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Sample records for human assembly time

  1. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  2. Real-time assembly and disassembly of human RAD51 filaments on individual DNA molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Heijden, T.; Seidel, R.; Modesti, M.; Kanaar, R.; Wyman, C.; Dekker, C.

    2007-01-01

    The human DNA repair protein RAD51 is the crucial component of helical nucleoprotein filaments that drive homologous recombination. The molecular mechanistic details of how this structure facilitates the requisite DNA strand rearrangements are not known but must involve dynamic interactions between

  3. Real-time assembly and disassembly of human RAD51 filaments on individual DNA molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van der Heijden (Thijn); R. Seidel (Ralf); M. Modesti (Mauro); R. Kanaar (Roland); C. Wyman (Claire); C. Dekker (Cees)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe human DNA repair protein RAD51 is the crucial component of helical nucleoprotein filaments that drive homologous recombination. The molecular mechanistic details of how this structure facilitates the requisite DNA strand rearrangements are not known but must involve dynamic

  4. Analysis of Human Communication during Assembly Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    AD-A7l 43 ANALYSIS OF HUMAN COMMUNICATION DURING ASSEMBLY TASKS in1(U) CRNEGIE-MELLO UNIY PITTSBURGH PA ROBOTICS INST UNCLSSIIEDK S BARBER ET AL...ao I Dur~~~~IngAbcbyTs; 7c .S:in i lSAo .0. Analysis of Human Communication During Assembly Tasks K. Suzanne Barber and Gerald J. Agin CMU-RI-TR-86-1...TYPE or REPORT & PE-Rioo CevCZaz Analysis of Human Communication During Assembly Inlterim Tasks I . PERFORMING 00RG. REPORT NUMBER 1. £UT~oOR~e) IL

  5. De novo assembly and phasing of a Korean human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Sun; Rhie, Arang; Kim, Junsoo; Lee, Sangjin; Sohn, Min-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Uk; Hastie, Alex; Cao, Han; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Kuk, Junho; Park, Gun Hwa; Kim, Juhyeok; Ryu, Hanna; Kim, Jongbum; Roh, Mira; Baek, Jeonghun; Hunkapiller, Michael W; Korlach, Jonas; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Changhoon

    2016-10-13

    Advances in genome assembly and phasing provide an opportunity to investigate the diploid architecture of the human genome and reveal the full range of structural variation across population groups. Here we report the de novo assembly and haplotype phasing of the Korean individual AK1 (ref. 1) using single-molecule real-time sequencing, next-generation mapping, microfluidics-based linked reads, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequencing approaches. Single-molecule sequencing coupled with next-generation mapping generated a highly contiguous assembly, with a contig N50 size of 17.9 Mb and a scaffold N50 size of 44.8 Mb, resolving 8 chromosomal arms into single scaffolds. The de novo assembly, along with local assemblies and spanning long reads, closes 105 and extends into 72 out of 190 euchromatic gaps in the reference genome, adding 1.03 Mb of previously intractable sequence. High concordance between the assembly and paired-end sequences from 62,758 BAC clones provides strong support for the robustness of the assembly. We identify 18,210 structural variants by direct comparison of the assembly with the human reference, identifying thousands of breakpoints that, to our knowledge, have not been reported before. Many of the insertions are reflected in the transcriptome and are shared across the Asian population. We performed haplotype phasing of the assembly with short reads, long reads and linked reads from whole-genome sequencing and with short reads from 31,719 BAC clones, thereby achieving phased blocks with an N50 size of 11.6 Mb. Haplotigs assembled from single-molecule real-time reads assigned to haplotypes on phased blocks covered 89% of genes. The haplotigs accurately characterized the hypervariable major histocompatability complex region as well as demonstrating allele configuration in clinically relevant genes such as CYP2D6. This work presents the most contiguous diploid human genome assembly so far, with extensive investigation of

  6. Parallelism and Time in Hierarchical Self-Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ho-Lin

    2011-01-01

    We study the role that parallelism plays in time complexity of Winfree's abstract Tile Assembly Model (aTAM), a model of molecular algorithmic self-assembly. In the "hierarchical" aTAM, two assemblies, both consisting of multiple tiles, are allowed to aggregate together, whereas in the "seeded" aTAM, tiles attach one at a time to a growing assembly. Adleman, Cheng, Goel, and Huang ("Running Time and Program Size for Self-Assembled Squares", STOC 2001) showed how to assemble an n x n square in O(n) time in the seeded aTAM using O(log n / log log n) unique tile types, where both of these parameters are optimal. They asked whether the hierarchical aTAM could allow a tile system to use the ability to form large assemblies in parallel before they attach to break the Omega(n) lower bound for assembly time. We show that there is a tile system with the optimal O(log n / log log n) tile types that assembles an n x n square using O(log^2 n) parallel "stages", which is close to the optimal Omega(log n) stages, forming t...

  7. Genetic variation and the de novo assembly of human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, Mark J P; Wilson, Richard K; Eichler, Evan E

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of genetic variation and the assembly of genome sequences are both inextricably linked to advances in DNA-sequencing technology. Short-read massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our ability to discover genetic variation but is insufficient to generate high-quality genome assemblies or resolve most structural variation. Full resolution of variation is only guaranteed by complete de novo assembly of a genome. Here, we review approaches to genome assembly, the nature of gaps or missing sequences, and biases in the assembly process. We describe the challenges of generating a complete de novo genome assembly using current technologies and the impact that being able to perfectly sequence the genome would have on understanding human disease and evolution. Finally, we summarize recent technological advances that improve both contiguity and accuracy and emphasize the importance of complete de novo assembly as opposed to read mapping as the primary means to understanding the full range of human genetic variation.

  8. Minimal absent words in four human genome assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara P Garcia

    Full Text Available Minimal absent words have been computed in genomes of organisms from all domains of life. Here, we aim to contribute to the catalogue of human genomic variation by investigating the variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species, using four human genome assemblies. We compare the reference human genome GRCh37 assembly, the HuRef assembly of the genome of Craig Venter, the NA12878 assembly from cell line GM12878, and the YH assembly of the genome of a Han Chinese individual. We find the variation in number and content of minimal absent words between assemblies more significant for large and very large minimal absent words, where the biases of sequencing and assembly methodologies become more pronounced. Moreover, we find generally greater similarity between the human genome assemblies sequenced with capillary-based technologies (GRCh37 and HuRef than between the human genome assemblies sequenced with massively parallel technologies (NA12878 and YH. Finally, as expected, we find the overall variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species to be generally smaller than the variation between species.

  9. Minimal absent words in four human genome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sara P; Pinho, Armando J

    2011-01-01

    Minimal absent words have been computed in genomes of organisms from all domains of life. Here, we aim to contribute to the catalogue of human genomic variation by investigating the variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species, using four human genome assemblies. We compare the reference human genome GRCh37 assembly, the HuRef assembly of the genome of Craig Venter, the NA12878 assembly from cell line GM12878, and the YH assembly of the genome of a Han Chinese individual. We find the variation in number and content of minimal absent words between assemblies more significant for large and very large minimal absent words, where the biases of sequencing and assembly methodologies become more pronounced. Moreover, we find generally greater similarity between the human genome assemblies sequenced with capillary-based technologies (GRCh37 and HuRef) than between the human genome assemblies sequenced with massively parallel technologies (NA12878 and YH). Finally, as expected, we find the overall variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species to be generally smaller than the variation between species.

  10. Cooperation between humans and robots in fine assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, C. K.; Konold, P.; Rapp, I.; Mann, C.; Muminovic, A.

    2017-01-01

    The development of ever smaller components in manufacturing processes require handling, assembling and testing of miniature similar components. The human eye meets its optical limits with ongoing miniaturization of parts, due to the fact that it is not able to detect particles with a size smaller than 0.11 mm or register distances below 0.07 mm - like separating gaps. After several hours of labour, workers cannot accurately differentiate colour nuances as well as constant quality of work cannot be guaranteed. Assembly is usually done with tools, such as microscopes, magnifiers or digital measuring devices. Due to the enormous mental concentration, quickly a fatigue process sets in. This requires breaks or change of task and reduces productivity. Dealing with handling devices such as grippers, guide units and actuators for component assembling, requires a time consuming training process. Often productivity increase is first achieved after years of daily training. Miniaturizations are ubiquitously needed, for instance in the surgery. Very small add-on instruments must be provided. In measurement, e.g. it is a technological must and a competitive advantage, to determine required data with a small-as-possible, highest-possible-resolution sensor. Solution: The realization of a flexible universal workstation, using standard robotic systems and image processing devices in cooperation with humans, where workers are largely freed up from highly strenuous physical and fine motoric work, so that they can do productive work monitoring and adjusting the machine assisted production process.

  11. Optimal use of human and machine resources for Space Station assembly operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the issues involved in determining the best mix of human and machine resources for assembly of the Space Station. It presents the current Station assembly sequence, along with descriptions of the available assembly resources. A number of methodologies for optimizing the human/machine tradeoff problem have been developed, but the Space Station assembly offers some unique issues that have not yet been addressed. These include a strong constraint on available EVA time for early flights and a phased deployment of assembly resources over time. A methodology for incorporating the previously developed decision methods to the special case of the Space Station is presented. This methodology emphasizes an application of multiple qualitative and quantitative techniques, including simulation and decision analysis, for producing an objective, robust solution to the tradeoff problem.

  12. Probing human response times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Anders

    2004-07-01

    In a recent preprint (Dialog in e-mail traffic, preprint cond-mat/0304433), the temporal dynamics of an e-mail network has been investigated by Eckmann, Moses and Sergi. Specifically, the time period between an e-mail message and its reply were recorded. It will be shown here that their data agrees quantitatively with the frame work proposed to explain a recent experiment on the response of “internauts” to a news publication (Physica A 296(3-4) (2001) 539) despite differences in communication channels, topics, time-scale and socio-economic characteristics of the two population. This suggest a generalized response time distribution ∼ t-1 for human populations in the absence of deadlines with important implications for psychological and social studies as well the study of dynamical networks.

  13. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang; Huang, Shujia; Sun, Yuhui; Tong, Xin; Xie, Yinlong; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Hailong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Jian; Li, Bo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Fang; Sun, Peng; Liu, Siyang; Gao, Peng; Huang, Haodong; Sun, Jing; Chen, Dan; He, Guangzhu; Huang, Weihua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Yue; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Bolund, Lars; Krogh, Anders; Kristiansen, Karsten; Drmanac, Radoje; Drmanac, Snezana; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Yingrui; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should aid in translating genotypes to phenotypes for the development of personalized medicine.

  14. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang

    2015-01-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome...... of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should...... shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb...

  15. Cell assemblies at multiple time scales with arbitrary lag constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Eleonora; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Hebb's idea of a cell assembly as the fundamental unit of neural information processing has dominated neuroscience like no other theoretical concept within the past 60 years. A range of different physiological phenomena, from precisely synchronized spiking to broadly simultaneous rate increases, has been subsumed under this term. Yet progress in this area is hampered by the lack of statistical tools that would enable to extract assemblies with arbitrary constellations of time lags, and at multiple temporal scales, partly due to the severe computational burden. Here we present such a unifying methodological and conceptual framework which detects assembly structure at many different time scales, levels of precision, and with arbitrary internal organization. Applying this methodology to multiple single unit recordings from various cortical areas, we find that there is no universal cortical coding scheme, but that assembly structure and precision significantly depends on the brain area recorded and ongoing task demands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19428.001 PMID:28074777

  16. First assembly times and equilibration in stochastic coagulation-fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Orsogna, Maria R. [Department of Biomathematics, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095-1766 (United States); Department of Mathematics, CSUN, Los Angeles, California 91330-8313 (United States); Lei, Qi [Institute for Computational and Engineering Sciences, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712-1229 (United States); Chou, Tom [Department of Biomathematics, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095-1766 (United States); Department of Mathematics, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095-1555 (United States)

    2015-07-07

    We develop a fully stochastic theory for coagulation and fragmentation (CF) in a finite system with a maximum cluster size constraint. The process is modeled using a high-dimensional master equation for the probabilities of cluster configurations. For certain realizations of total mass and maximum cluster sizes, we find exact analytical results for the expected equilibrium cluster distributions. If coagulation is fast relative to fragmentation and if the total system mass is indivisible by the mass of the largest allowed cluster, we find a mean cluster-size distribution that is strikingly broader than that predicted by the corresponding mass-action equations. Combinations of total mass and maximum cluster size under which equilibration is accelerated, eluding late-stage coarsening, are also delineated. Finally, we compute the mean time it takes particles to first assemble into a maximum-sized cluster. Through careful state-space enumeration, the scaling of mean assembly times is derived for all combinations of total mass and maximum cluster size. We find that CF accelerates assembly relative to monomer kinetic only in special cases. All of our results hold in the infinite system limit and can be only derived from a high-dimensional discrete stochastic model, highlighting how classical mass-action models of self-assembly can fail.

  17. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): halo formation times and halo assembly bias on the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojeiro, Rita; Eardley, Elizabeth; Peacock, John A.; Norberg, Peder; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Driver, Simon P.; Henriques, Bruno; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kafle, Prajwal R.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Thomas, Peter; Tonini, Chiara; Wild, Vivienne

    2017-09-01

    We present evidence for halo assembly bias as a function of geometric environment (GE). By classifying Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) galaxy groups as residing in voids, sheets, filaments or knots using a tidal tensor method, we find that low-mass haloes that reside in knots are older than haloes of the same mass that reside in voids. This result provides direct support to theories that link strong halo tidal interactions with halo assembly times. The trend with GE is reversed at large halo mass, with haloes in knots being younger than haloes of the same mass in voids. We find a clear signal of halo downsizing - more massive haloes host galaxies that assembled their stars earlier. This overall trend holds independently of GE. We support our analysis with an in-depth exploration of the L-Galaxies semi-analytic model, used here to correlate several galaxy properties with three different definitions of halo formation time. We find a complex relationship between halo formation time and galaxy properties, with significant scatter. We confirm that stellar mass to halo mass ratio, specific star formation rate (SFR) and mass-weighed age are reasonable proxies of halo formation time, especially at low halo masses. Instantaneous SFR is a poor indicator at all halo masses. Using the same semi-analytic model, we create mock spectral observations using complex star formation and chemical enrichment histories, which approximately mimic GAMA's typical signal-to-noise ratio and wavelength range. We use these mocks to assert how well potential proxies of halo formation time may be recovered from GAMA-like spectroscopic data.

  18. Long coherence times in self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Leosson, K.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2002-01-01

    We report measurements of ultra-long coherence in self-assembled quantum dots. Transient four-wave mixing experiments at 5 K show an average dephasing time of 372 ps, corresponding to a homogeneous linewidth of 3.5 mueV, which is significantly smaller than the linewidth observed in single-dot...... luminescence. Time-resolved luminescence measurements show a lifetime of the dot ground state of 800 ps demonstrating the presence of pure dephasing at finite temperature. The homogeneous width is lifetime limited only at temperatures approaching 0 K....

  19. Glutamine analogs promote cytoophidium assembly in human and Drosophila cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kangni Chen; Jing Zhang; (O)mür Yilmaz Tastan; Zillah Anne Deussen; Mayte Yu-Yin Siswick; Ji-Long Liu

    2011-01-01

    CTP synthase is compartmentalized within a subcellular structure,termed the cytoophidium,in a range of organisms including bacteria,yeast,fruit fly and rat.Here we show that CTP synthase is also compartmentalized into cytoophidia in human cells.Surprisingly,the occurrence of cyloophidia in human cells increases upon treatment with a glutamine analog 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON),an inhibitor of glutaminedependent enzymes including CTP synthase.Experiments in flies confirmned that DON globally promotes cytoophidium assembly.Clonal analysis via CTP synthase RNA interference in somatic cells indicates that CTP synthase expression level is critical for the formation of cytoophidia.Moreover,DON facilitates cytoophidium assembly even when CTP synthase level is low.A second glutamine analog azaserine also promotes cytoophidum formation.Our data demonstrate that glutamine analogs serve as useful tools in the study of cytoophidia.

  20. Selective assembly of laminin variants by human carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Wayner, E A; Hoffstrom, B G

    1994-01-01

    basement membranes, the pattern of production of various laminin subunits remains to be explored. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The expression of laminin was examined in several human carcinoma cells using a panel of specific cDNA probes as well as polyclonal and chain specific monoclonal antibodies......BACKGROUND: The laminins are heterotrimeric basement membrane glycoproteins. Eight subunits that can be assembled into laminins have been characterized and are known as: A, B1, B2, S, M, K, B2t, B1k laminin chains. Although many neoplastic cells secrete laminins and some of them even assemble....... For this purpose a human laminin S chain 2 kb cDNA was isolated and characterized and used together with existing probes for laminin chains. RESULTS: All carcinoma cell lines had a high level of expression of three light chains (B1, S and B2) mRNA. In contrast, the heavy chains of laminin, A and M, were expressed...

  1. Engineered human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) are produced in a rotating wall vessel (RWV) with microcarriers by coculturing mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (BTC) and bronchial epithelium cells (BEC). These TLAs display structural characteristics and express markers of in vivo respiratory epithelia. TLAs are useful for screening compounds active in lung tissues such as antiviral compounds, cystic fibrosis treatments, allergens, and cytotoxic compounds.

  2. GPS Block 2R Time Standard Assembly (TSA) architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Anthony P.

    1990-01-01

    The underlying philosophy of the Global Positioning System (GPS) 2R Time Standard Assembly (TSA) architecture is to utilize two frequency sources, one fixed frequency reference source and one system frequency source, and to couple the system frequency source to the reference frequency source via a sample data loop. The system source is used to provide the basic clock frequency and timing for the space vehicle (SV) and it uses a voltage controlled crystal oscillator (VCXO) with high short term stability. The reference source is an atomic frequency standard (AFS) with high long term stability. The architecture can support any type of frequency standard. In the system design rubidium, cesium, and H2 masers outputting a canonical frequency were accommodated. The architecture is software intensive. All VCXO adjustments are digital and are calculated by a processor. They are applied to the VCXO via a digital to analog converter.

  3. An Effective Division of Labor Between Human and Robotic Agents Performing a Cooperative Assembly Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnmark, Fredrik; Bluethmann, William; Rochlis, Jennifer; Huber, Eric; Ambrose, Robert

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Human Space Flight program depends heavily on spacewalks performed by human astronauts. These so-called extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) are risky, expensive and complex. Work is underway to develop a robotic astronaut's assistant that can help reduce human EVA time and workload by delivering human-like dexterous manipulation capabilities to any EVA worksite. An experiment is conducted to evaluate human-robot teaming strategies in the context of a simplified EVA assembly task in which Robonaut, a collaborative effort with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), an anthropomorphic robot works side-by-side with a human subject. Team performance is studied in an effort to identify the strengths and weaknesses of each teaming configuration and to recommend an appropriate division of labor. A shared control approach is developed to take advantage of the complementary strengths of the human teleoperator and robot, even in the presence of significant time delay.

  4. Assembling the Marine Metagenome, One Cell at a Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Xie, Gary; Copeland, Alex; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Han, Cliff; Kiss, Hajnalka; Saw, Jimmy H.; Senin, Pavel; Yang, Chi; Chatterji, Sourav; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Sieracki, Michael E.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2010-06-24

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91percent and 78percent, respectively. Only 0.24percent of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured

  5. Assembling The Marine Metagenome, One Cell At A Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Gang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Shunsheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiss, Hajnalka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saw, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Senin, Pavel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Woyke, Tanja [DOE JOINT GENOME INAT.; Copeland, Alex [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Gonzalez, Jose [UNIV OF LAGUNA, SPAIN; Chatterji, Sourav [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Cheng, Jan - Fang [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Eisen, Jonathan A [DOE JOINT GENOME INST.; Sieracki, Michael E [UNIV OF CA-DAVIS; Stepanauskas, Ramunas [BIGELOW LAB

    2008-01-01

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91% and 78%, respectively. Only 0.24% of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured taxa from a complex

  6. Assembling the marine metagenome, one cell at a time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Woyke

    Full Text Available The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91% and 78%, respectively. Only 0.24% of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured

  7. Stellar Mass Assembly of Brightest Cluster Galaxies at Late Times

    CERN Document Server

    Inagaki, Takahiro; Huang, Hung-Jin; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the formation history of brightest cluster galaxies is an important topic in galaxy formation. Utilizing the Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich cluster catalog, and applying the Ansatz that the most massive halos at one redshift remain among the most massive ones at a slightly later cosmic epoch, we have constructed cluster samples at redshift z~0.4 and z~0.2 that can be statistically regarded as progenitor-descendant pairs. This allows us to study the stellar mass assembly history of BCGs in these massive clusters at late times, finding the degree of growth between the two epochs is likely at only few percent level, which is far lower compared to the prediction from a state-of-the-art semi-analytic galaxy formation model.

  8. A Framework for Geometric Reasoning About Human Figures and Factors in Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calton, Terri L.

    1999-07-20

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be perfectly valid operations, but in reality some operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. For example, the use of a ratchet may be reasoned feasible for an assembly operation; however, when a hand is placed on the tool the operation is no longer feasible, perhaps because of inaccessibility, insufficient strength or human interference with assembly components. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications, however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem, HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning which allows engineers to quickly verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. This paper presents a framework for integrating geometry-based assembly planning algorithms with commercially available human figure modeling software packages. Experimental results to selected applications along with lessons learned are presented.

  9. Tissuelike 3D Assemblies of Human Broncho-Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissuelike assemblies (TLAs) of human broncho-epithelial (HBE) cells have been developed for use in in vitro research on infection of humans by respiratory viruses. The 2D monolayer HBE cell cultures heretofore used in such research lack the complex cell structures and interactions characteristic of in vivo tissues and, consequently, do not adequately emulate the infection dynamics of in-vivo microbial adhesion and invasion. In contrast, the 3D HBE TLAs are characterized by more-realistic reproductions of the geometrical and functional complexity, differentiation of cells, cell-to-cell interactions, and cell-to-matrix interactions characteristic of human respiratory epithelia. Hence, the 3D HBE TLAs are expected to make it possible to perform at least some of the research in vitro under more-realistic conditions, without need to infect human subjects. The TLAs are grown on collagen-coated cyclodextran microbeads under controlled conditions in a nutrient liquid in the simulated microgravitational environment of a bioreactor of the rotating- wall-vessel type. Primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells are used as a foundation matrix, while adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cells are used as the overlying component. The beads become coated with cells, and cells on adjacent beads coalesce into 3D masses. The resulting TLAs have been found to share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelia including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The differentiation of the cells in these TLAs into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues is confirmed by the presence of compounds, including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium marker compounds, and by the production of tissue mucin. In a series of initial infection tests, TLA cultures were inoculated with human respiratory syncytial viruses and parainfluenza type 3 viruses. Infection was confirmed by photomicrographs that

  10. In-Space Assembly Capability Assessment for Potential Human Exploration and Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Sharon A.; Jones, Christopher A.; Arney, Dale C.; Stillwagen, Frederic H.; Chai, Patrick R.; Hutchinson, Craig D.; Stafford, Matthew A.; Moses, Robert W.; Dempsey, James A.; Rodgers, Erica M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Human missions to Mars present several major challenges that must be overcome, including delivering multiple large mass and volume elements, keeping the crew safe and productive, meeting cost constraints, and ensuring a sustainable campaign. Traditional methods for executing human Mars missions minimize or eliminate in-space assembly, which provides a narrow range of options for addressing these challenges and limits the types of missions that can be performed. This paper discusses recent work to evaluate how the inclusion of in-space assembly in space mission architectural concepts could provide novel solutions to address these challenges by increasing operational flexibility, robustness, risk reduction, crew health and safety, and sustainability. A hierarchical framework is presented to characterize assembly strategies, assembly tasks, and the required capabilities to assemble mission systems in space. The framework is used to identify general mission system design considerations and assembly system characteristics by assembly strategy. These general approaches are then applied to identify potential in-space assembly applications to address each challenge. Through this process, several focus areas were identified where applications of in-space assembly could affect multiple challenges. Each focus area was developed to identify functions, potential assembly solutions and operations, key architectural trades, and potential considerations and implications of implementation. This paper helps to identify key areas to investigate were potentially significant gains in addressing the challenges with human missions to Mars may be realized, and creates a foundation on which to further develop and analyze in-space assembly concepts and assembly-based architectures.

  11. Community assembly in experimental grasslands: suitable environment or timely arrival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejrnaes, Rasmus; Bruun, Hans Henrik; Graae, Bente J

    2006-05-01

    It is hard to defend the view that biotic communities represent a simple and predictable response to the abiotic environment. Biota and the abiotic environment interact, and the environment of an individual certainly includes its neighbors and visitors in the community. The complexity of community assembly calls forth a quest for general principles, yet current results and theories on assembly rules differ widely. Using a grassland microcosm as a model system, we manipulated fertility, disturbance by defoliation, soil/microclimate, and arrival order of species belonging to two groups differing in functional attributes. We analyzed the outcome of community assembly dynamics in terms of species richness, invasibility, and species composition. The analyses revealed strong environmental control over species richness and invasibility. Species composition was mainly determined by the arrival order of species, indicating that historical contingency may change the outcome of community assembly. The probability for multiple equilibria appeared to increase with productivity and environmental stability. The importance of arrival order offers an explanation of the difficulties in predicting local occurrences of species in the field. In our experiment, variation in fertility and disturbance was controlling colonization with predictable effects on emergent community properties such as species richness. The key mechanism is suggested to be asymmetric competition, and our results show that this mechanism is relatively insensitive to the species through which it works. While our analyses indicate a positive and significant correlation between richness and invasibility, the significance disappears after accounting for the effect of the environment. The importance of arrival order (historical contingency) and environmental control supports the assumption of the unified neutral theory that different species within a trophic level can be considered functionally equivalent when it comes

  12. Premitotic assembly of human CENPs -T and -W switches centromeric chromatin to a mitotic state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Prendergast

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are differentiated chromatin domains, present once per chromosome, that direct segregation of the genome in mitosis and meiosis by specifying assembly of the kinetochore. They are distinct genetic loci in that their identity in most organisms is determined not by the DNA sequences they are associated with, but through specific chromatin composition and context. The core nucleosomal protein CENP-A/cenH3 plays a primary role in centromere determination in all species and directs assembly of a large complex of associated proteins in vertebrates. While CENP-A itself is stably transmitted from one generation to the next, the nature of the template for centromere replication and its relationship to kinetochore function are as yet poorly understood. Here, we investigate the assembly and inheritance of a histone fold complex of the centromere, the CENP-T/W complex, which is integrated with centromeric chromatin in association with canonical histone H3 nucleosomes. We have investigated the cell cycle regulation, timing of assembly, generational persistence, and requirement for function of CENPs -T and -W in the cell cycle in human cells. The CENP-T/W complex assembles through a dynamic exchange mechanism in late S-phase and G2, is required for mitosis in each cell cycle and does not persist across cell generations, properties reciprocal to those measured for CENP-A. We propose that the CENP-A and H3-CENP-T/W nucleosome components of the centromere are specialized for centromeric and kinetochore activities, respectively. Segregation of the assembly mechanisms for the two allows the cell to switch between chromatin configurations that reciprocally support the replication of the centromere and its conversion to a mitotic state on postreplicative chromatin.

  13. Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0008 TITLE: Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Jan 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...Investigator [PI], Scripps) and John Cleveland (Collaborating/Partnering PI, Moffitt Cancer Center) seek to validate 40S ribosome assembly as a therapeutic

  14. A human CCT5 gene mutation causing distal neuropathy impairs hexadecamer assembly in an archaeal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wonki; Angileri, Francesca; Luo, Haibin; Lauria, Antonino; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Almerico, Anna Maria; Cappello, Francesco; de Macario, Everly Conway; Lednev, Igor K; Macario, Alberto J L; Robb, Frank T

    2014-10-27

    Chaperonins mediate protein folding in a cavity formed by multisubunit rings. The human CCT has eight non-identical subunits and the His147Arg mutation in one subunit, CCT5, causes neuropathy. Knowledge is scarce on the impact of this and other mutations upon the chaperone's structure and functions. To make progress, experimental models must be developed. We used an archaeal mutant homolog and demonstrated that the His147Arg mutant has impaired oligomeric assembly, ATPase activity, and defective protein homeostasis functions. These results establish for the first time that a human chaperonin gene defect can be reproduced and studied at the molecular level with an archaeal homolog. The major advantage of the system, consisting of rings with eight identical subunits, is that it amplifies the effects of a mutation as compared with the human counterpart, in which just one subunit per ring is defective. Therefore, the slight deficit of a non-lethal mutation can be detected and characterized.

  15. Self-assembly of human plasma fibrinogens on binary organosilane monolayers with micro domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H. [Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu Universuty, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380 8553 (Japan); Saito, N., E-mail: hiro@eco-t.esi.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464 8603 (Japan); Department of Molecular Design and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464 8603 (Japan); Takai, O. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464 8603 (Japan)

    2009-06-30

    The adsorption behavior and self-assembly of human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) on binary methyl- and amino-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The binary SAMs were fabricated through self-assembly mechanism of organosilane molecules. The height of domains is the domain height is 0.8 {+-} 0.2 nm from the AFM topographic image. It corresponds to the domain height is 0.8 {+-} 0.2 nm from the AFM topographic image. It corresponds to the difference between the length of the alkyl chain of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and that of n-(6-aminohexyl)aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AHAPS). The fibrinogen solution used ultrapure water as the solvent and its pH was adjusted at 3 and 10. From the AFM results at pH 3, HPF only formed network structures on the OTS domains of the binary SAM at early immersion times, and then the network structures expanded and connected between OTS domains through the AHAPS surface at long immersion times. In this case, a few HPFs are discretely adsorbed on the AHAPS surface. However, HPF is uniformly adsorbed on the binary SAM under the other conditions of pH.

  16. Human oocytes. Error-prone chromosome-mediated spindle assembly favors chromosome segregation defects in human oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubcová, Zuzana; Blayney, Martyn; Elder, Kay; Schuh, Melina

    2015-06-05

    Aneuploidy in human eggs is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and several genetic disorders such as Down syndrome. Most aneuploidy results from chromosome segregation errors during the meiotic divisions of an oocyte, the egg's progenitor cell. The basis for particularly error-prone chromosome segregation in human oocytes is not known. We analyzed meiosis in more than 100 live human oocytes and identified an error-prone chromosome-mediated spindle assembly mechanism as a major contributor to chromosome segregation defects. Human oocytes assembled a meiotic spindle independently of either centrosomes or other microtubule organizing centers. Instead, spindle assembly was mediated by chromosomes and the small guanosine triphosphatase Ran in a process requiring ~16 hours. This unusually long spindle assembly period was marked by intrinsic spindle instability and abnormal kinetochore-microtubule attachments, which favor chromosome segregation errors and provide a possible explanation for high rates of aneuploidy in human eggs.

  17. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  18. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  19. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  20. Discovery of human inversion polymorphisms by comparative analysis of human and chimpanzee DNA sequence assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available With a draft genome-sequence assembly for the chimpanzee available, it is now possible to perform genome-wide analyses to identify, at a submicroscopic level, structural rearrangements that have occurred between chimpanzees and humans. The goal of this study was to investigate chromosomal regions that are inverted between the chimpanzee and human genomes. Using the net alignments for the builds of the human and chimpanzee genome assemblies, we identified a total of 1,576 putative regions of inverted orientation, covering more than 154 mega-bases of DNA. The DNA segments are distributed throughout the genome and range from 23 base pairs to 62 mega-bases in length. For the 66 inversions more than 25 kilobases (kb in length, 75% were flanked on one or both sides by (often unrelated segmental duplications. Using PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization we experimentally validated 23 of 27 (85% semi-randomly chosen regions; the largest novel inversion confirmed was 4.3 mega-bases at human Chromosome 7p14. Gorilla was used as an out-group to assign ancestral status to the variants. All experimentally validated inversion regions were then assayed against a panel of human samples and three of the 23 (13% regions were found to be polymorphic in the human genome. These polymorphic inversions include 730 kb (at 7p22, 13 kb (at 7q11, and 1 kb (at 16q24 fragments with a 5%, 30%, and 48% minor allele frequency, respectively. Our results suggest that inversions are an important source of variation in primate genome evolution. The finding of at least three novel inversion polymorphisms in humans indicates this type of structural variation may be a more common feature of our genome than previously realized.

  1. Mitochondrial Complex I plays an Essential Role in Human Respirasome Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Lastres, David; Fontanesi, Flavia; García Consuegra, Inés; Martín, Miguel A.; Arenas, Joaquín; Barrientos, Antoni; Ugalde, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The assembly and function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) involve the organization of RC enzyme complexes in supercomplexes or respirasomes through an unknown biosynthetic process. This leads to structural interdependences between RC complexes, which are highly relevant from biological and biomedical perspectives, because RC defects lead to severe human disorders. We show that in human cells, respirasome biogenesis involves a complex I assembly intermediate acting as a scaffold fo...

  2. Kinase Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0009 TITLE: PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Cleveland CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center...so designated by other documentation. Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0009 5c

  3. Supply coordination based on bonus policy in assembly under uncertain delivery time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Liu, Mengqi; Wang, Zhaohua; Peng, Bingzong

    2013-03-01

    The existing research of supply coordination under uncertain delivery time mainly focuses on the collaboration between the supplier and the manufacturer, which aim at minimizing the total cost of each side and finding comparative optimal solutions under decentralized decision. In the supply coordination, the collaboration between suppliers in assembly system is usually not considered. As a result, the manufacturer's production is often delayed due to mismatching delivery of components between suppliers. Therefore, to ensure supply coordination in assembly system, collaboration between suppliers should be taken into consideration. In this paper, an assembly system with two suppliers and one manufacturer under uncertain delivery time is considered. The model is established and optimal solution is given under decentralized decision. Furthermore, the cost functions of two suppliers are both convex, and a unique Nash equilibrium exists between two suppliers. Then the optimal decision under supply coordination is analyzed, which is regarded as a benchmark for supply coordination. Additionally, the total cost of the assembly system is jointly convex in agreed delivery time. To achieve supply coordination a bonus policy is explored in the assembly system under uncertain delivery time, and the total cost under bonus policy must be lower than under decentralized decision. Finally the numerical and sensitivity analysis shows the cost of assembly system under bonus policy equals that under supply coordination, and the cost of each side in assembly system under bonus policy is lower compared to that under decentralized decision. The proposed research minimizes the total cost of each side with bonus policy in assembly system, ensures the supply coordination between suppliers and the manufacturer, and improves the competiveness of the whole supply chain.

  4. Interactive domains in the molecular chaperone human alphaB crystallin modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy G Ghosh

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113FISREFHR(120 exposed on the surface of alphaB crystallin decreased microtubule assembly by approximately 45%. In contrast, the interactive sequences, (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, corresponding to the beta8 strand and the C-terminal extension respectively, which are involved in complex formation, increased microtubule assembly by approximately 34-45%. The alphaB crystallin peptides, (113FISREFHR(120 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, inhibited microtubule disassembly by approximately 26-36%, and the peptides (113FISREFHR(120 and (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 decreased the thermal aggregation of tubulin by approximately 42-44%. The (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164 peptides were more effective than the widely used anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, in modulating tubulinmicrotubule dynamics. Mutagenesis of these interactive sequences in wt human alphaB crystallin confirmed the effects of the alphaB crystallin peptides on microtubule assembly/disassembly and tubulin aggregation. The regulation of microtubule assembly by alphaB crystallin varied over a narrow range of concentrations. The assembly of microtubules was maximal at alphaB crystallin to tubulin molar ratios between 1:4 and 2:1, while molar ratios >2:1 inhibited microtubule assembly.Interactive sequences on the surface of human alphaB crystallin collectively modulate microtubule assembly through a dynamic subunit exchange mechanism that depends on the concentration and ratio of alphaB crystallin to tubulin. These are the first

  5. The power of single molecule real-time sequencing technology in the de novo assembly of a eukaryotic genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiroaki; Naito, Ken; Ogiso-Tanaka, Eri; Takahashi, Yu; Iseki, Kohtaro; Muto, Chiaki; Satou, Kazuhito; Teruya, Kuniko; Shiroma, Akino; Shimoji, Makiko; Hirano, Takashi; Itoh, Takeshi; Kaga, Akito; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-11-30

    Second-generation sequencers (SGS) have been game-changing, achieving cost-effective whole genome sequencing in many non-model organisms. However, a large portion of the genomes still remains unassembled. We reconstructed azuki bean (Vigna angularis) genome using single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology and achieved the best contiguity and coverage among currently assembled legume crops. The SMRT-based assembly produced 100 times longer contigs with 100 times smaller amount of gaps compared to the SGS-based assemblies. A detailed comparison between the assemblies revealed that the SMRT-based assembly enabled a more comprehensive gene annotation than the SGS-based assemblies where thousands of genes were missing or fragmented. A chromosome-scale assembly was generated based on the high-density genetic map, covering 86% of the azuki bean genome. We demonstrated that SMRT technology, though still needed support of SGS data, achieved a near-complete assembly of a eukaryotic genome.

  6. Are human interactivity times lognormal?

    CERN Document Server

    Blenn, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we are analyzing the interactivity time, defined as the duration between two consecutive tasks such as sending emails, collecting friends and followers and writing comments in online social networks (OSNs). The distributions of these times are heavy tailed and often described by a power-law distribution. However, power-law distributions usually only fit the heavy tail of empirical data and ignore the information in the smaller value range. Here, we argue that the durations between writing emails or comments, adding friends and receiving followers are likely to follow a lognormal distribution. We discuss the similarities between power-law and lognormal distributions, show that binning of data can deform a lognormal to a power-law distribution and propose an explanation for the appearance of lognormal interactivity times. The historical debate of similarities between lognormal and power-law distributions is reviewed by illustrating the resemblance of measurements in this paper with the historical...

  7. Wnt5a Regulates the Assembly of Human Adipose Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction-Derived Microvasculatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkat M Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (hSVF cells are an easily accessible, heterogeneous cell system that can spontaneously self-assemble into functional microvasculatures in vivo. However, the mechanisms underlying vascular self-assembly and maturation are poorly understood, therefore we utilized an in vitro model to identify potential in vivo regulatory mechanisms. We utilized passage one (P1 hSVF because of the rapid UEA1+ endothelium (EC loss at even P2 culture. We exposed hSVF cells to a battery of angiogenesis inhibitors and found that the pan-Wnt inhibitor IWP2 produced the most significant hSVF-EC networking decrease (~25%. To determine which Wnt isoform(s and receptor(s may be involved, hSVF was screened by PCR for isoforms associated with angiogenesis, with only WNT5A and its receptor, FZD4, being expressed for all time points observed. Immunocytochemistry confirmed Wnt5a protein expression by hSVF. To see if Wnt5a alone could restore IWP2-induced EC network inhibition, recombinant human Wnt5a (0-150 ng/ml was added to IWP2-treated cultures. The addition of rhWnt5a significantly increased EC network area and significantly decreased the ratio of total EC network length to EC network area compared to untreated controls. To determine if Wnt5a mediates in vivo microvascular self-assembly, 3D hSVF constructs containing an IgG isotype control, anti-Wnt5a neutralizing antibody or rhWnt5a were implanted subcutaneously for 2w in immune compromised mice. Compared to IgG controls, anti-Wnt5a treatment significantly reduced vessel length density by ~41%, while rhWnt5a significantly increased vessel length density by ~62%. However, anti-Wnt5a or rhWnt5a did not significantly affect the density of segments and nodes, both of which measure vascular complexity. Taken together, this data demonstrates that endogenous Wnt5a produced by hSVF plays a regulatory role in microvascular self-assembly in vivo. These findings also suggest that

  8. FPGA Based Assembling of Facial Components for Human Face Construction

    CERN Document Server

    Halder, Santanu; Nasipuri, Mita; Basu, Dipak Kumar; Kundu, Mahantapas

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims at VLSI realization for generation of a new face from textual description. The FASY (FAce SYnthesis) System is a Face Database Retrieval and new Face generation System that is under development. One of its main features is the generation of the requested face when it is not found in the existing database. The new face generation system works in three steps - searching phase, assembling phase and tuning phase. In this paper the tuning phase using hardware description language and its implementation in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) device is presented.

  9. De novo assembly of human genomes with massively parallel short read sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruiqiang; Zhu, Hongmei; Ruan, Jue

    2010-01-01

    genomes from short read sequences. We successfully assembled both the Asian and African human genome sequences, achieving an N50 contig size of 7.4 and 5.9 kilobases (kb) and scaffold of 446.3 and 61.9 kb, respectively. The development of this de novo short read assembly method creates new opportunities...... for building reference sequences and carrying out accurate analyses of unexplored genomes in a cost-effective way....

  10. Who creates the Time: Nature or Human?

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    The paper defends the thesis that analysis of time meaning in a context of philosophy of physical and mathematical natural sciences and philosophical anthropology allows to clear basis of human being and to construct special model of general understanding of time as a creation of nature or creation of human. Regulations on discretization and virtual nature of cultural interaction, mutual tension of limits of cultural and historical process allow connecting philosophy of the nature and philosophical anthropology with system of categories (energy, weight, distance, etc.). It finds application both in the physical and mathematical sphere and in the field of humanitarian studies. We can make a conclusion that neither nature nor human create the time. Time is an imaginary phenomenon connecting human activity and natural processes in the limits of human consciousness.

  11. Terbium to Quantum Dot FRET Bioconjugates for Clinical Diagnostics: Influence of Human Plasma on Optical and Assembly Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Hildebrandt

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET from luminescent terbium complexes (LTC as donors to semiconductor quantum dots (QDs as acceptors allows extraordinary large FRET efficiencies due to the long Förster distances afforded. Moreover, time-gated detection permits an efficient suppression of autofluorescent background leading to sub-picomolar detection limits even within multiplexed detection formats. These characteristics make FRET-systems with LTC and QDs excellent candidates for clinical diagnostics. So far, such proofs of principle for highly sensitive multiplexed biosensing have only been performed under optimized buffer conditions and interactions between real-life clinical media such as human serum or plasma and LTC-QD-FRET-systems have not yet been taken into account. Here we present an extensive spectroscopic analysis of absorption, excitation and emission spectra along with the luminescence decay times of both the single components as well as the assembled FRET-systems in TRIS-buffer, TRIS-buffer with 2% bovine serum albumin, and fresh human plasma. Moreover, we evaluated homogeneous LTC-QD FRET assays in QD conjugates assembled with either the well-known, specific biotin-streptavidin biological interaction or, alternatively, the metal-affinity coordination of histidine to zinc. In the case of conjugates assembled with biotin-streptavidin no significant interference with the optical and binding properties occurs whereas the histidine-zinc system appears to be affected by human plasma.

  12. Construction and Assembly of the Wire Planes for the MicroBooNE Time Projection Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciarri, R. [Fermilab; Adams, C. [Yale U.; Asaadi, J. [Texas A-M; Danaher, J. [Fermilab; Fleming, B. T. [Yale U.; Gardner, R. [Fermilab; Gollapinni, S. [Kansas State U.; Grosso, R. [Cincinnati U.; Guenette, R. [Oxford U.; Littlejohn, B. R. [IIT, Chicago; Lockwitz, S. [Fermilab; Raaf, J. L. [Fermilab; Soderberg, M. [Syracuse U.; St. John, J. [Cincinnati U.; Strauss, T. [Fermilab; Szelc, A. M. [Manchester U.; Yu, B. [Brookhaven

    2017-03-09

    In this paper we describe how the readout planes for the MicroBooNE Time Projection Chamber were constructed, assembled and installed. We present the individual wire preparation using semi-automatic winding machines and the assembly of wire carrier boards. The details of the wire installation on the detector frame and the tensioning of the wires are given. A strict quality assurance plan ensured the integrity of the readout planes. The different tests performed at all stages of construction and installation provided crucial information to achieve the successful realization of the MicroBooNE wire planes.

  13. Construction and Assembly of the Wire Planes for the MicroBooNE Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, R; Asaadi, J; Danaher, J; Fleming, B T; Gardner, R; Gollapinni, S; Grosso, R; Guenette, R; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Raaf, J L; Soderberg, M; John, J St; Strauss, T; Szelc, A M; Yu, B

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe how the readout planes for the MicroBooNE Time Projection Chamber were constructed, assembled and installed. We present the individual wire preparation using semi-automatic winding machines and the assembly of wire carrier boards. The details of the wire installation on the detector frame and the tensioning of the wires are given. A strict quality assurance plan ensured the integrity of the readout planes. The different tests performed at all stages of construction and installation provided crucial information to achieve the successful realisation of the MicroBooNE wire planes.

  14. The ordered assembly of tau is the gain-of-toxic function that causes human tauopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedert, Michel

    2016-10-01

    A pathological pathway leading from soluble to insoluble and filamentous tau underlies human tauopathies. This ordered assembly causes disease and is the gain-of-toxic function. It involves the transition from an intrinsically disordered monomer to a highly structured filament. Based on recent findings, one can divide the ordered assembly into propagation of pathology and neurodegeneration. Short tau fibrils constitute the major species of seed-competent tau in the brains of mice transgenic for human P301S tau. The molecular species of aggregated tau that are essential for neurodegeneration remain to be identified. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Expression and assembly of active human cardiac troponin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassalle, Michael W

    2013-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy-related mutations in human cardiac troponin subunits, including troponin C (hcTnC), troponin I (hcTnI), and troponin T (hcTnT), are well-documented. Recently, it has been recognised that human cardiac troponin (hcTn) is a sophisticated allosteric system. Therefore, the effect of drugs on this protein complex should be studied with assembled hcTn rather than a short fragment of a subunit or the subunit itself. Here, we describe the expression and assembly of active hcTn in Escherichia coli, a novel method that is rapid and simple, and produces large amounts of functional hcTn.

  16. REDUCTION OF CYCLE TIME IN SCREW AIR COMPRESSOR ASSEMBLY LINE USING KAIZEN SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rajenthirakumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this competitive world, any company has to fulfill its customer needs to survive in the market. Lean manufacturing is a technique that can be adopted in a company to improve the quality of its products, reduce the cost of the production and also deliver the products in less time. The goal of this work is to show the applicability of lean manufacturing’s body of knowledge in a screw air compressor manufacturing company. Here, the main objective is to evolve and test several methodologies to eliminate wastes in the assembly line as the company at present unable to meet the customer demand. A systematic approach is suggested for the implementation of lean principles to showcase that lean could be applied to the compressor assembly line to enhance the productivity thereby making the line more efficient. In the current assembly line there was no work standardization followed by absence of kaizen that has led to an increased assembly time. Thus with the help of lean tools and techniques such as 5S, kaizen, standardization, visual management, poke yoke and string diagram the total cycle time has been reduced from 236 to 209 minutes. This reduction has benefitted the company in meeting the customer demand, increased profit and work satisfaction.

  17. Assembling Tunable Time-Resolved Fluorescence Layer onto Nano-Gold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The assembling of a coating of time-resolved fluorescent chelator BSPDA (abbreviated for 4,7-bis(sulfhydrylphenyl)-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid) onto a nano-gold layer was demonstrated. First, BSPDA was synthesized by simple procedures, and then an approach was developed to immobilize BSPDA onto the nano-gold layer deposited on a silane modified glass substrate, whereby europium ion (Ⅲ, Eu3+) was captured and released owing to the interactive process of complexation and dissociation between BSPDA functionalized coating and Eu3+ solution. The fluorescence spectra and related lifetimes were determined. Also, the BSPDA functionalized coating's specific complexation with Eu3+ on the BSPDA assembly layer and the nonspecific adsorption of Eu3+ on the nano-gold layer were compared. These results allowed a selective complexation of Eu3+ by assembling a BSPDA chelating layer on the nano-gold layer;thus, a tunable time-resolved fluorescent layer was covalently attached. The results of the nanoparticle assembling and probing (or labeling) processes to specific bio-systems were very interesting and had significant implications to time-resolved-fluorescence-based detection on biosensor surfaces such as DNA chip and to arrayed light display devices.

  18. Significance of respirasomes for the assembly/stability of human respiratory chain complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schägger, Hermann; de Coo, René; Bauer, Matthias F; Hofmann, Sabine; Godinot, Catherine; Brandt, Ulrich

    2004-08-27

    We showed that the human respiratory chain is organized in supramolecular assemblies of respiratory chain complexes, the respirasomes. The mitochondrial complexes I (NADH dehydrogenase) and III (cytochrome c reductase) form a stable core respirasome to which complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) can also bind. An analysis of the state of respirasomes in patients with an isolated deficiency of single complexes provided evidence that the formation of respirasomes is essential for the assembly/stability of complex I, the major entry point of respiratory chain substrates. Genetic alterations leading to a loss of complex III prevented respirasome formation and led to the secondary loss of complex I. Therefore, primary complex III assembly deficiencies presented as combined complex III/I defects. This dependence of complex I assembly/stability on respirasome formation has important implications for the diagnosis of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

  19. Prediction of phenotypes of missense mutations in human proteins from biological assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiong; Xu, Qifang; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2013-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent variation in the human genome. Nonsynonymous SNPs that lead to missense mutations can be neutral or deleterious, and several computational methods have been presented that predict the phenotype of human missense mutations. These methods use sequence-based and structure-based features in various combinations, relying on different statistical distributions of these features for deleterious and neutral mutations. One structure-based feature that has not been studied significantly is the accessible surface area within biologically relevant oligomeric assemblies. These assemblies are different from the crystallographic asymmetric unit for more than half of X-ray crystal structures. We find that mutations in the core of proteins or in the interfaces in biological assemblies are significantly more likely to be disease-associated than those on the surface of the biological assemblies. For structures with more than one protein in the biological assembly (whether the same sequence or different), we find the accessible surface area from biological assemblies provides a statistically significant improvement in prediction over the accessible surface area of monomers from protein crystal structures (P = 6e-5). When adding this information to sequence-based features such as the difference between wildtype and mutant position-specific profile scores, the improvement from biological assemblies is statistically significant but much smaller (P = 0.018). Combining this information with sequence-based features in a support vector machine leads to 82% accuracy on a balanced dataset of 50% disease-associated mutations from SwissVar and 50% neutral mutations from human/primate sequence differences in orthologous proteins.

  20. Functional Metagenomics of Spacecraft Assembly Cleanrooms: Presence of Virulence Factors Associated with Human Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Mina; Ahmed, Mahjabeen; Weinmaier, Thomas; Ciobanu, Doina; Ivanova, Natalia; Pieber, Thomas R; Vaishampayan, Parag A

    2016-01-01

    Strict planetary protection practices are implemented during spacecraft assembly to prevent inadvertent transfer of earth microorganisms to other planetary bodies. Therefore, spacecraft are assembled in cleanrooms, which undergo strict cleaning and decontamination procedures to reduce total microbial bioburden. We wanted to evaluate if these practices selectively favor survival and growth of hardy microorganisms, such as pathogens. Three geographically distinct cleanrooms were sampled during the assembly of three NASA spacecraft: The Lockheed Martin Aeronautics' Multiple Testing Facility during DAWN, the Kennedy Space Center's Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (KSC-PHSF) during Phoenix, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Spacecraft Assembly Facility during Mars Science Laboratory. Sample sets were collected from the KSC-PHSF cleanroom at three time points: before arrival of the Phoenix spacecraft, during the assembly and testing of the Phoenix spacecraft, and after removal of the spacecraft from the KSC-PHSF facility. All samples were subjected to metagenomic shotgun sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. Strict decontamination procedures had a greater impact on microbial communities than sampling location Samples collected during spacecraft assembly were dominated by Acinetobacter spp. We found pathogens and potential virulence factors, which determine pathogenicity in all the samples tested during this study. Though the relative abundance of pathogens was lowest during the Phoenix assembly, potential virulence factors were higher during assembly compared to before and after assembly, indicating a survival advantage. Decreased phylogenetic and pathogenic diversity indicates that decontamination and preventative measures were effective against the majority of microorganisms and well implemented, however, pathogen abundance still increased over time. Four potential pathogens, Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter lwoffii, Escherichia coli and Legionella

  1. The human genome: Some assembly required. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Human Genome Project promises to be one of the most rewarding endeavors in modern biology. The cost and the ethical and social implications, however, have made this project the source of considerable debate both in the scientific community and in the public at large. The 1994 Graduate Student Symposium addresses the scientific merits of the project, the technical issues involved in accomplishing the task, as well as the medical and social issues which stem from the wealth of knowledge which the Human Genome Project will help create. To this end, speakers were brought together who represent the diverse areas of expertise characteristic of this multidisciplinary project. The keynote speaker addresses the project`s motivations and goals in the larger context of biological and medical sciences. The first two sessions address relevant technical issues, data collection with a focus on high-throughput sequencing methods and data analysis with an emphasis on identification of coding sequences. The third session explores recent advances in the understanding of genetic diseases and possible routes to treatment. Finally, the last session addresses some of the ethical, social and legal issues which will undoubtedly arise from having a detailed knowledge of the human genome.

  2. Expression of human apolipoprotein B and assembly of lipoprotein(a) in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callow, M.J.; Stoltzfus, L.J.; Rubin, E.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Lawn, R.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-03-15

    The atherogenic macromolecule lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] has resisted in vivo analyses partly because it is found in a limited number of experimental animals. Although transgenic mice expressing human apolipoprotein (a) [apo(a)] have previously been described, they failed to assemble Lp(a) particles because of the inability of human apo(a) to associate with mouse apolipoprotein B (apoB). The authors isolated a 90-kilobase P1 phagemid containing the human apoB gene and with this DNA generated 13 lines of transgenic mice of which 11 expressed human apoB. The human apoB transcript was expressed and edited in the liver of the transgenic mice. Plasma concentrations of human apoB, as well as low density lipoprotein (LDL), were related to transgene copy number; the transgenic line with the most copies of human apoB had a >4-fold increase in LDL cholesterol compared with nontransgenics and a lipoprotein profile similar to that of humans. When human apoB and apo(a) transgenic mice were bred together, plasma apo(a) in mice expressing both human proteins was tightly associated with lipoproteins in the LDL density region. These studies demonstrate the successful expression of human apoB and the efficient assembly of Lp(a) in mice.

  3. In vitro production and characterization of partly assembled human CD3 complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J; Pedersen, L Ø; Dietrich, J

    2002-01-01

    in Golgi apparatus before the fully assembled T-cell receptor is transported to the cell surface. To study the structural properties of the human CD3 chains, we have developed new methods to produce and fold the extracellular domains of CD3 gamma, CD3 delta and CD3 epsilon. Proteins were expressed...

  4. Augmented Teams -- Assembling Smart Sensors, Intelligent Networks and Humans into Agile Task Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neef, R.M.; Rijn, M. van; Marck, J.W.; Keus, D.

    2009-01-01

    Safety and security environments are full of networked devices. Despite ample research on sensor networks and network technology, there is little practical comprehensive work on how to incorporate such technologies effectively into human-centered teams. This paper discusses the challenge of assembli

  5. Computational Comparison of Human Genomic Sequence Assemblies for a Region of Chromosome 4

    OpenAIRE

    Semple, Colin; Stewart W. Morris; Porteous, David J.; Evans, Kathryn L.

    2002-01-01

    Much of the available human genomic sequence data exist in a fragmentary draft state following the completion of the initial high-volume sequencing performed by the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) and Celera Genomics (CG). We compared six draft genome assemblies over a region of chromosome 4p (D4S394–D4S403), two consecutive releases by the IHGSC at University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC), two consecutive releases from the National Centre for Biotechnology Informa...

  6. The Impact of Walking Time on U-Shaped Assembly Line Worker Allocation Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parames Chutima

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The one-piece flow manufacturing line of single and customized products is usually organized as a U-shaped assembly layout. In this study, the characteristics of a single U-line are described and modeled. The worker allocation problem is hierarchically concerned with the task assignment into a U-line and allocate task to workers in sequence. Several products are assembled in 7-task to 297-task problems, and each problem is performed with a given cycle time. The primary purpose is to identify the impact of walking time on both symmetrical and rectangular U-shaped assembly layouts. The minor purpose is to compare the number of workers between two fixed layouts. Coincidence algorithm demonstrates clarifying solutions. To respond to two previous aims, the primary objective function of a number of workers is used. Finally, with the Pareto-optimal frontier between the deviation of operation times of workers and the walking time, its computational study is exemplified to identify good task assignment and walking path.

  7. Mcm10 coordinates the timely assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Bruck, Irina; Kaplan, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Mcm10 is an essential replication factor that is required for DNA replication in eukaryotes. Two key steps in the initiation of DNA replication are the assembly and activation of Cdc45–Mcm2–7-GINS (CMG) replicative helicase. However, it is not known what coordinates helicase assembly with helicase activation. We show in this manuscript, using purified proteins from budding yeast, that Mcm10 directly interacts with the Mcm2–7 complex and Cdc45. In fact, Mcm10 recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2–7 complex in vitro. To study the role of Mcm10 in more detail in vivo we used an auxin inducible degron in which Mcm10 is degraded upon addition of auxin. We show in this manuscript that Mcm10 is required for the timely recruitment of Cdc45 and GINS recruitment to the Mcm2–7 complex in vivo during early S phase. We also found that Mcm10 stimulates Mcm2 phosphorylation by DDK in vivo and in vitro. These findings indicate that Mcm10 plays a critical role in coupling replicative helicase assembly with helicase activation. Mcm10 is first involved in the recruitment of Cdc45 to the Mcm2–7 complex. After Cdc45–Mcm2–7 complex assembly, Mcm10 promotes origin melting by stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2, which thereby leads to GINS attachment to Mcm2–7. PMID:26582917

  8. Dynamics of Human Telomerase Holoenzyme Assembly and Subunit Exchange across the Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogan, Jacob M; Collins, Kathleen

    2015-08-28

    Human telomerase acts on telomeres during the genome synthesis phase of the cell cycle, accompanied by its concentration in Cajal bodies and transient colocalization with telomeres. Whether the regulation of human telomerase holoenzyme assembly contributes to the cell cycle restriction of telomerase function is unknown. We investigated the steady-state levels, assembly, and exchange dynamics of human telomerase subunits with quantitative in vivo cross-linking and other methods. We determined the physical association of telomerase subunits in cells blocked or progressing through the cell cycle as synchronized by multiple protocols. The total level of human telomerase RNA (hTR) was invariant across the cell cycle. In vivo snapshots of telomerase holoenzyme composition established that hTR remains bound to human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) throughout all phases of the cell cycle, and subunit competition assays suggested that hTERT-hTR interaction is not readily exchangeable. In contrast, the telomerase holoenzyme Cajal body-associated protein, TCAB1, was released from hTR in mitotic cells coincident with TCAB1 delocalization from Cajal bodies. This telomerase holoenzyme disassembly was reversible with cell cycle progression without any change in total TCAB1 protein level. Consistent with differential cell cycle regulation of hTERT-hTR and TCAB1-hTR protein-RNA interactions, overexpression of hTERT or TCAB1 had limited if any influence on hTR assembly of the other subunit. Overall, these findings revealed a cell cycle regulation that disables human telomerase association with telomeres while preserving the co-folded hTERT-hTR ribonucleoprotein catalytic core. Studies here, integrated with previous work, led to a unifying model for telomerase subunit assembly and trafficking in human cells.

  9. A hybrid approach for de novo human genome sequence assembly and phasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Lam, Jessica; Lam, Ernest T; Hastie, Alex R; Marks, Patrick; Lee, Joyce; Chu, Catherine; Lin, Chin; Džakula, Željko; Cao, Han; Schlebusch, Stephen A; Giorda, Kristina; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Wall, Jeffrey D; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2016-07-01

    Despite tremendous progress in genome sequencing, the basic goal of producing a phased (haplotype-resolved) genome sequence with end-to-end contiguity for each chromosome at reasonable cost and effort is still unrealized. In this study, we describe an approach to performing de novo genome assembly and experimental phasing by integrating the data from Illumina short-read sequencing, 10X Genomics linked-read sequencing, and BioNano Genomics genome mapping to yield a high-quality, phased, de novo assembled human genome.

  10. Assembly of infectious HIV-1 in human epithelial and T-lymphoblastic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorov, Boyan; Arcanger, Fabienne; Roingeard, Philippe; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Muriaux, Delphine

    2006-06-16

    The canonical view of the ultimate steps of HIV-1 replication is that virus assembly and budding are taking place at the plasma membrane of infected cells. Surprisingly, recent studies revealed that these steps also occur on endosomal membranes in the interior of infected cells, such as macrophages. This prompted us to revisit the site of HIV-1 assembly in human epithelial-like cells and in infected human T-lymphoblastic cells. To address this question, we investigated the intracellular location of the major viral structural components of HIV-1, namely Gag, Env and the genomic RNA. Using a sub-cellular fractionation method, as well as immuno-confocal and electron microscopy, we show that Gag, the Env glycoproteins and the genomic RNA accumulate in late endosomes that contain infectious HIV-1 particles. In epithelial-like 293T cells, HIV-1 assembles and buds both at the plasma membrane and in endosomes, while in chronically infected human T lymphocytes, viral assembly mostly occurs within the cell where large amounts of infectious virions accumulate in endosomal compartments. In addition, HIV-1 release could be enhanced by ionomycin, a drug stimulating calcium-dependent exocytosis. These results favour the view that newly made Gag molecules associate with the genomic RNA in the cytosol, then viral core complexes can be targeted to late endosomes together with Env, where infectious HIV-1 are made and subsequently released by exocytosis.

  11. MR-1S Interacts with PET100 and PET117 in Module-Based Assembly of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoni, Sara; Harbour, Michael E; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Signes, Alba; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Taylor, Robert W; Tiranti, Valeria; Arnold, Susanne; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2017-02-14

    The biogenesis of human cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is an intricate process in which three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded core subunits are assembled in a coordinated way with at least 11 nucleus-encoded subunits. Many chaperones shared between yeast and humans are involved in COX assembly. Here, we have used a MT-CO3 mutant cybrid cell line to define the composition of assembly intermediates and identify new human COX assembly factors. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis led us to modify the assembly model from a sequential pathway to a module-based process. Each module contains one of the three core subunits, together with different ancillary components, including HIGD1A. By the same analysis, we identified the short isoform of the myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1S) as a new COX assembly factor, which works with the highly conserved PET100 and PET117 chaperones to assist COX biogenesis in higher eukaryotes.

  12. Research of Dynamic Material Handling in an Automobile General Assembly Line Based on Real-time Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Nan; LI Shi-qi; WANG Jun-feng; ZHANG Zhen-li

    2012-01-01

    The status of material delivery of an automobile general assembly line is analyzed, and the technique to achieve the real-time tracking of assembly status information is proposed based on RFID( Radio Frequency Identification). Thus the consumption of line-side buffer is obtained dynamically, then the type and quantity of needed material are fed back to the subsystem of material handling; the algorithm for determining the best time departure time of delivery driver based on minimizing of total time penalty function is proposed. This approach makes the material amount of a single delivery trip maximized and improves the efficiency of delivery drivers significantly in the case of does not affect the assembly line normal throughput. Additionally, although this dynamic material handling method is developed for the automobile assembly plant, it should be pointed out that this method is also applicable to other mixed model assembly plants such as electronics, semiconductor and aerospace industry.

  13. Mitochondrial complex I plays an essential role in human respirasome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Lastres, David; Fontanesi, Flavia; García-Consuegra, Inés; Martín, Miguel A; Arenas, Joaquín; Barrientos, Antoni; Ugalde, Cristina

    2012-03-01

    The biogenesis and function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) involve the organization of RC enzyme complexes in supercomplexes or respirasomes through an unknown biosynthetic process. This leads to structural interdependences between RC complexes, which are highly relevant from biological and biomedical perspectives, because RC defects often lead to severe neuromuscular disorders. We show that in human cells, respirasome biogenesis involves a complex I assembly intermediate acting as a scaffold for the combined incorporation of complexes III and IV subunits, rather than originating from the association of preassembled individual holoenzymes. The process ends with the incorporation of complex I NADH dehydrogenase catalytic module, which leads to the respirasome activation. While complexes III and IV assemble either as free holoenzymes or by incorporation of free subunits into supercomplexes, the respirasomes constitute the structural units where complex I is assembled and activated, thus explaining the significance of the respirasomes for RC function.

  14. Assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation system in humans: what we have learned by studying its defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in the mitochondrial inner membrane is an intricate process in which many factors must interact. The OXPHOS system is composed of four respiratory chain complexes, which are responsible for electron transport and generation of the proton gradient in the mitochondrial intermembrane space, and of the ATP synthase that uses this proton gradient to produce ATP. Mitochondrial human disorders are caused by dysfunction of the OXPHOS system, and many of them are associated with altered assembly of one or more components of the OXPHOS system. The study of assembly defects in patients has been useful in unraveling and/or gaining a complete understanding of the processes by which these large multimeric complexes are formed. We review here current knowledge of the biogenesis of OXPHOS complexes based on investigation of the corresponding disorders.

  15. 3D Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent VZV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  16. Molecular architecture of the human Mediator-RNA polymerase II-TFIIF assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Bernecky

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The macromolecular assembly required to initiate transcription of protein-coding genes, known as the Pre-Initiation Complex (PIC, consists of multiple protein complexes and is approximately 3.5 MDa in size. At the heart of this assembly is the Mediator complex, which helps regulate PIC activity and interacts with the RNA polymerase II (pol II enzyme. The structure of the human Mediator-pol II interface is not well-characterized, whereas attempts to structurally define the Mediator-pol II interaction in yeast have relied on incomplete assemblies of Mediator and/or pol II and have yielded inconsistent interpretations. We have assembled the complete, 1.9 MDa human Mediator-pol II-TFIIF complex from purified components and have characterized its structural organization using cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction techniques. The orientation of pol II within this assembly was determined by crystal structure docking and further validated with projection matching experiments, allowing the structural organization of the entire human PIC to be envisioned. Significantly, pol II orientation within the Mediator-pol II-TFIIF assembly can be reconciled with past studies that determined the location of other PIC components relative to pol II itself. Pol II surfaces required for interacting with TFIIB, TFIIE, and promoter DNA (i.e., the pol II cleft are exposed within the Mediator-pol II-TFIIF structure; RNA exit is unhindered along the RPB4/7 subunits; upstream and downstream DNA is accessible for binding additional factors; and no major structural re-organization is necessary to accommodate the large, multi-subunit TFIIH or TFIID complexes. The data also reveal how pol II binding excludes Mediator-CDK8 subcomplex interactions and provide a structural basis for Mediator-dependent control of PIC assembly and function. Finally, parallel structural analysis of Mediator-pol II complexes lacking TFIIF reveal that TFIIF plays a key role in

  17. Application of real-time holographic interferometry in the nondestructive inspection of electronic parts and assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Craig P.; Trolinger, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Nondestructive inspection by holographic interferometry (HI) is quickly gaining acceptance in the electronics industry as a sensitive and accurate method of locating manufacturing and assembly flaws in a wide range of electronics, from individual components to assembled modules. This paper describes the specific application of real-time HI in the nondestructive analysis of circuit board heat exchangers and multiple-layer printed wiring boards to locate areas of debonding and delamination. In the application of HI, the choice of a stressing method is often as important as the choice of a specific HI technique. Methods for component stressing include thermal, vibrational, and pressure-induced stressing methods, and these are described in detail. In addition, two techniques for sensitivity enhancement, phase shift interferometry and beam tilt correction, are discussed in detail.

  18. Time lapse microscopy of temperature control during self-assembly of 3D DNA crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Fiona W.; Jong, Michael Alexander; Tan, Andre; Tseng, Robert; Park, Eunice; Ohayon, Yoel P.; Sha, Ruojie; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2017-10-01

    DNA nanostructures are created by exploiting the high fidelity base-pairing interactions of double-stranded branched DNA molecules. These structures present a convenient medium for the self-assembly of macroscopic 3D crystals. In some self-assemblies in this system, crystals can be formed by lowering the temperature, and they can be dissolved by raising it. The ability to monitor the formation and melting of these crystals yields information that can be used to monitor crystal formation and growth. Here, we describe the development of an inexpensive tool that enables direct observation of the crystal growth process as a function of both time and temperature. Using the hanging-drop crystallization of the well-characterized 2-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif for our model system, its response to temperature has been characterized visually.

  19. Hand Gesture Modeling and Recognition for Human and Robot Interactive Assembly Using Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gesture recognition is essential for human and robot collaboration. Within an industrial hybrid assembly cell, the performance of such a system significantly affects the safety of human workers. This work presents an approach to recognizing hand gestures accurately during an assembly task while in collaboration with a robot co-worker. We have designed and developed a sensor system for measuring natural human-robot interactions. The position and rotation information of a human worker's hands and fingertips are tracked in 3D space while completing a task. A modified chain-code method is proposed to describe the motion trajectory of the measured hands and fingertips. The Hidden Markov Model (HMM method is adopted to recognize patterns via data streams and identify workers' gesture patterns and assembly intentions. The effectiveness of the proposed system is verified by experimental results. The outcome demonstrates that the proposed system is able to automatically segment the data streams and recognize the gesture patterns thus represented with a reasonable accuracy ratio.

  20. Hand Gesture Modeling and Recognition for Human and Robot Interactive Assembly Using Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gesture recognition is essential for human and robot collaboration. Within an industrial hybrid assembly cell, the performance of such a system significantly affects the safety of human workers. This work presents an approach to recognizing hand gestures accurately during an assembly task while in collaboration with a robot co-worker. We have designed and developed a sensor system for measuring natural human-robot interactions. The position and rotation information of a human worker’s hands and fingertips are tracked in 3D space while completing a task. A modified chain-code method is proposed to describe the motion trajectory of the measured hands and fingertips. The Hidden Markov Model (HMM method is adopted to recognize patterns via data streams and identify workers’ gesture patterns and assembly intentions. The effectiveness of the proposed system is verified by experimental results. The outcome demonstrates that the proposed system is able to automatically segment the data streams and recognize the gesture patterns thus represented with a reasonable accuracy ratio.

  1. Human tNASP promotes in vitro nucleosome assembly with histone H3.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Daiki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-02-10

    Nuclear autoantigenic sperm proteins (NASPs) are members of the acidic histone chaperones, which promote nucleosome assembly. In humans, two splicing variants proposed for the somatic and testicular isoforms, sNASP and tNASP, respectively, have been found, and the shorter form, sNASP, reportedly promotes nucleosome assembly with the histone H3 isoforms, H3.1, H3.2, and H3.3. However, the biochemical properties of the longer form, tNASP, have not been reported. tNASP is considered to exist specifically in the testis. Our present results revealed that the tNASP protein is ubiquitously produced in various human tissues, in addition to testis. Unexpectedly, we found that the nucleosome assembly activity of purified tNASP was extremely low with the canonical histone H3.1 or H3.2, but was substantially detected with the replacement histone H3.3 variant. A mutational analysis revealed that the H3.3 Ile89 residue, corresponding to the H3.1 Val89 residue, is responsible for the tNASP-mediated nucleosome assembly with H3.3. A histone deposition assay showed that the H3.3-H4 complex is more efficiently deposited onto DNA by tNASP than the H3.1-H4 complex. These results provide evidence that tNASP is ubiquitously produced in various types of human tissues and promotes in vitro nucleosome assembly with H3 variant specificity.

  2. A Novel Self-Assembling DNA Nano Chip for Rapid Detection of Human Papillomavirus Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Li, Yanbo; Hong, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection of tumor-associated DNA such as Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has important clinical value for the early screening of tumors. By attaching oligonucleotides or cDNA onto the chip surface, DNA chip technology provides a rapid method to analyze gene expression. However, challenges remain regarding increasing probe density and improving detection time. To address these challenges, we proposed a DNA chip that was self-assembled from single stranded DNA in combination with high probe density and a rapid detection method. Over 200 probes could be attached to the surface of this 100-nm diameter DNA chip. For detection, the chips were adsorbed onto a mica surface and then incubated for ten minutes with HPV-DNA; the results were directly observable using atomic force microscopy (AFM). This bottom-up fabricated DNA nano chip combined with high probe density and direct AFM detection at the single molecule level will likely have numerous potential clinical applications for gene screening and the early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:27706184

  3. A Novel Self-Assembling DNA Nano Chip for Rapid Detection of Human Papillomavirus Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Li, Yanbo; Hong, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection of tumor-associated DNA such as Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has important clinical value for the early screening of tumors. By attaching oligonucleotides or cDNA onto the chip surface, DNA chip technology provides a rapid method to analyze gene expression. However, challenges remain regarding increasing probe density and improving detection time. To address these challenges, we proposed a DNA chip that was self-assembled from single stranded DNA in combination with high probe density and a rapid detection method. Over 200 probes could be attached to the surface of this 100-nm diameter DNA chip. For detection, the chips were adsorbed onto a mica surface and then incubated for ten minutes with HPV-DNA; the results were directly observable using atomic force microscopy (AFM). This bottom-up fabricated DNA nano chip combined with high probe density and direct AFM detection at the single molecule level will likely have numerous potential clinical applications for gene screening and the early diagnosis of cancer.

  4. Visualizing Human Migration Trhough Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambotti, G.; Guan, W.; Gest, J.

    2015-07-01

    Human migration has been an important activity in human societies since antiquity. Since 1890, approximately three percent of the world's population has lived outside of their country of origin. As globalization intensifies in the modern era, human migration persists even as governments seek to more stringently regulate flows. Understanding this phenomenon, its causes, processes and impacts often starts from measuring and visualizing its spatiotemporal patterns. This study builds a generic online platform for users to interactively visualize human migration through space and time. This entails quickly ingesting human migration data in plain text or tabular format; matching the records with pre-established geographic features such as administrative polygons; symbolizing the migration flow by circular arcs of varying color and weight based on the flow attributes; connecting the centroids of the origin and destination polygons; and allowing the user to select either an origin or a destination feature to display all flows in or out of that feature through time. The method was first developed using ArcGIS Server for world-wide cross-country migration, and later applied to visualizing domestic migration patterns within China between provinces, and between states in the United States, all through multiple years. The technical challenges of this study include simplifying the shapes of features to enhance user interaction, rendering performance and application scalability; enabling the temporal renderers to provide time-based rendering of features and the flow among them; and developing a responsive web design (RWD) application to provide an optimal viewing experience. The platform is available online for the public to use, and the methodology is easily adoptable to visualizing any flow, not only human migration but also the flow of goods, capital, disease, ideology, etc., between multiple origins and destinations across space and time.

  5. Functional Metagenomics of Spacecraft Assembly Cleanrooms: Presence of Virulence Factors Associated with Human Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Mina; Ahmed, Mahjabeen; Weinmaier, Thomas; Ciobanu, Doina; Ivanova, Natalia; Pieber, Thomas R.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2016-01-01

    Strict planetary protection practices are implemented during spacecraft assembly to prevent inadvertent transfer of earth microorganisms to other planetary bodies. Therefore, spacecraft are assembled in cleanrooms, which undergo strict cleaning and decontamination procedures to reduce total microbial bioburden. We wanted to evaluate if these practices selectively favor survival and growth of hardy microorganisms, such as pathogens. Three geographically distinct cleanrooms were sampled during the assembly of three NASA spacecraft: The Lockheed Martin Aeronautics' Multiple Testing Facility during DAWN, the Kennedy Space Center's Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (KSC-PHSF) during Phoenix, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Spacecraft Assembly Facility during Mars Science Laboratory. Sample sets were collected from the KSC-PHSF cleanroom at three time points: before arrival of the Phoenix spacecraft, during the assembly and testing of the Phoenix spacecraft, and after removal of the spacecraft from the KSC-PHSF facility. All samples were subjected to metagenomic shotgun sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. Strict decontamination procedures had a greater impact on microbial communities than sampling location Samples collected during spacecraft assembly were dominated by Acinetobacter spp. We found pathogens and potential virulence factors, which determine pathogenicity in all the samples tested during this study. Though the relative abundance of pathogens was lowest during the Phoenix assembly, potential virulence factors were higher during assembly compared to before and after assembly, indicating a survival advantage. Decreased phylogenetic and pathogenic diversity indicates that decontamination and preventative measures were effective against the majority of microorganisms and well implemented, however, pathogen abundance still increased over time. Four potential pathogens, Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter lwoffii, Escherichia coli and Legionella

  6. Functional metagenomics of spacecraft assembly cleanrooms: Presence of virulence factors associated with human pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Bashir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Strict planetary protection practices are implemented during spacecraft assembly to prevent inadvertent transfer of earth microorganisms to other planetary bodies. Therefore, spacecraft are assembled in cleanrooms, which undergo strict cleaning and decontamination procedures to reduce total microbial bioburden. We wanted to evaluate if these practices selectively favor survival and growth of hardy microorganisms, such as pathogens. Three geographically distinct cleanrooms were sampled during the assembly of three NASA spacecraft: The Lockheed Martin Aeronautics’ Multiple Testing Facility during DAWN, the Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (KSC-PHSF during Phoenix, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Spacecraft Assembly Facility during Mars Science Laboratory. Sample sets were collected from the KSC-PHSF cleanroom at three time points: before arrival of the Phoenix spacecraft, during the assembly and testing of the Phoenix spacecraft, and after removal of the spacecraft from the KSC-PHSF facility. All samples were subjected to metagenomic shotgun sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. Strict decontamination procedures had a greater impact on microbial communities than sampling location Samples collected during spacecraft assembly were dominated by Acinetobacter spp. We found pathogens and potential virulence factors, which determine pathogenicity in all the samples tested during this study. Though the relative abundance of pathogens was lowest during the Phoenix assembly, potential virulence factors were higher during assembly compared to before and after assembly, indicating a survival advantage. Decreased phylogenetic and pathogenic diversity indicates that decontamination and preventative measures were effective against the majority of microorganisms and well implemented, however, pathogen abundance still increased over time. Four potential pathogens, Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter lwoffii

  7. Assembly of the cardiac intercalated disk during pre- and postnatal development of the human heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Vreeker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In cardiac muscle, the intercalated disk (ID at the longitudinal cell-edges of cardiomyocytes provides as a macromolecular infrastructure that integrates mechanical and electrical coupling within the heart. Pathophysiological disturbance in composition of this complex is well known to trigger cardiac arrhythmias and pump failure. The mechanisms underlying assembly of this important cellular domain in human heart is currently unknown. METHODS: We collected 18 specimens from individuals that died from non-cardiovascular causes. Age of the specimens ranged from a gestational age of 15 weeks through 11 years postnatal. Immunohistochemical labeling was performed against proteins comprising desmosomes, adherens junctions, the cardiac sodium channel and gap junctions to visualize spatiotemporal alterations in subcellular location of the proteins. RESULTS: Changes in spatiotemporal localization of the adherens junction proteins (N-cadherin and ZO-1 and desmosomal proteins (plakoglobin, desmoplakin and plakophilin-2 were identical in all subsequent ages studied. After an initial period of diffuse and lateral labelling, all proteins were fully localized in the ID at approximately 1 year after birth. Nav1.5 that composes the cardiac sodium channel and the gap junction protein Cx43 follow a similar pattern but their arrival in the ID is detected at (much later stages (two years for Nav1.5 and seven years for Cx43, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our data on developmental maturation of the ID in human heart indicate that generation of the mechanical junctions at the ID precedes that of the electrical junctions with a significant difference in time. In addition arrival of the electrical junctions (Nav1.5 and Cx43 is not uniform since sodium channels localize much earlier than gap junction channels.

  8. NDUFAF5 Hydroxylates NDUFS7 at an Early Stage in the Assembly of Human Complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Virginie F; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2016-07-08

    Complex I (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in mammalian mitochondria is an L-shaped assembly of 45 proteins. One arm lies in the inner membrane, and the other extends about 100 Å into the matrix of the organelle. The extrinsic arm contains binding sites for NADH, the primary electron acceptor FMN, and seven iron-sulfur clusters that form a pathway for electrons linking FMN to the terminal electron acceptor, ubiquinone, which is bound in a tunnel in the region of the junction between the arms. The membrane arm contains four antiporter-like domains, energetically coupled to the quinone site and involved in pumping protons from the matrix into the intermembrane space contributing to the proton motive force. Seven of the subunits, forming the core of the membrane arm, are translated from mitochondrial genes, and the remaining subunits, the products of nuclear genes, are imported from the cytosol. Their assembly is coordinated by at least thirteen extrinsic assembly factor proteins that are not part of the fully assembled complex. They assist in insertion of co-factors and in building up the complex from smaller sub-assemblies. One such factor, NDUFAF5, belongs to the family of seven-β-strand S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases. However, similar to another family member, RdmB, it catalyzes the introduction of a hydroxyl group, in the case of NDUFAF5, into Arg-73 in the NDUFS7 subunit of human complex I. This modification occurs early in the pathway of assembly of complex I, before the formation of the juncture between peripheral and membrane arms.

  9. Human-Centric Teaming in a Multi-Agent EVA Assembly Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnmark, Fredrik; Currie, Nancy; Ambrose, Robert O.; Culbert, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Human Space Flight program depends heavily on spacewalks performed by pairs of suited human astronauts. These Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) are severely restricted in both duration and scope by consumables and available manpower.An expanded multi-agent EVA team combining the information-gathering and problem-solving skills of human astronauts with the survivability and physical capabilities of highly dexterous space robots is proposed. A 1-g test featuring two NASA/DARPA Robonaut systems working side-by-side with a suited human subject is conducted to evaluate human-robot teaming strategies in the context of a simulated EVA assembly task based on the STS-61B ACCESS flight experiment.

  10. Human cells lacking coilin and Cajal bodies are proficient in telomerase assembly, trafficking and telomere maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanlian; Deng, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Hu, Qian; Liu, Haiying; Songyang, Zhou; Ma, Wenbin; Chen, Shi; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The RNA component of human telomerase (hTR) localizes to Cajal bodies, and it has been proposed that Cajal bodies play a role in the assembly of telomerase holoenzyme and telomerase trafficking. Here, the role of Cajal bodies was examined in Human cells deficient of coilin (i.e. coilin-knockout (KO) cells), in which no Cajal bodies are detected. In coilin-KO cells, a normal level of telomerase activity is detected and interactions between core factors of holoenzyme are preserved, indicating that telomerase assembly occurs in the absence of Cajal bodies. Moreover, dispersed hTR aggregates and forms foci specifically during S and G2 phase in coilin-KO cells. Colocalization of these hTR foci with telomeres implies proper telomerase trafficking, independent of Cajal bodies. Therefore, telomerase adds similar numbers of TTAGGG repeats to telomeres in coilin-KO and controls cells. Overexpression of TPP1-OB-fold blocks cell cycle-dependent formation of hTR foci and inhibits telomere extension. These findings suggest that telomerase assembly, trafficking and extension occur with normal efficiency in Cajal bodies deficient human cells. Thus, Cajal bodies, as such, are not essential in these processes, although it remains possible that non-coilin components of Cajal bodies and/or telomere binding proteins (e.g. TPP1) do play roles in telomerase biogenesis and telomere homeostasis.

  11. Human cells lacking coilin and Cajal bodies are proficient in telomerase assembly, trafficking and telomere maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yanlian; Deng, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Hu, Qian; Liu, Haiying; Songyang, Zhou; Ma, Wenbin; Chen, Shi; Zhao, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The RNA component of human telomerase (hTR) localizes to Cajal bodies, and it has been proposed that Cajal bodies play a role in the assembly of telomerase holoenzyme and telomerase trafficking. Here, the role of Cajal bodies was examined in Human cells deficient of coilin (i.e. coilin-knockout (KO) cells), in which no Cajal bodies are detected. In coilin-KO cells, a normal level of telomerase activity is detected and interactions between core factors of holoenzyme are preserved, indicating t...

  12. International Human Mission to Mars: Analyzing A Conceptual Launch and Assembly Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Grant; Stromgren, Chel; Arney, Dale; Cirillo, William; Goodliff, Kandyce

    2014-01-01

    In July of 2013, U.S. Congressman Kennedy (D-Mass.) successfully offered an amendment to H.R. 2687, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2013. "International Participation—The President should invite the United States partners in the International Space Station program and other nations, as appropriate, to participate in an international initiative under the leadership of the United States to achieve the goal of successfully conducting a crewed mission to the surface of Mars." This paper presents a concept for an international campaign to launch and assemble a crewed Mars Transfer Vehicle. NASA’s “Human Exploration of Mars: Design Reference Architecture 5.0” (DRA 5.0) was used as the point of departure for this concept. DRA 5.0 assumed that the launch and assembly campaign would be conducted using NASA launch vehicles. The concept presented utilizes a mixed fleet of NASA Space Launch System (SLS), U.S. commercial and international launch vehicles to accomplish the launch and assembly campaign. This concept has the benefit of potentially reducing the campaign duration. However, the additional complexity of the campaign must also be considered. The reliability of the launch and assembly campaign utilizing SLS launches augmented with commercial and international launch vehicles is analyzed and compared using discrete event simulation.

  13. A Real-Time de novo DNA Sequencing Assembly Platform Based on an FPGA Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanqi; Georgiou, Pantelis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an FPGA based DNA comparison platform which can be run concurrently with the sensing phase of DNA sequencing and shortens the overall time needed for de novo DNA assembly. A hybrid overlap searching algorithm is applied which is scalable and can deal with incremental detection of new bases. To handle the incomplete data set which gradually increases during sequencing time, all-against-all comparisons are broken down into successive window-against-window comparison phases and executed using a novel dynamic suffix comparison algorithm combined with a partitioned dynamic programming method. The complete system has been designed to facilitate parallel processing in hardware, which allows real-time comparison and full scalability as well as a decrease in the number of computations required. A base pair comparison rate of 51.2 G/s is achieved when implemented on an FPGA with successful DNA comparison when using data sets from real genomes.

  14. Self-assembling of zinc phthalocyanines on ZnO (1010) surface through multiple time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Claudio; Raiteri, Paolo; Colombo, Luciano; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2011-12-27

    We adopt a hierarchic combination of theoretical methods to study the assembling of zinc phthalocyanines (ZnPcs) on a ZnO (1010) surface through multiple time scales. Atomistic simulations, such as model potential molecular dynamics and metadynamics, are used to study the energetics and short time evolution (up to ∼100 ns) of small ZnPc aggregates. The stability and the lifetime of large clusters is then studied by means of an atomistically informed coarse-grained model using classical molecular dynamics. Finally, the macroscopic time scale clustering phenomenon is studied by Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithms as a function of temperature and surface coverage. We provide evidence that at room temperature the aggregation is likely to occur at sufficiently high coverage, and we characterize the nature, morphology, and lifetime of ZnPc's clusters. We identify the molecular stripes oriented along [010] crystallographic directions as the most energetically stable aggregates.

  15. Human Polycomb group EED protein negatively affects HIV-1 assembly and release

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    Darlix Jean-Luc

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human EED protein, a member of the superfamily of Polycomb group (PcG proteins with WD-40 repeats, has been found to interact with three HIV-1 components, namely the structural Gag matrix protein (MA, the integrase enzyme (IN and the Nef protein. The aim of the present study was to analyze the possible biological role of EED in HIV-1 replication, using the HIV-1-based vector HIV-Luc and EED protein expressed by DNA transfection of 293T cells. Results During the early phase of HIV-1 infection, a slight negative effect on virus infectivity occurred in EED-expressing cells, which appeared to be dependent on EED-MA interaction. At late times post infection, EED caused an important reduction of virus production, from 20- to 25-fold as determined by CAp24 immunoassay, to 10- to 80-fold based on genomic RNA levels, and this decrease was not due to a reduction of Gag protein synthesis. Coexpression of WTNef, or the non-N-myristoylated mutant NefG2A, restored virus yields to levels obtained in the absence of exogenous EED protein. This effect was not observed with mutant NefΔ57 mimicking the Nef core, or with the lipid raft-retargeted fusion protein LAT-Nef. LATAA-Nef, a mutant defective in the lipid raft addressing function, had the same anti-EED effect as WTNef. Cell fractionation and confocal imaging showed that, in the absence of Nef, EED mainly localized in membrane domains different from the lipid rafts. Upon co-expression with WTNef, NefG2A or LATAA-Nef, but not with NefΔ57 or LAT-Nef, EED was found to relocate into an insoluble fraction along with Nef protein. Electron microscopy of HIV-Luc producer cells overexpressing EED showed significant less virus budding at the cell surface compared to control cells, and ectopic assembly and clustering of nuclear pore complexes within the cytoplasm. Conclusion Our data suggested that EED exerted an antiviral activity at the late stage of HIV-1 replication, which included genomic

  16. Accessory subunits are integral for assembly and function of human mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, David A; Surgenor, Elliot E; Formosa, Luke E; Reljic, Boris; Frazier, Ann E; Dibley, Marris G; Osellame, Laura D; Stait, Tegan; Beilharz, Traude H; Thorburn, David R; Salim, Agus; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-10-06

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and is composed of 45 subunits in humans, making it one of the largest known multi-subunit membrane protein complexes. Complex I exists in supercomplex forms with respiratory chain complexes III and IV, which are together required for the generation of a transmembrane proton gradient used for the synthesis of ATP. Complex I is also a major source of damaging reactive oxygen species and its dysfunction is associated with mitochondrial disease, Parkinson's disease and ageing. Bacterial and human complex I share 14 core subunits that are essential for enzymatic function; however, the role and necessity of the remaining 31 human accessory subunits is unclear. The incorporation of accessory subunits into the complex increases the cellular energetic cost and has necessitated the involvement of numerous assembly factors for complex I biogenesis. Here we use gene editing to generate human knockout cell lines for each accessory subunit. We show that 25 subunits are strictly required for assembly of a functional complex and 1 subunit is essential for cell viability. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cell lines revealed that loss of each subunit affects the stability of other subunits residing in the same structural module. Analysis of proteomic changes after the loss of specific modules revealed that ATP5SL and DMAC1 are required for assembly of the distal portion of the complex I membrane arm. Our results demonstrate the broad importance of accessory subunits in the structure and function of human complex I. Coupling gene-editing technology with proteomics represents a powerful tool for dissecting large multi-subunit complexes and enables the study of complex dysfunction at a cellular level.

  17. Human Tau Isoforms Assemble into Ribbon-like Fibrils That Display Polymorphic Structure and Stability*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Susanne; Jung, Yu Jin; Chinnathambi, Subashchandrabose; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Muller, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrous aggregates of Tau protein are characteristic features of Alzheimer disease. We applied high resolution atomic force and EM microscopy to study fibrils assembled from different human Tau isoforms and domains. All fibrils reveal structural polymorphism; the “thin twisted” and “thin smooth” fibrils resemble flat ribbons (cross-section ∼10 × 15 nm) with diverse twist periodicities. “Thick fibrils” show periodicities of ∼65–70 nm and thicknesses of ∼9–18 nm such as routinely reported for “paired helical filaments” but structurally resemble heavily twisted ribbons. Therefore, thin and thick fibrils assembled from different human Tau isoforms challenge current structural models of paired helical filaments. Furthermore, all Tau fibrils reveal axial subperiodicities of ∼17–19 nm and, upon exposure to mechanical stress or hydrophobic surfaces, disassemble into uniform fragments that remain connected by thin thread-like structures (∼2 nm). This hydrophobically induced disassembly is inhibited at enhanced electrolyte concentrations, indicating that the fragments resemble structural building blocks and the fibril integrity depends largely on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Because full-length Tau and repeat domain constructs assemble into fibrils of similar thickness, the “fuzzy coat” of Tau protein termini surrounding the fibril axis is nearly invisible for atomic force microscopy and EM, presumably because of its high flexibility. PMID:20566652

  18. Human Tau isoforms assemble into ribbon-like fibrils that display polymorphic structure and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Susanne; Jung, Yu Jin; Chinnathambi, Subashchandrabose; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Muller, Daniel J

    2010-08-27

    Fibrous aggregates of Tau protein are characteristic features of Alzheimer disease. We applied high resolution atomic force and EM microscopy to study fibrils assembled from different human Tau isoforms and domains. All fibrils reveal structural polymorphism; the "thin twisted" and "thin smooth" fibrils resemble flat ribbons (cross-section approximately 10 x 15 nm) with diverse twist periodicities. "Thick fibrils" show periodicities of approximately 65-70 nm and thicknesses of approximately 9-18 nm such as routinely reported for "paired helical filaments" but structurally resemble heavily twisted ribbons. Therefore, thin and thick fibrils assembled from different human Tau isoforms challenge current structural models of paired helical filaments. Furthermore, all Tau fibrils reveal axial subperiodicities of approximately 17-19 nm and, upon exposure to mechanical stress or hydrophobic surfaces, disassemble into uniform fragments that remain connected by thin thread-like structures ( approximately 2 nm). This hydrophobically induced disassembly is inhibited at enhanced electrolyte concentrations, indicating that the fragments resemble structural building blocks and the fibril integrity depends largely on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Because full-length Tau and repeat domain constructs assemble into fibrils of similar thickness, the "fuzzy coat" of Tau protein termini surrounding the fibril axis is nearly invisible for atomic force microscopy and EM, presumably because of its high flexibility.

  19. Real time imaging of human progenitor neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Keenan

    Full Text Available Human neural progenitors are increasingly being employed in drug screens and emerging cell therapies targeted towards neurological disorders where neurogenesis is thought to play a key role including developmental disorders, Alzheimer's disease, and depression. Key to the success of these applications is understanding the mechanisms by which neurons arise. Our understanding of development can provide some guidance but since little is known about the specifics of human neural development and the requirement that cultures be expanded in vitro prior to use, it is unclear whether neural progenitors obey the same developmental mechanisms that exist in vivo. In previous studies we have shown that progenitors derived from fetal cortex can be cultured for many weeks in vitro as undifferentiated neurospheres and then induced to undergo neurogenesis by removing mitogens and exposing them to supportive substrates. Here we use live time lapse imaging and immunocytochemical analysis to show that neural progenitors use developmental mechanisms to generate neurons. Cells with morphologies and marker profiles consistent with radial glia and recently described outer radial glia divide asymmetrically and symmetrically to generate multipolar intermediate progenitors, a portion of which express ASCL1. These multipolar intermediate progenitors subsequently divide symmetrically to produce CTIP2(+ neurons. This 3-cell neurogenic scheme echoes observations in rodents in vivo and in human fetal slice cultures in vitro, providing evidence that hNPCs represent a renewable and robust in vitro assay system to explore mechanisms of human neurogenesis without the continual need for fresh primary human fetal tissue. Knowledge provided by this and future explorations of human neural progenitor neurogenesis will help maximize the safety and efficacy of new stem cell therapies by providing an understanding of how to generate physiologically-relevant cell types that maintain their

  20. Time dependent Bloch mode transmittance in self-assembled random photonic crystal for photonic time delay switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Nair, Radhika V.; Vijayan, C.

    2017-02-01

    Light propagation and localization in a random structure with a periodic background is an upcoming paradigm for novel photonic applications. This paper demonstrates the phenomenon of time dependent transmittance of evanescent Bloch modes (EBM) in ZnS random photonic crystal (RPC) which forms the basis for photonic delay switching. The RPC is fabricated by colloidal self-assembly with ZnS nanospheres of size 215 nm. An anomalous reciprocity and time dependent transmission at EBM (mid band gap wavelength) are observed in coherent back scattering and transmission studies respectively. These are explained on the basis of restricted propagation of EBMs through random channels in the periodic background and enhanced field storage inside RPC. The channelized propagation of EBMs is evident from decreasing time delay of transmittance at reduced thicknesses. The proportionality between transmission time delay and incident power confirms photon (field) storage within the RPC. The results indicate that structures with systematically engineered EBM channels can work as wavelength selective delay switch and further provide a short time photon storage system under non-absorbing conditions.

  1. Assembly and diploid architecture of an individual human genome via single-molecule technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Matthew; Sebra, Robert; Pang, Andy Wing Chun; Ummat, Ajay; Franzen, Oscar; Rausch, Tobias; Stütz, Adrian M; Stedman, William; Anantharaman, Thomas; Hastie, Alex; Dai, Heng; Fritz, Markus Hsi-Yang; Cao, Han; Cohain, Ariella; Deikus, Gintaras; Durrett, Russell E; Blanchard, Scott C; Altman, Roger; Chin, Chen-Shan; Guo, Yan; Paxinos, Ellen E; Korbel, Jan O; Darnell, Robert B; McCombie, W Richard; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Mason, Christopher E; Schadt, Eric E; Bashir, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We present the first comprehensive analysis of a diploid human genome that combines single-molecule sequencing with single-molecule genome maps. Our hybrid assembly markedly improves upon the contiguity observed from traditional shotgun sequencing approaches, with scaffold N50 values approaching 30 Mb, and we identified complex structural variants (SVs) missed by other high-throughput approaches. Furthermore, by combining Illumina short-read data with long reads, we phased both single-nucleotide variants and SVs, generating haplotypes with over 99% consistency with previous trio-based studies. Our work shows that it is now possible to integrate single-molecule and high-throughput sequence data to generate de novo assembled genomes that approach reference quality.

  2. Advanced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy Techniques for the Investigation of Peptide Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Neil R.

    The ubiquitous cross beta sheet peptide motif is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative diseases while at the same time offers remarkable potential for constructing isomorphic high-performance bionanomaterials. Despite an emerging understanding of the complex folding landscape of cross beta structures in determining disease etiology and final structure, we lack knowledge of the critical initial stages of nucleation and growth. In this dissertation, I advance our understanding of these key stages in the cross-beta nucleation and growth pathways using cutting-edge microscopy techniques. In addition, I present a new combined time-resolved fluorescence analysis technique with the potential to advance our current understanding of subtle molecular level interactions that play a pivotal role in peptide self-assembly. Using the central nucleating core of Alzheimer's Amyloid-beta protein, Abeta(16 22), as a model system, utilizing electron, time-resolved, and non-linear microscopy, I capture the initial and transient nucleation stages of peptide assembly into the cross beta motif. In addition, I have characterized the nucleation pathway, from monomer to paracrystalline nanotubes in terms of morphology and fluorescence lifetime, corroborating the predicted desolvation process that occurs prior to cross-beta nucleation. Concurrently, I have identified unique heterogeneous cross beta domains contained within individual nanotube structures, which have potential bionanomaterials applications. Finally, I describe a combined fluorescence theory and analysis technique that dramatically increases the sensitivity of current time-resolved techniques. Together these studies demonstrate the potential for advanced microscopy techniques in the identification and characterization of the cross-beta folding pathway, which will further our understanding of both amyloidogenesis and bionanomaterials.

  3. Frataxin Accelerates [2Fe-2S] Cluster Formation on the Human Fe–S Assembly Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nicholas G.; Das, Deepika; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A.; Barondeau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters function as protein cofactors for a wide variety of critical cellular reactions. In human mitochondria, a core Fe–S assembly complex [called SDUF and composed of NFS1, ISD11, ISCU2, and frataxin (FXN) proteins] synthesizes Fe–S clusters from iron, cysteine sulfur, and reducing equivalents and then transfers these intact clusters to target proteins. In vitro assays have relied on reducing the complexity of this complicated Fe–S assembly process by using surrogate electron donor molecules and monitoring simplified reactions. Recent studies have concluded that FXN promotes the synthesis of [4Fe-4S] clusters on the mammalian Fe–S assembly complex. Here the kinetics of Fe–S synthesis reactions were determined using different electron donation systems and by monitoring the products with circular dichroism and absorbance spectroscopies. We discovered that common surrogate electron donor molecules intercepted Fe–S cluster intermediates and formed high-molecular weight species (HMWS). The HMWS are associated with iron, sulfide, and thiol-containing proteins and have properties of a heterogeneous solubilized mineral with spectroscopic properties remarkably reminiscent of those of [4Fe-4S] clusters. In contrast, reactions using physiological reagents revealed that FXN accelerates the formation of [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] clusters as previously reported. In the preceding paper [Fox, N. G., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, DOI: 10.1021/bi5014485], [2Fe-2S] intermediates on the SDUF complex were shown to readily transfer to uncomplexed ISCU2 or apo acceptor proteins, depending on the reaction conditions. Our results indicate that FXN accelerates a rate-limiting sulfur transfer step in the synthesis of [2Fe-2S] clusters on the human Fe–S assembly complex. PMID:26016518

  4. Genomic characterization of large heterochromatic gaps in the human genome assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Altemose

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The largest gaps in the human genome assembly correspond to multi-megabase heterochromatic regions composed primarily of two related families of tandem repeats, Human Satellites 2 and 3 (HSat2,3. The abundance of repetitive DNA in these regions challenges standard mapping and assembly algorithms, and as a result, the sequence composition and potential biological functions of these regions remain largely unexplored. Furthermore, existing genomic tools designed to predict consensus-based descriptions of repeat families cannot be readily applied to complex satellite repeats such as HSat2,3, which lack a consistent repeat unit reference sequence. Here we present an alignment-free method to characterize complex satellites using whole-genome shotgun read datasets. Utilizing this approach, we classify HSat2,3 sequences into fourteen subfamilies and predict their chromosomal distributions, resulting in a comprehensive satellite reference database to further enable genomic studies of heterochromatic regions. We also identify 1.3 Mb of non-repetitive sequence interspersed with HSat2,3 across 17 unmapped assembly scaffolds, including eight annotated gene predictions. Finally, we apply our satellite reference database to high-throughput sequence data from 396 males to estimate array size variation of the predominant HSat3 array on the Y chromosome, confirming that satellite array sizes can vary between individuals over an order of magnitude (7 to 98 Mb and further demonstrating that array sizes are distributed differently within distinct Y haplogroups. In summary, we present a novel framework for generating initial reference databases for unassembled genomic regions enriched with complex satellite DNA, and we further demonstrate the utility of these reference databases for studying patterns of sequence variation within human populations.

  5. Shielding of the Geomagnetic Field Alters Actin Assembly and Inhibits Cell Motility in Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Wei-Chuan; Zhang, Zi-Jian; Wang, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F; He, Rong-Qiao

    2016-03-31

    Accumulating evidence has shown that absence of the geomagnetic field (GMF), the so-called hypomagnetic field (HMF) environment, alters the biological functions in seemingly non-magnetosensitive cells and organisms, which indicates that the GMF could be sensed by non-iron-rich and non-photo-sensing cells. The underlying mechanisms of the HMF effects on those cells are closely related to their GMF sensation but remain poorly understood so far. Previously, we found that the HMF represses expressions of genes associated with cell migration and cytoskeleton assembly in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line). Here, we measured the HMF-induced changes on cell morphology, adhesion, motility and actin cytoskeleton in SH-SY5Y cells. The HMF inhibited cell adhesion and migration accompanied with a reduction in cellular F-actin amount. Moreover, following exposure to the HMF, the number of cell processes was reduced and cells were smaller in size and more round in shape. Furthermore, disordered kinetics of actin assembly in vitro were observed during exposure to the HMF, as evidenced by the presence of granule and meshed products. These results indicate that elimination of the GMF affects assembly of the motility-related actin cytoskeleton, and suggest that F-actin is a target of HMF exposure and probably a mediator of GMF sensation.

  6. Data Mining Techniques to Estimate Plutonium, Initial Enrichment, Burnup, and Cooling Time in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trellue, Holly Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fugate, Michael Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tobin, Stephen Joesph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-19

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a multi-laboratory, university, international partner collaboration to (1) detect replaced or missing pins from spent fuel assemblies (SFA) to confirm item integrity and deter diversion, (2) determine plutonium mass and related plutonium and uranium fissile mass parameters in SFAs, and (3) verify initial enrichment (IE), burnup (BU), and cooling time (CT) of facility declaration for SFAs. A wide variety of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques were researched to achieve these goals [Veal, 2010 and Humphrey, 2012]. In addition, the project includes two related activities with facility-specific benefits: (1) determination of heat content and (2) determination of reactivity (multiplication). In this research, a subset of 11 integrated NDA techniques was researched using data mining solutions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for their ability to achieve the above goals.

  7. Organizing principles of real-time memory encoding: neural clique assemblies and universal neural codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Longnian; Osan, Remus; Tsien, Joe Z

    2006-01-01

    Recent identification of network-level coding units, termed neural cliques, in the hippocampus has enabled real-time patterns of memory traces to be mathematically described, directly visualized, and dynamically deciphered. These memory coding units are functionally organized in a categorical and hierarchical manner, suggesting that internal representations of external events in the brain is achieved not by recording exact details of those events, but rather by recreating its own selective pictures based on cognitive importance. This neural-clique-based hierarchical-extraction and parallel-binding process enables the brain to acquire not only large storage capacity but also abstraction and generalization capability. In addition, activation patterns of the neural clique assemblies can be converted to strings of binary codes that would permit universal categorizations of internal brain representations across individuals and species.

  8. Effects of demographic stochasticity on biological community assembly on evolutionary time scales

    KAUST Repository

    Murase, Yohsuke

    2010-04-13

    We study the effects of demographic stochasticity on the long-term dynamics of biological coevolution models of community assembly. The noise is induced in order to check the validity of deterministic population dynamics. While mutualistic communities show little dependence on the stochastic population fluctuations, predator-prey models show strong dependence on the stochasticity, indicating the relevance of the finiteness of the populations. For a predator-prey model, the noise causes drastic decreases in diversity and total population size. The communities that emerge under influence of the noise consist of species strongly coupled with each other and have stronger linear stability around the fixed-point populations than the corresponding noiseless model. The dynamics on evolutionary time scales for the predator-prey model are also altered by the noise. Approximate 1/f fluctuations are observed with noise, while 1/ f2 fluctuations are found for the model without demographic noise. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  9. Chiral-induced self-assembly sphere phase liquid crystal with fast switching time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ji-Liang; Ni, Shui-Bin; Ping Chen, Chao; Lu, Jian-Gang, E-mail: lujg@sjtu.edu.cn; Su, Yikai [National Engineering Lab for TFT-LCD Materials and Technologies, Department of Electronic Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wu, Dong-Qing [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Song, Xiao-Long; Chen, Chao-Yuan [The Jiangsu Hecheng Display Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing 211300 (China); Shieh, Han-Ping D. [National Engineering Lab for TFT-LCD Materials and Technologies, Department of Electronic Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Photonics and Display Institute, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-03

    A fluid self-assembly sphere phase (SP) of liquid crystal induced by chiral dopant is observed in a narrow temperature range between isotropic and blue phase or between isotropic and chiral nematic phase. The SP consists of three-dimensional twist spheres (3-DTSs) and disclinations among 3-DTSs. The temperature range of the SP has been broadened to more than 85 °C by stabilizing the disclinations with amorphous polymer chains. The electro-optical switching time of the polymer-stabilized SP is demonstrated in sub-millisecond with a low switching electric field of 4.4 V μm{sup −1}, which is of promising applications in displays, 3-D tunable photonic crystals, and phase modulators.

  10. Understanding the Concentration Dependence of Viral Capsid Assembly Kinetics—the Origin of the Lag Time and Identifying the Critical Nucleus Size

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hagan, Michael F; Elrad, Oren M

    2010-01-01

    ... )), but extracting mechanistic information such as the critical nucleus size or the time to assemble an individual capsid has been challenging. In this article, we theoretically examine two models for capsid assembly kinetics to show that these properties can be determined from the concentration dependence of median assembly times and the la...

  11. Human genetics in troubled times and places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Peter S

    2018-01-01

    The development of human genetics world-wide during the twentieth century, especially across Europe, has occurred against a background of repeated catastrophes, including two world wars and the ideological problems and repression posed by Nazism and Communism. The published scientific literature gives few hints of these problems and there is a danger that they will be forgotten. The First World War was largely indiscriminate in its carnage, but World War 2 and the preceding years of fascism were associated with widespread migration, especially of Jewish workers expelled from Germany, and of their children, a number of whom would become major contributors to the post-war generation of human and medical geneticists in Britain and America. In Germany itself, eminent geneticists were also involved in the abuses carried out in the name of 'eugenics' and 'race biology'. However, geneticists in America, Britain and the rest of Europe were largely responsible for the ideological foundations of these abuses. In the Soviet Union, geneticists and genetics itself became the object of persecution from the 1930s till as late as the mid 1960s, with an almost complete destruction of the field during this time; this extended also to Eastern Europe and China as part of the influence of Russian communism. Most recently, at the end of the twentieth century, China saw a renewal of government sponsored eugenics programmes, now mostly discarded. During the post-world war 2 decades, human genetics research benefited greatly from recognition of the genetic dangers posed by exposure to radiation, following the atomic bomb explosions in Japan, atmospheric testing and successive accidental nuclear disasters in Russia. Documenting and remembering these traumatic events, now largely forgotten among younger workers, is essential if we are to fully understand the history of human genetics and avoid the repetition of similar disasters in the future. The power of modern human genetic and genomic

  12. Cdc25 Phosphatases Are Required for Timely Assembly of CDK1-Cyclin B at the G2/M Transition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Oleg; Cizmecioglu, Onur; Settele, Florian; Kempf, Tore; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Progression through mitosis requires the coordinated regulation of Cdk1 kinase activity. Activation of Cdk1 is a multistep process comprising binding of Cdk1 to cyclin B, relocation of cyclin-kinase complexes to the nucleus, activating phosphorylation of Cdk1 on Thr161 by the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK; Cdk7 in metazoans), and removal of inhibitory Thr14 and Tyr15 phosphorylations. This dephosphorylation is catalyzed by the dual specific Cdc25 phosphatases, which occur in three isoforms in mammalian cells, Cdc25A, -B, and -C. We find that expression of Cdc25A leads to an accelerated G2/M phase transition. In Cdc25A-overexpressing cells, Cdk1 exhibits high kinase activity despite being phosphorylated on Tyr15. In addition, Tyr15-phosphorylated Cdk1 binds more cyclin B in Cdc25A-overexpressing cells compared with control cells. Consistent with this observation, we demonstrate that in human transformed cells, Cdc25A and Cdc25B, but not Cdc25C phosphatases have an effect on timing and efficiency of cyclin-kinase complex formation. Overexpression of Cdc25A or Cdc25B promotes earlier assembly and activation of Cdk1-cyclin B complexes, whereas repression of these phosphatases by short hairpin RNA has a reverse effect, leading to a substantial decrease in amounts of cyclin B-bound Cdk1 in G2 and mitosis. Importantly, we find that Cdc25A overexpression leads to an activation of Cdk7 and increase in Thr161 phosphorylation of Cdk1. In conclusion, our data suggest that complex assembly and dephosphorylation of Cdk1 at G2/M is tightly coupled and regulated by Cdc25 phosphatases. PMID:20360007

  13. Human mitochondrial complex I assembles through the combination of evolutionary conserved modules: a framework to interpret complex I deficiencies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ugalde, C.; Vogel, R.O.; Huijbens, R.J.F.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    With 46 subunits, human mitochondrial complex I is the largest enzyme of the oxidative phosphorylation system. We have studied the assembly of complex I in cultured human cells. This will provide essential information about the nature of complex I deficiencies and will enhance our understanding of

  14. Study of weld quality real-time monitoring system for auto-body assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Li, Yong-Bing; Chen, Guan-Long

    2005-12-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) is widely used for the auto-body assembly in automotive industry. But RSW suffers from a major problem of inconsistent quality from weld to weld. The major problem is the complexity of the basic process that may involve material coatings, electrode force, electrode wear, fit up, etc. Therefore weld quality assurance is still a big challenge and goal. Electrode displacement has proved to be a particularly useful signal which correlates well with weld quality. This paper introduces a novel auto-body spot weld quality monitoring system which uses electrode displacement as the quality parameter. This system chooses the latest laser displacement sensor with high resolution to measure the real-time electrode displacement. It solves the interference problem of sensor mounting by designing special fixture, and can be successfully applied on the portable welding machine. It is capable of evaluating weld quality and making diagnosis of process variations such as surface asperities, shunting, worn electrode and weld expansion with real-time electrode displacement. As proved by application in the workshop, the monitoring system has good stability and reliability, and is qualified for monitoring weld quality in process.

  15. The Carboxyl Tail of Connexin32 Regulates Gap Junction Assembly in Human Prostate and Pancreatic Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Parul; Mitra, Shalini; Ray, Anuttoma; Kelsey, Linda; Roberts, Brett J.; Wahl, James K.; Johnson, Keith R.; Mehta, Parmender P.

    2015-01-01

    Connexins, the constituent proteins of gap junctions, are transmembrane proteins. A connexin (Cx) traverses the membrane four times and has one intracellular and two extracellular loops with the amino and carboxyl termini facing the cytoplasm. The transmembrane and the extracellular loop domains are highly conserved among different Cxs, whereas the carboxyl termini, often called the cytoplasmic tails, are highly divergent. We have explored the role of the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32, a Cx expressed in polarized and differentiated cells, in regulating gap junction assembly. Our results demonstrate that compared with the full-length Cx32, the cytoplasmic tail-deleted Cx32 is assembled into small gap junctions in human pancreatic and prostatic cancer cells. Our results further document that the expression of the full-length Cx32 in cells, which express the tail-deleted Cx32, increases the size of gap junctions, whereas the expression of the tail-deleted Cx32 in cells, which express the full-length Cx32, has the opposite effect. Moreover, we show that the tail is required for the clustering of cell-cell channels and that in cells expressing the tail-deleted Cx32, the expression of cell surface-targeted cytoplasmic tail alone is sufficient to enhance the size of gap junctions. Our live-cell imaging data further demonstrate that gap junctions formed of the tail-deleted Cx32 are highly mobile compared with those formed of full-length Cx32. Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 is not required to initiate the assembly of gap junctions but for their subsequent growth and stability. Our findings suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 may be involved in regulating the permeability of gap junctions by regulating their size. PMID:25548281

  16. Generic concept to program the time domain of self-assemblies with a self-regulation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Thomas; Steppert, Ann-Kathrin; Lopez, Catalina Molano; Zhu, Baolei; Walther, Andreas

    2015-04-08

    Nature regulates complex structures in space and time via feedback loops, kinetically controlled transformations, and under energy dissipation to allow non-equilibrium processes. Although man-made static self-assemblies realize excellent control over hierarchical structures via molecular programming, managing their temporal destiny by self-regulation is a largely unsolved challenge. Herein, we introduce a generic concept to control the time domain by programming the lifetimes of switchable self-assemblies in closed systems. We conceive dormant deactivators that, in combination with fast promoters, enable a unique kinetic balance to establish an autonomously self-regulating, transient pH-state, whose duration can be programmed over orders of magnitude-from minutes to days. Coupling this non-equilibrium state to pH-switchable self-assemblies allows predicting their assembly/disassembly fate in time, similar to a precise self-destruction mechanism. We demonstrate a platform approach by programming self-assembly lifetimes of block copolymers, nanoparticles, and peptides, enabling dynamic materials with a self-regulation functionality.

  17. Assembly of fibronectin into the extracellular matrix of early and late passage human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The specific binding of soluble /sup 125/I-human plasma fibronectin (/sup 125/I-HFN-P) to confluent cultures of early and late passage human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Previous studies HFN-P bound to fibroblast cell layers indicated that HNF-P was present in the cultures in two separate pools, distinguishable on the basis of their solubility in 1% deoxycholate. Examination of the kinetics of /sup 125/I-HFN-P binding to Pool I of early and late passage cultures revealed that both cultures required 2-4 h to approach steady-state conditions. Other kinetic studies showed that the rates of low of /sup 125/I-HFN-P from either Pool I or Pool II were similar for both cultures. Further, Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of Pool I binding sites with apparent dissociation constants (K/sub d/) of 5.3 x 10/sup -8/M (early passage) and 4.2 x 10/sup -8/M (late passage). These results indicate that early and late passage cultures of human fibroblasts exhibit differences in the number of cell surface biding sites for soluble fibronectin, and in the extent to which they incorporate soluble fibronectin into the extracellular matrix. Parameters which affect the fibronectin matrix assembly system of human skin fibroblasts were also examined. In addition, several monoclonal anti-fibronectin antibodies were characterized and developed as experimental probes for fibronectin structure and function.

  18. Purification of recombinant human and Drosophila septin hexamers for TIRF assays of actin-septin filament assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrakis, M; Tsai, F-C; Koenderink, G H

    2016-01-01

    Septins are guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that are conserved from fungi to humans. Septins assemble into heterooligomeric complexes and higher-order structures with key roles in various cellular functions including cell migration and division. The mechanisms by which septins assemble and interact with other cytoskeletal elements like actin remain elusive. A powerful approach to address this question is by cell-free reconstitution of purified cytoskeletal proteins combined with fluorescence microscopy. Here, we describe procedures for the purification of recombinant Drosophila and human septin hexamers from Escherichia coli and reconstitution of actin-septin coassembly. These procedures can be used to compare assembly of Drosophila and human septins and their coassembly with the actin cytoskeleton by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

  19. Structure and self-assembly of the calcium binding matrix protein of human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyrat, Cedric; Renner, Max; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-07

    The matrix protein (M) of paramyxoviruses plays a key role in determining virion morphology by directing viral assembly and budding. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human metapneumovirus M at 2.8 Å resolution in its native dimeric state. The structure reveals the presence of a high-affinity Ca²⁺ binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) predict a secondary lower-affinity site that correlates well with data from fluorescence-based thermal shift assays. By combining small-angle X-ray scattering with MDS and ensemble analysis, we captured the structure and dynamics of M in solution. Our analysis reveals a large positively charged patch on the protein surface that is involved in membrane interaction. Structural analysis of DOPC-induced polymerization of M into helical filaments using electron microscopy leads to a model of M self-assembly. The conservation of the Ca²⁺ binding sites suggests a role for calcium in the replication and morphogenesis of pneumoviruses.

  20. The role of humans and robots in the assembly of large infrared observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Edward J.; Espero, Tracey

    2004-10-01

    Many authors have endorsed the concept of assembly of large optics in space and have pointed out the technology needs for astronauts, infrastructure, robots and the observatories themselves. In this paper, we consider the technical issues associated with the integration and test in space of large optics during the next 15 years or so, when human activity is largely confined to low Earth orbit (LEO). We identify technical areas that need development and define a first version of the processes that might be used to create successful telescope missions that are tested in space. We identify a pathway that supports scalable solutions for very large systems necessary for imaging planets in other solar systems and other magnificent science. The investment in space integration and testing technology will return important dividends to designers of large space optics of the future. This approach to space optics testing is attractive because it overcomes the limits of ground testing associated with large test chambers, star simulators and the effects of gravity. It also directly benefits from, and supports, the technology and infrastructure investments about to be made by the new NASA Exploration Systems Enterprise, allowing both observatories and exploration missions to be assembled.

  1. Efficient assembly of de novo human artificial chromosomes from large genomic loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Gregory

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Artificial Chromosomes (HACs are potentially useful vectors for gene transfer studies and for functional annotation of the genome because of their suitability for cloning, manipulating and transferring large segments of the genome. However, development of HACs for the transfer of large genomic loci into mammalian cells has been limited by difficulties in manipulating high-molecular weight DNA, as well as by the low overall frequencies of de novo HAC formation. Indeed, to date, only a small number of large (>100 kb genomic loci have been reported to be successfully packaged into de novo HACs. Results We have developed novel methodologies to enable efficient assembly of HAC vectors containing any genomic locus of interest. We report here the creation of a novel, bimolecular system based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs for the construction of HACs incorporating any defined genomic region. We have utilized this vector system to rapidly design, construct and validate multiple de novo HACs containing large (100–200 kb genomic loci including therapeutically significant genes for human growth hormone (HGH, polycystic kidney disease (PKD1 and ß-globin. We report significant differences in the ability of different genomic loci to support de novo HAC formation, suggesting possible effects of cis-acting genomic elements. Finally, as a proof of principle, we have observed sustained ß-globin gene expression from HACs incorporating the entire 200 kb ß-globin genomic locus for over 90 days in the absence of selection. Conclusion Taken together, these results are significant for the development of HAC vector technology, as they enable high-throughput assembly and functional validation of HACs containing any large genomic locus. We have evaluated the impact of different genomic loci on the frequency of HAC formation and identified segments of genomic DNA that appear to facilitate de novo HAC formation. These genomic loci

  2. Interactively human: Sharing time, constructing materiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepstorff, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Predictive processing models of cognition are promising an elegant way to unite action, perception, and learning. However, in the current formulations, they are species-unspecific and have very little particularly human about them. I propose to examine how, in this framework, humans can be able to massively interact and to build shared worlds that are both material and symbolic.

  3. A United Nations General Assembly Special Session for mental, neurological, and substance use disorders: the time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Judith K; Bornemann, Thomas H; Burkey, Matthew; Chehil, Sonia; Chen, Lenis; Copeland, John R M; Eaton, William W; Ganju, Vijay; Hayward, Erin; Hock, Rebecca S; Kidwai, Rubeena; Kolappa, Kavitha; Lee, Patrick T; Minas, Harry; Or, Flora; Raviola, Giuseppe J; Saraceno, Benedetto; Patel, Vikram

    2012-01-01

    Mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders are leading causes of the global burden of disease and profoundly impact the social and economic well-being of individuals and communities. The majority of people affected by MNS disorders globally do not have access to evidence-based interventions and many experience discrimination and abuses of their human rights. A United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) is needed to focus global attention on MNS disorders as a core development issue requiring commitments to improve access to care, promote human rights, and strengthen the evidence on effective prevention and treatment.

  4. Connecting Galaxies with Halos Across Cosmic Time: Stellar mass assembly distribution modeling of galaxy statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    In this work, I explore an empirically motivated model for investigating the relationship between galaxy stellar masses, star formation rates and their halo masses and mass accretion histories. The core statistical quantity in this model is the stellar mass assembly distribution, $P(dM_{*}/dt|\\mathbf{X},a)$, which specifies the probability density distribution of stellar mass assembly rates given a set of halo properties $\\mathbf{X}$ and epoch $a$. Predictions from this model are obtained by integrating the stellar mass assembly distribution (SMAD) over halo merger trees, easily obtained from modern, high-resolution $N$-body simulations. Further properties of the galaxies hosted by the halos can be obtained by post-processing the stellar mass assembly histories with stellar population synthesis models. In my particular example implementation of this model, I use the \\citet{behroozi13a} constraint on the median stellar mass assembly rates of halos as a function of their mass and redshift to construct an exampl...

  5. Dexamethasone-Mediated Activation of Fibronectin Matrix Assembly Reduces Dispersal of Primary Human Glioblastoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Shannon

    Full Text Available Despite resection and adjuvant therapy, the 5-year survival for patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is less than 10%. This poor outcome is largely attributed to rapid tumor growth and early dispersal of cells, factors that contribute to a high recurrence rate and poor prognosis. An understanding of the cellular and molecular machinery that drive growth and dispersal is essential if we are to impact long-term survival. Our previous studies utilizing a series of immortalized GBM cell lines established a functional causation between activation of fibronectin matrix assembly (FNMA, increased tumor cohesion, and decreased dispersal. Activation of FNMA was accomplished by treatment with Dexamethasone (Dex, a drug routinely used to treat brain tumor related edema. Here, we utilize a broad range of qualitative and quantitative assays and the use of a human GBM tissue microarray and freshly-isolated primary human GBM cells grown both as conventional 2D cultures and as 3D spheroids to explore the role of Dex and FNMA in modulating various parameters that can significantly influence tumor cell dispersal. We show that the expression and processing of fibronectin in a human GBM tissue-microarray is variable, with 90% of tumors displaying some abnormality or lack in capacity to secrete fibronectin or assemble it into a matrix. We also show that low-passage primary GBM cells vary in their capacity for FNMA and that Dex treatment reactivates this process. Activation of FNMA effectively "glues" cells together and prevents cells from detaching from the primary mass. Dex treatment also significantly increases the strength of cell-ECM adhesion and decreases motility. The combination of increased cohesion and decreased motility discourages in vitro and ex vivo dispersal. By increasing cell-cell cohesion, Dex also decreases growth rate of 3D spheroids. These effects could all be reversed by an inhibitor of FNMA and by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU

  6. Application of Assembly of Finite Element Methods on Graphics Processors for Real-Time Elastodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Cecka, Cris

    2012-01-01

    This chapter discusses multiple strategies to perform general computations on unstructured grids, with specific application to the assembly of matrices in finite element methods (FEMs). It reviews and applies two methods for assembly of FEMs to produce and accelerate a FEM model for a nonlinear hyperelastic solid where the assembly, solution, update, and visualization stages are performed solely on the GPU, benefiting from speed-ups in each stage and avoiding costly GPUCPU transfers of data. For each method, the chapter discusses the NVIDIA GPU hardware\\'s limiting resources, optimizations, key data structures, and dependence of the performance with respect to problem size, element size, and GPU hardware generation. Furthermore, this chapter informs potential users of the benefits of GPU technology, provides guidelines to help them implement their own FEM solutions, gives potential speed-ups that can be expected, and provides source code for reference. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Real-time analysis of self-assembled nucleobases by Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Na; Shi, Ruixia; Long, Zi; Lu, Xin; Jiang, Fubin; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the real-time analysis of self-assembled nucleobases was employed by Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry (V-EASI-MS). With the analysis of three nucleobases including 6-methyluracil (6MU), uracil (U) and thymine (T) as examples, different orders of clusters centered with different metal ions were recorded in both positive and negative modes. Compared with the results obtained by traditional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) under the same condition, more clusters with high orders, such as [6MU7+Na](+), [6MU15+2NH4](2+), [6MU10+Na](+), [T7+Na](+), and [T15+2NH4](2+) were detected by V-EASI-MS, which demonstrated the soft ionization ability of V-EASI for studying the non-covalent interaction in a self-assembly process. Furthermore, with the injection of K(+) to the system by a syringe pumping, the real-time monitoring of the formation of nucleobases clusters was achieved by the direct extraction of samples from the system under the Venturi effect. Therefore, the effect of cations on the formation of clusters during self-assembly of nucleobases was demonstrated, which was in accordance with the reports. Free of high voltage, heating or radiation during the ionization, this technique is much soft and suitable for obtaining the real-time information of the self-assembly system, which also makes it quite convenient for extraction samples from the reaction system. This "easy and soft" ionization technique has provided a potential pathway for monitoring and controlling the self-assembly processes.

  8. Rooting human parechovirus evolution in time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria, N.R.; de Vries, M.; van Hemert, F.J.; Benschop, K.; van der Hoek, L.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Picornaviridae family contains a number of important pathogenic viruses, among which the recently reclassified human parechoviruses (HPeVs). These viruses are widespread and can be grouped in several types. Understanding the evolutionary history of HPeV could answer questio

  9. Light-induced disassembly of self-assembled vesicle-capped nanotubes observed in real time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, Anthony C.; Beierle, John M.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Macia, Beatriz; Caroli, Giuseppe; Mika, Jacek T.; van Dijken, Derk Jan; Chen, Jiawen; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    Molecular self-assembly is the basis for the formation of numerous artificial nanostructures(1,2). The self-organization of peptides(3-6), amphiphilic molecules composed of fused benzene rings(7-10) and other functional molecules(11-15) into nanotubes is of particular interest. However, the design

  10. Fatigue evaluation in maintenance and assembly operations by digital human simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Liang; Bennis, Fouad; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Bo; Guillaume, François; 10.1007/s10055-010-0156-8

    2010-01-01

    Virtual human techniques have been used a lot in industrial design in order to consider human factors and ergonomics as early as possible. The physical status (the physical capacity of virtual human) has been mostly treated as invariable in the current available human simulation tools, while indeed the physical capacity varies along time in an operation and the change of the physical capacity depends on the history of the work as well. Virtual Human Status is proposed in this paper in order to assess the difficulty of manual handling operations, especially from the physical perspective. The decrease of the physical capacity before and after an operation is used as an index to indicate the work difficulty. The reduction of physical strength is simulated in a theoretical approach on the basis of a fatigue model in which fatigue resistances of different muscle groups were regressed from 24 existing maximum endurance time (MET) models. A framework based on digital human modeling technique is established to realiz...

  11. Human response times in a graphic environment

    CERN Document Server

    Yule, A

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the results obtained from measuring the response times of the users of an interactive graphics system available on the CERN central computers is presented. These results are then used to find an optimum time to wait before rolling the user's program to disc.

  12. Time trends in human fecundability in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas H; Rylander, Lars; Carstensen, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    increased with age, except that for women in their late 1930s, an apparent decrease was observed, particularly among the early cohorts. CONCLUSION: We found decreasing subfertility over time. We speculate that these patterns might be related to a Sweden-specific decrease over time in sexually transmitted...

  13. Time trends in human fecundability in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas H; Rylander, Lars; Carstensen, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    increased with age, except that for women in their late 1930s, an apparent decrease was observed, particularly among the early cohorts. CONCLUSION: We found decreasing subfertility over time. We speculate that these patterns might be related to a Sweden-specific decrease over time in sexually transmitted...

  14. Geometric reasoning about assembly tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Planning for assembly requires reasoning about various tools used by humans, robots, or other automation to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper presents a general framework to represent and reason about geometric accessibility issues for a wide variety of such assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is then reduced to an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, the author presents more efficient methods to integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method pre-processes a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product in polynomial time, reducing all later state-tool queries to evaluations of a simple expression. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. The author presents a wide variety of tools that can be described adequately using the approach, and surveys tool catalogs to determine coverage of standard tools. Finally, the author describes an implementation of the approach in an assembly planning system and experiments with a library of over one hundred manual and robotic tools and several complex assemblies.

  15. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kuijt, Timo E F; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-12-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome-spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore-microtubule attachment or the force generated by dynamic microtubules that signals stable biorientation of chromosomes? To answer this, we uncoupled these two processes by expressing a non-phosphorylatable version of the main microtubule-binding protein at kinetochores (HEC1-9A), causing stabilization of incorrect kinetochore-microtubule attachments despite persistent activity of the error-correction machinery. The SAC is fully functional in HEC1-9A-expressing cells, yet cells in which chromosomes cannot biorient but are stably attached to microtubules satisfy the SAC and exit mitosis. SAC satisfaction requires neither intra-kinetochore stretching nor dynamic microtubules. Our findings support the hypothesis that in human cells the end-on interactions of microtubules with kinetochores are sufficient to satisfy the SAC without the need for microtubule-based pulling forces.

  16. Three-dimensional normal human neural progenitor tissue-like assemblies: a model of persistent varicella-zoster virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Goodwin

    Full Text Available Varicella-zoster virus (VZV is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs, which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  17. Three-dimensional normal human neural progenitor tissue-like assemblies: a model of persistent varicella-zoster virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J; McCarthy, Maureen; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Cohrs, Randall J; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  18. Adsorption of biopolymers human serum albumin and human gamma globulin to well-defined surfaces of self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cregger, Tricia Ann

    The tenacity with which the blood proteins Human Serum Albumin (HSA) and Human Gamma Globulin (HGG) adsorb to a surface modified with a monomolecular coating varies with the packing of the alkyl chains in the coating. The adsorption of proteins onto well-defined surfaces of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was studied with X-ray reflectometry (XR), neutron reflectometry (NR), optical reflectometry, and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). NR and XR was used to study adsorption in the absence of flow, while optical reflectometry and TIRF were used to probe the adsorption under flow conditions. In particular, competitive adsorption measurements of binary solutions of HSA, HGG and Fibrinogen (FIB) were performed with TIRE The properties of the surface were varied by altering the alkyl chains' packing density and the chain end functionality of the SAMs. The depth profiles of protein concentration near the adsorbing surface measured by NR were dependent upon the chain packing density in the case of HSA. The concentration depth profile of HGG was unaltered by varying chain packing density. Measurements performed under flow using optical reflectometry showed a different behavior: the surface excess of adsorbed HSA was relatively independent of the surface packing, while the surface excess of HGG depended on the packing density of the SAM. The tenacity with which the proteins adsorbed to different functionalized surfaces was determined by attempting to remove the protein using a strong surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ex situ XR measurements suggested that both HSA and HGG adsorb more tenaciously to a less densely-packed monolayer, almost independent of surface functionality. Two exceptions were a less densely-packed vinyl-terminated monolayer and a less densely-packed bromine-terminated monolayer, from which HSA could not be removed at all.

  19. Chronomics, human time estimation, and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Halberg

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Franz Halberg, Robert B Sothern, Germaine Cornélissen, Jerzy Czaplicki1Halberg Chronobiology Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 1Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, FranceBackground: Circadian rhythm stage affects many outcomes, including those of mental aging.Methods: Estimations of 1 minute ∼5 times/day for a year, 25 years apart, by a healthy male biomedical scientist (RBS, are analyzed by the extended cosinor.Results: Cycles of a half-week, a week, ∼30 days, a half-year and a year, in self-assessed 1-minute estimation by RBS between 25 and 60 years of age in health, are mapped for the first time, compared and opposite effects are found. For RBS at 60 vs at 25 years of age, it takes less time in the morning around 10:30 (P < 0.001, but not in the evening around 19:30 (P = 0.956, to estimate 1 minute.Discussion: During the intervening decades, the time of estimating 1 minute differed greatly, dependent on circadian stage, being a linear decrease in the morning and increase in the evening, the latter modulated by a ∼33.6-year cycle.Conclusion: Circadian and infradian rhythm mapping is essential for a scrutiny of effects of aging. A ∼30-day and a circannual component apparent at 25 years of age are not found later; cycles longer than a year are detected. Rhythm stages await tests as markers for timing therapy in disease.Keywords: circadian rhythm, mental function, time estimation

  20. Perspective: Economic Human Rights: The Time Has Come!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Anuradha

    1998-01-01

    Maintains that the high poverty levels in the United States implies that the goals of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) have not yet transformed the reality of U.S. citizens. Describes the national campaign called "Economic Human Rights: The Time Has Come!" that combats the violations of basic human rights like poverty.…

  1. Robots, Industry 4.0 and Humans, or Why Assembly Work Is More than Routine Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Pfeiffer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article condenses the key findings of qualitative studies on assembly work. Grounded conceptually in considerations of the role of experiential knowledge and living labor capacity with regard to informal expertise and tacit knowledge, the empirical results challenge the dominant view of assembly work as routine tasks that could easily be replaced by robotics. The empirical basis comprised of 62 qualitative interviews in five assembly plants provides answers to two questions: Are there non-routine aspects to be found in assembly work today? What exactly is the nature of experience in assembly work? The detailed research results are presented in three steps: the first focuses on the role of the non-routine in core assembly tasks; the second discusses the important and increasing role played by interactive capabilities in assembly work to ensure high performance, quality, and a smooth material flow; and the third highlights the usually neglected role of assembly workers in processes of innovation and organizational learning. The concluding chapter discusses the findings from the perspective of new technological options in robotics, possible worker resistance and effects on employment.

  2. Tracing human mitochondrial complex I assembly by use of GFP-tagged subunits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieteren, C.E.J.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Disturbances in the assembly of mitochondrial complex I (CI) are a frequent cause of mitochondrial disorders. Several lines of evidence hint at a semi-sequential assembly pathway, in which the 45 individual subunits that form the holoenzyme are pieced together by means of smaller intermediates. To u

  3. Human artificial chromosome assembly by transposon-based retrofitting of genomic BACs with synthetic alpha-satellite arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Joydeep; Willard, Huntington F; Stromberg, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    The development of methodologies for the rapid assembly of synthetic alpha-satellite arrays recapitulating the higher-order periodic organization of native human centromeres permits the systematic investigation of the significance of primary sequence and sequence organization in centromere function. Synthetic arrays with defined mutations affecting sequence and/or organization may be evaluated in a de novo human artificial chromosome assay. This unit describes strategies for the assembly of custom built alpha-satellite arrays containing any desired mutation as well as strategies for the construction and manipulation of alpha satellite-based transposons. Transposons permit the rapid and reliable retrofitting of any genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) with synthetic alpha-satellite arrays and other functional components, thereby facilitating conversion into BAC-based human artificial chromosome vectors. These techniques permit identification and optimization of the critical parameters underlying the unique ability of alpha-satellite DNA to facilitate de novo centromere assembly, and they will establish the foundation for the next generation of human artificial chromosome vectors.

  4. Determination of the optimal time and cost of manufacturing flow of an assembly using the Taguchi method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrila, S.; Brabie, G.; Chirita, B.

    2016-08-01

    The optimization of the parts and assembly manufacturing operation was carried out in order to minimize both the time and cost of production as appropriate. The optimization was made by using the Taguchi method. The Taguchi method is based on the plans of experiences that vary the input and outputs factors. The application of the Taguchi method in order to optimize the flow of the analyzed assembly production is made in the following: to find the optimal combination between the manufacturing operations; to choose the variant involving the use of equipment performance; to delivery operations based on automation. The final aim of the Taguchi method application is that the entire assembly to be achieved at minimum cost and in a short time. Philosophy Taguchi method of optimizing product quality is synthesized from three basic concepts: quality must be designed into the product and not he product inspected after it has been manufactured; the higher quality is obtained when the deviation from the proposed target is low or when uncontrollable factors action has no influence on it, which translates robustness; costs entailed quality are expressed as a function of deviation from the nominal value [1]. When determining the number of experiments involving the study of a phenomenon by this method, follow more restrictive conditions [2].

  5. The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Is Not Essential for Viability of Human Cells with Genetically Lowered APC/C Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, Thomas; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Narita, Takeo;

    2016-01-01

    -conjugating enzymes-UBE2C and UBE2S. We show that APC/C activity in human cells is tuned by the combinatorial use of three E2s, namely UBE2C, UBE2S, and UBE2D. Genetic deletion of UBE2C and UBE2S, individually or in combination, leads to discriminative reduction in APC/C function and sensitizes cells to UBE2D......The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which inhibits the APC/C, are essential determinants of mitotic timing and faithful division of genetic material. Activation of the APC/C is known to depend on two APC/C-interacting E2 ubiquitin...... depletion. Reduction of APC/C activity results in loss of switch-like metaphase-to-anaphase transition and, strikingly, renders cells insensitive to chemical inhibition of MPS1 and genetic ablation of MAD2, both of which are essential for the SAC. These results provide insights into the regulation of APC...

  6. All-electrical measurement of the triplet-singlet spin relaxation time in self-assembled quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltrudis, K.; Al-Ashouri, A.; Beckel, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Geller, M.; Lorke, A.

    2017-08-01

    We have measured the spin relaxation time of an excited two-electron spin-triplet state into its singlet ground state in self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots. We use a time-resolved measurement scheme that combines transconductance spectroscopy with spin-to-charge conversion to address the |s ↑,p ↑ 〉 triplet state, where one electron is in the quantum dot s-shell and a second one in the p-shell. The evaluation of the state-selective tunneling times from the dots into a nearby two-dimensional electron gas allows us to determine the s- and p-shell occupation and extract the relaxation time from a rate equation model. A comparably long triplet-to-singlet spin relaxation time of 25 μs is found.

  7. Anchored pseudo-de novo assembly of human genomes identifies extensive sequence variation from unmapped sequence reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber-Hammond, Joshua J; Brown, Kim H

    2016-07-01

    The human genome reference (HGR) completion marked the genomics era beginning, yet despite its utility universal application is limited by the small number of individuals used in its development. This is highlighted by the presence of high-quality sequence reads failing to map within the HGR. Sequences failing to map generally represent 2-5 % of total reads, which may harbor regions that would enhance our understanding of population variation, evolution, and disease. Alternatively, complete de novo assemblies can be created, but these effectively ignore the groundwork of the HGR. In an effort to find a middle ground, we developed a bioinformatic pipeline that maps paired-end reads to the HGR as separate single reads, exports unmappable reads, de novo assembles these reads per individual and then combines assemblies into a secondary reference assembly used for comparative analysis. Using 45 diverse 1000 Genomes Project individuals, we identified 351,361 contigs covering 195.5 Mb of sequence unincorporated in GRCh38. 30,879 contigs are represented in multiple individuals with ~40 % showing high sequence complexity. Genomic coordinates were generated for 99.9 %, with 52.5 % exhibiting high-quality mapping scores. Comparative genomic analyses with archaic humans and primates revealed significant sequence alignments and comparisons with model organism RefSeq gene datasets identified novel human genes. If incorporated, these sequences will expand the HGR, but more importantly our data highlight that with this method low coverage (~10-20×) next-generation sequencing can still be used to identify novel unmapped sequences to explore biological functions contributing to human phenotypic variation, disease and functionality for personal genomic medicine.

  8. A CENP-S/X complex assembles at the centromere in S and G2 phases of the human cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornblut, Carsten; Quinn, Nadine; Monajambashi, Shamci; Prendergast, Lisa; van Vuuren, Chelly; Münch, Sandra; Deng, Wen; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M Cristina; Hoischen, Christian; Diekmann, Stephan; Sullivan, Kevin F

    2014-02-12

    The functional identity of centromeres arises from a set of specific nucleoprotein particle subunits of the centromeric chromatin fibre. These include CENP-A and histone H3 nucleosomes and a novel nucleosome-like complex of CENPs -T, -W, -S and -X. Fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) revealed that human CENP-S and -X exist principally in complex in soluble form and retain proximity when assembled at centromeres. Conditional labelling experiments show that they both assemble de novo during S phase and G2, increasing approximately three- to fourfold in abundance at centromeres. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) measurements documented steady-state exchange between soluble and assembled pools, with CENP-X exchanging approximately 10 times faster than CENP-S (t1/2 ∼ 10 min versus 120 min). CENP-S binding to sites of DNA damage was quite distinct, with a FRAP half-time of approximately 160 s. Fluorescent two-hybrid analysis identified CENP-T as a uniquely strong CENP-S binding protein and this association was confirmed by FRET, revealing a centromere-bound complex containing CENP-S, CENP-X and CENP-T in proximity to histone H3 but not CENP-A. We propose that deposition of the CENP-T/W/S/X particle reveals a kinetochore-specific chromatin assembly pathway that functions to switch centromeric chromatin to a mitosis-competent state after DNA replication. Centromeres shuttle between CENP-A-rich, replication-competent and H3-CENP-T/W/S/X-rich mitosis-competent compositions in the cell cycle.

  9. Na+-permeable channels of human sperm membrane re- assembled into giant liposome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Previous data showed that a Na+-transmembrane flux was accompanied with acrosome reaction of sperm. However, the electrophysiological recording and characterization of Na+ current in human sperm membrane have not been yet reported. In the present investigation, membrane proteins extracted from human sperms were reassembled into liposome bilayer, and then the liposomes were fused by dehydration-rehydration into giant liposomes with the diameter of more than 10 mm. By patch clamping the giant liposomes two kinds of single channel currents were recorded in a NaCl solution system. Both of them were Na+-carried, TTX-sensitive and strongly rectifying, but with different unit conductance and open probability. Moreover, bursting activity and channel-substates as well as two open time constants were observed in the larger channel.

  10. Orc1 Binding to Mitotic Chromosomes Precedes Spatial Patterning during G1 Phase and Assembly of the Origin Recognition Complex in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Nihan; Hossain, Manzar; Prasanth, Supriya G; Stillman, Bruce

    2015-05-08

    Replication of eukaryotic chromosomes occurs once every cell division cycle in normal cells and is a tightly controlled process that ensures complete genome duplication. The origin recognition complex (ORC) plays a key role during the initiation of DNA replication. In human cells, the level of Orc1, the largest subunit of ORC, is regulated during the cell division cycle, and thus ORC is a dynamic complex. Upon S phase entry, Orc1 is ubiquitinated and targeted for destruction, with subsequent dissociation of ORC from chromosomes. Time lapse and live cell images of human cells expressing fluorescently tagged Orc1 show that Orc1 re-localizes to condensing chromatin during early mitosis and then displays different nuclear localization patterns at different times during G1 phase, remaining associated with late replicating regions of the genome in late G1 phase. The initial binding of Orc1 to mitotic chromosomes requires C-terminal amino acid sequences that are similar to mitotic chromosome-binding sequences in the transcriptional pioneer protein FOXA1. Depletion of Orc1 causes concomitant loss of the mini-chromosome maintenance (Mcm2-7) helicase proteins on chromatin. The data suggest that Orc1 acts as a nucleating center for ORC assembly and then pre-replication complex assembly by binding to mitotic chromosomes, followed by gradual removal from chromatin during the G1 phase.

  11. 'Human paced' walking: Followers adopt stride time dynamics of leaders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmelat, V.C.M.; Delignières, D.; Torre, K.; Beek, P.J.; Daffertshofer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Isochronous cueing is widely used in gait rehabilitation even though it alters the stride-time dynamics toward anti-persistent rather than the persistent, fractal fluctuations characteristic of human walking. In the present experiment we tested an alternative cueing method: pacing by a human. To thi

  12. Assembly Finite Element Models as a Basis to Save Time for Creating Spacecraft Detailed Thermal Mathematical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Kulikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates the role of mathematical modeling in thermal design at different stages of spacecraft development. It analyses the current state of the issue and the approach used to solve this problem in the aerospace industry. The paper suggests using the assembly finite elements models (AFEM for detailed thermal mathematical models (DTMM at the stages of conceptual design, production of technical documentation, and technology groundwork. It shows advantages of the proposed approach such as an increased productivity, a possibility of real-time correction of the thermal models and their reuse when designing the next generation of products or upgrading. There are the ways of creating finite element models of assemblies and their applicability in matters of a descending, ascending and combined thermal design styles. A honeycomb panel «+ Z», a part of the construction of small spacecraft "AIST-2D", is used, as an example, to consider the process of creating the assembly finite element model (AFEM in the software package Siemens NX.During the AFEM application tests when building the detailed thermal mathematical models of small spacecraft "AIST" and "AICT-2D" was revealed an essential feature inherent in the proposed technology that is a need to use thermal couplings because the meshes of various components do not involve a mate "node to node ".A test problem has been solved by analytical and numerical methods in order to verify the proper use of thermal couplings when building the detailed thermal mathematical models of small spacecraft. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been estimated in terms of saving time to create DTMM, with the benefit of hindsight of its use as applied to the functioning and newly developed small spacecraft.

  13. Preparation of a novel composite nanofiber gel-encapsulated human placental extract through layer-by-layer self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guohui; Chen, X I; Zhou, W U; Yang, Shuhua; Ye, Shunan; Cao, Faqi; Liu, Y I; Xiong, Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Aqueous human placenta extract (HPE) has been previously used to treat chronic soft tissue ulcer; however, the optimal dosage of HPE has yet to be elucidated. The present study investigated a novel nanofiber gel composed through layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly, in which HPE was encapsulated. IKVAV, RGD, RAD16 and FGL-PA were screened and combined to produce an optimal vehicle nanofiber gel through LbL assembly. Subsequently, the aqueous HPE was encapsulated into this nanofiber at the appropriate concentration, and the morphology, particle size, drug loading efficacy, encapsulation rate, release efficiency and structure validation were detected. The encapsulation efficiency of all three HPE samples was >90%, the nanofiber gel exhibited a slow releasing profile, and the structure of HPE encapsulated in the nanofiber gel was unvaried. In conclusion, this type of novel composite nanocapsules may offer a promising delivery system for HPE.

  14. De novo centriole formation in human cells is error-prone and does not require SAS-6 self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Won-Jing; Acehan, Devrim; Kao, Chien-Han; Jane, Wann-Neng; Uryu, Kunihiro; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2015-11-26

    Vertebrate centrioles normally propagate through duplication, but in the absence of preexisting centrioles, de novo synthesis can occur. Consistently, centriole formation is thought to strictly rely on self-assembly, involving self-oligomerization of the centriolar protein SAS-6. Here, through reconstitution of de novo synthesis in human cells, we surprisingly found that normal looking centrioles capable of duplication and ciliation can arise in the absence of SAS-6 self-oligomerization. Moreover, whereas canonically duplicated centrioles always form correctly, de novo centrioles are prone to structural errors, even in the presence of SAS-6 self-oligomerization. These results indicate that centriole biogenesis does not strictly depend on SAS-6 self-assembly, and may require preexisting centrioles to ensure structural accuracy, fundamentally deviating from the current paradigm.

  15. Total Chemical Synthesis,Assembly of Human Torque Teno Virus Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Hou; Gengfu Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Torque teno virus(TTV)is a nonenveloped virus containing a single-stranded,circular DNA genome of approximately 3.8kb.We completely synthesized the 3808 nucleotides of the TTV(SANBAN isolate)genome,which contains a hairpin structure and a GC-rich region.More than 100 overlapping oligonucleotides were chemically synthesized and assembled by polymerise chain assembly reaction(PCA),and the synthesis was completed with splicing by overlap extension(SOEing).This study establishes the methodological basis of the chemical synthesis of a viral genome for use as a live attenuated vaccine or gene therapy vector.

  16. Polymorphisms in the human tropoelastin gene modify in vitro self-assembly and mechanical properties of elastin-like polypeptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David He

    Full Text Available Elastin is a major structural component of elastic fibres that provide properties of stretch and recoil to tissues such as arteries, lung and skin. Remarkably, after initial deposition of elastin there is normally no subsequent turnover of this protein over the course of a lifetime. Consequently, elastic fibres must be extremely durable, able to withstand, for example in the human thoracic aorta, billions of cycles of stretch and recoil without mechanical failure. Major defects in the elastin gene (ELN are associated with a number of disorders including Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS, Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS and autosomal dominant cutis laxa (ADCL. Given the low turnover of elastin and the requirement for the long term durability of elastic fibres, we examined the possibility for more subtle polymorphisms in the human elastin gene to impact the assembly and long-term durability of the elastic matrix. Surveys of genetic variation resources identified 118 mutations in human ELN, 17 being non-synonymous. Introduction of two of these variants, G422S and K463R, in elastin-like polypeptides as well as full-length tropoelastin, resulted in changes in both their assembly and mechanical properties. Most notably G422S, which occurs in up to 40% of European populations, was found to enhance some elastomeric properties. These studies reveal that even apparently minor polymorphisms in human ELN can impact the assembly and mechanical properties of the elastic matrix, effects that over the course of a lifetime could result in altered susceptibility to cardiovascular disease.

  17. 航天产品准时装配管理技术研究%Research on the Management Technologies of Just - in - Time Assembly for Aerospace Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    端存真; 薛善良; 李建平; 马继红; 杨年宝

    2012-01-01

    An aerospace assembly plant is still employing the traditional productive management. In order to a-chieve informatization of assembling productive management, it introduces just - in - time assembly management technology for aerospace products, presents a just - in - time assembling system for aerospace products and Kan-ban management, describes the standardizing operation, equalization of production, rational arrangement of e-quipment, multi - skill operator and full - scale quality management. According to Java EE standards, it analyzes just - in - time assembly management requirements such as function modules, implementation of assembly dispatching, assembly process Kanban, material distribution Kanban, and assembly quality Kanban, etc. , develops the just - in - time assembly management system.%某航天装配车间生产管理仍是传统的生产管理方式,为了实现装配生产管理的信息化,研究了航天产品准时装配管理技术.引入丰田生产方式中“准时生产”技术,建立以一个流生产和看板管理为实施基础,以标准化作业、生产均衡化、设备合理布置、多技能作业员和全面质量管理为实施手段的航天产品准时装配体系.分析准时装配管理系统需求,并按照Java EE标准设计包括装配派工执行、装配进度看板、物料配送看板和装配质量看板等功能模块,最后开发了航天产品准时装配管理系统原型.

  18. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kuijt, Timo E F; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome-spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore-microtubule

  19. Human and robotic repair of a solar array wing during ISS assembly mission 10A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghenekevwe, Viano; Redmond, Scott; Hiltz, Michael; Rembala, Richard

    2009-12-01

    With the installation of a new module and the relocation of three other modules, including multiple hand-offs from the station arm (SSRMS) to the shuttle arm (SRMS), International Space Station (ISS) assembly mission 10A/STS-120 was anticipated to be one of the most complicated ISS assembly missions ever attempted. The assembly operations became even more complex when a solar array wing (SAW) on the relocated Port-6 (P6) truss segment ripped while being extended. Repairing the torn SAW became the single most important objective for the remainder of STS-120, with future ISS assembly missions threatened by reduced power generation capacity if the SAW could not be repaired. Precise coordination between the space shuttle and ISS robotics teams led to an operational concept that combined the capabilities of the SRMS and SSRMS robotic systems in ways far beyond their original design capacities. Benefits of consistent standards for ISS robotic interfaces have been previously identified, but the advantages of having two such versatile and compatible robotic systems have never been quite so spectacular. This paper describes the role of robotics in the emergency SAW repair and highlights how versatility within space robotics systems can allow operations far beyond the intended design scenarios.

  20. Bacterial community variation in human body habitats across space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Elizabeth K; Lauber, Christian L; Hamady, Micah; Fierer, Noah; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Knight, Rob

    2009-12-18

    Elucidating the biogeography of bacterial communities on the human body is critical for establishing healthy baselines from which to detect differences associated with diseases. To obtain an integrated view of the spatial and temporal distribution of the human microbiota, we surveyed bacteria from up to 27 sites in seven to nine healthy adults on four occasions. We found that community composition was determined primarily by body habitat. Within habitats, interpersonal variability was high, whereas individuals exhibited minimal temporal variability. Several skin locations harbored more diverse communities than the gut and mouth, and skin locations differed in their community assembly patterns. These results indicate that our microbiota, although personalized, varies systematically across body habitats and time; such trends may ultimately reveal how microbiome changes cause or prevent disease.

  1. Metagenomic systems biology and metabolic modeling of the human microbiome: from species composition to community assembly rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Roie; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2014-01-01

    The human microbiome is a key contributor to health and development. Yet little is known about the ecological forces that are at play in defining the composition of such host-associated communities. Metagenomics-based studies have uncovered clear patterns of community structure but are often incapable of distinguishing alternative structuring paradigms. In a recent study, we integrated metagenomic analysis with a systems biology approach, using a reverse ecology framework to model numerous human microbiota species and to infer metabolic interactions between species. Comparing predicted interactions with species composition data revealed that the assembly of the human microbiome is dominated at the community level by habitat filtering. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this habitat filtering cannot be accounted for by known host phenotypes or by the metabolic versatility of the various species. Here we provide a summary of our findings and offer a brief perspective on related studies and on future approaches utilizing this metagenomic systems biology framework.

  2. Enzymatic reaction modulated gold nanorod end-to-end self-assembly for ultrahigh sensitively colorimetric sensing of cholinesterase and organophosphate pesticides in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Linlin; Xia, Yunsheng

    2015-08-18

    We present herein the first reported self-assembly modulation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) by enzymatic reaction, which is further employed for colorimetric assays of cholinesterase (ChE) and organophosphate pesticides (OPs) in human blood. ChE catalyzes its substrate (acetylthiocholine) and produces thiocholine and acetate acid. The resulting thiols then react with the tips of the AuNRs by S-Au conjunction and prevent subsequent cysteine-induced AuNR end-to-end (EE) self-assembly. Correspondingly, the AuNR surface plasmon resonance is regulated, which results in a distinctly ratiometric signal output. Under optimal conditions, the linear range is 0.042 to 8.4 μU/mL, and the detection limit is as low as 0.018 μU/mL. As ChE is incubated with OPs, the enzymatic activity is inhibited. So, the cysteine-induced assembly is observed again. On the basis of this principle, OPs can be well determined ranging from 0.12 to 40 pM with a 0.039 pM detection limit. To our knowledge, the present quasi pU/mL level sensitivity for ChE and the quasi femtomolar level sensitivity for OPs are at least 500 and 7000 times lower than those of previous colorimetric methods, respectively. The ultrahigh sensitivity results from (1) the rational choice of anisotropic AuNRs as building blocks and reporters and (2) the specific structure of the enzymatic thiocholine. Because of ultrahigh sensitivity, serum samples are allowed to be extremely diluted in the assay. Accordingly, various nonspecific interactions, even from glutathione/cysteine, are well avoided. So, both ChE and OPs in human blood can be directly assayed without any prepurification, indicating the simplicity and practical promise of the proposed method.

  3. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  4. Time-varying priority queuing models for human dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Pan, Raj Kumar; Kaski, Kimmo

    2012-06-01

    Queuing models provide insight into the temporal inhomogeneity of human dynamics, characterized by the broad distribution of waiting times of individuals performing tasks. We theoretically study the queuing model of an agent trying to execute a task of interest, the priority of which may vary with time due to the agent's "state of mind." However, its execution is disrupted by other tasks of random priorities. By considering the priority of the task of interest either decreasing or increasing algebraically in time, we analytically obtain and numerically confirm the bimodal and unimodal waiting time distributions with power-law decaying tails, respectively. These results are also compared to the updating time distribution of papers in arXiv.org and the processing time distribution of papers in Physical Review journals. Our analysis helps to understand human task execution in a more realistic scenario.

  5. Time-Varying Priority Queuing Models for Human Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Kaski, Kimmo

    2011-01-01

    Queuing models provide insight into the temporal inhomogeneity of human dynamics, characterized by the broad distribution of waiting times of individuals performing tasks. We study the queuing model of an agent trying to execute a task of interest, the priority of which may vary with time due to the agent's "state of mind." However, its execution can be disrupted by other tasks of random priorities. By considering the priority of the task of interest either decreasing or increasing algebraically in time, we analytically obtain and numerically confirm the bimodal and unimodal waiting time distributions with power-law decaying tails, respectively. These results are also compared to the updating time distribution of papers in the arXiv and the processing time distribution of papers in Physical Review journals. Our analysis helps to understand the human task execution behavior in a more realistic scenario.

  6. Noise-induced transition in human reaction times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-09-01

    The human reaction/response time can be defined as the time elapsed from the onset of stimulus presentation until a response occurs in many sensory and cognitive processes. A reaction time model based on Piéron’s law is investigated. The model shows a noise-induced transition in the moments of reaction time distributions due to the presence of strong additive noise. The model also demonstrates that reaction times do not follow fluctuation scaling between the mean and the variance but follow a generalized version between the skewness and the kurtosis. The results indicate that noise-induced transitions in the moments govern fluctuations in sensory-motor transformations and open an insight into the macroscopic effects of noise in human perception and action. The conditions that lead to extreme reaction times are discussed based on the transfer of information in neurons.

  7. Modeling of RFID-Enabled Real-Time Manufacturing Execution System in Mixed-Model Assembly Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To quickly respond to the diverse product demands, mixed-model assembly lines are well adopted in discrete manufacturing industries. Besides the complexity in material distribution, mixed-model assembly involves a variety of components, different process plans and fast production changes, which greatly increase the difficulty for agile production management. Aiming at breaking through the bottlenecks in existing production management, a novel RFID-enabled manufacturing execution system (MES, which is featured with real-time and wireless information interaction capability, is proposed to identify various manufacturing objects including WIPs, tools, and operators, etc., and to trace their movements throughout the production processes. However, being subject to the constraints in terms of safety stock, machine assignment, setup, and scheduling requirements, the optimization of RFID-enabled MES model for production planning and scheduling issues is a NP-hard problem. A new heuristical generalized Lagrangian decomposition approach has been proposed for model optimization, which decomposes the model into three subproblems: computation of optimal configuration of RFID senor networks, optimization of production planning subjected to machine setup cost and safety stock constraints, and optimization of scheduling for minimized overtime. RFID signal processing methods that could solve unreliable, redundant, and missing tag events are also described in detail. The model validity is discussed through algorithm analysis and verified through numerical simulation. The proposed design scheme has important reference value for the applications of RFID in multiple manufacturing fields, and also lays a vital research foundation to leverage digital and networked manufacturing system towards intelligence.

  8. AN APPLICATION OF DOCTRINE OF NECESSITY: PREVIOUS CONSTITUENT ASSEMBLY OF NEPAL AND ITS TIME EXTENSION TO AVOID CONSTITUTIONAL UNCERTAINTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Pd. Jayshwal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate issues in relation of constitutional doctrine which had potential debate among the jurists of Nepal for the issues of time extension. The paper will also argue some weaknesses in the constituent assembly and their role expected by the people of Nepal. This paper will discuss about the evolution of constitution in Nepal, its features, the principle of Constitutionalism embodied in Nepalese constitution. This paper will further argue about the legitimacy of Doctrine of Necessity and its application in Nepal. In last, this paper will show the possibility of constitutional uncertainty by newly elected constituent assembly.   Penulisan ini dalam rangka mengkaji doktrin konstitusional yang tengah ramai diperdebatkan oleh para ahli hukum di Nepal, khususnya berkaitan dengan isu mengenai perpanjangan waktu. Melalui tulisan ini, terdapat temuan yang menunjukkan beberapa kelemahan yang ada dalam majelis konstituate Nepal di samping peran-perannya sebagaimana yang diharapkan oleh rakyat Nepal. Tulisan ini membahas pula mengenai evolusi konstitusi Nepal sebagaimana diwujudkan dalam prinsip-prinsip konstitusionalism yang dianut oleh Konstitusi Nepal. Lebih lanjut, berkaitan dengan legitimasi dari Doctrin of Necessity dan penerapannya di Nepal. Pada akhirnya, tulisan ini akan memberikan gambaran mengenai kemungkinan ketidakpastian secara konstitusional berkaitan dengan kondisi majelis konstituante yang baru saja terpilih.

  9. Data on cytochrome c oxidase assembly in mice and human fibroblasts or tissues induced by SURF1 defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovářová, Nikola; Pecina, Petr; Nůsková, Hana; Vrbacký, Marek; Zeviani, Massimo; Mráček, Tomáš; Viscomi, Carlo; Houštěk, Josef

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes data related to a research article entitled "Tissue- and species-specific differences in cytochrome c oxidase assembly induced by SURF1 defects" [1]. This paper includes data of the quantitative analysis of individual forms of respiratory chain complexes I, III and IV present in SURF1 knockout (SURF1 (-/-) ) and control (SURF1 (+/+) ) mouse fibroblasts and tissues and in fibroblasts of human control and patients with SURF1 gene mutation. Also it includes data demonstrating response of complex IV, cytochrome c oxidase (COX), to reversible inhibition of mitochondrial translation in SURF1 (-/-) mouse and SURF1 patient fibroblast cell lines.

  10. Structural analysis of the human SYCE2-TEX12 complex provides molecular insights into synaptonemal complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Owen R; Maman, Joseph D; Pellegrini, Luca

    2012-07-01

    The successful completion of meiosis is essential for all sexually reproducing organisms. The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a large proteinaceous structure that holds together homologous chromosomes during meiosis, providing the structural framework for meiotic recombination and crossover formation. Errors in SC formation are associated with infertility, recurrent miscarriage and aneuploidy. The current lack of molecular information about the dynamic process of SC assembly severely restricts our understanding of its function in meiosis. Here, we provide the first biochemical and structural analysis of an SC protein component and propose a structural basis for its function in SC assembly. We show that human SC proteins SYCE2 and TEX12 form a highly stable, constitutive complex, and define the regions responsible for their homotypic and heterotypic interactions. Biophysical analysis reveals that the SYCE2-TEX12 complex is an equimolar hetero-octamer, formed from the association of an SYCE2 tetramer and two TEX12 dimers. Electron microscopy shows that biochemically reconstituted SYCE2-TEX12 complexes assemble spontaneously into filamentous structures that resemble the known physical features of the SC central element (CE). Our findings can be combined with existing biological data in a model of chromosome synapsis driven by growth of SYCE2-TEX12 higher-order structures within the CE of the SC.

  11. Melatonin and the circadian timing of human parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcese, James; Lozier, Stephen; Paradise, Courtney

    2013-02-01

    Although the onset of spontaneous human parturition has long been known to occur preferentially during the nighttime and early morning hours, no convincing physiological explanation for this pattern has yet been proposed. This review focuses on the circadian timing of mammalian parturition, particularly in the human. It is proposed that differences in the phasing of parturition among different species are likely a function of opposite uterine responses to humoral cues, in particular those coding for time of day. The brain hormone melatonin fulfills many of the prerequisites to serve as a circadian signal for initiating uterine contractions that lead to human parturition. These encompass direct actions of melatonin on myometrial smooth muscle cells that are synergistic with oxytocin in facilitating greater uterine contractions at night. This may not only help to explain the nocturnal phasing of human parturition but also open new avenues for the management of term and preterm labor.

  12. Galaxy Assembly and the Evolution of Structure over the First Third of Cosmic Time - I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey {CANDELS}is designed to document the |*|rst third of galactic evolution from z =8 to 1.5 via deep imaging of more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IRand ACS. It will also find the first Type Ia SNe beyond z > 1.5 andestablish their accuracy as standard candles for cosmology. Fivepremier multi-wavelength sky regions are selected from the SpitzerExtragalactic Deep Survey {SEDS} to provide complementary IRAC imagingdata down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource for stellar masses at allredshifts. The use of |*|ve widely separated |*|elds mitigates cosmicvariance and yields statistically robust and complete samples ofgalaxies down to 10^9 solar masses out to z 8.The program merges two originally separate MCT proposals. The Faberprogram incorporates a |*|Wide|*| imaging survey in three separate fieldsto 2 orbit depth over 0.2 sq. degrees, plus a |*|Deep|*| imaging surveyto 12 orbit depth in the two GOODS regions over 0.04 sq. degrees.In combination with ultra-deep imaging from the Hubble Ultradeep Fieldprogram {GO 11563}, the result is a three-tiered strategy that ef|*|cientlysamples both bright/rare and faint/common extragalactic objects. TheFerguson program adds an extensive high-redshift Type Ia SNe search,plus ultraviolet "daytime" UVIS exposures in GOODS-N to exploit theCVZ opportunity in that field.This program, GO 12064, is part of the Wide mosaic survey, which has thefollowing field centers and sizes: Field ID RA{2000} Dec{2000} WFC3 Dim. PA on sky UDS 02 17 38 -05 12 02 4x11 270 COSMOS 10 00 31 +02 24 00 4x11 180 EGS 14 19 31 +52 54 10 3x15 41 Science highlights from the Wide program: * Underlying structural properties of galaxies as revealed by WFC3-IR images sensitive to older stars {beyond the 4000-A break} and less affected by dust than ACS. A key redshift is z 2, where star-formation peaks, QSOs are most abundant, and where restframe B-band is still accessible to WFC3. Sample questions include

  13. Human SAS-6 C-Terminus Nucleates and Promotes Microtubule Assembly in Vitro by Binding to Microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Hindol; Badarudeen, Binshad; George, Athira; Thomas, Geethu Emily; Gireesh, K K; Manna, Tapas K

    2015-10-20

    Centrioles are essential components of the animal centrosome and play crucial roles in the formation of cilia and flagella. They are cylindrical structures composed of nine triplet microtubules organized around a central cartwheel. Recent studies have identified spindle assembly abnormal protein SAS-6 as a critical component necessary for formation of the cartwheel. However, the molecular details of how the cartwheel participates in centriolar microtubule assembly have not been clearly understood. In this report, we show that the C-terminal tail (residues 470-657) of human SAS-6, HsSAS-6 C, the region that has been shown to extend toward the centriolar wall where the microtubule triplets are organized, nucleated and induced microtubule polymerization in vitro. The N-terminus (residues 1-166) of HsSAS-6, the domain known to be involved in formation of the central hub of the cartwheel, did not, however, exert any effect on microtubule polymerization. HsSAS-6 C bound to the microtubules and localized along the lengths of the microtubules in vitro. Microtubule pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) experiments with S-phase synchronized HeLa cell lysates showed that the endogenous HsSAS-6 coprecipitated with the microtubules, and it mediated interaction with tubulin. Isothermal calorimetry titration and size exclusion chromatography showed that HsSAS-6 C bound to the αβ-tubulin dimer in vitro. The results demonstrate that HsSAS-6 possesses an intrinsic microtubule assembly promoting activity and further implicate that its outer exposed C-terminal tail may play critical roles in microtubule assembly and stabilizing microtubule attachment with the centriolar cartwheel.

  14. The beginning of human life under time-laps Cinematography

    OpenAIRE

    Mio, Yasuyuki

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The aim of this study was to follow and record the early stages of development of a human embryo using time-lapse cinematography, and to discuss the beginning of human life. Materials and Methods: Human ova were incubated in thermo-stabilized and pH controlled chambers and observed using an inverted microscope fitted with a CCD digital camera. Images were taken at 2-minute intervals for 5–6 days. A total of 30 consecutive images, corresponding to an hour of incubat...

  15. Space, time and the limits of human understanding

    CERN Document Server

    Ghirardi, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    In this compendium of essays, some of the world’s leading thinkers discuss their conceptions of space and time, as viewed through the lens of their own discipline. With an epilogue on the limits of human understanding, this volume hosts contributions from six or more diverse fields. It presumes only rudimentary background knowledge on the part of the reader. Time and again, through the prism of intellect, humans have tried to diffract reality into various distinct, yet seamless, atomic, yet holistic, independent, yet interrelated disciplines and have attempted to study it contextually. Philosophers debate the paradoxes, or engage in meditations, dialogues and reflections on the content and nature of space and time. Physicists, too, have been trying to mold space and time to fit their notions concerning micro- and macro-worlds. Mathematicians focus on the abstract aspects of space, time and measurement. While cognitive scientists ponder over the perceptual and experiential facets of our consciousness of spac...

  16. Performance analysis of the DSN baseband assembly (Bba) Real-Time Combiner (RTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M. K.; Mileant, A.

    1985-01-01

    The operation of the BBA Real Time Combiner (RTC) is discussed and its performance investigated in detail. It is shown that each channel of the RTC can be modelled by a simple block diagram in the z-transform domain from which all pertinent transient and steady state behavioral characteristics can be determined. In particular, the characteristic equation of the tracking loop and its equivalent noise bandwidth are found and used to evaluate the closed loop transient response and steady-state mean squared timing jitter. The impact of the totality of these loop jitter contributions on the combiner output SNR is evaluated and illustrated numerically. These results show that for parameters of interest to various space missions, the RTC is capable of providing significant SNR improvement relative to a single receiving antenna.

  17. Structural Requirements for Membrane Assembly of Proteins Spanning the Membrane Several Times

    OpenAIRE

    Lipp, Joachim; Flint, Nicholas; Haeuptle, Marie-Theres; Dobberstein, Bernhard

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the structural requirements for the biogenesis of proteins spanning the membrane several times. Proteins containing various combinations of topological signals (signal anchor and stop transfer sequences) were synthesized in a cell-free translation system and their membrane topology was determined. Proteins spanning the membrane twice were obtained when a signal anchor sequence was followed by either a stop transfer sequence or a second signal anchor sequence. Thus, a sig...

  18. Time and temporality: linguistic distribution in human life-games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowley, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    While clock-time can be used to clarify facts, all living systems construct their own temporalities. Having illustrated the claim for foxtail grasses, it is argued that, with motility and brains, organisms came to use temporalities that build flexibility into behavior. With the rise of human...... culture, individuals developed a knack of using linguistic distribution to link metabolism with collective ways of assessing and managing experience. Of human temporal management, the best known case is the mental time travel enabled by, among other functions, autobiographical memory. One contribution...

  19. Visualizing the store-operated channel complex assembly in real time: identification of SERCA2 as a new member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Alicia; Zepeda, Angelica; Asanov, Alexander; Vaca, Luis

    2009-05-01

    Depletion of intracellular calcium stores leads to the activation of calcium influx via the so-called store-operated channels (SOCs). Recent evidence positions Orai proteins as the putative channels responsible for this process. The stromal interacting molecule (STIM1) has been recently identified as the calcium sensor located at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and responsible for communicating the deplete state of calcium stores to Orai at the plasma membrane (PM). However, recent experimental findings suggest that Orai and STIM1 are only part of a larger molecular complex required to modulate store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In the present study we describe the assembly of the several of the components from the SOC complex in real-time, utilizing a novel imaging method. Using FRET imaging we show that under resting conditions (with calcium stores replenished) STIM1 travels continuously through the ER associated to the microtubule tracking protein, EB1. Upon depletion of the ER STIM1 dissociates from EB1 and aggregates into macromolecular complexes at the ER which includes the microsomal calcium ATPase. This association follows the assembly of Orai into macromolecular aggregates at the PM. We show that STIM1-Orai association follows a similar time course as that of Orai aggregation at the PM. During this last step of the process, calcium-selective, whole-cell inward currents developed, simultaneously. We show that this process is fully reversible. Replenishing intracellular calcium stores induces STIM1-Orai complex dissociation and shuts down inward currents. Under these conditions STIM1 re-associates to EB1, and reinitiates its travel through the ER.

  20. Development of Cross-Assembly Phage PCR-Based Methods for Human Fecal Source Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technologies that can characterize human fecal pollution in environmental waters offer many advantages over traditional general indicator approaches. However, many human-associated methods cross-react with non-human animal sources and lack suitable sensitivity for fecal source id...

  1. REDUCTION OF CYCLE TIME IN SCREW AIR COMPRESSOR ASSEMBLY LINE USING KAIZEN SURVEY

    OpenAIRE

    D. Rajenthirakumar; Nandhakumar, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this competitive world, any company has to fulfill its customer needs to survive in the market. Lean manufacturing is a technique that can be adopted in a company to improve the quality of its products, reduce the cost of the production and also deliver the products in less time. The goal of this work is to show the applicability of lean manufacturing’s body of knowledge in a screw air compressor manufacturing company. Here, the main objective is to evolve and te...

  2. The cell cycle timing of centromeric chromatin assembly in Drosophila meiosis is distinct from mitosis yet requires CAL1 and CENP-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Elaine M; Beier, Nicole L; Gorgescu, Walter; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V; Karpen, Gary H

    2012-01-01

    CENP-A (CID in flies) is the histone H3 variant essential for centromere specification, kinetochore formation, and chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent studies have elucidated major cell cycle mechanisms and factors critical for CENP-A incorporation in mitosis, predominantly in cultured cells. However, we do not understand the roles, regulation, and cell cycle timing of CENP-A assembly in somatic tissues in multicellular organisms and in meiosis, the specialized cell division cycle that gives rise to haploid gametes. Here we investigate the timing and requirements for CID assembly in mitotic tissues and male and female meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster, using fixed and live imaging combined with genetic approaches. We find that CID assembly initiates at late telophase and continues during G1 phase in somatic tissues in the organism, later than the metaphase assembly observed in cultured cells. Furthermore, CID assembly occurs at two distinct cell cycle phases during male meiosis: prophase of meiosis I and after exit from meiosis II, in spermatids. CID assembly in prophase I is also conserved in female meiosis. Interestingly, we observe a novel decrease in CID levels after the end of meiosis I and before meiosis II, which correlates temporally with changes in kinetochore organization and orientation. We also demonstrate that CID is retained on mature sperm despite the gross chromatin remodeling that occurs during protamine exchange. Finally, we show that the centromere proteins CAL1 and CENP-C are both required for CID assembly in meiosis and normal progression through spermatogenesis. We conclude that the cell cycle timing of CID assembly in meiosis is different from mitosis and that the efficient propagation of CID through meiotic divisions and on sperm is likely to be important for centromere specification in the developing zygote.

  3. The cell cycle timing of centromeric chromatin assembly in Drosophila meiosis is distinct from mitosis yet requires CAL1 and CENP-C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M Dunleavy

    Full Text Available CENP-A (CID in flies is the histone H3 variant essential for centromere specification, kinetochore formation, and chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent studies have elucidated major cell cycle mechanisms and factors critical for CENP-A incorporation in mitosis, predominantly in cultured cells. However, we do not understand the roles, regulation, and cell cycle timing of CENP-A assembly in somatic tissues in multicellular organisms and in meiosis, the specialized cell division cycle that gives rise to haploid gametes. Here we investigate the timing and requirements for CID assembly in mitotic tissues and male and female meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster, using fixed and live imaging combined with genetic approaches. We find that CID assembly initiates at late telophase and continues during G1 phase in somatic tissues in the organism, later than the metaphase assembly observed in cultured cells. Furthermore, CID assembly occurs at two distinct cell cycle phases during male meiosis: prophase of meiosis I and after exit from meiosis II, in spermatids. CID assembly in prophase I is also conserved in female meiosis. Interestingly, we observe a novel decrease in CID levels after the end of meiosis I and before meiosis II, which correlates temporally with changes in kinetochore organization and orientation. We also demonstrate that CID is retained on mature sperm despite the gross chromatin remodeling that occurs during protamine exchange. Finally, we show that the centromere proteins CAL1 and CENP-C are both required for CID assembly in meiosis and normal progression through spermatogenesis. We conclude that the cell cycle timing of CID assembly in meiosis is different from mitosis and that the efficient propagation of CID through meiotic divisions and on sperm is likely to be important for centromere specification in the developing zygote.

  4. The Cell Cycle Timing of Centromeric Chromatin Assembly in Drosophila Meiosis Is Distinct from Mitosis Yet Requires CAL1 and CENP-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgescu, Walter; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2012-01-01

    CENP-A (CID in flies) is the histone H3 variant essential for centromere specification, kinetochore formation, and chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent studies have elucidated major cell cycle mechanisms and factors critical for CENP-A incorporation in mitosis, predominantly in cultured cells. However, we do not understand the roles, regulation, and cell cycle timing of CENP-A assembly in somatic tissues in multicellular organisms and in meiosis, the specialized cell division cycle that gives rise to haploid gametes. Here we investigate the timing and requirements for CID assembly in mitotic tissues and male and female meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster, using fixed and live imaging combined with genetic approaches. We find that CID assembly initiates at late telophase and continues during G1 phase in somatic tissues in the organism, later than the metaphase assembly observed in cultured cells. Furthermore, CID assembly occurs at two distinct cell cycle phases during male meiosis: prophase of meiosis I and after exit from meiosis II, in spermatids. CID assembly in prophase I is also conserved in female meiosis. Interestingly, we observe a novel decrease in CID levels after the end of meiosis I and before meiosis II, which correlates temporally with changes in kinetochore organization and orientation. We also demonstrate that CID is retained on mature sperm despite the gross chromatin remodeling that occurs during protamine exchange. Finally, we show that the centromere proteins CAL1 and CENP-C are both required for CID assembly in meiosis and normal progression through spermatogenesis. We conclude that the cell cycle timing of CID assembly in meiosis is different from mitosis and that the efficient propagation of CID through meiotic divisions and on sperm is likely to be important for centromere specification in the developing zygote. PMID:23300382

  5. Mass assembly history and infall time of the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Mei-Yu; Lovell, Mark R; Frenk, Carlos S; Zentner, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    We use cosmological simulations to identify dark matter subhalo host candidates of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy using the stellar kinematic properties of Fornax. We consider cold dark matter (CDM), warm dark matter (WDM), and decaying dark matter (DDM) simulations for our models of structure formation. The subhalo candidates in CDM typically have smaller mass and higher concentrations at z = 0 than the corresponding candidates in WDM and DDM. We examine the formation histories of the ~ 100 Fornax candidate subhalos identified in CDM simulations and, using approximate luminosity-mass relationships for subhalos, we find two of these subhalos that are consistent with both the Fornax luminosity and kinematics. These two subhalos have a peak mass over ten times larger than their z = 0 mass. We suggest that in CDM the dark matter halo hosting Fornax must have been severely stripped of mass and that it had an infall time into the Milky Way of ~ 9 Gyr ago. In WDM, we find that candidate subhalos consistent with...

  6. Extreme reaction times determine fluctuation scaling in human color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-11-01

    In modern mental chronometry, human reaction time defines the time elapsed from stimulus presentation until a response occurs and represents a reference paradigm for investigating stochastic latency mechanisms in color vision. Here we examine the statistical properties of extreme reaction times and whether they support fluctuation scaling in the skewness-kurtosis plane. Reaction times were measured for visual stimuli across the cardinal directions of the color space. For all subjects, the results show that very large reaction times deviate from the right tail of reaction time distributions suggesting the existence of dragon-kings events. The results also indicate that extreme reaction times are correlated and shape fluctuation scaling over a wide range of stimulus conditions. The scaling exponent was higher for achromatic than isoluminant stimuli, suggesting distinct generative mechanisms. Our findings open a new perspective for studying failure modes in sensory-motor communications and in complex networks.

  7. Jet-Ricci Geometry of Time-Dependent Human Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ivancevic, Tijana T.

    2009-01-01

    We propose the time-dependent generalization of an `ordinary' autonomous human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. We introduce a general framework for time-dependent biomechanics in terms of jet manifolds derived from the extended musculo-skeletal configuration manifold. The corresponding Riemannian geometrical evolution follows the Ricci flow diffusion. In particular, we show that the exponential-like decay of total biomechanical energy (due to exh...

  8. Investigating the Effects of Assembly Order on the Performance in Relation to Cognitive and Physical Demands Under Takt Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeel Ahmed Shaikh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Assembly line operations generally involve physical and cognitive demanding tasks. Simultaneous performance under physical and cognitive demanding tasks may create physical and mental stresses. A within subjects study was carried out to determine the effects of assembly levels (variable assembly and consistent assembly on working conditions. Nine participants participated in a study and performed 8 conditions. The objective of the study was to determine the relation between physical and cognitive demands in a simulated task involving simultaneous performance of physical (fastening nuts and bolts and cognitive (code matching with secondary task of memorizing the code demanding task. Results showed the significant effects of assembly order (consisted of the concurrent performance of physically and cognitively demanding task on the working conditions. Quality of performance was affected by variable assembly order, high mental demand and above shoulder height

  9. Conserving Cartilage In Microtia Repair: The Modular Component Assembly Approach To Rebuilding A Human Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Jessica R.; Lemieux, Bryan; Foulad, Allen; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Current methods of microtia repair include carving an auricular framework from the costal synchondrosis. This requires considerable skill and may create a substantial donor site defect. Here, we present a modular component assembly (MCA) approach that minimizes the procedural difficulty and reduces the amount of cartilage to a single rib. Study Design Ex vivo study and survey Methods A single porcine rib was sectioned into multiple slices using a cartilage guillotine, cut into components outlined by 3D-printed templates, and assembled into an auricular scaffold. Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) was used to bend cartilage slices for creation of the helical rim. Chondrocyte viability was confirmed using confocal imaging. Ten surgeons reviewed the scaffold constructed with the MCA approach to evaluate aesthetics, relative stability, and clinical feasibility. Results An auricular framework with projection and curvature was fashioned from one rib. Surgeons found the MCA scaffold to meet minimal aesthetic and anatomic acceptability. When embedded under a covering, the region of the helix and anti-helix of the scaffold scored significantly higher on the assessment survey than that of an embedded alloplast implant (t-value=0.01). Otherwise, no difference was found between the embedded MCA and alloplast implants (t-value >0.05). EMR treated cartilage was found to be viable. Conclusion This study demonstrates that one rib can be used to create an aesthetic and durable framework for microtia repair. Precise assembly and the ability to obtain thin, uniform slices of cartilage were essential. This cartilage-sparing MCA approach may be an alternative to classic techniques. PMID:26720326

  10. The Transmission Interfaces Contribute Asymmetrically to the Assembly and Activity of Human P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2015-07-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) is an ABC drug pump that protects us from toxic compounds. It is clinically important because it confers multidrug resistance. The homologous halves of P-gp each contain a transmembrane (TM) domain (TMD) with 6 TM segments followed by a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). The drug- and ATP-binding sites reside at the interface between the TMDs and NBDs, respectively. Each NBD is connected to the TMDs by a transmission interface involving a pair of intracellular loops (ICLs) that form ball-and-socket joints. P-gp is different from CFTR (ABCC7) in that deleting NBD2 causes misprocessing of only P-gp. Therefore, NBD2 might be critical for stabilizing ICLs 2 and 3 that form a tetrahelix bundle at the NBD2 interface. Here we report that the NBD1 and NBD2 transmission interfaces in P-gp are asymmetric. Point mutations to 25 of 60 ICL2/ICL3 residues at the NBD2 transmission interface severely reduced P-gp assembly while changes to the equivalent residues in ICL1/ICL4 at the NBD1 interface had little effect. The hydrophobic nature at the transmission interfaces was also different. Mutation of Phe-1086 or Tyr-1087 to arginine at the NBD2 socket blocked activity or assembly while the equivalent mutations at the NBD1 socket had only modest effects. The results suggest that the NBD transmission interfaces are asymmetric. In contrast to the ICL2/3-NBD2 interface, the ICL1/4-NBD1 transmission interface is more hydrophilic and insensitive to mutations. Therefore the ICL2/3-NBD2 transmission interface forms a precise hydrophobic connection that acts as a linchpin for assembly and trafficking of P-gp.

  11. Changes in Dimensionality and Fractal Scaling Suggest Soft-Assembled Dynamics in Human EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiltshire, Travis; Euler, Matthew J.; McKinney, Ty

    2017-01-01

    . In a repetition priming task, we assessed evidence for changes in the correlation dimension and fractal scaling exponents during stimulus-locked event-related potentials, as a function of stimulus onset and familiarity, and relative to spontaneous non-task-related activity. Consistent with predictions derived...... from soft-assembly, results indicated decreases in dimensionality and increases in fractal scaling exponents from resting to pre-stimulus states and following stimulus onset. However, contrary to predictions, familiarity tended to increase dimensionality estimates. Overall, the findings support...

  12. Galaxy Assembly and the Evolution of Structure over the First Third of Cosmic Time - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Sandra

    2011-10-01

    This survey will document the first third of galactic evolution fromz=8 to 1.5 andtest for evolution in the properties of Type Ia supernovae to z 2 byimaging more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IR and ACS. Five premiermulti-wavelength regions are selected from within the Spitzer SEDSsurvey, providing complementaryIRAC data down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource forstellar masses at high redshifts. The use of five widely separatedfields mitigates cosmic variance and yields statistically robustsamples of galaxies down to 10^9 M_Sun out to z 8.We adopt a two-tiered strategy with a "Wide" component {roughly 2orbits deep over 0.2 sq. degrees} and a "Deep" component {roughly 12orbits deep over 0.04 sq. degrees}. Combining these with ultra-deepimaging from the Cycle 17 HUDF09 program yields a three-tieredstrategy for efficient sampling of both rare/bright and faint/commonobjects.Three of the Wide-survey fields are located in COSMOS, EGS, andUKIDSS/UDS. Each of these consists of roughly 3x15 WFC3/IR tiles.Each WFC3 tile will be observed for 2 orbits, with single orbitsseparated in time to allow a search for high-redshift Type Ia SNe.The co-added exposure times will be approximately 2/3 orbit in J{F125W} and 4/3 orbit in H {F160W}. ACS parallels overlap most of theWFC3 area and will consist of roughly 2/3 orbits in V {F606W} and4/3 orbit in I {F814W}. Because of the larger area of ACS,this results in effective exposures that are twice as long {4/3 in V,8/3 in I}, making a very significant improvement to existing ACSmosaics in COSMOS and EGS and creating a new ACS mosaic in UDS/UKIDSSwhere none now exists. Other Wide-survey components are located inthe GOODS fields {North and South} surrounding the Deep-survey areas.The Deep-survey fields cover roughly half of each GOODS field, withexact areas and placements to be determined as part of the Phase-2process. Each WFC3/IR tile within the Deep regions will receiveapproximately 12 orbits of exposure time split between Y{F105W}, J

  13. Differences in auditory timing between human and nonhuman primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.; Merchant, H.

    2014-01-01

    The gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis is proposed as an alternative interpretation to the auditory timing mechanisms discussed in Ackermann et al.'s article. This hypothesis accommodates the fact that the performance of nonhuman primates is comparable to humans in single-interval tasks (such

  14. Forming Human-Robot Teams Across Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambuchen, Kimberly; Burridge, Robert R.; Ambrose, Robert O.; Bluethmann, William J.; Diftler, Myron A.; Radford, Nicolaus A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA pushes telerobotics to distances that span the Solar System. At this scale, time of flight for communication is limited by the speed of light, inducing long time delays, narrow bandwidth and the real risk of data disruption. NASA also supports missions where humans are in direct contact with robots during extravehicular activity (EVA), giving a range of zero to hundreds of millions of miles for NASA s definition of "tele". . Another temporal variable is mission phasing. NASA missions are now being considered that combine early robotic phases with later human arrival, then transition back to robot only operations. Robots can preposition, scout, sample or construct in advance of human teammates, transition to assistant roles when the crew are present, and then become care-takers when the crew returns to Earth. This paper will describe advances in robot safety and command interaction approaches developed to form effective human-robot teams, overcoming challenges of time delay and adapting as the team transitions from robot only to robots and crew. The work is predicated on the idea that when robots are alone in space, they are still part of a human-robot team acting as surrogates for people back on Earth or in other distant locations. Software, interaction modes and control methods will be described that can operate robots in all these conditions. A novel control mode for operating robots across time delay was developed using a graphical simulation on the human side of the communication, allowing a remote supervisor to drive and command a robot in simulation with no time delay, then monitor progress of the actual robot as data returns from the round trip to and from the robot. Since the robot must be responsible for safety out to at least the round trip time period, the authors developed a multi layer safety system able to detect and protect the robot and people in its workspace. This safety system is also running when humans are in direct contact with the robot

  15. Understanding the Structure of Reversible Coordination Polymers Based on Europium in Electrostatic Assemblies Using Time-Resolved Luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Limin; Xie, Mengqi; Huang, Jianbin; Yan, Yun

    2016-06-14

    In situ characterization of the structure of reversible coordination polymers remains a challenge because of their dynamic and concentration-responsive nature. It is especially difficult to determine these structures in their self-assemblies where their degree of polymerization responds to the local concentration. In this paper, we report on the structure of reversible lanthanide coordination polymers in electrostatic assemblies using time-resolved luminescence (TRL) measurement. The reversible coordinating system is composed of the bifunctional ligand 1,11-bis(2,6-dicarboxypyridin-4-yloxy)-3,6,9-trioxaundecane (L2EO4) and europium ion Eu(3+). Upon mixing with the positively charged diblock copolymer poly(2-vinylpyridine)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (P2VP41-b-PEO205), electrostatic polyion micelles are formed and the negatively charged L2EO4-Eu coordination complex simultaneously transforms into coordination "polymers" in the micellar core. By virtue of the water-sensitive luminescence of Eu(3+), we are able to obtain the structural information of the L2EO4-Eu coordination polymers before and after the formation of polyion micelles. Upon analyzing the fluorescence decay curves of Eu(3+) before and after micellization, the fraction of Eu(3+) fully coordinated with L2EO4 is found to increase from 32 to 83%, which verifies the occurrence of chain extension of the L2EO4-Eu coordination polymers in the micellar core. Our work provides a qualitative picture for the structure change of reversible coordination polymers, which allows us to look into these "invisible" structures.

  16. A Circuit Model of Real Time Human Body Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asogwa, Clement Ogugua; Teshome, Assefa K; Collins, Stephen F; Lai, Daniel T H

    2016-06-01

    Changes in human body hydration leading to excess fluid losses or overload affects the body fluid's ability to provide the necessary support for healthy living. We propose a time-dependent circuit model of real-time human body hydration, which models the human body tissue as a signal transmission medium. The circuit model predicts the attenuation of a propagating electrical signal. Hydration rates are modeled by a time constant τ, which characterizes the individual specific metabolic function of the body part measured. We define a surrogate human body anthropometric parameter θ by the muscle-fat ratio and comparing it with the body mass index (BMI), we find theoretically, the rate of hydration varying from 1.73 dB/min, for high θ and low τ to 0.05 dB/min for low θ and high τ. We compare these theoretical values with empirical measurements and show that real-time changes in human body hydration can be observed by measuring signal attenuation. We took empirical measurements using a vector network analyzer and obtained different hydration rates for various BMI, ranging from 0.6 dB/min for 22.7 [Formula: see text] down to 0.04 dB/min for 41.2 [Formula: see text]. We conclude that the galvanic coupling circuit model can predict changes in the volume of the body fluid, which are essential in diagnosing and monitoring treatment of body fluid disorder. Individuals with high BMI would have higher time-dependent biological characteristic, lower metabolic rate, and lower rate of hydration.

  17. Human-Robot Teaming in a Multi-Agent Space Assembly Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnmark, Fredrik; Currie, Nancy; Ambrose, Robert O.; Culbert, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Human Space Flight program depends heavily on spacewalks performed by pairs of suited human astronauts. These Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVAs) are severely restricted in both duration and scope by consumables and available manpower. An expanded multi-agent EVA team combining the information-gathering and problem-solving skills of humans with the survivability and physical capabilities of robots is proposed and illustrated by example. Such teams are useful for large-scale, complex missions requiring dispersed manipulation, locomotion and sensing capabilities. To study collaboration modalities within a multi-agent EVA team, a 1-g test is conducted with humans and robots working together in various supporting roles.

  18. Theorizing Time in Abortion Law and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, Joanna N

    2017-06-01

    The legal regulation of abortion by gestational age, or length of pregnancy, is a relatively undertheorized dimension of abortion and human rights. Yet struggles over time in abortion law, and its competing representations and meanings, are ultimately struggles over ethical and political values, authority and power, the very stakes that human rights on abortion engage. This article focuses on three struggles over time in abortion and human rights law: those related to morality, health, and justice. With respect to morality, the article concludes that collective faith and trust should be placed in the moral judgment of those most affected by the passage of time in pregnancy and by later abortion-pregnant women. With respect to health, abortion law as health regulation should be evidence-based to counter the stigma of later abortion, which leads to overregulation and access barriers. With respect to justice, in recognizing that there will always be a need for abortion services later in pregnancy, such services should be safe, legal, and accessible without hardship or risk. At the same time, justice must address the structural conditions of women's capacity to make timely decisions about abortion, and to access abortion services early in pregnancy.

  19. A time- and cost-effective strategy to sequence mammalian Y Chromosomes: an application to the de novo assembly of gorilla Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszkiewicz, Marta; Rangavittal, Samarth; Cechova, Monika; Campos Sanchez, Rebeca; Fescemyer, Howard W; Harris, Robert; Ye, Danling; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Chikhi, Rayan; Ryder, Oliver A; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Medvedev, Paul; Makova, Kateryna D

    2016-04-01

    The mammalian Y Chromosome sequence, critical for studying male fertility and dispersal, is enriched in repeats and palindromes, and thus, is the most difficult component of the genome to assemble. Previously, expensive and labor-intensive BAC-based techniques were used to sequence the Y for a handful of mammalian species. Here, we present a much faster and more affordable strategy for sequencing and assembling mammalian Y Chromosomes of sufficient quality for most comparative genomics analyses and for conservation genetics applications. The strategy combines flow sorting, short- and long-read genome and transcriptome sequencing, and droplet digital PCR with novel and existing computational methods. It can be used to reconstruct sex chromosomes in a heterogametic sex of any species. We applied our strategy to produce a draft of the gorilla Y sequence. The resulting assembly allowed us to refine gene content, evaluate copy number of ampliconic gene families, locate species-specific palindromes, examine the repetitive element content, and produce sequence alignments with human and chimpanzee Y Chromosomes. Our results inform the evolution of the hominine (human, chimpanzee, and gorilla) Y Chromosomes. Surprisingly, we found the gorilla Y Chromosome to be similar to the human Y Chromosome, but not to the chimpanzee Y Chromosome. Moreover, we have utilized the assembled gorilla Y Chromosome sequence to design genetic markers for studying the male-specific dispersal of this endangered species.

  20. Jet-Ricci Geometry of Time-Dependent Human Biomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ivancevic, Tijana T

    2009-01-01

    We propose the time-dependent generalization of an `ordinary' autonomous human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. We introduce a general framework for time-dependent biomechanics in terms of jet manifolds derived from the extended musculo-skeletal configuration manifold. The corresponding Riemannian geometrical evolution follows the Ricci flow diffusion. In particular, we show that the exponential-like decay of total biomechanical energy (due to exhaustion of biochemical resources) is closely related to the Ricci flow on the biomechanical configuration manifold. Keywords: Time-dependent biomechanics, extended configuration manifold, configuration bundle, jet manifolds, Ricci flow diffusion

  1. Timing of Multimodal Robot Behaviors during Human-Robot Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Christian; Fischer, Kerstin; Suvei, Stefan-Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we address issues of timing between robot behaviors in multimodal human-robot interaction. In particular, we study what effects sequential order and simultaneity of robot arm and body movement and verbal behavior have on the fluency of interactions. In a study with the Care...... output plays a special role because participants carry their expectations from human verbal interaction into the interactions with robots.......-O-bot, a large service robot, in a medical measurement scenario, we compare the timing of the robot's behaviors in three between-subject conditions. The results show that the relative timing of robot behaviors has significant effects on the number of problems participants encounter, and that the robot's verbal...

  2. A Class of Methods for the Analysis of Blade Tip Timing Data from Bladed Assemblies Undergoing Simultaneous Resonances—Part II: Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gallego-Garrido

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Blade tip timing is a technique for the measurement of vibrations in rotating bladed assemblies. In Part I of this work a class of methods for the analysis of blade tip timing data from bladed assemblies undergoing two simultaneous synchronous resonances was developed. The approaches were demonstrated using data from a mathematical simulation of tip timing data. In Part II the methods are validated on an experimental test rig. First, the construction and characteristics of the rig will be discussed. Then, the performance of the analysis techniques when applied to data from the rig will be compared and analysed. It is shown that accurate frequency estimates are obtained by all the methods for both single and double resonances. Furthermore, the recovered frequencies are used to calculate the amplitudes of the blade tip responses. The presence of mistuning in the bladed assembly does not affect the performance of the new techniques.

  3. Understanding human activity patterns based on space-time-semantics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Songnian

    2016-11-01

    Understanding human activity patterns plays a key role in various applications in an urban environment, such as transportation planning and traffic forecasting, urban planning, public health and safety, and emergency response. Most existing studies in modeling human activity patterns mainly focus on spatiotemporal dimensions, which lacks consideration of underlying semantic context. In fact, what people do and discuss at some places, inferring what is happening at the places, cannot be simple neglected because it is the root of human mobility patterns. We believe that the geo-tagged semantic context, representing what individuals do and discuss at a place and a specific time, drives a formation of specific human activity pattern. In this paper, we aim to model human activity patterns not only based on space and time but also with consideration of associated semantics, and attempt to prove a hypothesis that similar mobility patterns may have different motivations. We develop a spatiotemporal-semantic model to quantitatively express human activity patterns based on topic models, leading to an analysis of space, time and semantics. A case study is conducted using Twitter data in Toronto based on our model. Through computing the similarities between users in terms of spatiotemporal pattern, semantic pattern and spatiotemporal-semantic pattern, we find that only a small number of users (2.72%) have very similar activity patterns, while the majority (87.14%) show different activity patterns (i.e., similar spatiotemporal patterns and different semantic patterns, similar semantic patterns and different spatiotemporal patterns, or different in both). The population of users that has very similar activity patterns is decreased by 56.41% after incorporating semantic information in the corresponding spatiotemporal patterns, which can quantitatively prove the hypothesis.

  4. Quantitative Modeling of Human-Environment Interactions in Preindustrial Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Philipp S.; Kaplan, Jed O.

    2017-04-01

    Quantifying human-environment interactions and anthropogenic influences on the environment prior to the Industrial revolution is essential for understanding the current state of the earth system. This is particularly true for the terrestrial biosphere, but marine ecosystems and even climate were likely modified by human activities centuries to millennia ago. Direct observations are however very sparse in space and time, especially as one considers prehistory. Numerical models are therefore essential to produce a continuous picture of human-environment interactions in the past. Agent-based approaches, while widely applied to quantifying human influence on the environment in localized studies, are unsuitable for global spatial domains and Holocene timescales because of computational demands and large parameter uncertainty. Here we outline a new paradigm for the quantitative modeling of human-environment interactions in preindustrial time that is adapted to the global Holocene. Rather than attempting to simulate agency directly, the model is informed by a suite of characteristics describing those things about society that cannot be predicted on the basis of environment, e.g., diet, presence of agriculture, or range of animals exploited. These categorical data are combined with the properties of the physical environment in coupled human-environment model. The model is, at its core, a dynamic global vegetation model with a module for simulating crop growth that is adapted for preindustrial agriculture. This allows us to simulate yield and calories for feeding both humans and their domesticated animals. We couple this basic caloric availability with a simple demographic model to calculate potential population, and, constrained by labor requirements and land limitations, we create scenarios of land use and land cover on a moderate-resolution grid. We further implement a feedback loop where anthropogenic activities lead to changes in the properties of the physical

  5. Extending reference assembly models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...

  6. Extending reference assembly models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Church, Deanna M.; Schneider, Valerie A.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz;

    2015-01-01

    The human genome reference assembly is crucial for aligning and analyzing sequence data, and for genome annotation, among other roles. However, the models and analysis assumptions that underlie the current assembly need revising to fully represent human sequence diversity. Improved analysis tools...

  7. NAP1-Assisted Nucleosome Assembly on DNA Measured in Real Time by Single-Molecule Magnetic Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.; Smitshuijzen, J.S.J.; Lusser, A.; Dekker, C.

    2012-01-01

    While many proteins are involved in the assembly and (re)positioning of nucleosomes, the dynamics of protein-assisted nucleosome formation are not well understood. We study NAP1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) assisted nucleosome formation at the single-molecule level using magnetic tweezers. This m

  8. NAP1-Assisted Nucleosome Assembly on DNA Measured in Real Time by Single-Molecule Magnetic Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.; Smitshuijzen, J.S.J.; Lusser, A.; Dekker, C.

    2012-01-01

    While many proteins are involved in the assembly and (re)positioning of nucleosomes, the dynamics of protein-assisted nucleosome formation are not well understood. We study NAP1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) assisted nucleosome formation at the single-molecule level using magnetic tweezers. This

  9. Processing follows function: pushing the formation of self-assembled monolayers to high-throughput compatible time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Milan; Schinke, Janusz; Hillebrandt, Sabina; Hänsel, Marc; Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo; Mechau, Norman; Glaser, Tobias; Mankel, Eric; Hamburger, Manuel; Deing, Kaja; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Pucci, Annemarie; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Lemmer, Uli; Lovrincic, Robert

    2014-11-26

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of organic molecules can be used to tune interface energetics and thereby improve charge carrier injection at metal-semiconductor contacts. We investigate the compatibility of SAM formation with high-throughput processing techniques. Therefore, we examine the quality of SAMs, in terms of work function shift and chemical composition as measured with photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy and in dependency on molecular exposure during SAM formation. The functionality of the SAMs is determined by the performance increase of organic field-effect transistors upon SAM treatment of the source/drain contacts. This combined analytical and device-based approach enables us to minimize the necessary formation times via an optimization of the deposition conditions. Our findings demonstrate that SAMs composed of partially fluorinated alkanethiols can be prepared in ambient atmosphere from ethanol solution using immersion times as short as 5 s and still exhibit almost full charge injection functionality if process parameters are chosen carefully. This renders solution-processed SAMs compatible with high-throughput solution-based deposition techniques.

  10. Fabrication of Wearable Sensors for Human Health Monitoring through Magnetically Directed Assembly Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Azar; Ashe, Jeffrey; Misner, Matthew; Yang, Yanzhe; Zhong, Sheng; Yin, Ming; Brewer, Joleyn; Karp, Jason

    2013-03-01

    Many previous efforts to modify patient monitors for remote or wearable use have suffered from high cost, poor performance, and low medical acceptance. A new technology approach is needed to enable these clinical benefits and to satisfy challenging economic, clinical, and user-acceptance criteria. Here, we present results on our initial efforts aimed at designing and building a prototype multi-wavelength arrayed photoplethysmograph (PPG) by using magnetically directed self-assembly (MDSA). We will discuss novel approaches in magnetic nanomaterial design, synthesis and deposition to enable MDSA based manufacturing. We will also demonstrate that multiple devices can be deposited through heterogeneous MDSA. The novel MDSA technology could make such PPG sensors a reality. This effort is sponsored by the Department of the Army under award W81XWH1110833

  11. Sulfate anion delays the self-assembly of human insulin by modifying the aggregation pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Owczarz, Marta; Arosio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    .... In this work, we characterize the aggregation process of human insulin at acidic pH in the presence of sulfate ions using a combination of Thioflavin T fluorescence, dynamic light scattering, size...

  12. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  13. Time and temporality: linguistic distribution in human life-games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowley, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    , we find that, in each case, parties shift between close attention to the lived situation and using resources--especially wordings--to manage temporality. It is concluded that the multi-scalar nature of language enables individuals to orchestrate their lives in ways that are, at once, social......While clock-time can be used to clarify facts, all living systems construct their own temporalities. Having illustrated the claim for foxtail grasses, it is argued that, with motility and brains, organisms came to use temporalities that build flexibility into behavior. With the rise of human...... culture, individuals developed a knack of using linguistic distribution to link metabolism with collective ways of assessing and managing experience. Of human temporal management, the best known case is the mental time travel enabled by, among other functions, autobiographical memory. One contribution...

  14. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Paul A; Church, Deanna M; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-04

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site.

  15. Stable functional networks exhibit consistent timing in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapeton, Julio I; Inati, Sara K; Zaghloul, Kareem A

    2017-03-01

    Despite many advances in the study of large-scale human functional networks, the question of timing, stability, and direction of communication between cortical regions has not been fully addressed. At the cellular level, neuronal communication occurs through axons and dendrites, and the time required for such communication is well defined and preserved. At larger spatial scales, however, the relationship between timing, direction, and communication between brain regions is less clear. Here, we use a measure of effective connectivity to identify connections between brain regions that exhibit communication with consistent timing. We hypothesized that if two brain regions are communicating, then knowledge of the activity in one region should allow an external observer to better predict activity in the other region, and that such communication involves a consistent time delay. We examine this question using intracranial electroencephalography captured from nine human participants with medically refractory epilepsy. We use a coupling measure based on time-lagged mutual information to identify effective connections between brain regions that exhibit a statistically significant increase in average mutual information at a consistent time delay. These identified connections result in sparse, directed functional networks that are stable over minutes, hours, and days. Notably, the time delays associated with these connections are also highly preserved over multiple time scales. We characterize the anatomic locations of these connections, and find that the propagation of activity exhibits a preferred posterior to anterior temporal lobe direction, consistent across participants. Moreover, networks constructed from connections that reliably exhibit consistent timing between anatomic regions demonstrate features of a small-world architecture, with many reliable connections between anatomically neighbouring regions and few long range connections. Together, our results demonstrate

  16. Cultivation of human neural progenitor cells in a 3-dimensional self-assembling peptide hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedmann, Andrea; Rolfs, Arndt; Frech, Moritz J

    2012-01-11

    technique like fluorescence microscopes able to take z-stacks of the specimen. Furthermore this kind of analysis is extremely time consuming. Here we demonstrate a method to release cells from the 3D-scaffolds for the later analysis e.g. by flow cytometry. In this protocol human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) of the ReNcell VM cell line (Millipore USA) were cultured and differentiated in 3D-scaffolds consisting of PuraMatrix (PM) or PuraMatrix supplemented with laminin (PML). In our hands a PM-concentration of 0.25% was optimal for the cultivation of the cells, however the concentration might be adapted to other cell types. The released cells can be used for e.g. immunocytochemical studies and subsequently analysed by flow cytometry. This speeds up the analysis and more over, the obtained data rest upon a wider base, improving the reliability of the data.

  17. Targeted non-covalent self-assembled nanoparticles based on human serum albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunschoten, Anton; Buckle, Tessa; Kuil, Joeri; Luker, Gary D.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Nieweg, Omgo; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2012-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a biological nanocarrier that forms non-covalent complexes with a number of synthetic and biomolecules. Previously we demonstrated radiolabeled HSA-based nanoparticles can form non-covalent complexes with fluorescent cyanine dyes yielding imaging agents for surgical guid

  18. HUMAN CATALASE IS IMPORTED AND ASSEMBLED IN PEROXISOMES OF SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEHOOP, MJ; HOLTMAN, WL; AB, G

    1993-01-01

    To study the conservation of peroxisomal targeting signals, we have determined the intracellular localization of human peroxisomal catalase when expressed in yeast. Using immunofluorescence, differential centrifugation and immuno-electron microscopy, we show that the protein is targeted to the perox

  19. Changes over time in audiometric thresholds in a group of automobile stamping and assembly workers with a hearing conservation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, LuAnn L; Talbott, Evelyn O; Burks, J Alton; Palmer, Catherine V

    2002-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) is among the 10 leading occupational diseases, afflicting between 7.4 and 10.2 million people who work in noise above 85 dBA. Although mandatory hearing conservation programs (HCPs) have been in effect since 1972, this problem persists, as hearing protectors are not consistently used by workers, or may not attenuate to manufacturer's estimates in real world conditions. In this study, information from noise and hearing protection use measurements taken at an automobile assembly plant were used to construct average lifetime noise exposure and hearing protection compliance estimates for use in modeling to predict both total hearing loss and onset of two accepted definitions of hearing loss. There were 301 males and females in this cohort; their mean age was 42.6 (7.2) years, and mean tenure was 14.3 (3.5) years. Average length of follow-up was 14.0 years. There were 16 members of this cohort who had hearing loss at the speech frequencies (defined as an average hearing level > or = 25 dB at 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz). In cross-sectional multivariate analyses, years of employment, male gender, and proportion of time wearing hearing protection were the factors most associated with hearing loss at the average of 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz (p noise exposure), race, and lifetime average noise exposure. The most consistent predictor of hearing loss in both univariate and multivariate analyses was percentage of time having used hearing protection during the workers' tenure.

  20. Specific genomic cues regulate Cajal body assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Iain A; Hager, Gordon L; Dundr, Miroslav

    2016-10-07

    The assembly of specialized sub-nuclear microenvironments known as nuclear bodies (NBs) is important for promoting efficient nuclear function. In particular, the Cajal body (CB), a prominent NB that facilitates spliceosomal snRNP biogenesis, assembles in response to genomic cues. Here, we detail the factors that regulate CB assembly and structural maintenance. These include the importance of transcription at nucleating gene loci, the grouping of these genes on human chromosomes 1, 6 and 17, as well as cell cycle and biochemical regulation of CB protein function. We also speculate on the correlation between CB formation and RNA splicing levels in neurons and cancer. The timing and location of these specific molecular events is critical to CB assembly and its contribution to genome function. However, further work is required to explore the emerging biophysical characteristics of CB assembly and the impact upon subsequent genome reorganization.

  1. BODIPY-based self-assembled nanoparticles as fluorescence turn-on sensor for the selective detection of zinc in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ming-Yan; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yang; Niu, Li-Ya; Feng, Liang

    2016-11-15

    Zinc plays important roles in regulating physiological and pathological processes. Regrettably, mild to moderate zinc deficiency is common worldwide. Hair Zn(2+) concentration, which reflects a zinc storage status, is useful for tracking trends in zinc status within populations. In this work, we report BODIPY-based self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) as fluorescence turn-on sensor for the selective sensing of Zn(2+) in human hair. The BODIPY monomers (BAN) self-assemble in aqueous medium to form nonfluorescent NPs. In the presence of Zn(2+) ions, the NPs selectively show an obvious turn-on fluorescence change. This selective response of the NPs allows the determination and quantification of Zn(2+) in human hair with a detection limit of 61.3nM. This study demonstrates that the small molecule self-assembled nanoparticle is a versatile and useful tool, and shows great potential for applications in sensing of important analytes in biological systems.

  2. The tangle of space and time in human cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Rafael; Cooperrider, Kensy

    2013-05-01

    Everyday concepts of duration, of sequence, and of past, present, and future are fundamental to how humans make sense of experience. In culture after culture, converging evidence from language, co-speech gesture, and behavioral tasks suggests that humans handle these elusive yet indispensable notions by construing them spatially. Where do these spatial construals come from and why do they take the particular, sometimes peculiar, spatial forms that they do? As researchers across the cognitive sciences pursue these questions on different levels--cultural, developmental--in diverse populations and with new methodologies, clear answers will depend upon a shared and nuanced set of theoretical distinctions. Time is not a monolith, but rather a mosaic of construals with distinct properties and origins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative label-free and real-time surface-enhanced Raman scattering monitoring of reaction kinetics using self-assembled bifunctional nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Jingjing; Ji, Ji; Li, Yixin; Liu, Baohong

    2015-09-01

    Although surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has proven to be an effective tool for label-free monitoring of catalytic reactions, quantitative characterization of reaction kinetics via this technique remains challenging owing to the difficulty in integrating catalytic and plasmonic activities into a single platform. In this work, we report on an easy access to highly sensitive plasmonic nanoarrays for direct and label-free monitoring of a gold-catalyzed reaction by SERS. The hierarchically structured three-dimensional assemblies, which consist of small gold catalyst nanoparticles distributed on a self-assembled monolayer of larger gold nanoparticles, were formed through a simple and rapid stepwise interfacial self-assembling process (fabrication time quantitative determination of the rate constant and activation energy of the catalytic reaction with SERS.

  4. Experiments and Simulations of the Use of Time-Correlated Thermal Neutron Counting to Determine the Multiplication of an Assembly of Highly Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Chichester; Mathew T. Kinlaw; Scott M. Watson; Jeffrey M. Kalter; Eric C. Miller; William A. Noonan

    2014-11-01

    A series of experiments and numerical simulations using thermal-neutron time-correlated measurements has been performed to determine the neutron multiplication, M, of assemblies of highly enriched uranium available at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiments used up to 14.4 kg of highly-enriched uranium, including bare assemblies and assemblies reflected with high-density polyethylene, carbon steel, and tungsten. A small 252Cf source was used to initiate fission chains within the assembly. Both the experiments and the simulations used 6-channel and 8-channel detector systems, each consisting of 3He proportional counters moderated with polyethylene; data was recorded in list mode for analysis. 'True' multiplication values for each assembly were empirically derived using basic neutron production and loss values determined through simulation. A total of one-hundred and sixteen separate measurements were performed using fifty-seven unique measurement scenarios, the multiplication varied from 1.75 to 10.90. This paper presents the results of these comparisons and discusses differences among the various cases.

  5. Experiments and Simulations of the Use of Time-Correlated Thermal Neutron Counting to Determine the Multiplication of an Assembly of Highly Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Chichester; Mathew T. Kinlaw; Scott M. Watson; Jeffrey M. Kalter; Eric C. Miller; William A. Noonan

    2014-11-01

    A series of experiments and numerical simulations using thermal-neutron time-correlated measurements has been performed to determine the neutron multiplication, M, of assemblies of highly enriched uranium available at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiments used up to 14.4 kg of highly-enriched uranium, including bare assemblies and assemblies reflected with high-density polyethylene, carbon steel, and tungsten. A small 252Cf source was used to initiate fission chains within the assembly. Both the experiments and the simulations used 6-channel and 8-channel detector systems, each consisting of 3He proportional counters moderated with polyethylene; data was recorded in list mode for analysis. 'True' multiplication values for each assembly were empirically derived using basic neutron production and loss values determined through simulation. A total of one-hundred and sixteen separate measurements were performed using fifty-seven unique measurement scenarios, the multiplication varied from 1.75 to 10.90. This paper presents the results of these comparisons and discusses differences among the various cases.

  6. Time scale interactions and the coevolution of humans and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-09-01

    We present a coevolutionary view of hydrologic systems, revolving around feedbacks between environmental and social processes operating across different time scales. This brings to the fore an emphasis on emergent phenomena in changing water systems, such as the levee effect, adaptation to change, system lock-in, and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system. Guidance is provided for the framing and modeling of these phenomena to test alternative hypotheses about how they arose. A plurality of coevolutionary models, from stylized to comprehensive system-of-system models, may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesize the observed dynamics in a wide range of case studies. Future research opportunities lie in exploring emergent phenomena arising from time scale interactions through historical, comparative, and process studies of human-water feedbacks.

  7. Shock waves and DNA-cationic lipid assemblies: a synergistic approach to express exogenous genes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán-Chiu, Blanca; Camacho, Giselle; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo; Tamariz, Elisa; Fernández, Francisco; López-Marín, Luz M; Loske, Achim M

    2014-07-01

    Cationic lipid/DNA complexes (lipoplexes) represent a powerful tool for cell transfection; however, their use is still limited by important concerns, including toxicity and poor internalization into deep tissues. In this work, we investigated the use of shock wave-induced acoustic cavitation in vitro for the transfection of lipoplexes in human embryo kidney 293 cells. We selected shock waves with the ability to internalize 10-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran into cells while maintaining survival rates above 50%. Cell transfection was tested using the green fluorescent protein-encoding plasmid pCX::GFPGPI2. Confocal microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting analyses revealed successful transfection after treatments ranging from 1 to 3 min using 60 to 180 shock waves at peak amplitudes of 12.3 ± 1.5 MPa. Interestingly, the combination of shock waves and lipoplexes induced a 3.1- and 3.8-fold increase in the expression of the reporter gene compared with the use of lipoplexes or shock waves alone, respectively. These results indicate that cationic DNA assembly and shock waves act in a synergistic manner to promote transfection of human cells, revealing a potential approach for non-invasive site-specific gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Chromatin assembly factor 1, subunit A (P150 facilitates cell proliferation in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Meng Xu, Yuli Jia, Zhikui Liu, Linglong Ding, Run Tian, Hua Gu, Yufeng Wang, Hongyong Zhang, Kangsheng Tu, Qingguang Liu Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Several studies have revealed that the abnormal expression of chromatin assembly factor 1, subunit A (P150 (CHAF1A was involved in the development of some types of malignant tumors. However, CHAF1A expression and its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC remain poorly characterized. In this study, we first investigated CHAF1A expression in six cell lines and 116 pairs of HCC and matched normal tumor-adjacent tissues to evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics of CHAF1A in HCC. Then, we detected the proliferation and apoptosis in HCC cells. In addition, a subcutaneous tumor model in nude mice was performed to evaluate tumor growth in vivo. We found that the expression of CHAF1A was significantly higher in HCC tissues than that in adjacent nontumor tissues (P<0.01. Clinical analysis indicated that CHAF1A expression was significantly correlated with the tumor–node–metastasis stage, tumor number, and tumor differentiation in HCC tissues (P<0.05, respectively. We also found that CHAF1A may potentially function as a poor prognostic indicator for 5-year overall and disease-free survival in patients with HCC (P<0.05, respectively. The elevated expression of CHAF1A was also observed in HCC cell lines compared with that in normal LO2 hepatic cell line (P<0.01. HCC cancer cells exhibited inhibition of cell growth, reduction in colony-formation ability, increased cell apoptosis rate, and impaired tumorigenicity in nude mice after CHAF1A knockdown. Collectively, we propose that CHAF1A by potentially mediating cancer cell proliferation plays an important role in promoting the development of HCC and may serve as a potential therapeutic target in HCC. Keywords: CHAF1A, hepatocellular

  9. A Bio-Acoustic Levitational (BAL) Assembly Method for Engineering of Multilayered, 3D Brain-Like Constructs, Using Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neuro-Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyer, Charlène; Chen, Pu; Güven, Sinan; Demirtaş, Tuğrul Tolga; Nieland, Thomas J F; Padilla, Frédéric; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-06

    A bio-acoustic levitational assembly method for engineering of multilayered, 3D brainlike constructs is presented. Acoustic radiation forces are used to levitate neuroprogenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells in 3D multilayered fibrin tissue constructs. The neuro-progenitor cells are subsequently differentiated in neural cells, resulting in a 3D neuronal construct with inter and intralayer neurite elongations.

  10. A multi-objective genetic algorithm for a mixed-model assembly U-line balancing type-I problem considering human-related issues, training, and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Masoud; Montazeri, Mona; Farrokhi-Asl, Hamed; Rafiei, Hamed

    2016-07-01

    Mixed-model assembly lines are increasingly accepted in many industrial environments to meet the growing trend of greater product variability, diversification of customer demands, and shorter life cycles. In this research, a new mathematical model is presented considering balancing a mixed-model U-line and human-related issues, simultaneously. The objective function consists of two separate components. The first part of the objective function is related to balance problem. In this part, objective functions are minimizing the cycle time, minimizing the number of workstations, and maximizing the line efficiencies. The second part is related to human issues and consists of hiring cost, firing cost, training cost, and salary. To solve the presented model, two well-known multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, namely non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm and multi-objective particle swarm optimization, have been used. A simple solution representation is provided in this paper to encode the solutions. Finally, the computational results are compared and analyzed.

  11. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  12. Dispersal time for ancient human migrations: Americas and Europe colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. C.

    2007-07-01

    I apply the recently proposed intermittence strategy to investigate the ancient human migrations in the world. That is, the Americas colonization (Bering-bridge and Pacific-coast theories) and Neanderthal replacement in Europe around 45000 years before the present. Using a mathematical equation related to diffusion and ballistic motion, I calculate the colonization time in all these cases in good agreement with archeological data (including Neolithic transition in Europe). Moreover, to support these calculations, I obtain analytically the effective speed of colonization in Europe veff=0.62 [km/yr] and related to the Aurignacian culture propagation.

  13. Long-read sequence assembly of the gorilla genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David; Huddleston, John; Chaisson, Mark J. P.; Hill, Christopher M.; Kronenberg, Zev N.; Munson, Katherine M.; Malig, Maika; Raja, Archana; Fiddes, Ian; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Dunn, Christopher; Baker, Carl; Armstrong, Joel; Diekhans, Mark; Paten, Benedict; Shendure, Jay; Wilson, Richard K.; Haussler, David; Chin, Chen-Shan; Eichler, Evan E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate sequence and assembly of genomes is a critical first step for studies of genetic variation. We generated a high-quality assembly of the gorilla genome using single-molecule, real-time sequence technology and a string graph de novo assembly algorithm. The new assembly improves contiguity by two to three orders of magnitude with respect to previously released assemblies, recovering 87% of missing reference exons and incomplete gene models. Although regions of large, high-identity segmental duplications remain largely unresolved, this comprehensive assembly provides new biological insight into genetic diversity, structural variation, gene loss, and representation of repeat structures within the gorilla genome. The approach provides a path forward for the routine assembly of mammalian genomes at a level approaching that of the current quality of the human genome. PMID:27034376

  14. Effect of time and deposition method on quality of phosphonic acid modifier self-assembled monolayers on indium zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Lingzi; Knesting, Kristina M.; Bulusu, Anuradha; Sigdel, Ajaya K.; Giordano, Anthony J.; Marder, Seth R.; Berry, Joseph J.; Graham, Samuel; Ginger, David S.; Pemberton, Jeanne E.

    2016-12-01

    Phosphonic acid (PA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are utilized at critical interfaces between transparent conductive oxides (TCO) and organic active layers in organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs). The effects of PA deposition method and time on the formation of close-packed, high-quality monolayers is investigated here for SAMs fabricated by solution deposition, micro-contact printing, and spray coating. The solution deposition isotherm for pentafluorinated benzylphosphonic acid (F5BnPA) on indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) is studied using polarization modulation-infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) at room temperature as a model PA/IZO system. Fast surface adsorption occurs within the first min; however, well-oriented high-quality SAMs are reached only after ∼48 h, presumably through a continual process of molecular adsorption/desorption and monolayer filling accompanied by molecular reorientation. Two other rapid, soak-free deposition techniques, micro-contact printing and spray coating, are also explored. SAM quality is compared for deposition of phenyl phosphonic acid (PPA), F13-octylphosphonic acid (F13OPA), and pentafluorinated benzyl phosphonic acid (F5BnPA) by solution deposition, micro-contact printing and spray coating using PM-IRRAS. In contrast to micro-contact printing and spray coating techniques, 48-168 h solution deposition at both room temperature and 70 °C result in contamination- and surface etch-free close-packed monolayers with good reproducibility. SAMs fabricated by micro-contact printing and spray coating are much less well ordered.

  15. Effect of Time and Deposition Method on Quality of Phosphonic Acid Modifier Self-Assembled Monolayers on Indium Zinc Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Lingzi; Knesting, Kristina M.; Bulusu, Anuradha; Sigdel, Ajaya K.; Giordano, Anthony J.; Marder, Seth R.; Berry, Joseph J.; Graham, Samuel; Ginger, David S.; Pemberton, Jeanne E.

    2016-12-15

    Phosphonic acid (PA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are utilized at critical interfaces between transparent conductive oxides (TCO) and organic active layers in organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs). The effects of PA deposition method and time on the formation of close-packed, high-quality monolayers is investigated here for SAMs fabricated by solution deposition, micro-contact printing, and spray coating. The solution deposition isotherm for pentafluorinated benzylphosphonic acid (F5BnPA) on indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) is studied using polarization modulation-infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) at room temperature as a model PA/IZO system. Fast surface adsorption occurs within the first min; however, well-oriented high-quality SAMs are reached only after -48 h, presumably through a continual process of molecular adsorption/desorption and monolayer filling accompanied by molecular reorientation. Two other rapid, soak-free deposition techniques, micro-contact printing and spray coating, are also explored. SAM quality is compared for deposition of phenyl phosphonic acid (PPA), F13-octylphosphonic acid (F13OPA), and pentafluorinated benzyl phosphonic acid (F5BnPA) by solution deposition, micro-contact printing and spray coating using PM-IRRAS. In contrast to micro-contact printing and spray coating techniques, 48-168 h solution deposition at both room temperature and 70 degrees C result in contamination- and surface etch-free close-packed monolayers with good reproducibility. SAMs fabricated by micro-contact printing and spray coating are much less well ordered.

  16. Good vibrations: human interval timing in the vibrotactile modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Luke A; Poliakoff, Ellen; Wells, Jill

    2009-11-01

    This article reports a detailed examination of timing in the vibrotactile modality and comparison with that of visual and auditory modalities. Three experiments investigated human timing in the vibrotactile modality. In Experiment 1, a staircase threshold procedure with a standard duration of 1,000 ms revealed a difference threshold of 160.35 ms for vibrotactile stimuli, which was significantly higher than that for auditory stimuli (103.25 ms) but not significantly lower than that obtained for visual stimuli (196.76 ms). In Experiment 2, verbal estimation revealed a significant slope difference between vibrotactile and auditory timing, but not between vibrotactile and visual timing. That is, both vibrations and lights were judged as shorter than sounds, and this comparative difference was greater at longer durations than at shorter ones. In Experiment 3, performance on a temporal generalization task showed characteristics consistent with the predications of scalar expectancy theory (SET: Gibbon, 1977) with both mean accuracy and scalar variance exhibited. The results were modelled using the modified Church and Gibbon model (MCG; derived by Wearden, 1992, from Church & Gibbon 1982). The model was found to give an excellent fit to the data, and the parameter values obtained were compared with those for visual and auditory temporal generalization. The pattern of results suggest that timing in the vibrotactile modality conforms to SET and that the internal clock speed for vibrotactile stimuli is significantly slower than that for auditory stimuli, which is logically consistent with the significant differences in difference threshold that were obtained.

  17. Disassembly of actin filaments by botulinum C2 toxin and actin-filament-disrupting agents induces assembly of microtubules in human leukaemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Yosuke; Kogo, Yasusi; Ohishi, Iwao

    2007-03-01

    C(2) toxin produced by Clostridium botulinum types C and D ADP-ribosylates actin monomers and inactivates their polymerization activities. The disassembly of actin filaments by C(2) toxin induces a polarization of cultured human leukaemia cell lines. The polarization induced by C(2) toxin was temperature dependent and was prevented by nocodazole, a microtubule-disrupting agent, whereas it was promoted by paclitaxel, a microtubule-stabilizing agent. The fluorescence staining of polarized cells indicated an increase in microtubule assembly accompanying disassembly of actin filaments. Furthermore, several actin-filament-disrupting agents, other than C(2) toxin, also induced microtubule assembly and cell polarization, irrespective of their different mechanisms of action. The effects induced by some of the agents, which have lower binding affinities for actin, were reversible in response to the re-assembly of actin filaments. Thus the disassembly of actin filaments by C(2) toxin and actin-filament-disrupting agents induces assembly of microtubules followed by polarization of human leukaemia cell lines, indicating that the assembly/disassembly equilibrium of actin filaments influences the dynamics of microtubules, which control cell morphology and, in turn, diverse cellular processes.

  18. Dragging human mesenchymal stem cells with the aid of supramolecular assemblies of single-walled carbon nanotubes, molecular magnets, and peptides in a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Ana Cláudia C; Sáfar, Gustavo A M; Góes, Alfredo M; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; Ribeiro, Marcos A; Stumpf, Humberto O

    2015-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) are an attractive cell source for therapeutic applicability in diverse fields for the repair and regeneration of damaged or malfunctioning tissues and organs. There is a growing number of cell therapies using stem cells due to their characteristics of modulation of immune system and reduction of acute rejection. So a challenge in stem cells therapy is the delivery of cells to the organ of interest, a specific site. The aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of a supramolecular assembly composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), molecular magnets (lawsone-Co-phenanthroline), and a synthetic peptide (FWYANHYWFHNAFWYANHYWFHNA) in the hASCs cultures. The hASCs were isolated, characterized, expanded, and cultured with the SWCNT supramolecular assembly (SWCNT-MA). The assembly developed did not impair the cell characteristics, viability, or proliferation. During growth, the cells were strongly attached to the assembly and they could be dragged by an applied magnetic field of less than 0.3 T. These assemblies were narrower than their related allotropic forms, that is, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and they could therefore be used to guide cells through thin blood capillaries within the human body. This strategy seems to be useful as noninvasive and nontoxic stem cells delivery/guidance and tracking during cell therapy.

  19. Early-time, beta-hairpin peptide self-assembly and hydrogelation: Structure, kinetics, and shear-recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Tuna

    Recently, there has been growing interest in the supramolecular self-assembly and hydrogelation of peptides for potential biomaterials applications. However, there has been limited work on the physicochemical characterization of these systems that will be crucial for the development of these materials for future applications. The main objective of this dissertation was to provide a solid understanding of the self-assembly kinetics, hydrogelation pathways and the physical origins of the shear-recovery behavior of a self-assembled, peptidic hydrogel system. The MAX1 peptide, (VK)4-VDPPT-(KV)4-NH 2 is unfolded, and completely soluble in acidic to neutral aqueous solution. Increasing the pH or ionic strength of the solution triggers intramolecular peptide folding into beta-hairpins and concomitant intermolecular self-assembly into bilayered nanofibrils. Combined static and dynamic light scattering experiments revealed a direct transition from the initial, monomeric state to self-assembled nanofibrils, without an intermediate self-assembly step. The energy barrier associated with MAX1 self-assembly suggested that the self-assembly process involved intramolecular peptide folding events and cluster reorganization to facilitate intermolecular self-assembly. The assembly kinetics could be modeled using Smoluchowski's equation which indicated an essentially diffusion-limited assembly process. The analysis of early-stage dependence of apparent mass on size and the concentration dependence of assembly kinetics gave different fractal dimension values: The former indicated that the nanofibrils behaved locally as rigid rods, while the latter analysis suggested an increase in the apparent fractal dimension at larger length scales. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy indicated that the increase in the apparent fractal dimension could be attributed to the formation of branched clusters of well-defined (uniform, 3 nm cross section), semi-flexible, beta-sheet-rich nanofibrils

  20. Ku80 binds to human replication origins prior to the assembly of the ORC complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibani, Sahar; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2005-05-31

    The Ku heterodimer, an abundant nuclear protein, binds DNA replication origins in a sequence-specific manner and promotes initiation. In this study, using HCT116 Ku80+/- haplo-insufficient and Orc2(delta/-) hypomorphic cells, the order of binding of Ku and the human origin recognition complex (HsORC) was determined. The nuclear expression of Ku80 was found to be decreased by 60% in Ku80+/- cells, while its general association with chromatin was decreased by 33%. Coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that the Ku heterodimer associates specifically with the human HsOrc-2, -3, -4, and -6 subunits. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments, using cells synchronized to late G1, showed that the association of Ku80 with the lamin B2, beta-globin, and c-myc origins in vivo was decreased by 1.5-, 2.3-, and 2.5-fold, respectively, in Ku80+/- cells. The association of HsOrc-3, -4, and -6 was consistently decreased in all three origins examined in Ku80+/- cells, while that of HsOrc-2 showed no significant variation, indicating that the HsOrc-3, -4, and -6 subunits bind to the origins after Ku80. In Orc2(delta/-) cells, the association of HsOrc-2 with the lamin B2, beta-globin, and c-myc origins was decreased by 2.8-, 4.9-, and 2.8-fold, respectively, relative to wild-type HCT116 cells. Furthermore, nascent strand abundance at these three origins was decreased by 4.5-, 2.3-, and 2.6-fold in Orc2(delta/-) relative to HCT116 cells, respectively. Interestingly, the association of Ku80 with these origins was not affected in this hypomorphic cell line, indicating that Ku and HsOrc-2 bind to origins independently of each other.

  1. Fetal Growth and Timing of Parturition in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Sun, Wenyu; Troendle, James

    2008-01-01

    Animal studies indicate that either the fetus or the intrauterine environment, both of which set the pattern for fetal growth, may affect the timing of parturition. The authors examined the association between fetal growth and timing of spontaneous onset of labor in humans among low-risk white US women with singleton pregnancies (1987–1991). They restricted the data to pregnancies which had a reliable date of the last menstrual period, normal fetal growth in the first half of pregnancy, and no history of or current pregnancy complications that might have impaired fetal growth (n = 3,360). Subjects received ultrasound examinations at 15–22 and 31–35 weeks’ gestation. Fetal growth was adjusted for parity, fetal sex, and maternal prepregnancy weight and height. Results showed that slower or faster fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy resulted in substantially lower or higher birth weight, respectively. However, fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy, even at extremes (2 standard deviations below or above the mean), did not have a meaningful impact on the timing of parturition; neither did fetal growth acceleration or deceleration in late pregnancy. Thus, in low-risk pregnancies where fetal growth is normal in early gestation, fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy does not affect the timing of normal parturition. PMID:18775925

  2. Fetal growth and timing of parturition in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Sun, Wenyu; Troendle, James

    2008-10-15

    Animal studies indicate that either the fetus or the intrauterine environment, both of which set the pattern for fetal growth, may affect the timing of parturition. The authors examined the association between fetal growth and timing of spontaneous onset of labor in humans among low-risk white US women with singleton pregnancies (1987-1991). They restricted the data to pregnancies which had a reliable date of the last menstrual period, normal fetal growth in the first half of pregnancy, and no history of or current pregnancy complications that might have impaired fetal growth (n = 3,360). Subjects received ultrasound examinations at 15-22 and 31-35 weeks' gestation. Fetal growth was adjusted for parity, fetal sex, and maternal prepregnancy weight and height. Results showed that slower or faster fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy resulted in substantially lower or higher birth weight, respectively. However, fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy, even at extremes (2 standard deviations below or above the mean), did not have a meaningful impact on the timing of parturition; neither did fetal growth acceleration or deceleration in late pregnancy. Thus, in low-risk pregnancies where fetal growth is normal in early gestation, fetal growth in the second half of pregnancy does not affect the timing of normal parturition.

  3. An Interactive Assembly Process Planner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖华飞; 张林鍹; 肖田元; 曾理; 古月

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and performance of the virtual assembly support system (VASS), a new system that can provide designers and assembly process engineers with a simulation and visualization environment where they can evaluate the assemblability/disassemblability of products, and thereby use a computer to intuitively create assembly plans and interactively generate assembly process charts. Subassembly planning and assembly priority reasoning techniques were utilized to find heuristic information to improve the efficiency of assembly process planning. Tool planning was implemented to consider tool requirements in the product design stage. New methods were developed to reduce the computation amount involved in interference checking. As an important feature of the VASS, human interaction was integrated into the whole process of assembly process planning, extending the power of computer reasoning by including human expertise, resulting in better assembly plans and better designs.

  4. Problematics of Time and Timing in the Longitudinal Study of Human Development: Theoretical and Methodological Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Richard M; Schwartz, Seth J; Phelps, Erin

    2009-02-01

    Studying human development involves describing, explaining, and optimizing intraindividual change and interindividual differences in such change and, as such, requires longitudinal research. The selection of the appropriate type of longitudinal design requires selecting the option that best addresses the theoretical questions asked about developmental process and the use of appropriate statistical procedures to best exploit data derived from theory-predicated longitudinal research. This paper focuses on several interrelated problematics involving the treatment of time and the timing of observations that developmental scientists face in creating theory-design fit and in charting in change-sensitive ways developmental processes across life. We discuss ways in which these problematics may be addressed to advance theory-predicated understanding of the role of time in processes of individual development.

  5. An ergonomics action research demonstration: integrating human factors into assembly design processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Village, J; Greig, M; Salustri, F; Zolfaghari, S; Neumann, W P

    2014-01-01

    In action research (AR), the researcher participates 'in' the actions in an organisation, while simultaneously reflecting 'on' the actions to promote learning for both the organisation and the researchers. This paper demonstrates a longitudinal AR collaboration with an electronics manufacturing firm where the goal was to improve the organisation's ability to integrate human factors (HF) proactively into their design processes. During the three-year collaboration, all meetings, workshops, interviews and reflections were digitally recorded and qualitatively analysed to inform new 'actions'. By the end of the collaboration, HF tools with targets and sign-off by the HF specialist were integrated into several stages of the design process, and engineers were held accountable for meeting the HF targets. We conclude that the AR approach combined with targeting multiple initiatives at different stages of the design process helped the organisation find ways to integrate HF into their processes in a sustainable way. Researchers acted as a catalyst to help integrate HF into the engineering design process in a sustainable way. This paper demonstrates how an AR approach can help achieve HF integration, the benefits of using a reflective stance and one method for reporting an AR study.

  6. Alignment of human cardiomyocytes on laser patterned biphasic core/shell nanowire assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karin; Lee, Juseok; Haidar, Ayman; Martinez Miró, Marina; Akkan, Cagri Kaan; Veith, Michael; Cenk Aktas, Oral; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim

    2014-12-01

    The management of end stage heart failure patients is only possible by heart transplantation or by the implantation of artificial hearts as a bridge for later transplantation. However, these therapeutic strategies are limited by a lack of donor hearts and by the associated complications, such as coagulation and infection, due to the used artificial mechanical circulatory assist devices. Therefore, new strategies for myocardial regenerative approaches are under extensive research to produce contractile myocardial tissue in the future to replace non-contractile myocardial ischemic and scarred tissue. Different approaches, such as cell transplantation, have been studied intensively. Although successful approaches have been observed, there are still limitations to the application. It is envisaged that myocardial tissue engineering can be used to help replace infarcted non-contractile tissue. The developed tissue should later mimic the aligned fibrillar structure of the extracellular matrix and provide important guidance cues for the survival, function and the needed orientation of cardiomyocytes. Nanostructured surfaces have been tested to provide a guided direction that cells can follow. In the present study, the cellular adhesion/alignment of human cardiomyocytes and the biocompatibility have been investigated after cultivation on different laser-patterned nanowires compared with unmodified nanowires. As a result, the nanostructured surfaces possessed good biocompatibility before and after laser modification. The laser-induced scalability of the pattern enabled the growth and orientation of the adhered myocardial tissue. Such approaches may be used to modify the surface of potential scaffolds to develop myocardial contractile tissue in the future.

  7. Assembling large genomes with single-molecule sequencing and locality-sensitive hashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Konstantin; Koren, Sergey; Chin, Chen-Shan; Drake, James P; Landolin, Jane M; Phillippy, Adam M

    2015-06-01

    Long-read, single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing is routinely used to finish microbial genomes, but available assembly methods have not scaled well to larger genomes. We introduce the MinHash Alignment Process (MHAP) for overlapping noisy, long reads using probabilistic, locality-sensitive hashing. Integrating MHAP with the Celera Assembler enabled reference-grade de novo assemblies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster and a human hydatidiform mole cell line (CHM1) from SMRT sequencing. The resulting assemblies are highly continuous, include fully resolved chromosome arms and close persistent gaps in these reference genomes. Our assembly of D. melanogaster revealed previously unknown heterochromatic and telomeric transition sequences, and we assembled low-complexity sequences from CHM1 that fill gaps in the human GRCh38 reference. Using MHAP and the Celera Assembler, single-molecule sequencing can produce de novo near-complete eukaryotic assemblies that are 99.99% accurate when compared with available reference genomes.

  8. Paramyxovirus Infection Mimics In Vivo Cellular Dynamics in Three-Demensional Human Bronchio-Epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatly, Anne M.; Lin, Yen-Huei; McCarthy, Maureen; Chen, Wei; Miller, Lynn Z.; Quiroz, Jorge; Nowak, Becky M.; Lerch, Robert A.; Udem, Stephen A.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus cause severe respiratory disease, especially in infants, children and the elderly. An in vitro model that accurately mimics infection of the human respiratory epithelium (HRE) would facilitate vaccine development greatly. Monolayer cultures traditionally used to study these viruses do not accurately and precisely differentiate the replication efficiencies of wild type and attenuated viruses. Therefore, we engineered novel three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) of human broncho-epithelial (HBE) cells to produce a more physiologically relevant in vitro model of the HRE. TLAs resemble HRE structurally and by expression of differentiated epithelial cell markers. Most significantly, wild type viruses exhibited a clear growth advantage over attenuated strains in TLAs unlike monolayer cultures. In addition, the TLAs responded to virus infection by secreting pro-inflammatory mediators similar to the respiratory epithelia of infected children. These characteristics make the TLA model a valuable platform technology to develop and evaluate live, attenuated respiratory virus vaccine candidates for human use. Respiratory virus diseases, the most frequent and least preventable of all infectious diseases, range in severity from the common cold to severe bronchiolitis and pneumonia . Two paramyxoviruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), are responsible for a majority of the most severe respiratory diseases of infants and young children. RSV causes 70% of all bronchiolitis cases and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in infants. PIV3 causes 10-15% of bronchiolitis and pneumonia during infancy, second only to RSV, and 40% of croup in infants To date, licensed vaccines are not available to prevent these respiratory diseases. At present, traditional monkey kidney (Vero and LLC-MK2) and human (HEp-2) tissue culture cells and small animal models (mouse

  9. Residue specific effects of human islet polypeptide amyloid on self-assembly and on cell toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemtemourian, Lucie; Guillemain, Ghislaine; Foufelle, Fabienne; Killian, J Antoinette

    2017-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized histopathologically by the presence of fibrillary amyloid deposits in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), the 37-residue pancreatic hormone, is the major constituent of these amyloid deposits. The propensity of IAPP to form amyloid fibrils is strongly dependent on its primary sequence. An intriguing example is His at residue 18. Although H18 is located outside the amyloidogenic region, it has been suggested that this residue and its charge state play an important role in the kinetics of conformational changes and fibril formation as well as in mediating cell toxicity. To gain more insight into the importance of this residue, we have synthesized four analogues (H18R-IAPP, H18K-IAPP, H18A-IAPP and H18E-IAPP) and we performed a full biophysical study on the properties of these peptides. Kinetic experiments as monitored by thioflavin-T fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, circular dichroism and cell toxicity assays revealed that all variants are less fibrillogenic and less toxic than native hIAPP both at neutral pH and at low pH. This demonstrates that the effect of H18 in native IAPP is not simply determined by its charge state, but rather that residue 18 is important for specific intra- and intermolecular interactions that occur during fibril formation and that may involve charge, size and hydrophobicity. Furthermore, our results indicate that H18R-IAPP has a strong inhibiting effect on native hIAPP fibril formation. Together these results highlight the large impact of modifying a single residue outside the amyloidogenic domain on fibril formation and cell toxicity induced by IAPP, opening up new avenues for design of inhibitors or modulators of IAPP aggregation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Experimental evidence that dispersal drives ant community assembly in human-altered ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joshua R; Tschinkel, Walter R

    2016-01-01

    A key shortcoming in our understanding of exotic species' success is that it is not known how post-introduction dispersal contributes to the success of exotic species and the reassembly of invaded communities. Exotic and native species face poorly understood competition-colonization trade-offs in heterogeneous landscapes of natural and anthropogenic habitats. We conducted three experiments that tested how ant queen behavior during dispersal affects community composition. Using experimental plots, we tested whether (1) different types of habitat disturbance and (2) different sizes of habitat disturbance affected the abundance of newly mated queens landing in the plots. The three most abundant species captured were the exotic fire ant Solenopsis invicta, and the native species Brachymyrmex depilis, and S. pergandei, respectively. When queens were considered collectively, more queens landed in plowed, sand-added, and roadside plots than in control or mow plots, in other words, in the more heavily disturbed plots. We also tested (3) the effect of habitat manipulations on the survival of newly mated fire ant queens (Solenopsis invicta). Soil disturbance (tilling), lack of shade, and removal (poisoning) of the ant community resulted in the greatest fire ant colony survivorship. Collectively, experiments revealed that both exotic and native newly mated ant queens select open, human-altered ecosystems for founding new colonies. The selection of such habitats by fire ant queens leads to their successful colony founding and ultimately to their dominance in those habitats. Selection of disturbed habitats is therefore advantageous for exotic species but is an ecological trap for native species because they do not often succeed in founding colonies in these habitats.

  11. Forward-time simulations of human populations with complex diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Peng

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing power of personal computers, as well as the availability of flexible forward-time simulation programs like simuPOP, it is now possible to simulate the evolution of complex human diseases using a forward-time approach. This approach is potentially more powerful than the coalescent approach since it allows simulations of more than one disease susceptibility locus using almost arbitrary genetic and demographic models. However, the application of such simulations has been deterred by the lack of a suitable simulation framework. For example, it is not clear when and how to introduce disease mutants-especially those under purifying selection-to an evolving population, and how to control the disease allele frequencies at the last generation. In this paper, we introduce a forward-time simulation framework that allows us to generate large multi-generation populations with complex diseases caused by unlinked disease susceptibility loci, according to specified demographic and evolutionary properties. Unrelated individuals, small or large pedigrees can be drawn from the resulting population and provide samples for a wide range of study designs and ascertainment methods. We demonstrate our simulation framework using three examples that map genes associated with affection status, a quantitative trait, and the age of onset of a hypothetical cancer, respectively. Nonadditive fitness models, population structure, and gene-gene interactions are simulated. Case-control, sibpair, and large pedigree samples are drawn from the simulated populations and are examined by a variety of gene-mapping methods.

  12. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide N-Terminus Fragment Self-Assembly: Effect of Conserved Disulfide Bond on Aggregation Propensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilitchev, Alexandre I.; Giammona, Maxwell J.; Do, Thanh D.; Wong, Amy G.; Buratto, Steven K.; Shea, Joan-Emma; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) has long been implicated in the pathogeny of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and failure of islet transplants, but the mechanism of IAPP self-assembly is still unclear. Numerous fragments of hIAPP are capable of self-association into oligomeric aggregates, both amyloid and non-amyloid in structure. The N-terminal region of IAPP contains a conserved disulfide bond between cysteines at position 2 and 7, which is important to hIAPP's in vivo function and may play a role in in vitro aggregation. The importance of the disulfide bond in this region was probed using a combination of ion mobility-based mass spectrometry experiments, molecular dynamics simulations, and high-resolution atomic force microscopy imaging on the wildtype 1-8 hIAPP fragment, a reduced fragment with no disulfide bond, and a fragment with both cysteines at positions 2 and 7 mutated to serine. The results indicate the wildtype fragment aggregates by a different pathway than either comparison peptide and that the intact disulfide bond may be protective against aggregation due to a reduction of inter-peptide hydrogen bonding.

  13. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human Rod–Zwilch–ZW10 (RZZ) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenfeld, Anika; Wohlgemuth, Sabine [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Wehenkel, Annemarie [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 3348/INSERM U1005, Bâtiment 110, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay CEDEX (France); Vetter, Ingrid R. [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Musacchio, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.musacchio@mpi-dortmund.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitätstrasse 1, 45141 Essen (Germany)

    2015-03-20

    The 800 kDa complex of the human Rod, Zwilch and ZW10 proteins (the RZZ complex) was reconstituted in insect cells, purified, crystallized and subjected to preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis. The spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors kinetochore–microtubule attachment during mitosis. In metazoans, the three-subunit Rod–Zwilch–ZW10 (RZZ) complex is a crucial SAC component that interacts with additional SAC-activating and SAC-silencing components, including the Mad1–Mad2 complex and cytoplasmic dynein. The RZZ complex contains two copies of each subunit and has a predicted molecular mass of ∼800 kDa. Given the low abundance of the RZZ complex in natural sources, its recombinant reconstitution was attempted by co-expression of its subunits in insect cells. The RZZ complex was purified to homogeneity and subjected to systematic crystallization attempts. Initial crystals containing the entire RZZ complex were obtained using the sitting-drop method and were subjected to optimization to improve the diffraction resolution limit. The crystals belonged to space group P3{sub 1} (No. 144) or P3{sub 2} (No. 145), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 215.45, c = 458.7 Å, α = β = 90.0, γ = 120.0°.

  14. Structural Determinants of Human FANCF Protein That Function in the Assembly of a DNA Damage Signaling Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowal,P.; Gurtan, A.; Stuckert, P.; D' Andrea, A.; Ellenberger, T.

    2007-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive and X-linked chromosomal instability disorder. At least eight FA proteins (FANCA, B, C, E, F, G, L, and M) form a nuclear core complex required for monoubiquitination of a downstream protein, FANCD2. The human FANCF protein reportedly functions as a molecular adaptor within the FA nuclear complex, bridging between the subcomplexes A:G and C:E. Our x-ray crystallographic studies of the C-terminal domain of FANCF reveal a helical repeat structure similar to the Cand1 regulator of the Cul1-Rbx1-Skp1-Fbox(Skp2) ubiquitin ligase complex. Two C-terminal loops of FANCF are essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and normal cellular resistance to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C. FANCF mutants bearing amino acid substitutions in this C-terminal surface fail to interact with other components of the FA complex, indicating that this surface is critical for the proper assembly of the FA core complex.

  15. Clofarabine targets the large subunit (α) of human ribonucleotide reductase in live cells by assembly into persistent hexamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Yimon; Brignole, Edward J; Long, Marcus J C; Chittuluru, Johnathan; Drennan, Catherine L; Asturias, Francisco J; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2012-07-27

    Clofarabine (ClF) is a drug used in the treatment of leukemia. One of its primary targets is human ribonucleotide reductase (hRNR), a dual-subunit, (α(2))(m)(β(2))(n), regulatory enzyme indispensable in de novo dNTP synthesis. We report that, in live mammalian cells, ClF targets hRNR by converting its α-subunit into kinetically stable hexamers. We established mammalian expression platforms that enabled isolation of functional α and characterization of its altered oligomeric associations in response to ClF treatment. Size exclusion chromatography and electron microscopy documented persistence of in-cell-assembled-α(6). Our data validate hRNR as an important target of ClF, provide evidence that in vivo α's quaternary structure can be perturbed by a nonnatural ligand, and suggest small-molecule-promoted, persistent hexamerization as a strategy to modulate hRNR activity. These studies lay foundations for documentation of RNR oligomeric state within a cell.

  16. Taxifolin enhances andrographolide-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells via spindle assembly checkpoint activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Rong Zhang

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (Andro suppresses proliferation and triggers apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. Taxifolin (Taxi has been proposed to prevent cancer development similar to other dietary flavonoids. In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of the addition of Andro alone and Andro and Taxi together on human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells were assessed. Andro inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation by mitotic arrest and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Although the effect of Taxi alone on DU145 cell proliferation was not significant, the combined use of Taxi with Andro significantly potentiated the anti-proliferative effect of increased mitotic arrest and apoptosis by enhancing the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase, and caspases-7 and -9. Andro together with Taxi enhanced microtubule polymerization in vitro, and they induced the formation of twisted and elongated spindles in the cancer cells, thus leading to mitotic arrest. In addition, we showed that depletion of MAD2, a component in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, alleviated the mitotic block induced by the two compounds, suggesting that they trigger mitotic arrest by SAC activation. This study suggests that the anti-cancer activity of Andro can be significantly enhanced in combination with Taxi by disrupting microtubule dynamics and activating the SAC.

  17. Taxifolin enhances andrographolide-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells via spindle assembly checkpoint activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong Rong; Al Zaharna, Mazen; Wong, Matthew Man-Kin; Chiu, Sung-Kay; Cheung, Hon-Yeung

    2013-01-01

    Andrographolide (Andro) suppresses proliferation and triggers apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. Taxifolin (Taxi) has been proposed to prevent cancer development similar to other dietary flavonoids. In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of the addition of Andro alone and Andro and Taxi together on human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells were assessed. Andro inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation by mitotic arrest and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Although the effect of Taxi alone on DU145 cell proliferation was not significant, the combined use of Taxi with Andro significantly potentiated the anti-proliferative effect of increased mitotic arrest and apoptosis by enhancing the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and caspases-7 and -9. Andro together with Taxi enhanced microtubule polymerization in vitro, and they induced the formation of twisted and elongated spindles in the cancer cells, thus leading to mitotic arrest. In addition, we showed that depletion of MAD2, a component in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), alleviated the mitotic block induced by the two compounds, suggesting that they trigger mitotic arrest by SAC activation. This study suggests that the anti-cancer activity of Andro can be significantly enhanced in combination with Taxi by disrupting microtubule dynamics and activating the SAC.

  18. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination at a Time of Changing Sexual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baussano, Iacopo; Lazzarato, Fulvio; Brisson, Marc; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence varies widely worldwide. We used a transmission model to show links between age-specific sexual patterns and HPV vaccination effectiveness. We considered rural India and the United States as examples of 2 heterosexual populations with traditional age-specific sexual behavior and gender-similar age-specific sexual behavior, respectively. We simulated these populations by using age-specific rates of sexual activity and age differences between sexual partners and found that transitions from traditional to gender-similar sexual behavior in women sexual behavior and that increased risk for HPV infection attributable to transition is preventable by early vaccination. Our study highlights the importance of using time-limited opportunities to introduce HPV vaccination in traditional populations before changes in age-specific sexual patterns occur.

  19. Complete telomere-to-telomere de novo assembly of the Plasmodium falciparum genome through long-read (>11 kb), single molecule, real-time sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vembar, Shruthi Sridhar; Seetin, Matthew; Lambert, Christine; Nattestad, Maria; Schatz, Michael C; Baybayan, Primo; Scherf, Artur; Smith, Melissa Laird

    2016-08-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing to estimate genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal malaria parasite, has proved challenging due to the skewed AT-richness [∼80.6% (A + T)] of its genome and the lack of technology to assemble highly polymorphic subtelomeric regions that contain clonally variant, multigene virulence families (Ex: var and rifin). To address this, we performed amplification-free, single molecule, real-time sequencing of P. falciparum genomic DNA and generated reads of average length 12 kb, with 50% of the reads between 15.5 and 50 kb in length. Next, using the Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process, we assembled the P. falciparum genome de novo and successfully compiled all 14 nuclear chromosomes telomere-to-telomere. We also accurately resolved centromeres [∼90-99% (A + T)] and subtelomeric regions and identified large insertions and duplications that add extra var and rifin genes to the genome, along with smaller structural variants such as homopolymer tract expansions. Overall, we show that amplification-free, long-read sequencing combined with de novo assembly overcomes major challenges inherent to studying the P. falciparum genome. Indeed, this technology may not only identify the polymorphic and repetitive subtelomeric sequences of parasite populations from endemic areas but may also evaluate structural variation linked to virulence, drug resistance and disease transmission.

  20. Electrostatic Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Polycation and DNA Multilayer Films by Real-time Surface Plasmon ResonanceTechnique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI, Ren-Jun; CUI, Xiao-Qiang; YANG, Xiu-Rong; WANG, Er-Kang

    2001-01-01

    The assembly of alternating DNA and positively charged poly(dimethyldiallylammonium chloride) (PDDA) multilayer films by electrostatic layer-by-layer adsorption has been studied.Real time surface plasmon resonance (BIAcore) technique was used to characterize and monitor the formation of multilayer films in solution in real time continuously. The results indicate that the uniform multilayer can be obtained on the poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) coated substrate surface. The kinetics of the adsorption of DNA on PDDA surface was also studied by real-time BIAcore technique, and the observed rate constant was calculated using a Langmuir model (kobs= (1.28±0.08) ×10-2 s-1).

  1. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  2. Time-Elastic Generative Model for Acceleration Time Series in Human Activity Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Organero, Mario; Ruiz-Blazquez, Ramona

    2017-02-08

    Body-worn sensors in general and accelerometers in particular have been widely used in order to detect human movements and activities. The execution of each type of movement by each particular individual generates sequences of time series of sensed data from which specific movement related patterns can be assessed. Several machine learning algorithms have been used over windowed segments of sensed data in order to detect such patterns in activity recognition based on intermediate features (either hand-crafted or automatically learned from data). The underlying assumption is that the computed features will capture statistical differences that can properly classify different movements and activities after a training phase based on sensed data. In order to achieve high accuracy and recall rates (and guarantee the generalization of the system to new users), the training data have to contain enough information to characterize all possible ways of executing the activity or movement to be detected. This could imply large amounts of data and a complex and time-consuming training phase, which has been shown to be even more relevant when automatically learning the optimal features to be used. In this paper, we present a novel generative model that is able to generate sequences of time series for characterizing a particular movement based on the time elasticity properties of the sensed data. The model is used to train a stack of auto-encoders in order to learn the particular features able to detect human movements. The results of movement detection using a newly generated database with information on five users performing six different movements are presented. The generalization of results using an existing database is also presented in the paper. The results show that the proposed mechanism is able to obtain acceptable recognition rates (F = 0.77) even in the case of using different people executing a different sequence of movements and using different hardware.

  3. Time-Elastic Generative Model for Acceleration Time Series in Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Munoz-Organero

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Body-worn sensors in general and accelerometers in particular have been widely used in order to detect human movements and activities. The execution of each type of movement by each particular individual generates sequences of time series of sensed data from which specific movement related patterns can be assessed. Several machine learning algorithms have been used over windowed segments of sensed data in order to detect such patterns in activity recognition based on intermediate features (either hand-crafted or automatically learned from data. The underlying assumption is that the computed features will capture statistical differences that can properly classify different movements and activities after a training phase based on sensed data. In order to achieve high accuracy and recall rates (and guarantee the generalization of the system to new users, the training data have to contain enough information to characterize all possible ways of executing the activity or movement to be detected. This could imply large amounts of data and a complex and time-consuming training phase, which has been shown to be even more relevant when automatically learning the optimal features to be used. In this paper, we present a novel generative model that is able to generate sequences of time series for characterizing a particular movement based on the time elasticity properties of the sensed data. The model is used to train a stack of auto-encoders in order to learn the particular features able to detect human movements. The results of movement detection using a newly generated database with information on five users performing six different movements are presented. The generalization of results using an existing database is also presented in the paper. The results show that the proposed mechanism is able to obtain acceptable recognition rates (F = 0.77 even in the case of using different people executing a different sequence of movements and using different

  4. Field application. Selective stimulation of reservoirs or perforated intervals with use of coiled tubing equipped with real-time data communication system in combination with straddle packer assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberascher, R.; Breimer, G. [GDF SUEZ E and P Deutschland GmbH, Lingen (Germany); Jonge, R.M. de [Baker Hughes (Netherlands)

    2013-08-01

    In two German gas wells a decline in production and wellhead pressures had been observed. Production logging data obtained by PLT surveys were evaluated, which showed that certain intervals within the reservoir section did not contribute, or showed a restricted contribution to the overall gas production. The restricted contribution was suspected to be caused by near-wellbore damage. To restore or enhance the production of the perforated intervals an acid treatment was considered in these wells in order to remove skin damage. To restore or enhance the production of the wells, an acid treatment of the perforated intervals was designed. For obtaining the required selective placement of the acid across the zones of interest, the use of coiled tubing (CT) in combination with a resettable straddle packer assembly was selected. The accuracy of the setting depth of the straddle packer was a critical issue for the execution of the well intervention operations. In order to obtain the required depth accuracy, the CT string was equipped with an intelligent CT communication system, which transfers real-time downhole data to surface. For the first time, a reservoir stimulation project was executed by combining CT equipped with a real-time data communication system (TeleCoil) and the Inflatable Straddle Acidizing Packer (ISAP) assembly. Inside the CT an encapsulated monoconductor cable was installed to transmit real-time data from the CT Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) to surface. The BHA consists of a Casing Collar Locator (CCL) and downhole pressure and temperature gauges. Due to the protective jacket of the monoconductor cable, there are no restrictions in the use of different fluids in combination with the system. Information provided by the CCL monitoring tool ensures accurate depth correlations, whereas differential pressure measurements from the down-hole pressure gauges provide positive information about the setting and sealing conditions of the straddle packer assembly. The

  5. Restyling the Humanities Curriculum of Higher Education for Posthuman Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Jamila R.

    2016-01-01

    The future viability of the humanities in higher education has been broadly debated. Yet, most of these debates are missing an important consideration. The humanities' object of study is the human, an object that some would argue has been replaced in our onto-epistemological systems by the posthuman. In her 2013 book, "The Posthuman,"…

  6. Restyling the Humanities Curriculum of Higher Education for Posthuman Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Jamila R.

    2016-01-01

    The future viability of the humanities in higher education has been broadly debated. Yet, most of these debates are missing an important consideration. The humanities' object of study is the human, an object that some would argue has been replaced in our onto-epistemological systems by the posthuman. In her 2013 book, "The Posthuman,"…

  7. A separable domain of the p150 subunit of human chromatin assembly factor-1 promotes protein and chromosome associations with nucleoli

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) is a three-subunit protein complex conserved throughout eukaryotes that deposits histones during DNA synthesis. Here we present a novel role for the human p150 subunit in regulating nucleolar macromolecular interactions. Acute depletion of p150 causes redistribution of multiple nucleolar proteins and reduces nucleolar association with several repetitive element–containing loci. Of note, a point mutation in a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) within p150 abolishe...

  8. The time course of shape discrimination in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ales, Justin M; Appelbaum, L Gregory; Cottereau, Benoit R; Norcia, Anthony M

    2013-02-15

    The lateral occipital cortex (LOC) activates selectively to images of intact objects versus scrambled controls, is selective for the figure-ground relationship of a scene, and exhibits at least some degree of invariance for size and position. Because of these attributes, it is considered to be a crucial part of the object recognition pathway. Here we show that human LOC is critically involved in perceptual decisions about object shape. High-density EEG was recorded while subjects performed a threshold-level shape discrimination task on texture-defined figures segmented by either phase or orientation cues. The appearance or disappearance of a figure region from a uniform background generated robust visual evoked potentials throughout retinotopic cortex as determined by inverse modeling of the scalp voltage distribution. Contrasting responses from trials containing shape changes that were correctly detected (hits) with trials in which no change occurred (correct rejects) revealed stimulus-locked, target-selective activity in the occipital visual areas LOC and V4 preceding the subject's response. Activity that was locked to the subjects' reaction time was present in the LOC. Response-locked activity in the LOC was determined to be related to shape discrimination for several reasons: shape-selective responses were silenced when subjects viewed identical stimuli but their attention was directed away from the shapes to a demanding letter discrimination task; shape-selectivity was present across four different stimulus configurations used to define the figure; LOC responses correlated with participants' reaction times. These results indicate that decision-related activity is present in the LOC when subjects are engaged in threshold-level shape discriminations.

  9. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  10. Microgravity Analogues of Herpes Virus Pathogenicity: Human Cytomegalovirus (hCMV) and Varicella Zoster (VZV) Infectivity in Human Tissue Like Assemblies (TLAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Albrecht, T.; Cohrs, R.

    2009-01-01

    The old adage we are our own worst enemies may perhaps be the most profound statement ever made when applied to man s desire for extraterrestrial exploration and habitation of Space. Consider the immune system protects the integrity of the entire human physiology and is comprised of two basic elements the adaptive or circulating and the innate immune system. Failure of the components of the adaptive system leads to venerability of the innate system from opportunistic microbes; viral, bacteria, and fungal, which surround us, are transported on our skin, and commonly inhabit the human physiology as normal and imunosuppressed parasites. The fine balance which is maintained for the preponderance of our normal lives, save immune disorders and disease, is deregulated in microgravity. Thus analogue systems to study these potential Risks are essential for our progress in conquering Space exploration and habitation. In this study we employed two known physiological target tissues in which the reactivation of hCMV and VZV occurs, human neural and lung systems created for the study and interaction of these herpes viruses independently and simultaneously on the innate immune system. Normal human neural and lung tissue analogues called tissue like assemblies (TLAs) were infected with low MOIs of approximately 2 x 10(exp -5) pfu hCMV or VZV and established active but prolonged low grade infections which spanned .7-1.5 months in length. These infections were characterized by the ability to continuously produce each of the viruses without expiration of the host cultures. Verification and quantification of viral replication was confirmed via RT_PCR, IHC, and confocal spectral analyses of the respective essential viral genomes. All host TLAs maintained the ability to actively proliferate throughout the entire duration of the experiments as is analogous to normal in vivo physiological conditions. These data represent a significant advance in the ability to study the triggering

  11. Microgravity Analogues of Herpes Virus Pathogenicity: Human Cytomegalovirus (hCMV) and Varicella Zoster (VZV) Infectivity in Human Tissue Like Assemblies (TLAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Albrecht, T.; Cohrs, R.

    2009-01-01

    The old adage we are our own worst enemies may perhaps be the most profound statement ever made when applied to man s desire for extraterrestrial exploration and habitation of Space. Consider the immune system protects the integrity of the entire human physiology and is comprised of two basic elements the adaptive or circulating and the innate immune system. Failure of the components of the adaptive system leads to venerability of the innate system from opportunistic microbes; viral, bacteria, and fungal, which surround us, are transported on our skin, and commonly inhabit the human physiology as normal and imunosuppressed parasites. The fine balance which is maintained for the preponderance of our normal lives, save immune disorders and disease, is deregulated in microgravity. Thus analogue systems to study these potential Risks are essential for our progress in conquering Space exploration and habitation. In this study we employed two known physiological target tissues in which the reactivation of hCMV and VZV occurs, human neural and lung systems created for the study and interaction of these herpes viruses independently and simultaneously on the innate immune system. Normal human neural and lung tissue analogues called tissue like assemblies (TLAs) were infected with low MOIs of approximately 2 x 10(exp -5) pfu hCMV or VZV and established active but prolonged low grade infections which spanned .7-1.5 months in length. These infections were characterized by the ability to continuously produce each of the viruses without expiration of the host cultures. Verification and quantification of viral replication was confirmed via RT_PCR, IHC, and confocal spectral analyses of the respective essential viral genomes. All host TLAs maintained the ability to actively proliferate throughout the entire duration of the experiments as is analogous to normal in vivo physiological conditions. These data represent a significant advance in the ability to study the triggering

  12. Human COX20 cooperates with SCO1 and SCO2 to mature COX2 and promote the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourens, Myriam; Boulet, Aren; Leary, Scot C; Barrientos, Antoni

    2014-06-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CIV) deficiency is one of the most common respiratory chain defects in patients presenting with mitochondrial encephalocardiomyopathies. CIV biogenesis is complicated by the dual genetic origin of its structural subunits, and assembly of a functional holoenzyme complex requires a large number of nucleus-encoded assembly factors. In general, the functions of these assembly factors remain poorly understood, and mechanistic investigations of human CIV biogenesis have been limited by the availability of model cell lines. Here, we have used small interference RNA and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology to create knockdown and knockout human cell lines, respectively, to study the function of the CIV assembly factor COX20 (FAM36A). These cell lines exhibit a severe, isolated CIV deficiency due to instability of COX2, a mitochondrion-encoded CIV subunit. Mitochondria lacking COX20 accumulate CIV subassemblies containing COX1 and COX4, similar to those detected in fibroblasts from patients carrying mutations in the COX2 copper chaperones SCO1 and SCO2. These results imply that in the absence of COX20, COX2 is inefficiently incorporated into early CIV subassemblies. Immunoprecipitation assays using a stable COX20 knockout cell line expressing functional COX20-FLAG allowed us to identify an interaction between COX20 and newly synthesized COX2. Additionally, we show that SCO1 and SCO2 act on COX20-bound COX2. We propose that COX20 acts as a chaperone in the early steps of COX2 maturation, stabilizing the newly synthesized protein and presenting COX2 to its metallochaperone module, which in turn facilitates the incorporation of mature COX2 into the CIV assembly line.

  13. A Real-Time Model-Based Human Motion Tracking and Analysis for Human-Computer Interface Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Lin Huang

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a real-time model-based human motion tracking and analysis method for human computer interface (HCI. This method tracks and analyzes the human motion from two orthogonal views without using any markers. The motion parameters are estimated by pattern matching between the extracted human silhouette and the human model. First, the human silhouette is extracted and then the body definition parameters (BDPs can be obtained. Second, the body animation parameters (BAPs are estimated by a hierarchical tritree overlapping searching algorithm. To verify the performance of our method, we demonstrate different human posture sequences and use hidden Markov model (HMM for posture recognition testing.

  14. Random walk in genome space: A key ingredient of intermittent dynamics of community assembly on evolutionary time scales

    KAUST Repository

    Murase, Yohsuke

    2010-06-01

    Community assembly is studied using individual-based multispecies models. The models have stochastic population dynamics with mutation, migration, and extinction of species. Mutants appear as a result of mutation of the resident species, while migrants have no correlation with the resident species. It is found that the dynamics of community assembly with mutations are quite different from the case with migrations. In contrast to mutation models, which show intermittent dynamics of quasi-steady states interrupted by sudden reorganizations of the community, migration models show smooth and gradual renewal of the community. As a consequence, instead of the 1/f diversity fluctuations found for the mutation models, 1/f2, random-walk like fluctuations are observed for the migration models. In addition, a characteristic species-lifetime distribution is found: a power law that is cut off by a "skewed" distribution in the long-lifetime regime. The latter has a longer tail than a simple exponential function, which indicates an age-dependent species-mortality function. Since this characteristic profile has been observed, both in fossil data and in several other mathematical models, we conclude that it is a universal feature of macroevolution. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Time course of large ribosomal subunit assembly in E. coli cells overexpressing a helicase inactive DbpA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Riley C; Childs, Jared J; Gevorkyan, Jirair; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Koculi, Eda

    2016-07-01

    DbpA is a DEAD-box RNA helicase implicated in Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit assembly. Previous studies have shown that when the ATPase and helicase inactive DbpA construct, R331A, is expressed in E. coli cells, a large ribosomal subunit intermediate accumulates. The large subunit intermediate migrates as a 45S particle in a sucrose gradient. Here, using a number of structural and fluorescent assays, we investigate the ribosome profiles of cells lacking wild-type DbpA and overexpressing the R331A DbpA construct. Our data show that in addition to the 45S particle previously described, 27S and 35S particles are also present in the ribosome profiles of cells overexpressing R331A DbpA. The 27S, 35S, and 45S independently convert to the 50S subunit, suggesting that ribosome assembly in the presence of R331A and the absence of wild-type DbpA occurs via multiple pathways.

  16. Assembling the Anthropocene: deep-time perspective on the development of a lithostratigraphic classification of Anthropogenic deposits and excavations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, C. N.; Ford, J. R.; Price, S.; Cooper, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Human modification of the Earth's surface/subsurface is associated with artificial deposits (anthropogenic sedimentary units) and excavated ground (anthropogenic unconformities), analogous to ancient depositional systems. This study examines how artificial ground can be classified by the procedures used for natural deposits. Anthropogenic deposits have different characteristics to other parts of the stratigraphic column: 1) they vary greatly in lateral and vertical extent; 2) they are strictly allostratigraphic, i.e. defined and identified by bounding discontinuities, either unconformities (e.g. artificial deposits resting directly upon bedrock), disconformities (e.g. a time-gap between parallel artificial strata associated with non-deposition or reworking) or the present-day land surface; 3) many units have no overlying strata or bounding surface; 4) they are often poorly exposed, though associated landforms/geomorphology may show characteristic features that can aid definition. Artificial deposits comprise modified geologic materials, e.g. sand, clay, coal and novel anthropogenic materials, e.g. plastic, brick, glass. Such deposits are typically heterogeneous, the lithology determined for practical purposes by current/former landuse activity. BGS maps for the UK use a five-fold morpho-stratigraphic subdivision with no lithological attribution. An enhanced BGS scheme (Price et al. 2011) uses a three-tier hierarchy to describe the origin and landform of the deposit or excavation with lithology and age treated as additional attributes. Though based largely on geomorphlogical expression and genetic origin, the scheme can be used for classifying subsurface deposits lacking landform expression. Anthropogenic modification ('anthropoturbation') of rock and natural sediments, e.g. boreholes, tunnels and mineshafts, may extend to significant depths. Although indicating the extent of human influence they do not affect the classification of the stratigraphy; analogous to

  17. Spindle assembly checkpoint protein expression correlates with cellular proliferation and shorter time to recurrence in ovarian cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrogan, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal of the gynecological malignancies, often presenting at an advanced stage. Treatment is hampered by high levels of drug resistance. The taxanes are microtubule stabilizing agents, used as first-line agents in the treatment of OC that exert their apoptotic effects through the spindle assembly checkpoint. BUB1-related protein kinase (BUBR1) and mitotic arrest deficient 2 (MAD2), essential spindle assembly checkpoint components, play a key role in response to taxanes. BUBR1, MAD2, and Ki-67 were assessed on an OC tissue microarray platform representing 72 OC tumors of varying histologic subtypes. Sixty-one of these patients received paclitaxel and platinum agents combined; 11 received platinum alone. Overall survival was available for all 72 patients, whereas recurrence-free survival (RFS) was available for 66 patients. Increased BUBR1 expression was seen in serous carcinomas, compared with other histologies (P = .03). Increased BUBR1 was significantly associated with tumors of advanced stage (P = .05). Increased MAD2 and BUBR1 expression also correlated with increased cellular proliferation (P < .0002 and P = .02, respectively). Reduced MAD2 nuclear intensity was associated with a shorter RFS (P = .03), in ovarian tumors of differing histologic subtype (n = 66). In this subgroup, for those women who received paclitaxel and platinum agents combined (n = 57), reduced MAD2 intensity also identified women with a shorter RFS (P < .007). For the entire cohort of patients, irrespective of histologic subtype or treatment, MAD2 nuclear intensity retained independent significance in a multivariate model, with tumors showing reduced nuclear MAD2 intensity identifying patients with a poorer RFS (P = .05).

  18. Neural Code-Neural Self-information Theory on How Cell-Assembly Code Rises from Spike Time and Neuronal Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Tsien, Joe Z

    2017-01-01

    A major stumbling block to cracking the real-time neural code is neuronal variability - neurons discharge spikes with enormous variability not only across trials within the same experiments but also in resting states. Such variability is widely regarded as a noise which is often deliberately averaged out during data analyses. In contrast to such a dogma, we put forth the Neural Self-Information Theory that neural coding is operated based on the self-information principle under which variability in the time durations of inter-spike-intervals (ISI), or neuronal silence durations, is self-tagged with discrete information. As the self-information processor, each ISI carries a certain amount of information based on its variability-probability distribution; higher-probability ISIs which reflect the balanced excitation-inhibition ground state convey minimal information, whereas lower-probability ISIs which signify rare-occurrence surprisals in the form of extremely transient or prolonged silence carry most information. These variable silence durations are naturally coupled with intracellular biochemical cascades, energy equilibrium and dynamic regulation of protein and gene expression levels. As such, this silence variability-based self-information code is completely intrinsic to the neurons themselves, with no need for outside observers to set any reference point as typically used in the rate code, population code and temporal code models. Moreover, temporally coordinated ISI surprisals across cell population can inherently give rise to robust real-time cell-assembly codes which can be readily sensed by the downstream neural clique assemblies. One immediate utility of this self-information code is a general decoding strategy to uncover a variety of cell-assembly patterns underlying external and internal categorical or continuous variables in an unbiased manner.

  19. Interferon-γ-induced upregulation of immunoproteasome subunit assembly overcomes bortezomib resistance in human hematological cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewerth, Denise; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Assaraf, Yehuda G; van Meerloo, Johan; Kirk, Christopher J; Anderl, Janet; Blank, Jonathan L; van de Ven, Peter M; Zweegman, Sonja; Jansen, Gerrit; Cloos, Jacqueline

    2014-01-13

    Despite encouraging results with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in the treatment of hematologic malignancies, emergence of resistance can limit its efficacy, hence calling for novel strategies to overcome bortezomib-resistance. We previously showed that bortezomib-resistant human leukemia cell lines expressed significantly lower levels of immunoproteasome at the expense of constitutive proteasomes, which harbored point mutations in exon 2 of the PSMB5 gene encoding the β5 subunit. Here we investigated whether up-regulation of immunoproteasomes by exposure to interferon-γ restores sensitivity to bortezomib in myeloma and leukemia cell lines with acquired resistance to bortezomib. RPMI-8226 myeloma, THP1 monocytic/macrophage and CCRF-CEM (T) parental cells and sub lines with acquired resistance to bortezomib were exposed to Interferon-γ for 24-48 h where after the effects on proteasome subunit expression and activity were measured, next to sensitivity measurements to proteasome inhibitors bortezomib, carfilzomib, and the immunoproteasome selective inhibitor ONX 0914. At last, siRNA knockdown experiments of β5i and β1i were performed to identify the contribution of these subunits to sensitivity to proteasome inhibition. Statistical significance of the differences were determined using the Mann-Whitney U test. Interferon-γ exposure markedly increased immunoproteasome subunit mRNA to a significantly higher level in bortezomib-resistant cells (up to 30-fold, 10-fold, and 6-fold, in β1i, β5i, and β2i, respectively) than in parental cells. These increases were paralleled by elevated immunoproteasome protein levels and catalytic activity, as well as HLA class-I. Moreover, interferon-γ exposure reinforced sensitization of bortezomib-resistant tumor cells to bortezomib and carfilzomib, but most prominently to ONX 0914, as confirmed by cell growth inhibition studies, proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis, activation of PARP cleavage and accumulation of

  20. [The human embryo after Dolly: new practices for new times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel Beriain, Iñigo

    2008-01-01

    The possiblity of cloning human beings introduced a lot of issues in our ethical and legal frameworks. In this paper, we will put the focus into the necessary changes in the concept of embryo that our legal systems will have to implement in order to face the new situation. The description of the embryo as a group of cells able to develop into a human being will be defended here as the best way of doing so.

  1. Time-scales of assembly and thermal history of a composite felsic pluton: constraints from the Emerald Lake area, northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Ian M.; Villeneuve, Mike E.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Duncan, Robert A.; Russell, James K.; Mortensen, James K.

    2002-05-01

    Knowledge of the time-scales of emplacement and thermal history during assembly of composite felsic plutons in the shallow crust are critical to deciphering the processes of crustal growth and magma chamber development. Detailed petrological and chemical study of the mid-Cretaceous, composite Emerald Lake pluton, from the northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon Territory, coupled with U-Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology, indicates that this pluton was intruded as a series of magmatic pulses. Intrusion of these pulses produced a strong petrological zonation from augite syenite, hornblende quartz syenite and monzonite, to biotite granite. Our data further indicate that multiple phases were emplaced and cooled to below the mineral closure temperatures over a time-scale on the order of the resolution of the 40Ar/ 39Ar technique (˜1 Myr), and that emplacement occurred at 94.3 Ma. Simple thermal modelling and heat conduction calculations were used to further constrain the temporal relationships within the intrusion. These calculations are consistent with the geochronology and show that emplacement and cooling were complete in less than 100 kyr and probably 70±5 kyr. These results demonstrate that production, transport and emplacement of the different phases of the Emerald Lake pluton occurred essentially simultaneously, and that these processes must also have been closely related in time and space. By analogy, these results provide insights into the assembly and petrogenesis of other complex intrusions and ultimately lead to an understanding of the processes involved in crustal development.

  2. The role of vascular actors in two dimensional dialogue of human bone marrow stromal cell and endothelial cell for inducing self-assembled network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Li

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is very important for vascularized tissue engineering. In this study, we found that a two-dimensional co-culture of human bone marrow stromal cell (HBMSC and human umbical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC is able to stimulate the migration of co-cultured HUVEC and induce self-assembled network formation. During this process, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF₁₆₅ was upregulated in co-cultured HBMSC. Meanwhile, VEGF₁₆₅-receptor2 (KDR and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA were upregulated in co-cultured HUVEC. Functional studies show that neutralization of VEGF₁₆₅ blocked the migration and the rearrangement of the cells and downregulated the expression of uPA and its receptor. Blocking of vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cad did not affect the migration of co-cultured HUVEC but suppressed the self-assembled network formation. In conclusion, co-cultures upregulated the expression of VEGF₁₆₅ in co-cultured HBMSC; VEGF₁₆₅ then activated uPA in co-cultured HUVEC, which might be responsible for initiating the migration and the self-assembled network formation with the participation of VE-cad. All of these results indicated that only the direct contact of HBMSC and HUVEC and their respective dialogue are sufficient to stimulate secretion of soluble factors and to activate molecules that are critical for self-assembled network formation which show a great application potential for vascularization in tissue engineering.

  3. Polymorphic segmental duplications at 8p23.1 challenge the determination of individual defensin gene repertoires and the assembly of a contiguous human reference sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loncarevic Ivan F

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defensins are important components of innate immunity to combat bacterial and viral infections, and can even elicit antitumor responses. Clusters of defensin (DEF genes are located in a 2 Mb range of the human chromosome 8p23.1. This DEF locus, however, represents one of the regions in the euchromatic part of the final human genome sequence which contains segmental duplications, and recalcitrant gaps indicating high structural dynamics. Results We find that inter- and intraindividual genetic variations within this locus prevent a correct automatic assembly of the human reference genome (NCBI Build 34 which currently even contains misassemblies. Manual clone-by-clone alignment and gene annotation as well as repeat and SNP/haplotype analyses result in an alternative alignment significantly improving the DEF locus representation. Our assembly better reflects the experimentally verified variability of DEF gene and DEF cluster copy numbers. It contains an additional DEF cluster which we propose to reside between two already known clusters. Furthermore, manual annotation revealed a novel DEF gene and several pseudogenes expanding the hitherto known DEF repertoire. Analyses of BAC and working draft sequences of the chimpanzee indicates that its DEF region is also complex as in humans and DEF genes and a cluster are multiplied. Comparative analysis of human and chimpanzee DEF genes identified differences affecting the protein structure. Whether this might contribute to differences in disease susceptibility between man and ape remains to be solved. For the determination of individual DEF gene repertoires we provide a molecular approach based on DEF haplotypes. Conclusions Complexity and variability seem to be essential genomic features of the human DEF locus at 8p23.1 and provides an ongoing challenge for the best possible representation in the human reference sequence. Dissection of paralogous sequence variations, duplicon SNPs ans

  4. Human movement analysis with image processing in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvet, Eric; Paindavoine, Michel; Cannard, F.

    1991-04-01

    In the field of the human sciences, a lot of applications needs to know the kinematic characteristics of the human movements Psycology is associating the characteristics with the control mechanism, sport and biomechariics are associating them with the performance of the sportman or of the patient. So the trainers or the doctors can correct the gesture of the subject to obtain a better performance if he knows the motion properties. Roherton's studies show the children motion evolution2 . Several investigations methods are able to measure the human movement But now most of the studies are based on image processing. Often the systems are working at the T.V. standard (50 frame per secund ). they permit only to study very slow gesture. A human operator analyses the digitizing sequence of the film manually giving a very expensive, especially long and unprecise operation. On these different grounds many human movement analysis systems were implemented. They consist of: - markers which are fixed to the anatomical interesting points on the subject in motion, - Image compression which is the art to coding picture data. Generally the compression Is limited to the centroid coordinates calculation tor each marker. These systems differ from one other in image acquisition and markers detection.

  5. Effect of switching time on timer-based burst assembly and its effect on voice-over-Internet protocol quality of service over optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Takuji; Kurita, Kaori; Kasahara, Shoji

    2006-07-01

    It is well known that performance, such as burst loss probability and transmission delay, for optical burst switching (OBS) networks greatly depends on the switching time of the OBS switch. We analyze the switching-time effect on the burst loss probability using a continuous-time Markov chain. In our analysis, the transmission time of a burst is characterized with both the burst size and the switching time, and the burst loss probability, burst throughput, and data throughput are explicitly derived using the Geo,M/M/c/c queueing model. Numerical examples show that our analysis is quite useful for investigating the effect of the switching time on the timer-based burst assembly. We also consider voice-over-Internet Protocol (VoIP) service as a delay-sensitive application, and we investigate the switching time on the VoIP service. From our performance analysis, we derive an appropriate switching time and a burst processing time of the VoIP service in terms of the transmission distance.

  6. Chimpocentrism and reconstructions of human evolution (a timely reminder).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaesen, Krist

    2014-03-01

    Chimpanzees, but very few other animals, figure prominently in (recent) attempts to reconstruct the evolution of uniquely human traits. In particular, the chimpanzee is used (i) to identify traits unique to humans, and thus in need of reconstruction; (ii) to initialize the reconstruction, by taking its state to reflect the state of the last common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees; (iii) as a baseline against which to test evolutionary hypotheses. Here I point out the flaws in this three-step procedure, and show how they can be overcome by taking advantage of much broader phylogenetic comparisons. More specifically, I explain how such comparisons yield more reliable estimations of ancestral states and how they help to resolve problems of underdetermination inherent to chimpocentric accounts. To illustrate my points, I use a recent chimpocentric argument by Kitcher. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vaclav Havel’s Levinas: Timely remarks on humanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores Václav Havel’s encounter with Emmanuel Levinas’ essay ‘Without Identity’, which Havel read while in prison. The discussion of this encounter will demonstrate the importance of this encounter for solidifying the humanist elements of Havel’s thought, whilst also demonstrating the pre-existing humanism in Havel, evidence itself of his large debt to Czechoslovak humanist thought. What emerges is a demonstration of the richness and timeliness of Havel’s writing on responsibility. The paper makes a case for rejecting popular Heideggerian interpretations of Havel’s oeuvre. Havel’s deep affinity for Levinas’ thinking demonstrates that Havel’s humanism, informed as it is from the Czech tradition as well as through his encounter with Levinas, is at odds with Heidegger’s essential anti-humanism.

  8. Structural variation in two human genomes mapped at single-nucleotide resolution by whole genome de novo assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zheng, Hancheng; Luo, Ruibang

    2011-01-01

    Here we use whole-genome de novo assembly of second-generation sequencing reads to map structural variation (SV) in an Asian genome and an African genome. Our approach identifies small- and intermediate-size homozygous variants (1-50 kb) including insertions, deletions, inversions and their precise...

  9. Coordinate regulation of fibronectin matrix assembly by the plasminogen activator system and vitronectin in human osteosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKeown-Longo Paula J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasminogen activators are known to play a key role in the remodeling of bone matrix which occurs during tumor progression, bone metastasis and bone growth. Dysfunctional remodeling of bone matrix gives rise to the osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions seen in association with metastatic cancers. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of these lesions are not well understood. Studies were undertaken to address the role of the plasminogen activator system in the regulation of fibronectin matrix assembly in the osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63. Results Treatment of MG-63 cells with P25, a peptide ligand for uPAR, resulted in an increase in assembly of fibronectin matrix which was associated with an increase in the number of activated β1 integrins on the cell surface. Overexpression of uPAR in MG-63 cells increased the effect of P25 on fibronectin matrix assembly and β1 integrin activation. P25 had no effect on uPAR null fibroblasts, confirming a role for uPAR in this process. The addition of plasminogen activator inhibitor Type I (PAI-1 to cells increased the P25-induced fibronectin polymerization, as well as the number of activated integrins. This positive regulation of PAI-1 on fibronectin assembly was independent of PAI-1's anti-proteinase activity, but acted through PAI-1 binding to the somatomedin B domain of vitronectin. Conclusion These results indicate that vitronectin modulates fibronectin matrix assembly in osteosarcoma cells through a novel mechanism involving cross-talk through the plasminogen activator system.

  10. Real-time human walking estimation with radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Ph. van; Groen, F.C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Radars can be used to observe persons. Animation of an observed human on the basis of Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar measurements in virtual reality considerably facilitates the interpretation of the radar measurements. These radar measurements give detailed information of the moti

  11. Changes in channel morphology over human time scales [Chapter 32

    Science.gov (United States)

    John M. Buffington

    2012-01-01

    Rivers are exposed to changing environmental conditions over multiple spatial and temporal scales, with the imposed environmental conditions and response potential of the river modulated to varying degrees by human activity and our exploitation of natural resources. Watershed features that control river morphology include topography (valley slope and channel...

  12. Real-time Animation of Interactive Virtual Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egges, A.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last years, there has been a lot of interest in the area of Interactive Virtual Humans (IVHs). Virtual characters who interact naturally with users in mixed realities have many different applications, such as interactive video games, virtual training and rehabilitation, or virtual heritage.

  13. 78 FR 21607 - Stakeholder Listening Session in Preparation for the 66th World Health Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Stakeholder Listening Session in Preparation for the 66th World Health Assembly Time and... leading the U.S. delegation to the 66th World Health Assembly-- will hold an informal Stakeholder..., 200 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20201. The Stakeholder Listening Session will help the...

  14. 77 FR 19666 - Stakeholder Listening Session in Preparation for the 65th World Health Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Stakeholder Listening Session in Preparation for the 65th World Health Assembly Time and... the 65th World Health Assembly-- will hold an informal Stakeholder Listening Session on Monday April...., Washington, DC, 20201. The Stakeholder Listening Session will help the HHS's Office of Global Affairs...

  15. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-dependent proteolysis of human cyclin A starts at the beginning of mitosis and is not subject to the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geley, S; Kramer, E; Gieffers, C; Gannon, J; Peters, J M; Hunt, T

    2001-04-02

    Cyclin A is a stable protein in S and G2 phases, but is destabilized when cells enter mitosis and is almost completely degraded before the metaphase to anaphase transition. Microinjection of antibodies against subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) or against human Cdc20 (fizzy) arrested cells at metaphase and stabilized both cyclins A and B1. Cyclin A was efficiently polyubiquitylated by Cdc20 or Cdh1-activated APC/C in vitro, but in contrast to cyclin B1, the proteolysis of cyclin A was not delayed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. The degradation of cyclin B1 was accelerated by inhibition of the spindle assembly checkpoint. These data suggest that the APC/C is activated as cells enter mitosis and immediately targets cyclin A for degradation, whereas the spindle assembly checkpoint delays the degradation of cyclin B1 until the metaphase to anaphase transition. The "destruction box" (D-box) of cyclin A is 10-20 residues longer than that of cyclin B. Overexpression of wild-type cyclin A delayed the metaphase to anaphase transition, whereas expression of cyclin A mutants lacking a D-box arrested cells in anaphase.

  16. Temporal sensitivity. [time dependent human perception of visual stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1986-01-01

    Human visual temporal sensitivity is examined. The stimuli used to measure temporal sensitivity are described and the linear systems theory is reviewed in terms of temporal sensitivity. A working model which represents temporal sensitivity is proposed. The visibility of a number of temporal wave forms, sinusoids, rectangular pulses, and pulse pairs, is analyzed. The relation between spatial and temporal effects is studied. Temporal variations induced by image motion and the effects of light adaptation on temporal sensitivity are considered.

  17. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benaroch Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective

  18. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies...

  19. A mutation in the FAM36A gene, the human ortholog of COX20, impairs cytochrome c oxidase assembly and is associated with ataxia and muscle hypotonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szklarczyk, Radek; Wanschers, Bas F J; Nijtmans, Leo G; Rodenburg, Richard J; Zschocke, Johannes; Dikow, Nicola; van den Brand, Mariël A M; Hendriks-Franssen, Marthe G M; Gilissen, Christian; Veltman, Joris A; Nooteboom, Marco; Koopman, Werner J H; Willems, Peter H G M; Smeitink, Jan A M; Huynen, Martijn A; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P

    2013-02-15

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) is a multi-subunit enzyme that transfers electrons from cytochrome c to molecular oxygen, yielding water. Its biogenesis requires concerted expression of mitochondria- and nuclear-encoded subunits and assembly factors. In this report, we describe a homozygous missense mutation in FAM36A from a patient who displays ataxia and muscle hypotonia. The FAM36A gene is a remote, putative ortholog of the fungal complex IV assembly factor COX20. Messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein co-expression analyses support the involvement of FAM36A in complex IV function in mammals. The c.154A>C mutation in the FAM36A gene, a mutation that is absent in sequenced exomes, leads to a reduced activity and lower levels of complex IV and its protein subunits. The FAM36A protein is nearly absent in patient's fibroblasts. Cells affected by the mutation accumulate subassemblies of complex IV that contain COX1 but are almost devoid of COX2 protein. We observe co-purification of FAM36A and COX2 proteins, supporting that the FAM36A defect hampers the early step of complex IV assembly at the incorporation of the COX2 subunit. Lentiviral complementation of patient's fibroblasts with wild-type FAM36A increases the complex IV activity as well as the amount of holocomplex IV and of individual subunits. These results establish the function of the human gene FAM36A/COX20 in complex IV assembly and support a causal role of the gene in complex IV deficiency.

  20. Structure of human Fe-S assembly subcomplex reveals unexpected cysteine desulfurase architecture and acyl-ACP-ISD11 interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Seth A; Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Brignole, Edward J; Patra, Shachin; Winge, Dennis R; Drennan, Catherine L; Rutter, Jared; Barondeau, David P

    2017-07-03

    In eukaryotes, sulfur is mobilized for incorporation into multiple biosynthetic pathways by a cysteine desulfurase complex that consists of a catalytic subunit (NFS1), LYR protein (ISD11), and acyl carrier protein (ACP). This NFS1-ISD11-ACP (SDA) complex forms the core of the iron-sulfur (Fe-S) assembly complex and associates with assembly proteins ISCU2, frataxin (FXN), and ferredoxin to synthesize Fe-S clusters. Here we present crystallographic and electron microscopic structures of the SDA complex coupled to enzyme kinetic and cell-based studies to provide structure-function properties of a mitochondrial cysteine desulfurase. Unlike prokaryotic cysteine desulfurases, the SDA structure adopts an unexpected architecture in which a pair of ISD11 subunits form the dimeric core of the SDA complex, which clarifies the critical role of ISD11 in eukaryotic assemblies. The different quaternary structure results in an incompletely formed substrate channel and solvent-exposed pyridoxal 5'-phosphate cofactor and provides a rationale for the allosteric activator function of FXN in eukaryotic systems. The structure also reveals the 4'-phosphopantetheine-conjugated acyl-group of ACP occupies the hydrophobic core of ISD11, explaining the basis of ACP stabilization. The unexpected architecture for the SDA complex provides a framework for understanding interactions with acceptor proteins for sulfur-containing biosynthetic pathways, elucidating mechanistic details of eukaryotic Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, and clarifying how defects in Fe-S cluster assembly lead to diseases such as Friedreich's ataxia. Moreover, our results support a lock-and-key model in which LYR proteins associate with acyl-ACP as a mechanism for fatty acid biosynthesis to coordinate the expression, Fe-S cofactor maturation, and activity of the respiratory complexes.

  1. Trends in puberty timing in humans and environmental modifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toppari, Jorma; Juul, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Secular trends in timing of puberty appear to continue although under-nutrition has not been any longer a limiting factor for pubertal development. Now obesity and other environmental reasons have been suspected to cause this trend, and endocrine disrupting chemicals have become into focus...... as possible contributors. Epidemiological studies on endocrine disrupters are still scarce and show only weak associations between exposures and timing of puberty. Since genetic background explains 50-80% of variability in the timing of puberty, it is not surprising that the observed environmental effects...... are rather modest when individual exposures are assessed. Despite that, some exposures have been reported to be associated to early (e.g., polybrominated biphenyls) or delayed (e.g., lead) puberty. Here we shortly review the available data on recent trends in timing of puberty and the possible role...

  2. Trends in puberty timing in humans and environmental modifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toppari, Jorma; Juul, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Secular trends in timing of puberty appear to continue although under-nutrition has not been any longer a limiting factor for pubertal development. Now obesity and other environmental reasons have been suspected to cause this trend, and endocrine disrupting chemicals have become into focus...... as possible contributors. Epidemiological studies on endocrine disrupters are still scarce and show only weak associations between exposures and timing of puberty. Since genetic background explains 50-80% of variability in the timing of puberty, it is not surprising that the observed environmental effects...... are rather modest when individual exposures are assessed. Despite that, some exposures have been reported to be associated to early (e.g., polybrominated biphenyls) or delayed (e.g., lead) puberty. Here we shortly review the available data on recent trends in timing of puberty and the possible role...

  3. Human Activity Recognition as Time-Series Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyesuk Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a system that can recognize daily human activities with a Kinect-style depth camera. Our system utilizes a set of view-invariant features and the hidden state conditional random field (HCRF model to recognize human activities from the 3D body pose stream provided by MS Kinect API or OpenNI. Many high-level daily activities can be regarded as having a hierarchical structure where multiple subactivities are performed sequentially or iteratively. In order to model effectively these high-level daily activities, we utilized a multiclass HCRF model, which is a kind of probabilistic graphical models. In addition, in order to get view-invariant, but more informative features, we extract joint angles from the subject’s skeleton model and then perform the feature transformation to obtain three different types of features regarding motion, structure, and hand positions. Through various experiments using two different datasets, KAD-30 and CAD-60, the high performance of our system is verified.

  4. Human learning: Power laws or multiple characteristic time scales?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried Mayer-Kress

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The central proposal of A. Newell and Rosenbloom (1981 was that the power law is the ubiquitous law of learning. This proposition is discussed in the context of the key factors that led to the acceptance of the power law as the function of learning. We then outline the principles of an epigenetic landscape framework for considering the role of the characteristic time scales of learning and an approach to system identification of the processes of performance dynamics. In this view, the change of performance over time is the product of a superposition of characteristic exponential time scales that reflect the influence of different processes. This theoretical approach can reproduce the traditional power law of practice – within the experimental resolution of performance data sets - but we hypothesize that this function may prove to be a special and perhaps idealized case of learning.

  5. The Effect on Moderate Altitude UPON Human Gastric Emptying Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-03-01

    physiological aliment . The emptying time, therefore, of a mixture of barium and food may perhaps differ somewhat from that of food alone. Determination of the... psychological stresses a vigorous program of preven- tive psychology had been undertaken as described above. The day prior to his first run each subject was

  6. Moderate superficial hypothermia prolongs bleeding time in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romlin, B; Petruson, K; Nilsson, K

    2007-02-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that mild systemic hypothermia influences platelet adhesion and aggregation and coagulation reactions. We wanted to test the hypothesis that mild local hypothermia in healthy volunteers with preserved core temperature increased bleeding time. A secondary aim was to evaluate if local cooling influenced whole blood coagulation measured by thrombelastograph (TEG) in the same setting. Bleeding time was measured at the left volar forearm at a baseline skin temperature of 32 degrees C and after cooling to 30 degrees C and 28 degrees C in a water bath. Skin temperature was continuously measured by contact thermistors. Measurements of coagulation by TEG were performed at baseline skin temperature before cooling and after cooling to 28 degrees C skin temperature. Tympanic membrane temperature was continuously measured. Compared with baseline, bleeding time was significantly prolonged at 30 degrees C skin temperature and further prolonged at 28 degrees C skin temperature. No significant differences were measured in any of the TEG parameters. During the procedure, tympanic membrane temperature did not change. Lowering the skin temperature from 32 degrees C to 30 degrees C and 28 degrees C with a preserved core temperature more than doubled the bleeding time. Whole blood coagulation measured by TEG was not influenced by the local cooling. In addition to core temperature, local temperature may offer information in understanding the surgical site of bleeding.

  7. Human anti-Aβ IgGs target conformational epitopes on synthetic dimer assemblies and the AD brain-derived peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred T Welzel

    Full Text Available Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ's conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody's nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody's lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted.

  8. Human Anti-Aβ IgGs Target Conformational Epitopes on Synthetic Dimer Assemblies and the AD Brain-Derived Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, Alfred T.; Williams, Angela D.; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Blinder, Veronika; Mably, Alex; Bunk, Sebastian; Hermann, Corinna; Farrell, Michael A.; Ehrlich, Hartmut J.; Schwarz, Hans P.; Walsh, Dominic M.; Solomon, Alan; O’Nuallain, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs) target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ’s conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody’s nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody’s lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted. PMID:23209707

  9. Human anti-Aβ IgGs target conformational epitopes on synthetic dimer assemblies and the AD brain-derived peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, Alfred T; Williams, Angela D; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Blinder, Veronika; Mably, Alex; Bunk, Sebastian; Hermann, Corinna; Farrell, Michael A; Ehrlich, Hartmut J; Schwarz, Hans P; Walsh, Dominic M; Solomon, Alan; O'Nuallain, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs) target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ's conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody's nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody's lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted.

  10. Invited Article: Autonomous assembly of atomically perfect nanostructures using a scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celotta, Robert J., E-mail: robert.celotta@nist.gov, E-mail: joseph.stroscio@nist.gov; Hess, Frank M.; Rutter, Gregory M.; Stroscio, Joseph A., E-mail: robert.celotta@nist.gov, E-mail: joseph.stroscio@nist.gov [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Balakirsky, Stephen B. [Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Fein, Aaron P. [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A major goal of nanotechnology is to develop the capability to arrange matter at will by placing individual atoms at desired locations in a predetermined configuration to build a nanostructure with specific properties or function. The scanning tunneling microscope has demonstrated the ability to arrange the basic building blocks of matter, single atoms, in two-dimensional configurations. An array of various nanostructures has been assembled, which display the quantum mechanics of quantum confined geometries. The level of human interaction needed to physically locate the atom and bring it to the desired location limits this atom assembly technology. Here we report the use of autonomous atom assembly via path planning technology; this allows atomically perfect nanostructures to be assembled without the need for human intervention, resulting in precise constructions in shorter times. We demonstrate autonomous assembly by assembling various quantum confinement geometries using atoms and molecules and describe the benefits of this approach.

  11. Invited Article: Autonomous assembly of atomically perfect nanostructures using a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celotta, Robert J; Balakirsky, Stephen B; Fein, Aaron P; Hess, Frank M; Rutter, Gregory M; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2014-12-01

    A major goal of nanotechnology is to develop the capability to arrange matter at will by placing individual atoms at desired locations in a predetermined configuration to build a nanostructure with specific properties or function. The scanning tunneling microscope has demonstrated the ability to arrange the basic building blocks of matter, single atoms, in two-dimensional configurations. An array of various nanostructures has been assembled, which display the quantum mechanics of quantum confined geometries. The level of human interaction needed to physically locate the atom and bring it to the desired location limits this atom assembly technology. Here we report the use of autonomous atom assembly via path planning technology; this allows atomically perfect nanostructures to be assembled without the need for human intervention, resulting in precise constructions in shorter times. We demonstrate autonomous assembly by assembling various quantum confinement geometries using atoms and molecules and describe the benefits of this approach.

  12. Human-machine Verification of Mining Refuge Chamber's Assembly and Maintenance%矿用救生舱装配与维修人机验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李元斌; 孙有朝; 张燕军

    2013-01-01

    To solve the problem that maintenance quality and maintenance efficiency is not high in the actual operation of the maintenance staff of the mine movable refuge chamber, the human-machine features are analyzed when the refuge chamber is assembled or maintained in the coal mine. The human-machine verification requirements on the accessibility and visibility are proposed. The verifying method of the human-machine features based on CATIA and DELMIA is presented. A certain type of refuge chamber' human-machine features with the method are verified. The accessibility and visibility, collision and interference and work attitude are analyzed in the assembly process. The verifying process and simulating results show the feasibility and effectiveness of the method.%针对矿用可移动式救生舱在实际操作时维修质量和维修效率不高的问题,分析救生舱在煤矿井下装配与维修的人机特性,给出救生舱装配与维修的可达性与可视性等人机性验证要求,提出基于CATIA和DELMIA的救生舱井下装配与维修的人机性验证方法.对救生舱进行装配与维修的人机性验证,对装配的可达性与可视性、碰撞与干涉和作业姿态进行仿真分析.验证过程及仿真结果证明了该方法的有效性与可行性.

  13. VIRUS instrument collimator assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; DePoy, Darren L.; Prochaska, Travis; Allen, Richard D.; Williams, Patrick; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Li, Ting; Nagasawa, Daniel Q.; Akers, Christopher; Baker, David; Boster, Emily; Campbell, Caitlin; Cook, Erika; Elder, Alison; Gary, Alex; Glover, Joseph; James, Michael; Martin, Emily; Meador, Will; Mondrik, Nicholas; Rodriguez-Patino, Marisela; Villanueva, Steven; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah; Vattiat, Brian; Lee, Hanshin; Chonis, Taylor S.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Tacon, Mike

    2014-07-01

    The Visual Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is a baseline array 150 identical fiber fed optical spectrographs designed to support observations for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). The collimator subassemblies of the instrument have been assembled in a production line and are now complete. Here we review the design choices and assembly practices used to produce a suite of identical low-cost spectrographs in a timely fashion using primarily unskilled labor.

  14. Investing in early human development: timing and economic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Orla; Harmon, Colm P; Heckman, James J; Tremblay, Richard E

    2009-03-01

    Policy discussions to ameliorate socioeconomic (SES) inequalities are increasingly focused on investments in early childhood. Yet such interventions are costly to implement, and clear evidence on the optimal time to intervene to yield a high economic and social return in the future is meagre. The majority of successful early childhood interventions start in the preschool years. However socioeconomic gradients in cognitive skills, socio-emotional functioning and health can be observed by age three, suggesting that preventative programmes starting earlier in childhood may be even more effective. We discuss the optimal timing of early childhood intervention with reference to recent research in developmental neuroscience. We motivate the need for early intervention by providing an overview of the impact of adverse risk factors during the antenatal and early childhood periods on outcomes later in life. We provide a brief review of the economic rationale for investing early in life and propose the "antenatal investment hypothesis". We conclude by discussing a suite of new European interventions that will inform this optimal timing debate.

  15. Human HERC5 restricts an early stage of HIV-1 assembly by a mechanism correlating with the ISGylation of Gag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Matthew W

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification and characterization of several interferon (IFN-induced cellular HIV-1 restriction factors, defined as host cellular proteins or factors that restrict or inhibit the HIV-1 life cycle, have provided insight into the IFN response towards HIV-1 infection and identified new therapeutic targets for HIV-1 infection. To further characterize the mechanism underlying restriction of the late stages of HIV-1 replication, we assessed the ability of IFNbeta-induced genes to restrict HIV-1 Gag particle production and have identified a potentially novel host factor called HECT domain and RCC1-like domain-containing protein 5 (HERC5 that blocks a unique late stage of the HIV-1 life cycle. Results HERC5 inhibited the replication of HIV-1 over multiple rounds of infection and was found to target a late stage of HIV-1 particle production. The E3 ligase activity of HERC5 was required for blocking HIV-1 Gag particle production and correlated with the post-translational modification of Gag with ISG15. HERC5 interacted with HIV-1 Gag and did not alter trafficking of HIV-1 Gag to the plasma membrane. Electron microscopy revealed that the assembly of HIV-1 Gag particles was arrested at the plasma membrane, at an early stage of assembly. The mechanism of HERC5-induced restriction of HIV-1 particle production is distinct from the mechanism underlying HIV-1 restriction by the expression of ISG15 alone, which acts at a later step in particle release. Moreover, HERC5 restricted murine leukemia virus (MLV Gag particle production, showing that HERC5 is effective in restricting Gag particle production of an evolutionarily divergent retrovirus. Conclusions HERC5 represents a potential new host factor that blocks an early stage of retroviral Gag particle assembly. With no apparent HIV-1 protein that directly counteracts it, HERC5 may represent a new candidate for HIV/AIDS therapy.

  16. Homocysteine enhances superoxide anion release and NADPH oxidase assembly by human neutrophils. Effects on MAPK activation and neutrophil migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Maqueda, Moisés; El Bekay, Rajaa; Monteseirín, Javier; Alba, Gonzalo; Chacón, Pedro; Vega, Antonio; Santa María, Consuelo; Tejedo, Juan R; Martín-Nieto, José; Bedoya, Francisco J; Pintado, Elisabeth; Sobrino, Francisco

    2004-02-01

    Hyperhomocysteinaemia has recently been recognized as a risk factor of cardiovascular disease. However, the action mechanisms of homocysteine (Hcy) are not well understood. Given that Hcy may be involved in the recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils to the vascular wall, we have investigated the role of Hcy in essential functions of human neutrophils. We show that Hcy increased superoxide anion (O2*-) release by neutrophils to the extracellular medium, and that this effect was inhibited by superoxide dismutase and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase activity. The enzyme from rat peritoneal macrophages displayed a similar response. These effects were accompanied by a time-dependent increased translocation of p47phox and p67phox subunits of NADPH oxidase to the plasma membrane. We also show that Hcy increased intracellular H2O2 production by neutrophils, that Hcy enhanced the activation and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), specifically p38-MAPK and ERK1/2, and that the migration of neutrophils was increased by Hcy. Present results are the first evidence that Hcy enhances the oxidative stress of neutrophils, and underscore the potential role of phagocytic cells in vascular wall injury through O2*- release in hyperhomocysteinaemia conditions.

  17. Structural Analysis of Human Cofilin 2/Filamentous Actin Assemblies: Atomic-Resolution Insights from Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehl, Jenna; Kudryashova, Elena; Reisler, Emil; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Polenova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Cellular actin dynamics is an essential element of numerous cellular processes, such as cell motility, cell division and endocytosis. Actin’s involvement in these processes is mediated by many actin-binding proteins, among which the cofilin family plays unique and essential role in accelerating actin treadmilling in filamentous actin (F-actin) in a nucleotide-state dependent manner. Cofilin preferentially interacts with older filaments by recognizing time-dependent changes in F-actin structure associated with the hydrolysis of ATP and release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the nucleotide cleft of actin. The structure of cofilin on F-actin and the details of the intermolecular interface remain poorly understood at atomic resolution. Here we report atomic-level characterization by magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of the muscle isoform of human cofilin 2 (CFL2) bound to F-actin. We demonstrate that resonance assignments for the majority of atoms are readily accomplished and we derive the intermolecular interface between CFL2 and F-actin. The MAS NMR approach reported here establishes the foundation for atomic-resolution characterization of a broad range of actin-associated proteins bound to F-actin. PMID:28303963

  18. Assembly and Immunogenicity of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Major Capsid Protein ( HPV16 L1 ) in Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a recombinant Pichia pastoris expression system was developed to express HPV16 L1 protein that was driven by a strong AOX1 promoter. HPV16L1 gene was cloned into vector pPICZαB. HPV16 L1 protein expression induced by methanol was screened by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ( SDSPAGE) and Western blotting. The results indicate that the HPV16 L1 protein is secreted by the recombinant P. pastotis, and the purified HPV16 L1 protein can self-assemble into virus-like particles(VLPs), which show a good immunogenicity and induces high-titer antibody in mice.

  19. Fluid resuscitation in human sepsis: Time to rewrite history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Liam; Van Haren, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Fluid resuscitation continues to be recommended as the first-line resuscitative therapy for all patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. The current acceptance of the therapy is based in part on long history and familiarity with its use in the resuscitation of other forms of shock, as well as on an incomplete and incorrect understanding of the pathophysiology of sepsis. Recently, the safety of intravenous fluids in patients with sepsis has been called into question with both prospective and observational data suggesting improved outcomes with less fluid or no fluid. The current evidence for the continued use of fluid resuscitation for sepsis remains contentious with no prospective evidence demonstrating benefit to fluid resuscitation as a therapy in isolation. This article reviews the historical and physiological rationale for the introduction of fluid resuscitation as treatment for sepsis and highlights a number of significant concerns based on current experimental and clinical evidence. The research agenda should focus on the development of hyperdynamic animal sepsis models which more closely mimic human sepsis and on experimental and clinical studies designed to evaluate minimal or no fluid strategies in the resuscitation phase of sepsis.

  20. A new test environment for the SOFIA secondary mirror assembly to reduce the required time for in-flight testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammen, Yannick; Reinacher, Andreas; Brewster, Rick; Greiner, Benjamin; Graf, Friederike; Krabbe, Alfred

    2016-07-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) reached its full operational capability in 2014 and takes off from the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center to explore the universe about three times a week. Maximizing the program's scientific output naturally leaves very little flight time for implementation and test of improved soft- and hardware. Consequently, it is very important to have a comparable test environment and infrastructure to perform troubleshooting, verifications and improvements on ground without interfering with science missions. SOFIA's Secondary Mirror Mechanism is one of the most complex systems of the observatory. In 2012 a first simple laboratory mockup of the mechanism was built to perform basic controller tests in the lower frequency band of up to 50Hz. This was a first step to relocate required engineering tests from the active observatory into the laboratory. However, to test and include accurate filters and damping methods as well as to evaluate hardware modifications a more precise mockup is required that represents the system characteristics over a much larger frequency range. Therefore the mockup has been improved in several steps to a full test environment representing the system dynamics with high accuracy. This new ground equipment allows moving almost the entire secondary mirror test activities away from the observatory. As fast actuator in the optical path, the SMM also plays a major role in SOFIA's pointing stabilization concept. To increase the steering bandwidth, hardware changes are required that ultimately need to be evaluated using the telescope optics. One interesting concept presented in this contribution is the in- stallation of piezo stack actuators between the mirror and the chopping mechanism. First successful baseline tests are presented. An outlook is given about upcoming performance tests of the actively controlled piezo stage with local metrology and optical feedback. To minimize the impact on

  1. Size dependence of the wavefunction of self-assembled InAs quantum dots from time-resolved optical measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Stobbe, Søren; Nikolaev, Ivan S.;

    2008-01-01

    and a theoretical model, we determine the striking dependence of the overlap of the electron and hole wavefunctions on the quantum dot size. We conclude that the optical quality is best for large quantum dots, which is important in order to optimally tailor quantum dot emitters for, e.g., quantum electrodynamics......The radiative and nonradiative decay rates of InAs quantum dots are measured by controlling the local density of optical states near an interface. From time-resolved measurements, we extract the oscillator strength and the quantum efficiency and their dependence on emission energy. From our results...

  2. Time-dependent histamine release from stored human blood products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Edvardsen, L; Vangsgaard, K;

    1996-01-01

    storage. Whole blood (six units), plasma-reduced whole blood (six units), and plasma- and buffy coat-reduced (saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol) (SAGM) blood (six units) from unpaid healthy donors were stored in the blood bank for 35 days at 4 degrees C. Plasma histamine and total cell-bound histamine......Perioperative transfusion of whole blood has been shown to amplify trauma-induced immunosuppression, which could be attenuated by perioperative administration of histamine2 receptor antagonists. Supernatants from different blood products were, therefore, analysed for histamine content during.......0 (range 176.0-910.0) nmol/l in whole blood and 475.0 (range 360.0-1560.0) nmol/l in plasma-reduced whole blood, while it was undetectable in SAGM blood. Spontaneous histamine release increased in a time-dependent manner from a median of 6.7 (range 2.2-17.4) nmol/l at the time of storage to 175.0 (range 33...

  3. Time is on my side: time, general mental ability, human capital, and extrinsic career success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Timothy A; Klinger, Ryan L; Simon, Lauren S

    2010-01-01

    The present study linked general mental ability (GMA) to extrinsic career success using a multilevel framework that included time and 3 possible time-based mediators of the GMA-career success relationship. Results, based on a large national sample, revealed that over a 28-year period, GMA affected growth in 2 indicators of extrinsic career success (income and occupational prestige), such that the careers of high-GMA individuals ascended more steeply over time than those of low-GMA individuals. Part of the reason high-GMA individuals had steeper growth in extrinsic success over time was because they attained more education, completed more job training, and gravitated toward more complex jobs. GMA also moderated the degree to which within-individual variation in the mediating variables affected within-individual variation in extrinsic career success over time: Education, training, and job complexity were much more likely to translate into career success for more intelligent individuals.

  4. The human IL-2 gene promoter can assemble a positioned nucleosome that becomes remodeled upon T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attema, Joanne L; Reeves, Raymond; Murray, Vincent; Levichkin, Ilya; Temple, Mark D; Tremethick, David J; Shannon, M Frances

    2002-09-01

    Controlled production of the cytokine IL-2 plays a key role in the mammalian immune system. Expression from the gene is tightly regulated with no detectable expression in resting T cells and a strong induction following T cell activation. The IL-2 proximal promoter (+1 to -300) contains many well-defined transcriptional activation elements that respond to T cell stimulation. To determine the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of interleukin-2 gene transcription, nucleosome assembly across the IL-2 promoter region was examined using in vitro chromatin reconstitution assays. The IL-2 promoter assembles a nucleosome that is both translationally and rotationally positioned, spanning some of the major functional control elements. The binding of transcription factors to these elements, with the exception of the architectural protein HMGA1, was occluded by the presence of the nucleosome. Analysis of the chromatin architecture of the IL-2 gene in Jurkat T cells provided evidence for the presence of a similarly positioned nucleosome in vivo. The region encompassed by this nucleosome becomes remodeled following activation of Jurkat T cells. These observations suggest that the presence of a positioned nucleosome across the IL-2 proximal promoter may play an important role in maintaining an inactive gene in resting T cells and that remodeling of this nucleosome is important for gene activation.

  5. Time-Varying Total Stiffness Matrix of a Rigid Machine Spindle-Angular Contact Ball Bearings Assembly: Theory and Analytical/Experimental Verifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzi M.A. El-Saeidy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A lagrangian formulation is presented for the total dynamic stiffness and damping matrices of a rigid rotor carrying noncentral rigid disk and supported on angular contact ball bearings (ACBBs. The bearing dynamic stiffness/damping marix is derived in terms of the bearing motions (displacements/rotations and then the principal of virtual work is used to transfer it from the bearing location to the rotor mass center to obtain the total dynamic stiffness/damping matrix. The bearing analyses take into account the bearing nonlinearities, cage rotation and bearing axial preload. The coefficients of these time-dependent matrices are presented analytically. The equations of motion of a rigid rotor-ACBBs assembly are derived using Lagrange's equation. The proposed analyses on deriving the bearing stiffness matrix are verified against existing bearing analyses of SKF researchers that, in turn, were verified using both SKF softwares/experiments and we obtained typical agreements. The presented total stiffness matrix is applied to a typical grinding machine spindle studied experimentally by other researchers and excellent agreements are obtained between our analytical eigenvalues and the experimental ones. The effect of using the total full stiffness matrix versus using the total diagonal stiffness matrix on the natural frequencies and dynamic response of the rigid rotor-bearings system is studied. It is found that using the diagonal matrix affects natural frequencies values (except the axial frequency and response amplitudes and pattern and causes important vibration tones to be missig from the response spectrum. Therefore it is recommended to use the full total stiffness matrix and not the diagonal matrix in the design/vibration analysis of these rotating machines. For a machine spindle-ACBBs assembly under mass unbalnce and a horizontal force at the spindle cutting nose when the bearing time-varying stiffness matrix (bearing cage rotation is considered

  6. Determining Human Clot Lysis Time (in vitro with Plasminogen/Plasmin from Four Species (Human, Bovine, Goat, and Swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omaira Cañas Bermúdez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, including failures in the plasminogen/plasmin system which is an important factor in poor lysis of blood clots. This article studies the fibrinolytic system in four species of mammals, and it identifies human plasminogen with highest thrombolysis efficiency. It examines plasminogen from four species (human, bovine, goat, and swine and identifies the most efficient one in human clot lysis in vitro. All plasminogens were identically purified by affinity chromatography. Human fibrinogen was purified by fractionation with ethanol. The purification of both plasminogen and fibrinogen was characterized by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE (10%. Human clot formation in vitro and its dissolution by plasminogen/plasmin consisted of determining lysis time from clot formation to its dilution. Purification of proteins showed greater than 95% purity, human plasminogen showed greater ability to lyse clot than animal plasminogen. The article concludes that human plasminogen/plasmin has the greatest catalysis and efficiency, as it dissolves human clot up to three times faster than that of irrational species.

  7. Timing of critical genetic changes in human breast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Ellsworth, Darrell L; Deyarmin, Brenda; Hoffman, Laurel R; Love, Brad; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D

    2005-12-01

    Breast cancer development has been characterized as a nonobligatory sequence of histological changes from normal epithelium through invasive malignancy. Although genetic alterations are thought to accumulate stochastically during tumorigenesis, little is known about the timing of critical mutations. This study examined allelic imbalance (AI) in tissue samples representing a continuum of breast cancer development to examine the evolution of genomic instability. Laser-microdissected DNA samples were collected from histologically normal breast specimens (n = 25), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH, n = 16), ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS, n = 37), and stage I to III invasive carcinomas (n = 72). Fifty-two microsatellite markers representing 26 chromosomal regions commonly deleted in breast cancer were used to assess patterns of AI. AI frequencies were .0001). DCIS lesions contain levels of genomic instability that are characteristic of advanced invasive tumors, and this suggests that the biology of a developing carcinoma may already be predetermined by the in situ stage. Observations that levels of AI in ADH lesions are similar to those in disease-free tissues provide a genomic rationale for why prevention strategies at the ADH level are successful and why cases with ADH involving surgical margins do not require further resection.

  8. Real-time monitoring for human clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harker, Y.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-11-01

    On August 3-4, 1994, an INEL team made measurements related to a real-time monitoring system for use on the epithermal beam facility at the BMRR. BNL has installed two fission chambers in front of the beam collimator, which are to monitor the beam coming from the reactor. These two monitors are located with one just above the 16-cm dia. front aperture and the other is just below. The fission chambers contain depleted uranium, but because of the small amount of U-235 present, they respond to thermal and near thermal neutrons rather than fast neutrons. This feature combined with their relatively small size (0.6 cm dia x 4 cm long) makes them very good monitors in the BMRR epithermal neutron beam. The INEL team worked with H.B. Lui (BNL) in performing initial tests of these monitors and established the settings to achieve stable operation. The main purpose of the measurement studies was to establish a basis for a monitoring method that tracks the dose the patient is receiving rather than the neutron fluence being delivered down the beam line.

  9. Effect of annealing and UV-radiation time over micropore architecture of self-assembled block copolymer thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. del C. Pizarro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Block copolymers have been recognized as versatile materials to prepare nanoporous polymer films or membranes, but their potential has not been completely explored. This study focuses on the formation and characterization of nanoporous polymer films based on poly(styrene-block-(methylmethacrylate/methacrylic acid; (PS-b-MMA/MAA were obtained through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP, by using two different protocols: annealing and annealingirradiation; for improving the formation of microporous surface. The composition, crystallinity and structural order of the films were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The film polymer thickness was obtained through very high resolution ellipsometry (VHRE. Finally, atomic force microcopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques were used to detect changes in the porous-structure. These results show that the morphological properties of the block copolymer were affected via the modification of two variables, UV-radiation time and annealing. SEM and AFM micrographs showed that the morphology exhibit a porous ordered structure. Contact angle measurement suggests additional interactions between hydrophilic functional groups that influence the film wettability.

  10. Adaptive changes in the kinetochore architecture facilitate proper spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Valentin; Paul, Raja; Yang, Nachen; Ault, Jeffrey G; O'Connell, Christopher B; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F; Mogilner, Alex; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2015-09-01

    Mitotic spindle formation relies on the stochastic capture of microtubules at kinetochores. Kinetochore architecture affects the efficiency and fidelity of this process with large kinetochores expected to accelerate assembly at the expense of accuracy, and smaller kinetochores to suppress errors at the expense of efficiency. We demonstrate that on mitotic entry, kinetochores in cultured human cells form large crescents that subsequently compact into discrete structures on opposite sides of the centromere. This compaction occurs only after the formation of end-on microtubule attachments. Live-cell microscopy reveals that centromere rotation mediated by lateral kinetochore-microtubule interactions precedes the formation of end-on attachments and kinetochore compaction. Computational analyses of kinetochore expansion-compaction in the context of lateral interactions correctly predict experimentally observed spindle assembly times with reasonable error rates. The computational model suggests that larger kinetochores reduce both errors and assembly times, which can explain the robustness of spindle assembly and the functional significance of enlarged kinetochores.

  11. Proprioceptive reaction times and long-latency reflexes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, C D; Tolhurst, S A; Bawa, P

    2012-08-01

    The stretch of upper limb muscles results in two electromyographic (EMG) peaks, M1 and M2. The amplitude of M2 peak can generally be modified by giving prior instruction to the subject on how to react to the applied perturbation. The unresolved question is whether the amplitude modulation results from change in the gain of the reflex pathway contributing to M2, or by superposition of reaction time (RT) activity. The following study attempted to resolve this question by examining the overlap between proprioceptive RT and M2 activities. Subject's right wrist flexors were stretched, and he/she was instructed either (1) not to intervene (passive task) or (2) to react as fast as possible by simultaneously flexing both wrists (active or compensate task). Under passive and active conditions, M1 and M2 were observed from EMG of right wrist flexors, and during the active condition, RT activities were additionally observed from both sides. The onset and offset of M2 (M1(onset), M2(offset)) were measured from the passive averages, while the RT was measured from the averaged EMG response of the left wrist flexors. For between-subject correlations, the data were divided into two sets: (1) subjects with RT shorter than M2(offset) (fast group) and (2) subjects with RT more than 10 ms longer than their M2(offset) (slow group). Modulation during M2 period was large for the fast group, and it was almost zero for the slow group. These results indicate that the superimposition of RT activity mainly contributes to the instruction-dependent modulation of M2 peak.

  12. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yueyang [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Munger, Karl, E-mail: kmunger@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore-microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the nuclear and mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons.

  13. CCDC39 is required for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex and for normal ciliary motility in humans and dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merveille, Anne-Christine; Davis, Erica E; Becker-Heck, Anita; Legendre, Marie; Amirav, Israel; Bataille, Géraldine; Belmont, John; Beydon, Nicole; Billen, Frédéric; Clément, Annick; Clercx, Cécile; Coste, André; Crosbie, Rachelle; de Blic, Jacques; Deleuze, Stephane; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Escalier, Denise; Escudier, Estelle; Fliegauf, Manfred; Horvath, Judith; Hill, Kent; Jorissen, Mark; Just, Jocelyne; Kispert, Andreas; Lathrop, Mark; Loges, Niki Tomas; Marthin, June K; Momozawa, Yukihide; Montantin, Guy; Nielsen, Kim G; Olbrich, Heike; Papon, Jean-François; Rayet, Isabelle; Roger, Gilles; Schmidts, Miriam; Tenreiro, Henrique; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Zelenika, Diana; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Georges, Michel; Lequarré, Anne-Sophie; Katsanis, Nicholas; Omran, Heymut; Amselem, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited disorder characterized by recurrent infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, reduced fertility in males and situs inversus in about 50% of affected individuals (Kartagener syndrome). It is caused by motility defects in the respiratory cilia that are responsible for airway clearance, the flagella that propel sperm cells and the nodal monocilia that determine left-right asymmetry1. Recessive mutations that cause PCD have been identified in genes encoding components of the outer dynein arms, radial spokes and cytoplasmic pre-assembly factors of axonemal dyneins, but these mutations account for only about 50% of cases of PCD. We exploited the unique properties of dog populations to positionally clone a new PCD gene, CCDC39. We found that loss-of-function mutations in the human ortholog underlie a substantial fraction of PCD cases with axonemal disorganization and abnormal ciliary beating. Functional analyses indicated that CCDC39 localizes to ciliary axonemes and is essential for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex. PMID:21131972

  14. CCDC39 is required for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex and for normal ciliary motility in humans and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merveille, Anne-Christine; Davis, Erica E; Becker-Heck, Anita; Legendre, Marie; Amirav, Israel; Bataille, Géraldine; Belmont, John; Beydon, Nicole; Billen, Frédéric; Clément, Annick; Clercx, Cécile; Coste, André; Crosbie, Rachelle; de Blic, Jacques; Deleuze, Stephane; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Escalier, Denise; Escudier, Estelle; Fliegauf, Manfred; Horvath, Judith; Hill, Kent; Jorissen, Mark; Just, Jocelyne; Kispert, Andreas; Lathrop, Mark; Loges, Niki Tomas; Marthin, June K; Momozawa, Yukihide; Montantin, Guy; Nielsen, Kim G; Olbrich, Heike; Papon, Jean-François; Rayet, Isabelle; Roger, Gilles; Schmidts, Miriam; Tenreiro, Henrique; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Zelenika, Diana; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Georges, Michel; Lequarré, Anne-Sophie; Katsanis, Nicholas; Omran, Heymut; Amselem, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited disorder characterized by recurrent infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, reduced fertility in males and situs inversus in about 50% of affected individuals (Kartagener syndrome). It is caused by motility defects in the respiratory cilia that are responsible for airway clearance, the flagella that propel sperm cells and the nodal monocilia that determine left-right asymmetry. Recessive mutations that cause PCD have been identified in genes encoding components of the outer dynein arms, radial spokes and cytoplasmic pre-assembly factors of axonemal dyneins, but these mutations account for only about 50% of cases of PCD. We exploited the unique properties of dog populations to positionally clone a new PCD gene, CCDC39. We found that loss-of-function mutations in the human ortholog underlie a substantial fraction of PCD cases with axonemal disorganization and abnormal ciliary beating. Functional analyses indicated that CCDC39 localizes to ciliary axonemes and is essential for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex.

  15. Climate processes shape the evolution of populations and species leading to the assembly of modern biotas - examples along a continuum from shallow to deep time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    California experiences droughts, so lets begin with the effects of streamflow variation on population evolution in a coastal lagoon-specialist endangered fish, the tidewater goby. Streamflow controls the closing and opening of lagoons to the sea determining genetic isolation or gene flow. Here evolution is a function of habitat preference for closing lagoons. Other estuarine fishes, with different habitat preferences, differentiate at larger spatial scales in response to longer glacio-eustatic control of estuarine habitat. Species of giraffes in Africa are a puzzle. Why do the ranges of large motile, potentially interbreeding, species occur in contact each other without hybridization? The answer resides in the timing of seasonal precipitation. Although the degree of seaonality of climate does not vary much between species, the timing of precipitation and seasonal "greenup" does. This provides a selective advantage to reproductive isolation, as reproductive timing can be coordinated in each region with seasonal browse availability for lactating females. Convective rainfall in Africa follows the sun and solar intensity is influenced by the precession cycle such that more extensive summer rains fell across the Sahara and South Asia early in the Holocene, this may also contribute to the genetic isolation and speciation of giraffes and others savanna species. But there also appears to be a correlation with rarity (CITES designation) of modern wetland birds, as the dramatic drying of the late Holocene landscape contributes to this conservation concern. Turning back to the West Coast we find the most diverse temperate coastal fauna in the world, yet this diversity evolved and is a relict of diversity accumulation during the apex of upwelling in the late Miocene, driven by the reglaciation of Antarctica. Lastly we can see that the deep-sea evolution is broadly constrained by the transitions from greenhouse to icehouse worlds over the last 90 mya as broad periods of warm

  16. Double loop control strategy with different time steps based on human characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Gwang Min; Lee, Jinoh; Kim, Jung

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a cooperative control strategy in consideration of the force sensitivity of human. The strategy consists of two loops: one is the intention estimation loop whose sampling time can be variable in order to investigate the effect of the sampling time; the other is the position control loop with fixed time step. A high sampling rate is not necessary for the intention estimation loop due to the bandwidth of the mechanoreceptors in humans. In addition, the force sensor implemented in the robot is sensitive to the noise induced from the sensor itself and tremor of the human. Multiple experiments were performed with the experimental protocol using various time steps of the intention estimation loop to find the suitable sampling times in physical human robot interaction. The task involves pull-and-push movement with a two-degree-of-freedom robot, and the norm of the interaction force was obtained for each experiment as the measure of the cooperative control performance.

  17. An Augmented Discrete-Time Approach for Human-Robot Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peidong Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human-robot collaboration (HRC is a key feature to distinguish the new generation of robots from conventional robots. Relevant HRC topics have been extensively investigated recently in academic institutes and companies to improve human and robot interactive performance. Generally, human motor control regulates human motion adaptively to the external environment with safety, compliance, stability, and efficiency. Inspired by this, we propose an augmented approach to make a robot understand human motion behaviors based on human kinematics and human postural impedance adaptation. Human kinematics is identified by geometry kinematics approach to map human arm configuration as well as stiffness index controlled by hand gesture to anthropomorphic arm. While human arm postural stiffness is estimated and calibrated within robot empirical stability region, human motion is captured by employing a geometry vector approach based on Kinect. A biomimetic controller in discrete-time is employed to make Baxter robot arm imitate human arm behaviors based on Baxter robot dynamics. An object moving task is implemented to validate the performance of proposed methods based on Baxter robot simulator. Results show that the proposed approach to HRC is intuitive, stable, efficient, and compliant, which may have various applications in human-robot collaboration scenarios.

  18. Real-time estimation of 3D human arm motion from markerless images for human-machine interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Siddharth; Kofman, Jonathan

    2003-10-01

    Vision-based motion tracking is commonly used in surveillance, human-machine interfaces in robotics and automation, virtual and augmented reality applications and biomechanics. Most techniques require markers, use a predefined motion sequence or user-intervention for initialization, and do not process in real-time. This paper describes the implementation of a vision-based non-invasive technique for markerless real-time tracking of human-arm motion. Human-arm motion is tracked by processing images from two calibrated cameras in real-time to estimate the position of the 3D joint centers of the wrist and elbow, and determine the orientation of the hand from the 3D positions of the index finger and thumb. Tracking of the hand and arm was carried out without any prior knowledge of subject's arm length, texture, width and distance from the camera.

  19. Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry studies of self-assembly of dodecanethiol on a nanoporous gold surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Aly M; Huber, Andreas; Wenclawiak, Bernd W

    2013-03-19

    Preparation of a nanoporous gold surface by dealloying (etching) of a 585 gold plate (58.5% Au, 30% Ag, and 11.5% non-noble metals) was studied by applying acidic and thermal treatment of the gold plate. The gold plate surface was studied before and after the etching process using different analytical techniques like field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyzer (EDX), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). CV analysis of the gold surface has shown that overnight etching with warm nitric acid increases the surface area 20 times higher than before etching. FE-SEM analysis has shown that a nanoporous gold surface with pore diameter ≤100 nm was obtained. SIMS depth profile analysis and EDX analysis have shown that the nanoporous gold surface was obtained as a result of removing the silver and copper from the first layers of the plate. The nanoporous gold surface was used as a substrate for self-assembly of dodecanethiol and has shown a higher extraction efficiency than the unetched gold alloy.

  20. Do monkeys think in metaphors? Representations of space and time in monkeys and humans

    OpenAIRE

    Merritt, D.; Casasanto, D; Brannon, E.

    2010-01-01

    Research on the relationship between the representation of space and time has produced two contrasting proposals. ATOM, posits that space and time are represented via a common magnitude system, suggesting a symmetrical relationship between space and time. According to metaphor theory, however, representations of time depend on representations of space asymmetrically. Previous findings in humans have supported metaphor theory. Here, we investigate the relationship between time and space in a n...

  1. Real Time Detection and Tracking of Human Face using Skin Color Segmentation and Region Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar G.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Real time faces detection and face tracking is one of the challenging problems in application like computer human interaction, video surveillance, biometrics etc. In this paper we are presenting an algorithm for real time face detection and tracking using skin color segmentation and region properties. First segmentation of skin regions from an image is done by using different color models. Skin regions are separated from the image by using thresholding. Then to decide whether these regions contain human face or not we used face features. Our procedure is based on skin color segmentation and human face features (knowledge-based approach. We have used RGB, YCbCr, and HSV color models for skin color segmentation. These color models with thresholds, help to remove non skin like pixel from an image. Each segmented skin regions are tested to know whether region is human face or not, by using human face features based on knowledge of geometrical properties of human face.

  2. 载人航天某装置人机交互式结构优化设计%Structural optimization using human-computer interaction for an aerospace assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊; 刘洪英; 马爱军; 胡清华; 冯雪梅; 石蒙; 董睿; 赵亚雄

    2016-01-01

    To solve the problem of the structural optimization of a complicated structure under dynamic response constraints, a human-computer interaction method is proposed to take the advantages of human and computer in the structural optimization, and it is used in the structural optimization of an aerospace assembly. The assembly, after the structural optimization, exhibits remarkable performance improvement in that the first integral vibration frequency increases 41.1% and the maximal the frequency response acceleration of cared points drops 24.3% under the sinusoidal vibration test load conditions while the mass remains essentially unchanged. The result satisfies the requirement of the optimal design and proves the effectiveness and feasibility of the method.%为了解决复杂结构在动力学响应约束下优化的难题,综合人工以及计算机在复杂结构优化中的优点,提出一种人机交互式优化方法用于载人航天某复杂装置的优化设计。经过结构优化后的装置,在质量保持基本不变的情况下一阶振动频率提升41.1%,正弦试验条件下关心节点的最大加速度响应值减小24.3%,优化效果明显,满足优化设计要求,验证了该优化设计方法的可行、有效。

  3. The human Arp2/3 complex is composed of evolutionarily conserved subunits and is localized to cellular regions of dynamic actin filament assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M D; DePace, A H; Verma, S; Iwamatsu, A; Mitchison, T J

    1997-07-28

    The Arp2/3 protein complex has been implicated in the control of actin polymerization in cells. The human complex consists of seven subunits which include the actin related proteins Arp2 and Arp3, and five others referred to as p41-Arc, p34-Arc, p21-Arc, p20-Arc, and p16-Arc (p omplex). We have determined the predicted amino acid sequence of all seven subunits. Each has homologues in diverse eukaryotes, implying that the structure and function of the complex has been conserved through evolution. Human Arp2 and Arp3 are very similar to family members from other species. p41-Arc is a new member of the Sop2 family of WD (tryptophan and aspartate) repeat-containing proteins and may be posttranslationally modified, suggesting that it may be involved in regulating the activity and/or localization of the complex. p34-Arc, p21-Arc, p20-Arc, and p16-Arc define novel protein families. We sought to evaluate the function of the Arp2/3 complex in cells by determining its intracellular distribution. Arp3, p34-Arc, and p21-Arc were localized to the lamellipodia of stationary and locomoting fibroblasts, as well to Listeria monocytogenes assembled actin tails. They were not detected in cellular bundles of actin filaments. Taken together with the ability of the Arp2/3 complex to induce actin polymerization, these observations suggest that the complex promotes actin assembly in lamellipodia and may participate in lamellipodial protrusion.

  4. Sabot assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bzorgi, Fariborz

    2016-11-08

    A sabot assembly includes a projectile and a housing dimensioned and configured for receiving the projectile. An air pressure cavity having a cavity diameter is disposed between a front end and a rear end of the housing. Air intake nozzles are in fluid communication with the air pressure cavity and each has a nozzle diameter less than the cavity diameter. In operation, air flows through the plurality of air intake nozzles and into the air pressure cavity upon firing of the projectile from a gun barrel to pressurize the air pressure cavity for assisting in separation of the housing from the projectile upon the sabot assembly exiting the gun barrel.

  5. A Cell-Based Self-Assembly Approach for the Production of Human Osseous Tissues from Adipose-Derived Stromal/Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Todd; Clafshenkel, William P; Kawecki, Fabien; Blanckaert, Camille; Labbé, Benoit; Fortin, Michel; Auger, François A; Fradette, Julie

    2017-02-01

    Achieving optimal bone defect repair is a clinical challenge driving intensive research in the field of bone tissue engineering. Many strategies focus on seeding graft materials with progenitor cells prior to in vivo implantation. Given the benefits of closely mimicking tissue structure and function with natural materials, the authors hypothesize that under specific culture conditions, human adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) can solely be used to engineer human reconstructed osseous tissues (hROTs) by undergoing osteoblastic differentiation with concomitant extracellular matrix production and mineralization. Therefore, the authors are developing a self-assembly methodology allowing the production of such osseous tissues. Three-dimensional (3D) tissues reconstructed from osteogenically-induced cell sheets contain abundant collagen type I and are 2.7-fold less contractile compared to non-osteogenically induced tissues. In particular, hROT differentiation and mineralization is reflected by a greater amount of homogenously distributed alkaline phosphatase, as well as higher calcium-containing hydroxyapatite (P tissues. Taken together, these findings show that hASC-driven tissue engineering leads to hROTs that demonstrate structural and functional characteristics similar to native osseous tissue. These highly biomimetic human osseous tissues will advantageously serve as a platform for molecular studies as well as for future therapeutic in vivo translation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human Rod-Zwilch-ZW10 (RZZ) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenfeld, Anika; Wohlgemuth, Sabine; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Vetter, Ingrid R; Musacchio, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors kinetochore-microtubule attachment during mitosis. In metazoans, the three-subunit Rod-Zwilch-ZW10 (RZZ) complex is a crucial SAC component that interacts with additional SAC-activating and SAC-silencing components, including the Mad1-Mad2 complex and cytoplasmic dynein. The RZZ complex contains two copies of each subunit and has a predicted molecular mass of ∼800 kDa. Given the low abundance of the RZZ complex in natural sources, its recombinant reconstitution was attempted by co-expression of its subunits in insect cells. The RZZ complex was purified to homogeneity and subjected to systematic crystallization attempts. Initial crystals containing the entire RZZ complex were obtained using the sitting-drop method and were subjected to optimization to improve the diffraction resolution limit. The crystals belonged to space group P3₁ (No. 144) or P3₂ (No. 145), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 215.45, c = 458.7 Å, α = β = 90.0, γ = 120.0°.

  7. Parallelized short read assembly of large genomes using de Bruijn graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yongchao

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next-generation sequencing technologies have given rise to the explosive increase in DNA sequencing throughput, and have promoted the recent development of de novo short read assemblers. However, existing assemblers require high execution times and a large amount of compute resources to assemble large genomes from quantities of short reads. Results We present PASHA, a parallelized short read assembler using de Bruijn graphs, which takes advantage of hybrid computing architectures consisting of both shared-memory multi-core CPUs and distributed-memory compute clusters to gain efficiency and scalability. Evaluation using three small-scale real paired-end datasets shows that PASHA is able to produce more contiguous high-quality assemblies in shorter time compared to three leading assemblers: Velvet, ABySS and SOAPdenovo. PASHA's scalability for large genome datasets is demonstrated with human genome assembly. Compared to ABySS, PASHA achieves competitive assembly quality with faster execution speed on the same compute resources, yielding an NG50 contig size of 503 with the longest correct contig size of 18,252, and an NG50 scaffold size of 2,294. Moreover, the human assembly is completed in about 21 hours with only modest compute resources. Conclusions Developing parallel assemblers for large genomes has been garnering significant research efforts due to the explosive size growth of high-throughput short read datasets. By employing hybrid parallelism consisting of multi-threading on multi-core CPUs and message passing on compute clusters, PASHA is able to assemble the human genome with high quality and in reasonable time using modest compute resources.

  8. Separating timing, movement conditions and individual differences in the analysis of human movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raket, Lars Lau; Grimme, Britta; Schöner, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    A central task in the analysis of human movement behavior is to determine systematic patterns and differences across experimental conditions, participants and repetitions. This is possible because human movement is highly regular, being constrained by invariance principles. Movement timing......-effects model for analyzing temporally continuous signals that contain systematic effects in both timing and path. Identifiability issues of path relative to timing are overcome by using maximum likelihood estimation in which the most likely separation of space and time is chosen given the variation found...

  9. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....

  10. Assembled microneedle arrays enhance the transport of compounds varying over a large range of molecular weight across human dermatomed skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbaan, F.J.; Bal, S.M.; Berg, van den D.J.; Groenink, W.H.H.; Verpoorten, H.; Luttge, R.; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility to use microneedle arrays manufactured from commercially available 30G hypodermal needles to enhance the transport of compounds up to a molecular weight of 72 kDa. Piercing of human dermatomed skin with microneedle arrays was studied by Trypan Blue stai

  11. Human surfactant protein A2 gene mutations impair dimmer/trimer assembly leading to deficiency in protein sialylation and secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Song

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2 plays an essential role in surfactant metabolism and lung host defense. SP-A2 mutations in the carbohydrate recognition domain have been related to familial pulmonary fibrosis and can lead to a recombinant protein secretion deficiency in vitro. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanism of protein secretion deficiency and the subsequent biological effects in CHO-K1 cells expressing both wild-type and several different mutant forms of SP-A2. We demonstrate that the SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the formation of dimmer/trimer SP-A2 which contributes to the protein secretion defect. A deficiency in sialylation, but not N-linked glycosylation, is critical to the observed dimmer/trimer impairment-induced secretion defect. Furthermore, both mutant forms accumulate in the ER and form NP-40-insoluble aggregates. In addition, the soluble mutant SP-A2 could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway but not the lysosome or autophagy pathway. Intriguingly, 4-phenylbutyrate acid (4-PBA, a chemical chaperone, alleviates aggregate formation and partially rescued the protein secretion of SP-A2 mutants. In conclusion, SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the dimmer/trimer assembly, which contributes to the protein sialylation and secretion deficiency. The intracellular protein mutants could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway and also formed aggregates. The treatment of the cells with 4-PBA resulted in reduced aggregation and rescued the secretion of mutant SP-A2.

  12. Ultrastructural Evidences of Hepatitis B Infection in Human Liver Biopsies Disclose Complex Assembly and Morphogenesis Pathways for Hepatitis B Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Falcon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite of recent advances on acknowledge of hepatitis B virus (HBV structure and biology, little is known about the morphogenesis and release of virions. In this study, the ultrastructural analysis of HBV components in liver biopsies from chronically HBV-infected patients disclosed complex assembly and morphogenesis pathways for HBV. HBV core (HBcAg and surface (HBsAg antigens were specifically identified in all liver biopsies from HVB-infected patients. HBcAg containing core-like particles 24-28 nm in diameter were observed both in nucleus and cytoplasm of hepatocytes. Dane’s-like particles were detected either budding to or into the lumen of ER close to HBsAg containing tubular structures. Besides, Dane’s-like particles were detected in different vesicular compartments resembling multivesicular endosomes. Other kind of enveloped HBV-like particles similar to the previously described cobra-shaped and horn-shaped particles were also observed in hepatocytes. Some of these particles were connected to the vesicle membrane through a stalk 20-22 nm in diameter. On the other hand, spherical subviral particles (SVP were frequently observed in cytoplasmic vesicles. Moreover, a minor proportion of enveloped HBV-like particles budding through the plasma membrane to the extracellular space and bile canaliculi were detected. Interestingly, Dane’s-like particles in the bile canaliculi and entering into ductular-like cells were shown. Strikingly, Dane’s-like particles close to tubular structures and specific immunolabeling for HBcAg both in cytoplasm and nuclei of stellate-like cells were detected. Remarkably, HVB-like particles appeared entering hepatocytes from large cytoplasmic processes of fibrocytes raising the interesting possibility of a cell to cell passage of HBV through direct transcellular migration.

  13. Multivalent Protein Assembly Using Monovalent Self-Assembling Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Petkau-Milroy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Discotic molecules, which self-assemble in water into columnar supramolecular polymers, emerged as an alternative platform for the organization of proteins. Here, a monovalent discotic decorated with one single biotin was synthesized to study the self-assembling multivalency of this system in regard to streptavidin. Next to tetravalent streptavidin, monovalent streptavidin was used to study the protein assembly along the supramolecular polymer in detail without the interference of cross-linking. Upon self-assembly of the monovalent biotinylated discotics, multivalent proteins can be assembled along the supramolecular polymer. The concentration of discotics, which influences the length of the final polymers at the same time dictates the amount of assembled proteins.

  14. Real-Time Human Motion Capture Driven by a Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-zhan Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion of a real object model is reconstructed through measurements of the position, direction, and angle of moving objects in 3D space in a process called “motion capture.” With the development of inertial sensing technology, motion capture systems that are based on inertial sensing have become a research hot spot. However, the solution of motion attitude remains a challenge that restricts the rapid development of motion capture systems. In this study, a human motion capture system based on inertial sensors is developed, and the real-time movement of a human model controlled by real people’s movement is achieved. According to the features of the system of human motion capture and reappearance, a hierarchical modeling approach based on a 3D human body model is proposed. The method collects articular movement data on the basis of rigid body dynamics through a miniature sensor network, controls the human skeleton model, and reproduces human posture according to the features of human articular movement. Finally, the feasibility of the system is validated by testing of system properties via capture of continuous dynamic movement. Experiment results show that the scheme utilizes a real-time sensor network-driven human skeleton model to achieve the accurate reproduction of human motion state. The system also has good application value.

  15. Interferon-γ-induced upregulation of immunoproteasome subunit assembly overcomes bortezomib resistance in human hematological cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite encouraging results with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in the treatment of hematologic malignancies, emergence of resistance can limit its efficacy, hence calling for novel strategies to overcome bortezomib-resistance. We previously showed that bortezomib-resistant human leukemia cell lines expressed significantly lower levels of immunoproteasome at the expense of constitutive proteasomes, which harbored point mutations in exon 2 of the PSMB5 gene encoding the β5 subu...

  16. A time- and cost-effective strategy to sequence mammalian Y Chromosomes: an application to the de novo assembly of gorilla Y

    OpenAIRE

    Tomaszkiewicz, Marta; Rangavittal, Samarth; Cechova, Monika; Sanchez, Rebeca Campos; Fescemyer, Howard W.; Harris, Robert; Ye, Danling; O'Brien, Patricia C.M.; Chikhi, Rayan; Ryder, Oliver A; Malcolm A Ferguson-Smith; Medvedev, Paul; Makova, Kateryna D.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian Y Chromosome sequence, critical for studying male fertility and dispersal, is enriched in repeats and palindromes, and thus, is the most difficult component of the genome to assemble. Previously, expensive and labor-intensive BAC-based techniques were used to sequence the Y for a handful of mammalian species. Here, we present a much faster and more affordable strategy for sequencing and assembling mammalian Y Chromosomes of sufficient quality for most comparative genomics analys...

  17. Time to smell: a cascade model of human olfactory perception based on response-time (RT) measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Jonas K

    2014-01-01

    The timing of olfactory behavioral decisions may provide an important source of information about how the human olfactory-perceptual system is organized. This review integrates results from olfactory response-time (RT) measurements from a perspective of mental chronometry. Based on these findings, a new cascade model of human olfaction is presented. Results show that main perceptual decisions are executed with high accuracy within about 1~s of sniff onset. The cascade model proposes the existence of distinct processing stages within this brief time-window. According to the cascade model, different perceptual features become accessible to the perceiver at different time-points, and the output of earlier processing stages provides the input for later processing stages. The olfactory cascade starts with detecting the odor, which is followed by establishing an odor object. The odor object, in turn, triggers systems for determining odor valence and edibility. Evidence for the cascade model comes from studies showing that RTs for odor valence and edibility assessment are predicted by the shorter RTs needed to establish the odor object. Challenges for future research include innovative task designs for olfactory RT experiments and the integration of the behavioral processing sequence into the underlying cortical processes using complementary RT measures and neuroimaging methods.

  18. Three-Dimensional Human Bronchial-Tracheal Epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies (TLAs) as Hosts For Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suderman, M. T.; McCarthy, M.; Mossell, E.; Watts, D. M.; Peters, C. J.; Shope, R.; Goodwin, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) tissue-like assembly (TLA) of human bronchial-tracheal mesenchymal (HBTC) cells with an overlay of human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells was constructed using a NASA Bioreactor to survey the infectivity of SARS-CoV. This TLA was inoculated with a low passage number Urbani strain of SARS-CoV. At selected intervals over a 10-day period, media and cell aliquots of the 3-D TLA were harvested for viral titer assay and for light and electron microscopy examination. All viral titer assays were negative in both BEAS-2B two-dimensional monolayer and TLA. Light microscopy immunohistochemistry demonstrated antigen-antibody reactivity with anti-SARS-CoV polyclonal antibody to spike and nuclear proteins on cell membranes and cytoplasm. Coronavirus Group 2 cross-reactivity was demonstrated by positive reaction to anti-FIPV 1 and anti-FIPV 1 and 2 antibodies. TLA examination by transmission electron microscopy indicated increasing cytoplasmic vacuolation with numerous electron-dense bodies measuring 45 to 270 nm from days 4 through 10. There was no evidence of membrane blebbing, membrane duplication, or fragmentation of organelles in the TLAs. However, progressive disruption of endoplasmic reticulum was observed throughout the cells. Antibody response to SARS-CoV specific spike and nucleocapsid glycoproteins, cross-reactivity with FIPV antibodies, and the cytoplasmic pathology suggests this HBTE TLA model is permissive to SARS-CoV infection.

  19. Seismic behaviour of fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Heuy Gap; Jhung, Myung Jo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-01

    A general approach for the dynamic time-history analysis of the reactor core is presented in this paper as a part of the fuel assembly qualification program. Several detailed core models are set up to reflect the placement of the fuel assemblies within the core shroud. Peak horizontal responses are obtained for each model for the motions induced from earthquake. The dynamic responses such as fuel assembly shear force, bending moment and displacement, and spacer grid impact loads are carefully investigated. Also, the sensitivity responses are obtained for the earthquake motions and the fuel assembly non-linear response characteristics are discussed. (Author) 9 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Treaties over Time and Human Rights: A Case Law Analysis of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique Arévalo Narváez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the issue of treaties over time and the interpretations of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in this context. Parts 1 and 2 introduce the elements of treaty interpretation in general international law, providing criteria for the application of the evolutionary approach to treaty interpretation, the debate between the application of evolutive interpretation and the use of subsequent conduct. Part 3 addresses the issue of fragmentation in international human rights law, and through the case law of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, provides  evidence for the application of the rules of general international law to interpret the American Convention on Human Rights. Finally, conclusions are extracted on the basis of the case law analyzed, contrasting the Court’s application of the American Convention over time, the conclusions of the International Law Commission Reports on the Fragmentation of International Law in 2008, and the preliminary conclusions of the Study Group on Subsequent Agreements and Subsequent Practice concerning treaty interpretation and the issue of the passage of time.

  1. Dual Extended Kalman Filter for the Identification of Time-Varying Human Manual Control Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, Alexandru; Zaal, Peter M. T.; Pool, Daan M.

    2017-01-01

    A Dual Extended Kalman Filter was implemented for the identification of time-varying human manual control behavior. Two filters that run concurrently were used, a state filter that estimates the equalization dynamics, and a parameter filter that estimates the neuromuscular parameters and time delay. Time-varying parameters were modeled as a random walk. The filter successfully estimated time-varying human control behavior in both simulated and experimental data. Simple guidelines are proposed for the tuning of the process and measurement covariance matrices and the initial parameter estimates. The tuning was performed on simulation data, and when applied on experimental data, only an increase in measurement process noise power was required in order for the filter to converge and estimate all parameters. A sensitivity analysis to initial parameter estimates showed that the filter is more sensitive to poor initial choices of neuromuscular parameters than equalization parameters, and bad choices for initial parameters can result in divergence, slow convergence, or parameter estimates that do not have a real physical interpretation. The promising results when applied to experimental data, together with its simple tuning and low dimension of the state-space, make the use of the Dual Extended Kalman Filter a viable option for identifying time-varying human control parameters in manual tracking tasks, which could be used in real-time human state monitoring and adaptive human-vehicle haptic interfaces.

  2. Mental time travel : A conceptual overview of social psychological perspectives on a fundamental human capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epstude, K.; Peetz, J.

    Humans have the unique capacity to mentally travel through time, that is, to reflect on the past, anticipate the future, and construct alternate realities in their minds. The ability to mentally travel through time affects a variety of social psychological topics. Representations of events can

  3. Mental time travel : A conceptual overview of social psychological perspectives on a fundamental human capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epstude, K.; Peetz, J.

    2012-01-01

    Humans have the unique capacity to mentally travel through time, that is, to reflect on the past, anticipate the future, and construct alternate realities in their minds. The ability to mentally travel through time affects a variety of social psychological topics. Representations of events can diffe

  4. Homo-trimeric Structure of the Type IVb Minor Pilin CofB Suggests Mechanism of CFA/III Pilus Assembly in Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Oki, Hiroya; Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Takuya; Imai, Tomoya; Maruno, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Motooka, Daisuke; Iida, Tetsuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Nakamura, Shota

    2016-03-27

    In gram-negative bacteria, the assembly of type IV pilus (T4P) and the evolutionally related pseudopilus of type II secretion system involves specialized structural proteins called pilins and pseudopilins, respectively, and is dynamically regulated to promote bacterial pathogenesis. Previous studies have suggested that a structural "tip"-like hetero-complex formed through the interaction of at least three minor (pseudo) pilins plays an important role in this process, while some members of the pathogenic type IVb subfamily are known to have only one such minor pilin subunit whose function is still unknown. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the type IVb minor pilin CofB of colonization factor antigen/III from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli at 1.88-Å resolution. The crystal structure, in conjunction with physicochemical analysis in solution, reveals a symmetrical homo-trimeric arrangement distinct from the hetero-complexes of minor (pseudo) pilins observed in other T4P and type II secretion systems. Each CofB monomer adopts a unique three-domain architecture, in which the C-terminal β-sheet-rich lectin domain can effectively initiate trimer association of its pilin-like N-terminal domain through extensive hydrophobic interactions followed by domain swapping at the central hinge-like domain. Deletion of cofB produces a phenotype with no detectable pili formation on the cell surface, while molecular modeling indicates that the characteristic homo-trimeric structure of CofB is well situated at the pilus tip of colonization factor antigen/III formed by the major pilin CofA, suggesting a role for the minor pilin in the efficient initiation of T4P assembly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A framework for geometric reasoning about tools in assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    When assembling a product, humans, robots, and other automation employ a variety of tools to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper proposes a framework lo represent and reason about geometric accessibility constraints for a wide variety of assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, we present more efficient methods lo integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method preprocesses a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. We describe experiments with an initial implementation of the framework and a library of seven tools.

  6. De Novo Assembly of Human Herpes Virus Type 1 (HHV-1) Genome, Mining of Non-Canonical Structures and Detection of Novel Drug-Resistance Mutations Using Short- and Long-Read Next Generation Sequencing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamitros, Timokratis; Harrison, Ian; Piorkowska, Renata; Katzourakis, Aris; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Mbisa, Jean Lutamyo

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus type 1 (HHV-1) has a large double-stranded DNA genome of approximately 152 kbp that is structurally complex and GC-rich. This makes the assembly of HHV-1 whole genomes from short-read sequencing data technically challenging. To improve the assembly of HHV-1 genomes we have employed a hybrid genome assembly protocol using data from two sequencing technologies: the short-read Roche 454 and the long-read Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencers. We sequenced 18 HHV-1 cell culture-isolated clinical specimens collected from immunocompromised patients undergoing antiviral therapy. The susceptibility of the samples to several antivirals was determined by plaque reduction assay. Hybrid genome assembly resulted in a decrease in the number of contigs in 6 out of 7 samples and an increase in N(G)50 and N(G)75 of all 7 samples sequenced by both technologies. The approach also enhanced the detection of non-canonical contigs including a rearrangement between the unique (UL) and repeat (T/IRL) sequence regions of one sample that was not detectable by assembly of 454 reads alone. We detected several known and novel resistance-associated mutations in UL23 and UL30 genes. Genome-wide genetic variability ranged from assembly of accurate, full-length HHV-1 genomes will be useful in determining genetic determinants of drug resistance, virulence, pathogenesis and viral evolution. The numerous, complex repeat regions of the HHV-1 genome currently remain a barrier towards this goal.

  7. The Bicycle Assembly Line Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    "The Bicycle Assembly Line Game" is a team-based, in-class activity that helps students develop a basic understanding of continuously operating processes. Each team of 7-10 students selects one of seven prefigured bicycle assembly lines to operate. The lines are run in real-time, and the team that operates the line that yields the…

  8. The Bicycle Assembly Line Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    "The Bicycle Assembly Line Game" is a team-based, in-class activity that helps students develop a basic understanding of continuously operating processes. Each team of 7-10 students selects one of seven prefigured bicycle assembly lines to operate. The lines are run in real-time, and the team that operates the line that yields the…

  9. Dump assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough.

  10. [Study on real-time wearable monitoring system for human heat and cold stresses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuhong; Wang, Tianhao; Li, Chenming

    2013-02-01

    In order to study the way of evaluating human performance under heat and cold stresses, we developed a wearable physiological monitoring system-intelligent belt system, capable of providing real-time, continuous and dynamic monitoring of multiple physiological parameters. The system has following features: multiuser communication, high integration, strong environment adaptability, dynamic features and real time physiological monitoring ability. The system uses sensing belts and elastic belts to acquire physiological parameters, uses WIFI to build wireless network monitoring for multiuser, and uses Delphi to develop data processing software capable of real-time viewing, storagng, processing, and alerting. With four different intensity-activity trials on six subjects and compared with standard laboratory human physiological acquisition instruments, the system was proved to be able to acquire accu-rate physiological parameters such as ECG, respiration, multi-point body temperatures, and body movement. The system worked steadily and reliably. This wearable real-time monitoring system for human heat and cold stresses can solve the problem facing our country that human heat stress and cold stress monitoring technology is insufficient, provide new methods and new ways for monitoring and evaluation of human heat and cold stresses under real task or stress environment, and provide technical platform for the study on human ergonomics.

  11. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  12. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  13. Time-invariant person-specific frequency templates in human brain activity

    CERN Document Server

    Doron, I; Baruchi, I; Towle, V L; Ben-Jacob, E; Doron, Itai; Hulata, Eyal; Baruchi, Itay; Towle, Vernon L.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2006-01-01

    The various human brain tasks are performed at different locations and time scales. Yet, we discovered the existence of time-invariant (above an essential time scale) partitioning of the brain activity into person-specific frequency bands. For that, we perform temporal and ensemble averaging of best wavelet packet bases from multi-electrode EEG recordings. These personal frequency-bands provide new templates for quantitative analyses of brain function, e.g., normal vs. epileptic activity.

  14. Assembly Sequence Planning for Mechanical Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A method for assembly sequence planning is proposed in this paper. First, two methods for assembly sequence planning are compared, which are indirect method and direct method. Then, the limits of the previous assembly planning system are pointed out. On the basis of indirect method, an improved method for assembly sequence planning is put forward. This method is composed of four parts, which are assembly modeling for products, assembly sequence representing, assembly sequence planning, and evaluation and optimization. The assembly model is established by human machine interaction, and the assembly model contains components' information and the assembly relation among the components. The assembly sequence planning is based on the breaking up of the assembly model. And/or graph is used to represent assembly sequence set. Every component which satisfies the disassembly condition is recorded as a node of an and/or graph. After the disassembly sequence and/or graph is generated, heuristic algorithm - AO* algorithm is used to search the disassembly sequence and/or graph, and the optimum assembly sequence planning is realized. This method is proved to be effective in a prototype system which is a sub-project of a state 863/CIMS research project of China - ‘Concurrent Engineering’.

  15. Plasticity of the intrinsic period of the human circadian timing system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A J L Scheer

    Full Text Available Human expeditions to Mars will require adaptation to the 24.65-h Martian solar day-night cycle (sol, which is outside the range of entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker under lighting intensities to which astronauts are typically exposed. Failure to entrain the circadian time-keeping system to the desired rest-activity cycle disturbs sleep and impairs cognitive function. Furthermore, differences between the intrinsic circadian period and Earth's 24-h light-dark cycle underlie human circadian rhythm sleep disorders, such as advanced sleep phase disorder and non-24-hour sleep-wake disorders. Therefore, first, we tested whether exposure to a model-based lighting regimen would entrain the human circadian pacemaker at a normal phase angle to the 24.65-h Martian sol and to the 23.5-h day length often required of astronauts during short duration space exploration. Second, we tested here whether such prior entrainment to non-24-h light-dark cycles would lead to subsequent modification of the intrinsic period of the human circadian timing system. Here we show that exposure to moderately bright light ( approximately 450 lux; approximately 1.2 W/m(2 for the second or first half of the scheduled wake episode is effective for entraining individuals to the 24.65-h Martian sol and a 23.5-h day length, respectively. Estimations of the circadian periods of plasma melatonin, plasma cortisol, and core body temperature rhythms collected under forced desynchrony protocols revealed that the intrinsic circadian period of the human circadian pacemaker was significantly longer following entrainment to the Martian sol as compared to following entrainment to the 23.5-h day. The latter finding of after-effects of entrainment reveals for the first time plasticity of the period of the human circadian timing system. Both findings have important implications for the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders and human space exploration.

  16. Multiscale Modeling of Human-Water Interactions: The Role of Time-Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloeschl, G.; Sivapalan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the interest in hydrological modeling in the past decades revolved around resolving spatial variability. With the rapid changes brought about by human impacts on the hydrologic cycle, there is now an increasing need to refocus on time dependency. We present a co-evolutionary view of hydrologic systems, in which every part of the system including human systems, co-evolve, albeit at different rates. The resulting coupled human-nature system is framed as a dynamical system, characterized by interactions of fast and slow time scales and feedbacks between environmental and social processes. This gives rise to emergent phenomena such as the levee effect, adaptation to change and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system in a dynamic way. The co-evolutionary approach differs from the traditional view of water resource systems analysis as it allows for path dependence, multiple equilibria, lock-in situations and emergent phenomena. The approach may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesise the observed dynamics of different case studies. Future research opportunities include the study of how changes in human values are connected to human-water interactions, historical analyses of trajectories of system co-evolution in individual places and comparative analyses of contrasting human-water systems in different climate and socio-economic settings. Reference Sivapalan, M. and G. Blöschl (2015) Time Scale Interactions and the Co-evolution of Humans and Water. Water Resour. Res., 51, in press.

  17. Remote detection of human toxicants in real time using a human-optimized, bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette bioreporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan; Webb, James; Ripp, Steven; Patterson, Stacey; Sayler, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, human toxicant bioavailability screening has been forced to proceed in either a high throughput fashion using prokaryotic or lower eukaryotic targets with minimal applicability to humans, or in a more expensive, lower throughput manner that uses fluorescent or bioluminescent human cells to directly provide human bioavailability data. While these efforts are often sufficient for basic scientific research, they prevent the rapid and remote identification of potentially toxic chemicals required for modern biosecurity applications. To merge the advantages of high throughput, low cost screening regimens with the direct bioavailability assessment of human cell line use, we re-engineered the bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette to function autonomously (without exogenous stimulation) within human cells. Optimized cassette expression provides for fully endogenous bioluminescent production, allowing continuous, real time monitoring of the bioavailability and toxicology of various compounds in an automated fashion. To access the functionality of this system, two sets of bioluminescent human cells were developed. The first was programed to suspend bioluminescent production upon toxicological challenge to mimic the non-specific detection of a toxicant. The second induced bioluminescence upon detection of a specific compound to demonstrate autonomous remote target identification. These cells were capable of responding to μM concentrations of the toxicant n-decanal, and allowed for continuous monitoring of cellular health throughout the treatment process. Induced bioluminescence was generated through treatment with doxycycline and was detectable upon dosage at a 100 ng/ml concentration. These results demonstrate that leveraging autonomous bioluminescence allows for low-cost, high throughput direct assessment of toxicant bioavailability.

  18. Domesticated animals and human infectious diseases of zoonotic origins: domestication time matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, Serge; McIntyre, K Marie; Baylis, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    The rate of emergence for emerging infectious diseases has increased dramatically over the last century, and research findings have implicated wildlife as an importance source of novel pathogens. However, the role played by domestic animals as amplifiers of pathogens emerging from the wild could also be significant, influencing the human infectious disease transmission cycle. The impact of domestic hosts on human disease emergence should therefore be ascertained. Here, using three independent datasets we showed positive relationships between the time since domestication of the major domesticated mammals and the total number of parasites or infectious diseases they shared with humans. We used network analysis, to better visualize the overall interactions between humans and domestic animals (and amongst animals) and estimate which hosts are potential sources of parasites/pathogens for humans (and for all other hosts) by investigating the network architecture. We used centrality, a measure of the connection amongst each host species (humans and domestic animals) in the network, through the sharing of parasites/pathogens, where a central host (i.e. high value of centrality) is the one that is infected by many parasites/pathogens that infect many other hosts in the network. We showed that domesticated hosts that were associated a long time ago with humans are also the central ones in the network and those that favor parasites/pathogens transmission not only to humans but also to all other domesticated animals. These results urge further investigation of the diversity and origin of the infectious diseases of domesticated animals in their domestication centres and the dispersal routes associated with human activities. Such work may help us to better understand how domesticated animals have bridged the epidemiological gap between humans and wildlife.

  19. The Human Placenta Project: placental structure, development, and function in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmacher, A E; Maddox, Y T; Spong, C Y

    2014-05-01

    Despite its crucial role in the health of both the fetus and the pregnant woman, the placenta is the least understood human organ. Since a growing body of evidence also underscores the importance of placental development in the lifelong health of both mother and offspring, this lack of knowledge about placental structure and function is particularly concerning. Given modern approaches and technologies and the ability to develop new methods, we propose a coordinated "Human Placenta Project", with the ultimate goal of understanding human placental structure, development, and function in real time.

  20. The Human Placenta Project: Placental Structure, Development, and Function in Real Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmacher, Alan E.; Maddox, Yvonne T.; Spong, Catherine Y.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its crucial role in the health of both the fetus and the pregnant woman, the placenta is the least understood human organ. Since a growing body of evidence also underscores the importance of placental development in the lifelong health of both mother and offspring, this lack of knowledge about placental structure and function is particularly concerning. Given modern approaches and technologies and the ability to develop new methods, we propose a coordinated “Human Placenta Project,” with the ultimate goal of understanding human placental structure, development, and function in real time. PMID:24661567

  1. Real-time multiple human perception with color-depth cameras on a mobile robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Reardon, Christopher; Parker, Lynne E

    2013-10-01

    The ability to perceive humans is an essential requirement for safe and efficient human-robot interaction. In real-world applications, the need for a robot to interact in real time with multiple humans in a dynamic, 3-D environment presents a significant challenge. The recent availability of commercial color-depth cameras allow for the creation of a system that makes use of the depth dimension, thus enabling a robot to observe its environment and perceive in the 3-D space. Here we present a system for 3-D multiple human perception in real time from a moving robot equipped with a color-depth camera and a consumer-grade computer. Our approach reduces computation time to achieve real-time performance through a unique combination of new ideas and established techniques. We remove the ground and ceiling planes from the 3-D point cloud input to separate candidate point clusters. We introduce the novel information concept, depth of interest, which we use to identify candidates for detection, and that avoids the computationally expensive scanning-window methods of other approaches. We utilize a cascade of detectors to distinguish humans from objects, in which we make intelligent reuse of intermediary features in successive detectors to improve computation. Because of the high computational cost of some methods, we represent our candidate tracking algorithm with a decision directed acyclic graph, which allows us to use the most computationally intense techniques only where necessary. We detail the successful implementation of our novel approach on a mobile robot and examine its performance in scenarios with real-world challenges, including occlusion, robot motion, nonupright humans, humans leaving and reentering the field of view (i.e., the reidentification challenge), human-object and human-human interaction. We conclude with the observation that the incorporation of the depth information, together with the use of modern techniques in new ways, we are able to create an

  2. Feature integration with random forests for real-time human activity recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hirokatsu; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi; Aoki, Yoshimitsu

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an approach for real-time human activity recognition. Three different kinds of features (flow, shape, and a keypoint-based feature) are applied in activity recognition. We use random forests for feature integration and activity classification. A forest is created at each feature that performs as a weak classifier. The international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) proposed by WHO is applied in order to set the novel definition in activity recognition. Experiments on human activity recognition using the proposed framework show - 99.2% (Weizmann action dataset), 95.5% (KTH human actions dataset), and 54.6% (UCF50 dataset) recognition accuracy with a real-time processing speed. The feature integration and activity-class definition allow us to accomplish high-accuracy recognition match for the state-of-the-art in real-time.

  3. Human factors in continuous time-concerned cooperative systems represented by NΣ-labeled calculus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tetsuya MIZUTANI; Shigeru IGARASH; Masayuki SHIO; Yasuwo IKEDA

    2008-01-01

    N-E-labeled calculus is a generalization of N-labeled calculus so as to describe time-concerned recog-nition, knowledge, belief and decision of humans or com-puter programs together with related external physical or logical phenomena. N-labeled calculus is the smallest for-mal system applicable to verification and analysis of coop-erative real-timing systems on natural number time introduced as an adaptation of tense arithmetic (TA). A merging problem of vehicles with misunderstanding or incorrect recognition is discussed as an example of coop-erating systems controlling continuously changing objects including human factor. Euler's approximation is intro-duced in order to represent the continuously changing objects. Through this example, relationship among arti-ficial intelligence, external environment and human fac-tors is investigated.

  4. Terbium to Quantum Dot FRET Bioconjugates for Clinical Diagnostics: Influence of Human Plasma on Optical and Assembly Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    portion should form a short alpha-helix around the alanines which are then disrupted at each side by the glycines ; this motif serves as a short...donor decay curves from an almost mono-exponential behavior (with max . 10% of a shorter time component) for LTC alone to a multi-exponential shape...copper, cobalt, manganese , iron and especially zinc. The binding is a result of the sharing of electron density between histidine’s imidazole

  5. WiFi-Based Real-Time Calibration-Free Passive Human Motion Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liangyi; Yang, Wu; Man, Dapeng; Dong, Guozhong; Yu, Miao; Lv, Jiguang

    2015-12-21

    With the rapid development of WLAN technology, wireless device-free passive human detection becomes a newly-developing technique and holds more potential to worldwide and ubiquitous smart applications. Recently, indoor fine-grained device-free passive human motion detection based on the PHY layer information is rapidly developed. Previous wireless device-free passive human detection systems either rely on deploying specialized systems with dense transmitter-receiver links or elaborate off-line training process, which blocks rapid deployment and weakens system robustness. In the paper, we explore to research a novel fine-grained real-time calibration-free device-free passive human motion via physical layer information, which is independent of indoor scenarios and needs no prior-calibration and normal profile. We investigate sensitivities of amplitude and phase to human motion, and discover that phase feature is more sensitive to human motion, especially to slow human motion. Aiming at lightweight and robust device-free passive human motion detection, we develop two novel and practical schemes: short-term averaged variance ratio (SVR) and long-term averaged variance ratio (LVR). We realize system design with commercial WiFi devices and evaluate it in typical multipath-rich indoor scenarios. As demonstrated in the experiments, our approach can achieve a high detection rate and low false positive rate.

  6. An evolutionary genomic approach to identify genes involved in human birth timing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevon Plunkett

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Coordination of fetal maturation with birth timing is essential for mammalian reproduction. In humans, preterm birth is a disorder of profound global health significance. The signals initiating parturition in humans have remained elusive, due to divergence in physiological mechanisms between humans and model organisms typically studied. Because of relatively large human head size and narrow birth canal cross-sectional area compared to other primates, we hypothesized that genes involved in parturition would display accelerated evolution along the human and/or higher primate phylogenetic lineages to decrease the length of gestation and promote delivery of a smaller fetus that transits the birth canal more readily. Further, we tested whether current variation in such accelerated genes contributes to preterm birth risk. Evidence from allometric scaling of gestational age suggests human gestation has been shortened relative to other primates. Consistent with our hypothesis, many genes involved in reproduction show human acceleration in their coding or adjacent noncoding regions. We screened >8,400 SNPs in 150 human accelerated genes in 165 Finnish preterm and 163 control mothers for association with preterm birth. In this cohort, the most significant association was in FSHR, and 8 of the 10 most significant SNPs were in this gene. Further evidence for association of a linkage disequilibrium block of SNPs in FSHR, rs11686474, rs11680730, rs12473870, and rs1247381 was found in African Americans. By considering human acceleration, we identified a novel gene that may be associated with preterm birth, FSHR. We anticipate other human accelerated genes will similarly be associated with preterm birth risk and elucidate essential pathways for human parturition.

  7. Dating the time of birth: a radiocarbon calibration curve for human eye lens crystallines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Henrik; Heinemeier, Jan; Heegaard, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon bomb-pulse dating has been used to measure the formation age of human eye-lens crystallines. Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye-lens that consist of virtually inert tissue. The experimental data show that the radiocarbon ages to a large extent reflect the time of birth......, in accordance with expectations. Moreover, it has been possible to develop an age model for the formation of the eye-lens crystallines. From this model a radiocarbon calibration curve for lens crystallines has been calculated. As a consequence, the time of birth of humans can be determined with an accuracy...

  8. A human genotyping trial to estimate the post-feeding time from mosquito blood meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshige, Yuuji; Hara, Masaaki; Nagai, Atsushi; Hikitsuchi, Tomoyuki; Umeda, Mitsuo; Kawajiri, Yumi; Nakayama, Koji; Suzuki, Koichi; Takada, Aya; Ishii, Akira; Yamamoto, Toshimichi

    2017-01-01

    Mosquitoes occur almost worldwide, and females of some species feed on blood from humans and other animals to support ovum maturation. In warm and hot seasons, such as the summer in Japan, fed mosquitoes are often observed at crime scenes. The current study attempted to estimate the time that elapsed since feeding from the degree of human DNA digestion in mosquito blood meals and also to identify the individual human sources of the DNA using genotyping in two species of mosquito: Culex pipiens pallens and Aedes albopictus. After stereomicroscopic observation, the extracted DNA samples were quantified using a human DNA quantification and quality control kit and were genotyped for 15 short tandem repeats using a commercial multiplexing kit. It took about 3 days for the complete digestion of a blood meal, and genotyping was possible until 2 days post-feeding. The relative peak heights of the 15 STRs and DNA concentrations were useful for estimating the post-feeding time to approximately half a day between 0 and 2 days. Furthermore, the quantitative ratios derived from STR peak heights and the quality control kit (Q129/Q41, Q305/Q41, and Q305/Q129) were reasonably effective for estimating the approximate post-feeding time after 2-3 days. We suggest that this study may be very useful for estimating the time since a mosquito fed from blood meal DNA, although further refinements are necessary to estimate the times more accurately.

  9. SERS study of different configurations of pharmaceutical and natural product molecules ginsenoside Rg3 under the interaction with human serum albumin on simple self-assembled substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Bai, Xueyuan; Wang, Yingping; Zhao, Bing; Zhao, Yu; Hou, Wei; Jin, Yinping; Zhao, Daqing

    2014-01-03

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescence spectroscopy were employed to probe the interaction of the pharmaceutical and natural product molecules, 20(R) and 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3, with human serum albumin (HSA). Normal Raman spectra of 20(R) and 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3 were obtained from solid powder on glass slide. Based on the splitting peaks near 1440 cm(-1), the stacking modes of 20(R) and 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3 were quite different. SERS spectra of both R and S configurations were obtained from a colloidal silver surface on a self-assembled SERS substrate, the most enhanced modes of 20(R) and 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3 were those with certain motions perpendicular to the metal surface. The SERS spectra were used to predict a common orientation geometry for the alkyl chain portion of the drugs on the colloidal surface with a minor difference in the carbocyclic rings. Nevertheless, once combined with HSA, the flexible portion of alkyl chains assumes a collectively similar conformation on the Ag surface with the glucose rings perpendicularly plugging into the hydrophobic site of HSA.

  10. A separable domain of the p150 subunit of human chromatin assembly factor-1 promotes protein and chromosome associations with nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corey L; Matheson, Timothy D; Trombly, Daniel J; Sun, Xiaoming; Campeau, Eric; Han, Xuemei; Yates, John R; Kaufman, Paul D

    2014-09-15

    Chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) is a three-subunit protein complex conserved throughout eukaryotes that deposits histones during DNA synthesis. Here we present a novel role for the human p150 subunit in regulating nucleolar macromolecular interactions. Acute depletion of p150 causes redistribution of multiple nucleolar proteins and reduces nucleolar association with several repetitive element-containing loci. Of note, a point mutation in a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) within p150 abolishes nucleolar associations, whereas PCNA or HP1 interaction sites within p150 are not required for these interactions. In addition, acute depletion of SUMO-2 or the SUMO E2 ligase Ubc9 reduces α-satellite DNA association with nucleoli. The nucleolar functions of p150 are separable from its interactions with the other subunits of the CAF-1 complex because an N-terminal fragment of p150 (p150N) that cannot interact with other CAF-1 subunits is sufficient for maintaining nucleolar chromosome and protein associations. Therefore these data define novel functions for a separable domain of the p150 protein, regulating protein and DNA interactions at the nucleolus.

  11. A Redox-Sensitive Micelle-Like Nanoparticle Self-Assembled from Amphiphilic Adriamycin-Human Serum Albumin Conjugates for Tumor Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Chen, Feng; Zhao, Mengxin; Zhu, Xiandi; Ke, Changhong; Yu, Jiangming; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Fulei; Sun, Yun; Chen, Di; Jiang, Cheng; Zhao, Xianxian; Gao, Yong; Guo, Shangjing; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The application of chemotherapeutic drug adriamycin (ADR) in cancer therapy is limited by its side effects like high toxicity and insolubility. Nanomedicine offers new hope for overcoming the shortcomings. But how to increase in vivo stability and to control intracellular drug release is a key issue for nano-based formulations. Herein, the hydrophobic ADR was successfully linked to the biocompatible human serum albumin (HSA) by disulfide bond 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionyl hydrazide (PDPH), resulting in amphiphilic HSA-ADR. The novel ADR-HSA micellar NPs which were thus assembled exhibited a well-defined stable core shell structure with glutathione (GSH) sensitive linkers. The stable PDPH linkers at extracellular level were broken by GSH at intracellular level with a controlled ADR release profile. The in vitro cytotoxicity against gastric cancer cells (NCI-N87) was obviously enhanced by such redox-sensitive ADR-HSA NPs. Additionally, as observed by IVIS Lumina II Imaging System (Xenogen), the intratumor accumulation of ADR-HSA NPs was much higher than that of HSA/ADR NPs due to its high stability. Consequently, the in vivo tumor inhibition was significantly promoted after intravenous administration to the Balb/c nude mice bearing gastric tumors. These in vitro/vivo results indicated that disulfide-bond-containing ADR-HSA NPs were an effective nanodrug delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:26075280

  12. Direct influence of culture dimensionality on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation at various matrix stiffnesses using a fibrous self-assembling peptide hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogrebe, Nathaniel J; Gooch, Keith J

    2016-09-01

    Much is unknown about the effects of culture dimensionality on cell behavior due to the lack of biomimetic substrates that are suitable for directly comparing cells grown on two-dimensional (2D) and encapsulated within three-dimensional (3D) matrices of the same stiffness and biochemistry. To overcome this limitation, we used a self-assembling peptide hydrogel system that has tunable stiffness and cell-binding site density as well as a fibrous microarchitecture resembling the structure of collagen. We investigated the effect of culture dimensionality on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation at different values of matrix stiffness (G' = 0.25, 1.25, 5, and 10 kPa) and a constant RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) binding site concentration. In the presence of the same soluble induction factors, culture on top of stiff gels facilitated the most efficient osteogenesis, while encapsulation within the same stiff gels resulted in a switch to predominantly terminal chondrogenesis. Adipogenesis dominated at soft conditions, and 3D culture induced better adipogenic differentiation than 2D culture at a given stiffness. Interestingly, initial matrix-induced cell morphology was predictive of these end phenotypes. Furthermore, optimal culture conditions corresponded to each cell type's natural niche within the body, highlighting the importance of incorporating native matrix dimensionality and stiffness into tissue engineering strategies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2356-2368, 2016.

  13. G protein-coupled receptor 30 ligand G-1 increases aryl hydrocarbon receptor signalling by inhibition of tubulin assembly and cell cycle arrest in human MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnow, Patrick; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory crosstalk between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and oestrogen receptor α (ERα) is well established. Apart from the nuclear receptors ERα and ERβ, oestrogen signalling further involves an unrelated G protein-coupled receptor termed GPR30. In order to investigate potential regulatory crosstalk, this study investigated the influence of G-1 as one of the few GPR30-specific ligands on the AHR regulon in MCF-7 cells. As a well-characterised model system, these human mammary carcinoma cells co-express all three receptors (AHR, ERα and GPR30) and are thus ideally suited to study corresponding regulatory pathway interactions on transcript level. Indeed, treatment with micromolar concentrations of the GPR30-specific agonist G-1 resulted in up-regulation of AHR as well as the transcripts for cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1B1, two well-known targets of the AHR regulon. While this was partly attributable to G-1-mediated inhibition of tubulin assembly and subsequent cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, the effects nevertheless required functional AHR. However, G-1-induced up-regulation of CYP 1A1 was not mediated by GPR30, as G15 antagonist treatment as well as a knockdown of GPR30 and AHR failed to inhibit this effect.

  14. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  15. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  16. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  17. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 avril 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2016. Programme de travail 2017. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2017 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2018. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposées. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. Élections des vérifica...

  18. Effects of a pretarget distractor on saccade reaction times across space and time in monkeys and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aarlenne Z; Munoz, Douglas P; Takahashi, Naomi; Blohm, Gunnar; McPeek, Robert M

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that the influence of a behaviorally irrelevant distractor on saccade reaction times (SRTs) varies depending on the temporal and spatial relationship between the distractor and the saccade target. We measured distractor influence on SRTs to a subsequently presented target, varying the spatial location and the timing between the distractor and the target. The distractor appeared at one of four equally eccentric locations, followed by a target (either 50 ms or 200 ms after) at one of 136 different locations encompassing an area of 20° square. We extensively tested two humans and two monkeys on this task to determine interspecies similarities and differences, since monkey neurophysiology is often used to interpret human behavioral findings. Results were similar across species; for the short interval (50 ms), SRTs were shortest to a target presented close to or at the distractor location and increased primarily as a function of the distance from the distractor. There was also an effect of distractor-target direction and visual field. For the long interval (200 ms) the results were inverted; SRTs were longest for short distances between the distractor and target and decreased as a function of distance from distractor. Both SRT patterns were well captured by a two-dimensional dynamic field model with short-distance excitation and long-distance inhibition, based upon known functional connectivity found in the superior colliculus that includes wide-spread excitation and inhibition. Based on these findings, we posit that the different time-dependent patterns of distractor-related SRTs can emerge from the same underlying neuronal mechanisms common to both species.

  19. Assembly line performance and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Arun B.; Sunnapwar, Vivek K.

    2017-03-01

    Automobile sector forms the backbone of manufacturing sector. Vehicle assembly line is important section in automobile plant where repetitive tasks are performed one after another at different workstations. In this thesis, a methodology is proposed to reduce cycle time and time loss due to important factors like equipment failure, shortage of inventory, absenteeism, set-up, material handling, rejection and fatigue to improve output within given cost constraints. Various relationships between these factors, corresponding cost and output are established by scientific approach. This methodology is validated in three different vehicle assembly plants. Proposed methodology may help practitioners to optimize the assembly line using lean techniques.

  20. Saline obtaining and time standardization of prothrombin using thromboplastin of human placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Jesús Sánchez Bouza

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Determining prothombine ‘s time is an important lab test in the study of coagulation disorders. To develop this essay the main reactive was thromboplastin , a substance that is presented in tissue and that has been obtained habitually from the human brain or certain animals but its extraction in labs or its commercial acquisition is difficult at present. Objective: To obtain Thromboplastin throughout the extraction of human placenta and to standardise the determination of pro-time into the obtained reactive Method: Placenta from normal delivery was used from which thromboplastin was obtained using a saline extraction. The reactive was compared with thromboplastin from human brain from ¨Dr. Hermanos Ameijeiras¨ Hospital in Havana City in a group of patients with and without anticoagulant treatment . With the extracted thromplastin similar or compatible results were obtained than with the habitual reactives by using easier and cheaper process.

  1. Real-time kymographic imaging for visualizing human vocal-fold vibratory function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, Qingjun; Schutte, Harm K.

    2007-01-01

    A stand-alone kymographic system for visualizing human vocal-fold vibration in real time is presented. By using a dual charge-coupled-device construction, the system not only provides kymographic images but also simultaneously presents structural images for navigating the endoscope to a desired posi

  2. Time-related contact angle measurements with human plasma on biomaterial surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhorst, G; Van der Mei, HC; Van Oeveren, W; Spijker, HT; Busscher, HJ

    1999-01-01

    Axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile (ADSA-P) was used to assess in time contact angle changes of human plasma drops placed on four different biomaterials. Results were related with conventional blood compatibility measurements: albumin adsorption, fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion.

  3. Interevent time distributions of human multi-level activity in a virtual world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mryglod, O.; Fuchs, B.; Szell, M.; Holovatch, Yu.; Thurner, S.

    2015-02-01

    Studying human behavior in virtual environments provides extraordinary opportunities for a quantitative analysis of social phenomena with levels of accuracy that approach those of the natural sciences. In this paper we use records of player activities in the massive multiplayer online game Pardus over 1238 consecutive days, and analyze dynamical features of sequences of actions of players. We build on previous work where temporal structures of human actions of the same type were quantified, and provide an empirical understanding of human actions of different types. This study of multi-level human activity can be seen as a dynamic counterpart of static multiplex network analysis. We show that the interevent time distributions of actions in the Pardus universe follow highly non-trivial distribution functions, from which we extract action-type specific characteristic 'decay constants'. We discuss characteristic features of interevent time distributions, including periodic patterns on different time scales, bursty dynamics, and various functional forms on different time scales. We comment on gender differences of players in emotional actions, and find that while males and females act similarly when performing some positive actions, females are slightly faster for negative actions. We also observe effects on the age of players: more experienced players are generally faster in making decisions about engaging in and terminating enmity and friendship, respectively.

  4. Body temperature predicts the direction of internal desynchronization in humans isolated from time cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, Serge; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    This publication presents a new analysis of experiments that were carried out in human subjects in isolation from time cues, under supervision of Jurgen Aschoff and Rutger Wever at the Max Planck Institute for Behavioural Physiology (Erling-Andechs, Germany, 1964-1974). Mean rectal temperatures

  5. Real-time trace gas sensing of ethylene, propanal and acetaldehyde from human skin in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moeskops, B.W.M.; Steeghs, M.M.L.; Swam, K. van; Cristescu, S.M.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Harren, F.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Trace gases emitted by human skin in vivo are monitored non-invasively and in real time using laser-based photoacoustic detection and proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry. A small quartz cuvette is placed on the skin to create a headspace from which a carrier gas transports the skin emissions

  6. STABILITY AND BIFURCATION OF A HUMAN RESPIRATORY SYSTEM MODEL WITH TIME DELAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈启宏; 魏俊杰

    2004-01-01

    The stability and bifurcation of the trivial solution in the two-dimensional differential equation of a model describing human respiratory system with time delay were investigated. Formulas about the stability of bifurcating periodic solution and the direction of Hopf bifurcation were exhibited by applying the normal form theory and the center manifold theorem. Furthermore, numerical simulation was carried out.

  7. Real-time trace gas sensing of ethylene, propanal and acetaldehyde from human skin in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moeskops, B.W.M.; Steeghs, M.M.L.; Swam, K. van; Cristescu, S.M.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Harren, F.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Trace gases emitted by human skin in vivo are monitored non-invasively and in real time using laser-based photoacoustic detection and proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry. A small quartz cuvette is placed on the skin to create a headspace from which a carrier gas transports the skin emissions

  8. Body temperature predicts the direction of internal desynchronization in humans isolated from time cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, Serge; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    This publication presents a new analysis of experiments that were carried out in human subjects in isolation from time cues, under supervision of Jurgen Aschoff and Rutger Wever at the Max Planck Institute for Behavioural Physiology (Erling-Andechs, Germany, 1964-1974). Mean rectal temperatures (t(b

  9. Robotically Assembled Aerospace Structures: Digital Material Assembly using a Gantry-Type Assembler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Greenfield; Copplestone, Grace; O'Connor, Molly; Hu, Steven; Nowak, Sebastian; Cheung, Kenneth; Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the development of automated assembly techniques for discrete lattice structures using a multi-axis gantry type CNC machine. These lattices are made of discrete components called digital materials. We present the development of a specialized end effector that works in conjunction with the CNC machine to assemble these lattices. With this configuration we are able to place voxels at a rate of 1.5 per minute. The scalability of digital material structures due to the incremental modular assembly is one of its key traits and an important metric of interest. We investigate the build times of a 5x5 beam structure on the scale of 1 meter (325 parts), 10 meters (3,250 parts), and 30 meters (9,750 parts). Utilizing the current configuration with a single end effector, performing serial assembly with a globally fixed feed station at the edge of the build volume, the build time increases according to a scaling law of n4, where n is the build scale. Build times can be reduced significantly by integrating feed systems into the gantry itself, resulting in a scaling law of n3. A completely serial assembly process will encounter time limitations as build scale increases. Automated assembly for digital materials can assemble high performance structures from discrete parts, and techniques such as built in feed systems, parallelization, and optimization of the fastening process will yield much higher throughput.

  10. Robotically Assembled Aerospace Structures: Digital Material Assembly using a Gantry-Type Assembler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Greenfield; Copplestone, Grace; O'Connor, Molly; Hu, Steven; Nowak, Sebastian; Cheung, Kenneth; Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the development of automated assembly techniques for discrete lattice structures using a multi-axis gantry type CNC machine. These lattices are made of discrete components called "digital materials." We present the development of a specialized end effector that works in conjunction with the CNC machine to assemble these lattices. With this configuration we are able to place voxels at a rate of 1.5 per minute. The scalability of digital material structures due to the incremental modular assembly is one of its key traits and an important metric of interest. We investigate the build times of a 5x5 beam structure on the scale of 1 meter (325 parts), 10 meters (3,250 parts), and 30 meters (9,750 parts). Utilizing the current configuration with a single end effector, performing serial assembly with a globally fixed feed station at the edge of the build volume, the build time increases according to a scaling law of n4, where n is the build scale. Build times can be reduced significantly by integrating feed systems into the gantry itself, resulting in a scaling law of n3. A completely serial assembly process will encounter time limitations as build scale increases. Automated assembly for digital materials can assemble high performance structures from discrete parts, and techniques such as built in feed systems, parallelization, and optimization of the fastening process will yield much higher throughput.

  11. Analysis of Timing Control Mechanism of Utterance and Body Motion Using Dialogue between Human and Communication Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasugi, Shoji; Yamamoto, Tomohito; Muto, Yumiko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the effects of timing control of utterance and body motion in human-robot interaction. Our previous study has already revealed the correlation of timing of utterance and body motion in human-human communication. Here we proposed a timing control model based on our previous research and estimated its influence to realize human-like communication using a questionnaire method. The results showed that the difference of effectiveness between the communication with the timing control model and that without it was observed. In addition, elderly people evaluated the communication with timing control much higher than younger people. These results show not only the importance of timing control of utterance and body motion in human communication but also its effectiveness for realizing human-like human-robot interaction.

  12. Colonic transit time relates to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencingand their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based......Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... on correlation analyses,we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gutmicrobial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolismfrom carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  13. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencing and their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based......Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... on correlation analyses, we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  14. Could Trends in Time Children Spend with Parents Help Explain the Black-White Gap in Human Capital? Evidence from the American Time Use Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    It is widely believed that the time children spend with parents significantly impacts human capital formation. If time varies significantly between black and white children, this may help explain the large racial gap in test scores and wages. In this study, I use data from the American Time Use Survey to examine the patterns in the time black and…

  15. Base on KingView 6.53 for Automated Box Assemble Machine Human Machine Interface%基于KingVieW6.53的全自动药板装盒机人机界面设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    边娟鸽

    2011-01-01

    The dissertation introduces the human-machine interface of the Automated Box Assemble Machine. The interface is designed by using of KingView 6.53. The interface is very friendly and convenient to operate. Through it, signals are acquired and alarms are analyzed. Parameters are set. It can monitor parameters for dynamic management and print statements. It can realize the scene real-time monitoring and record data. It is flexible.%文章介绍了采用组态王KingView 6.53设计的药板装盒机人机界面.界面设计友好,便于操作,具有信号采集、预报警分析、参数设置等功能,能对各种监控参数进行动态管理和报表自动生成及打印,实现了现场数据实时监控与记录,而且运行灵活.

  16. Ultrasonication and the quality of human milk: variation of power and time of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Lukas; Lai, Ching Tat; Hartmann, Peter E

    2012-08-01

    Donor human milk is pasteurized to prevent the potential risk of the transmission of pathogens to preterm infants. Currently, Holder pasteurization (human milk held at 62·5°C for 30 min) is used in most human milk banks, but has the disadvantage that it results in excessive inactivation of important bioactive components. Power-ultrasound (20-100 kHz) is an emerging technology for the preservation of foods and could be an alternative method for the treatment of human milk. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different ultrasound settings on the elimination of Escherichia coli and the retention of bile salt stimulated lipase (BSSL) activity. Ultrasonication with a constant power decreased Esch. coli viability exponentially over time until the processing temperature increased to sub-pasteurization level to between 51·4 and 58·5°C, then a log10 1·3 decrease was observed (Phuman milk using high ultrasound power over a short exposure time to ensure that the temperature remains below the critical level for protein denaturation. Alternatively, the use of lower power settings such as the 26 W used in the present studies would require a cooling system to ensure the human milk BSSL was protected against temperature denaturation.

  17. Effect of oxygen concentration on human embryo development evaluated by time-lapse monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans Jakob; Hindkjær, Johnny Juhl; Kirkegaard, Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    -points are given as hours after fertilisation Results: The timing of the first two cleavage cycles resulting in a 4-cell embryo was not significantly different between the groups. The timing of the third cleavage cycle, i.e. division to 5, 6, 7 and 8 cells was delayed for embryos cultured in 20% oxygen (P5cell =0......Introduction: Data from a number of studies indicate -but not unequivocally- that culture of embryos in 5% O2 compared to 20% O2 improves blastocyst formation in humans and various animal species and may yield better pregnancy rates in IVF. The detrimental effects of atmospheric oxygen were...... recently demonstrated to occur from first cleavage cycle in mice using time-lapse microscopy, with the largest impact on the pre-compaction stages. However, embryonic development in mice differs in many aspects from human embryonic development. The objective of this retrospective, descriptive study...

  18. Real-time face and gesture analysis for human-robot interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhoff, Frank; Rehrl, Tobias; Mayer, Christoph; Radig, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Human communication relies on a large number of different communication mechanisms like spoken language, facial expressions, or gestures. Facial expressions and gestures are one of the main nonverbal communication mechanisms and pass large amounts of information between human dialog partners. Therefore, to allow for intuitive human-machine interaction, a real-time capable processing and recognition of facial expressions, hand and head gestures are of great importance. We present a system that is tackling these challenges. The input features for the dynamic head gestures and facial expressions are obtained from a sophisticated three-dimensional model, which is fitted to the user in a real-time capable manner. Applying this model different kinds of information are extracted from the image data and afterwards handed over to a real-time capable data-transferring framework, the so-called Real-Time DataBase (RTDB). In addition to the head and facial-related features, also low-level image features regarding the human hand - optical flow, Hu-moments are stored into the RTDB for the evaluation process of hand gestures. In general, the input of a single camera is sufficient for the parallel evaluation of the different gestures and facial expressions. The real-time capable recognition of the dynamic hand and head gestures are performed via different Hidden Markov Models, which have proven to be a quick and real-time capable classification method. On the other hand, for the facial expressions classical decision trees or more sophisticated support vector machines are used for the classification process. These obtained results of the classification processes are again handed over to the RTDB, where other processes (like a Dialog Management Unit) can easily access them without any blocking effects. In addition, an adjustable amount of history can be stored by the RTDB buffer unit.

  19. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Price, Sarah L.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17β-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety. PMID:26516295

  20. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Price, Sarah L.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-05-01

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17β-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety.

  1. Referee comment on Velocity-Based Terrain Coefficients for Time-Based Models of Human Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmela Herzog

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In many archaeological studies assessing the impact of topography on past human movement, only weak arguments without validation for the weights assigned to different terrain features are given. Therefore a study presenting terrain coefficients relying on sound tests is most welcome though the range of applications in archaeological modelling is limited. This article is a referee comment for de Gruchy, M., Caswell, E and Edwards, J. 2017 Velocity-Based Terrain Coefficients for Time-Based Models of Human Movement, Internet Archaeology.

  2. Simulation Of Assembly Processes With Technical Of Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García, Manuel; Arenas Reina, José Manuel; Lite, Alberto Sánchez; Sebastián Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2009-11-01

    Virtual reality techniques use at industrial processes provides a real approach to product life cycle. For components manual assembly, the use of virtual surroundings facilitates a simultaneous engineering in which variables such as human factors and productivity take a real act. On the other hand, in the actual phase of industrial competition it is required a rapid adjustment to client needs and to market situation. In this work it is analyzed the assembly of the front components of a vehicle using virtual reality tools and following up a product-process design methodology which includes every life service stage. This study is based on workstations design, taking into account productive and human factors from the ergonomic point of view implementing a postural study of every assembly operation, leaving the rest of stages for a later study. Design is optimized applying this methodology together with the use of virtual reality tools. It is also achieved a 15% reduction on time assembly and of 90% reduction in muscle—skeletal diseases at every assembly operation.

  3. RNA LEGO: magnesium-dependent assembly of RNA building blocks through loop-loop interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiya, Satoru; Li, Xianglan; Kawai, Gota; Saito, Ryota; Katoh, Akira; Kobayashi, Koh; Harada, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    We describe the construction of nano-molecular assemblies using RNA building blocks the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) dimerization initiation site (DIS) RNA, that forms stable base pairing through a magnesium-dependent loop-loop interaction ("kissing"). RNA building blocks containing two DIS or DIS-like hairpins connected by a two nucleotide linker self-assembled to form specific structures as observed by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Furthermore, observation of "real time" formation of the molecular assemblies by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy was attempted.

  4. Detection of human bocavirus and human metapneumovirus by real-time PCR from patients with respiratory symptoms in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo André Pilger

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of newer molecular methods has led to the discovery of new respiratory viruses, such as human metapneumovirus (hMPV and human bocavirus (hBoV, in respiratory tract specimens. We have studied the occurrence of hMPV and hBoV in the Porto Alegre (PA metropolitan area, one of the southernmost cities of Brazil, evaluating children with suspected lower respiratory tract infection from May 2007-June 2008. A real-time polymerase chain reaction method was used for amplification and detection of hMPV and hBoV and to evaluate coinfections with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, influenza A and B, parainfluenza 1, 2 and 3, human rhinovirus and human adenovirus. Of the 455 nasopharyngeal aspirates tested, hMPV was detected in 14.5% of samples and hBoV in 13.2%. A unique causative viral agent was identified in 46.2% samples and the coinfection rate was 43.7%. For hBoV, 98.3% of all positive samples were from patients with mixed infections. Similarly, 84.8% of all hMPV-positive results were also observed in mixed infections. Both hBoV and hMPV usually appeared with RSV. In summary, this is the first confirmation that hMPV and hBoV circulate in PA; this provides evidence of frequent involvement of both viruses in children with clinical signs of acute viral respiratory tract infection, although they mainly appeared as coinfection agents.

  5. Circadian variation of the human metabolome captured by real-time breath analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Martinez-Lozano Sinues

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks play a significant role in the correct timing of physiological metabolism, and clock disruption might lead to pathological changes of metabolism. One interesting method to assess the current state of metabolism is metabolomics. Metabolomics tries to capture the entirety of small molecules, i.e. the building blocks of metabolism, in a given matrix, such as blood, saliva or urine. Using mass spectrometric approaches we and others have shown that a significant portion of the human metabolome in saliva and blood exhibits circadian modulation; independent of food intake or sleep/wake rhythms. Recent advances in mass spectrometry techniques have introduced completely non-invasive breathprinting; a method to instantaneously assess small metabolites in human breath. In this proof-of-principle study, we extend these findings about the impact of circadian clocks on metabolomics to exhaled breath. As previously established, our method allows for real-time analysis of a rich matrix during frequent non-invasive sampling. We sampled the breath of three healthy, non-smoking human volunteers in hourly intervals for 24 hours during total sleep deprivation, and found 111 features in the breath of all individuals, 36-49% of which showed significant circadian variation in at least one individual. Our data suggest that real-time mass spectrometric "breathprinting" has high potential to become a useful tool to understand circadian metabolism, and develop new biomarkers to easily and in real-time assess circadian clock phase and function in experimental and clinical settings.

  6. Simultaneous detection, typing and quantitation of oncogenic human papillomavirus by multiplex consensus real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Andrew; Allum, Anne-Gry; Strand, Linda; Aakre, Randi Kersten

    2013-02-01

    A consensus multiplex real-time PCR test (PT13-RT) for the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 and 66 is described. The test targets the L1 gene. Analytical sensitivity is between 4 and 400 GU (genomic units) in the presence of 500 ng of human DNA, corresponding to 75,000 human cells. HPV types are grouped into multiplex groups of 3 or 4 resulting in the use of 4 wells per sample and permitting up to 24 samples per run (including controls) in a standard 96-well real-time PCR instrument. False negative results are avoided by (a) measuring sample DNA concentration to control that sufficient cellular material is present and (b) including HPV type 6 as a homologous internal control in order to detect PCR inhibition or competition from other (non-oncogenic) HPV types. Analysis time from refrigerator to report is 8 h, including 2.5 h hands-on time. Relative to the HC2 test, the sensitivity and specificity were respectively 98% and 83%, the lower specificity being attributable to the higher analytical sensitivity of PT13-RT. To assess type determination comparison was made with a reversed line-blot test. Type concordance was high (κ=0.79) with discrepancies occurring mostly in multiple-positive samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Time-lapse cinematography of dynamic changes occurring during in vitro development of human embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mio, Yasuyuki; Maeda, Kazuo

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify developmental changes of early human embryos by using time-lapse cinematography (TLC). For human ova, fertilization and cleavage, development of the blastocyst, and hatching, as well as consequent changes were repeatedly photographed at intervals of 5-6 days by using an inverse microscope under stabilized temperature and pH. Photographs were taken at 30 frames per second and the movies were studied. Cinematography has increased our understanding of the morphologic mechanisms of fertilization, development, and behavior of early human embryos, and has identified the increased risk of monozygotic twin pregnancy based on prolonged incubation in vitro to the blastocyst stage. Using TLC, we observed the fertilization of an ovum by a single spermatozoon, followed by early cleavages, formation of the morula, blastocyst hatching, changes in the embryonic plates, and the development of monozygotic twins from the incubated blastocysts.

  8. Separating timing, movement conditions and individual differences in the analysis of human movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raket, Lars Lau; Grimme, Britta; Schöner, Gregor;

    2016-01-01

    mixed-effects models as viable alternatives to conventional analysis frameworks. The model is then combined with a novel factor-analysis model that estimates the low-dimensional subspace within which movements vary when the task demands vary. Our framework enables us to visualize different dimensions......A central task in the analysis of human movement behavior is to determine systematic patterns and differences across experimental conditions, participants and repetitions. This is possible because human movement is highly regular, being constrained by invariance principles. Movement timing...... of movement variation and to test hypotheses about the effect of obstacle placement and height on the movement path. We demonstrate that the approach can be used to uncover new properties of human movement....

  9. Tolerance of disturbance by humans in long-time resident and recent colonist urban doves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jemma Gendall; Alan Lill; Juliey Beckman

    2015-01-01

    Background:A critical trait for successful urban dwelling by birds is the ability to tolerate high levels of disturbing stimulation by humans. If such tolerance is partly acquired gradually after colonization, species with a long history of residence in cities are likely to be more tolerant of such stimulation than recent urban colonists, but this has not often been tested. Methods:We tested whether introduced Rock (Columba livia) and Spotted (Streptopelis chinensis) Doves, historically long-term residents of Melbourne, Australia, were more tolerant of disturbance by humans than the very recent colonist, the native Crested Pigeon (Ochyphaps lophotes) by comparing the Flight Initiation Distances (FID) and time allocations to vigilance during foraging of all three species in urban Melbourne. That al three species are members of the Columbiformes reduces the possibility that any species differences in tolerance are simply phylogenetic in origin. Results:Flight initiation distance was shorter in Rock Doves than in the other two species, which did not differ in approachability by a human. Rock Doves retreated from an approaching human mainly by walking a relatively short distance, Crested Pigeons mainly by running a relatively short distance and Spotted Doves primarily by flying a comparatively long distance. The time allocation to anti-predator vigilance of Rock Doves was smaller than that of the other two species, whose allocations were similar. Conclusions:The very recent colonist of eastern Melbourne, the Crested Pigeon, was not the least tolerant of disturbance by humans of the three related species. Natural selection for tolerance therefore probably cannot entirely explain the pattern of tolerance evident among these urban dove species and behavioural flexibility is probably involved. Length of residency in a city is not an infallible guide to a species’ level of tolerance of disturbance by humans.

  10. Tolerance of disturbance by humans in long-time resident and recent colonist urban doves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jemma; Gendall; Alan; Lill; Juliey; Beckman

    2015-01-01

    Background: A critical trait for successful urban dwelling by birds is the ability to tolerate high levels of disturbing stimulation by humans. If such tolerance is partly acquired gradually after colonization, species with a long history of residence in cities are likely to be more tolerant of such stimulation than recent urban colonists, but this has not often been tested.Methods: We tested whether introduced Rock(Columba livia) and Spotted(Streptopelis chinensis) Doves, historically long-term residents of Melbourne, Australia, were more tolerant of disturbance by humans than the very recent colonist, the native Crested Pigeon(Ochyphaps lophotes) by comparing the Flight Initiation Distances(FID) and time allocations to vigilance during foraging of all three species in urban Melbourne. That all three species are members of the Columbiformes reduces the possibility that any species differences in tolerance are simply phylogenetic in origin.Results: Flight initiation distance was shorter in Rock Doves than in the other two species, which did not differ in approachability by a human. Rock Doves retreated from an approaching human mainly by walking a relatively short distance, Crested Pigeons mainly by running a relatively short distance and Spotted Doves primarily by flying a comparatively long distance. The time allocation to anti-predator vigilance of Rock Doves was smaller than that of the other two species, whose allocations were similar.Conclusions: The very recent colonist of eastern Melbourne, the Crested Pigeon, was not the least tolerant of disturbance by humans of the three related species. Natural selection for tolerance therefore probably cannot entirely explain the pattern of tolerance evident among these urban dove species and behavioural flexibility is probably involved. Length of residency in a city is not an infallible guide to a species’ level of tolerance of disturbance by humans.

  11. Evidence for a time-invariant phase variable in human ankle control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Gregg

    Full Text Available Human locomotion is a rhythmic task in which patterns of muscle activity are modulated by state-dependent feedback to accommodate perturbations. Two popular theories have been proposed for the underlying embodiment of phase in the human pattern generator: a time-dependent internal representation or a time-invariant feedback representation (i.e., reflex mechanisms. In either case the neuromuscular system must update or represent the phase of locomotor patterns based on the system state, which can include measurements of hundreds of variables. However, a much simpler representation of phase has emerged in recent designs for legged robots, which control joint patterns as functions of a single monotonic mechanical variable, termed a phase variable. We propose that human joint patterns may similarly depend on a physical phase variable, specifically the heel-to-toe movement of the Center of Pressure under the foot. We found that when the ankle is unexpectedly rotated to a position it would have encountered later in the step, the Center of Pressure also shifts forward to the corresponding later position, and the remaining portion of the gait pattern ensues. This phase shift suggests that the progression of the stance ankle is controlled by a biomechanical phase variable, motivating future investigations of phase variables in human locomotor control.

  12. Amplified Immunoassay of Human IgG Using Real-time Biomolecular Interaction Analysis (BIA) Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI,Ren-Jun(裴仁军); CUI,Xiao-Qiang(崔小强); YANG,Xiu-Rong(杨秀荣); WANG,Er-Kang(汪尔康)

    2002-01-01

    An automated biomolecular interaction analysis instrument (BIAcore) based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been used to determine human immunoglobulin G (IgG) in real time. Polyclonal anti-human IgG antibody was covalently immobilized to a carboxymethyldextran-modified gold film surface. The samples of human IgG prepared in HBS buffer were poured over the immobilized surface. The signal amplification antibody was applied to amplify the response signal. After each measurement, the surface was regenerated with 0.1 mol/L H3PO4. The assay was rapid, requiring only 30 min for antibody immobilization and 20 min for each subsequent process of immune binding, antibody amplification and regeneration. The antibody immobilized surface had good response to human IgG in the range of 0.12-60 nmol/L with a detection limit of 60 pmoL/L. The same antibody immobilized surface could be used for more than 110 cycles of binding, amplificafion and regeneration. The results demonstrate that the sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility of amplified immunoassay using real-time BIA technology are satisfactory.

  13. A Novel Bioinspired Vision System: A Step toward Real-Time Human-Robot Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahman Hafiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Building a human-like robot that could be involved in our daily lives is a dream of many scientists. Achieving a sophisticated robot's vision system, which can enhance the robot's real-time interaction ability with the human, is one of the main keys toward realizing such an autonomous robot. In this work, we are suggesting a bioinspired vision system that helps to develop an advanced human-robot interaction in an autonomous humanoid robot. First, we enhance the robot's vision accuracy online by applying a novel dynamic edge detection algorithm abstracted from the rules that the horizontal cells play in the mammalian retina. Second, in order to support the first algorithm, we improve the robot's tracking ability by designing a variant photoreceptors distribution corresponding to what exists in the human vision system. The experimental results verified the validity of the model. The robot could have a clear vision in real time and build a mental map that assisted it to be aware of the frontal users and to develop a positive interaction with them.

  14. Humans can adopt optimal discounting strategy under real-time constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Schweighofer

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Critical to our many daily choices between larger delayed rewards, and smaller more immediate rewards, are the shape and the steepness of the function that discounts rewards with time. Although research in artificial intelligence favors exponential discounting in uncertain environments, studies with humans and animals have consistently shown hyperbolic discounting. We investigated how humans perform in a reward decision task with temporal constraints, in which each choice affects the time remaining for later trials, and in which the delays vary at each trial. We demonstrated that most of our subjects adopted exponential discounting in this experiment. Further, we confirmed analytically that exponential discounting, with a decay rate comparable to that used by our subjects, maximized the total reward gain in our task. Our results suggest that the particular shape and steepness of temporal discounting is determined by the task that the subject is facing, and question the notion of hyperbolic reward discounting as a universal principle.

  15. Time-dependent biphasic modulation of human BDNF by antidepressants in neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musazzi Laura

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent rodent studies reported that antidepressant treatments affect the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF mRNA in a way that is dependent on treatment duration, by selective modulation of different BDNF transcripts. However, no data are available for the human BDNF gene. We studied the effect of different antidepressants on BDNF mRNA expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Results Cultured cells were treated with the antidepressants fluoxetine, reboxetine and desipramine for different time lengths (6, 24, 48 hours. Expression of total BDNF mRNA was analyzed by reverse transcription PCR and levels of different BDNF transcripts were detected by hemi-nested PCR with specific primers. Short-term treatment (6 hours with reboxetine or desipramine reduced total BDNF, whereas long-term treatment (48 hours significantly increased total BDNF mRNA levels. These changes were accounted for by differential regulation of BDNF IV and VIa/b transcripts. Fluoxetine showed no significant effects. Conclusion This is the first study showing biphasic changes in the expression of total and specific BDNF transcripts in human cells following antidepressant treatments. These findings suggest that biphasic induction of BDNF by antidepressants could be a feature common to rodents and humans and encourage the use of SH-SY5Y cells as a tool for investigation of drug effects on human genes.

  16. Constitutive Modeling of Time-Dependent Response of Human Plantar Aponeurosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pavan, P. G.; Pachera, P.; Stecco, C.; Natali, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    The attention is focused on the viscoelastic behavior of human plantar aponeurosis tissue. At this purpose, stress relaxation tests were developed on samples taken from the plantar aponeurosis of frozen adult donors with age ranging from 67 to 78 years, imposing three levels of strain in the physiological range (4%, 6%, and 8%) and observing stress decay for 240 s. A viscohyperelastic fiber-reinforced constitutive model with transverse isotropy was assumed to describe the time-dependent behav...

  17. Plasticity resembling spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity: the evidence in human cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Müller-Dahlhaus

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP has been studied extensively in a variety of animal models during the past decade but whether it can be studied at the systems level of the human cortex has been a matter of debate. Only recently newly developed non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS have made it possible to induce and assess timing dependent plasticity in conscious human subjects. This review will present a critical synopsis of these experiments, which suggest that several of the principal characteristics and molecular mechanisms of TMS-induced plasticity correspond to those of STDP as studied at a cellular level. TMS combined with a second phasic stimulation modality can induce bidirectional long-lasting changes in the excitability of the stimulated cortex, whose polarity depends on the order of the associated stimulus-evoked events within a critical time window of tens of milliseconds. Pharmacological evidence suggests an NMDA receptor mediated form of synaptic plasticity. Studies in human motor cortex demonstrated that motor learning significantly modulates TMS-induced timing dependent plasticity, and, conversely, may be modulated bidirectionally by prior TMS-induced plasticity, providing circumstantial evidence that long-term potentiation-like mechanisms may be involved in motor learning. In summary, convergent evidence is being accumulated for the contention that it is now possible to induce STDP-like changes in the intact human central nervous system by means of TMS to study and interfere with synaptic plasticity in neural circuits in the context of behaviour such as learning and memory.

  18. MRI is unable to illustrate the absorption time of the absorbable TIGR mesh in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öberg, Stina; Andresen, Kristoffer; Møller, Jakob M;

    2015-01-01

    3 years in sheep. The patient was therefore followed for 3 years by annual magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) to illustrate the absorption time in humans. During follow-up, the thickness of the absorbable mesh slightly decreased, and at the last clinical examination, the patient was without...... a recurrence. However, MRI failed to illustrate absorption of the TIGR mesh, perhaps since new connective tissue and the mesh material had the same appearance on the images. In conclusion, MRI was unable to confirm an absorption time of 3 years for the TIGR mesh, and further studies are needed to investigate...

  19. UWB micro-doppler radar for human gait analysis using joint range-time-frequency representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Fathy, Aly E.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel, standalone ultra wideband (UWB) micro-Doppler radar sensor that goes beyond simple range or micro-Doppler detection to combined range-time-Doppler frequency analysis. Moreover, it can monitor more than one human object in both line-of-sight (LOS) and through wall scenarios, thus have full human objects tracking capabilities. The unique radar design is based on narrow pulse transceiver, high speed data acquisition module, and wideband antenna array. For advanced radar post-data processing, joint range-time-frequency representation has been performed. Characteristics of human walking activity have been analyzed using the radar sensor by precisely tracking the radar object and acquiring range-time-Doppler information simultaneously. The UWB micro-Doppler radar prototype is capable of detecting Doppler frequency range from -180 Hz to +180 Hz, which allows a maximum target velocity of 9 m/s. The developed radar sensor can also be extended for many other applications, such as respiration and heartbeat detection of trapped survivors under building debris.

  20. Optimal time for human umbilical cord blood cell transplantation in rats with myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Yun-li; SHEN Lu-hua; LI Hong-wei; ZHANG Yu-chen; ZHAO Lin; ZHAO Shu-mei; XU Qing

    2009-01-01

    Background Cell therapy for cardiac regeneration is still under investigation. To date there have been a limited number of studies describing the optimal time for cell injection. The present study aimed to examine the optimal time for human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) transplantation after myocardial infarction (MI).Methods The animals underwent MI by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery and received an intravenous injection of equal volumes of HUCBCs or phosphate buffered saline at days 1,5,10 and 30 after MI. HUCBCs were detected by immunostaining against human human leucocyte antigen (HLA). Cardiac function, histological analysis and measurement of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were performed 4 weeks after cell transplantation. Results HUCBCs transplantation could improve cardiac function in rats that received transplantation at 5 and 10 days after MI. The best benefit was achieved in rats that received cells at 10-day after MI. Survival of engrafted HUCBCs, angiogenesis and VEGF expression were more obvious in the 10-day transplantation group than in the other transplantation groups. No evidence of cardiomyocyte regeneration was detected in any transplanted rats. Conclusions HUCBCs transplantation could improve cardiac function in rats that received HUCBCs at days 5 and 10 after MI with the optimal time for transplantation being 10 days post MI. Angiogenesis, but not cardiomyocyte regeneration, played a key role in the cardiac function improvement.

  1. Time-course regulation of quercetin on cell survival/proliferation pathways in human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén; Angeles Martín, María; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia

    2008-04-01

    Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid, has been shown to possess anticarcinogenic properties, but the precise molecular mechanisms of action are not thoroughly elucidated. This study was aimed at investigating the time-course regulation effect of quercetin on survival/proliferation pathways in a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2). Quercetin induced a significant time-dependent inactivation of the major survival signaling proteins, i. e., phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B (AKT), extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha), in concert with a time-dependent activation of key death-related signals: c-jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and PKC-delta. These data suggest that quercetin exerts a tight regulation of survival/proliferation pathways that requires the integration of different signals and persists over time, being the balance of these regulatory signals what determines the fate of HepG2 cells.

  2. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favalli, A., E-mail: afavalli@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, Stockholm (Sweden); Tobin, S.J.; Trellue, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg (Luxembourg)

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)–Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI–SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute {sup 137}Cs count rate and the {sup 154}Eu/{sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs, {sup 106}Ru/{sup 137}Cs, and {sup 144}Ce/{sup 137}Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity’s behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  3. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, A.; Vo, D.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S. J.; Trellue, H.; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)-Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI-SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity's behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  4. The time-delayed inverted pendulum: Implications for human balance control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, John; Cabrera, Juan Luis; Ohira, Toru; Tajima, Shigeru; Tonosaki, Yukinori; Eurich, Christian W.; Campbell, Sue Ann

    2009-06-01

    The inverted pendulum is frequently used as a starting point for discussions of how human balance is maintained during standing and locomotion. Here we examine three experimental paradigms of time-delayed balance control: (1) mechanical inverted time-delayed pendulum, (2) stick balancing at the fingertip, and (3) human postural sway during quiet standing. Measurements of the transfer function (mechanical stick balancing) and the two-point correlation function (Hurst exponent) for the movements of the fingertip (real stick balancing) and the fluctuations in the center of pressure (postural sway) demonstrate that the upright fixed point is unstable in all three paradigms. These observations imply that the balanced state represents a more complex and bounded time-dependent state than a fixed-point attractor. Although mathematical models indicate that a sufficient condition for instability is for the time delay to make a corrective movement, τn, be greater than a critical delay τc that is proportional to the length of the pendulum, this condition is satisfied only in the case of human stick balancing at the fingertip. Thus it is suggested that a common cause of instability in all three paradigms stems from the difficulty of controlling both the angle of the inverted pendulum and the position of the controller simultaneously using time-delayed feedback. Considerations of the problematic nature of control in the presence of delay and random perturbations ("noise") suggest that neural control for the upright position likely resembles an adaptive-type controller in which the displacement angle is allowed to drift for small displacements with active corrections made only when θ exceeds a threshold. This mechanism draws attention to an overlooked type of passive control that arises from the interplay between retarded variables and noise.

  5. Influence of Power Delivery Timing on the Energetics and Biomechanics of Humans Wearing a Hip Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Aaron J; Foss, Jessica; Gannon, Hannah; Ferris, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    A broad goal in the field of powered lower limb exoskeletons is to reduce the metabolic cost of walking. Ankle exoskeletons have successfully achieved this goal by correctly timing a plantarflexor torque during late stance phase. Hip exoskeletons have the potential to assist with both flexion and extension during walking gait, but the optimal timing for maximally reducing metabolic cost is unknown. The focus of our study was to determine the best assistance timing for applying hip assistance through a pneumatic exoskeleton on human subjects. Ten non-impaired subjects walked with a powered hip exoskeleton, and both hip flexion and extension assistance were separately provided at different actuation timings using a simple burst controller. The largest average across-subject reduction in metabolic cost for hip extension was at 90% of the gait cycle (just prior to heel contact) and for hip flexion was at 50% of the gait cycle; this resulted in an 8.4 and 6.1% metabolic reduction, respectively, compared to walking with the unpowered exoskeleton. However, the ideal timing for both flexion and extension assistance varied across subjects. When selecting the assistance timing that maximally reduced metabolic cost for each subject, average metabolic cost for hip extension was 10.3% lower and hip flexion was 9.7% lower than the unpowered condition. When taking into account user preference, we found that subject preference did not correlate with metabolic cost. This indicated that user feedback was a poor method of determining the most metabolically efficient assistance power timing. The findings of this study are relevant to developers of exoskeletons that have a powered hip component to assist during human walking gait.

  6. Influence of Power Delivery Timing on the Energetics and Biomechanics of Humans Wearing a Hip Exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Aaron J.; Foss, Jessica; Gannon, Hannah; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2017-01-01

    A broad goal in the field of powered lower limb exoskeletons is to reduce the metabolic cost of walking. Ankle exoskeletons have successfully achieved this goal by correctly timing a plantarflexor torque during late stance phase. Hip exoskeletons have the potential to assist with both flexion and extension during walking gait, but the optimal timing for maximally reducing metabolic cost is unknown. The focus of our study was to determine the best assistance timing for applying hip assistance through a pneumatic exoskeleton on human subjects. Ten non-impaired subjects walked with a powered hip exoskeleton, and both hip flexion and extension assistance were separately provided at different actuation timings using a simple burst controller. The largest average across-subject reduction in metabolic cost for hip extension was at 90% of the gait cycle (just prior to heel contact) and for hip flexion was at 50% of the gait cycle; this resulted in an 8.4 and 6.1% metabolic reduction, respectively, compared to walking with the unpowered exoskeleton. However, the ideal timing for both flexion and extension assistance varied across subjects. When selecting the assistance timing that maximally reduced metabolic cost for each subject, average metabolic cost for hip extension was 10.3% lower and hip flexion was 9.7% lower than the unpowered condition. When taking into account user preference, we found that subject preference did not correlate with metabolic cost. This indicated that user feedback was a poor method of determining the most metabolically efficient assistance power timing. The findings of this study are relevant to developers of exoskeletons that have a powered hip component to assist during human walking gait. PMID:28337434

  7. [Detection of human enteroviruses with real-time PCR assay using TaqMan fluorescent probe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leś, Katarzyna; Przybylski, Maciej; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Młynarczyk, Grazyna

    2010-01-01

    Infections with human enteroviruses are common worldwide and cause a wide range of signs and symptoms. Nowadays in current diagnostics procedures older virological methods, such virus isolation in a cell cultures and seroneutralisation assay, are replaced with molecular biology tests. The aim of the study was development of real-time PCR assay for detection of human adenoviruses. DNA isolated from MK2 cell line infected with nineteen different enterovirus strains was used for development of a qualitative real-time PCR assay using primers targeting a conserved region of the 5'UTR region and a specific TaqMan probe. The analytical sensitivity of real-time PCR assay was tested using serial dilutions of Coxackie A9 cDNA in range between 10 degrees and 10(-8). For comparison typical end-point detected RT-PCR for enterovirus detection with the same cDNA dilutions was made. The sensitivity of novel method was about ten thousand-fold higher than older one. The conclusion is that real-time PCR is very advisable in diagnostics of diseases caused with enteroviruses. The high level of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and rapidity provided by this assay are favorable for the use in the detection of enteroviral RNA in clinical specimens, especially from neuroinfections.

  8. Real-time functional near-infrared imager and imaging of human brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Gong, Hui; Chen, Weiguo; Zhang, Zhi; Chance, Britton

    1999-02-01

    A real time functional near infrared imager (fNIRI) was introduced. The imager was controlled by a computer and the signals from the detectors were converted and processed in real time. A user-friendly software was programmed with Visual C++ language. Relative changes of oxy - Hb, Hb, and total blood concentration in 16 channels and the corresponding images can be displayed in real time on the computer. The imager was used as a real time monitor in psychological tests to record the response of the frontal cortex of human subjects. In mental work and pattern recognition tests, we recorded oxygen consumption and blood flow changes of volunteers' frontal cortex. The psychological results showed that the lower part of the left frontal gyres had intensive relation to pattern recognition and has definite boundaries. However, the mental work involved more zones of the frontal gyres and may be a complex conceptual model. The results also suggested that the human brain has an precise and complicated adjustability. The oxygen supplement in the stimulated area increased as the neuron stimulation.

  9. Control model for reconfigurable assembly systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jianfeng; Yin Yuehong; Chen Zhaoneng

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes knowledge based object-oriented timed colored Petri net, a modeling method for reconfigurable assembly systems. Combining knowledge and object-oriented method into timed colored Petri net, a comprehensive and powerful representation model for control of RAS is obtained. With object-oriented method the whole system can be decomposed into concrete objects explicitly, and their relationships are constructed according to the system assembly requirements. Finally, a simple assembly system modeled by the KTCOPN is presented.

  10. Critical time delay of the pineal melatonin rhythm in humans due to weak electromagnetic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgamuge, Malka N

    2013-08-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) can increase free radicals, activate the stress response and alter enzyme reactions. Intracellular signalling is mediated by free radicals and enzyme kinetics is affected by radical pair recombination rates. The magnetic field component of an external EMF can delay the "recombination rate" of free radical pairs. Magnetic fields thus increase radical life-times in biological systems. Although measured in nanoseconds, this extra time increases the potential to do more damage. Melatonin regulates the body's sleep-wake cycle or circadian rhythm. The World Health Organization (WHO) has confirmed that prolonged alterations in sleep patterns suppress the body's ability to make melatonin. Considerable cancer rates have been attributed to the reduction of melatonin production as a result of jet lag and night shift work. In this study, changes in circadian rhythm and melatonin concentration are observed due to the external perturbation of chemical reaction rates. We further analyze the pineal melatonin rhythm and investigate the critical time delay or maturation time of radical pair recombination rates, exploring the impact of the mRNA degradation rate on the critical time delay. The results show that significant melatonin interruption and changes to the circadian rhythm occur due to the perturbation of chemical reaction rates, as also reported in previous studies. The results also show the influence of the mRNA degradation rate on the circadian rhythm's critical time delay or maturation time. The results support the hypothesis that exposure to weak EMFs via melatonin disruption can adversely affect human health.

  11. DNA methylation dynamics in human induced pluripotent stem cells over time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Nishino

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic reprogramming is a critical event in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. Here, we determined the DNA methylation profiles of 22 human iPSC lines derived from five different cell types (human endometrium, placental artery endothelium, amnion, fetal lung fibroblast, and menstrual blood cell and five human embryonic stem cell (ESC lines, and we followed the aberrant methylation sites in iPSCs for up to 42 weeks. The iPSCs exhibited distinct epigenetic differences from ESCs, which were caused by aberrant methylation at early passages. Multiple appearances and then disappearances of random aberrant methylation were detected throughout iPSC reprogramming. Continuous passaging of the iPSCs diminished the differences between iPSCs and ESCs, implying that iPSCs lose the characteristics inherited from the parent cells and adapt to very closely resemble ESCs over time. Human iPSCs were gradually reprogrammed through the "convergence" of aberrant hyper-methylation events that continuously appeared in a de novo manner. This iPS reprogramming consisted of stochastic de novo methylation and selection/fixation of methylation in an environment suitable for ESCs. Taken together, random methylation and convergence are driving forces for long-term reprogramming of iPSCs to ESCs.

  12. Quantifying the Human Impacts on Papua New Guinea Reef Fish Communities across Space and Time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A Drew

    Full Text Available Describing the drivers of species loss and of community change are important goals in both conservation and ecology. However, it is difficult to determine whether exploited species decline due to direct effects of harvesting or due to other environmental perturbations brought about by proximity to human populations. Here we quantify differences in species richness of coral reef fish communities along a human population gradient in Papua New Guinea to understand the relative impacts of fishing and environmental perturbation. Using data from published species lists we categorize the reef fishes as either fished or non-fished based on their body size and reports from the published literature. Species diversity for both fished and non-fished groups decreases as the size of the local human population increases, and this relationship is stronger in species that are fished. Additionally, comparison of modern and museum collections show that modern reef communities have proportionally fewer fished species relative to 19th century ones. Together these findings show that the reef fish communities of Papua New Guinea experience multiple anthropogenic stressors and that even at low human population levels targeted species experience population declines across both time and space.

  13. Enhanced homology-directed human genome engineering by controlled timing of CRISPR/Cas9 delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven; Staahl, Brett T; Alla, Ravi K; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-12-15

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a robust genome editing technology that works in human cells, animals and plants based on the RNA-programmed DNA cleaving activity of the Cas9 enzyme. Building on previous work (Jinek et al., 2013), we show here that new genetic information can be introduced site-specifically and with high efficiency by homology-directed repair (HDR) of Cas9-induced site-specific double-strand DNA breaks using timed delivery of Cas9-guide RNA ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. Cas9 RNP-mediated HDR in HEK293T, human primary neonatal fibroblast and human embryonic stem cells was increased dramatically relative to experiments in unsynchronized cells, with rates of HDR up to 38% observed in HEK293T cells. Sequencing of on- and potential off-target sites showed that editing occurred with high fidelity, while cell mortality was minimized. This approach provides a simple and highly effective strategy for enhancing site-specific genome engineering in both transformed and primary human cells.

  14. Quantifying the Human Impacts on Papua New Guinea Reef Fish Communities across Space and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Joshua A; Amatangelo, Kathryn L; Hufbauer, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    Describing the drivers of species loss and of community change are important goals in both conservation and ecology. However, it is difficult to determine whether exploited species decline due to direct effects of harvesting or due to other environmental perturbations brought about by proximity to human populations. Here we quantify differences in species richness of coral reef fish communities along a human population gradient in Papua New Guinea to understand the relative impacts of fishing and environmental perturbation. Using data from published species lists we categorize the reef fishes as either fished or non-fished based on their body size and reports from the published literature. Species diversity for both fished and non-fished groups decreases as the size of the local human population increases, and this relationship is stronger in species that are fished. Additionally, comparison of modern and museum collections show that modern reef communities have proportionally fewer fished species relative to 19th century ones. Together these findings show that the reef fish communities of Papua New Guinea experience multiple anthropogenic stressors and that even at low human population levels targeted species experience population declines across both time and space.

  15. Real Time Multiple Hand Gesture Recognition System for Human Computer Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth S. Rautaray

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing use of computing devices in day to day life, the need of user friendly interfaces has lead towards the evolution of different types of interfaces for human computer interaction. Real time vision based hand gesture recognition affords users the ability to interact with computers in more natural and intuitive ways. Direct use of hands as an input device is an attractive method which can communicate much more information by itself in comparison to mice, joysticks etc allowing a greater number of recognition system that can be used in a variety of human computer interaction applications. The gesture recognition system consist of three main modules like hand segmentation, hand tracking and gesture recognition from hand features. The designed system further integrated with different applications like image browser, virtual game etc. possibilities for human computer interaction. Computer Vision based systems has the potential to provide more natural, non-contact solutions. The present research work focuses on to design and develops a practical framework for real time hand gesture.

  16. Possible mechanism of polyspermy block in human oocytes observed by time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mio, Yasuyuki; Iwata, Kyoko; Yumoto, Keitaro; Kai, Yoshiteru; Sargant, Haruka C; Mizoguchi, Chizuru; Ueda, Minako; Tsuchie, Yuka; Imajo, Akifumi; Iba, Yumiko; Nishikori, Kyoko

    2012-09-01

    To analyze the fertilization process related to polyspermy block in human oocytes using an in vitro culturing system for time-lapse cinematography. We had 122 oocytes donated for this study from couples that provided informed consent. We recorded human oocytes at 2,000 to 2,800 frames every 10 s during the fertilization process and thereafter every 2 min using a new in vitro culture system originally developed by the authors for time-lapse cinematography. We displayed 30 frames per second for analysis of the polyspermy block during fertilization. Three oocytes showed the leading and following sperm within the zona pellucida in the same microscopic field. The dynamic images obtained during the fertilization process using this new system revealed that once a leading sperm penetrated the zona pellucida and attached to the oocyte membrane, a following sperm was arrested from further penetration into the zona pellucida within 10 s. The present results strongly suggest the existence of a novel mechanism of polyspermy block that takes place at the zona pellucida immediately after fertilization. These findings are clearly different from previous mechanisms describing polyspermy block as the oocyte membrane block to sperm penetration and the zona reaction. The finding presented herein thus represents a novel discovery about the highly complicated polyspermy block mechanism occurring in human oocytes.

  17. Automatic Tracking and Motility Analysis of Human Sperm in Time-Lapse Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Leonardo F; Masson, Puneet; VerMilyea, Matthew; Kam, Moshe

    2017-03-01

    We present a fully automated multi-sperm tracking algorithm. It has the demonstrated capability to detect and track simultaneously hundreds of sperm cells in recorded videos while accurately measuring motility parameters over time and with minimal operator intervention. Algorithms of this kind may help in associating dynamic swimming parameters of human sperm cells with fertility and fertilization rates. Specifically, we offer an image processing method, based on radar tracking algorithms, that detects and tracks automatically the swimming paths of human sperm cells in timelapse microscopy image sequences of the kind that is analyzed by fertility clinics. Adapting the well-known joint probabilistic data association filter (JPDAF), we automatically tracked hundreds of human sperm simultaneously and measured their dynamic swimming parameters over time. Unlike existing CASA instruments, our algorithm has the capability to track sperm swimming in close proximity to each other and during apparent cell-to-cell collisions. Collecting continuously parameters for each sperm tracked without sample dilution (currently impossible using standard CASA systems) provides an opportunity to compare such data with standard fertility rates. The use of our algorithm thus has the potential to free the clinician from having to rely on elaborate motility measurements obtained manually by technicians, speed up semen processing, and provide medical practitioners and researchers with more useful data than are currently available.

  18. Physiological time structure of the tibialis anterior motor activity during sleep in mice, rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvani, Alessandro; Lo Martire, Viviana; Salvadè, Agnese; Bastianini, Stefano; Ferri, Raffaele; Berteotti, Chiara; Baracchi, Francesca; Pace, Marta; Bassetti, Claudio L; Zoccoli, Giovanna; Manconi, Mauro

    2015-12-01

    The validation of rodent models for restless legs syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease) and periodic limb movements during sleep requires knowledge of physiological limb motor activity during sleep in rodents. This study aimed to determine the physiological time structure of tibialis anterior activity during sleep in mice and rats, and compare it with that of healthy humans. Wild-type mice (n = 9) and rats (n = 8) were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram of neck muscles and both tibialis anterior muscles. Healthy human subjects (31 ± 1 years, n = 21) underwent overnight polysomnography. An algorithm for automatic scoring of tibialis anterior electromyogram events of mice and rats during non-rapid eye movement sleep was developed and validated. Visual scoring assisted by this algorithm had inter-rater sensitivity of 92-95% and false-positive rates of 13-19% in mice and rats. The distribution of the time intervals between consecutive tibialis anterior electromyogram events during non-rapid eye movement sleep had a single peak extending up to 10 s in mice, rats and human subjects. The tibialis anterior electromyogram events separated by intervals Willis-Ekbom disease. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  19. Effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y F; Zheng, J; Zheng, L; Zhou, Z R

    2015-02-01

    Salivary pellicle is a biofilm that is formed by the selective adsorption of salivary proteins. Almost all the functions of the salivary pellicle (lubricating properties, anti-caries properties, etc.) are closely associated with its adhesion strength to tooth surface. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel, aiming to understand what act as the determinant of the interfacial adhesion. In this study, human tooth enamel samples were immersed in human whole saliva in vitro to obtain a salivary pellicle on the surface of enamel. Immersion treatments lasting up to 1, 3, 10 and 60 min were conducted, respectively. Nano-scratch tests were conducted on the surface of enamel after different adsorption times. The wettability of enamel surface was measured through water contact angle. Results showed that the shear energy between salivary pellicle and enamel surface increased exponentially with the adsorption time. The adhesion force between salivary pellicle and bare enamel surface was more than twice that between salivary pellicle and salivary pellicle. It was found that both the wettability and zeta potential of enamel increased obviously after 1 min saliva-adsorption treatment, and then they almost kept stable as the adsorption time further increased. In summary, the adhesion strength between initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface was much higher than that between initial salivary pellicle and outer salivary pellicle. It seemed that electrostatic interaction contributed to the adhesion between the initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface, but not to the adhesion between the initial and outer salivary pellicle. The results would be helpful to extend the understanding of the adhesion mechanism of salivary pellicle and then to develop new artificial saliva and dental restorative materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The impact of communication on human behaviour in times of crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Andrew

    Decision makers have constantly sought to find the most appropriate ways to use communication to influence behaviour during times of crises to assist in their recovery. This paper will investigate why policy makers wish to utilise effective crisis communications and explore the importance of crisis communication on influencing human behaviour in a time of crisis as well as the influence that the medium of communication can have. It will be noted that the medium of the message is important to ensure that the correct audience has been reached. This paper will suggest that, for decision makers to maximise the impact of crisis communications during a crisis, they must utilise rhetoric and cognitive response theory. It will also be suggested that the most importance factor in influencing behaviour in a time of crisis is that communications are provided from a credible source and are empathic in nature.

  1. Integrated Virtual Assembly Process Planning System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jianhua; HOU Weiwei; HOU Weiwei; SHANG Wei; SHANG Wei; NING Ruxin; NING Ruxin

    2009-01-01

    Assembly process planning(APP) for complicated products is a time-consuming and difficult work with conventional method. Virtual assembly process planning(VAPP) provides engineers a new and efficiency way. Previous studies in VAPP are almost isolated and dispersive, and have not established a whole understanding and discussed key realization techniques of VAPP from a systemic and integrated view. The integrated virtual assembly process planning(IVAPP) system is a new virtual reality based engineering application, which offers engineers an efficient, intuitive, immersive and integrated method for assembly process planning in a virtual environment. Based on analysis the information integration requirement of VAPP, the architecture of IVAPP is proposed. Through the integrated structure, IVAPP system can realize information integration and workflow controlling. In order to model the assembly process in IVAPP, a hierarchical assembly task list(HATL) is presented, in which different assembly tasks for assembling different components are organized into a hierarchical list. A process-oriented automatic geometrical constraint recognition algorithm(AGCR) is proposed, so that geometrical constraints between components can be automatically recognized during the process of interactive assembling. At the same time, a progressive hierarchical reasoning(PHR) model is discussed. AGCR and PHR will greatly reduce the interactive workload. A discrete control node model(DCNM) for cable harness assembly planning in IVAPP is detailed. DCNM converts a cable harness into continuous flexed line segments connected by a series of section center points, and designs can realize cable harness planning through controlling those control nodes. Mechanical assemblies (such as transmission case and engine of automobile) are used to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method and algorithms. The application of IVAPP system reveals advantages over the traditional assembly process planning method

  2. Real-time detection of acetylcholine release from the human endocrine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Dando, Robin; Huang, Y Anthony; Berggren, Per-Olof; Roper, Stephen D; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2012-05-03

    Neurons, sensory cells and endocrine cells secrete neurotransmitters and hormones to communicate with other cells and to coordinate organ and system function. Validation that a substance is used as an extracellular signaling molecule by a given cell requires a direct demonstration of its secretion. In this protocol we describe the use of biosensor cells to detect neurotransmitter release from endocrine cells in real-time. Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor M3 were used as ACh biosensors to record ACh release from human pancreatic islets. We show how ACh biosensors loaded with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura-2 and pressed against isolated human pancreatic islets allow the detection of ACh release. The biosensor approach is simple; the Ca(2+) signal generated in the biosensor cell reflects the presence (release) of a neurotransmitter. The technique is versatile because biosensor cells expressing a variety of receptors can be used in many applications. The protocol takes ∼3 h.

  3. Real-time estimation of small-area populations with human biomarkers in sewage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daughton, Christian G., E-mail: daughton.christian@epa.gov

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is conceptualized for measuring small-area human populations by using biomarkers in sewage. The basis for the concept (SCIM: Sewage Chemical-Information Mining) is supported by a comprehensive examination and synthesis of data published across several disciplines, including medicine, microbiology, clinical chemistry, and environmental science. Accurate measures of human populations are fundamental to numerous disciplines, including economics, marketing, politics, sociology, public health and safety (e.g., disease management; assessment of natural hazards; disaster prevention and response), quality of life, and the environment. Knowing the size, distribution, and flow of a small-area (local) population facilitates understanding the numerous and complex linkages and interactions between humans and the environment. Examples include material-flow (substance-flow) analysis, determining the magnitude of per capita contribution of pollutant loadings to watersheds, or forecasting future impacts of local populations on the environment or a population's demands on resources. While no definitive approach exists for measuring small-area populations, census-taking is a long-established convention. No approach exists, however, for gauging small-area populations in real-time, as none is able to capture population dynamics, which involve transient changes (e.g., daily influx and efflux) and lasting changes (e.g., births, deaths, change in residence). Accurate measurement of small-area populations in real time has never been possible but is essential for facilitating the design of more sustainable communities. Real-time measurement would provide communities the capability of testing what-if scenarios in design and policy decisions. After evaluation of a range of biomarkers (including the nitrogenous waste product creatinine, which has been long used in clinical chemistry as a parameter to normalize the concentrations of other urinary excretion products to

  4. Multiplicative processes and power laws in human reaction times derived from hyperbolic functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, José M., E-mail: jmanuel@fisica.uminho.pt [Center for Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2012-04-09

    In sensory psychophysics reaction time is a measure of the stochastic latency elapsed from stimulus presentation until a sensory response occurs as soon as possible. A random multiplicative model of reaction time variability is investigated for generating the reaction time probability density functions. The model describes a generic class of hyperbolic functions by Piéron's law. The results demonstrate that reaction time distributions are the combination of log-normal with power law density functions. A transition from log-normal to power law behavior is found and depends on the transfer of information in neurons. The conditions to obtain Zipf's law are analyzed. -- Highlights: ► I have examined human reaction time variability by random multiplicative processes. ► A transition from power law to log-normal distributions is described. ► The transition depends on the transfer of information in neurons. ► Zipf's law in reaction time distributions depends on the exponent of Piéron's law.

  5. Use of erroneous wolf generation time in assessments of domestic dog and human evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David; Barber-meyer, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    Scientific interest in dog domestication and parallel evolution of dogs and humans (Wang et al. 2013) has increased recently (Freedman et al. 2014, Larson and Bradley 2014, Franz et al. 2016,), and various important conclusions have been drawn based on how long ago the calculations show dogs were domesticated from ancestral wolves (Canis lupus). Calculation of this duration is based on “the most commonly assumed mutation rate of 1 x 10-8 per generation and a 3-year gray wolf generation time . . .” (Skoglund et al. 2015:3). It is unclear on what information the assumed generation time is based, but Ersmark et al. (2016) seemed to have based their assumption on a single wolf (Mech and Seal 1987). The importance of assuring that such assumptions are valid is obvious. Recently, two independent studies employing three large data sets and three methods from two widely separated areas have found that wolf generation time is 4.2-4.7 years. The first study, based on 200 wolves in Yellowstone National Park used age-specific birth and death rates to calculate a generation time of 4.16 years (vonHoldt et al. 2008). The second, using estimated first-breeding times of 86 female wolves in northeastern Minnesota found a generation time of 4.3 years and using uterine examination of 159 female wolves from throughout Minnesota yielded a generation time of 4.7 years (Mech et al. 2016). We suggest that previous studies using a 3-year generation time recalculate their figures and adjust their conclusions based on these generation times and publish revised results.

  6. Physiological and Molecular Genetic Effects of Time-Varying Electromagnetic Fields on Human Neuronal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    The present investigation details the development of model systems for growing two- and three-dimensional human neural progenitor cells within a culture medium facilitated by a time-varying electromagnetic field (TVEMF). The cells and culture medium are contained within a two- or three-dimensional culture vessel, and the electromagnetic field is emitted from an electrode or coil. These studies further provide methods to promote neural tissue regeneration by means of culturing the neural cells in either configuration. Grown in two dimensions, neuronal cells extended longitudinally, forming tissue strands extending axially along and within electrodes comprising electrically conductive channels or guides through which a time-varying electrical current was conducted. In the three-dimensional aspect, exposure to TVEMF resulted in the development of three-dimensional aggregates, which emulated organized neural tissues. In both experimental configurations, the proliferation rate of the TVEMF cells was 2.5 to 4.0 times the rate of the non-waveform cells. Each of the experimental embodiments resulted in similar molecular genetic changes regarding the growth potential of the tissues as measured by gene chip analyses, which measured more than 10,000 human genes simultaneously.

  7. Human Activity Recognition in Real-Times Environments using Skeleton Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, we proposed a most effective noble approach for Human activity recognition in real-time environments. We recognize several distinct dynamic human activity actions using kinect. A 3D skeleton data is processed from real-time video gesture to sequence of frames and getter skeleton joints (Energy Joints, orientation, rotations of joint angles from selected setof frames. We are using joint angle and orientations, rotations information from Kinect therefore less computation required. However, after extracting the set of frames we implemented several classification techniques Principal Component Analysis (PCA with several distance based classifiers and Artificial Neural Network (ANN respectively with some variants for classify our all different gesture models. However, we conclude that use very less number of frame (10-15% for train our system efficiently from the entire set of gesture frames. Moreover, after successfully completion of our classification methods we clinch an excellent overall accuracy 94%, 96% and 98% respectively. We finally observe that our proposed system is more useful than comparing to other existing system, therefore our model is best suitable for real-time application such as in video games for player action/gesture recognition.

  8. Analysis of compaction initiation in human embryos by using time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kyoko; Yumoto, Keitaro; Sugishima, Minako; Mizoguchi, Chizuru; Kai, Yoshiteru; Iba, Yumiko; Mio, Yasuyuki

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the initiation of compaction in human embryos in vitro by using time-lapse cinematography (TLC), with the goal of determining the precise timing of compaction and clarifying the morphological changes underlying the compaction process. One hundred and fifteen embryos donated by couples with no further need for embryo-transfer were used in this study. Donated embryos were thawed and processed, and then their morphological behavior during the initiation of compaction was dynamically observed via time-lapse cinematography (TLC) for 5 days. Although the initiation of compaction occurred throughout the period from the 4-cell to 16-cell stage, 99 (86.1 %) embryos initiated compaction at the 8-cell stage or later, with initiation at the 8-cell stage being most frequent (22.6 %). Of these 99 embryos, 49.5 % developed into good-quality blastocysts. In contrast, of the 16 (13.9 %) embryos that initiated compaction prior to the 8-cell stage, only 18.8 % developed into good-quality blastocysts. Embryos that initiated compaction before the 8-cell stage showed significantly higher numbers of multinucleated blastomeres, due to asynchronism in nuclear division at the third mitotic division resulting from cytokinetic failure. The initiation of compaction primarily occurs at the third mitotic division or later in human embryos. Embryos that initiate compaction before the 8-cell stage are usually associated with aberrant embryonic development (i.e., cytokinetic failure accompanied by karyokinesis).

  9. Time to decide: Diurnal variations on the speed and quality of human decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, María Juliana; Fernandez Slezak, Diego; Golombek, Diego; Sigman, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    Human behavior and physiology exhibit diurnal fluctuations. These rhythms are entrained by light and social cues, with vast individual differences in the phase of entrainment - referred as an individual's chronotype - ranging in a continuum between early larks and late owls. Understanding whether decision-making in real-life situations depends on the relation between time of the day and an individual's diurnal preferences has both practical and theoretical implications. However, answering this question has remained elusive because of the difficulty of measuring precisely the quality of a decision in real-life scenarios. Here we investigate diurnal variations in decision-making as a function of an individual's chronotype capitalizing on a vast repository of human decisions: online chess servers. In a chess game, every player has to make around 40 decisions using a finite time budget and both the time and quality of each decision can be accurately determined. We found reliable diurnal rhythms in activity and decision-making policy. During the morning, players adopt a prevention focus policy (slower and more accurate decisions) which is later modified to a promotion focus (faster but less accurate decisions), without daily changes in performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Probe tip heating assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  11. Quantitative Models of the Dose-Response and Time Course of Inhalational Anthrax in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Wiley A.; Bulmahn, Kenneth; Walton, Thomas E.; Woods, Christopher W.; Coghill, Catherine; Gallegos, Frank; Samore, Matthew H.; Adler, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    Anthrax poses a community health risk due to accidental or intentional aerosol release. Reliable quantitative dose-response analyses are required to estimate the magnitude and timeline of potential consequences and the effect of public health intervention strategies under specific scenarios. Analyses of available data from exposures and infections of humans and non-human primates are often contradictory. We review existing quantitative inhalational anthrax dose-response models in light of criteria we propose for a model to be useful and defensible. To satisfy these criteria, we extend an existing mechanistic competing-risks model to create a novel Exposure–Infection–Symptomatic illness–Death (EISD) model and use experimental non-human primate data and human epidemiological data to optimize parameter values. The best fit to these data leads to estimates of a dose leading to infection in 50% of susceptible humans (ID50) of 11,000 spores (95% confidence interval 7,200–17,000), ID10 of 1,700 (1,100–2,600), and ID1 of 160 (100–250). These estimates suggest that use of a threshold to human infection of 600 spores (as suggested in the literature) underestimates the infectivity of low doses, while an existing estimate of a 1% infection rate for a single spore overestimates low dose infectivity. We estimate the median time from exposure to onset of symptoms (incubation period) among untreated cases to be 9.9 days (7.7–13.1) for exposure to ID50, 11.8 days (9.5–15.0) for ID10, and 12.1 days (9.9–15.3) for ID1. Our model is the first to provide incubation period estimates that are independently consistent with data from the largest known human outbreak. This model refines previous estimates of the distribution of early onset cases after a release and provides support for the recommended 60-day course of prophylactic antibiotic treatment for individuals exposed to low doses. PMID:24058320

  12. Modular Sampling and Analysis Techniques for the Real-Time Analysis of Human Breath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M; Farquar, G; Adams, K; Bogan, M; Martin, A; Benner, H; Spadaccini, C; Steele, P; Davis, C; Loyola, B; Morgan, J; Sankaran, S

    2007-07-09

    At LLNL and UC Davis, we are developing several techniques for the real-time sampling and analysis of trace gases, aerosols and exhaled breath that could be useful for a modular, integrated system for breath analysis. Those techniques include single-particle bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) for the analysis of exhaled aerosol particles or droplets as well as breath samplers integrated with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or MEMS-based differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). We describe these techniques and present recent data obtained from human breath or breath condensate, in particular, addressing the question of how environmental exposure influences the composition of breath.

  13. A real time study of the human equilibrium using an instrumented insole with 3 pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Ghaida, Hussein; Mottet, Serge; Goujon, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    The present work deals with the study of the human equilibrium using an ambulatory e-health system. One of the point on which we focus is the fall risk, when losing equilibrium control. A specific postural learning model is presented, and an ambulatory instrumented insole is developed using 3 pressures sensors per foot, in order to determine the real-time displacement and the velocity of the centre of pressure (CoP). The increase of these parameters signals a loss of physiological sensation, usually of vision or of the inner ear. The results are compared to those obtained from classical more complex systems.

  14. Evolution of human posture and bipedal locomotion within a provisional time frame of harsh climate changes

    OpenAIRE

    Kurbel, Sven; Rapan, Saša

    2015-01-01

    In this review paper several emerging issues related to development of human posture and locomotion are arranged in a provisional time frame. Accumulated evidences show that the Eurasian climate was often cold and arid with abundant dust in the atmosphere during the last 500 Ky. These dusty periods of cold, aridity and low insolation lasted from 360 to 340 Kya, 270 to 255 Kya, 170 to 130 Kya, 80 to 60 and finally 40 to 10 Kya. They coincide with migrations of Neanderthals a...

  15. Human perception of the measurement of a network attack taxonomy in near real-time

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    van Heerden, R

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available , Pretoria, South Africa malan747@gmail.com 3 University of Rhodes, Computer Science Department, Grahamstown, South Africa b.irwin@ru.ac.za Abstract. This paper investigates how the measurement of a network attack taxonomy can be related to human... perception. Network attacks do not have a time limitation, but the earlier its detected, the more damage can be prevented and the more preventative actions can be taken. This paper evaluate how ele- ments of network attacks can be measured in near real...

  16. A real-time algorithm for predicting core temperature in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribok, Andrei V; Buller, Mark J; Hoyt, Reed W; Reifman, Jaques

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, we present a real-time implementation of a previously developed offline algorithm for predicting core temperature in humans. The real-time algorithm uses a zero-phase Butterworth digital filter to smooth the data and an autoregressive (AR) model to predict core temperature. The performance of the algorithm is assessed in terms of its prediction accuracy, quantified by the root mean squared error (RMSE), and in terms of prediction uncertainty, quantified by statistically based prediction intervals (PIs). To evaluate the performance of the algorithm, we simulated real-time implementation using core-temperature data collected during two different field studies, involving ten different individuals. One of the studies includes a case of heat illness suffered by one of the participants. The results indicate that although the real-time predictions yielded RMSEs that are larger than those of the offline algorithm, the real-time algorithm does produce sufficiently accurate predictions for practically meaningful prediction horizons (approximately 20 min). The algorithm reached alert (39 degrees C) and alarm (39.5 degrees C) thresholds for the heat-ill individual but did not even attain the alert threshold for the other individuals, demonstrating the algorithm's good sensitivity and specificity. The PIs reflected, in an intuitively expected manner, the uncertainty associated with real-time forecast as a function of prediction horizon and core-temperature variability. The results also corroborate the feasibility of "universal" AR models, where an offline-developed model based on one individual's data could be used to predict any other individual in real time. We conclude that the real-time implementation of the algorithm confirms the attributes observed in the offline version and, hence, could be considered as a warning tool for impending heat illnesses.

  17. Newnes electronics assembly handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electronics Assembly Handbook: Techniques, Standards and Quality Assurance focuses on the aspects of electronic assembling. The handbook first looks at the printed circuit board (PCB). Base materials, basic mechanical properties, cleaning of assemblies, design, and PCB manufacturing processes are then explained. The text also discusses surface mounted assemblies and packaging of electromechanical assemblies, as well as the soldering process. Requirements for the soldering process; solderability and protective coatings; cleaning of PCBs; and mass solder/component reflow soldering are des

  18. Real-time imaging of suction blistering in human skin using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Joana C.O.; Palero, Jonathan A.; Jurna, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Separation of skin epidermis from the dermis by suction blistering has been used with high success rate for autologous skin epidermal grafting in burns, chronic wounds and vitiligo transplantation treatment. Although commercial products that achieve epidermal grafting by suction blistering are presently available, there is still limited knowledge and understanding on the dynamic process of epidermal-dermal separation during suction blistering. In this report we integrated a suction system to an Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) which allowed for the first time, real-time imaging of the suction blistering process in human skin. We describe in this report the evolution of a suction blister where the growth is modeled with a Boltzmann sigmoid function. We further investigated the relationship between onset and steady-state blister times, blister growth rate, applied suction pressure and applied local skin temperature. Our results show that while the blister time is inversely proportional to the applied suction pressure, the relationship between the blister time and the applied temperature is described by an exponential decay. PMID:26713194

  19. A real-time system for biomechanical analysis of human movement and muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogert, Antonie J; Geijtenbeek, Thomas; Even-Zohar, Oshri; Steenbrink, Frans; Hardin, Elizabeth C

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical analysis of movement plays an important role in clinical management of neurological and orthopedic conditions. There has been increasing interest in performing movement analysis in real-time, to provide immediate feedback to both therapist and patient. However, such work to date has been limited to single-joint kinematics and kinetics. Here we present a software system, named human body model (HBM), to compute joint kinematics and kinetics for a full body model with 44 degrees of freedom, in real-time, and to estimate length changes and forces in 300 muscle elements. HBM was used to analyze lower extremity function during gait in 12 able-bodied subjects. Processing speed exceeded 120 samples per second on standard PC hardware. Joint angles and moments were consistent within the group, and consistent with other studies in the literature. Estimated muscle force patterns were consistent among subjects and agreed qualitatively with electromyography, to the extent that can be expected from a biomechanical model. The real-time analysis was integrated into the D-Flow system for development of custom real-time feedback applications and into the gait real-time analysis interactive lab system for gait analysis and gait retraining.

  20. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  1. Design for interaction between humans and intelligent systems during real-time fault management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schreckenghost, Debra L.; Thronesbery, Carroll G.

    1992-01-01

    Initial results are reported to provide guidance and assistance for designers of intelligent systems and their human interfaces. The objective is to achieve more effective human-computer interaction (HCI) for real time fault management support systems. Studies of the development of intelligent fault management systems within NASA have resulted in a new perspective of the user. If the user is viewed as one of the subsystems in a heterogeneous, distributed system, system design becomes the design of a flexible architecture for accomplishing system tasks with both human and computer agents. HCI requirements and design should be distinguished from user interface (displays and controls) requirements and design. Effective HCI design for multi-agent systems requires explicit identification of activities and information that support coordination and communication between agents. The effects are characterized of HCI design on overall system design and approaches are identified to addressing HCI requirements in system design. The results include definition of (1) guidance based on information level requirements analysis of HCI, (2) high level requirements for a design methodology that integrates the HCI perspective into system design, and (3) requirements for embedding HCI design tools into intelligent system development environments.

  2. An ultrasensitive time-resolved immunofluorometric assay of human epidermal growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, K; Alfthan, H; Stenman, U H; Viinikka, L; Perheentupa, J

    1986-09-01

    We have developed a sandwich-type time-resolved immunofluorometric assay (TR-IFMA) for human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) in body fluids. A two-step solid-phase technique was used. The assay utilizes a polyclonal anti-hEGF attached to the solid phase, and a monoclonal anti-hEGF labeled with Europium (III) as a tracer. The sensitivity of the assay (2.5 pg/ml) is at least 20 times better than what has been achieved by radioimmunoassay (RIA), and the measuring range is much wider: 2.5-5000 pg/ml. The feasibility of TR-IFMA was tested by assaying urine containing large amounts and amniotic fluid containing small amounts (mostly undetectable by RIA) of immunoreactive hEGF. The correlation between urine hEGF concentrations (1-100 ng/ml) measured by RIA and TR-IFMA was good: r = 0.96.

  3. Ultrasensitive PCR and real-time detection from human genomic samples using a bidirectional flow microreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; West, Jonathan; Auroux, Pierre-Alain; Manz, Andreas; Day, Philip J R

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we present a reliable bidirectional flow DNA amplification microreactor for processing real-world genomic samples. This system shares the low-power thermal responsiveness of a continuous flow reactor with the low surface area to volume ratio character of stationary reactors for reducing surface inhibitory effects. Silanization with dimethyldichlorosilane in combination with dynamic surface passivation was used to enhance PCR compatibility and enable efficient amplification. For real-time fragment amplification monitoring we have implemented an epimodal fluorescent detection capability. The passivated bidirectional flow system was ultrasensitive, achieving an RNase P gene detection limit of 24 human genome copies with a reaction efficiency of 77%. This starts to rival the performance of a conventional real-time PCR instrument with a reaction efficiency of 93% and revitalizes flow-through PCR as a viable component of lab on a chip DNA analysis formats.

  4. Steady state and time-resolved autofluorescence studies of human colonic tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Buhong Li; Zhenxi Zhang; Shusen Xie

    2006-01-01

    Steady state and time-resolved autofluorescence spectroscopies are employed to study the autofluorescence characteristics of human colonic tissues in vitro. The excitation wavelength varies from 260 to 540 nm, and the corresponding fluorescence emission spectra are acquired from 280 to 800 nm. Significant difference in fluorescence intensity of excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) is observed between normal and tumor colonic tissues. Compared with normal colonic tissue, low nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and high amino acids and protoporphyrin Ⅸ (PpⅨ) fluorescences characterize high-grade malignant tissue. Moreover, the autofluorescence lifetimes of normal and carcinomatous colonic tissues at 635 nm under 397-nm excitation are about 4.32±0.12 and 18.45±0.05 ns, respectively. The high accumulation of endogenous PpⅨ in colonic cancers is demonstrated in both steady state and time-resolved autofluorescence spectroscopies.

  5. Energy-Efficient Real-Time Human Activity Recognition on Smart Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, human activity recognition (HAR plays an important role in wellness-care and context-aware systems. Human activities can be recognized in real-time by using sensory data collected from various sensors built in smart mobile devices. Recent studies have focused on HAR that is solely based on triaxial accelerometers, which is the most energy-efficient approach. However, such HAR approaches are still energy-inefficient because the accelerometer is required to run without stopping so that the physical activity of a user can be recognized in real-time. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for HAR process that controls the activity recognition duration for energy-efficient HAR. We investigated the impact of varying the acceleration-sampling frequency and window size for HAR by using the variable activity recognition duration (VARD strategy. We implemented our approach by using an Android platform and evaluated its performance in terms of energy efficiency and accuracy. The experimental results showed that our approach reduced energy consumption by a minimum of about 44.23% and maximum of about 78.85% compared to conventional HAR without sacrificing accuracy.

  6. Time-dependent mechanical behavior of human amnion: macroscopic and microscopic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Arabella; Perrini, Michela; Ehret, Alexander E; De Focatiis, Davide S A; Mazza, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the mechanical response of the human amnion is essential to understand and to eventually prevent premature rupture of fetal membranes. In this study, a large set of macroscopic and microscopic mechanical tests have been carried out on fresh unfixed amnion to gain insight into the time-dependent material response and the underlying mechanisms. Creep and relaxation responses of amnion were characterized in macroscopic uniaxial tension, biaxial tension and inflation configurations. For the first time, these experiments were complemented by microstructural information from nonlinear laser scanning microscopy performed during in situ uniaxial relaxation tests. The amnion showed large tension reduction during relaxation and small inelastic strain accumulation in creep. The short-term relaxation response was related to a concomitant in-plane and out-of-plane contraction, and was dependent on the testing configuration. The microscopic investigation revealed a large volume reduction at the beginning, but no change of volume was measured long-term during relaxation. Tension-strain curves normalized with respect to the maximum strain were highly repeatable in all configurations and allowed the quantification of corresponding characteristic parameters. The present data indicate that dissipative behavior of human amnion is related to two mechanisms: (i) volume reduction due to water outflow (up to ∼20 s) and (ii) long-term dissipative behavior without macroscopic deformation and no systematic global reorientation of collagen fibers.

  7. Using recruitment source timing and diagnosticity to enhance applicants' occupation-specific human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Michael C; Ployhart, Robert E; Campion, Michael A

    2017-05-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 102(5) of Journal of Applied Psychology (see record 2017-14296-001). In the article, the following headings were inadvertently set at the wrong level: Method, Participants and Procedure, Measures, Occupation specific human capital, Symbolic jobs, Relevant majors, Occupation-specific capital hotspots, Source timing, Source diagnosticity, Results, and Discussion. All versions of this article have been corrected.] This study proposes that reaching applicants through more diagnostic recruitment sources earlier in their educational development (e.g., in high school) can lead them to invest more in their occupation-specific human capital (OSHC), thereby making them higher quality candidates. Using a sample of 78,157 applicants applying for jobs within a desirable professional occupation in the public sector, results indicate that applicants who report hearing about the occupation earlier, and applicants who report hearing about the occupation through more diagnostic sources, have higher levels of OSHC upon application. Additionally, source timing and diagnosticity affect the likelihood of candidates applying for jobs symbolic of the occupation, selecting relevant majors, and attending educational institutions with top programs related to the occupation. These findings suggest a firm's recruiting efforts may influence applicants' OSHC investment strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Distortion effects in a switch array UWB radar for time-lapse imaging of human heartbeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovoll, Sverre; Berger, Tor; Aardal, Åyvind; Lande, Tor S.; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a major cause of deaths all over the world. Microwave radar can be an alternative sensor for heart diagnostics and monitoring in modern healthcare that aids early detection of CVD symptoms. In this paper measurements from a switch array radar system are presented. This UWB system operates below 3 GHz and does time-lapse imaging of the beating heart inside the human body. The array consists of eight fat dipole elements. With a switch system, every possible sequence of transmit/receive element pairs can be selected to build a radar image from the recordings. To make the radar waves penetrate the human tissue, the antenna array is placed in contact with the body. Removal of the direct signal leakage through the antennas and body surface are done by high-pass (HP) filtering of the data prior to image processing. To analyze the results, measurements of moving spheres in air and simulations are carried out. We see that removal of the direct signal introduces amplitude distortion in the images. In addition, the effect of small target motion between the collection times of data from the individual elements is analyzed. With low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) this motion will distort the image. By using data from real measurements of heart motion in simulations, we analyze how the PRF and the antenna geometry influence this distortions.

  9. In a Time of Change: Integrating the Arts and Humanities with Climate Change Science in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, M.; Golux, S.; Franzen, K.

    2011-12-01

    The arts and humanities have a powerful capacity to create lines of communication between the public, policy and scientific spheres. A growing network of visual and performing artists, writers and scientists has been actively working together since 2007 to integrate scientific and artistic perspectives on climate change in interior Alaska. These efforts have involved field workshops and collaborative creative processes culminating in public performances and a visual art exhibit. The most recent multimedia event was entitled In a Time of Change: Envisioning the Future, and challenged artists and scientists to consider future scenarios of climate change. This event included a public performance featuring original theatre, modern dance, Alaska Native Dance, poetry and music that was presented concurrently with an art exhibit featuring original works by 24 Alaskan visual artists. A related effort targeted K12 students, through an early college course entitled Climate Change and Creative Expression, which was offered to high school students at a predominantly Alaska Native charter school and integrated climate change science, creative writing, theatre and dance. Our program at Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site is just one of many successful efforts to integrate arts and humanities with science within and beyond the NSF LTER Program. The efforts of various LTER sites to engage the arts and humanities with science, the public and policymakers have successfully generated excitement, facilitated mutual understanding, and promoted meaningful dialogue on issues facing science and society. The future outlook for integration of arts and humanities with science appears promising, with increasing interest from artists, scientists and scientific funding agencies.

  10. Determining baselines for human-elephant conflict: A matter of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Rocío A; Coulson, Tim; McCulloch, Graham; Stronza, Amanda L; Songhurst, Anna C

    2017-01-01

    Elephant crop raiding is one of the most relevant forms of human-elephant conflict (HEC) in Africa. Northern Botswana holds the largest population of African elephants in the world, and in the eastern Okavango Panhandle, 16,000 people share and compete for resources with more than 11,000 elephants. Hence, it is not surprising this area represents a HEC 'hotspot' in the region. Crop-raiding impacts lead to negative perceptions of elephants by local communities, which can strongly undermine conservation efforts. Therefore, assessing trends in conflict levels is essential to developing successful management strategies. In this context, we investigated the trend in the number of reported raiding incidents as one of the indicators of the level of HEC, and assessed its relationship to trends in human and elephant population size, as well as land-use in the study area. For each of these factors, we considered data spanning historical (since the 1970s) and contemporary (2008-2015) time frames, with the aim of comparing subsequent inferences on the drivers of crop raiding and predictions for the future. We find that the level of reported crop raiding by elephants in the eastern Panhandle appears to have decreased since 2008, which seems to be related to the reduction in agricultural land allocated to people in recent years, more than with human and elephant population size. We show that inferences regarding the drivers of HEC and predictions for the future are dependent on the time span of the data used. Although our study represents a first step in developing a HEC baseline in the eastern Panhandle, it highlights the need for additional multi-scale analyses that consider progress in conservation conflict to better understand and predict drivers of HEC in the region.

  11. ULTRASONIC ASSEMBLY [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PORAV Viorica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper exposes the possibility of machine producesers to optimize the costs of clothes assembling. Ultrasonic systems being frequently utilized have many advantages on semi products of synthetic textile and technical textile. First of all, sewing – cutting process can be accomplished under high speeds and rate of losses can be minimized. Cutting seal applications are frequently used for underwear and sportswear. Slicing and unit cutting machines, as well as portable sealing machines are available for labeling sector. Products such as bag, pocket and cover can be sewed in a seamless manner for promotion purposes. All objects in terms of accessories are obtained in same standard. Our quilting machines are preferred in worldwide due to its threadless, high quality sealing. An alternative to the classic sewing assembly, with thread and needles is ultrasonic seaming. In ultrasonic welding, there are no connective bolts, nails, soldering materials, or adhesives necessary to bind the materials together. Ultrasonic is defined as acoustic frequencies above the range audible to the human ear. Ultrasonic frequencies are administered to the fabric from the sonotrode of bonding machine. The high frequency and powerful energy produced, when is release in one special environment, the ultrasound heating this environment. The ability to ultrasonic weld textiles and films depend on their thermoplastic contents and the desired end results. The paper defines the weld ability of more common textiles and films. The welding refers to all types of bonding and sealing, as in point bonding of fabric, or continuous sealing of film.

  12. Real-Time Hand Posture Recognition for Human-Robot Interaction Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Belmonte, Uriel Haile; Ayala-Ramirez, Victor

    2016-01-04

    In this work, we present a multiclass hand posture classifier useful for human-robot interaction tasks. The proposed system is based exclusively on visual sensors, and it achieves a real-time performance, whilst detecting and recognizing an alphabet of four hand postures. The proposed approach is based on the real-time deformable detector, a boosting trained classifier. We describe a methodology to design the ensemble of real-time deformable detectors (one for each hand posture that can be classified). Given the lack of standard procedures for performance evaluation, we also propose the use of full image evaluation for this purpose. Such an evaluation methodology provides us with a more realistic estimation of the performance of the method. We have measured the performance of the proposed system and compared it to the one obtained by using only the sampled window approach. We present detailed results of such tests using a benchmark dataset. Our results show that the system can operate in real time at about a 10-fps frame rate.

  13. Time pattern locking scheme for secure multimedia contents in human-centric device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Jun-Ho; Park, Jong Hyuk; Jeong, Young-Sik