise and silence. Functional connectivity was measured between all channel-pairs. Prior to stimulation, connectivity of the region of interest to the temporal and fronto-temporal region was decreased in tinnitus participants compared to controls. Overall, connectivity in tinnitus was differentially altered as compared to controls following sound stimulation. Enhanced connectivity was seen in both auditory and non-auditory regions in the tinnitus brain, while controls showed a decrease in connectivity following sound stimulation. In tinnitus, the strength of connectivity was increased between auditory cortex and fronto-temporal, fronto-parietal, temporal, occipito-temporal and occipital cortices. Together these data suggest that central auditory and non-auditory brain regions are modified in tinnitus and that resting functional connectivity measured by fNIRS technology may contribute to conscious phantom

  10. Transient human auditory cortex activation during volitional attention shifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Christian Harm; Gutschalk, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    While strong activation of auditory cortex is generally found for exogenous orienting of attention, endogenous, intra-modal shifting of auditory attention has not yet been demonstrated to evoke transient activation of the auditory cortex. Here, we used fMRI to test if endogenous shifting of attention is also associated with transient activation of the auditory cortex. In contrast to previous studies, attention shifts were completely self-initiated and not cued by transient auditory or visual stimuli. Stimuli were two dichotic, continuous streams of tones, whose perceptual grouping was not ambiguous. Participants were instructed to continuously focus on one of the streams and switch between the two after a while, indicating the time and direction of each attentional shift by pressing one of two response buttons. The BOLD response around the time of the button presses revealed robust activation of the auditory cortex, along with activation of a distributed task network. To test if the transient auditory cortex activation was specifically related to auditory orienting, a self-paced motor task was added, where participants were instructed to ignore the auditory stimulation while they pressed the response buttons in alternation and at a similar pace. Results showed that attentional orienting produced stronger activity in auditory cortex, but auditory cortex activation was also observed for button presses without focused attention to the auditory stimulus. The response related to attention shifting was stronger contralateral to the side where attention was shifted to. Contralateral-dominant activation was also observed in dorsal parietal cortex areas, confirming previous observations for auditory attention shifting in studies that used auditory cues.

  11. Distractor Effect of Auditory Rhythms on Self-Paced Tapping in Chimpanzees and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Hattori

    Full Text Available Humans tend to spontaneously align their movements in response to visual (e.g., swinging pendulum and auditory rhythms (e.g., hearing music while walking. Particularly in the case of the response to auditory rhythms, neuroscientific research has indicated that motor resources are also recruited while perceiving an auditory rhythm (or regular pulse, suggesting a tight link between the auditory and motor systems in the human brain. However, the evolutionary origin of spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms is unclear. Here, we report that chimpanzees and humans show a similar distractor effect in perceiving isochronous rhythms during rhythmic movement. We used isochronous auditory rhythms as distractor stimuli during self-paced alternate tapping of two keys of an electronic keyboard by humans and chimpanzees. When the tempo was similar to their spontaneous motor tempo, tapping onset was influenced by intermittent entrainment to auditory rhythms. Although this effect itself is not an advanced rhythmic ability such as dancing or singing, our results suggest that, to some extent, the biological foundation for spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms was already deeply rooted in the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans, 6 million years ago. This also suggests the possibility of a common attentional mechanism, as proposed by the dynamic attending theory, underlying the effect of perceiving external rhythms on motor movement.

  12. Distractor Effect of Auditory Rhythms on Self-Paced Tapping in Chimpanzees and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yuko; Tomonaga, Masaki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Humans tend to spontaneously align their movements in response to visual (e.g., swinging pendulum) and auditory rhythms (e.g., hearing music while walking). Particularly in the case of the response to auditory rhythms, neuroscientific research has indicated that motor resources are also recruited while perceiving an auditory rhythm (or regular pulse), suggesting a tight link between the auditory and motor systems in the human brain. However, the evolutionary origin of spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms is unclear. Here, we report that chimpanzees and humans show a similar distractor effect in perceiving isochronous rhythms during rhythmic movement. We used isochronous auditory rhythms as distractor stimuli during self-paced alternate tapping of two keys of an electronic keyboard by humans and chimpanzees. When the tempo was similar to their spontaneous motor tempo, tapping onset was influenced by intermittent entrainment to auditory rhythms. Although this effect itself is not an advanced rhythmic ability such as dancing or singing, our results suggest that, to some extent, the biological foundation for spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms was already deeply rooted in the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans, 6 million years ago. This also suggests the possibility of a common attentional mechanism, as proposed by the dynamic attending theory, underlying the effect of perceiving external rhythms on motor movement.

  13. Frequency-specific modulation of population-level frequency tuning in human auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Larry E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under natural circumstances, attention plays an important role in extracting relevant auditory signals from simultaneously present, irrelevant noises. Excitatory and inhibitory neural activity, enhanced by attentional processes, seems to sharpen frequency tuning, contributing to improved auditory performance especially in noisy environments. In the present study, we investigated auditory magnetic fields in humans that were evoked by pure tones embedded in band-eliminated noises during two different stimulus sequencing conditions (constant vs. random under auditory focused attention by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. Results In total, we used identical auditory stimuli between conditions, but presented them in a different order, thereby manipulating the neural processing and the auditory performance of the listeners. Constant stimulus sequencing blocks were characterized by the simultaneous presentation of pure tones of identical frequency with band-eliminated noises, whereas random sequencing blocks were characterized by the simultaneous presentation of pure tones of random frequencies and band-eliminated noises. We demonstrated that auditory evoked neural responses were larger in the constant sequencing compared to the random sequencing condition, particularly when the simultaneously presented noises contained narrow stop-bands. Conclusion The present study confirmed that population-level frequency tuning in human auditory cortex can be sharpened in a frequency-specific manner. This frequency-specific sharpening may contribute to improved auditory performance during detection and processing of relevant sound inputs characterized by specific frequency distributions in noisy environments.

  14. Efficacy of Distortion Product Oto-Acoustic Emission (OAE)/Auditory Brainstem Evoked Response (ABR) Protocols in Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening and Detecting Hearing Loss in Children <2 Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Girish; Sharma, Yojana; Mehta, Kanishk; Patel, Gunjan

    2013-04-01

    Deafness is commonest curable childhood handicap. Most remedies and programmes don't address this issue at childhood level leading to detrimental impact on development of newborns. Aims and objectives are (A) screen all newborns for deafness and detect prevalence of deafness in children less than 2 years of age. and (B) assess efficacy of multi-staged OAE/ABR protocol for hearing screening. Non-randomized, prospective study from August 2008 to August 2011. All infants underwent a series of oto-acoustic emission (OAE) and final confirmatory auditory brainstem evoked response (ABR) audiometry. Finally, out of 1,101 children, 1,069 children passed the test while 12 children had impaired hearing after final testing, confirmed by ABR. Positive predictive value of OAE after multiple test increased to 100 %. OAE-ABR test series is effective in screening neonates and multiple tests reduce economic burden. High risk screening will miss nearly 50 % deaf children, thus universal screening is indispensable in picking early deafness.

  15. 电刺激听神经诱发小鼠脑干神经元活动的光信号特征%Optical mapping of brainstem neuronal activity evoked by auditory electro-stimulation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡竖平; 沈静; 土井直

    2005-01-01

    刺激听神经诱发的脑干光学信号及其特征:刺激听神经诱发的光学信号以时间-空间分布的形式被记录.在同侧耳蜗核,光学信号的潜伏期为(4.63±1.01)ms,前庭核的峰潜伏期为(6.00±0.89)ms.每一个光学信号分为两个成分:快的峰电位样反应及慢的长时程反应.快电位的起始相具有突触前性质,晚期相具有突触后性质;慢的长时程反应可能与多突触传递有关.②γ-氨基丁酸和荷包牡丹碱光学反应记录结果:灌流液中加入50 μmol/Lγ-氨基丁酸可最大限度地降低听神经诱发的脑干神经元信号的幅度,快反应起始相的潜伏期没有延长,但幅度有所降低,晚期相以及慢反应的幅度被明显抑制;而灌流液中加入50μmol/Lγ-氨基丁酸、200 μmol/L荷包牡丹碱后则可部分逆转γ-氨基丁酸对此信号的作用,快的峰电位样反应和慢反应的幅度有部分恢复.结论:多部位的光学记录系统可以收集电刺激听神经的诱发反应,光学信号显示了时间-空间分布的类型.γ-氨基丁酸能够使电刺激听神经诱发的脑干神经元信号的幅度明显降低,而γ-氨基丁酸A受体拮抗剂荷包牡丹碱可以竞争性地对抗部分而非全部的γ-氨基丁酸的抑制作用,提示γ-氨基丁酸能神经元对听神经诱发冲动的抑制作用除部分通过γ-氨基丁酸A受体实现外,还涉及其他亚型的γ-氨基丁酸受体.%BACKGROUND: Optical mapping technique is a novel electrophysiological detection method in which voltage-sensitivity dye is medium and silicon photoelectrical diode transforming technology is characteristic, used for analyzing the spatial-temporal distribution of membrane potential in complex neural system.OBJECTIVE: To observe the spatial-temporal changes of brainstem auditory electro-stimulation evoked potential by using optical mapping technology, so as to probe into the influence of γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and γ-GABA receptor

  16. Hemodynamic responses in human multisensory and auditory association cortex to purely visual stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumann Simon

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings of a tight coupling between visual and auditory association cortices during multisensory perception in monkeys and humans raise the question whether consistent paired presentation of simple visual and auditory stimuli prompts conditioned responses in unimodal auditory regions or multimodal association cortex once visual stimuli are presented in isolation in a post-conditioning run. To address this issue fifteen healthy participants partook in a "silent" sparse temporal event-related fMRI study. In the first (visual control habituation phase they were presented with briefly red flashing visual stimuli. In the second (auditory control habituation phase they heard brief telephone ringing. In the third (conditioning phase we coincidently presented the visual stimulus (CS paired with the auditory stimulus (UCS. In the fourth phase participants either viewed flashes paired with the auditory stimulus (maintenance, CS- or viewed the visual stimulus in isolation (extinction, CS+ according to a 5:10 partial reinforcement schedule. The participants had no other task than attending to the stimuli and indicating the end of each trial by pressing a button. Results During unpaired visual presentations (preceding and following the paired presentation we observed significant brain responses beyond primary visual cortex in the bilateral posterior auditory association cortex (planum temporale, planum parietale and in the right superior temporal sulcus whereas the primary auditory regions were not involved. By contrast, the activity in auditory core regions was markedly larger when participants were presented with auditory stimuli. Conclusion These results demonstrate involvement of multisensory and auditory association areas in perception of unimodal visual stimulation which may reflect the instantaneous forming of multisensory associations and cannot be attributed to sensation of an auditory event. More importantly, we are able

  17. Empathy and the somatotopic auditory mirror system in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazzola, Valeria; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa; Keysers, Christian

    2006-01-01

    How do we understand the actions of other individuals if we can only hear them? Auditory mirror neurons respond both while monkeys perform hand or mouth actions and while they listen to sounds of similar actions [1, 2]. This system might be critical for auditory action understanding and language

  18. Brainstem response audiometry in the determination of low-frequency hearing loss : a study of various methods for frequency-specific ABR-threshold assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.G.J. Conijn

    1992-01-01

    textabstractBrainstem Electric Response Audiometry (BERA) is a method to visualize some of the electric activity generated in the auditory nerve and the brainstem during the processing of sound. The amplitude of the Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) is very small (0.05-0.5 flV). The potentials origi

  19. Aging degrades the neural encoding of simple and complex sounds in the human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinard, Christopher G; Tremblay, Kelly L

    2013-01-01

    Older adults, with or without normal peripheral hearing sensitivity, have difficulty understanding speech. This impaired speech perception may, in part, be due to desynchronization affecting the neural representation of acoustic features. Here we determine if phase-locked neural activity generating the brainstem frequency-following response (FFR) exhibits age-related desynchronization and how this degradation affects the neural representation of simple and complex sounds. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the effects of age on the neural representation of simple tones and complex consonant-vowel stimuli, (2) determine if sustained and transient components of the FFR are differentially affected by age, and (3) determine if the inability to encode a simple signal predicts degradation in representation for complex speech signals. Correlational. Thirty four adults (aged 22-77 yr) with hearing thresholds falling within normal limits. Stimuli used to evoke FFRs were 1000 Hz tone bursts as well as a consonant-vowel /da/ sound. The neural representation of simple (tone) and complex (/da/) stimuli declines with advancing age. Tone-FFR phase coherence decreased as chronological age increased. For the consonant-vowel FFRs, transient onset and offset response amplitudes were smaller, and offset responses were delayed with age. Sustained responses at the onset of vowel periodicity were prolonged in latency and smaller in amplitude as age increased. FFT amplitude of the consonant-vowel FFR fundamental frequency did not significantly decline with increasing age. The ability to encode a simple signal was related to degradation in the neural representation of a complex, speechlike sound. Tone-FFR phase coherence was significantly related to the later vowel response components but not the earlier vowel components. FFR components representing the tone and consonant-vowel /da/ stimulus were negatively affected by age, showing age-related reductions in response

  20. Auditory Brainstem and Middle Latency Responses Measured Pre- and Posttreatment for Hyperacusic Hearing-Impaired Persons Successfully Treated to Improve Sound Tolerance and to Expand the Dynamic Range for Loudness: Case Evidence.

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    Formby, Craig; Korczak, Peggy; Sherlock, LaGuinn P; Hawley, Monica L; Gold, Susan

    2017-02-01

    In this report of three cases, we consider electrophysiologic measures from three hyperacusic hearing-impaired individuals who, prior to treatment to expand their dynamic ranges for loudness, were problematic hearing aid candidates because of their diminished sound tolerance and reduced dynamic ranges. Two of these individuals were treated with structured counseling combined with low-level broadband sound therapy from bilateral sound generators and the third case received structured counseling in combination with a short-acting placebo sound therapy. Each individual was highly responsive to his or her assigned treatment as revealed by expansion of the dynamic range by at least 20 dB at one or more frequencies posttreatment. Of specific interest in this report are their latency and amplitude measures taken from tone burst-evoked auditory brainstem response (ABR) and cortically derived middle latency response (MLR) recordings, measured as a function of increasing loudness at 500 and 2,000 Hz pre- and posttreatment. The resulting ABR and MLR latency and amplitude measures for each case are considered here in terms of pre- and posttreatment predictions. The respective pre- and posttreatment predictions anticipated larger pretreatment response amplitudes and shorter pretreatment response latencies relative to typical normal control values and smaller normative-like posttreatment response amplitudes and longer posttreatment response latencies relative to the corresponding pretreatment values for each individual. From these results and predictions, we conjecture about the neural origins of the hyperacusis conditions (i.e., brainstem versus cortical) and the neuronal sites responsive to treatment. The only consistent finding in support of the pre- and posttreatment predictions and, thus, the strongest index of hyperacusis and positive treatment-related effects was measured for MLR latency responses for wave Pa at 2,000 Hz. Other response indices, including ABR wave V

  1. Interaction of streaming and attention in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutschalk, Alexander; Rupp, André; Dykstra, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Serially presented tones are sometimes segregated into two perceptually distinct streams. An ongoing debate is whether this basic streaming phenomenon reflects automatic processes or requires attention focused to the stimuli. Here, we examined the influence of focused attention on streaming-related activity in human auditory cortex using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Listeners were presented with a dichotic paradigm in which left-ear stimuli consisted of canonical streaming stimuli (ABA_ or ABAA) and right-ear stimuli consisted of a classical oddball paradigm. In phase one, listeners were instructed to attend the right-ear oddball sequence and detect rare deviants. In phase two, they were instructed to attend the left ear streaming stimulus and report whether they heard one or two streams. The frequency difference (ΔF) of the sequences was set such that the smallest and largest ΔF conditions generally induced one- and two-stream percepts, respectively. Two intermediate ΔF conditions were chosen to elicit bistable percepts (i.e., either one or two streams). Attention enhanced the peak-to-peak amplitude of the P1-N1 complex, but only for ambiguous ΔF conditions, consistent with the notion that automatic mechanisms for streaming tightly interact with attention and that the latter is of particular importance for ambiguous sound sequences.

  2. Immunolocalization of pro- and mature-brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and receptor TrkB in the human brainstem and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Samantha; Machaalani, Rita; Waters, Karen A

    2010-10-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB are essential in promoting normal development of the central nervous system. Specific functions that are affected in knockout models include respiratory control, coordination of movement and balance, and feeding activities. The expression of these markers has not yet been studied in the human infant brain. This study provides a detailed account of the distribution and localization of both pro- and mature-recombinant human (rh) forms of BDNF, and of TrkB in the human infant brainstem and hippocampus, and qualitatively compares this expression to that seen in the human adult. Using commercially available antibodies, we applied immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed and paraffin embedded human brain tissue [n=8 for infant, n=6 for adult], and qualitatively analyzed the expression of proBDNF, rhBDNF and TrkB. Amongst the brainstem regions studied, the greatest expression of the markers was in the mesencephalic trigeminal of the pons, and in the medulla, the inferior olive and arcuate nucleus. The lowest expression was in the substantia nigra of the midbrain and pontine locus coeruleus. Compared to adults, all the studied markers had a higher expression in the infant brainstem nuclei of the hypoglossal, vestibular, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, prepositus, cuneate, and dorsal raphe. In the hippocampus, only TrkB showed a higher expression in infants compared to adults. We conclude that BDNF and TrkB play important roles in controlling respiration, movement, balance and feeding in the brainstem and that the TrkB receptor is the most age-sensitive component of this system, especially in the hippocampus.

  3. 广泛性焦虑与强迫症患者脑干听觉诱发电位的比较%Comparison of brainstem auditory evoked potentials in generalized anxiety disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆加文; 李长安; 施和勋; 钱桂碧; 唐云翔; 崔轶

    2011-01-01

    背景 强迫症(Obsessive Conpulsive Disorder,OCD)患者常伴有焦虑症状,但尚不明确两种状态下患者脑功能是否相似.假设:广泛性焦虑(Generalized Anxiety Disorder,GAD)患者与OCD患者的脑予听觉诱发电位(Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials,BAEP)存在差异.方法:按照中国精神障碍分类与诊断标准第3版诊断标准,纳入门诊或住院的41例GAD患者以及69例OCD患者,并选取58名健康对照者.使用Nicolet Bravo脑诱发电位仪,用"Click"短声刺激,测查上述对象的BAEP.结果:NC组,OCD组及GAD组的波V绝对潜伏期依次为6.2(0.7)ms、7.6(0.4)ms以及6.8(0.5)ms(F=92.31,PGAD>NC);波V绝对波幅依次为0.55(0.23)μV、0.20(0.14)μV以及0.16(0.09)μV(F=88.11,POCD,GAD);波Ⅲ绝对波幅依次为0.34(0.18)μV、0.17(0.09)μV以及0.16(0.09)μV(F=36.81,POCD,GAD).结论:OCD与GAD患者的BAEP参数与健康对照者不同,但是两种疾病患者的BEAP参数差异极少.%Background: Anxiety symptoms are often seen in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) patients, but it is unknown whether or not the underlying functioning of the brain is similar in the two conditions.Hypothesis: There are significant differences in the brainstem auditory evoked potentials(BAEP) of patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) compared to those of patients with OCD.Method: Using criteria specified in the 3rd edition of the Chinese Classification of Mental Disorders, 41 GAD patients and 69 OCD patients were identified from inpatient and outpatient services. Using Nicolet Bravo instruments, a short “click”was used to elicit the BAEP from these patients and from 58 normal control subjects.Results: The mean (SD) latency of wave V for the normal controls, OCD patients and GAD patents were 6.2(0.7) ms, 7.6(0.4) ms, and 6.8(0.5) ms, respectively ( F = 92.31, P < 0.001; multiple comparisons: OCD > GAD > normals). The mean amplitude of wave V in the three groups were 0.55 (0.23) μV, 0.20 (0.14) μV, and 0

  4. Coding of melodic gestalt in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Andreas; Herdener, Marcus; Bartels, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The perception of a melody is invariant to the absolute properties of its constituting notes, but depends on the relation between them-the melody's relative pitch profile. In fact, a melody's "Gestalt" is recognized regardless of the instrument or key used to play it. Pitch processing in general is assumed to occur at the level of the auditory cortex. However, it is unknown whether early auditory regions are able to encode pitch sequences integrated over time (i.e., melodies) and whether the resulting representations are invariant to specific keys. Here, we presented participants different melodies composed of the same 4 harmonic pitches during functional magnetic resonance imaging recordings. Additionally, we played the same melodies transposed in different keys and on different instruments. We found that melodies were invariantly represented by their blood oxygen level-dependent activation patterns in primary and secondary auditory cortices across instruments, and also across keys. Our findings extend common hierarchical models of auditory processing by showing that melodies are encoded independent of absolute pitch and based on their relative pitch profile as early as the primary auditory cortex.

  5. Human auditory steady state responses to binaural and monaural beats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, D W F; Taylor, P

    2005-03-01

    Binaural beat sensations depend upon a central combination of two different temporally encoded tones, separately presented to the two ears. We tested the feasibility to record an auditory steady state evoked response (ASSR) at the binaural beat frequency in order to find a measure for temporal coding of sound in the human EEG. We stimulated each ear with a distinct tone, both differing in frequency by 40Hz, to record a binaural beat ASSR. As control, we evoked a beat ASSR in response to both tones in the same ear. We band-pass filtered the EEG at 40Hz, averaged with respect to stimulus onset and compared ASSR amplitudes and phases, extracted from a sinusoidal non-linear regression fit to a 40Hz period average. A 40Hz binaural beat ASSR was evoked at a low mean stimulus frequency (400Hz) but became undetectable beyond 3kHz. Its amplitude was smaller than that of the acoustic beat ASSR, which was evoked at low and high frequencies. Both ASSR types had maxima at fronto-central leads and displayed a fronto-occipital phase delay of several ms. The dependence of the 40Hz binaural beat ASSR on stimuli at low, temporally coded tone frequencies suggests that it may objectively assess temporal sound coding ability. The phase shift across the electrode array is evidence for more than one origin of the 40Hz oscillations. The binaural beat ASSR is an evoked response, with novel diagnostic potential, to a signal that is not present in the stimulus, but generated within the brain.

  6. The effect of precision and power grips on activations in human auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Alexander Wikman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The neuroanatomical pathways interconnecting auditory and motor cortices play a key role in current models of human auditory cortex (AC. Evidently, auditory-motor interaction is important in speech and music production, but the significance of these cortical pathways in other auditory processing is not well known. We investigated the general effects of motor responding on AC activations to sounds during auditory and visual tasks. During all task blocks, subjects detected targets in the designated modality, reported the relative number of targets at the end of the block, and ignored the stimuli presented in the opposite modality. In each block, they were also instructed to respond to targets either using a precision grip, power grip, or to give no overt target responses. We found that motor responding strongly modulated AC activations. First, during both visual and auditory tasks, activations in widespread regions of AC decreased when subjects made precision and power grip responses to targets. Second, activations in AC were modulated by grip type during the auditory but not during the visual task. Further, the motor effects were distinct from the strong attention-related modulations in AC. These results are consistent with the idea that operations in AC are shaped by its connections with motor cortical regions.

  7. Categorical vowel perception enhances the effectiveness and generalization of auditory feedback in human-machine-interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Larson

    Full Text Available Human-machine interface (HMI designs offer the possibility of improving quality of life for patient populations as well as augmenting normal user function. Despite pragmatic benefits, utilizing auditory feedback for HMI control remains underutilized, in part due to observed limitations in effectiveness. The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which categorical speech perception could be used to improve an auditory HMI. Using surface electromyography, 24 healthy speakers of American English participated in 4 sessions to learn to control an HMI using auditory feedback (provided via vowel synthesis. Participants trained on 3 targets in sessions 1-3 and were tested on 3 novel targets in session 4. An "established categories with text cues" group of eight participants were trained and tested on auditory targets corresponding to standard American English vowels using auditory and text target cues. An "established categories without text cues" group of eight participants were trained and tested on the same targets using only auditory cuing of target vowel identity. A "new categories" group of eight participants were trained and tested on targets that corresponded to vowel-like sounds not part of American English. Analyses of user performance revealed significant effects of session and group (established categories groups and the new categories group, and a trend for an interaction between session and group. Results suggest that auditory feedback can be effectively used for HMI operation when paired with established categorical (native vowel targets with an unambiguous cue.

  8. Segmental processing in the human auditory dorsal stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaehle, Tino; Geiser, Eveline; Alter, Kai; Jancke, Lutz; Meyer, Martin

    2008-07-18

    In the present study we investigated the functional organization of sublexical auditory perception with specific respect to auditory spectro-temporal processing in speech and non-speech sounds. Participants discriminated verbal and nonverbal auditory stimuli according to either spectral or temporal acoustic features in the context of a sparse event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Based on recent models of speech processing, we hypothesized that auditory segmental processing, as is required in the discrimination of speech and non-speech sound according to its temporal features, will lead to a specific involvement of a left-hemispheric dorsal processing network comprising the posterior portion of the inferior frontal cortex and the inferior parietal lobe. In agreement with our hypothesis results revealed significant responses in the posterior part of the inferior frontal gyrus and the parietal operculum of the left hemisphere when participants had to discriminate speech and non-speech stimuli based on subtle temporal acoustic features. In contrast, when participants had to discriminate speech and non-speech stimuli on the basis of changes in the frequency content, we observed bilateral activations along the middle temporal gyrus and superior temporal sulcus. The results of the present study demonstrate an involvement of the dorsal pathway in the segmental sublexical analysis of speech sounds as well as in the segmental acoustic analysis of non-speech sounds with analogous spectro-temporal characteristics.

  9. Active stream segregation specifically involves the left human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deike, Susann; Scheich, Henning; Brechmann, André

    2010-06-14

    An important aspect of auditory scene analysis is the sequential grouping of similar sounds into one "auditory stream" while keeping competing streams separate. In the present low-noise fMRI study we presented sequences of alternating high-pitch (A) and low-pitch (B) complex harmonic tones using acoustic parameters that allow the perception of either two separate streams or one alternating stream. However, the subjects were instructed to actively and continuously segregate the A from the B stream. This was controlled by the additional instruction to listen for rare level deviants only in the low-pitch stream. Compared to the control condition in which only one non-separable stream was presented the active segregation of the A from the B stream led to a selective increase of activation in the left auditory cortex (AC). Together with a similar finding from a previous study using a different acoustic cue for streaming, namely timbre, this suggests that the left auditory cortex plays a dominant role in active sequential stream segregation. However, we found cue differences within the left AC: Whereas in the posterior areas, including the planum temporale, activation increased for both acoustic cues, the anterior areas, including Heschl's gyrus, are only involved in stream segregation based on pitch.

  10. Auditory-Visual Perception of Changing Distance by Human Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Andrews, Arlene S.; Lennon, Elizabeth M.

    1985-01-01

    Examines, in two experiments, 5-month-old infants' sensitivity to auditory-visual specification of distance and direction of movement. One experiment presented two films with soundtracks in either a match or mismatch condition; the second showed the two films side-by-side with a single soundtrack appropriate to one. Infants demonstrated visual…

  11. Neuronal representations of distance in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopčo, Norbert; Huang, Samantha; Belliveau, John W; Raij, Tommi; Tengshe, Chinmayi; Ahveninen, Jyrki

    2012-07-03

    Neuronal mechanisms of auditory distance perception are poorly understood, largely because contributions of intensity and distance processing are difficult to differentiate. Typically, the received intensity increases when sound sources approach us. However, we can also distinguish between soft-but-nearby and loud-but-distant sounds, indicating that distance processing can also be based on intensity-independent cues. Here, we combined behavioral experiments, fMRI measurements, and computational analyses to identify the neural representation of distance independent of intensity. In a virtual reverberant environment, we simulated sound sources at varying distances (15-100 cm) along the right-side interaural axis. Our acoustic analysis suggested that, of the individual intensity-independent depth cues available for these stimuli, direct-to-reverberant ratio (D/R) is more reliable and robust than interaural level difference (ILD). However, on the basis of our behavioral results, subjects' discrimination performance was more consistent with complex intensity-independent distance representations, combining both available cues, than with representations on the basis of either D/R or ILD individually. fMRI activations to sounds varying in distance (containing all cues, including intensity), compared with activations to sounds varying in intensity only, were significantly increased in the planum temporale and posterior superior temporal gyrus contralateral to the direction of stimulation. This fMRI result suggests that neurons in posterior nonprimary auditory cortices, in or near the areas processing other auditory spatial features, are sensitive to intensity-independent sound properties relevant for auditory distance perception.

  12. Brainstem encoding of speech and musical stimuli in congenital amusia: evidence from Cantonese speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Maggu, Akshay R; Lau, Joseph C Y; Wong, Patrick C M

    2014-01-01

    Congenital amusia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of musical processing that also impacts subtle aspects of speech processing. It remains debated at what stage(s) of auditory processing deficits in amusia arise. In this study, we investigated whether amusia originates from impaired subcortical encoding of speech (in quiet and noise) and musical sounds in the brainstem. Fourteen Cantonese-speaking amusics and 14 matched controls passively listened to six Cantonese lexical tones in quiet, two Cantonese tones in noise (signal-to-noise ratios at 0 and 20 dB), and two cello tones in quiet while their frequency-following responses (FFRs) to these tones were recorded. All participants also completed a behavioral lexical tone identification task. The results indicated normal brainstem encoding of pitch in speech (in quiet and noise) and musical stimuli in amusics relative to controls, as measured by FFR pitch strength, pitch error, and stimulus-to-response correlation. There was also no group difference in neural conduction time or FFR amplitudes. Both groups demonstrated better FFRs to speech (in quiet and noise) than to musical stimuli. However, a significant group difference was observed for tone identification, with amusics showing significantly lower accuracy than controls. Analysis of the tone confusion matrices suggested that amusics were more likely than controls to confuse between tones that shared similar acoustic features. Interestingly, this deficit in lexical tone identification was not coupled with brainstem abnormality for either speech or musical stimuli. Together, our results suggest that the amusic brainstem is not functioning abnormally, although higher-order linguistic pitch processing is impaired in amusia. This finding has significant implications for theories of central auditory processing, requiring further investigations into how different stages of auditory processing interact in the human brain.

  13. Calretinin as a marker for premotor neurons involved in upgaze in human brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eAdamczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eye movements are generated by different premotor pathways. Damage to them can cause specific deficits of eye movements, such as saccades. For correlative clinico-anatomical post-mortem studies of cases with eye movement disorders it is essential to identify the functional cell groups of the oculomotor system in the human brain by marker proteins. Based on monkey studies, the premotor neurons of the saccadic system can be identified by the histochemical markers parvalbumin and perineuronal nets in humans. These areas involve the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC and the rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fascicle (RIMLF, which both contain premotor neurons for upgaze and downgaze. Recent monkey and human studies revealed a selective excitatory calretinin-positive input to the motoneurons mediating upgaze, but not to those for downgaze. Three premotor regions were identified as sources of calretinin input in monkey: y-group, INC and RIMLF. These findings suggest that the expression pattern of parvalbumin and calretinin may help to identify premotor neurons involved in up- or downgaze. In a post-mortem study of five human cases without neurological diseases we investigated the y-group, INC and RIMLF for the presence of parvalbumin and calretinin positive neurons including their co-expression. Adjacent thin paraffin sections were stained for the aggrecan component of perineuronal nets, parvalbumin or calretinin and glutamate decarboxylase. The comparative analysis of scanned thin sections of INC and RIMLF revealed medium-sized parvalbumin positive neurons with and without calretinin coexpression, which were intermingled. The parvalbumin/calretinin positive neurons in both nuclei are considered as excitatory premotor upgaze neurons. Accordingly, the parvalbumin-positive neurons lacking calretinin are considered as premotor downgaze neurons in RIMLF, but may in addition include inhibitory premotor upgaze neurons in the INC as

  14. Task-specific reorganization of the auditory cortex in deaf humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, Łukasz; Zimmermann, Maria; Mostowski, Piotr; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Rutkowski, Paweł; Szwed, Marcin

    2017-01-24

    The principles that guide large-scale cortical reorganization remain unclear. In the blind, several visual regions preserve their task specificity; ventral visual areas, for example, become engaged in auditory and tactile object-recognition tasks. It remains open whether task-specific reorganization is unique to the visual cortex or, alternatively, whether this kind of plasticity is a general principle applying to other cortical areas. Auditory areas can become recruited for visual and tactile input in the deaf. Although nonhuman data suggest that this reorganization might be task specific, human evidence has been lacking. Here we enrolled 15 deaf and 15 hearing adults into an functional MRI experiment during which they discriminated between temporally complex sequences of stimuli (rhythms). Both deaf and hearing subjects performed the task visually, in the central visual field. In addition, hearing subjects performed the same task in the auditory modality. We found that the visual task robustly activated the auditory cortex in deaf subjects, peaking in the posterior-lateral part of high-level auditory areas. This activation pattern was strikingly similar to the pattern found in hearing subjects performing the auditory version of the task. Although performing the visual task in deaf subjects induced an increase in functional connectivity between the auditory cortex and the dorsal visual cortex, no such effect was found in hearing subjects. We conclude that in deaf humans the high-level auditory cortex switches its input modality from sound to vision but preserves its task-specific activation pattern independent of input modality. Task-specific reorganization thus might be a general principle that guides cortical plasticity in the brain.

  15. Exponential processes in human auditory excitation and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formby, C; Rutledge, J C; Sherlock, L P

    2002-02-01

    Peripheral auditory adaptation has been studied extensively in animal models, and multiple exponential components have been identified. This study explores the feasibility of estimating these component processes for human listeners with a peripheral model of adaptation. The processes were estimated from off-frequency masked detection data that probed temporal masking responses to a gated narrowband masker. The resulting response patterns reflected step-like onset and offset features with characteristically little evidence of confounding backward and forward masking. The model was implemented with linear combinations of exponential functions to represent the unadapted excitation response to gating the masker on and then off and the opposing effects of adaptation in each instance. The onset and offset of the temporal masking response were assumed to be approximately inverse operations and were modeled independently in this scheme. The unadapted excitation response at masker onset and the reversed excitation response at masker offset were each represented in the model by a single exponential function. The adaptation processes were modeled by three independent exponential functions, which were reversed at masker offset. Each adaptation component was subtractive and partially negated the unadapted excitation response to the dynamic masker. This scheme allowed for quantification of the response amplitude, action latency, and time constant for the unadapted excitation component and for each adaptation component. The results reveal that (1) the amplitudes of the unadapted excitation and reversed excitation components grow nonlinearly with masker level and mirror the 'compressive' input-output velocity response of the basilar membrane; (2) the time constants for the unadapted excitation and reversed excitation components are related inversely to masker intensity, which is compatible with neural synchrony increasing at masker onset (or offset) with increasing masker strength

  16. 脑干听觉诱发电位检查在后循环缺血诊断中的应用%Application value of the brainstem auditory evoked potential in diagnos-ing posterior circulation ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张开宇; 梁守礼; 张亚杰; 朱认真; 盛彦勤

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)检查在后循环缺血(PCI)患者中的应用价值。方法回顾分析驻马店市中心医院脑电图室2008~2012年PCI患者96例(PCI组)的BAEP检查结果,并与同期80例健康对照组进行对比。结果 PCI组患者I、Ⅲ、吁波的平均潜伏期(PL)分别为(1.80±0.22)、(3.92±0.29)、(6.12±0.26)ms,I~Ⅲ和Ⅲ~吁波平均峰间潜伏期(IPL)分别为(2.16±0.39)ms和(2.23±0.21)ms;健康对照组I、Ⅲ、吁波平均PL分别为(1.75±0.20)、(3.79±0.25)、(5.98±0.23)ms,I~Ⅲ和Ⅲ~吁波平均IPL分别为(2.19±0.30)ms和(1.67±0.19)ms。 PCI组患者Ⅲ、吁波PL和Ⅲ~吁波IPL长于健康对照组,差异有统计学意义(P1,表现以脑干型为主(45/96,46.8%),高于内耳型(20/96,20.8%)和混合型(31/96,32.2%)。结论 BAEP检查能灵敏地检测出PCI患者的神经电生理异常,可对PCI的诊断提供重要的参考。%Objective To explore the application value of the brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) in diagnosing posterior circulation ischemia (PCI). Methods BAEP resunlts in 96 PCI patients (PCI group) and 80 normal cases (health control group) were analyzed in Department of Electromyography Laboratory, Zhumadian Central Hospital be-tween 2008 and 2012. Results The PL of Ⅰ, Ⅲ, Ⅴ wave in PCI group were (1.80±0.22), (3.92±0.29), (6.12±0.26) ms respectively, the IPL of Ⅰ-Ⅲ and Ⅲ-Ⅴ wave in PCI group were (2.16±0.39) ms and (2.23±0.21) ms respectively. The PL of Ⅰ, Ⅲ, Ⅴ wave in health control group were (1.75±0.20), (3.79±0.25), (5.98±0.23) ms respectively, the IPL ofⅠ-Ⅲ andⅢ-Ⅴ wave in health control group were (2.19±0.30) ms and (1.67±0.19) ms respectively. The PL of Ⅲ,Ⅴ wave and IPL of Ⅲ-Ⅴ wave in PCI group were all longer than those in health control group, the differences were statistically significant (P1;the brainstem type was the main performance (45/96, 46.8%), it was higher than the inner ear type (20/96, 20.8%) and

  17. Audiometria de tronco encefálico (abr: o uso do mascaramento na avaliação de indivíduos portadores de perda auditiva unilateral Auditory brainstem response (abr: use of masking in unilateral hearing loss patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. T. Toma

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A necessidade do mascaramento na avaliação da audição por meio da ABR ainda é um assunto consideravelmente debatido (Durrant & Ferraro, 2001. OBJETIVO: O presente estudo propôs investigar a necessidade do mascaramento contralateral, empregado na orelha normal, ao realizar a ABR em indivíduos portadores de perda auditiva neurossensorial unilateral. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico prospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: A amostra constituiu-se de 22 indivíduos portadores de perda auditiva neurossensorial unilateral de grau profundo, sendo 10 do sexo feminino e 12 do sexo masculino, com idades variando entre 9 e 44 anos. Todos os indivíduos foram submetidos a: audiometria tonal liminar, logoaudiometria (SRT, IPRF e SDT, medidas de imitância acústica (incluindo a pesquisa dos reflexos acústicos - modo ipsilateral e contralateral e audiometria de tronco encefálico na ausência e na presença do mascaramento. RESULTADOS: Todos os indivíduos apresentaram perda auditiva neurossensorial unilateral de grau profundo e curvas timpanométricas do tipo A bilateralmente. Na avaliação da ABR, 100% da amostra apresentou presença da Onda V na orelha comprometida, sendo que ao introduzir o mascaramento contralateral tais respostas não foram observadas. CONCLUSÕES: O mascaramento é um procedimento necessário para a avaliação da audição por meio da ABR em indivíduos portadores de perdas auditivas unilaterais, visando a obtenção de resultados fidedignos. Na ABR, a atenuação interaural para clicks foi maior (65 dB do que a observada na audiometria tonal liminar, sendo necessário, portanto, uma menor intensidade de mascaramento para eliminar a resposta da via auditiva contralateral.The need of masking in auditory brainstem response (ABR evaluation is still considerably debated issue (Durrant and Ferraro, 2001. AIM: In addition, the present study was to investigate the need of masking in ABR with unilateral hearing loss. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical

  18. Functional maps of human auditory cortex: effects of acoustic features and attention.

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    David L Woods

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While human auditory cortex is known to contain tonotopically organized auditory cortical fields (ACFs, little is known about how processing in these fields is modulated by other acoustic features or by attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and population-based cortical surface analysis to characterize the tonotopic organization of human auditory cortex and analyze the influence of tone intensity, ear of delivery, scanner background noise, and intermodal selective attention on auditory cortex activations. Medial auditory cortex surrounding Heschl's gyrus showed large sensory (unattended activations with two mirror-symmetric tonotopic fields similar to those observed in non-human primates. Sensory responses in medial regions had symmetrical distributions with respect to the left and right hemispheres, were enlarged for tones of increased intensity, and were enhanced when sparse image acquisition reduced scanner acoustic noise. Spatial distribution analysis suggested that changes in tone intensity shifted activation within isofrequency bands. Activations to monaural tones were enhanced over the hemisphere contralateral to stimulation, where they produced activations similar to those produced by binaural sounds. Lateral regions of auditory cortex showed small sensory responses that were larger in the right than left hemisphere, lacked tonotopic organization, and were uninfluenced by acoustic parameters. Sensory responses in both medial and lateral auditory cortex decreased in magnitude throughout stimulus blocks. Attention-related modulations (ARMs were larger in lateral than medial regions of auditory cortex and appeared to arise primarily in belt and parabelt auditory fields. ARMs lacked tonotopic organization, were unaffected by acoustic parameters, and had distributions that were distinct from those of sensory responses. Unlike the gradual adaptation seen for sensory responses

  19. Auditory evoked fields elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral-temporal changes in human cerebral cortex

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    Hidehiko eOkamoto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural sounds contain complex spectral components, which are temporally modulated as time-varying signals. Recent studies have suggested that the auditory system encodes spectral and temporal sound information differently. However, it remains unresolved how the human brain processes sounds containing both spectral and temporal changes. In the present study, we investigated human auditory evoked responses elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral-temporal sound changes by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. The auditory evoked responses elicited by the spectral-temporal change were very similar to those elicited by the spectral change, but those elicited by the temporal change were delayed by 30 – 50 ms and differed from the others in morphology. The results suggest that human brain responses corresponding to spectral sound changes precede those corresponding to temporal sound changes, even when the spectral and temporal changes occur simultaneously.

  20. Functional changes in the human auditory cortex in ageing.

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    Oliver Profant

    Full Text Available Hearing loss, presbycusis, is one of the most common sensory declines in the ageing population. Presbycusis is characterised by a deterioration in the processing of temporal sound features as well as a decline in speech perception, thus indicating a possible central component. With the aim to explore the central component of presbycusis, we studied the function of the auditory cortex by functional MRI in two groups of elderly subjects (>65 years and compared the results with young subjects (auditory cortex. The fMRI showed only minimal activation in response to the 8 kHz stimulation, despite the fact that all subjects heard the stimulus. Both elderly groups showed greater activation in response to acoustical stimuli in the temporal lobes in comparison with young subjects. In addition, activation in the right temporal lobe was more expressed than in the left temporal lobe in both elderly groups, whereas in the young control subjects (YC leftward lateralization was present. No statistically significant differences in activation of the auditory cortex were found between the MP and EP groups. The greater extent of cortical activation in elderly subjects in comparison with young subjects, with an asymmetry towards the right side, may serve as a compensatory mechanism for the impaired processing of auditory information appearing as a consequence of ageing.

  1. Effects of auditory integration training on brainstem auditory evoked potential and symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorders%听觉统合干预对孤独症谱系障碍患儿脑干听觉诱发电位及临床疗效的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周洋; 陈一心; 高润; 王建军; 陈图农; 骆松; 黄懿钖

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the curative effect of auditory integration training (AIT) on autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in children with abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP).Methods 56 cases of ASD patients with abnormal BAEP were treated with AIT (aged 2-6 years).BAEP will be reviewed after each course of treatments until the test results were back to normal or had no obvious changes.Children' s core symptoms were evaluated by using autism behavior checklist (ABC) and the childhood autism rating scale (CARS) before and after treatments.Results 56 children accepted (1.95±0.92) courses of AIT.Compared with the data before AIT,CARS scores ((36.32± 3.54),(34.11 ± 3.12)),scores of the sensory factor((5.65±4.61),(4.28±4.11)) and the stereotypes factor of ABC were decreased significantly(P<0.05).After treatments,BAEP of 29 cases (51.79%) went back to normal levels.The bilateral wave incubation periods on left side (Ⅰ:(1.81 ± 0.17) ms,(1.71 ± 0.12) ms,Ⅲ:(4.14 ± 0.18) ms,(4.07 ±0.17)ms,V:(6.09±0.23)ms,(5.97±0.22) ms)and right side (Ⅰ:(1.79±0.17) ms,(1.74±0.13) ms,Ⅲ:(4.15±0.16) ms,(4.07±0.16) ms,V:(6.06±0.23) ms,(5.99±0.26) ms) were significantly shortened (P< 0.05).Conclusion AIT can improve the functional handicap of auditory pathway in brainstem of ASD children,and the core symptoms of ASD.%目的 探究听觉统合训练(auditory integration training,AIT)对存在脑干听觉传导通路功能障碍的孤独症谱系障碍(autism spectrum disorders,ASD)患儿的疗效.方法 56例脑干听觉诱发电位(brainstem auditory evoked potential,BAEP)异常的ASD患儿(年龄2~6岁)接受AIT,每疗程结束后复查BAEP,直至检测结果恢复正常或不再有明显变化.分别在治疗前后对患儿进行孤独症行为评定量表(ABC)及儿童孤独症评定量表(CARS)评估.结果 56例患儿平均接受AIT(1.95±0.92)个疗程.与治疗前比较,治疗后56例患儿的CARS评分下降[(36.32±3.54)分,(34.11±3.12)

  2. Neurofibromatosis type 2 and auditory brainstem implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Hong-jun; Dennis K.K. Au; Yau Hui; Chun-kuen Chow; Yiu-wah Fan; William Ignace Wei

    2007-01-01

    @@ Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF-2) is one of the most common single gene disorders in the nervous system.For approximately 96% of patients with NF-2 present with bilateral Schwannomas involving the eighth cranial nerves, which may be accompanied by Schwannomas involving other cranial, spinal or peripheral nerves, NF-2 is also referred to as "bilateral acoustic neuromas".

  3. Modeling auditory evoked potentials to complex stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch

    The auditory evoked potential (AEP) is an electrical signal that can be recorded from electrodes attached to the scalp of a human subject when a sound is presented. The signal is considered to reflect neural activity in response to the acoustic stimulation and is a well established clinical...... clinically and in research towards using realistic and complex stimuli, such as speech, to electrophysiologically assess the human hearing. However, to interpret the AEP generation to complex sounds, the potential patterns in response to simple stimuli needs to be understood. Therefore, the model was used...... to simulate auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) evoked by classic stimuli like clicks, tone bursts and chirps. The ABRs to these simple stimuli were compared to literature data and the model was shown to predict the frequency dependence of tone-burst ABR wave-V latency and the level-dependence of ABR wave...

  4. Positive and negative reinforcement activate human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Tina; Puschmann, Sebastian; Brechmann, André; Thiel, Christiane M

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies suggest that reward modulates neural activity in sensory cortices, but less is known about punishment. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and an auditory discrimination task, where participants had to judge the duration of frequency modulated tones. In one session correct performance resulted in financial gains at the end of the trial, in a second session incorrect performance resulted in financial loss. Incorrect performance in the rewarded as well as correct performance in the punishment condition resulted in a neutral outcome. The size of gains and losses was either low or high (10 or 50 Euro cent) depending on the direction of frequency modulation. We analyzed neural activity at the end of the trial, during reinforcement, and found increased neural activity in auditory cortex when gaining a financial reward as compared to gaining no reward and when avoiding financial loss as compared to receiving a financial loss. This was independent on the size of gains and losses. A similar pattern of neural activity for both gaining a reward and avoiding a loss was also seen in right middle temporal gyrus, bilateral insula and pre-supplemental motor area, here however neural activity was lower after correct responses compared to incorrect responses. To summarize, this study shows that the activation of sensory cortices, as previously shown for gaining a reward is also seen during avoiding a loss.

  5. Positive and negative reinforcement activate human auditory cortex

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    Tina eWeis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies suggest that reward modulates neural activity in sensory cortices, but less is known about punishment. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and an auditory discrimination task, where participants had to judge the duration of frequency modulated tones. In one session correct performance resulted in financial gains at the end of the trial, in a second session incorrect performance resulted in financial loss. Incorrect performance in the rewarded as well as correct performance in the punishment condition resulted in a neutral outcome. The size of gains and losses was either low or high (10 or 50 Euro cent depending on the direction of frequency modulation. We analyzed neural activity at the end of the trial, during reinforcement, and found increased neural activity in auditory cortex when gaining a financial reward as compared to gaining no reward and when avoiding financial loss as compared to receiving a financial loss. This was independent on the size of gains and losses. A similar pattern of neural activity for both gaining a reward and avoiding a loss was also seen in right middle temporal gyrus, bilateral insula and pre-supplemental motor area, here however neural activity was lower after correct responses compared to incorrect responses. To summarize, this study shows that the activation of sensory cortices, as previously shown for gaining a reward is also seen during avoiding a loss.

  6. Early influence of auditory stimuli on upper-limb movements in young human infants: an overview

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    Priscilla Augusta Monteiro Ferronato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Given that the auditory system is rather well developed at the end of the third trimester of pregnancy, it is likely that couplings between acoustics and motor activity can be integrated as early as at the beginning of postnatal life. The aim of the present mini-review was to summarize and discuss studies on early auditory-motor integration, focusing particularly on upper-limb movements (one of the most crucial means to interact with the environment in association with auditory stimuli, to develop further understanding of their significance with regard to early infant development. Many studies have investigated the relationship between various infant behaviors (e.g., sucking, visual fixation, head turning and auditory stimuli, and established that human infants can be observed displaying couplings between action and environmental sensory stimulation already from just after birth, clearly indicating a propensity for intentional behavior. Surprisingly few studies, however, have investigated the associations between upper-limb movements and different auditory stimuli in newborns and young infants, infants born at risk for developmental disorders/delays in particular. Findings from studies of early auditory-motor interaction support that the developing integration of sensory and motor systems is a fundamental part of the process guiding the development of goal-directed action in infancy, of great importance for continued motor, perceptual and cognitive development. At-risk infants (e.g., those born preterm may display increasing central auditory processing disorders, negatively affecting early sensory-motor integration, and resulting in long-term consequences on gesturing, language development and social communication. Consequently, there is a need for more studies on such implications

  7. Mapping the Tonotopic Organization in Human Auditory Cortex with Minimally Salient Acoustic Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langers, Dave R. M.; van Dijk, Pim

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous neuroimaging studies, the tonotopic organization in human auditory cortex is not yet unambiguously established. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 20 subjects were presented with low-level task-irrelevant tones to avoid spread of cortical activation. Data-driven an

  8. Speaking modifies voice-evoked activity in the human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curio, G; Neuloh, G; Numminen, J; Jousmäki, V; Hari, R

    2000-04-01

    The voice we most often hear is our own, and proper interaction between speaking and hearing is essential for both acquisition and performance of spoken language. Disturbed audiovocal interactions have been implicated in aphasia, stuttering, and schizophrenic voice hallucinations, but paradigms for a noninvasive assessment of auditory self-monitoring of speaking and its possible dysfunctions are rare. Using magnetoencephalograpy we show here that self-uttered syllables transiently activate the speaker's auditory cortex around 100 ms after voice onset. These phasic responses were delayed by 11 ms in the speech-dominant left hemisphere relative to the right, whereas during listening to a replay of the same utterances the response latencies were symmetric. Moreover, the auditory cortices did not react to rare vowel changes interspersed randomly within a series of repetitively spoken vowels, in contrast to regular change-related responses evoked 100-200 ms after replayed rare vowels. Thus, speaking primes the human auditory cortex at a millisecond time scale, dampening and delaying reactions to self-produced "expected" sounds, more prominently in the speech-dominant hemisphere. Such motor-to-sensory priming of early auditory cortex responses during voicing constitutes one element of speech self-monitoring that could be compromised in central speech disorders.

  9. Mouth and Voice: A Relationship between Visual and Auditory Preference in the Human Superior Temporal Sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin L; Beauchamp, Michael S

    2017-03-08

    Cortex in and around the human posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) is known to be critical for speech perception. The pSTS responds to both the visual modality (especially biological motion) and the auditory modality (especially human voices). Using fMRI in single subjects with no spatial smoothing, we show that visual and auditory selectivity are linked. Regions of the pSTS were identified that preferred visually presented moving mouths (presented in isolation or as part of a whole face) or moving eyes. Mouth-preferring regions responded strongly to voices and showed a significant preference for vocal compared with nonvocal sounds. In contrast, eye-preferring regions did not respond to either vocal or nonvocal sounds. The converse was also true: regions of the pSTS that showed a significant response to speech or preferred vocal to nonvocal sounds responded more strongly to visually presented mouths than eyes. These findings can be explained by environmental statistics. In natural environments, humans see visual mouth movements at the same time as they hear voices, while there is no auditory accompaniment to visual eye movements. The strength of a voxel's preference for visual mouth movements was strongly correlated with the magnitude of its auditory speech response and its preference for vocal sounds, suggesting that visual and auditory speech features are coded together in small populations of neurons within the pSTS.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Humans interacting face to face make use of auditory cues from the talker's voice and visual cues from the talker's mouth to understand speech. The human posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), a brain region known to be important for speech perception, is complex, with some regions responding to specific visual stimuli and others to specific auditory stimuli. Using BOLD fMRI, we show that the natural statistics of human speech, in which voices co-occur with mouth movements, are reflected in the neural architecture of

  10. Processing of location and pattern changes of natural sounds in the human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Christian F; Bledowski, Christoph; Wibral, Michael; Kaiser, Jochen

    2007-04-15

    Parallel cortical pathways have been proposed for the processing of auditory pattern and spatial information, respectively. We tested this segregation with human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and separate electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in the same subjects who listened passively to four sequences of repetitive spatial animal vocalizations in an event-related paradigm. Transitions between sequences constituted either a change of auditory pattern, location, or both pattern+location. This procedure allowed us to investigate the cortical correlates of natural auditory "what" and "where" changes independent of differences in the individual stimuli. For pattern changes, we observed significantly increased fMRI responses along the bilateral anterior superior temporal gyrus and superior temporal sulcus, the planum polare, lateral Heschl's gyrus and anterior planum temporale. For location changes, significant increases of fMRI responses were observed in bilateral posterior superior temporal gyrus and planum temporale. An overlap of these two types of changes occurred in the lateral anterior planum temporale and posterior superior temporal gyrus. The analysis of source event-related potentials (ERPs) revealed faster processing of location than pattern changes. Thus, our data suggest that passive processing of auditory spatial and pattern changes is dissociated both temporally and anatomically in the human brain. The predominant role of more anterior aspects of the superior temporal lobe in sound identity processing supports the role of this area as part of the auditory pattern processing stream, while spatial processing of auditory stimuli appears to be mediated by the more posterior parts of the superior temporal lobe.

  11. A review of the history, development and application of auditory weighting functions in humans and marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Dorian S; Yost, William; Burkard, Robert; Finneran, James J; Reichmuth, Colleen; Mulsow, Jason

    2017-03-01

    This document reviews the history, development, and use of auditory weighting functions for noise impact assessment in humans and marine mammals. Advances from the modern era of electroacoustics, psychophysical studies of loudness, and other related hearing studies are reviewed with respect to the development and application of human auditory weighting functions, particularly A-weighting. The use of auditory weighting functions to assess the effects of environmental noise on humans-such as hearing damage-risk criteria-are presented, as well as lower-level effects such as annoyance and masking. The article also reviews marine mammal auditory weighting functions, the development of which has been fundamentally directed by the objective of predicting and preventing noise-induced hearing loss. Compared to the development of human auditory weighting functions, the development of marine mammal auditory weighting functions have faced additional challenges, including a large number of species that must be considered, a lack of audiometric information on most species, and small sample sizes for nearly all species for which auditory data are available. The review concludes with research recommendations to address data gaps and assumptions underlying marine mammal auditory weighting function design and application.

  12. Potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco encefálico por frequência específica e de estado estável na audiologia pediátrica: estudo de caso Frequency-specific and steady-state evoked auditory brainstem responses in pediatric audiology: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ribeiro Ivo Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Preconiza-se o diagnóstico até os três meses de idade em crianças com deficiência auditiva congênita. Após a etapa inicial de confirmação do diagnóstico, é necessário que se obtenha limiares precisos nas diferentes frequências, para que seja possível uma adequada seleção, indicação e regulagem de aparelhos de amplificação sonora. Nesse contexto, inserem-se os Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Tronco Encefálico por Frequência Específica (PEATE-FE e, mais recentemente, os Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Estado Estável (PEAEE. O objetivo deste estudo de caso foi apresentar os achados das duas técnicas para estimar os limiares auditivos em uma criança de três meses de idade, com perda auditiva neurossensorial bilateral, diagnosticada utilizando-se como primeiro método de avaliação os Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Tronco Encefálico com estímulo clique, tanto por via aérea como por via óssea. As duas técnicas mostraram-se eficientes para estimar os limiares auditivos, com uma vantagem dos PEAEE com relação ao tempo de duração de exame.It is recommended that congenital hearing loss is identified as early as three months old. After the initial step of confirming the diagnosis, it is necessary to obtain accurate hearing thresholds, allowing an adequate selection, indication and regulation of hearing aids for these children. It is inserted, in this context, the Frequency-Specific Auditory Brainstem Responses (FSABR and, more recently, the Auditory Steady-State Responses (ASSR. The aim of the present study was to describe the findings of the use of both techniques to estimate the auditory thresholds of a three-month-old infant with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss diagnosed using, as primary evaluation method, the click-evoked Auditory Brainstem Responses, with both air and bone stimuli conduction. Both techniques provided reliable findings for estimating auditory thresholds. The ASSR had an advantage regarding

  13. Consonance and dissonance of musical chords: neural correlates in auditory cortex of monkeys and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Y I; Volkov, I O; Noh, M D; Garell, P C; Bakken, H; Arezzo, J C; Howard, M A; Steinschneider, M

    2001-12-01

    Some musical chords sound pleasant, or consonant, while others sound unpleasant, or dissonant. Helmholtz's psychoacoustic theory of consonance and dissonance attributes the perception of dissonance to the sensation of "beats" and "roughness" caused by interactions in the auditory periphery between adjacent partials of complex tones comprising a musical chord. Conversely, consonance is characterized by the relative absence of beats and roughness. Physiological studies in monkeys suggest that roughness may be represented in primary auditory cortex (A1) by oscillatory neuronal ensemble responses phase-locked to the amplitude-modulated temporal envelope of complex sounds. However, it remains unknown whether phase-locked responses also underlie the representation of dissonance in auditory cortex. In the present study, responses evoked by musical chords with varying degrees of consonance and dissonance were recorded in A1 of awake macaques and evaluated using auditory-evoked potential (AEP), multiunit activity (MUA), and current-source density (CSD) techniques. In parallel studies, intracranial AEPs evoked by the same musical chords were recorded directly from the auditory cortex of two human subjects undergoing surgical evaluation for medically intractable epilepsy. Chords were composed of two simultaneous harmonic complex tones. The magnitude of oscillatory phase-locked activity in A1 of the monkey correlates with the perceived dissonance of the musical chords. Responses evoked by dissonant chords, such as minor and major seconds, display oscillations phase-locked to the predicted difference frequencies, whereas responses evoked by consonant chords, such as octaves and perfect fifths, display little or no phase-locked activity. AEPs recorded in Heschl's gyrus display strikingly similar oscillatory patterns to those observed in monkey A1, with dissonant chords eliciting greater phase-locked activity than consonant chords. In contrast to recordings in Heschl's gyrus

  14. Innervation of the Human Cavum Conchae and Auditory Canal: Anatomical Basis for Transcutaneous Auricular Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, P.; López, M.; Larraya, I.; Chamorro, J.; Cobo, J. L.; Ordóñez, S.

    2017-01-01

    The innocuous transcutaneous stimulation of nerves supplying the outer ear has been demonstrated to be as effective as the invasive direct stimulation of the vagus nerve for the treatment of some neurological and nonneurological disturbances. Thus, the precise knowledge of external ear innervation is of maximal interest for the design of transcutaneous auricular nerve stimulation devices. We analyzed eleven outer ears, and the innervation was assessed by Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemistry, or immunofluorescence (neurofilaments, S100 protein, and myelin-basic protein). In both the cavum conchae and the auditory canal, nerve profiles were identified between the cartilage and the skin and out of the cartilage. The density of nerves and of myelinated nerve fibers was higher out of the cartilage and in the auditory canal with respect to the cavum conchae. Moreover, the nerves were more numerous in the superior and posterior-inferior than in the anterior-inferior segments of the auditory canal. The present study established a precise nerve map of the human cavum conchae and the cartilaginous segment of the auditory canal demonstrating regional differences in the pattern of innervation of the human outer ear. These results may provide additional neuroanatomical basis for the accurate design of auricular transcutaneous nerve stimulation devices.

  15. Sensitivity to an Illusion of Sound Location in Human Auditory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C. Higgins

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human listeners place greater weight on the beginning of a sound compared to the middle or end when determining sound location, creating an auditory illusion known as the Franssen effect. Here, we exploited that effect to test whether human auditory cortex (AC represents the physical vs. perceived spatial features of a sound. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to measure AC responses to sounds that varied in perceived location due to interaural level differences (ILD applied to sound onsets or to the full sound duration. Analysis of hemodynamic responses in AC revealed sensitivity to ILD in both full-cue (veridical and onset-only (illusory lateralized stimuli. Classification analysis revealed regional differences in the sensitivity to onset-only ILDs, where better classification was observed in posterior compared to primary AC. That is, restricting the ILD to sound onset—which alters the physical but not the perceptual nature of the spatial cue—did not eliminate cortical sensitivity to that cue. These results suggest that perceptual representations of auditory space emerge or are refined in higher-order AC regions, supporting the stable perception of auditory space in noisy or reverberant environments and forming the basis of illusions such as the Franssen effect.

  16. Mapping auditory core, lateral belt, and parabelt cortices in the human superior temporal gyrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweet, Robert A; Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton; Lewis, David A

    2005-01-01

    the location of the lateral belt and parabelt with respect to gross anatomical landmarks. Architectonic criteria for the core, lateral belt, and parabelt were readily adapted from monkey to human. Additionally, we found evidence for an architectonic subdivision within the parabelt, present in both species......The goal of the present study was to determine whether the architectonic criteria used to identify the core, lateral belt, and parabelt auditory cortices in macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) could be used to identify homologous regions in humans (Homo sapiens). Current evidence indicates...... that auditory cortex in humans, as in monkeys, is located on the superior temporal gyrus (STG), and is functionally and structurally altered in illnesses such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we used serial sets of adjacent sections processed for Nissl substance, acetylcholinesterase...

  17. EFFECTS OF NOISE EXPOSURE ON CLICK- AND TONE BURST-EVOKED AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSE IN RATS%噪声暴露对大鼠短纯音与短声听觉脑干反应的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佘晓俊; 崔博; 吴铭权; 马强; 刘洪涛

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究噪声暴露对大鼠听觉脑干反应(ABR)的影响,及大鼠短声ABR(C-ABR)和短纯音ABR(Tb-ABR)的特点,以探讨Tb-ABR在听力评估中的价值.方法 将成年SD大鼠随机分为噪声组和正常组,每组7只(14耳).噪声组暴露于100 dB(SPL)白噪声,6 h/d,连续12周.噪声停止后24 h分别测定C-ABR和Tb-ABR(刺激声2、4、8、16、32 kHz).对2组的ABR结果进行统计分析.结果 随着刺激声从32 kHz到2 kHz,正常大鼠Tb-ABR各波的潜伏期延长;与C-ABR比较,Tb-ABR各频率波Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅳ的潜伏期都延迟,差异有显著性(P<0.01).大鼠听力在16 kHz比较敏感,阈值较低.噪声组大鼠在8 kHz听力损失最重,升高11 dB;各种短纯音刺激时,Tb-ABR各波潜伏期及峰间潜伏期无明显变化.结论 正常大鼠在各个频率的听力闽值、敏感性不同,噪声对各频率听力影响也不同;Tb-ABR较C-ABR更能反映听力损失的频率特性.%Objective To study the effects of noise exposure on click-evoked auditory brainstem responses( CABR) and tone burst-evoked ABR(Tb-ABR) in rats, so as to provide the reference for application of Tb-ABR to hearing evaluation.Methods Fourteen SD rats were divided into two groups, named the control group and the noise exposure group with seven rats per group(fourteen ears).The noise exposure group were exposed to the white noise[100 dB(SPL),6 h/day,12 weeks].C-ABR and Tb-ABR(2,4,8, 16,32 kHz) were measured 24 hours after noise exposure.Results The peak latency in normal rats was prolonged when the stimulate tone changed from 32 kHz to 2 kHz; the peak latency of TbABR with any frequency was significantly longer than that of C-ABR ( P < 0.01 ); the hearing threshold at 16 kHz of TbABR was the lowest, and the hearing was the best.The hearing loss in noise exposure group was most severe at 8 kHz ( 11 dB more than the control).The thresholds of C-ABR and Tb-ABR of noise exposure group were higher than those of control group.The peak latency of

  18. Resolving the Brainstem Contributions to Attentional Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jonathan C.W.; Davies, Wendy-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Previous human imaging studies manipulating attention or expectancy have identified the periaqueductal gray (PAG) as a key brainstem structure implicated in endogenous analgesia. However, animal studies indicate that PAG analgesia is mediated largely via caudal brainstem structures, such as the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and locus coeruleus (LC). To identify their involvement in endogenous analgesia, we used brainstem optimized, whole-brain imaging to record responses to concurrent thermal stimulation (left forearm) and visual attention tasks of titrated difficulty in 20 healthy subjects. The PAG, LC, and RVM were anatomically discriminated using a probabilistic atlas. Pain ratings disclosed the anticipated analgesic interaction between task difficulty and pain intensity (p pain intensity. Intersubject analgesia scores correlated to activity within a distinct region of the RVM alone. These results identify distinct roles for a brainstem triumvirate in attentional analgesia: with the PAG activated by attentional load; specific RVM regions showing pronociceptive and antinociceptive processes (in line with previous animal studies); and the LC showing lateralized activity during conflicting attentional demands. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attention modulates pain intensity, and human studies have identified roles for a network of forebrain structures plus the periaqueductal gray (PAG). Animal data indicate that the PAG acts via caudal brainstem structures to control nociception. We investigated this issue within an attentional analgesia paradigm with brainstem-optimized fMRI and analysis using a probabilistic brainstem atlas. We find pain intensity encoding in several forebrain structures, including the insula and attentional activation of the PAG. Discrete regions of the rostral ventromedial medulla bidirectionally influence pain perception, and locus coeruleus activity mirrors the interaction between attention and nociception. This approach has enabled the

  19. Broadened population-level frequency tuning in human auditory cortex of portable music player users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiko Okamoto

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many people use portable players to enrich their daily life with enjoyable music. However, in noisy environments, the player volume is often set to extremely high levels in order to drown out the intense ambient noise and satisfy the appetite for music. Extensive and inappropriate usage of portable music players might cause subtle damages in the auditory system, which are not behaviorally detectable in an early stage of the hearing impairment progress. Here, by means of magnetoencephalography, we objectively examined detrimental effects of portable music player misusage on the population-level frequency tuning in the human auditory cortex. We compared two groups of young people: one group had listened to music with portable music players intensively for a long period of time, while the other group had not. Both groups performed equally and normally in standard audiological examinations (pure tone audiogram, speech test, and hearing-in-noise test. However, the objective magnetoencephalographic data demonstrated that the population-level frequency tuning in the auditory cortex of the portable music player users was significantly broadened compared to the non-users, when attention was distracted from the auditory modality; this group difference vanished when attention was directed to the auditory modality. Our conclusion is that extensive and inadequate usage of portable music players could cause subtle damages, which standard behavioral audiometric measures fail to detect in an early stage. However, these damages could lead to future irreversible hearing disorders, which would have a huge negative impact on the quality of life of those affected, and the society as a whole.

  20. Polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM in the human trigeminal ganglion and brainstem at prenatal and adult ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melis Tiziana

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM is considered a marker of developing and migrating neurons and of synaptogenesis in the immature vertebrate nervous system. However, it persists in the mature normal brain in some regions which retain a capability for morphofunctional reorganization throughout life. With the aim of providing information relevant to the potential for dynamic changes of specific neuronal populations in man, this study analyses the immunohistochemical occurrence of PSA-NCAM in the human trigeminal ganglion (TG and brainstem neuronal populations at prenatal and adult age. Results Western blot analysis in human and rat hippocampus supports the specificity of the anti-PSA-NCAM antibody and the immunodetectability of the molecule in postmortem tissue. Immunohistochemical staining for PSA-NCAM occurs in TG and several brainstem regions during prenatal life and in adulthood. As a general rule, it appears as a surface staining suggestive of membrane labelling on neuronal perikarya and proximal processes, and as filamentous and dot-like elements in the neuropil. In the TG, PSA-NCAM is localized to neuronal perikarya, nerve fibres, pericellular networks, and satellite and Schwann cells; further, cytoplasmic perikaryal staining and positive pericellular fibre networks are detectable with higher frequency in adult than in newborn tissue. In the adult tissue, positive neurons are mostly small- and medium-sized, and amount to about 6% of the total ganglionic population. In the brainstem, PSA-NCAM is mainly distributed at the level of the medulla oblongata and pons and appears scarce in the mesencephalon. Immunoreactivity also occurs in discretely localized glial structures. At all ages examined, PSA-NCAM occurs in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, solitary nuclear complex, vestibular and cochlear nuclei, reticular formation nuclei, and most of the precerebellar nuclei. In specimens of different age

  1. Ubiquitous crossmodal Stochastic Resonance in humans: auditory noise facilitates tactile, visual and proprioceptive sensations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Lugo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stochastic resonance is a nonlinear phenomenon whereby the addition of noise can improve the detection of weak stimuli. An optimal amount of added noise results in the maximum enhancement, whereas further increases in noise intensity only degrade detection or information content. The phenomenon does not occur in linear systems, where the addition of noise to either the system or the stimulus only degrades the signal quality. Stochastic Resonance (SR has been extensively studied in different physical systems. It has been extended to human sensory systems where it can be classified as unimodal, central, behavioral and recently crossmodal. However what has not been explored is the extension of this crossmodal SR in humans. For instance, if under the same auditory noise conditions the crossmodal SR persists among different sensory systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using physiological and psychophysical techniques we demonstrate that the same auditory noise can enhance the sensitivity of tactile, visual and propioceptive system responses to weak signals. Specifically, we show that the effective auditory noise significantly increased tactile sensations of the finger, decreased luminance and contrast visual thresholds and significantly changed EMG recordings of the leg muscles during posture maintenance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that crossmodal SR is a ubiquitous phenomenon in humans that can be interpreted within an energy and frequency model of multisensory neurons spontaneous activity. Initially the energy and frequency content of the multisensory neurons' activity (supplied by the weak signals is not enough to be detected but when the auditory noise enters the brain, it generates a general activation among multisensory neurons of different regions, modifying their original activity. The result is an integrated activation that promotes sensitivity transitions and the signals are then perceived. A physiologically

  2. Auditory event-related response in visual cortex modulates subsequent visual responses in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naue, Nicole; Rach, Stefan; Strüber, Daniel; Huster, Rene J; Zaehle, Tino; Körner, Ursula; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2011-05-25

    Growing evidence from electrophysiological data in animal and human studies suggests that multisensory interaction is not exclusively a higher-order process, but also takes place in primary sensory cortices. Such early multisensory interaction is thought to be mediated by means of phase resetting. The presentation of a stimulus to one sensory modality resets the phase of ongoing oscillations in another modality such that processing in the latter modality is modulated. In humans, evidence for such a mechanism is still sparse. In the current study, the influence of an auditory stimulus on visual processing was investigated by measuring the electroencephalogram (EEG) and behavioral responses of humans to visual, auditory, and audiovisual stimulation with varying stimulus-onset asynchrony (SOA). We observed three distinct oscillatory EEG responses in our data. An initial gamma-band response around 50 Hz was followed by a beta-band response around 25 Hz, and a theta response around 6 Hz. The latter was enhanced in response to cross-modal stimuli as compared to either unimodal stimuli. Interestingly, the beta response to unimodal auditory stimuli was dominant in electrodes over visual areas. The SOA between auditory and visual stimuli--albeit not consciously perceived--had a modulatory impact on the multisensory evoked beta-band responses; i.e., the amplitude depended on SOA in a sinusoidal fashion, suggesting a phase reset. These findings further support the notion that parameters of brain oscillations such as amplitude and phase are essential predictors of subsequent brain responses and might be one of the mechanisms underlying multisensory integration.

  3. Experience-dependent learning of auditory temporal resolution: evidence from Carnatic-trained musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Panda, Manasa R

    2014-01-22

    Musical training and experience greatly enhance the cortical and subcortical processing of sounds, which may translate to superior auditory perceptual acuity. Auditory temporal resolution is a fundamental perceptual aspect that is critical for speech understanding in noise in listeners with normal hearing, auditory disorders, cochlear implants, and language disorders, yet very few studies have focused on music-induced learning of temporal resolution. This report demonstrates that Carnatic musical training and experience have a significant impact on temporal resolution assayed by gap detection thresholds. This experience-dependent learning in Carnatic-trained musicians exhibits the universal aspects of human perception and plasticity. The present work adds the perceptual component to a growing body of neurophysiological and imaging studies that suggest plasticity of the peripheral auditory system at the level of the brainstem. The present work may be intriguing to researchers and clinicians alike interested in devising cross-cultural training regimens to alleviate listening-in-noise difficulties.

  4. Plasticity of the human auditory cortex related to musical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantev, Christo; Herholz, Sibylle C

    2011-11-01

    During the last decades music neuroscience has become a rapidly growing field within the area of neuroscience. Music is particularly well suited for studying neuronal plasticity in the human brain because musical training is more complex and multimodal than most other daily life activities, and because prospective and professional musicians usually pursue the training with high and long-lasting commitment. Therefore, music has increasingly been used as a tool for the investigation of human cognition and its underlying brain mechanisms. Music relates to many brain functions like perception, action, cognition, emotion, learning and memory and therefore music is an ideal tool to investigate how the human brain is working and how different brain functions interact. Novel findings have been obtained in the field of induced cortical plasticity by musical training. The positive effects, which music in its various forms has in the healthy human brain are not only important in the framework of basic neuroscience, but they also will strongly affect the practices in neuro-rehabilitation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 耳鸣掩蔽对耳鸣患者脑干听觉诱发电位波幅的影响%Effect of tinnitus masking on auditory brainstem response wave amplitude in patients with tinnitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘淑芳; 祝威; 闻雨婷

    2006-01-01

    背景:研究发现耳鸣患者常伴有脑干听觉诱发电位波幅大Ⅲ小Ⅴ波的变化,耳鸣掩蔽是耳鸣治疗中的一种方法,在耳鸣掩蔽的治疗过程中耳鸣患者脑干听觉诱发电位将会如何变化?目的:观察耳鸣患者的脑干听觉诱发电位变化特点,以及耳鸣掩蔽后脑干听觉诱发电位变化规律.设计:病例-对照及自身前后对照.单位:吉林大学第一医院耳鼻咽喉-头颈外科.对象:持续性耳鸣组:63例(68耳),为1999-03/2001-10吉林大学第一医院门诊收治;对照组:听力正常的青年人(20~23岁)10例(20耳).所有受试者自愿接受检测及治疗.方法:耳鸣患者首先进行脑干听觉诱发电位检查(采用额部乳突部引导方法记录),然后进行耳鸣检查及耳鸣掩蔽试验(掩蔽5 min),随后立刻做脑干听觉诱发电位检查,并与对照组进行对比观察.主要观察指标:①耳鸣患者脑干听觉诱发电位的特点.②耳鸣掩蔽后对脑干听觉诱发电位波幅的影响,分为后效抑制试验阳性和阴性2组进行分析.结果:83例全部进入结果分析.①听力正常青年人的脑干听觉诱发电位波幅为小Ⅲ波大Ⅴ波,而63例(68耳)中有22耳(312%)脑干听觉诱发电位为大Ⅲ波小Ⅴ波,其中17耳后效抑制试验阳性,5耳阴性.②后效抑制试验阳性17耳经耳鸣掩蔽治疗后10耳由大Ⅲ波小Ⅴ波转为小Ⅲ波大Ⅴ波,3耳Ⅲ波幅度减小;阴性5耳经耳鸣掩蔽治疗后有2耳转为小Ⅲ波大Ⅴ波,其余3耳无改变.结论:耳鸣掩蔽能使耳鸣患者异常的脑干听觉诱发电位波幅恢复至正常,此结果有望作为后效抑制阳性判定的客观指标.%BACKGROUND: Research shows that the auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave amplitude of tinnitus patients often act as big Ⅲ small Ⅴ.Tinnitus masking is a therapy of tinnitus, then how dose the ABR change in the process of tinnitus masking?OBJECTIVE: To observe the changing characteristics of ABR in patients

  6. 不同部位参考电极诱发的豚鼠听性脑干反应差异分析%The Auditory Brainstem Response of Guinea Pigs Recorded at Different Electrode Positions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文杰; 傅仲鹰; 刘淑芳; 陈玮伦

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe auditory brainstem response evoked at different electrode positions adopting electrode slices .Methods The ABRs of 12 normal guinea pigs (24 ears)were recorded by two methods using clicks as stimulation .Active electrode was positioned at the vertex while the ground electrode at the nose .The reference e‐lectrode was placed on bilateral pinnas or mastoids .Then observe waveforms ,response thresholds (RT) ,peak la‐tencies(PL) and inter-peak latencies (IPL)of ABR .Results No significant difference were observed in the RT ,Ⅰ ,Ⅱand Ⅲ PL ,Ⅰ - Ⅲ IPL of ABR between the two methods(P>0 .05) .When stimulation was decreasing and with the reference electrode slices placed at bilateral pinnas ,waveⅡpeak was stable and discernable of ABR record‐ings across twenty -four ears of guinea pigs .The amplitude decreased more slowly than any other waves ,and dis‐appeared at the last .While reference electrode slices were placed on bilateral mastoids ,the amplitude of wave Ⅲ de‐creased more slowly than any other waves except wave Ⅳ ,and disappeared at lost .Ⅱ - Ⅲ ,Ⅲ - Ⅳ IPL became shorter .These two positions both recorded amplitude higher and PL advanced for wave Ⅳ as the stimulation de‐creased by 20 to 40 dB nHL ,and Ⅲ - Ⅳ IPL became shorter .This phenomenon was more obvious when reference electrode was placed at mastoid .Conclusion Wave Ⅱwas more stable and discernible with reference electrode placed at the bilateral pinnas .Therefore wave Ⅱ recorded by this way can be a new method to record the ABR threshold of g uinea pig s .%目的:分析不同部位参考电极诱发豚鼠听性脑干反应(ABR )的差异。方法健康豚鼠12只(24耳),分别采用双侧耳廓或双侧乳突作为参考电极,鼻尖部为接地电极,颅顶为记录电极,给予短声刺激,分别观察以耳廓和乳突为参考电极时的ABR波形、反应阈、潜伏期、波间期。结果两

  7. Altered temporal dynamics of neural adaptation in the aging human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Björn; Henry, Molly J; Johnsrude, Ingrid S; Obleser, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    Neural response adaptation plays an important role in perception and cognition. Here, we used electroencephalography to investigate how aging affects the temporal dynamics of neural adaptation in human auditory cortex. Younger (18-31 years) and older (51-70 years) normal hearing adults listened to tone sequences with varying onset-to-onset intervals. Our results show long-lasting neural adaptation such that the response to a particular tone is a nonlinear function of the extended temporal history of sound events. Most important, aging is associated with multiple changes in auditory cortex; older adults exhibit larger and less variable response magnitudes, a larger dynamic response range, and a reduced sensitivity to temporal context. Computational modeling suggests that reduced adaptation recovery times underlie these changes in the aging auditory cortex and that the extended temporal stimulation has less influence on the neural response to the current sound in older compared with younger individuals. Our human electroencephalography results critically narrow the gap to animal electrophysiology work suggesting a compensatory release from cortical inhibition accompanying hearing loss and aging.

  8. Sparse gammatone signal model optimized for English speech does not match the human auditory filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahl, Stefan; Mertins, Alfred

    2008-07-18

    Evidence that neurosensory systems use sparse signal representations as well as improved performance of signal processing algorithms using sparse signal models raised interest in sparse signal coding in the last years. For natural audio signals like speech and environmental sounds, gammatone atoms have been derived as expansion functions that generate a nearly optimal sparse signal model (Smith, E., Lewicki, M., 2006. Efficient auditory coding. Nature 439, 978-982). Furthermore, gammatone functions are established models for the human auditory filters. Thus far, a practical application of a sparse gammatone signal model has been prevented by the fact that deriving the sparsest representation is, in general, computationally intractable. In this paper, we applied an accelerated version of the matching pursuit algorithm for gammatone dictionaries allowing real-time and large data set applications. We show that a sparse signal model in general has advantages in audio coding and that a sparse gammatone signal model encodes speech more efficiently in terms of sparseness than a sparse modified discrete cosine transform (MDCT) signal model. We also show that the optimal gammatone parameters derived for English speech do not match the human auditory filters, suggesting for signal processing applications to derive the parameters individually for each applied signal class instead of using psychometrically derived parameters. For brain research, it means that care should be taken with directly transferring findings of optimality for technical to biological systems.

  9. Auditory capacities in Middle Pleistocene humans from the Sierra de Atapuerca in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, I.; Rosa, M.; Arsuaga, J.-L.; Jarabo, P.; Quam, R.; Lorenzo, C.; Gracia, A.; Carretero, J.-M.; de Castro, J.-M. Bermúdez; Carbonell, E.

    2004-01-01

    Human hearing differs from that of chimpanzees and most other anthropoids in maintaining a relatively high sensitivity from 2 kHz up to 4 kHz, a region that contains relevant acoustic information in spoken language. Knowledge of the auditory capacities in human fossil ancestors could greatly enhance the understanding of when this human pattern emerged during the course of our evolutionary history. Here we use a comprehensive physical model to analyze the influence of skeletal structures on the acoustic filtering of the outer and middle ears in five fossil human specimens from the Middle Pleistocene site of the Sima de los Huesos in the Sierra de Atapuerca of Spain. Our results show that the skeletal anatomy in these hominids is compatible with a human-like pattern of sound power transmission through the outer and middle ear at frequencies up to 5 kHz, suggesting that they already had auditory capacities similar to those of living humans in this frequency range. PMID:15213327

  10. Auditory capacities in Middle Pleistocene humans from the Sierra de Atapuerca in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, I; Rosa, M; Arsuaga, J-L; Jarabo, P; Quam, R; Lorenzo, C; Gracia, A; Carretero, J-M; Bermúdez de Castro, J-M; Carbonell, E

    2004-07-06

    Human hearing differs from that of chimpanzees and most other anthropoids in maintaining a relatively high sensitivity from 2 kHz up to 4 kHz, a region that contains relevant acoustic information in spoken language. Knowledge of the auditory capacities in human fossil ancestors could greatly enhance the understanding of when this human pattern emerged during the course of our evolutionary history. Here we use a comprehensive physical model to analyze the influence of skeletal structures on the acoustic filtering of the outer and middle ears in five fossil human specimens from the Middle Pleistocene site of the Sima de los Huesos in the Sierra de Atapuerca of Spain. Our results show that the skeletal anatomy in these hominids is compatible with a human-like pattern of sound power transmission through the outer and middle ear at frequencies up to 5 kHz, suggesting that they already had auditory capacities similar to those of living humans in this frequency range.

  11. Auditory evoked potentials and multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Gentile Matas; Sandro Luiz de Andrade Matas; Caroline Rondina Salzano de Oliveira; Isabela Crivellaro Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease that can affect several areas of the central nervous system. Damage along the auditory pathway can alter its integrity significantly. Therefore, it is important to investigate the auditory pathway, from the brainstem to the cortex, in individuals with MS. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to characterize auditory evoked potentials in adults with MS of the remittent-recurrent type. METHOD: The study comprised 25 individuals w...

  12. 脑干听觉诱发电位在新生儿脑损伤早期评估中的研究进展%Study Progress in Early Assessment of Neonate with Cerebral Injury by Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林小苗; 宋雄; 邹林霞

    2012-01-01

    Neonate cerebral injury can lead to hypoxia or ischemia,and makes peripheral and central auditory nerve pathway abnormal by damaging the cochlear nucleus and brainstem. Finally, it will lead to auditory damage, or even the occurrence of sequelae of nerve system. BAEP is of great importance in the early assessment and intervention for neonate cerebral injury, reducing hearing injury in high risk neo-nates, improving the prognosis and their quality of life. Here is to summarize the clinical significance of BAEP in the early assessment of neonate cerebral injury.%新生儿脑损伤可导致缺氧或缺血,使耳蜗核和脑干损害,引起外周及中枢听神经通路异常,易发生听神经损伤,甚至可能出现神经系统后遗症.突出脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)的早期检测对于脑损伤的早期诊断、早期干预,降低高危儿的听神经损伤发生率,改善患儿预后和生活质量具有重要意义.现就BAEP在新生儿脑损伤早期评估中的临床研究予以综述.

  13. 水杨酸钠对豚鼠听反应阈值、螺旋神经节形态及GABA、GLU表达的影响%Effects of sodium salicylate on the auditory brainstem response and the morphology, the expressions of γ-aminobutvricacid and glutamate of the spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周琦; 黄训健; 尹时华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of sodium salicylate on the auditory brainstem response and the morphology , the expressions of -y-aminobutyricacid and glutamate of spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs. Methods Forty a-dult guinea pigs were randomly divided into two groups (20 cases for each) ; the saline control group (group A) and the salicylate group [group B injected with a dose of 300 mg/(kg·d) for 15 days) ] respectively. After administration for 15 days, 10 guinea pigs were randomly chosen, then the rest of the animals were fed without adaministration for 30 days. Auditory brainstem response ( detected by Tucker Davis Technologies) , scanning electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the auditory function of guinea pigs, the morphological changes and the expressions of 7-aminobutyri-cacid and glutamate of the spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs. Results After administration for 15 days, ABR thresholds of guinea pigs increased, spiral ganglion was disorganized, cell body not smooth, nerve fiber apt to divide, the expression of GABA, GLU of spiral ganglion increased in B group. After drug withdrawal for 30 days, ABR thresholds of guinea pigs was still at the high thresholds levels, spiral ganglion also exist aboved morphologically changes, the levels of GABA, GLU of spiral ganglion were higher than those after administration for 15 days (all P < 0. 05). But there was no obviously significance of the aboved indexes in group A. Conclusions Sodium salicylate could increase the the auditory brainstem response threshold of guinea pig and the expressions of -y-aminobutyricacid and glutamate of the spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs. It could also change the morphologies of the spiral ganglion neurons partly.%目的 探讨水杨酸钠对豚鼠听反应阈值、螺旋神经节形态及γ氨基丁酸(GABA)、谷氨酸(GLU)表达的影响.方法 将40只成年豚鼠随机均分为两组,A组予生理盐水

  14. Tonotopic representation of missing fundamental complex sounds in the human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Takako; Ross, Bernhard; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Takeshima, Yasuyuki; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo

    2003-07-01

    The N1m component of the auditory evoked magnetic field in response to tones and complex sounds was examined in order to clarify whether the tonotopic representation in the human secondary auditory cortex is based on perceived pitch or the physical frequency spectrum of the sound. The investigated stimulus parameters were the fundamental frequencies (F0 = 250, 500 and 1000 Hz), the spectral composition of the higher harmonics of the missing fundamental sounds (2nd to 5th, 6th to 9th and 10th to 13th harmonic) and the frequencies of pure tones corresponding to F0 and to the lowest component of each complex sound. Tonotopic gradients showed that high frequencies were more medially located than low frequencies for the pure tones and for the centre frequency of the complex tones. Furthermore, in the superior-inferior direction, the tonotopic gradients were different between pure tones and complex sounds. The results were interpreted as reflecting different processing in the auditory cortex for pure tones and complex sounds. This hypothesis was supported by the result of evoked responses to complex sounds having longer latencies. A more pronounced tonotopic representation in the right hemisphere gave evidence for right hemispheric dominance in spectral processing.

  15. Lipreading and covert speech production similarly modulate human auditory-cortex responses to pure tones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauramäki, Jaakko; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Hari, Riitta; Möttönen, Riikka; Rauschecker, Josef P; Sams, Mikko

    2010-01-27

    Watching the lips of a speaker enhances speech perception. At the same time, the 100 ms response to speech sounds is suppressed in the observer's auditory cortex. Here, we used whole-scalp 306-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study whether lipreading modulates human auditory processing already at the level of the most elementary sound features, i.e., pure tones. We further envisioned the temporal dynamics of the suppression to tell whether the effect is driven by top-down influences. Nineteen subjects were presented with 50 ms tones spanning six octaves (125-8000 Hz) (1) during "lipreading," i.e., when they watched video clips of silent articulations of Finnish vowels /a/, /i/, /o/, and /y/, and reacted to vowels presented twice in a row; (2) during a visual control task; (3) during a still-face passive control condition; and (4) in a separate experiment with a subset of nine subjects, during covert production of the same vowels. Auditory-cortex 100 ms responses (N100m) were equally suppressed in the lipreading and covert-speech-production tasks compared with the visual control and baseline tasks; the effects involved all frequencies and were most prominent in the left hemisphere. Responses to tones presented at different times with respect to the onset of the visual articulation showed significantly increased N100m suppression immediately after the articulatory gesture. These findings suggest that the lipreading-related suppression in the auditory cortex is caused by top-down influences, possibly by an efference copy from the speech-production system, generated during both own speech and lipreading.

  16. High Stimulus Rate Auditory Brainstem Responses in Presbycusis Patients Older than 80 Years%80岁以上老年性聋患者高刺激速率ABR的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐良慰; 冀飞; 杨仕明

    2016-01-01

    characteristics of auditory brainstem responses in presbycusis patients older than 80 years at high stimulus rates, as diagnostic evidence of posterior circulation ischemia and aging of the central nervous system in the elderly. Methods Fifty-four (108 ears) presbycusis patients older than 80 years participated in this study (mean age=88.17±4.99 years). Clicks-evoked ABRs were tested at stimulus rates of 11.1/s and 51.1/s. The peak latency (PL) of waves I, III and V, inter-peak latencies (IPL) of waves I-III, III-V and I-V in response to the low and high rate stimuli were com-pared. The inter-peak latency differences (ΔIPL) were calculated and compared with normal reference values. Results 1. The ABR waveforms in the presbycusis patients were poorly differentiated, with low signal-to-noise ratios. 2. PLs of waves I, III and V and IPLs of I-III, III-V and I-V were 1.66±0.17, 4.06±0.20, 6.16±0.20, 2.41±0.19, 2.10±0.20 and 4.50±0.19 ms respectively at the stimulus rate of 51.1/s, and 1.57±0.16, 3.87±0.19, 5.86±0.19, 2.30±0.18, 1.99±0.15 and 4.29±0.16 ms, re-spectively, at the stimulus rate of 11.1/s (p<0.05). 3.ΔIPLs of I-III, III-V and I-V were 0.11 ± 0.18, 0.11 ± 0.19 and 22 ± 0.10 ms, respectively, and the I-IIIΔIPL in males was prolonged compared to females. At the stimulus rate of 51.1/s, I-VΔIPL was longer than the normal value (P<0.001). 4. PLs of waves I, III and V in the presbycusis patients, as well as IPLs of I-III, III-V and I-V, at both stimulus rates were distinctly different from those in normal-hearing young subjects (P<0.05). Conclu-sion ABR waveforms in presbycusis patients are poorly differentiated. At high stimulus rate, PLs and IPLs are significantly prolonged, and wave I-VΔIPL is greater than that in normal-hearing young subjects. High stimulus rate ABRs can be an im-portant clinical diagnostic indicator of posterior circulation ischemia and aged central nervous system in the elderly.

  17. Hierarchical organization of speech perception in human auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin eHumphries

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human speech consists of a variety of articulated sounds that vary dynamically in spectral composition. We investigated the neural activity associated with the perception of two types of speech segments: (a the period of rapid spectral transition occurring at the beginning of a stop-consonant vowel (CV syllable and (b the subsequent spectral steady-state period occurring during the vowel segment of the syllable. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was recorded while subjects listened to series of synthesized CV syllables and non-phonemic control sounds. Adaptation to specific sound features was measured by varying either the transition or steady-state periods of the synthesized sounds. Two spatially distinct brain areas in the superior temporal cortex were found that were sensitive to either the type of adaptation or the type of stimulus. In a relatively large section of the bilateral dorsal superior temporal gyrus (STG, activity varied as a function of adaptation type regardless of whether the stimuli were phonemic or non-phonemic. Immediately adjacent to this region in a more limited area of the ventral STG, increased activity was observed for phonemic trials compared to non-phonemic trials, however, no adaptation effects were found. In addition, a third area in the bilateral medial superior temporal plane showed increased activity to non-phonemic compared to phonemic sounds. The results suggest a multi-stage hierarchical stream for speech sound processing extending ventrolaterally from the superior temporal plane to the superior temporal sulcus. At successive stages in this hierarchy, neurons code for increasingly more complex spectrotemporal features. At the same time, these representations become more abstracted from the original acoustic form of the sound.

  18. 术中经蜗窗龛电刺激记录听性脑干反应方法的建立及初步应用%Establishment and rudimentary application of the method of recording auditory brainstem responses electrically stimulated via round-window niche in cochlear implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程靖宁; 曹克利; 魏朝刚; 杨立军; 栾岚; 李欢; 李原; 张秋航

    2008-01-01

    current Was used as electrical stimulation via round window niche,and then electrically evoked auditory brainstem responge was recorded.Results Electrically evoked auditory brainstem response waveforms were clearlv recorded in all 17 cases.The Iatencies of Ⅲ and Ⅴ waves were(2.12±0.18)ms and(4.18±0.19)ms respectively,with threshold as (220.0±16.04)CL.Thewaveforms of the 2 patientswith auditory neuropathy,5 pailentswithinner ear malformation.1 patient with ossifiod cochlea and 1 patient with leukodystrophy were well differentiated.Conclusions Monitoting electrically evoked auditory brainstem response was an obiective nerve electmphysiological testing method that accurately reflects function complexness of auditory pathway.It had important value for helping making the judgment whether patients could acquire auditory response after cochlear implantation.This method Was safe and gave high emission of auditory response,therefore should be spread widely.

  19. A brainstem anosognosia of hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Abe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A woman had anosognosia for hemiplegia as a manifestation of brainstem infarction. She had no mental or neuropsychological disturbances, and had involvement of the brainstem in the frontal/parietal-subcortical circuits to the right cerebral hemisphere. Brainstem lesions that disrupt frontal/parietal-subcortical areas may affect anosognosia for hemiplegia.

  20. Pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mohindra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the first report of pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma, infiltrating midbrain, and medulla oblongata. The report details clinical features, radiological findings, and surgical steps. As this entity is exceedingly uncommon, the overall epidemiology, prognosis, and long-term outcome remain far from established.

  1. Consciousness and the Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Josef; Damasio, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes a theoretical framework and set of hypotheses aimed at accounting for consciousness in neurobiological terms. Discusses the functional neuroanatomy of nuclei in the brainstem reticular formation. Notes that the views presented are compatible with the idea that the reticular formation modulates the electrophysiological activity of the…

  2. 胆红素/清蛋白比值及脑干听觉诱发电位与胆红素神经毒性的相关性%Relationship between bilirubin/albumin ratio, auditory brainstem responses and bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 杨波; 郑瑞平

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨高胆红素血症患儿血清总胆红素(TBIL)、总胆红素/清蛋白比值(B/A比值)与胆红素神经毒性的相关性,分析高胆红素血症患儿脑干听觉诱发电位(ABRs)中脑干功能损伤及听神经功能损伤敏感程度.方法 将91例足月高胆红素血症患儿根据ABRs结果分为A组(未见明显异常)、B组(仅脑干功能受损)、C组(仅听神经受损)、D组(脑干功能及听神经均受损),比较各组间TBIL、B/A比值的差异并分析二者与ABRs的关系.结果 A组与B组比较,TBIL差异无统计学意义(t=1.566,P>0.05),B/A比值差异有统计学意义(t=1.898,P<0.05);B组与C组TBIL、B/A比值比较差异均有统计学意义(tTBIL=2.372,PTBIL<0.05;tB/A=2.794,PB/A<0.01);A组与C组比较、A组与D组比较、B组与D组比较,TBIL比值差异均有统计学意义(t =2.452、3.328、2.256,P均<0.05);A组与C组比较、A组与D组比较、B组与D组比较,B/A比值差异均有统计学意义(=2.571、4.680、2.657,P均<0.05、0.01);C组与D组比较,TBIL、B/A比值差异均无统计学意义(tTBIL=0.705,PTBIL >0.05;tB/A=0.636,PB/A >0.05).TBIL、B/A比值的受试者工作特征曲线(ROC)下面积分别为0.919、0.829.TBIL、B/A比值与ABRs有显著相关性(r=0.495、0.564,P均<0.05).结论 B/A比值是预测足月儿胆红素神经毒性的良好指标,ABRs异常中脑干功能较听神经易受损.%Objective To explore the relationship between serum total bilirubin (TBIL),total bilirubin/albumin ratio (B/A ratio) and bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity,and to analyze the sensitivity of brainstem function and auditory nerval function in auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) in full-term newborn infants with hyperbilirubinemia.Methods Ninety-one cases of full-term neonates with hyperbilirubinemia were divided into 4 groups according to the findings of ABRs:group A(with normal ABRs),group B (only brainstem dysfunction),group C (only auditory neural damage),group D(brainstem

  3. Social and emotional values of sounds influence human (Homo sapiens) and non-human primate (Cercopithecus campbelli) auditory laterality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Muriel; Lemasson, Alban; Blois-Heulin, Catherine

    2009-07-17

    The last decades evidenced auditory laterality in vertebrates, offering new important insights for the understanding of the origin of human language. Factors such as the social (e.g. specificity, familiarity) and emotional value of sounds have been proved to influence hemispheric specialization. However, little is known about the crossed effect of these two factors in animals. In addition, human-animal comparative studies, using the same methodology, are rare. In our study, we adapted the head turn paradigm, a widely used non invasive method, on 8-9-year-old schoolgirls and on adult female Campbell's monkeys, by focusing on head and/or eye orientations in response to sound playbacks. We broadcast communicative signals (monkeys: calls, humans: speech) emitted by familiar individuals presenting distinct degrees of social value (female monkeys: conspecific group members vs heterospecific neighbours, human girls: from the same vs different classroom) and emotional value (monkeys: contact vs threat calls; humans: friendly vs aggressive intonation). We evidenced a crossed-categorical effect of social and emotional values in both species since only "negative" voices from same class/group members elicited a significant auditory laterality (Wilcoxon tests: monkeys, T = 0 p = 0.03; girls: T = 4.5 p = 0.03). Moreover, we found differences between species as a left and right hemisphere preference was found respectively in humans and monkeys. Furthermore while monkeys almost exclusively responded by turning their head, girls sometimes also just moved their eyes. This study supports theories defending differential roles played by the two hemispheres in primates' auditory laterality and evidenced that more systematic species comparisons are needed before raising evolutionary scenario. Moreover, the choice of sound stimuli and behavioural measures in such studies should be the focus of careful attention.

  4. Social and emotional values of sounds influence human (Homo sapiens and non-human primate (Cercopithecus campbelli auditory laterality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Basile

    Full Text Available The last decades evidenced auditory laterality in vertebrates, offering new important insights for the understanding of the origin of human language. Factors such as the social (e.g. specificity, familiarity and emotional value of sounds have been proved to influence hemispheric specialization. However, little is known about the crossed effect of these two factors in animals. In addition, human-animal comparative studies, using the same methodology, are rare. In our study, we adapted the head turn paradigm, a widely used non invasive method, on 8-9-year-old schoolgirls and on adult female Campbell's monkeys, by focusing on head and/or eye orientations in response to sound playbacks. We broadcast communicative signals (monkeys: calls, humans: speech emitted by familiar individuals presenting distinct degrees of social value (female monkeys: conspecific group members vs heterospecific neighbours, human girls: from the same vs different classroom and emotional value (monkeys: contact vs threat calls; humans: friendly vs aggressive intonation. We evidenced a crossed-categorical effect of social and emotional values in both species since only "negative" voices from same class/group members elicited a significant auditory laterality (Wilcoxon tests: monkeys, T = 0 p = 0.03; girls: T = 4.5 p = 0.03. Moreover, we found differences between species as a left and right hemisphere preference was found respectively in humans and monkeys. Furthermore while monkeys almost exclusively responded by turning their head, girls sometimes also just moved their eyes. This study supports theories defending differential roles played by the two hemispheres in primates' auditory laterality and evidenced that more systematic species comparisons are needed before raising evolutionary scenario. Moreover, the choice of sound stimuli and behavioural measures in such studies should be the focus of careful attention.

  5. Neural coding and perception of pitch in the normal and impaired human auditory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Pitch is an important attribute of hearing that allows us to perceive the musical quality of sounds. Besides music perception, pitch contributes to speech communication, auditory grouping, and perceptual segregation of sound sources. In this work, several aspects of pitch perception in humans were...... investigated using psychophysical methods. First, hearing loss was found to affect the perception of binaural pitch, a pitch sensation created by the binaural interaction of noise stimuli. Specifically, listeners without binaural pitch sensation showed signs of retrocochlear disorders. Despite adverse effects...

  6. Task-specific modulation of human auditory evoked responses in a delayed-match-to-sample task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng eRong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus our investigation on task-specific cognitive modulation of early cortical auditory processing in human cerebral cortex. During the experiments, we acquired whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG data while participants were performing an auditory delayed-match-to-sample (DMS task and associated control tasks. Using a spatial filtering beamformer technique to simultaneously estimate multiple source activities inside the human brain, we observed a significant DMS-specific suppression of the auditory evoked response to the second stimulus in a sound pair, with the center of the effect being located in the vicinity of the left auditory cortex. For the right auditory cortex, a non-invariant suppression effect was observed in both DMS and control tasks. Furthermore, analysis of coherence revealed a beta band (12 ~ 20 Hz DMS-specific enhanced functional interaction between the sources in left auditory cortex and those in left inferior frontal gyrus, which has been shown to involve in short-term memory processing during the delay period of DMS task. Our findings support the view that early evoked cortical responses to incoming acoustic stimuli can be modulated by task-specific cognitive functions by means of frontal-temporal functional interactions.

  7. Auditory function in the Tc1 mouse model of down syndrome suggests a limited region of human chromosome 21 involved in otitis media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kuhn

    Full Text Available Down syndrome is one of the most common congenital disorders leading to a wide range of health problems in humans, including frequent otitis media. The Tc1 mouse carries a significant part of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21 in addition to the full set of mouse chromosomes and shares many phenotypes observed in humans affected by Down syndrome with trisomy of chromosome 21. However, it is unknown whether Tc1 mice exhibit a hearing phenotype and might thus represent a good model for understanding the hearing loss that is common in Down syndrome. In this study we carried out a structural and functional assessment of hearing in Tc1 mice. Auditory brainstem response (ABR measurements in Tc1 mice showed normal thresholds compared to littermate controls and ABR waveform latencies and amplitudes were equivalent to controls. The gross anatomy of the middle and inner ears was also similar between Tc1 and control mice. The physiological properties of cochlear sensory receptors (inner and outer hair cells: IHCs and OHCs were investigated using single-cell patch clamp recordings from the acutely dissected cochleae. Adult Tc1 IHCs exhibited normal resting membrane potentials and expressed all K(+ currents characteristic of control hair cells. However, the size of the large conductance (BK Ca(2+ activated K(+ current (I(K,f, which enables rapid voltage responses essential for accurate sound encoding, was increased in Tc1 IHCs. All physiological properties investigated in OHCs were indistinguishable between the two genotypes. The normal functional hearing and the gross structural anatomy of the middle and inner ears in the Tc1 mouse contrast to that observed in the Ts65Dn model of Down syndrome which shows otitis media. Genes that are trisomic in Ts65Dn but disomic in Tc1 may predispose to otitis media when an additional copy is active.

  8. Auditory Contagious Yawning in Humans: An Investigation into Affiliation and Status Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg J.M. Massen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available While comparative research on contagious yawning has grown substantially in the past few years, both the interpersonal factors influencing this response and the sensory modalities involved in its activation in humans remain relatively unknown. Extending upon previous studies showing various in-group and status effects in non-human great apes, we performed an initial study to investigate how the political affiliation (Democrat versus Republican and status (high versus low of target stimuli influences auditory contagious yawning, as well as the urge to yawn, in humans. Self-report responses and a subset of video recordings were analyzed from 118 undergraduate students in the US following exposure to either breathing (control or yawning (experimental vocalizations paired with images of former US Presidents (high status and their respective Cabinet Secretaries of Commerce (low status. The overall results validate the use of auditory stimuli to prompt yawn contagion, with greater response in the experimental than the control condition. There was also a negative effect of political status on self-reported yawning and the self-reported urge to yawn irrespective of the condition. In contrast, we found no evidence for a political affiliation bias in this response. These preliminary findings are discussed in terms of the existing comparative evidence, though we highlight limitations in the current investigation and we provide suggestions for future research in this area.

  9. Auditory pathways: anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, James O

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the anatomy and physiology of the auditory pathways. After a brief analysis of the external, middle ears, and cochlea, the responses of auditory nerve fibers are described. The central nervous system is analyzed in more detail. A scheme is provided to help understand the complex and multiple auditory pathways running through the brainstem. The multiple pathways are based on the need to preserve accurate timing while extracting complex spectral patterns in the auditory input. The auditory nerve fibers branch to give two pathways, a ventral sound-localizing stream, and a dorsal mainly pattern recognition stream, which innervate the different divisions of the cochlear nucleus. The outputs of the two streams, with their two types of analysis, are progressively combined in the inferior colliculus and onwards, to produce the representation of what can be called the "auditory objects" in the external world. The progressive extraction of critical features in the auditory stimulus in the different levels of the central auditory system, from cochlear nucleus to auditory cortex, is described. In addition, the auditory centrifugal system, running from cortex in multiple stages to the organ of Corti of the cochlea, is described.

  10. Intense and specialized dendritic localization of the fragile X mental retardation protein in binaural brainstem neurons: a comparative study in the alligator, chicken, gerbil, and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Sakano, Hitomi; Beebe, Karisa; Brown, Maile R; de Laat, Rian; Bothwell, Mark; Kulesza, Randy J; Rubel, Edwin W

    2014-06-15

    Neuronal dendrites are structurally and functionally dynamic in response to changes in afferent activity. The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an mRNA binding protein that regulates activity-dependent protein synthesis and morphological dynamics of dendrites. Loss and abnormal expression of FMRP occur in fragile X syndrome (FXS) and some forms of autism spectrum disorders. To provide further understanding of how FMRP signaling regulates dendritic dynamics, we examined dendritic expression and localization of FMRP in the reptilian and avian nucleus laminaris (NL) and its mammalian analogue, the medial superior olive (MSO), in rodents and humans. NL/MSO neurons are specialized for temporal processing of low-frequency sounds for binaural hearing, which is impaired in FXS. Protein BLAST analyses first demonstrate that the FMRP amino acid sequences in the alligator and chicken are highly similar to human FMRP with identical mRNA-binding and phosphorylation sites, suggesting that FMRP functions similarly across vertebrates. Immunocytochemistry further reveals that NL/MSO neurons have very high levels of dendritic FMRP in low-frequency hearing vertebrates including alligator, chicken, gerbil, and human. Remarkably, dendritic FMRP in NL/MSO neurons often accumulates at branch points and enlarged distal tips, loci known to be critical for branch-specific dendritic arbor dynamics. These observations support an important role for FMRP in regulating dendritic properties of binaural neurons that are essential for low-frequency sound localization and auditory scene segregation, and support the relevance of studying this regulation in nonhuman vertebrates that use low frequencies in order to further understand human auditory processing disorders.

  11. Connectivity in the human brain dissociates entropy and complexity of auditory inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastase, Samuel A; Iacovella, Vittorio; Davis, Ben; Hasson, Uri

    2015-03-01

    Complex systems are described according to two central dimensions: (a) the randomness of their output, quantified via entropy; and (b) their complexity, which reflects the organization of a system's generators. Whereas some approaches hold that complexity can be reduced to uncertainty or entropy, an axiom of complexity science is that signals with very high or very low entropy are generated by relatively non-complex systems, while complex systems typically generate outputs with entropy peaking between these two extremes. In understanding their environment, individuals would benefit from coding for both input entropy and complexity; entropy indexes uncertainty and can inform probabilistic coding strategies, whereas complexity reflects a concise and abstract representation of the underlying environmental configuration, which can serve independent purposes, e.g., as a template for generalization and rapid comparisons between environments. Using functional neuroimaging, we demonstrate that, in response to passively processed auditory inputs, functional integration patterns in the human brain track both the entropy and complexity of the auditory signal. Connectivity between several brain regions scaled monotonically with input entropy, suggesting sensitivity to uncertainty, whereas connectivity between other regions tracked entropy in a convex manner consistent with sensitivity to input complexity. These findings suggest that the human brain simultaneously tracks the uncertainty of sensory data and effectively models their environmental generators.

  12. Design of a New Audio Watermarking System Based on Human Auditory System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, D.H. [Maqtech Co., Ltd., (Korea); Shin, S.W.; Kim, J.W.; Choi, J.U. [Markany Co., Ltd., (Korea); Kim, D.Y. [Bucheon College, Bucheon (Korea); Kim, S.H. [The University of Seoul, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust digital copyright-protection technique based on the concept of human auditory system. First, we propose a watermarking technique that accepts the various attacks such as, time scaling, pitch shift, add noise and a lot of lossy compression such as MP3, AAC, WMA. Second, we implement audio PD(portable device) for copyright protection using proposed method. The proposed watermarking technique is developed using digital filtering technique. Being designed according to critical band of HAS(human auditory system), the digital filters embed watermark without nearly affecting audio quality. Before processing of digital filtering, wavelet transform decomposes the input audio signal into several signals that are composed of specific frequencies. Then, we embed watermark in the decomposed signal (0kHz-11kHz) by designed band-stop digital filter. Watermarking detection algorithm is implemented on audio PD(portable device). Proposed watermarking technology embeds 2bits information per 15 seconds. If PD detects watermark '11', which means illegal song, PD displays 'Illegal Song' message on LCD, skips the song and plays the next song. The implemented detection algorithm in PD requires 19 MHz computational power, 7.9kBytes ROM and 10kBytes RAM. The suggested technique satisfies SDMI(secure digital music initiative) requirements of platform3 based on ARM9E core. (author). 9 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Dynamic Range Adaptation to Spectral Stimulus Statistics in Human Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Nadine; Obleser, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Classically, neural adaptation refers to a reduction in response magnitude by sustained stimulation. In human electroencephalography (EEG), neural adaptation has been measured, for example, as frequency-specific response decrease by previous stimulation. Only recently and mainly based on animal studies, it has been suggested that statistical properties in the stimulation lead to adjustments of neural sensitivity and affect neural response adaptation. However, it is thus far unresolved which statistical parameters in the acoustic stimulation spectrum affect frequency-specific neural adaptation, and on which time scales the effects take place. The present human EEG study investigated the potential influence of the overall spectral range as well as the spectral spacing of the acoustic stimulation spectrum on frequency-specific neural adaptation. Tones randomly varying in frequency were presented passively and computational modeling of frequency-specific neural adaptation was used. Frequency-specific adaptation was observed for all presentation conditions. Critically, however, the spread of adaptation (i.e., degree of coadaptation) in tonotopically organized regions of auditory cortex changed with the spectral range of the acoustic stimulation. In contrast, spectral spacing did not affect the spread of frequency-specific adaptation. Therefore, changes in neural sensitivity in auditory cortex are directly coupled to the overall spectral range of the acoustic stimulation, which suggests that neural adjustments to spectral stimulus statistics occur over a time scale of multiple seconds. PMID:24381293

  14. Craniofacial Pain: Brainstem Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Sessle

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent research advances in animals that have identified critical neural elements in the brainstem receiving and transmitting craniofacial nociceptive inputs, as well as some of the mechanisms involved in the modulation and plasticity of nociceptive transmission. Nociceptive neurones in the trigeminal (V brainstem sensory nuclear complex can be classified as nociceptive-specific (NS or wide dynamic range (WDR. Some of these neurones respond exclusively to sensory inputs evoked by stimulation of facial skin or oral mucosa and have features suggesting that they are critical neural elements involved in the ability to localize an acute superficial pain and sense its intensity and duration. Many of the V brainstem nociceptive neurones, however, receive convergent inputs from afferents supplying deep craniofacial tissues (eg, dural vessel, muscle and skin or mucosa. These neurones are likely involved in deep pain, including headache, because few nociceptive neurones receive inputs exclusively from afferents supplying these tissues. These extensive convergent input patterns also appear to be important factors in pain spread and referral, and in central mechanisms underlying neuroplastic changes in V neuronal properties that may occur with injury and inflammation. For example, application of the small fibre excitant and inflammatory irritant mustard oil into the temporomandibular joint, masseter or tongue musculature induces a prolonged but reversible enhancement of responses to cutaneous and deep afferent inputs of most WDR and NS neurones. These effects may be accompanied by increased electromyographic activity reflexly induced in the masticatory muscles by mustard oil, and involve endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate and opioid neurochemical mechanisms. Such peripherally induced modulation of brainstem nociceptive neuronal properties reflects the functional plasticity of the central V system, and may be involved in the development of

  15. Sensitivity of the human auditory cortex to acoustic degradation of speech and non-speech sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiitinen Hannu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that the human right-hemispheric auditory cortex is particularly sensitive to reduction in sound quality, with an increase in distortion resulting in an amplification of the auditory N1m response measured in the magnetoencephalography (MEG. Here, we examined whether this sensitivity is specific to the processing of acoustic properties of speech or whether it can be observed also in the processing of sounds with a simple spectral structure. We degraded speech stimuli (vowel /a/, complex non-speech stimuli (a composite of five sinusoidals, and sinusoidal tones by decreasing the amplitude resolution of the signal waveform. The amplitude resolution was impoverished by reducing the number of bits to represent the signal samples. Auditory evoked magnetic fields (AEFs were measured in the left and right hemisphere of sixteen healthy subjects. Results We found that the AEF amplitudes increased significantly with stimulus distortion for all stimulus types, which indicates that the right-hemispheric N1m sensitivity is not related exclusively to degradation of acoustic properties of speech. In addition, the P1m and P2m responses were amplified with increasing distortion similarly in both hemispheres. The AEF latencies were not systematically affected by the distortion. Conclusions We propose that the increased activity of AEFs reflects cortical processing of acoustic properties common to both speech and non-speech stimuli. More specifically, the enhancement is most likely caused by spectral changes brought about by the decrease of amplitude resolution, in particular the introduction of periodic, signal-dependent distortion to the original sound. Converging evidence suggests that the observed AEF amplification could reflect cortical sensitivity to periodic sounds.

  16. Auditory processing disorders: relationship to cognitive processes and underlying auditory neural integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Prudence; Allan, Chris

    2014-02-01

    Auditory processing disorder (APD) in children has been reported and discussed in the clinical and research literature for many years yet there remains poor agreement on diagnostic criteria, the relationship between APD and cognitive skills, and the importance of assessing underlying neural integrity. The present study used a repeated measures design to examine the relationship between a clinical APD diagnosis achieved with behavioral tests used in many clinics, cognitive abilities measured with standardized tests of intelligence, academic achievement, language, phonology, memory and attention and measures of auditory neural integrity as measured with acoustic reflex thresholds and auditory brainstem responses. Participants were 63 children, 7-17 years of age, who reported listening difficulties in spite of normal hearing thresholds. Parents/guardians completed surveys about the child's auditory and attention behavior while children completed an audiologic examination that included 5 behavioral tests of auditory processing ability. Standardized tests that examined intelligence, academic achievement, language, phonology, memory and attention, and objective tests auditory function included crossed and uncrossed acoustic reflex thresholds and auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were also administered to each child. Forty of the children received an APD diagnosis based on the 5 behavioral tests and 23 did not. The groups of children performed similarly on intelligence measures but the children with an APD diagnosis tended to perform more poorly on other cognitive measures. Auditory brainstem responses and acoustic reflex thresholds were often abnormal in both groups of children. Results of this study suggest that a purely behavioral test battery may be insufficient to accurately identify all children with auditory processing disorders. Physiologic test measures, including acoustic reflex and auditory brainstem response tests, are important indicators of auditory

  17. A general auditory bias for handling speaker variability in speech? Evidence in humans and songbirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhamas eKriengwatana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Different speakers produce the same speech sound differently, yet listeners are still able to reliably identify the speech sound. How listeners can adjust their perception to compensate for speaker differences in speech, and whether these compensatory processes are unique only to humans, is still not fully understood. In this study we compare the ability of humans and zebra finches to categorize vowels despite speaker variation in speech in order to test the hypothesis that accommodating speaker and gender differences in isolated vowels can be achieved without prior experience with speaker-related variability. Using a behavioural Go/No-go task and identical stimuli, we compared Australian English adults’ (naïve to Dutch and zebra finches’ (naïve to human speech ability to categorize /ɪ/ and /ɛ/ vowels of an novel Dutch speaker after learning to discriminate those vowels from only one other speaker. Experiment 1 and 2 presented vowels of two speakers interspersed or blocked, respectively. Results demonstrate that categorization of vowels is possible without prior exposure to speaker-related variability in speech for zebra finches, and in non-native vowel categories for humans. Therefore, this study is the first to provide evidence for what might be a species-shared auditory bias that may supersede speaker-related information during vowel categorization. It additionally provides behavioural evidence contradicting a prior hypothesis that accommodation of speaker differences is achieved via the use of formant ratios. Therefore, investigations of alternative accounts of vowel normalization that incorporate the possibility of an auditory bias for disregarding inter-speaker variability are warranted.

  18. Effect of Bluetooth headset and mobile phone electromagnetic fields on the human auditory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalà, Marco; Colletti, Vittorio; Sacchetto, Luca; Manganotti, Paolo; Ramat, Stefano; Marcocci, Alessandro; Colletti, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    The possibility that long-term mobile phone use increases the incidence of astrocytoma, glioma and acoustic neuroma has been investigated in several studies. Recently, our group showed that direct exposure (in a surgical setting) to cell phone electromagnetic fields (EMFs) induces deterioration of auditory evoked cochlear nerve compound action potential (CNAP) in humans. To verify whether the use of Bluetooth devices reduces these effects, we conducted the present study with the same experimental protocol. Randomized trial. Twelve patients underwent retrosigmoid vestibular neurectomy to treat definite unilateral Ménière's disease while being monitored with acoustically evoked CNAPs to assess direct mobile phone exposure or alternatively the EMF effects of Bluetooth headsets. We found no short-term effects of Bluetooth EMFs on the auditory nervous structures, whereas direct mobile phone EMF exposure confirmed a significant decrease in CNAPs amplitude and an increase in latency in all subjects. The outcomes of the present study show that, contrary to the finding that the latency and amplitude of CNAPs are very sensitive to EMFs produced by the tested mobile phone, the EMFs produced by a common Bluetooth device do not induce any significant change in cochlear nerve activity. The conditions of exposure, therefore, differ from those of everyday life, in which various biological tissues may reduce the EMF affecting the cochlear nerve. Nevertheless, these novel findings may have important safety implications. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Segregation of vowels and consonants in human auditory cortex: Evidence for distributed hierarchical organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas eObleser

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The speech signal consists of a continuous stream of consonants and vowels, which must be de– and encoded in human auditory cortex to ensure the robust recognition and categorization of speech sounds. We used small-voxel functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to study information encoded in local brain activation patterns elicited by consonant-vowel syllables, and by a control set of noise bursts.First, activation of anterior–lateral superior temporal cortex was seen when controlling for unspecific acoustic processing (syllables versus band-passed noises, in a classic subtraction-based design. Second, a classifier algorithm, which was trained and tested iteratively on data from all subjects to discriminate local brain activation patterns, yielded separations of cortical patches discriminative of vowel category versus patches discriminative of stop-consonant category across the entire superior temporal cortex, yet with regional differences in average classification accuracy. Overlap (voxels correctly classifying both speech sound categories was surprisingly sparse. Third, lending further plausibility to the results, classification of speech–noise differences was generally superior to speech–speech classifications, with the notable exception of a left anterior region, where speech–speech classification accuracies were significantly better.These data demonstrate that acoustic-phonetic features are encoded in complex yet sparsely overlapping local patterns of neural activity distributed hierarchically across different regions of the auditory cortex. The redundancy apparent in these multiple patterns may partly explain the robustness of phonemic representations.

  20. Cellular and molecular bases of neuroplasticity: brainstem effects after cochlear damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Loyzaga, Pablo; Carricondo, Francisco; Bartolomé, Maria V; Iglesias, Mari C; Rodríguez, Fernando; Poch-Broto, Joaquin

    2010-03-01

    After a cochlear lesion or auditory nerve damage, afferent connections from auditory ganglia can be highly altered. This results in a clear reduction of auditory input and an alteration of connectivity of terminals on cochlear nuclei neurons. Such a process could stimulate the reorganization of the neural circuits and neuroplasticity. Cochlea removal has been demonstrated to be a good model in which to analyse brainstem neuroplasticity, particularly with regard to the cochlear nuclei. After cochlea removal three main periods of degeneration and regeneration were observed. Early effects, during the first week post lesion, involved acute degeneration with nerve ending oedema and degeneration. During the second and, probably, the third post lesion weeks, degeneration was still present, even though a limited and diffuse expression of GAP-43 started. Around 1 month post lesion, degeneration at the cochlear nuclei progressively disappeared and a relevant GAP-43 expression was found. We conclude that neuroplasticity leads neurons to modify their activity and/or their synaptic tree as a consequence of animal adaptation to learning and memory. For the human being neuroplasticity is involved in language learning and comprehension, particularly the acquisition of a second language. Neuroplasticity is important for therapeutic strategies, such as hearing aids and cochlear implants.

  1. Functional Mapping of the Human Auditory Cortex: fMRI Investigation of a Patient with Auditory Agnosia from Trauma to the Inferior Colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliva, Oren; Bestelmeyer, Patricia E G; Hall, Michelle; Bultitude, Janet H; Koller, Kristin; Rafal, Robert D

    2015-09-01

    To use functional magnetic resonance imaging to map the auditory cortical fields that are activated, or nonreactive, to sounds in patient M.L., who has auditory agnosia caused by trauma to the inferior colliculi. The patient cannot recognize speech or environmental sounds. Her discrimination is greatly facilitated by context and visibility of the speaker's facial movements, and under forced-choice testing. Her auditory temporal resolution is severely compromised. Her discrimination is more impaired for words differing in voice onset time than place of articulation. Words presented to her right ear are extinguished with dichotic presentation; auditory stimuli in the right hemifield are mislocalized to the left. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine cortical activations to different categories of meaningful sounds embedded in a block design. Sounds activated the caudal sub-area of M.L.'s primary auditory cortex (hA1) bilaterally and her right posterior superior temporal gyrus (auditory dorsal stream), but not the rostral sub-area (hR) of her primary auditory cortex or the anterior superior temporal gyrus in either hemisphere (auditory ventral stream). Auditory agnosia reflects dysfunction of the auditory ventral stream. The ventral and dorsal auditory streams are already segregated as early as the primary auditory cortex, with the ventral stream projecting from hR and the dorsal stream from hA1. M.L.'s leftward localization bias, preserved audiovisual integration, and phoneme perception are explained by preserved processing in her right auditory dorsal stream.

  2. Motor-Auditory-Visual Integration: The Role of the Human Mirror Neuron System in Communication and Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bel, Ronald M.; Pineda, Jaime A.; Sharma, Anu

    2009-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) is a trimodal system composed of neuronal populations that respond to motor, visual, and auditory stimulation, such as when an action is performed, observed, heard or read about. In humans, the MNS has been identified using neuroimaging techniques (such as fMRI and mu suppression in the EEG). It reflects an…

  3. Motor-Auditory-Visual Integration: The Role of the Human Mirror Neuron System in Communication and Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bel, Ronald M.; Pineda, Jaime A.; Sharma, Anu

    2009-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) is a trimodal system composed of neuronal populations that respond to motor, visual, and auditory stimulation, such as when an action is performed, observed, heard or read about. In humans, the MNS has been identified using neuroimaging techniques (such as fMRI and mu suppression in the EEG). It reflects an…

  4. Brainstem Tuberculoma in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana A. Muin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a Somali refugee who presented in the second trimester of her first pregnancy with a four-week history of gradual right-sided sensomotoric hemisyndrome including facial palsy and left-sided paresis of the oculomotorius nerve causing drooping of the left eyelid and double vision. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solitary brainstem lesion. Upon detection of hilar lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray (CXR, the diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis with involvement of the central nervous system was confirmed by PCR and treatment induced with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. The patient had a steady neurological improvement and a favorable pregnancy outcome.

  5. Congenital brainstem disconnection associated with a syrinx of the brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, P. G.; de Vries, L. S.; Nikkels, P. G. J.; Troost, D.

    We report a case of congenital brainstem disconnection including the second detailed autopsy. A full-term newborn presented with irreversible apnoea and died on the fifth day. MRI revealed disconnection of the brainstem. The autopsy included a series of transverse sections of the mesencephalon,

  6. Congenital brainstem disconnection associated with a syrinx of the brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, P. G.; de Vries, L. S.; Nikkels, P. G. J.; Troost, D.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of congenital brainstem disconnection including the second detailed autopsy. A full-term newborn presented with irreversible apnoea and died on the fifth day. MRI revealed disconnection of the brainstem. The autopsy included a series of transverse sections of the mesencephalon, medu

  7. Music-induced cortical plasticity and lateral inhibition in the human auditory cortex as foundations for tonal tinnitus treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo ePantev

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 15 years, we have studied plasticity in the human auditory cortex by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. Two main topics nurtured our curiosity: the effects of musical training on plasticity in the auditory system, and the effects of lateral inhibition. One of our plasticity studies found that listening to notched music for three hours inhibited the neuronal activity in the auditory cortex that corresponded to the center-frequency of the notch, suggesting suppression of neural activity by lateral inhibition. Crucially, the overall effects of lateral inhibition on human auditory cortical activity were stronger than the habituation effects. Based on these results we developed a novel treatment strategy for tonal tinnitus - tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT. By notching the music energy spectrum around the individual tinnitus frequency, we intended to attract lateral inhibition to auditory neurons involved in tinnitus perception. So far, the training strategy has been evaluated in two studies. The results of the initial long-term controlled study (12 months supported the validity of the treatment concept: subjective tinnitus loudness and annoyance were significantly reduced after TMNMT but not when notching spared the tinnitus frequencies. Correspondingly, tinnitus-related auditory evoked fields (AEFs were significantly reduced after training. The subsequent short-term (5 days training study indicated that training was more effective in the case of tinnitus frequencies ≤ 8 kHz compared to tinnitus frequencies > 8 kHz, and that training should be employed over a long-term in order to induce more persistent effects. Further development and evaluation of TMNMT therapy are planned. A goal is to transfer this novel, completely non-invasive, and low-cost treatment approach for tonal tinnitus into routine clinical practice.

  8. Auditory-like filterbank: An optimal speech processor for efficient human speech communication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prasanta Kumar Ghosh; Louis M Goldstein; Shrikanth S Narayanan

    2011-10-01

    The transmitter and the receiver in a communication system have to be designed optimally with respect to one another to ensure reliable and efficient communication. Following this principle, we derive an optimal filterbank for processing speech signal in the listener’s auditory system (receiver), so that maximum information about the talker’s (transmitter) message can be obtained from the filterbank output, leading to efficient communication between the talker and the listener. We consider speech data of 45 talkers from three different languages for designing optimal filterbanks separately for each of them. We find that the computationally derived optimal filterbanks are similar to the empirically established auditory (cochlear) filterbank in the human ear. We also find that the output of the empirically established auditory filterbank provides more than 90% of the maximum information about the talker’s message provided by the output of the optimal filterbank. Our experimental findings suggest that the auditory filterbank in human ear functions as a near-optimal speech processor for achieving efficient speech communication between humans.

  9. Mechanism of auditory hypersensitivity in human autism using autism model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida-Eto, Michiru; Hara, Nao; Ohkawara, Takeshi; Narita, Masaaki

    2017-04-01

    Auditory hypersensitivity is one of the major complications in autism spectrum disorder. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the auditory brain center is affected in autism model rats. Autism model rats were prepared by prenatal exposure to thalidomide on embryonic day 9 and 10 in pregnant rats. The superior olivary complex (SOC), a complex of auditory nuclei, was immunostained with anti-calbindin d28k antibody at postnatal day 50. In autism model rats, SOC immunoreactivity was markedly decreased. Strength of immunostaining of SOC auditory fibers was also weak in autism model rats. Surprisingly, the size of the medial nucleus of trapezoid body, a nucleus exerting inhibitory function in SOC, was significantly decreased in autism model rats. Auditory hypersensitivity may be, in part, due to impairment of inhibitory processing by the auditory brain center. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Visual activation and audiovisual interactions in the auditory cortex during speech perception: intracranial recordings in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besle, Julien; Fischer, Catherine; Bidet-Caulet, Aurélie; Lecaignard, Francoise; Bertrand, Olivier; Giard, Marie-Hélène

    2008-12-24

    Hemodynamic studies have shown that the auditory cortex can be activated by visual lip movements and is a site of interactions between auditory and visual speech processing. However, they provide no information about the chronology and mechanisms of these cross-modal processes. We recorded intracranial event-related potentials to auditory, visual, and bimodal speech syllables from depth electrodes implanted in the temporal lobe of 10 epileptic patients (altogether 932 contacts). We found that lip movements activate secondary auditory areas, very shortly (approximately equal to 10 ms) after the activation of the visual motion area MT/V5. After this putatively feedforward visual activation of the auditory cortex, audiovisual interactions took place in the secondary auditory cortex, from 30 ms after sound onset and before any activity in the polymodal areas. Audiovisual interactions in the auditory cortex, as estimated in a linear model, consisted both of a total suppression of the visual response to lipreading and a decrease of the auditory responses to the speech sound in the bimodal condition compared with unimodal conditions. These findings demonstrate that audiovisual speech integration does not respect the classical hierarchy from sensory-specific to associative cortical areas, but rather engages multiple cross-modal mechanisms at the first stages of nonprimary auditory cortex activation.

  11. Clinical Values of Applying Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential (BAEP) Combined with Somatosensory Evoked Potential(SEP) in the Prognosis Evaluation of Coma%脑干听觉诱发电位联合体感诱发电位对于昏迷患者预后评估的临床应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱素丽; 成家欣; 陈秀娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the feasibility and accuracy of applying brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) combined with somatosensory evoked potential(SEP) in the prognosis of brain function for coma patients. Methods 30 coma patients in our hospital from October 2013 to April 2014 were selected and divided into 2 groups, the control group was given clinical assessment such as GCS score and brainstem reflection,so as to detect and observe the prognosis of patients dynamically;the experimental group was given BAEP and SEP for prognosis evaluation,then analyzed the feasibility and accuracy. Results The accuracy rate of experimental group (93.33%) was significantly higher than control group (66.67%), differences were statistically significant(P<0.05). Conclusion It can improve the accuracy that applying BAEP combined with SEP in the prognosis evaluation of coma patients, which has important values in clinical practice.%目的:探讨脑干听觉诱发电位联合体感诱发电位评估昏迷患者脑功能状态可行性和准确性。方法选取我院2013年10月至2014年4月的昏迷患者30例,平均将其分成两组,对对照组进行GCS评分、脑干反射等临床评估,动态检测并观察患者预后,对实验组患者实行脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)和体感诱发电位(SEP)检查,探讨BAEP和SEP判断昏迷患者脑功能状态的可行性和准确性。结果实验组的准确率(93.33%)明显高于对照组(66.67%)的准确率,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论脑干听觉诱发电位联合体感诱发电位可以提高昏迷患者预后评估的准确性,在临床上实践中具有重要价值。

  12. Spoken word memory traces within the human auditory cortex revealed by repetition priming and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnepain, Pierre; Chételat, Gael; Landeau, Brigitte; Dayan, Jacques; Eustache, Francis; Lebreton, Karine

    2008-05-14

    Previous neuroimaging studies in the visual domain have shown that neurons along the perceptual processing pathway retain the physical properties of written words, faces, and objects. The aim of this study was to reveal the existence of similar neuronal properties within the human auditory cortex. Brain activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a repetition priming paradigm, with words and pseudowords heard in an acoustically degraded format. Both the amplitude and peak latency of the hemodynamic response (HR) were assessed to determine the nature of the neuronal signature of spoken word priming. A statistically significant stimulus type by repetition interaction was found in various bilateral auditory cortical areas, demonstrating either HR suppression and enhancement for repeated spoken words and pseudowords, respectively, or word-specific repetition suppression without any significant effects for pseudowords. Repetition latency shift only occurred with word-specific repetition suppression in the right middle/posterior superior temporal sulcus. In this region, both repetition suppression and latency shift were related to behavioral priming. Our findings highlight for the first time the existence of long-term spoken word memory traces within the human auditory cortex. The timescale of auditory information integration and the neuronal mechanisms underlying priming both appear to differ according to the level of representations coded by neurons. Repetition may "sharpen" word-nonspecific representations coding short temporal variations, whereas a complex interaction between the activation strength and temporal integration of neuronal activity may occur in neuronal populations coding word-specific representations within longer temporal windows.

  13. Representation of lateralization and tonotopy in primary versus secondary human auditory cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langers, Dave R. M.; Backes, Walter H.; van Dijk, Pim

    2007-01-01

    Functional MRI was performed to investigate differences in the basic functional organization of the primary and secondary auditory cortex regarding preferred stimulus lateratization and frequency. A modified sparse acquisition scheme was used to spatially map the characteristics of the auditory cort

  14. The Adverse Effects of Heavy Metals with and without Noise Exposure on the Human Peripheral and Central Auditory System: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Josée Castellanos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to some chemicals in the workplace can lead to occupational chemical-induced hearing loss. Attention has mainly focused on the adverse auditory effects of solvents. However, other chemicals such as heavy metals have been also identified as ototoxic agents. The aim of this work was to review the current scientific knowledge about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure with and without co-exposure to noise in humans. PubMed and Medline were accessed to find suitable articles. A total of 49 articles met the inclusion criteria. Results from the review showed that no evidence about the ototoxic effects in humans of manganese is available. Contradictory results have been found for arsenic, lead and mercury as well as for the possible interaction between heavy metals and noise. All studies found in this review have found that exposure to cadmium and mixtures of heavy metals induce auditory dysfunction. Most of the studies investigating the adverse auditory effects of heavy metals in humans have investigated human populations exposed to lead. Some of these studies suggest peripheral and central auditory dysfunction induced by lead exposure. It is concluded that further evidence from human studies about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure is still required. Despite this issue, audiologists and other hearing health care professionals should be aware of the possible auditory effects of heavy metals.

  15. The Adverse Effects of Heavy Metals with and without Noise Exposure on the Human Peripheral and Central Auditory System: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Marie-Josée; Fuente, Adrian

    2016-12-09

    Exposure to some chemicals in the workplace can lead to occupational chemical-induced hearing loss. Attention has mainly focused on the adverse auditory effects of solvents. However, other chemicals such as heavy metals have been also identified as ototoxic agents. The aim of this work was to review the current scientific knowledge about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure with and without co-exposure to noise in humans. PubMed and Medline were accessed to find suitable articles. A total of 49 articles met the inclusion criteria. Results from the review showed that no evidence about the ototoxic effects in humans of manganese is available. Contradictory results have been found for arsenic, lead and mercury as well as for the possible interaction between heavy metals and noise. All studies found in this review have found that exposure to cadmium and mixtures of heavy metals induce auditory dysfunction. Most of the studies investigating the adverse auditory effects of heavy metals in humans have investigated human populations exposed to lead. Some of these studies suggest peripheral and central auditory dysfunction induced by lead exposure. It is concluded that further evidence from human studies about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure is still required. Despite this issue, audiologists and other hearing health care professionals should be aware of the possible auditory effects of heavy metals.

  16. Peak latency prolongation of Ⅴ wave in brainstem auditory evoked potential during intraoperative monitoring of acoustic neuroma surgery%脑干听觉诱发电位的Ⅴ波PL延长在听神经瘤手术监护中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包国庆; 朱沂; 李建新; 杨小朋

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨BAEP的Ⅴ波PL延长在听神经瘤手术中的应用价值. 方法 回顾性分析55例听神经瘤手术患者行BAEP术前检查、术中监护及术后疗效评估,分析Ⅴ波PL延长不同指标的监测结果. 结果 以Ⅴ波PL延长>0.6 ms为标准,脑干或听神经损伤的灵敏度100%,特异度95.3%,误诊率4.7%,漏诊率0%,符合率96.4%.以Ⅴ波PL延长>1.0 ms为标准,灵敏度58.3%,特异度97.7%,误诊率2.3%,漏诊率41.7%,符合率89.1%. 结论 BAEP监护听神经瘤手术中,V波PL延长>0.6 ms有较高的敏感度和特异度,作为术中监护报警指标更合适.%Objective To explore the applied value of peak latency (PL) prolongation of Ⅴ wave in brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) during intraoperative monitoring of acoustic neuroma surgery. Methods The preoperative BAEP examination data,intraoperative monitoring and postoperative evaluation data in 55 patients with acoustic neuroma were retrospectively analyzed; the monitoring results under the circumstance that different degrees of prolongation of PL of Ⅴ wave were chosen were analyzed. Results The PL prolongation of Ⅴ wave >0.6 ms was used as the baseline,the sensitivity of diagnosing the brainstem or acoustic nerve injury was 100%,the specificity was 95.3%,the misdiagnosis rate was 4.7%,the missed diagnosis rate was 0% and the accordance rate was 96.4%.The PL prolongation of Ⅴ wave >1.0 ms was used as the baseline,the sensitivity of diagnosing the brainstem or acoustic nerve injury was 58.3%,the specificity was 97.7%,the misdiagnosis rate was 2.3%,the missed diagnosis rate was 41.7% and the accordance rate was 89.1%. Conclusion It is more suitable that using thePL prolongation of Ⅴ wave >0.6 ms as the baseline,enjoying high sensitivity and specificity,during the intraoperative monitoring of acoustic neuroma.

  17. 新生儿胆红素脑病脑脊液胆红素及脑干听觉诱发电位检测的临床意义%The clinical significance of cerebrospinal fluid bilirubin and brainstem auditory evoked potential tests in neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李先红; 张健; 查萍; 王丽丽; 孔萤; 孙璐路; 郑洪

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical significance of cerebrospinal fluid bilirubin level and brainstem auditory evoked poten -tial in neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy .Methods All the cases with hyperbilirubinemia were selected from July 2011 to July 2013 in our department,and were divided into the bilirubin encephalopathy group (44 cases) and the non-bilirubin encephalopathy group (79 cases).Ce-rebrospinal fluid ,serum bilirubin level and brainstem auditory evoked potential ( BAEP ) changes were compared between the two groups of children .Results The cerebrospinal fluid bilirubin level in bilirubin encephalopathy group was higher than that of non -bilirubin encephalopa-thy group [(11.0 +3.9) tendency/L vs (7.4 +4.0) tendency/L],and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.01).The inci-dence of abnormal BAEP (61.4%) in bilirubin encephalopathy group was higher than that of non-bilirubin encephalopathy group (16.5%), and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.01).Conclusion Cerebrospinal fluid bilirubin can be used as a reliable indicator for bilirubin encephalopathy in the early diagnosis ,and newborn infants with bilirubin encephalopathy accompanied by higher incidence of hearing damage require early intervention treatment .%目的:探讨新生儿胆红素脑病脑脊液胆红素水平及脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)检查的临床意义。方法选取高胆红素血症新生儿为研究对象,分为胆红素脑病组(44例)和非胆红素脑病组(79例),比较两组患儿脑脊液、血清胆红素水平以及BAEP变化。结果胆红素脑病组患儿脑脊液胆红素水平高于非胆红素脑病组[(11.0±3.9) mol/L VS (7.4±4.0) mol/L],差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);胆红素脑病组BAEP异常发生率(61.4%)高于非胆红素脑病组(16.5%),差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)。结论脑脊液胆红素水平检测可作为新生儿胆红素脑病早期诊断的可

  18. The study on the targets of the optical evoked auditory brainstem response on the cochlea of guinea pig stimulating by infrared laser%红外线激光刺激豚鼠耳蜗诱发听性脑干反应作用靶点的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢冰斌; 李华伟; 戴春富

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the targets of the infrared laser stimulating on the cochlea of guinea pig which evoked auditory brainstem response (oABR),and explore the mechanisms of the infrared neurostimulation.Methods A polished optical fiber with 200 μm diameter (NA =0.22) was planted into the scala tympani of guinea pigs to stimulate the cochlea of both the normal hearing and acute deafened guinea pigs.The direction of the fiber distal was changed to radiate different regions of the scala tympani,recording the oABR respectively.Differences of energy thresholds and amplitudes of oABR between normal hearing and acute deafened animals was concerned,and different responses were recorded as the optical path of laser fiber being changed to investigate the targets of the infrared laser stimulation.Immunofluorescence was used to detect the changes of inner and outer hair cells,and spiral ganglion neurons 7 days postdeafening,to looking for the probable association with the oABR changes at the same stimulus.SPSS 18.0 software was used to analyze the data.Results Inner and outer hair cells were damaged in basal and middle turn,butresidual hair cells were observed in apical turn.Only when the optical fiber pointed to Rosenthal's canal stimulated the spiral ganglion region directly could the oABR be evoked.No response was recorded while the fiber pointed to other directions.Conclusion Infrared laser stimulates cochlea evoked oABR generats from the response of spiral ganglion directly,the spiral ganglion neurons are the target of infrared stimulation.%目的 研究红外线激光刺激豚鼠耳蜗诱发听性脑干反应(optical evoled auditory brainstem response,oABR)的作用靶点,探讨激光刺激的作用机制.方法 对正常听力豚鼠及急性耳蜗损伤豚鼠耳蜗植入直径200μm的光纤(NA =0.22),光纤末端对准鼓阶不同部位进行激光刺激,记录并比较不同刺激角度下oABR的反应情况及正常听力与急性耳蜗损伤豚鼠oABR阈值和

  19. Development of electrically evoked auditory brainstem response modules of REZ-Ⅰ domestic cochlear implant device%REZ-Ⅰ型国产人工耳蜗电诱发听性脑干反应模块的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁秀勇; 张汝祥; 许长建; 樊伟; 张道行

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop electrically evoked auditory brainstem response(EABR) modules of REZ-Ⅰ domestic cochlear implant device,and testify the reliability and validity of the modules.Methods Postoperative EABR were recorded in guinea pigs by using the self-designed EABR module.Results EABR waves were recorded in all 15 ears of 9 guinea pigs with normal hearing.The threshold was (159.00 ±50.21) current level (CL) and e Ⅲ wave latency was (2.36 ± 0.46)ms of 100 μs pulse width stimulation; for 150 μs pulse width stimulation,the threshold was (131.44 ± 49.25)CL and e Ⅲ wave latency was (2.59 ± 0.46) ms ; for 200 μs pulse width stimulation,the threshold was (119.63 ± 52.56) CL and e Ⅲ wave latency was (2.62 ± 0.44) ms.Conclusion According the preliminary results of the study,the reliability and stability of the EABR modules of domestic cochlear implant device can meet the demands of EABR recording.%目的 建立REZ-Ⅰ型国产人工耳蜗电诱发听性脑干反应(electrically evoked auditory brainstem response,EABR)模块,并测试其稳定性及可靠性.方法 使用自行设计构建的REZ-Ⅰ型国产人工耳蜗EABR测试模块记录听力正常豚鼠人工耳蜗植入后的EABR,并探索相关技术参数.结果 9只豚鼠(15耳)EABR波形引出率为100%.100μs刺激脉宽的阈值平均(均数±标准差,下同)为(159.00±50.21)电流级(current level,CL),波Ⅲ潜伏期为(2.36 ±0.46) ms;150μs刺激脉宽的阈值为(131.44 ±49.25)CL,波Ⅲ潜伏期为(2.59±0.46)ms;200 μs刺激脉宽的阈值为(119.63 ±52.56)CL,波Ⅲ潜伏期为(2.62±0.44) ms.结论 REZ-Ⅰ型人工耳蜗EABR模块动物实验的引出率达到100%,其稳定性和可靠性能够满足EABR的测试要求.

  20. Analysis of transient otoacoustic emissions and brainstem evoked auditory potentials in neonates with hyperbilirubinemia Análise das emissões otoacústicas transientes e dos potenciais evocados auditivos do tronco encefálico em neonatos com hiperbilirrubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Polo Camargo da Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbilirubinemia is toxic to the auditory pathways and to the central nervous system, leaving sequelae such as hearing loss and encephalopathy. AIM: to assess the hearing of neonates with hyperbilirubinemia, using transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TOAEs and brainstem evoked auditory potentials (BEAP. Prospective study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: we had two groups: GI (n-25, neonates with hyperbilirubinemia; GII (n-22, neonates without hyperbilirubinemia and without risk factors for hearing loss. All the neonates had up to 60 days of life and were submitted to TOAE and BEAP. RESULTS: 12 neonates from GI and 10 from GII were girls and 13 from GI and 12 from GII were boys. TOAEs were present in all the children, however with lower amplitudes in GI, especially in the frequencies of 2 and 3KHz (p A hiperbilirrubinemia é tóxica às vias auditivas e ao sistema nervoso central, deixando sequelas como surdez e encefalopatia. OBJETIVOS: avaliar a audição de neonatos portadores de hiperbilirrubinemia, utilizando-se a pesquisa das emissões otoacústicas evocadas transientes (EOAET e dos potenciais evocados auditivos do tronco encefálico (PEATE. Estudo prospectivo. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: Constituíram-se dois grupos: GI (n-25, neonatos com hiperbilirrubinemia; GII (n-22, neonatos sem hiperbilirrubinemia e sem fatores de risco para surdez. Todos os neonatos tinham até 60 dias de vida e foram submetidos à EOAET e ao PEATE. RESULTADOS: 12 neonatos de GI e 10 de GII eram meninas e 13 de GI e 12 de GII eram meninos. As EOAET estavam presentes em todas as crianças, porém com amplitudes menores em GI, especialmente nas frequências de 2 e 3KHz (p < 0,05. No PEATE, observou-se discreto prolongamento de PV e de LI-V em GI. As alterações observadas nesses testes não se correlacionaram aos níveis séricos da bilirrubinemia. CONCLUSÕES: Em neonatos portadores de hiperbilirrubinemia, menores amplitudes das EOAET e discreto prolongamento de PV e de LI

  1. 3种声强下脑干听觉诱发电位在颅脑手术麻醉深度评估中的应用%The Applied Evaluation of Depth of Anaesthesia with Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential in Three Different Decibels Level in Patients Undergoing Craniocerebral Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛; 孟尽海; 刘南平

    2006-01-01

    目的 研究应用3种声强下脑干听觉诱发电位(Brainstem auditory evoked potential,BAEP)监测颅脑手术麻醉深度的可行性.方法 选择听力正常的经头部CT或MRI证实有颅内占位病变须行开颅手术的择期手术患者(ASAⅠ-Ⅱ级) 16例,采用丹麦维迪公司四通道Keytoint肌电诱发电位仪监测并记录麻醉不同时间点的Ⅰ、Ⅲ、Ⅴ波潜伏期(potential time,PL),观察PL在不同麻醉时间点麻醉深度的变化,探讨神经外科手术患者术中不同麻醉深度和BAEP变化之间的规律及其临床意义.结果 3种声强下Ⅰ、Ⅲ、Ⅴ波的PL都比麻醉前延长,各波波峰逐渐右移,尤以Ⅴ波延长最为明显,并持续至停药时,拔管时各波PL明显缩短,Ⅰ波PL最先缩短,但仍未恢复麻醉前状态.结论 BAEP可用于颅脑手术的麻醉深度监测,3种声强下的阳性检出率均高.Ⅰ、Ⅲ、Ⅴ波的PL与麻醉深度关系密切,可作为判断麻醉变浅的敏感指标.

  2. Comparação dos estímulos clique e CE-chirp® no registro do Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Tronco Encefálico Comparison of click and CE-chirp® stimuli on Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ribeiro Ivo Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar as latências e as amplitudes da onda V no registro do Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Tronco Encefálico (PEATE com os estímulos clique e CE-chirp® e a presença ou ausência das ondas I, III e V em fortes intensidades. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com 12 adultos com limiares audiométricos PURPOSE: To compare the latencies and amplitudes of wave V on the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential (BAEP recording obtained with click and CE-chirp® stimuli and the presence or absence of waves I, III and V in high intensities. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 12 adults with audiometric thresholds <15 dBHL (24 ears and mean age of 27 years. The parameters used for the recording with both stimuli in intensities of 80, 60, 40, 20 dBnHL were alternate polarity and repetition rate of 27.1 Hz. RESULTS: The CE-chirp® latencies for wave V were longer than click latencies at low intensity levels (20 and 40 dBnHL. At high intensity levels (60 and 80 dBnHL, the opposite occurred. Larger wave V amplitudes were observed with CE-chirp® in all intensity levels, except at 80 dBnHL. CONCLUSION: The CE-chirp® showed shorter latencies than those observed with clicks at high intensity levels and larger amplitudes at all intensity levels, except at 80 dBnHL. The waves I and III tended to disappear with CE-chirp® stimulation.

  3. Music-induced cortical plasticity and lateral inhibition in the human auditory cortex as foundations for tonal tinnitus treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantev, Christo; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Teismann, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, we have studied plasticity in the human auditory cortex by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). Two main topics nurtured our curiosity: the effects of musical training on plasticity in the auditory system, and the effects of lateral inhibition. One of our plasticity studies found that listening to notched music for 3 h inhibited the neuronal activity in the auditory cortex that corresponded to the center-frequency of the notch, suggesting suppression of neural activity by lateral inhibition. Subsequent research on this topic found that suppression was notably dependent upon the notch width employed, that the lower notch-edge induced stronger attenuation of neural activity than the higher notch-edge, and that auditory focused attention strengthened the inhibitory networks. Crucially, the overall effects of lateral inhibition on human auditory cortical activity were stronger than the habituation effects. Based on these results we developed a novel treatment strategy for tonal tinnitus—tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT). By notching the music energy spectrum around the individual tinnitus frequency, we intended to attract lateral inhibition to auditory neurons involved in tinnitus perception. So far, the training strategy has been evaluated in two studies. The results of the initial long-term controlled study (12 months) supported the validity of the treatment concept: subjective tinnitus loudness and annoyance were significantly reduced after TMNMT but not when notching spared the tinnitus frequencies. Correspondingly, tinnitus-related auditory evoked fields (AEFs) were significantly reduced after training. The subsequent short-term (5 days) training study indicated that training was more effective in the case of tinnitus frequencies ≤ 8 kHz compared to tinnitus frequencies >8 kHz, and that training should be employed over a long-term in order to induce more persistent effects. Further development and evaluation of TMNMT therapy

  4. Resolving the neural dynamics of visual and auditory scene processing in the human brain: a methodological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Santani

    2017-01-01

    In natural environments, visual and auditory stimulation elicit responses across a large set of brain regions in a fraction of a second, yielding representations of the multimodal scene and its properties. The rapid and complex neural dynamics underlying visual and auditory information processing pose major challenges to human cognitive neuroscience. Brain signals measured non-invasively are inherently noisy, the format of neural representations is unknown, and transformations between representations are complex and often nonlinear. Further, no single non-invasive brain measurement technique provides a spatio-temporally integrated view. In this opinion piece, we argue that progress can be made by a concerted effort based on three pillars of recent methodological development: (i) sensitive analysis techniques such as decoding and cross-classification, (ii) complex computational modelling using models such as deep neural networks, and (iii) integration across imaging methods (magnetoencephalography/electroencephalography, functional magnetic resonance imaging) and models, e.g. using representational similarity analysis. We showcase two recent efforts that have been undertaken in this spirit and provide novel results about visual and auditory scene analysis. Finally, we discuss the limits of this perspective and sketch a concrete roadmap for future research. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Auditory and visual scene analysis’. PMID:28044019

  5. Correlates of perceptual awareness in human primary auditory cortex revealed by an informational masking experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Katrin; Gutschalk, Alexander

    2012-05-15

    The presence of an auditory event may remain undetected in crowded environments, even when it is well above the sensory threshold. This effect, commonly known as informational masking, allows for isolating neural activity related to perceptual awareness, by comparing repetitions of the same physical stimulus where the target is either detected or not. Evidence from magnetoencephalography (MEG) suggests that auditory-cortex activity in the latency range 50-250 ms is closely coupled with perceptual awareness. Here, BOLD fMRI and MEG were combined to investigate at which stage in the auditory cortex neural correlates of conscious auditory perception can be observed. Participants were asked to indicate the perception of a regularly repeating target tone, embedded within a random multi-tone masking background. Results revealed widespread activation within the auditory cortex for detected target tones, which was delayed but otherwise similar to the activation of an unmasked control stimulus. The contrast of detected versus undetected targets revealed activity confined to medial Heschl's gyrus, where the primary auditory cortex is located. These results suggest that activity related to conscious perception involves the primary auditory cortex and is not restricted to activity in secondary areas.

  6. 79例语言障碍儿童脑干听觉诱发电位的结果分析%Analysis of Results of Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential In 79 Cases of Language-Impaired Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静

    2009-01-01

    目的 研究脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)在语言障碍儿童中的变化规律及应用价值.方法 采用丹麦维迪KEY-POINT诱发电位仪,对我院2006年8月~2008年12月间79例语言障碍儿童进行BAEP检测结果 分析.结果 患儿BAEP总异常率为64.6%,其中15.7%为双侧BAEP各波消失;11.8%为单侧BAEP各波消失,伴另侧BAEP各波异常;72.5%为各波潜伏期(PL)、波间期(IPL)异常.结论 BAEP是一种简便、无创性、阈值稳定、结果 可靠、重复性强的检查方法 ,对于语言障碍儿童听力损害及神经传导通路的异常可为临床提供有价值的客观指标.%Objective To study the change and its application of the brain stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) in language -impaired children. Methods We used evoked potentials Denmark Wedy Keypoint device to analysis the BAEP test results of the 79 cases of children in our hospital from August 2006 to December 2008. Rsults The total rate of BAEP abnormalities in children was 64.6% , of which 15.7% for one of the bilateral BAEP wave disappeared, 11.8% for the unilateral BAEP wave disappeared with the other side of the wave being abnormal BAEP,and 72.5% for the wave latency (PL) and wave interphase (IPL) abnomal. Conclusion BAEP is a sim-ple, noninvasive, threshold stability, results reliable and reproducible method of examination. For language -impaired children of hearing damage and abnormal neural pathway ,it can provide valuable objective indicators.

  7. Mild maternal iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy and lactation in guinea pigs causes abnormal auditory function in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jougleux, Jean-Luc; Rioux, France M; Church, Michael W; Fiset, Sylvain; Surette, Marc E

    2011-07-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) anemia (IDA) adversely affects different aspects of the nervous system such as myelinogenesis, neurotransmitters synthesis, brain myelin composition, and brain fatty acid and eicosanoid metabolism. Infant neurophysiological outcome in response to maternal IDA is underexplored, especially mild to moderate maternal IDA. Furthermore, most human research has focused on childhood ID rather than prenatal or neonatal ID. Thus, our study evaluated the consequences of mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation on the offsprings' auditory function using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). This technique provides objective measures of auditory acuity, neural transmission times along the peripheral and brainstem portions of the auditory pathway, and postnatal brain maturation. Female guinea pigs (n = 10/group) were fed an iron sufficient diet (ISD) or an iron deficient diet (IDD) (144 and 11.7 mg iron/kg) during their acclimation, gestation, and lactation periods. From postnatal d (PNd) 9 onward, the ISD was given to all weaned offspring. ABR were collected from the offspring on PNd24 using a broad range of stimulus intensities in response to 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 kHz tone pips. IDA siblings (n = 4), [corrected] compared with the IS siblings (n = 5), had significantly elevated ABR thresholds (hearing loss) in response to all tone pips. These physiological disturbances were primarily due to a sensorineural hearing loss, as revealed by the ABR's latency-intensity curves. These results indicate that mild maternal IDA during gestation and lactation altered the hearing and nervous system development of the young offspring.

  8. Functional organization for musical consonance and tonal pitch hierarchy in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Grall, Jeremy

    2014-11-01

    Pitch relationships in music are characterized by their degree of consonance, a hierarchical perceptual quality that distinguishes how pleasant musical chords/intervals sound to the ear. The origins of consonance have been debated since the ancient Greeks. To elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these musical fundamentals, we recorded neuroelectric brain activity while participants listened passively to various chromatic musical intervals (simultaneously sounding pitches) varying in their perceptual pleasantness (i.e., consonance/dissonance). Dichotic presentation eliminated acoustic and peripheral contributions that often confound explanations of consonance. We found that neural representations for pitch in early human auditory cortex code perceptual features of musical consonance and follow a hierarchical organization according to music-theoretic principles. These neural correlates emerge pre-attentively within ~ 150 ms after the onset of pitch, are segregated topographically in superior temporal gyrus with a rightward hemispheric bias, and closely mirror listeners' behavioral valence preferences for the chromatic tone combinations inherent to music. A perceptual-based organization implies that parallel to the phonetic code for speech, elements of music are mapped within early cerebral structures according to higher-order, perceptual principles and the rules of Western harmony rather than simple acoustic attributes.

  9. The effects of iron supplementation on auditory brain-stem response with iron deficiency anemia in rats%缺铁性贫血治疗前后听性脑干反应的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周本忠; 王胜国; 王琼; 孙爱华; 马玉龙; 沈建军

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the therapeutic methods of sensorineural hearing loss with iron deficiency anemia and their effects. Method:Sixty-eight Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: Group A (iron deficiency group A) 24 rats, group B (iron deficiency group B) 24 rats and group C (control group) 20 rats. Group A and B were fed with iron deficiency diet for 6 weeks. By analyzing ABR and DPOAE, hearing loss was detected in group A and B. Then,group A was given iron supplementation diet and hyperbaric oxygen therapies. and group B was given iron supplementation diet only. Result:The auditory thresholds and period latencies (PL) of I waves of ABR and DPOAE amplitude in 2 kHz and 3kHz within group A and B were significantly different before and after treatment (P<0.05). But the effects of treatment between these two groups had not significant differences (P>0.05). Conclusion: It suggested that good results can be obtained by early iron supplementation in iron deficiency hearing loss cases. Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy may not be necessary.%目的:探讨缺铁性贫血导致感音神经性聋的治疗方法及疗效。方法:将68只Wistar大鼠分成3组:48只通过缺铁饮食制作缺铁性贫血模型,缺铁A组和B组各24只;另设标准对照C组正常大鼠20只。将A、B两组进行缺铁饲养6周,检测听性脑干反应(ABR),每组各随机取样10只检测畸变产物耳声发射(DPOAE),再分别给予铁剂加高压氧治疗和单纯铁剂治疗。结果:缺铁Wistar大鼠经6周饲养,较实验前ABR听觉阈值提高和Ⅰ波PL延长,经过两种不同方案治疗6周,均取得明显效果(P<0.05),但两组差异无显著性。结论:对于缺铁性贫血造成感音神经性耳聋,早期给予及时的铁剂治疗疗效好,而高压氧用于治疗此类耳聋并非必要。

  10. Sustained selective attention to competing amplitude-modulations in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecke, Lars; Scharke, Wolfgang; Valente, Giancarlo; Gutschalk, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Auditory selective attention plays an essential role for identifying sounds of interest in a scene, but the neural underpinnings are still incompletely understood. Recent findings demonstrate that neural activity that is time-locked to a particular amplitude-modulation (AM) is enhanced in the auditory cortex when the modulated stream of sounds is selectively attended to under sensory competition with other streams. However, the target sounds used in the previous studies differed not only in their AM, but also in other sound features, such as carrier frequency or location. Thus, it remains uncertain whether the observed enhancements reflect AM-selective attention. The present study aims at dissociating the effect of AM frequency on response enhancement in auditory cortex by using an ongoing auditory stimulus that contains two competing targets differing exclusively in their AM frequency. Electroencephalography results showed a sustained response enhancement for auditory attention compared to visual attention, but not for AM-selective attention (attended AM frequency vs. ignored AM frequency). In contrast, the response to the ignored AM frequency was enhanced, although a brief trend toward response enhancement occurred during the initial 15 s. Together with the previous findings, these observations indicate that selective enhancement of attended AMs in auditory cortex is adaptive under sustained AM-selective attention. This finding has implications for our understanding of cortical mechanisms for feature-based attentional gain control.

  11. Effects of acupuncture in" inner Tinggong" acupoint on auditory brainstem response in sudden hearing loss patients%针刺"内听宫"穴对突发性耳聋患者脑干听觉诱发电位的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓彤; 袁国莲; 许珉; 赵龙柱; 张全安; 樊玉林

    2004-01-01

    AIM:To observe the changes of auditory brainstem response(ABR) in sudden hearing loss patients and normal ears by acupuncture in " inner Tinggong" acupoint to confirm the effectiveness of the acupuncture in this acupoint in hearing loss. METHODS:The ABR of 19 cases(21 ears) of sudden hearing loss was assayed under copper grid shielding by 2000 model of evoked potential instrument obtained from Dandi Company.ABR was retested after 15-minute acupuncture in inner Tinggong acupoint and 5-minute rest.The results were compared. RESULTS:There was no significant difference in I,V wave latency and I-V interval before and after acupuncture in normal ears(P >0.05).Tinnitus and auditory stuffiness in 15 of 21 ears with sudden hearing loss were relieved or even disappeared after acupuncture with auditory improvement.The ABR waves of 5 ears were poorly differentiated before acupuncture,and I wave or III wave disappeared with poor repetition,while the differentiations of ABR waves were markedly in focus with I wave,III wave and V wave,and moreover with good repetition.I wave latence of ABR in 16 ears with sudden hearing loss was( 2.00± 0.34) ms,V wave latence was(6.04± 0.59) ms, and I-V wave interval was(4.04± 0.57) ms before acupuncture;after acupunture, I wave latence was(1.77± 0.27) ms,V wave latence was(5.79± 0.63) ms and I-V interval was(3.98± 0.58) ms.There were significant differences in I and V latency between before and after acupuncture(t=2.406,2.463,P0.05). 21耳突聋中 15耳针刺内听宫穴耳鸣减轻,甚至消失.耳闷减轻,听力提高.其中 5耳针刺前 ABR波形分化差,Ⅰ波或Ⅲ波消失,重复性差,针刺后其 ABR波形分化明显清晰,Ⅰ,Ⅲ,Ⅴ波均出现,且重复性好. 16耳突聋针刺前 ABR的Ⅰ波潜伏期:( 2.00± 0.34) ms,Ⅴ波潜伏期 (6.04± 0.59)ms,ⅠⅤ波间期 (4.04± 0.57)ms,针刺后 ABR的Ⅰ波潜伏期: (1.77± 0.27)ms,Ⅴ波潜伏期: (5.79± 0.63)ms,ⅠⅤ波间期: (3.98± 0.58)ms,Ⅰ ,Ⅴ波潜伏期针刺

  12. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize the brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit saccular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) (Colebatch & Halmagyi 1992; Colebatch et al. 1994). Some researchers have reported that airconducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects (Curthoys et al. 2009, Wackym et al., 2012). However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying the vestibular disorders related to otolith deficits. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, pre and post central gyri, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation (Bottini et al., 1994; Dieterich et al., 2003; Emri et al., 2003; Schlindwein et al., 2008; Janzen et al., 2008). Here we hypothesized that the skull tap elicits the similar pattern of cortical activity as the auditory tone burst. Subjects put on a set of MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in supine position, with eyes closed. All subjects received both forms of the stimulation, however, the order of stimulation with auditory tone burst and air-conducted skull tap was counterbalanced across subjects. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular cortex, resulting in vestibular response (Halmagyi et al., 1995). Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate

  13. Auditory Neuropathy - A Case of Auditory Neuropathy after Hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Mazaher Yazdi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Auditory neuropathy is an hearing disorder in which peripheral hearing is normal, but the eighth nerve and brainstem are abnormal. By clinical definition, patient with this disorder have normal OAE, but exhibit an absent or severely abnormal ABR. Auditory neuropathy was first reported in the late 1970s as different methods could identify discrepancy between absent ABR and present hearing threshold. Speech understanding difficulties are worse than can be predicted from other tests of hearing function. Auditory neuropathy may also affect vestibular function. Case Report: This article presents electrophysiological and behavioral data from a case of auditory neuropathy in a child with normal hearing after bilirubinemia in a 5 years follow-up. Audiological findings demonstrate remarkable changes after multidisciplinary rehabilitation. Conclusion: auditory neuropathy may involve damage to the inner hair cells-specialized sensory cells in the inner ear that transmit information about sound through the nervous system to the brain. Other causes may include faulty connections between the inner hair cells and the nerve leading from the inner ear to the brain or damage to the nerve itself. People with auditory neuropathy have OAEs response but absent ABR and hearing loss threshold that can be permanent, get worse or get better.

  14. Modulatory effects of spectral energy contrasts on lateral inhibition in the human auditory cortex: an MEG study.

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    Alwina Stein

    Full Text Available We investigated the modulation of lateral inhibition in the human auditory cortex by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. In the first experiment, five acoustic masking stimuli (MS, consisting of noise passing through a digital notch filter which was centered at 1 kHz, were presented. The spectral energy contrasts of four MS were modified systematically by either amplifying or attenuating the edge-frequency bands around the notch (EFB by 30 dB. Additionally, the width of EFB amplification/attenuation was varied (3/8 or 7/8 octave on each side of the notch. N1m and auditory steady state responses (ASSR, evoked by a test stimulus with a carrier frequency of 1 kHz, were evaluated. A consistent dependence of N1m responses upon the preceding MS was observed. The minimal N1m source strength was found in the narrowest amplified EFB condition, representing pronounced lateral inhibition of neurons with characteristic frequencies corresponding to the center frequency of the notch (NOTCH CF in secondary auditory cortical areas. We tested in a second experiment whether an even narrower bandwidth of EFB amplification would result in further enhanced lateral inhibition of the NOTCH CF. Here three MS were presented, two of which were modified by amplifying 1/8 or 1/24 octave EFB width around the notch. We found that N1m responses were again significantly smaller in both amplified EFB conditions as compared to the NFN condition. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that the energy and width of the EFB around the notch modulate lateral inhibition in human secondary auditory cortical areas. Because it is assumed that chronic tinnitus is caused by a lack of lateral inhibition, these new insights could be used as a tool for further improvement of tinnitus treatments focusing on the lateral inhibition of neurons corresponding to the tinnitus frequency, such as the tailor-made notched music training.

  15. The neurochemical basis of human cortical auditory processing: combining proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetoencephalography

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    Tollkötter Melanie

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A combination of magnetoencephalography and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to correlate the electrophysiology of rapid auditory processing and the neurochemistry of the auditory cortex in 15 healthy adults. To assess rapid auditory processing in the left auditory cortex, the amplitude and decrement of the N1m peak, the major component of the late auditory evoked response, were measured during rapidly successive presentation of acoustic stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that: (i the amplitude of the N1m response and (ii its decrement during rapid stimulation are associated with the cortical neurochemistry as determined by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results Our results demonstrated a significant association between the concentrations of N-acetylaspartate, a marker of neuronal integrity, and the amplitudes of individual N1m responses. In addition, the concentrations of choline-containing compounds, representing the functional integrity of membranes, were significantly associated with N1m amplitudes. No significant association was found between the concentrations of the glutamate/glutamine pool and the amplitudes of the first N1m. No significant associations were seen between the decrement of the N1m (the relative amplitude of the second N1m peak and the concentrations of N-acetylaspartate, choline-containing compounds, or the glutamate/glutamine pool. However, there was a trend for higher glutamate/glutamine concentrations in individuals with higher relative N1m amplitude. Conclusion These results suggest that neuronal and membrane functions are important for rapid auditory processing. This investigation provides a first link between the electrophysiology, as recorded by magnetoencephalography, and the neurochemistry, as assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, of the auditory cortex.

  16. Parcellation of Human and Monkey Core Auditory Cortex with fMRI Pattern Classification and Objective Detection of Tonotopic Gradient Reversals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönwiesner, Marc; Dechent, Peter; Voit, Dirk; Petkov, Christopher I; Krumbholz, Katrin

    2015-10-01

    Auditory cortex (AC) contains several primary-like, or "core," fields, which receive thalamic input and project to non-primary "belt" fields. In humans, the organization and layout of core and belt auditory fields are still poorly understood, and most auditory neuroimaging studies rely on macroanatomical criteria, rather than functional localization of distinct fields. A myeloarchitectonic method has been suggested recently for distinguishing between core and belt fields in humans (Dick F, Tierney AT, Lutti A, Josephs O, Sereno MI, Weiskopf N. 2012. In vivo functional and myeloarchitectonic mapping of human primary auditory areas. J Neurosci. 32:16095-16105). We propose a marker for core AC based directly on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data and pattern classification. We show that a portion of AC in Heschl's gyrus classifies sound frequency more accurately than other regions in AC. Using fMRI data from macaques, we validate that the region where frequency classification performance is significantly above chance overlaps core auditory fields, predominantly A1. Within this region, we measure tonotopic gradients and estimate the locations of the human homologues of the core auditory subfields A1 and R. Our results provide a functional rather than anatomical localizer for core AC. We posit that inter-individual variability in the layout of core AC might explain disagreements between results from previous neuroimaging and cytological studies.

  17. Acute stress alters auditory selective attention in humans independent of HPA: a study of evoked potentials.

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    Ludger Elling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute stress is a stereotypical, but multimodal response to a present or imminent challenge overcharging an organism. Among the different branches of this multimodal response, the consequences of glucocorticoid secretion have been extensively investigated, mostly in connection with long-term memory (LTM. However, stress responses comprise other endocrine signaling and altered neuronal activity wholly independent of pituitary regulation. To date, knowledge of the impact of such "paracorticoidal" stress responses on higher cognitive functions is scarce. We investigated the impact of an ecological stressor on the ability to direct selective attention using event-related potentials in humans. Based on research in rodents, we assumed that a stress-induced imbalance of catecholaminergic transmission would impair this ability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The stressor consisted of a single cold pressor test. Auditory negative difference (Nd and mismatch negativity (MMN were recorded in a tonal dichotic listening task. A time series of such tasks confirmed an increased distractibility occurring 4-7 minutes after onset of the stressor as reflected by an attenuated Nd. Salivary cortisol began to rise 8-11 minutes after onset when no further modulations in the event-related potentials (ERP occurred, thus precluding a causal relationship. This effect may be attributed to a stress-induced activation of mesofrontal dopaminergic projections. It may also be attributed to an activation of noradrenergic projections. Known characteristics of the modulation of ERP by different stress-related ligands were used for further disambiguation of causality. The conjuncture of an attenuated Nd and an increased MMN might be interpreted as indicating a dopaminergic influence. The selective effect on the late portion of the Nd provides another tentative clue for this. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Prior studies have deliberately tracked the adrenocortical influence

  18. Representation of auditory-filter phase characteristics in the cortex of human listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rupp, A.; Sieroka, N.; Gutschalk, A.;

    2008-01-01

    , which differently affect the flat envelopes of the Schroeder-phase maskers. We examined the influence of auditory-filter phase characteristics on the neural representation in the auditory cortex by investigating cortical auditory evoked fields ( AEFs). We found that the P1m component exhibited larger...... amplitudes when a long-duration tone was presented in a repeating linearly downward sweeping ( Schroeder positive, or m(+)) masker than in a repeating linearly upward sweeping ( Schroeder negative, or m(-)) masker. We also examined the neural representation of short-duration tone pulses presented...... at different temporal positions within a single period of three maskers differing in their component phases ( m(+), m(-), and sine phase m(0)). The P1m amplitude varied with the position of the tone pulse in the masker and depended strongly on the masker waveform. The neuromagnetic results in all cases were...

  19. Mapping the after-effects of theta burst stimulation on the human auditory cortex with functional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Jamila; Zatorre, Robert J

    2012-09-12

    Auditory cortex pertains to the processing of sound, which is at the basis of speech or music-related processing. However, despite considerable recent progress, the functional properties and lateralization of the human auditory cortex are far from being fully understood. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique that can transiently or lastingly modulate cortical excitability via the application of localized magnetic field pulses, and represents a unique method of exploring plasticity and connectivity. It has only recently begun to be applied to understand auditory cortical function. An important issue in using TMS is that the physiological consequences of the stimulation are difficult to establish. Although many TMS studies make the implicit assumption that the area targeted by the coil is the area affected, this need not be the case, particularly for complex cognitive functions which depend on interactions across many brain regions. One solution to this problem is to combine TMS with functional Magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The idea here is that fMRI will provide an index of changes in brain activity associated with TMS. Thus, fMRI would give an independent means of assessing which areas are affected by TMS and how they are modulated. In addition, fMRI allows the assessment of functional connectivity, which represents a measure of the temporal coupling between distant regions. It can thus be useful not only to measure the net activity modulation induced by TMS in given locations, but also the degree to which the network properties are affected by TMS, via any observed changes in functional connectivity. Different approaches exist to combine TMS and functional imaging according to the temporal order of the methods. Functional MRI can be applied before, during, after, or both before and after TMS. Recently, some studies interleaved TMS and fMRI in order to provide online mapping of the functional changes induced by TMS. However, this

  20. Discrimination of timbre in early auditory responses of the human brain.

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    Jaeho Seol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The issue of how differences in timbre are represented in the neural response still has not been well addressed, particularly with regard to the relevant brain mechanisms. Here we employ phasing and clipping of tones to produce auditory stimuli differing to describe the multidimensional nature of timbre. We investigated the auditory response and sensory gating as well, using by magnetoencephalography (MEG. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty-five healthy subjects without hearing deficit participated in the experiments. Two different or same tones in timbre were presented through conditioning (S1-testing (S2 paradigm as a pair with an interval of 500 ms. As a result, the magnitudes of auditory M50 and M100 responses were different with timbre in both hemispheres. This result might support that timbre, at least by phasing and clipping, is discriminated in the auditory early processing. The second response in a pair affected by S1 in the consecutive stimuli occurred in M100 of the left hemisphere, whereas both M50 and M100 responses to S2 only in the right hemisphere reflected whether two stimuli in a pair were the same or not. Both M50 and M100 magnitudes were different with the presenting order (S1 vs. S2 for both same and different conditions in the both hemispheres. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: Our results demonstrate that the auditory response depends on timbre characteristics. Moreover, it was revealed that the auditory sensory gating is determined not by the stimulus that directly evokes the response, but rather by whether or not the two stimuli are identical in timbre.

  1. Atypical Bilateral Brain Synchronization in the Early Stage of Human Voice Auditory Processing in Young Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Toshiharu; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Yoshimura, Yuko; Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Chiaki; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Hirosawa, Tetsu; Furutani, Naoki; Higashida, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Takashi; Mutou, Kouhei; Asada, Minoru; Minabe, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been postulated to involve impaired neuronal cooperation in large-scale neural networks, including cortico-cortical interhemispheric circuitry. In the context of ASD, alterations in both peripheral and central auditory processes have also attracted a great deal of interest because these changes appear to represent pathophysiological processes; therefore, many prior studies have focused on atypical auditory responses in ASD. The auditory evoked field (AEF), recorded by magnetoencephalography, and the synchronization of these processes between right and left hemispheres was recently suggested to reflect various cognitive abilities in children. However, to date, no previous study has focused on AEF synchronization in ASD subjects. To assess global coordination across spatially distributed brain regions, the analysis of Omega complexity from multichannel neurophysiological data was proposed. Using Omega complexity analysis, we investigated the global coordination of AEFs in 3–8-year-old typically developing (TD) children (n = 50) and children with ASD (n = 50) in 50-ms time-windows. Children with ASD displayed significantly higher Omega complexities compared with TD children in the time-window of 0–50 ms, suggesting lower whole brain synchronization in the early stage of the P1m component. When we analyzed the left and right hemispheres separately, no significant differences in any time-windows were observed. These results suggest lower right-left hemispheric synchronization in children with ASD compared with TD children. Our study provides new evidence of aberrant neural synchronization in young children with ASD by investigating auditory evoked neural responses to the human voice. PMID:27074011

  2. "To ear is human, to frogive is divine": Bob Capranica's legacy to auditory neuroethology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Andrea Megela

    2013-03-01

    Bob Capranica was a towering figure in the field of auditory neuroethology. Among his many contributions are the exploitation of the anuran auditory system as a general vertebrate model for studying communication, the introduction of a signal processing approach for quantifying sender-receiver dynamics, and the concept of the matched filter for efficient neural processing of complex vocal signals. In this paper, meant to honor Bob on his election to Fellow of the International Society for Neuroethology, I provide a description and analysis of some of his most important research, and I highlight how the concepts and data he contributed still inspire neuroethology today.

  3. Audiological assessment value of click-evoked auditory brainstem response combined with single stimulation of the auditory steady-state evoked response on normal young people%听性脑干诱发电位结合单刺激听觉稳态诱发反应对正常青年人听阈正常值评估的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李倩庆; 宋江顺; 刘文婷

    2013-01-01

    目的 分析正常青年人多频刺激听觉稳态诱发电位(multiple stimuli auditory steady-state response,m-ASSR)、单频刺激听觉稳态诱发电位(single stimulusauditory steady-state response,s-ASSR)、听性脑干诱发电位(click-evoked auditory brain stem response,CABR)、纯音听力测试(pure tone auditory,PTA)阈值,探讨C-ABR结合0.5、1 kHz s-ASSR在正常青年人中反应阈的正常值.方法 对听力正常青年人(43人,共86耳)分别行PTA、m-ASSR、0.5、1.0 kHz s-ASSR、C-ABR检查.将PTA、m-ASSR、听力测试组合(C-ABR结合0.5、1 kHzs-ASSR反应阈)结果行f检验、线性回归分析等统计学分析.结果 ①0.5、1、2、4 kHz处,听力测试组合反应阈高于PTA;除1 kHz外其他频率均较m-ASSR反应阈接近PTA;②0.5、1、2、4 kHz处,听力测试组合反应阈预测PTA的回归方程分别为:y=0.75x-4.53,y=0.56x-4.46,y=0.62x-7.70和y=0.92x-12.66.结论 正常青年人中ASSR反应阈与PTA、C-ABR V波反应阈有一定的差值;听力测试组合较m-ASSR更接近PTA;听力测试组合可以更准确、更可靠评估正常成年人听阈水平.

  4. A preliminary study on the correlation of electrically evoked auditory brainstem response and electrically evoked compound action potential with the inserting depth of cochlear electrode%EABR与人工耳蜗电极植入深度关系的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静; 谢景华; 丁秀勇; 李悦; 高志强

    2015-01-01

    目的 初步探讨人工耳蜗电极植入深度和术后电诱发听性脑干反应(EABR,Electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses)及电诱发听神经复合动作电位(electrically evoked compound actionpotentials,ECAP)的相关性. 方法 选取耳蜗形态正常植入奥地利标准电极患者24例,术后头颅侧位片检查判断电极全植入. 根据电极耳蜗内位置分为E9-E12耳蜗底区、E5-E8耳蜗中区、E1-E4耳蜗顶区三部分,分别记录各区域EABR阈值及波形特点和对应区域的ECAP阈值,分析其间相关性. 结果蜗顶部、蜗中部、蜗底部EABR引出率分别为87.50%,83.33%,79.16%;ECAP引出率分别为91.67%,79.17%,75%;EABR波V阈值为分别为(20.13±5.91)qu,(22.98±4.82)qu,(26.71±6.25)qu;ECAP阈值分别为 (21.61±4.18)qu,(23.28±3.70)qu,(29.18±3.74)qu.结论 蜗顶部和蜗中部EABR及ECAP引出率高于蜗底部,自蜗顶区至蜗底区EABR和EACP阈值依次增高,相同植入深度电极的EABR阈值低于ECAP阈值.%Objective To explore the correlation of electrically evoked auditory brain stem response (EABR) and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) with the inserting depth of cochlear electrode. Methods EABR and ECAP recordings were carried out among 24 subjects with MED-EL standard cochlear electrode array implanted. With the electrode insertion depth assayed by lateral cranial X-ray photography, these evoked potential recordings were then analyzed, based on the definition of electrode placed locations in the regions of apical (E1-E4), middle (E5-E8) and basal (E9-E12) to determine if the threshold and latency differ depending on the region stimulated. Results At the locations of apical, middle and basal region, the positive recording rate was 87.50%, 83.33% and 79.16% for EABR, and that was 91.67%, 79.17%, 75% fro ECAP, with the thresholds of EABR at eV were (20.13±5.91)qu, (22.98±4.82)qu and (26.71±6.25)qu and those of ECAP were (21.61±4.18)qu, (23.28±3.70)qu, (29.18±3

  5. Central auditory function of deafness genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaredt, Marc A; Ebbers, Lena; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2014-06-01

    The highly variable benefit of hearing devices is a serious challenge in auditory rehabilitation. Various factors contribute to this phenomenon such as the diversity in ear defects, the different extent of auditory nerve hypoplasia, the age of intervention, and cognitive abilities. Recent analyses indicate that, in addition, central auditory functions of deafness genes have to be considered in this context. Since reduced neuronal activity acts as the common denominator in deafness, it is widely assumed that peripheral deafness influences development and function of the central auditory system in a stereotypical manner. However, functional characterization of transgenic mice with mutated deafness genes demonstrated gene-specific abnormalities in the central auditory system as well. A frequent function of deafness genes in the central auditory system is supported by a genome-wide expression study that revealed significant enrichment of these genes in the transcriptome of the auditory brainstem compared to the entire brain. Here, we will summarize current knowledge of the diverse central auditory functions of deafness genes. We furthermore propose the intimately interwoven gene regulatory networks governing development of the otic placode and the hindbrain as a mechanistic explanation for the widespread expression of these genes beyond the cochlea. We conclude that better knowledge of central auditory dysfunction caused by genetic alterations in deafness genes is required. In combination with improved genetic diagnostics becoming currently available through novel sequencing technologies, this information will likely contribute to better outcome prediction of hearing devices.

  6. Dynamic Correlations between Intrinsic Connectivity and Extrinsic Connectivity of the Auditory Cortex in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Cui

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The arrival of sound signals in the auditory cortex (AC triggers both local and inter-regional signal propagations over time up to hundreds of milliseconds and builds up both intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC and extrinsic functional connectivity (eFC of the AC. However, interactions between iFC and eFC are largely unknown. Using intracranial stereo-electroencephalographic recordings in people with drug-refractory epilepsy, this study mainly investigated the temporal dynamic of the relationships between iFC and eFC of the AC. The results showed that a Gaussian wideband-noise burst markedly elicited potentials in both the AC and numerous higher-order cortical regions outside the AC (non-auditory cortices. Granger causality analyses revealed that in the earlier time window, iFC of the AC was positively correlated with both eFC from the AC to the inferior temporal gyrus and that to the inferior parietal lobule. While in later periods, the iFC of the AC was positively correlated with eFC from the precentral gyrus to the AC and that from the insula to the AC. In conclusion, dual-directional interactions occur between iFC and eFC of the AC at different time windows following the sound stimulation and may form the foundation underlying various central auditory processes, including auditory sensory memory, object formation, integrations between sensory, perceptional, attentional, motor, emotional, and executive processes.

  7. Auditory Pattern Memory: Mechanisms of Tonal Sequence Discrimination by Human Observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-30

    and Creelman (1977) in a study of categorical perception. Tanner’s model included a short-term decaying memory for the acoustic input to the system plus...auditory pattern components, J. &Coust. Soc. 91 Am., 76, 1037- 1044. Macmillan, N. A., Kaplan H. L., & Creelman , C. D. (1977). The psychophysics of

  8. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either the vestibulo-spinal reflex (saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)), or the ocular muscle response (utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)). Some researchers have reported that air-conducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying otolith-specific deficits, including gait and balance problems that astronauts experience upon returning to earth. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that skull taps elicit similar patterns of cortical activity as the auditory tone bursts, and previous vestibular imaging studies. Subjects wore bilateral MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in the supine position, with eyes closed. Subjects received both forms of the stimulation in a counterbalanced fashion. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular system, resulting in the vestibular cortical response. Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory

  9. 体感刺激激活人脑听觉皮层%Somatosensory stimulation activates human auditory cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋宇钢; 周倩; 张明铭

    2011-01-01

    目的 初步探讨体感刺激是否可以激活听觉皮层,为听觉皮层作为多重感觉皮层提供证据.方法 5例颞叶占位的患者术中暴露颞上回后,分别接受声音(100 dB)和体感刺激,通过光学成像在红光下(610±10)nm观察初级、次级听觉皮层(BA41、42)反射内源光信号变化特征.结果 红光(610±lO)nm下我们观察到听觉刺激后听觉皮层(BA41、42)明显激活(n=5),体感刺激后可观察到和听觉刺激时相似区域的激活,且响应的方式与听觉刺激无明显差异(n=4).结论 体感刺激可激活听觉皮层,这可能是听觉皮层作为多重感觉皮层的一个证据.%Objective This paper is to explore whether somatosensory stimulation could activate human auditory cortex (AI) and provide a new evidence for the multisensory center.Methods Intrinsic optical signals from the superior temporal gyrus were measured intraoperatively in five anesthetized patients with temporal lobe tumors.We detected the activation of the auditory cortex ( BA41、42) during auditory and somatosensory stimuli respectively under red illuminating light (610 ± 10 ) nm.Results Under the illumination of red light wavelength we clearly detected hemodynamic responses in the primary and secondary auditory cortex ( BA 41,42) by the stimulus of the 100 dB clicks ( n =5) and similar response area during the somatosensory paradigm ( n =4).Conclusion Somatosensory stimulation can activate the auditory cortex which may be a new evidence of the multisensory center.

  10. Architectural organization of the african elephant diencephalon and brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseko, Busisiwe C; Patzke, Nina; Fuxe, Kjell; Manger, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the organization of the diencephalon and brainstem of the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) - a region of the elephant brain that has not been examined for at least 50 years. The current description, employing material amenable for use with modern neuroanatomical methods, shows that, for the most part, the elephant diencephalon and brainstem are what could be considered typically mammalian, with subtle differences in proportions and topology. The variations from these previous descriptions, where they occurred, were related to four specific aspects of neural information processing: (1) the motor systems, (2) the auditory and vocalization systems, (3) the orexinergic satiety/wakefulness centre of the hypothalamus and the locus coeruleus, and (4) the potential neurogenic lining of the brainstem. For the motor systems, three specific structures exhibited interesting differences in organization - the pars compacta of the substantia nigra, the facial motor nerve nucleus, and the inferior olivary nuclear complex, all related to the timing and learning of movements and likely related to the control of the trunk. The dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra appear to form distinct islands separated from each other by large fibre pathways, an appearance unique to the elephant. Each island may send topologically organized projections to the striatum forming a dopaminergic innervation mosaic that may relate to trunk movements. At least five regions of the combined vocalization production and auditory/seismic reception system were specialized, including the large and distinct nucleus ellipticus of the periaqueductal grey matter, the enlarged lateral superior olivary nucleus, the novel transverse infrageniculate nucleus of the dorsal thalamus, the enlarged dorsal column nuclei and the ventral posterior inferior nucleus of the dorsal thalamus. These specializations, related to production and reception of infrasound, allow the proposal of a

  11. Glycinergic inhibition tunes coincidence detection in the auditory brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myoga, Michael H; Lehnert, Simon; Leibold, Christian; Felmy, Felix; Grothe, Benedikt

    2014-05-07

    Neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) detect microsecond differences in the arrival time of sounds between the ears (interaural time differences or ITDs), a crucial binaural cue for sound localization. Synaptic inhibition has been implicated in tuning ITD sensitivity, but the cellular mechanisms underlying its influence on coincidence detection are debated. Here we determine the impact of inhibition on coincidence detection in adult Mongolian gerbil MSO brain slices by testing precise temporal integration of measured synaptic responses using conductance-clamp. We find that inhibition dynamically shifts the peak timing of excitation, depending on its relative arrival time, which in turn modulates the timing of best coincidence detection. Inhibitory control of coincidence detection timing is consistent with the diversity of ITD functions observed in vivo and is robust under physiologically relevant conditions. Our results provide strong evidence that temporal interactions between excitation and inhibition on microsecond timescales are critical for binaural processing.

  12. Sparse Spectro-Temporal Receptive Fields Based on Multi-Unit and High-Gamma Responses in Human Auditory Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick L Jenison

    Full Text Available Spectro-Temporal Receptive Fields (STRFs were estimated from both multi-unit sorted clusters and high-gamma power responses in human auditory cortex. Intracranial electrophysiological recordings were used to measure responses to a random chord sequence of Gammatone stimuli. Traditional methods for estimating STRFs from single-unit recordings, such as spike-triggered-averages, tend to be noisy and are less robust to other response signals such as local field potentials. We present an extension to recently advanced methods for estimating STRFs from generalized linear models (GLM. A new variant of regression using regularization that penalizes non-zero coefficients is described, which results in a sparse solution. The frequency-time structure of the STRF tends toward grouping in different areas of frequency-time and we demonstrate that group sparsity-inducing penalties applied to GLM estimates of STRFs reduces the background noise while preserving the complex internal structure. The contribution of local spiking activity to the high-gamma power signal was factored out of the STRF using the GLM method, and this contribution was significant in 85 percent of the cases. Although the GLM methods have been used to estimate STRFs in animals, this study examines the detailed structure directly from auditory cortex in the awake human brain. We used this approach to identify an abrupt change in the best frequency of estimated STRFs along posteromedial-to-anterolateral recording locations along the long axis of Heschl's gyrus. This change correlates well with a proposed transition from core to non-core auditory fields previously identified using the temporal response properties of Heschl's gyrus recordings elicited by click-train stimuli.

  13. Auditory agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slevc, L Robert; Shell, Alison R

    2015-01-01

    Auditory agnosia refers to impairments in sound perception and identification despite intact hearing, cognitive functioning, and language abilities (reading, writing, and speaking). Auditory agnosia can be general, affecting all types of sound perception, or can be (relatively) specific to a particular domain. Verbal auditory agnosia (also known as (pure) word deafness) refers to deficits specific to speech processing, environmental sound agnosia refers to difficulties confined to non-speech environmental sounds, and amusia refers to deficits confined to music. These deficits can be apperceptive, affecting basic perceptual processes, or associative, affecting the relation of a perceived auditory object to its meaning. This chapter discusses what is known about the behavioral symptoms and lesion correlates of these different types of auditory agnosia (focusing especially on verbal auditory agnosia), evidence for the role of a rapid temporal processing deficit in some aspects of auditory agnosia, and the few attempts to treat the perceptual deficits associated with auditory agnosia. A clear picture of auditory agnosia has been slow to emerge, hampered by the considerable heterogeneity in behavioral deficits, associated brain damage, and variable assessments across cases. Despite this lack of clarity, these striking deficits in complex sound processing continue to inform our understanding of auditory perception and cognition. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Induction of plasticity in the human motor cortex by pairing an auditory stimulus with TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowman, Paul F; Dueholm, Søren S; Rasmussen, Jesper H; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic stimuli can cause a transient increase in the excitability of the motor cortex. The current study leverages this phenomenon to develop a method for testing the integrity of auditorimotor integration and the capacity for auditorimotor plasticity. We demonstrate that appropriately timed transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the hand area, paired with auditorily mediated excitation of the motor cortex, induces an enhancement of motor cortex excitability that lasts beyond the time of stimulation. This result demonstrates for the first time that paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced plasticity within the motor cortex is applicable with auditory stimuli. We propose that the method developed here might provide a useful tool for future studies that measure auditory-motor connectivity in communication disorders.

  15. Spectro-temporal analysis of complex sounds in the human auditory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piechowiak, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Most sounds encountered in our everyday life carry information in terms of temporal variations of their envelopes. These envelope variations, or amplitude modulations, shape the basic building blocks for speech, music, and other complex sounds. Often a mixture of such sounds occurs in natural...... acoustic scenes, with each of the sounds having its own characteristic pattern of amplitude modulations. Complex sounds, such as speech, share the same amplitude modulations across a wide range of frequencies. This "comodulation" is an important characteristic of these sounds since it can enhance...... in conditions which are sensitive to cochlear suppression. The fourth chapter examines the role of cognitive processing in different stimulus paradigms: CMR, binaural masking level differences and modulation detection interference are investigated in contexts of auditory grouping. It is shown that auditory...

  16. Differential maturation of brain signal complexity in the human auditory and visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Lippe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain development carries with it a large number of structural changes at the local level which impact on the functional interactions of distributed neuronal networks for perceptual processing. Such changes enhance information processing capacity, which can be indexed by estimation of neural signal complexity. Here, we show that during development, EEG signal complexity increases from one month to 5 years of age in response to auditory and visual stimulation. However, the rates of change in complexity were not equivalent for the two responses. Infants’ signal complexity for the visual condition was greater than auditory signal complexity, whereas adults showed the same level of complexity to both types of stimuli. The differential rates of complexity change may reflect a combination of innate and experiential factors on the structure and function of the two sensory systems.

  17. The Effect of Temporal Context on the Sustained Pitch Response in Human Auditory Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Gutschalk, Alexander; Patterson, Roy D.; Scherg, Michael; Uppenkamp, Stefan; Rupp, André

    2006-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that activity in lateral Heschl’s gyrus covaries specifically with the strength of musical pitch. Pitch strength is important for the perceptual distinctiveness of an acoustic event, but in complex auditory scenes, the distinctiveness of an event also depends on its context. In this magnetoencephalography study, we evaluate how temporal context influences the sustained pitch response (SPR) in lateral Heschl’s gyrus. In 2 sequences of continuously alterna...

  18. Human Auditory and Adjacent Nonauditory Cerebral Cortices Are Hypermetabolic in Tinnitus as Measured by Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Mohamad; Bisconti, Silvia; Kovelman, Ioulia; Kileny, Paul; Basura, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is the phantom perception of sound in the absence of an acoustic stimulus. To date, the purported neural correlates of tinnitus from animal models have not been adequately characterized with translational technology in the human brain. The aim of the present study was to measure changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration from regions of interest (ROI; auditory cortex) and non-ROI (adjacent nonauditory cortices) during auditory stimulation and silence in participants with subjective tinnitus appreciated equally in both ears and in nontinnitus controls using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Control and tinnitus participants with normal/near-normal hearing were tested during a passive auditory task. Hemodynamic activity was monitored over ROI and non-ROI under episodic periods of auditory stimulation with 750 or 8000 Hz tones, broadband noise, and silence. During periods of silence, tinnitus participants maintained increased hemodynamic responses in ROI, while a significant deactivation was seen in controls. Interestingly, non-ROI activity was also increased in the tinnitus group as compared to controls during silence. The present results demonstrate that both auditory and select nonauditory cortices have elevated hemodynamic activity in participants with tinnitus in the absence of an external auditory stimulus, a finding that may reflect basic science neural correlates of tinnitus that ultimately contribute to phantom sound perception.

  19. Human Auditory and Adjacent Nonauditory Cerebral Cortices Are Hypermetabolic in Tinnitus as Measured by Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Issa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus is the phantom perception of sound in the absence of an acoustic stimulus. To date, the purported neural correlates of tinnitus from animal models have not been adequately characterized with translational technology in the human brain. The aim of the present study was to measure changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration from regions of interest (ROI; auditory cortex and non-ROI (adjacent nonauditory cortices during auditory stimulation and silence in participants with subjective tinnitus appreciated equally in both ears and in nontinnitus controls using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS. Control and tinnitus participants with normal/near-normal hearing were tested during a passive auditory task. Hemodynamic activity was monitored over ROI and non-ROI under episodic periods of auditory stimulation with 750 or 8000 Hz tones, broadband noise, and silence. During periods of silence, tinnitus participants maintained increased hemodynamic responses in ROI, while a significant deactivation was seen in controls. Interestingly, non-ROI activity was also increased in the tinnitus group as compared to controls during silence. The present results demonstrate that both auditory and select nonauditory cortices have elevated hemodynamic activity in participants with tinnitus in the absence of an external auditory stimulus, a finding that may reflect basic science neural correlates of tinnitus that ultimately contribute to phantom sound perception.

  20. Perceptual demand modulates activation of human auditory cortex in response to task-irrelevant sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Merav; Humphries, Colin; Verber, Matthew; Mangalathu, Jain; Desai, Anjali; Binder, Jeffrey R; Liebenthal, Einat

    2013-09-01

    In the visual modality, perceptual demand on a goal-directed task has been shown to modulate the extent to which irrelevant information can be disregarded at a sensory-perceptual stage of processing. In the auditory modality, the effect of perceptual demand on neural representations of task-irrelevant sounds is unclear. We compared simultaneous ERPs and fMRI responses associated with task-irrelevant sounds across parametrically modulated perceptual task demands in a dichotic-listening paradigm. Participants performed a signal detection task in one ear (Attend ear) while ignoring task-irrelevant syllable sounds in the other ear (Ignore ear). Results revealed modulation of syllable processing by auditory perceptual demand in an ROI in middle left superior temporal gyrus and in negative ERP activity 130-230 msec post stimulus onset. Increasing the perceptual demand in the Attend ear was associated with a reduced neural response in both fMRI and ERP to task-irrelevant sounds. These findings are in support of a selection model whereby ongoing perceptual demands modulate task-irrelevant sound processing in auditory cortex.

  1. Histological Basis of Laminar MRI Patterns in High Resolution Images of Fixed Human Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Mark N.; Cronin, Matthew J.; Bowtell, Richard W.; Scott, Ian S.; Palmer, Alan R.; Gowland, Penny A.

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of the auditory region of the temporal lobe would benefit from the availability of image contrast that allowed direct identification of the primary auditory cortex, as this region cannot be accurately located using gyral landmarks alone. Previous work has suggested that the primary area can be identified in magnetic resonance (MR) images because of its relatively high myelin content. However, MR images are also affected by the iron content of the tissue and in this study we sought to confirm that different MR image contrasts did correlate with the myelin content in the gray matter and were not primarily affected by iron content as is the case in the primary visual and somatosensory areas. By imaging blocks of fixed post-mortem cortex in a 7 T scanner and then sectioning them for histological staining we sought to assess the relative contribution of myelin and iron to the gray matter contrast in the auditory region. Evaluating the image contrast in T2*-weighted images and quantitative R2* maps showed a reasonably high correlation between the myelin density of the gray matter and the intensity of the MR images. The correlation with T1-weighted phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) images was better than with the previous two image types, and there were clearly differentiated borders between adjacent cortical areas in these images. A significant amount of iron was present in the auditory region, but did not seem to contribute to the laminar pattern of the cortical gray matter in MR images. Similar levels of iron were present in the gray and white matter and although iron was present in fibers within the gray matter, these fibers were fairly uniformly distributed across the cortex. Thus, we conclude that T1- and T2*-weighted imaging sequences do demonstrate the relatively high myelin levels that are characteristic of the deep layers in primary auditory cortex and allow it and some of the surrounding areas to be

  2. Creating a sense of auditory space

    OpenAIRE

    McAlpine, D

    2005-01-01

    Determining the location of a sound source requires the use of binaural hearing - information about a sound at the two ears converges onto neurones in the auditory brainstem to create a binaural representation. The main binaural cue used by many mammals to locate a sound source is the interaural time difference, or ITD. For over 50 years a single model has dominated thinking on how ITDs are processed. The Jeffress model consists of an array of coincidence detectors binaural neurones that resp...

  3. Sound identification in human auditory cortex: Differential contribution of local field potentials and high gamma power as revealed by direct intracranial recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourski, Kirill V; Steinschneider, Mitchell; Rhone, Ariane E; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew A; McMurray, Bob

    2015-09-01

    High gamma power has become the principal means of assessing auditory cortical activation in human intracranial studies, albeit at the expense of low frequency local field potentials (LFPs). It is unclear whether limiting analyses to high gamma impedes ability of clarifying auditory cortical organization. We compared the two measures obtained from posterolateral superior temporal gyrus (PLST) and evaluated their relative utility in sound categorization. Subjects were neurosurgical patients undergoing invasive monitoring for medically refractory epilepsy. Stimuli (consonant-vowel syllables varying in voicing and place of articulation and control tones) elicited robust evoked potentials and high gamma activity on PLST. LFPs had greater across-subject variability, yet yielded higher classification accuracy, relative to high gamma power. Classification was enhanced by including temporal detail of LFPs and combining LFP and high gamma. We conclude that future studies should consider utilizing both LFP and high gamma when investigating the functional organization of human auditory cortex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lyme disease of the brainstem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalina, Peter [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Decker, Andrew [Northern Westchester Hospital Center, Department of Neurology, Mt. Kisco, NY (United States); Kornel, Ezriel [Northern Westchester Hospital Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Mt. Kisco, NY (United States); Halperin, John J. [North Shore University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Manhasset, NY (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement typically causes local inflammation, most commonly meningitis, but rarely parenchymal brain involvement. We describe a patient who presented with clinical findings suggesting a brainstem process. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) suggested a brainstem neoplasm. Prior to biopsy, laboratory evaluation led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. Clinical and imaging abnormalities improved markedly following antimicrobial therapy. We describe Lyme disease involvement of the cerebellar peduncles with hypermetabolism on PET. Although MRI is the primary imaging modality for most suspected CNS pathology, the practical applications of PET continue to expand. (orig.)

  5. Auditory streaming by phase relations between components of harmonic complexes: a comparative study of human subjects and bird forebrain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolležal, Lena-Vanessa; Itatani, Naoya; Günther, Stefanie; Klump, Georg M

    2012-12-01

    Auditory streaming describes a percept in which a sequential series of sounds either is segregated into different streams or is integrated into one stream based on differences in their spectral or temporal characteristics. This phenomenon has been analyzed in human subjects (psychophysics) and European starlings (neurophysiology), presenting harmonic complex (HC) stimuli with different phase relations between their frequency components. Such stimuli allow evaluating streaming by temporal cues, as these stimuli only vary in the temporal waveform but have identical amplitude spectra. The present study applied the commonly used ABA- paradigm (van Noorden, 1975) and matched stimulus sets in psychophysics and neurophysiology to evaluate the effects of fundamental frequency (f₀), frequency range (f(LowCutoff)), tone duration (TD), and tone repetition time (TRT) on streaming by phase relations of the HC stimuli. By comparing the percept of humans with rate or temporal responses of avian forebrain neurons, a neuronal correlate of perceptual streaming of HC stimuli is described. The differences in the pattern of the neurons' spike rate responses provide for a better explanation for the percept observed in humans than the differences in the temporal responses (i.e., the representation of the periodicity in the timing of the action potentials). Especially for HC stimuli with a short 40-ms duration, the differences in the pattern of the neurons' temporal responses failed to represent the patterns of human perception, whereas the neurons' rate responses showed a good match. These results suggest that differential rate responses are a better predictor for auditory streaming by phase relations than temporal responses.

  6. The reduced cochlear output and the failure to adapt the central auditory response causes tinnitus in noise exposed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Rüttiger

    Full Text Available Tinnitus is proposed to be caused by decreased central input from the cochlea, followed by increased spontaneous and evoked subcortical activity that is interpreted as compensation for increased responsiveness of central auditory circuits. We compared equally noise exposed rats separated into groups with and without tinnitus for differences in brain responsiveness relative to the degree of deafferentation in the periphery. We analyzed (1 the number of CtBP2/RIBEYE-positive particles in ribbon synapses of the inner hair cell (IHC as a measure for deafferentation; (2 the fine structure of the amplitudes of auditory brainstem responses (ABR reflecting differences in sound responses following decreased auditory nerve activity and (3 the expression of the activity-regulated gene Arc in the auditory cortex (AC to identify long-lasting central activity following sensory deprivation. Following moderate trauma, 30% of animals exhibited tinnitus, similar to the tinnitus prevalence among hearing impaired humans. Although both tinnitus and no-tinnitus animals exhibited a reduced ABR wave I amplitude (generated by primary auditory nerve fibers, IHCs ribbon loss and high-frequency hearing impairment was more severe in tinnitus animals, associated with significantly reduced amplitudes of the more centrally generated wave IV and V and less intense staining of Arc mRNA and protein in the AC. The observed severe IHCs ribbon loss, the minimal restoration of ABR wave size, and reduced cortical Arc expression suggest that tinnitus is linked to a failure to adapt central circuits to reduced cochlear input.

  7. Signs of noise-induced neural degeneration in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtegaard, Pernille; Olsen, Steen Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies demonstrated that noise exposure causes a primary and selective loss of auditory-nerve fibres with low spontaneous firing rate. This neuronal impairment, if also present in humans, can be assumed to affect the processing of supra-threshold stimuli, especially in the presence...... thresholds within the “normal” range perform poorer, in terms of their speech recognition threshold in noise (SRTN), and (2) if auditory brainstem responses (ABR) reveal lower amplitude of wave I in the noise-exposed listeners. A test group of noise/music-exposed individuals and a control group were...

  8. Distributed neural signatures of natural audiovisual speech and music in the human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Juha; Koistinen, Olli-Pekka; Glerean, Enrico; Jylänki, Pasi; Vehtari, Aki; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Mäkelä, Sasu; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Nummi-Kuisma, Katarina; Nummi, Ilari; Sams, Mikko

    2016-12-06

    During a conversation or when listening to music, auditory and visual information are combined automatically into audiovisual objects. However, it is still poorly understood how specific type of visual information shapes neural processing of sounds in lifelike stimulus environments. Here we applied multi-voxel pattern analysis to investigate how naturally matching visual input modulates supratemporal cortex activity during processing of naturalistic acoustic speech, singing and instrumental music. Bayesian logistic regression classifiers with sparsity-promoting priors were trained to predict whether the stimulus was audiovisual or auditory, and whether it contained piano playing, speech, or singing. The predictive performances of the classifiers were tested by leaving one participant at a time for testing and training the model using the remaining 15 participants. The signature patterns associated with unimodal auditory stimuli encompassed distributed locations mostly in the middle and superior temporal gyrus (STG/MTG). A pattern regression analysis, based on a continuous acoustic model, revealed that activity in some of these MTG and STG areas were associated with acoustic features present in speech and music stimuli. Concurrent visual stimulus modulated activity in bilateral MTG (speech), lateral aspect of right anterior STG (singing), and bilateral parietal opercular cortex (piano). Our results suggest that specific supratemporal brain areas are involved in processing complex natural speech, singing, and piano playing, and other brain areas located in anterior (facial speech) and posterior (music-related hand actions) supratemporal cortex are influenced by related visual information. Those anterior and posterior supratemporal areas have been linked to stimulus identification and sensory-motor integration, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Attentional influences on functional mapping of speech sounds in human auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbert Thomas

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The speech signal contains both information about phonological features such as place of articulation and non-phonological features such as speaker identity. These are different aspects of the 'what'-processing stream (speaker vs. speech content, and here we show that they can be further segregated as they may occur in parallel but within different neural substrates. Subjects listened to two different vowels, each spoken by two different speakers. During one block, they were asked to identify a given vowel irrespectively of the speaker (phonological categorization, while during the other block the speaker had to be identified irrespectively of the vowel (speaker categorization. Auditory evoked fields were recorded using 148-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG, and magnetic source imaging was obtained for 17 subjects. Results During phonological categorization, a vowel-dependent difference of N100m source location perpendicular to the main tonotopic gradient replicated previous findings. In speaker categorization, the relative mapping of vowels remained unchanged but sources were shifted towards more posterior and more superior locations. Conclusions These results imply that the N100m reflects the extraction of abstract invariants from the speech signal. This part of the processing is accomplished in auditory areas anterior to AI, which are part of the auditory 'what' system. This network seems to include spatially separable modules for identifying the phonological information and for associating it with a particular speaker that are activated in synchrony but within different regions, suggesting that the 'what' processing can be more adequately modeled by a stream of parallel stages. The relative activation of the parallel processing stages can be modulated by attentional or task demands.

  10. Age-related hearing loss in dogs : Diagnosis with Brainstem-Evoked Response Audiometry and Treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant.

    OpenAIRE

    ter Haar, G.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common cause of acquired hearing impairment in dogs. Diagnosis requires objective electrophysiological tests (brainstem evoked response audiometry [BERA]) evaluating the entire audible frequency range in dogs. In our laboratory a method was developed to deliver tone bursts ranging in frequency from 1 - 32 kHz for frequency-specific assessment of the cochlea in dogs. Brainstem auditory evoked responses to a click (CS) and to 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, a...

  11. 听力筛查转诊婴幼儿不同滤波条件短纯音诱发听性脑干反应的比较%Comparison of tone burst evoked auditory brainstem responses with different filter settings for referral infants after hearing screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁文雯; 倪道凤; 李奉荣; 商莹莹

    2011-01-01

    Objective Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) evoked by tone burst is an important method of hearing assessment in referral infants after hearing screening. The present study was to compare the thresholds of tone burst ABR with filter settings of 30 - 1500 Hz and 30 - 3000 Hz at each frequency,figure out the characteristics of ABR thresholds with the two filter settings and the effect of the waveform judgement, so as to select a more optimal frequency specific ABR test parameter. Methods Thresholds with filter settings of 30 - 1500 Hz and 30 -3000 Hz in children aged 2 -33 months were recorded by click,tone burst ABR. A total of 18 patients ( 8 male / 10 female), 22 ears were included. Results The thresholds of tone burst ABR with filter settings of 30 - 3000 Hz were higher than that with filter settings of 30 - 1500 Hz. Significant difference was detected for that at 0. 5 kHz and 2.0 kHz ( t values were 2.238 and 2. 217, P < 0. 05 ), no significant difference between the two filter settings was detected at the rest frequencies tone evoked ABR thresholds. The waveform of ABR with filter settings of 30 - 1500 Hz was smoother than that with filter settings of 30 - 3000 Hz at the same stimulus intensity. Response curve of the latter appeared jagged small interfering wave. Conclusions The filter setting of 30 - 1500 Hz may be a more optimal parameter of frequency specific ABR to improve the accuracy of frequency specificity ABR for infants' hearing assessment.%目的 短纯音诱发听性脑干反应(ABR)是听力筛查转诊婴幼儿听力评估的重要方法,本研究比较滤波分别为30~1500 Hz与30~3000 Hz时不同频率短纯音ABR阈值之间的差异,总结两种滤波条件下ABR波形特点及对阈值判断的影响,以选择更优化的频率特异性ABR测试参数.方法 应用美国IHS公司SmartEP听觉诱发电位仪记录18例(22耳)2~33月龄婴幼儿短声、滤波为30~1500 Hz与30~3000 Hz短纯音ABR各频率反应阈.结果 0.5 k

  12. 正常听力耳鸣患者听尼特TM检测及高刺激率听觉脑干反应结果及分析%Tinni TestTM and high stimulus rate auditory brainstem response in patients with normal hearing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹效平; 王天生; 顾东胜; 黄爱萍

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics of tinnitus and the relationship between inner ear micro-circulation and tinnitus by examining tinnitus pitch-matching, loudnessin-matching, Feldmann masking curves and high stimulus rat ABR in tinnitus patients with normal hearing. Methods 162 patients with normal hearing and 140 tinnitus patients were enrolled. Tinnitus measurements consisted of pitch-matching, loudnessin-matching, Feldmann masking curves, and high stimulus rat auditory brainstem response (ABR). Results The tinnitus pitch-matched frequencies of tinnitus patients with normal hearing ranged from 125 Hz to 8 000 Hz, in which 57. 3% of them located between 3 000 Hz ~ 8 000 Hz. The tinnitus loudness-matched frequencies ranged form 0 dB to 2 0 dB, in which 45. 6% of them were 5 ~ 10 dB. There was no difference in I ~ V interval between the tinnitus ears and normal ears. Conclusion The clinical characterisitics of 162 tinnitus patients with normal hearing were identified in order to facilitate the further management. The relationship between the inner ear micro-circulation and tinnitus could not be attributed to the tinnitus in patients with normal hearing.%目的 观察正常听力耳鸣患者的耳鸣音调、响度、掩蔽曲线及高刺激率听觉脑干反应(ABR)检测结果,探讨耳呜的临床特征及发病机制.方法 选取162例正常听力耳鸣患者,对其进行耳鸣音调、响度匹配,同时选取其中140例单侧耳鸣患者,对140患耳与对侧140健耳,分别进行高、低刺激率ABR检测,比较不同刺激率下PL差值(△PL)、IPL差值(△IPL).结果 听力正常耳鸣的耳鸣音调分布从125~8000 Hz,以4000 ~8000 Hz高频为主;耳鸣响度从0~20 dB,5~ 10 dB最多;佛德曼曲线以汇聚型为主;患耳与健侧耳高、低刺激率ABRⅠ~Ⅴ△IPL差值>0.28 ms的耳数分别为16耳及12耳,差值无显著意义(P>0.05).结论 总结162例听力正常耳鸣患者的临床特征,为进一步的

  13. Clinical study of prognosls evaluation of brainstem auditory evoked potential combined with mesencephalic morphology on coma patients with severe craniocerebral injury%脑干听觉诱发电位联合中脑形态对重型颅脑损伤昏迷患者预后评估的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王磊; 黄富; 张清华; 赵振林; 胡栋; 肖华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) combined with mesencephalic morphology and the prognosis of coma patients with severe craniocerebral injury.Methods Forty-seven coma patients with severe craniocerebral injury were examined with BAEP and moaitored dynamically in early period of coma,and all these patients got head CT scans and the ratio of anteroposterior diameter and transverse diameter of mesencephalon were measured at the same time.Results There was a significantly negative relationship between the first BAEP classification and GOS score at the end of the follow-up (r =-0.755,P =0.000 ).Among all of the patients,there were 27 patients with the ratio of anteroposterior diameter and tansverse diameter of mesencephalon from 0.9 to 1.1,19 patients (70.4%,19/27) with good prognosis;20 patients with the ratio >1.1 or < 0.9,6 patients (30.0%,6/20 ) with good prognosis.The rate of good prognosis between the two had significant difference ( x2 =7.521,P =0.006).The sensitivity and specificity were 73.7%(14/19),82.6% (19/23) at the first BAEP combined with mesencephalic morphology,88.2% (15/17),100.0% (21/21) at the second BAEP combined with mesencephalic morphology.Conclusion BAEP combined with mesencephalic morphology can evaluate effectively the prognosis of coma patients with severe craniocerebral injury.%目的 探讨脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)联合中脑形态与重型颅脑损伤昏迷患者临床预后的关系.方法 对47例重型颅脑损伤昏迷患者早期行BAEP检查并行动态监测,同时行头颅CT扫描并测量中脑前后径与横径比值.结果 47例患者首次BAEP分级与随访结束时格拉斯哥预后量表(GOS)评分呈负相关(r=-0.755,P=0.000).47例患者中27例中脑前后径与横径比值为0.9 ~ 1.1,预后良好19例(70.4%,19/27);20例患者中脑前后径与横径比值>1.1或<0.9,预后良好6例(30.0%,6/20),两者预后良好率比

  14. Auditory evoked potentials in peripheral vestibular disorder individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matas, Carla Gentile

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The auditory and vestibular systems are located in the same peripheral receptor, however they enter the CNS and go through different ways, thus creating a number of connections and reaching a wide area of the encephalon. Despite going through different ways, some changes can impair both systems. Such tests as Auditory Evoked Potentials can help find a diagnosis when vestibular alterations are seen. Objective: describe the Auditory Evoked Potential results in individuals complaining about dizziness or vertigo with Peripheral Vestibular Disorders and in normal individuals having the same complaint. Methods: Short, middle and long latency Auditory Evoked Potentials were performed as a transversal prospective study. Conclusion: individuals complaining about dizziness or vertigo can show some changes in BAEP (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential, MLAEP (Medium Latency Auditory Evoked Potential and P300.

  15. Animal models for auditory streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itatani, Naoya; Klump, Georg M

    2017-02-19

    Sounds in the natural environment need to be assigned to acoustic sources to evaluate complex auditory scenes. Separating sources will affect the analysis of auditory features of sounds. As the benefits of assigning sounds to specific sources accrue to all species communicating acoustically, the ability for auditory scene analysis is widespread among different animals. Animal studies allow for a deeper insight into the neuronal mechanisms underlying auditory scene analysis. Here, we will review the paradigms applied in the study of auditory scene analysis and streaming of sequential sounds in animal models. We will compare the psychophysical results from the animal studies to the evidence obtained in human psychophysics of auditory streaming, i.e. in a task commonly used for measuring the capability for auditory scene analysis. Furthermore, the neuronal correlates of auditory streaming will be reviewed in different animal models and the observations of the neurons' response measures will be related to perception. The across-species comparison will reveal whether similar demands in the analysis of acoustic scenes have resulted in similar perceptual and neuronal processing mechanisms in the wide range of species being capable of auditory scene analysis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Auditory and visual scene analysis'.

  16. On the Relevance of Natural Stimuli for the Study of Brainstem Correlates: The Example of Consonance Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Marion; Bidelman, Gavin M; Peretz, Isabelle; Lehmann, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Some combinations of musical tones sound pleasing to Western listeners, and are termed consonant, while others sound discordant, and are termed dissonant. The perceptual phenomenon of consonance has been traced to the acoustic property of harmonicity. It has been repeatedly shown that neural correlates of consonance can be found as early as the auditory brainstem as reflected in the harmonicity of the scalp-recorded frequency-following response (FFR). "Neural Pitch Salience" (NPS) measured from FFRs-essentially a time-domain equivalent of the classic pattern recognition models of pitch-has been found to correlate with behavioral judgments of consonance for synthetic stimuli. Following the idea that the auditory system has evolved to process behaviorally relevant natural sounds, and in order to test the generalizability of this finding made with synthetic tones, we recorded FFRs for consonant and dissonant intervals composed of synthetic and natural stimuli. We found that NPS correlated with behavioral judgments of consonance and dissonance for synthetic but not for naturalistic sounds. These results suggest that while some form of harmonicity can be computed from the auditory brainstem response, the general percept of consonance and dissonance is not captured by this measure. It might either be represented in the brainstem in a different code (such as place code) or arise at higher levels of the auditory pathway. Our findings further illustrate the importance of using natural sounds, as a complementary tool to fully-controlled synthetic sounds, when probing auditory perception.

  17. On the Relevance of Natural Stimuli for the Study of Brainstem Correlates: The Example of Consonance Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Cousineau

    Full Text Available Some combinations of musical tones sound pleasing to Western listeners, and are termed consonant, while others sound discordant, and are termed dissonant. The perceptual phenomenon of consonance has been traced to the acoustic property of harmonicity. It has been repeatedly shown that neural correlates of consonance can be found as early as the auditory brainstem as reflected in the harmonicity of the scalp-recorded frequency-following response (FFR. "Neural Pitch Salience" (NPS measured from FFRs-essentially a time-domain equivalent of the classic pattern recognition models of pitch-has been found to correlate with behavioral judgments of consonance for synthetic stimuli. Following the idea that the auditory system has evolved to process behaviorally relevant natural sounds, and in order to test the generalizability of this finding made with synthetic tones, we recorded FFRs for consonant and dissonant intervals composed of synthetic and natural stimuli. We found that NPS correlated with behavioral judgments of consonance and dissonance for synthetic but not for naturalistic sounds. These results suggest that while some form of harmonicity can be computed from the auditory brainstem response, the general percept of consonance and dissonance is not captured by this measure. It might either be represented in the brainstem in a different code (such as place code or arise at higher levels of the auditory pathway. Our findings further illustrate the importance of using natural sounds, as a complementary tool to fully-controlled synthetic sounds, when probing auditory perception.

  18. Auditory agnosia due to long-term severe hydrocephalus caused by spina bifida - specific auditory pathway versus nonspecific auditory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Kaga, Kimitaka; Hayashi, Akimasa

    2011-07-01

    A 27-year-old female showed auditory agnosia after long-term severe hydrocephalus due to congenital spina bifida. After years of hydrocephalus, she gradually suffered from hearing loss in her right ear at 19 years of age, followed by her left ear. During the time when she retained some ability to hear, she experienced severe difficulty in distinguishing verbal, environmental, and musical instrumental sounds. However, her auditory brainstem response and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were largely intact in the left ear. Her bilateral auditory cortices were preserved, as shown by neuroimaging, whereas her auditory radiations were severely damaged owing to progressive hydrocephalus. Although she had a complete bilateral hearing loss, she felt great pleasure when exposed to music. After years of self-training to read lips, she regained fluent ability to communicate. Clinical manifestations of this patient indicate that auditory agnosia can occur after long-term hydrocephalus due to spina bifida; the secondary auditory pathway may play a role in both auditory perception and hearing rehabilitation.

  19. Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Estado Estável no diagnóstico audiológico infantil: uma comparação com os Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Tronco Encefálico Steady-state auditory evoked responses in audiological diagnosis in children: a comparison with brainstem evoked auditory responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ribeiro Ivo Rodrigues

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Os Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Estado Estável (PEAEE têm sido apontados como uma técnica promissora na avaliação audiológica infantil. OBJETIVO: Investigar o nível de concordância entre os resultados dos PEAEE e dos Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Tronco Encefálico (PEATE-clique em um grupo de crianças com perda auditiva sensorioneural, averiguando assim a aplicabilidade clínica desta técnica na avaliação audiológica infantil. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico prospectivo de coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: 15 crianças com idade entre dois e 36 meses e diagnóstico de perda auditiva sensorioneural. A concordância entre as respostas dos dois testes foi avaliada por meio do coeficiente de correlação intraclasse e o teste de McNemar comparou os dois testes quanto à probabilidade de ocorrência de resposta. RESULTADOS: Os coeficientes de correlação encontrados foram 0,70; 0,64; 0,49; 0,69; 0,63 e 0,68 respectivamente para as frequências de 1, 2, 4, 1-2, 2-4 e 1-2-4kHz. No teste de McNemar foi obtido p=0.000, indicando que a probabilidade de se obter resposta presente nos dois testes não é igual, sendo maior nos PEAEE. CONCLUSÃO: A boa concordância observada entre as técnicas sugere que um exame pode ser complementar ao outro. Os PEAEE, entretanto, promoveram informações adicionais nos casos de perdas severas e profundas, acrescentando dados importantes para a reabilitação destas crianças e proporcionando maior precisão no diagnóstico audiológico.Auditory Steady-State Responses (ASSR are being recognized as a promising technique in the assessment of hearing in children. AIM: To investigate the agreement level between results obtained from ASSR and click-ABR in a group of children with sensorineural hearing loss, in order to study the clinical applicability of this technique to evaluate the hearing status in young children. STUDY DESIGN: clinical prospective with a cross-sectional cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS

  20. Auditory evoked potentials in a newborn Wistar rat model of hyperbilirubinemia

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    Çagil Gökdogan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Hyperbilirubinemia is a common health problem in newborns. Its effects can be different according to the level and duration of the hyperbilirubinemia. The toxic effect of bilirubin on the auditory system can be seen as a sensory neural hearing loss or auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of toxic bilirubin level on the auditory system by using Auditory Brainstem Response audiometry. METHODS: Rats are used as animal models due to their low cost and easy attainability. Auditory Brainstem Response was used for auditory assessment. In this study, three groups were established: experimental, control and placebo groups. RESULTS: In the experimental group, which consists of rats with hyperbilirubinemia, sensory neural hearing loss was found bilaterally in 4 rats (66.67% and unilaterally in 2 rats (16.67% and auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder was found unilaterally in 1 rat (8.33%. Auditory Brainstem Response thresholds were significantly elevated compared to control and placebo groups (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Hyperbilirubinemia of newborn rats may result both in sensory neural hearing loss and auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder.

  1. Auditory evoked potentials in a newborn Wistar rat model of hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökdoğan, Çağıl; Genç, Aydan; Gülbahar, Özlem; Gökdoğan, Ozan; Helvacı, Ayşe; Bezgin, Selin Üstün; Memiş, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia is a common health problem in newborns. Its effects can be different according to the level and duration of the hyperbilirubinemia. The toxic effect of bilirubin on the auditory system can be seen as a sensory neural hearing loss or auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD). The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of toxic bilirubin level on the auditory system by using Auditory Brainstem Response audiometry. Rats are used as animal models due to their low cost and easy attainability. Auditory Brainstem Response was used for auditory assessment. In this study, three groups were established: experimental, control and placebo groups. In the experimental group, which consists of rats with hyperbilirubinemia, sensory neural hearing loss was found bilaterally in 4 rats (66.67%) and unilaterally in 2 rats (16.67%) and auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder was found unilaterally in 1 rat (8.33%). Auditory Brainstem Response thresholds were significantly elevated compared to control and placebo groups (p<0.05). Hyperbilirubinemia of newborn rats may result both in sensory neural hearing loss and auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  3. Disentangling the effects of phonation and articulation: Hemispheric asymmetries in the auditory N1m response of the human brain

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    Mäkinen Ville

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cortical activity underlying the perception of vowel identity has typically been addressed by manipulating the first and second formant frequency (F1 & F2 of the speech stimuli. These two values, originating from articulation, are already sufficient for the phonetic characterization of vowel category. In the present study, we investigated how the spectral cues caused by articulation are reflected in cortical speech processing when combined with phonation, the other major part of speech production manifested as the fundamental frequency (F0 and its harmonic integer multiples. To study the combined effects of articulation and phonation we presented vowels with either high (/a/ or low (/u/ formant frequencies which were driven by three different types of excitation: a natural periodic pulseform reflecting the vibration of the vocal folds, an aperiodic noise excitation, or a tonal waveform. The auditory N1m response was recorded with whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG from ten human subjects in order to resolve whether brain events reflecting articulation and phonation are specific to the left or right hemisphere of the human brain. Results The N1m responses for the six stimulus types displayed a considerable dynamic range of 115–135 ms, and were elicited faster (~10 ms by the high-formant /a/ than by the low-formant /u/, indicating an effect of articulation. While excitation type had no effect on the latency of the right-hemispheric N1m, the left-hemispheric N1m elicited by the tonally excited /a/ was some 10 ms earlier than that elicited by the periodic and the aperiodic excitation. The amplitude of the N1m in both hemispheres was systematically stronger to stimulation with natural periodic excitation. Also, stimulus type had a marked (up to 7 mm effect on the source location of the N1m, with periodic excitation resulting in more anterior sources than aperiodic and tonal excitation. Conclusion The auditory brain areas

  4. Effects of Auditory Input in Individuation Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christopher W.; Sloutsky, Vladimir M.

    2008-01-01

    Under many conditions auditory input interferes with visual processing, especially early in development. These interference effects are often more pronounced when the auditory input is unfamiliar than when the auditory input is familiar (e.g. human speech, pre-familiarized sounds, etc.). The current study extends this research by examining how…

  5. Deriving cochlear delays in humans using otoacoustic emissions and auditory evoked potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigasse, Gilles

    A great deal of the processing of incoming sounds to the auditory system occurs within the cochlear. The organ of Corti within the cochlea has differing mechanical properties along its length that broadly gives rise to frequency selectivity. Its stiffness is at maximum at the base and decreases...... relation between frequency and travel time in the cochlea defines the cochlear delay. This delay is directly associated with the signal analysis occurring in the inner ear and is therefore of primary interest to get a better knowledge of this organ. It is possible to estimate the cochlear delay by direct...... and ASSR latency estimates demonstrated similar rates of latency decrease as a function of frequency. It was further concluded, in this thesis, that OAE measurements are the most appropriate to estimate cochlear delays, since they had the best repeatability and the shortest recording time. Preliminary...

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of human locomotion: effects of rhythmic auditory cueing on local dynamic stability

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    Philippe eTerrier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been observed that times series of gait parameters (stride length (SL, stride time (ST and stride speed (SS, exhibit long-term persistence and fractal-like properties. Synchronizing steps with rhythmic auditory stimuli modifies the persistent fluctuation pattern to anti-persistence. Another nonlinear method estimates the degree of resilience of gait control to small perturbations, i.e. the local dynamic stability (LDS. The method makes use of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, which estimates how fast a nonlinear system embedded in a reconstructed state space (attractor diverges after an infinitesimal perturbation. We propose to use an instrumented treadmill to simultaneously measure basic gait parameters (time series of SL, ST and SS from which the statistical persistence among consecutive strides can be assessed, and the trajectory of the center of pressure (from which the LDS can be estimated. In 20 healthy participants, the response to rhythmic auditory cueing (RAC of LDS and of statistical persistence (assessed with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA was compared. By analyzing the divergence curves, we observed that long-term LDS (computed as the reverse of the average logarithmic rate of divergence between the 4th and the 10th strides downstream from nearest neighbors in the reconstructed attractor was strongly enhanced (relative change +47%. That is likely the indication of a more dampened dynamics. The change in short-term LDS (divergence over one step was smaller (+3%. DFA results (scaling exponents confirmed an anti-persistent pattern in ST, SL and SS. Long-term LDS (but not short-term LDS and scaling exponents exhibited a significant correlation between them (r=0.7. Both phenomena probably result from the more conscious/voluntary gait control that is required by RAC. We suggest that LDS and statistical persistence should be used to evaluate the efficiency of cueing therapy in patients with neurological gait disorders.

  7. Complexin-I Is Required for High-Fidelity Transmission at the Endbulb of Held Auditory Synapse

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strenzke, Nicola; Chanda, Soham; Kopp-Scheinpflug, Cornelia; Khimich, Darina; Reim, Kerstin; Bulankina, Anna V; Neef, Andreas; Wolf, Fred; Brose, Nils; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A; Moser, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    .... Here, we explored the role of CPXs in the mouse auditory system. Hearing was impaired in CPX I knock-out mice but normal in knock-out mice for CPXs II, III, IV, and III/IV as measured by auditory brainstem responses...

  8. Auditory hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Jan Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations constitute a phenomenologically rich group of endogenously mediated percepts which are associated with psychiatric, neurologic, otologic, and other medical conditions, but which are also experienced by 10-15% of all healthy individuals in the general population. The group of phenomena is probably best known for its verbal auditory subtype, but it also includes musical hallucinations, echo of reading, exploding-head syndrome, and many other types. The subgroup of verbal auditory hallucinations has been studied extensively with the aid of neuroimaging techniques, and from those studies emerges an outline of a functional as well as a structural network of widely distributed brain areas involved in their mediation. The present chapter provides an overview of the various types of auditory hallucination described in the literature, summarizes our current knowledge of the auditory networks involved in their mediation, and draws on ideas from the philosophy of science and network science to reconceptualize the auditory hallucinatory experience, and point out directions for future research into its neurobiologic substrates. In addition, it provides an overview of known associations with various clinical conditions and of the existing evidence for pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments.

  9. Human Auditory Communication Disturbances Due To Road Traffic Noise Pollution in Calabar City, Nigeria

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    E. O. Obisung

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Study on auditory communication disturbances due to road transportation noise in Calabar Urban City, Nigeria was carried out. Both subjective (psycho-social and objective (acoustical measurements were made for a period of twelve months. Questionnaire/interview schedules containing pertinent questions were administered randomly to 500 respondents of age 15 year and above, who were also with a good level of literacy skills (reading writing and leaving in houses sited along or parallel to busy road, with heavy traffic volume for at least three (3 years. The questionnaires provided the psycho-social responses of respondents used in this study, their reactions to road traffic noise effect on communication activities (listening to radio, listening and watching television, verbal communication between individuals, speech communication and telephone/GSM communication. Acoustical measurements were made at the facades of respondents' houses facing the road using precision digital sound level meter, Bruel and Kjaer (B & K type 732 following ISO standards 1996. The meter read the road traffic noise levels at measurement sites (facades of respondents' houses. From the results obtained in this study residents of Calabar City suffer serious communication interferences as a result of excessive road traffic noise levels. The noise indices used for this study were LAeq and Ldn. Noise levels obtained were over 93 dB(A (daytime and 60 dB(A, (nighttime for LAeq and 80 dB(A for Ldn. These far exceeded the recommended theoretical values of 45-55 and 70 dB(A, for LAeqand Ldn respectively. A-weighted sound pressure level (SPLS range between 87.0 and 100.0 dB(A. In this study it was also observed that over 98% of the respondents reported their television watching/radio listening disturbed, 99% recorded telephone/GSM disturbed, and 98% reported face-to-face verbal conversation disturbed, and 98% reported speech communication disturbed. The background noise levels (BNLs of

  10. A case of Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis in childhood

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    Ji Youn Kim

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE is a rare disease diagnosed by specific clinical features such as 'progressive, relatively symmetric external ophthalmoplegia and ataxia by 4 weeks' and 'disturbance of consciousness or hyperreflexia' after the exclusion of other diseases involving the brain stem. Anti-ganglioside antibodies (GM, GD and GQ in the serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are sometimes informative for the diagnosis of BBE because of the rarity of positive findings in other diagnositic methods: brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, routine CSF examination, motor nerve conduction study, and needle electromyography. We report a rare case of childhood BBE with elevated anti-GM1 antibodies in the serum, who had specific clinical symptoms such as a cranial polyneuropathy presenting as ophthalmoplegia, dysarthria, dysphagia, and facial weakness; progressive motor weakness; altered mental status; and ataxia. However, the brain MRI, routine CSF examination, nerve conduction studies, electromyography, somatosensory evoked potentials, and brainstem auditory evoked potentials were normal. BBE was suspected and the patient was successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulins.

  11. Neural adaptation to silence in the human auditory cortex: a magnetoencephalographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that a decrement in the N1m response, a major deflection in the auditory evoked response, with sound repetition was mainly caused by bottom-up driven neural refractory periods following brain activation due to sound stimulations. However, it currently remains unknown whether this decrement occurs with a repetition of silences, which do not induce refractoriness. In the present study, we investigated decrements in N1m responses elicited by five repetitive silences in a continuous pure tone and by five repetitive pure tones in silence using magnetoencephalography. Repetitive sound stimulation differentially affected the N1m decrement in a sound type-dependent manner; while the N1m amplitude decreased from the 1st to the 2nd pure tone and remained constant from the 2nd to the 5th pure tone in silence, a gradual decrement was observed in the N1m amplitude from the 1st to the 5th silence embedded in a continuous pure tone. Our results suggest that neural refractoriness may mainly cause decrements in N1m responses elicited by trains of pure tones in silence, while habituation, which is a form of the implicit learning process, may play an important role in the N1m source strength decrements elicited by successive silences in a continuous pure tone.

  12. A Neurophysiological Approach for Evaluating Noise-Induced Sleep Disturbance: Calculating the Time Constant of the Dynamic Characteristics in the Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagusari, Junta; Matsui, Toshihito

    2016-03-25

    Chronic sleep disturbance induced by traffic noise is considered to cause environmental sleep disorder, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes and other stress-related diseases. However, noise indices for the evaluation of sleep disturbance are not based on the neurophysiological process of awakening regulated by the brainstem. In this study, through the neurophysiological approach, we attempted (1) to investigate the thresholds of awakening due to external stimuli in the brainstem; (2) to evaluate the dynamic characteristics in the brainstem and (3) to verify the validity of existing noise indices. Using the mathematical Phillips-Robinson model, we obtained thresholds of awakening in the brainstem for different durations of external stimuli. The analysis revealed that the brainstem seemed insensitive to short stimuli and that the response to external stimuli in the brainstem could be approximated by a first-order lag system with a time constant of 10-100 s. These results suggest that the brainstem did not integrate sound energy as external stimuli, but neuroelectrical signals from auditory nerve. To understand the awakening risk accumulated in the brainstem, we introduced a new concept of "awakening potential" instead of sound energy.

  13. GF-GC Theory of Human Cognition: Differentiation of Short-Term Auditory and Visual Memory Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Ron; Lieberman, Lewis

    1994-01-01

    Study sought to determine whether separate short-term auditory and visual memory factors would emerge given a sufficient number of markers in a factor matrix. A principal component factor analysis with varimax rotation was performed. Short-term visual and short-term auditory memory factors emerged as expected. (RJM)

  14. Auditory and Visual Sensations

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    Professor Yoichi Ando, acoustic architectural designer of the Kirishima International Concert Hall in Japan, presents a comprehensive rational-scientific approach to designing performance spaces. His theory is based on systematic psychoacoustical observations of spatial hearing and listener preferences, whose neuronal correlates are observed in the neurophysiology of the human brain. A correlation-based model of neuronal signal processing in the central auditory system is proposed in which temporal sensations (pitch, timbre, loudness, duration) are represented by an internal autocorrelation representation, and spatial sensations (sound location, size, diffuseness related to envelopment) are represented by an internal interaural crosscorrelation function. Together these two internal central auditory representations account for the basic auditory qualities that are relevant for listening to music and speech in indoor performance spaces. Observed psychological and neurophysiological commonalities between auditor...

  15. Analysis of brainstem auditory evoked potential changes and follow-up outcomes in children with severe hand-foot-mouth disease%重症手足口病脑干听觉诱发电位变化及随访结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆彦; 汤昔康; 刘春华

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the application value of brainstem auditory evoked potential (BA-EP)in children diagnosed with severe hand-foot-mouth disease by assessing the BAEP changes and follow-up outcomes. Methods Eighty six children with severe hand-foot-mouth disease were assigned into the observa-tion group,and 50 children undergoing physical examination were recruited into the control group. The BAEPs were statistically compared between two groups. According to the Hall classification of the BAEPs upon admis-sion,86 affected children were divided into the normal and abnormal BAEP groups. The children in the abnor-mal BAEP group were further classified into the early and late recovery groups based upon the re-examination results at the 2nd week of course of diseases. Clinical features and prognosis were statistically compared among all groups. Results Among 86 children with severe hand-foot-mouth disease,32 cases (37%)were manifes-ted as abnormal BAEPs including 23 of brain stem type,5 of inner ear type and 4 of mixed type. Compared with the control group,the PL ofⅠ,Ⅲ,Ⅴwave and IPL ofⅠ~Ⅲ,Ⅲ~Ⅴand Ⅰ~Ⅴwere significantly prolonged (all P0.05 ). The incidence of nervous system sequela and abnormal rate of head MRI in the late recovery group was considerably higher compared with that in the early recovery group (both P0.05 ). Conclusions A majority of children with hand-foot-mouth disease are complicated with abnormal BAEP. Those complicated with BAEP abnormality present with severe clinical mani-festations. Along with the alleviation of the disease,BAEP may return to normal level in most cases. For those with persistent BAEP abnormality,the incidence of neurological sequela is relatively high.%目的:通过检测脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)在重症手足口病的变化及随访结果,评价BAEP在重症手足口病的应用价值。方法收集重症手足口病患儿86例为观察组,以同期50名健康体检儿童为对照组,比较2

  16. Non-linear laws of echoic memory and auditory change detection in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshima Yasuyuki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of any abrupt change in the environment is important to survival. Since memory of preceding sensory conditions is necessary for detecting changes, such a change-detection system relates closely to the memory system. Here we used an auditory change-related N1 subcomponent (change-N1 of event-related brain potentials to investigate cortical mechanisms underlying change detection and echoic memory. Results Change-N1 was elicited by a simple paradigm with two tones, a standard followed by a deviant, while subjects watched a silent movie. The amplitude of change-N1 elicited by a fixed sound pressure deviance (70 dB vs. 75 dB was negatively correlated with the logarithm of the interval between the standard sound and deviant sound (1, 10, 100, or 1000 ms, while positively correlated with the logarithm of the duration of the standard sound (25, 100, 500, or 1000 ms. The amplitude of change-N1 elicited by a deviance in sound pressure, sound frequency, and sound location was correlated with the logarithm of the magnitude of physical differences between the standard and deviant sounds. Conclusions The present findings suggest that temporal representation of echoic memory is non-linear and Weber-Fechner law holds for the automatic cortical response to sound changes within a suprathreshold range. Since the present results show that the behavior of echoic memory can be understood through change-N1, change-N1 would be a useful tool to investigate memory systems.

  17. Brainstem injury in motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viano, David C; Parenteau, Chantal S

    2017-10-03

    This is a descriptive study of the frequency and risk for brainstem injury by crash type, belt use, and crash severity (delta-V). NASS-CDS electronic cases were reviewed to see whether the transition from vehicles without advanced airbags and seat belts and side airbags and curtains to vehicles with the safety technologies has influenced the risk for brainstem injury. 1994-2013 NASS-CDS was analyzed to determine the number of brainstem injuries in nonejected adults (15+ years old) in vehicle crashes. Crashes were grouped by front, side, rear, and rollover. The effect of belt use was investigated. Light vehicles were included with model year (MY) 1994+. Occupants with severe head injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] 4+) and Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale (MAIS) 4+F injury were also determined. The risk for injury with standard errors was determined using the MAIS 0+F exposure by belt use and crash type. NASS-CDS electronic cases were studied with brainstem injury in 2001-2013 MY vehicles. NASS-CDS indicates there are 872 ± 133 cases of brainstem injury per year. About 16.0% of AIS 4+ head injury involves the brainstem. For belted occupants, the highest risk for brainstem injury was in side impacts at 0.065 ± 0.010%. In contrast, the highest risk for brainstem injury was 0.310 ± 0.291% in rear impacts and 0.310 ± 0.170% in rollovers for unbelted occupants. The risk for brainstem injury increased with crash severity. The highest risk for brainstem injury was 3.54 ± 1.45% in crashes with >72 km/h (>45 mph) delta-V. Exponential functions fit the change in risk with delta-V. Eighteen NASS-CDS electronic cases showed that brainstem injury occurred in very severe collisions where the occupant experienced multiple injuries from intrusion or impact on vehicle structures stiffened by deformation. The risk for brainstem injury in belted occupants has remained essentially constant over 20 years, whereas the risk for MAIS 4+F injury has declined 38.3%. The prevention

  18. Imaging of adult brainstem gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, Bela, E-mail: purohitbela@yahoo.co.in; Kamli, Ali A.; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •BSG are classified on MRI into diffuse low-grade, malignant, focal tectal and exophytic subtypes. •Their prognosis and treatment is variable and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. •This article illustrates the imaging of adult BSGs on MRI and FET-PET. •We also describe prognostic factors and the treatment options of these tumours. -- Abstract: Brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are uncommon in adults accounting for about 2% of all intracranial neoplasms. They are often phenotypically low-grade as compared to their more common paediatric counterparts. Since brainstem biopsies are rarely performed, these tumours are commonly classified according to their MR imaging characteristics into 4 subgroups: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas, (b) enhancing malignant gliomas, (c) focal tectal gliomas and (d) exophytic gliomas/other subtypes. The prognosis and treatment is variable for the different types and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. Radiotherapy (RT) with adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment of diffuse low-grade and malignant BSGs, whereas, surgical resection is limited to the exophytic subtypes. Review of previous literature shows that the detailed imaging of adult BSGs has not received significant attention. This review illustrates in detail the imaging features of adult BSGs using conventional and advanced MR techniques like diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), as well as {sup 18}F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FET/PET). We have discussed the pertinent differences between childhood and adult BSGs, imaging mimics, prognostic factors and briefly reviewed the treatment options of these tumours.

  19. The encoding of auditory objects in auditory cortex: insights from magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jonathan Z

    2015-02-01

    Auditory objects, like their visual counterparts, are perceptually defined constructs, but nevertheless must arise from underlying neural circuitry. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of the neural responses of human subjects listening to complex auditory scenes, we review studies that demonstrate that auditory objects are indeed neurally represented in auditory cortex. The studies use neural responses obtained from different experiments in which subjects selectively listen to one of two competing auditory streams embedded in a variety of auditory scenes. The auditory streams overlap spatially and often spectrally. In particular, the studies demonstrate that selective attentional gain does not act globally on the entire auditory scene, but rather acts differentially on the separate auditory streams. This stream-based attentional gain is then used as a tool to individually analyze the different neural representations of the competing auditory streams. The neural representation of the attended stream, located in posterior auditory cortex, dominates the neural responses. Critically, when the intensities of the attended and background streams are separately varied over a wide intensity range, the neural representation of the attended speech adapts only to the intensity of that speaker, irrespective of the intensity of the background speaker. This demonstrates object-level intensity gain control in addition to the above object-level selective attentional gain. Overall, these results indicate that concurrently streaming auditory objects, even if spectrally overlapping and not resolvable at the auditory periphery, are individually neurally encoded in auditory cortex, as separate objects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of general anaesthesia on the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, L; Fernández-Candil, J; León, A; Gambús, P L

    2017-03-01

    The exact role of the brainstem in the control of body functions is not yet well known and the same applies to the influence of general anaesthesia on brainstem functions. Nevertheless in all general anaesthesia the anaesthesiologist should be aware of the interaction of anaesthetic drugs and brainstem function in relation to whole body homeostasis. As a result of this interaction there will be changes in consciousness, protective reflexes, breathing pattern, heart rate, temperature or arterial blood pressure to name a few. Brainstem function can be explored using three different approaches: clinically, analyzing changes in brain electric activity or using neuroimaging techniques. With the aim of providing the clinician anaesthesiologist with a global view of the interaction between the anaesthetic state and homeostatic changes related to brainstem function, the present review article addresses the influence of anaesthetic drug effects on brainstem function through clinical exploration of cranial nerves and reflexes, analysis of electric signals such as electroencephalographic changes and what it is known about brainstem through the use of imaging techniques, more specifically functional magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Processing Complex Sounds Passing through the Rostral Brainstem: The New Early Filter Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, John E; Campbell, Tom A

    2016-01-01

    The rostral brainstem receives both "bottom-up" input from the ascending auditory system and "top-down" descending corticofugal connections. Speech information passing through the inferior colliculus of elderly listeners reflects the periodicity envelope of a speech syllable. This information arguably also reflects a composite of temporal-fine-structure (TFS) information from the higher frequency vowel harmonics of that repeated syllable. The amplitude of those higher frequency harmonics, bearing even higher frequency TFS information, correlates positively with the word recognition ability of elderly listeners under reverberatory conditions. Also relevant is that working memory capacity (WMC), which is subject to age-related decline, constrains the processing of sounds at the level of the brainstem. Turning to the effects of a visually presented sensory or memory load on auditory processes, there is a load-dependent reduction of that processing, as manifest in the auditory brainstem responses (ABR) evoked by to-be-ignored clicks. Wave V decreases in amplitude with increases in the visually presented memory load. A visually presented sensory load also produces a load-dependent reduction of a slightly different sort: The sensory load of visually presented information limits the disruptive effects of background sound upon working memory performance. A new early filter model is thus advanced whereby systems within the frontal lobe (affected by sensory or memory load) cholinergically influence top-down corticofugal connections. Those corticofugal connections constrain the processing of complex sounds such as speech at the level of the brainstem. Selective attention thereby limits the distracting effects of background sound entering the higher auditory system via the inferior colliculus. Processing TFS in the brainstem relates to perception of speech under adverse conditions. Attentional selectivity is crucial when the signal heard is degraded or masked: e.g., speech in

  2. Impact of monaural frequency compression on binaural fusion at the brainstem level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Isabelle; Kohl, Manuel C; Hannemann, Ronny; Kornagel, Ulrich; Strauss, Daniel J; Corona-Strauss, Farah I

    2015-08-01

    A classical objective measure for binaural fusion at the brainstem level is the so-called β-wave of the binaural interaction component (BIC) in the auditory brainstem response (ABR). However, in some cases it appeared that a reliable detection of this component still remains a challenge. In this study, we investigate the wavelet phase synchronization stability (WPSS) of ABR data for the analysis of binaural fusion and compare it to the BIC. In particular, we examine the impact of monaural nonlinear frequency compression on binaural fusion. As the auditory system is tonotopically organized, an interaural frequency mismatch caused by monaural frequency compression could negatively effect binaural fusion. In this study, only few subjects showed a detectable β-wave and in most cases only for low ITDs. However, we present a novel objective measure for binaural fusion that outperforms the current state-of-the-art technique (BIC): the WPSS analysis showed a significant difference between the phase stability of the sum of the monaurally evoked responses and the phase stability of the binaurally evoked ABR. This difference could be an indicator for binaural fusion in the brainstem. Furthermore, we observed that monaural frequency compression could indeed effect binaural fusion, as the WPSS results for this condition vary strongly from the results obtained without frequency compression.

  3. Bayesian segmentation of brainstem structures in MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen; Bhatt, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a method to segment four brainstem structures (midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata and superior cerebellar peduncle) from 3D brain MRI scans. The segmentation method relies on a probabilistic atlas of the brainstem and its neighboring brain structures. To build the atlas, we...... the brainstem structures in novel scans. Thanks to the generative nature of the scheme, the segmentation method is robust to changes in MRI contrast or acquisition hardware. Using cross validation, we show that the algorithm can segment the structures in previously unseen T1 and FLAIR scans with great accuracy...

  4. Current clinical management of brainstem cavernomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinov, Oliver; Hatano, Taketo; Sarnthein, Johannes; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2010-11-26

    Over the last two decades a favourable course for treated or nontreated brainstem cavernomas has become possible with enhanced diagnostic tools and clinical experience, as well as minimally invasive microsurgical improvements. Currently, brainstem cavernoma can be treated microsurgically with excellent results and an acceptable morbidity rate. The preferred surgical route has progressively shifted from a dorsal to a lateral approach, but this remains dependent on the location of the lesion in the brainstem. Surgical evaluation and management of all cases of this rare disease should be performed by experienced teams from the outset.

  5. A unique cellular scaling rule in the avian auditory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Long, Brendan; Krilow, Justin M; Wylie, Douglas R; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2016-06-01

    Although it is clear that neural structures scale with body size, the mechanisms of this relationship are not well understood. Several recent studies have shown that the relationship between neuron numbers and brain (or brain region) size are not only different across mammalian orders, but also across auditory and visual regions within the same brains. Among birds, similar cellular scaling rules have not been examined in any detail. Here, we examine the scaling of auditory structures in birds and show that the scaling rules that have been established in the mammalian auditory pathway do not necessarily apply to birds. In galliforms, neuronal densities decrease with increasing brain size, suggesting that auditory brainstem structures increase in size faster than neurons are added; smaller brains have relatively more neurons than larger brains. The cellular scaling rules that apply to auditory brainstem structures in galliforms are, therefore, different to that found in primate auditory pathway. It is likely that the factors driving this difference are associated with the anatomical specializations required for sound perception in birds, although there is a decoupling of neuron numbers in brain structures and hair cell numbers in the basilar papilla. This study provides significant insight into the allometric scaling of neural structures in birds and improves our understanding of the rules that govern neural scaling across vertebrates.

  6. The specificity of stimulus-specific adaptation in human auditory cortex increases with repeated exposure to the adapting stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley, Paul M; Krumbholz, Katrin

    2013-12-01

    The neural response to a sensory stimulus tends to be more strongly reduced when the stimulus is preceded by the same, rather than a different, stimulus. This stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA) is ubiquitous across the senses. In hearing, SSA has been suggested to play a role in change detection as indexed by the mismatch negativity. This study sought to test whether SSA, measured in human auditory cortex, is caused by neural fatigue (reduction in neural responsiveness) or by sharpening of neural tuning to the adapting stimulus. For that, we measured event-related cortical potentials to pairs of pure tones with varying frequency separation and stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA). This enabled us to examine the relationship between the degree of specificity of adaptation as a function of frequency separation and the rate of decay of adaptation with increasing SOA. Using simulations of tonotopic neuron populations, we demonstrate that the fatigue model predicts independence of adaptation specificity and decay rate, whereas the sharpening model predicts interdependence. The data showed independence and thus supported the fatigue model. In a second experiment, we measured adaptation specificity after multiple presentations of the adapting stimulus. The multiple adapters produced more adaptation overall, but the effect was more specific to the adapting frequency. Within the context of the fatigue model, the observed increase in adaptation specificity could be explained by assuming a 2.5-fold increase in neural frequency selectivity. We discuss possible bottom-up and top-down mechanisms of this effect.

  7. Mutism and auditory agnosia due to bilateral insular damage--role of the insula in human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, M; Daquin, G; Milandre, L; Royere, M L; Rey, M; Lanteri, A; Salamon, G; Khalil, R

    1995-03-01

    We report a case of transient mutism and persistent auditory agnosia due to two successive ischemic infarcts mainly involving the insular cortex on both hemispheres. During the 'mutic' period, which lasted about 1 month, the patient did not respond to any auditory stimuli and made no effort to communicate. On follow-up examinations, language competences had re-appeared almost