WorldWideScience

Sample records for human assets interpersonal

  1. Development of Humane Interpersonal Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleptsova, Elena Yuryevna; Balabanov, Anton Anatolyevich

    2016-01-01

    The article reflects some theoretical aspects of humanization of interpersonal relationships in the sphere of education. The notion "humanization of interpersonal relationships" is being analyzed. The authors offer a characterization of some parameters of relationships: orientation, modality, valence, intensity, awareness,…

  2. Leveraging Human Assets: Interpersonal Skill Development Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carpenter, T. D; Wisecarver, M. M

    2006-01-01

    As the requirements of U.S. Army missions fluctuate from conflicts to peacekeeping and nationbuilding efforts, Soldiers confront complex cultural situations and are often in delicate positions that could be politically explosive...

  3. Human Capital and Risky Asset Allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Wenjie; Yu, Qun

    2011-01-01

    Much research has been done to examine the relation between investors' human capital and their financial asset allocation. While some showed that the value of human capital should be taken into consideration to make financial asset allocation decisions on the composition of investing portfolios, most argued not. In this paper, we selected the monthly return of 9 industrial ETFs from June of 2007 to July 2011, used the present value of total future income as estimate of human capital, and reli...

  4. Enhancement of human capital assets role in current economic situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pechenaia Liudmila Timofeevna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents transformation of the notion “human capital assets” in economics. Methodical approaches to evaluation of human capital assets and involvement in innovation process. Generalization of theoretical overview data allows conclusion about strong interest to this economic category, testifying to good promise of this field development.

  5. Human Asset Internalization and Global Sourcing of Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.; Petersen, Bent

    In this exploratory study we look at human asset aspects of offshore outsourcing of services that over time become more advanced and strategic potent to the outsourcing firms. As a consequence, the outsourcing firms might want to internalize the operations. We focus on the ways that outsourcing......, the internalization process....

  6. The Future of Asset Management for Human Space Exploration: Supply Classification and an Integrated Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Sarah A.; Gralla, Erica L.; deWeck, Olivier L.; Shishko, Robert

    2006-01-01

    One of the major logistical challenges in human space exploration is asset management. This paper presents observations on the practice of asset management in support of human space flight to date and discusses a functional-based supply classification and a framework for an integrated database that could be used to improve asset management and logistics for human missions to the Moon, Mars and beyond.

  7. Influence of socio-cultural modernization on development of human capital assets in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents major points of research into socio-cultural conditions of human capital assets accumulation in Russia. Notion of social justice, social responsibility of business, realization of their role as “vehicle of capital” by employees, national mentality – all this essentially influences on efficiency of human capital assets accumulation in Russia.

  8. The Educational Asset Market: A Finance Perspective on Human Capital Investment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte; Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    2002-01-01

    on type and level of education enables us to focus on the shared features between human capital and stock investments. An innovative finance-labor approach is applied to study the educational asset market. A risk-return trade-off is revealed which is not directly related to the length of education.......Like the stock market, the human capital market consists of a wide range of assets, i.e. educations. Each young individual chooses the educational asset that matches his preferred combination of risk and return in terms of future income. A unique register-based data set with exact information...

  9. SUSTAINABLE FACTORS IN THE HUMAN ASSETS OF DANA HOTEL AS A HERITAGE HOTEL IN SOLO, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyuniwati Wahyudi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study what sustainable factors of Dana Hotel in the human assets; and also find out what the status of Dana Hotel, using VRIN analysis (Value, Rarity, Imperfect Imitability, and Non-Subs­ti­tu­ta­bility from Natural Language Data of observation and in-depth interviews in a descriptive qua­litative study. In results, in order to achieve sustainability, Dana Hotel has valuable, rare, imperfectly imitable, and non-subs­titutable factors in the human assets. As the human assets are valuable, rare, im­perfectly imitable, and non-subs­titutable, the status of Dana Hotel is sustainable in the context of hu­man resources. It is concluded that following the success of Dana Hotel, organizations that have those fac­tors or even more, tend to have big opportunities to survive.

  10. HUMAN RESOURCES ACCOUNTING ACCOUNTING FOR THE MOST VALUABLE ASSET OF AN ENTERPRISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoniu Ioan Dumitru

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Employees are the most important assets of an enterprise and its success or failure depends on their qualifications and performance. Human resources are not properly evaluated because the enterprises consider the wages, actually an investment in the qualification and improvement of the staff as expenditure and and not as an investment in the most important asset of an enterprise the human capital. The current accounting system is not able to provide the actual value of employee capabilities and knowledge. This indirectly affects future investments of a company, as each year the cost on human resource development and recruitment increases. Human resource accounting is a direct part of the social accounting and aims to provide information on the evaluation of one of the most important components of the organization, namely human capital. This article seeks to show the importance of human resources for an enterprise, what human resource accounting is, which would be its implications and what are its main objectives.

  11. Strategic Human Capital: Preserving a Vital National Asset

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scott, Lynn

    1997-01-01

    .... These reductions neither account for the strategic value of human capital nor for the possible consequences of its depletion and the resulting dispersal and loss of strategic knowledge, skills and experience...

  12. Hypnosis and Human Development: Interpersonal Influence of Intrapersonal Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Examines the relationship between hypnosis and human development. Defines hypnosis within a communications framework, and identifies essential features of hypnosis in the communicative exchanges of the first months of life; this forces a reconsideration of the understanding of the ontogenesis of hypnosis. Identifies four key features of hypnosis,…

  13. Conditional Tests of Factor Augmented Asset Pricing Models with Human Capital and Housing: Some New Results

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Klinkowska

    2009-01-01

    In this paper I develop the asset pricing model in which the wealth portfolio is enriched with human capital and housing capital. These two types of capital account for a significant portion of the total wealth. Additionally I introduce dynamics into the model and represent conditioning information by common factors estimated with dynamic factor methodology. In this way I can use more accurate representative of the unobservable information set of the investors. Obtained results prove that ind...

  14. Interpersonal circumplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, T

    1996-04-01

    The social and intellectual climate of the late 1940s and early 1950s in America helped nourish humanistic, person-centered views of human behavior. During that time, psychologists such as Gordon Allport, Abraham Maslow, David McClelland, Harry Murray, and Carl Rogers emphasized the positive growth potential in human character. The psychiatrist Harry Stack Sullivan proposed that personality can best be understood within the context of interpersonal transactions, and he provided a practical, street-smart understanding of psychiatric symptoms that was quite an advance over the traditional medical and psychoanalytic viewpoints. These ideas, along with the concept of dimensionalizing traits rather than categorizing them, inspired my colleagues and I to conduct our cooperative work on the interpersonal circumplex, which culminated in the publication of my monograph. Interpersonal Diagnosis of Personality (Leary, 1957).

  15. The Virtual Teacher (VT) Paradigm: Learning New Patterns of Interpersonal Coordination Using the Human Dynamic Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrubiec, Viviane; Dumas, Guillaume; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Kelso, J A Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Virtual Teacher paradigm, a version of the Human Dynamic Clamp (HDC), is introduced into studies of learning patterns of inter-personal coordination. Combining mathematical modeling and experimentation, we investigate how the HDC may be used as a Virtual Teacher (VT) to help humans co-produce and internalize new inter-personal coordination pattern(s). Human learners produced rhythmic finger movements whilst observing a computer-driven avatar, animated by dynamic equations stemming from the well-established Haken-Kelso-Bunz (1985) and Schöner-Kelso (1988) models of coordination. We demonstrate that the VT is successful in shifting the pattern co-produced by the VT-human system toward any value (Experiment 1) and that the VT can help humans learn unstable relative phasing patterns (Experiment 2). Using transfer entropy, we find that information flow from one partner to the other increases when VT-human coordination loses stability. This suggests that variable joint performance may actually facilitate interaction, and in the long run learning. VT appears to be a promising tool for exploring basic learning processes involved in social interaction, unraveling the dynamics of information flow between interacting partners, and providing possible rehabilitation opportunities.

  16. Assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogy on entrepreneurship knowledge and entrepreneurial human capital asset: A conceptual model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidimma Odira Okeke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is an effort to propose a conceptual model to measure the impact assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogic. It delineates entrepreneurship education pedagogic into four dimensions and opined specific level for each dimension. Reviewing the entrepreneurship education programme, assessment of entrepreneurship pedagogic evaluates the structure that influence growth mindset development through embedded heuristic strategies, thus, the impact on entrepreneurship knowledge and entrepreneurial capital asset context is proposed. Affirming Fayolle, Gailly, and Lassa-Clerc conceptual affinity that entrepreneurship education share with learning theories and entrepreneurship pedagogical content knowledge were conceptualized to suggest some practical realism guidelines of what insightful philosophy of teaching entrepreneurship need to achieve. With direct synthesis of relevant literature, propositions relating to entrepreneurship pedagogic structure along with the institutional connectedness and associated dimensions of entrepreneurship pedagogic assessment outcome were postulated. Also, the paper proposes the need for further assessment of specific forms of pedagogic impact on entrepreneurial human capital asset.

  17. Evaluating a national science and technology program using the human capital and relational asset perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chia-Liang; Chou, Jerome Chih-Lung; Roan, Hung-Wei

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate the performance of the National Science and Technology Program (NSTP) by targeting the Taiwan National Telecommunication Program (NTP) initiated in 1998. The Taiwan telecommunications industry has prospered, currently occupying key positions in global markets even though NTP seldom contributes positively to patent citation performance. Hence, the authors of this study investigate the qualitative perspective of intellectual capital rather than quantitative technological indices. The current study focuses on both human capital and relational assets through surveys of 53 principal investigators of NTP projects and 63 industrial R&D managers of telecommunications corporations in the Taiwan market. Results show that NSTP member quality and the flow of employment are good indicators of human capital and that both perform better than the middle value in the case of Taiwan NTP. In addition, we find that industrial participants are more likely to share R&D resources than other academic researchers with higher intention of co-publishing, co-funding, and sharing equipment and facilities. The industrial NTP participants also have higher expectations regarding achieving advanced technology breakthroughs in contrast to non-NTP industrial interviewees. Moreover, industrial participants with greater industry-university cooperation intensity indeed obtain a particular advantage, that is, greater knowledge acquisition from other fields related to the effect of knowledge spillovers through the particular NSTP linkage. Accordingly, from the perspectives of human capital and relational assets, the authors conclude by articulating the importance of absorptive capacity resulting from good human capital and knowledge spillover contributed by relational assets within governmental technology policy and NSTP programming. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lack of association between human plasma oxytocin and interpersonal trust in a Prisoner's Dilemma paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Christensen

    Full Text Available Expanding interest in oxytocin, particularly the role of endogenous oxytocin in human social behavior, has created a pressing need for replication of results and verification of assay methods. In this study, we sought to replicate and extend previous results correlating plasma oxytocin with trust and trustworthy behavior. As a necessary first step, the two most commonly used commercial assays were compared in human plasma via the addition of a known quantity of exogenous oxytocin, with and without sample extraction. Plasma sample extraction was found to be critical in obtaining repeatable concentrations of oxytocin. In the subsequent trust experiment, twelve samples in duplicate, from each of 82 participants, were collected over approximately six hours during the performance of a Prisoner's Dilemma task paradigm that stressed human interpersonal trust. We found no significant relationship between plasma oxytocin concentrations and trusting or trustworthy behavior. In light of these findings, previous published work that used oxytocin immunoassays without sample extraction should be reexamined and future research exploring links between endogenous human oxytocin and trust or social behavior should proceed with careful consideration of methods and appropriate biofluids for analysis.

  19. Japanese views on ASSET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Masashi [Department of Reactor Safety Research, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    In general, the ASSET has had a positive effect on enhancement of operating experience feedback. The ASSET has played an important role to supply information to the IAEA Extra Budgetary Program. However, this role has come to an end; since the needs for safety upgrading have become identified and prioritized. ASSET missions in future: Linkage among various safety missions should be sought in order to avoid duplication and to enhance effective usage of a limited budget and human resources.

  20. Interpersonal influence among public health leaders in the United States department of health and human services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jenine K; Carothers, Bobbi J; Wald, Lana M; Shelton, Sarah C; Leischow, Scott J

    2012-02-17

    In public health, interpersonal influence has been identified as an important factor in the spread of health information, and in understanding and changing health behaviors. However, little is known about influence in public health leadership. Influence is important in leadership settings, where public health professionals contribute to national policy and practice agendas. Drawing on social theory and recent advances in statistical network modeling, we examined influence in a network of tobacco control leaders at the United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Fifty-four tobacco control leaders across all 11 agencies in the DHHS were identified; 49 (91%) responded to a web-based survey. Participants were asked about communication with other tobacco control leaders, who influenced their work, and general job characteristics. Exponential random graph modeling was used to develop a network model of influence accounting for characteristics of individuals, their relationships, and global network structures. Higher job ranks, more experience in tobacco control, and more time devoted to tobacco control each week increased the likelihood of influence nomination, as did more frequent communication between network members. Being in the same agency and working the same number of hours per week were positively associated with mutual influence nominations. Controlling for these characteristics, the network also exhibited patterns associated with influential clusters of network members. Findings from this unique study provide a perspective on influence within a government agency that both helps to understand decision-making and also can serve to inform organizational efforts that allow for more effective structuring of leadership.

  1. Interpersonal influence among public health leaders in the United States Department of Health and Human Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenine K. Harris

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. In public health, interpersonal influence has been identified as an important factor in the spread of health information, and in understanding and changing health behaviors. However, little is known about influence in public health leadership. Influence is important in leadership settings, where public health professionals contribute to national policy and practice agendas. Drawing on social theory and recent advances in statistical network modeling, we examined influence in a network of tobacco control leaders at the United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS. Design and Methods. Fifty-four tobacco control leaders across all 11 agencies in the DHHS were identified; 49 (91% responded to a web-based survey. Participants were asked about communication with other tobacco control leaders, who influenced their work, and general job characteristics. Exponential random graph modeling was used to develop a network model of influence accounting for characteristics of individuals, their relationships, and global network structures. Results. Higher job ranks, more experience in tobacco control, and more time devoted to tobacco control each week increased the likelihood of influence nomination, as did more frequent communication between network members. Being in the same agency and working the same number of hours per week were positively associated with mutual influence nominations. Controlling for these characteristics, the network also exhibited patterns associated with influential clusters of network members. Conclusions. Findings from this unique study provide a perspective on influence within a government agency that both helps to understand decision-making and also can serve to inform organizational efforts that allow for more effective structuring of leadership.

  2. Solar Asset Management Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iverson, Aaron [Ra Power Management, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States); Zviagin, George [Ra Power Management, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Ra Power Management (RPM) has developed a cloud based software platform that manages the financial and operational functions of third party financed solar projects throughout their lifecycle. RPM’s software streamlines and automates the sales, financing, and management of a portfolio of solar assets. The software helps solar developers automate the most difficult aspects of asset management, leading to increased transparency, efficiency, and reduction in human error. More importantly, our platform will help developers save money by improving their operating margins.

  3. ASSET guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    The IAEA Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team (ASSET) Service provides advice and assistance to Member States to enhance the overall level of plant safety while dealing with the policy of prevention of incidents at nuclear power plants. The ASSET programme, initiated in 1986, is not restricted to any particular group of Member States, whether developing or industrialized, but is available to all countries with nuclear power plants in operation or approaching commercial operation. The IAEA Safety Series publications form common basis for the ASSET reviews, including the Nuclear Safety Standards (NUSS) and the Basic Safety Principles (Recommendations of Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-3). The ASSET Guidelines provide overall guidance for the experts to ensure the consistency and comprehensiveness of their review of incident investigations. Additional guidance and reference material is provided by the IAEA to complement the expertise of the ASSET members. ASSET reviews accept different approaches that contribute to ensuring an effective prevention of incidents at plants. Suggestions are offered to enhance plant safety performance. Commendable good practices are identified and generic lessons are communicated to other plants, where relevant, for long term improvement

  4. Interpersonal Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakat NG

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTIONInterpersonal skills are becoming more and more a necessity in the medical profession. The expectation from health care professionals is beyond just knowledge of the medical facts. To practice medicine effectively, doctors need to develop interpersonal skills in communication, leadership, management, teaching and time management. All of these are vital tools and are becoming increasingly essential subjects in teaching both undergraduate students and postgraduate doctors. However, a degree of self-motivation and personal initiative is needed to develop these skills. In this article, I will give an overview on interpersonal skills and will be follow this by a series of articles, in future issues, dealing with these skills.

  5. CERN, an Invaluable Asset for Humanity – Interview with the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Fabiola Gianotti is an Italian physicist and the first woman appointed by the CERN Council as the Director-General of the Laboratory. She took office on January 1st, 2016. The two Vice-Presidents of the Staff Association (SA) met with her to discuss the current affairs of the Organization. Appointment as D-G and ambitions for CERN As a former member of the personnel in the Physics department of CERN, Fabiola Gianotti has a long history with the Organization, and her vast in-house experience was likely a key factor in her appointment as the Director-General. Indeed, her in-depth knowledge of CERN and its functioning, as well as the current and future challenges of the Organization, are indispensable assets in guiding her ambitions for the Laboratory. Among her greatest aspirations for CERN, she names the increase of scientific excellence in the field of experimental research, development of cutting-edge technologies, education of younger generations, and collaborations with scientists from all over the wor...

  6. Asset Meltdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marekwica, Marcel; Maurer, Raimond; Sebastian, Steffen P.

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary. This paper analyzes the relation between demographic structure and real asset returns on Treasury bills, bonds, and stocks for the G7 countries (United States, Canada, Japan, Italy, France, the United Kingdom, and Germany). A macroeconomic multifactor model is used to examine a...

  7. Engineering Asset Management and Infrastructure Sustainability : Proceedings of the 5th World Congress on Engineering Asset Management

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Lin; Tan, Andy; Weijnen, Margot; Lee, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Engineering Asset Management 2010 represents state-of-the art trends and developments in the emerging field of engineering asset management as presented at the Fifth World Congress on Engineering Asset Management (WCEAM). The proceedings of the WCEAM 2010 is an excellent reference for practitioners, researchers and students in the multidisciplinary field of asset management, covering topics such as: Asset condition monitoring and intelligent maintenance Asset data warehousing, data mining and fusion Asset performance and level-of-service models Design and life-cycle integrity of physical assets Education and training in asset management Engineering standards in asset management Fault diagnosis and prognostics Financial analysis methods for physical assets Human dimensions in integrated asset management Information quality management Information systems and knowledge management Intelligent sensors and devices Maintenance strategies in asset management Optimisation decisions in asset management Risk management ...

  8. Asset prices and priceless assets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penasse, J.N.G.

    2014-01-01

    The doctoral thesis studies several aspects of asset returns dynamics. The first three chapters focus on returns in the fine art market. The first chapter provides evidence for the existence of a slow-moving fad component in art prices that induces short-term return predictability. The article has

  9. Abstract robots with an attitude : applying interpersonal relation models to human-robot interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiah, J.L.; Beursgens, L.; Haex, R.; Perez Romero, L.M.; Teh, Y.; Bhomer, ten M.; Berkel, van R.E.A.; Barakova, E.I.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores new possibilities for social interaction between a human user and a robot with an abstract shape. The social interaction takes place by simulating behaviors such as submissiveness and dominance and analyzing the corresponding human reactions. We used an object that has no

  10. Victims of ‘private’ crimes and application of human rights in interpersonal relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiter Axelle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available International human rights law has been challenged because of its alleged inability to safeguard the rights of the most vulnerable victims of violence. Whereas in real life they are often marginalized and effectively left without adequate protection, this is not to be attributed to the absence of an appropriate normative framework but rather to the contempt, lack of enforcement and systemic neglect of their claims. This paper proposes to find a ‘cure’ inside international human rights law, by strengthening the mechanisms that permit a horizontal application of human rights standards in private relations. The paper is divided in four sections. The first section describes the problematic at hand, focusing in particular on violence against women and children. The three subsequent sections then analyze the avenues open to victims in order to claim a ‘third-party’ application of human rights treaties against non-state actors who have violated their fundamental rights.

  11. Interpersonal Attraction in the Counseling Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowiak, Dale; Diaz, Sandra

    Murstein's Stimulus-Value-Role theory of dyadic relationships, in which attraction depends on the exchange value of the assets and liabilities each person brings to the situation, is employed as a foundation for this review of the literature on interpersonal attraction in the counseling relationship. A three-stage model, accounting for both…

  12. Prosocial Consequences of Interpersonal Synchrony

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The capacity to establish interpersonal synchrony is fundamental to human beings because it constitutes the basis for social connection and understanding. Interpersonal synchrony refers to instances when the movements or sensations of two or more people overlap in time and form. Recently, the causal influence of interpersonal synchrony on prosociality has been established through experiments. The current meta-analysis is the first to synthesize these isolated and sometimes contradictory experiments. We meta-analyzed 60 published and unpublished experiments that compared an interpersonal synchrony condition with at least one control condition. The results reveal a medium effect of interpersonal synchrony on prosociality with regard to both attitudes and behaviors. Furthermore, experimenter effects and intentionality moderate these effects. We discuss the strengths and limitations of our analysis, as well as its practical implications, and we suggest avenues for future research. PMID:28105388

  13. Lack of Association between Human Plasma Oxytocin and Interpersonal Trust in a Prisoners Dilemma Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-30

    from data using rodent models. Zhang et al. [17] used two- dimensional liquid chromatography -tandem mass spectrometry (2D LC-MS/MS) to demonstrate that...DM, Lin Z, Steenwyk R (2011) Ultra sensitive quantitation of endogenous oxytocin in rat and human plasma using a two-dimensional liquid chromatography ... Handbook of motivation and cognition: Foundations of social behavior, 1, 96–121. 42. Feldman R, Weller A, Zagoory-Sharon O, Levine A (2007) Evidence for

  14. Role of Gaze Cues in Interpersonal Motor Coordination: Towards Higher Affiliation in Human-Robot Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Khoramshahi

    Full Text Available The ability to follow one another's gaze plays an important role in our social cognition; especially when we synchronously perform tasks together. We investigate how gaze cues can improve performance in a simple coordination task (i.e., the mirror game, whereby two players mirror each other's hand motions. In this game, each player is either a leader or follower. To study the effect of gaze in a systematic manner, the leader's role is played by a robotic avatar. We contrast two conditions, in which the avatar provides or not explicit gaze cues that indicate the next location of its hand. Specifically, we investigated (a whether participants are able to exploit these gaze cues to improve their coordination, (b how gaze cues affect action prediction and temporal coordination, and (c whether introducing active gaze behavior for avatars makes them more realistic and human-like (from the user point of view.43 subjects participated in 8 trials of the mirror game. Each subject performed the game in the two conditions (with and without gaze cues. In this within-subject study, the order of the conditions was randomized across participants, and subjective assessment of the avatar's realism was assessed by administering a post-hoc questionnaire. When gaze cues were provided, a quantitative assessment of synchrony between participants and the avatar revealed a significant improvement in subject reaction-time (RT. This confirms our hypothesis that gaze cues improve the follower's ability to predict the avatar's action. An analysis of the pattern of frequency across the two players' hand movements reveals that the gaze cues improve the overall temporal coordination across the two players. Finally, analysis of the subjective evaluations from the questionnaires reveals that, in the presence of gaze cues, participants found it not only more human-like/realistic, but also easier to interact with the avatar.This work confirms that people can exploit gaze cues to

  15. The Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Stage (NTPS): A Key Space Asset for Human Exploration and Commercial Missions to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Burke, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) has frequently been discussed as a key space asset that can bridge the gap between a sustained human presence on the Moon and the eventual human exploration of Mars. Recently, a human mission to a near Earth asteroid (NEA) has also been included as a "deep space precursor" to an orbital mission of Mars before a landing is attempted. In his "post-Apollo" Integrated Space Program Plan (1970 to 1990), Wernher von Braun, proposed a reusable Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Stage (NTPS) to deliver cargo and crew to the Moon to establish a lunar base initially before sending human missions to Mars. The NTR was selected because it was a proven technology capable of generating both high thrust and high specific impulse (Isp approx. 900 s)-twice that of today's best chemical rockets. During the Rover and NERVA programs, 20 rocket reactors were designed, built and successfully ground tested. These tests demonstrated the (1) thrust levels; (2) high fuel temperatures; (3) sustained operation; (4) accumulated lifetime; and (5) restart capability needed for an affordable in-space transportation system. In NASA's Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, the "Copernicus" crewed NTR Mars transfer vehicle used three 25 klbf "Pewee" engines-the smallest and highest performing engine tested in the Rover program. Smaller lunar transfer vehicles-consisting of a NTPS with three approx. 16.7 klbf "SNRE-class" engines, an in-line propellant tank, plus the payload-can be delivered to LEO using a 70 t to LEO upgraded SLS, and can support reusable cargo delivery and crewed lunar landing missions. The NTPS can play an important role in returning humans to the Moon to stay by providing an affordable in-space transportation system that can allow initial lunar outposts to evolve into settlements capable of supporting commercial activities. Over the next decade collaborative efforts between NASA and private industry could open up new exploration and commercial

  16. Humanization in newborn care: interpersonal relationships and their importance to the neurobiological organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Cypel

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Humanization in newborn care is an ever more emphasized proposalin maternity ward care, both in normal delivery conditions andespecially, when medical intercurrences (prematurity, infections, etc.occur in neonatal intensive care units. The relevance of this approachis based on the current understanding and valorization of the earlyinterpersonal relationships in the organization of the neurobiologicalfoundations to which more complex living and learning experienceswill successively add, building what is currently conceptualized asDevelopmental Neurobiology. The present paper has the objectiveof stressing these aspects, attempting to correlate them with thecorresponding neurobiological structures, stressing the fact thatthe early bonds established by the newborn will shape the neuronalcircuitry responsible for future behaviors and actions of this child.

  17. Values, Attitudes Toward Interpersonal Violence, and Interpersonal Violent Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddig, Daniel; Davidov, Eldad

    2018-01-01

    The relevance of human values for the study of the motivational sources of interpersonal violent behavior was investigated in various fields of the social sciences. However, several past studies mixed up values with other dimensions like attitudes, norms, or beliefs, and only a few systematically assessed the effect of values on violent behavior relying on a value theory. Furthermore, in other studies, violence was often analyzed as a composite index of different forms of delinquent behavior rather than as violence per se . In the current study we address these gaps in the literature by building upon Schwartz' theory of basic human values. We use it to explain attitudes toward interpersonal violence and interpersonal violent behavior. We analyze data of young people ( n = 1,810) drawn from a German study in Duisburg, Germany, which assessed various types of self-reported violent behavior as well as values and attitudes toward violence. We test structural equation models in which we explain interpersonal violent behavior with basic human values, and where attitudes toward interpersonal violent behavior mediate this relation. Results show that self-transcendence and conservation values are associated negatively and power and stimulation values positively with interpersonal violent behavior. In addition, attitudes operate as a partial mediator for the former and as a full mediator for the latter in the relation between values and violent behavior. Despite a dominant association between attitudes and behavior, values themselves can significantly contribute to the explanation of violent behavior.

  18. Values, Attitudes Toward Interpersonal Violence, and Interpersonal Violent Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Seddig

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of human values for the study of the motivational sources of interpersonal violent behavior was investigated in various fields of the social sciences. However, several past studies mixed up values with other dimensions like attitudes, norms, or beliefs, and only a few systematically assessed the effect of values on violent behavior relying on a value theory. Furthermore, in other studies, violence was often analyzed as a composite index of different forms of delinquent behavior rather than as violence per se. In the current study we address these gaps in the literature by building upon Schwartz’ theory of basic human values. We use it to explain attitudes toward interpersonal violence and interpersonal violent behavior. We analyze data of young people (n = 1,810 drawn from a German study in Duisburg, Germany, which assessed various types of self-reported violent behavior as well as values and attitudes toward violence. We test structural equation models in which we explain interpersonal violent behavior with basic human values, and where attitudes toward interpersonal violent behavior mediate this relation. Results show that self-transcendence and conservation values are associated negatively and power and stimulation values positively with interpersonal violent behavior. In addition, attitudes operate as a partial mediator for the former and as a full mediator for the latter in the relation between values and violent behavior. Despite a dominant association between attitudes and behavior, values themselves can significantly contribute to the explanation of violent behavior.

  19. 6th World Congress on Engineering Asset Management

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Jun; Sarangapani, Jagnathan; Mathew, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This text represents state-of-the-art trends and developments in the emerging field of engineering asset management as presented at the Sixth World Congress on Engineering Asset Management (WCEAM) held in Cincinnati, OH, USA from October 3-5, 2011 The Proceedings of the WCEAM 2011 is an excellent reference for practitioners, researchers and students in the multidisciplinary field of asset management, covering topics such as: • Asset condition monitoring and intelligent maintenance • Asset data warehousing, data mining and fusion • Asset performance and level-of-service models • Design and lifecycle integrity of physical assets • Deterioration and preservation models for assets • Education and training in asset management • Engineering standards in asset management • Fault diagnosis and prognostics • Financial analysis methods for physical assetsHuman dimensions in integrated asset management • Information quality management • Information systems and knowledge management • Intellig...

  20. Japanese views on ASSET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, M [Department of Reactor Safety Research, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The presentation briefly reviews the following aspects directed to ensuring NPP safety: Japanese participation in ASSET activities; views to ASSET activities; recent operating experience in Japan; future ASSET activities.

  1. Japanese views on ASSET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, M.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation briefly reviews the following aspects directed to ensuring NPP safety: Japanese participation in ASSET activities; views to ASSET activities; recent operating experience in Japan; future ASSET activities

  2. Asset Pricing in Markets with Illiquid Assets

    OpenAIRE

    Longstaff, Francis A

    2005-01-01

    Many important classes of assets are illiquid in the sense that they cannot always be traded immediately. Thus, a portfolio position in these types of illiquid investments becomes at least temporarily irreversible. We study the asset-pricing implications of illiquidity in a two-asset exchange economy with heterogeneous agents. In this market, one asset is always liquid. The other asset can be traded initially, but then not again until after a “blackout†period. Illiquidity has a dramatic e...

  3. Essays on International Finance and Asset Pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eiling, E.

    2007-01-01

    The second part of this dissertation takes a more general asset pricing perspective. In particular, it investigates the impact of human capital on asset pricing. Investors' portfolio decisions may be affected by their human capital. For instance, an investor who works in the IT sector may want to

  4. INTERPERSONAL COMUNICATION IN THE CONTEMPORARY SIRCUMSTANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan JAKULIC

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available In this item, the writer emphasizes the origination of the interpersonal communications in contemporary circumstances on the present evolutionary stage of the civilization. In addition the phenomenon of the interpersonal communications determine the social being of the humans in the area of the family and nation together with the area of the wide social community.

  5. Improving Music Teaching through Interpersonal Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, Natalie Steele

    2017-01-01

    Interpersonal relationships are fundamental to learning and human development. To develop a positive and safe classroom environment with student motivation and learning, music educators need to learn to relate and connect effectively with others. This article looks at the importance of the interpersonal relationships in the classroom environment…

  6. Dukovany ASSET mission preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouklik, I [NPP Dukovany (Czech Republic)

    1997-12-31

    We are in the final stages of the Dukovany ASSET mission 1996 preparation. I would like to present some of our recent experiences. Maybe they would be helpful to other plants, that host ASSET missions in future.

  7. Dukovany ASSET mission preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouklik, I.

    1996-01-01

    We are in the final stages of the Dukovany ASSET mission 1996 preparation. I would like to present some of our recent experiences. Maybe they would be helpful to other plants, that host ASSET missions in future

  8. "Asset Ownership Across Generations"

    OpenAIRE

    Ngina S. Chiteji; Frank P. Stafford

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines cross-generational connections in asset ownership. It begins by presenting a theoretical framework that develops the distinction between the intergenerational transfer of knowledge about financial assets and the direct transfer of dollars from parents to children. Its analysis of data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) reveals intergenerational correlations in asset ownership, and we find evidence to suggest that parental asset ownership or family-based exposur...

  9. Assessing Asset Pricing Anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. de Groot (Wilma)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractOne of the most important challenges in the field of asset pricing is to understand anomalies: empirical patterns in asset returns that cannot be explained by standard asset pricing models. Currently, there is no consensus in the academic literature on the underlying causes of

  10. Capital Structure and Assets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flor, Christian Riis

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes a firm's capital structure choice when assets have outside value. Valuable assets implicitly provide a collateral and increase tax shield exploitation. The key feature in this paper is asset value uncertainty, implying that it is unknown ex ante whether the equity holders ex p...

  11. Three-dimensional GIS approach for management of assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. Y.; Yee, S. X.; Majid, Z.; Setan, H.

    2014-02-01

    Assets play an important role in human life, especially to an organization. Organizations strive and put more effort to improve its operation and assets management. The development of GIS technology has become a powerful tool in management as it is able to provide a complete inventory for managing assets with location-based information. Spatial information is one of the requirements in decision making in various areas, including asset management in the buildings. This paper describes a 3D GIS approach for management of assets. An asset management system was developed by integrating GIS concept and 3D model assets. The purposes of 3D visualization to manage assets are to facilitate the analysis and understanding in the complex environment. Behind the 3D model of assets is a database to store the asset information. A user-friendly interface was also designed for more easier to operate the application. In the application developed, location of each individual asset can be easily tracked according to the referring spatial information and 3D viewing. The 3D GIS approach described in this paper is certainly would be useful in asset management. Systematic management of assets can be carried out and this will lead to less-time consuming and cost-effective. The results in this paper will show a new approach to improve asset management.

  12. Three-dimensional GIS approach for management of assets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S Y; Yee, S X; Majid, Z; Setan, H

    2014-01-01

    Assets play an important role in human life, especially to an organization. Organizations strive and put more effort to improve its operation and assets management. The development of GIS technology has become a powerful tool in management as it is able to provide a complete inventory for managing assets with location-based information. Spatial information is one of the requirements in decision making in various areas, including asset management in the buildings. This paper describes a 3D GIS approach for management of assets. An asset management system was developed by integrating GIS concept and 3D model assets. The purposes of 3D visualization to manage assets are to facilitate the analysis and understanding in the complex environment. Behind the 3D model of assets is a database to store the asset information. A user-friendly interface was also designed for more easier to operate the application. In the application developed, location of each individual asset can be easily tracked according to the referring spatial information and 3D viewing. The 3D GIS approach described in this paper is certainly would be useful in asset management. Systematic management of assets can be carried out and this will lead to less-time consuming and cost-effective. The results in this paper will show a new approach to improve asset management

  13. Computationally Modeling Interpersonal Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Joo eLee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a computational model capable of predicting—above human accuracy—the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind’s readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our prior work using human-subjects experiments, when incorporated into the feature engineering process, permits a computational model to outperform both human predictions and a baseline model built in naivete' of this domain knowledge. We then present the construction of hidden Markov models to incorporate temporal relationships among the trust-related nonverbal cues. By interpreting the resulting learned structure, we observe that models built to emulate different levels of trust exhibit different sequences of nonverbal cues. From this observation, we derived sequence-based temporal features that further improve the accuracy of our computational model. Our multi-step research process presented in this paper combines the strength of experimental manipulation and machine learning to not only design a computational trust model but also to further our understanding of the dynamics of interpersonal trust.

  14. Human Rights Education: A Framework for Social Study from the Interpersonal to the Global. Pull Out 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Janet; Manson, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Addresses human rights education (HRE) for young learners stressing the centrality of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Illustrates the use of HRE within history, geography, world cultures, and literature. Believes that HRE begins by creating a human rights community in the classroom. (CMK)

  15. Valuation of intangible assets

    OpenAIRE

    Karlíková, Jitka

    2010-01-01

    The thesis is focused on the valuation of intangible assets, particularly trademarks and copyrights. In the beginning it deals with the problems of valuation of intangible assets. The main part of the thesis provides an overview of methods for valuation of intangible assets. This part is followed by a practical section that illustrates the procedure of valuation of trademarks and copyrights on a concrete example.

  16. [ASSET experience in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shanming

    1996-01-01

    The ASSET philosophy for prevention of nuclear safety incident is being implemented in our nuclear power plant as the other international nuclear power plants, and the in-depth analysis of operational events in order to find out and eliminate the root causes is considered as the prioritized work in the plant safety management. Some observations are discussed which were made during the implementation of ASSET philosophy and the ASSET approach in our nuclear power plant

  17. Asset Opacity and Liquidity

    OpenAIRE

    Stenzel, A.; Wagner, W.B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: We consider a model of private information acquisition in which the cost of information depends on an asset's opacity. The model generates a hump-shaped relationship between opacity and the equilibrium amount of private information. In particular, the incentives to acquire information are largest for assets of intermediate opacity; such assets hence display low liquidity in the secondary market due to adverse selection. We also show that costly information acquisition generates ince...

  18. [ASSET experience in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanming, Zhang [Dayabay NPP (China)

    1997-12-31

    The ASSET philosophy for prevention of nuclear safety incident is being implemented in our nuclear power plant as the other international nuclear power plants, and the in-depth analysis of operational events in order to find out and eliminate the root causes is considered as the prioritized work in the plant safety management. Some observations are discussed which were made during the implementation of ASSET philosophy and the ASSET approach in our nuclear power plant.

  19. Preparing for asset retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, Randall W; Reinstein, Alan

    2003-04-01

    Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 143 requires organizations to recognize a liability for an asset retirement obligation when it is incurred--even if that occurs far in advance of the asset's planned retirement. For example, organizations must recognize future costs associated with medical equipment disposal that carries hazardous material legal obligations.

  20. Essays on asset pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazliben, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    The dissertation consists of three chapters that represent separate papers in the area of asset pricing. The first chapter studies investors optimal asset allocation problem in which mean reversion in stock prices is captured by explicitly modeling transitory and permanent shocks. The second chapter

  1. Interpersonal emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Jamil; Williams, W Craig

    2013-10-01

    Contemporary emotion regulation research emphasizes intrapersonal processes such as cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression, but people experiencing affect commonly choose not to go it alone. Instead, individuals often turn to others for help in shaping their affective lives. How and under what circumstances does such interpersonal regulation modulate emotional experience? Although scientists have examined allied phenomena such as social sharing, empathy, social support, and prosocial behavior for decades, there have been surprisingly few attempts to integrate these data into a single conceptual framework of interpersonal regulation. Here we propose such a framework. We first map a "space" differentiating classes of interpersonal regulation according to whether an individual uses an interpersonal regulatory episode to alter their own or another person's emotion. We then identify 2 types of processes--response-dependent and response-independent--that could support interpersonal regulation. This framework classifies an array of processes through which interpersonal contact fulfills regulatory goals. More broadly, it organizes diffuse, heretofore independent data on "pieces" of interpersonal regulation, and identifies growth points for this young and exciting research domain.

  2. TEACHING INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas

    2009-01-01

    of the examination. This study aims at presenting and reviewing a practical approach to teaching of interpersonal skills, referred to as the Social Risk Analysis, which has been applied and integrated into the curriculum of two engineering courses. The Social Risk Analysis encourages and imposes a critical review......In addition to the traditional learning outcomes for technical disciplinary knowledge, the CDIO-syllabus also specifies personal and interpersonal learning outcomes. The argument for teaching interpersonal skills rest upon the team-based working environment that is typical for engineers, where...... knowledge and skills in teamwork, leadership, and communications are highly required. Thus, the practice of interpersonal skills need to be implemented in engineering teaching, not only in terms of learning objectives, but realised in practical teaching activities and as an integrated part...

  3. Fostering interpersonal relationship: the counsellor's viewpoint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interpersonal relationship involves activities where two or more people need to communicate with one another. As human beings, we always come in contact with people and in the process, relate with them and sometimes react to their utterances and actions. Pathologies, maladaptive behaviours and most human problems ...

  4. IT Asset Management System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — ITAMS provides a web frontend for the managing of all HW Assets lifecycle data purchased by ATO since 2006. In addition it contains much of our Enterprise SW license...

  5. Asset Inventory Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — AIDM is used to track USAID assets such as furniture, computers, and equipment. Using portable bar code readers, receiving and inventory personnel can capture...

  6. Interpersonal psychotherapy for anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, V V; Bulik, C M; McKenzie, J M; Luty, S E; Jordan, J

    2000-03-01

    This paper outlines the rationale for treating individuals with anorexia nervosa using interpersonal psychotherapy. We review theoretical, empirical, and psychotherapy literature relating to interpersonal functioning in anorexia nervosa. Etiological theories emphasize interpersonal and family dysfunction in the development of anorexia nervosa. Research supports the notion that families of individuals with anorexia nervosa have dysfunctional patterns of communication. The history of treatment for anorexia nervosa emphasizes the need for resolution of interpersonal dysfunction, within the traditions of psychodynamic, family therapy, and multidimensional therapies. Interpersonal psychotherapy is a time-limited psychotherapy based on the notion that regardless of etiology, interpersonal relationships are intertwined with symptomatology. The goals of the therapy are to improve interpersonal functioning and thereby decrease symptomatology. Factors identified as important in the development of anorexia nervosa are readily conceptualized within the interpersonal psychotherapy problem areas of grief, interpersonal disputes, interpersonal deficits, and role transitions. Copyright 2000 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Metadata for the description of broadcast assets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efthimiadis, Efthimis N.; Mai, Jens Erik; Burrows, Paul E.

    2003-01-01

    The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and public broadcasters consider Media Asset Management (MAM) of critical importance since without a concerted and cooperative plan to manage their vast library of content, broadcasters are unable to reach their potential for service in the digital age....... The concerns for Media Asset Management, human and technical, are myriad. Media Asset Management is the framework upon which many of the largest technology projects will be built, including the future interconnection system between and among CPB member stations. It is CPB's hope that its licensees...... and their partners in university, museum, and library communities, will work together to contribute to Media Asset Management solutions. These issues are not unique to Public Broadcasters. Similar issues are faced by all networks at different levels of complexity. This panel will present efforts by broadcasters...

  8. The Social Neuroscience of Interpersonal Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Pinzler, Laura; Krach, Sören; Krämer, Ulrike M; Paulus, Frieder M

    In our daily lives, we constantly engage in reciprocal interactions with other individuals and represent ourselves in the context of our surrounding social world. Within social interactions, humans often experience interpersonal emotions such as embarrassment, shame, guilt, or pride. How interpersonal emotions are processed on the neural systems level is of major interest for social neuroscience research. While the configuration of laboratory settings in general is constraining for emotion research, recent neuroimaging investigations came up with new approaches to implement socially interactive and immersive scenarios for the real-life investigation of interpersonal emotions. These studies could show that among other brain regions the so-called mentalizing network, which is typically involved when we represent and make sense of others' states of mind, is associated with interpersonal emotions. The anterior insula/anterior cingulate cortex network at the same time processes one's own bodily arousal during such interpersonal emotional experiences. Current research aimed to explore how we make sense of others' emotional states during social interactions and investigates the modulating factors of our emotional experiences during social interactions. Understanding how interpersonal emotions are processed on the neural systems level may yield significant implications for neuropsychiatric disorders that affect social behavior such as social anxiety disorders or autism.

  9. Arbitrage Pricing, Capital Asset Pricing, and Agricultural Assets

    OpenAIRE

    Louise M. Arthur; Colin A. Carter; Fay Abizadeh

    1988-01-01

    A new asset pricing model, the arbitrage pricing theory, has been developed as an alternative to the capital asset pricing model. The arbitrage pricing theory model is used to analyze the relationship between risk and return for agricultural assets. The major conclusion is that the arbitrage pricing theory results support previous capital asset pricing model findings that the estimated risk associated with agricultural assets is low. This conclusion is more robust for the arbitrage pricing th...

  10. Asset Pricing - A Brief Review

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Minqiang

    2010-01-01

    I first introduce the early-stage and modern classical asset pricing and portfolio theories. These include: the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), the arbitrage pricing theory (APT), the consumption capital asset pricing model (CCAPM), the intertemporal capital asset pricing model (ICAPM), and some other important modern concepts and techniques. Finally, I discuss the most recent development during the last decade and the outlook in the field of asset pricing.

  11. Rational Asset Pricing Bubbles Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Werner

    2012-01-01

    Price bubble arises when the price of an asset exceeds the asset's fundamental value, that is, the present value of future dividend payments. The important result of Santos and Woodford (1997) says that price bubbles cannot exist in equilibrium in the standard dynamic asset pricing model with rational agents as long as assets are in strictly positive supply and the present value of total future resources is finite. This paper explores the possibility of asset price bubbles when either one of ...

  12. INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS IN SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Opić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of the scientific project titled “The Curriculum of Social Competences and Relations in School”, the aim of this paper is to examine the quality of interpersonal relations between teachers and pupils. On a sample of 432 teachers from 20 towns, 35 primary schools in the Republic of Croatia, and 432 pupils, it was confirmed that there is a difference in the appraisal of the quality of their interpersonal relations. Although the overall quality of interpersonal relations between pupils and teachers is at a moderately satisfactory level, pupils still appraise the quality of interpersonal relations lower than their teachers. In view of latent dimensionality, a factor questionnaire structure was used (14 variables; ordinal type and two main components (subscales determined: didactic support and interaction, and rough verbal and physical treatment. As part of the differential draft of our research, no gender differences were established (between female and male teachers in the appraisal of the quality of interpersonal relations with pupils (on two subscales. The correlation analysis confirmed a low negative statistically significant correlation between the years of service and the subscale rough verbal and physical treatment (Rho=-0.101. In view of the subscale of rough verbal and physical treatment between pupils and teachers, such results on a negative correlation imply that older teachers, as opposed to their younger colleagues, use more corporal punishment in schools, treat pupils rudely, use nasty and impolite words, and call pupils insulting names.

  13. Perlakuan Akuntansi Sumber Daya Manusia: Assets Sekaligus Investor Bagi Perusahaan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Ningsih

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human resources or called employee as a company asset to be one determinant of the success of the company (organization. Issue growing is that labor (human resources is not only the company's assets but also as owners and investors on its human capital to be invested in the company where he works (at work. This article tries to see how human resources can be considered as an asset for the company and when human resources can act as an investor of its human capital. This article also discusses the accounting treatment of human resources as company assets and the possibility of counting on human resources as human capital investor.    

  14. Asset management techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Joachim; Gaul, Armin J. [RWE Energy AG, Assetmanagement, Dortmund (Germany); Neumann, Claus [RWE Transportnetz Strom GmbH, Dortmund (Germany); Hograefer, Juergen [SAG Energieversorgungsloesungen GmbH, Langen (Germany); Wellssow, Wolfram; Schwan, Michael [Siemens AG, Power Transmission and Distribution, Erlangen (Germany); Schnettler, Armin [RWTH-Aachen, Institut fuer Hochspannungstechnik, Aachen (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Deregulation and an increasing competition in electricity markets urge energy suppliers to optimize the utilization of their equipment, focusing on technical and cost-effective aspects. As a respond to these requirements utilities introduce methods formerly used by investment managers or insurance companies. The article describes the usage of these methods, particularly with regard to asset management and risk management within electrical grids. The essential information needed to set up an appropriate asset management system and differences between asset management systems in transmission and distribution systems are discussed. The bulk of costs in electrical grids can be found in costs for maintenance and capital depreciation. A comprehensive approach for an asset management in transmission systems thus focuses on the 'life-cycle costs' of the individual equipment. The objective of the life management process is the optimal utilisation of the remaining life time regarding a given reliability of service and a constant distribution of costs for reinvestment and maintenance ensuring a suitable return. In distribution systems the high number of components would require an enormous effort for the consideration of single individuals. Therefore statistical approaches have been used successfully in practical applications. Newest insights gained by a German research project on asset management systems in distribution grids give an outlook to future developments. (author)

  15. Asset management techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Joachim; Gaul, Armin J.; Neumann, Claus; Hograefer, Juergen; Wellssow, Wolfram; Schwan, Michael; Schnettler, Armin

    2006-01-01

    Deregulation and an increasing competition in electricity markets urge energy suppliers to optimize the utilization of their equipment, focusing on technical and cost-effective aspects. As a respond to these requirements utilities introduce methods formerly used by investment managers or insurance companies. The article describes the usage of these methods, particularly with regard to asset management and risk management within electrical grids. The essential information needed to set up an appropriate asset management system and differences between asset management systems in transmission and distribution systems are discussed. The bulk of costs in electrical grids can be found in costs for maintenance and capital depreciation. A comprehensive approach for an asset management in transmission systems thus focuses on the 'life-cycle costs' of the individual equipment. The objective of the life management process is the optimal utilisation of the remaining life time regarding a given reliability of service and a constant distribution of costs for reinvestment and maintenance ensuring a suitable return. In distribution systems the high number of components would require an enormous effort for the consideration of single individuals. Therefore statistical approaches have been used successfully in practical applications. Newest insights gained by a German research project on asset management systems in distribution grids give an outlook to future developments. (author)

  16. Implementace Asset managementu

    OpenAIRE

    Fuxa, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    Tato diplomová práce obsahuje návrh implementace Asset managementu do ServiceNow v nejmenované nadnárodní společnosti. Cílem diplomové práce je analýza požadavku společnosti a nalezení vhodného řešení implementace Asset managementu v rámci stávajících nástrojů. Závěrem zhodnotím, zda je možné vybraný nástroj využít. This master’s thesis contains proposal to implementation Asset management to ServiceNow in unnamed multinational company. The aim of this master’s thesis is analysis of company...

  17. 8th World Congress on Engineering Asset Management & the 3rd International Conference on Utility Management & Safety

    CERN Document Server

    Mathew, Joseph; Wong, King; Lam, Rocky; Ko, CN; WCEAM 2013; ICUMAS; Engineering asset management : systems, professional practices and certification

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings represents state-of-the-art trends and developments in the emerging field of engineering asset management as presented at the Eight World Congress on Engineering Asset Management (WCEAM). The Proceedings of the WCEAM 2013 is an excellent reference for practitioners, researchers and students in the multidisciplinary field of asset management, covering topics such as: Asset condition monitoring and intelligent maintenance, 2.  Asset data warehousing, data mining and fusion, 3. Asset performance and level-of-service models, 4. Design and life-cycle integrity of physical assets, 5. Deterioration and preservation models for assets, 6. Education and training in asset management, 7. Engineering standards in asset management, 8. Fault diagnosis and prognostics, 9. Financial analysis methods for physical assets, 10. Human dimensions in integrated asset management, 11. Information quality management, 12. Information systems and knowledge management, 13. Intelligent sensors and devices, 14. Maintenance...

  18. Interpersonal Biocybernetics: Connecting Through Social Psychophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alan T.; Stephens, Chad L.

    2012-01-01

    One embodiment of biocybernetic adaptation is a human-computer interaction system designed such that physiological signals modulate the effect that control of a task by other means, usually manual control, has on performance of the task. Such a modulation system enables a variety of human-human interactions based upon physiological self-regulation performance. These interpersonal interactions may be mixes of competition and cooperation for simulation training and/or videogame entertainment

  19. Culture and Pragmatic Inference in Interpersonal Communication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cognitive process, and that the human capacity for inference is crucially important ... been noted that research in interpersonal communication is currently pushing the ... communicative actions, the social-cultural world of everyday life is not only ... personal experiences of the authors', as documented over time and recreated ...

  20. Education and Asset Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Michael G.; Graham, John W.

    1988-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between educational attainment and married couples' efficiency at managing their assets. Using 1976 data, this study of over 750 Illinois couples disclosed little empirical evidence that education imparts efficiency to the realm of personal finance. Includes 6 tables, 5 notes, and 17 references. (MLH)

  1. Asset Opacity and Liquidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenzel, A.; Wagner, W.B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: We consider a model of private information acquisition in which the cost of information depends on an asset's opacity. The model generates a hump-shaped relationship between opacity and the equilibrium amount of private information. In particular, the incentives to acquire information are

  2. Managing intangible assets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, M.J.R.; Jonker, J.

    2005-01-01

    - Purpose – To develop a concept of managing intangible assets in contemporary organisations. Insight is given into the rise of the network organisation and the importance of talent, social capital and identity in this kind of organisation. - Design/methodology/approach – This paper develops a

  3. Pension plan asset valuation

    OpenAIRE

    Owadally, M. I; Haberman, S.

    2001-01-01

    Various asset valuation methods are used in the context of funding valuations. The motivation for such methods and their properties are briefly described. Some smoothed value or market-related methods based on arithmetic averaging and exponential smoothing are considered and their effect on funding is discussed. Suggestions for further research are also made.

  4. 2014 State of Western's Assets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-01-01

    In this report we document the State of Western’s Assets in terms of physical equipment, financial resources, strategic direction, and human capital, both at the organizational and regional levels. We identify the condition of our assets today and share what work we will be doing in these areas in the coming years.

  5. Financial Integration and Asset Returns

    OpenAIRE

    P Martin; H Rey

    2000-01-01

    The paper investigates the impact of financial integration on asset return, risk diversification and breadth of financial markets. We analyse a three-country macroeconomic model in which (i) the number of financial assets is endogenous; (ii) assets are imperfect substitutes; (iii) cross-border asset trade entails some transaction costs; (iv) the investment technology is indivisible. In such an environment, lower transaction costs between two financial markets translate to higher demand for as...

  6. INNOVATION IN ACCOUNTING BIOLOGIC ASSETS

    OpenAIRE

    Stolуarova M. A.; Shcherbina I. D.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes the innovations in the classification and measurement of biological assets according to IFRS (IAS) 41 "Agriculture". The difficulties faced by agricultural producers using standard, set out in article. The classification based on the adopted amendments, according to which the fruit-bearing plants, previously accounted for as biological assets are measured at fair value are included in the category of fixed assets. The structure of biological assets and main means has bee...

  7. Efficiently Inefficient Markets for Assets and Assets Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garleanu, Nicolae; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    We consider a model where investors can invest directly or search for an asset manager, information about assets is costly, and managers charge an endogenous fee. The efficiency of asset prices is linked to the efficiency of the asset management market: if investors can find managers more easily......, more money is allocated to active management, fees are lower, and asset prices are more efficient. Informed managers outperform after fees, uninformed managers underperform after fees, and the net performance of the average manager depends on the number of "noise allocators." Finally, we show why large...

  8. Competitive Procurement and Asset Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorana, V.

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of asset specificity on the performance of procurement auctions with subcontracting and asset sales.The analysis highlights the role of several asset features like transfer costs, type of alternative uses and maintenance requirements.It is argued that, if bargaining

  9. Asset planning performance measurement framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arthur, D.; Hodkiewicz, M.; Schoenmaker, R.; Muruvan, S.

    2014-01-01

    The international asset management standard ISO 55001, introduced in early 2014, outlines the requirement for an effective Asset Management System. Asset Management practitioners are seeking guidance on implementing one of the key requirements of the standard: the “line of sight” between the

  10. Guilt: an interpersonal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, R F; Stillwell, A M; Heatherton, T F

    1994-03-01

    Multiple sets of empirical research findings on guilt are reviewed to evaluate the view that guilt should be understood as an essentially social phenomenon that happens between people as much as it happens inside them. Guilt appears to arise from interpersonal transactions (including transgressions and positive inequities) and to vary significantly with the interpersonal context. In particular, guilt patterns appear to be strongest, most common, and most consistent in the context of communal relationships, which are characterized by expectations of mutual concern. Guilt serves various relationship-enhancing functions, including motivating people to treat partners well and avoid transgressions, minimizing inequities and enabling less powerful partners to get their way, and redistributing emotional distress.

  11. Dialogue as interpersonal synergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Raczaszek-Leonardi, Joanna; Tylén, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    What is the proper unit of analysis in the psycholinguistics of dialogue? While classical approaches are largely based on models of individual linguistic processing, recent advances stress the social coordinative nature of dialogue. In the influential interactive alignment model, dialogue is thus...... of individual cognitive systems but must be approached also at the interpersonal level. From such a perspective follows a number of new predictions: beyond simple synchrony, dialogue affords complementary dynamics, constrained by contextual sensitivity and functional specificity. We substantiate our arguments...

  12. Asset management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wison, P.; Newman, G.

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand our assets we have been assessing the condition of the units in our nuclear power plants developing asset life management options on a component by component basis. We have concluded that with the right work and planning we will be able to manage the units in a way that balances capacity requirements over the long term and at the same time manage the demand on critical resources. Major component replacement outages include Installing/removing bulkheads, pressure tube and calandria tube replacement, feeder replacement, steam generator replacement, supporting facilities and infrastructure, reactor inspections and maintenance including tooling enhancements, additional non reactor systems inspection & testing and continued research and analysis. These plans will have to take into account cost, resource and capacity requirements.

  13. Digital asset management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Clinton D; Tollefson, Travis T; Kriet, J David

    2010-05-01

    Facial plastic surgeons are accumulating massive digital image databases with the evolution of photodocumentation and widespread adoption of digital photography. Managing and maximizing the utility of these vast data repositories, or digital asset management (DAM), is a persistent challenge. Developing a DAM workflow that incorporates a file naming algorithm and metadata assignment will increase the utility of a surgeon's digital images. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Organizations must match assets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carley, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    The unprofitable state of the Canadian oil industry, the adverse economic environment, the difficulty of finding capital, and the diminishing resources of conventional lighter crude oil make it necessary for Canadian oil companies to match their organizations and their financing to their assets. This is illustrated according to the experience of Saskoil, a Saskatchewan oil and gas company. An increasing production of oil and natural gas, and an increasing amount of new oil production as heavy oil, led to organizational changes such as the purchase of an asphalt plant to provide the company with downstream experience, establishing a working group to explore and develop heavy oil resources, and forming a company to manage non-core assets. The latter company, Pasqua Resources, manages assets such as small properties and ownership interests in order to increase the operating efficiency of Saskoil. Pasqua provides Saskoil with a corporate and organizational vehicle to accommodate partnerships and joint venture capital invested in property purchase opportunities, and to manage any of Saskoil's divestiture activities

  15. Accounting treatment of intangible assets

    OpenAIRE

    Gorgieva-Trajkovska, Olivera; Koleva, Blagica; Georgieva Svrtinov, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    The accounting for fixed assets is, in many cases, a straightforward exercise, but it isn’t always so when it comes to the issue of intangible fixed assets and recognizing such assets on the balance sheet. IAS 38, In¬tan¬gi¬ble Assets, outlines the accounting re¬quire¬ments for in¬tan¬gi¬ble assets, which are non-mon¬e¬tary assets which are without physical substance and iden¬ti¬fi¬able (either being separable or arising from con¬trac¬tual or other legal rights). In¬tan¬gi¬ble assets meeting ...

  16. Measuring the strategic readiness of intangible assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2004-02-01

    Measuring the value of intangible assets such as company culture, knowledge management systems, and employees' skills is the holy grail of accounting. Executives know that these intangibles, being hard to imitate, are powerful sources of sustainable competitive advantage. If managers could measure them, they could manage the company's competitive position more easily and accurately. In one sense, the challenge is impossible. Intangible assets are unlike financial and physical resources in that their value depends on how well they serve the organizations that own them. But while this prevents an independent valuation of intangible assets, it also points to an altogether different approach for assessing their worth. In this article, the creators of the Balanced Scorecard draw on its tools and framework--in particular, a tool called the strategy map--to present a step-by-step way to determine "strategic readiness," which refers to the alignment of an organization's human, information, and organization capital with its strategy. In the method the authors describe, the firm identifies the processes most critical to creating and delivering its value proposition and determines the human, information, and organization capital the processes require. Some managers shy away from measuring intangible assets because they seem so subjective. But by using the systematic approaches set out in this article, companies can now measure what they want, rather than wanting only what they can currently measure.

  17. Asset sales, asset exchanges, and shareholder wealth in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiting Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study a sample of 1376 corporate asset sales and 250 asset exchanges in China between 1998 and 2006. We find that corporate asset sales in China enhance firm value with a cumulative abnormal return (CAR of 0.46% for the pre-announcement five-day period, which is consistent with the evidence discovered in both U.K. and U.S. For companies that exchanged assets during the sample period, the pre-announcement five-day CAR of 1.32% is statistically significant. We also discover that gains from divesting assets are positively related to managerial performance measured by Tobin's q ratio and the relative size of the asset sold or exchanged. Well-managed (high-q companies are more likely to sell or exchange assets in a value-maximizing fashion than poorly managed (low-q companies. Furthermore, asset-seller gains are not related to enhancing corporate focus, but improving corporate focus by exchanging for core assets enhances firm value.

  18. Pricing Volatility Referenced Assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan De Genaro Dario

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatility swaps are contingent claims on future realized volatility. Variance swaps are similar instruments on future realized variance, the square of future realized volatility. Unlike a plain vanilla option, whose volatility exposure is contaminated by its asset price dependence, volatility and variance swaps provide a pure exposure to volatility alone. This article discusses the risk-neutral valuation of volatility and variance swaps based on the framework outlined in the Heston (1993 stochastic volatility model. Additionally, the Heston (1993 model is calibrated for foreign currency options traded at BMF and its parameters are used to price swaps on volatility and variance of the BRL / USD exchange rate.

  19. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohemi Sala

    Full Text Available Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  20. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  1. FOSTERING ADOLESCENTS' INTERPERSONAL BEHAVIOUR: AN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Engr E. Egbochukwu

    skill training (SST) in fostering interpersonal behaviour among Nigerian adolescents. ..... communication problems (Akinade, 1988, Aremu, 1998, Ojekunle, 1999, .... Restructuring on the Enhancement of Self Esteem of Visually Impaired.

  2. Shared reality in interpersonal relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Susan M; Przybylinski, Elizabeth

    2017-11-24

    Close relationships afford us opportunities to create and maintain meaning systems as shared perceptions of ourselves and the world. Establishing a sense of mutual understanding allows for creating and maintaining lasting social bonds, and as such, is important in human relations. In a related vein, it has long been known that knowledge of significant others in one's life is stored in memory and evoked with new persons-in the social-cognitive process of 'transference'-imbuing new encounters with significance and leading to predictable cognitive, evaluative, motivational, and behavioral consequences, as well as shifts in the self and self-regulation, depending on the particular significant other evoked. In these pages, we briefly review the literature on meaning as interpersonally defined and then selectively review research on transference in interpersonal perception. Based on this, we then highlight a recent series of studies focused on shared meaning systems in transference. The highlighted studies show that values and beliefs that develop in close relationships (as shared reality) are linked in memory to significant-other knowledge, and thus, are indirectly activated (made accessible) when cues in a new person implicitly activate that significant-other knowledge (in transference), with these shared beliefs then actively pursued with the new person and even protected against threat. This also confers a sense of mutual understanding, and all told, serves both relational and epistemic functions. In concluding, we consider as well the relevance of co-construction of shared reality n such processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Portfolio Choice with Illiquid Assets

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Ang; Dimitris Papanikolaou; Mark Westerfield

    2013-01-01

    We present a model of optimal allocation over liquid and illiquid assets, where illiquidity is the restriction that an asset cannot be traded for intervals of uncertain duration. Illiquidity leads to increased and state-dependent risk aversion, and reduces the allocation to both liquid and illiquid risky assets. Uncertainty about the length of the illiquidity interval, as opposed to a deterministic non-trading interval, is a primary determinant of the cost of illiquidity. We allow market liqu...

  4. Basel III and Asset Securitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mpundu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asset securitization via special purpose entities involves the process of transforming assets into securities that are issued to investors. These investors hold the rights to payments supported by the cash flows from an asset pool held by the said entity. In this paper, we discuss the mechanism by which low- and high-quality entities securitize low- and high-quality assets, respectively, into collateralized debt obligations. During the 2007–2009 financial crisis, asset securitization was seriously inhibited. In response to this, for instance, new Basel III capital and liquidity regulations were introduced. Here, we find that we can explicitly determine the transaction costs related to low-quality asset securitization. Also, in the case of dynamic and static multipliers, the effects of unexpected negative shocks such as rating downgrades on asset price and input, debt obligation price and output, and profit will be quantified. In this case, we note that Basel III has been designed to provide countercyclical capital buffers to negate procyclicality. Moreover, we will develop an illustrative example of low-quality asset securitization for subprime mortgages. Furthermore, numerical examples to illustrate the key results will be provided. In addition, connections between Basel III and asset securitization will be highlighted.

  5. EFFICIENCY OF CURRENCY ASSET CLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad R. Safarzadeh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing the risk and return for the S&P Currency Index Arbitrage and the Merk Absolute Return Currency Fund, this study intends to find whether currency asset classes are worthwhile investments. To determine where the efficient currency portfolios lie in the risk and return spectrum, this paper compares the two portfolios to fixed income and equity asset portfolios. The results lead to a baffling conclusion that, in general, the returns to low-risk currency asset portfolios are higher than the equity asset portfolios of same risk level.

  6. INTANGIBLE ASSETS THROUGH THE COHESION POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popescu (Stingaciu Ana-Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available INTANGIBLE ASSETS THROUGH THE COHESION POLICY Roth Anne-Marie-Monika West University of Timisoara Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Popescu (Stingaciu Ana-Maria West University of Timisoara Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Intangible assets in general and intellectual capital in particular are important to both society and organizations. It can be a source of competitive advantage for business and stimulate innovation that leads to wealth generation. Technological revolutions, the rise of the knowledge-based economy and the networked society have all led to the same conclusion that intangibles and how they contribute to value creation have to be appreciated so that the appropriate decisions can be made to protect and enhance them. The Cohesion Policy represents the main EU measure to ensure a balanced and sustainable growth in Europe by promoting harmonious development and reducing the regional disparities. The general objective of the paper is to highlight the important role of the Cohesion Policy in the development of intangible assets. The objectives and the instruments of the Cohesion Policy are designed to support programs on regional development, economic change, enhanced competitiveness and territorial cooperation through the European Union, to develop human resources and employability. Keywords: intangible assets, intellectual capital, Cohesion policy, development; JEL Classification: O43, G32, D24, O34

  7. Public Relations and Interpersonal Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Elizabeth P.

    Despite a lack of consensus on theoretical perspectives on public relations and variations in the ways it and interpersonal communication are defined, public relations may be related to interpersonal communication in three ways: (1) it is two-way communication, (2) it is personal, and (3) it is relational. Even in activities having the highest…

  8. Efficiently Inefficient Markets for Assets and Asset Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garleanu, Nicolae; Pedersen, Lasse Heje

    We consider a model where investors can invest directly or search for an asset manager, information about assets is costly, and managers charge an endogenous fee. The efficiency of asset prices is linked to the efficiency of the asset management market: if investors can find managers more easily......, more money is allocated to active management, fees are lower, and asset prices are more efficient. Informed managers outperform after fees, uninformed managers underperform after fees, and the net performance of the average manager depends on the number of "noise allocators." Small investors should...... be passive, but large and sophisticated investors benefit from searching for informed active managers since their search cost is low relative to capital. Hence, managers with larger and more sophisticated investors are expected to outperform....

  9. Managing assets in the infrastructure sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houten, T.P.; Zhang, L.

    2010-01-01

    In view of the importance of managing assets and the lack of research in managing assets in the infrastructure sector, we develop an asset management model in this study. This model is developed in line with the unique characteristics of the infrastructure assets and asset management principles and

  10. Asset management: the big picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinstadt, Deborah C

    2005-10-01

    To develop an comprehensive asset management plan, you need, first of all, to understand the asset management continuum. A key preliminary step is to thoroughly assess the existing equipment base. A critical objective is to ensure that there are open lines of communication among the teams charged with managing the plan's various phases.

  11. Evaluation of the Effect of Non-Current Fixed Assets on Profitability and Asset Management Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubyanaya, Alexandra V.; Izmailov, Airat M.; Nikulina, Ekaterina Y.; Shaposhnikov, Vladislav A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the problem, which stems from non-current fixed assets affecting profitability and asset management efficiency. Tangible assets, intangible assets and financial assets are all included in non-current fixed assets. The aim of the research is to identify the impact of estimates and valuation in…

  12. Cooperative Learning and Interpersonal Synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Roy; Wijnants, Maarten L; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Bosman, Anna M T

    2017-04-01

    Cooperative learning has been shown to result in better task performance, compared to individual and competitive learning, and can lead to positive social effects. However, potential working mechanisms at a micro level remain unexplored. One potential working mechanism might be the level of interpersonal synchrony between cooperating individuals. It has been shown that increased levels of interpersonal synchrony are related to better cognitive performance (e.g., increased memory). Social factors also appear to be affected by the level of interpersonal synchrony, with more interpersonal synchrony leading to increased likeability. In the present study, interpersonal synchrony of postural sway and its relation to task performance and social factors (i.e., popularity, social acceptance, and likeability) was examined. To test this, 183 dyads performed a tangram task while each child stood on a Nintendo Wii Balance Board that recorded their postural sway. The results showed that lower levels of interpersonal synchrony were related to better task performance and those dyads who were on average more popular synchronized more. These results contradict previous findings. It is suggested that for task performance, a more loosely coupled system is better than a synchronized system. In terms of social competence, dyad popularity was associated with more interpersonal synchrony.

  13. On the Same Wavelength: Face-to-Face Communication Increases Interpersonal Neural Synchronization

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Kyongsik

    2013-01-01

    Understanding neural mechanisms of social interaction is important for understanding human social nature and for developing treatments for social deficits related to disorders such as autism. However, conventional cognitive and behavioral neuroscience has concentrated on developing novel experimental paradigms and investigating human–computer interactions, rather than studying interpersonal interaction per se. To fully understand neural mechanisms of human interpersonal interaction, we will l...

  14. Digital asset ecosystems rethinking crowds and cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Digital asset management is undergoing a fundamental transformation. Near universal availability of high-quality web-based assets makes it important to pay attention to the new world of digital ecosystems and what it means for managing, using and publishing digital assets. The Ecosystem of Digital Assets reflects on these developments and what the emerging 'web of things' could mean for digital assets. The book is structured into three parts, each covering an important aspect of digital assets. Part one introduces the emerging ecosystems of digital assets. Part two examines digital asset manag

  15. Preventing Interpersonal Violence in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Sethi

    2014-06-01

    CONCLUSION: Community surveys can play an important role to better understand the scale and risk factors of different types of interpersonal violence. Readers are called upon to support a coordinated public health response to prevent this societal and health threat.

  16. Gender, Livestock and Asset Ownership

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    measure of gender inequality and women's economic empowerment compared to indicators such as income. The role of livestock as an asset for women has been analysed in Kenya, Tanzania .... were a more common source in Tanzania and.

  17. Developing formal asset management plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report highlights key recommendations and best practices identified at the peer exchange on Transportation Asset Management Plans (TAMP), held on February 5 and 6, 2014, in Columbia, South Carolina. This event was sponsored by the Transportation...

  18. Asset management techniques for transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Elanien, Ahmed E.B.; Salama, M.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    In a deregulated/reformed environment, the electric utilities are under constant pressure for reducing operating costs, enhancing the reliability of transmission and distribution equipments, and improving quality of power and services to the customer. Moreover, the risk involved in running the system without proper attention to assets integrity in service is quite high. Additionally, the probability of losing any equipment vital to the transmission and distribution system, such as power and distribution transformers, is increasing especially with the aging of power system's assets. Today the focus of operating the power system is changed and efforts are being directed to explore new approaches/techniques of monitoring, diagnosis, condition evaluation, maintenance, life assessment, and possibility of extending the life of existing assets. In this paper, a comprehensive illustration of the transformer asset management activities is presented. The importance of each activity together with the latest researches done in the area is highlighted. (author)

  19. Why Do We Fall into Sync with Others? Interpersonal Synchronization and the Brain's Optimization Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koban, Leonie; Ramamoorthy, Anand; Konvalinka, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous interpersonal synchronization of rhythmic behavior such as gait or clapping is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human interactions, and is potentially important for social relationships and action understanding. Although several authors have suggested a role of the mirror neuron system...... in interpersonal coupling, the underlying brain mechanisms are not well understood. Here we argue that more general theories of neural computations, namely predictive coding and the Free Energy Principle, could explain interpersonal coordination dynamics. Each brain minimizes coding costs by reducing the mismatch...

  20. An Asset-Based Approach to Tribal Community Energy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Rachael A. [Pratt Inst., Brooklyn, NY (United States). City and Regional Planning; Martino, Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials, Devices, and Energy Technologies; Begay, Sandra K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials, Devices, and Energy Technologies

    2016-08-01

    Community energy planning is a vital component of successful energy resource development and project implementation. Planning can help tribes develop a shared vision and strategies to accomplish their energy goals. This paper explores the benefits of an asset-based approach to tribal community energy planning. While a framework for community energy planning and federal funding already exists, some areas of difficulty in the planning cycle have been identified. This paper focuses on developing a planning framework that offsets those challenges. The asset-based framework described here takes inventory of a tribe’s capital assets, such as: land capital, human capital, financial capital, and political capital. Such an analysis evaluates how being rich in a specific type of capital can offer a tribe unique advantages in implementing their energy vision. Finally, a tribal case study demonstrates the practical application of an asset-based framework.

  1. Asset Pricing and Monetary Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Bingbing Dong

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the role of money in understanding the behavior of asset prices and whether and how monetary policy should react to asset prices such as stock prices and equity premiums. To do so, I introduce money via the form of transaction cost into a production economy with limited stock market participation where agents with lower inter-temporal elasticity of substitution (IES), called non-stockholders, have no access to stock market. In addition to facilitating transactions of consu...

  2. Interpersonal Stressors Predict Ghrelin and Leptin Levels in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaremka, Lisa M.; Belury, Martha A.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Malarkey, William B.; Glaser, Ronald; Christian, Lisa; Emery, Charles F.; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Stressful events enhance risk for weight gain and adiposity. Ghrelin and leptin, two hormones that are implicated in appetite regulation, may link stressful events to weight gain; a number of rodent studies suggest that stressors increase ghrelin production. The present study investigated the links among daily stressors, ghrelin and leptin, and dietary intake in humans. Method Women (N = 50) completed three study appointments that were scheduled at least 2 weeks apart. At each visit, women arrived fasting and ate a standardized breakfast and lunch. Blood samples were collected 45 minutes after each meal. Women completed a self-report version of the Daily Inventory of Stressful Events (DISE) at each appointment. Two composites were created from the DISE data, reflecting the number of stressors that did and did not involve interpersonal tension. Results Women who experienced more stressors involving interpersonal tension had higher ghrelin and lower leptin levels than those who experienced fewer interpersonal stressors. Furthermore, women who experienced more interpersonal stressors had a diet that was higher in calories, fat, carbohydrates, protein, sugar, sodium, and fiber, and marginally higher in cholesterol, vegetables (but not fruits), vitamin A, and vitamin C. Stressors that did not involve interpersonal tension were unrelated to ghrelin and leptin levels or any of the dietary components examined. Conclusions These data suggest that ghrelin and leptin may link daily interpersonal stressors to weight gain and obesity. PMID:25032903

  3. Distinguishing Intrapsychic From Interpersonal Motives in Psychological Theory and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Mark R; Raimi, Kaitlin Toner; Jongman-Sereno, Katrina P; Diebels, Kate J

    2015-07-01

    Many psychological phenomena have been explained primarily in terms of intrapsychic motives to maintain particular cognitive or affective states--such as motives for consistency, self-esteem, and authenticity--whereas other phenomena have been explained in terms of interpersonal motives to obtain tangible resources, reactions, or outcomes from other people. In this article, we describe and contrast intrapsychic and interpersonal motives, and we review evidence showing that these two distinct sets of motives are sometimes conflated and confused in ways that undermine the viability of motivational theories. Explanations that invoke motives to maintain certain intrapsychic states offer a dramatically different view of the psychological foundations of human behavior than those that posit motives to obtain desired interpersonal outcomes. Several phenomena are examined as exemplars of instances in which interpersonal and intrapsychic motives have been inadequately distinguished, if not directly confounded, including cognitive dissonance, the self-esteem motive, biases in judgment and decision making, posttransgression accounts, authenticity, and self-conscious emotions. Our analysis of the literature suggests that theorists and researchers should consider the relative importance of intrapsychic versus interpersonal motives in the phenomena they study and that they should make a concerted effort to deconfound intrapsychic and interpersonal influences in their research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. AUTOMATING ASSET KNOWLEDGE WITH MTCONNECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Sid; Ly, Sidney; Manning, Martin; Michaloski, John; Proctor, Fred

    2016-01-01

    In order to maximize assets, manufacturers should use real-time knowledge garnered from ongoing and continuous collection and evaluation of factory-floor machine status data. In discrete parts manufacturing, factory machine monitoring has been difficult, due primarily to closed, proprietary automation equipment that make integration difficult. Recently, there has been a push in applying the data acquisition concepts of MTConnect to the real-time acquisition of machine status data. MTConnect is an open, free specification aimed at overcoming the "Islands of Automation" dilemma on the shop floor. With automated asset analysis, manufacturers can improve production to become lean, efficient, and effective. The focus of this paper will be on the deployment of MTConnect to collect real-time machine status to automate asset management. In addition, we will leverage the ISO 22400 standard, which defines an asset and quantifies asset performance metrics. In conjunction with these goals, the deployment of MTConnect in a large aerospace manufacturing facility will be studied with emphasis on asset management and understanding the impact of machine Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) on manufacturing.

  5. Asset management trends and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijks, E. [Continuon, Arnhem (Netherlands); Ford, G.L. [PowerNex Associates Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada); Sanchis, G. [Reseau de Transport d' Electricite, Paris (France)

    2007-07-01

    Recent business and regulatory changes in the electric power industry have affected the operation of electric utilities. Most have accepted competition and commercialization. Various strategies have emerged as companies strive to improve performance and retain profitability in an environment where competition or regulatory pressure is reducing revenues at a time when customer expectation is increasing. As focus shifts away from engineering excellence towards commercial performance, the new business ideology for electric utilities is to optimize asset management. This paper identified asset management technology trends, opportunities and challenges. Although many utilities are currently comfortable with their existing asset management processes, regulators are increasingly scrutinizing utilities as they seek approval for rates and investments in aging infrastructure. Much more rigorous financial analysis methods are needed to justify the large investments that are needed. In addition, the credibility of the processes and methods used by utilities will be increasingly questioned. In recognition of the growing importance of asset management, several initiatives have been launched to provide forums for sharing information and to provide a unifying force to asset management methods. The International Council on Large Electric Systems (CIGRE) was one of the first to recognize the importance of asset management. This paper summarized recent CIGRE activities as well as the developments of publicly available specification (PAS) 55 in the United Kingdom. It was concluded that utilities that adopt standardized approaches will be more credible in the eyes of regulatory authorities. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Managing municipal infrastructure assets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wall, K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available into the legislative, regulatory, institutional, financial, technological, human resources and other changes that are no doubt required. Part of this national strategy must be a skills plan to ensure the long-term supply of technically trained human resources....

  7. 24 CFR 990.270 - Asset management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Asset management. 990.270 Section... THE PUBLIC HOUSING OPERATING FUND PROGRAM Asset Management § 990.270 Asset management. As owners, PHAs have asset management responsibilities that are above and beyond property management activities. These...

  8. Financier-led asset lease model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X.; Angelov, S.A.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Meersman, R.A.; Dillon, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, the business globalisation trend drives organisations to spread their business worldwide, which in turn generates vast asset demands. In this context, broader asset channels and higher financial capacities are required to boost the asset lease sector to meet the increasing asset demands

  9. Steam generator asset management: integrating technology and asset management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, P.; Cislo, D.

    2006-01-01

    Asset Management is an established but often misunderstood discipline that is gaining momentum within the nuclear generation industry. The global impetus behind the movement toward asset management is sustainability. The discipline of asset management is based upon three fundamental aspects; key performance indicators (KPI), activity-based cost accounting, and cost benefits/risk analysis. The technology associated with these three aspects is fairly well-developed, in all but the most critical area; cost benefits/risk analysis. There are software programs that calculate, trend, and display key-performance indicators to ensure high-level visibility. Activity-based costing is a little more difficult; requiring a consensus on the definition of what comprises an activity and then adjusting cost accounting systems to track. In the United States, the Nuclear Energy Institute's Standard Nuclear Process Model (SNPM) serves as the basis for activity-based costing. As a result, the software industry has quickly adapted to develop tracking systems that include the SNPM structure. Both the KPI's and the activity-based cost accounting feed the cost benefits/risk analysis to allow for continuous improvement and task optimization; the goal of asset management. In the case where the benefits and risks are clearly understood and defined, there has been much progress in applying technology for continuous improvement. Within the nuclear generation industry, more specialized and unique software systems have been developed for active components, such as pumps and motors. Active components lend themselves well to the application of asset management techniques because failure rates can be established, which serves as the basis to quantify risk in the cost-benefits/risk analysis. A key issue with respect to asset management technologies is only now being understood and addressed, that is how to manage passive components. Passive components, such as nuclear steam generators, reactor vessels

  10. Managing Assets in The Infrastructure Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.P. van Houten

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In view of the importance of managing assets and the lack of research in managing assets in the infrastructure sector, we develop an asset management model in this study. This model is developed in line with the unique characteristics of the infrastructure assets and asset management principles and criteria. In the proposed model, we consider activities at three levels, namely the strategical, tactical and operational levels. The interviews with experts in asset management and officials in several Dutch organizations have proven the potential of our asset management model.

  11. Financing Asset Sales and Business Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Marc; Hackbarth, Dirk; Puhan, Tatjana-Xenia

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the decision of firms to sell assets to fund investments (financing asset sales). For a sample of U.S. manufacturing firms during the 1971-2010 period, we document new stylized facts about financing asset sales that cannot be explained by traditional motives for selling assets, such as financial distress or financing constraints. Using a structural model of financing, investment, and macroeconomic risk, we show that financing asset sales attenuate the debt overhang problem...

  12. ISO 55000: Creating an asset management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Chris; Main, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    In the October 2014 issue of HEJ, Keith Hamer, group vice-president, Asset Management & Engineering at Sodexo, and marketing director at Asset Wisdom, Kevin Main, argued that the new ISO 55000 standards present facilities managers with an opportunity to create 'a joined-up, whole lifecycle approach' to managing and delivering value from assets. In this article, Kevin Main and Chris Bradley, who runs various asset management projects, examine the process of creating an asset management system.

  13. Selection of asset investment models by hospitals: examination of influencing factors, using Switzerland as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    Hospitals are responsible for a remarkable part of the annual increase in healthcare expenditure. This article examines one of the major cost drivers, the expenditure for investment in hospital assets. The study, conducted in Switzerland, identifies factors that influence hospitals' investment decisions. A suggestion on how to categorize asset investment models is presented based on the life cycle of an asset, and its influencing factors defined based on transaction cost economics. The influence of five factors (human asset specificity, physical asset specificity, uncertainty, bargaining power, and privacy of ownership) on the selection of an asset investment model is examined using a two-step fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis. The research shows that outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are particularly favored in the presence of two combinations of influencing factors: First, if technological uncertainty is high and both human asset specificity and bargaining power of a hospital are low. Second, if assets are very specific, technological uncertainty is high and there is a private hospital with low bargaining power, outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are favored too. Using Qualitative Comparative Analysis, it can be demonstrated that investment decisions of hospitals do not depend on isolated influencing factors but on a combination of factors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Incarceration and Household Asset Ownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Kristin; Schneider, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    A considerable literature documents the deleterious economic consequences of incarceration. However, little is known about the consequences of incarceration for household assets-a distinct indicator of economic well-being that may be especially valuable to the survival of low-income families-or about the spillover economic consequences of incarceration for families. In this article, we use longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to examine how incarceration is associated with asset ownership among formerly incarcerated men and their romantic partners. Results, which pay careful attention to the social forces that select individuals into incarceration, show that incarceration is negatively associated with ownership of a bank account, vehicle, and home among men and that these consequences for asset ownership extend to the romantic partners of these men. These associations are concentrated among men who previously held assets. Results also show that post-incarceration changes in romantic relationships are an important pathway by which even short-term incarceration depletes assets.

  15. ASSET guidelines. Revised 1991 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The present publication is an updated version of the IAEA Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team (ASSET) Guidelines, IAEA-TECDOC-573, published in 1990. Sections 5 and 6 include revised definitions and investigation guidelines for identification of both direct and root causes. These revisions were recommended by a Consultants Meeting held in Vienna on 3-7 December 1990. This guidance is not intended to infringe an expert's prerogative to investigate additional items. Its main purpose is to provide a basic structure and ensure consistency in the assessments. Use of the ASSET guidelines should also facilitate comparison between the observations made in different nuclear power plants and harmonize the reporting of generic ASSET results. The guidelines should always be used with a critical attitude and a view to possible improvements

  16. ASSETS STRUCTURE AT CREDIT UNIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiplea Augustin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Balance is a static tool for assessing the entity's position, profit and loss on one hand and cash flow statement on the other hand. These are dynamic situations on one hand showing the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the total consumption of resources ( profit and loss and on the other hand entity's business viability (by cash flows. As reflection of financial position, the balance, established at the end of the reporting period (called a financial year, describes separately items of assets, liabilities and equity of the company. Assets are resources controlled by the enterprise as a result of past events and from which is expected to generate future economic benefits for the enterprise. The economic benefits correspond to a production potential, a possibility for conversion into cash or a reduction in output capacity of funds (cost reduction that an asset contributes, directly or indirectly to a company-specific cash flow.

  17. 2014 World Congress on Engineering Asset Management

    CERN Document Server

    Hoohlo, Changela; Mathew, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Engineering asset management encompasses all types of engineered assets including built environment, infrastructure, plant, equipment, hardware systems and components. Following the release of ISO 5500x set of standards, the 9th WCEAM addresses the hugely important issue of what constitutes the body of knowledge in Engineering Asset Management. Topics discussed by Congress delegates are grouped into a number of tracks including strategies for investment and divestment of assets, operations and maintenance of assets, assessments of assets condition, risk and vulnerability, technologies and systems for management of asset, standards, education, training and certification. These proceedings include a sample of the wide range of topics presented during the 9th World Congress on Engineering Asset Management in Pretoria South Africa 28 – 31 October, 2014 and complements other emerging publications and standards that embrace the wide ranging issues concerning the management of engineered physical assets.

  18. A socio-interpersonal perspective on PTSD: the case for environments and interpersonal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maercker, Andreas; Horn, Andrea B

    2013-01-01

    an emphasis on the role of the individuals' partner, family or social support in the development or maintenance of PTSD and its recovery. At the distant social level, societal and cultural factors, e.g., individualistic versus collectivistic or other human value orientations, are acknowledged as contributing to the severity and course of PTSD. Increasing attention should be given to new approaches of PTSD treatment that refer to an interpersonal view of PTSD, e.g., communication training, PTSD-specific couples' therapy or community programs. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Comparison of physical, public and human assets as determinants of socioeconomic inequalities in contraceptive use in Colombia - moving beyond the household wealth index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmot Michael G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colombia is a lower-middle income country that faces the challenge of addressing health inequalities. This effort includes the task of developing measures of socioeconomic position (SEP to describe and analyse disparities in health and health related outcomes. This study explores the use of a multidimensional approach to SEP, in which socioeconomic inequalities in contraceptive use are investigated along multiple dimensions of SEP. We tested the hypothesis that provision of Public capital compensated for low levels of Human capital. Methods This study used the 2005 Colombian Demographic and Health Survey (DHS dataset. The outcome measures were 'current non-use' and 'never use' of contraception. Inequalities in contraceptive behaviour along four measures of SEP were compared: the Household wealth index (HWI, Physical capital (housing, consumer durables, Public capital (publicly provided services and Human capital (level of education. Principal component analysis was applied to construct the HWI, Physical capital and Public capital measures. Logistic regression models were used to estimate relative indices of inequality (RII for each measure of SEP with both outcomes. Results Socio-economic inequalities among rural women tended to be larger than those among urban women, for all measures of SEP and for both outcomes. In models mutually adjusted for Physical, Public and Human capital and age, Physical capital identified stronger gradients in contraceptive behaviour in urban and rural areas (Current use of contraception by Physical capital in urban areas RII 2.37 95% CI (1.99-2.83 and rural areas RII 3.70 (2.57-5.33. The impact of women's level of education on contraceptive behaviour was relatively weak in households with high Public capital compared to households with low Public capital (Current use of contraception in rural areas, interaction p = Conclusions A multidimensional approach provides a framework for disentangling

  20. Interpersonal communication and issues for autonomous vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Interpersonal roadway communication is a vital component of the transportation system. Road users communicate to coordinate movement and increase roadway safety. Future autonomous vehicle research needs to account for the role of interpersonal roadwa...

  1. Recognizing and Managing Interpersonal Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Nancy; Hovland, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Practical advice is offered, to managers and supervisors at any level, on recognizing and analyzing interpersonal conflicts, managing such conflicts and making them productive, and ensuring that performance reviews result in progress for both supervisor and employee. Conflict is seen as inevitable, an opportunity to take action, and manageable.…

  2. Perfectionism in an Interpersonal Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, Lynn E.; Bieling, Peter M.

    Numerous studies have suggested that depression and social anxiety are associated with perfectionism. The present study examines how self-oriented perfectionism and socially-prescribed perfectionism influence cognitive reactions to an interpersonal interaction. Undergraduate women (n=90) completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Beck…

  3. A Model of Interpersonal Persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cegala, Donald J.

    The traditional views of audience analysis and rhetorical strategy are examined in terms of modifications necessary for application to persuasion in interpersonal communication contexts. To obtain guidance for ways in which the traditional concepts may be modified, a framework consisting of selected work by Erving Goffman and Ernest Becker is…

  4. Interpersonal Relationships in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Jean Ortowski; And Others

    This curriculum guide on interpersonal relations in the workplace give techniques for instructors to use in evaluating these skills in their students. Eighteen competencies are included in this guide: adaptability; attendance; attitude; communication (nonverbal); communication (verbal); communication (written); confidence; cooperation; enthusiasm;…

  5. Comprehensive transportation asset management : making a business case and prioritizing assets for inclusion in formal asset management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Several agencies are applying asset management principles as a business tool and paradigm to help them define goals and prioritize agency resources in decision making. Previously, transportation asset management (TAM) has focused more on big ticke...

  6. Saving-Based Asset Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Johannes Kabderian; Schneider, Johannes; T. Smith, William

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the implications of a novel class of preferences for the behavior of asset prices. Following a suggestion by Marshall (1920), we entertain the possibility that people derive utility not only from consumption, but also from the very act of saving. These ‘‘saving-based’’ prefere...

  7. Strategic Asset Seeking by EMNEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent; Seifert, Jr., Rene E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The chapter provides an economic explanation and perspectivation of strategic asset seeking of multinational enterprises from emerging economies (EMNEs) as a prominent feature of today’s global economy. Approach: The authors apply and extend the “springboard perspective.” This perspective...

  8. Asset tracking in harsh environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, E.S.

    2009-01-01

    Current economic times require tight control of all assets / inventory and processes a company manages. These items if managed correctly and timely can mean the difference between success and failure of a company. Cost savings in hard economic times are essential to allow a company to utilize its assets to the fullest potential by eliminating duplication and waste. Accurate process management leads to greater customer satisfaction and loyalty. Many industries and processes have believed it to be impossible to track their products or assets using bar-codes due to the unique conditions of their environment; whether it is high temperature, rough handling or chemicals. That has now changed. Companies specializing in identification methods have stepped up to the challenge and have overcome many obstacles of the past. It's no longer a paper or plastic bar-code world. The presentation will be broken down into four parts: 1) The differences between Asset and ID tracking; 2) Why does a company need to bar-code?; 3) The objections many companies use for not bar-coding; and, 4) What's new in bar-coding? Case study handouts and a reference list of various companies including software, labeling and attachment techniques will be available at the end of the presentation. (author)

  9. Asset tracking in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neal, E.S. [Infosight Corp., Chillicothe, OH (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Current economic times require tight control of all assets / inventory and processes a company manages. These items if managed correctly and timely can mean the difference between success and failure of a company. Cost savings in hard economic times are essential to allow a company to utilize its assets to the fullest potential by eliminating duplication and waste. Accurate process management leads to greater customer satisfaction and loyalty. Many industries and processes have believed it to be impossible to track their products or assets using bar-codes due to the unique conditions of their environment; whether it is high temperature, rough handling or chemicals. That has now changed. Companies specializing in identification methods have stepped up to the challenge and have overcome many obstacles of the past. It's no longer a paper or plastic bar-code world. The presentation will be broken down into four parts: 1) The differences between Asset and ID tracking; 2) Why does a company need to bar-code?; 3) The objections many companies use for not bar-coding; and, 4) What's new in bar-coding? Case study handouts and a reference list of various companies including software, labeling and attachment techniques will be available at the end of the presentation. (author)

  10. Modifying Older Adults’ Daily Sedentary Behaviour Using an Asset-based Solution: Views from Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn A Skelton

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is a growing public health focus on the promotion of successful and active ageing. Interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour (SB in older adults are feasible and are improved by tailoring to individuals’ context and circumstances. SB is ubiquitous; therefore part of the tailoring process is to ensure individuals’ daily sedentary routine can be modified. The aim of this study was to understand the views of older adults and identify important considerations when creating a solution to modify daily sedentary patterns. Method: This was a qualitative research study. Fifteen older adult volunteers (mean age = 78 years participated in 1 of 4 focus groups to identify solutions to modify daily sedentary routine. Two researchers conducted the focus groups whilst a third took detailed fieldnotes on a flipchart to member check the findings. Data were recorded and analysed thematically. Results: Participants wanted a solution with a range of options which could be tailored to individual needs and circumstances. The strategy suggested was to use the activities of daily routine and reasons why individuals already naturally interrupting their SB, collectively framed as assets. These assets were categorised into 5 sub-themes: physical assets (eg. standing up to reduce stiffness; psychological assets (eg. standing up to reduce feelings of guilt; interpersonal assets (eg. standing up to answer the phone; knowledge assets (eg. standing up due to knowing the benefits of breaking SB and activities of daily living assets (eg. standing up to get a drink. Conclusion: This study provides important considerations from older adults’ perspectives to modify their daily sedentary patterns. The assets identified by participants could be used to co-create a tailored intervention with older adults to reduce SB, which may increase effectiveness and adherence.

  11. Modifying Older Adults' Daily Sedentary Behaviour Using an Asset-based Solution: Views from Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leask, Calum F; Sandlund, Marlene; Skelton, Dawn A; Tulle, Emmanuelle; Chastin, Sebastien Fm

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing public health focus on the promotion of successful and active ageing. Interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour (SB) in older adults are feasible and are improved by tailoring to individuals' context and circumstances. SB is ubiquitous; therefore part of the tailoring process is to ensure individuals' daily sedentary routine can be modified. The aim of this study was to understand the views of older adults and identify important considerations when creating a solution to modify daily sedentary patterns. This was a qualitative research study. Fifteen older adult volunteers (mean age = 78 years) participated in 1 of 4 focus groups to identify solutions to modify daily sedentary routine. Two researchers conducted the focus groups whilst a third took detailed fieldnotes on a flipchart to member check the findings. Data were recorded and analysed thematically. Participants wanted a solution with a range of options which could be tailored to individual needs and circumstances. The strategy suggested was to use the activities of daily routine and reasons why individuals already naturally interrupting their SB, collectively framed as assets. These assets were categorised into 5 sub-themes: physical assets (eg. standing up to reduce stiffness); psychological assets (eg. standing up to reduce feelings of guilt); interpersonal assets (eg. standing up to answer the phone); knowledge assets (eg. standing up due to knowing the benefits of breaking SB) and activities of daily living assets (eg. standing up to get a drink). This study provides important considerations from older adults' perspectives to modify their daily sedentary patterns. The assets identified by participants could be used to co-create a tailored intervention with older adults to reduce SB, which may increase effectiveness and adherence.

  12. Life Assets in Teenage Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thatsanee Soontrapirom

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teenage pregnancy is an evolving global public health problem. Level of life assets could predict behaviors and take effect to less sexual risk behaviors in teenagers. Objective: To compare life assets between pregnant and non-pregnant teenagers and to evaluate the relationship between basic factors and teenage pregnancy. Methods: A total of 172 female teenagers aged 12-19 years were included. The control group was matched with the case group by age with mean age of 17.07 years old. The case group consisted of 86 pregnant teenagers who attended the Teenage Antenatal Care Unit at Siriraj Hospital. The control group consisted of 86 teenagers who were not pregnant and who had never been pregnant. The research instruments were general information and life assets inventory questionnaires developed by Suriyadeo Tripathi with Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient at 0.890. Results: Mean life assets scores were significantly higher in the control group than in the case group (T-test analysis: Mean = 94.70/87.65, SD = 17.45/22.68, p-value =.024, respectively. The control group scored more favorably than the case group on 16 items. In addition, the case group could not meet the minimum assessment criteria on 21 items, which indicated their status as an at risk group. A total of 12 factors were found to be statistically significantly associated with teenage pregnancy. Conclusion: Overall life assets were significantly higher among teenagers who had not experienced pregnancy. The risk factors included level of education, GPA, family income, mothers or family members of teenagers having experience of teenage pregnancy, main guardians, father education, mother occupation, parental relationship, family warmth and smoking were found to be significantly associated with risk of teenage pregnancy in this study. These results will help to facilitate preventive interventions and the development of policies and guidelines to control and perhaps reverse current

  13. Prediction of future asset prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Ng Yew; Hin, Pooi Ah; Ching, Soo Huei

    2014-12-01

    This paper attempts to incorporate trading volumes as an additional predictor for predicting asset prices. Denoting r(t) as the vector consisting of the time-t values of the trading volume and price of a given asset, we model the time-(t+1) asset price to be dependent on the present and l-1 past values r(t), r(t-1), ....., r(t-1+1) via a conditional distribution which is derived from a (2l+1)-dimensional power-normal distribution. A prediction interval based on the 100(α/2)% and 100(1-α/2)% points of the conditional distribution is then obtained. By examining the average lengths of the prediction intervals found by using the composite indices of the Malaysia stock market for the period 2008 to 2013, we found that the value 2 appears to be a good choice for l. With the omission of the trading volume in the vector r(t), the corresponding prediction interval exhibits a slightly longer average length, showing that it might be desirable to keep trading volume as a predictor. From the above conditional distribution, the probability that the time-(t+1) asset price will be larger than the time-t asset price is next computed. When the probability differs from 0 (or 1) by less than 0.03, the observed time-(t+1) increase in price tends to be negative (or positive). Thus the above probability has a good potential of being used as a market indicator in technical analysis.

  14. Recreational Assets in the State of Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This dataset is meant to be a comprehensive database of recreational assets in public areas. Recreational assets are considered amenities provided to the public for...

  15. Problems of intangible assets commercialization accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Legenchyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The growing role of intangible assets in conditions of global economy postindustrialization is grounded. The problems of intangible assets accounting are singled out. The basic tasks of the intangible assets accounting commercialization process are determined. The difference between the commercialization of intellectual property and intangible assets is considered. The basic approaches to understanding the essence of the intangible assets commercialization are singled out and grounded. The basic forms and methods of intangible assets commercialization researched by the author are analyzed. The order of accounting reflection of licensee royalties is considered. The factors of influence on the accounting process of intangible assets commercialization are determined. The necessity of solving the problem of accounting of lease payments for computer program by providing access to SaaS environment is grounded. The prospects of further studies of intangible assets accounting commercialization are determined.

  16. Current approaches to assessing intangible assets

    OpenAIRE

    Урусова, Зінаїда Петрівна

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes methods of assessing intangible assets in Ukraine as well as in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. Contemporary approaches to assessing intangible assets have been researched.

  17. Asset Management Guidebook for Safety and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    A primary product of this research was the Asset Management Guidebook that TxDOT division and district : personnel can use to help them define, develop, and implement asset management across all levels : particularly as it relates to establishing ...

  18. Asset management inventory and data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    An efficient and accurate inventory of a state highway agencys assets, along with the means to assess the condition : of those assets and model their performance, is critical to enabling an agency to make informed investment decisions : in a Trans...

  19. Investment in Transportation Assets : Briefing Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-21

    Highways, streets, railroad lines, transit systems, ports, and other transportation fixed assets enable the movement of people and goods. Investment in transportation fixed assets helps build and maintain these critical resources. The pattern of tran...

  20. The Role of Interpersonal Relations in Healthcare Team Communication and Patient Safety: A Proposed Model of Interpersonal Process in Teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Charlotte Tsz-Sum; Doran, Diane Marie

    2017-06-01

    Patient safety is compromised by medical errors and adverse events related to miscommunications among healthcare providers. Communication among healthcare providers is affected by human factors, such as interpersonal relations. Yet, discussions of interpersonal relations and communication are lacking in healthcare team literature. This paper proposes a theoretical framework that explains how interpersonal relations among healthcare team members affect communication and team performance, such as patient safety. We synthesized studies from health and social science disciplines to construct a theoretical framework that explicates the links among these constructs. From our synthesis, we identified two relevant theories: framework on interpersonal processes based on social relation model and the theory of relational coordination. The former involves three steps: perception, evaluation, and feedback; and the latter captures relational communicative behavior. We propose that manifestations of provider relations are embedded in the third step of the framework on interpersonal processes: feedback. Thus, varying team-member relationships lead to varying collaborative behavior, which affects patient-safety outcomes via a change in team communication. The proposed framework offers new perspectives for understanding how workplace relations affect healthcare team performance. The framework can be used by nurses, administrators, and educators to improve patient safety, team communication, or to resolve conflicts.

  1. Beyond Level 4: Tying HPT to Valuation of Intangible Assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayeski, Diane

    2001-01-01

    Considers how human performance technology (HPT) can achieve greater recognition in the mainstream business world by developing interventions that are framed in terms of enhancing the overall valuation of the organization's intangible assets. Discusses a consulting model that can be used with clients and stakeholders to identify barriers to…

  2. The church: asset and agent in achieving sustainable water supply ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Religion and Human Relations ... argues that the church as both asset and agent is most useful in conscientizing and transforming people to adopt a new mindset- a behavioral attitude required to halt the progression of environmental degradation in general and specifically improve urban water supply in Nigeria.

  3. CONTRADICTORY ASPECTS ASSESSMENT ON INTANGIBLE ASSETS

    OpenAIRE

    Ecaterina Necşulescu

    2011-01-01

    In Romania, the evaluation of intangible assets is rarely used due to extremely poor casuistry. From a sample of 100 companies we analyzed, only 4.5% revealed the existence of intangible assets worth less than 3% of total assets and none of the companies has not reviewed the assets. In crisis conditions, the study concludes that companies value decreases (bad will), and while economic growth increases the value of companies (good will). An effective leadership in the crisis assessment may be ...

  4. The Interpersonal Sunk-Cost Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivola, Christopher Y

    2018-05-01

    The sunk-cost fallacy-pursuing an inferior alternative merely because we have previously invested significant, but nonrecoverable, resources in it-represents a striking violation of rational decision making. Whereas theoretical accounts and empirical examinations of the sunk-cost effect have generally been based on the assumption that it is a purely intrapersonal phenomenon (i.e., solely driven by one's own past investments), the present research demonstrates that it is also an interpersonal effect (i.e., people will alter their choices in response to other people's past investments). Across eight experiments ( N = 6,076) covering diverse scenarios, I documented sunk-cost effects when the costs are borne by someone other than the decision maker. Moreover, the interpersonal sunk-cost effect is not moderated by social closeness or whether other people observe their sunk costs being "honored." These findings uncover a previously undocumented bias, reveal that the sunk-cost effect is a much broader phenomenon than previously thought, and pose interesting challenges for existing accounts of this fascinating human tendency.

  5. THE INTANGIBLE ASSETS INVESTMENTS. CHARACTERISTICS AND THE ACCOUNTING TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prediscan Mariana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the knowledge-based economy the fundamental determinants of the enterprise value, in the present, have an intangible nature. The intangible investments are the most important factors of the enterprise success. Wealth, growth and welfare are driven nowadays by intangible investments. The knowledge economy is characterized by huge investments in human capital and informational technology. Despite of the increased importance of intangible assets, as the source of the firm` competitive advantages, the information regarding these kind of assets, both available in the inside of the firm and, which is presented to the externals, is pour. In this paper I present the reasons for this situation.

  6. 12 CFR 560.160 - Asset classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Asset classification. 560.160 Section 560.160... Lending and Investment Provisions Applicable to all Savings Associations § 560.160 Asset classification... consistent with, or reconcilable to, the asset classification system used by OTS in its Thrift Activities...

  7. Asset pricing restrictions on predictability : Frictions matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roon, F.A.; Szymanowska, M.

    2012-01-01

    U.S. stock portfolios sorted on size; momentum; transaction costs; market-to-book, investment-to-assets, and return-on-assets (ROA) ratios; and industry classification show considerable levels and variation of return predictability, inconsistent with asset pricing models. This means that a

  8. Community Asset Mapping. Trends and Issues Alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerka, Sandra

    Asset mapping involves documenting tangible and intangible resources of a community viewed as a place with assets to be preserved and enhanced, not deficits to be remedied. Kretzmann and McKnight (1993) are credited with developing the concept of asset-based community development (ABCD) that draws on appreciative inquiry; recognition of social…

  9. Experience with the ASSET service in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, J.

    1996-01-01

    The experience with the ASSET service in Slovakia is described, including the following: ASSET follow-up mission to Bohunice Unit 1-2 NPP; IAEA peer review of the national Incident Reporting System in the Slovak Republic; ASSET seminar on prevention of incidents, Bratislava, January 8-12, 1996

  10. Assets and Educational Achievement: Theory and Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, William; Sherraden, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of Economics of Education Review explores the role of savings and asset holding in post-secondary educational achievement. Most college success research has focused on income rather than assets as a predictor, and most college financing policy has focused on tuition support and educational debt, rather than asset accumulation.…

  11. Work at Forsmark since ASSET 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenhielm, G; Andersson, O [Forsmark Kraftgrupp AB, Oesthammar (Sweden)

    1997-10-01

    The following directions of work at Forsmark since ASSET 1996 are briefly described: peer review follow-up; work related to peer review, Forsmark 2 mini-ASSET; MTO(man-technology-organization)-analysis method, concept development, combination of MTO and ASSET methods; Forsmark INES manual.

  12. Intelligent tactical asset allocation support system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Y.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an advanced support system for Tactical Asset Allocation. Asset allocation explains over 90% of portfolio performance (Brinson, Hood and Beebower, 1988). Tactical asset allocation adjusts a strategic portfolio on the basis of short term market outlooks. The system includes

  13. Experience with the ASSET service in Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misak, J [Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1997-12-31

    The experience with the ASSET service in Slovakia is described, including the following: ASSET follow-up mission to Bohunice Unit 1-2 NPP; IAEA peer review of the national Incident Reporting System in the Slovak Republic; ASSET seminar on prevention of incidents, Bratislava, January 8-12, 1996.

  14. Defining ecosystem assets for natural capital accounting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hein, Lars; Bagstad, Ken; Edens, Bram; Obst, Carl; Jong, de Rixt; Lesschen, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    In natural capital accounting, ecosystems are assets that provide ecosystem services to people. Assets can be measured using both physical and monetary units. In the international System of Environmental-Economic Accounting, ecosystem assets are generally valued on the basis of the net present

  15. Approaches of Improving University Assets Management Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingliang

    2015-01-01

    University assets management, as an important content of modern university management, is generally confronted with the issue of low efficiency. Currently, to address the problems exposed in university assets management and take appropriate modification measures is an urgent issue in front of Chinese university assets management sectors. In this…

  16. Global Tactical Cross-Asset Allocation: Applying Value and Momentum Across Asset Classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Blitz (David); P. van Vliet (Pim)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we examine global tactical asset allocation (GTAA) strategies across a broad range of asset classes. Contrary to market timing for single asset classes and tactical allocation across similar assets, this topic has received little attention in the existing literature. Our

  17. Medical student empathy: interpersonal distinctions and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kevin D; Foster, Penni Smith

    2016-12-01

    Attention to interpersonal behaviors, communication, and relational factors is taking on increasing importance in medical education. Medical student empathy is one aspect of the physician-patient relationship that is often involved in beneficial interactions leading to improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. As an interpersonal quality, empathy is a social behavior well-suited to be examined from an interpersonal perspective. The present study used the interpersonal theory of clinical, personality, and social psychology to examine the construct of empathy and theorize about likely interpersonal correlates. One hundred and sixty-three students from an academic health center in the southeastern United States participated in this study. The medical student version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy was used to assess empathy and its factors: Perspective taking, compassionate care, and walking in the patient's shoes. Interpersonal assessments included the International Personality Item Pool-Interpersonal Circumplex, the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List, and the UCLA Loneliness Scale. Distinct interpersonal styles and correlates emerged among empathy and its factors. While all factors of empathy were related to interpersonal warmth, perspective taking and compassionate care were also associated with submissiveness. Of note, only walking in the patient's shoes was correlated with both social support and less loneliness. These findings are discussed in light of interpersonal theory with particular attention paid to the implications for medical education and professional development.

  18. THE IMPORTANCE OF INTAGIBILE ASSETS FOR TOURISTIC`S ENTERPRISE IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF GLOBALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja DJUKIC

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In time of globalization very important role in touristic enterprise have intangible assets: human capital, information capital and organization capital. Intangible assets, especially human resources drive long-term value creation. So human resources are generally accepted as being strategically important. The main management problem is being able to make alignment of intangible assets and organization's strategy. The tools which management in tourism enterprise can use for this purpose are balanced score card and strategy map, which will be explained in this article.

  19. Análise da teoria humanística e a relação interpessoal do enfermeiro no cuidado ao recém-nascido Análisis de la teoría humanística y de la relación interpersonal del enfermero en el cuidado al recién nacido Analysis of humanistic theory and interpersonal relations of nurses in newborn care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Maria Carneiro Rolim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available As teorias são proposições elaboradas para avaliar a assistência de enfermagem, possibilitando às enfermeiras considerá-las e incorporá-las na prática profissional. O trabalho objetivou refletir, criticamente, sobre a utilidade na prática de conceitos da Teoria Humanística de Enfermagem, numa dissertação de mestrado. O estudo é descritivo-reflexivo, realizado em 2004, e utilizou o modelo de análise de teorias de Meleis. Desse modelo, foi recortado o segmento "crítica da teoria", com ênfase no item "utilidade", para servir de suporte analítico. Da análise crítica, percebeu-se que "utilidade" do relacionamento interpessoal e do diálogo é notório, e estes podem ser praticados no cotidiano da Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal, valorizando a relação humana afetiva, situação essencial no ato de cuidar pelo enfermeiro. Conclui-se que a prática do enfermeiro deve ser norteada por referenciais teóricos, filosóficos e metodológicos responsáveis por levarem o profissional a uma crítica reflexiva do ser e do fazer.Las teorías son propuestas elaboradas para evaluar la atención de enfermería, posibilitando a las enfermeras considerar e incorporarlas en su práctica profesional. La finalidad de este trabajo fue reflexionar críticamente sobre la utilidad práctica de los conceptos de la Teoría Humanística de Enfermería, mediante una disertación de maestría. Este estudio descriptivo-reflexivo fue realizado en 2004 y utilizó el modelo de análisis de teorías de Meleis. De este modelo, fue seleccionado el segmento "crítica de la teoría", con énfasis en el ítem "utilidad", para servir de soporte analítico. Del análisis crítico se deduce que la "utilidad" de la relación interpersonal y del diálogo es notoria y que estos pueden ser practicados en el cotidiano de la Unidad de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal, valorizando la relación humana afectiva, situación esencial en el acto de cuidar del enfermero. Se concluye

  20. SOCIAL NETWORKS AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica GHEORGHIȚĂ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Social networks visible influence people's ability to interact and communicate. Extending social circles by establishing virtual links involves a number of positive aspects such as: instant access to options for interaction, sharing of information to large communities of people, intensification of acts of communication, high levels of feedback and trust with people with whom we communicate. On the other hand, social networks adversely affects communication by decreasing the interaction face to face, by imposing superficial communications experiences, grammatical and spelling erosion of the language. Therefore, the study aims to capture the spread of social networks, their use and impact on interpersonal communication. More specifically, they look for the answer to the question: what is the nature of interpersonal communication that is found on social networking sites: personal, emotional, private or shared, informal, and public?

  1. Interpersonal relationships in early adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Kočevar, Zala

    2014-01-01

    Interpersonal relationships in early adulthood, in people aged 25 to 30 vary considerably among individuals. Some place emphasis on partnership, and others on relations with friends. Even the relationship with parents and siblings are experienced by young adults in a variety of ways. Some have frequent and regular contact with their parents while some no longer have any relationship with their parents. These are two frequent situations hiding much more in between. Relationships are complex an...

  2. Financial Assets [share, bonds] & Ancylia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-11-01

    Instead Elaine Scarry: "Thermonuclear monarchy" reinvent Carry Nation since Aug 17, 1965 the Republic of Indonesia's President speech: "Reach to the Star", for "cancellation" usually found in External Debt herewith retrieved from "the Window of theWorld": Ancylia, feast in March, a month named after Mars, the god of war. "On March 19 they used to put on their biggest performance of gymnastics in order to "bribe" their god for another good year", further we have vacancy & "vacuum tube"- Bulat Air karena Pembuluh, Bulat Kata karena Mufakat" proverb from Minangkabau, West Sumatra. Follows March 19, 1984 are first prototype flight of IAI Astra Jet as well as March 19, 2012 invoice accompanies Electric car Kujang-193, Fainancial Assets [share, bonds] are the answer for "infrastructure" & state owned enterprises assets to be hedged first initial debt per capita accordances. Heartfelt gratitudes to HE. Mr. Ir. Sarwono Kusumaatmadja/PT. Smartfren INDONESIA.

  3. Asset Return Dynamics and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    William A. Branch; George W. Evans

    2010-01-01

    This article advocates a theory of expectation formation that incorporates many of the central motivations of behavioral finance theory while retaining much of the discipline of the rational expectations approach. We provide a framework in which agents, in an asset pricing model, underparameterize their forecasting model in a spirit similar to Hong, Stein, and Yu (2007) and Barberis, Shleifer, and Vishny (1998), except that the parameters of the forecasting model and the choice of predictor a...

  4. Essays in Empirical Asset Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rzeznik, Aleksandra

    This thesis consists of three essays investigating financial and real estate markets and identifying a relationship between them. A 2008 financial crises provides a perfect example of sizeable interactions between US housing market and equity prices, where a negative shock to house prices trigger...... a word-wide recession. Therefore, understanding forces driving investors behaviour and preferences, which in turn affect asset prices in both equity and housing market are of great interest....

  5. Global Tactical Cross-Asset Allocation: Applying Value and Momentum Across Asset Classes

    OpenAIRE

    Blitz, D.C.; van Vliet, P.

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we examine global tactical asset allocation (GTAA) strategies across a broad range of asset classes. Contrary to market timing for single asset classes and tactical allocation across similar assets, this topic has received little attention in the existing literature. Our main finding is that momentum and value strategies applied to GTAA across twelve asset classes deliver statistically and economically significant abnormal returns. For a long top-quartile and short b...

  6. Interpersonal communication and creativity in journalistic telework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manssour, Ana Beatriz Benites

    2003-02-01

    Man and work histories are interlaced to tell us how the interaction among different human groups have helped in the development of intellectual capacities of our species. Creativity is mostly seen as a gift or an individual quality, for whose bloom and exercise there are internal and external factors, understood as stimulants of the creative process. Research for a master's thesis had, as its principal aim, the analysis of the subjective impact of telework on the workers personal satisfaction. Our second category authenticates the importance of interpersonal communication among fellow workers as incentive to personal creativity. The study was developed with columnists of a great newspaper with a big circulation in the south of Brazil, because telework is a tool of the press media, and creativity is a requirement for journalistic employment.

  7. Mechanisms of Change in Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, Joshua D.; Markowitz, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Although interpersonal therapy (IPT) has demonstrated efficacy for mood and other disorders, little is known about how IPT works. We present interpersonal change mechanisms that we hypothesize account for symptom change in IPT. IPT’s interpersonal model integrates both relational theory, building on work by Sullivan, Bowlby, and others, and insights based on research findings regarding stress, social support, and illness to highlight contextual factors thought to precipitate and maintain psychiatric disorders. IPT frames therapy around a central interpersonal problem in the patient’s life, a current crisis or relational predicament that is disrupting social support and increasing interpersonal stress. By mobilizing and working collaboratively with the patient to resolve (better manage or negotiate) this problem, IPT seeks to activate several interpersonal change mechanisms. These include: 1) enhancing social support, 2) decreasing interpersonal stress, 3) facilitating emotional processing, and 4) improving interpersonal skills. We hope that articulating these mechanisms will help therapists to formulate cases and better maintain focus within an IPT framework. We propose interpersonal mechanisms that might explain how IPT’s interpersonal focus leads to symptom change. Future work needs to specify and test candidate mediators in clinical trials of IPT. We anticipate that pursuing this more systematic strategy will lead to important refinements and improvements in IPT and enhance its application in a range of clinical populations. PMID:24100081

  8. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Frase, Lukas

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we will introduce interpersonal psychotherapy as an effective short-term treatment strategy in major depression. In IPT, a reciprocal relationship between interpersonal problems and depressive symptoms is regarded as important in the onset and as a maintaining factor of depressive disorders. Therefore, interpersonal problems are the main therapeutic targets of this approach. Four interpersonal problem areas are defined, which include interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, complicated bereavement, and interpersonal deficits. Patients are helped to break the interactions between depressive symptoms and their individual interpersonal difficulties. The goals are to achieve a reduction in depressive symptoms and an improvement in interpersonal functioning through improved communication, expression of affect, and proactive engagement with the current interpersonal network. The efficacy of this focused and structured psychotherapy in the treatment of acute unipolar major depressive disorder is summarized. This article outlines the background of interpersonal psychotherapy, the process of therapy, efficacy, and the expansion of the evidence base to different subgroups of depressed patients.

  9. A new measure of interpersonal exploitativeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy B. Brunell

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Measures of exploitativeness evidence problems with validity and reliability. The present set of studies assessed a new measure (the Interpersonal Exploitativeness Scale that defines exploitativeness in terms of reciprocity. In Studies 1 and 2, 33 items were administered to participants. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that a single factor consisting of six items adequately assess interpersonal exploitativeness. Study 3 results revealed that the Interpersonal Exploitativeness Scale was positively associated with normal narcissism, pathological narcissism, psychological entitlement, and negative reciprocity and negatively correlated with positive reciprocity. In Study 4, participants competed in a commons dilemma. Those who scored higher on the Interpersonal Exploitativeness Scale were more likely to harvest a greater share of resources over time, even while controlling for other relevant variables, such as entitlement. Together, these studies show the Interpersonal Exploitativeness Scale to be a valid and reliable measure of interpersonal exploitativeness. The authors discuss the implications of these studies.

  10. Implementation of ASSET concept in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koley, J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a retrospective assessment of the use of ASSET methodology in India since the first ASSET seminary organized by IAEA in collaboration with the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, India (AERB) in May, 1994. The first ASSET seminar was organized to initiate the spread of idea among operating and research organizations and regulatory body personnel. The participants were carefully chosen from various fields and with different levels of experiences to generate teams with sufficiently wide spectrum of knowledge base. AERB took initiative in leading by example and formed ASSET teams to carry out the first ASSET reviews in India. These teams at the instance of AERB carried out ASSET review of three Safety Related Events, two at Nuclear Power Plants and one at Research Reactor. This paper describes the outcome of these ASSET studies and subsequent implementation of the recommendations. The initiative taken by the regulatory body has led to formation of ASSET teams by the utilities to carry out ASSET study on their own. The results of these studies are yet to be assessed by the regulatory body. The result of the ASSET experience reveals the fact that it has further potential in improving the safety performance and safety culture and brining in fresh enthusiasm among safety professionals of Indian Nuclear Utilities

  11. Implementation of ASSET concept in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koley, J [Operating Plants Safety Div., AERB, Mumbai (India)

    1997-10-01

    The paper presents a retrospective assessment of the use of ASSET methodology in India since the first ASSET seminary organized by IAEA in collaboration with the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, India (AERB) in May, 1994. The first ASSET seminar was organized to initiate the spread of idea among operating and research organizations and regulatory body personnel. The participants were carefully chosen from various fields and with different levels of experiences to generate teams with sufficiently wide spectrum of knowledge base. AERB took initiative in leading by example and formed ASSET teams to carry out the first ASSET reviews in India. These teams at the instance of AERB carried out ASSET review of three Safety Related Events, two at Nuclear Power Plants and one at Research Reactor. This paper describes the outcome of these ASSET studies and subsequent implementation of the recommendations. The initiative taken by the regulatory body has led to formation of ASSET teams by the utilities to carry out ASSET study on their own. The results of these studies are yet to be assessed by the regulatory body. The result of the ASSET experience reveals the fact that it has further potential in improving the safety performance and safety culture and brining in fresh enthusiasm among safety professionals of Indian Nuclear Utilities.

  12. Methodological aspects of network assets accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhimenko-Nazaruk I.A.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of using innovative tools of processing and representation of information about network assets is substantiated. The suggestions for displaying network assets in accounts are presented. The main reasons for the need to display the network assets in the financial statements of all members of the network structure (the economic essence of network assets as the object of accounting; the non-additional model for the formation of the value of network assets; the internetworking mechanism for the formation of the value of network assets are identified. The stages of accounting valuation of network assets are allocated and substantiated. The analytical table for estimating the value of network assets and additional network capital in accounting is developed. The order of additional network capital reflection in accounting is developed. The method of revaluation of network assets in accounting in the broad sense is revealed. The order of accounting of network assets with increasing or decreasing the number of participants in the network structure is determined.

  13. Mechanisms of Change in Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

    OpenAIRE

    Lipsitz, Joshua D.; Markowitz, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Although interpersonal therapy (IPT) has demonstrated efficacy for mood and other disorders, little is known about how IPT works. We present interpersonal change mechanisms that we hypothesize account for symptom change in IPT. IPT’s interpersonal model integrates both relational theory, building on work by Sullivan, Bowlby, and others, and insights based on research findings regarding stress, social support, and illness to highlight contextual factors thought to precipitate and maintain psyc...

  14. PENGGUNAAN INSTANT MESSANGER dan KOMUNIKASI INTERPERSONAL REMAJA

    OpenAIRE

    Primada Qurrota Ayun

    2016-01-01

    Interpersonal communication should ideally in face to face, until the achievement of intimate communication. Instant messenger makes interpersonal communication easier and more efficient. However, it also resulted in less effective communication to occur, because it only uses text messaging as a means to convey a message so frequent miscommunication. This study wanted to see how the use of instant messenger among teenagers in interpersonal communication. The theory used in this study is a Com...

  15. Penggunaan Instant Messanger Dan Komunikasi Interpersonal Remaja

    OpenAIRE

    Ayun, Primada Qurrota

    2016-01-01

    Interpersonal communication should ideally in face to face, until the achievement of intimate communication. Instant messenger makes interpersonal communication easier and more efficient. However, it also resulted in less effective communication to occur, because it only uses text messaging as a means to convey a message so frequent miscommunication. This study wanted to see how the use of instant messenger among teenagers in interpersonal communication. The theory used in this study is a Com...

  16. Nuclear asset management. Slide notes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglia, W.; Bailey, H.; Kubinova, J.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear asset management is defined as the process for making resource allocation and risk management decisions at all levels of nuclear generation business to maximize value/profitability for all stakeholders while maintaining plant safety. In the presentation, the NAM concept is explained, financial benefits achieved in US industry over the past 12 years are outlined, Data Systems and Solutions (DS and S) is presented as a joint venture between Rolls-Royce and SAIC, and NAM benefits in nuclear industry from DS and S client experience are demonstrated. (P.A.)

  17. Renewable energies: the Spanish assets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit-Pez, Ch.; Molenat, G.

    2009-01-01

    Even though Spain is far away from the Kyoto protocol objectives, this country possesses numerous assets in terms of renewable energies. This report presents overviews of the present situation and of innovation and research activities in the different fields of renewable energies: wind energy, solar energy (thermal, thermoelectric and photovoltaic), hydraulic energy (dams, tide and wave energy), biomass (wood, bio-fuels, biogas). Along with these presentations, the authors propose tables and graphs of quantitative data concerning these different energy productions, at the national as well as at the regional level, with comparison with data for other European countries

  18. Mechanisms of change in interpersonal therapy (IPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, Joshua D; Markowitz, John C

    2013-12-01

    Although interpersonal therapy (IPT) has demonstrated efficacy for mood and other disorders, little is known about how IPT works. We present interpersonal change mechanisms that we hypothesize account for symptom change in IPT. Integrating relational theory and insights based on research findings regarding stress, social support, and illness, IPT highlights contextual factors thought to precipitate and maintain psychiatric disorders. It frames therapy around a central interpersonal problem in the patient's life, a current crisis or relational predicament that is disrupting social support and increasing interpersonal stress. By mobilizing and working collaboratively with the patient to resolve this problem, IPT seeks to activate several interpersonal change mechanisms. These include: 1) enhancing social support, 2) decreasing interpersonal stress, 3) facilitating emotional processing, and 4) improving interpersonal skills. We hope that articulating these mechanisms will help therapists to formulate cases and better maintain focus within an IPT framework. Here we propose interpersonal mechanisms that might explain how IPT's interpersonal focus leads to symptom change. Future work needs to specify and test candidate mediators in clinical trials. We anticipate that pursuing this more systematic strategy will lead to important refinements and improvements in IPT and enhance its application in a range of clinical populations. © 2013.

  19. Asset Condition, Information Systems and Decision Models

    CERN Document Server

    Willett, Roger; Brown, Kerry; Mathew, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Asset Condition, Information Systems and Decision Models, is the second volume of the Engineering Asset Management Review Series. The manuscripts provide examples of implementations of asset information systems as well as some practical applications of condition data for diagnostics and prognostics. The increasing trend is towards prognostics rather than diagnostics, hence the need for assessment and decision models that promote the conversion of condition data into prognostic information to improve life-cycle planning for engineered assets. The research papers included here serve to support the on-going development of Condition Monitoring standards. This volume comprises selected papers from the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd World Congresses on Engineering Asset Management, which were convened under the auspices of ISEAM in collaboration with a number of organisations, including CIEAM Australia, Asset Management Council Australia, BINDT UK, and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Chin...

  20. Retrading, production, and asset market performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerstad, Steven D; Porter, David; Smith, Vernon L; Winn, Abel

    2015-11-24

    Prior studies have shown that traders quickly converge to the price-quantity equilibrium in markets for goods that are immediately consumed, but they produce speculative price bubbles in resalable asset markets. We present a stock-flow model of durable assets in which the existing stock of assets is subject to depreciation and producers may produce additional units of the asset. In our laboratory experiments inexperienced consumers who can resell their units disregard the consumption value of the assets and compete vigorously with producers, depressing prices and production. Consumers who have first participated in experiments without resale learn to heed their consumption values and, when they are given the option to resell, trade at equilibrium prices. Reproducibility is therefore the most natural and most effective treatment for suppression of bubbles in asset market experiments.

  1. Interpersonal Accuracy of Interventions and the Outcome of Cognitive and Interpersonal Therapies for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Temes, Christina M.; Elkin, Irene; Gallop, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the interpersonal accuracy of interventions in cognitive therapy and interpersonal therapy as a predictor of the outcome of treatment for patients with major depressive disorder. Method: The interpersonal accuracy of interventions was rated using transcripts of treatment sessions…

  2. Valuation of intellectual property and intangible assets

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    M.Comm. Intangible assets are increasingly becoming the critical determinant of value creation and future profitability of most businesses. There is a clear distinction between the accounting treatment of physical assets and are reported on the firm’s balance sheets, but intangible assets are by large written off in the income statement, along with regular expenses such as wages, rents and interest. This distorted treatment of intangibles in an accounting sense, has dire consequences for m...

  3. Recording environmental assets in the national accounts

    OpenAIRE

    Carl Obst; Michael Vardon

    2014-01-01

    Accounting information is a core element of economic decision-making at both national and corporate levels. It is widely accepted that much economic activity is dependent upon natural capital and natural resources—generically termed environmental assets in an accounting context. Environmental assets are under threat of depletion and degradation from economic activity. Consequently, the incorporation of information on environmental assets into standard accounting frameworks is an essential ele...

  4. Macroeconomic influences on optimal asset allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Flavin, Thomas; Wickens, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    We develop a tactical asset allocation strategy that incorporates the effects of macroeconomic variables. The joint distribution of financial asset returns and the macroeconomic variables is modelled using a VAR with a multivariate GARCH (M-GARCH) error structure. As a result, the portfolio frontier is time varying and subject to contagion from the macroeconomic variable. Optimal asset allocation requires that this be taken into account. We illustrate how to do this using three ri...

  5. Price Manipulation in an Experimental Asset Market

    OpenAIRE

    Veiga Helena; Vorsatz Marc

    2006-01-01

    We analyze in the laboratory whether an uninformed trader is able to manipulate the price of a financial asset. To do so, we compare the results of two different experimental treatments. In the Benchmark Treatment, twelve subjects trade a common value asset that takes either a high or a low value. Information is distributed asymmetrically, only three outof twelve subjects know the actual value of the asset. The Manipulation Treatment is identical to the Benchmark Treatment apart from the fact...

  6. Managing corporate assets to maximize value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, L.

    1992-01-01

    As the utility industry environment becomes more complex, pressures grow for managers to make more effective use of all their assets - including fuel, equipment, and personnel. Improving the management of assets leads to the delivery of greater value to ratepayers, stockholders, and society. EPRI is sponsoring a broad research program to help utilities effectively apply the tools needed in these changing business conditions, especially the latest in cost and quality management and asset management techniques

  7. "Overreaction" of Asset Prices in General Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Aiyagari, S.R.; Gertler, M.

    1998-01-01

    We attempt to explain the overreaction of asset prices to movements in short-term interest rates, dividends, and asset supplies. The key element of our explanation is a margin constraint that traders face which limits their leverage to a fraction of the value of their assets. Traders may lever themselves, further, either directly by borrowing short term or indirectly by engaging in futures and options trading, so that the scenario is relevant to contemporary financial markets. When some shock...

  8. Intelligent tactical asset allocation support system

    OpenAIRE

    Hiemstra, Y.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an advanced support system for Tactical Asset Allocation. Asset allocation explains over 90% of portfolio performance (Brinson, Hood and Beebower, 1988). Tactical asset allocation adjusts a strategic portfolio on the basis of short term market outlooks. The system includes aprediction model that forecasts quarterly excess returns on the S and PSOO, an optimization model that adjusts a user-specified strategic portfolio on thebasis of the excess return forecast, and a compo...

  9. Intangible assets for intangible deliverables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsmore, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    As the dominant economic business model in Europe, services are important when we consider intangible assets. This article argues a case for some kind of 'special relationship' between service firms and trade marks-specifically bearing in mind the CTM system and new EU services law. On the questi...... of EU businesses. The article suggests a starting point for a fresh yet reassuringly ordinary dialogue within trade mark law, one that asserts it a central role in realising predicted economic benefits of the Internal Market.......As the dominant economic business model in Europe, services are important when we consider intangible assets. This article argues a case for some kind of 'special relationship' between service firms and trade marks-specifically bearing in mind the CTM system and new EU services law. On the question...... if there can be constructive overlap between trade marks and services and how this emerges, the analysis shows there is reason both for and against thinking that together the relevant sets of laws, among other things, ease the transition from national- to Community-based trading for the overwhelming majority...

  10. Fractional-moment Capital Asset Pricing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hui; Wu Min; Wang Xiaotian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the definition of the 'α-covariance' and present the fractional-moment versions of Capital Asset Pricing Model,which can be used to price assets when asset return distributions are likely to be stable Levy (or Student-t) distribution during panics and stampedes in worldwide security markets in 2008. Furthermore, if asset returns are truly governed by the infinite-variance stable Levy distributions, life is fundamentally riskier than in a purely Gaussian world. Sudden price movements like the worldwide security market crash in 2008 turn into real-world possibilities.

  11. Risk and return in oilfield asset holdings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzschmar, Gavin L.; Kirchner, Axel; Reusch, Hans [University of Edinburgh, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, The Management School (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Convention suggests that emerging market investment should provide commensurately lower risk or higher returns than comparable assets in developed countries. This study demonstrates that emerging markets contain regulatory specificities that challenge asset valuation model convergence and potentially invert risk return convention. 292 oilfield assets are used to provide evidence that, under upward oil prices, emerging markets are characterized by progressive state participation in oilfield cash flows. Specifically, this work advances the low oil price paradigm of prior oil and gas asset valuation studies and provides evidence that emerging market state participation terms limit the corporate value of globalization for the sector. (author)

  12. Risk and return in oilfield asset holdings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretzschmar, Gavin L.; Kirchner, Axel; Reusch, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Convention suggests that emerging market investment should provide commensurately lower risk or higher returns than comparable assets in developed countries. This study demonstrates that emerging markets contain regulatory specificities that challenge asset valuation model convergence and potentially invert risk return convention. 292 oilfield assets are used to provide evidence that, under upward oil prices, emerging markets are characterized by progressive state participation in oilfield cash flows. Specifically, this work advances the low oil price paradigm of prior oil and gas asset valuation studies and provides evidence that emerging market state participation terms limit the corporate value of globalization for the sector. (author)

  13. The Q theory of investment, the capital asset pricing model, and asset valuation: a synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, John F

    2004-05-01

    The paper combines Tobin's Q theory of real investment with the capital asset pricing model to produce a new and relatively simple procedure for the valuation of real assets using the income approach. Applications of the new method are provided.

  14. Effective knowledge management as basis for holistic knowledge engineering – Knowledge as the key asset of an organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Lazović

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In knowledge management , human resources are in the foreground and their value is constantly rising. In the eyes of modern managers knowledge is the key asset of an organization. Effective management and management of knowledge processes are central preoccupations of modern managers and, at the same time, the most prominent feature of a knowledge-based organization. Like innovation and creativity, knowledge needs to be encouraged and treated with due care. Commitment to acquisition of new knowledge depends on how the interpersonal relationships are managed in an organization, therefore, those responsible for knowledge processes, the so-called modern knowledge managers, will develop partnership relation- ships with all members of their organization. In the core of such partnerships lie competences of individual employees and their creative application of knowledge. By encouraging learning, discussions and opinion exchange as well as personal and professional growth of their employees, management in knowledge-based organizations is improving the quality of work, and consequently, generation of new knowledge and their organization’s competitive advantage.

  15. The potential / opportunities for leveraging competences: the intangible assets dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Kazlauskienė

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A lot of discussions on the variety and identification of individual abilities and / or general competences arise. There is a lack of unanimous approach among scholars. Relevance of the research is proved by numerous publications on human, intellectual, knowledge capital, the impact of intangible assets on economic growth of the country and competitiveness. Some intangible assets could be easily identified, it is easy to determine their value because they are manifested in material forms, e.g. software, and patents; however, there is a increasing demand to identify and evaluate those intangible assets, which are complicated in terms of determining their value; those are e.g. knowledge, experience, abilities, and competences. The aim of this paper is to determine the potential of leveraging abilities to increase income of Lithuanian population by distinguishing abilities in the context of intangible assets definition and evaluation. The methods of research include the following: analysis of scientific literature, comparative analysis, questionnaire survey, summarizing method, statistical data analysis methods. Empirical research allowed determining statistically significant relations between general abilities, population income and expenditure, and education. The majority of surveyed Lithuanian inhabitants think that their income will not change, if they improve their abilities in any of identified domains.

  16. Bulimia and Interpersonal Relationships: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Mark H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Assessed changes in bulimia in female college students (N=44) and in relation between bulimia and interpersonal relationships over time. Found (1) stable symptomology for normals and bulimics; (2) strong negative correlations between bulimia measures and interpersonal relationships with men; and (3) improvement in symptomology and relationships…

  17. Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Markowitz, John C.; Weissman, Myrna M.

    2012-01-01

    The authors briefly describe the origins, theory, and development of interpersonal psychotherapy: its roots in clinical outcome research, its spread from major depression to other psychiatric disorders and its increasing dissemination as an empirically validated clinical intervention included in treatment guidelines. They attempt to forecast research, organizational and training issues the growing interpersonal psychotherapy community may face in the future.

  18. Interpersonal Conflicts In Ghanaian University Libraries | Kofi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results indicate that personality differences, superior/subordinate relationships, power struggle and competition are responsible for interpersonal conflicts in Ghanaian university libraries. It then makes recommendations on how to manage the various types of interpersonal conflicts within university libraries. Keywords: ...

  19. The Interpersonal Contract: A Vehicle for Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Ben; Arnn, John

    All interpersonal relationships are a function of the basic beliefs, expectations, and reactions of the people involved. These conditions may not be written or even verbalized formally, but they exist nontheless and are as binding as any legal contract. Giving specific and intentional consideration to interpersonal contracts and utilizing them as…

  20. Pluralism and Objectivism: Cornerstones for Interpersonal Comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    comparison, and between a subjectivist and objectivist standard of interpersonal comparison. The paper provides a normative argument for pluralism and objectivism with regard to interpersonal comparison, and it suggests that the Capability Approach as developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum fits...

  1. Interpersonal Perception: Cognitive Complexity and Trait Implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Charles F., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Demonstrates that evaluative connotations of personality characteristics have more persuasive effect on interpersonal judgment for persons low in cognitive complexity than for cognitively complex persons. Stresses need for conceptualizing interpersonal judgment as function of interaction between cognitive complexity and evaluative requirements of…

  2. Interpersonal Teaching Style and Student Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldren, Jeffrey; Hively, Jodi

    2009-01-01

    Assuming that learning is an inherently social process, this research explores interpersonal variables that affect teaching. Specifically, does the interpersonal teaching style affect student impressions of the instructor? Eighty-five undergraduates viewed one of three ten-minute videos that portrayed either an authoritarian, authoritative, or…

  3. The interpersonal core of personality pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Ansell, Emily B.; Pincus, Aaron L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that personality pathology is, at its core, fundamentally interpersonal. We review the proposed DSM-5 Section 3 redefinition of personality pathology involving self and interpersonal dysfunction, which we regard as a substantial improvement over the DSM-IV (and DSM-5 Section 2) definition. We note similarities between the proposed scheme and contemporary interpersonal theory and interpret the DSM-5 Section 3 definition using the underlying assumptions and evidence base of the interpersonal paradigm in clinical psychology. We describe how grounding the proposed DSM-5 Section 3 definition in interpersonal theory, and in particular a focus on the “interpersonal situation”, adds to its theoretical texture, empirical support, and clinical utility. We provide a clinical example that demonstrates the ability of contemporary interpersonal theory to augment the DSM-5 definition of personality pathology. We conclude with directions for further research that could clarify the core of personality pathology, and how interpersonal theory can inform research aimed at enhancing the DSM-5 Section 3 proposal and ultimately justify its migration to DSM-5 Section 2. PMID:23735037

  4. Global interpersonal inequality: Trends and measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel; Roope, Laurence; Tarp, Finn

    This paper discusses different approaches to the measurement of global interpersonal in equality. Trends in global interpersonal inequality during 1975-2005 are measured using data from UNU-WIDER’s World Income Inequality Database. In order to better understand the trends, global interpersonal...... inequality is decomposed into within-country and between-country inequality. The paper illustrates that the relationship between global interpersonal inequality and these constituent components is a complex one. In particular, we demonstrate that the changes in China’s and India’s income distributions over...... the past 30 years have simultaneously caused inequality to rise domestically in those countries, while tending to reduce global inter-personal inequality. In light of these findings, we reflect on the meaning and policy relevance of global vis-à-vis domestic inequality measures...

  5. PENGARUH KONSEP DIRI TERHADAP KOMUNIKASI INTERPERSONAL MAHASISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapto Irawan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to test the significance effect of self-concept on students’ interpersonal communication. Subjects in this reasearch were guidance and counseling students in Satwa Wacana Christian University, Salatiga. Analysis of data used simple regression to determine the effect of self-concept on students’ interpersonal communication. The results showed that Sig. = 0.012, which means that there was a significant relationship between self-concept and interpersonal communication. Besides, the value of R Square or determination coefficient was 0.048, which means that self-concept has the contribution effect of a 4.8% on the student interpersonal communication, while the remaining 95.2% was influenced by other factors. It can be concluded that there is a significant relationship between self-concept on students’ interpersonal communication.

  6. Interpersonal trust in different ages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Sacchi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar diferentes escalas en español para la evaluación de la confianza interpersonal. La calidad de las relaciones establecidas entre los miembros de un grupo social permite el crecimiento de cada integrante y del grupo como conjunto. En la mayoría de los casos, y particularmente en la infancia, las necesidades solamente pueden ser satisfechas a través de la interacción con los demás; esto implica interdependencia y requiere reciprocidad. Por lo tanto es importante prever cómo actuará la otra persona, para anticipar nuestro comportamiento hacia ella. Las expectativas producen cambios en la atribución, según sea interpretada la actitud del otro como beligerante o cooperativa, y a la vez modifican el comportamiento hacia los demás.

  7. Interactive Teaching in Interpersonal Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Erik; Karhu, Markku; Christensen, Cecillia

    2013-01-01

    skills, leadership and awareness. Consequently, educational programs for teaching engineers should work with the fact that the capability of communicating with people with different background competences is important, nevertheless the engineering education has traditionally focused on technical skills...... to the CDIO (conceive, design, implement and operate) approach in the autumn of 2008. The CDIO pedagogy encouraged to develop an interactive course in interpersonal skills, where the students have to take an active part in the exercises as well as involve themselves in the interactive communication process....... The course consists of various exercises from which the participants will develop their awareness and knowledge of communication. It is the intention to give the students a personal understanding and idea of a different approach to communicating between people. The students evaluated the course, and the four...

  8. ASSET experience at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, I.

    1997-01-01

    At Paks NPP special attention has been paid to international reviews since the very beginning of operation. Several international teams visited Paks in order to provide independent assessment of plant performance, conditions and safety. Paks NPP Management has the further intention to invite international reviews regularly (yearly) in the future as well. The experience gained during these reviews helped to establish a unified process of preparation for the reviews, performing them and handling the results. The Safety Department is in charge of organization of the whole process. All these reviews have their specific features and they are focused on different areas. The ASSET reviews provides the assessment of plant performance and safety through the analysis of safety significant events, which have occurred at the nuclear power plant. This approach makes this review specific and different from the other ones

  9. ASSET experience at Paks NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, I [Operational Safety Dept., Paks NPP, Paks (Hungary)

    1997-10-01

    At Paks NPP special attention has been paid to international reviews since the very beginning of operation. Several international teams visited Paks in order to provide independent assessment of plant performance, conditions and safety. Paks NPP Management has the further intention to invite international reviews regularly (yearly) in the future as well. The experience gained during these reviews helped to establish a unified process of preparation for the reviews, performing them and handling the results. The Safety Department is in charge of organization of the whole process. All these reviews have their specific features and they are focused on different areas. The ASSET reviews provides the assessment of plant performance and safety through the analysis of safety significant events, which have occurred at the nuclear power plant. This approach makes this review specific and different from the other ones.

  10. Labor Unions and Asset Prices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busato, Francesco; Addessi, William

    The paper investigates the nexus between labor and financial markets, focusing on the interaction between labor union behavior in setting wages, firms' investment strategy and asset prices. The way unions set wage claims after observing firm's financial performance increases the volatility of firms......' returns and the riskiness of corporate ownership. To remunerate this higher volatility and stronger risk, firms' equities have to grant high return. This mechanism is able to offer an explanation of for the "equity puzzle", that is it can explain the difference between equity returns and the risk free...... rate. It is a welcome result that the simulated excess return is about the empirical estimate and this result is obtained with a logarithmic specification of the shareholders preferences....

  11. Investor Flows to Asset Managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Susan E. K.; Musto, David K.; Wermers, Russ

    2014-01-01

    of the financial system and the real economy, and the retirement security and protection of the investors. There is an accordingly large and growing literature on flows that has concentrated on the main retail investment pool, the open-end mutual fund, and has used flows to explore many aspects of retail financial...... decision making. We survey this literature and, where relevant, describe how open-end flows compare to other investment vehicles. We also identify opportunities both for future research and for refinement of mutual fund design, in particular as suggested by the recent rethinking of retail investment pools......Cash flows between investors and funds are both cause and effect in a complex web of economic decisions. Among the issues at stake are the prospects and fees of the funds, the efforts and risk choices by the funds' managers, the pricing and comovement of the assets they trade, the stability...

  12. Future Assets, Student Talent (FAST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Future Assets, Student Talent (FAST) motivates and prepares talented students with disabilities to further their education and achieve High Tech and professional employment. The FAST program is managed by local professionals, business, and industry leaders; it is modeled after High School High Tech project TAKE CHARGE started in Los Angeles in 1983. Through cooperative efforts of Alabama Department of Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Adult and Children Services, and the President's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, north central Alabama was chosen as the second site for a High School High Tech project. In 1986 local business, industry, education, government agencies, and rehabilitation representatives started FAST. The program objectives and goals, results and accomplishments, and survey results are included.

  13. Essays on Empirical Asset Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gormsen, Niels Joachim

    that the expected return to the distant-future cash flows increases by more in bad times than the expected return to near-future cash flows does. This new stylized fact is important for understanding why the expected return on the market portfolio as a whole varies over time. In addition, it has strong implications...... for which economic model that drives the return to stocks. Indeed, I find that none of the canonical asset pricing models can explain this new stylized fact while also explaining the previously documented facts about stock returns. The second chapter, called Conditional Risk, studies how the expected return...... on individual stocks is influenced by the fact that their riskiness varies over time. We introduce a new ”conditional-risk factor”, which is a simple method for determining how much of the expected return to individual stocks that can be explained by time variation in their market risk, i.e. market betas. Using...

  14. On the management and operation of enterprises intangible asset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Wang, Hong

    2011-10-01

    Since entering the knowledge economy, the management of intangible assets becomes an important part of manage, this article discusses the problem of management on intangible assets, the properties of intangible assets, and the channels of management and operation on intangible assets, and stressed the important role of intangible assets in the development and innovation of the enterprise.

  15. 76 FR 78594 - Reporting of Specified Foreign Financial Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... Reporting of Specified Foreign Financial Assets AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION... foreign financial assets and the value of those assets is more than the applicable reporting threshold... hold specified foreign financial assets generally will be excepted from reporting such assets under...

  16. Launch Vehicle Demonstrator Using Shuttle Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threet, Grady E., Jr.; Creech, Dennis M.; Philips, Alan D.; Water, Eric D.

    2011-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) has the leading role for NASA s preliminary conceptual launch vehicle design and performance analysis. Over the past several years the ACO Earth-to-Orbit Team has evaluated thousands of launch vehicle concept variations for a multitude of studies including agency-wide efforts such as the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS), Constellation, Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV), Heavy Lift Propulsion Technology (HLPT), Human Exploration Framework Team (HEFT), and Space Launch System (SLS). NASA plans to continue human space exploration and space station utilization. Launch vehicles used for heavy lift cargo and crew will be needed. One of the current leading concepts for future heavy lift capability is an inline one and a half stage concept using solid rocket boosters (SRB) and based on current Shuttle technology and elements. Potentially, the quickest and most cost-effective path towards an operational vehicle of this configuration is to make use of a demonstrator vehicle fabricated from existing shuttle assets and relying upon the existing STS launch infrastructure. Such a demonstrator would yield valuable proof-of-concept data and would provide a working test platform allowing for validated systems integration. Using shuttle hardware such as existing RS-25D engines and partial MPS, propellant tanks derived from the External Tank (ET) design and tooling, and four-segment SRB s could reduce the associated upfront development costs and schedule when compared to a concept that would rely on new propulsion technology and engine designs. There are potentially several other additional benefits to this demonstrator concept. Since a concept of this type would be based on man-rated flight proven hardware components, this demonstrator has the potential to evolve into the first iteration of heavy lift crew or cargo and serve as a baseline for block upgrades. This vehicle could also serve as a demonstration

  17. Community asset mapping for violence prevention

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opperwjj

    Responses to this violence take many forms, including various violence prevention and ... 2 SCRATCHMAPS: Spiritual Capacity and Religious Assets for Transforming Community Health by Mobilising Males for Peace and. Safety .... The asset mapping methodology and toolset were designed by the collaborative research.

  18. Inflation risk and international asset returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Moerman (Gerard); M.A. van Dijk (Mathijs)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe show that inflation risk is priced in international asset returns. We analyze inflation risk in a framework that encompasses the International Capital Asset Pricing Model (ICAPM) of Adler and Dumas (1983). In contrast to the extant empirical literature on the ICAPM, we relax the

  19. Analytical Provision of Management of Intangible Assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelest Viktoriya S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in the study of the process of conduct of economic analysis of such a complex product of the innovation and information society as objects of intellectual property, which are accepted in business accounting as intangible assets. All-absorbing integration processes in the economy and large-scale propagation of information technologies influence the capital structure. Thus, accepting intangible assets as a driving factor of competitiveness, enterprises prefer namely these assets, reducing the share of tangible assets. Taking this into account the scientists thoroughly studied the issues of economic analysis of intangible assets, since the obtained data are the main source of accounting and analytical information required for making weighted managerial decisions. At the same time, the issues of authenticity, accuracy, efficiency and transparency of the obtained results become topical. In the process of the study the article shows information content of the accounting and analytical data due to introduction of accounting and conduct of economic analysis of intangible assets. The article considers the modern state of the methods of analysis of intangible assets based on opinions of scientists. It characterises economic and legal state of development of licence agreements in Ukraine. It justifies economic expediency of use of such agreements. It forms the ways of making efficient managerial decisions on use of intangible assets in economic activity of subjects of entrepreneurship.

  20. QUANTITATIVE INDICATORS OF THE SECURITIZATION OF ASSETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis VOSTRICOV

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Securitization is instrumental in return on capital increment through the withdrawal from the balance oflending activities being accompanied by off-balance incomes flow from fees, which are less capital-intensive. Thepurpose of this paper is to analyze the quantitative indicators characterizing the securitization of assets. For draftingthis article, the method of analysis, synthesis method, logic and dialectic method, normative method, the study ofstatistical sampling and time series of expert evaluations (Standard and Poor’s, personal observations, andmonographic studies have been used. The main difference between the securitization of assets from traditional waysof financing is related to the achievement of a plenty of secondary goals in attracting financial resources, whichcan play a significant role in choosing to favour the securitization of assets or other types of financing. Inparticular, it gives a possibility to write off the assets from the balance sheet along with the relevant obligationsunder the securities, to expand the range of potential investors accompanied by the reducing of credit risk, interestrate and liquidity risk, as well as to improve the management quality of assets, liabilities and risks. All of thesesecondary effects are achieved by the isolation of selected assets from the total credit risk of the enterprise, raisingits funds, which forms the pivotal actuality and significance of asset securitization. The article containsdemonstrations of quantitative and qualitative indicators characterizing the securitization of assets.

  1. Proceedings: 2001 Nuclear Asset Management Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The fourth annual EPRI Nuclear Asset Management Workshop helped decision makers at all levels of nuclear enterprises to keep informed about developing nuclear asset management (NAM) processes, methods, and tools. The goal is to operate nuclear plants with enhanced profitability, while maintaining safety

  2. Asset management methodology in NPP Cofrentes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galbally, D.; Feijo, J. P.; Sierra, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Cofrentes asset management plan is articulated around the tool SIGAN (computer management system of nuclear assets), this tool allows you to structure in an objective and documented the investment plan aimed at modernization and management of the plant life, achieving a consensus among the parties involved in terms of planning development and implementation.

  3. Managing Cultural Assets from a Business Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Laura; Smith, Abby

    Without understanding the value of collections as assets to the home institution, it is difficult for libraries to determine how best to make those assets most productive. This report describes how the Library of Congress developed and implemented a plan for greater accountability over its collections. The report presents a model for the…

  4. 12 CFR 347.210 - Asset maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... primary regulator, may require that a higher ratio of eligible assets be maintained if the financial..., copies of periodic memoranda that include an analysis of the borrower's recent financial statements and a... requiring a higher ratio of eligible assets are the concentration of risk to any one borrower or group of...

  5. Gaining Insight into an Organization's Fixed Assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Elisabet

    2003-01-01

    Discusses issues related to school district implementation of June 2001 Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement 34 designed to change how schools report fixed assets. Includes planning for GASB implementation, conducting fixed-asset inventories, and making time for GASB reporting. (PKP)

  6. Liquidity-related plan asset issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B B; Johnson, M K; Zorn, W P

    2000-12-01

    By about 2025, most baby boomers will have retired, which will put a tremendous strain on public sector pension plans. Many will experience negative cash flows, and liquidity will be an increasing concern. Asset/liability studies can help measure the effect of this risk on system funding and contribution requirements, resulting in more informed asset allocation choices and benefit policies.

  7. USING RF TECHNOLOGY FOR PROTECTED ASSET TRACKING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younkin, James R.; Pickett, Chris A.; Richardson, Dave; Stinson, Brad J.

    2008-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is working on systems that use a new radio frequency (RF) technology called Rubee to manage and inventory many types of protected assets, including weapons housed in Department of Energy (DOE) armories, tooling, and nuclear material containers. Rubee is being considered for an IEEE Standard, and is used on several projects at ORNL because of its high performance when used in, on, and around metal-an environment that is typical of that found in an armory vault and that of many other protected assets locations within nuclear facilities. The primary objective using Rubee is to supply sustainable technology that provides timely information on the status and location of protected assets. This paper focuses on the results from a deployment of this technology at a DOE armory and discusses the applicability of Rubee for use with other protected assets within nuclear facilities. Key Words: Rubee, low radio frequency, protected assets

  8. AN ECOSYSTEM PERSPECTIVE ON ASSET MANAGEMENT INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse METSO

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Big Data and Internet of Things will increase the amount of data on asset management exceedingly. Data sharing with an increased number of partners in the area of asset management is important when developing business opportunities and new ecosystems. An asset management ecosystem is a complex set of relationships between parties taking part in asset management actions. In this paper, the current barriers and benefits of data sharing are identified based on the results of an interview study. The main benefits are transparency, access to data and reuse of data. New services can be created by taking advantage of data sharing. The main barriers to sharing data are an unclear view of the data sharing process and difficulties to recognize the benefits of data sharing. For overcoming the barriers in data sharing, this paper applies the ecosystem perspective on asset management information. The approach is explained by using the Swedish railway industry as an example.

  9. An Ecosystem Perspective On Asset Management Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metso, Lasse; Kans, Mirka

    2017-09-01

    Big Data and Internet of Things will increase the amount of data on asset management exceedingly. Data sharing with an increased number of partners in the area of asset management is important when developing business opportunities and new ecosystems. An asset management ecosystem is a complex set of relationships between parties taking part in asset management actions. In this paper, the current barriers and benefits of data sharing are identified based on the results of an interview study. The main benefits are transparency, access to data and reuse of data. New services can be created by taking advantage of data sharing. The main barriers to sharing data are an unclear view of the data sharing process and difficulties to recognize the benefits of data sharing. For overcoming the barriers in data sharing, this paper applies the ecosystem perspective on asset management information. The approach is explained by using the Swedish railway industry as an example.

  10. Effective Interpersonal Communication: A Practical Guide to Improve Your Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertino, Kathleen A

    2014-09-30

    Use of effective interpersonal communication strategies by nurses in both personal and professional settings, may reduce stress, promote wellness, and therefore, improve overall quality of life. This article briefly explores the concept of interpersonal communication as it relates to Maslow's hierarchy of human needs; describes personal variables and the interaction of internal and external variables that can impact communication; and discusses possible causes and consequences of ineffective communication. Drawing on both the literature and experiences as a longtime provider of care in the mental health field, the author offers multiple practical strategies, with specific examples of possible responses for effective communication. Recommendations in this article are intended for nurses to consider as they seek healthy communication strategies that may be useful in both their personal and professional lives.

  11. Embodiment of the interpersonal nexus: revealing qualitative research findings on shoulder surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glass N

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nel Glass, K Robyn OgleSchool of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, VIC, AustraliaBackground: The paper reports on the importance of the interpersonal nexus within qualitative research processes, from a recent research project on patient experiences of shoulder surgery. Our aim is to reveal the importance of qualitative research processes and specifically the role of the interpersonal nexus in generating quality data. Literature related to the importance of human interactions and interpersonal communication processes in health-related research remains limited. Shoulder surgery has been reported to be associated with significant postoperative pain. While shoulder surgery research has investigated various analgesic techniques to determine key efficacy and minimization of adverse side effects, little has been reported from the patient perspective.Methods: Following institutional ethics approval, this project was conducted in two private hospitals in Victoria, Australia, in 2010. The methods included a survey questionnaire, semistructured interviews, and researcher-reflective journaling. Researcher-reflective journaling was utilized to highlight and discuss the interpersonal nexus.Results: This research specifically addresses the importance of the contributions of qualitative methods and processes to understanding patient experiences of analgesic efficacy and shoulder surgery. The results reveal the importance of the established research process and the interwoven interpersonal nexus between the researcher and the research participants. The interpersonal skills of presencing and empathetic engagement are particularly highlighted.Conclusion: The authors attest the significance of establishing an interpersonal nexus in order to reveal patient experiences of shoulder surgery. Interpersonal emotional engagement is particularly highlighted in data collection, in what may be otherwise understated and overlooked

  12. Potret interpersonal communication skill mahasiswa calon konselor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Ari Widyastuti

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the interpersonal communication skill level of the counselor candidate students. This study is a quantitative descriptive study with data collection instrument in the form of Interpersonal Communication Skill (ICS scale. The subjects of the study were 105 students of Guidance and Counseling Study Program in one of the universities in Yogyakarta City which was taken by random sampling technique. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis, where the criteria were calculated using standard deviation and mean formulas. The results showed that as many as 14.29% of students are in the criteria of interpersonal communication skill is very high, 23.81% of students are in interpersonal communication skill criteria high, 37.14% of students are on interpersonal communication skill criteria are, 20% sinterpersonal communication skills criteria are low, and 4.76% of students are in very low interpersonal communication skill criteria. The results of this study can be used as a reference in an effort to develop interpersonal communication skill prospective student counselor

  13. PENGGUNAAN INSTANT MESSANGER dan KOMUNIKASI INTERPERSONAL REMAJA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primada Qurrota Ayun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal communication should ideally in face to face, until the achievement of intimate communication. Instant messenger makes interpersonal communication easier and more efficient. However, it also resulted in less effective communication to occur, because it only uses text messaging as a means to convey a message so frequent miscommunication. This study wanted to see how the use of instant messenger among teenagers in interpersonal communication. The theory used in this study is a Computer Mediated Communication, Ecology Media and Interpersonal Intimacy. The method used in this research is phenomenology. The results of this study indicate that the instant messenger is a medium that is considered to be practical and easy to communicate interpersonally with family, friends, and lovers. Interpersonal communication process through instant messenger can not reach the stage of intimate relationship, because of interactions that occur frequently experienced miscommunication due to an incorrect perception. Interpersonal communication is more effective if it is done face to face. Teens when communicating via instant messenger, tend not to believe and to tell the truth.

  14. Monitoring highway assets using remote sensing technology : research spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Collecting inventory data about roadway assets is a critical part of : MDOTs asset management efforts, which help the department operate, : maintain and upgrade these assets cost-effectively. Federal law requires : that states develop a risk-based...

  15. When asset management and organizations meet: accounting for employee experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraven, Daan; Hartmann, Andreas; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2015-01-01

    For some time, organisations have encountered challenges when implementing asset management, particularly when closing the gap between how the asset management is understood by employees and how they support it in practice. Maturity models, common applied evaluations for implementing asset

  16. Development of transportation asset management decision support tools : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-09

    This study developed a web-based prototype decision support platform to demonstrate the benefits of transportation asset management in monitoring asset performance, supporting asset funding decisions, planning budget tradeoffs, and optimizing resourc...

  17. Empirical study on the degree of homogeneity of financial reporting concerning intangible assets

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina-Ionela FADUR; Daniela CIOTINA; Marilena MIRONIUC

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify to what extent is the information presented by Romanian companies quoted in the Bucharest Stock Exchange, concerning intangible assets, homogenous and what are the intangible assets included in financial reporting. We have also monitored a series of indicators of intangible capital, made up of human, relational, and structural capital, in order to identify to what extent the Romanian accounting environment meets the challenges of acknowledging intangib...

  18. Peran Manajemen Sumber Daya Manusia dalam Proses Penciptaan Pengetahuan sebagai Intangible Asset di Perusahaan

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi, Utari

    2003-01-01

    In an era of globalization, most companies face mounting pressure from their boards and from capital markets to add value. Although executives have become shopisticated in their understanding of what it to achieve competitive adventage, lntengible asset will be basis for company to get it, through creating knowledge. This effort has focused on employee performance as a knowledge creator, and sustainability of learning process. Keywords: knowledge, intangible asset, human capital

  19. Keterampilan Mendengarkan Secara Aktif dalam Komunikasi Interpersonal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikodemus Thomas Martoredjo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal communication is transactional and two-way direction. Therefore active listening skills play a key role in interpersonal communication. These active listening skills can have a positive impact on communication and at the same time creating a better relationship. So it is very useful to improve the skills of active listening. This paper intends to reveal the important role of active listening skills in interpersonal communication, identifying the challenges that exist within it both internally and externally as well as indicate the action that needs to be developed to improve these skills. 

  20. Interpersonal trust and quality-of-life: a cross-sectional study in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuharu Tokuda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in psychosocial factors with positive attitudes, such as interpersonal trust, as determinants for Quality-of-life (QOL or subjective well-being. Despite their longevity, Japanese people report a relatively poor subjective well-being, as well as lower interpersonal trust. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the possible association between interpersonal trust and QOL among Japanese people. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on the cross-sectional data for Japanese adults (2008, we analyzed the relationship between interpersonal trust and each of four domains of the WHOQOL-BREF. Interpersonal trust was assessed using three scales for trust in people, in human fairness and in human nature. In a total of 1000 participants (mean age: 45 years; 49% women, greater trust was recognized among women (vs. men, those aged 60-69 (vs. 20-29, or the high-income group (vs. low-income. Each of three trust scales was positively correlated with all domains of QOL. Multiple linear-regression models were constructed for each of QOL and the principal component score of the trust scales, adjusted for age, gender, area size of residence, income, education, and occupation. For all QOL domains, interpersonal trust was significantly and positively associated with better QOL with p<0.001 for all four domains including physical, psychological, social, and environmental QOL. Other factors associated with QOL included gender, age class, area size of residence, and income. Education and occupation were not associated with QOL. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Greater interpersonal trust is strongly associated with a better QOL among Japanese adults. If a causal relationship is demonstrated in a controlled interventional study, social and political measures should be advocated to increase interpersonal trust for achieving better QOL.

  1. Accounting valuation development of specific assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Zhigley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current issues of accounting estimate development are considered. The necessity of the development of accounting estimate in the context of the non-institutional theory principles based on the selection of a number of reasons is grounded. The reasons for deterioration of accounting reputation as a separate socio-economic institute in the context of developing the methodology for specific assets accounting are discovered. The system of normative regulation of accounting estimate of enterprise non-current assets in the case of diminishing their usefulness is analyzed. The procedure for determining and accounting for the depreciation of assets in accordance with IFRS 36 «Depreciation of Assets» is developed. The features of the joint use of the concept of «value in use» and «fair value» in the accounting system are disclosed. The procedure for determining the value of compensation depending on the degree of specificity of assets is developed. The necessity to clarify the features that indicate the possibility of diminishing the usefulness of specific assets (termination or pre-term termination of the contract for the use of a specific asset is grounded.

  2. Evaluating the interpersonal content of the MMPI-2-RF Interpersonal Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayearst, Lindsay E; Sellbom, Martin; Trobst, Krista K; Bagby, R Michael

    2013-01-01

    Convergence between the MMPI-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008) interpersonal scales and 2 interpersonal circumplex (IPC) measures was examined. University students (N = 405) completed the MMPI-2 and 2 IPC measures, the Interpersonal Adjectives Scales Revised Big Five Version (IASR-B5; Trapnell & Wiggins, 1990) and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems Circumplex (IIP-C; Horowitz, Alden, Wiggins, & Pincus, 2000). Internal consistency was adequate for 3 of the 6 scales investigated. The majority of scales were located in their hypothesized locations, although magnitude of correlations was somewhat weaker than anticipated, partly owing to restricted range from using a healthy sample. The expected pattern of correlations that defines a circular matrix was demonstrated, lending support for the convergent and discriminant validity of the MMPI-2-RF interpersonal scales with respect to the assessment of interpersonal traits and problems.

  3. Emotional conflict in interpersonal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruz, María; Tudela, Pío

    2011-01-15

    Facial displays of emotions can help to infer the mental states of other individuals. However, the expectations we generate on the basis of people's emotions can mismatch their actual behaviour in certain circumstances, which generates conflict. In the present study, we explored the neural mechanisms of emotional conflict during interpersonal interactions. Participants had to accept or reject economic offers made by several partners who displayed emotional expressions. On every trial, a cue informed participants of whether they could trust the emotion of their partner or not. Trustworthy (low-conflict) partners with happy facial expressions were cooperative and those with angry expressions did not cooperate. Untrustworthy (high-conflict) partners, on the other hand, cooperated when their expression was angry and did not cooperate when they displayed a happy emotion. Behavioural responses were faster for trustworthy than for untrustworty partners. High-conflict partners activated the anterior cingulate and the anterior insula. In turn, trustworthy partners were associated with activations in the left precuneus. Our results suggest that the emotion displayed by another person affects our decision-making in social contexts. When emotional expressions are linked to their natural consequences, they engage ToM processes. In contrast, untrustworthy emotional expressions engage conflict-related brain regions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Assets optimization at Heavy Water Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiremath, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    In the world where the fittest can only survive, manufacturing and production enterprises are under intense pressure to achieve maximum efficiency in each and every field related to the ultimate production of plant. The winners will be those that use their assets, i.e men, material, machinery and money most effectively. The objective is to optimize the utilization of all plant assets-from entire process lines to individual pressure vessels, piping, process machinery, and vital machine components. Assets of Heavy Water Plants mainly consist of Civil Structures, Equipment and Systems (Mechanical, Electrical) and Resources like Water, Energy and Environment

  5. Managing terminology assets in Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Kelly; Schneider, Sue; Scichilone, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR)systems rely on standard terminologies and classification systems that require both Information Technology (IT) and Information Management (IM) skills. Convergence of perspectives is necessary for effective terminology asset management including evaluation for use, maintenance and intersection with software applications. Multiple terminologies are necessary for patient care communication and data capture within EHRs and other information management tasks. Terminology asset management encompasses workflow and operational context as well as IT specifications and software application run time requirements. This paper identifies the tasks, skills and collaboration of IM and IT approaches for terminology asset management.

  6. Tactical Asset Allocation mit Genetischen Algorithmen

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Ammann; Christian Zenkner

    2003-01-01

    In this study of tactical asset allocation, we use a genetic algorithm to implement a market timing strategy. The algorithm makes a daily decision whether to invest in the market index or in a riskless asset. The market index is represented by the S&P500 Composite Index, the riskless asset by a 3-month T-Bill. The decision of the genetic algorithm is based on fundamental macroeconomic variables. The association of fundamental variables with a set of operators creates a space of possible strat...

  7. Developing Interpersonal Abilities With Interactive Vignettes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zbylut, Michelle L; Ward, Jason N

    2004-01-01

    ... of innovation and cultural awareness." This paper discussed an innovative training prototype that not only targets the development of interpersonal ability in junior officers, but also incorporates many of the situation elements...

  8. Increasing interpersonal trust through divergent thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eSellaro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal trust is an essential ingredient of many social relationships but how stable is it actually, and how is it controlled? There is evidence that the degree of trust into others might be rather volatile and can be affected by manipulations like drawing attention to personal interdependence or independence. Here we investigated whether the degree of interpersonal trust can be biased by inducing either a more integrative or a more cognitive-control mode by means of a creativity task requiring divergent or convergent thinking, respectively. Participants then performed the Trust Game, which provides an index of interpersonal trust by assessing the money units one participant (the trustor transfers to another participant (the trustee. As expected, participants transferred significantly more money to the trustee after engaging in divergent thinking as compared to convergent thinking. This observation provides support for the idea that interpersonal trust is controlled by domain-general (i.e., not socially dedicated cognitive states.

  9. Interpersonal Compatibility: Effect on Simulation Game Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantis, Betty; Nixon, John E.

    1982-01-01

    Investigates the impact of interpersonal relationships on decision-making success in small groups using a business simulation game as a research vehicle. The study concludes that group decision making may be unfavorably affected by personality conflicts. (Author/JJD)

  10. Interpersonal Communication of Children with Mental Retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyah Nur'aini Hanun

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tunagrahita were a terminology to called the children with mentally retarded conditions. This conditions caused these children having difficulties at least on four areas, related with attention, memory, language, and academics. The research problem is how interpersonal communication tunagrahita in Dormitory Extraordinary Education Foundation (YPLB Cipaganti Bandung. This research’s aim is to seek the interpersonal communication phenomenon of children with mentally retarded in YPLB Cipaganti Dormitory. The research method which were used is the qualitative method with communication Ethnography approach and Symbolic Interactionism theory to have comprehensive descriptions about life reality of mentally retarded’s children in YPLB Cipaganti Dormitory. Data obtained by participation observer, unstructured interviews, and documentary study. The result showed that interpersonal interactions are done with each child boarding and with the management of the hostel, is a series of unique events and interpersonal communication with a distinctive circular process that takes place continuously.

  11. Interpersonal attraction in buyer–supplier relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The concept of attraction is not reserved for the study of interpersonal relationships between husband and wife, family members, or lifelong friends. On the contrary, it contains much potential as a variable describing interpersonal business exchange relationships. This potential has been noted...... by well-known industrial marketing scholars in the past, and recent theoretical advances have incorporated attraction to describe buyer– supplier exchange, although primarily at the interorganizational level of analysis. The in-depth understanding of interpersonal attraction between boundary spanners...... representing buying and supply companies has yet to be developed. By drawing on social psychology and social exchange literature, this paper attempts to fill some of this gap. It contributes by uncovering the elements and process of interpersonal attraction. Furthermore, propositions are formulated to guide...

  12. Group Coupons: Interpersonal Bundling on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Yongmin Chen; Tianle Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Sellers sometimes offer goods for sale under both a regular price and a discount for group purchase if the consumer group reaches some minimum size. This selling practice, which we term interpersonal bundling, has been popularized on the Internet by companies such as Groupon. We explain why interpersonal bundling is a profitable strategy in the presence of demand uncertainty, and how it may further boost profits by stimulating product information dissemination. Other reasons for its profitabi...

  13. Relation between birth order and interpersonal styles

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro de Oliveira Magalhães

    2009-01-01

    Interpersonal style is an aspect of personality related to the particular way individuals participate and gain influence in social contexts. It has its origin in childhood’s first social interactions within the family group. It is suggested that the individual position in the family structure, namely birth order, is an important variable in this process. The present study investigated combined effects of sex and birth order on interpersonal style. A sample of 435 college students (196 men and...

  14. Increasing interpersonal trust through divergent thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Sellaro, Roberta; Hommel, Bernhard; de Kwaadsteniet, Erik W.; van de Groep, Suzanne; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2014-01-01

    Interpersonal trust is an essential ingredient of many social relationships but how stable is it actually, and how is it controlled? There is evidence that the degree of trust into others might be rather volatile and can be affected by manipulations like drawing attention to personal interdependence or independence. Here we investigated whether the degree of interpersonal trust can be biased by inducing either a more integrative or a more focused/exclusive cognitive control mode by means of a...

  15. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-P?rez, Ana; Pablos, Adri?n; Mart?nez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M.; G?mez-Olivencia, Asier; Berm?dez de Castro, Jos? Mar?a; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force ...

  16. Interpersonal skills for effective library management

    OpenAIRE

    Koganuramath, M. M.; Angadi, Mallikarjun

    2000-01-01

    This paper intends to reveal various facets of interpersonal skills and also the importance of public relations skills, including librarian's own skills, that helps the users to cultivate interpersonal skills as a positive reference service. Surveys of professional librarians show a high need for the skills for professional competencies, management, networking and teamwork. The perceived need for skills in these areas may reflect the increasing interdependence of library workers and relianc...

  17. Trying to trust: Brain activity during interpersonal social attitude change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkowski, Megan M; Anderson, Ian W; Haas, Brian W

    2016-04-01

    Interpersonal trust and distrust are important components of human social interaction. Although several studies have shown that brain function is associated with either trusting or distrusting others, very little is known regarding brain function during the control of social attitudes, including trust and distrust. This study was designed to investigate the neural mechanisms involved when people attempt to control their attitudes of trust or distrust toward another person. We used a novel control-of-attitudes fMRI task, which involved explicit instructions to control attitudes of interpersonal trust and distrust. Control of trust or distrust was operationally defined as changes in trustworthiness evaluations of neutral faces before and after the control-of-attitudes fMRI task. Overall, participants (n = 60) evaluated faces paired with the distrust instruction as being less trustworthy than faces paired with the trust instruction following the control-of-distrust task. Within the brain, both the control-of-trust and control-of-distrust conditions were associated with increased temporoparietal junction, precuneus (PrC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and medial prefrontal cortex activity. Individual differences in the control of trust were associated with PrC activity, and individual differences in the control of distrust were associated with IFG activity. Together, these findings identify a brain network involved in the explicit control of distrust and trust and indicate that the PrC and IFG may serve to consolidate interpersonal social attitudes.

  18. Neural correlates of dynamically evolving interpersonal ties predict prosocial behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Jacobus Fahrenfort

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest for the determinants of human choice behaviour in social settings. Upon initial contact, investment choices in social settings can be inherently risky, as the degree to which the other person will reciprocate is unknown. Nevertheless, people have been shown to exhibit prosocial behaviour even in one-shot laboratory settings where all interaction has been taken away. A logical step has been to link such behaviour to trait empathy-related neurobiological networks. However, as a social interaction unfolds, the degree of uncertainty with respect to the expected payoff of choice behaviour may change as a function of the interaction. Here we attempt to capture this factor. We show that the interpersonal tie one develops with another person during interaction - rather than trait empathy - motivates investment in a public good that is shared with an anonymous interaction partner. We examined how individual differences in trait empathy and interpersonal ties modulate neural responses to imposed monetary sharing. After, but not before interaction in a public good game, sharing prompted activation of neural systems associated with reward (striatum, empathy (anterior insular cortex [AIC] and anterior cingulate cortex [ACC] as well as altruism and social significance (posterior superior temporal sulcus [pSTS]. Although these activations could be linked to both empathy and interpersonal ties, only tie-related pSTS activation predicted prosocial behaviour during subsequent interaction, suggesting a neural substrate for keeping track of social relevance.

  19. Determinants of investment in fixed assets and in intangible assets for high-tech firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Maçãs Nunes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on a sample of 141 Portuguese high-tech firms for the period 2004-2012 and using GMM system (1998 and LSDVC (2005 dynamic estimators, this paper studies whether the determinants of high-tech firms’ investment in fixed assets are identical to the determinants of their investment in intangible assets. The multiple empirical evidence obtained allows us to conclude that the determinants of their investment in fixed assets are considerably different from those of their investment in intangible assets. Debt is a determinant stimulating investment in fixed assets, with age being a determinant restricting such investment. Size, age, internal finance and GDP are determinants stimulating investment in intangible assets, whereas debt and interest rates restrict such investment. These results let us make important suggestions for the owners/managers of high-tech firms, and also for policy-makers.

  20. What have we learned from asset sales?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, J.

    1999-01-01

    The author has created a database of 33 sales of generating assets and has the characteristics of those sales to estimate the value of generating assets. The authors conclusion so far is negative: the sales observed to date have varied so widely in characteristics and price that observed sales data cannot be usefully employed to forecast with any reliability the price at which some other asset is likely to sell in a subsequent auction. The author concludes this does not mean that the auction method is in any way inferior to an administrative method for determining stranded costs. It simply means that there are at present no reliable inferences which can be drawn from this process to inform the administrative process. While this situation might change as more and more assets are auctioned, there are reasons to think that this may not be the case

  1. Applying transportation asset management in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The study consists primarily of a detailed review of those states that utilize transportation asset management (TAM) systems that may be applicable for Connecticuts consideration, and includes as well the identification of a comprehensive pavement...

  2. A rural transit asset management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This reports the research undertaken to create an interactive, geographic information system based asset management system for the Alabama Department of Transportation to manage vehicles purchased and operated through Section 5310 and 5311 federal gr...

  3. Asset Management for Water and Wastewater Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewing and replacing the nation's public water infrastructure is an ongoing task. Asset management can help a utility maximize the value of its capital as well as its operations and maintenance dollars.

  4. Prolong Your Roof's Performance: Roof Asset Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitsma, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the roof asset management process for maintaining a roof system's integrity and value in a cost-effective manner. Included is a breakdown of roofing surface characteristics for multiply and single ply roofing systems. (GR)

  5. [ASSET missions at the Russian NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnyk, N [Ministry of the Russian Federation on Atomic Energy, Moscow (Russian Federation). Div. of International Organizations and Non-Proliferation

    1997-12-31

    The activities connected with the ASSET missions and seminars which were held at the Russian nuclear power plants with the assistance of the IAEA and which facilitated the enhancement of nuclear safety culture are described.

  6. [ASSET missions at the Russian NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnyk, N.

    1996-01-01

    The activities connected with the ASSET missions and seminars which were held at the Russian nuclear power plants with the assistance of the IAEA and which facilitated the enhancement of nuclear safety culture are described

  7. Consolidated asset management for Minnesota local agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Transportation agencies are increasingly turning their attention to transportation asset management (TAM), a systematic process for tracking the conditions of physical infrastructure to make better decisions about its maintenance. TAM is mandated by ...

  8. Integrated Facilities Management and Fixed Asset Accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golz, W. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A record of a school district's assets--land, buildings, machinery, and equipment--can be a useful management tool that meets accounting requirements and provides appropriate information for budgeting, forecasting, and facilities management. (MLF)

  9. Integrated Data for Improved Asset Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the potential benefits for agency-wide data integration for VDOT asset management. This objective is achieved through an example application that requires information distributed across multiple databa...

  10. APPROACHES CONCERNING ACCOUNTING OF INTANGIBLE ASSETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe MOROSAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of intangible assets in the company the paper aims to establish criteria for recognizing and measuring these assets through which the company can not only reflect the true value and its carrying amount. The main objective is to formulate a logical definition of intangible assets in accounting terms that allows their recognition in financial reporting to help build an accurate image of the company. It will demonstrate how important intangible assets for a successful company are and how they can help develop the economy and especially the Romanian economy. The secondary objectives are: - Setting limits in the valuation of intellectual capital from the point of view of internal control and external - Create a new post in the balance sheet to include this related value

  11. The complexity classification of intangible assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula-Angela Vidrascu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to solve the complex problems of arising in the definition and delimitation of the intangible assets. Over time the technology develops and resizes continuously and along with it redefine in a very short time the theoretical and practical concepts of the economy. From the economic point of view an asset can be defined as a resource controlled by the enterprise as a result of past transactions or investments, and which is expected to generate future economic benefits. Intangible assets are the most important economic resources of an entity because in terms of their analysis of the technical, material and financial ñ of her evolution over time and the ability of continuous development. The main purpose of this article is to analyse the research carried out for the purposes of the definition and delimitation of intangible assets.

  12. Space assets for demining assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijff, Michiel; Eriksson, Daniel; Bouvet, Thomas; Griffiths, Alexander; Craig, Matthew; Sahli, Hichem; González-Rosón, Fernando Valcarce; Willekens, Philippe; Ginati, Amnon

    2013-02-01

    Populations emerging from armed conflicts often remain threatened by landmines and explosive remnants of war. The international mine action community is concerned with the relief of this threat. The Space Assets for Demining Assistance (SADA) undertaking is a set of activities that aim at developing new services to improve the socio-economic impact of mine action activities, primarily focused on the release of land thought to be contaminated, a process described as land release. SADA was originally initiated by the International Astronautical Federation (IAF). It has been implemented under the Integrated Applications Promotion (IAP) program of the European Space Agency (ESA). Land release in mine action is the process whereby the demining community identifies, surveys and prioritizes suspected hazardous areas for more detailed investigation, which eventually results in the clearance of landmines and other explosives, thereby releasing land to the local population. SADA has a broad scope, covering activities, such as planning (risk and impact analysis, prioritization, and resource management), field operations and reporting. SADA services are developed in two phases: feasibility studies followed by demonstration projects. Three parallel feasibility studies have been performed. They aimed at defining an integrated set of space enabled services to support the land release process in mine action, and at analyzing their added value, viability and sustainability. The needs of the mine action sector have been assessed and the potential contribution of space assets has been identified. Support services have been formulated. To test their fieldability, proofs of concept involving mine action end users in various operational field settings have been performed by each of the study teams. The economic viability has also been assessed. Whenever relevant and cost-effective, SADA aims at integrating Earth observation data, GNSS navigation and SatCom technologies with existing

  13. The valuation of health care intangible assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, R F; Rabe, J R

    1997-01-01

    Health care entities (and especially medical practices) are valued for a number of reasons: sale transaction pricing and structuring, merger formation and dissolution, taxation and regulatory compliance, and litigation support and dispute resolution. The identification and quantification of the entity's intangible assets are often the most important aspects of the valuation. This article illustrates the generally accepted methods for valuing health care-related intangible assets.

  14. THE BUSINESS MODEL AND FINANCIAL ASSETS MEASUREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    NICULA Ileana

    2012-01-01

    The paper work analyses some aspects regarding the implementation of IFRS 9, the relationship between the business model approach and the assets classification and measurement. It does not discuss the cash flows characteristics, another important aspect of assets classification, or the reclassifications. The business model is related to some characteristics of the banks (opaqueness, leverage ratio, compliance to capital, sound liquidity requirements and risk management) and to Special Purpose...

  15. Asset Allocation of Mutual Fund Investors

    OpenAIRE

    Dengpan Luo

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies mutual fund investors' asset allocation decisions using monthly flow data of U.S mutual fund industry from 1984 to 1998. We find that mutual fund investors change their asset allocations between stocks and bonds in reaction to business conditions tracked by changes in expected stock market returns. They tend to allocate less into stock funds during the trough of a business cycle when expected stock market returns are higher and to allocate more into stock funds during the p...

  16. Accounting of Long-Term Biological Assets

    OpenAIRE

    Valeriy Mossakovskyy; Vasyl Korytnyy

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to generalization of experience in valuation of long-term biological assets of plant-growing and animal-breeding, and preparation of suggestions concerning improvement of accounting in this field. Recommendations concerning accounting of such assets are given based on the study of accounting practice at specific agricultural company during long period of time. Authors believe that fair value is applicable only if price level for agricultural products is fixed by the gov...

  17. Globalization and the Housing Asset Rich

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This article explores the importance of housing assets in shaping the global landscape of opportunity and disadvantage. In doing so, it is concerned with four key issues. First, it seeks to highlight the increasing significance of housing related wealth at a global scale. Second, it is concerned with the uneven and potentially divisive impact of housing asset accumulation, within and between societies. Third, it seeks to show how economic, geo-demographic and policy contex...

  18. Intangible liabilities: beyond models of intellectual assets

    OpenAIRE

    García Parra, Mercedes; Simó Guzmán, Pep; Sallán Leyes, José María; Mundet Hiern, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – Most models of intellectual capital measurment equal intellectual capital with intellectual assets. Nevertheless, companies sometimes must incur liabilities to make intellectual assets truly actionable. This fact suggests the existence of intangible liabilities. The aim of this paper is to refine the methods of assessment of intellectual capital by refining and extending the concept of intangible liabilities. Design/methodology/approach – The paper consists of a literature revi...

  19. IAEA ASSET service - A KANUPP perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Ghafoor, M [Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (Pakistan)

    1997-12-31

    IAEA has been providing ASSET Service since 1986. It is a mechanism for drawing and disseminating specific and generic lesson from a significant event. Like many other operating organizations, KANUPP has also benefited from its in-depth technical exchange experience which has resulted in significant improvement in the level of operation safety. The ASSET mission, which visited KANUPP in connection with fuelling machine locking problem in 1989, triggered many actions which were responsible for improvement of overall safety of the plant.

  20. IAEA ASSET service - A KANUPP perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Ghafoor, M.

    1996-01-01

    IAEA has been providing ASSET Service since 1986. It is a mechanism for drawing and disseminating specific and generic lesson from a significant event. Like many other operating organizations, KANUPP has also benefited from its in-depth technical exchange experience which has resulted in significant improvement in the level of operation safety. The ASSET mission, which visited KANUPP in connection with fuelling machine locking problem in 1989, triggered many actions which were responsible for improvement of overall safety of the plant

  1. Asset evaluation methods for intellectual property

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Ing. With the introduction of "International Financial Reporting Standards" (IFRS) through out Europe in April 2001, there is a requirement to accurately report the value of all company assets. This will include by implication all intangible assets and Intellectual Property, such as patents, trademarks, copyrights, and know-how. Items that have not been recorded before are much more visible under IFRS and will need to be carefully interpreted by investors and analysts. In order to meet t...

  2. Liquid Assets in Banks: Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Alger; Ingela Alger

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes theoretical findings on the determinants of liquid assets held by banks. The findings are summarized in a series of predictions, some of which are tested using a panel data set on Mexican banks. Surprisingly, we find that banks with relatively more demand deposits have relatively less liquid assets, in contrast with the theoretical prediction. We further exploit a period characterized by a prolonged aggregate liquidity shock on the Mexican banking system to shed light on...

  3. Asset liability management using stochastic programming

    OpenAIRE

    Pirbhai, M; Mitra, G; Kyriakis, T

    2003-01-01

    This chapter sets out to explain an important financial planning model called asset liability management (ALM); in particular, it discusses why in practice, optimum planning models are used. The ability to build an integrated approach that combines liability models with that of asset allocation decisions has proved to be desirable and more efficient in that it can lead to better ALM decisions. The role of uncertainty and quantification of risk in these planning models is con...

  4. Italian asset management companies: products and governance

    OpenAIRE

    Arcuri, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the asset management sector has prompted many studies to highlight the need to promote its growth and development. This is even more so following the recent financial crisis, considered by many authors the most severe recession after World War II. Contributions existing in literature have emphasized the importance of investigating the corporate governance system of the Asset Management Companies (AMCs), considering that the Italian financial system is characterized by a "...

  5. Higher Order Expectations in Asset Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe BACCHETTA; Eric VAN WINCOOP

    2004-01-01

    We examine formally Keynes' idea that higher order beliefs can drive a wedge between an asset price and its fundamental value based on expected future payoffs. Higher order expectations add an additional term to a standard asset pricing equation. We call this the higher order wedge, which depends on the difference between higher and first order expectations of future payoffs. We analyze the determinants of this wedge and its impact on the equilibrium price. In the context of a dynamic noisy r...

  6. Historical development of derivatives’ underlying assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Riederová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The derivative transactions are able to eliminate the unexpected risk arising from the price volatility of the asset. The need for risk elimination relates to the application of derivatives.This paper is focused on derivatives’ underlying assets themselves. With the plain description, supported by progressive summarization, the authors analysed the relevant theoretical sources, dealt with derivatives, their underlying assets and their development in centuries. Starting in the ancient history, 2000 BC, the first non-standard transaction, very close to today’s understanding of derivatives, becomes to be closed between counterparties. During the time, in different kingdoms and emporiums, derivatives started to play a significant role in daily life, helping to reduce the uncertainty of the future. But the real golden era for derivatives started with the so called ‘New derivative markets’ and computer supported trading. They have extended their form from simple tools to most complex structures, without changing their main purpose hedging and risk – reduction.For the main purpose of this paper it is impossible to split the development of derivatives from the very wide extension of underlying assets. The change of these assets was one of the main drivers in derivatives development. Understanding of the dynamic character of these assets helps to understand the world of derivatives.

  7. Confidence sets for asset correlations in portfolio credit risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Castro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Asset correlations are of critical importance in quantifying portfolio credit risk and economic capitalin financial institutions. Estimation of asset correlation with rating transition data has focusedon the point estimation of the correlation without giving any consideration to the uncertaintyaround these point estimates. In this article we use Bayesian methods to estimate a dynamicfactor model for default risk using rating data (McNeil et al., 2005; McNeil and Wendin, 2007.Bayesian methods allow us to formally incorporate human judgement in the estimation of assetcorrelation, through the prior distribution and fully characterize a confidence set for the correlations.Results indicate: i a two factor model rather than the one factor model, as proposed bythe Basel II framework, better represents the historical default data. ii importance of unobservedfactors in this type of models is reinforced and point out that the levels of the implied asset correlationscritically depend on the latent state variable used to capture the dynamics of default,as well as other assumptions on the statistical model. iii the posterior distributions of the assetcorrelations show that the Basel recommended bounds, for this parameter, undermine the levelof systemic risk.

  8. The role of intangible assets in the regional economic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Suriñach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the summary of the IAREG (Intangible Assets and RegionalEconomic Growth European project, which analyzed the role of intangibleassets (IA on regional economic growth. We focused on some of the most relevantintangible assets, for which statistical information is available and where the consortiumhad more expertise. Consequently, in this paper we put special attentionin four big factors: knowledge capital, human capital, social capital and entrepreneurshipcapital. Additional to the main characteristics of each of these IA (relatedwith their measurement and their effects on regional economic growth, we alsoanalyzed the ensemble effects of these IA over the location of firms. For each asset,we describe its main characteristics, the indicators for its measuring and its limitations,as well as the main results associated to its impact on regional growth. Wemust outline that in order to improve the analysis of the effects of the IA in regionaleconomic growth it is necessary to develop more and better databases. We presentsome thoughts in this respect, based on our research experience. Finally, we givesome policy implications and recommendations.

  9. Learning Agents for Autonomous Space Asset Management (LAASAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scally, L.; Bonato, M.; Crowder, J.

    2011-09-01

    Current and future space systems will continue to grow in complexity and capabilities, creating a formidable challenge to monitor, maintain, and utilize these systems and manage their growing network of space and related ground-based assets. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM), and in particular, Condition-Based System Health Management (CBHM), is the ability to manage and maintain a system using dynamic real-time data to prioritize, optimize, maintain, and allocate resources. CBHM entails the maintenance of systems and equipment based on an assessment of current and projected conditions (situational and health related conditions). A complete, modern CBHM system comprises a number of functional capabilities: sensing and data acquisition; signal processing; conditioning and health assessment; diagnostics and prognostics; and decision reasoning. In addition, an intelligent Human System Interface (HSI) is required to provide the user/analyst with relevant context-sensitive information, the system condition, and its effect on overall situational awareness of space (and related) assets. Colorado Engineering, Inc. (CEI) and Raytheon are investigating and designing an Intelligent Information Agent Architecture that will provide a complete range of CBHM and HSI functionality from data collection through recommendations for specific actions. The research leverages CEI’s expertise with provisioning management network architectures and Raytheon’s extensive experience with learning agents to define a system to autonomously manage a complex network of current and future space-based assets to optimize their utilization.

  10. 18 CFR 367.22 - Accounting for asset retirement obligations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accounting for asset... GAS ACT General Instructions § 367.22 Accounting for asset retirement obligations. (a) An asset... measurement changes to the initial liability for the legal obligation recorded in account 230, Asset...

  11. 24 CFR 990.290 - Compliance with asset management requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance with asset management... URBAN DEVELOPMENT THE PUBLIC HOUSING OPERATING FUND PROGRAM Asset Management § 990.290 Compliance with asset management requirements. (a) A PHA is considered in compliance with asset management requirements...

  12. Dynamic service contracting for on-demand asset delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X.; Angelov, S.A.; Grefen, P.W.P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional financial asset lease operates in an asset provider centred mode, in which financiers passively provide financial solutions to the customers of their allied asset vendors. To capture the highly customised asset lease demands from the mass market, this paper advocates adopting a

  13. 12 CFR 701.36 - FCU ownership of fixed assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FCU ownership of fixed assets. 701.36 Section... ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONS § 701.36 FCU ownership of fixed assets. (a) Investment in Fixed Assets. (1) No Federal credit union with $1,000,000 or more in assets may invest in any fixed...

  14. 13 CFR 120.546 - Loan asset sales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loan asset sales. 120.546 Section....546 Loan asset sales. (a) General. Loan asset sales are governed by § 120.545(b)(4) and by this... consented to SBA's sale of the loan (guaranteed and unguaranteed portions) in an asset sale conducted or...

  15. Interpersonal ambivalence in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Steffen; Niemeyer, Helen; Hottenrott, Birgit; Schilling, Lisa; Spitzer, Carsten

    2013-10-01

    The social attitudes and interpersonal relationships of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are subject to a longstanding controversy. Whereas cognitive-behavioural researchers emphasize exaggerated pro-social attitudes in OCD like inflated responsibility and worry for other people (especially significant others), dynamic theories traditionally focus on anti-social attitudes such as latent aggression and hostility. In two recent studies, we gathered support not only for a co-existence of these seemingly opposing attitudes in OCD, but also for a functional connection: inflated responsibility in part appears to serve as a coping strategy (or “defense”) against negative interpersonal feelings. In the present study, we tested a shortened version of the Responsibility and Interpersonal Behaviours and Attitudes Questionnaire (RIBAQ-R). The scale was administered to 34 participants with OCD and 34 healthy controls. The questionnaire concurrently measures pro-social and anti-social interpersonal attitudes across three subscales. In line with our prior studies, patients displayed higher scores on both exaggerated pro-social attitudes (e.g. “I suffer from a strict conscience concerning my relatives”) as well as latent aggression (e.g. “Sometimes I would like to harm strangers on the street“) and suspiciousness/distrust (e.g. “I cannot even trust my own family”). A total of 59% of the patients but only 12% of the healthy controls showed marked interpersonal ambivalence (defined as scores higher than one standard deviation from the mean of the nonclinical controls on both the prosocial and at least one of the two anti-social subscales). The study asserts high interpersonal ambivalence in OCD. Further research is required to pinpoint both the dynamic and causal links between opposing interpersonal styles. Normalization and social competence training may prove beneficial to resolve the apparent problems of patients with OCD regarding anger

  16. A formal model of interpersonal inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eMoutoussis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We propose that active Bayesian inference – a general framework for decision-making – can equally be applied to interpersonal exchanges. Social cognition, however, entails special challenges. We address these challenges through a novel formulation of a formal model and demonstrate its psychological significance. Method: We review relevant literature, especially with regards to interpersonal representations, formulate a mathematical model and present a simulation study. The model accommodates normative models from utility theory and places them within the broader setting of Bayesian inference. Crucially, we endow people's prior beliefs, into which utilities are absorbed, with preferences of self and others. The simulation illustrates the model's dynamics and furnishes elementary predictions of the theory. Results: 1. Because beliefs about self and others inform both the desirability and plausibility of outcomes, in this framework interpersonal representations become beliefs that have to be actively inferred. This inference, akin to 'mentalising' in the psychological literature, is based upon the outcomes of interpersonal exchanges. 2. We show how some well-known social-psychological phenomena (e.g. self-serving biases can be explained in terms of active interpersonal inference. 3. Mentalising naturally entails Bayesian updating of how people value social outcomes. Crucially this includes inference about one’s own qualities and preferences. Conclusion: We inaugurate a Bayes optimal framework for modelling intersubject variability in mentalising during interpersonal exchanges. Here, interpersonal representations are endowed with explicit functional and affective properties. We suggest the active inference framework lends itself to the study of psychiatric conditions where mentalising is distorted.

  17. Momentary assessment of interpersonal process in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Katherine M; Hopwood, Christopher J; Woody, Erik; Ethier, Nicole; Sadler, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate how a novel computer joystick coding method can illuminate the study of interpersonal processes in psychotherapy sessions, we applied it to Shostrom's (1966) well-known films in which a client, Gloria, had sessions with 3 prominent psychotherapists. The joystick method, which records interpersonal behavior as nearly continuous flows on the plane defined by the interpersonal dimensions of control and affiliation, provides an excellent sampling of variability in each person's interpersonal behavior across the session. More important, it yields extensive information about the temporal dynamics that interrelate clients' and therapists' behaviors. Gloria's 3 psychotherapy sessions were characterized using time-series statistical indices and graphical representations. Results demonstrated that patterns of within-person variability tended to be markedly asymmetric, with a predominant, set-point-like interpersonal style from which deviations mostly occurred in just 1 direction (e.g., occasional submissive departures from a modal dominant style). In addition, across each session, the therapist and client showed strongly cyclical variations in both control and affiliation, and these oscillations were entrained to different extents depending on the therapist. We interpreted different patterns of moment-to-moment complementarity of interpersonal behavior in terms of different therapeutic goals, such as fostering a positive alliance versus disconfirming the client's interpersonal expectations. We also showed how this method can be used to provide a more detailed analysis of specific shorter segments from each of the sessions. Finally, we compared our approach to alternative techniques, such as act-to-act lagged relations and dynamic systems and pointed to a variety of possible research and training applications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Computational Interpersonal Communication: Communication Studies and Spoken Dialogue Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Gunkel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of spoken dialogue systems (SDS, communication can no longer be considered a human-to-human transaction. It now involves machines. These mechanisms are not just a medium through which human messages pass, but now occupy the position of the other in social interactions. But the development of robust and efficient conversational agents is not just an engineering challenge. It also depends on research in human conversational behavior. It is the thesis of this paper that communication studies is best situated to respond to this need. The paper argues: 1 that research in communication can supply the information necessary to respond to and resolve many of the open problems in SDS engineering, and 2 that the development of SDS applications can provide the discipline of communication with unique opportunities to test extant theory and verify experimental results. We call this new area of interdisciplinary collaboration “computational interpersonal communication” (CIC

  19. What are we measuring? Convergence of leadership with interpersonal and non-interpersonal personality.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Since leadership styles have been most commonly defined in terms of interpersonal influence, one would assume that they have their main projections on the interpersonal circumplex. In this study, the relations between leadership styles from the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire and Leader

  20. System and Method for Monitoring Distributed Asset Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinevsky, Dimitry (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A computer-based monitoring system and monitoring method implemented in computer software for detecting, estimating, and reporting the condition states, their changes, and anomalies for many assets. The assets are of same type, are operated over a period of time, and outfitted with data collection systems. The proposed monitoring method accounts for variability of working conditions for each asset by using regression model that characterizes asset performance. The assets are of the same type but not identical. The proposed monitoring method accounts for asset-to-asset variability; it also accounts for drifts and trends in the asset condition and data. The proposed monitoring system can perform distributed processing of massive amounts of historical data without discarding any useful information where moving all the asset data into one central computing system might be infeasible. The overall processing is includes distributed preprocessing data records from each asset to produce compressed data.

  1. Attachment style and interpersonal trauma in refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morina, Naser; Schnyder, Ulrich; Schick, Matthis; Nickerson, Angela; Bryant, Richard A

    2016-12-01

    Refugees can suffer many experiences that threaten their trust in others. Although models of refugee mental health have postulated that attachment securities may be damaged by refugee experiences, this has yet to be empirically tested. This study aimed to understand the relationship between the nature of traumatic experiences sustained by refugees and attachment styles. In a cross-sectional study, treatment-seeking refugees (N = 134) were assessed for traumatic exposure using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale. Attachment style was assessed using the Experiences in Close Relationship Scale. Whereas gender and severity of interpersonal traumatic events predicted avoidant attachment style (accounting for 11% of the variance), neither these factors nor non-interpersonal trauma predicted anxious attachment. Exposure to interpersonal traumatic events, including torture, is associated with enduring avoidant attachment tendencies in refugees. This finding accords with attachment theories that prior adverse interpersonal experiences can undermine secure attachment systems, and may promote avoidance of attachment seeking. This finding may point to an important process maintaining poor psychological health in refugees affected by interpersonal trauma. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  2. Substantiation of the Essence of Intangible Assets in Accounting

    OpenAIRE

    Beskosta Halyna M.

    2013-01-01

    Economic subjects in Ukraine started to use intangible assets in their financial and economic activity more often, but still less than in other countries of the world. One of the reasons is a difficulty in understanding the essence of an intangible asset as an object of accounting. The goal of the article is to identify the essence of intangible assets for accounting in accordance with regulatory documents on accounting of intangible assets. The article justifies essence of intangible assets,...

  3. The Role of Agribusiness Assets in Investment Portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Michael; Malcolm, Bill; O'Connor, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Investment in agribusiness assets has grown significantly in recent years. The question of interest is whether including agribusiness assets in investment portfolios provide benefits. The effects of diversification by including agribusiness assets in two investment portfolios, a mixed asset portfolio and a diversified share portfolio was investigated using Markowitz’s (1952) Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT) of mean-variance optimization. To measure the performance of agribusiness assets, an in...

  4. Looking for Synergy with Momentum in Main Asset Classes

    OpenAIRE

    Lukas Macijauskas; Dimitrios I. Maditinos

    2014-01-01

    As during turbulent market conditions correlations between main asset-classes falter, classical asset management concepts seem unreliable. This problem stimulates search for non-discretionary asset allocation methods. The aim of the paper is to test weather the concept of Momentum phenomena could be used as a stand alone investment strategy using all main asset classes. The study is based on exploring historical prices of various asset classes; statistical data analysis method is used. Result...

  5. Computer Based Asset Management System For Commercial Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanze

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Computer-based Asset Management System is a web-based system. It allows commercial banks to keep track of their assets. The most advantages of this system are the effective management of asset by keeping records of the asset and retrieval of information. In this research I gather the information to define the requirements of the new application and look at factors how commercial banks managed their asset.

  6. Fundamental-driven and Tactical Asset Allocation: what really matters?

    OpenAIRE

    Hartpence, Maria; Boulier, Jean-François

    2004-01-01

    Asset allocation contribution to ex-post performance is of primary importance. Nobody denies its role, yet the subject of allocating assets remains controversial. To some contenders, the added value stems only from strategic asset allocation which aims at providing the long-term average exposure to the selected asset classes. On the other hand, proponents of active management have introduced several forms of tactical asset allocation. In this paper, we will go a step further by distinguishing...

  7. [Self-reflection, interpersonal behavior and psychoanalytic ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgy, M

    1997-05-01

    In the middle ages, ethical practice included a metaphysical theory of value. In comparison with that, self-reflection and interpersonality should be described as principles of more individual ethics and proceeding from philosophy to psychoanalysis in modern times. Drawing a borderline between human philosophy and metaphysies, Kant defined his so-called categorial imperative as a basic phenomenon of human reciprocity. Ethical relationship to another person, however, requires realization of one's own self, i.e. self-reflection. Hegel's subsequent association of intersubjectivity and selfreflection supplied the basis for Sarte's constitution of consciousness: Existence as existing for the good of the fellow-being. Self-reflection, basing on the sight of one's own self by the other person, leads to Sartre's concept of existential psychoanalysis and to his understanding of ethics. His concept illustrates the decline of significance of philosophy for the analysis of human relationship. Habermas describes self-reflection and interpersonality as fundamental principles of the psychoanalytic therapy and its ethical demands. With the historical concept of the super-ego, Freud established therapeutical one-sidedness and abstinence from ethics; however, as therapeutical interrelationship continued to intensity, ethics of depth psychology also began to develop. This ethical demand was not expressly formulated within the context of psychoanalysis, with the exception of jung and his epigones. Nevertheless, psychoanalytic interaction implies the development of self-reflection, which definitely represents a step forward in the sense of "ethical enlightenment" represented by Kant.

  8. Agility in asset management, or: how to be flexible with assets designed for stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenburg, Richard Jacob; Braaksma, Anne Johannes Jan; van Dongen, Leonardus Adriana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Agility is increasingly important in manufacturing. However, thus far little attention has been paid to the agility of the physical assets used in production, which are typically designed for decades of operation in a stable context. This paper investigates the topic of agile Asset Management using

  9. The pricing of illiquidity and illiquid assets : Essays on empirical asset pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijp, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation studies the pricing of liquidity and illiquid assets. For this thesis, liquidity will generally refer to the ease with which an asset can be traded. The first chapter investigates the role of the investment horizon in the impact of illiquidity on stock prices. We obtain a clientele

  10. Macroeconomic Dynamics of Assets, Leverage and Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozendaal, Jeroen C.; Malevergne, Yannick; Sornette, Didier

    A macroeconomic model based on the economic variables (i) assets, (ii) leverage (defined as debt over asset) and (iii) trust (defined as the maximum sustainable leverage) is proposed to investigate the role of credit in the dynamics of economic growth, and how credit may be associated with both economic performance and confidence. Our first notable finding is the mechanism of reward/penalty associated with patience, as quantified by the return on assets. In regular economies where the EBITA/Assets ratio is larger than the cost of debt, starting with a trust higher than leverage results in the highest long-term return on assets (which can be seen as a proxy for economic growth). Therefore, patient economies that first build trust and then increase leverage are positively rewarded. Our second main finding concerns a recommendation for the reaction of a central bank to an external shock that affects negatively the economic growth. We find that late policy intervention in the model economy results in the highest long-term return on assets. However, this comes at the cost of suffering longer from the crisis until the intervention occurs. The phenomenon that late intervention is most effective to attain a high long-term return on assets can be ascribed to the fact that postponing intervention allows trust to increase first, and it is most effective to intervene when trust is high. These results are derived from two fundamental assumptions underlying our model: (a) trust tends to increase when it is above leverage; (b) economic agents learn optimally to adjust debt for a given level of trust and amount of assets. Using a Markov Switching Model for the EBITA/Assets ratio, we have successfully calibrated our model to the empirical data of the return on equity of the EURO STOXX 50 for the time period 2000-2013. We find that dynamics of leverage and trust can be highly nonmonotonous with curved trajectories, as a result of the nonlinear coupling between the variables. This

  11. Casting a Resource-Based View on Intangible Assets and Export Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Mohammad Tabatabaei Nasab

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prosperous companies in the 21st century have come to know the necessity of intangible assets as an important factor to achieve sustainable competitive advantage and constant presence in the international markets. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to examine intangible assets and evaluate its relationship with export behaviour in terms of export intensity (Export-Sales Ratio and export type (Permanent, Occasional & Periodical. The population under study includes all export firms during 2002 until 2010 in Yazd province, Iran. Research data were collected by questionnaire and in order to answer the research questions and testing hypotheses, MCDM techniques (i.e. AHP & TOPSIS and statistical analysis (i.e. ANOVA were utilized. According to the research results, human capital, relational capital, technological capital, corporate reputation, and structural capital placed as the first to the fifth significant factors respectively. Findings revealed that there is a significant difference between the permanent and occasional presence in the international markets regarding intangible assets; as the mean of intangible assets in the firms with permanent export is higher than the mean of intangible assets in the firms with occasional export. However, there is no significant difference between intangible assets and the export intensity.

  12. Defining Ecosystem Assets for Natural Capital Accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Lars; Bagstad, Ken; Edens, Bram; Obst, Carl; de Jong, Rixt; Lesschen, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    In natural capital accounting, ecosystems are assets that provide ecosystem services to people. Assets can be measured using both physical and monetary units. In the international System of Environmental-Economic Accounting, ecosystem assets are generally valued on the basis of the net present value of the expected flow of ecosystem services. In this paper we argue that several additional conceptualisations of ecosystem assets are needed to understand ecosystems as assets, in support of ecosystem assessments, ecosystem accounting and ecosystem management. In particular, we define ecosystems' capacity and capability to supply ecosystem services, as well as the potential supply of ecosystem services. Capacity relates to sustainable use levels of multiple ecosystem services, capability involves prioritising the use of one ecosystem service over a basket of services, and potential supply considers the ability of ecosystems to generate services regardless of demand for these services. We ground our definitions in the ecosystem services and accounting literature, and illustrate and compare the concepts of flow, capacity, capability, and potential supply with a range of conceptual and real-world examples drawn from case studies in Europe and North America. Our paper contributes to the development of measurement frameworks for natural capital to support environmental accounting and other assessment frameworks.

  13. Defining Ecosystem Assets for Natural Capital Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Lars; Bagstad, Ken; Edens, Bram; Obst, Carl; de Jong, Rixt; Lesschen, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    In natural capital accounting, ecosystems are assets that provide ecosystem services to people. Assets can be measured using both physical and monetary units. In the international System of Environmental-Economic Accounting, ecosystem assets are generally valued on the basis of the net present value of the expected flow of ecosystem services. In this paper we argue that several additional conceptualisations of ecosystem assets are needed to understand ecosystems as assets, in support of ecosystem assessments, ecosystem accounting and ecosystem management. In particular, we define ecosystems’ capacity and capability to supply ecosystem services, as well as the potential supply of ecosystem services. Capacity relates to sustainable use levels of multiple ecosystem services, capability involves prioritising the use of one ecosystem service over a basket of services, and potential supply considers the ability of ecosystems to generate services regardless of demand for these services. We ground our definitions in the ecosystem services and accounting literature, and illustrate and compare the concepts of flow, capacity, capability, and potential supply with a range of conceptual and real-world examples drawn from case studies in Europe and North America. Our paper contributes to the development of measurement frameworks for natural capital to support environmental accounting and other assessment frameworks. PMID:27828969

  14. Operational management of offshore energy assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolios, A. J.; Martinez Luengo, M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy assets and especially those deployed offshore are subject to a variety of harsh operational and environmental conditions which lead to deterioration of their performance and structural capacity over time. The aim of reduction of CAPEX in new installations shifts focus to operational management to monitor and assess performance of critical assets ensuring their fitness for service throughout their service life and also to provide appropriate and effective information towards requalification or other end of life scenarios, optimizing the OPEX. Over the last decades, the offshore oil & gas industry has developed and applied various approaches in operational management of assets through Structural Health and Condition Monitoring (SHM/CM) systems which can be, at a certain level, transferable to offshore renewable installations. This paper aims to highlight the key differences between offshore oil & gas and renewable energy assets from a structural integrity and reliability perspective, provide a comprehensive overview of different approaches that are available and applicable, and distinguish the benefits of such systems in the efficient operation of offshore energy assets.

  15. Kursk ASSET brings praise for plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    An Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team (ASSET) from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) visited Kursk on 19-31 July 1992 - the first time such a group had been to a RBMK reactor site. Kursk is a four unit station and the IAEA Team was able to consider safety significant events over its 45 reactor-year history. all four units have good operating records, with lifetime load factors of 70-80%. The ASSET's aim was to consider the plants current safety provisions for prevention of accidents and incidents. ASSET recommendations may cover the design and operability of the plant, personnel or operating procedures. At Kursk the Team found that ''highly qualified plant management and a very dedicated and knowledgeable operating staff'' was a major asset. They found a sound maintenance programme although some aspects of the facility appeared neglected. This was attributed to Russian industrial priorities that focused on functionality rather than appearance. it was in the test and maintenance personnel that the ASSET mission found the safety culture weakest. Some of their recommendations are reported in this article. (Author)

  16. Defining ecosystem assets for natural capital accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Lars; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Edens, Bram; Obst, Carl; de Jong, Rixt; Lesschen, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    In natural capital accounting, ecosystems are assets that provide ecosystem services to people. Assets can be measured using both physical and monetary units. In the international System of Environmental-Economic Accounting, ecosystem assets are generally valued on the basis of the net present value of the expected flow of ecosystem services. In this paper we argue that several additional conceptualisations of ecosystem assets are needed to understand ecosystems as assets, in support of ecosystem assessments, ecosystem accounting and ecosystem management. In particular, we define ecosystems’ capacity and capability to supply ecosystem services, as well as the potential supply of ecosystem services. Capacity relates to sustainable use levels of multiple ecosystem services, capability involves prioritising the use of one ecosystem service over a basket of services, and potential supply considers the ability of ecosystems to generate services regardless of demand for these services. We ground our definitions in the ecosystem services and accounting literature, and illustrate and compare the concepts of flow, capacity, capability, and potential supply with a range of conceptual and real-world examples drawn from case studies in Europe and North America. Our paper contributes to the development of measurement frameworks for natural capital to support environmental accounting and other assessment frameworks.

  17. The dark triad: Emotional and interpersonal characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Katarina N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dark triad is a construct of pathological personality traits, which consists of three components conceptually different, but still with significant empirical overlap: narcissism, Machiavellianism and subclinical psychopathy. The concept of Dark Triad found its place in the current structural models of personality, such as the Big-five and HEXACO model, and also an Interpersonal circumplex, within which the personal qualities project itselves into certain patterns of interpersonal behavior. This paper provides a brief theoretical overview of the basic elements of the Dark Triad, and an overview of current research related to (un justified observation of the three constituent dimensions as a single construct in theoretical and empirical terms. Also, the paper presents an overview of the emotional dysfunctions typical for the triad, as well as the problems and consequences in the area of interpersonal and social relations.

  18. A free response test of interpersonal effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getter, H; Nowinski, J K

    1981-06-01

    Development of the Interpersonal Problem Solving Assessment Technique (IPSAT), College form, is described. Guided by Rotter's Social Learning Theory, problem-solving, and assertiveness research, a semi-structured free response format was designed to assess components of interpersonal effectiveness, The instrument yields patterns of self-reported behaviors in six classes of problematic social situations. A detailed manual enabled reliable scoring of the following response categories: Effectiveness, avoidance, appropriateness, dependency and solution productivity. Scores were not materially affected by sex, verbal ability, or social desirability response sets. Correlations with the College Self-Expression Scale, the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule and the Lanyon Psychological Screening Inventory provided initial evidence of validity. Comparison of mean IPSAT scores of 23 psychotherapy clients with those of 78 normative subjects showed that clients report less interpersonal effectiveness and more avoidance than controls. Implications for utility of the IPSAT are discussed.

  19. Interpersonal conflict, agreeableness, and personality development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Campbell, Lauri A; Gleason, Katie A; Adams, Ryan; Malcolm, Kenya T

    2003-12-01

    This multimethod research linked the Big-Five personality dimensions to interpersonal conflict in childhood. Agreeableness was the personality dimension of focus because this dimension has been associated with maintaining positive interpersonal relations in adolescents and adults. In two studies, elementary school children were assessed on the Big-Five domains of personality. Study 1 (n=276) showed that agreeableness was uniquely associated with endorsements of conflict resolution tactics in children as well as parent and teacher reports of coping and adjustment. Study 2 (n=234) revealed that children's perceptions of themselves and others during conflict was influenced by their agreeableness regardless of their partner's agreeableness. Observers also reported that pairs higher in agreeableness had more harmonious, constructive conflicts. Overall findings suggest that of the Big-Five dimensions, agreeableness is most closely associated with processes and outcomes related to interpersonal conflict and adjustment in children.

  20. [Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottai, T; Biloa-Tang, M; Christophe, S; Dupuy, C; Jacquesy, L; Kochman, F; Meynard, J-A; Papeta, D; Rahioui, H; Adida, M; Fakra, E; Kaladjian, A; Pringuey, D; Azorin, J-M

    2010-12-01

    Bipolar disorder is common, recurrent, often severe and debiliting disorder. All types of bipolar disorder have a common determinant: depressive episode. It is justify to propose a psychotherapy which shown efficacy in depression. Howewer, perturbations in circadian rhythms have been implicated in the genesis of each episode of the illness. Biological circadian dysregulation can be encouraged by alteration of time-givers (Zeitgebers) or occurrence of time-disturbers (Zeitstörers). Addition of social rhythm therapy to interpersonal psychotherapy leads to create a new psychotherapy adaptated to bipolar disorders: InterPersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy (IPSRT). IPSRT, in combinaison with medication, has demonstrated efficacy as a treatment for bipolar disorders. IPSRT combines psychoeducation, behavioral strategy to regularize daily routines and interpersonal psychotherapy which help patients cope better with the multiple psychosocial and relationship problems associated with this chronic disorder. The main issues of this psychotherapy are: to take the history of the patient's illness and review of medication, to help patient for "grief for the lost healthy self" translated in the french version in "acceptance of a long-term medical condition", to give the sick role, to examinate the current relationships and changes proximal to the emergence of mood symptoms in the four problem areas (unresolved grief, interpersonal disputes, role transitions, role déficits), to examinate and increase daily routines and social rhythms. French version of IPSRT called TIPARS (with few differences), a time-limited psychotherapy, in 24 sessions during approximatively 6 months, is conducted in three phases. In the initial phase, the therapist takes a thorough history of previous episodes and their interpersonal context and a review of previous medication, provides psychoeducation, evaluates social rhythms, introduces the Social Rhythm Metric, identifies the patient's main interpersonal

  1. Entropy-based financial asset pricing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihály Ormos

    Full Text Available We investigate entropy as a financial risk measure. Entropy explains the equity premium of securities and portfolios in a simpler way and, at the same time, with higher explanatory power than the beta parameter of the capital asset pricing model. For asset pricing we define the continuous entropy as an alternative measure of risk. Our results show that entropy decreases in the function of the number of securities involved in a portfolio in a similar way to the standard deviation, and that efficient portfolios are situated on a hyperbola in the expected return-entropy system. For empirical investigation we use daily returns of 150 randomly selected securities for a period of 27 years. Our regression results show that entropy has a higher explanatory power for the expected return than the capital asset pricing model beta. Furthermore we show the time varying behavior of the beta along with entropy.

  2. Regret Theory and Equilibrium Asset Prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiliang Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regret theory is a behavioral approach to decision making under uncertainty. In this paper we assume that there are two representative investors in a frictionless market, a representative active investor who selects his optimal portfolio based on regret theory and a representative passive investor who invests only in the benchmark portfolio. In a partial equilibrium setting, the objective of the representative active investor is modeled as minimization of the regret about final wealth relative to the benchmark portfolio. In equilibrium this optimal strategy gives rise to a behavioral asset priciting model. We show that the market beta and the benchmark beta that is related to the investor’s regret are the determinants of equilibrium asset prices. We also extend our model to a market with multibenchmark portfolios. Empirical tests using stock price data from Shanghai Stock Exchange show strong support to the asset pricing model based on regret theory.

  3. INTANGIBLE ASSETS EVALUATION FOR THE KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Washington Cantelli

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In the history of civilizations, knowledge has always been highlighted, mainly because of its close relation with power. In the modern world, where the efficiency in solving problems has become the main component for the success of companies and the knowledge is responsible for putting some companies ahead in competitions, it is necessary to insert them in the management models as well as finding a way to measure them. Measuring the knowledge and other intangible assets, has been discussed among university students and in companies which are more worried about knowledge. There are some controversies about this subject because its high level of subjectivity, when measuring the intangible assets. This article aims to show the main methods to evaluate the intangible assets versus the traditional ones.

  4. Entropy-based financial asset pricing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormos, Mihály; Zibriczky, Dávid

    2014-01-01

    We investigate entropy as a financial risk measure. Entropy explains the equity premium of securities and portfolios in a simpler way and, at the same time, with higher explanatory power than the beta parameter of the capital asset pricing model. For asset pricing we define the continuous entropy as an alternative measure of risk. Our results show that entropy decreases in the function of the number of securities involved in a portfolio in a similar way to the standard deviation, and that efficient portfolios are situated on a hyperbola in the expected return-entropy system. For empirical investigation we use daily returns of 150 randomly selected securities for a period of 27 years. Our regression results show that entropy has a higher explanatory power for the expected return than the capital asset pricing model beta. Furthermore we show the time varying behavior of the beta along with entropy.

  5. Ontology modeling in physical asset integrity management

    CERN Document Server

    Yacout, Soumaya

    2015-01-01

    This book presents cutting-edge applications of, and up-to-date research on, ontology engineering techniques in the physical asset integrity domain. Though a survey of state-of-the-art theory and methods on ontology engineering, the authors emphasize essential topics including data integration modeling, knowledge representation, and semantic interpretation. The book also reflects novel topics dealing with the advanced problems of physical asset integrity applications such as heterogeneity, data inconsistency, and interoperability existing in design and utilization. With a distinctive focus on applications relevant in heavy industry, Ontology Modeling in Physical Asset Integrity Management is ideal for practicing industrial and mechanical engineers working in the field, as well as researchers and graduate concerned with ontology engineering in physical systems life cycles. This book also: Introduces practicing engineers, research scientists, and graduate students to ontology engineering as a modeling techniqu...

  6. International HRM in the IJVs: the impacts of interpersonal relationships between employees from different cultural backgrounds on the work performance

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Human resource issues are one of the most significant problems in the management of international joint ventures (IJVs). This study aims to investigate the possible impacts of interpersonal relationships between Chinese employees and foreign employees in China’s Sino-foreign joint ventures on employees’ work performance. At first, this study examines the possible influences of interpersonal relationships between people from different cultural backgrounds on group processes. Then, the...

  7. Modelling the Costs of Preserving Digital Assets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kejser, Ulla Bøgvad; Nielsen, Anders Bo; Thirifays, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Information is increasingly being produced in digital form, and some of it must be preserved for the longterm. Digital preservation includes a series of actively managed activities that require on-going funding. To obtain sufficient resources, there is a need for assessing the costs...... and the benefits accrued by preserving the assets. Cost data is also needed for optimizing activities and comparing the costs of different preservation alternatives. The purpose of this study is to analyse generic requirements for modelling the cost of preserving digital assets. The analysis was based...

  8. Evaluating the Knowledge Assets of Innovative Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maen Al-Hawari

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge has long been recognised as a valuable resource for organisational growth and sustained competitive advantage, especially for organisations competing in an uncertain environment (Miller & Shamsie 1987. In the current post-industrial society, knowledge is recognised as a primary source of a company’s wealth. However knowledge assets are much more difficult to identify and measure than are the physical assets with which we are much more familiar. (Boisot 1998 As a company’s innovative capacity may be dependent upon its ability to take advantage of its knowledge assets, it is important to be able to identify and measure those assets. While large companies can afford extensive knowledge management projects, there is a acute need for a method by which managers in smaller organisations can easily and reliably locate, quantify and compare their knowledge assets in order to maximise their potential for innovation. The paper will begin with an overview of current thinking on the topic of Knowledge Management (KM. It will then introduce the three functions of the knowledge life cycle (Bhatt 2000, Tan 2000, the four modes of conversion between tacit and explicit knowledge (Nonaka 1995 and the five knowledge enablers (Von Krogh 2000. The research, reported here, aims to identify, from the literature, a set of knowledge elements that will give a balanced view of knowledge assets across the four modes and five enablers. An integrated model, which is the result of research to date by the authors, will then be defined. This model combines the functions of the knowledge life cycle and Nonaka’s knowledge creation spiral with the notion of I-Space, which has been used to classify information across three dimensions, to form a new model of K-Space, which can be used to classify the knowledge elements. The paper will present this model and discuss the appropriateness of a set of knowledge elements as a means of measuring the knowledge asset of an

  9. Securing energy assets and infrastructure 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    This report describes in detail the energy industry's challenges and solutions for protecting critical assets including oil and gas infrastructure, transmission grids, power plants, storage, pipelines, and all aspects of strategic industry assets. It includes a special section on cyber-terrorism and protecting control systems. Contents: Section I - Introduction; U.S Energy Trends; Vulnerabilities; Protection Measures. Section II - Sector-wise Vulnerabilities Assessments and Security Measures: Coal, Oil and Petroleum, Natural Gas, Electric Power, Cybersecurity and Control Systems, Key Recommendations; Section III - Critical Infrastructure Protection Efforts: Government Initiatives, Agencies, and Checklists.

  10. System development and asset management under restructuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In many developed countries the electricity infrastructure contains ageing assets. Because of the need of a continuing operation and higher load factors on the network, the opportunities for replacement or refurbishment are limited. These must be regarded as an opportunity to review the structure of the system and to consider the design and development required to meet the new requirements, taking advantage of new available technologies: HVDC, FACTS, cables, etc. The symposium examines assets management issues and assesses strategies for overhauling existing systems, taking into account the impact on market operation, on supply security and environment

  11. Asset Stripping in a Mature Market Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov Jeppesen, Kim; Møller, Ulrik Gorm

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to document a Danish fraud scheme, in which a large number of limited companies were stripped of their assets leaving them with nothing but tax debt, eventually causing the Danish Tax and Customs Administration to lose large sums. Furthermore, the purpose...... indicates that asset stripping may take place in mature market economies to the extent that perpetrators are able to circumvent the corporate governance system by giving lawyers, public accountants and banks incentives to act less critically towards dubious business transactions. Research limitations...

  12. Reconceptualising vulnerable children by acknowledging their assets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most prominent among the capacities of the participants in this study are a positive identity and essential social competencies. Keywords: Africa, case study, child well-being, emotional support, HIV/AIDS, interpersonal skills, memory boxes, psychological aspects, rural communities. African Journal of AIDS Research 2007, ...

  13. Radioactive waste today - an asset tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmstrand, M. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    Mining of Rare Earth Elements (REE) causes radioactive pollution, as ores which contain REE also contain an elevated concentration of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Wastes from REE mining are therefore regarded as being inherently radioactive. One of the potential economically viable REE resources in Norway is in the Fensfield area in Telemark County, which is recognized as one of the world's largest thorium resources. If REE was mined in this area, a large volume of radioactive waste would be created. The authorities would then need to know how to regulate the waste so that the environmental impact would be as low as reasonably achievable when societal and economic factors having been accounted for (ALARA). Radioactive pollution from REE tailings could be a threat to the environment, biota and humans. However, naturally occurring thorium is practically not mobile nor bioavailable and has a relatively low specific activity and might therefore safely be deposited in a landfill. An environmental risk assessment should be used to evaluate if it is justifiable to deposit the radioactive tailings in a landfill or if alternative ways of handling, such as extraction of thorium in addition to extraction of REE from the ore, might be better. The risk assessment must start with a source term, the native carbonatite rocks, and an investigation on how the chemical properties of the rock changes when it's milled and treated with chemicals. Changes in the physical and chemical properties and changes in the environment where the processed rock are deposited might mobilize and/or make thorium bioavailable, thus increasing the environmental risk. Removal of thorium from the raw materials or tailings from the REE mining industry prior to deposition could be seen as one form of environmental protection with many benefits, for instance reducing the potential of external and internal radiation in biota and humans. We could also speculate about the

  14. The recognition of acted interpersonal stance in police interrogations and the influence of actor proficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnes, Merijn; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Spitters, Sophie; Sanders, Merijn; Fu, Quihua

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on judgement studies regarding the perception of interpersonal stances taken by humans playing the role of a suspect in a police interrogation setting. Our project aims at building believable embodied conversational characters to play the role of suspects in a serious game for

  15. Childhood Animal Cruelty Methods and Their Link to Adult Interpersonal Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brandy B.; Hensley, Christopher; Tallichet, Suzanne E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has begun to establish a relationship between childhood acts of animal cruelty and later violence against humans. However, few studies have focused on the influence of animal cruelty methods on later interpersonal violence. In a replication of a study by Hensley and Tallichet (2009) and based on a sample of 180 inmates at medium-…

  16. A Conceptual Model of Interpersonal Attraction (Centers' Instrumental Theory) Useful in Marriage and Family Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgo, Reese D.

    Based upon Maslow's hierarchy of human needs, interpersonal attraction (any personal relationship characterized by love and affection; husband-wife, parent-child, friendship) can be seen as the mutual meeting of emotional needs, especially at the fourth level (love needs) and the fifth level (esteem needs). These levels are differentiated into 10…

  17. Interpersonal relationship of high schools' teachers and teachers profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telli, Sibel; Cakiroglu, Jale; den Brok, Perry

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine associations between Turkish high school students' perceptions of their teachers' interpersonal behavior and drawn attention to the relationship between students' affective outcomes and teachers' interpersonal behavior. The Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction

  18. Interpersonal relationships of high schools' teachers and teachers' profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telli, S.; Cakiroglu, J.; Brok, den P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examnine associations between Turkish high school students'perceptions of their teacher's interpersonal behavior and drawn attention to the relationship between students'affective outcomes and teachers' interpersonal behavior. The Questionnaire on Teacher

  19. Responding to Destructive Interpersonal Interactions: A way forward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Responding to Destructive Interpersonal Interactions: A way forward for ... cultural intolerance and other destructive interpersonal interactions and relationships clearly ... This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  20. Communication skills: A tool for interpersonal relationship in nursing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Communication skills: A tool for interpersonal relationship in nursing care. ... Journal Home > Vol 1, No 2 (2007) >. Log in or Register to ... Background: The interpersonal relationship between the nurse and other health care providers is poor.

  1. Interpersonal Group Therapy for Women Experiencing Bulimia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is a chronic disorder that results in a high degree of psychological impairment for many women. This article presents a description of Interpersonal Therapy for Group (IPT-G), an evidence-based approach for the treatment of BN. The author presents a rationale for the use of IPT-G, an outline of the group model, and provides…

  2. Designing social play through interpersonal touch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padfield, Nicolas; Löwgren, Jonas; Hobye, Mads

    2013-01-01

    We present five design cases as an annotated portfolio, exploring ways to design for intimate, interpersonal touch and social intimacy in interaction design. Five key qualities are elicited from the cases, including novel connotations sparking curiosity; providing an excuse to interact; unfolding...

  3. Negative Interpersonal Interactions in Student Training Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Patricia A.; Kline, Theresa J. B.

    2009-01-01

    Studies demonstrate that negative interpersonal interaction(s) (NII) such as bullying are frequent and harmful to individuals in workplace and higher education student settings. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether the degree of perceived severity of NII varies by the status of the actor. The present study explored the moderating effect of actor…

  4. Interpersonal communication: It's relevance to nursing practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is aimed at highlighting how essential interpersonal communication is necessary for establishing rapport, understanding the needs of the patients and planning effective intervention for meeting holistic health care. To be continually relevant, Nurses have to improve on their communication skills to meet the ...

  5. Medical Student Empathy: Interpersonal Distinctions and Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kevin D.; Foster, Penni Smith

    2016-01-01

    Attention to interpersonal behaviors, communication, and relational factors is taking on increasing importance in medical education. Medical student empathy is one aspect of the physician-patient relationship that is often involved in beneficial interactions leading to improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. As an interpersonal…

  6. Fostering Adolescents' Interpersonal Behaviour: An Empirical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effect of enhanced thinking skills (ETS) and social skill training (SST) in fostering interpersonal behaviour among Nigerian adolescents. A pre- and post-test experimental-control group design with a 3x2 factorial matrix was employed for the study. Gender which was used as a moderator variable ...

  7. Interrelationships Between Mass and Interpersonal Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Judith

    Academic departmentalization, especially at the undergraduate level, can result in the isolation of subject areas. The two purposes of this paper are to make a case for the interrelationships between mass and interpersonal communication becoming an integral aspect of mass media study, and to stress the importance of presenting this material in…

  8. Only Children, Achievement, and Interpersonal Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falbo, Toni

    Many psychological theories point to the importance of siblings in individual personality development. The impact of sibling status on interpersonal and achievement orientation was examined with undergraduates (N=1782) who completed a series of objective personality measures and a background questionnaire. Sibling status was defined in terms of…

  9. Physical pain increases interpersonal trust in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Gao, J; Ma, Y; Zhu, C; Dong, X-W

    2018-01-01

    People behave and interact with others differently when experiencing physical pain. Pain has dramatic effects on one's emotional responses, cognitive functions and social interaction. However, little has been known about whether and how physical pain influences interpersonal trust in social interaction. In the present study, we examined the influence of physical pain on trusting behaviour. A total of 112 healthy participants were recruited and assigned to physical pain condition (induced by Capsaicin) and control condition (with hand cream), respectively. Thirty minutes after pain induction, three decision-making tasks were conducted to measure behaviours in social interaction, including trust and trustworthiness (trust game), non-social risk-taking (risk game) and altruism (dictator game). Results showed that physical pain increased interpersonal trust among females, but not among males. Pain did not influence non-social risk-taking, altruism or trustworthiness, as evaluated by monetary transfers in those tasks. Moreover, the effect of physical pain on interpersonal trust was fully mediated by expectation of monetary profit. These findings demonstrate an effect of pain on interpersonal trust and suggest a reciprocity mechanism that the effect may be driven by self-interest rather than altruistic motivation. The pain effect on trust was evident only in females, implying distinct pain coping strategies used by both genders. The present work highlights the social component of pain and extends our understanding of mutual interactions between pain and social cognition. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  10. Interpersonal Relations: A Choice-Theoretic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvillion, L. Michael; Eckstein, Daniel G.

    The microeconomic theory relating to utility and cost is applied to the "risk," and the possible "payoff" relative to relationships with others. A good measure of utility is the need or want-satisfying power of an alternative. For the analysis of interpersonal relationships, the needs delineated by Maslow (i.e. food, shelter, belongingness, love,…

  11. Joining the Ideational and the Interpersonal Metafunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holsting, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    in question are ideational (clause complex, Angle) and interpersonal (modal Adjunct, modal auxiliary, mood) and how they – individually and in combination – emphasize different aspects of projection meaning. A specific status is ascribed to the subjunctive mood, which has a special instructive function...

  12. Risk factors for interpersonal conflicts at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Raeve, Lore; Jansen, Nicole Wh; van den Brandt, Piet A; Vasse, Rineke M; Kant, Ijmert

    2008-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to identify work-related risk factors for the onset of interpersonal conflicts at work. Longitudinal data from the Maastricht Cohort Study on "fatigue at work" (N=9241) were used. After the respondents who reported an interpersonal conflict at baseline were excluded, logistic regression analyses were used to determine the role of several work-related risk factors at baseline in the onset of a conflict with coworkers or supervisors after 1 year of follow-up. Higher psychological job demands, higher levels of role ambiguity, the presence of physical demands, higher musculoskeletal demands, a poorer physical work environment, shift work, overtime, and higher levels of job insecurity significantly predicted the onset of both a coworker conflict and a supervisor conflict. Higher levels of coworker and supervisor social support, more autonomy concerning the terms of employment, good overall job satisfaction, monetary gratification, and esteem reward significantly protected against the onset of both a coworker conflict and a supervisor conflict. Higher levels of decision latitude and more career opportunities also significantly protected against the onset of a supervisor conflict. Several factors in the work environment were related to the onset of interpersonal conflicts at work. Given the rather serious consequences of interpersonal conflicts at work with respect to health and well-being, the observed risk factors can serve as a starting point for effective prevention and intervention strategies in the workplace.

  13. Interpersonal violence against children in sport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tine Vertommen; Filip Van Den Ede; Nicolette Schipper-van Veldhoven

    2017-01-01

    Children worldwide are confronted with interpersonal violence (IV) on a daily basis. They encounter violence in children’s books, cartoons, on television and in the media or, more personally, in social media, at home, at school, in church or on the streets, with the acts being perpetrated by

  14. Severe interpersonal violence against children in sport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vertommen, Tine; Kampen, Jarl; Schipper-van Veldhoven, Nicolette; Uzieblo, Kasia; Eede, Van Den Filip

    2018-01-01

    In a recent large-scale prevalence study of interpersonal violence (IV) against child athletes in the Netherlands and Belgium we found that 9% of adult respondents who participated in organized sports before the age of 18 had experienced severe psychological violence, 8% severe physical violence,

  15. Relation between birth order and interpersonal styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro de Oliveira Magalhães

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal style is an aspect of personality related to the particular way individuals participate and gain influence in social contexts. It has its origin in childhood’s first social interactions within the family group. It is suggested that the individual position in the family structure, namely birth order, is an important variable in this process. The present study investigated combined effects of sex and birth order on interpersonal style. A sample of 435 college students (196 men and 239 women with ranging in age from 18 to 40 years (M = 23,3 answered the BASIS-A (Basic Adlerian Scales of Interpersonal Styles and a brief demographic questionnaire. Interactions between sex and birth order were found. Lastborn women showed greater tendency to search for success and social approval than firstborn women and lastborn men. Among men, lastborn revealed less need for social approval compared to firstborn and only children. First born men showed a higher need to attend social conventions and obtain success. The interaction between sex and birth order was relevant for the understanding of personality development in the context of family relations.   Keywords: birth order; interpersonal styles; personality.

  16. Instructional Materials in Consumer Education: Interpersonal Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck.

    The seven interpersonal relations units in the consumer education guide are: Expressing Satisfaction or Dissatisfaction with Consumer Goods and Services, What to Do in Case of a Financial Crisis, Bridging the Generation Gap, Rebellion, Emotions, Discovering Myself, and Dual Role (homemaker/wage earner). Grade levels of the units, are…

  17. Others : Essays on Interpersonal and Consumer Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Consiglio (Irene)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn this dissertation, I explore the intersection between interpersonal and consumer behaviour in three chapters. In chapter 2, I propose that consumers with low self-esteem become wary of new relationships with alternative service providers if they experience service failures in a

  18. The dimensionality of workplace interpersonal trust and its relationship to workplace affective commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Bagraim

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Trust is fundamental to the existence of human relationships, including the workplace relationship between employees and their co-workers and supervisors. This paper presents the results of a study that investigated the nature and dimensionality of interpersonal trust at work, specifically trust in co-workers and trust in supervisor. Survey questionnaire responses from 278 employees in four South African organisations were analysed. The research findings evidence that interpersonal trust is a multi-foci construct that is differentially related to corresponding foci of affective commitment.

  19. Interpersonal Functioning in Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Cain, Nicole M.; Ansell, Emily B.; Simpson, H. Blair; Pinto, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The core symptoms of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) often lead to interpersonal difficulties. However, little research has explored interpersonal functioning in OCPD. The current study examined interpersonal problems, interpersonal sensitivities, empathy, and systemizing, the drive to analyze and derive underlying rules for systems, in a sample of 25 OCPD individuals, 25 individuals with comorbid OCPD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and 25 healthy controls. We found...

  20. [Interpersonal psychotherapy from research to practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahioui, H; Blecha, L; Bottai, T; Depuy, C; Jacquesy, L; Kochman, F; Meynard, J-A; Papeta, D; Rammouz, I; Ghachem, R

    2015-04-01

    Interpersonal therapy (IPT) is a brief, structured psychotherapy initially intended to treat adult depression that was developed in the 1970s and manualized in 1984 by G. Klerman and his team. Two main theories served as a basis for its design: Bowlby's attachment theory and communication theory. Klerman theorized that tensions and problems in interpersonal relationships (i.e. disputes) cause psychological distress in vulnerable individuals that may lead to a major depressive episode. Clinical and epidemiological studies have shown that an insecure attachment style is strongly associated with lifetime depression. Severe depressive episodes have been correlated with avoidant attachment in women. IPT is based on the hypothesis that recent or ongoing disturbances in interpersonal relationships either trigger or follow the onset of mood disorder. In practice, IPT assists patients in analysing their interpersonal relationship modes, correlating their relational states with their mood and in learning to use better communication. Resolving difficulties in interpersonal relationships through the use of better communication skills promotes the improvement of depressive symptoms. Klerman identified four interpersonal areas that seem to be highly correlated with depressive episodes: grief (a close and important personal relation who has died), interpersonal disputes (conflicts with significant people such as a spouse or another close family member), role transition (significant life changes such as retirement, parenthood or chronic and invalidating illness) and interpersonal deficits (patients who have limited social contacts and few interpersonal relations). Classically, IPT is planned around 12-16 weekly sessions. During the initial sessions, the therapist will explore all existing interpersonal relations and any significant dysfunctions, both recent and ongoing. Following this interview, the area the patient considers as driving the current depressive episode will be

  1. Interpersonal synchrony enhanced through 20 Hz phase-coupled dual brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblich, Günther; Dunne, Laura; Keller, Peter E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Synchronous movement is a key component of social behavior in several species including humans. Recent theories have suggested a link between interpersonal synchrony of brain oscillations and interpersonal movement synchrony. The present study investigated this link. Using transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) applied over the left motor cortex, we induced beta band (20 Hz) oscillations in pairs of individuals who both performed a finger-tapping task with the right hand. In-phase or anti-phase oscillations were delivered during a preparatory period prior to movement and while the tapping task was performed. In-phase 20 Hz stimulation enhanced interpersonal movement synchrony, compared with anti-phase or sham stimulation, particularly for the initial taps following the preparatory period. This was confirmed in an analysis comparing real vs pseudo pair surrogate data. No enhancement was observed for stimulation frequencies of 2 Hz (matching the target movement frequency) or 10 Hz (alpha band). Thus, phase-coupling of beta band neural oscillations across two individuals’ (resting) motor cortices supports the interpersonal alignment of sensorimotor processes that regulate rhythmic action initiation, thereby facilitating the establishment of synchronous movement. Phase-locked dual brain stimulation provides a promising method to study causal effects of interpersonal brain synchrony on social, sensorimotor and cognitive processes. PMID:28119510

  2. Downside Risk And Empirical Asset Pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. van Vliet (Pim)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractCurrently, the Nobel prize winning Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) celebrates its 40th birthday. Although widely applied in financial management, this model does not fully capture the empirical riskreturn relation of stocks; witness the beta, size, value and momentum effects. These

  3. Essays on banking and asset pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roscovan, V.

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation contains three studies on banking and asset pricing. It analyzes questions related to informational content of bank loan announcements and trading activity. The first two chapters examine theoretically and empirically how stock and bond holders react to bank loan announcements as a

  4. Ambiguity and Volatility : Asset Pricing Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pataracchia, B.

    2011-01-01

    Using a simple dynamic consumption-based asset pricing model, this paper explores the implications of a representative investor with smooth ambiguity averse preferences [Klibano¤, Marinacci and Mukerji, Econometrica (2005)] and provides a comparative analysis of risk aversion and ambiguity aversion.

  5. The regulation of asset valuation in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detzen, D.; Hoffman, S.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the regulatory history of asset valuation in Germany from the fifteenth century to the implementation of the European Economic Community's Fourth Directive in 1986. Aiming to explain regulatory changes by reference to preceding socio-economic and political developments, we find

  6. The Theoretical Underpinnings of Customer Asset Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.N. Bolton; K.N. Lemo; P.C. Verhoef (Peter)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractMost research in customer asset management has focused on specific aspects of the value of the customer to the company. The purpose of this article is to propose an integrated framework ? called CUSAMS -- that enables service organizations to comprehensively assess the value of their

  7. Community asset mapping for violence prevention

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opperwjj

    Medical Research Council and Institute for Social and Health Sciences, University of ... 1 Please direct all correspondence to: Teresa Cutts, Wake Forest School of ... assets lie in networks and relationships, focusing on making community ...... fire departments going to elementary schools to tell children about their jobs).

  8. Asset Management: A Maintenance Engineers View

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Leonardus Adriana Maria

    2015-01-01

    In the past, assets were designed in large construction teams but companies in recent decades focus more and more on their core activities. The management of capital goods is being organized in the (supply) chain of owners, users, manufacturers, research institutes, IT, service providers and so on.

  9. NPP Bohunice experience with ASSET services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimo, J.

    1996-01-01

    The general description of Bohunice NPP ASSET experience history was given at the last annual workshop in 1995. In my short presentation I would like to pay attention to the progress in this area which was achieved at our NPP during the last year. (author)

  10. Expectations and bubbles in asset pricing experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.; Sonnemans, J.; Tuinstra, J.; van de Velden, H.

    2008-01-01

    We present results on expectation formation in a controlled experimental environment. In each period subjects are asked to predict the next price of a risky asset. The realized market price is derived from an unknown market equilibrium equation with feedback from individual forecasts. In most

  11. Asset management argunents for smart grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berende, M.J.C.; Slootweg, J.G.; Kuiper, J.; Peters, J.C.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how Essent Netwerk has developed a strategy for the automation of its medium voltage network. Using Asset Management techniques, it was demonstrated that the application of a new distribution automation concept results in an improvement of network reliability and enables the

  12. The United Kingdom's School Asset Management Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Examines the U.K.'s Asset Management Plans (AMPs) designed to help Local Education Authorities (LEAs) identify and address the most important priorities in their school capital programs, and to help in their longer term planning and management of the school estate. Discusses AMP objectives, the stages of developing an AMP, and how the Department…

  13. New Trends in Facility Asset Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matt

    2000-01-01

    Explains new, positive trends in facility asset management that encompasses greater acceptance and involvement of facility managers in the financial planning process, greater awareness of the need for maintenance, and facility administrators taking a greater role with business officers. The new climate for alternative renewal financing proposals…

  14. NPP Bohunice experience with ASSET services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimo, J [Bohunice NPP (Slovakia)

    1997-12-31

    The general description of Bohunice NPP ASSET experience history was given at the last annual workshop in 1995. In my short presentation I would like to pay attention to the progress in this area which was achieved at our NPP during the last year. (author).

  15. Knowledge as an Asset and Knowledge Management

    OpenAIRE

    Sevinç Gülseçen

    2014-01-01

    The most valuable resource available to any organization today is its knowledge asset which is stored in processes and information systems, corporate data warehouses, employees’ brains, copyrights and patents. Knowledge management is the process of capturing, distributing, and effectively using this knowledge. The factors affecting Knowledge Management can be listed as follows: organizational culture, knowledge manager, the evolution of knowledge, knowledge polution and technology.

  16. Asset Reuse of Images from a Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    According to Markus's theory of reuse, when digital repositories are deployed to collect and distribute organizational assets, they supposedly help ensure accountability, extend information exchange, and improve productivity. Such repositories require a large investment due to the continuing costs of hardware, software, user licenses, training,…

  17. Sinopec Goes After Oil Assets Worldwide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ US$2.45b deal to gain reserves of 393m barrels of crude equivalent China's enterprises eye global expansion via mergers and acquisitions in 2010 as the country's economic power increases.China Petrochemical Corporation (Sinopec),Asia's largest oil refiner, plans to purchase the entire oil and gas assets in the Argentinean arm of US-based Occidental Petroleum Corp.

  18. Liquid Assets: Increasing Students' Mathematical Capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Mary Jean; Carlson, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a laboratory-type activity, liquid assets, used to illustrate, develop, or reinforce central concepts in first-year algebra. These include linear function, slope, intercept, and dependent and independent variables. Presents a group activity for collecting data, transition from group to individual activity in plotting data points, and…

  19. Regionalisation of asset values for risk analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Thieken

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In risk analysis there is a spatial mismatch of hazard data that are commonly modelled on an explicit raster level and exposure data that are often only available for aggregated units, e.g. communities. Dasymetric mapping techniques that use ancillary information to disaggregate data within a spatial unit help to bridge this gap. This paper presents dasymetric maps showing the population density and a unit value of residential assets for whole Germany. A dasymetric mapping approach, which uses land cover data (CORINE Land Cover as ancillary variable, was adapted and applied to regionalize aggregated census data that are provided for all communities in Germany. The results were validated by two approaches. First, it was ascertained whether population data disaggregated at the community level can be used to estimate population in postcodes. Secondly, disaggregated population and asset data were used for a loss evaluation of two flood events that occurred in 1999 and 2002, respectively. It must be concluded that the algorithm tends to underestimate the population in urban areas and to overestimate population in other land cover classes. Nevertheless, flood loss evaluations demonstrate that the approach is capable of providing realistic estimates of the number of exposed people and assets. Thus, the maps are sufficient for applications in large-scale risk assessments such as the estimation of population and assets exposed to natural and man-made hazards.

  20. THEORETICAL ASPECTS REGARDING THE VALUATION OF INTANGIBLE ASSETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOLT GHEORGHE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Valuation of intangible assets represents one of the most delicate problems of assessing a company. Usually, valuation of intangible assets is in the process of evaluating enterprise as a whole. Therefore, Intangible Asset Valuers must have detailed knowledge on business valuation, in particular, the income-based valuation methods (capitalization / updating net cash flow. Valuation of Intangible Assets is the objective of the International Valuation Standards (GN 4 Valuation of Intangible Assets (revised 2010. Next to it was recently proposed GN 16 Valuation of Intangible Assets for IFRS reporting. International Accounting Standard (IAS 38 Intangible Assets prescribe the accounting treatment for intangible assets, analyze the criteria that an intangible asset must meet to be recognized, specific carrying amount of intangible assets and sets out requirements for disclosure of intangible assets. From an accounting perspective, relevant professional accounting standards and the following: IFRS 3 Business Combinations, IAS 36 Impairment of Assets and SFAS 157 fair value measurement, developed by the FASB. There is a more pronounced near the provisions of IAS 38 contained in GN 4. Therefore, a good professional intangible asset valuation must know thoroughly the conditions, principles, criteria and assessment methods recognized by those standards

  1. Development and Validation of Coaches' Interpersonal Style Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Juan J.; Sánchez-Oliva, David; Leo, Francisco M.; Sánchez-Cano, Jorge; García-Calvo, Tomás

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives were to develop and validate the Coaches' Interpersonal Style Questionnaire. The Coaches' Interpersonal Style Questionnaire analyzes the interpersonal style adopted by coaches when implementing their strategy of supporting or thwarting athletes' basic psychological needs. Method: In Study 1, an exploratory factor analysis…

  2. An Examination of the "Interpersonalness" of the Outcome Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Timothy R.; Rohlfing, Jessica E.; Hardy, Amanda O.; Glidden-Tracey, Cynthia; Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ) and its subscales assessed unique interpersonal distress. The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP) was used to assess discriminant validity for unique interpersonal distress. Participants (N = 121) were recruited from a southwestern university counselor training center. Significant…

  3. The effect of counsellors' personality types on interpersonal skills in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result indicated that personality types (introvert and extrovert) do not affect counsellors' interpersonal skill in counselling therapy. It was also concluded that counsellor personality types do not have much implication on the use of interpersonal skills. The researcher, therefore, recommended that mastering interpersonal ...

  4. A Multisurface Interpersonal Circumplex Assessment of Rejection Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Nicole M; De Panfilis, Chiara; Meehan, Kevin B; Clarkin, John F

    2017-01-01

    Individuals high in rejection sensitivity (RS) are at risk for experiencing high levels of interpersonal distress, yet little is known about the interpersonal profiles associated with RS. This investigation examined the interpersonal problems, sensitivities, and values associated with RS in 2 samples: 763 multicultural undergraduate students (Study 1) and 365 community adults (Study 2). In Study 1, high anxious RS was associated with socially avoidant interpersonal problems, whereas low anxious RS was associated with vindictive interpersonal problems. In Study 2, we assessed both anxious and angry expectations of rejection. Circumplex profile analyses showed that the high anxious RS group reported socially avoidant interpersonal problems, sensitivities to remoteness in others, and valuing connections with others, whereas the high angry RS group reported vindictive interpersonal problems, sensitivities to submissiveness in others, and valuing detached interpersonal behavior. Low anxious RS was related to domineering interpersonal problems, sensitivity to attention-seeking behavior, and valuing detached interpersonal behavior, whereas low angry RS was related to submissive interpersonal problems, sensitivity to attention-seeking behavior, and valuing receiving approval from others. Overall, results suggest that there are distinct interpersonal profiles associated with varying levels and types of RS.

  5. Livelihood asset maps: a multidimensional approach to measuring risk-management capacity and adaptation policy targeting—a case study in Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kristian Thor

    2013-01-01

    to the fact that some areas facing increased level of climate-related risks lack access to productive and human capital, while other areas facing a similar situation have relatively insufficient access to financial assets. This again shows that any non-targeted policy aiming at improving households’ risk-management......The application of a livelihood asset-based approach to adaptation policy targeting is presented through the creation of maps highlighting the spatial contrasts of access to various types of livelihood assets utilizing primary household data. Thus, the livelihood maps provide policy......-makers with a tool to quickly identify areas with limited access to certain types of assets, making the latter less able to react to a changing level of climaterelated risks. In the case of Bhutan, distinct spatial patterns of asset endowments is identified using five different asset indicators drawing attention...

  6. Social categories as markers of intrinsic interpersonal obligations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marjorie; Chalik, Lisa

    2013-06-01

    Social categorization is an early-developing feature of human social cognition, yet the role that social categories play in children's understanding of and predictions about human behavior has been unclear. In the studies reported here, we tested whether a foundational functional role of social categories is to mark people as intrinsically obligated to one another (e.g., obligated to protect rather than harm). In three studies, children (aged 3-9, N = 124) viewed only within-category harm as violating intrinsic obligations; in contrast, they viewed between-category harm as violating extrinsic obligations defined by explicit rules. These data indicate that children view social categories as marking patterns of intrinsic interpersonal obligations, suggesting that a key function of social categories is to support inferences about how people will relate to members of their own and other groups.

  7. A Content Validity Study of AIMIT (Assessing Interpersonal Motivation in Transcripts).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassone, Giovanni; Lo Reto, Floriana; Foggetti, Paola; Santomassimo, Chiara; D'Onofrio, Maria Rita; Ivaldi, Antonella; Liotti, Giovanni; Trincia, Valeria; Picardi, Angelo

    2016-07-01

    Multi-motivational theories of human relatedness state that different motivational systems with an evolutionary basis modulate interpersonal relationships. The reliable assessment of their dynamics may usefully inform the understanding of the therapeutic relationship. The coding system of the Assessing Interpersonal Motivation in Transcripts (AIMIT) allows to identify in the clinical the activity of five main interpersonal motivational systems (IMSs): attachment (care-seeking), caregiving, ranking, sexuality and peer cooperation. To assess whether the criteria currently used to score the AIMIT are consistently correlated with the conceptual formulation of the interpersonal multi-motivational theory, two different studies were designed. Study 1: Content validity as assessed by highly qualified independent raters. Study 2: Content validity as assessed by unqualified raters. Results of study 1 show that out of the total 60 AIMIT verbal criteria, 52 (86.7%) met the required minimum degree of correspondence. The average semantic correspondence scores between these items and the related IMSs were quite good (overall mean: 3.74, standard deviation: 0.61). In study 2, a group of 20 naïve raters had to identify each prevalent motivation (IMS) in a random sequence of 1000 utterances drawn from therapy sessions. Cohen's Kappa coefficient was calculated for each rater with reference to each IMS and then calculated the average Kappa for all raters for each IMS. All average Kappa values were satisfactory (>0.60) and ranged between 0.63 (ranking system) and 0.83 (sexuality system). Data confirmed the overall soundness of AIMIT's theoretical-applicative approach. Results are discussed, corroborating the hypothesis that the AIMIT possesses the required criteria for content validity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Assessing Interpersonal Motivations in psychotherapy transcripts as a useful tool to better understand links between motivational systems and intersubjectivity

  8. Improving the asset pricing ability of the Consumption-Capital Asset Pricing Model?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anne-Sofie Reng

    This paper compares the asset pricing ability of the traditional consumption-based capital asset pricing model to models from two strands of literature attempting to improve on the poor empirical results of the C-CAPM. One strand is based on the intertemporal asset pricing model of Campbell (1993...... able to price assets conditionally as suggested by Cochrane (1996) and Lettau and Ludvigson (2001b). The unconditional C-CAPM is rewritten as a scaled factor model using the approximate log consumptionwealth ratio cay, developed by Lettau and Ludvigson (2001a), as scaling variable. The models...... and composite. Thus, there is no unambiguous solution to the pricing ability problems of the C-CAPM. Models from both the alternative literature strands are found to outperform the traditional C-CAPM on average pricing errors. However, when weighting pricing errors by the full variance-covariance matrix...

  9. 17 CFR 256.174 - Miscellaneous current and accrued assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR MUTUAL SERVICE COMPANIES AND SUBSIDIARY SERVICE COMPANIES, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935 3. Current and Accrued Assets § 256.174 Miscellaneous... nature of each asset included herein. 4. deferred debits ...

  10. Review of asset hierarchy criticality assessment and risk analysis practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The MTA NYC Transit (NYCT) has begun an enterprise-wide Asset Management Improvement Program (AMIP). In : 2012, NYCT developed an executive-level concept of operations that defined a new asset management : framework following a systems engineering ap...

  11. Signal systems asset management state-of-the-practice review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to obtain a better understanding of operations-level asset management by examining the specific case of signal systems. Key products will include: a synthesis of existing signal systems asset management practices; a gen...

  12. Research on asset management for safety and operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) is challenged with managing a wide range of : transportation safety and operations assets in order to respond to public and other outside interests. These : assets include, but are not limited to pavemen...

  13. Assets Impairment Testing: An Analysis of IAS 36

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    Since assets impairment can distort the usefulness of accounting information ... a firm, and should assist investors in better approximating economic values of assets .... surrogates can be used by taking into account: (a) the entity's WACC using.

  14. Interpersonal violence: an important risk factor for disease and injury in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Rosana; Schneider, Michelle; Bradshaw, Debbie; Jewkes, Rachel; Abrahams, Naeemah; Matzopoulos, Richard; Vos, Theo

    2010-12-01

    Burden of disease estimates for South Africa have highlighted the particularly high rates of injuries related to interpersonal violence compared with other regions of the world, but these figures tell only part of the story. In addition to direct physical injury, violence survivors are at an increased risk of a wide range of psychological and behavioral problems. This study aimed to comprehensively quantify the excess disease burden attributable to exposure to interpersonal violence as a risk factor for disease and injury in South Africa. The World Health Organization framework of interpersonal violence was adapted. Physical injury mortality and disability were categorically attributed to interpersonal violence. In addition, exposure to child sexual abuse and intimate partner violence, subcategories of interpersonal violence, were treated as risk factors for disease and injury using counterfactual estimation and comparative risk assessment methods. Adjustments were made to account for the combined exposure state of having experienced both child sexual abuse and intimate partner violence. Of the 17 risk factors included in the South African Comparative Risk Assessment study, interpersonal violence was the second leading cause of healthy years of life lost, after unsafe sex, accounting for 1.7 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) or 10.5% of all DALYs (95% uncertainty interval: 8.5%-12.5%) in 2000. In women, intimate partner violence accounted for 50% and child sexual abuse for 32% of the total attributable DALYs. The implications of our findings are that estimates that include only the direct injury burden seriously underrepresent the full health impact of interpersonal violence. Violence is an important direct and indirect cause of health loss and should be recognized as a priority health problem as well as a human rights and social issue. This study highlights the difficulties in measuring the disease burden from interpersonal violence as a risk factor

  15. Interpersonal violence: an important risk factor for disease and injury in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrahams Naeemah

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burden of disease estimates for South Africa have highlighted the particularly high rates of injuries related to interpersonal violence compared with other regions of the world, but these figures tell only part of the story. In addition to direct physical injury, violence survivors are at an increased risk of a wide range of psychological and behavioral problems. This study aimed to comprehensively quantify the excess disease burden attributable to exposure to interpersonal violence as a risk factor for disease and injury in South Africa. Methods The World Health Organization framework of interpersonal violence was adapted. Physical injury mortality and disability were categorically attributed to interpersonal violence. In addition, exposure to child sexual abuse and intimate partner violence, subcategories of interpersonal violence, were treated as risk factors for disease and injury using counterfactual estimation and comparative risk assessment methods. Adjustments were made to account for the combined exposure state of having experienced both child sexual abuse and intimate partner violence. Results Of the 17 risk factors included in the South African Comparative Risk Assessment study, interpersonal violence was the second leading cause of healthy years of life lost, after unsafe sex, accounting for 1.7 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs or 10.5% of all DALYs (95% uncertainty interval: 8.5%-12.5% in 2000. In women, intimate partner violence accounted for 50% and child sexual abuse for 32% of the total attributable DALYs. Conclusions The implications of our findings are that estimates that include only the direct injury burden seriously underrepresent the full health impact of interpersonal violence. Violence is an important direct and indirect cause of health loss and should be recognized as a priority health problem as well as a human rights and social issue. This study highlights the difficulties in measuring

  16. Fight or freeze? Individual differences in investors’ motivational systems and trading in experimental asset markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muehlfeld, K.S.; Weitzel, G.U.; van Witteloostuijn, A.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze investors’ trading behavior, particularly their coping with fundamental shocks in asset value, depending on individual differences in the sensitivity of two basic neurophysiological systems—the Behavioral Approach System (BAS), the ‘driving force’ of human behavior, and the Behavioral

  17. Fight or freeze? Individual differences in investors' motivational systems and trading in experimental asset markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühlfeld, K.; Weitzel, U.; van Witteloostuijn, A.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze investors’ trading behavior, particularly their coping with fundamental shocks in asset value, depending on individual differences in the sensitivity of two basic neurophysiological systems—the Behavioral Approach System (BAS), the ‘driving force’ of human behavior, and the Behavioral

  18. Financial Super-Markets: Size Matters for Asset Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Martin; Helene Rey

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new theoretical framework to analyze=20 financial markets in an international context. We build a two-country=20 macroeconomic model in which agents are risk averse, assets are imperfect=20 substitutes, the number of financial assets is endogenous, and cross-border= =20 asset trade entails transaction costs. We show that demand effects have=20 important implications for the link between market size, asset prices and=20 financial market development. These effects are cons...

  19. Financial Super-Markets: Size Matters for Asset Trade.

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Martin and Hélène Rey.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new theoretical framework to analyze financial markets in an international context. We build a two-country macroeconomic model in which agents are risk averse, assets are imperfect substitutes, the number of financial assets is endogenous, and cross-border asset trade entails transaction costs. We show that demand effects have important implications for the link between market size, asset prices and financial market development. These effects are consistent with the exis...

  20. ACCOUNTING AND TAX ISSUES RELATING TO DEPRECIATION OF TANGIBLE ASSETS

    OpenAIRE

    ZEFINESCU CARMEN-VERONICA

    2014-01-01

    The article proposes a study on the financial and accounting implications of tangible assets depreciation. According to national accounting rules and IFRS, depreciation is the equivalent to irreversible impairment of assets. This amend character is given by correcting the fixed assets counting value to obtain the net counting value. The value of depreciation calculated by applying redemption quota to the counting value of the asset is included in operating expenses for the dur...

  1. Implementing SFAS No 121: Accounting for Impaired Assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, R W; Meeting, D T; Stotzer, W G

    1996-10-01

    In March 1995, FASB issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 121: "Accounting for the Impairment of Long-Lived Assets and for Long-Lived Assets to be Disposed Of." It establishes accounting standards for assets whose carrying costs have been overstated due to a variety of circumstances that have reduced the value of the assets. Healthcare financial managers should fully understand the statement's implications for their organizations.

  2. THEORETICAL ASPECTS REGARDING THE VALUATION OF INTANGIBLE ASSETS

    OpenAIRE

    HOLT GHEORGHE

    2015-01-01

    Valuation of intangible assets represents one of the most delicate problems of assessing a company. Usually, valuation of intangible assets is in the process of evaluating enterprise as a whole. Therefore, Intangible Asset Valuers must have detailed knowledge on business valuation, in particular, the income-based valuation methods (capitalization / updating net cash flow). Valuation of Intangible Assets is the objective of the International Valuation Standards (GN) 4 Valuation of Intangible A...

  3. A neural link between affective understanding and interpersonal attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Silke; de Jong, Roos; Beck, Christian; Haynes, John-Dylan; Ethofer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Being able to comprehend another person’s intentions and emotions is essential for successful social interaction. However, it is currently unknown whether the human brain possesses a neural mechanism that attracts people to others whose mental states they can easily understand. Here we show that the degree to which a person feels attracted to another person can change while they observe the other’s affective behavior, and that these changes depend on the observer’s confidence in having correctly understood the other’s affective state. At the neural level, changes in interpersonal attraction were predicted by activity in the reward system of the observer’s brain. Importantly, these effects were specific to individual observer–target pairs and could not be explained by a target’s general attractiveness or expressivity. Furthermore, using multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA), we found that neural activity in the reward system of the observer’s brain varied as a function of how well the target’s affective behavior matched the observer’s neural representation of the underlying affective state: The greater the match, the larger the brain’s intrinsic reward signal. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that reward-related neural activity during social encounters signals how well an individual’s “neural vocabulary” is suited to infer another person’s affective state, and that this intrinsic reward might be a source of changes in interpersonal attraction. PMID:27044071

  4. The quest for connection in interpersonal and therapeutic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Hadas

    2017-07-01

    This paper focuses on the need for connection as a common core theme at the heart of both close relationships and therapeutic relationships and explores ways to connect these two research domains that have evolved as separate fields of study. Bowlby's attachment theory provides a strong conceptual and empirical base for linking human bonds and bonds in psychotherapy. The growing body of research intersecting attachment and psychotherapy (1980-2014) is documented, and meta-analytic studies on attachment-outcome and attachment-alliance links are highlighted. Five ways of studying attachment as a variable in psychotherapy are underscored: as moderator, as mediator, as outcome, client-therapist attachment match, and as process. By integrating conceptualizations and methods in studying relational narratives of client-therapist dyads (Core Conflictual Relationship Theme), measures of alliance, and client attachment to therapist during psychotherapy, we may discover unique client-therapist relational dances. Future fine-grained studies on how to promote core authentic relational relearning are important to clinicians, supervisors and trainers, who all share the common quest to alleviate interpersonal distress and enhance wellbeing. Directions for advancing research on interpersonal and therapeutic relationships are suggested. Learning from each other, both researchers of close relationships and of psychotherapy relationships can gain a deeper and multidimensional understanding of complex relational processes and outcomes.

  5. Money illusion and nominal inertia in experimental asset markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noussair, C.N.; Richter, G.; Tyran, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    We test whether large but purely nominal shocks affect real asset market prices. We subject a laboratory asset market to an exogenous shock, which either inflates or deflates the nominal fundamental value of the asset while holding the real fundamental value constant. After an inflationary shock,

  6. 26 CFR 1.168(i)-1 - General asset accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... residual) is a multiple category asset (as defined in § 1.861-9T(g)(3)(ii)), and the income yield from the... for Salt Lake City, Utah facility”) that identify the assets included in each general asset account...

  7. 5 CFR 4001.105 - Purchase of System institution assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purchase of System institution assets... SUPPLEMENTAL STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION § 4001.105 Purchase of System institution assets. (a) Prohibition on purchasing assets owned by a System...

  8. 5 CFR 4101.105 - Purchase of System institution assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION § 4101.105 Purchase of System institution assets. (a) Prohibition on purchasing assets owned by a System institution. No covered employee, or... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purchase of System institution assets...

  9. Building a DAM To Last: Archiving Digital Assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeichick, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses archiving digital information and the need for organizations to develop policies regarding digital asset management (DAM) and storage. Topics include determining the value of digital assets; formats of digital information; use of stored information; and system architecture, including hardware and asset management software. (LRW)

  10. Continued Learning in Asset Management for the Dutch Transport Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, L.; Van der Lei, T.E.; Van den Boom, M.; Van der Velde, J.; Wessels, P.; Ligtvoet, A.; Herder, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Asset management aims at improving the overall performance of assetintensive industries by making and executing systematic and highest value decisions about the use and care of assets. To assist organizations to improve their asset management performance, maturity models can be used. In this paper

  11. The model of asset management of commercial banks

    OpenAIRE

    Shaymardanov, Shakhzod; Nuriddinov, Sadriddin; Mamadaliev, Donierbek; Murodkhonov, Mukhammad

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of the commercial bank's policy in the sphere of asset and liability management is to maintain the optimal structure of assets and liabilities, ensure the compliance of amounts, terms and currency of attracting and allocating resources. The objectives and principles of asset and liability management are based on the bank's strategy and the fundamental principles of the risk management policy.

  12. Asset retirement obligations: a reporting concern for healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Gary G; Bayes, Paul E; Morgan, Robert G

    2008-11-01

    FASB statements and SEC guidelines give direction as to how healthcare organizations should account for their asset retirement obligations (AROs) where environmental issues are concerned. A key consideration is that current costs associated with environmental problems, such as encapsulating asbestos, are to be accounted for as part of an asset's cost and depreciated over the asset's remaining life.

  13. 49 CFR 639.33 - Management of leased assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Management of leased assets. 639.33 Section 639.33..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CAPITAL LEASES Lease Management § 639.33 Management of leased assets. Each recipient must maintain an inventory of capital assets acquired by standard FTA project management...

  14. Spectral decomposition of optimal asset-liability management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decamps, M.; de Schepper, A.; Goovaerts, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns optimal asset-liability management when the assets and the liabilities are modeled by means of correlated geometric Brownian motions as suggested in Gerber and Shiu [2003. Geometric Brownian motion models for assets and liabilities: from pension funding to optimal dividends.

  15. 75 FR 70966 - Transit Asset Management (TAM) Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Transit Asset Management (TAM) Pilot... Management (TAM) systems and ``best practices'', which can be replicated to improve transportation asset... with asset management system suppliers; however the official proposer must be a public agency. The TAM...

  16. Effects of Diversification of Assets on Mean and Variance | Jayeola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diversification is a means of minimizing risk and maximizing returns by investing in a variety of assets of the portfolio. This paper is written to determine the effects of diversification of three types of Assets; uncorrelated, perfectly correlated and perfectly negatively correlated assets on mean and variance. To go about this, ...

  17. Money Illusion and Nominal Inertia in Experimental Asset Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noussair, Charles N.; Richter, Gregers; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    We test whether large but purely nominal shocks affect real asset market prices. We subject a laboratory asset market to an exogenous shock, which either inflates or deflates the nominal fundamental value of the asset, while holding the real fundamental value constant. After an inflationary shock...

  18. Asset backed securities : risks, ratings and quantitative modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jönsson, B.H.B.; Schoutens, W.

    2009-01-01

    Asset backed securities (ABSs) are structured finance products backed by pools of assets and are created through a securitisation process. The risks in asset backed securities, such as, credit risk, prepayment risk, market risks, operational risk, and legal risks, are directly connected with the

  19. THE PROBLEMS OF FIXED ASSETS CLASSIFICATION FOR ACCOUNTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophiia Kafka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a critical analysis of research in accounting of fixed assets; the basic issues of fixed assets accounting that have been developed by the Ukrainian scientists during 1999-2016 have been determined. It is established that the problems of non-current assets taxation and their classification are the most noteworthy. In the dissertations the issues of fixed assets classification are of exclusively particular branch nature, so its improvement is important. The purpose of the article is developing science-based classification of fixed assets for accounting purposes since their composition is quite diverse. The classification of fixed assets for accounting purposes have been summarized and developed in Figure 1 according to the results of the research. The accomplished analysis of existing approaches to classification of fixed assets has made it possible to specify its basic types and justify the classification criteria of fixed assets for the main objects of fixed assets. Key words: non-current assets, fixed assets, accounting, valuation, classification of the fixed assets. JEL:G M41  

  20. Interpersonal functioning in obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Nicole M; Ansell, Emily B; Simpson, H Blair; Pinto, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The core symptoms of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) often lead to interpersonal difficulties. However, little research has explored interpersonal functioning in OCPD. This study examined interpersonal problems, interpersonal sensitivities, empathy, and systemizing, the drive to analyze and derive underlying rules for systems, in a sample of 25 OCPD individuals, 25 individuals with comorbid OCPD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and 25 healthy controls. We found that OCPD individuals reported hostile-dominant interpersonal problems and sensitivities with warm-dominant behavior by others, whereas OCPD+OCD individuals reported submissive interpersonal problems and sensitivities with warm-submissive behavior by others. Individuals with OCPD, with and without OCD, reported less empathic perspective taking relative to healthy controls. Finally, we found that OCPD males reported a higher drive to analyze and derive rules for systems than OCPD females. Overall, results suggest that there are interpersonal deficits associated with OCPD and the clinical implications of these deficits are discussed.

  1. Interpersonal Functioning in Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Nicole M.; Ansell, Emily B.; Simpson, H. Blair; Pinto, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The core symptoms of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) often lead to interpersonal difficulties. However, little research has explored interpersonal functioning in OCPD. The current study examined interpersonal problems, interpersonal sensitivities, empathy, and systemizing, the drive to analyze and derive underlying rules for systems, in a sample of 25 OCPD individuals, 25 individuals with comorbid OCPD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and 25 healthy controls. We found that OCPD individuals reported hostile-dominant interpersonal problems and sensitivities with warm-dominant behavior by others while OCPD+OCD individuals reported submissive interpersonal problems and sensitivities with warm-submissive behavior by others. Individuals with OCPD, with and without OCD, reported less empathic perspective taking relative to healthy controls. Finally, we found that OCPD males reported a higher drive to analyze and derive rules for systems than OCPD females. Overall, results suggest that there are interpersonal deficits associated with OCPD and the clinical implications of these deficits are discussed. PMID:25046040

  2. A risk-based approach to sanitary sewer pipe asset management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baah, Kelly; Dubey, Brajesh; Harvey, Richard; McBean, Edward

    2015-02-01

    Wastewater collection systems are an important component of proper management of wastewater to prevent environmental and human health implications from mismanagement of anthropogenic waste. Due to aging and inadequate asset management practices, the wastewater collection assets of many cities around the globe are in a state of rapid decline and in need of urgent attention. Risk management is a tool which can help prioritize resources to better manage and rehabilitate wastewater collection systems. In this study, a risk matrix and a weighted sum multi-criteria decision-matrix are used to assess the consequence and risk of sewer pipe failure for a mid-sized city, using ArcGIS. The methodology shows that six percent of the uninspected sewer pipe assets of the case study have a high consequence of failure while four percent of the assets have a high risk of failure and hence provide priorities for inspection. A map incorporating risk of sewer pipe failure and consequence is developed to facilitate future planning, rehabilitation and maintenance programs. The consequence of failure assessment also includes a novel failure impact factor which captures the effect of structurally defective stormwater pipes on the failure assessment. The methodology recommended in this study can serve as a basis for future planning and decision making and has the potential to be universally applied by municipal sewer pipe asset managers globally to effectively manage the sanitary sewer pipe infrastructure within their jurisdiction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Critical asset and portfolio risk analysis: an all-hazards framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyub, Bilal M; McGill, William L; Kaminskiy, Mark

    2007-08-01

    This article develops a quantitative all-hazards framework for critical asset and portfolio risk analysis (CAPRA) that considers both natural and human-caused hazards. Following a discussion on the nature of security threats, the need for actionable risk assessments, and the distinction between asset and portfolio-level analysis, a general formula for all-hazards risk analysis is obtained that resembles the traditional model based on the notional product of consequence, vulnerability, and threat, though with clear meanings assigned to each parameter. Furthermore, a simple portfolio consequence model is presented that yields first-order estimates of interdependency effects following a successful attack on an asset. Moreover, depending on the needs of the decisions being made and available analytical resources, values for the parameters in this model can be obtained at a high level or through detailed systems analysis. Several illustrative examples of the CAPRA methodology are provided.

  4. Developing Asset Life Cycle Management capabilities through the implementation of Asset Life Cycle Plans – an Action Research project

    OpenAIRE

    Ruitenburg, Richard; Braaksma, Anne Johannes Jan

    2017-01-01

    Asset Life Cycle Management is a strategic approach to managing physical assets over their complete life cycle. However, the literature and the recent ISO 55,000 standard do not offer guidance as to how to develop such an approach. This paper investigates the main capabilities for Asset Life Cycle Management by means of a four year Action Research project implementing Asset Life Cycle Plans. Five main capabilities emerged: 1. strategic information use; 2. alignment of operations and strategy;...

  5. Interpersonal conflict: strategies and guidelines for resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, D E; Bushardt, S C

    1985-02-01

    Historically, management theorists have recommended the avoidance or suppression of conflict. Modern management theorists recognize interpersonal conflict as an inevitable byproduct of growth and change. The issue is no longer avoidance of conflict but the strategy by which conflict is resolved. Various strategies of conflict resolution and the consequences of each are discussed in this article, along with guidelines for the effective use of confrontation strategy.

  6. The influence of Facebook on interpersonal communication

    OpenAIRE

    Sevük, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Today, with the development of communication technologies, social network sites become common and popular. People prefer to communicate with each other via social network sites. In particular, Facebook is used by almost everyone and today it has about 901 million users from all around the world. Therefore, the aim of this study is to explore the influence of Facebook on interpersonal communication among 200 students who study at the Faculty of Communication and Media Studies at the ...

  7. Social cohesion and interpersonal conflicts in projects

    OpenAIRE

    Ojiako, Udechukwu; Manville, Graham; Zouk, Nadine; Chipulu, Maxwell

    2016-01-01

    One particular area of project management literature that has continued to gain momentum in literature is its social dimension; with a number of scholars emphasising the fact that there is a considerable social dimension to every project activity. Within this context, the authors examine parameters that drive social facets of projects with a particular focus on social cohesion, interpersonal conflicts and national culture. Data from 167 project managers working in Kuwait were collected utilis...

  8. Intangible Assets – Important Resources for Performant Enterprise Gestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Grosu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Along time, the goal of intangible assets became very important for the activity and prosperity of business. This matter is achieved as well as more and more the companies operate in a global economy which has as main base the digital revolution and information management. The increase of the immaterial investments percent requires evaluation and recognition criteria by knowledge, intelligence and human competence. But recently, the accounting standards were about to accord negligible attention or even totally ignored the appropriate modalities of report this category of assets. The accounting, obliged to bend to economic, financial and juridical logics, in a „Taylor” modality, presents an unreal image of the company economic life and particularly of investment activity. In a competitive environment, the reliability of future economic benefits, generated by investments, depends less on their material or immaterial nature and more on the characteristics of the market they operate on. These are just a few reflections which determined us to focus our attention to this thought-provoking domain of immaterial investments, appreciated as a potential for the company.

  9. INTANGIBLE ASSETS – IMPORTANT RESOURCE FOR ENTERPRISE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREEA PAULA DUMITRU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Along time, the goal of intangible assets became very important for the activity and prosperity of business. This matter is achieved as well as more and more the companies operate in a global economy which has as main base the digital revolution and information management. The increase of the immaterial investments percent requires evaluation and recognition criteria by knowledge, intelligence and human competence. But recently, the accounting standards were about to accord negligible attention or even totally ignored the appropriate modalities of report this category of assets. The accounting, obliged to bend to economic, financial and juridical logics, in a „Taylor” modality, presents an unreal image of the company economic life and particularly of investment activity. In a competitive environment, the reliability of future economic benefits, generated by investments, depends less on their material or immaterial nature and more on the characteristics of the market they operate on. These are just a few reflections which determined us to focus our attention to this thoughtprovoking domain of immaterial investments, appreciated as a potential for the company.

  10. Asset management guide : focusing on the management of our transit investments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    To advance transit asset management, this guide provides a transit-specific asset management framework for managing assets indi-vidually and as a portfolio of assets that comprise an integrated system. The guide provides flexible, yet targeted guidan...

  11. Asset management guide : focusing on the management of our transit investments [updated November 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    To advance transit asset management, this guide provides a transit-specific asset management framework for managing assets individually and as a portfolio of assets that comprise an integrated system. The guide provides flexible, yet targeted guidanc...

  12. Asset life cycle plans: twelve steps to assist strategic decision-making in asset life cycle management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenburg, Richard Jacob; Braaksma, Anne Johannes Jan; van Dongen, Leonardus Adriana Maria; Carnero, Maria Carmen; Gonzalez-Prida, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Effective management of physical assets should deliver maximum business value. Therefore, Asset Management standards such as PAS 55 and ISO 55000 ask for a life cycle approach. However, most existing methods focus only on the short term of the asset's life or the estimation of its remaining life.

  13. Developing Asset Life Cycle Management capabilities through the implementation of Asset Life Cycle Plans – an Action Research project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenburg, Richard; Braaksma, Anne Johannes Jan

    2017-01-01

    Asset Life Cycle Management is a strategic approach to managing physical assets over their complete life cycle. However, the literature and the recent ISO 55,000 standard do not offer guidance as to how to develop such an approach. This paper investigates the main capabilities for Asset Life Cycle

  14. Interpersonal polyvictimization and mental health in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Carol Rhonda; Lagdon, Susan; Boyda, David; Armour, Cherie

    2016-05-01

    A consistent conclusion within the extant literature is that victimization and in particular polyvictimization leads to adverse mental health outcomes. A large body of literature exists as it pertains to the association between victimisation and mental health in studies utilising samples of childhood victims, female only victims, and samples of male and female victims; less research exists as it relates to males victims of interpersonal violence. The aim of the current study was therefore to identify profiles of interpersonal victimizations in an exclusively male sample and to assess their differential impact on a number of adverse mental health outcomes. Using data from 14,477 adult males from Wave 2 of the NESARC, we identified interpersonal victimization profiles via Latent Class Analysis. Multinomial Logistic Regression was subsequently utilized to establish risk across mental health disorders. A 4-class solution was optimal. Victimisation profiles showed elevated odds ratios for the presence of mental health disorders; suggesting that multiple life-course victimisation typologies exists, and that victimization is strongly associated with psychopathology. Several additional notable findings are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Movement constraints on interpersonal coordination and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolston, Michael T; Shockley, Kevin; Riley, Michael A; Richardson, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated how constraining movement affects interpersonal coordination and joint cognitive performance. Pairs of participants worked cooperatively to solve picture-puzzle tasks in which they conversed to identify differences between pictures in 3 degree-of-constraint conditions: both participants were free to move their hands (free-free; FF); both participants' hands were restrained (restrained-restrained; RR); and the hands of 1 participant were free while the hands of the other participant were restrained (free-restrained; FR). Eye tracking data were collected, and movement was measured at the waist, hand, and head. Data were analyzed using Cross-Recurrence Quantification Analysis (CRQ). Postural sway coordination, gaze coordination, and task performance were predicted to be highest in FF, followed by RR, and then by FR. Results showed the asymmetric FR condition generally exhibited lesser degrees of coordination than the symmetric Conditions FF and RR, and that the patterning of coordination in the symmetric conditions varied across the measured body segments. These results demonstrate that movement restraints affect not only interpersonal postural coordination, but also joint attention. Additionally, significant positive relationships were found between task performance and total amount of anterior-posterior movement measured at the head, hand and waist; number of utterances; and number of differences pairs found in the puzzles. These findings indicate a relationship between movement and task performance consistent with the hypotheses that both interpersonal coordination and cognitive performance are sensitive to local action constraints.

  16. Interpersonal violence in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Ossama T; Abbas, Alaa K; Eid, Hani O; Salem, Mohamed O; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study the anatomical distribution, severity and outcome of hospitalised interpersonal violence-related injured patients in Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates so as to give recommendations regarding the magnitude of this problem, its causes and priorities of prevention. Data were retrieved from Al-Ain Hospital Trauma Registry, which was prospectively collected over three years. There were 75 patients (males = 85.3%) having a mean age of 30 years. Eighty-one percent had blunt trauma. The estimated annual injury hospitalisation of interpersonal violence in Al-Ain city was 6.7 per 100,000 population. Females were significantly more injured by a family member (p = 0.02), at home (p = 0.005), and had more severe injuries (p = 0.003). There was a trend for children less than 18 years old to have more penetrating trauma (p = 0.06) and to be injured by a family member (p = 0.09). There was only one case of woman sexual assault and two cases of child abuse. The mean (SD) hospital stay was 7.87 (14.1) days. Less than 3% (n = 2) were admitted to the intensive care unit with no deaths. In conclusion, the majority of patients in our study had minor injuries. Nevertheless, the psychological impact may be major. This highlights the need to develop suitable mental health services in support of victims of interpersonal violence.

  17. The interpersonal effects of Facebook reassurance seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, Elise M; Smith, April R; Hames, Jennifer L

    2013-11-01

    Social networking sites like Facebook represent a potentially valuable means for individuals with low self-esteem or interpersonal difficulties to connect with others; however, recent research indicates that individuals who are most in need of social benefits from Facebook may be ineffective in their communication strategies, and thereby sabotage their potential to benefit interpersonally. The current study tested whether reassurance seeking via Facebook negatively influenced self-esteem, and whether this change in self-esteem mediated the relationship between Facebook reassurance seeking and greater thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness. Participants completed measures online at two time-points approximately 24 days apart. Results provided evidence that Facebook reassurance seeking predicted lower levels of self-esteem, which in turn predicted increased feelings that one does not belong and that one is a burden. Key limitations to this study include our use of a predominantly young, female, Caucasian sample, a novel reassurance seeking measure, and only evaluating two time points. These results suggest that Facebook usage has the potential for negative and far-reaching influences on one's interpersonal functioning. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. THE MAIN QUESTION OF FIXED ASSETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogan A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the methods of selecting the best type of fixed assets (real investment. Explore the current situation where the investor has to compare the different-parametrical alternatives (DPA. The DPA are the fixed assets which have similar functions, but different in price, durability and periodic effects. In the general case the DPA are the investment projects which have different amounts of investment, accounting periods and net cash flow. Net present value (NPV and internal rate of return (IRR are criticized. The author describes his indicator «speed index of unit value increase» (IS. The author proves on numerical examples that the economy, the subjects of which use IS instead of NPV and IRR, has accelerated the pace of development.

  19. Asset management using an extended Markowitz theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paria Karimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Markowitz theorem is one of the most popular techniques for asset management. The method has been widely used to solve many applications, successfully. In this paper, we present a multi objective Markowitz model to determine asset allocation by considering cardinality constraints. The resulted model is an NP-Hard problem and the proposed study uses two metaheuristics, namely genetic algorithm (GA and particle swarm optimization (PSO to find efficient solutions. The proposed study has been applied on some data collected from Tehran Stock Exchange over the period 2009-2011. The study considers four objectives including cash return, 12-month return, 36-month return and Lower Partial Moment (LPM. The results indicate that there was no statistical difference between the implementation of PSO and GA methods.

  20. Risiko Likuiditas Bank dan Asset Liabilities Management

    OpenAIRE

    Lesmana, Iwan

    2007-01-01

    Uquidity is of critical importance to companies in the banking services sector. Most failures of financialintermediaries have occured in large part due to insufficient liquidity resulting from adverse circumstances.Goldman Sachs has in piace a comprehensive set of liquidity and funding policies that are intended tomaintain significant flexibility to address specific and broader industry or market liquidity events.In asset liabilities mal1agement or liquidity management, liquidity risk is mana...

  1. The Accounting Practices of Heritage Assets

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Nor Laili; Saad, Natrah; Ahmad, Halimah Nasibah; Salleh, Md. Suhaimi Md.; Ismail, Mohamad Sharofi

    2016-01-01

    Accrual-based accounting is introduced to the government agencies with the intention to hold prudent fiscal management and improve the efficiency of financial management and accounting of the Malaysian Government. For that purpose, Malaysian Public Sector Accounting Standards (MPSAS) was introduced as a main reference in applying the accrual-based accounting. MPSAS 17 which deals with heritage assets, will take effect in 2017. The study intended to discover how do overseas’ museums report the...

  2. Intangible Capital, Corporate Valuation and Asset Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Danthine, Jean-Pierre; Jin, Xiangrong

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have found unmeasured intangible capital to be large and important. In this paper we observe that by nature intangible capital is also very different from physical capital. We find it plausible to argue that the accumulation process for intangible capital differs significantly from the process by which physical capital accumulates. We study the implications of this hypothesis for rational firm valuation and asset pricing using a two-sector general equilibrium model. Our main fi...

  3. Aging System Sustainment and Enabling Technologies (ASSET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Description Bolt , Machine AMC/AMSC Fab Prototypes COMPLbTb Type Alternate Offer Awardee Fairchild Controls First Article Inspection COMPLhlh City...Fredrick State MD Lab Comparison Analysis ASSET PO Issued $16,488 SAR COMPLETE CO NSN 5307-01-185-3077 RE/TDP COMPLblb Description Stud , Self...Project Elements Project Status m CO NSN 5307-01-185-3077 RE/TDP COMPLETE Description Stud , Self Locking AMC/AMSC 3/P Fab Prototypes

  4. Asset Pricing Implications of Firms' Financing Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Joao F; Yaron, Amir; Zhang, Lu

    2002-01-01

    We incorporate costly external finance in a production based asset pricing model and investigate whether financing frictions are quantitatively important for pricing a cross-section of expected returns. We show that the common assumptions about the nature of the financing frictions are captured by a simple ‘financing cost’ function, equal to the product of the financing premium and the amount of external finance. This approach provides a tractable framework to examine the role of financing fr...

  5. Trust conceptualized as a corporate knowledge asset

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, Waymond; Gago Rodríguez, Susana

    2006-01-01

    To most individuals, "trust" can be viewed as a knowledge corporate asset that may add, or rest, value to the company. The role of knowledge in achieving a competitive advantage is becoming and increasingly important management issue in all business and non-business sectors. As such, our Throughput Modeling approach indicates how six different trust behaviors can be guided, how trust decision making can be improved and made defensible, and how special problems facing individuals can be dealt ...

  6. Knowledge as an Asset and Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinç Gülseçen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most valuable resource available to any organization today is its knowledge asset which is stored in processes and information systems, corporate data warehouses, employees’ brains, copyrights and patents. Knowledge management is the process of capturing, distributing, and effectively using this knowledge. The factors affecting Knowledge Management can be listed as follows: organizational culture, knowledge manager, the evolution of knowledge, knowledge polution and technology.

  7. Return models and dynamic asset allocation strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Wyanet Wen

    2017-01-01

    This thesis studies the design of optimal investment strategies. A strategy is considered optimal when it minimizes the variance of terminal portfolio wealth for a given level of expected terminal portfolio wealth, or equivalently, maximizes an investor's utility. We study this issue in two particular situations: when asset returns follow a continuous-time path-independent process, and when they follow a discrete-time path-dependent process. Continuous-time path-independent return mode...

  8. KEMAMPUAN MENGELOLA KONFLIK INTERPERSONAL DI TEMPAT KERJA DITINJAU DARI PERSEPSI TERHADAP KOMUNIKASI INTERPERSONAL DAN TIPE KEPRIBADIAN EKSTROVERT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyas Hapsari Dewi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the relationship between perceptions of interpersonal communication and extrovert personality type with the ability to manage interpersonal conflict in the workplace on employees Editorial Suara Merdeka Semarang. The sample in this study was 60 employees. Major hypothesis in this study is that there is a relationship between perceptions of interpersonal communication and extrovert personality types with the ability to manage interpersonal conflict in the workplace. Minor hypotheses in this study were 1 There is a positive relationship between perceptions of interpersonal communication with the ability to manage interpersonal conflict in the workplace, 2 There is a positive relationship between the extroverted personality type with the ability to manage interpersonal conflict in the workplace. Major hypothesis testing using regression analysis two predictors, the results obtained ry (1-2 = 0.639 with p = 0.000 (p 0,05.

  9. CONSIDERATION REGARDING CURRENT ASSETS IN THE CONSTRUCTION ENTITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Adriana COJOCARU (ALIONESCU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accounting for current assets mainly aims to obtain useful information on the management of their best in order to make management decisions. Counting efficiency of these assets, their importance, provides improved performance of the entity. In this paper we want to study the degree of implementation of policies and accounting treatments on the current assets in the specific construction economic entities, the problems of implementation and thus better addressing their theoretical and procedural to improve the information provided by financial statements. Due to the importance of proper conduct of business owned entities, accounting current assets should result in optimal and efficient control of current assets.

  10. IMPLEMENTATION OF ASSET MANAGEMENT IN ROAD ADMINISTRATION OF SLOVAK REPUBLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomír Pepucha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents basic principles and solutions for the application of Asset Management as part of road administration in Slovakia. It deals with application of Assets management methods and best practices of global trends in road maintenance, repair and rehabilitation strategies. An effective public Asset Management combines principles and strategies of asset management used in private sector with sound practices and methods proven to be applicable by public road administrator and his digital information systems. The under-funding of road management leads to development of tools and methods, which enable us to define criteria for establishing priorities for investments into road assets.

  11. Salivary cortisol and interpersonal functioning : An event-contingent recording study in the offspring of parents with bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbogen, Mark A.; Linnen, Anne-Marie; Santo, Jonathan B.; aan het Rot, Marije; Hodgins, Sheilagh; Young, Simon N.

    Despite a large body of research in non-human primates, the relationship between naturalistic patterns of social behaviour and basal cortisol levels has been understudied in humans. The present study examined the relationship between patterns of interpersonal functioning and cortisol levels in 23

  12. Earnings Management and Valuation of Biological Assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Luiz Menezes da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of fair value to measure the worth of biological assets allows discretionary choices when using discounted cash flow in the absence of an active market, influencing the quality of accounting information. The objective of this study was to investigate evidence of earnings management among Brazilian companies that have adopted fair value based on the discounted cash flow method. The firms were investigated with regard to: a disclosure of the discount rate, b BM&FBovespa corporate governance levels; and c adherence to disclosure requirements in the Brazilian accounting standard CPC 29 (IAS 41. We analyzed 31 firms with significant biological assets from 2010 to 2012. The earnings management measurements were calculated according to the modified Jones, the Teoh, Welch and Wong (1998, and the KS models. The Mann-Whitney test of the means was applied and revealed evidence of greater earnings management for companies that use discounted cash flow, and the ones that least meet CPC 29 disclosure requirements, considering the KS model estimates. Regarding the other proposals, testing did not offer enough evidence of differences in discretionary accruals. In this sense, only hypotheses 1 and 4 are partially accepted, demanding more research in this area. We also present evidence in favor of adopting Exposure Draft ED/2013/08 Agriculture: Bearer Plants, Proposed amendments to IAS 16 and IAS 41, which proposes to measure biological assets at cost, because firms already following these rules showed lower earnings management in this study.

  13. Visual Decision Support Tool for Supporting Asset ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract:Managing urban water infrastructures faces the challenge of jointly dealing with assets of diverse types, useful life, cost, ages and condition. Service quality and sustainability require sound long-term planning, well aligned with tactical and operational planning and management. In summary, the objective of an integrated approach to infrastructure asset management is to assist utilities answer the following questions:•Who are we at present?•What service do we deliver?•What do we own?•Where do we want to be in the long-term?•How do we get there?The AWARE-P approach (www.aware-p.org) offers a coherent methodological framework and a valuable portfolio of software tools. It is designed to assist water supply and wastewater utility decision-makers in their analyses and planning processes. It is based on a Plan-Do-Check-Act process and is in accordance with the key principles of the International Standards Organization (ISO) 55000 standards on asset management. It is compatible with, and complementary to WERF’s SIMPLE framework. The software assists in strategic, tactical, and operational planning, through a non-intrusive, web-based, collaborative environment where objectives and metrics drive IAM planning. It is aimed at industry professionals and managers, as well as at the consultants and technical experts that support them. It is easy to use and maximizes the value of information from multiple existing data sources, both in da

  14. A guideline for interpersonal capabilities enhancement to support sustainable facility management practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpin, Norliana; Kasim, Narimah; Zainal, Rozlin; Noh, Hamidun Mohd

    2018-04-01

    Facility management is the key phase in the development cycle of an assets and spans over a considerable length of time. Therefore, facility managers are in a commanding position to maximise the potential of sustainability through the development phases from construction, operation, maintenance and upgrade leading to decommission and deconstruction. Sustainability endeavours in facility management practices will contribute to reducing energy consumption, waste and running costs. Furthermore, it can also help in improving organisational productivity, financial return and community standing of the organisation. Facility manager should be empowered with the necessary knowledge and capabilities at the forefront facing sustainability challenge. However, literature studies show a gap between the level of awareness, specific knowledge and the necessary skills required to pursue sustainability in the facility management professional. People capability is considered as the key enabler in managing the sustainability agenda as well as being central to the improvement of competency and innovation in an organisation. This paper aims to develop a guidelines for interpersonal capabilities to support sustainability in facility management practice. Starting with a total of 7 critical interpersonal capabilities factors identified from previous questionnaire survey, the authors conducted an interview with 3 experts in facility management to assess the perceived importance of these factors. The findings reveal a set of guidelines for the enhancement of interpersonal capabilities among facility managers by providing what can be done to acquire these factors and how it can support the application of sustainability in their practice. The findings of this paper are expected to form the basis of a mechanism framework developed to equip facility managers with the right knowledge, to continue education and training and to develop new mind-sets to enhance the implementation of sustainability

  15. Initial cash/asset ratio and asset prices: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caginalp, G; Porter, D; Smith, V

    1998-01-20

    A series of experiments, in which nine participants trade an asset over 15 periods, test the hypothesis that an initial imbalance of asset/cash will influence the trading price over an extended time. Participants know at the outset that the asset or "stock" pays a single dividend with fixed expectation value at the end of the 15th period. In experiments with a greater total value of cash at the start, the mean prices during the trading periods are higher, compared with those with greater amount of asset, with a high degree of statistical significance. The difference is most significant at the outset and gradually tapers near the end of the experiment. The results are very surprising from a rational expectations and classical game theory perspective, because the possession of a large amount of cash does not lead to a simple motivation for a trader to bid excessively on a financial instrument. The gradual erosion of the difference toward the end of trading, however, suggests that fundamental value is approached belatedly, offering some consolation to the rational expectations theory. It also suggests that there is a time scale on which an evolution toward fundamental value occurs. The experimental results are qualitatively compatible with the price dynamics predicted by a system of differential equations based on asset flow. The results have broad implications for the marketing of securities, particularly initial and secondary public offerings, government bonds, etc., where excess supply has been conjectured to suppress prices.

  16. Competence Map of Regulatory Body: Personal and Interpersonal Effectiveness Competencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, E.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents implementation stages and outcomes of the project “Nuclear Facility Competences” fulfilled in JSC “Rosenergoatom” and outcomes of the project “Knowledge Management, Training and Staff Retention” fulfilled for Romania regulatory authority. The goal of the project was a development of competence profiles for nuclear power plant and corporate inspectorate key job positions. The paper is focused on personal and interpersonal effectiveness competencies for inspectorate job positions which are a part of well-known 4-Quadrant Competence Model. Each competence is described by one or two behavior scales. One can consider those competencies like common ones for organizations implementing inspection activity and could be used in human resource management processes like personnel selection, job assessment, career planning, training, mentoring. (author

  17. Frontal negativity: An electrophysiological index of interpersonal guilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Bingbing; Wang, Xiangling; Cao, Bihua; Li, Fuhong

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to reveal the temporal course and electrophysiological correlates of interpersonal guilt. Human participants were asked to perform multiple rounds of a dot-estimation task with their partners, while event-related potential being recorded. The paired participants were informed that they would win money if both responded correctly; otherwise, both of them would lose money. The feeling of guilt in Self-Wrong condition (SW) was significantly higher than that in Both-Wrong and Partner-Wrong conditions. At approximately 350 ms after the onset of feedback presentation, greater negativities were observed in the frontal regions in the guilt condition (i.e., SW) than those in the non-guilt condition. The guilt-modulated frontal negativity might reflect the interactions of self-reflection, condemnation, and negative emotion.

  18. Application of Securitization of Leasing Assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Viktorovich Linev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Securitization of leasing assets was widely adopted abroad within the last decades. Securitization of leasing assets usually is meant as process of formation of a portfolio based on future leasing payments of one and (or more leasing company and sale of securities to investors for the subsequent refinancing of leasing operations. These securities can be bonds, actions or bills. Thus the asset leased, acts as providing these papers. Nomenclature of property includes office, medical (first of all, stomatology, training, video the equipment, and also a car, motor-equipment, towers of cellular communication production of heavy mechanical engineering and computers. The essence of securitization of leasing assets consists in isolation of streams of leasing payments from risk of bankruptcy of the leasing company. As the considered mechanism has the greatest development in the USA, so far as consideration of experience of its application in this country is represented especially actual. The special attention is deserved by a question of decrease in credit risk of the investor. External and internal providing is applied to its decision in different types. Interest of participants in securitization of leasing assets consists in distribution of risks between them, emergence of a new source of financing, depreciation of attracted resources, increase of liquidity of a leasing portfolio and optimization by management by balance of the enterprise. Appeal of this tool to the leasing company in a case when it has no available own funds for business development, represents separate interest. Securitization allows the leasing company to expand sources of attraction of the capital and to receive a reserve for the future, and also to broaden the sphere of options of activity and to give it new opportunities for financing of projects. Widespread introduction of schemes of securitization in practice of the Russian leasing business, requires development, and on some

  19. Are There Subtypes of Panic Disorder? An Interpersonal Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilcha-Mano, Sigal; McCarthy, Kevin S.; Dinger, Ulrike; Chambless, Dianne L.; Milrod, Barbara L.; Kunik, Lauren; Barber, Jacques P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Panic disorder (PD) is associated with significant personal, social, and economic costs. However, little is known about specific interpersonal dysfunctions that characterize the PD population. The current study systematically examined these interpersonal dysfunctions. Method The present analyses included 194 patients with PD out of a sample of 201 who were randomized to cognitive-behavioral therapy, panic-focused psychodynamic psychotherapy, or applied relaxation training. Interpersonal dysfunction was measured using the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems–Circumplex (Horowitz, Alden, Wiggins, & Pincus, 2000). Results Individuals with PD reported greater levels of interpersonal distress than that of a normative cohort (especially when PD was accompanied by agoraphobia), but lower than that of a cohort of patients with major depression. There was no single interpersonal profile that characterized PD patients. Symptom-based clusters (with versus without agoraphobia) could not be discriminated on core or central interpersonal problems. Rather, as revealed by cluster analysis based on the pathoplasticity framework, there were two empirically derived interpersonal clusters among PD patients which were not accounted for by symptom severity and were opposite in nature: domineering-intrusive and nonassertive. The empirically derived interpersonal clusters appear to be of clinical utility in predicting alliance development throughout treatment: While the domineering-intrusive cluster did not show any changes in the alliance throughout treatment, the non-assertive cluster showed a process of significant strengthening of the alliance. Conclusions Empirically derived interpersonal clusters in PD provide clinically useful and non-redundant information about individuals with PD. PMID:26030762

  20. Are there subtypes of panic disorder? An interpersonal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilcha-Mano, Sigal; McCarthy, Kevin S; Dinger, Ulrike; Chambless, Dianne L; Milrod, Barbara L; Kunik, Lauren; Barber, Jacques P

    2015-10-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is associated with significant personal, social, and economic costs. However, little is known about specific interpersonal dysfunctions that characterize the PD population. The current study systematically examined these interpersonal dysfunctions. The present analyses included 194 patients with PD out of a sample of 201 who were randomized to cognitive-behavioral therapy, panic-focused psychodynamic psychotherapy, or applied relaxation training. Interpersonal dysfunction was measured with the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Circumplex (Horowitz, Alden, Wiggins, & Pincus, 2000). Individuals with PD reported greater levels of interpersonal distress than that of a normative cohort (especially when PD was accompanied by agoraphobia), but lower than that of a cohort of patients with major depression. There was no single interpersonal profile that characterized PD patients. Symptom-based clusters (with vs. without agoraphobia) could not be discriminated on core or central interpersonal problems. Rather, as revealed by cluster analysis based on the pathoplasticity framework, there were 2 empirically derived interpersonal clusters among PD patients that were not accounted for by symptom severity and were opposite in nature: domineering-intrusive and nonassertive. The empirically derived interpersonal clusters appear to be of clinical utility in predicting alliance development throughout treatment: Although the domineering-intrusive cluster did not show any changes in the alliance throughout treatment, the nonassertive cluster showed a process of significant strengthening of the alliance. Empirically derived interpersonal clusters in PD provide clinically useful and nonredundant information about individuals with PD. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Interpersonal Development, Stability, and Change in Early Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Aidan G. C.; Pincus, Aaron L.; Lenzenweger, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This goal of this research was to explore the development of the interpersonal system mapped by the interpersonal circumplex in early adulthood (Ages 18-22). Method This study uses the Longitudinal Study of Personality Disorders sample (N = 250; 53% Female). Participants completed the Revised Interpersonal Adjective Scales (Wiggins, Trapnell, & Phillips, 1988) in their freshman, sophomore, and senior years of college. Estimates of structural, rank-order, mean, individual, and ipsative stability were calculated for the broad interpersonal dimensions of Dominance and Affiliation, and also the lower-order octant scales. Additionally, the interpersonal profile parameters of differentiation and prototypicality were calculated at each wave and explored longitudinally, and also used as predictors of interpersonal stability. Results We found excellent structural and high rank-order and ipsative stability in the interpersonal scales over this time period. Mean increases on the Affiliation axis, but not on the Dominance axis, were found to mask differential rates of change among the octant scales, along with significant individual variation in the rates of change. Interpersonal differentiation and prototypicality were related to higher stability in overall interpersonal style. Conclusions Results point to evidence of both stability and nuanced change, illuminating some of the features of the structural variables that can be derived from interpersonal circumplex profiles. PMID:22224462

  2. Mapping the role of structural and interpersonal violence in the lives of women: implications for public health interventions and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesanti, Stephanie Rose; Thurston, Wilfreda E

    2015-11-11

    Research on interpersonal violence towards women has commonly focused on individual or proximate-level determinants associated with violent acts ignores the roles of larger structural systems that shape interpersonal violence. Though this research has contributed to an understanding of the prevalence and consequences of violence towards women, it ignores how patterns of violence are connected to social systems and social institutions. In this paper, we discuss the findings from a scoping review that examined: 1) how structural and symbolic violence contributes to interpersonal violence against women; and 2) the relationships between the social determinants of health and interpersonal violence against women. We used concept mapping to identify what was reported on the relationships among individual-level characteristics and population-level influence on gender-based violence against women and the consequences for women's health. Institutional ethics review was not required for this scoping review since there was no involvement or contact with human subjects. The different forms of violence-symbolic, structural and interpersonal-are not mutually exclusive, rather they relate to one another as they manifest in the lives of women. Structural violence is marked by deeply unequal access to the determinants of health (e.g., housing, good quality health care, and unemployment), which then create conditions where interpersonal violence can happen and which shape gendered forms of violence for women in vulnerable social positions. Our web of causation illustrates how structural factors can have negative impacts on the social determinants of health and increases the risk for interpersonal violence among women. Public health policy responses to violence against women should move beyond individual-level approaches to violence, to consider how structural and interpersonal level violence and power relations shape the 'lived experiences' of violence for women.

  3. Patterns of interpersonal problems and their improvement in depressive and anxious patients treated with psychoanalytic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Simone; Leibing, Eric; Jakobsen, Thorsten; Rudolf, Gerd; Brockmann, Josef; Eckert, Jochen; Huber, Dorothea; Klug, Günther; Henrich, Gerhard; Grande, Tilmann; Keller, Wolfram; Kreische, Reinhard; Biskup, Joachim; Staats, Hermann; Warwas, Jasmin; Leichsenring, Falk

    2010-01-01

    Interpersonal problems were studied in 121 patients treated with psychoanalytic therapy using the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems. Four characteristic subtypes were identified, which differed in the quality and flexibility of their interpersonal behavior. Independent of the predominant type of interpersonal problems, the psychotherapy treatment led to strong decreases in interpersonal distress and increases in interpersonal differentiation. Psychoanalytic therapy was highly effective for all identified interpersonal subtypes and seems to help patients achieve more satisfactory relationships.

  4. Nuclear industry strategic asset management: Managing nuclear assets in a competitive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.; Hunt, E.W. Jr.; Oatman, E.N.

    1999-01-01

    The former Electric Power Research Institute took the lead in developing an approach now widely known as strategic asset management (SAM). The SAM methodology applies the tools of decision/risk analysis used in the financial community to clarify effective use of physical assets and resources to create value: to build a clear line of sight to value creation. SAM processes have been used in both the power and other industries. The rapid change taking place in the nuclear business creates the need for competitive decision making regarding the management of nuclear assets. The nuclear industry is moving into an era in which shareholder value is determined by the net revenues earned on power marketed in a highly competitive and frequently low-priced power market environment

  5. Pathological Narcissism and Interpersonal Behavior in Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael J.; Pincus, Aaron L.; Conroy, David E.; Hyde, Amanda L.; Ram, Nilam

    2014-01-01

    The Cognitive-Affective Processing System (CAPS) has been proposed as a useful meta-framework for integrating contextual differences in situations with individual differences in personality pathology. In this article, we evaluated the potential of combining the CAPS meta-framework and contemporary interpersonal theory to investigate how individual differences in pathological narcissism influenced interpersonal functioning in daily life. University students (N = 184) completed event-contingent reports about interpersonal interactions across a 7-day diary study. Using multilevel regression models, we found that combinations of narcissistic expression (grandiosity, vulnerability) were associated with different interpersonal behavior patterns reflective of interpersonal dysfunction. These results are among the first to empirically demonstrate the usefulness of the CAPS model to conceptualize personality pathology through the patterning of if-then interpersonal processes. PMID:23205698

  6. Interpersonal subtypes in social phobia: diagnostic and treatment implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Nicole M; Pincus, Aaron L; Grosse Holtforth, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Interpersonal assessment may provide a clinically useful way to identify subtypes of social phobia. In this study, we examined evidence for interpersonal subtypes in a sample of 77 socially phobic outpatients. A cluster analysis based on the dimensions of dominance and love on the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Circumplex Scales (Alden, Wiggins, & Pincus, 1990) found 2 interpersonal subtypes of socially phobic patients. These subtypes did not differ on pretreatment global symptom severity as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis, 1993) or diagnostic comorbidity but did exhibit differential responses to outpatient psychotherapy. Overall, friendly-submissive social phobia patients had significantly lower scores on measures of social anxiety and significantly higher scores on measures of well-being and satisfaction at posttreatment than cold-submissive social phobia patients. We discuss the results in terms of interpersonal theory and the clinical relevance of assessment of interpersonal functioning prior to beginning psychotherapy with socially phobic patients.

  7. The four key characteristics of interpersonal emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niven, Karen

    2017-10-01

    Emotion researchers are increasingly interested in processes by which people influence others' feelings. Although one such process, interpersonal emotion regulation, has received particular attention in recent years, there remains confusion about exactly how to define this process. The present article aims to distinguish interpersonal emotion regulation from other, related processes by outlining its four key characteristics. Specifically, interpersonal emotion regulation is presented as a process of (i) regulation, that (ii) has an affective target, (iii) is deliberate, and (iv) has a social target. Considering these characteristics raises questions for future research concerning factors that may influence the process of interpersonal emotion regulation, why interpersonal emotion regulation sometimes fails, and whether interventions can improve people's use of interpersonal emotion regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mathematics creative thinking levels based on interpersonal intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncorowati, R. H.; Mardiyana; Saputro, D. R. S.

    2017-12-01

    Creative thinking ability was one of student’s ability to determine various alternative solutions toward mathematics problem. One of indicators related to creative thinking ability was interpersonal intelligence. Student’s interpersonal intelligence would influence to student’s creativity. This research aimed to analyze creative thinking ability level of junior high school students in Karanganyar using descriptive method. Data was collected by test, questionnaire, interview, and documentation. The result showed that students with high interpersonal intelligence achieved third and fourth level in creative thinking ability. Students with moderate interpersonal intelligence achieved second level in creative thinking ability and students with low interpersonal intelligence achieved first and zero level in creative thinking ability. Hence, students with high, moderate, and low interpersonal intelligence could solve mathematics problem based on their mathematics creative thinking ability.

  9. Daily Interpersonal and Affective Dynamics in Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Aidan G.C.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Simms, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    In this naturalistic study we adopt the lens of interpersonal theory to examine between-and within-person differences in dynamic processes of daily affect and interpersonal behaviors among individuals (N = 101) previously diagnosed with personality disorders who completed daily diaries over the course of 100 days. Dispositional ratings of interpersonal problems and measures of daily stress were used as predictors of daily shifts in interpersonal behavior and affect in multilevel models. Results indicate that ~40%–50% of the variance in interpersonal behavior and affect is due to daily fluctuations, which are modestly related to dispositional measures of interpersonal problems but strongly related to daily stress. The findings support conceptions of personality disorders as a dynamic form of psychopathology involving the individuals interacting with and regulating in response to the contextual features of their environment. PMID:26200849

  10. Electrical actuators in asset management systems; Elektrische Stellantriebe in Asset-Management-Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbstritt, Michael [AUMA Riester GmbH und Co. KG, Muellheim (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    The terms ''asset management'' and ''life-cycle management'' are nowadays popularly used to designate modern plant management. In the case of complex systems such as process-engineering plants, time and effort are necessary before an idea can be translated into data clear to all the persons involved, however. A key role is played in this context by NAMUR. This article discusses the potential benefits of asset management for electrical actuators and similar field devices and the part played by the NAMUR recommendations. (orig.)

  11. Association between Unintentional Interpersonal Postural Coordination Produced by Interpersonal Light Touch and the Intensity of Social Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Ishigaki

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal postural coordination (IPC produced by interpersonal light touch (ILT, whereby time-series variations in the postural sway between two people unintentionally resemble each other, may be a possible social interaction. From a sociopsychological standpoint, close mutual behavioral coordination is recognized as “social glue,” which represents the closeness of relationships and contributes to the building of a good rapport. Therefore, we hypothesized that if IPC functions as social glue, then IPC produced by ILT also represents a social relationship. Participants were dyadic pairs with a preexisting social relationship (acquaintance, friend, or best-friend, and we assessed the closeness between the partners. Postural sway in two quiet standing conditions—no touch (NT and ILT (a mutual light touch with <1 N condition—was concurrently measured with the side-by-side standing position, and the association of IPC with intradyadic closeness (rapport was analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. The results showed that unintentional IPC was higher in both axes of the ILT condition than in NT condition. Additionally, IPC in the mediolateral axis (the partner side of the ILT condition was positively correlated with intradyadic closeness, whereas that in the anteroposterior axis (the non-partner side showed a negative association. As expected, IPC represented intradyadic closeness (rapport. Results indicate that, in unintentional IPC produced by ILT, the priority of processing sensory feedback for postural control, which is received from the individual and a partner, is modulated depending on the rapport in interactional coupled feedback loops between the two individuals (i.e., good rapport increases the degree of taking in feedback from a partner. Thus, unintentional IPC produced by ILT functions as social glue, and it provides an understanding of the sociopsychological aspect in the human-to-human postural coordination mechanism.

  12. The Intangible Assets of Korean Manufacturing Firms for Foreign Direct Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghoon Hong

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to apply the intangible assets approach to the emerging multinational enterprises of Korea. More specifically, it tries to empirically analyze whether Korean firms investing in foreign markets possess more advanced intangible assets than those investing only in the domestic market, and whether Korean firms exploit different types of tangible assets in different host regions. The following conclusions have been drawn by analyzing the data on Korea manufacturing firms listed on the Stock Exchange. First, firms investing in foreign markets possess more advanced intangible assets than domestic market-oriented ones. More specifically, firms investing in the Western developed region are shown to be superior in the economies of scale, R&D, advertising intensity, capital intensity, and interfirm linkages, whereas those investing in the Asian developing region are superior only in the economies of scale and organizational skills. This implies that Korean firms operating in developed countries seem to exploit a wider range of intangible assets to address intense competition and sophisticated demand in the host markets. And, when firms investing in the developed and developing regions are compared directly, the former group are found to exploit technological capability and interfirm linkages more intensively. Second, availability of internal funds and human capital intensity do not show statistical significances, implying that these abilities are not different between firms investing in foreign markets and the domestic market. Third, Korean multinational enterprises are more similar to Japanese than Western ones in terms that they actively exploit organizational skills and interfirm network. Nonetheless, these conclusions have been derived by analyzing the data on parent firms, based on the assumption that Korean overseas subsidiaries commonly share the intangible assets of their parents. This weakness is mainly due to the limited

  13. INEQUALITY, INCENTIVES AND THE INTERPERSONAL TEST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article defends three claims: (1) even if Rawls' difference principle permits incentives to induce talented people to be more productive, it does not follow that it permits inequalities; (2) the difference principle, when adequately specified, may in some circumstances permit incent...... incentives and allow that the worst off are not made as well off as they could be; and (3) an argument for incentives might pass Cohen's interpersonal test even if it is unsound and might not pass it even if it is sound. 1...

  14. [Motives and interpersonal functions of aggression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbuchi, K

    1987-06-01

    In this review, the author theoretically and empirically examined motives and interpersonal functions of aggression. A factor-analysis of Averill's questionnaire items on anger revealed that motives involved in aggressive responses were clustered into two groups: the hostile and the instrumental. It was also clarified that an individual is likely to engage in aggression particularly when some hostile motives are evoked. Concerning the interpersonal functions, the author proposed that aggression might serve four principal goals. (1) Aggression can be generated as an avoidance response to an aversive stimulus, such as frustration, annoyance, or pain, and so on. It depends on the severity of the stimulus. It was however emphasized that aggression is also mediated by social cognition, such as an attribution of intent to a harm-doer. (2) Aggression can be used as a means of coercing the other person into doing something. An individual is likely to use such a power strategy if he/she is lacking in self-confidence or a perspective for influencing the target person by more peaceful strategies. (3) Aggression can be interpreted as a punishment when it is directed toward a transgressor. In this case, aggression is motivated by restoration of a social justice, and thus its intensity is determined by the perceived moral responsibility of the transgressor. Further, it was indicated that aggression is intensified if it is justified as a sanctional conduct against the immoral. (4) Aggression can be also evoked when an individual's social identity is threatened. It was suggested that impression management motives are involved in aggression by an unexpected finding that the presence of audience or the identifiability rather facilitated retaliative aggression. The aggression-inhibition effect of apology was also explained in terms of impression management. In conclusion, it was presented that aggression is a behavioral strategy as an attempt to resolve interpersonal conflicts

  15. The Relational Antecedents of Interpersonal Helping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stea, Diego; Pedersen, Torben; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2017-01-01

    networks are also associated with cognitive costs, which may reduce the focal employee's ability to both recognize the need for help and engage in helping behaviours. For these reasons, the authors assert an inverted U-shaped relation between the size of an ego's social network and engagement in helping...... behaviour. However, high-quality relationships imply higher mutual understanding between the actors, and hence lower cognitive costs. In turn, the position (and threshold) of the curve between network size and interpersonal helping should be influenced by the quality of the relationship between the provider...

  16. Interpersonal bullying behaviours in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper employing a phenomenological method to explicate seven informants’ experience of interpersonal bullying behaviors in a South African work context, I demarcated four general themes namely: lack of recognition, discrimination, obstructionism, and isolation. Moreover, I found that perpetrators (male and female managers predominantly used verbal and indirect negative acts to bully subordinates. Finally, racial tensions contributed to bullying behavior. While a phenomenological approach shows promise to explore local bullying behavior more research is needed to broaden our understanding of the phenomenon, including explicating bullying through the eyes of bystanders and alleged bullies.

  17. Strengthening Institutions and Enterprises of Cooperative and Their Impact on Members’ Assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Widiyati Soemodipoero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Revitalization of Cooperative interpreted as a series of activities undertaken to reorganize the institutional and strengthen cooperative efforts in accordance with the values and principles of cooperatives. Cooperative serves as a tool to equalize the concentration of control of economic assets so that the weak economy may have opportunities to enhance economic independence. The purpose of this study is to explore the link between the level of member participation and human resource competencies to the strengthening of the institutional and cooperative efforts as well as its impact on member assets. This research used logistic regression analysis and Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. The results showed that the level of participation of members and managers of Human Resources competencies significantly affect institutional strengthening and cooperative efforts. Different test shows that there is a difference between financial capital and human capital before and after become a member of the cooperative.

  18. Nuclear Materials: Reconsidering Wastes and Assets - 13193

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalske, T.A.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear industry, both in the commercial and the government sectors, has generated large quantities of material that span the spectrum of usefulness, from highly valuable ('assets') to worthless ('wastes'). In many cases, the decision parameters are clear. Transuranic waste and high level waste, for example, have no value, and is either in a final disposition path today, or - in the case of high level waste - awaiting a policy decision about final disposition. Other materials, though discardable, have intrinsic scientific or market value that may be hidden by the complexity, hazard, or cost of recovery. An informed decision process should acknowledge the asset value, or lack of value, of the complete inventory of materials, and the structure necessary to implement the range of possible options. It is important that informed decisions are made about the asset value for the variety of nuclear materials available. For example, there is a significant quantity of spent fuel available for recycle (an estimated $4 billion value in the Savannah River Site's (SRS) L area alone); in fact, SRS has already blended down more than 300 metric tons of uranium for commercial reactor use. Over 34 metric tons of surplus plutonium is also on a path to be used as commercial fuel. There are other radiological materials that are routinely handled at the site in large quantities that should be viewed as strategically important and / or commercially viable. In some cases, these materials are irreplaceable domestically, and failure to consider their recovery could jeopardize our technological leadership or national defense. The inventories of nuclear materials at SRS that have been characterized as 'waste' include isotopes of plutonium, uranium, americium, and helium. Although planning has been performed to establish the technical and regulatory bases for their discard and disposal, recovery of these materials is both economically attractive and in the national interest. (authors)

  19. Nuclear Materials: Reconsidering Wastes and Assets - 13193

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalske, T.A. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry, both in the commercial and the government sectors, has generated large quantities of material that span the spectrum of usefulness, from highly valuable ('assets') to worthless ('wastes'). In many cases, the decision parameters are clear. Transuranic waste and high level waste, for example, have no value, and is either in a final disposition path today, or - in the case of high level waste - awaiting a policy decision about final disposition. Other materials, though discardable, have intrinsic scientific or market value that may be hidden by the complexity, hazard, or cost of recovery. An informed decision process should acknowledge the asset value, or lack of value, of the complete inventory of materials, and the structure necessary to implement the range of possible options. It is important that informed decisions are made about the asset value for the variety of nuclear materials available. For example, there is a significant quantity of spent fuel available for recycle (an estimated $4 billion value in the Savannah River Site's (SRS) L area alone); in fact, SRS has already blended down more than 300 metric tons of uranium for commercial reactor use. Over 34 metric tons of surplus plutonium is also on a path to be used as commercial fuel. There are other radiological materials that are routinely handled at the site in large quantities that should be viewed as strategically important and / or commercially viable. In some cases, these materials are irreplaceable domestically, and failure to consider their recovery could jeopardize our technological leadership or national defense. The inventories of nuclear materials at SRS that have been characterized as 'waste' include isotopes of plutonium, uranium, americium, and helium. Although planning has been performed to establish the technical and regulatory bases for their discard and disposal, recovery of these materials is both economically attractive and in the

  20. Rhythm in joint action: psychological and neurophysiological mechanisms for real-time interpersonal coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peter E.; Novembre, Giacomo; Hove, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Human interaction often requires simultaneous precision and flexibility in the coordination of rhythmic behaviour between individuals engaged in joint activity, for example, playing a musical duet or dancing with a partner. This review article addresses the psychological processes and brain mechanisms that enable such rhythmic interpersonal coordination. First, an overview is given of research on the cognitive-motor processes that enable individuals to represent joint action goals and to anticipate, attend and adapt to other's actions in real time. Second, the neurophysiological mechanisms that underpin rhythmic interpersonal coordination are sought in studies of sensorimotor and cognitive processes that play a role in the representation and integration of self- and other-related actions within and between individuals' brains. Finally, relationships between social–psychological factors and rhythmic interpersonal coordination are considered from two perspectives, one concerning how social-cognitive tendencies (e.g. empathy) affect coordination, and the other concerning how coordination affects interpersonal affiliation, trust and prosocial behaviour. Our review highlights musical ensemble performance as an ecologically valid yet readily controlled domain for investigating rhythm in joint action. PMID:25385772