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Sample records for human aromatase complex

  1. Inhibition of human aromatase complex (CYP19) by antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Birkved, Franziska Maria A Kramer

    2008-01-01

    of 1.4-49.7 mM. Carbamazepine, gabapentin, primidone, topiramate and vigabatrin showed no inhibition. Additionally, binary drug combinations were tested to investigate if combination therapy could potentiate the aromatase inhibition. Additive inhibition was seen in combination experiments...... with valproate and phenobarbital. When adding carbamazepine to a range of valproate concentrations no additional inhibition was seen. The data for some of the AEDs show that side effects on steroid synthesis in humans due to inhibition of aromatase should be considered....

  2. Local aromatase activity in human breast tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, J H; Daroszewski, J; Milewicz, A; Blankenstein, M A

    1993-03-01

    The presence of oestradiol in malignant breast cells is considered to be an important factor in the promotion of growth of the tumor. Therefore the regulation of the local high intra-tissue oestradiol concentrations, regardless of plasma concentrations, has been investigated. Experimental evidence suggests that in situ biosynthesis of oestrogens is at least partly responsible for the local accumulation of these steroids. In this paper we report further data on measurements in fatty and tumor tissues of local aromatase activities and of concentrations of substrates and products of this enzyme. Data are given on localization of aromatase and on steroid concentrations in tumors and in adipose tissues dissected from different quadrants of breasts with malignant tumors. In adipose tissues small variations in steroid concentrations in fatty tissues were found. No tumor-directed gradients in the adipose tissue-concentrations of the androgens dehydro-epiandrosterone, 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol, 4-androstene-3,17-dione and testosterone and of the oestrogens oestradiol, oestrone and their sulfates could be detected. Furthermore no consistent pattern could be recognized in the aromatase activities in the fatty tissues dissected from tumor-bearing and non-affected quadrants of the same breast. No correlations between aromatase activity measured in vitro and product concentrations in vivo were found. Therefore the mechanisms for regulation of the local oestradiol levels in breast tissues remain unknown.

  3. Human aromatase: perspectives in biochemistry and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, Giovanna; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Aromatase (CYP19) is involved in steroidogenesis, catalyzing the conversion of androgens into estrogens through a unique reaction that causes the aromatization of the A ring of the steroid. The enzyme is widely distributed and well conserved among species as it plays a crucial role in physiological processes such as control of reproduction and neuroprotection. It has also been a subject of intense research both at the biotechnological level in drug development due to its involvement in estrogen-dependent tumors and at a fundamental biochemical level because there are numerous questions regarding its reaction mechanism. This review will report the great progress made in this area. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Aromatase reaction of 3-deoxyandrogens: steric mode of the C-19 oxygenation and cleavage of the C10-C19 bond by human placental aromatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Nagaoka, Masao; Sohtome, Norishige

    2005-08-16

    Aromatase is a cytochrome P-450 enzyme complex that catalyzes the conversion of androst-4-ene-3,17-dione (AD) to estrone and formic acid through three sequential oxygenations of the 19-methyl group. To gain insight into the catalytic function of aromatase as well as the mechanism of the hitherto uncertain third oxygenation step, we focused on the aromatase-catalyzed 19-oxygenation of 3-deoxyandrogens: 3-deoxy-AD (1), which is a very powerful competitive inhibitor but poor substrate of aromatase, and its 5-ene isomer 4, which is a good competitive inhibitor and effective substrate of the enzyme. In incubations of their 19S-(3)H-labeled 19-hydroxy derivatives 2 and 5 and the corresponding 19R-(3)H isomers with human placental microsomes in the presence of NADPH under air, the radioactivity was liberated in both water and formic acid. The productions of (3)H(2)O and (3)HCOOH were blocked by the substrate AD or the inhibitor 4-hydroxy-AD, indicating that these productions are due to a catalytic function of aromatase. A comparison of the (3)H(2)O production from S-(3)H substrates 2 and 5 with that from the corresponding R-(3)H isomers revealed that the 19-pro-R hydrogen atom was stereospecifically (pro-R:pro-S = 100:0) removed in the conversion of 5-ene substrate 5 into the 19-oxo product 6, whereas 75:25 stereoselectivity for the loss of the pro-R and pro-S hydrogen atoms was observed in the oxygenation of the other substrate, 2. The present results reveal that human placental aromatase catalyzes three sequential oxygenations at C-19 of 3-deoxyandrogens 1 and 4 to cause the cleavage of the C(10)-C(19) bond through their 19-hydroxy (2 and 5) and 19-oxo (3 and 6) intermediates, respectively, where there is a difference in the stereochemistry between the two androgens in the second 19-hydroxylation. It is implied that the aromatase-catalyzed 19-oxygenation of 5-ene steroid 4 but not the 4-ene isomer 1 would proceed in the same steric mechanism as that involved in the AD

  5. Relation among Aromatase P450 and Tumoral Growth in Human Prolactinomas

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    María José García-Barrado

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The pituitary gland is part of hypothalamic-pituitary–gonadal axis, which controls development, reproduction, and aging in humans and animals. In addition, the pituitary gland is regulated mainly by hormones and neurotransmitters released from the hypothalamus and by systemic hormones secreted by target glands. Aromatase P450, the enzyme responsible for the catabolization of aromatizable androgens to estrogens, is expressed in different parts of body, including the pituitary gland. Moreover, aromatase P450 is involved in sexual dimorphism where alteration in the level of aromatase can initiate a number of diseases in both genders. On the other hand, the direct actions of estrogens, mainly estradiol, are well known for stimulating prolactin release. Numerous studies have shown that changes in the levels of estrogens, among other factors, have been implicated in the genesis and development of prolactinoma. The pituitary gland can produce estradiol locally in several types of endocrine cells, and it is possible that aromatase could be responsible for the maintenance of the population of lactotroph cells and the modulation of the action of central or peripheral regulators. Aromatase overexpression due to inappropriate gene regulation has clinical effects such as the pathogenesis of prolactinomas. The present study reports on the synthesis of pituitary aromatase, its regulation by gonadal steroids, and the physiological roles of aromatase on pituitary endocrine cells. The involvement of aromatase in the pathogenesis of pituitary tumors, mainly prolactinomas, through the auto-paracrine production of estradiol is reviewed.

  6. Aromatase activity in human skin fibroblasts grown in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitz, G D; Brown, T R; Fujimoto, M

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies in this laboratory have described an unusual kindred in which gynecomastia resulted from abnormally elevated levels of extraglandular aromatase activity. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for the abnormal aromatase activity in these and other patients, we explored the aromatase activity of genital skin fibroblasts. Our studies demonstrate that the kinetic parameters for aromatase in skin are similar to those of other cultured cells and suggest that skin is an important site of extraglandular aromatase activity. These cells also contain 5 alpha-reductase activity and androgen receptors and are, therefore, a model for androgen action and metabolism. For example, they provided a system for the study of the potency and specificity of the aromatase inhibitors 4-OHA and MDL 18,962. Finally, the influence of DEX on aromatase in genital skin fibroblasts differs in some important respects from the pattern of control observed in adipose tissue stromal-vascular cells. These findings suggest that investigating the molecular mechanisms for the regulation of aromatase in skin may provide unique information about the control of the enzyme.

  7. The critical iron-oxygen intermediate in human aromatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Stephanie L; Denisov, Ilia G; Grinkova, Yelena V; Sligar, Stephen G

    2009-09-11

    Aromatase (CYP19) is the target of several therapeutics used for breast cancer treatment and catalyzes the three-step conversion of androgens to estrogens, with an unusual C-C cleavage reaction in the third step. To better understand the CYP19 reaction, the oxy-ferrous complex of CYP19 with androstenedione substrate was cryotrapped, characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, and cryoreduced to generate the next reaction cycle intermediate. EPR analysis revealed that the initial intermediate observed following cryoreduction is the unprotonated g(1)=2.254 peroxo-ferric intermediate, which is stable up to 180K. Upon gradual cryoannealing, the low-spin (g(1)=2.39) product complex is formed, with no evidence for accumulation of the g(1)=2.30 hydroperoxo-ferric intermediate. The relative stabilization of the peroxo-ferric heme and the lack of observed hydroperoxo-ferric heme distinguish CYP19 from other P450s, suggesting that the proton delivery pathway is more hindered in CYP19 than in most other P450s.

  8. Aromatase in human endometrial carcinoma and hyperplasia. Immunohistochemical, in situ hybridization, and biochemical studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, K.; Sasano, H.; Harada, N.; Ozaki, M.; Niikura, H.; Sato, S.; Yajima, A.

    1995-01-01

    The expression of P450 aromatase and other steroidogenic enzymes were evaluated in 42 endometrioid endometrial carcinomas, 23 endometrial hyperplasias, and 7 normal endometrial specimens. These findings were correlated with clinicopathological findings to elucidate the possible biological significance of in situ estrogen production in the development of human endometrial carcinoma. Only weak aromatase immunoreactivity was observed in vascular walls and myometrial cells. In contrast, strong ar...

  9. Investigation of aromatase inhibitory activity of metal complexes of 8-hydroxyquinoline and uracil derivatives

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    Prachayasittikul V

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Veda Prachayasittikul,1 Ratchanok Pingaew,2 Chanin Nantasenamat,3 Supaluk Prachayasittikul,3 Somsak Ruchirawat,4,5 Virapong Prachayasittikul1 1Department of Clinical Microbiology and Applied Technology, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok, Thailand; 3Center of Data Mining and Biomedical Informatics, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry, Chulabhorn Research Institute, 5Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Bangkok, Thailand Purpose: Estrogens play important roles in the pathogenesis and progression of breast cancer as well as estrogen-related diseases. Aromatase is a key enzyme in the rate-limiting step of estrogen production, in which its inhibition is one strategy for controlling estrogen levels to improve prognosis of estrogen-related cancers and diseases. Herein, a series of metal (Mn, Cu, and Ni complexes of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ and uracil derivatives (4–9 were investigated for their aromatase inhibitory and cytotoxic activities. Methods: The aromatase inhibition assay was performed according to a Gentest™ kit using CYP19 enzyme, wherein ketoconazole and letrozole were used as reference drugs. The cytotoxicity was tested on normal embryonic lung cells (MRC-5 using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Results: Only Cu complexes (6 and 9 exhibited aromatase inhibitory effect with IC50 0.30 and 1.7 µM, respectively. Cytotoxicity test against MRC-5 cells showed that Mn and Cu complexes (5 and 6, as well as free ligand 8HQ, exhibited activity with IC50 range 0.74–6.27 µM. Conclusion: Cu complexes (6 and 9 were found to act as a novel class of aromatase inhibitor. Our findings suggest that these 8HQ–Cu–uracil complexes are promising agents that could be potentially developed as a selective anticancer agent for breast cancer

  10. Inhibition of aromatase activity by methyl sulfonyl PCB metabolites in primary culture of human mammary fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M. van den; Heneweer, M.; Geest, M. de; Sanderson, T. [Inst. for Risk Assessment Sciences and Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands); Jong, P. de [St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Bergman, A. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Methyl sulfonyl PCB metabolites (MeSO2-PCBs) are persistent contaminants and are ubiquitously present in humans and the environment. Lipophilicity of MeSO2- PCB metabolites is similar to the parent compounds and they have been detected in human milk, adipose, liver and lung tissue. 4- MeSO2-PCB-149 is the most abundant PCB metabolite in human adipose tissue and milk at a level of 1.5 ng/g lipids. Human blood concentration of 4-MeSO2-PCB-149 is approximately 0.03 nM. 3- MeSO2-PCB-101 is the predominant PCB metabolite in muscle and blubber in wildlife, such as otter, mink and grey seal. In the environment, they have been linked to chronic and reproductive toxicity in exposed mink. Additionaly, some MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs have been shown to be glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists. Since approximately 60% of all breast tumors are estrogen responsive, exposure to compounds that are able to alter estrogen synthesis through interference with the aromatase enzyme, can lead to changes in estrogen levels and possibly to accelerated or inhibit breast tumor growth. Therefore, it is important to identify exogenous compounds that can alter aromatase activity in addition to those compounds which have direct interaction with the estrogen receptor (ER). Aromatase (CYP19) comprises the ubiquitous flavoprotein, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and a unique cytochrome P450 that is exclusively expressed in estrogen producing cells. Previous studies have revealed that expression of the aromatase gene is regulated in a species- and tissue specific manner. In healthy breast tissue, the predominantly active aromatase promoter region I.4 is regulated by glucocorticoids and class I cytokines. Therefore, it is important to investigate possible aromatase inhibiting properties of MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs (as anti glucocorticoids?) in relevant human tissues. We used primary human mammary fibroblasts because of their role in breast cancer development. We compared the results in primary fibroblasts with

  11. The cytochrome P450 aromatase lacking exon 5 is associated with a phenotype of nonclassic aromatase deficiency and is also present in normal human steroidogenic tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Pepe Carolina M; Saraco Nora I; Baquedano Maria Sonia; Guercio Gabriela; Vaiani Elisa; Marino Roxana; Pandey Amit V; Flück Christa E; Rivarola Marco A; Belgorosky Alicia

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The previously described c655G>A mutation of the human cytochrome P450 aromatase gene (P450aro CYP19) results in aberrant splicing due to disruption of a donor splice site. To explain the phenotype of partial aromatase deficiency observed in a female patient described with this mutation molecular consequences of the c655G>A mutation were investigated. DESIGN To investigate whether the c655G>A mutation causes an aberrant spliced mRNA lacking exon 5 ( Ex5) P450aro RNA was analysed fro...

  12. New insights about the evaluation of human sperm quality: the aromatase example.

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    A Saad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Male contribution to the couple's infertility is at first evaluated by the routine examination of semen parameters upon optical microscopy providing valuable information for a rational initial diagnosis and for a clinical management of infertility. But the different forms of infertility defined according to the WHO criteria especially teratozoospermia are not always related to the chromatin structure or to the fertilization capacity. New investigations at the molecular level (transcript and protein could be developed in order to understand the nature of sperm malformation responsible of human infertility and thus to evaluate the sperm quality. The profile analysis of spermatozoal transcripts could be considered as a fingerprint of the past spermatogenic events. The selection of representative transcripts of normal spermatozoa remains complex because a differential expression (increased, decreased or not modified levels of specific transcripts has been revealed between immotile and motile sperm fractions issued from normozoospermic donors. Microarrays tests or real-time quantitative PCR could be helpful for the identification of factors involved in the male infertility. Differences in the expression of specific transcripts have been reported between normal and abnormal semen samples. With the aromatase example, we have noted a negative strong correlation between the amount of transcript and the percentage of abnormal forms especially in presence of head defects. Immunocytochemical procedures using fluorescent probes associated with either confocal microscopy or flow cytometry can be also helpful to proceed with further investigations about the localization of proteins in the compartmentalized spermatozoa or the acrosome reaction. The dual location of aromatase both in the equatorial segment, the mid-piece and the tail could explain the double role of this enzyme in acrosome reaction and motility.

  13. Relation among Aromatase P450 and Tumoral Growth in Human Prolactinomas

    OpenAIRE

    María José García-Barrado; Blanco, Enrique J.; María Carmen Iglesias-Osma; Marta Carretero-Hernández; Leonardo Catalano-Iniesta; Virginia Sanchez-Robledo; Manuel Carretero; Julio Joaquín Herrero; Sixto Carrero; José Carretero

    2017-01-01

    The pituitary gland is part of hypothalamic-pituitary–gonadal axis, which controls development, reproduction, and aging in humans and animals. In addition, the pituitary gland is regulated mainly by hormones and neurotransmitters released from the hypothalamus and by systemic hormones secreted by target glands. Aromatase P450, the enzyme responsible for the catabolization of aromatizable androgens to estrogens, is expressed in different parts of body, including the pituitary gland. Moreover, ...

  14. Limonoids and their anti-proliferative and anti-aromatase properties in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhee; Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2013-02-01

    Lemons are a widely used citrus crop and have shown several potential health benefits. In the present study, the mechanism and effectiveness of the anti-cancer and anti-aromatase properties of limonoids were investigated for the first time. Defatted lemon (Citrus lemon L. Burm) seed powder was extracted with ethyl acetate (EtOAc) and methanol (MeOH) for 16 h each, successively. These extracts were fractionated using 1D (silica) and 2D (ion exchange and SP-70 columns) column chromatography to obtain nine limonoids. The compounds were identified by TLC, HPLC, and LC-MS techniques. A panel of 9 purified limonoids, including limonin, nomilin, obacunone, limonexic acid (LNA), isolimonexic acid (ILNA), nomilinic acid glucoside (NAG), deacetyl nomilinic acid glucoside (DNAG), limonin glucoside (LG) and obacunone glucoside (OG) as well as 4 modified compounds such as limonin methoxime (LM), limonin oxime (LO), defuran limonin (DL), and defuran nomilin (DN), were screened for their cytotoxicity on estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (MCF-7) or ER-negative (MDA-MB-231) human breast cancer cells. We further tested the mechanism of the anti-proliferative activity of limonoids using an in vitro aromatase enzyme assay and western blot with anti-caspase-7. Among the tested limonoids, 11 limonoids exhibited cytotoxicity on MCF-7 whereas 8 limonoids showed cytotoxicity against the MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Although most of the limonoids showed anti-aromatase activity, the inhibition of proliferation was not related to the anti-aromatase activity. On the other hand, the anti-proliferative activity was significantly correlated with caspase-7 activation by limonoids. Our findings indicated that the citrus limonoids may have potential for the prevention of estrogen-responsive breast cancer (MCF-7) via caspase-7 dependent pathways.

  15. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric study of 19-oxygenation of the aromatase inhibitor 19-methylandrostenedione with human placental microsomes.

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    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Nagaoka, Masao; Handa, Wakako; Yamada, Akane

    2006-06-01

    To gain insight into the catalytic function of aromatase, we studied 19-oxygenation of 19-methyl-substituted derivative of the natural substrate androstenedione (AD), compound 1, with human placental aromatase by use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Incubation of the 19-methyl derivative 1 with human placental microsomes in the presence of NADPH under an aerobic condition did not yield a detectable amount of [19S]19-hydroxy product 2 or its [19R]-isomer 3 when the product was analyzed as the bis-methoxime-trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative by GC-MS; moreover, the production of estrogen was not detected as the bis-TMS derivative of estradiol (detection limit: about 3 ng and 10 pg per injection for the 19-ol and estradiol, respectively). The results reveal that the 19-methyl steroid 1 does not serve as a substrate of aromatase, although it does serve as a powerful inhibitor of the enzyme.

  16. Mammary gland development in transgenic male mice expressing human P450 aromatase.

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    Li, Xiangdong; Wärri, Anni; Mäkelä, Sari; Ahonen, Tommi; Streng, Tomi; Santti, Risto; Poutanen, Matti

    2002-10-01

    We recently generated a transgenic mouse strain that expresses the human aromatase gene under the ubiquitin C promoter (AROM+). We have previously shown that in these mice the serum estradiol concentration is highly elevated, whereas the testosterone concentration is decreased. In the present study we examined mammary gland development in AROM+ male mice at different ages and found that the mammary glands of AROM+ males undergo ductal and alveolar development morphologically resembling that of terminally differentiated female mammary glands, expressing mRNA for a milk protein gene (beta-casein). The male mammary glands also express multiple hormone receptors typical for female mammary gland: estrogen receptor alpha and beta, progesterone receptor, and PRL receptor. Furthermore, data showed activation of the Stat5 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 5) signaling pathway in the AROM+ male mammary gland. Interestingly, the phenotype observed is in part reversible. Treatment with finrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, caused an involution of the differentiated phenotype of the mammary gland, marked by the disappearance of alveolar structures and the majority of the tertiary side branches of the ducts. The present animal model is a valuable tool for better understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the development of gynecomastia.

  17. Modulation of Aromatase by Phytoestrogens

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    Edwin D. Lephart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aromatase enzyme catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens in many human tissues. Estrogens are known to stimulate cellular proliferation associated with certain cancers and protect against adverse symptoms during the peri- and postmenopausal intervals. Phytoestrogens are a group of plant derived naturally occurring compounds that have chemical structures similar to estrogen. Since phytoestrogens are known to be constituents of animal/human food sources, these compounds have received increased research attention. Phytoestrogens may contribute to decreased cancer risk by the inhibition of aromatase enzyme activity and CYP19 gene expression in human tissues. This review covers (a the aromatase enzyme (historical descriptions on function, activity, and gene characteristics, (b phytoestrogens in their classifications and applications to human health, and (c a chronological coverage of aromatase activity modulated by phytoestrogens from the early 1980s to 2015. In general, phytoestrogens act as aromatase inhibitors by (a decreasing aromatase gene expression, (b inhibiting the aromatase enzyme itself, or (c in some cases acting at both levels of regulation. The findings presented herein are consistent with estrogen’s impact on health and phytoestrogen’s potential as anticancer treatments, but well-controlled, large-scale studies are warranted to determine the effectiveness of phytoestrogens on breast cancer and age-related diseases.

  18. Unique Distribution of Aromatase in the Human Brain: In Vivo Studies With PET and [N-Methyl-11C]Vorozole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A.; Biegon, A.; Kim, S.W.; Alexoff, D.; Millard, J.; Carter, P.; Hubbard, B.; King, P.; Logan, J.; Muench, L.; Pareto, D.; Schlyer, D.; Shea, C.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Xu, Y.; Fowler, J.

    2010-10-01

    Aromatase catalyzes the last step in estrogen biosynthesis. Brain aromatase is involved in diverse neurophysiological and behavioral functions including sexual behavior, aggression, cognition, and neuroprotection. Using positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiolabeled aromatase inhibitor [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]vorozole, we characterized the tracer distribution and kinetics in the living human brain. Six young, healthy subjects, three men and three women, were administered the radiotracer alone on two separate occasions. Women were scanned in distinct phases of the menstrual cycle. Specificity was confirmed by pretreatment with a pharmacological (2.5 mg) dose of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. PET data were acquired over a 90-min period and regions of interest placed over selected brain regions. Brain and plasma time activity curves, corrected for metabolites, were used to derive kinetic parameters. Distribution volume (V{sub T}) values in both men and women followed the following rank order: thalamus > amygdala = preoptic area > medulla (inferior olive) > accumbens, pons, occipital and temporal cortex, putamen, cerebellum, and white matter. Pretreatment with letrozole reduced VT in all regions, though the size of the reduction was region-dependent, ranging from {approx}70% blocking in thalamus andpreoptic area to {approx}10% in cerebellum. The high levels of aromatase in thalamus and medulla (inferior olive) appear to be unique to humans. These studies set the stage for the noninvasive assessment of aromatase involvement in various physiological and pathological processes affecting the human brain.

  19. Unique distribution of aromatase in the human brain: in vivo studies with PET and [N-methyl-11C]vorozole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegon, Anat; Kim, Sung Won; Alexoff, David L; Jayne, Millard; Carter, Pauline; Hubbard, Barbara; King, Payton; Logan, Jean; Muench, Lisa; Pareto, Deborah; Schlyer, David; Shea, Colleen; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Xu, Youwen; Fowler, Joanna S

    2010-11-01

    Aromatase catalyzes the last step in estrogen biosynthesis. Brain aromatase is involved in diverse neurophysiological and behavioral functions including sexual behavior, aggression, cognition, and neuroprotection. Using positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiolabeled aromatase inhibitor [N-methyl-(11)C]vorozole, we characterized the tracer distribution and kinetics in the living human brain. Six young, healthy subjects, three men and three women, were administered the radiotracer alone on two separate occasions. Women were scanned in distinct phases of the menstrual cycle. Specificity was confirmed by pretreatment with a pharmacological (2.5 mg) dose of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. PET data were acquired over a 90-min period and regions of interest placed over selected brain regions. Brain and plasma time activity curves, corrected for metabolites, were used to derive kinetic parameters. Distribution volume (V(T)) values in both men and women followed the following rank order: thalamus > amygdala = preoptic area > medulla (inferior olive) > accumbens, pons, occipital and temporal cortex, putamen, cerebellum, and white matter. Pretreatment with letrozole reduced V(T) in all regions, though the size of the reduction was region-dependent, ranging from ∼70% blocking in thalamus andpreoptic area to ∼10% in cerebellum. The high levels of aromatase in thalamus and medulla (inferior olive) appear to be unique to humans. These studies set the stage for the noninvasive assessment of aromatase involvement in various physiological and pathological processes affecting the human brain.

  20. Nicotine Blocks Brain Estrogen Synthase (Aromatase): In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography Studies in Female Baboons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegon, Anat; Kim, Sung-Won; Logan, Jean; Hooker, Jacob M.; Muench, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking and nicotine have complex effects on human physiology and behavior, including some effects similar to those elicited by inhibition of aromatase, the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. We report the first in vivo primate study to determine whether there is a direct effect of nicotine administration on brain aromatase. Methods Brain aromatase availability was examined with positron emission tomography and the selective aromatase inhibitor [11C]vorozole in six baboons before and after exposure to IV nicotine at .015 and .03 mg/kg. Results Nicotine administration produced significant, dose-dependent reductions in [11C]vorozole binding. The amygdala and preoptic area showed the largest reductions. Plasma levels of nicotine and its major metabolite cotinine were similar to those found in cigarette smokers. Conclusions Nicotine interacts in vivo with primate brain aromatase in regions involved in mood, aggression, and sexual behavior. PMID:20188349

  1. Nicotine Blocks Brain Estrogen Synthase (Aromatase): In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography Studies in Female Baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A.; Biegon, A.; Kim, S.-W.; Logan, J.; Hooker, J.M.; Muench, L.; Fowler, J.S.

    2010-01-12

    Cigarette smoking and nicotine have complex effects on human physiology and behavior, including some effects similar to those elicited by inhibition of aromatase, the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. We report the first in vivo primate study to determine whether there is a direct effect of nicotine administration on brain aromatase. Brain aromatase availability was examined with positron emission tomography and the selective aromatase inhibitor [{sup 11}C]vorozole in six baboons before and after exposure to IV nicotine at .015 and .03 mg/kg. Nicotine administration produced significant, dose-dependent reductions in [{sup 11}C]vorozole binding. The amygdala and preoptic area showed the largest reductions. Plasma levels of nicotine and its major metabolite cotinine were similar to those found in cigarette smokers. Nicotine interacts in vivo with primate brain aromatase in regions involved in mood, aggression, and sexual behavior.

  2. Effect of β-agonist on the dexamethasone-induced expression of aromatase by the human monocyte cells

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    Masatada Watanabe

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that sex steroids are important for human skin health. In particular, estrogen improves skin thickness, elasticity and moisture of older women. The major source of circulating estrogen is the ovary; however, local estrogen synthesis and secretion have important roles in, for example, bone metabolism and breast cancer development. We hypothesized that infiltrated peripheral monocytes are one of the sources of estrogen in skin tissues. We also hypothesized that, during atopic dermatitis under stress, a decline in the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal axis (HPA and facilitation of the (hypothalamus–sympathetic–adrenomedullary system (SAM attenuates estrogen secretion from monocytes. Based on this hypothesis, we tested aromatase expression in the human peripheral monocyte-derived cell line THP-1 in response to the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex, the synthetic β-agonist isoproterenol (Iso and the β-antagonist propranolol (Pro. Dex mimics glucocorticoid secreted during excitation of the HPA, and Iso mimics catecholamine secreted during excitation of the SAM. We found that aromatase activity and the CYP19A1 gene transcript were both upregulated in THP-1 cells in the presence of Dex. Addition of Iso induced their downregulation and further addition of Pro rescued aromatase expression. These results may suggest that attenuation of estrogen secretion from peripheral monocytes could be a part of the pathology of stress-caused deterioration of atopic dermatitis. Further examination using an in vitro human skin model including THP-1 cells might be a valuable tool for investigating the therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of estrogen treatment for skin health.

  3. Arsenic-induced cancer cell phenotype in human breast epithelia is estrogen receptor-independent but involves aromatase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Tokar, Erik J; Waalkes, Michael P

    2014-02-01

    Accumulating data suggest arsenic may be an endocrine disruptor and tentatively linked to breast cancer by some studies. Therefore, we tested the effects of chronic inorganic arsenic exposure on the normal estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A. Cells were chronically exposed to a low-level arsenite (500 nM) for up to 24 weeks. Markers of cancer cell phenotype and the expression of critical genes relevant to breast cancer or stem cells (SCs) were examined. After 24 weeks, chronic arsenic-exposed breast epithelial (CABE) cells showed increases in secreted MMP activity, colony formation, invasion, and proliferation rate, indicating an acquired cancer cell phenotype. These CABE cells presented with basal-like breast cancer characteristics, including ER-α, HER-2, and progesterone receptor negativity, and overexpression of K5 and p63. Putative CD44(+)/CD24(-/low) breast SCs were increased to 80 % over control in CABE cells. CABE cells also formed multilayer cell mounds, indicative of loss of contact inhibition. These mounds showed high levels of K5 and p63, indicating the potential presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition occurred during arsenic exposure. Overexpression of aromatase, a key rate-limiting enzyme in estrogen synthesis, occurred with arsenic starting early on in exposure. Levels of 17β-estradiol increased in CABE cells and their conditioned medium. The aromatase inhibitor letrozole abolished arsenic-induced increases in 17β-estradiol production and reversed cancer cell phenotype. Thus, chronic arsenic exposure drives human breast epithelia into a cancer cell phenotype with an apparent overabundance of putative CSCs. Arsenic appears to transform breast epithelia through overexpression of aromatase, thereby activating oncogenic processes independent of ER.

  4. Perfluorinated chemicals: Differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Casas, Josefina [Department of Biomedicinal Chemistry, IQAC–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Lacorte, Sílvia, E-mail: slbqam@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Porte, Cinta, E-mail: cinta.porte@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA > PFOS ≫ PFNA > PFOA > PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57–80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells. - Highlights: • Eight perfluorinated chemicals of different chain lengths have been selected. • Long chain ones – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – were cytotoxic in placenta cells. • The uptake of long chain perfluorinated chemicals by cells was comparatively higher. • PFOS, PFOA and the short chain PFBS significantly inhibited aromatase activity. • A mixture of perfluorinated chemicals significantly altered placenta cell

  5. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits p53 in human breast adipose stromal cells: a novel mechanism for the regulation of aromatase in obesity and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuyi; Docanto, Maria M; Sasano, Hironobu; Lo, Camden; Simpson, Evan R; Brown, Kristy A

    2015-02-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer and the majority of these cancers are estrogen dependent. Aromatase converts androgens into estrogens and its increased expression in breast adipose stromal cells (ASC) is a major driver of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. In particular, obesity-associated and tumor-derived factors, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), have been shown to drive the expression of aromatase by stimulating the activity of the proximal promoter II (PII). The tumor-suppressor p53 is a key regulator of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and is frequently mutated in breast cancer. Mutations in p53 are rare in tumor-associated ASCs. Therefore, it was hypothesized that p53 is regulated by PGE2 and involved in the PGE2-mediated regulation of aromatase. Results demonstrate that PGE2 causes a significant decrease in p53 transcript and nuclear protein expression, as well as phosphorylation at Ser15 in primary human breast ASCs. Stabilization of p53 with RITA leads to a significant decrease in the PGE2-stimulated aromatase mRNA expression and activity, and PII activity. Interaction of p53 with PII was demonstrated and this interaction is decreased in the presence of PGE2. Moreover, mutation of the identified p53 response element leads to an increase in the basal activity of the promoter. Immunofluorescence on clinical samples demonstrates that p53 is decreased in tumor-associated ASCs compared with ASCs from normal breast tissue, and that there is a positive association between perinuclear (inactive) p53 and aromatase expression in these cells. Furthermore, aromatase expression is increased in breast ASCs from Li-Fraumeni patients (germline TP53 mutations) compared with non-Li-Fraumeni breast tissue. Overall, our results demonstrate that p53 is a negative regulator of aromatase in the breast and its inhibition by PGE2 provides a novel mechanism for aromatase regulation in obesity and breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer

  6. Ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin inhibit aromatase expression and activity in human adipose stromal cells: suppression of cAMP as a possible mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docanto, Maria M; Yang, Fangyuan; Callaghan, Brid; Au, CheukMan C; Ragavan, Rahini; Wang, Xuyi; Furness, John B; Andrews, Zane B; Brown, Kristy A

    2014-08-01

    Aromatase converts androgens into estrogens and its expression within adipose stromal cells (ASCs) is believed to be the major driver of estrogen-dependent cancers in older women. Ghrelin is a gut-hormone that is involved in the regulation of appetite and known to bind to and activate the cognate ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a. The unacylated form of ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin, binds weakly to GHSR1a but has been shown to play an important role in regulating a number of physiological processes. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin on aromatase in primary human ASCs. Primary human ASCs were isolated from adipose tissue of women undergoing cosmetic surgery. Real-time PCR and tritiated water-release assays were performed to examine the effect of treatment on aromatase transcript expression and aromatase activity, respectively. Treatments included ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin, obestatin, and capromorelin (GHSR1a agonist). GHSR1a protein expression was assessed by Western blot and effects of treatment on Ca(2+) and cAMP second messenger systems were examined using the Flexstation assay and the Lance Ultra cAMP kit, respectively. Results demonstrate that pM concentrations of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin inhibit aromatase transcript expression and activity in ASCs under basal conditions and in PGE2-stimulated cells. Moreover, the effects of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin are mediated via effects on aromatase promoter PII-specific transcripts. Neither the GHSR1a-specific agonist capromorelin nor obestatin had any effect on aromatase transcript expression or activity. Moreover, GHSR1a protein was undetectable by Western blot and neither ghrelin nor capromorelin elicited a calcium response in ASCs. Finally, ghrelin caused a significant decrease in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP in ASC. These findings suggest that ghrelin acts at alternate receptors in ASCs by decreasing intracellular cAMP levels. Ghrelin mimetics may be useful in the

  7. Effects of Neonicotinoids on Promoter-Specific Expression and Activity of Aromatase (CYP19) in Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma (H295R) and Primary Umbilical Vein Endothelial (HUVEC) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron-Beaudoin, Élyse; Denison, Michael S; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme aromatase (CYP19; cytochrome P450 19) in humans undergoes highly tissue- and promoter-specific regulation. In hormone-dependent breast cancer, aromatase is over-expressed via several normally inactive promoters (PII, I.3, I.7). Aromatase biosynthesizes estrogens, which stimulate breast cancer cell proliferation. The placenta produces estrogens required for healthy pregnancy and the major placental CYP19 promoter is I.1. Exposure to certain pesticides, such as atrazine, is associated with increased CYP19 expression, but little is known about the effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on CYP19. We developed sensitive and robust RT-qPCR methods to detect the promoter-specific expression of CYP19 in human adrenocortical carcinoma (H295R) and primary umbilical vein endothelial (HUVEC) cells, and determined the potential promoter-specific disruption of CYP19 expression by atrazine and the commonly used neonicotinoids imidacloprid, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam. In H295R cells, atrazine concentration-dependently increased PII- and I.3-mediated CYP19 expression and aromatase catalytic activity. Thiacloprid and thiamethoxam induced PII- and I.3-mediated CYP19 expression and aromatase activity at relatively low concentrations (0.1-1.0 µM), exhibiting non-monotonic concentration-response curves with a decline in gene induction and catalytic activity at higher concentrations. In HUVEC cells, atrazine slightly induced overall (promoter-indistinct) CYP19 expression (30 µM) and aromatase activity (≥ 3 µM), without increasing I.1 promoter activity. None of the neonicotinoids increased CYP19 expression or aromatase activity in HUVEC cells. Considering the importance of promoter-specific (over)expression of CYP19 in disease (breast cancer) or during sensitive developmental periods (pregnancy), our newly developed RT-qPCR methods will be helpful tools in assessing the risk that neonicotinoids and other chemicals may pose to exposed women. © The Author 2015

  8. Aromatase expression and role of estrogens in male gonad : a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis-Galeraud Isabelle

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability of the testis to convert irreversibly androgens into estrogens is related to the presence of a microsomal enzymatic complex named aromatase, which is composed of a specific glycoprotein, the cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom and an ubiquitous reductase. The aromatase gene is unique in humans and contained 18 exons, 9 of them being translated. In the rat testis we have immunolocalized the P450arom not only in Leydig cells but also in germ cells and especially in elongated spermatids. Related to the stage of germ cell maturation, we have shown that the level of P450arom mRNA transcripts decreases, it is much more abundant in pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids than in mature germ cells whereas the aromatase activity is 2–4 fold greater in spermatozoa when compared to the younger germ cells. Using a highly specific quantitative competitive RT-PCR method we have evidenced that several factors direct the expression of the aromatase gene in Leydig cells, Sertoli cells, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids, and it is obvious that promoter PII is the main one but other promoters could be concerned. In the bank-vole testis we have observed a positive correlation between a fully developed spermatogenesis and a strong immunoreactivity for both P450arom and estrogen receptor β not only in Sertoli cells but also in pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids. Our recent data obtained from ejaculated human spermatozoa demonstrate the presence of aromatase both in terms of mRNA and protein, and in addition, we suggest that aromatase could be involved in the acquisition of sperm motility. Indeed in men the congenital aromatase deficiency is associated with severe bone maturation problems and sterility. Together with the widespread distribution of estrogen receptors in testicular cells these data clearly show that estrogens play a physiological role in the regulation of spermatogenesis in mammals.

  9. Two natural products, trans-phytol and (22E)-ergosta-6,9,22-triene-3β,5α,8α-triol, inhibit the biosynthesis of estrogen in human ovarian granulosa cells by aromatase (CYP19)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiajia [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Yuan, Yun [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); School of Life Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang (China); Lu, Danfeng; Du, Baowen [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Xiong, Liang; Shi, Jiangong [State Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substance and Function of Natural Medicines, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Yang, Lijuan [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Liu, Wanli [MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yuan, Xiaohong [School of Life Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang (China); Zhang, Guolin, E-mail: zhanggl@cib.ac.cn [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences Sichuan Translational Medicine Research Hospital, Chengdu (China); Wang, Fei, E-mail: wangfei@cib.ac.cn [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences Sichuan Translational Medicine Research Hospital, Chengdu (China)

    2014-08-15

    Aromatase is the only enzyme in vertebrates to catalyze the biosynthesis of estrogens. Although inhibitors of aromatase have been developed for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer, the whole-body inhibition of aromatase causes severe adverse effects. Thus, tissue-selective aromatase inhibitors are important for the treatment of estrogen-dependent cancers. In this study, 63 natural products with diverse structures were examined for their effects on estrogen biosynthesis in human ovarian granulosa-like KGN cells. Two compounds—trans-phytol (SA-20) and (22E)-ergosta-6,9,22-triene-3β,5α,8α-triol (SA-48)—were found to potently inhibit estrogen biosynthesis (IC{sub 50}: 1 μM and 0.5 μM, respectively). Both compounds decreased aromatase mRNA and protein expression levels in KGN cells, but had no effect on the aromatase catalytic activity in aromatase-overexpressing HEK293A cells and recombinant expressed aromatase. The two compounds decreased the expression of aromatase promoter I.3/II. Neither compound affected intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels, but they inhibited the phosphorylation or protein expression of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). The effects of these two compounds on extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and AKT/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway were examined. Inhibition of p38 MAPK could be the mechanism underpinning the actions of these compounds. Our results suggests that natural products structurally similar to SA-20 and SA-48 may be a new source of tissue-selective aromatase modulators, and that p38 MAPK is important in the basal control of aromatase in ovarian granulosa cells. SA-20 and SA-48 warrant further investigation as new pharmaceutical tools for the prevention and treatment of estrogen-dependent cancers. - Highlights: • Two natural products inhibited estrogen biosynthesis in human ovarian granulosa cells. • They

  10. The effects of the standardized extracts of Ginkgo biloba on steroidogenesis pathways and aromatase activity in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aromatase inhibitors that block estrogen synthesis are a proven first-line hormonal therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer. Although it is known that standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGb761) induces anti-carcinogenic effects like the aromatase inhibitors, the effects of EGb761 on steroidogenesis have not been studied yet. Therefore, the effects of EGb761 on steroidogenesis and aromatase activity was studied using a H295R cell model, which was a good in vitro model to predict effects on human adrenal steroidogenesis. Methods Cortisol, aldosterone, testosterone, and 17β-estradiol were evaluated in the H295R cells by competitive enzyme-linked immunospecific assay after exposure to EGb761. Real-time polymerase chain reaction were performed to evaluate effects on critical genes in steroid hormone production, specifically cytochrome P450 (CYP11/ 17/19/21) and the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (3β-HSD2 and 17β-HSD1/4). Finally, aromatase activities were measured with a tritiated water-release assay and by western blotting analysis. Results H295R cells exposed to EGb761 (10 and 100 μg/mL) showed a significant decrease in 17β-estradiol and testosterone, but no change in aldosterone or cortisol. Genes (CYP19 and 17β-HSD1) related to the estrogen steroidogenesis were significantly decreased by EGb761. EGb761 treatment of H295R cells resulted in a significant decrease of aromatase activity as measured by the direct and indirect assays. The coding sequence/ Exon PII of CYP19 gene transcript and protein level of CYP19 were significantly decreased by EGb761. Conclusions These results suggest that EGb761 could regulate steroidogenesis-related genes such as CYP19 and 17β-HSD1, and lead to a decrease in 17β-estradiol and testosterone. The present study provides good information on potential therapeutic effects of EGb761 on estrogen dependent breast cancer. PMID:27188280

  11. Probing the active site of aromatase with 2-methyl-substituted androstenedione analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Watari, Yoko; Yamada, Keiko; Umemura, Nao; Handa, Wakako

    2003-08-01

    To gain insight into the spatial nature of the androstenedione (AD) binding (active) site of aromatase in relation to the catalytic function of the enzyme, we synthesized 2,2-dimethylAD (4), 2beta- and 2alpha-methylADs (5 and 6), 19-oxygenated derivatives of compounds 4 and 6, and 2-methyleneAD (17), and we then tested their inhibitory activity as well as their aromatase reaction (aromatization for 2-methyl and 2-methylene analogs or 19-oxygenation for 2,2-dimethyl steroids) with human placental aromatase. 2-Methyl and 2-methylene steroids 5, 6, and 17 were good competitive inhibitors of aromatase (K(i)=22-68nM), but less effective compared to the 2,2-dimethyl analog 4 (K(i)=8.8nM), indicating that a combination of 2beta- and 2alpha-methyl moieties is essential for the formation of a thermodynamically stable inhibitor-aromatase complex. A series of 2alpha-methyl steroids were good substrates for aromatase, whereas 2beta-methyl steroid 5 was an extremely poor substrate, and a series of 2,2-dimethyl steroids did not serve as substrate, suggesting that a 2beta-methyl moiety of the 2,2-dimethyl and 2beta-methyl steroids would prevent the aromatase reaction probably due to steric hindrance in each case. The 2-methylene compound 17 was also aromatized to produce 2-methylestrogen with a low conversion rate where the 1,4-diene structure may have been created before the C(10)-C(19) bond cleavage. Kinetic analysis of the aromatization of androgens revealed that a good substrate was not essentially a good inhibitor for aromatase.

  12. Merlin, the product of NF2 gene, is associated with aromatase expression and estrogen formation in human liver tissues and liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocciadiferro, Letizia; Miceli, Vitale; Granata, Orazia M; Carruba, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    The product of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene, also known as Merlin/neurofibromin 2, homeostatically regulates liver stem cells by controlling abundance and signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), with a mechanism independent of the Hippo pathway. We have reported that locally elevated estrogen formation, driven by abnormally high expression and function of aromatase, may be implicated in development and progression of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through activation of a rapid signaling pathway mediated by amphiregulin (AREG) and EGFR. We have recently presented a model by which the aromatase-estrogen-amphiregulin-EGFR axis is activated in response to tissue injury and/or inflammatory disease, with its alteration eventually leading to development of major human tumors (liver, breast, prostate) and other chronic diseases (diabetes, obesity, Alzheimer's and heart disease). In this study, we investigated NF2 expression in liver cancer cells and tissues in relation to aromatase expression/function, estrogen receptor (ER) status and amphiregulin. Our data indicate that NF2 expression is associated with aromatase and AREG expression, being elevated in HCC tissues and HepG2 cells, intermediate in cirrhotic tissues and Huh7 cells, and lower in nontumoral liver and HA22T cells. In addition, NF2 expression is inversely related to wild type hERα66 and proportional to the expression of the membrane-associated hERα36 splice variant, as measured by exon-specific RT-PCR analysis, both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, incubation with estradiol induced a significant decrease of NF2 expression in both HA22T and Huh7 cells (over 54% and 22%, respectively), while no change could be observed in HepG2 cells, this effect being inversely related to aromatase expression and activity in HCC cell lines. Based on the above combined evidence, we hypothesize that NF2 behaves as a protein sensing tissue damage and aromatase-driven local estrogen formation

  13. The effect of aromatase inhibitors on bone metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Bjarnason, Nina H; Bjerregaard, Jon Kroll

    2009-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors increase the disease-free survival in patients with receptor-positive breast cancer. Aromatase is a cytochrome P450 enzyme complex catalysing the conversion of androgens to oestrogens. These properties cause a significant increase in bone loss. In this MiniReview, we present...... density have shown a significant decrease in bone mineral density of the femoral neck in the aromatase inhibitor groups compared to placebo groups. Placebo-controlled studies lack statistical power to detect changes in fracture incidence; however, aromatase inhibitors increase the incidence of fractures...

  14. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of resveratrol analogues as aromatase and quinone reductase 2 inhibitors for chemoprevention of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Bin; Hoshino, Juma; Jermihov, Katie; Marler, Laura; Pezzuto, John M.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Cushman, Mark (Hawaii); (Purdue); (UIC)

    2012-07-11

    A series of new resveratrol analogues were designed and synthesized and their inhibitory activities against aromatase were evaluated. The crystal structure of human aromatase (PDB 3eqm) was used to rationalize the mechanism of action of the aromatase inhibitor 32 (IC{sub 50} 0.59 {mu}M) through docking, molecular mechanics energy minimization, and computer graphics molecular modeling, and the information was utilized to design several very potent inhibitors, including compounds 82 (IC{sub 50} 70 nM) and 84 (IC{sub 50} 36 nM). The aromatase inhibitory activities of these compounds are much more potent than that for the lead compound resveratrol, which has an IC{sub 50} of 80 {mu}M. In addition to aromatase inhibitory activity, compounds 32 and 44 also displayed potent QR2 inhibitory activity (IC{sub 50} 1.7 {mu}M and 0.27 {mu}M, respectively) and the high-resolution X-ray structures of QR2 in complex with these two compounds provide insight into their mechanism of QR2 inhibition. The aromatase and quinone reductase inhibitors resulting from these studies have potential value in the treatment and prevention of cancer.

  15. Relevance of estrogenic and aromatase inhibiting effects of mixtures of xenoestrogens for human exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meeuwen, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831034

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Daily humans are exposed to various sources of estrogen-like compounds (xenoestrogens), such as food (naturally occurring, residues or contaminants), clothes and cosmetics. Non-governmental organisations give the impression that this causes adverse effects on human health and the

  16. Inhibitory Aromatase Effects of Flavonoids from Ginkgo Biloba Extracts on Estrogen Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Joo; Choo, Wun Hak; Kim, Ha Ryong; Chung, Kyu Hyuck; Oh, Seung Min

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) is a popular phytomedicine and has been used for disorders of the central nervous system, cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and circulatory diseases. Although GBE is a complex mixture of over 300 compounds, its major components are 24% flavonoids and 6% terpene lactones. In this study, we tested the inhibitory effects of the three major flavonoids (kaempferol, quercetin, and isorhamnetin) from GBE, independently and as mixtures, on aromatase activity using JEG-3 cells (human placental cells) and recombinant proteins (human placental microsome). In both systems, kaempferol showed the strongest inhibitory effects among the three flavonoids; the flavanoid mixtures exerted increased inhibitory effects. The results of exon I.1-driven luciferase reporter gene assays supported the increased inhibitory effects of flavonoid mixtures, accompanied by suppression of estrogen biosynthesis. In the RT-PCR analysis, decreased patterns of aromatase promoter I.1 mRNA expressions were observed, which were similar to the aromatase inhibition patterns of flavonoids and their mixtures. The present study demonstrated that three flavonoids synergistically inhibit estrogen biosynthesis through aromatase inhibition, decrease CYP19 mRNA, and induce transcriptional suppression. Our results support the usefulness of flavonoids in adjuvant therapy for breast cancer by reducing estrogen levels with reduced adverse effects due to estrogen depletion.

  17. Co-Formulants in Glyphosate-Based Herbicides Disrupt Aromatase Activity in Human Cells below Toxic Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Defarge

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pesticide formulations contain declared active ingredients and co-formulants presented as inert and confidential compounds. We tested the endocrine disruption of co-formulants in six glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH, the most used pesticides worldwide. All co-formulants and formulations were comparably cytotoxic well below the agricultural dilution of 1% (18–2000 times for co-formulants, 8–141 times for formulations, and not the declared active ingredient glyphosate (G alone. The endocrine-disrupting effects of all these compounds were measured on aromatase activity, a key enzyme in the balance of sex hormones, below the toxicity threshold. Aromatase activity was decreased both by the co-formulants alone (polyethoxylated tallow amine—POEA and alkyl polyglucoside—APG and by the formulations, from concentrations 800 times lower than the agricultural dilutions; while G exerted an effect only at 1/3 of the agricultural dilution. It was demonstrated for the first time that endocrine disruption by GBH could not only be due to the declared active ingredient but also to co-formulants. These results could explain numerous in vivo results with GBHs not seen with G alone; moreover, they challenge the relevance of the acceptable daily intake (ADI value for GBHs exposures, currently calculated from toxicity tests of the declared active ingredient alone.

  18. Co-Formulants in Glyphosate-Based Herbicides Disrupt Aromatase Activity in Human Cells below Toxic Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defarge, Nicolas; Takács, Eszter; Lozano, Verónica Laura; Mesnage, Robin; Spiroux de Vendômois, Joël; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Székács, András

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide formulations contain declared active ingredients and co-formulants presented as inert and confidential compounds. We tested the endocrine disruption of co-formulants in six glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH), the most used pesticides worldwide. All co-formulants and formulations were comparably cytotoxic well below the agricultural dilution of 1% (18–2000 times for co-formulants, 8–141 times for formulations), and not the declared active ingredient glyphosate (G) alone. The endocrine-disrupting effects of all these compounds were measured on aromatase activity, a key enzyme in the balance of sex hormones, below the toxicity threshold. Aromatase activity was decreased both by the co-formulants alone (polyethoxylated tallow amine—POEA and alkyl polyglucoside—APG) and by the formulations, from concentrations 800 times lower than the agricultural dilutions; while G exerted an effect only at 1/3 of the agricultural dilution. It was demonstrated for the first time that endocrine disruption by GBH could not only be due to the declared active ingredient but also to co-formulants. These results could explain numerous in vivo results with GBHs not seen with G alone; moreover, they challenge the relevance of the acceptable daily intake (ADI) value for GBHs exposures, currently calculated from toxicity tests of the declared active ingredient alone. PMID:26927151

  19. Comparison of the effect of cortisol on aromatase activity and androgen metabolism in two human fibroblast cell lines derived from the same individual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, B; Brünner, N; Dombernowsky, P

    1990-01-01

    The effect of preincubation with cortisol on estrogen and androgen metabolism was investigated in human fibroblast monolayers grown from biopsies of genital and non-genital skin of the same person. The activity in the cells of aromatase, 5 alpha-reductase, 17 beta-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase...... and 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase was investigated by isolating estrone, estradiol, estriol, dihydrotestosterone, androstanedione, androsterone, 3 alpha-androstanediol, testosterone and androstenedione after incubation of the cells with [14C]testosterone or [14C]androstenedione. For experiments.......5-1.0 x 10(-6) M in both cell lines. When preincubation with cortisol was omitted no estrogen synthesis was detected. The formation of androgen was not altered after preincubation with cortisol. Pronounced differences were found in estrogen and in androgen metabolism in the two cell lines suggesting...

  20. Preparation of a novel antiserum to aromatase with high affinity and specificity: Its clinicopathological significance on breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanomata, Naoki; Matsuura, Shiro; Nomura, Tsunehisa; Kurebayashi, Junichi; Mori, Taisuke; Kitawaki, Jo; Moriya, Takuya

    2017-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been widely used for the endocrine treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer in postmenopausal patients. However, clinicopathological studies of aromatase have been limited due to unsatisfactory specificity and/or restricted availability of anti-aromatase antibodies. Here, we have generated a polyclonal antiserum with high affinity and specificity for human aromatase using a monoclonal antibody tagged immunoaffinity chromatography on an industrial production scale. Our preliminary immunohistochemical analysis of 221 invasive breast cancer cases indicated that 87.3% (193/221) had at least 5% aromatase positive cells. The histoscore for aromatase was inversely correlated with pT (p = 0.019), pN (p = 0.001), stage (p cancer aromatase expression was independent of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 statuses. This antiserum will be applicable to clinicopathological examination of aromatase in addition to ER and PgR for an appropriate use of aromatase inhibitor on the treatment of breast cancer. Further studies on the relationship between Aromatase inhibitors have been widely used for the endocrine treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer in postmenopausal patients. However, clinicopathological studies of aromatase have been limited due to unsatisfactory specificity and/or restricted availability of anti-aromatase antibodies. Here, we have generated a polyclonal antiserum with high affinity and specificity for human aromatase using a monoclonal antibody tagged immunoaffinity chromatography on an industrial production scale. Our preliminary immunohistochemical analysis of 221 invasive breast cancer cases indicated that 87.3% (193/221) had at least 5% aromatase positive cells. The histoscore for aromatase was inversely correlated with pT (p = 0.019), pN (p = 0.001), stage (p cancer aromatase expression was independent of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), and

  1. Placental Aromatase Is Deficient in Placental Ischemia and Preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Perez-Sepulveda

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a maternal hypertensive disorder with uncertain etiology and a leading cause of maternal and fetal mortality worldwide, causing nearly 40% of premature births delivered before 35 weeks of gestation. The first stage of preeclampsia is characterized by reduction of utero-placental blood flow which is reflected in high blood pressure and proteinuria during the second half of pregnancy. In human placenta androgens derived from the maternal and fetal adrenal glands are converted into estrogens by the enzymatic action of placental aromatase. This implies that alterations in placental steroidogenesis and, subsequently, in the functionality or bioavailability of placental aromatase may be mechanistically involved in the pathophysiology of PE.Serum samples were collected at 32-36 weeks of gestation and placenta biopsies were collected at time of delivery from PE patients (n = 16 and pregnant controls (n = 32. The effect of oxygen tension on placental cells was assessed by incubation JEG-3 cells under 1% and 8% O2 for different time periods, Timed-mated, pregnant New Zealand white rabbits (n = 6 were used to establish an in vivo model of placental ischemia (achieved by ligature of uteroplacental vessels. Aromatase content and estrogens and androgens concentrations were measured.The protein and mRNA content of placental aromatase significantly diminished in placentae obtained from preeclamptic patients compared to controls. Similarly, the circulating concentrations of 17-β-estradiol/testosterone and estrone/androstenedione were reduced in preeclamptic patients vs. controls. These data are consistent with a concomitant decrease in aromatase activity. Aromatase content was reduced in response to low oxygen tension in the choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cell line and in rabbit placentae in response to partial ligation of uterine spiral arteries, suggesting that reduced placental aromatase activity in preeclamptic patients may be associated with chronic

  2. [Development of aromatase inhibitors and analysis of their inhibitory activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, M

    1998-12-01

    Inhibitors of aromatase are of interest in the treatment of advanced estrogen-dependent breast cancers. In addition, the inhibitors are promising to play as conformational and catalytic probes for the active site of this enzyme, aromatase. There fore, we synthesized a number of steroidal aromatase inhibitors, including suicide substrates, and also studied the mechanism for a time-dependent inactivation of aromatase by the suicide substrates. The mechanism for the aromatase inactivation by 6-oxo-androstenedione (AD) (1), one of the first discovered suicide substrates, was explored using the 19-substituted analogs 2-5 as well as stereo- and/or regio-specifically labeled [3H, 14C]-compound 1. The results indicated that the 4 beta,5 beta-epoxy-19-oxo derivative 7 is a reactive electrophile that irreversibly binds to the active site of aromatase. Studies on the aromatase inhibition by regioisomers of AD, 4-en-6-one 17, 5-en-4-one 18 and 5-en-7-one 19, revealed that the C-3 carbonyl function is not essential for the tight binding of an inhibitor to the active site. 3-Deoxy AD (22) and its 6 alpha,7 alpha-cyclopropano steroid 24 as well as some of 6-alkyl-ADs are among the most potent competitive inhibitors reported so for (K(m) for AD/Ki > 6). Structure-activity relationships of the 6-alkyl-ADs and their 3-deoxy-, delta 1-, delta 6-, and delta 1,6-analogs as aromatase inhibitors showed that aromatase has a hydrophobic binding pocket with a limited accessible volume in the active site in the region corresponding to the beta-side rather than the alpha-side of the C-6 position of the substrate. The 6-alkyl-ADs and their delta 1-analogs were converted into the corresponding estrogens with human placental aromatase, whereas the 3-deoxy steroids 22 and 25 were metabolized to the corresponding 19-oxygenated compounds. The relative apparent K(m) values for the androgens are different from the relative Ki values, indicating that there is a difference between the ability to serve

  3. Inhibitory effect of Sphagnum palustre extract and its bioactive compounds on aromatase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jeong Eom

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sphagnum palustre (a moss has been traditionally used in Korea for the cure of several diseases such as cardiac pain and stroke. In this research, the inhibitory effect of S. palustre on aromatase (cytochrome P450 19, CYP19 activity was studied. [1β-3H] androstenedione was used as a substrate and incubated with S. palustre extract and recombinant human CYP19 in the presence of NADPH. S. palustre extract inhibited aromatase in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 value: 36.4 ± 8.1 µg/mL. To elucidate the major compounds responsible for the aromatase inhibitory effects of S. palustre extract, nine compounds were isolated from the extract and tested for their inhibition of aromatase activity. Compounds 1, 6, and 7 displayed aromatase inhibition, while the inhibition by the other compounds was negligible.

  4. Imaging of aromatase distribution in rat and rhesus monkey brains with [{sup 11}C]vorozole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kayo [Division of Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-75124 (Sweden); Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden)]. E-mail: kayo.takahashi@uppsala.imanet.se; Bergstroem, Mats [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden); Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-75124 (Sweden); Fraendberg, Pernilla [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden); Vesstroem, Eva-Lotta [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi [Department of Physiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Langstroem, Bengt [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden)

    2006-07-15

    Aromatase is an enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens and may play a role in mood and mental status. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that brain aromatase distribution could be evaluated with a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [{sup 11}C]vorozole. Vorozole is a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor that reversibly binds to the heme domain of aromatase. In vitro experiments in rat brain, using frozen section autoradiography, illustrated specific binding in the medial amygdala (MA), the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BST) and the preoptic area (POA) of male rat brain. Specific binding in female rat brain was found in the MA and the BST; however, the signals were lower than those of males. The K {sub d} of [{sup 11}C]vorozole binding to aromatase in MA was determined to be 0.60{+-}0.06 nM by Scatchard plot analysis using homogenates. An in vivo PET study in female rhesus monkey brain demonstrated the uptake of [{sup 11}C]vorozole in the amygdala, where the uptake was blocked by the presence of excess amounts of unlabeled vorozole. Thus, this tracer has a high affinity for brain aromatase and could have a potential for in vivo aromatase imaging. This technique might enable the investigation of human brain aromatase in healthy and diseased persons.

  5. Aromatase Expression in the Hippocampus of AD Patients and 5xFAD Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Prange-Kiel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies show that 17β-estradiol (E2 protects against Alzheimer’s disease (AD induced neurodegeneration. The E2-synthesizing enzyme aromatase is expressed in healthy hippocampi, but although the hippocampus is severely affected in AD, little is known about the expression of hippocampal aromatase in AD. To better understand the role of hippocampal aromatase in AD, we studied its expression in postmortem material from patients with AD and in a mouse model for AD (5xFAD mice. In human hippocampi, aromatase-immunoreactivity was observed in the vast majority of principal neurons and signal quantification revealed higher expression of aromatase protein in AD patients compared to age- and sex-matched controls. The tissue-specific first exons of aromatase I.f, PII, I.3, and I.6 were detected in hippocampi of controls and AD patients by RT-PCR. In contrast, 3-month-old, female 5xFAD mice showed lower expression of aromatase mRNA and protein (measured by qRT-PCR and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry than WT controls; no such differences were observed in male mice. Our findings stress the importance of hippocampal aromatase expression in neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Extra virgin olive oil potentiates the effects of aromatase inhibitors via glutathione depletion in estrogen receptor-positive human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Amar Mohamed; In, Lionel L A; Tasyriq, Mohammad; Syamsir, Devi Rosmy; Awang, Khalijah; Mustafa, Ayda Hussein Omer; Idris, Omer Fadul; Fadl-Elmula, Imad; Hasima, Noor

    2013-12-01

    There have been numerous evidences supporting the relationship between olive oil and cancer, with most of the attention being directed toward its fat and phenolic content. The aims of this study were to investigate whether EVOO and OA could enhance the effects of aromatase inhibitors (letrozole and anastrozole) in ER-positive MCF-7 cells, as well as to investigate its influence on cytochrome c release and GSH levels. It was observed that upon combination treatment, anti-proliferation effects and apoptosis induction were augmented. Apoptosis was triggered via the intrinsic pathway in accordance with cytochrome c release into the cytosol based on IF-IC and ELISA observations. Intracellular GSH levels were also reduced upon EVOO/OA treatment in combination with aromatase inhibitors, and were found to be inversely correlated to cytosolic cytochrome c levels. Additionally, the estrogenic suppressive effects of letrozole and anastrozole were amplified when used in combination with EVOO/OA. Therefore, the employment of aromatase inhibitors in combination with EVOO/OA could orchestrate a reduction in intracellular estrone biosynthesis which feeds ER-positive cells, while simultaneously depleting GSH levels and increasing ROS generation, thus releasing cytochrome c and subsequent induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Paternal retrieval behavior regulated by brain estrogen synthetase (aromatase in mouse sires that engage in communicative interactions with pairmates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin eAkther

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Parental behaviors involve complex social recognition and memory processes and interactive behavior with children that can greatly facilitate healthy human family life. Fathers play a substantial role in child care in a small but significant number of mammals, including humans. However, the brain mechanism that controls male parental behavior is much less understood than that controlling female parental behavior. Fathers of non-monogamous laboratory ICR mice are an interesting model for examining the factors that influence paternal responsiveness because sires can exhibit maternal-like parental care (retrieval of pups when separated from their pups along with their pairmates because of olfactory and auditory signals from the dams. Here we tested whether paternal behavior is related to femininity by the aromatization of testosterone. For this purpose, we measured the immunoreactivity of aromatase (cytochrome P450 family 19 (CYP19, which synthesizes estrogen from androgen, in nine brain regions of the sire. We observed higher levels of aromatase expression in these areas of the sire brain when they engaged in communicative interactions with dams in separate cages. The capacity of sires to retrieve pups was increased following a period of five days spent with the pups as a whole family after parturition, whereas the acquisition of this ability was suppressed in sires treated daily with an aromatase inhibitor. These results suggest that brain aromatization regulates the initiation, development, and maintenance of paternal behavior in the ICR mice.

  8. A candidate gene study of CYP19 (aromatase) and male sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPree, Michael G; Mustanski, Brian S; Bocklandt, Sven; Nievergelt, Caroline; Hamer, Dean H

    2004-05-01

    Aromatase cytochrome P450 (CYP19), which is necessary for the conversion of androgens to estrogens, plays an important role in the sexual differentiation of the brain. To investigate whether differences in the gene encoding the aromatase enzyme influence sexual orientation in men, we conducted linkage, association, and expression analyses in a large sample of homosexual brothers using microsatellite markers in and around CYP19. No linkage was detected, and a gene-specific relative risk of 1.5-fold could be excluded at a lod score of -2. Results of the TDT demonstrated no preferential transmission of any of the CYP19 alleles in this sample. Expression of aromatase mRNA by microarray analysis was not significantly different between heterosexual and homosexual men. These results suggest that variation in the gene for this subunit of the aromatase enzyme complex is not likely to be a major factor in the development of individual differences in male sexual orientation.

  9. Understanding the mechanisms of aromatase inhibitor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R; Larionov, Alexey A

    2012-01-19

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have a central role in the treatment of breast cancer; however, resistance is a major obstacle to optimal management. Evidence from endocrine, molecular and pathological measurements in clinical material taken before and after therapy with AIs and data from clinical trials in which AIs have been given as treatment either alone or in combination with other targeted agents suggest diverse causes for resistance. These include inherent tumour insensitivity to oestrogen, ineffective inhibition of aromatase, sources of oestrogenic hormones independent of aromatase, activation of signalling by non-endocrine pathways, enhanced cell survival and selection of hormone-insensitive cellular clones during treatment.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: aromatase excess syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ogata T. Genomic basis of aromatase excess syndrome: recombination- and replication-mediated rearrangements leading to CYP19A1 overexpression. ... 2013 Oct 18. Citation on PubMed More from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins Rare Disease Day 2018 Darwin ...

  11. Aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Słopień

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in which foci of endometrial tissue grow outside of the uterine cavity. Endometriosis was estimated to affect 176 million women of childbearing potential all over the world in 2010. The presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue is associated with pain and infertility. Typical symptoms of endometriosis include dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia, pelvic pain that is not related to menstrual cycles, dysuria, and chronic fatigue. Medical treatments for endometriosis include combined oral contraceptive pills, danazol, gestrinone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (aGnRHs. A new class of medications called aromatase inhibitors has been identified in recent years as potential therapeutic agents for endometriosis. This article provides general information about aromatase inhibitors, their use in gynaecology, and their adverse effects. In particular, the paper discusses the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis in postmenopausal women. Unlike oral contraceptives, gestagens, aGnRHs, and danazol, which suppress ovarian oestrogen synthesis, aromatase inhibitors inhibit mainly extra-ovarian synthesis of oestrogens. Therefore, the use of aromatase inhibitors seems to be particularly relevant in older patients, as most of the body’s oestrogen is produced outside the ovaries after menopause. The paper discusses also the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of pain associated with endometriosis and infertility caused by endometriosis.

  12. Approaching human language with complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jin; Liu, Haitao

    2014-12-01

    The interest in modeling and analyzing human language with complex networks is on the rise in recent years and a considerable body of research in this area has already been accumulated. We survey three major lines of linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) characterization of human language as a multi-level system with complex network analysis; 2) linguistic typological research with the application of linguistic networks and their quantitative measures; and 3) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language (determined by the topology of linguistic networks) and microscopic linguistic (e.g., syntactic) features (as the traditional concern of linguistics). We show that the models and quantitative tools of complex networks, when exploited properly, can constitute an operational methodology for linguistic inquiry, which contributes to the understanding of human language and the development of linguistics. We conclude our review with suggestions for future linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language and microscopic linguistic features; 2) expansion of research scope from the global properties to other levels of granularity of linguistic networks; and 3) combination of linguistic network analysis with other quantitative studies of language (such as quantitative linguistics). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Studies directed towards a mechanistic evaluation of inactivation of aromatase by the suicide substrates androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-diones and its 6-ene derivatives aromatase inactivation by the 19-substituted derivatives and their enzymic aromatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Nagaoka, Masao; Handa, Wakako; Ogawa, Yoko; Matsuoka, Satomi

    2007-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanistic features for aromatase inactivation by the typical suicide substrates, androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione (ADD, 1) and its 6-ene derivative 2, we synthesized 19-substituted (methyl and halogeno) ADD and 1,4,6-triene derivatives 8 and 10 along with 4,6-diene derivatives 9 and tested for their ability to inhibit aromatase in human placental microsomes as well as their ability to serve as a substrate for the enzyme. 19-Methyl-substituted steroids were the most powerful competitive inhibitors of aromatase (K(i): 8.2-40 nM) in each series. Among the 19-substituted inhibitors examined, 19-chloro-ADD and its 6-ene derivatives (7b and 9b) inactivated aromatase in a time-dependent manner in the presence of NADPH in air while the other ones did not. The time-dependent inactivation was blocked by the substrate AD and required NADPH. Only the time-dependent inactivators 7b and 9b in series of 1,4-diene and 1,4,6-triene steroids as well as all of 4,6-diene steroids 9, except for the methyl compound 9a, served as a substrate for aromatase to yield estradiol and/or its 6-ene estradiol with lower conversion rates compared to the corresponding parent steroids 1,4-diene, 1,4,6-triene and 4,6-diene derivatives. The present findings strongly suggest that the aromatase reaction, 19-oxygenation, at least in part, would be involved in the time-dependent inactivation of aromatase by the suicide substrates 1 and 2, where the 19-substitutent would play a critical role in the aromatase reaction probably though steric and electronic reasons.

  14. Aromatase deficiency in male and female siblings caused by a novel mutation and the physiological role of estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishima, Akira; Grumbach, M.M.; Simpson, E.R. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)]|[Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The aromatase enzyme complex catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens in a wide variety of tissues, including the ovary, testis, placenta, brain, and adipose tissue. Only a single human gene encoding aromatase P450 (CYP19) has been isolated; tissue-specific regulation is controlled in part by alternative promoters in a tissue-specific manner. We report a novel mutation in the CYP19 gene in a sister and brother. The 28-yr-old XX proband, followed since infancy, exhibited the cardinal features of the aromatase deficiency syndrome as recently defined. She had nonadrenal female pseudohermaphrodism at birth and underwent repair of the external genitalia, including a clitorectomy. Her adult height is 177.6 cm (+2.5 SD). Her only sibling, and XY male, was studied at 24 yr of age. During both pregnancies, the mother exhibited signs of progressive virilization that regressed postpartum. The height of the brother was 204 cm (+3.7 SD) with eunuchoid skeletal proportions, and the weight was 135.1 kg (+2.1 SD). He was sexually fully mature and had macroorchidism. The bone age was 14 yr at a chronological age of 24 3/12 yr. Bone mineral densitometric indexes of the lumbar spine (cancellous bone) and distal radius (cortical bone) were consistent with osteoporosis; the distal radius was -4.7 SD below the mean value for age- and sex-matched normal men; indexes of bone turnover were increased. Analysis of genomic DNA in transformed lymphoblasts from both the sister and brother indicated a homozygous single base change at base pair 1123 (C{r_arrow}T) in exon IX of the CYP19 gene, a highly conserved region, that results in a cysteine instead of an arginine at position 375 (R375C). The parents are obligate heterozygotes in this consanguineous pedigree. Expression of the mutant complementary DNA showed that the R375C mutation had 0.2% the aromatase activity of the wild-type enzyme. 44 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Aromatase inhibitors in stimulated IVF cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papanikolaou, Evangelos G; Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been introduced as a new treatment modality that could challenge clomiphene citrate as an ovulation induction regiment in patients with PCOS. Although several randomized trials have been conducted regarding their use as ovulation induction agents, only few trials are ava...

  16. Inflammation, dysregulated metabolism and aromatase in obesity and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Heba; Simpson, Evan R; Brown, Kristy A

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of estrogen-dependent breast cancer after menopause. Adipose tissue undergoes important changes in obesity due to excess storage of lipids, leading to adipocyte cell death and the recruitment of macrophages. The resultant state of chronic low-grade inflammation is associated with the activation of NFkB signaling and elevated levels of aromatase, the rate-limiting enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. This occurs not only in the visceral and subcutaneous fat, but also in the breast fat. The regulation of aromatase in the breast adipose stromal cell in response to inflammatory mediators is under the control of complex signaling pathways, including metabolic pathways involving LKB1/AMPK, p53, HIF1α and PKM2. Interventions aimed at modifying weight, including diet and exercise, are associated with changes in adipose tissue inflammation and estrogen production that are likely to impact breast cancer risk. This review will present an overview of these topics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Full Enzyme Complex Simulation: Interactions in Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezaveh, Samira; Zeng, An-Ping; Jandt, Uwe

    2018-01-24

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is a large macromolecular machine consisting of dozens of interacting enzymes that are connected and regulated by highly flexible domains, also called swinging arms. The overall structure and function of these domains and how they organize the complex function have not been elucidated in detail to date. This lack of structural and dynamic understanding is frequently observed in multidomain enzymatic complexes. Here we present the first full and dynamic structural model of full human PDC (hPDC), including binding of the linking arms to the surrounding E1 and E3 enzymes via their binding domains with variable stoichiometries. All of the linking domains were modeled at atomistic and coarse-grained levels, and the latter was parametrized to reproduce the same properties of those from the atomistic model. The radii of gyration of the wild-type full complex and functional trimeric subunits were in agreement with available experimental data. Furthermore, the E1 and E3 population effect on the overall structure of the full complex was studied. The results indicated that decreasing the number of E1s increases the flexibility of the now nonoccupied arms. Furthermore, their flexibility depends on the presence of other E1s and E3s in the vicinity, even if they are associated with other arms. As one consequence, the radius of gyration decreases with decreasing number of E1s. This effect also provides an indication of the optimal configuration of E1 and E3 on the basis of the assumption that a certain stability of the enymatic cloud is necessary to avoid free metabolic diffusion of intermediates (metabolic channeling). Our approach and results open a window for future enzyme engineering in a more effective way by evaluating the effect of different linker arm lengths, flexibilities, and combinations of mutations on the activity of other complex enzymes that involve flexible domains, including for example processive enzymes.

  18. Phosphoregulation of the human SMN complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husedzinovic, Alma; Oppermann, Felix; Draeger-Meurer, Stefanie; Chari, Ashwin; Fischer, Utz; Daub, Henrik; Gruss, Oliver J

    2014-03-01

    The survival motor neuron (SMN) complex is a macromolecular machine comprising 9 core proteins: SMN, Gemins2-8 and unrip in vertebrates. It performs tasks in RNA metabolism including the cytoplasmic assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). The SMN complex also localizes to the nucleus, where it accumulates in Cajal Bodies (CB) and may function in transcription and/or pre-mRNA splicing. The SMN complex is subject to extensive phosphorylation. Detailed understanding of SMN complex regulation necessitates a comprehensive analysis of these post-translational modifications. Here, we report on the first comprehensive phosphoproteome analysis of the intact human SMN complex, which identify 48 serine/threonine phosphosites in the complex. We find that 7 out of 9 SMN components of the intact complex are phosphoproteins and confidently place 29 phosphorylation sites, 12 of them in SMN itself. By the generation of multi non-phosphorylatable or phosphomimetic variants of SMN, respectively, we address to which extent phosphorylation regulates SMN complex function and localization. Both phosphomimetic and non-phosphorylatable variants assemble into intact SMN complexes and can compensate the loss of endogenous SMN in snRNP assembly at least to some extent. However, they partially or completely fail to target to nuclear Cajal bodies. Moreover, using a mutant of SMN, which cannot be phosphorylated on previously reported tyrosine residues, we provide first evidence that this PTM regulates SMN localization and nuclear accumulation. Our data suggest complex regulatory cues mediated by phosphorylation of serine/threonine and tyrosine residues, which control the subcellular localization of the SMN complex and its accumulation in nuclear CB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure-activity relationships of 2-, 4-, or 6-substituted estrogens as aromatase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Ando, Momoko; Watari, Yoko; Tominaga, Takako; Hayata, Yasuko; Yoshimura, Akiko

    2005-06-01

    Aromatase, which is responsible for the conversion of androgens to estrogens, is a potential therapeutic target for the selective lowering of estrogen levels in patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer. To develop a novel class of aromatase inhibitors, we tested series of 2- and 4-substituted (halogeno, methyl, formyl, methoxy, nitro, and amino) estrones (7 and 9), as well as series of 6alpha- and 6beta-substituted (alkyl, phenalkyl, and alkoxy) estrones (13 and 14), and their estradiol analogs (8, 10, 11, and 12) as aromatase inhibitors. All of the inhibitors examined blocked the androstenedione aromatization in a competitive manner. Introduction of halogeno and methyl functions at C-2 of estrone as well as that of a phenalkyl or methyl function at the C-6alpha or C-6beta position markedly increased affinity to aromatase (apparent K(i) value=0.10-0.66 microM for the inhibitors versus 2.5 microM for estrone). 6alpha-Phenylestrone (13c) was the most powerful inhibitor among the estrogens studied, and its affinity was comparable to that of the androgen substrate androstenedione. Estradiol analogs were much weaker inhibitors than the corresponding estrone compounds in each series, indicating that the 17-carbonyl group plays a critical role in the formation of a thermodynamically stable enzyme-inhibitor complex.

  20. Des-acyl ghrelin inhibits the capacity of macrophages to stimulate the expression of aromatase in breast adipose stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, CheukMan C; Docanto, Maria M; Zahid, Heba; Raffaelli, Francesca-Maria; Ferrero, Richard L; Furness, John B; Brown, Kristy A

    2017-06-01

    Des-acyl ghrelin is the unacylated form of the well-characterized appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin. It affects a number of physiological processes, including increasing adipose lipid accumulation and inhibiting adipose tissue inflammation. Breast adipose tissue inflammation in obesity is associated with an increase in the expression of the estrogen biosynthetic enzyme, aromatase, and is hypothesized to create a hormonal milieu conducive to tumor growth. We previously reported that des-acyl ghrelin inhibits the expression and activity of aromatase in isolated human adipose stromal cells (ASCs), the main site of aromatase expression in the adipose tissue. The current study aimed to examine the effect of des-acyl ghrelin on the capacity of mouse macrophages (RAW264.7 cells) and human adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) to stimulate aromatase expression in primary human breast ASCs. RAW264.7 cells were treated with 0, 10 and 100pM des-acyl ghrelin following activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and cells and conditioned media were collected after 6 and 24h. The effect of des-acyl ghrelin on macrophage polarization was examined by assessing mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory M1-specific marker Cd11c and anti-inflammatory M2-specific marker Cd206, as well as expression of Tnf and Ptgs2, known mediators of the macrophage-dependent stimulation of aromatase. TNF protein in conditioned media was assessed by ELISA. The effect of RAW264.7 and ATM-conditioned media on aromatase expression in ASCs was assessed after 6h. Results demonstrate des-acyl ghrelin significantly increases the expression of Cd206 and suppresses the expression of Cd11c, Tnf and Ptgs2 in activated RAW264.7 cells. Treatment of RAW264.7 and ATMs with des-acyl ghrelin also significantly reduces the capacity of these cells to stimulate aromatase transcript expression in human breast ASCs. Overall, these findings suggest that in addition to direct effects on aromatase in ASCs, des-acyl ghrelin also

  1. 4- and 6-(p-Sulphamoylphenyl)androstenediones: Studies of aromatase inhibitor-based oestrone sulphatase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Madoka; Nagaoka, Masao; Numazawa, Mitsuteru

    2010-12-01

    4-(p-Sulphamoylphenyl)androstenedione (3) and 6alpha-p-sulphamoylphenyl analogues 12-14 were synthesised and tested as aromatase inhibitors as well as oestrone sulphatase inhibitors in human placental microsomes. All of the p-sulphamoylphenyl compounds synthesised were powerful inhibitors of aromatase with apparent K(i) values ranging between 30 and 97nM. In addition, the aromatase inhibitory activities of 6alpha-p-hydroxyphenyl compounds 9-11, which may be produced from their respective sulphamoylphenyl compounds by action of oestrone sulphatase, were also high in a range of 23 and 75nM of the K(i) values. On the other hand, all of the sulphamoylphenyl compounds were poor inhibitors of oestrone sulphatase with more than about 200microM of IC(25) values. Although the present findings of the oestrone sulphatase inhibition are disappointing, such attempts may be valuable to develop a new class of drugs having a dual function, aromatase inhibitor and oestrone sulphatase inhibitor, for the treatment of oestrogen-dependent breast cancer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Human Error Mechanisms in Complex Work Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1988-01-01

    Human error taxonomies have been developed from analysis of industrial incident reports as well as from psychological experiments. In this paper the results of the two approaches are reviewed and compared. It is found, in both cases, that a fairly small number of basic psychological mechanisms...... will account for most of the action errors observed. In addition, error mechanisms appear to be intimately related to the development of high skill and know-how in a complex work context. This relationship between errors and human adaptation is discussed in detail for individuals and organisations...

  3. Aromatase inhibitors in men: effects and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jong Frank H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aromatase inhibitors effectively delay epiphysial maturation in boys and improve testosterone levels in adult men Therefore, aromatase inhibitors may be used to increase adult height in boys with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty, idiopathic short stature and constitutional delay of puberty. Long-term efficacy and safety of the use of aromatase inhibitors has not yet been established in males, however, and their routine use is therefore not yet recommended.

  4. Aromatase and neuroinflammation in rat focal brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu H; Dhawan, Jasbeer; Kovoor, Joel A; Sullivan, John; Zhang, Wei X; Choi, Dennis; Biegon, Anat

    2017-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that expression of aromatase, the enzyme responsible for the conversion of androgens to estrogens, is transiently upregulated in rat stroke models. It was further suggested that increased aromatase expression is linked to neuroinflammation and that it is neuroprotective in females. Our goal was to investigate aromatase upregulation in male rats subjected to experimental stroke in relationship to neuroinflammation, infarct and response to treatment with different putative neuroprotective agents. Intact male rats were subjected to transient (90min) middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and administered selfotel (N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor competitive antagonist), TPEN (a zinc chelator), a combination of the two drugs or vehicle, injected immediately after reperfusion. Animals were killed 14days after MCAO and consecutive brain sections used to measure aromatase expression, cerebral infarct volume and neuroinflammation. Quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC) demonstrated increased brain aromatase expression in the peri-infarct area relative to contralesional area, which was partially abrogated by neuroprotective agents. There was no correlation between aromatase expression in the peri-infarct zone and infarct volume, which was reduced by neuroprotective agents. Microglial activation, measured by quantitative autoradiography, was positively correlated with infarct and inversely correlated with aromatase expression in the peri-infarct zone. Our findings indicate that focal ischemia upregulates brain aromatase in the male rat brain at 14days post surgery, which is within the time frame documented in females. However, the lack of negative correlation between aromatase expression and infarct volume and lack of positive correlation between microgliosis and aromatase do not support a major role for aromatase as a mediator of neuroprotection or a causal relationship between microglial activation and increased aromatase

  5. Human behavioral complexity peaks at age 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Random Item Generation tasks (RIG) are commonly used to assess high cognitive abilities such as inhibition or sustained attention. They also draw upon our approximate sense of complexity. A detrimental effect of aging on pseudo-random productions has been demonstrated for some tasks, but little is as yet known about the developmental curve of cognitive complexity over the lifespan. We investigate the complexity trajectory across the lifespan of human responses to five common RIG tasks, using a large sample (n = 3429). Our main finding is that the developmental curve of the estimated algorithmic complexity of responses is similar to what may be expected of a measure of higher cognitive abilities, with a performance peak around 25 and a decline starting around 60, suggesting that RIG tasks yield good estimates of such cognitive abilities. Our study illustrates that very short strings of, i.e., 10 items, are sufficient to have their complexity reliably estimated and to allow the documentation of an age-dependent decline in the approximate sense of complexity. PMID:28406953

  6. Aromatase 2004, Edinburgh, UK, 6-8 September 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R; Larionov, Alexey

    2004-11-02

    Aromatase is the key enzyme involved in oestrogen biosynthesis. Oestrogens not only influence normal development and function but are also implicated in the aetiology and progression of many diseases. Over recent years rational drug design programmes have led to the development of agents that specifically and potently inhibit aromatase. The multidisciplinary international symposium Aromatase 2004 provided a forum in which basic scientists, translational researchers and practising clinicians reviewed latest results, exchanged opinions, and defined future needs for the regulation of oestrogen biosynthesis and the use of aromatase inhibitors.

  7. Currently used pesticides and their mixtures affect the function of sex hormone receptors and aromatase enzyme activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldsen, Lisbeth Stigaard; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie, E-mail: ebj@mil.au.dk

    2013-10-15

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of pesticides is of health concern, since they are found ubiquitously in the environment and in food items. We investigated in vitro effects on estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) transactivity, and aromatase enzyme activity, of the following pesticides: 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), terbuthylazine, iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium, mesosulfuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, chlormequat chloride, bitertanol, propiconazole, prothioconazole, mancozeb, cypermethrin, tau fluvalinate, malathion and the metabolite ethylene thiourea (ETU). The pesticides were analyzed alone and in selected mixtures. Effects of the pesticides on ER and AR function were assessed in human breast carcinoma MVLN cells and hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells, respectively, using luciferase reporter gene assays. Effects on aromatase enzyme activity were analyzed in human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells, employing the classical [{sup 3}H]{sub 2}O method. Five pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole, prothioconazole, cypermethrin and malathion) weakly induced the ER transactivity, and three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole and mancozeb) antagonized the AR activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Three pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole and prothioconazole) weakly induced the aromatase activity. In addition, two mixtures, consisting of three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin) and five pesticides (terbuthylazine, bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin, malathion), respectively, induced the ER transactivity and aromatase activity, and additively antagonized the AR transactivity. In conclusion, our data suggest that currently used pesticides possess endocrine-disrupting potential in vitro which can be mediated via ER, AR and aromatase activities. The observed mixture effects emphasize the importance of considering the combined action of pesticides in order to assure proper estimations of related health effect risks

  8. Aromatase inhibitors in early breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriac, Louis; Smith, Ian

    2003-08-01

    A recent National Institutes of Health consensus guideline recommends the general use of adjuvant hormonal therapy for the treatment of early breast cancer in postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Standard therapy has been 5 years of tamoxifen, but about 30% of those patients fail to survive 10 years, many as a consequence of tamoxifen resistance. Promising results with the third-generation aromatase inhibitors anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane in first- and second-line treatment of metastatic breast cancer has prompted their evaluation as adjuvant therapy in patients progressing on tamoxifen or as alternative first-line treatment. Anastrozole has recently achieved significantly longer disease-free survival than tamoxifen in a first-line adjuvant therapy trial, and letrozole is being investigated in several large adjuvant trials. Aromatase inhibitors appear to be well tolerated for long-term adjuvant treatment. In the neoadjuvant setting, letrozole has been especially effective compared with tamoxifen in downstaging primary tumors in postmenopausal women, permitting significantly more breast-conserving surgery.

  9. Consanguinity, human evolution, and complex diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittles, A. H.; Black, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    There is little information on inbreeding during the critical early years of human existence. However, given the small founding group sizes and restricted mate choices it seems inevitable that intrafamilial reproduction occurred and the resultant levels of inbreeding would have been substantial. Currently, couples related as second cousins or closer (F ≥ 0.0156) and their progeny account for an estimated 10.4% of the global population. The highest rates of consanguineous marriage occur in north and sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and west, central, and south Asia. In these regions even couples who regard themselves as unrelated may exhibit high levels of homozygosity, because marriage within clan, tribe, caste, or biraderi boundaries has been a long-established tradition. Mortality in first-cousin progeny is ≈3.5% higher than in nonconsanguineous offspring, although demographic, social, and economic factors can significantly influence the outcome. Improving socioeconomic conditions and better access to health care will impact the effects of consanguinity, with a shift from infant and childhood mortality to extended morbidity. At the same time, a range of primarily social factors, including urbanization, improved female education, and smaller family sizes indicate that the global prevalence of consanguineous unions will decline. This shift in marriage patterns will initially result in decreased homozygosity, accompanied by a reduction in the expression of recessive single-gene disorders. Although the roles of common and rare gene variants in the etiology of complex disease remain contentious, it would be expected that declining consanguinity would also be reflected in reduced prevalence of complex diseases, especially in population isolates. PMID:19805052

  10. Time-dependent aromatase inactivation by 4 beta,5 beta-epoxides of the natural substrate androstenedione and its 19-oxygenated analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Yoshimura, Akiko; Tachibana, Mii; Shelangouski, Momoko; Ishikawa, Maya

    2002-03-01

    Aromatase catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens through three sequential oxygenations. To gain insight into the catalytic function of aromatase and its aromatization mechanism, we studied the inhibition of human placental aromatase by 4 beta,5 beta-epoxyandrostenedione (5) as well as its 19-hydroxy and 19-oxo derivatives (6 and 7, respectively), and we also examined the biochemical aromatization of these steroids. All of the epoxides were weak competitive inhibitors of aromatase with apparent K(i) values ranging from 5.0 microM to 30 microM. The 19-methyl and 19-oxo compounds 5 and 7 inactivated aromatase in a time-dependent manner with k(inact) of 0.048 and 0.110 min(-1), respectively, in the presence of NADPH. In the absence of NADPH, only the former inhibited aromatase with a k(inact) of 0.091 min(-1). However, 19-hydroxy steroid 6 did not cause irreversible inactivation either in the presence or absence of NADPH. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the metabolite produced by a 5-min incubation of the three epoxides with human placental microsomes in the presence of NADPH under air revealed that all three compounds were aromatized to produce estradiol with rates of 8.82, 0.51, and 1.62 pmol/min/mg protein for 5, 6, and 7, respectively. In each case, the aromatization was efficiently prevented by 19-hydroxyandrost-4-en-17-one, a potent aromatase inhibitor. On the basis of the aromatization and inactivation results, it seems likely that the two pathways, aromatization and inactivation, may proceed, in part, through a common intermediate, 19-oxo compound 7, although they may be principally different.

  11. Studies on the catalytic function of aromatase: aromatization of 6-alkoxy-substituted androgens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Ando, Momoko; Zennyoji, Rika

    2002-09-01

    To gain insight into the catalytic function of aromatase, we studied aromatization of a series of 6alpha- and 6beta-ether-substituted (methoxy, ethoxy, and n-butoxy) androst-4-ene-3,17-dione (AD) steroids (1 and 2) and their androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione (ADD) derivatives (3 and 4) with human placental aromatase by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among the steroids examined, 6beta-methoxy and 6beta-ethoxyADDs (4a and 4b) are suicide substrates of aromatase. All of the steroids were found to be converted into the corresponding 6-alkoxy estrogens. Introduction of the alkoxy groups at C-6 of AD or ADD decreased the ability of these to serve as a substrate of aromatase. In 6alpha-alkoxy steroid series, compounds 1 and 3, the aromatization rate increased by elongating the 6-methoxy group up to the n-butoxy group whereas, in the 6beta-isomers series, 2 and 4, the rate decreased due to this structural modification. 6beta-Alkoxy steroids, 2 and 4, including the suicide substrates, were extremely poor substrates for the aromatization reaction. Apparent K(m) values obtained for 6alpha-alkoxy compounds 1 and 3 were similar to each other, ranging from 92 to 111nM, as shown by their previously-obtained K(i) values. The findings indicate that the stereochemistry as well as the bulkiness of the 6-ether-substituent play an important role in the ability to serve as a substrate. It is also predicted that the aromatization reaction and the mechanism-based inactivation reaction would be related and have a definite partition number which is characteristic to the compound in a series of suicide substrates.

  12. 6beta,19-Bridged androstenedione analogs as aromatase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Sachiko; Yaguchi, Ayaka; Yamashita, Kouwa; Nagaoka, Masao; Numazawa, Mitsuteru

    2009-11-01

    Inhibition of aromatase is an efficient approach for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. New 6beta,19-bridged steroid analogs of androstenedione, 6beta,19-epithio- and 6beta,19-methano compounds 11 and 17, were synthesized starting from 19-hydroxyandrostenedione (6) and 19-formylandrost-5-ene-3beta,17beta-yl diacetate (12), respectively, as aromatase inhibitors. All of the compounds including known steroids 6beta,19-epoxyandrostenedione (4) and 6beta,19-cycloandrostenedione (5) tested were weak to poor competitive inhibitors of aromatase and, among them, 6beta,19-epoxy steroid 4 provided only moderate inhibition (K(i): 2.2 microM). These results show that the 6beta,19-bridged groups of the inhibitors interfere with binding in active site of aromatase.

  13. Benchmarking human protein complexes to investigate drug-related systems and evaluate predicted protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wu

    Full Text Available Protein complexes are key entities to perform cellular functions. Human diseases are also revealed to associate with some specific human protein complexes. In fact, human protein complexes are widely used for protein function annotation, inference of human protein interactome, disease gene prediction, and so on. Therefore, it is highly desired to build an up-to-date catalogue of human complexes to support the research in these applications. Protein complexes from different databases are as expected to be highly redundant. In this paper, we designed a set of concise operations to compile these redundant human complexes and built a comprehensive catalogue called CHPC2012 (Catalogue of Human Protein Complexes. CHPC2012 achieves a higher coverage for proteins and protein complexes than those individual databases. It is also verified to be a set of complexes with high quality as its co-complex protein associations have a high overlap with protein-protein interactions (PPI in various existing PPI databases. We demonstrated two distinct applications of CHPC2012, that is, investigating the relationship between protein complexes and drug-related systems and evaluating the quality of predicted protein complexes. In particular, CHPC2012 provides more insights into drug development. For instance, proteins involved in multiple complexes (the overlapping proteins are potential drug targets; the drug-complex network is utilized to investigate multi-target drugs and drug-drug interactions; and the disease-specific complex-drug networks will provide new clues for drug repositioning. With this up-to-date reference set of human protein complexes, we believe that the CHPC2012 catalogue is able to enhance the studies for protein interactions, protein functions, human diseases, drugs, and related fields of research. CHPC2012 complexes can be downloaded from http://www1.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/xlli/CHPC2012/CHPC2012.htm.

  14. Aromatase inactivation by 2-substituted derivatives of the suicide substrate androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Madoka; Handa, Wakako; Umeta, Hiromi; Ishikawa, Saki; Yamashita, Kouwa; Numazawa, Mitsuteru

    2009-09-01

    To gain the structure-activity relationship of Delta(1)-androstenediones (Delta(1)-ADs) as mechanism-based inactivator of aromatase, series of 2-alkyl- and 2-alkoxy-substituted Delta(1)-ADs (6 and 9) as well as 2-bromo-Delta(1)-AD (14) were synthesized and tested. All of the inhibitors examined blocked aromatase in human placental microsomes in a competitive manner. In a series of 2-alkyl-Delta(1)-ADs (6), n-hexyl compound 6f was the most powerful inhibitor with an apparent K(i) value of 31 nM. The inhibitory activities of 2-alkoxy steroids 9 decreased in relation to length of the alkyl chain up to n-hexyloxy group (K(i): 95 nM for methoxy 9a). All of the alkyl steroids 6 along with the alkoxy steroid 9, except for the ethyl and n-propyl compounds 6b and 6c, caused a time-dependent inactivation of aromatase. The inactivation rates (k(inact): 0.020-0.084 min(-1)) were comparable to that of the parent compound Delta(1)-AD. The inactivation was prevented by the substrate AD, and no significant effect of l-cysteine on the inactivation was observed in each case. The results indicate that the 2-hexyl compound 6f act as the most powerful mechanism-based inactivator of aromatase among Delta(1)-AD analogs and may be submitted to the preclinical study in estrogen-dependent breast cancer.

  15. Structure-activity relationships of 2alpha-substituted androstenedione analogs as aromatase inhibitors and their aromatization reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Handa, Wakako; Hasegawa, Chie; Takahashi, Madoka

    2005-12-01

    Aromatase catalyzes the conversion of androstenedione (1a, AD) to estrone through three sequential oxygenations of the 19-methyl group. To gain insight into the spatial nature of the AD binding (active) site of aromatase in relation to the catalytic function of the enzyme, we tested for the ability of 2alpha-substituted (halogeno, alkyl, hydroxy, and alkoxy) ADs (1b-1i) to inhibit aromatase in human placental microsomes as well as their ability to serve as a substrate for the enzyme. All of the steroids inhibited the enzyme in a competitive manner with the apparent K(i)'s ranging from 45 to 1150 nM. 2alpha-Halogeno (F, Cl, and Br) and 2alpha-alkyl (CH3 and CH2CH3) steroids 1b-1f were powerful to good inhibitors (Ki=45-171 nM) whereas steroids 1g-1i, having an oxygen function (hydroxy or alkoxy) at C-2alpha, were poor inhibitors (Ki=670-1150 nM). Aromatization of some of the steroids with placental microsomes was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, indicating that the aromatization rate of the bromide 1d was about two-fold that of the natural substrate AD and that of 2alpha-methoxide 1h was similar to that of AD. Kinetic analysis of the aromatization of androgens revealed that a good substrate was not essentially a good inhibitor for aromatase.

  16. Currently used pesticides and their mixtures affect the function of sex hormone receptors and aromatase enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Lisbeth Stigaard; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-10-15

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of pesticides is of health concern, since they are found ubiquitously in the environment and in food items. We investigated in vitro effects on estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) transactivity, and aromatase enzyme activity, of the following pesticides: 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), terbuthylazine, iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium, mesosulfuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, chlormequat chloride, bitertanol, propiconazole, prothioconazole, mancozeb, cypermethrin, tau fluvalinate, malathion and the metabolite ethylene thiourea (ETU). The pesticides were analyzed alone and in selected mixtures. Effects of the pesticides on ER and AR function were assessed in human breast carcinoma MVLN cells and hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells, respectively, using luciferase reporter gene assays. Effects on aromatase enzyme activity were analyzed in human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells, employing the classical [(3)H](2)O method. Five pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole, prothioconazole, cypermethrin and malathion) weakly induced the ER transactivity, and three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole and mancozeb) antagonized the AR activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Three pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole and prothioconazole) weakly induced the aromatase activity. In addition, two mixtures, consisting of three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin) and five pesticides (terbuthylazine, bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin, malathion), respectively, induced the ER transactivity and aromatase activity, and additively antagonized the AR transactivity. In conclusion, our data suggest that currently used pesticides possess endocrine-disrupting potential in vitro which can be mediated via ER, AR and aromatase activities. The observed mixture effects emphasize the importance of considering the combined action of pesticides in order to assure proper estimations of related health effect risks. © 2013

  17. Structure-activity relationships of 3-deoxy androgens as aromatase inhibitors. Synthesis and biochemical studies of 4-substituted 4-ene and 5-ene steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Masao; Watari, Yoko; Yajima, Hiromi; Tsukioka, Kaoru; Muroi, Yasuyo; Yamada, Keiko; Numazawa, Mitsuteru

    2003-08-01

    As part of our investigation into the structure-activity relationship of a novel class of aromatase inhibitors, two series of 3-deoxy androgens, androst-5-en-17-ones with a non-polar alkoxy (5 and 6), alkyl (20-22), or phenylalkyl (23 and 24) group at C-4beta and 4-acyloxyandrost-4-en-17-ones (29-32, and 34) were synthesized and evaluated. The 4beta-alkyl and 4beta-phenylalkyl compounds were obtained through reaction of 4alpha,5alpha-epoxy steroid (8) with RMgBr (R: alkyl and phenylalkyl) followed by dehydration of the 4beta-substituted 5alpha-hydroxy products (15-19) with SOCl(2) as key reactions. Acylation of 4alpha,5alpha-diol (25) with (RCO)(2)O in pyridine and subsequent dehydration with SOCl(2) gave the 4-acyloxy steroids. All of the steroids studied, except for 4-acetoxy-19-ol (34) that was a non-competitive inhibitor of human placental aromatase, blocked aromatase activity in a competitive manner. 4-Benzoyloxy- and 4-acetoxy steroids (31) and (32) were the most powerful inhibitors of aromatase (K(i)=70 and 60nM, respectively). Elongation of an acetoxy group in a series of 4-acyloxy steroids or a methyl group in a series of 4beta-alkyl steroids decreased affinity for aromatase principally in relation to carbon number of the acyl or alkyl function. The present findings are potentially useful for understanding the spatial and electronic nature of the binding site of aromatase as well as for developing effective aromatase inhibitors.

  18. Complex loci in human and mouse genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Engstroem, P.G.; Suzuki, H.; Ninomiya, N.; Akalin, A.; Sessa, L.; Lavorgna, G.; Brozzi, A.; Luzi, L.; Tan, S.L.; Yang, L.; Kunarso, G.; Ng, E.L.C.; Batalov, S.; Wahlestedt, C.; Kai, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis–antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis–antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse ...

  19. New steroidal aromatase inhibitors: Suppression of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cell proliferation and induction of cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roleira Fernanda MF

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatase, the cytochrome P-450 enzyme (CYP19 responsible for estrogen biosynthesis, is an important target for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. In fact, the use of synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AI, which induce suppression of estrogen synthesis, has shown to be an effective alternative to the classical tamoxifen for the treatment of postmenopausal patients with ER-positive breast cancer. New AIs obtained, in our laboratory, by modification of the A and D-rings of the natural substrate of aromatase, compounds 3a and 4a, showed previously to efficiently suppress aromatase activity in placental microsomes. In the present study we have investigated the effects of these compounds on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and induction of cell death using the estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell line stably transfected with the aromatase gene, MCF-7 aro cells. Results The new steroids inhibit hormone-dependent proliferation of MCF-7aro cells in a time and dose-dependent manner, causing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and inducing cell death with features of apoptosis and autophagic cell death. Conclusion Our in vitro studies showed that the two steroidal AIs, 3a and 4a, are potent inhibitors of breast cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, it was also shown that the antiproliferative effects of these two steroids on MCF-7aro cells are mediated by disrupting cell cycle progression, through cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and induction of cell death, being the dominant mechanism autophagic cell death. Our results are important for the elucidation of the cellular effects of steroidal AIs on breast cancer.

  20. Knockout of Zebrafish Ovarian Aromatase Gene (cyp19a1a) by TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 Leads to All-male Offspring Due to Failed Ovarian Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Esther Shuk-Wa; Zhang, Zhiwei; Qin, Mingming; Ge, Wei

    2016-11-23

    Sexual or gonadal differentiation is a complex event and its mechanism remains elusive in teleosts. Despite its complexity and plasticity, the process of ovarian differentiation is believed to involve gonadal aromatase (cyp19a1a) in nearly all species studied. However, most data concerning the role of aromatase have come from gene expression analysis or studies involving pharmacological approaches. There has been a lack of genetic evidence for the importance of aromatase in gonadal differentiation, especially the timing when the enzyme starts to exert its effect. This is due to the lack of appropriate loss-of-function approaches in fish models for studying gene functions. This situation has changed recently with the development of genome editing technologies, namely TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9. Using both TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9, we successfully established three mutant zebrafish lines lacking the ovarian aromatase. As expected, all mutant fish were males, supporting the view that aromatase plays a critical role in directing ovarian differentiation and development. Further analysis showed that the ovarian aromatase did not seem to affect the formation of so-called juvenile ovary and oocyte-like germ cells; however, it was essential for further differentiation of the juvenile ovary into the true ovary.

  1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of oxidative reactions of [19,19-(2)H(2)]19-hydroxy-3-deoxy androgens by placental aromatase. bsence of a deuterium-isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Masao; Numazawa, Mitsuteru

    2005-11-01

    Aromatase is a cytochrome P-450 enzyme complex that catalyzes the conversion of androst-4-ene-3,17-dione (AD) to estrone through three sequential oxidations of the 19-methyl group. 3-DeoxyAD (1) and its 5-ene isomer 4 are potent and good competitive aromatase inhibitors, which are converted by aromatase to the aldehyde derivatives 3 and 6, respectively, through 19-hydroxy intermediates 2 and 5, respectively. To study the deuterium isotope effect on the conversions of 19-ols 2 and 5 into the corresponding 19-als 3 and 6, we initially synthesized [19,19-(2)H(2)]19-ols 2 and 5 starting from the corresponding non-labeled 19-als 3 and 6 through NaB(2)H(4) reduction of the 19-aldehyde group, followed by oxidation with pyridinium dichromate, and a subsequent NaB(2)H(4) reduction. Approximately 1:1 mixtures of non-labeled (d(0)) and deuterated (d(2)) 19-ols 2 and 5 were separately incubated with human placental microsomes in the presence of NADPH under an air atmosphere, and deuterium contents of the recovered substrates and the 19-aldehyde products were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In each experiment, the ratio of d(0) to d(2) of the recovered substrate along with that of d(0) to d(1) of the product were identical to the d(0) to d(2) ratio of the employed substrate irrespective of the incubation time, indicating that the 19-oxygenations of the 3-deoxy steroids 2 and 5 proceeded without a detectable isotope effect, as seen in the aromatization sequence of the natural substrate AD.

  2. Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Infections in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Hung, Chien-Ching; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus complex comprises a group of rapidly growing, multidrug-resistant, nontuberculous mycobacteria that are responsible for a wide spectrum of skin and soft tissue diseases, central nervous system infections, bacteremia, and ocular and other infections. M. abscessus complex is differentiated into 3 subspecies: M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. The 2 major subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, have different erm(41) gene patterns. This gene provides intrinsic resistance to macrolides, so the different patterns lead to different treatment outcomes. M. abscessus complex outbreaks associated with cosmetic procedures and nosocomial transmissions are not uncommon. Clarithromycin, amikacin, and cefoxitin are the current antimicrobial drugs of choice for treatment. However, new treatment regimens are urgently needed, as are rapid and inexpensive identification methods and measures to contain nosocomial transmission and outbreaks.

  3. Complex Human Dynamics From Mind to Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Winkowska-Nowak, Katarzyna; Brée, David

    2013-01-01

    This book, edited and authored by a closely collaborating network of social scientists and psychologists, recasts typical research topics in these fields into the language of nonlinear, dynamic and complex systems. The aim is to provide scientists with different backgrounds - physics, applied mathematics and computer sciences - with the opportunity to apply the tools of their trade to an altogether new range of possible applications. At the same time, this book will serve as a first reference for a new generation of social scientists and psychologists wishing to familiarize themselves with the new methodology and the "thinking in complexity".

  4. Aromatase inhibitors in stimulated IVF cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tournaye Herman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aromatase inhibitors have been introduced as a new treatment modality that could challenge clomiphene citrate as an ovulation induction regiment in patients with PCOS. Although several randomized trials have been conducted regarding their use as ovulation induction agents, only few trials are available regarding their efficacy in IVF stimulated cycles. Current available evidence support that letrozole may have a promising role in stimulated IVF cycles, either when administered during the follicular phase for ovarian stimulation. Especially for women with poor ovarian response, letrozole appears to have the potential to increase clinical pregnancy rates when combined with gonadotropins, whereas at the same time reduces the total gonadotropin dose required for ovarian stimulation. However, given that in all of the trials letrozole has been administered in GnRH antagonist cycles, it is intriguing to test in the future how it may perform when used in GnRH agonist cycles. Finally administration of letrozole during luteal phase in IVF cycles offers another treatment modality for patients at high risk for OHSS taking into account that it drastically reduces estradiol levels

  5. Effects of currently used pesticides in assays for estrogenicity, androgenicity, and aromatase activity in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Vinggaard, Anne; Rasmussen, Thomas Høj

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-four pesticides were tested for interactions with the estrogen receptor (ER) and the androgen receptor (AR) in transactivation assays. Estrogen-like effects on MCF-7 cell proliferation and effects on CYP19 aromatase activity in human placental microsomes were also investigated. Pesticides...... to their frequent use in Danish greenhouses. In addition, the metabolite mercaptodimethur sulfoxide, the herbicide tribenuron-methyl, and the organochlorine dieldrin, were included. Several of the pesticides, dieldrin, endosulfan, methiocarb, and fenarimol, acted both as estrogen agonists and androgen antagonists...

  6. Endogenous steroid hormones and local aromatase activity in the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, J H; Blankenstein, M A; Donker, G H; Daroszewski, J

    1991-11-01

    To test the hypothesis of an increased activity of the enzyme aromatase in adipose tissue from affected when compared with non-affected quadrants of patients with breast cancer, the aromatase activity has been measured in tumour and fatty tissues dissected at specific sites from the breasts of 16 patients. Activity was measured after extensive purification of the product formed. Results, expressed in fmol/g of tissue, did not show a higher activity in the affected vs the non-affected quadrants. In the tumours, higher activities were found when expressed per g of tissue. Per mg of DNA, an indicator of the number of cells, tumour enzymatic activity was lower than in fatty tissues. The relations between the products of aromatase, oestrone and oestradiol in the various tissues point to the importance of additional enzymatic processes, especially of the reductive 17 beta-oestradiol dehydrogenase, in the accumulation of high quantities of oestradiol in the malignant tissue.

  7. The human RNase MRP complex : composition, assembly and role in human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenennaam, Hans van

    2002-01-01

    Not all RNA molecules in human cells are being translated into proteins. Some of them function in binding proteins, thereby forming so-called RNA-protein complexes. The RNase MRP complex is an example of such an RNA-protein complex. In this thesis two new protein components of the human RNase MRP

  8. Proposal for analysis of human talent from complex thought

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abel Del Río Cortina; Jairo Rodrigo Velásquez Moreno

    2015-01-01

    ...*, considering a series of demonstrations framed in the learning process, this, with respect to the complexity of the human development derived from the interactions of the individual, the family...

  9. Sociology and Human Ecology: Complexity and Posthumanist Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, John A.; Jenks, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This book proposal represents the first title in the proposed Complexity in Social Science series at Routledge. In common with the series this book begins with the current crisis or declining credibility of post-structuralism and human-centred analyses as sufficient to address the complexities of the human ecological relationship to the terrestrial environment and the biosphere. Further, this need to address ecological processes and emergent phenomena is dispersed through many disciplines tha...

  10. 'Slow-binding' sixth-ligand inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 aromatase. Studies with 19-thiomethyl- and 19-azido-androstenedione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J N; Slatcher, G; Akhtar, M

    1991-02-01

    The progress curves for the inhibition of aromatase by 19-thiomethylandrostenedione and 19-azidoandrostenedione were found to be non-linear where the extent of inhibition increased with time. Further experiments enabled these compounds to be classified as 'slow-binding' inhibitors of aromatase. The phenomenon was attributed to the formation of an initial E.I complex that rearranged to another species (E.I*) in which the interaction between the enzyme and inhibitor had been maximized, giving rise to tighter binding. When 19-thiomethylandrostenedione was used as the inhibitor the t0.5 (half-time) for the dissociation of E.I* was calculated to be 12.6 min with Ki and Ki* values of 2.4 and 1.4 nM respectively. In the case of 19-azidoandrostenedione, the two separate dissociation constants were not determined, and a single Ki value of 5 nM was obtained. The conclusions drawn from kinetic studies were confirmed by absorption spectrometry, when time-dependent formation of complexes between aromatase and either 19-thiomethylandrostenedione or 19-azidoandrostenedione were observed by the formation of 'Type II' spectra. The two complexes respectively had maxima at 429 and 418 nm. The spectral data suggested that the two inhibitors interact with the haem iron of aromatase, forming hexaco-ordinated species for which structural models are presented.

  11. Short-term androgen priming by use of aromatase inhibitor and hCG before controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF. A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lossl, K; Andersen, C Yding; Loft, A

    2008-01-01

    Temporary exposure of follicles to increased levels of androgens may augment follicular responsiveness. The present study tested whether short-term androgen priming by aromatase inhibitor and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) before controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) increases the number of top...

  12. The Rh complex exports ammonium from human red blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemker, Mirte B.; Cheroutre, Goedele; van Zwieten, Rob; Maaskant-van Wijk, Petra A.; Roos, Dirk; Loos, Johannes A.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; von dem Borne, Albert E. G. Kr

    2003-01-01

    The Rh blood group system represents a major immunodominant protein complex on red blood cells (RBC). Recently, the Rh homologues RhAG and RhCG were shown to promote ammonium ion transport in yeast. In this study, we showed that also in RBC the human Rh complex functions as an exporter of ammonium

  13. Molecular docking and 3D-QSAR-based virtual screening of flavonoids as potential aromatase inhibitors against estrogen-dependent breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Manika; Singh, Swati; Pandey, Veda P; Dwivedi, Upendra N

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase, catalyzing final step of estrogen biosynthesis, is considered a key target for the development of drug against estrogen-dependent breast cancer (EDBC). Identification and development of naturally occurring compounds, such as flavonoids, as drugs against EDBC is in demand due to their lesser toxicity when compared to those of synthetic ones. Thus, a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship, using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) was done on a series of 45 flavonoids against human aromatase. A significant cross-validated correlation coefficient (q(2)) of 0.827 was obtained. The best predictive CoMFA model explaining the biological activity of the training and test sets with correlation coefficient values (r(2)) of 0.916 and 0.710, respectively, when used for virtual screening of a flavanoids database following molecular docking revealed a flavanone namely, 7-hydroxyflavanone beta-D-glucopyranoside showing highest predicted activity of 1.09 μM. In comparison to a well-established inhibitor of aromatase, namely 7-hydroxyflavanone (IC50: 3.8 μM), the derivative identified in the present study, namely 7-hydroxyflavanone beta-D-glucopyranoside exhibited about 3.5 folds higher inhibitory activity against aromatase. The result of virtual screening was further validated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis. Thus, a 25 ns MD simulation analysis revealed high stability and effective binding of 7-hydroxyflavanone beta-D-glucopyranoside within the active site of aromatase. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of CoMFA-based QSAR model for virtual screening of flavonoids as inhibitors of aromatase.

  14. Methadone: A Substrate and Mechanism-Based Inhibitor of CYP19 (Aromatase)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bies, Robert; Kamden, Landry K.; Desta, Zeruesenay; Flockhart, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The peripheral conversion of testosterone to estradiol by aromatase is the primary source of endogenous estrogen in postmenopausal women. Studies indicating that placental aromatase is able to metabolize methadone to its primary metabolite, 2-ethylidene-1, 5-dimethyl-3, 3-diphenylpyrrolidin (EDDP), led us to test the hypothesis that methadone is able to act as an inhibitor of aromatase. Using recombinant human CYP19, we examined the ability of methadone to bring about either reversible or mechanism-based inhibition of the conversion of testosterone to estradiol. To test for reversible inhibition, racemic methadone or its metabolite EDDP or 2-ethyl-5-methyl-3, 3-diphenylpyrroline (EMDP) was incubated for 30 min with testosterone at the Km (4 μM). To test for mechanism-based inhibition, microsomal preincubations were performed for up to 30 min using racemic methadone (1–1000 μM), R- or S-methadone (0.5–500 μM), or EDDP or EMDP (10 and 100 μM) followed by incubation with testosterone at a Vmax concentration (50 μM). Racemic methadone, EDDP, and EMDP did not act as competitive inhibitors of CYP19. Preincubation of methadone, EDDP, or EMDP with CYP19 resulted in time- and concentration-dependent inhibition, indicating a mechanism-based reaction that destroys CYP19 activity. The KI and kinact values for racemic methadone were calculated to be 40.6 ± 2.8 μM and 0.061 ± 0.001 min−1, respectively. No stereoselectivity was observed. Methadone is metabolized by CYP19 and may act as a potent inhibitor of CYP19 in vivo. These findings may contribute to variability in methadone clearance, to drug-drug interactions, and to side effects observed in individual patients. PMID:20410453

  15. Potential utility of natural products as regulators of breast cancer-associated aromatase promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Larry A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aromatase, the key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, converts androstenedione to estrone and testosterone to estradiol. The enzyme is expressed in various tissues such as ovary, placenta, bone, brain, skin, and adipose tissue. Aromatase enzyme is encoded by a single gene CYP 19A1 and its expression is controlled by tissue-specific promoters. Aromatase mRNA is primarily transcribed from promoter I.4 in normal breast tissue and physiological levels of aromatase are found in breast adipose stromal fibroblasts. Under the conditions of breast cancer, as a result of the activation of a distinct set of aromatase promoters (I.3, II, and I.7 aromatase expression is enhanced leading to local overproduction of estrogen that promotes breast cancer. Aromatase is considered as a potential target for endocrine treatment of breast cancer but due to nonspecific reduction of aromatase activity in other tissues, aromatase inhibitors (AIs are associated with undesirable side effects such as bone loss, and abnormal lipid metabolism. Inhibition of aromatase expression by inactivating breast tumor-specific aromatase promoters can selectively block estrogen production at the tumor site. Although several synthetic chemical compounds and nuclear receptor ligands are known to inhibit the activity of the tumor-specific aromatase promoters, further development of more specific and efficacious drugs without adverse effects is still warranted. Plants are rich in chemopreventive agents that have a great potential to be used in chemotherapy for hormone dependent breast cancer which could serve as a source for natural AIs. In this brief review, we summarize the studies on phytochemicals such as biochanin A, genistein, quercetin, isoliquiritigenin, resveratrol, and grape seed extracts related to their effect on the activation of breast cancer-associated aromatase promoters and discuss their aromatase inhibitory potential to be used as safer chemotherapeutic agents for

  16. Intracranial cortical localization of the human K-complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennberg, Richard

    2010-08-01

    The K-complex was first identified in human sleep EEG more than 70years ago, but the localization of its intracranial generators is an unresolved issue. In this study, K-complexes recorded using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG were analyzed to discover the intracranial distribution of the human K-complex. Stereoelectroencephalographic recordings were performed in six patients with medically-refractory epilepsy. Full 10-20 scalp montages were used and intracranial macroelectrodes sampled medial, lateral and basal frontal and temporal cortices, medial and lateral parietal and occipital cortices, as well as the hippocampus and thalamus. Spontaneous K-complexes were visually identified in stage II sleep and averaged off-line. The intracranial K-complex field was maximal over the anterior and superior aspects of the medial and lateral frontal lobe cortices, consistent with the frontal midline scalp EEG maximum. The frontal maximum surface-negative field was volume conducted as an inverted, positive field posteriorly and inferiorly, the polarity reversing laterally above the inferior temporal region and medially above the cingulate cortex. As suggested by the scalp EEG topography, the intracranial distribution of the human K-complex is maximal over the anterior and superior frontal cortices. K-complex generation appears limited to cortical regions above the inferior temporal sulcus laterally, the cingulate sulcus medially and the parietooccipital junction posteriorly. The human K-complex is produced by synchronous cortical activity that appears maximal intracranially over the superior medial and lateral aspects of the frontal lobes. The cingulate cortex and functionally related mesial temporal structures appear uninvolved in human K-complex generation. Copyright 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Which patients benefit most from adjuvant aromatase inhibitors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viale, G; Regan, M M; Dell'Orto, P

    2011-01-01

    On average, aromatase inhibitors are better than tamoxifen when used as initial or sequential therapy for postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer. Because there may be contraindications to their use based on side-effects or cost, we investigated subgroups in which...

  18. Comment. The Comparative and Evolutionary Biology of Vertebrate Aromatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aromatase is the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of estrogens from androgens. It is doubtful that there are many other genes that have such a broad and profound influence on reproduction and survival of species. The expression of this enzyme in various tissues controls both directly and indirec...

  19. Analysis of aromatase ( CYP19 ) gene in Iranian women with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of aromatase (CYP19) gene in Iranian women with endometriosis. Hajar Saber, Zivar Salehi, Saiedeh Sadri. Abstract. Endometriosis is a chronic, inflammatory, estrogen dependent disease that affects up to 10% of all women of fertile age. It is characterized by the presence and proliferation of functional endometrial ...

  20. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships of steroid aromatase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprea, Tudor I.; García, Angel E.

    1996-06-01

    Inhibition of aromatase, a cytochrome P450 that converts androgens to estrogens, is relevant in the therapeutic control of breast cancer. We investigate this inhibition using a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) method known as Comparative Molecular Field Analysis, CoMFA [Cramer III, R.D. et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 110 (1988) 5959]. We analyzed the data for 50 steroid inhibitors [Numazawa, M. et al., J. Med. Chem., 37 (1994) 2198, and references cited therein] assayed against androstenedione on human placental microsomes. An initial CoMFA resulted in a three-component model for log(1/Ki), with an explained variance r2 of 0.885, and a cross-validated q2 of 0.673. Chemometric studies were performed using GOLPE [Baroni, M. et al., Quant. Struct.-Act. Relatsh., 12 (1993) 9]. The CoMFA/GOLPE model is discussed in terms of robustness, predictivity, explanatory power and simplicity. After randomized exclusion of 25 or 10 compounds (repeated 25 times), the q2 for one component was 0.62 and 0.61, respectively, while r2 was 0.674. We demonstrate that the predictive r2 based on the mean activity (Ym) of the training set is misleading, while the test set Ym-based predictive r2 index gives a more accurate estimate of external predictivity. Using CoMFA, the observed differences in aromatase inhibition among C6-substituted steroids are rationalized at the atomic level. The CoMFA fields are consistent with known, potent inhibitors of aromatase, not included in the model. When positioned in the same alignment, these compounds have distinct features that overlap with the steric and electrostatic fields obtained in the CoMFA model. The presence of two hydrophobic binding pockets near the aromatase active site is discussed: a steric bulk tolerant one, common for C4, C6-alpha and C7-alpha substitutents, and a smaller one at the C6-beta region.

  1. Expression and localization of aromatase during fetal mouse testis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borday, Caroline; Merlet, Jorge; Racine, Chrystèle; Habert, René

    2013-01-01

    Both androgens and estrogens are necessary to ensure proper testis development and function. Studies on endocrine disruptors have highlighted the importance of maintaining the balance between androgens and estrogens during fetal development, when testis is highly sensitive to environmental disturbances. This balance is regulated mainly through an enzymatic cascade that converts irreversibly androgens into estrogens. The most important and regulated component of this cascade is its terminal enzyme: the cytochrome p450 19A1 (aromatase hereafter). This study was conducted to improve our knowledge about its expression during mouse testis development. By RT-PCR and western blotting, we show that full-length aromatase is expressed as early as 12.5 day post-coitum (dpc) with maximal expression at 17.5 dpc. Two additional truncated transcripts were also detected by RT-PCR. Immunostaining of fetal testis sections and of gonocyte-enriched cell cultures revealed that aromatase is strongly expressed in fetal Leydig cells and at variable levels in gonocytes. Conversely, it was not detected in Sertoli cells. This study shows for the first time that i) aromatase is expressed from the early stages of fetal testis development, ii) it is expressed in mouse gonocytes suggesting that fetal germ cells exert an endocrine function in this species and that the ratio between estrogens and androgens may be higher inside gonocytes than in the interstitial fluid. Furthermore, we emphasized a species-specific cell localization. Indeed, previous works found that in the rat aromatase is expressed both in Sertoli and Leydig cells. We propose to take into account this species difference as a new concept to better understand the changes in susceptibility to Endocrine Disruptors from one species to another.

  2. Overexpression of aromatase in transgenic male mice results in the induction of gynecomastia and other biochemical changes in mammary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, K; Kirma, N; Tekmal, R R

    2001-04-01

    Our previous studies have shown that overexpression of aromatase in mammary glands results in the induction of hyperplastic and dysplastic changes in female transgenic mice. In this study we show that overexpression of aromatase in male transgenic mice results in increased mammary growth and histopathological changes similar to gynecomastia. Increased estrogenic activity also results in an increase in estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in the mammary glands of transgenic males as compared to the nontransgenic males, as well as an increase in the expression of various genes involved in cell cycle and cell proliferation. We have also observed an increase in certain growth factors, such as bFGF and TGFbeta, as a result of aromatase overexpression in the male transgenic mammary glands. In order to obtain a better understanding of the biological significance of gynecomastia, a reliable model is necessary to explain the mechanisms and correlations associated with human cancers. This model, can potentially serve as a predictable and useful tool for studying gynecomastia, hormonal carcinogenesis and action of other carcinogens on hormone induced cancers.

  3. Inhibition of estrone sulfatase by aromatase inhibitor-based estrogen 3-sulfamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Tominaga, Takako; Watari, Yoko; Tada, Yasue

    2006-05-01

    Our rationale is based on the finding that estrone 3-sulfamate (EMATE, 2d), a typical estrone sulfatase (ES) inhibitor, can be hydrolyzed and the pharmacological effect of the free estrogen contributes to the bioactivity of the sulfamate. A number of 3-sulfamoylated derivatives of the good aromatase inhibitors, 2- and 4-halogeno (F, Cl, and Br) estrones and their estradiol analogs as well as 6beta-methyl and phenyl estrones, were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of ES in human placental microsomes in comparison with the lead compound EMATE. Among them, 2-chloro- and 2-bromoestrone 3-sulfamates (2b and 2c), along with their estradiol analogs 3b and 3c, were powerful competitive inhibitors with K(i)'s ranging between 4.0 and 11.3 nM (K(i) for EMATE, 73 nM). These four sulfamates as well as the 2-fluoro analogs 2a and 3a inactivated ES in a time-dependent manner more efficiently than EMATE, and 2-halogeno estrone sulfamates 2 also caused a concentration-dependent loss of ES activity. The results may be useful for developing a new class of drugs having a dual function, ES inhibition and aromatase inhibition, for the treatment of breast cancer.

  4. Peak Oil and the Everyday Complexity of Human Progress Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Pruit

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The “big” story of human progress has polarizing tendencies featuring the binary options of progress or decline. I consider human progress narratives in the context of everyday life. Analysis of the “little” stories from two narrative environments focusing on peak oil offers a more complex picture of the meaning and contours of the narrative. I consider the impact of differential blog site commitments to peak oil perspectives and identify five narrative types culled from two narrative dimensions. I argue that the lived experience complicates human progress narratives, which is no longer an either/or proposition.

  5. Synthesis and biochemical properties of 6-bromoandrostenedione derivatives with a 2,2-dimethyl or 2-methyl group as aromatase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Handa, Wakako; Yamada, Keiko

    2004-11-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism for irreversible inactivation of aromatase by 6beta-bromoandrostenedione (1), one of the earliest discovered suicide substrates, in relation to the catalytic function of the enzyme, the 2,2-dimethyl derivative of compound 1, steroid 4, and its 6alpha-isomer 5, as well as 2-methyl-1,4-diene steroid 8 and its 6alpha-bromide 10, were synthesized. All of the steroids inhibited aromatase activity in human placental microsomes with apparent K(i)'s ranging between 10 and 81 nM. The 2,2-dimethyl-6beta- and 6alpha-bromo steroids 4 and 5 were extremely powerful inhibitors (K(i): 14 and 10 nM, respectively), but these two did not cause a time-dependent inactivation of aromatase in the presence of NADPH; in contrast, the 2-methyl-1,4-diene steroids 8 and 10 caused time-dependent inactivation with apparent k(inact) of 0.035 and 0.071 min(-1), respectively, in a suicide manner. These results indicate that the 2,2-dimethyl function of the 6beta-bromide 4 would prevent the inactivation of aromatase caused by inhibitor 1 in a suicide manner, probably through steric activity, whereas the 2-methyl group of steroid 8 did not significantly affect the suicidal inactivation by the parent 1,4-diene steroid, a typical suicide substrate.

  6. The dominating macromolecular complex of human gallbladder bile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, J.C.M.; Mijnlieff, P.F.

    The solutes of human gall bladder bile appear to exist mainly in the form of a complex macromolecule, formed around a nucleus of lipoprotein. The existence of this macromolecule was demonstrated by paper electrophoresis1, free electrophoresis and ultracentrifuge experiments. The molecular weight of

  7. Aromatase inhibition by 4 beta,5 beta-epoxides of 16 alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione and its 19-oxygenated analogs, potential precursors of estriol production in the feto-placental unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Yoshimura, Akiko; Watari, Yoko; Matsuzaki, Hisao

    2002-12-01

    To gain insight into the nature of the substrate binding site and the catalytic function of aromatase, we studied the inhibition of androstenedione aromatization by 4beta,5beta-epoxy-16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione (4) and its 19-hydroxy and 19-oxo derivatives, 5 and 6, as well as the biochemical aromatization of these steroids in human placental microsomes. The 19-methyl and 19-oxo compounds, 4 and 6, were weak competitive inhibitors of aromatase, with apparent K(i) values of 246 microM and 270 microM, respectively, whereas the 19-hydroxy compound 5 inhibited aromatase in a non-competitive manner with the K(i) of 135 microM. The 19-methyl compound 4 inactivated aromatase in a time-dependent manner with k(inact) of 0.213 min(-1) in the presence of NADPH in air, but the other two did not cause it. The conversion of the three epoxides into estrogen, as well as 19-oxygenation of 19-methyl steroid 4 with human placental microsomes in the presence of NADPH in air, were not detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The present results are consistent with the two binding sites theory in the active site of aromatase.

  8. Dynamic analysis of the human brain with complex cerebral sulci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jung-Ge; Huang, Bo-Wun; Ou, Yi-Wen; Yen, Ke-Tien; Wu, Yi-Te

    2016-07-03

    The brain is one of the most vulnerable organs inside the human body. Head accidents often appear in daily life and are easy to cause different level of brain damage inside the skull. Once the brain suffered intense locomotive impact, external injuries, falls, or other accidents, it will result in different degrees of concussion. This study employs finite element analysis to compare the dynamic characteristics between the geometric models of an assumed simple brain tissue and a brain tissue with complex cerebral sulci. It is aimed to understand the free vibration of the internal brain tissue and then to protect the brain from injury caused by external influences. Reverse engineering method is used for a Classic 5-Part Brain (C18) model produced by 3B Scientific Corporation. 3D optical scanner is employed to scan the human brain structure model with complex cerebral sulci and imported into 3D graphics software to construct a solid brain model to simulate the real complex brain tissue. Obtaining the normal mode analysis by inputting the material properties of the true human brain into finite element analysis software, and then to compare the simplified and the complex of brain models.

  9. Biochemistry of Complex Glycan Depolymerisation by the Human Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndeh, Didier; Gilbert, Harry J

    2018-01-09

    The human gut microbiota (HGM) makes an important contribution to health and disease. It is a complex microbial community of trillions of microbes with a majority of its members represented within two phyla, the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, although it also contains species of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Reflecting its importance, the HGM is sometimes referred to as an 'organ' as it performs functions analogous to systemic tissues within the human host. The major nutrients available to the HGM are host and dietary complex carbohydrates. To utilise these nutrient sources the HGM has developed elaborate, variable and sophisticated systems for the sensing, capture and utilisation of these glycans. Understanding nutrient acquisition by the HGM can thus provide mechanistic insights into the dynamics of this ecosystem, and how it impacts human health. Dietary nutrient sources include a wide variety of simple and complex plant and animal-derived glycans most of which are not degraded by enzymes in the digestive tract of the host. Here we review how various adaptive mechanisms that operate across the major phyla of the HGM contribute to glycan utilisation, focusing on the most complex carbohydrates presented to this ecosystem. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The activity and expression of aromatase in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlinger, B A

    1997-01-01

    Songbirds have emerged as extremely important animals for investigating sex steroid hormone effects on the central nervous system. The masculinizing effects of exogenous estrogen on the neural circuits controlling song in female zebra finches are well documented. There is evidence that estrogens are necessary for the full activation of singing behavior in several species. These kinds of studies have led us and others to investigate the mechanisms whereby estrogens are made available to the brains of songbirds during development and adulthood. In this article, I review results of some of these studies examining the estrogen synthetic enzyme aromatase and its expression and activity in brain and in other tissues of songbirds. I will discuss some results and thoughts we have about the interactions of aromatase with the two remaining androgen-metabolizing enzymes in the avian brain, 5alpha-reductase, the enzyme that converts T into the active androgen 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT); and 5beta-reductase, the enzyme that converts T into the inactive 5beta-DHT. Finally, I will consider some ideas raised by these studies concerning potential sources of the androgen substrate for brain aromatization as well as some possible new functions that aromatase might be playing in the songbird telencephalon.

  11. Enzymic aromatization of 6-alkyl-substituted androgens, potent competitive and mechanism-based inhibitors of aromatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, M; Yoshimura, A; Oshibe, M

    1998-01-01

    To gain insight into the relationships between the aromatase inhibitory activity of 6-alkyl-substituted androgens, potent competitive inhibitors, and their ability to serve as a substrate of aromatase, we studied the aromatization of a series of 6alpha- and 6beta-alkyl (methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, n-pentyl and n-heptyl)-substituted androst-4-ene-3,17-diones (ADs) and their androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione (ADD) derivatives with human placental aromatase, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Among the inhibitors examined, ADD and its 6alpha-alkyl derivatives with alkyl functions less than three carbons long, together with 6beta-methyl ADD, are suicide substrates of aromatase. All of the steroids, except for 6beta-n-pentyl ADD and its n-heptyl analogue as well as 6beta-n-heptyl AD, were found to be converted into the corresponding 6-alkyl oestrogens. The 6-methyl steroids were aromatized most efficiently in each series, and the aromatization rate essentially decreased in proportion to the length of the 6-alkyl chains in each series, where the 6alpha-alkyl androgens were more efficient substrates than the corresponding 6beta isomers. The Vmax of 6alpha-methyl ADD was approx. 2.5-fold that of the natural substrate AD and approx. 3-fold that of the parent ADD. On the basis of this, along with the facts that the rates of a mechanism-based inactivation of aromatase by ADD and its 6alpha-methyl derivative are similar, it is implied that alignment of 6alpha-methyl ADD in the active site could favour the pathway leading to oestrogen over the inactivation pathway, compared with that of ADD. The relative apparent Km values for the androgens obtained in this study are different from the relative Ki values obtained previously, indicating that there is a difference between the ability to serve as an inhibitor and the ability to serve as a substrate in the 6-alkyl androgen series. PMID:9405288

  12. Modulation of Aromatase Activity as a Mode of Action for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in a Marine Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    The steroidogenic enzyme aromatase catalyzes the conversion of androgens (androstenedione and testosterone) to estrogens (estrone and estradiol) and therefore plays a central role in reproduction. In contrast to most vertebrates, teleost fish have two distinct forms of aromatase....

  13. Understanding Complex Human Ecosystems: The Case of Ecotourism on Bonaire

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Abel

    2003-01-01

    It is suggested that ecotourism development on the island of Bonaire can be productively understood as a perturbation of a complex human ecosystem. Inputs associated with ecotourism have fueled transformations of the island ecology and sociocultural system. The results of this study indicate that Bonaire's social and economic hierarchy is approaching a new, stable systems state following a 50-yr transition begun by government and industry that stabilized with the appearance of ecotourism deve...

  14. data for aromatase 3D qsar modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — computational chemistry data (very complex; need to be an expert to understand and use. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Lee, S., and M....

  15. How to Save Human Lives with Complexity Science

    CERN Document Server

    Helbing, Dirk; Chadefaux, Thomas; Donnay, Karsten; Blanke, Ulf; Woolley-Meza, Olivia; Moussaid, Mehdi; Johansson, Anders; Krause, Jens; Schutte, Sebastian; Perc, Matjaz

    2014-01-01

    We discuss models and data of crowd disasters, crime, terrorism, war and disease spreading to show that conventional recipes, such as deterrence strategies, are not effective and sufficient to contain them. The failure of many conventional approaches results from their neglection of feedback loops, instabilities and/or cascade effects, due to which equilibrium models do often not provide a good picture of the actual system behavior. However, the complex and often counter-intuitive behavior of social systems and their macro-level collective dynamics can be understood by means of complexity science, which enables one to address the aforementioned problems more successfully. We highlight that a suitable system design and management can help to stop undesirable cascade effects and to enable favorable kinds of self-organization in the system. In such a way, complexity science can help to save human lives.

  16. Pedigree models for complex human traits involving the mitochrondrial genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schork, N.J.; Guo, S.W. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Recent biochemical and molecular-genetic discoveries concerning variations in human mtDNA have suggested a role for mtDNA mutations in a number of human traits and disorders. Although the importance of these discoveries cannot be emphasized enough, the complex natures of mitochondrial biogenesis, mutant mtDNA phenotype expression, and the maternal inheritance pattern exhibited by mtDNA transmission make it difficult to develop models that can be used routinely in pedigree analyses to quantify and test hypotheses about the role of mtDNA in the expression of a trait. In the present paper, the authors describe complexities inherent in mitochondrial biogenesis and genetic transmission and show how these complexities can be incorporated into appropriate mathematical models. The authors offer a variety of likelihood-based models which account for the complexities discussed. The derivation of the models is meant to stimulate the construction of statistical tests for putative mtDNA contribution to a trait. Results of simulation studies which make use of the proposed models are described. The results of the simulation studies suggest that, although pedigree models of mtDNA effects can be reliable, success in mapping chromosomal determinants of a trait does not preclude the possibility that mtDNA determinants exist for the trait as well. Shortcomings inherent in the proposed models are described in an effort to expose areas in need of additional research. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Environmental layout complexity affects neural activity during navigation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Edward; Burles, Ford; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Navigating large-scale surroundings is a fundamental ability. In humans, it is commonly assumed that navigational performance is affected by individual differences, such as age, sex, and cognitive strategies adopted for orientation. We recently showed that the layout of the environment itself also influences how well people are able to find their way within it, yet it remains unclear whether differences in environmental complexity are associated with changes in brain activity during navigation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how the brain responds to a change in environmental complexity by asking participants to perform a navigation task in two large-scale virtual environments that differed solely in interconnection density, a measure of complexity defined as the average number of directional choices at decision points. The results showed that navigation in the simpler, less interconnected environment was faster and more accurate relative to the complex environment, and such performance was associated with increased activity in a number of brain areas (i.e. precuneus, retrosplenial cortex, and hippocampus) known to be involved in mental imagery, navigation, and memory. These findings provide novel evidence that environmental complexity not only affects navigational behaviour, but also modulates activity in brain regions that are important for successful orientation and navigation. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Optimization of a classical aromatase activity assay and application in normal, adenomatous and malignant breast parenchyma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkeschei, LD; Wolthers, BG; BosZuur, [No Value; delaRiviere, GB; Nagel, GT; vanderKolk, DA; Willemse, PHB

    1996-01-01

    The tritium water release assay, originally described for the analysis of aromatase activity in placental tissue, was used to estimate aromatase activity in breast tissue samples. The lower activity in this tissue necessitates longer incubation times and thus optimization of the assay conditions. To

  19. Uso de inibidores da aromatase no tratamento do câncer de mama e osteoporose = The use of aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer treatment and osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassol, Lina Barbosa

    2005-01-01

    Conclusão: Estratégias diagnósticas, preventivas e, eventualmente, terapêuticas de osteoporose devem ser empregadas precocemente em pacientes com câncer de mama tratadas com inibidores da aromatase

  20. The use of a unique co-culture model of fetoplacental steroidogenesis as a screening tool for endocrine disruptors: The effects of neonicotinoids on aromatase activity and hormone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron-Beaudoin, Elyse; Viau, Rachel; Hudon-Thibeault, Andrée-Anne; Vaillancourt, Cathy; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Estrogen biosynthesis during pregnancy is dependent on the collaboration between the fetus producing the androgen precursors, and the placenta expressing the enzyme aromatase (CYP19). Disruption of estrogen production by contaminants may result in serious pregnancy outcomes. We used our recently developed in vitro co-culture model of fetoplacental steroidogenesis to screen the effects of three neonicotinoid insecticides on the catalytic activity of aromatase and the production of steroid hormones. A co-culture of H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells with fetal characteristics and BeWo human choriocarcinoma cells which display characteristics of the villous cytotrophoblast was exposed for 24h to various concentrations of three neonicotinoids: thiacloprid, thiamethoxam and imidacloprid. Aromatase catalytic activity was determined in both cell lines using the tritiated water-release assay. Hormone production was measured by ELISA. The three neonicotinoids induced aromatase activity in our fetoplacental co-culture and concordingly, estradiol and estrone production were increased. In contrast, estriol production was strongly inhibited by the neonicotinoids. All three pesticides induced the expression of CYP3A7 in H295R cells, and this induction was reversed by co-treatment of H295R cells with exogenous estriol. CYP3A7 is normally expressed in fetal liver and is a key enzyme involved in estriol synthesis. We suggest that neonicotinoids are metabolized by CYP3A7, thus impeding the 16α-hydroxylation of fetal DHEA(-sulfate), which is normally converted to estriol by placental aromatase. We successfully used the fetoplacental co-culture as a physiologically relevant tool to highlight the potential effects of neonicotinoids on estrogen production, aromatase activity and CYP3A7 expression during pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Proposal for analysis of human talent from complex thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Del Río Cortina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is expose a displaying scheme of the actions of the individual in the context of the productive world*, considering a series of demonstrations framed in the learning process, this, with respect to the complexity of the human development derived from the interactions of the individual, the family, the community, the labor environment, and society in general from the perspective of volitional, cognitive, and procedural dimensions. The proposed visualization, is conceived as a relational map that includes six pillars of human interaction immersed in the above dimensions, being them, know-to be, know-to know, Know-to live, Know-to create, know-to manage, and know-to communicate, being all these reflected as a synergic structure made manifest in the know-how, from the interplay of values, emotional skills or soft skills, attitudes, knowledge, and finally, ways of proceeding. All of the above, in order to generate an approach to the relational complexity of the human talent development in society. * The productive world, in this document, is conceived as the one in which people get articulated in order to live in family, community, entrepreneurial organization, a diverse kind of institutions, and society in general.

  2. Human opinion dynamics: An inspiration to solve complex optimization problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rishemjit; Kumar, Ritesh; Bhondekar, Amol P.; Kapur, Pawan

    2013-10-01

    Human interactions give rise to the formation of different kinds of opinions in a society. The study of formations and dynamics of opinions has been one of the most important areas in social physics. The opinion dynamics and associated social structure leads to decision making or so called opinion consensus. Opinion formation is a process of collective intelligence evolving from the integrative tendencies of social influence with the disintegrative effects of individualisation, and therefore could be exploited for developing search strategies. Here, we demonstrate that human opinion dynamics can be utilised to solve complex mathematical optimization problems. The results have been compared with a standard algorithm inspired from bird flocking behaviour and the comparison proves the efficacy of the proposed approach in general. Our investigation may open new avenues towards understanding the collective decision making.

  3. Understanding Complex Human Ecosystems: The Case of Ecotourism on Bonaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Abel

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that ecotourism development on the island of Bonaire can be productively understood as a perturbation of a complex human ecosystem. Inputs associated with ecotourism have fueled transformations of the island ecology and sociocultural system. The results of this study indicate that Bonaire's social and economic hierarchy is approaching a new, stable systems state following a 50-yr transition begun by government and industry that stabilized with the appearance of ecotourism development and population growth. Ecotourism can be understood to have "filled in" the middle of the production hierarchy of Bonaire. Interpreted from this perspective, population growth has completed the transformation by expanding into production niches at smaller scales in the production hierarchy. Both a consequence and a cause, ecotourism has transformed the island's social structure and demography. The theory and methods applied in this case study of interdisciplinary research in the field of human ecosystems are also presented.

  4. Aromatase inhibitors, efficacy and metabolic risk in the treatment of postmenopausal women with early breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Gonnelli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Gonnelli1, Roberto Petrioli21Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrine-Metabolic Science and Biochemistry, University of Siena, Italy (Dir. R. Nuti.; 2Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, Medical Oncology Section, University of Siena, Italy (Dir. G. FranciniAbstract: The third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs, letrozole, anastrozole and exemestane, are becoming the first choice endocrine drugs for post-menopausal women with breast cancer, since they present greater efficacy when compared with tamoxifen in both adjuvant and metastatic setting. In particular, several large and well designed trials have suggested an important role for AIs in the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer either in the upfront, sequential or extended adjuvant mode. Overall, AIs are associated with a small but significant improvement in disease free survival. The expanding use of AIs in the treatment of early breast cancer means that individual patients will be exposed to the agents for longer durations, making it increasingly important to establish their long-term safety. This review focused on the effects of AIs on bone metabolism, serum lipids and cardiovascular risk. AIs have adverse effects on bone turnover with a reduction of bone mineral density and an increase in the rate of fragility fractures. With respect to tamoxifen AIs present lower thrombotic risk and a less favorable impact on lipid profile, whereas the true effects on cardiovascular risk still remain to be clarified. An adequate monitoring of bone mineral density (BMD and lipid profile could be recommended for post-menopausal women candidate to AIs.Keywords: breast cancer, aromatase inhibitors, bone loss, lipids, cardiovascular risk

  5. CYP11A1 expression in bone is associated with aromatase inhibitor-related bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sanz, M; García-Giralt, N; Prieto-Alhambra, D; Servitja, S; Balcells, S; Pecorelli, R; Díez-Pérez, A; Grinberg, D; Tusquets, I; Nogués, X

    2015-08-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) used as adjuvant therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer cause diverse musculoskeletal side effects that include bone loss and its associated fracture. About half of the 391 patients treated with AIs in the Barcelona-Aromatase induced bone loss in early breast cancer cohort suffered a significant bone loss at lumbar spine (LS) and/or femoral neck (FN) after 2 years on AI-treatment. In contrast, up to one-third (19.6% LS, 38.6% FN) showed no decline or even increased bone density. The present study aimed to determine the genetic basis for this variability. SNPs in candidate genes involved in vitamin D and estrogen hormone-response pathways (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, HSD3B2, HSD17B3, CYP19A1, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, ESR1, DHCR7, GC, CYP2R1, CYP27B1, VDR and CYP24A1) were genotyped for association analysis with AI-related bone loss (AIBL). After multiple testing correction, 3 tag-SNPs (rs4077581, s11632698 and rs900798) located in the CYP11A1 gene were significantly associated (Pbone tissue and primary osteoblasts was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Both common isoforms of human cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (encoded by CYP11A1 gene) were detected in osteoblasts by western blot. In conclusion, the genetic association of CYP11A1 gene with AIBL and its expression in bone tissue reveals a potential local function of this enzyme in bone metabolism regulation, offering a new vision of the steroidogenic ability of this tissue and new understanding of AI-induced bone loss. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. Human more complex than mouse at cellular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E Vinogradov

    Full Text Available The family of transcription factors with the C2H2 zinc finger domain is expanding in the evolution of vertebrates, reaching its highest numbers in the mammals. The question arises: whether an increased amount of these transcription factors is related to embryogenesis, nervous system, pathology or more of them are expressed in individual cells? Among mammals, the primates have a more complex anatomical structure than the rodents (e.g., brain. In this work, I show that a greater number of C2H2-ZF genes are expressed in the human cells than in the mouse cells. The effect is especially pronounced for C2H2-ZF genes accompanied with the KRAB domain. The relative difference between the numbers of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes in the human and mouse cellular transcriptomes even exceeds their difference in the genomes (i.e. a greater subset of existing in the genome genes is expressed in the human cellular transcriptomes compared to the mouse transcriptomes. The evolutionary turnover of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes acts in the direction of the revealed phenomenon, i.e. gene duplication and loss enhances the difference in the relative number of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes between human and mouse cellular transcriptomes. A higher amount of these genes is expressed in the brain and embryonic cells (compared with other tissues, whereas a lower amount--in the cancer cells. It is specifically the C2H2-ZF transcription factors whose repertoire is poorer in the cancer and richer in the brain (other transcription factors taken together do not show this trend. These facts suggest that increase of anatomical complexity is accompanied by a more complex intracellular regulation involving these transcription factors. Malignization is associated with simplification of this regulation. These results agree with the known fact that human cells are more resistant to oncogenic transformation than mouse cells. The list of C2H2-ZF genes whose suppression might be involved in malignization is provided.

  7. Synchronization in human musical rhythms and mutually interacting complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Holger

    2014-09-09

    Though the music produced by an ensemble is influenced by multiple factors, including musical genre, musician skill, and individual interpretation, rhythmic synchronization is at the foundation of musical interaction. Here, we study the statistical nature of the mutual interaction between two humans synchronizing rhythms. We find that the interbeat intervals of both laypeople and professional musicians exhibit scale-free (power law) cross-correlations. Surprisingly, the next beat to be played by one person is dependent on the entire history of the other person's interbeat intervals on timescales up to several minutes. To understand this finding, we propose a general stochastic model for mutually interacting complex systems, which suggests a physiologically motivated explanation for the occurrence of scale-free cross-correlations. We show that the observed long-term memory phenomenon in rhythmic synchronization can be imitated by fractal coupling of separately recorded or synthesized audio tracks and thus applied in electronic music. Though this study provides an understanding of fundamental characteristics of timing and synchronization at the interbrain level, the mutually interacting complex systems model may also be applied to study the dynamics of other complex systems where scale-free cross-correlations have been observed, including econophysics, physiological time series, and collective behavior of animal flocks.

  8. Aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of deep endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Ferrero

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent case reports and pilot studies suggested that aromatase inhibitors might be effective in treating pain symptoms related to the presence of endometriosis. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who suffered dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, chronic pelvic pain, and dyschezia caused by rectovaginal endometriosis. Pain symptoms recurred after treatment with the oral contraceptive pill; the patient refused surgery. Therefore a double-drug regimen including letrozole (2.5 mg/day and norethisterone acetate (2.5 mg/day was offered to the patient. The scheduled length of treatment was six months. This double-drug regimen determined a quick and significant improvement in all pain symptoms. During treatment, the patient complained mild arthralgia. After the interruption of treatment, pain symptoms quickly recurred and at 6-month follow-up their intensity was similar to baseline values. Operative laparoscopy was performed, the presence of rectovaginal endometriosis was confirmed and all visible endometriotic lesions were excised. Aromatase inhibitors might be offered when pain symptoms caused by endometriosis persist during the administration of other hormonal therapies and the patient refuses surgery. However, women must be informed that these drugs determine only a temporary relief of pain symptoms and might cause adverse effects (such as arthralgia.

  9. Aromatase expression increases the survival and malignancy of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keya De Mukhopadhyay

    Full Text Available In postmenopausal women, local estrogen produced by adipose stromal cells in the breast is believed to support estrogen receptor alpha (ERα positive breast cancer cell survival and growth. This raises the question of how the ERα positive metastatic breast cancer cells survive after they enter blood and lymph circulation, where estrogen level is very low in postmenopausal women. In this study, we show that the aromatase expression increased when ERα positive breast cancer cells were cultured in suspension. Furthermore, treatment with the aromatase substrate, testosterone, inhibited suspension culture-induced apoptosis whereas an aromatase inhibitor attenuated the effect of testosterone suggesting that suspended circulating ERα positive breast cancer cells may up-regulate intracrine estrogen activity for survival. Consistent with this notion, a moderate level of ectopic aromatase expression rendered a non-tumorigenic ERα positive breast cancer cell line not only tumorigenic but also metastatic in female nude mice without exogenous estrogen supplementation. The increased malignant phenotype was confirmed to be due to aromatase expression as the growth of orthotopic tumors regressed with systemic administration of an aromatase inhibitor. Thus, our study provides experimental evidence that aromatase plays an important role in the survival of metastatic ERα breast cancer cells by suppressing anoikis.

  10. The complexity of human walking: a knee osteoarthritis study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Kotti

    Full Text Available This study proposes a framework for deconstructing complex walking patterns to create a simple principal component space before checking whether the projection to this space is suitable for identifying changes from the normality. We focus on knee osteoarthritis, the most common knee joint disease and the second leading cause of disability. Knee osteoarthritis affects over 250 million people worldwide. The motivation for projecting the highly dimensional movements to a lower dimensional and simpler space is our belief that motor behaviour can be understood by identifying a simplicity via projection to a low principal component space, which may reflect upon the underlying mechanism. To study this, we recruited 180 subjects, 47 of which reported that they had knee osteoarthritis. They were asked to walk several times along a walkway equipped with two force plates that capture their ground reaction forces along 3 axes, namely vertical, anterior-posterior, and medio-lateral, at 1000 Hz. Data when the subject does not clearly strike the force plate were excluded, leaving 1-3 gait cycles per subject. To examine the complexity of human walking, we applied dimensionality reduction via Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis. The first principal component explains 34% of the variance in the data, whereas over 80% of the variance is explained by 8 principal components or more. This proves the complexity of the underlying structure of the ground reaction forces. To examine if our musculoskeletal system generates movements that are distinguishable between normal and pathological subjects in a low dimensional principal component space, we applied a Bayes classifier. For the tested cross-validated, subject-independent experimental protocol, the classification accuracy equals 82.62%. Also, a novel complexity measure is proposed, which can be used as an objective index to facilitate clinical decision making. This measure proves that knee osteoarthritis

  11. Complex history of admixture between modern humans and Neandertals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernot, Benjamin; Akey, Joshua M

    2015-03-05

    Recent analyses have found that a substantial amount of the Neandertal genome persists in the genomes of contemporary non-African individuals. East Asians have, on average, higher levels of Neandertal ancestry than do Europeans, which might be due to differences in the efficiency of purifying selection, an additional pulse of introgression into East Asians, or other unexplored scenarios. To better define the scope of plausible models of archaic admixture between Neandertals and anatomically modern humans, we analyzed patterns of introgressed sequence in whole-genome data of 379 Europeans and 286 East Asians. We found that inferences of demographic history restricted to neutrally evolving genomic regions allowed a simple one-pulse model to be robustly rejected, suggesting that differences in selection cannot explain the differences in Neandertal ancestry. We show that two additional demographic models, involving either a second pulse of Neandertal gene flow into the ancestors of East Asians or a dilution of Neandertal lineages in Europeans by admixture with an unknown ancestral population, are consistent with the data. Thus, the history of admixture between modern humans and Neandertals is most likely more complex than previously thought. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetics of human episodic memory: dealing with complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2011-09-01

    Episodic memory is a polygenic behavioral trait with substantial heritability estimates. Despite its complexity, recent empirical evidence supports the notion that behavioral genetic studies of episodic memory might successfully identify trait-associated molecules and pathways. The development of high-throughput genotyping methods, of elaborated statistical analyses and of phenotypic assessment methods at the neural systems level will facilitate the reliable identification of novel memory-related genes. Importantly, a necessary crosstalk between behavioral genetic studies and investigation of causality by molecular genetic studies will ultimately pave the way towards the identification of biologically important, and hopefully druggable, genes and molecular pathways related to human episodic memory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The emergence of complex patterns in online human communication

    CERN Document Server

    Mathiesen, Joachim; Jensen, Mogens H

    2012-01-01

    Social media have become essential conduits in the worldwide exchange of ideas, opinions and consumer marketing. Complex networks are important tools for analyzing the information flow in many aspects of nature and human society. Here, we introduce a method based on networks and social media to gauge how ideas, opinions and new trends impact society. We show that correlations between different international brands, nouns or US major cities follow a universal scale free distribution. The correlations indicate a self-organizing dynamics in large social organizations where the exchange of information between individuals is highly volatile. Our method provides new fundamental insight on the propagation of opinions and the emergence of trends in online communities.

  14. New Developments in Understanding the Complexity of Human Speech Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Kristina; Ackermann, Hermann; Chang, Edward F; Greenlee, Jeremy D

    2016-11-09

    Speech is one of the most unique features of human communication. Our ability to articulate our thoughts by means of speech production depends critically on the integrity of the motor cortex. Long thought to be a low-order brain region, exciting work in the past years is overturning this notion. Here, we highlight some of major experimental advances in speech motor control research and discuss the emerging findings about the complexity of speech motocortical organization and its large-scale networks. This review summarizes the talks presented at a symposium at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Neuroscience; it does not represent a comprehensive review of contemporary literature in the broader field of speech motor control. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/3611440-09$15.00/0.

  15. Complex-tone pitch representations in the human auditory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Federica

    enhanced relative to the non-musicians for both resolved and unresolved harmonics in the right auditory cortex, right frontal regions and inferior colliculus. However, the increase in neural activation in the right auditory cortex of musicians was predictive of the increased pitch......Understanding how the human auditory system processes the physical properties of an acoustical stimulus to give rise to a pitch percept is a fascinating aspect of hearing research. Since most natural sounds are harmonic complex tones, this work focused on the nature of pitch-relevant cues...... of training, which seemed to be specific to the stimuli containing resolved harmonics. Finally, a functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm was used to examine the response of the auditory cortex to resolved and unresolved harmonics in musicians and non-musicians. The neural responses in musicians were...

  16. Probing the binding pocket of the active site of aromatase with 2-phenylaliphatic androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Madoka; Yamashita, Kouwa; Numazawa, Mitsuteru

    2010-04-01

    A series of 2-phenylaliphatic-substituted androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-diones (6) as well as their androstenedione derivatives (5) were synthesized as aromatase inhibitors to gain insights of structure-activity relationships of varying the alkyl moiety (C(1) to C(4)) of the 2-phenylaliphatic substituents as well as introducing a methyl- or trifluoromethyl function to p-position of a phenethyl moiety to the inhibitory activity. The inhibitors examined showed a competitive type inhibition. The 2-phenpropylandrosta-1,4-diene 6c was the most powerful inhibitor (K(i): 16.1nM) among them. Compounds 6c along with the phenethyl derivative 6b caused a time-dependent inactivation of aromatase (k(inact): 0.0293 and 0.0454min(-1) for 6b and 6c, respectively). The inactivation was prevented by the substrate androstenedione, and no significant effect of l-cysteine on the inactivation was observed in each case. Molecular docking of the phenpropyl compound 6c to aromatase was conducted to demonstrate that the phenpropyl group orients to a hydrophobic binding pocket in the active site to result in the formation of thermodynamically stable enzyme-inhibitor complex.

  17. Forward-time simulations of human populations with complex diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Peng

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing power of personal computers, as well as the availability of flexible forward-time simulation programs like simuPOP, it is now possible to simulate the evolution of complex human diseases using a forward-time approach. This approach is potentially more powerful than the coalescent approach since it allows simulations of more than one disease susceptibility locus using almost arbitrary genetic and demographic models. However, the application of such simulations has been deterred by the lack of a suitable simulation framework. For example, it is not clear when and how to introduce disease mutants-especially those under purifying selection-to an evolving population, and how to control the disease allele frequencies at the last generation. In this paper, we introduce a forward-time simulation framework that allows us to generate large multi-generation populations with complex diseases caused by unlinked disease susceptibility loci, according to specified demographic and evolutionary properties. Unrelated individuals, small or large pedigrees can be drawn from the resulting population and provide samples for a wide range of study designs and ascertainment methods. We demonstrate our simulation framework using three examples that map genes associated with affection status, a quantitative trait, and the age of onset of a hypothetical cancer, respectively. Nonadditive fitness models, population structure, and gene-gene interactions are simulated. Case-control, sibpair, and large pedigree samples are drawn from the simulated populations and are examined by a variety of gene-mapping methods.

  18. The Impact of the Human Genome Project on Complex Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N. Cooke Bailey

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the decade that has passed since the initial release of the Human Genome, numerous advancements in science and technology within and beyond genetics and genomics have been encouraged and enhanced by the availability of this vast and remarkable data resource. Progress in understanding three common, complex diseases: age-related macular degeneration (AMD, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and multiple sclerosis (MS, are three exemplars of the incredible impact on the elucidation of the genetic architecture of disease. The approaches used in these diseases have been successfully applied to numerous other complex diseases. For example, the heritability of AMD was confirmed upon the release of the first genome-wide association study (GWAS along with confirmatory reports that supported the findings of that state-of-the art method, thus setting the foundation for future GWAS in other heritable diseases. Following this seminal discovery and applying it to other diseases including AD and MS, the genetic knowledge of AD expanded far beyond the well-known APOE locus and now includes more than 20 loci. MS genetics saw a similar increase beyond the HLA loci and now has more than 100 known risk loci. Ongoing and future efforts will seek to define the remaining heritability of these diseases; the next decade could very well hold the key to attaining this goal.

  19. Superiority of aromatase inhibitor and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor combined delivery: Hyaluronate-targeted versus PEGylated protamine nanocapsules for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzoghby, Ahmed O; Mostafa, Shaimaa K; Helmy, Maged W; ElDemellawy, Maha A; Sheweita, Salah A

    2017-08-30

    Despite several reports have revealed the beneficial effect of co-administration of COX-2 inhibitors with aromatase inhibitors in managing postmenopausal breast cancer; no nanocarriers for such combined delivery have been developed till now. Therefore, protamine nanocapsules (PMN-NCs) have been developed to co-deliver letrozole (LTZ) that inhibits aromatase-mediated estrogen biosynthesis and celecoxib (CXB) that synergistically inhibits aromatase expression. Inspired by the CD44-mediated tumor targeting ability of hyaluronate (HA), we developed HA-coated PMN-NCs (HA-NCs) via electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly. Moreover, multi-compartmental PEGylated phospholipid-CXB complex bilayer enveloping PMN-NCs (PEG-NCs) were designed for conferring biphasic CXB release from the phospholipid corona and oily core as well as enabling passive-targeting. The NCs demonstrated excellent stability, prolonged circulation and could be scaled up with the aid of spray-drying technology. Hemolysis, serum stability and cytotoxicity studies confirmed the superiority of combined LTZ-CXB nano-delivery. Mechanistically, the NCs especially HA-NCs and PEG-NCs demonstrated precious anti-tumor effects in vivo revealed as reduction in the tumor volume and aromatase level, increased apoptosis, as well as inhibition of VEGF, NF-κB and TNF-α augmented by histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Overall, our approach provided for the first time a potential strategy for targeted LTZ-CXB combined therapy of hormone-dependent breast cancer via singular nanocapsule delivery system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinjens, W N; ten Kate, J; van der Linden, E P; Wijnen, J T; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1989-12-01

    The normal distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human body was investigated quantitatively by ADCP-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and qualitatively by immunohistochemistry. In these studies we used a specific rabbit anti-human ADCP antiserum. In all 19 investigated tissues, except erythrocytes, ADCP was found by RIA in the soluble and membrane fractions. From all tissues the membrane fractions contained more ADCP (expressed per mg protein) than the soluble fractions. High membrane ADCP concentrations were found in skin, renal cortex, gastrointestinal tract, and prostate. Immunoperoxidase staining confirmed the predominant membrane-associated localization of the protein. In serous sweat glands, convoluted tubules of renal cortex, bile canaliculi, gastrointestinal tract, lung, pancreas, prostate gland, salivary gland, gallbladder, mammary gland, and uterus, ADCP immunoreactivity was found confined to the luminal membranes of the epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that ADCP is present predominantly in exocrine glands and absorptive epithelia. The localization of ADCP at the secretory or absorptive apex of the cells suggests that the function of ADCP is related to the secretory and/or absorptive process.

  1. Complexity of human and ecosystem interactions in an agricultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, Richard H.; Barlow, Jeannie R.; Capel, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of human interaction in the commercial agricultural landscape and the resulting impacts on the ecosystem services of water quality and quantity is largely ignored by the current agricultural paradigm that maximizes crop production over other ecosystem services. Three examples at different spatial scales (local, regional, and global) are presented where human and ecosystem interactions in a commercial agricultural landscape adversely affect water quality and quantity in unintended ways in the Delta of northwestern Mississippi. In the first example, little to no regulation of groundwater use for irrigation has caused declines in groundwater levels resulting in loss of baseflow to streams and threatening future water supply. In the second example, federal policy which subsidizes corn for biofuel production has encouraged many producers to switch from cotton to corn, which requires more nutrients and water, counter to national efforts to reduce nutrient loads to the Gulf of Mexico and exacerbating groundwater level declines. The third example is the wholesale adoption of a system for weed control that relies on a single chemical, initially providing many benefits and ultimately leading to the widespread occurrence of glyphosate and its degradates in Delta streams and necessitating higher application rates of glyphosate as well as the use of other herbicides due to increasing weed resistance. Although these examples are specific to the Mississippi Delta, analogous situations exist throughout the world and point to the need for change in how we grow our food, fuel, and fiber, and manage our soil and water resources.

  2. Potential role of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Hashim H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hatem Abu HashimDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, EgyptAbstract: Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent chronic inflammatory disease affecting 5%–10% of reproductive-age women, with a prevalence of 5%–50% in infertile women and >33% of women with chronic pelvic pain. Third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs are approved adjuvants for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Molecular studies have revealed the presence of aromatase P450, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ovarian estradiol, inside the endometriotic tissue, indicating local synthesis of estradiol. Thereby, AIs represent an appealing medical option for the management of different aspects of this enigmatic disease, especially pelvic pain and infertility. Accordingly, this review aims to evaluate the potential role of AIs in the treatment of endometriosis-associated symptoms, mainly pain and infertility. Notably, several studies have demonstrated that the combination of AIs with conventional therapy as oral contraceptive pills, progestins, or gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs can be used to control endometriosis-associated pain and pain recurrence in premenopausal women, particularly those with pain due to rectovaginal endometriosis refractory to other medical or surgical treatment. Some case reports have shown promising results in the treatment of postmenopausal endometriosis as first-line treatment, when surgery is contraindicated, or as second-line treatment in the case of postoperative recurrence. Third-generation AIs, especially letrozole, have challenged clomiphene citrate as an ovulation-induction agent in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and in cases of unexplained infertility. However, few studies are available regarding the use of AIs to treat endometriosis-associated infertility. Therefore, larger multicenter randomized trials using AIs for the treatment of endometriosis

  3. Human factoring the procedures element in a complex manufacturing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caccamise, D.J.; Mecherikoff, M.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of Human Factors evaluations of procedures associated with incidents at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) it was determined that the existing procedure format created significant opportunities for confusion in their attempt to convey information about a work process. For instance, there was no mechanism to clearly identify the participants and their roles during the instructions portion of the procedure. In addition, procedure authors frequently used complex logic to convey a series of contingent actions within steps. It was also difficult to discern the actual procedure steps from other types of information in the procedure. These and other inadequacies prompted the Human Factors Engineering (HFE) department to propose solutions to these problems that followed well-researched principles of cognitive psychology, dealing with how humans process information. Format and style contribute to procedure usability, and therefore to safety and efficiency in operations governed by the procedures. Since it was difficult to tie specific performance failures to specific format and style characteristics and thereby dearly define costs and benefits, it was difficult on that basis to sell the idea that changes in procedure format and style were really necessary to improve safety and efficiency. In addition, we found that the socio-political systems governing this process, particularly at the subprocess interface level, were not functioning efficiently. Both the technological aspects of the process and the socio-political aspects were contributing to waste and considerable re-work. Fixing the customer feedback loop to the process owners not only minimized re-work and waste, but also provided the data to persuade subprocess owners to make the necessary changes that heretofore were being met with great resistance.

  4. Aromatase inhibitors for subfertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome: summary of a Cochrane review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franik, S.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Farquhar, C.; Marjoribanks, J.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common cause of anovulatory subfertility. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of aromatase inhibitors compared with other methods of ovulation induction in women with anovulatory PCOS.

  5. Ekspresi Gen CYP19 Aromatase, Estrogen, Androgen pada penderita Periodontitis Agresif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlia Herawati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kepadatan tulang tubuh ditentukan oleh gen CYP19 aromatase, hormon estrogen dan androgen. Pada periodontitis agresif terjadi perkembangan cepat kerusakan tulang alveolar, dan kerusakan tulang alveoler tersebut tidak diimbangioleh regenerasi tulang. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menunjukkan ekspresi gen CYP19 aromatase, estrogen, androgen pada penderita periodontitis agresif agar dapat untuk menjadi pertimbangan pada saat melakukan perawatan periodontal. Metode penelitian, pemeriksaan ekspresi gen aromatse CYP19 berasal dari spesimen tulang alveolar menggunakan imunohistokimia, pengukuran hormon estrogen dan androgen dari serum menggunakan Vidas: Elfa. Hasil penelitian ekspresi gene CYP19 aromatase pada periodontitis agresif menunjukkan gambaran lebih rendah densitasnya dibandingkan pada nonperiodontitis. Estrogen dan androgen pad aperiodontitis agresif ada kecenderungan lebih rendah dibandingkan pada nonperiodontitis. Kesimpulan regenerasi tulang alveoler pad a periodontitis agresif terhambat karena sedikitnya gen CYP19 aromatase dan hormon estrogen dan androgen yang berperan pada pembentukan tulang alveoler kurang memadai.

  6. Structure-activity relationships of estrogen derivatives as aromatase inhibitors. Effects of heterocyclic substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Komatsu, Sachiko; Tominaga, Takako; Yamashita, Kouwa

    2008-09-01

    Aromatase, which is responsible for the conversion of androgens to estrogens, is a potential therapeutic target for the selective lowering estrogen level in patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer. We prepared and tested series of the pyridine- and other heterocyclic ring-containing derivatives of 2- and 4-aminoestrones, estrone, and estradiol, compounds 5, 10, 12 and 15. The isonicotinyl derivatives of 2- and 4-aminoestrone, compounds 5c and 10c, were fairly potent competitive inhibitors of aromatase (K(i), 2.1+/-0.14 and 1.53+/-0.08 microM for 5c and 10c, respectively) and other compounds did not show, to a significant extent, the aromatase inhibitory activity. This result suggests that the isonicotinyl-substituted derivatives 5c and 10c would be accessible to the active site of aromatase.

  7. Musculoskeletal Adverse Events Associated with Adjuvant Aromatase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamar J. Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal symptoms including arthralgia and myalgia occur frequently in aging women, particularly during the transition to menopause, when plasma estrogens precipitously decline. In postmenopausal women (PMW with breast cancer, third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs as adjuvant hormonal therapy have proven to be more effective, and to have a more predictable side effect profile, than tamoxifen. However, AIs further reduce plasma estrogens in PMW, exacerbating musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinical trial data have shown significantly higher incidences of arthralgia and myalgia with AIs compared with women on tamoxifen or placebo. Symptoms may be severe enough to significantly affect quality of life; musculoskeletal symptoms are a frequent reason for discontinuing therapy. In many cases, symptoms can be effectively managed with oral analgesics or other strategies. Early recognition and effective management of musculoskeletal symptoms can help maximize treatment compliance, enabling patients to derive optimal benefit from therapy in terms of preventing recurrence.

  8. Correlation between aromatase expression in the eutopic endometrium of symptomatic patients and the presence of endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Jr H

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hugo Maia Jr1,2, Clarice Haddad1,2, Julio Casoy11CEPARH, 2Itaigara Memorial Day Hospital, Salvador, Bahia, BrazilObjective: To investigate whether aromatase expression in the eutopic endometrium correlates with the presence and severity of endometriosis in patients with infertility and/or dysmenorrhea undergoing laparoscopy and hysteroscopy.Patients: The study involved 106 patients of reproductive age with symptoms of dysmenorrhea and infertility. Sixteen endometriosis-free asymptomatic patients were used as a control group.Methods: Concomitant laparoscopy and hysteroscopy was carried out in all cases. An endometrial biopsy was taken to determine aromatase p450 expression by immunohistochemistry. Endometriosis was staged according to the American Society of Reproductive Medicine classification.Results: Endometriosis was diagnosed by laparoscopy in 92/106 symptomatic patients. In this group, aromatase expression was detected in the eutopic endometrium of 66/92 patients with endometriosis (72% and in 13/14 (95% patients in the symptomatic, endometriosis-free group (P = 0.09. Aromatase expression was not detected in any patients from the control group. In the endometriosis group, aromatase expression was detected in the eutopic endometrium of 28/45 patients (62% with American Society of Reproductive Medicine classification stage 1 of the disease, in 11/14 patients (78% with stage II, 14/20 patients (70% with stage III, and in 12/13 patients (92% with stage IV; however, the difference was only statistically significant between stages I and IV (P = 0.04.Conclusion: Aromatase expression in the endometrium was associated with the presence of dysmenorrhea and infertility irrespective of the presence of endometriosis. When endometriosis was present, however, there was a tendency for aromatase expression to be positively correlated with dysmenorrhea severity.Keywords: aromatase, endometrium, endometriosis, Cox-2, dysmenorrhea

  9. Sexual dimorphism of brain aromatase activity in medaka: induction of a female phenotype by estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, A C; Ramsdell, J S

    2001-01-01

    In this study we identified sex-dependent dimorphism of brain aromatase in the teleost medaka and examined its regulation by sex steriods. We first investigated differential distribution of brain aromatase activity in sexually mature male and female medaka in serial coronal sections of the brain and identified the hypothalamic nuclei contained in each section using the brain atlas of medaka. In the brain of male medaka, high levels of activity are localized in sections containing the preoptic (POA) and suprachiasmatic nuclei (SC) (63-75 fmol/hr) and low levels in the nuclei periventricular dorsalis (HD), ventralis (HV), and caudalis (Hc), nuclei diffusus of lobulus inferiores (NDIL), and nuclei tuberi anteriores (TA) and posteriores (TP) (< 25 fmol/hr). In the brain of female medaka high aromatase activity is localized in sections containing the HD, HV, Hc, NDIL, TA, and TP (85-80 fmol/hr) and highly variable levels in the POA and SC (23-70 fmol/hr). The concentration and time dependency of the exposure of male medaka to estradiol on the total brain aromatase activity and morphologic sex characteristics were determined next. Estradiol increased the activity of brain aromatase in a concentration-dependent manner at 2.5 and 25 microg/L, but the increase was lower at higher concentrations of the hormone. The effect was time dependent, gradually increasing up to the fifth day of exposure, after which it reached a plateau. Estradiol induction of brain aromatase analyzed using Lineweaver-Burke plots of saturation assays revealed a non-first-order reaction. The results indicate that a positive feedback mechanism regulates brain aromatase and imply that the sexual dimorphic distribution of aromatase may be highly sensitive to physiologic cues and environmental perturbations in fish. PMID:11333187

  10. Bilateral De Quervain Syndrome after Aromatase Inhibitor Administration: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Papadimitriou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatase inhibitors are widely used as one of the main treatment options of both early and advanced hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Unfortunately, musculoskeletal symptoms are often presented in patients treated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs, and, although the pathogenesis is unknown, postulated mechanisms have been described. Herein, to our knowledge, we present the first report of bilateral De Quervain syndrome related with AIs therapy with a review of the relevant literature.

  11. Bilateral de quervain syndrome after aromatase inhibitor administration: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Morakis, Emmanouil; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Barbounis, Vasileios; Ardavanis, Alexandros

    2012-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors are widely used as one of the main treatment options of both early and advanced hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Unfortunately, musculoskeletal symptoms are often presented in patients treated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs), and, although the pathogenesis is unknown, postulated mechanisms have been described. Herein, to our knowledge, we present the first report of bilateral De Quervain syndrome related with AIs therapy with a review of the relevant literature.

  12. Management of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal breast cancer patients taking adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Derzko, C.; Elliott, S.; Lam, W.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment with aromatase inhibitors for postmenopausal women with breast cancer has been shown to reduce or obviate invasive procedures such as hysteroscopy or curettage associated with tamoxifen-induced endometrial abnormalities. The side effect of upfront aromatase inhibitors, diminished estrogen synthesis, is similar to that seen with the natural events of aging. The consequences often include vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes) and vaginal dryness and atrophy, which in turn may result in cys...

  13. Aromatase expression is linked to estrogenic sensitivity of periurethral muscles in female rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Ángeles Carrasco-Ruiz, María; García-Villamar, Verónica; López-García, Kenia; Sánchez-García, Octavio; Pacheco, Pablo; Cuevas, Estela; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Castelán, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    Beyond its role in the conversion of androgens to estrogens, the expression of aromatase could influence on the estrogenic signalling in targeted tissues. Considering the well-defined biochemical and physiological differences between the pubococcygeus (Pcm) and bulbospongiosus (Bsm) muscles in female rabbits, it is presently hypothesized that the aromatase expression is differentially linked to the estrogen sensitivity of each muscle. To this end, serum estradiol levels and the aromatase expression, presence of ERα and ERβ and morphometry were evaluated in the Pcm and Bsm of female rabbits allocated in control, ovariectomized (OVX) and OVX treated with estradiol benzoate (OVX + EB) groups. Aromatase expression was high in the Pcm. Independently to serum estradiol, ovariectomy increased aromatase expression in the Pcm while decreased it in the Bsm. The EB treatment avoided the effect of ovariectomy only in the Pcm. The number of immunoreactive nuclei anti-ERα and anti-ERβ was high in the Pcm of OVX and OVX + EB rabbits, while those in the Bsm remained unchanged. The number of peripheral nuclei per fibre and the cross-sectional area-to-myonucleus ratio were modified only in the Pcm. Our findings support aromatase expression in the Pcm, and Bsm of rabbits is differentially linked to estrogenic sensitivity of each muscle. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Leptin induces CREB-dependent aromatase activation through COX-2 expression in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Jin, Sun Woo; Kim, Yong An; Khanal, Tilak; Lee, Gi Ho; Kim, Se Jong; Rhee, Sang Dal; Chung, Young Chul; Hwang, Young Jung; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2017-08-01

    Leptin plays a key role in the control of adipocyte formation, as well as in the associated regulation of energy intake and expenditure. The goal of this study was to determine if leptin-induced aromatase enhances estrogen production and induces tumor cell growth stimulation. To this end, breast cancer cells were incubated with leptin in the absence or presence of inhibitor pretreatment, and changes in aromatase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression were evaluated at the mRNA and protein levels. Transient transfection assays were performed to examine the aromatase and COX-2 gene promoter activities and immunoblot analysis was used to examine protein expression. Leptin induced aromatase expression, estradiol production, and promoter activity in breast cancer cells. Protein levels of phospho-STAT3, PKA, Akt, ERK, and JNK were increased by leptin. Leptin also significantly increased cAMP levels, cAMP response element (CRE) activation, and CREB phosphorylation. In addition, leptin induced COX-2 expression, promoter activity, and increased the production of prostaglandin E2. Finally, a COX-2 inhibitor and aromatase inhibitor suppressed leptin-induced cell proliferation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Together, our data show that leptin increased aromatase expression in breast cancer cells, which was correlated with COX-2 upregulation, mediated through CRE activation and cooperation among multiple signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of letrozole as a chemopreventive agent in aromatase overexpressing transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Roopa; Kirma, Nameer; Jones, Jeremy; Tekmal, Rajeshwar Rao

    2003-09-01

    Our recent studies have shown that overexpression of aromatase results in increased tissue estrogenic activity and induction of hyperplastic and dysplastic lesions in mammary glands, and gynecomastia and testicular cancer in male aromatase transgenic mice. Our studies also have shown that aromatase overexpression-induced changes in mammary glands can be abrogated with very low concentrations of letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor without any effect on normal physiology. In the present study, we have examined the effect of prior low dose letrozole treatment on pregnancy and lactation. We have also investigated the effect of low dose letrozole treatment on subsequent mammary growth and biochemical changes in these animals. There was no change in the litter size, birth weight and no visible birth defects in letrozole-treated animals. Although, there was an insignificant increase in mammary growth in aged animals after 6 weeks of letrozole treatment, the levels of expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and genes involved in cell cycle and cell proliferation remained low compared to control untreated animals. These observations indicate that aromatase inhibitors such as letrozole can be used as chemopreventive agents without effecting normal physiology in aromatase transgenic mice.

  16. Overexpression of aromatase alone is sufficient for ovarian development in genetically male chicken embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke S Lambeth

    Full Text Available Estrogens play a key role in sexual differentiation of both the gonads and external traits in birds. The production of estrogen occurs via a well-characterised steroidogenic pathway, which is a multi-step process involving several enzymes, including cytochrome P450 aromatase. In chicken embryos, the aromatase gene (CYP19A1 is expressed female-specifically from the time of gonadal sex differentiation. To further explore the role of aromatase in sex determination, we ectopically delivered this enzyme using the retroviral vector RCASBP in ovo. Aromatase overexpression in male chicken embryos induced gonadal sex-reversal characterised by an enlargement of the left gonad and development of ovarian structures such as a thickened outer cortex and medulla with lacunae. In addition, the expression of key male gonad developmental genes (DMRT1, SOX9 and Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH was suppressed, and the distribution of germ cells in sex-reversed males followed the female pattern. The detection of SCP3 protein in late stage sex-reversed male embryonic gonads indicated that these genetically male germ cells had entered meiosis, a process that normally only occurs in female embryonic germ cells. This work shows for the first time that the addition of aromatase into a developing male embryo is sufficient to direct ovarian development, suggesting that male gonads have the complete capacity to develop as ovaries if provided with aromatase.

  17. Complexation of insecticide chlorantraniliprole with human serum albumin: Biophysical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Fei [Department of Chemistry, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xi Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100193 (China); Liu Wei [College of Economics and Management, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Diao Jianxiong [Department of Chemistry, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xi Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100193 (China); Yin Bin [Key Laboratory of Pesticide Chemistry and Application Technology, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Zhang Li, E-mail: zhli.work@gmail.co [Key Laboratory of Pesticide Chemistry and Application Technology, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Sun Ying, E-mail: sunying@cau.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xi Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Chlorantraniliprole is a novel insecticide belonging to the diamide class of selective ryanodine receptor agonists. A biophysical study on the binding interaction of a novel diamide insecticide, chlorantraniliprole, with staple in vivo transporter, human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated utilizing a combination of steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and molecular modeling methods. The interaction of chlorantraniliprole with HSA gives rise to fluorescence quenching through static mechanism, this corroborates the fluorescence lifetime outcomes that the ground state complex formation and the predominant forces in the HSA-chlorantraniliprole conjugate are van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds, as derived from thermodynamic analysis. The definite binding site of chlorantraniliprole in HSA has been identified from the denaturation of protein, competitive ligand binding, and molecular modeling, subdomain IIIA (Sudlow's site II) was designated to possess high-affinity binding site for chlorantraniliprole. Moreover, using synchronous fluorescence, CD, and three-dimensional fluorescence we testified some degree of HSA structure unfolding upon chlorantraniliprole binding. - Highlights: {yields} Our study highlights for the first time how binding dynamics can predominate for the new diamide insecticide, chlorantraniliprole. {yields} Chlorantraniliprole is situated within subdomain IIIA, Sudlow's site II, which is the same as that of indole-benzodiazepine site. {yields} Biophysical and molecular modeling approaches are useful to resolve the ligand interaction with biomacromolecule. {yields} It serves as a protective device in binding and in inactivating potential toxic compounds to which the body is exposed.

  18. Epigenetic randomness, complexity and singularity of human iris patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugman, J; Downing, C

    2001-08-22

    We investigated the randomness and uniqueness of human iris patterns by mathematically comparing 2.3 million different pairs of eye images. The phase structure of each iris pattern was extracted by demodulation with quadrature wavelets spanning several scales of analysis. The resulting distribution of phase sequence variation among different eyes was precisely binomial, revealing 244 independent degrees of freedom. This amount of statistical variability corresponds to an entropy (information density) of about 3.2 bits mm(-2) over the iris. It implies that the probability of two different irides agreeing by chance in more than 70% of their phase sequence is about one in 7 billion. We also compared images of genetically identical irides, from the left and right eyes of 324 persons, and from monozygotic twins. Their relative phase sequence variation generated the same statistical distribution as did unrelated eyes. This indicates that apart from overall form and colour, iris patterns are determined epigenetically by random events in the morphogenesis of this tissue. The resulting diversity, and the combinatorial complexity created by so many dimensions of random variation, mean that the failure of a simple test of statistical independence performed on iris patterns can serve as a reliable rapid basis for automatic personal identification.

  19. Quantitative analysis of long-form aromatase mRNA in the male and female rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Tabatadze

    Full Text Available In vitro studies show that estrogens acutely modulate synaptic function in both sexes. These acute effects may be mediated in vivo by estrogens synthesized within the brain, which could fluctuate more rapidly than circulating estrogens. For this to be the case, brain regions that respond acutely to estrogens should be capable of synthesizing them. To investigate this question, we used quantitative real-time PCR to measure expression of mRNA for the estrogen-synthesizing enzyme, aromatase, in different brain regions of male and female rats. Importantly, because brain aromatase exists in two forms, a long form with aromatase activity and a short form with unknown function, we targeted a sequence found exclusively in long-form aromatase. With this approach, we found highest expression of aromatase mRNA in the amygdala followed closely by the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST and preoptic area (POA; we found moderate levels of aromatase mRNA in the dorsal hippocampus and cingulate cortex; and aromatase mRNA was detectable in brainstem and cerebellum, but levels were very low. In the amygdala, gonadal/hormonal status regulated aromatase expression in both sexes; in the BNST and POA, castration of males down-regulated aromatase, whereas there was no effect of estradiol in ovariectomized females. In the dorsal hippocampus and cingulate cortex, there were no differences in aromatase levels between males and females or effects of gonadal/hormonal status. These findings demonstrate that long-form aromatase is expressed in brain regions that respond acutely to estrogens, such as the dorsal hippocampus, and that gonadal/hormonal regulation of aromatase differs among different brain regions.

  20. Quantitative analysis of long-form aromatase mRNA in the male and female rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatadze, Nino; Sato, Satoru M; Woolley, Catherine S

    2014-01-01

    In vitro studies show that estrogens acutely modulate synaptic function in both sexes. These acute effects may be mediated in vivo by estrogens synthesized within the brain, which could fluctuate more rapidly than circulating estrogens. For this to be the case, brain regions that respond acutely to estrogens should be capable of synthesizing them. To investigate this question, we used quantitative real-time PCR to measure expression of mRNA for the estrogen-synthesizing enzyme, aromatase, in different brain regions of male and female rats. Importantly, because brain aromatase exists in two forms, a long form with aromatase activity and a short form with unknown function, we targeted a sequence found exclusively in long-form aromatase. With this approach, we found highest expression of aromatase mRNA in the amygdala followed closely by the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and preoptic area (POA); we found moderate levels of aromatase mRNA in the dorsal hippocampus and cingulate cortex; and aromatase mRNA was detectable in brainstem and cerebellum, but levels were very low. In the amygdala, gonadal/hormonal status regulated aromatase expression in both sexes; in the BNST and POA, castration of males down-regulated aromatase, whereas there was no effect of estradiol in ovariectomized females. In the dorsal hippocampus and cingulate cortex, there were no differences in aromatase levels between males and females or effects of gonadal/hormonal status. These findings demonstrate that long-form aromatase is expressed in brain regions that respond acutely to estrogens, such as the dorsal hippocampus, and that gonadal/hormonal regulation of aromatase differs among different brain regions.

  1. Similarities between GCS and human motor cortex: complex movement coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jose A.; Macias, Rosa; Molgo, Jordi; Guerra, Dailos

    2014-07-01

    The "Gran Telescopio de Canarias" (GTC1) is an optical-infrared 10-meter segmented mirror telescope at the ORM observatory in Canary Islands (Spain). The GTC control system (GCS), the brain of the telescope, is is a distributed object & component oriented system based on RT-CORBA and it is responsible for the management and operation of the telescope, including its instrumentation. On the other hand, the Human motor cortex (HMC) is a region of the cerebrum responsible for the coordination of planning, control, and executing voluntary movements. If we analyze both systems, as far as the movement control of their mechanisms and body parts is concerned, we can find extraordinary similarities in their architectures. Both are structured in layers, and their functionalities are comparable from the movement conception until the movement action itself: In the GCS we can enumerate the Sequencer high level components, the Coordination libraries, the Control Kit library and the Device Driver library as the subsystems involved in the telescope movement control. If we look at the motor cortex, we can also enumerate the primary motor cortex, the secondary motor cortices, which include the posterior parietal cortex, the premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area (SMA), the motor units, the sensory organs and the basal ganglia. From all these components/areas we will analyze in depth the several subcortical regions, of the the motor cortex, that are involved in organizing motor programs for complex movements and the GCS coordination framework, which is composed by a set of classes that allow to the high level components to transparently control a group of mechanisms simultaneously.

  2. A review of human factors challenges of complex adaptive systems: discovering and understanding chaos in human performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Waldemar

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the author explores a need for a greater understanding of the true nature of human-system interactions from the perspective of the theory of complex adaptive systems, including the essence of complexity, emergent properties of system behavior, nonlinear systems dynamics, and deterministic chaos. Human performance, more often than not, constitutes complex adaptive phenomena with emergent properties that exhibit nonlinear dynamical (chaotic) behaviors. The complexity challenges in the design and management of contemporary work systems, including service systems, are explored. Examples of selected applications of the concepts of nonlinear dynamics to the study of human physical performance are provided. Understanding and applications of the concepts of theory of complex adaptive and dynamical systems should significantly improve the effectiveness of human-centered design efforts of a large system of systems. Performance of many contemporary work systems and environments may be sensitive to the initial conditions and may exhibit dynamic nonlinear properties and chaotic system behaviors. Human-centered design of emergent human-system interactions requires application of the theories of nonlinear dynamics and complex adaptive system. The success of future human-systems integration efforts requires the fusion of paradigms, knowledge, design principles, and methodologies of human factors and ergonomics with those of the science of complex adaptive systems as well as modern systems engineering.

  3. Human Rights Outcomes in Complexity and the Problem of Causation

    OpenAIRE

    McGrogan, David

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring of human rights performance is increasingly a measurement exercise. This is true for the UN institutions whose role is to monitor compliance with human rights treaties; governments who fulfil their obligations to report to those institutions regarding their performance; NGOs which are engaged in applying pressure to States Parties to the relevant treaties; and human rights-interested academia. The international human rights system, to put it another way, is increasingly concern...

  4. Combined down-regulation by aromatase inhibitor and GnRH-agonist in IVF patients with endometriomas-A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lossl, Kristine; Loft, Anne; Freiesleben, Nina L C

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The key enzyme in the biosynthesis of estradiol, aromatase, has been demonstrated within endometriosis. Combined administration of aromatase inhibitor and GnRH-agonist may efficiently suppress estrogen biosynthesis through a combined pituitary, ovarian, peripheral and "in situ" action...

  5. Exploring the potential relevance of human-specific genes to complex disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper David N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although human disease genes generally tend to be evolutionarily more ancient than non-disease genes, complex disease genes appear to be represented more frequently than Mendelian disease genes among genes of more recent evolutionary origin. It is therefore proposed that the analysis of human-specific genes might provide new insights into the genetics of complex disease. Cross-comparison with the Human Gene Mutation Database (http://www.hgmd.org revealed a number of examples of disease-causing and disease-associated mutations in putatively human-specific genes. A sizeable proportion of these were missense polymorphisms associated with complex disease. Since both human-specific genes and genes associated with complex disease have often experienced particularly rapid rates of evolutionary change, either due to weaker purifying selection or positive selection, it is proposed that a significant number of human-specific genes may play a role in complex disease.

  6. Complexity and the Idea of Human Development | Hurst | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I agree with Cilliers that deconstruction is exemplary in this respect, but aim to broaden the adventure by suggesting ideas for a 'pragmatics of complexity' involving vocabulary, concepts, strategies, metaphors, and heuristics derived also from other philosophers and psychoanalytic theorists. The difficulty of complex thought ...

  7. Human Navigational Performance in a Complex Network with Progressive Disruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Ramesh, Amitash; Iyengar, Sudarshan; Sekhar, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    The current paper is an investigation towards understanding the navigational performance of humans on a network when the "landmark" nodes are blocked. We observe that humans learn to cope up, despite the continued introduction of blockages in the network. The experiment proposed involves the task of navigating on a word network based on a puzzle called the wordmorph. We introduce blockages in the network and report an incremental improvement in performance with respect to time. We explain this phenomenon by analyzing the evolution of the knowledge in the human participants of the underlying network as more and more landmarks are removed. We hypothesize that humans learn the bare essentials to navigate unless we introduce blockages in the network which would whence enforce upon them the need to explore newer ways of navigating. We draw a parallel to human problem solving and postulate that obstacles are catalysts for humans to innovate techniques to solve a restricted variant of a familiar problem.

  8. Adjuvant therapy with aromatase inhibitors for postmenopausal women with early breast cancer: evidence and ongoing controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheler, Jennifer; Johnson, Melissa; Seidman, Andrew

    2006-12-01

    Results of five major randomized trials have increased our understanding of the role of aromatase inhibitors in the adjuvant setting. Two of these trials, the Anastrozole or Tamoxifen Alone or in Combination (ATAC) trial and the International Breast Cancer Study Group's BIG 1-98 trial compared an aromatase inhibitor versus tamoxifen as initial hormonal therapy. Three other trial were designed as cross-over studies; the Intergroup Exemestane Study (IES) and the Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group (ABCSG) Trial 8/German ARNO 95 trial compared a crossover from tamoxifen to an aromatase inhibitor versus continued tamoxifen in women who had completed 2 to 3 years of tamoxifen. The MA-17 trial compared the use of letrozole with placebo for 5 years, following 5 years of tamoxifen. Based on the results of these studies, the use of an aromatase inhibitor for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer has largely replaced the previous standard of 5 years of tamoxifen. Still unanswered, however, are questions regarding optimal sequencing, selection of aromatase inhibitor, and duration of treatment. This review will provide an overview of the major studies with an emphasis on these important questions.

  9. Complex Systems for Human Body Biomechanical Behavior Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baritz, Mihaela; Cristea, Luciana; Rogozea, Liliana; Cotoros, Diana; Ion, Balcu

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we will explore the way we are able to obtain some information about human body behavior during gait or stability actions using video and tracking capture and transpose these data on a virtual model for the simulation process. In the first part of the paper we presented some considerations about the problems developed by human body modeling and its interactions with the environment. In the final part we presented some recordings of the human body movements during the gait process and the model built to analyze biomechanical behavior of the human body.

  10. Worms under stress: C. elegans stress response and its relevance to complex human disease and aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Sanchez, M.; Snoek, L.B.; Bono, de M.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Many organisms have stress response pathways, components of which share homology with players in complex human disease pathways. Research on stress response in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans has provided detailed insights into the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying complex human

  11. The Impact of Evolutionary Driving Forces on Human Complex Diseases: A Population Genetics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr T. M. Saeb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the molecular evolution of human genome has paved the way to understand genetic adaptation of humans to the environmental changes and corresponding complex diseases. In this review, we discussed the historical origin of genetic diversity among human populations, the evolutionary driving forces that can affect genetic diversity among populations, and the effects of human movement into new environments and gene flow on population genetic diversity. Furthermore, we presented the role of natural selection on genetic diversity and complex diseases. Then we reviewed the disadvantageous consequences of historical selection events in modern time and their relation to the development of complex diseases. In addition, we discussed the effect of consanguinity on the incidence of complex diseases in human populations. Finally, we presented the latest information about the role of ancient genes acquired from interbreeding with ancient hominids in the development of complex diseases.

  12. Linguistic complex networks: Rationale, application, interpretation, and directions. Reply to comments on "Approaching human language with complex networks"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jin; Liu, Haitao

    2014-12-01

    Amid the enthusiasm for real-world networks of the new millennium, the enquiry into linguistic networks is flourishing not only as a productive branch of the new networks science but also as a promising approach to linguistic research. Although the complex network approach constitutes a potential opportunity to make linguistics a science, the world of linguistics seems unprepared to embrace it. For one thing, linguistics has been largely unaffected by quantitative methods. Those who are accustomed to qualitative linguistic methods may find it hard to appreciate the application of quantitative properties of language such as frequency and length, not to mention quantitative properties of language modeled as networks. With this in mind, in our review [1] we restrict ourselves to the basics of complex networks and the new insights into human language with the application of complex networks. For another, while breaking new grounds and posing new challenges for linguistics, the complex network approach to human language as a new tradition of linguistic research is faced with challenges and unsolved issues of its own. It is no surprise that the comments on our review, especially their skepticism and suggestions, focus on various different aspects of the complex network approach to human language. We are grateful to all the insightful and penetrating comments, which, together with our review, mark a significant impetus to linguistic research from the complex network approach. In this reply, we would like to address four major issues of the complex network approach to human language, namely, a) its theoretical rationale, b) its application in linguistic research, c) interpretation of the results, and d) directions of future research.

  13. Tool use induces complex and flexible plasticity of human body representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Matthew R; Serino, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    Plasticity of body representation fundamentally underpins human tool use. Recent studies have demonstrated remarkably complex plasticity of body representation in humans, showing that such plasticity (1) occurs flexibly across multiple time scales and (2) involves multiple body representations responding differently to tool use. Such findings reveal remarkable sophistication of body plasticity in humans, suggesting that Vaesen may overestimate the similarity of such mechanisms in humans and non-human primates.

  14. A Complex Genome-MicroRNA Interplay in Human Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Shinde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding regulatory RNA exist in wide spectrum of organisms ranging from prokaryote bacteria to humans. In human, a systematic search for noncoding RNA is mainly limited to the nuclear and cytosolic compartments. To investigate whether endogenous small regulatory RNA are present in cell organelles, human mitochondrial genome was also explored for prediction of precursor microRNA (pre-miRNA and mature miRNA (miRNA sequences. Six novel miRNA were predicted from the organelle genome by bioinformatics analysis. The structures are conserved in other five mammals including chimp, orangutan, mouse, rat, and rhesus genome. Experimentally, six human miRNA are well accumulated or deposited in human mitochondria. Three of them are expressed less prominently in Northern analysis. To ascertain their presence in human skeletal muscles, total RNA was extracted from enriched mitochondria by an immunomagnetic method. The expression of six novel pre-miRNA and miRNA was confirmed by Northern blot analysis; however, low level of remaining miRNA was found by sensitive Northern analysis. Their presence is further confirmed by real time RT-PCR. The six miRNA find their multiple targets throughout the human genome in three different types of software. The luciferase assay was used to confirm that MT-RNR2 gene was the potential target of hsa-miR-mit3 and hsa-miR-mit4.

  15. Characterization of Aromatase Binding Agents from the Dichloromethane Extract of Corydalis yanhusuo Using Ultrafiltration and Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aromatase represents an important target for the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer. In the present study, nine alkaloids from the dichloromethane extract of Corydalis yanhusuo were identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and tested for their aromatase binding activities using an ultrafiltration LC-MS method by investigating the differences of peak areas of compounds before and after incubations with aromatase. It was demonstrated that the quaternary protoberberine alkaloids and the tertiary protoberberine alkaloids exhibited potent aromatase binding activities. The quaternary ammonium group and the methyl group at C-13 position of tertiary protoberberine alkaloids might be necessary for the activity. The findings should provide guidance for the discovery of potential aromatase inhibitors from natural products.

  16. Complexity analysis of human physiological signals based on case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Maia; Holloway, Philip; Ellis, Jason

    2015-04-01

    This work focuses on methods for investigation of physiological time series based on complexity analysis. It is a part of a wider programme to determine non-invasive markers for healthy ageing. We consider two case studies investigated with actigraphy: (a) sleep and alternations with insomnia, and (b) ageing effects on mobility patterns. We illustrate, using these case studies, the application of fractal analysis to the investigation of regulation patterns and control, and change of physiological function. In the first case study, fractal analysis techniques were implemented to study the correlations present in sleep actigraphy for individuals suffering from acute insomnia in comparison with healthy controls. The aim was to investigate if complexity analysis can detect the onset of adverse health-related events. The subjects with acute insomnia displayed significantly higher levels of complexity, possibly a result of too much activity in the underlying regulatory systems. The second case study considered mobility patterns during night time and their variations with age. It showed that complexity metrics can identify change in physiological function with ageing. Both studies demonstrated that complexity analysis can be used to investigate markers of health, disease and healthy ageing.

  17. Chemical Composition of Roots Flemingia philippinensis and Their Inhibitory Kinetics on Aromatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fang; Li, Qin; Xu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Aromatase is the key enzyme responsible for catalyzing the conversion of C19 steroids to estrogens. Its inhibitors are widely used in breast cancer therapy. The CH2 Cl2 partition of a crude ethanolic extract from the roots of Flemingia philippinensis showed potent inhibitory activity of aromatase. The constituents of the extract were analyzed and identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Five purified prenylated isoflavones were evaluated for aromatase inhibition and their IC50 values ranged between 2.98 and 58.08 μm. In kinetic studies, all tested compounds behaved as reversible competitive inhibitors and their Ki values were calculated by Dixon plots. The most potent inhibitor (6,8-diprenylorobol) had a Ki value of 1.42 μm. Furthermore, using UPLC and LC/MS, 6,8-diprenylorobol was proven to be present in the native roots in high quantities. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  18. Aromatase Inhibitor-Induced Erythrocytosis in a Patient Undergoing Hormonal Treatment for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi Yeruva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatase inhibitors (AIs are most commonly used for breast cancer patients with hormone receptor positive disease. Although the side effect profile of aromatase inhibitors is well known, including common side effects like arthralgia, bone pain, arthritis, hot flashes, and more serious problems like osteoporosis, we present a case of an uncommon side effect of these medications. We report the case of a postmenopausal woman on adjuvant hormonal therapy with anastrozole after completing definitive therapy for stage IIIB estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, who was referred to hematology service for evaluation of persistent erythrocytosis. Primary and known secondary causes of polycythemia were ruled out. On further evaluation, we found that her erythrocytosis began after initiation of anastrozole and resolved after it was discontinued. We discuss the pathophysiology of aromatase inhibitor-induced erythrocytosis and reference of similar cases reported in the literature.

  19. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human Rod–Zwilch–ZW10 (RZZ) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenfeld, Anika; Wohlgemuth, Sabine [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Wehenkel, Annemarie [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 3348/INSERM U1005, Bâtiment 110, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay CEDEX (France); Vetter, Ingrid R. [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Musacchio, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.musacchio@mpi-dortmund.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitätstrasse 1, 45141 Essen (Germany)

    2015-03-20

    The 800 kDa complex of the human Rod, Zwilch and ZW10 proteins (the RZZ complex) was reconstituted in insect cells, purified, crystallized and subjected to preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis. The spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors kinetochore–microtubule attachment during mitosis. In metazoans, the three-subunit Rod–Zwilch–ZW10 (RZZ) complex is a crucial SAC component that interacts with additional SAC-activating and SAC-silencing components, including the Mad1–Mad2 complex and cytoplasmic dynein. The RZZ complex contains two copies of each subunit and has a predicted molecular mass of ∼800 kDa. Given the low abundance of the RZZ complex in natural sources, its recombinant reconstitution was attempted by co-expression of its subunits in insect cells. The RZZ complex was purified to homogeneity and subjected to systematic crystallization attempts. Initial crystals containing the entire RZZ complex were obtained using the sitting-drop method and were subjected to optimization to improve the diffraction resolution limit. The crystals belonged to space group P3{sub 1} (No. 144) or P3{sub 2} (No. 145), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 215.45, c = 458.7 Å, α = β = 90.0, γ = 120.0°.

  20. On the significance of in situ production of oestrogens in human breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenstein, M A; Maitimu-Smeele, I; Donker, G H; Daroszewski, J; Milewicz, A; Thijssen, J H

    1992-03-01

    We have previously shown that human breast cancer is autonomous in the regulation of its intra-tissue oestradiol concentration. Breast fatty tissue does not have this capacity, but rather reflects changes in the peripheral oestradiol concentration. To further evaluate the relative contribution of breast cancer and fatty tissue to the maintenance of tumour oestradiol we investigated whether a tumour-directed gradient in aromatase activity and oestrogen levels existed in mastectomy specimens. No such gradient was found, however, for aromatase, oestrone, oestradiol and their sulphates. Aromatase activity (expressed per gram of tissue) and the concentrations of oestradiol, oestradiol sulphate and oestrone sulphate were higher in tumour than in breast fatty tissue. Fatty tissue had a higher oestrone concentration. It is tentatively concluded that breast tumour aromatase activity is more important for the maintenance of tumour oestradiol levels than aromatase in breast fatty tissue.

  1. Effects of transferrin on aromatase activity in porcine granulosa cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Duda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferating cells have an absolute requirement for iron, which is delivered by transferrin with subsequent intracellular transport via the transferrin receptor. Recent studies have reported that transferrin plays a crucial role in the local regulation of ovarian function, apart from its iron-binding characteristic. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to explore the possible role of transferrin in porcine granulosa cells function by examining its influence on aromatase activity, the most important indicator of follicular cell differentiation. In the first series of studies, pig granulosa cells isolated from small, immature follicles were cultured in the presence of transferrin alone (10 microg/ml or 100 microg/ml or with the addition of FSH (100ng/ml. The second series of studies was undertaken to determine transferrin-stimulated granulosa cells ability to aromatize exogenous testosterone (1x10(-7M. One hour after the establishment of cultures an aromatase inhibitor CGS16949A was added to test its influence on estradiol production. After 48 hours, cultures were terminated and cells were processed for immunocytochemical staining of aromatase. Media were frozen for further estradiol level analysis. Positive immunostaining for aromatase was found in all granulosa cell cultures. The intensity of immunostaining was always stronger in cultures supplemented with FSH whereas the addition of transferrin had no effect. Granulosa cells in vitro synthesized the highest amount of estradiol after the addition of FSH and exogenous testosterone as measured radioimmunologically. Concomitant treatment with FSH and transferrin caused an inhibition of FSH-stimulated aromatase activity. The production of estradiol also declined in the presence of FSH, testosterone and transferrin. This study demonstrates that transferrin had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on FSH-stimulated aromatase activity, which was confirmed by radioimmunoassay. Our results indicate

  2. A human phenome-interactome network of protein complexes implicated in genetic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Lage; Karlberg, Erik, Olof, Linnart; Størling, Zenia, Marian

    2007-01-01

    We performed a systematic, large-scale analysis of human protein complexes comprising gene products implicated in many different categories of human disease to create a phenome-interactome network. This was done by integrating quality-controlled interactions of human proteins with a validated, co...

  3. Epigenetic randomness, complexity and singularity of human iris patterns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John Daugman; Cathryn Downing

    2001-01-01

    .... The resulting diversity, and the combinatorial complexity created by so many dimensions of random variation, mean that the failure of a simple test of statistical independence performed on iris patterns can serve as a reliable rapid basis for automatic personal identification.

  4. Complexity of Human Circulation Design: Tips for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Sven; Gros, Mario; Maric, Svjetlana

    2009-01-01

    Medical students are faced with a challenge to comprehend the enormous complexity of the circulatory systems. There is a gap between courses of anatomy, with detailed description of all normally present macroscopic vessels, and histology, which is focused on microscopic tissue architecture. Both courses leave arterioles, capillaries, and venules…

  5. Metformin inhibits follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) action in human granulosa cells: relevance to polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Suman; Elia, Androulla; Jawad, Zara; Pellatt, Laura; Mason, Helen D

    2013-09-01

    Women with anovulatory polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are generally insulin-resistant and as a consequence are often treated with the biguanide metformin. Results with metformin have, however, been variable with some studies demonstrating induction of regular cycles and an increase in ovulation, whereas others do not. Hence more understanding is needed regarding the mechanism of metformin's actions in ovarian granulosa cells especially in light of previous demonstrations of direct actions. The aim of this study was to investigate metformin's interaction with the FSH/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway, which is the primary signaling pathway controlling CYP19A1 (aromatase) expression in the ovary. The effect of metformin on FSH and forskolin-stimulated aromatase expression in human granulosa cells was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Activity was assessed after transfection with a promoter II-luciferase construct, and by an RIA measuring conversion of androgen to estrogens. The effect on FSH receptor (FSHR) mRNA was assessed by quantitative PCR. Levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 2 (CRTC2) were measured by Western blotting and cAMP by a bioluminescent assay. Metformin markedly reduced FSH but not forskolin-stimulated aromatase expression and activity. This effect was exerted by inhibition of basal and ligand-induced up-regulation of FSHR expression. Metformin also reduced FSH-induced phosphorylation of CREB and hence CRE activity, which could potentially disrupt the CREB-CREB-binding protein-CRTC2 coactivator complex that binds to CRE in promoter II of the aromatase gene. This is mediated in an AMP-activated protein kinase-independent manner, and does not involve alteration of cAMP levels. These finding have implications for the use of metformin in the treatment of anovulation in women with PCOS.

  6. Screening of selected pesticides for inhibition of CYP19 aromatase activity in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, A.M.; Hnida, C.; Breinholt, V.

    2000-01-01

    Many pesticides are able to block or activate the steroid hormone receptors and/or to affect the levels of sex hormones, thereby potentially affecting the development or expression of the male and female reproductive system or both. This emphasizes the relevance of screening pesticides for a wide......, and triadimenol were identified as weak aromatase inhibitors. In conclusion, seven out of 22 tested pesticides turned out to be weak to moderate aromatase inhibitors in vitro, indicating the relevance of elucidating the endocrine effects in vivo of these compounds....

  7. Aromatase inhibitors and calcium absorption in early stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevaarwerk, Amye; Burkard, Mark E; Wisinski, Kari B; Shafer, Martin M; Davis, Lisa A; Gogineni, Jyothi; Crone, Elizabeth; Hansen, Karen E

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the effect of aromatase inhibitors (AI) on intestinal calcium absorption, measured using the gold-standard dual stable calcium isotope method. In this pilot study, we recruited 10 postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer who planned to initiate AI therapy; women receiving chemotherapy were excluded. Women completed two 24 h inpatient calcium absorption study visits, the first prior to AI therapy and the second at least 6 weeks following onset of AI therapy. We calculated total fractional calcium absorption (TFCA) using the dose-corrected fractional recovery of two stable isotopes from 24 h urine collections. Ten postmenopausal women (mean±SD age, 66±7 years; 25(OH)D 40±7 ng/mL, and total calcium intake of 1,714±640 mg/day) exhibited no change in TFCA related to AI therapy (0.155±0.042 prior to and 0.160±0.064 following AI therapy, p=1.0). Subjects exhibited a surprisingly small decline in serum estradiol levels with AI therapy that was not statistically significant. However, there was a significant correlation between duration of AI therapy and the decline in serum estradiol levels (r=-0.65, p=0.040). In this pilot study, AI therapy did not decrease TFCA. Women with early stage breast cancer exhibited an unexpectedly low TFCA, most likely due to their high calcium intake. The null effect of AI therapy on TFCA might relate to the brief duration of AI therapy, the minimal effect of AI therapy on estradiol levels, subjects' high calcium intake or excellent vitamin D status.

  8. Associations Between Patient and Anthropometric Characteristics and Aromatase Inhibitor Discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, N Lynn; Speth, Kelly; Lintermans, Anneleen; Kidwell, Kelley M; Carlson, Rachel; Hayes, Daniel F; Neven, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Toxicity can lead to noncontinuation of adjuvant endocrine therapy. We hypothesized that endocrine therapy-induced changes in grip strength would predict for early discontinuation of therapy because of musculoskeletal toxicity and would be associated with a patient's body mass index. Postmenopausal women with breast cancer starting a new adjuvant endocrine therapy were enrolled in the present study. The patients were monitored for 12 months to assess their symptoms, endocrine therapy adherence and change in grip strength and baseline body mass index. The association between the change in grip strength and interval to discontinuation was assessed using a joint longitudinal and survival model. Of the 93 aromatase inhibitor (AI)-treated and 22 tamoxifen-treated patients, 40.9% and 9% discontinued endocrine therapy within 12 months because of toxicity, respectively (P = .019). A trend was seen toward a greater decrease in grip strength in the AI-treated patients over time (P = .055); however, the decrease was not significantly associated with the interval to discontinuation (P = .96). Receipt of an AI (hazard ratio, 5.49; P = .019) and baseline pain (hazard ratio, 1.19; P = .004) significantly decreased the interval to discontinuation. In contrast with the findings from previous reports, the change in grip strength in our study was not associated with the interval to discontinuation of AI therapy. Future research should focus on proactive treatment of patients at increased risk of AI intolerance, such as those with high levels of pre-existing pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Accommodating complexity and human behaviors in decision analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Siirola, John Daniel; Schoenwald, David Alan; Strip, David R.; Hirsch, Gary B.; Bastian, Mark S.; Braithwaite, Karl R.; Homer, Jack [Homer Consulting

    2007-11-01

    This is the final report for a LDRD effort to address human behavior in decision support systems. One sister LDRD effort reports the extension of this work to include actual human choices and additional simulation analyses. Another provides the background for this effort and the programmatic directions for future work. This specific effort considered the feasibility of five aspects of model development required for analysis viability. To avoid the use of classified information, healthcare decisions and the system embedding them became the illustrative example for assessment.

  10. Complex-tone pitch representations in the human auditory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Federica

    ) listeners and the effect of musical training for pitch discrimination of complex tones with resolved and unresolved harmonics. Concerning the first topic, behavioral and modeling results in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) indicated that temporal envelope cues of complex tones......, although their benefit was larger for the resolved harmonics. Additionally, task-evoked pupil responses were recorded as an indicator of processing effort while listeners performed a pitch-discrimination task. Although the difficulty of the task was adjusted for each participant to compensate...... for the individual pitch-discrimination abilities, the musically trained listeners still allocated lower processing effort than did the non-musicians to perform the task at the same performance level. This finding suggests an enhanced pitch representation along the auditory system in musicians, possibly as a result...

  11. Alteration to the SWI/SNF complex in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa S. Gordon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The SWI/SNF complex is a key catalyst for gene expression and regulates a variety of pathways, many of which have anticancer roles. Its central roles in cellular growth control, DNA repair, differentiation, cell adhesion and development are often targeted, and inactivated, during cancer development and progression. In this review, we will discuss what is known about how SWI/SNF is inactivated, and describe the potential impact of abrogating this complex. BRG1 and BRM are the catalytic subunits which are essential for SWI/SNF function, and thus, it is not surprising that they are lost in a variety of cancer types. As neither gene is mutated when lost, the mechanism of suppression, as well as the impact of potential gene activity restoration, are reviewed.

  12. The human EKC/KEOPS complex is recruited to Cullin2 ubiquitin ligases by the human tumour antigen PRAME.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Costessi

    Full Text Available The human tumour antigen PRAME (preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma is frequently overexpressed during oncogenesis, and high PRAME levels are associated with poor clinical outcome in a variety of cancers. However, the molecular pathways in which PRAME is implicated are not well understood. We recently characterized PRAME as a BC-box subunit of a Cullin2-based E3 ubiquitin ligase. In this study, we mined the PRAME interactome to a deeper level and identified specific interactions with OSGEP and LAGE3, which are human orthologues of the ancient EKC/KEOPS complex. By characterizing biochemically the human EKC complex and its interactions with PRAME, we show that PRAME recruits a Cul2 ubiquitin ligase to EKC. Moreover, EKC subunits associate with PRAME target sites on chromatin. Our data reveal a novel link between the oncoprotein PRAME and the conserved EKC complex and support a role for both complexes in the same pathways.

  13. The human EKC/KEOPS complex is recruited to Cullin2 ubiquitin ligases by the human tumour antigen PRAME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costessi, Adalberto; Mahrour, Nawel; Sharma, Vikram; Stunnenberg, Rieka; Stoel, Marieke A; Tijchon, Esther; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G

    2012-01-01

    The human tumour antigen PRAME (preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma) is frequently overexpressed during oncogenesis, and high PRAME levels are associated with poor clinical outcome in a variety of cancers. However, the molecular pathways in which PRAME is implicated are not well understood. We recently characterized PRAME as a BC-box subunit of a Cullin2-based E3 ubiquitin ligase. In this study, we mined the PRAME interactome to a deeper level and identified specific interactions with OSGEP and LAGE3, which are human orthologues of the ancient EKC/KEOPS complex. By characterizing biochemically the human EKC complex and its interactions with PRAME, we show that PRAME recruits a Cul2 ubiquitin ligase to EKC. Moreover, EKC subunits associate with PRAME target sites on chromatin. Our data reveal a novel link between the oncoprotein PRAME and the conserved EKC complex and support a role for both complexes in the same pathways.

  14. Expression of aromatase in radial glial cells in the brain of the Japanese eel provides insight into the evolution of the cyp191a gene in Actinopterygians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Ru Jeng

    Full Text Available The cyp19a1 gene that encodes aromatase, the only enzyme permitting conversion of C19 aromatizable androgens into estrogens, is present as a single copy in the genome of most vertebrate species, except in teleosts in which it has been duplicated. This study aimed at investigating the brain expression of a cyp19a1 gene expressed in both gonad and brain of Japanese eel, a basal teleost. By means of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we show that cyp19a1 is expressed only in radial glial cells of the brain and in pituitary cells. Treatments with salmon pituitary homogenates (female or human chorionic gonadotrophin (male, known to turn on steroid production in immature eels, strongly stimulated cyp19a1 messenger and protein expression in radial glial cells and pituitary cells. Using double staining studies, we also showed that aromatase-expressing radial glial cells exhibit proliferative activity in both the brain and the pituitary. Altogether, these data indicate that brain and pituitary expression of Japanese eel cyp19a1 exhibits characteristics similar to those reported for the brain specific cyp19a1b gene in teleosts having duplicated cyp19a1 genes. This supports the hypothesis that, despite the fact that eels also underwent the teleost specific genome duplication, they have a single cyp19a1 expressed in both brain and gonad. Such data also suggest that the intriguing features of brain aromatase expression in teleost fishes were not gained after the whole genome duplication and may reflect properties of the cyp19a1 gene of ancestral Actinopterygians.

  15. Mass spectrometric analysis of oxygenations in aromatization of androst-4-ene-3,6,17-trione, a suicide substrate of aromatase, by placental microsomes. Isotope effect and stereochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Takahashi, Madoka; Nagaoka, Masao; Handa, Wakako; Yamashita, Kouwa

    2007-01-01

    Aromatase catalyzes the conversion of androstenedione (AD) to estrone through three sequential oxygenations of the 19-methyl group. 6-OxoAD (1) is one of the typical suicide substrates of aromatase, which is converted by aromatase to 6-oxoestrone through 19-alcohol (19-ol) and 19-aldehyde (19-al) intermediates 2 and 3. To study the deuterium isotope effect on the conversion of 19-ol 2 to 19-al 3 as well as the stereochemistry of the 19-hydrogen removal in this conversion, we initially synthesized [19,19-(2)H(2)] and [19S- or 19R-(2)H] 19-ols 2, starting from the corresponding deuterium-labeled 19-hydroxyAD derivatives. In incubation of non-labeled and [19,19-(2)H(2)]-labeled 19-ol 2 or that of their 1:1 mixture with human placental microsomes in the presence of NADPH under air, there was no significant deuterium-isotope effect on the production of the aromatized product 6-oxoestrone or on the conversion of 19-ol 2 to 19-al 3, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the estrogen product or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (LC-MS) analysis of the deuterium contents of the product 19-al 3 and the recovered 19-ol 2. Moreover, in the incubations of [19S-(2)H] 19-ol 2 and its 19R isomer, LC-MS analysis of the product 3 demonstrated that the 19-pro-R hydrogen atom was stereospecifically removed in the conversion of 19-ol 2 to 19-al 3. These findings indicate that the 19-oxygenation of 19-ol 2 would proceed in the same mechanism as that involved in the AD aromatization.

  16. Interaction profiling identifies the human nuclear exosome targeting complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon; Christensen, Marianne Spangsberg; Kristiansen, Maiken Søndergaard

    2011-01-01

    The RNA exosome is a conserved degradation machinery, which obtains full activity only when associated with cofactors. The most prominent activator of the yeast nuclear exosome is the RNA helicase Mtr4p, acting in the context of the Trf4p/Air2p/Mtr4p polyadenylation (TRAMP) complex. The existence...... from nucleoli, and consistently NEXT is specifically required for the exosomal degradation of promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs). We also detect putative homolog TRAMP subunits hTRF4-2 (Trf4p) and ZCCHC7 (Air2p) in hRRP6 and hMTR4 precipitates. However, at least ZCCHC7 function is restricted...

  17. Concordance of gene expression in human protein complexes reveals tissue specificity and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börnigen, Daniela; Pers, Tune Hannes; Thorrez, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing variants in human genes usually lead to phenotypes specific to only a few tissues. Here, we present a method for predicting tissue specificity based on quantitative deregulation of protein complexes. The underlying assumption is that the degree of coordinated expression among...... proteins in a complex within a given tissue may pinpoint tissues that will be affected by a mutation in the complex and coordinated expression may reveal the complex to be active in the tissue. We identified known disease genes and their protein complex partners in a high-quality human interactome. Each...... susceptibility gene's tissue involvement was ranked based on coordinated expression with its interaction partners in a non-disease global map of human tissue-specific expression. The approach demonstrated high overall area under the curve (0.78) and was very successfully benchmarked against a random model...

  18. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  19. Expression and distribution of P450-aromatase in the ovine hypothalamus at different stages of fetal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Arcadia; Gadau, Sergio; Lepore, Gianluca; Balzano, Francesca; Zedda, Marco; Mura, Emilio; Farina, Vittorio

    2010-01-01

    An important step of sexual differentiation is the conversion of testosterone to estrogen by aromatase leading to masculinization and defeminization of the fetal brain areas crucial for normal sexual behavior and reproduction. Brain sexual differentiation occurs throughout a critical period starting from different prenatal stages depending on the species. Such period goes on from gestation day (GD) 30 to 100GD in the sheep. The fetal sheep brain is reported to aromatize androgens to estrogens at 64GD. The main goal of this work was to evaluate aromatase expression in sheep hypothalami during the whole period of sexual differentiation (35GD, 55GD, 80GD, 115GD) and whether differences may be observed depending on gestational stage and sex. Sections at the hypothalamic level underwent immunoperoxidase technique employing anti-aromatase and anti-androgen receptor antibodies. Samples from 35GD and 55GD were also processed with in situ hybridization using aromatase cDNA probe. Blot analyses were performed to quantify possible aromatase immunoexpression differences between sexes. For sexing, samples at 35GD and 55GD underwent DNA extraction and SRY amplification. Our results revealed aromatase and androgen receptor immunoreactivity along the whole period of sexual differentiation. Both molecules were detected in many brain regions and markedly in the periventricular area. The highest aromatase and androgen receptor amounts were observed at 35GD and 55GD, when aromatase was more abundant in females than in males. In conclusion, the sheep can be included among the species where aromatase is highly expressed in the hypothalamus during the whole period of sexual differentiation.

  20. Aromatase expression in the brain of the ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) and comparisons with other galliform birds (Aves, Galliformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Harada, Nobuhiro; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme aromatase is important for regulating sexual and aggressive behaviors during the reproductive season, including many aspects of courtship. In birds, aromatase is expressed at high levels in a number of different brain regions. Although this expression does vary among species, the extent to which the distribution of aromatase positive cells reflects species differences in courtship and other behaviors is not well established. Here, we examine the distribution of aromatase immunoreactive (ARO) neurons in the brain of a species with a unique courtship display, the ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus). Unlike most other galliforms, male ruffed grouse do not vocalize as part of their courtship and instead use their wings to create a non-vocal auditory signal to attract females. Because aromatase is involved in courtship behaviors in several bird species, including other galliforms, we hypothesized that aromatase distribution in the ruffed grouse would differ from that of other galliforms. We used an antibody raised against quail aromatase to examine aromatase immunoreactivity in the ruffed grouse, the closely related spruce grouse (Falcipennis canadensis) and the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). In all three species, ARO neurons were identified in the medial preoptic nucleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the nucleus ventromedialis hypothalami. Both grouse species had ARO neurons in two regions of the telencephalon, the hyperpallium, and entopallium, and the ruffed grouse also in field L. ARO neurons were only found in one region in the telencephalon of the Japanese quail, the septum. In general, breeding male ruffed grouse had significantly more ARO neurons and those neurons were larger than that of both the non-breeding male and female ruffed grouse. Aromatase expression in the telencephalon of the ruffed grouse suggests that steroid hormones might modulate responses to visual and acoustic stimuli, but how this relates to species differences in

  1. The Cultural Historical Complexity of Human Personality Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa E. Wynn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on implicit intelligence has conceptualized students’ beliefs about the nature of intelligence as either fixed or malleable. This research has largely not included African American adolescents, a group for whom beliefs about intelligence have a cultural historical complexity related to both scientific racism and master narratives of race and intelligence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature of implicit theories of intelligence for 63 African American adolescents who are seventh and eighth graders in a public charter school. The two-way ANOVA revealed that these adolescents held a malleable view of intelligence, which did not vary by gender or grade. Exploratory correlation analysis showed some consistent relationships with achievement motivation variables found in other studies. These findings may be explained by African American cultural values and the personality characteristic adaptations that they make living within a racialized society.

  2. Genome-wide epigenetic profiling of breast cancer tumors treated with aromatase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nevedomskaya, E.; Wessels, L.; Zwart, W.

    2014-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI) are extensively used in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers, however resistance to AI treatment is commonly observed. Apart from Estrogen receptor (ER?) expression, no predictive biomarkers for response to AI treatment are clinically applied. Yet,

  3. Is aromatase cytochrome P450 involved in the pathogenesis of endometrioid endometrial cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, VHWM; Thijssen, JHH; Hollema, H; Donker, GH; Santema, JG; Van Der Zee, AGJ; Heineman, MJ

    2005-01-01

    Prospectively, the relationship between androgen levels in the utero-ovarian circulation, aromatase activity in endometrial and body fat tissue, and the presence or absence of endometrioid endometrial cancer was studied in postmenopausal women. In 43 women with endometrioid endometrial cancer and 8

  4. DIFERENSIASI KELAMIN TIGA GENOTIPE IKAN NILA YANG DIBERI BAHAN AROMATASE INHIBITOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didik Ariyanto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Penggunaan hormon sintetik 17 a-metiltestosterone untuk sex reversal ikan konsumsi sudah dilarang. Salah satu bahan yang terbukti efektif dalam sex reversal adalah bahan aromatase inhibitor. Bahan ini dapat digunakan dalam proses pembalikan kelamin karena menghambat sekresi enzim aromatase yang bertanggung jawab dalam konversi hormon androgen menjadi estrogen. Tingginya kadar androgen dalam tubuh akan mengarahkan proses diferensiasi kelamin ke arah kelamin jantan. Penelitian ini bertujuan mengetahui pengaruh pemberian bahan aromatase inhibitor terhadap diferensiasi kelamin tiga genotipe ikan nila. Bahan utama yang digunakan adalah larva ikan nila genotipe XX, XY, dan YY yang diberi bahan aromatase inhibitor, khususnya imidazole. Penambahan hormon sintetik 17a-metiltestosterone digunakan sebagai kontrol (+. Pemberian imidazole dilakukan melalui pakan pada larva ikan nila yang berumur 7 hari setelah menetas, selama 28 hari. Selanjutnya benih dipelihara dalam hapa pendederan selama 60 hari di kolam tanah. Pada akhir pendederan dilakukan identifikasi jenis kelamin, bobot individu rata-rata, dan sintasan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa imidazole efektif meningkatkan rasio kelamin jantan pada ikan nila genotipe XX dan YY, tetapi tidak pada genotipe XY. Sampai akhir tahap pendederan, semua genotipe dan perlakuan yang berbeda tidak memberikan efek yang berbeda nyata terhadap laju pertumbuhan maupun nilai sintasan, kecuali pada genotipe YY

  5. Effects on guppy brain aromatase activity following short-term steroid and 4-nonylphenol exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Stefan; Olsén, K Håkan

    2010-06-01

    Brain estrogen production, performed by the enzyme aromatase, can be disrupted/affected in teleost fish exposed to endocrine disruptors found in polluted aquatic environments. The guppy (Poecilia reticulata) was previously studied and confirmed to suffer negative effects on reproductive behaviors following inhibition of the brain aromatase reaction. Here adult guppies (Poecilia reticulata) of both genders were subjected to known endocrine disruptors: the androgen androstenedione (A), the synthetic estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE(2)), and the estrogenic surfactant 4-nonylphenol (NP), at high (50 microg/L) and at environmentally relevant concentrations (10 ng/L EE(2), 5 microg/L NP, and 0.7 microg/L A) for 2 weeks followed by measurements of brain aromatase activity (bAA). In the adult males, bAA was stimulated by A and EE(2) at 50 microg/L. Female activity was also stimulated by the higher estrogenic treatment. At environmentally relevant concentrations only the EE(2) treatment affected bAA, and only in males. The alkylphenolic substance NP produced no effect in either of the experiments, not on males nor females. The results indicate that short-term steroid treatments have stimulatory effects on guppy brain aromatase even at concentrations that can be found in the environment. We thus suggest bAA of adult guppies to be a suitable bioindicator of endocrine disruptors. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Aromatase Activity in the Preoptic Area Differs Between Aggressive and Nonaggressive Male House Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaan, J.C.; Wozniak, A.; Ruiter, A.J.H. de; Koolhaas, J.M.; Hutchison, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Treatment with testosterone (T) or estradiol (E2) facilitates intraspecific aggressive behavior in adult rodents. Brain aromatization of T to E2 appears to be involved in facilitation of fighting behavior. In the present study we measure the in vitro brain aromatase activity (AA) in the preoptic

  7. HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN AND PROLACTIN INDUCIBLE PROTEIN COMPLEX ENHANCES SPERM CAPACITATION IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Tomar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Prolactin inducible protein (PIP is a 17 kDa protein expressed in human body fluids. It interacts with several other proteins including fibrinogen, IgG, actin, CD4, ZAG, etc. and their association contributes to multifaceted molecular functions of PIP in diverse classes of biological processes. The roles of PIP are reported in immunoregulation, tumor progression, apoptosis and fertility. Recently, PIP was purified in complex with human serum albumin (HSA from human semen. Here, we have reported comparative expression analysis of this complex in human seminal plasma samples of various categories of infertility conditions (oligozoospermia, azoospermia and asthenozoospermia and fertile controls (normozoospermia. We have also evaluated sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction in presence of varying concentrations of this complex. Comparative expression analysis was performed under same experimental conditions by co-immunoprecipitation followed by western blot analysis and results highlighted that HSA-PIP complex is down-regulated in azoospermia as depicted by the intensity of protein bands on the blot. Assessment of sperm functions in presence or absence of this complex revealed that this complex acts as an inducer of in vitro sperm capacitation. It was observed that 87% sperm were capacitated after 4h incubation with HSA-PIP complex (100 µg/mL in comparison to 60.33% in +ve control. On the basis of our findings, we conclude that this complex might be a positive regulator of sperm motility and capacitation in vivo.

  8. Musculoskeletal modelling of human ankle complex: Estimation of ankle joint moments

    OpenAIRE

    Jamwal, PK; Hussain, S; Tsoi, YH; Ghayesh, MH; Xie, SQ

    2017-01-01

    Background: A musculoskeletal model for the ankle complex is vital in order to enhance the understanding of neuro-mechanical control of ankle motions, diagnose ankle disorders and assess subsequent treatments. Motions at the human ankle and foot, however, are complex due to simultaneous movements at the two joints namely, the ankle joint and the subtalar joint. The musculoskeletal elements at the ankle complex, such as ligaments, muscles and tendons, have intricate arrangements and exhibit tr...

  9. Skill networks and measures of complex human capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We propose a network-based method for measuring worker skills. We illustrate the method using data from an online freelance website. Using the tools of network analysis, we divide skills into endogenous categories based on their relationship with other skills in the market. Workers who specialize in these different areas earn dramatically different wages. We then show that, in this market, network-based measures of human capital provide additional insight into wages beyond traditional measures. In particular, we show that workers with diverse skills earn higher wages than those with more specialized skills. Moreover, we can distinguish between two different types of workers benefiting from skill diversity: jacks-of-all-trades, whose skills can be applied independently on a wide range of jobs, and synergistic workers, whose skills are useful in combination and fill a hole in the labor market. On average, workers whose skills are synergistic earn more than jacks-of-all-trades. PMID:29133397

  10. Time-Dependent Kinematics of Complex Human Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaibani, Saami J.

    2013-03-01

    The human body can be arranged in numerous geometrical configurations, including many interesting scenarios from the sport of gymnastics. One particularly challenging analytical example among these is the forward flip with maximum separation from the ground at the apex of the flight. The temporal aspects of this move involve the evaluation of multiple different positions during the trajectory, which adds significantly to the effort required. When a forward flip was executed during a football game, ready access to the recording of this allowed a detailed kinematic examination to be performed. Careful application of highly intricate protocols produces results which are consistent with similar athletic environments. The emphasis in this research is to transcend standard approaches elsewhere, which are severely limited to generic athletes and/or generic circumstances. Pedagogical benefits of the rigorous methodology adopted here are explored beyond what was introduced in a recent related study.

  11. Unraveling human complexity and disease with systems biology and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Stephen; Chen, Jake Y

    2010-05-01

    We are all perplexed that current medical practice often appears maladroit in curing our individual illnesses or disease. However, as is often the case, a lack of understanding, tools and technologies are the root cause of such situations. Human individuality is an often-quoted term but, in the context of human biology, it is poorly understood. This is compounded when there is a need to consider the variability of human populations. In the case of the former, it is possible to quantify human complexity as determined by the 35,000 genes of the human genome, the 1-10 million proteins (including antibodies) and the 2000-3000 metabolites of the human metabolome. Human variability is much more difficult to assess, since many of the variables, such as the definition of race, are not even clearly agreed on. In order to accommodate human complexity, variability and its influence on health and disease, it is necessary to undertake a systematic approach. In the past decade, the emergence of analytical platforms and bioinformatics tools has led to the development of systems biology. Such an approach offers enormous potential in defining key pathways and networks involved in optimal human health, as well as disease onset, progression and treatment. The tools and technologies now available in systems biology analyses offer exciting opportunities to exploit the emerging areas of personalized medicine. In this article, we discuss the current status of human complexity, and how systems biology and personalized medicine can impact at the individual and population level.

  12. Improved methodology for the affinity isolation of human protein complexes expressed at near endogenous levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanski, Michal; Molloy, Kelly; Jiang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    An efficient and reliable procedure for the capture of affinity-tagged proteins and associated complexes from human cell lines is reported. Through multiple optimizations, high yield and low background affinity-purifications are achieved from modest quantities of human cells expressing endogenous...

  13. Skill networks and measures of complex human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Katharine A

    2017-11-28

    We propose a network-based method for measuring worker skills. We illustrate the method using data from an online freelance website. Using the tools of network analysis, we divide skills into endogenous categories based on their relationship with other skills in the market. Workers who specialize in these different areas earn dramatically different wages. We then show that, in this market, network-based measures of human capital provide additional insight into wages beyond traditional measures. In particular, we show that workers with diverse skills earn higher wages than those with more specialized skills. Moreover, we can distinguish between two different types of workers benefiting from skill diversity: jacks-of-all-trades, whose skills can be applied independently on a wide range of jobs, and synergistic workers, whose skills are useful in combination and fill a hole in the labor market. On average, workers whose skills are synergistic earn more than jacks-of-all-trades. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  14. Recognition of complex human behaviours using 3D imaging for intelligent surveillance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bo; Lepley, Jason J.; Peall, Robert; Butler, Michael; Hagras, Hani

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a system that exploits 3-D imaging technology as an enabler for the robust recognition of the human form. We combine this with pose and feature recognition capabilities from which we can recognise high-level human behaviours. We propose a hierarchical methodology for the recognition of complex human behaviours, based on the identification of a set of atomic behaviours, individual and sequential poses (e.g. standing, sitting, walking, drinking and eating) that provides a framework from which we adopt time-based machine learning techniques to recognise complex behaviour patterns.

  15. The N2-P3 complex of the evoked potential and human performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odonnell, Brian F.; Cohen, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    The N2-P3 complex and other endogenous components of human evoked potential provide a set of tools for the investigation of human perceptual and cognitive processes. These multidimensional measures of central nervous system bioelectrical activity respond to a variety of environmental and internal factors which have been experimentally characterized. Their application to the analysis of human performance in naturalistic task environments is just beginning. Converging evidence suggests that the N2-P3 complex reflects processes of stimulus evaluation, perceptual resource allocation, and decision making that proceed in parallel, rather than in series, with response generation. Utilization of these EP components may provide insights into the central nervous system mechanisms modulating task performance unavailable from behavioral measures alone. The sensitivity of the N2-P3 complex to neuropathology, psychopathology, and pharmacological manipulation suggests that these components might provide sensitive markers for the effects of environmental stressors on the human central nervous system.

  16. Which patients benefit most from adjuvant aromatase inhibitors? Results using a composite measure of prognostic risk in the BIG 1-98 randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, G.; Regan, M. M.; Dell'Orto, P.; Mastropasqua, M. G.; Maiorano, E.; Rasmussen, B. B.; MacGrogan, G.; Forbes, J. F.; Paridaens, R. J.; Colleoni, M.; Láng, I.; Thürlimann, B.; Mouridsen, H.; Mauriac, L.; Gelber, R. D.; Price, K. N.; Goldhirsch, A.; Gusterson, B. A.; Coates, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: On average, aromatase inhibitors are better than tamoxifen when used as initial or sequential therapy for postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer. Because there may be contraindications to their use based on side-effects or cost, we investigated subgroups in which aromatase inhibitors may be more or less important. Patients and methods: Breast International Group 1-98 trial randomized 6182 women among four groups comparing letrozole and tamoxifen with sequences of each agent; 5177 (84%) had centrally confirmed estrogen receptor (ER) positivity. We assessed whether centrally determined ER, progesterone receptor (PgR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, and Ki-67 labeling index, alone or in combination with other prognostic features, predicted the magnitude of letrozole effectiveness compared with either sequence or tamoxifen monotherapy. Results: Individually, none of the markers significantly predicted differential treatment effects. Subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot analysis of a composite measure of prognostic risk revealed three patterns. Estimated 5-year disease-free survival for letrozole monotherapy, letrozole→tamoxifen, tamoxifen→letrozole, and tamoxifen monotherapy were 96%, 94%, 93%, and 94%, respectively, for patients at lowest risk; 90%, 91%, 93%, and 86%, respectively, for patients at intermediate risk; and 80%, 76%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, for patients at highest risk. Conclusion: A composite measure of risk informs treatment selection better than individual biomarkers and supports the choice of 5 years of letrozole for patients at highest risk for recurrence. PMID:21335417

  17. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human Atg4B–LC3 complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoo, Kenji; Suzuki, Nobuo N.; Fujioka, Yuko [Department of Structural Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, N-12, W-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Mizushima, Noboru [Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); SORST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Ohsumi, Yoshinori [Division of Molecular Cell Biology, National Institute for Basic Biology, 38 Nishigonaka, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Inagaki, Fuyuhiko, E-mail: finagaki@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Structural Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, N-12, W-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2007-02-01

    Human Atg4B and LC3 were expressed, purified and crystallized as a complex. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.9 Å. The reversible modification of Atg8 with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is crucial for autophagy, the bulk degradation process of cytoplasmic components by the vacuolar/lysosomal system. Atg4 is a cysteine protease that is responsible for the processing and deconjugation of Atg8. Human Atg4B (HsAtg4B; a mammalian orthologue of yeast Atg4) and LC3 (a mammalian orthologue of yeast Atg8) were expressed and purified and two complexes, one consisting of HsAtg4B(1–354) and LC3(1–120) (complex I; the product complex) and the other consisting of HsAtg4B(1–354) and LC3(1–124) (complex II; the substrate complex), were crystallized using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. In both complexes His280 of HsAtg4B was mutated to alanine. The crystals belong to the same space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.5, b = 91.8, c = 102.6 Å for complex I and a = 46.9, b = 90.9, c = 102.5 Å for complex II. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.9 Å from both crystals.

  18. Examining the complexity of human RNA polymerase complexes using HaloTag technology coupled to label free quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Danette L; Méndez, Jacqui; Mosley, Amber L; Ramisetty, Sreenivasa R; Murphy, Nancy; Benink, Hélène; Wood, Keith V; Urh, Marjeta; Washburn, Michael P

    2012-02-03

    Efficient determination of protein interactions and cellular localization remains a challenge in higher order eukaryotes and creates a need for robust technologies for functional proteomics studies. To address this, the HaloTag technology was developed for highly efficient and rapid isolation of intracellular complexes and correlative in vivo cellular imaging. Here we demonstrate the strength of this technology by simultaneous capture of human eukaryotic RNA polymerases (RNAP) I, II, and III using a shared subunit, POLR2H, fused to the HaloTag. Affinity purifications showed successful isolation, as determined using quantitative proteomics, of all RNAP core subunits, even at expression levels near endogenous. Transient known RNAP II interacting partners were identified as well as three previously uncharacterized interactors. These interactions were validated and further functionally characterized using cellular imaging. The multiple capabilities of the HaloTag technology demonstrate the ability to efficiently isolate highly challenging multiprotein complexes, discover new interactions, and characterize cellular localization.

  19. [Elderly human being with ostomy and environments of care: reflection on the perspective of complexity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Edaiane Joana Lima; Santos, Silvana Sidney Costa; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo

    2012-01-01

    This is discussion about the relationship between elderly human beings with ostomy and their environments care, under the perspective of Complexity Edgar Morin. An axis holds the reflection: environments of care for elderly humans with ostomy. In this sense, we present three types of environment that surround the context of elderly humans with ostomy: home environment, group environment and hospital environment. This brings, as a social contribution, a new look about resizing caring of elderly humans with ostomy in their environment. It is considered that the environment hosting this human being contains a diversity of feelings, emotions, experiences; it binds multiple meanings, from the Complexity perspective, about the relationship between the environment and the caring process.

  20. Benefit/risk for adjuvant breast cancer therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use by age, and race/ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlebowski, R T; Haque, R; Hedlin, H; Col, N; Paskett, E; Manson, J E; Kubo, J T; Johnson, K C; Wactawski-Wende, J; Pan, K; Anderson, G

    2015-12-01

    In early adjuvant breast cancer trial reports, aromatase inhibitors more effectively reduced breast recurrence with lower risk of thromboembolic events and endometrial cancer than tamoxifen, while aromatase inhibitors had higher fracture and cardiovascular disease risk. We used data from updated patient-level meta-analyses of adjuvant trials in analyses to summarize the benefits and risks of these agents in various clinical circumstances. Baseline incidence rates for health outcomes by age and race/ethnicity, absent aromatase inhibitor, or tamoxifen use were estimated from the Women's Health Initiative. Aromatase inhibitor and tamoxifen effects on distant recurrence were obtained from a meta-analysis of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (ATAC) and Breast International Group (Big-1-98) clinical trials. Impact on other health outcomes were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials comparing aromatase inhibitor to tamoxifen use and from placebo-controlled chemoprevention trials. All health outcomes were given equal weight when modeling net benefit/risk for aromatase inhibitor compared to tamoxifen use by breast cancer recurrence risk, age (decade), race/ethnicity, hysterectomy (yes/no), and by prior myocardial infarction. Over a 10-year period, the benefit/risk index was more favorable for aromatase inhibitor than for tamoxifen as adjuvant breast cancer therapy in almost all circumstances regardless of patient age, race/ethnicity, breast cancer recurrence risk, or presence or absence of a uterus. Only in older women with prior myocardial infarction and low recurrence risk was an advantage for tamoxifen seen. Using a benefit/risk index for endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy in postmenopausal women, benefit was higher for aromatase inhibitor use in almost all circumstances.

  1. Aromatase inhibitor treatment of menorrhagia and subsequent pregnancy in a patient with familial hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Erin F; Hill, Micah J; Simonds, William F; Segars, James H

    2012-12-01

    To describe the clinical management of menorrhagia in a woman with hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome (HPT-JT). Case report. Large translation research hospital. A 26-year-old nulligravid woman with familial HPT-JT presented with life-long menorrhagia resistant to progesterone intrauterine device (IUD) therapy and a desire for fertility. Aromatase inhibitor therapy. Clinical response to therapy and pregnancy. Imaging demonstrated an enlarged endometrial lining and thickening of the junctional zone. At operative hysteroscopy, multiple atypical endometrial polyp-like lesions filled the entire uterine cavity and were removed. Histologic evaluation demonstrated the lesions to be adenomyomas with an abundance of aromatase expression. Postoperative treatment included an aromatase inhibitor. The patient's menorrhagia, which had previously been resistant to progesterone IUD therapy, resolved with the aromatase inhibitor. After 10 months of this treatment, the aromatase inhibitor was discontinued and a repeated hysteroscopy revealed a markedly improved uterine cavity. The patient subsequently became pregnant on her first natural cycle and delivered a healthy term infant. Aromatase inhibitors may represent a novel treatment for benign uterine pathology in HPT-JT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Aromatase inhibitor treatment of menorrhagia and subsequent pregnancy in a patient with Familial Hyperparathyroidism-Jaw Tumor Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Erin F.; Hill, Micah J.; Simonds, William F.; Segars, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical management of menorrhagia in a woman with Hyperparathyroidism-Jaw Tumor Syndrome (HPT-JT). Design Case report. Setting Large translation research hospital. Patient A 26 year old nulligravid woman with familial HPT-JT presented with life-long menorrhagia resistant to progesterone IUD therapy and a desire for fertility. Intervention Aromatase inhibitor therapy. Main Outcome Measures Clinical response to therapy and pregnancy. Result Imaging demonstrated an enlarged endometrial lining and thickening of the junctional zone. At operative hysteroscopy, multiple atypical endometrial polyp-like lesions filled the entire uterine cavity and were removed. Histologic evaluation demonstrated the lesions to be adenomyomas with an abundance of aromatase expression. Postoperative treatment included an aromatase inhibitor. The patient's menorrhagia, which had previously been resistant to progesterone IUD therapy, resolved with the aromatase inhibitor. After ten months of this treatment, the aromatase inhibitor was discontinued and a repeat hysteroscopy revealed a markedly improved uterine cavity. The patient subsequently became pregnant on her first natural cycle and delivered a healthy term infant. Conclusion Aromatase inhibitors may represent a novel treatment for benign uterine pathology in HPT-JT. PMID:22963808

  3. A role for human mitochondrial complex II in the production of reactive oxygen species in human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial respiratory chain is a major generator of cellular oxidative stress, thought to be an underlying cause of the carcinogenic and ageing process in many tissues including skin. Previous studies of the relative contributions of the respiratory chain (RC complexes I, II and III towards production of reactive oxygen species (ROS have focussed on rat tissues and certainly not on human skin which is surprising as this tissue is regularly exposed to UVA in sunlight, a potent generator of cellular oxidative stress. In a novel approach we have used an array of established specific metabolic inhibitors and DHR123 fluorescence to study the relative roles of the mitochondrial RC complexes in cellular ROS production in 2 types of human skin cells. These include additional enhancement of ROS production by exposure to physiological levels of UVA. The effects within epidermal and dermal derived skin cells are compared to other tissue cell types as well as those harbouring a compromised mitochondrial status (Rho-zero A549. The results show that the complex II inhibitor, TTFA, was the only RC inhibitor to significantly increase UVA-induced ROS production in both skin cell types (P<0.05 suggesting that the role of human skin complex II in terms of influencing ROS production is more important than previously thought particularly in comparison to liver cells. Interestingly, two-fold greater maximal activity of complex II enzyme was observed in both skin cell types compared to liver (P<0.001. The activities of RC enzymes appear to decrease with increasing age and telomere length is correlated with ageing. Our study showed that the level of maximal complex II activity was higher in the MRC5/hTERT (human lung fibroblasts transfected with telomerase cells than the corresponding wild type cells (P=0.0012 which can be considered (in terms of telomerase activity as models of younger and older cells respectively.

  4. Complex forms of mitochondrial DNA in human B cells transformed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Christiansen, C; Zeuthen, J

    1983-01-01

    Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed lymphoblast......Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed...

  5. Progress and Promise of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Human Complex Trait Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranger, Barbara E.; Stahl, Eli A.; Raj, Towfique

    2011-01-01

    Enormous progress in mapping complex traits in humans has been made in the last 5 yr. There has been early success for prevalent diseases with complex phenotypes. These studies have demonstrated clearly that, while complex traits differ in their underlying genetic architectures, for many common disorders the predominant pattern is that of many loci, individually with small effects on phenotype. For some traits, loci of large effect have been identified. For almost all complex traits studied in humans, the sum of the identified genetic effects comprises only a portion, generally less than half, of the estimated trait heritability. A variety of hypotheses have been proposed to explain why this might be the case, including untested rare variants, and gene–gene and gene–environment interaction. Effort is currently being directed toward implementation of novel analytic approaches and testing rare variants for association with complex traits using imputed variants from the publicly available 1000 Genomes Project resequencing data and from direct resequencing of clinical samples. Through integration with annotations and functional genomic data as well as by in vitro and in vivo experimentation, mapping studies continue to characterize functional variants associated with complex traits and address fundamental issues such as epistasis and pleiotropy. This review focuses primarily on the ways in which genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the field of human quantitative genetics. PMID:21115973

  6. Resolving the complexity of the human genome using single-molecule sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, Mark J P; Huddleston, John; Dennis, Megan Y; Sudmant, Peter H; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Antonacci, Francesca; Surti, Urvashi; Sandstrom, Richard; Boitano, Matthew; Landolin, Jane M; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Hunkapiller, Michael W; Korlach, Jonas; Eichler, Evan E

    2015-01-29

    The human genome is arguably the most complete mammalian reference assembly, yet more than 160 euchromatic gaps remain and aspects of its structural variation remain poorly understood ten years after its completion. To identify missing sequence and genetic variation, here we sequence and analyse a haploid human genome (CHM1) using single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing. We close or extend 55% of the remaining interstitial gaps in the human GRCh37 reference genome--78% of which carried long runs of degenerate short tandem repeats, often several kilobases in length, embedded within (G+C)-rich genomic regions. We resolve the complete sequence of 26,079 euchromatic structural variants at the base-pair level, including inversions, complex insertions and long tracts of tandem repeats. Most have not been previously reported, with the greatest increases in sensitivity occurring for events less than 5 kilobases in size. Compared to the human reference, we find a significant insertional bias (3:1) in regions corresponding to complex insertions and long short tandem repeats. Our results suggest a greater complexity of the human genome in the form of variation of longer and more complex repetitive DNA that can now be largely resolved with the application of this longer-read sequencing technology.

  7. Aromatase overexpression in dysfunctional adipose tissue links obesity to postmenopausal breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuyi; Simpson, Evan R; Brown, Kristy A

    2015-09-01

    The number of breast cancer cases has increased in the last a few decades and this is believed to be associated with the increased prevalence of obesity worldwide. The risk of breast cancer increases with age beyond menopause and the relationship between obesity and the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women is well established. The majority of postmenopausal breast cancers are estrogen receptor (ER) positive and estrogens produced in the adipose tissue promotes tumor formation. Obesity results in the secretion of inflammatory factors that stimulate the expression of the aromatase enzyme, which converts androgens into estrogens in the adipose tissue. Evidence demonstrating a link between obesity and breast cancer has led to the investigation of metabolic pathways as novel regulators of estrogen production, including pathways that can be targeted to inhibit aromatase specifically within the breast. This review aims to present some of the key findings in this regard. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Xanthones from the botanical dietary supplement mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) with aromatase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balunas, Marcy J; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2008-07-01

    Twelve xanthone constituents of the botanical dietary supplement mangosteen (the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana) were screened using a noncellular, enzyme-based microsomal aromatase inhibition assay. Of these compounds, garcinone D (3), garcinone E (5), alpha-mangostin (8), and gamma-mangostin (9) exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity. In a follow-up cell-based assay using SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells that express high levels of aromatase, the most potent of these four xanthones was gamma-mangostin (9). Because xanthones may be consumed in substantial amounts from commercially available mangosteen products, the consequences of frequent intake of mangosteen botanical dietary supplements require further investigation to determine their possible role in breast cancer chemoprevention.

  9. Controlling Your Impulses: Electrical Stimulation of the Human Supplementary Motor Complex Prevents Impulsive Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Spieser, L.; Van den Wildenberg, W; Hasbroucq, T.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Burle, B.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy humans leaves action urges unchanged but prevents them from turning into overt errors. Subjects performed a choice reaction-time task known to trigger impulsive responses, l...

  10. Improved methodology for the affinity isolation of human protein complexes expressed at near endogenous levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, Michal; Molloy, Kelly; Jiang, Hua; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Jensen, Torben Heick; LaCava, John

    2013-01-01

    An efficient and reliable procedure for the capture of affinity-tagged proteins and associated complexes from human cell lines is reported. Through multiple optimizations, high yield and low background affinity-purifications are achieved from modest quantities of human cells expressing endogenous-level tagged proteins. Isolations of triple-FLAG and GFP-tagged fusion proteins involved in RNA metabolism are presented. PMID:22668517

  11. How do precision medicine and system biology response to human body's complex adaptability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bing

    2016-12-01

    In the field of life sciences, although system biology and "precision medicine" introduce some complex scientifific methods and techniques, it is still based on the "analysis-reconstruction" of reductionist theory as a whole. Adaptability of complex system increase system behaviour uncertainty as well as the difficulties of precise identifification and control. It also put systems biology research into trouble. To grasp the behaviour and characteristics of organism fundamentally, systems biology has to abandon the "analysis-reconstruction" concept. In accordance with the guidelines of complexity science, systems biology should build organism model from holistic level, just like the Chinese medicine did in dealing with human body and disease. When we study the living body from the holistic level, we will fifind the adaptability of complex system is not the obstacle that increases the diffificulty of problem solving. It is the "exceptional", "right-hand man" that helping us to deal with the complexity of life more effectively.

  12. Assessing randomness and complexity in human motion trajectories through analysis of symbolic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen ePeng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Complexity is a hallmark of intelligent behavior consisting both of regular patterns and random variation. To quantitatively assess the complexity and randomness of human motion, we designed a motor task in which we translated subjects' motion trajectories into strings of symbol sequences. In the first part of the experiment participants were asked to perform self-paced movements to create repetitive patterns, copy pre-specified letter sequences, and generate random movements. To investigate whether the degree of randomness can be manipulated, in the second part of the experiment participants were asked to perform unpredictable movements in the context of a pursuit game, where they received feedback from an online Bayesian predictor guessing their next move. We analyzed symbol sequences representing subjects' motion trajectories with five common complexity measures: predictability, compressibility, approximate entropy, Lempel-Ziv complexity, as well as effective measure complexity. We found that subjects’ self-created patterns were the most complex, followed by drawing movements of letters and self-paced random motion. We also found that participants could change the randomness of their behavior depending on context and feedback. Our results suggest that humans can adjust both complexity and regularity in different movement types and contexts and that this can be assessed with information-theoretic measures of the symbolic sequences generated from movement trajectories.

  13. Impact of nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors on steroid profile in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yanyi; Liu, Xin; Yan, Mengmeng; Chen, Tianqi; Lu, Fei; Xu, Bing; Gong, Yan; Chu, Fuhao; Lei, Haimin

    2017-07-01

    Steroid profiling was introduced to determine the endogenous steroid misuse in sports. Thus, screening for the exogenous use of these prohibited substances can be established by monitoring a range of endogenous steroids, which constitute the steroid profile and evaluate their concentrations and ratios against reference values. The steroid profiling is currently based on population statistics. As large interindividual variations exist, athlete biological passport (ABP) analysis is ongoing. This study aimed to identify new biomarker(s) for aromatase inhibitor detection in sports using statistical analysis and adapt the model into ABP analysis.Forty-one Chinese nonathlete volunteers (21 males and 20 females) were administered 3 nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors (aminoglutethimide, letrozole, and anastrozole) independently. Statistical analysis was performed on 16 steroid profile parameters.After administration, the concentrations of endogenous androgen biomarkers including testosterone (T), epitestosterone, androsterone (AN), etiocholanolone (ETIO), 5α-diol, 5β-diol, and dehydroepiandrosterone were increased, while the level of estrogen was decreased. These biomarkers returned to the baselines levels within 1 month. In females, the concentrations of endogenous biomarkers were affected by nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors, without a common trend. Three new endogenous biomarkers (AN/estrone, ETIO/estrone, and T/estrone) elevated significantly after treatment. The 3 new models were more sensitive than the World Anti-Doping Agency ratio biomarkers. They were also effective in exponentially weighted moving average chart analysis.Verification experiment demonstrated that the biomarker T/estrone was valid in judging the steroidal aromatase inhibitor abuse. The screening of these new endogenous biomarkers can provide additional parameters to support ABP monitoring and specific information regarding the administered steroids.

  14. Advances in the stereoselective synthesis of antifungal agents and aromatase inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Summa, Vincenzo

    2000-01-01

    Numerous drugs are chiral, generally only one enantiomer is therapeutically active while the other antipode is completely inactive or shows often undesired and/or toxic side effects. For this reason, all new chiral drugs are now formulated in enantiopure form. Non-steroidal anticancer and antifungal drugs contain the same chemical structure e.g. Bifonazole 6a and non-steroidal aromatase inhibitors such as the Menarini anticancer drug 18. They are characterized by the presence of single chiral...

  15. Interactions of the human MCM-BP protein with MCM complex components and Dbf4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin Nguyen

    Full Text Available MCM-BP was discovered as a protein that co-purified from human cells with MCM proteins 3 through 7; results which were recapitulated in frogs, yeast and plants. Evidence in all of these organisms supports an important role for MCM-BP in DNA replication, including contributions to MCM complex unloading. However the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood. Here we show that human MCM-BP is capable of interacting with individual MCM proteins 2 through 7 when co-expressed in insect cells and can greatly increase the recovery of some recombinant MCM proteins. Glycerol gradient sedimentation analysis indicated that MCM-BP interacts most strongly with MCM4 and MCM7. Similar gradient analyses of human cell lysates showed that only a small amount of MCM-BP overlapped with the migration of MCM complexes and that MCM complexes were disrupted by exogenous MCM-BP. In addition, large complexes containing MCM-BP and MCM proteins were detected at mid to late S phase, suggesting that the formation of specific MCM-BP complexes is cell cycle regulated. We also identified an interaction between MCM-BP and the Dbf4 regulatory component of the DDK kinase in both yeast 2-hybrid and insect cell co-expression assays, and this interaction was verified by co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins from human cells. In vitro kinase assays showed that MCM-BP was not a substrate for DDK but could inhibit DDK phosphorylation of MCM4,6,7 within MCM4,6,7 or MCM2-7 complexes, with little effect on DDK phosphorylation of MCM2. Since DDK is known to activate DNA replication through phosphorylation of these MCM proteins, our results suggest that MCM-BP may affect DNA replication in part by regulating MCM phosphorylation by DDK.

  16. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  17. Complex Formation of Human Proelastases with Procarboxypeptidases A1 and A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, András; Pilsak, Claudia; Bence, Melinda; Witt, Heiko; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2016-08-19

    The pancreas secretes digestive proenzymes typically in their monomeric form. A notable exception is the ternary complex formed by proproteinase E, chymotrypsinogen C, and procarboxypeptidase A (proCPA) in cattle and other ruminants. In the human and pig pancreas binary complexes of proCPA with proelastases were found. To characterize complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens in a systematic manner, we performed binding experiments using recombinant proelastases CELA2A, CELA3A, and CELA3B; chymotrypsinogens CTRB1, CTRB2, CTRC, and CTRL1; and procarboxypeptidases CPA1, CPA2, and CPB1. We found that proCELA3B bound not only to proCPA1 (KD 43 nm) but even more tightly to proCPA2 (KD 18 nm), whereas proCELA2A bound weakly to proCPA1 only (KD 152 nm). Surprisingly, proCELA3A, which shares 92% identity with proCELA3B, did not form stable complexes due to the evolutionary replacement of Ala(241) with Gly. The polymorphic nature of position 241 in both CELA3A (∼4% Ala(241) alleles) and CELA3B (∼2% Gly(241) alleles) points to individual variations in complex formation. The functional effect of complex formation was delayed procarboxypeptidase activation due to increased affinity of the inhibitory activation peptide, whereas proelastase activation was unchanged. We conclude that complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens is limited to a subset of proelastases and procarboxypeptidases. Complex formation stabilizes the inhibitory activation peptide of procarboxypeptidases and thereby increases zymogen stability and controls activation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Complex Formation of Human Proelastases with Procarboxypeptidases A1 and A2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, András; Pilsak, Claudia; Bence, Melinda; Witt, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The pancreas secretes digestive proenzymes typically in their monomeric form. A notable exception is the ternary complex formed by proproteinase E, chymotrypsinogen C, and procarboxypeptidase A (proCPA) in cattle and other ruminants. In the human and pig pancreas binary complexes of proCPA with proelastases were found. To characterize complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens in a systematic manner, we performed binding experiments using recombinant proelastases CELA2A, CELA3A, and CELA3B; chymotrypsinogens CTRB1, CTRB2, CTRC, and CTRL1; and procarboxypeptidases CPA1, CPA2, and CPB1. We found that proCELA3B bound not only to proCPA1 (KD 43 nm) but even more tightly to proCPA2 (KD 18 nm), whereas proCELA2A bound weakly to proCPA1 only (KD 152 nm). Surprisingly, proCELA3A, which shares 92% identity with proCELA3B, did not form stable complexes due to the evolutionary replacement of Ala241 with Gly. The polymorphic nature of position 241 in both CELA3A (∼4% Ala241 alleles) and CELA3B (∼2% Gly241 alleles) points to individual variations in complex formation. The functional effect of complex formation was delayed procarboxypeptidase activation due to increased affinity of the inhibitory activation peptide, whereas proelastase activation was unchanged. We conclude that complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens is limited to a subset of proelastases and procarboxypeptidases. Complex formation stabilizes the inhibitory activation peptide of procarboxypeptidases and thereby increases zymogen stability and controls activation. PMID:27358403

  19. PENGARUH RANGSANGAN HORMON AROMATASE INHIBITOR DAN OODEV TERHADAP PERUBAHAN KELAMIN DAN PERKEMBANGAN GONAD IKAN KERAPU SUNU, Plectropomus leopardus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirmawan Tirta Yudha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Permasalahan utama yang dihadapi dalam penyediaan calon induk ikan kerapu sunu Plectropomus leopardus hasil budidaya yang bersifat hermaprodit sekuensial adalah keterlambatan dalam perkembangan gonad dan perubahan gonad dari betina menjadi jantan. Manipulasi hormonal merupakan cara yang paling efektif dan efisien dalam memacu perkembangan reproduksi dan pematangan gonad. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mendapatkan dosis hormon aromatase inhibitor dan oodev yang tepat untuk memacu perubahan kelamin dan perkembangan gonad ikan kerapu sunu. Ikan uji yang digunakan sebanyak 35 ekor F-1 dengan bobot rerata 2,3 ± 0,28 kg. Penelitian dilakukan selama dua bulan. Induksi hormon dilakukan melalui penyuntikan setiap dua minggu sekali dengan empat dosis aromatase inhibitor dan oodev yang berbeda; A (aromatase inhibitor 1 mg kg-1 ikan, O (oodev 1 mL kg-1 ikan, AO1 (aromatase inhibitor 0,1 mg kg-1 ikan + oodev 1 mL kg-1 ikan, AO2 (aromatase inhibitor 1 mg kg-1 ikan + oodev 1 mL kg-1 ikan, dan K (plasebo. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kombinasi aromatase inhibitor 1 mg kg-1 ikan dan oodev 1 mL kg-1 ikan efektif untuk merangsang perubahan kelamin. Perlakuan tersebut dapat meningkatkan konsentrasi testosteron dalam darah (2,819 ng/mL setelah delapan minggu pemeliharaan. Berdasarkan hasil histologi gonad dan observasi terhadap ekspresi gen terkait reproduksi menggunakan gen target DMRT1 dan SOX3 menunjukkan bahwa perlakuan hormon AO2 (Aromatase inhibitor 1 mg kg-1 ikan + oodev 1 mL kg-1 ikan terbukti dapat memacu perubahan kelamin dari betina menjadi jantan dan kematangan gonad pada ikan kerapu sunu Plectropomus leopardus. The main problems faced in providing prospective broodstock of protogynous hermaphrodite coral trout grouper Plectropomus leopardus are lateness of gonadal development and gonadal sex reversal from female to male. Hormonal manipulation is the most effective way to induce reproductive development and gonadal maturation. The present

  20. Prediction of Complex Human Traits Using the Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Predictor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Vazquez, Ana I; Fernando, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    . However, breeding and human populations differ greatly in a number of factors that can affect the predictive performance of G-BLUP. Using theory, simulations, and real data analysis, we study the erformance of G-BLUP when applied to data from related and unrelated human subjects. Under perfect linkage......Despite important advances from Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS), for most complex human traits and diseases, a sizable proportion of genetic variance remains unexplained and prediction accuracy (PA) is usually low. Evidence suggests that PA can be improved using Whole-Genome Regression (WGR...

  1. Wave processes in the human cardiovascular system: The measuring complex, computing models, and diagnostic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganiev, R. F.; Reviznikov, D. L.; Rogoza, A. N.; Slastushenskiy, Yu. V.; Ukrainskiy, L. E.

    2017-03-01

    A description of a complex approach to investigation of nonlinear wave processes in the human cardiovascular system based on a combination of high-precision methods of measuring a pulse wave, mathematical methods of processing the empirical data, and methods of direct numerical modeling of hemodynamic processes in an arterial tree is given.

  2. Impact of familiarity on information complexity in human-computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakaev Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative measure of information complexity remains very much desirable in HCI field, since it may aid in optimization of user interfaces, especially in human-computer systems for controlling complex objects. Our paper is dedicated to exploration of subjective (subject-depended aspect of the complexity, conceptualized as information familiarity. Although research of familiarity in human cognition and behaviour is done in several fields, the accepted models in HCI, such as Human Processor or Hick-Hyman’s law do not generally consider this issue. In our experimental study the subjects performed search and selection of digits and letters, whose familiarity was conceptualized as frequency of occurrence in numbers and texts. The analysis showed significant effect of information familiarity on selection time and throughput in regression models, although the R2 values were somehow low. Still, we hope that our results might aid in quantification of information complexity and its further application for optimizing interaction in human-machine systems.

  3. Controlling your impulses: Electrical stimulation of the human supplementary motor complex prevents impulsive errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spieser, L.; van den Wildenberg, W.; Hasbroucq, T.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Burle, B.

    2015-01-01

    To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy

  4. From mice to men: the evolution of the large, complex human brain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2004-12-15

    Dec 15, 2004 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 2. Perspectives: From mice to men: the evolution of the large, complex human brain. Jon H Kaas. Volume 30 Issue 2 March 2005 pp 155-165. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. A model of the human triceps surae muscle-tendon complex applied to jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; Huijing, Peter A.; van Ingen Schenau, Gerrit Jan

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain more insight into the behavior of the muscle-tendon complex of human m. triceps surae in jumping. During one-legged vertical jumps of ten subjects ground reaction forces as well as cinematographic data were registered, and electromyograms were recorded from m.

  6. Multi-view 3D Human Pose Estimation in Complex Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, K.M.; Gavrila, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a framework for unconstrained 3D human upper body pose estimation from multiple camera views in complex environment. Its main novelty lies in the integration of three components: single-frame pose recovery, temporal integration and model texture adaptation. Single-frame pose recovery

  7. The genetics of complex human behaviour: Cannabis use, personality, sexuality and mating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    I investigated the genetic and environmental etiology of individual differences in a variety of complex human behaviours, broadly captured within three domains - 1) cannabis use, 2) personality, and 3) sexuality and mating. Research questions and hypotheses are addressed with large community-based,

  8. Localising versus standardising electronic human resource management: complexities and tensions between HRM and IT departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tate, Mary; Furtmueller-Ettinger, Elfriede; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we provide an analysis of the complexities involved during global e-HRM (Electronic Human Resource Management) implementation. We present findings from a case study on the challenge of global integration versus local responsiveness of e-HRM systems. We take a local site lens,

  9. Mechanical properties of the normal human cartilage-bone complex in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Dalstra, M; Linde, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the age-related variations in the mechanical properties of the normal human tibial cartilage-bone complex and the relationships between cartilage and bone. DESIGN: A novel technique was applied to assess the mechanical properties of the cartilage and bone by means...... of testing the cartilage-bone complex. BACKGROUND: Up to now, mechanical testing of cartilage and bone has been reported separately, and little is known about the mechanical behaviour of both tissues when examined as a unit. METHODS: Cylindrical human proximal tibial cartilage-bone complex specimens from 31...... demonstrates that similar age-related trends were seen in cartilage and bone, as if they behaved as a single mechanical unit. RELEVANCE: The basic information presented here on the mechanical properties of cartilage and bone and the correlations between them reveals the unit function of both tissues...

  10. History matching of a complex epidemiological model of human immunodeficiency virus transmission by using variance emulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianakis, I; Vernon, I; McCreesh, N; McKinley, T J; Oakley, J E; Nsubuga, R N; Goldstein, M; White, R G

    2017-08-01

    Complex stochastic models are commonplace in epidemiology, but their utility depends on their calibration to empirical data. History matching is a (pre)calibration method that has been applied successfully to complex deterministic models. In this work, we adapt history matching to stochastic models, by emulating the variance in the model outputs, and therefore accounting for its dependence on the model's input values. The method proposed is applied to a real complex epidemiological model of human immunodeficiency virus in Uganda with 22 inputs and 18 outputs, and is found to increase the efficiency of history matching, requiring 70% of the time and 43% fewer simulator evaluations compared with a previous variant of the method. The insight gained into the structure of the human immunodeficiency virus model, and the constraints placed on it, are then discussed.

  11. Does Human Migration Affect International Trade? A Complex-Network Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiolo, Giorgio; Mastrorillo, Marina

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships between international human migration and merchandise trade using a complex-network approach. We firstly compare the topological structure of worldwide networks of human migration and bilateral trade over the period 1960–2000. Next, we ask whether pairs of countries that are more central in the migration network trade more. We show that: (i) the networks of international migration and trade are strongly correlated, and such correlation can be mostly explained by country economic/demographic size and geographical distance; (ii) centrality in the international-migration network boosts bilateral trade; (iii) intensive forms of country centrality are more trade enhancing than their extensive counterparts. Our findings suggest that bilateral trade between any two countries is not only affected by the presence of migrants from either countries, but also by their relative embeddedness in the complex web of corridors making up the network of international human migration. PMID:24828376

  12. Complex for monitoring visual acuity and its application for evaluation of human psycho-physiological state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokoumov, P. S.; Khabibullin, T. R.; Tolstaya, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The existing psychological theories associate the movement of a human eye with its reactions to external change: what we see, hear and feel. By analyzing the glance, we can compare the external human response (which shows the behavior of a person), and the natural reaction (that they actually feels). This article describes the complex for detection of visual activity and its application for evaluation of the psycho-physiological state of a person. The glasses with a camera capture all the movements of the human eye in real time. The data recorded by the camera are transmitted to the computer for processing implemented with the help of the software developed by the authors. The result is given in an informative and an understandable report, which can be used for further analysis. The complex shows a high efficiency and stable operation and can be used both, for the pedagogic personnel recruitment and for testing students during the educational process.

  13. Synthesis and PET studies of [11C-cyano]letrozole (Femara), an aromatase inhibitor drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    kil K. E.; Biegon A.; Kil, K.-E.; Biegon, A.; Ding, Y.-S.; Fischer, A.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Kim, S.-W.; Pareto, D.; Schueller, M.J.; Fowler, J.S.

    2008-11-10

    Aromatase, a member of the cytochrome P450 family, converts androgens such as androstenedione and testosterone to estrone and estradiol respectively. Letrozole (1-[bis-(4-cyanophenyl)methyl]-1H-1,2,4-triazole, Femara{reg_sign}) is a high affinity aromatase inhibitor (K{sub i}=11.5 nM) which has FDA approval for breast cancer treatment. Here we report the synthesis of carbon-11 labeled letrozole and its assessment as a radiotracer for brain aromatase in the baboon. Letrozole and its precursor (4-[(4-bromophenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl]benzonitrile, 3) were prepared in two-step syntheses from 4-cyanobenzyl bromide and 4-bromobenzyl bromide, respectively. The [{sup 11}C]cyano group was introduced via the tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0) catalyzed coupling of [{sup 11}C]cyanide with the bromo-precursor (3). PET studies in the baboon brain were carried out to assess regional distribution and kinetics, reproducibility of repeated measures and saturability. The free fraction of letrozole in the plasma, log D, and the [{sup 11}C-cyano]letrozole fraction in the arterial plasma were also measured. [{sup 11}C-cyano]Letrozole was synthesized in 60 min with a radiochemical yield of 79-80%, with a radiochemical purity greater than 98% and a specific activity of 4.16 {+-} 2.21 Ci/{micro}mol at the end of bombardment (n=4). PET studies in the baboon revealed initial rapid and high uptake and initial rapid clearance followed by slow clearance of carbon-11 from the brain with no difference between brain regions. The brain kinetics was not affected by co-injection of unlabeled letrozole (0.1 mg/kg). The free fraction of letrozole in plasma was 48.9% and log D was 1.84. [{sup 11}C-cyano]Letrozole is readily synthesized via a palladium catalyzed coupling reaction with [{sup 11}C]cyanide. Although it is unsuitable as a PET radiotracer for brain aromatase as revealed by the absence of regional specificity and saturability in brain regions, such as amygdala, which are known

  14. Synthesis and PET studies of [{sup 11}C-cyano]letrozole (Femara), an aromatase inhibitor drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Kun-Eek [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Biegon, Anat [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Ding, Yu-Shin [Department of Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8048 (United States); Fischer, Andre [Johannes-Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Organische Chemie, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Ferrieri, Richard A.; Kim, Sung Won; Pareto, Deborah; Schueller, Michael J. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fowler, Joanna S. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)], E-mail: fowler@bnl.gov

    2009-02-15

    Introduction: Aromatase, a member of the cytochrome P450 family, converts androgens such as androstenedione and testosterone into estrone and estradiol, respectively. Letrozole (1-[bis-(4-cyanophenyl)methyl]-1H-1,2,4-triazole; Femara) is a high-affinity aromatase inhibitor (K{sub i}=11.5 nM) that has Food and Drug Administration approval for breast cancer treatment. Here we report the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled letrozole and its assessment as a radiotracer for brain aromatase in the baboon. Methods: Letrozole and its precursor (4-[(4-bromophenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl]benzonitrile) were prepared in a two-step synthesis from 4-cyanobenzyl bromide and 4-bromobenzyl bromide, respectively. The [{sup 11}C]cyano group was introduced via tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0)-catalyzed coupling of [{sup 11}C]cyanide with the bromo precursor. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies in the baboon brain were carried out to assess regional distribution and kinetics, reproducibility of repeated measures and saturability. Log D, the free fraction of letrozole in plasma and the [{sup 11}C-cyano]letrozole fraction in arterial plasma were also measured. Results: [{sup 11}C-cyano]Letrozole was synthesized in 60 min with a radiochemical yield of 79-80%, with a radiochemical purity greater than 98% and a specific activity of 4.16{+-}2.21 Ci/{mu}mol at the end of bombardment (n=4). PET studies in the baboon revealed initial rapid and high uptake and initial rapid clearance, followed by slow clearance of carbon-11 from the brain, with no difference between brain regions. Brain kinetics was not affected by coinjection of unlabeled letrozole (0.1 mg/kg). The free fraction of letrozole in plasma was 48.9%, and log D was 1.84. Conclusion: [{sup 11}C-cyano]Letrozole is readily synthesized via a palladium-catalyzed coupling reaction with [{sup 11}C]cyanide. Although it is unsuitable as a PET radiotracer for brain aromatase, as revealed by the absence of regional specificity

  15. The Driving Forces of Cultural Complexity : Neanderthals, Modern Humans, and the Question of Population Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Laurel; Wakano, Joe Yuichiro; Feldman, Marcus W; Aoki, Kenichi

    2017-03-01

    The forces driving cultural accumulation in human populations, both modern and ancient, are hotly debated. Did genetic, demographic, or cognitive features of behaviorally modern humans (as opposed to, say, early modern humans or Neanderthals) allow culture to accumulate to its current, unprecedented levels of complexity? Theoretical explanations for patterns of accumulation often invoke demographic factors such as population size or density, whereas statistical analyses of variation in cultural complexity often point to the importance of environmental factors such as food stability, in determining cultural complexity. Here we use both an analytical model and an agent-based simulation model to show that a full understanding of the emergence of behavioral modernity, and the cultural evolution that has followed, depends on understanding and untangling the complex relationships among culture, genetically determined cognitive ability, and demographic history. For example, we show that a small but growing population could have a different number of cultural traits from a shrinking population with the same absolute number of individuals in some circumstances.

  16. Ontogeny of neuro-insular complexes and islets innervation in the human pancreas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E. Proshchina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ontogeny of the neuro-insular complexes (NIC and the islets innervation in human pancreas has not been studied in detail. Our aim was to describe the developmental dynamics and distribution of the nervous system structures in the endocrine part of human pancreas. We used doublestaining with antibodies specific to pan-neural markers (neuron-specific enolase (NSE and S100 protein and to hormones of pancreatic endocrine cells. NSE and S100-positive nerves and ganglia were identified in the human fetal pancreas from gestation week (gw 10 onwards. Later the density of S100 and NSE-positive fibers increased. In adults this network was sparse. The islets innervation started to form from gw 14. NSE-containing endocrine cells were identified from gw 12 onwards. Additionally, S100-positive cells were detected both in the periphery and within some of the islets starting at gw 14. The analysis of islets innervation has shown that the fetal pancreas contained neuro-insular complexes and the number of these complexes was reduced in adults. The highest density of neuro-insular complexes is detected during middle and late fetal periods, when the mosaic islets, typical for adults, form. The close integration between the developing pancreatic islets and the nervous system structures may play an important role not only in the hormone secretion, but also in the islets morphogenesis.

  17. Co-expression of estrogen receptor beta and aromatase in Japanese lung cancer patients: gender-dependent clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mohit Kumar; Miki, Yasuhiro; Abe, Keiko; Nagasaki, Shuji; Niikawa, Hiromichi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kondo, Takashi; Sasano, Hironobu

    2012-10-22

    The potential gender differences in lung cancer development have been proposed on the basis of hormonal actions. We aimed to evaluate whether estrogen receptors (ERs) in non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC) patients may primarily depend upon intratumoral estrogen produced via aromatase pathway. We evaluated ER beta (ERβ) and aromatase status in 169 Japanese NSCLC patients through immunohistochemistry analysis (IHC). Significance of IHC was further confirmed in NSCLC cell lines via in vitro assays. IHC analysis of NSCLC patients demonstrated that both ERβ and aromatase were highly co-expressed (p=0.032) in carcinoma cells. Overall survival in males was significantly worse than that in postmenopausal female among double positive NSCLC patients (p=0.010) but not in non-double positive patients. In addition, among double positive cases, overall survival of males was significantly worse than that of postmenopausal females in those with higher ERβ Allred score ≥5, (p=0.034), but not in those with lower ERβ Allred score=3-4. In-vitro analysis demonstrated aromatase activity on testosterone treatment, which resulted in in situ estrogen production (pblocker i.e. fulvestrant abrogated this effect, (p<0.0001). Our results suggest that co-expression of ERβ and aromatase in NSCLCs of Japanese males may result in tumor progression and potential endocrine therapy may confer therapeutic benefits to these patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. NEW BIOKERATOPROSTHETIC COMPLEX BASED ON MODIFIED ALLOGENIC DONOR CORNEAS AND CULTURED POSTNATAL HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Borzenok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to develop biokeratoprosthetic complex based on cross-linking modified allogenic donor corneas and cultured postnatal human skin fibroblasts. Cross-linking enhances corneal strength and tole- rance to proteolytic enzymes. Fibroblasts’ proliferation and migration in the intrastromal pocket stimulates fiber syncytium formation and collagen microcarriers integration into the corneal stroma, as well as intercellular ma- trix formation around the prosthetic metallic plate as early as the cocultivation stage. A new biokeratoprosthetic complex has been successfully developed for further in vivo studies. 

  19. Quantification of spatial structure of human proximal tibial bone biopsies using 3D measures of complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saparin, Peter I.; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Prohaska, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    3D data sets of human tibia bone biopsies acquired by a micro-CT scanner. In order to justify the newly proposed approach, the measures of complexity of the bone architecture were compared with the results of traditional 2D bone histomorphometry. The proposed technique is able to quantify......Changes in trabecular bone composition during development of osteoporosis are used as a model for bone loss in microgravity conditions during a space flight. Symbolic dynamics and measures of complexity are proposed and applied to assess quantitatively the structural composition of bone tissue from...

  20. Complex glycan catabolism by the human gut microbiota: the Bacteroidetes Sus-like paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Eric C; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Smith, Thomas J; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2009-09-11

    Trillions of microbes inhabit the distal gut of adult humans. They have evolved to compete efficiently for nutrients, including a wide array of chemically diverse, complex glycans present in our diets, secreted by our intestinal mucosa, and displayed on the surfaces of other gut microbes. Here, we review how members of the Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant gut-associated bacterial phyla, process complex glycans using a series of similarly patterned, cell envelope-associated multiprotein systems. These systems provide insights into how gut, as well as terrestrial and aquatic, Bacteroidetes survive in highly competitive ecosystems.

  1. Brain Aromatase: Dyed-in-the-Wool Homosexuality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morris, John A; Gobrogge, Kyle L; Jordan, Cynthia L; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2004-01-01

    ... (INAH3), which has a greater volume in men than in women (2). But there was no way to know which, if any, of these neural sexual dimorphisms were responsible for the robust human sex difference in sexual partner preference. Then in 1991, Simon LeVay (3) not only replicated the sex difference in human INAH3 but reported that the nucleus in homosexual men w...

  2. Potential effects of environmental contaminants on P450 aromatase activity and DNA damage in swallows from the Rio Grande and Somerville, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzlar, M.A.; Mora, M.A.; Fleming, J.G.W.; Bazer, F.W.; Bickham, J.W.; Matson, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and cave swallows (P. fulva) were sampled during the breeding season at several locations in the Rio Grande, Texas, to evaluate the potential effects of environmental contaminants on P450 aromatase activity in brain and gonads and DNA damage in blood cells. The tritiated water-release aromatase assay was used to measure aromatase activity and flow cytometry was used to measure DNA damage in nucleated blood cells. There were no significant differences in brain and gonadal aromatase activities or in estimates of DNA damage (HPCV values) among cave swallow colonies from the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) and Somerville. However, both brain and gonadal aromatase activities were significantly higher (P DNA damage estimates were significantly higher (P DNA damage in cliff swallows. We did not observe any differences in aromatase activity or DNA damage in cave swallows that could be associated with contaminant exposure. Also, the differences in aromatase activity and DNA damage between male cliff swallows from Laredo and Somerville could not be explained by contaminants measured at each site in previous studies. Our study provides baseline information on brain and gonadal aromatase activity in swallows that could be useful in future studies. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  3. Expression of P450 Aromatase in Granulosa Cell Tumors and Sertoli-Stromal Cell Tumors of the Ovary: Which Cells Are Responsible for Estrogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Noriko; Uchigasaki, Shinya; Fukase, Masayuki; Kurose, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors are representative of estrogenic ovarian tumors, and some Sertoli-stromal cell tumors are also estrogenic. The exact cells that are responsible for estrogenesis, however, have yet to be identified. In the present study, 25 sex cord-stromal tumors (20 granulosa cell tumors, 4 Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, and a Sertoli cell tumor) were immunohistochemically examined for expression of P450 aromatase, which is critical for estrogenesis. All of the tumors had been evaluated for estrogenic function, including contemporaneous endometrial hyperplasia and/or elevation of serum estradiol. Eleven of 14 estrogenic granulosa cell tumors showed sparse or aggregated immunoreactivity for aromatase, whereas 5 of 6 nonestrogenic tumors did not. Aromatase was selectively expressed by plump granulosa cells with eosinophilic or vacuolated cytoplasm, resembling luteinized granulosa cells. Such a localization of aromatase is analogous to that in normal ovaries. Aromatase expression in primary tumors was recapitulated by recurrent tumors. In Sertoli-stromal cell tumors, either undifferentiated plump cells or well-differentiated Sertoli cells expressed aromatase. In conclusion, the expression of P450 aromatase corresponds to specific cell morphology in sex cord-stromal tumors, including recurrent tumors. Aromatase status in granulosa cell tumors provides helpful information on whether serum estradiol could be a marker for recurrence.

  4. Brain aromatase (Cyp19A2) and estrogen receptors, in larvae and adult pejerrey fish Odontesthes bonariensis: Neuroanatomical and functional relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl-Mazzulla, P. H.; Lethimonier, C.; Gueguen, M.M.; Karube, M.; Fernandino, J.I.; Yoshizaki, G.; Patino, R.; Strussmann, C.A.; Kah, O.; Somoza, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Although estrogens exert many functions on vertebrate brains, there is little information on the relationship between brain aromatase and estrogen receptors. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of two estrogen receptors, ?? and ??, in pejerrey. Both receptors' mRNAs largely overlap and were predominantly expressed in the brain, pituitary, liver, and gonads. Also brain aromatase and estrogen receptors were up-regulated in the brain of estradiol-treated males. In situ hybridization was performed to study in more detail, the distribution of the two receptors in comparison with brain aromatase mRNA in the brain of adult pejerrey. The estrogen receptors' mRNAs exhibited distinct but partially overlapping patterns of expression in the preoptic area and the mediobasal hypothalamus, as well as in the pituitary gland. Moreover, the estrogen receptor ??, but not ??, were found to be expressed in cells lining the preoptic recess, similarly as observed for brain aromatase. Finally, it was shown that the onset expression of brain aromatase and both estrogen receptors in the head of larvae preceded the morphological differentiation of the gonads. Because pejerrey sex differentiation is strongly influenced by temperature, brain aromatase expression was measured during the temperature-sensitive window and was found to be significantly higher at male-promoting temperature. Taken together these results suggest close neuroanatomical and functional relationships between brain aromatase and estrogen receptors, probably involved in the sexual differentiation of the brain and raising interesting questions on the origin (central or peripheral) of the brain aromatase substrate. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  5. Genetic Alterations of δ-Catenin/NPRAP/Neurojungin (CTNND2): Functional Implications in Complex Human Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qun; Aguilar, Byron J.; Li, Mingchuan; Jiang, Yongguang; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Some genes involved in complex human diseases are particularly vulnerable to genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphism, copy number variations, and mutations. For example, Ras mutations account for over 30% of all human cancers. Additionally, there are some genes that can display different variations with functional impact in different diseases that are unrelated. One such gene stands out: δ-catenin/NPRAP/Neurojungin with gene designation as CTNND2 on chromosome 5p15.2. Recent advances in genome wide association as well as molecular biology approaches have uncovered striking involvement of δ-catenin gene variations linked to complex human disorders. These disorders include cancer, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism, Cri-du-chat syndrome, myopia, cortical cataract-linked Alzheimer’s disease, and infectious diseases. This list has rapidly grown longer in recent years, underscoring the pivotal roles of δ-catenin in critical human diseases. δ-Catenin is an adhesive junction-associated protein in the delta subfamily of the β-catenin superfamily. δ-Catenin functions in Wnt signaling to regulate gene expression and modulate Rho GTPases of the Ras superfamily in cytoskeletal reorganization. δ-Catenin likely lies where Wnt signaling meets Rho GTPases and is a unique and vulnerable common target for mutagenesis in different human diseases. PMID:27380241

  6. DNA methylation profiling of the human major histocompatibility complex: a pilot study for the human epigenome project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardhman K Rakyan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human Epigenome Project aims to identify, catalogue, and interpret genome-wide DNA methylation phenomena. Occurring naturally on cytosine bases at cytosine-guanine dinucleotides, DNA methylation is intimately involved in diverse biological processes and the aetiology of many diseases. Differentially methylated cytosines give rise to distinct profiles, thought to be specific for gene activity, tissue type, and disease state. The identification of such methylation variable positions will significantly improve our understanding of genome biology and our ability to diagnose disease. Here, we report the results of the pilot study for the Human Epigenome Project entailing the methylation analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex. This study involved the development of an integrated pipeline for high-throughput methylation analysis using bisulphite DNA sequencing, discovery of methylation variable positions, epigenotyping by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, and development of an integrated public database available at http://www.epigenome.org. Our analysis of DNA methylation levels within the major histocompatibility complex, including regulatory exonic and intronic regions associated with 90 genes in multiple tissues and individuals, reveals a bimodal distribution of methylation profiles (i.e., the vast majority of the analysed regions were either hypo- or hypermethylated, tissue specificity, inter-individual variation, and correlation with independent gene expression data.

  7. DNA Methylation Profiling of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex: A Pilot Study for the Human Epigenome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakyan, Vardhman K; Hildmann, Thomas; Novik, Karen L; Lewin, Jörn; Tost, Jörg; Cox, Antony V; Andrews, T. Dan; Howe, Kevin L; Otto, Thomas; Olek, Alexander; Fischer, Judith; Gut, Ivo G; Berlin, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    The Human Epigenome Project aims to identify, catalogue, and interpret genome-wide DNA methylation phenomena. Occurring naturally on cytosine bases at cytosine–guanine dinucleotides, DNA methylation is intimately involved in diverse biological processes and the aetiology of many diseases. Differentially methylated cytosines give rise to distinct profiles, thought to be specific for gene activity, tissue type, and disease state. The identification of such methylation variable positions will significantly improve our understanding of genome biology and our ability to diagnose disease. Here, we report the results of the pilot study for the Human Epigenome Project entailing the methylation analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex. This study involved the development of an integrated pipeline for high-throughput methylation analysis using bisulphite DNA sequencing, discovery of methylation variable positions, epigenotyping by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, and development of an integrated public database available at http://www.epigenome.org. Our analysis of DNA methylation levels within the major histocompatibility complex, including regulatory exonic and intronic regions associated with 90 genes in multiple tissues and individuals, reveals a bimodal distribution of methylation profiles (i.e., the vast majority of the analysed regions were either hypo- or hypermethylated), tissue specificity, inter-individual variation, and correlation with independent gene expression data. PMID:15550986

  8. Distinguishing humans from computers in the game of go: A complex network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquidé, C.; Georgeot, B.; Giraud, O.

    2017-08-01

    We compare complex networks built from the game of go and obtained from databases of human-played games with those obtained from computer-played games. Our investigations show that statistical features of the human-based networks and the computer-based networks differ, and that these differences can be statistically significant on a relatively small number of games using specific estimators. We show that the deterministic or stochastic nature of the computer algorithm playing the game can also be distinguished from these quantities. This can be seen as a tool to implement a Turing-like test for go simulators.

  9. Musculoskeletal modelling of human ankle complex: Estimation of ankle joint moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Tsoi, Yun Ho; Ghayesh, Mergen H; Xie, Sheng Quan

    2017-05-01

    A musculoskeletal model for the ankle complex is vital in order to enhance the understanding of neuro-mechanical control of ankle motions, diagnose ankle disorders and assess subsequent treatments. Motions at the human ankle and foot, however, are complex due to simultaneous movements at the two joints namely, the ankle joint and the subtalar joint. The musculoskeletal elements at the ankle complex, such as ligaments, muscles and tendons, have intricate arrangements and exhibit transient and nonlinear behaviour. This paper develops a musculoskeletal model of the ankle complex considering the biaxial ankle structure. The model provides estimates of overall mechanical characteristics (motion and moments) of ankle complex through consideration of forces applied along ligaments and muscle-tendon units. The dynamics of the ankle complex and its surrounding ligaments and muscle-tendon units is modelled and formulated into a state space model to facilitate simulations. A graphical user interface is also developed during this research in order to include the visual anatomical information by converting it to quantitative information on coordinates. Validation of the ankle model was carried out by comparing its outputs with those published in literature as well as with experimental data obtained from an existing parallel ankle rehabilitation robot. Qualitative agreement was observed between the model and measured data for both, the passive and active ankle motions during trials in terms of displacements and moments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A major prolactin-binding complex on human milk fat globule membranes contains cyclophilins A and B: the complex is not the prolactin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, Mary Y; Ueda, Eric K; Chen, KuanHui E; Walker, Ameae M

    2012-03-01

    Prolactin (PRL) in milk influences maturation of gastrointestinal epithelium and development of both the hypothalamo-pituitary and immune systems of offspring. Here, we demonstrate that most PRL in human milk is part of a novel, high-affinity, multicomponent binding complex found on the milk fat globule membrane and not in whey. To examine properties of the complex, a sensitive ELISA was developed such that human PRL (hPRL) binding to the complex was measured by loss of hPRL detectability; thus, as much as 50 ng of hPRL was undetectable in the presence of 10 μl of human milk. Using the same methodology, no comparable complex formation was observed with human serum or amniotic fluid. hPRL complexation in milk was rapid, time dependent, and cooperative. Antibodies to or competitors of the hPRL receptor (placental lactogen and growth hormone) showed the hPRL receptor was not involved in the complex. However, hPRL complexation was antagonized by cyclosporine A and anti-cyclophilins. The complex was very stable, resisting dissociation in SDS, urea, and dithiothreitol. Western analysis revealed an ∼75-kDa complex that included hPRL, cyclophilins A and B, and a 16-kDa cyclophilin A. Compared with noncomplexed hPRL, complexed hPRL in whole milk showed similar activation of STAT5 but markedly delayed activation of ERK. Alteration of signaling suggests that complex formation may alter hPRL biological activity. This is the first report of a unique, multicomponent, high-capacity milk fat reservoir of hPRL; all other analyses of milk PRL have utilized defatted milk.

  11. In vitro production and characterization of partly assembled human CD3 complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J; Pedersen, L Ø; Dietrich, J

    2002-01-01

    Pairwise assembly of human CD3 chains takes place in the endoplasmic reticulum of T cells. Subsequently, the CD3 heterodimers form complexes with Ti alpha and Tiss chains forming hexameric Ti alpha beta CD3 gamma epsilon delta epsilon complexes. Finally, association with the zeta 2 homodimer occurs...... in Golgi apparatus before the fully assembled T-cell receptor is transported to the cell surface. To study the structural properties of the human CD3 chains, we have developed new methods to produce and fold the extracellular domains of CD3 gamma, CD3 delta and CD3 epsilon. Proteins were expressed...... in Escherichia coli as denatured chains and de novo folded in vitro. CD3 gamma and CD3 epsilon folded as soluble monomers, whereas CD3 delta did not yield any soluble proteins. When folding the chains pairwise, soluble CD3 gamma epsilon and CD3 delta epsilon heterodimers could be isolated, whereas CD3 gamma...

  12. Better decision making in complex, dynamic tasks training with human-facilitated interactive learning environments

    CERN Document Server

    Qudrat-Ullah, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes interactive learning environments (ILEs) and their underlying concepts. It explains how ILEs can be used to improve the decision-making process and how these improvements can be empirically verified. The objective of this book is to enhance our understanding of and to gain insights into the process by which human facilitated ILEs are effectively designed and used in improving users’ decision making in complex, dynamic tasks. This book is divided into four major parts. Part I serves as an introduction to the importance and complexity of decision making in dynamic tasks. Part II provides background material, drawing upon relevant literature, for the development of an integrated process model on the effectiveness of human facilitated ILEs in improving decision making in dynamic tasks. Part III focuses on the design, development, and application of FishBankILE in laboratory experiments to gather empirical evidence for the validity of the process model. Finally, part IV presents a comprehensi...

  13. Human topoisomerase IB is a target of a thiosemicarbazone copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutey, Venn; Castelli, Silvia; D'Annessa, Ilda; Sâmia, Luciana B P; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Beraldo, Heloisa; Desideri, Alessandro

    2016-09-15

    The human topoisomerase IB inhibition and the antiproliferative activity of 3-(4-bromophenyl)-1-pyridin-2-ylprop-2-en-1-one thiosemicarbazone HPyCT4BrPh alone and its copper(II) complex [Cu(PyCT4BrPh)Cl] was investigated. [Cu(PyCT4BrPh)Cl] inhibits both the DNA cleavage and religation step of the enzyme, whilst the ligand alone does not display any effect. In addition we show that coordination to copper(II) improves the cytotoxicity of HPyCT4BrPh against THP-1 leukemia and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The data indicate that the copper(II) thiosemicarbazone complex may hit human topoisomerase IB and that metal coordination can be useful to improve cytotoxicity of this versatile class of compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Purification and preliminary characterization of the glycoprotein Ib complex in the human platelet membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, M C; Gregory, C; Kabral, A; Zola, H; Fournier, D; Castaldi, P A

    1985-09-16

    Human platelet glycoprotein Ib (GP Ib) is a major integral membrane protein that has been identified as the platelet-binding site mediating the factor VIII/von Willebrand-factor-dependent adhesion of platelets to vascular subendothelium. Recent evidence suggests that GP Ib is normally complexed with another platelet membrane protein, GP IX. In this study, human platelet plasma membranes were selectively solubilized with a buffer containing 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100. The GP Ib complex (GP Ib plus GP IX) was purified to homogeneity in approximately 30% yield by immunoaffinity chromatography of the membrane extract using the anti-(glycoprotein Ib complex) murine monoclonal antibody, WM 23, coupled to agarose. GP Ib and GP IX were subsequently isolated as purified components by immunoaffinity chromatography of the GP Ib complex using a second anti-(glycoprotein Ib complex) monoclonal antibody, FMC 25, coupled to agarose. As assessed by dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, purified GP Ib was identical to the molecule on intact platelets and had an apparent relative molecular mass of 170 000 under nonreducing conditions and 135 000 (alpha subunit) and 25 000 (beta subunit) under reducing conditions. GP IX had an apparent Mr of 22 000 under both nonreducing and reducing conditions. Purified Gb Ib complex and GP Ib inhibited the ristocetin-mediated, human factor VIII/von Willebrand-factor-dependent and bovine factor VIII/von Willebrand-factor-dependent agglutination of washed human platelets suggesting the proteins had been isolated in functionally active form. GP Ib alpha had a similar amino acid composition to that previously reported for its proteolytic degradation product, glycocalicin. The amino acid compositions of GP Ib beta and GP IX were similar but showed marked differences in the levels of glutamic acid, alanine, histidine and arginine. The N-termini of GP Ib alpha and GP IX were blocked; GP Ib beta had the N-terminal sequence, Ile-Pro-Ala-Pro-. On

  15. Very stable high molecular mass multiprotein complex with DNase and amylase activities in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleva, Svetlana E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Verkhovod, Timofey D; Buneva, Valentina N; Sedykh, Sergey E; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-01-01

    For breastfed infants, human milk is more than a source of nutrients; it furnishes a wide array of proteins, peptides, antibodies, and other components promoting neonatal growth and protecting infants from viral and bacterial infection. It has been proposed that most biological processes are performed by protein complexes. Therefore, identification and characterization of human milk components including protein complexes is important for understanding the function of milk. Using gel filtration, we have purified a stable high molecular mass (~1000 kDa) multiprotein complex (SPC) from 15 preparations of human milk. Light scattering and gel filtration showed that the SPC was stable in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl and MgCl2 but dissociated efficiently under the conditions that destroy immunocomplexes (2 M MgCl2 , 0.5 M NaCl, and 10 mM DTT). Such a stable complex is unlikely to be a casual associate of different proteins. The relative content of the individual SPCs varied from 6% to 25% of the total milk protein. According to electrophoretic and mass spectrometry analysis, all 15 SPCs contained lactoferrin (LF) and α-lactalbumin as major proteins, whereas human milk albumin and β-casein were present in moderate or minor amounts; a different content of IgGs and sIgAs was observed. All SPCs efficiently hydrolyzed Plasmid supercoiled DNA and maltoheptaose. Some freshly prepared SPC preparations contained not only intact LF but also small amounts of its fragments, which appeared in all SPCs during their prolonged storage; the fragments, similar to intact LF, possessed DNase and amylase activities. LF is found in human epithelial secretions, barrier body fluids, and in the secondary granules of leukocytes. LF is a protein of the acute phase response and nonspecific defense against different types of microbial and viral infections. Therefore, LF complexes with other proteins may be important for its functions not only in human milk. Copyright © 2014

  16. Investigation into transmission of complex sound signals in the human respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenbaum, V. I.; Nuzhdenko, A. V.; Tagiltsev, A. A.; Kostiv, A. E.

    2010-07-01

    Lumen probing of human lungs with complex acoustic signals in the frequency band from 100 to 1000 Hz made it possible for the first time to explicitly confirm the concurrent existence of two mechanisms differing in propagation velocity behind the transmission of acoustic vibrations from the oral cavity to the thoracic cage surface. The numerical values of propagation time lags allowed one of these mechanisms to be associated with combined aerial-structural transmission and the other, with purely structural transmission.

  17. Visual learning shapes the processing of complex movement stimuli in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastorff, Jan; Kourtzi, Zoe; Giese, Martin A

    2009-11-04

    Recognition of actions and complex movements is fundamental for social interactions and action understanding. While the relationship between motor expertise and visual recognition of body movements has received a vast amount of interest, the role of visual learning remains largely unexplored. Combining psychophysics and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments, we investigated neural correlates of visual learning of complex movements. Subjects were trained to visually discriminate between very similar complex movement stimuli generated by motion morphing that were either compatible (experiments 1 and 2) or incompatible (experiment 3) with human movement execution. Employing an fMRI adaptation paradigm as index of discriminability, we scanned human subjects before and after discrimination training. The results of experiment 1 revealed three different effects as a consequence of training: (1) Emerging fMRI-selective adaptation in general motion-related areas (hMT/V5+, KO/V3b) for the differences between human-like movements. (2) Enhanced of fMRI-selective adaptation already present before training in biological motion-related areas (pSTS, FBA). (3) Changes covarying with task difficulty in frontal areas. Moreover, the observed activity changes were specific to the trained movement patterns (experiment 2). The results of experiment 3, testing artificial movement stimuli, were strikingly similar to the results obtained for human movements. General and biological motion-related areas showed movement-specific changes in fMRI-selective adaptation for the differences between the stimuli after training. These results support the existence of a powerful visual machinery for the learning of complex motion patterns that is independent of motor execution. We thus propose a key role of visual learning in action recognition.

  18. The mouse as a model for human biology: a resource guide for complex trait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Luanne L; Robledo, Raymond F; Bult, Carol J; Churchill, Gary A; Paigen, Beverly J; Svenson, Karen L

    2007-01-01

    The mouse has been a powerful force in elucidating the genetic basis of human physiology and pathophysiology. From its beginnings as the model organism for cancer research and transplantation biology to the present, when dissection of the genetic basis of complex disease is at the forefront of genomics research, an enormous and remarkable mouse resource infrastructure has accumulated. This review summarizes those resources and provides practical guidelines for their use, particularly in the analysis of quantitative traits.

  19. Saving Human Lives: What Complexity Science and Information Systems can Contribute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbing, Dirk; Brockmann, Dirk; Chadefaux, Thomas; Donnay, Karsten; Blanke, Ulf; Woolley-Meza, Olivia; Moussaid, Mehdi; Johansson, Anders; Krause, Jens; Schutte, Sebastian; Perc, Matjaž

    We discuss models and data of crowd disasters, crime, terrorism, war and disease spreading to show that conventional recipes, such as deterrence strategies, are often not effective and sufficient to contain them. Many common approaches do not provide a good picture of the actual system behavior, because they neglect feedback loops, instabilities and cascade effects. The complex and often counter-intuitive behavior of social systems and their macro-level collective dynamics can be better understood by means of complexity science. We highlight that a suitable system design and management can help to stop undesirable cascade effects and to enable favorable kinds of self-organization in the system. In such a way, complexity science can help to save human lives.

  20. Single-molecule imaging of telomerase reverse transcriptase in human telomerase holoenzyme and minimal RNP complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Robert Alexander; Dagdas, Yavuz S; Yilmaz, S Tunc; Yildiz, Ahmet; Collins, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase synthesizes chromosome-capping telomeric repeats using an active site in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and an integral RNA subunit template. The fundamental question of whether human telomerase catalytic activity requires cooperation across two TERT subunits remains under debate. In this study, we describe new approaches of subunit labeling for single-molecule imaging, applied to determine the TERT content of complexes assembled in cells or cell extract. Surprisingly, telomerase reconstitutions yielded heterogeneous DNA-bound TERT monomer and dimer complexes in relative amounts that varied with assembly and purification method. Among the complexes, cellular holoenzyme and minimal recombinant enzyme monomeric for TERT had catalytic activity. Dimerization was suppressed by removing a TERT domain linker with atypical sequence bias, which did not inhibit cellular or minimal enzyme assembly or activity. Overall, this work defines human telomerase DNA binding and synthesis properties at single-molecule level and establishes conserved telomerase subunit architecture from single-celled organisms to humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08363.001 PMID:26457608

  1. Crystal structure of human heme oxygenase-1 in a complex with biliverdin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Latesh; Friedman, Jonathan; Li, Huying; Bhaskar, B; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R; Poulos, Thomas L

    2004-04-06

    Heme oxygenase oxidatively cleaves heme to biliverdin, leading to the release of iron and CO through a process in which the heme participates both as a cofactor and as a substrate. Here we report the crystal structure of the product, iron-free biliverdin, in a complex with human HO-1 at 2.19 A. Structural comparisons of the human biliverdin-HO-1 structure with its heme complex and the recently published rat HO-1 structure in a complex with the biliverdin-iron chelate [Sugishima, M., Sakamoto, H., Higashimoto, Y., Noguchi, M., and Fukuyama, K. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 32352-32358] show two major differences. First, in the absence of an Fe-His bond and solvent structure in the active site, the distal and proximal helices relax and adopt an "open" conformation which most likely encourages biliverdin release. Second, iron-free biliverdin occupies a different position and orientation relative to heme and the biliverdin-iron complex. Biliverdin adopts a more linear conformation and moves from the heme site to an internal cavity. These structural results provide insight into the rate-limiting step in HO-1 catalysis, which is product, biliverdin, release.

  2. MEASURING THE INFLUENCE OF TASK COMPLEXITY ON HUMAN ERROR PROBABILITY: AN EMPIRICAL EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCA PODOFILLINI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A key input for the assessment of Human Error Probabilities (HEPs with Human Reliability Analysis (HRA methods is the evaluation of the factors influencing the human performance (often referred to as Performance Shaping Factors, PSFs. In general, the definition of these factors and the supporting guidance are such that their evaluation involves significant subjectivity. This affects the repeatability of HRA results as well as the collection of HRA data for model construction and verification. In this context, the present paper considers the TAsk COMplexity (TACOM measure, developed by one of the authors to quantify the complexity of procedure-guided tasks (by the operating crew of nuclear power plants in emergency situations, and evaluates its use to represent (objectively and quantitatively task complexity issues relevant to HRA methods. In particular, TACOM scores are calculated for five Human Failure Events (HFEs for which empirical evidence on the HEPs (albeit with large uncertainty and influencing factors are available – from the International HRA Empirical Study. The empirical evaluation has shown promising results. The TACOM score increases as the empirical HEP of the selected HFEs increases. Except for one case, TACOM scores are well distinguished if related to different difficulty categories (e.g., “easy” vs. “somewhat difficult”, while values corresponding to tasks within the same category are very close. Despite some important limitations related to the small number of HFEs investigated and the large uncertainty in their HEPs, this paper presents one of few attempts to empirically study the effect of a performance shaping factor on the human error probability. This type of study is important to enhance the empirical basis of HRA methods, to make sure that 1 the definitions of the PSFs cover the influences important for HRA (i.e., influencing the error probability, and 2 the quantitative relationships among PSFs and error

  3. Neurochemical dynamics of acute orofacial pain in the human trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Nuno M P; Hock, Andreas; Wyss, Michael; Ettlin, Dominik A; Brügger, Mike

    2017-09-04

    The trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex is the first central relay structure mediating orofacial somatosensory and nociceptive perception. Animal studies suggest a substantial involvement of neurochemical alterations at such basal CNS levels in acute and chronic pain processing. Translating this animal based knowledge to humans is challenging. Human related examining of brainstem functions are challenged by MR related peculiarities as well as applicability aspects of experimentally standardized paradigms. Based on our experience with an MR compatible human orofacial pain model, the aims of the present study were twofold: 1) from a technical perspective, the evaluation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T regarding measurement accuracy of neurochemical profiles in this small brainstem nuclear complex and 2) the examination of possible neurochemical alterations induced by an experimental orofacial pain model. Data from 13 healthy volunteers aged 19-46 years were analyzed and revealed high quality spectra with significant reductions in total N-acetylaspartate (N-acetylaspartate + N-acetylaspartylglutamate) (-3.7%, p = 0.009) and GABA (-10.88%, p = 0.041) during the pain condition. These results might reflect contributions of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate in neuronal activity-dependent physiologic processes and/or excitatory neurotransmission, whereas changes in GABA might indicate towards a reduction in tonic GABAergic functioning during nociceptive signaling. Summarized, the present study indicates the applicability of (1)H-MRS to obtain neurochemical dynamics within the human trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. Further developments are needed to pave the way towards bridging important animal based knowledge with human research to understand the neurochemistry of orofacial nociception and pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular profiling of aromatase inhibitor-treated postmenopausal breast tumors identifies immune-related correlates of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbier, Anita K; Ghazoui, Zara; Anderson, Helen; Salter, Janine; Nerurkar, Ashutosh; Osin, Peter; A'hern, Roger; Miller, William R; Smith, Ian E; Dowsett, Mitch

    2013-05-15

    Estrogen withdrawal by treatment with aromatase inhibitors is the most effective form of endocrine therapy for postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. However, response to therapy varies markedly and understanding of the precise molecular effects of aromatase inhibitors and causes of resistance is limited. We aimed to identify in clinical breast cancer those genes and pathways most associated with resistance to aromatase inhibitors by examining the global transcriptional effects of AI treatment. Baseline and 2-week posttreatment biopsies were obtained from 112 postmenopausal women with ER+ breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant anastrozole. Gene expression data were obtained from 81 baseline and 2-week paired samples. Pathway analysis identified (i) the most prevalent changes in expression and (ii) the pretreatment genes/pathways most related to poor antiproliferative response. A total of 1,327 genes were differentially expressed after 2-week treatment (false discovery rate < 0.01). Proliferation-associated genes and classical estrogen-dependent genes were strongly downregulated whereas collagens and chemokines were upregulated. Pretreatment expression of an inflammatory signature correlated with antiproliferative response to anastrozole and this observation was validated in an independent study. Higher expression of immune-related genes such as SLAMF8 and TNF as well as lymphocytic infiltration were associated with poorer response (P < 0.001) and validated in an independent cohort. The molecular response to aromatase inhibitor treatment varies greatly between patients consistent with the variable clinical benefit from aromatase inhibitor treatment. Higher baseline expression of an inflammatory signature is associated with poor antiproliferative response and should be assessed further as a novel biomarker and potential target for aromatase inhibitor-treated patients. ©2013 AACR

  5. New Insights Into the Role of Estrogens in Male Fertility Based on Findings in Aromatase-Deficient Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haipei; Chen, Yu; Liu, Yun; Yin, Yike; Li, Gaofei; Guo, Yin; Liu, Xiaochun; Lin, Haoran

    2017-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that estrogens are indispensable for male fertility in mammals. Aromatase (encoded by CYP19) catalyzes the final step of estradiol biosynthesis. However, less is known about the role of aromatase in male fertility in nonmammalian species. Fish aromatase is encoded by two separate genes: the gonad-specific cyp19a1a and the brain-specific cyp19a1b. In a recent study, we used transcription activatorlike effector nucleases to systematically generate cyp19a1a and cyp19a1b mutant lines and a cyp19a1a;cyp19a1b double-mutant line in zebrafish and demonstrated that cyp19a1a was indispensable for sex differentiation. In this study, we focused on male fertility in these aromatase-deficient zebrafish. Our results showed that all aromatase-deficient male fish had normal fertility even at 1 year after fertilization. Interestingly, we observed more spermatozoa in the cyp19a1a and double-mutant males than in the wild-type and cyp19a1b mutant males. The whole-body androgen levels, follicle-stimulating hormone β and luteinizing hormone β protein levels in the pituitary, and transcript levels of genes known to be involved in spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in the testes were significantly higher in the cyp19a1a mutant and aromatase double-mutant males than in the wild-type and cyp19a1b mutant males. These results might explain why more spermatozoa were observed in these fish. Collectively, our findings indicate that estrogens are not needed to achieve and maintain normal fertility in male zebrafish. This finding challenges the traditional view that estrogens are indispensable for male fertility. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  6. Cellular Expression of Cyclooxygenase, Aromatase, Adipokines, Inflammation and Cell Proliferation Markers in Breast Cancer Specimen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Basu

    Full Text Available Current evidences suggest that expression of Ki67, cyclooxygenase (COX, aromatase, adipokines, prostaglandins, free radicals, β-catenin and α-SMA might be involved in breast cancer pathogenesis. The main objective of this study was to compare expression/localization of these potential compounds in breast cancer tissues with tissues collected adjacent to the tumor using immunohistochemistry and correlated with clinical pathology. The breast cancer specimens were collected from 30 women aged between 49 and 89 years who underwent breast surgery following cancer diagnosis. Expression levels of molecules by different stainings were graded as a score on a scale based upon staining intensity and proportion of positive cells/area or individually. AdipoR1, adiponectin, Ob-R, leptin, COX-1, COX-2, aromatase, PGF2α, F2-isoprostanes and α-SMA were localised on higher levels in the breast tissues adjacent to the tumor compared to tumor specimens when considering either score or staining area whereas COX-2 and AdipoR2 were found to be higher considering staining intensity and Ki67 on score level in the tumor tissue. There was no significant difference observed on β-catenin either on score nor on staining area and intensity between tissues adjacent to the tumor and tumor tissues. A positive correlation was found between COX-1 and COX-2 in the tumor tissues. In conclusion, these suggest that Ki67, COXs, aromatase, prostaglandin, free radicals, adipokines, β-catenin and α-SMA are involved in breast cancer. These further focus the need of examination of tissues adjacent to tumor, tumor itself and compare them with normal or benign breast tissues for a better understanding of breast cancer pathology and future evaluation of therapeutic benefit.

  7. Aromatase (CYP19) promoter gene polymorphism and risk of nonviral hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Wang, Renwei; Govindarajan, Sugantha; Oppenheimer, Rowena; Zhang, Zhen Quan; Yu, Mimi C; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2011-08-01

    Experimental studies suggest that sex hormones may induce or promote the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Androgens are converted to estrogens by the CYP19 gene product, aromatase. Hepatic aromatase level and activity have been shown to be markedly elevated in HCC. Aromatase expression in liver tumors is driven by a promoter upstream of CYP19 exon I.6. First, the authors identified an A/C polymorphism in the exon I.6 promoter of the CYP19 gene. To determine whether allelic variants in the CYP19 I.6 promoter differ in their ability to drive gene expression, we carried out an in vitro reporter gene assay. Then, the authors studied the association between this polymorphism and HCC risk in 2 complementary case-control studies: 1 in high-risk southern Guangxi, China, and another in low-risk US non-Asians of Los Angeles County. Transcriptional activity was 60% higher for promoter vectors carrying the rs10459592 C allele compared with those carrying an A allele (P = .007). In both study populations, among subjects negative for at-risk serologic markers of hepatitis B or C, there was a dose-dependent association between number of high activity C allele and risk of HCC (P(trend) = .014). Risk of HCC was significantly higher (odds ratio [OR], 2.25; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18-4.31) in subjects homozygous for the C allele compared with those homozygous for the A allele. This study provides epidemiologic evidence for the role of hepatic aromatization of androgen into estrogen in the development of nonviral hepatitis-related HCC. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  8. Organizing effects of sex steroids on brain aromatase activity in quail.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte A Cornil

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Preoptic/hypothalamic aromatase activity (AA is sexually differentiated in birds and mammals but the mechanisms controlling this sex difference remain unclear. We determined here (1 brain sites where AA is sexually differentiated and (2 whether this sex difference results from organizing effects of estrogens during ontogeny or activating effects of testosterone in adulthood. In the first experiment we measured AA in brain regions micropunched in adult male and female Japanese quail utilizing the novel strategy of basing the microdissections on the distribution of aromatase-immunoreactive cells. The largest sex difference was found in the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (mBST followed by the medial preoptic nucleus (POM and the tuberal hypothalamic region. A second experiment tested the effect of embryonic treatments known to sex-reverse male copulatory behavior (i.e., estradiol benzoate [EB] or the aromatase inhibitor, Vorozole on brain AA in gonadectomized adult males and females chronically treated as adults with testosterone. Embryonic EB demasculinized male copulatory behavior, while vorozole blocked demasculinization of behavior in females as previously demonstrated in birds. Interestingly, these treatments did not affect a measure of appetitive sexual behavior. In parallel, embryonic vorozole increased, while EB decreased AA in pooled POM and mBST, but the same effect was observed in both sexes. Together, these data indicate that the early action of estrogens demasculinizes AA. However, this organizational action of estrogens on AA does not explain the behavioral sex difference in copulatory behavior since AA is similar in testosterone-treated males and females that were or were not exposed to embryonic treatments with estrogens.

  9. The nasal complex of Neanderthals: an entry portal to their place in human ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Samuel; Pagano, Anthony S; Delson, Eric; Lawson, William; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2014-11-01

    Neanderthals are one of the most intensely studied groups of extinct humans, as aspects of their phylogeny and functional morphology remain controversial. They have long been described as cold adapted but recent analyses of their nasal anatomy suggest that traits formerly considered adaptations may be the result of genetic drift. This study performs quantitative and qualitative analysis of aspects of the nasal complex (NC) in Neanderthals and other later Pleistocene fossils from Europe and Africa. A geographically diverse sample of modern human crania was used to establish an anatomical baseline for populations inhabiting cold and tropical climates. Nasofrontal angle, piriform aperture dimensions, and relative maxillary sinus volume were analyzed along with qualitative features of the piriform aperture rim. Results indicate that Neanderthals and other later Pleistocene Homo possessed NC's that align them with tropical modern humans. Thus comparison of Neanderthal nasal morphology with that of modern humans from cold climates may not be appropriate as differences in overall craniofacial architecture may constrain the narrowing of the piriform apertures in Neanderthals. They retain primitively long, low crania, large maxillary sinuses, and large piriform aperture area similar to mid-Pleistocene Homo specimens such as Petralona 1 and Kabwe 1. Adaptation to cold climate may have necessitated other adaptations such as bony medial projections at the piriform aperture rim and, potentially, midfacial prognathism. Nasal complex components of the upper respiratory tract remain a critical but poorly understood area that may yet offer novel insight into one of the greatest continuing controversies in paleoanthropology. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. [The evolution of human cultural behavior: notes on Darwinism and complexity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric, Mikael; Murrieta, Rui Sérgio Sereni

    2015-12-01

    The article analyzes three schools that can be understood as central in studies of the evolution of human behavior within the paradigm of evolution by natural selection: human behavioral ecology (HBE), evolutionary psychology, and dual inheritance. These three streams of thought are used to depict the Darwinist landscape and pinpoint its strong suits and limitations. Theoretical gaps were identified that seem to reduce these schools' ability to account for the diversity of human evolutionary behavior. Their weak points include issues related to the concept of reproductive success, types of adaptation, and targets of selection. An interdisciplinary approach is proposed as the solution to this dilemma, where complex adaptive systems would serve as a source.

  11. Humans with chimpanzee-like major histocompatibility complex-specificities control HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Kesmir, Can; Lund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Background: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules allow immune surveillance by presenting a snapshot of the intracellular state of a cell to circulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The MHC class I alleles of an HIV-1 infected individual strongly influence the level of viremia...... and the progression rate to AIDS. Chimpanzees control HIV-1 viral replication and develop a chronic infection without progressing to AIDS. A similar course of disease is observed in human long-term non-progressors. Objective: To investigate if long-term non-progressors and chimpanzees have functional similarities...... in their MHC class I repertoire. Methods: We compared the specificity of groups of human MHC molecules associated with different levels of viremia in HIV-1 infected individuals with those of chimpanzee. Results and conclusion: We demonstrate that human MHC with control of HIV-1 viral load share binding motifs...

  12. Disseminated blue naevus and malignant blue naevus associated with excessive aromatase syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, A Z C; Martin, R M; Belda, W; Michi, M M; Arnone, M; Festa-Neo, C; Sotto, M N; Vilela, M A C; Sanches, J A

    2008-08-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who had a giant congenital blue naevus with multiple satellite pigmented lesions. Later the patient developed melanoma arising in the pre-existing lesion. He also had gynaecomastia and was diagnosed as having aromatase excess syndrome. To our knowledge, the association of these two rare conditions has not been previously reported. Further studies should be performed to investigate this unusual combination, which may have a genetic, endocrine or local cutaneous link leading to its occurrence.

  13. Short Stature in Chronic Kidney Disease Treated with Growth Hormone and an Aromatase Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan R. Mendley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an alternative strategy for management of severe growth failure in a 14-year-old child who presented with advanced chronic kidney disease close to puberty. The patient was initially treated with growth hormone for a year until kidney transplantation, followed immediately by a year-long course of an aromatase inhibitor, anastrozole, to prevent epiphyseal fusion and prolong the period of linear growth. Outcome was excellent, with successful transplant and anticipated complete correction of height deficit. This strategy may be appropriate for children with chronic kidney disease and short stature who are in puberty.

  14. Erythema multiforme after radiotherapy with aromatase inhibitor administration in breast-conservation treatment for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Kimiko; Matsumoto, Masaaki; Ue, Hironobu; Nishioka, Akihito; Tanaka, Yousuke; Kodama, Hajime; Sasaguri, Shiro; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Generalized eruptions associated with radiotherapy such as erythema multiforme (EM), Steven-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are uncommon reactions. A few cases of generalized eruptions during and after radiotherapy have been reported with the use of anticonvulsants and anticancer drugs. However, no reports have described mucocutaneous reactions associated with radiotherapy and concurrent use of anastrozole, an aromatase inhibitor. This report describes EM occurring after radiotherapy performed during breast-conserving treatment for breast cancer in a patient who was taking oral anastrozole.

  15. Sex-Dependent Regulation of Aromatase-Mediated Synaptic Plasticity in the Basolateral Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Roland A; Zhou, Lepu; Vierk, Ricardo; Brandt, Nicola; Keller, Alexander; Gee, Christine E; Schäfer, Michael K E; Rune, Gabriele M

    2017-02-08

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) integrates sensory input from cortical and subcortical regions, a function that requires marked synaptic plasticity. Here we provide evidence that cytochrome P450 aromatase (AROM), the enzyme converting testosterone to 17β-estradiol (E2), contributes to the regulation of this plasticity in a sex-specific manner. We show that AROM is expressed in the BLA, particularly in the basolateral nucleus (BL), in male and female rodents. Systemic administration of the AROM inhibitor letrozole reduced spine synapse density in the BL of adult female mice but not in the BL of male mice. Similarly, in organotypic corticoamygdalar slice cultures from immature rats, treatment with letrozole significantly reduced spine synapses in the BL only in cultures derived from females. In addition, letrozole sex-specifically altered synaptic properties in the BL: in acute slices from juvenile (prepubertal) female rats, wash-in of letrozole virtually abolished long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas it did not prevent the generation of LTP in the slices from males. Together, these data indicate that neuron-derived E2 modulates synaptic plasticity in rodent BLA sex-dependently. As protein expression levels of AROM, estrogen and androgen receptors did not differ between males and females and were not sex-specifically altered by letrozole, the findings suggest sex-specific mechanisms of E2 signaling. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is a key structure of the fear circuit. This research reveals a sexually dimorphic regulation of synaptic plasticity in the BLA involving neuronal aromatase, which produces the neurosteroid 17β-estradiol (E2). As male and female neurons in rodent BLA responded differently to aromatase inhibition both in vivo and in vitro , our findings suggest that E2 signaling in BLA neurons is regulated sex-dependently, presumably via mechanisms that have been established during sexual determination. These findings could be

  16. Structural characterization of the NAP; the major adhesion complex of the human pathogen Mycoplasma genitalium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Margot P; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Luis; Seybert, Anja; Ratera, Mercè; Kunz, Michael; Valpuesta, José M; Fita, Ignacio; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Frangakis, Achilleas S

    2017-09-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium, the causative agent of non-gonococcal urethritis and pelvic inflammatory disease in humans, is a small eubacterium that lacks a peptidoglycan cell wall. On the surface of its plasma membrane is the major surface adhesion complex, known as NAP that is essential for adhesion and gliding motility of the organism. Here, we have performed cryo-electron tomography of intact cells and detergent permeabilized M. genitalium cell aggregates, providing sub-tomogram averages of free and cell-attached NAPs respectively, revealing a tetrameric complex with two-fold rotational (C2) symmetry. Each NAP has two pairs of globular lobes (named α and β lobes), arranged as a dimer of heterodimers with each lobe connected by a stalk to the cell membrane. The β lobes are larger than the α lobes by 20%. Classification of NAPs showed that the complex can tilt with respect to the cell membrane. A protein complex containing exclusively the proteins P140 and P110, was purified from M. genitalium and was structurally characterized by negative-stain single particle EM reconstruction. The close structural similarity found between intact NAPs and the isolated P140/P110 complexes, shows that dimers of P140/P110 heterodimers are the only components of the extracellular region of intact NAPs in M. genitalium. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Structure of the active form of human origin recognition complex and its ATPase motor module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocilj, Ante; On, Kin Fan; Yuan, Zuanning; Sun, Jingchuan; Elkayam, Elad; Li, Huilin; Stillman, Bruce; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2017-01-23

    Binding of the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) to origins of replication marks the first step in the initiation of replication of the genome in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the structure of the active form of human ORC determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. The complex is composed of an ORC1/4/5 motor module lobe in an organization reminiscent of the DNA polymerase clamp loader complexes. A second lobe contains the ORC2/3 subunits. The complex is organized as a double-layered shallow corkscrew, with the AAA+ and AAA+-like domains forming one layer, and the winged-helix domains (WHDs) forming a top layer. CDC6 fits easily between ORC1 and ORC2, completing the ring and the DNA-binding channel, forming an additional ATP hydrolysis site. Analysis of the ATPase activity of the complex provides a basis for understanding ORC activity as well as molecular defects observed in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome mutations.

  18. Complexity in neurobiology: perspectives from the study of noise in human motor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Torre, Kjerstin

    2012-01-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the themed special issue on "Complex Systems in Neurobiology." The study of complexity in neurobiology has been sensitive to the stochastic processes that dominate the micro-level architecture of neurobiological systems and the deterministic processes that govern the macroscopic behavior of these systems. A large body of research has traversed these scales of interest, seeking to determine how noise at one spatial or temporal scale influences the activity of the system at another scale. In introducing this special issue, we pay special attention to the history of inquiry in complex systems and why scientists have tended to favor linear, causally driven, reductionist approaches in Neurobiology. We follow this with an elaboration of how an alternative approach might be formulated. To illustrate our position on how the sciences of complexity and the study of noise can inform neurobiology, we use three systematic examples from the study of human motor control and learning: 1) phase transitions in bimanual coordination; 2) balance, intermittency, and discontinuous control; and 3) sensorimotor synchronization and timing. Using these examples and showing that noise is adaptively utilized by the nervous system, we make the case for the studying complexity with a perspective of understanding the macroscopic stability in biological systems by focusing on component processes at extended spatial and temporal scales. This special issue continues this theme with contributions in topics as diverse as neural network models, physical biology, motor learning, and statistical physics.

  19. Pharmacological NAD-Boosting Strategies Improve Mitochondrial Homeostasis in Human Complex I-Mutant Fibroblasts.

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    Felici, Roberta; Lapucci, Andrea; Cavone, Leonardo; Pratesi, Sara; Berlinguer-Palmini, Rolando; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are devastating genetic diseases for which efficacious therapies are still an unmet need. Recent studies report that increased availability of intracellular NAD obtained by inhibition of the NAD-consuming enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 or supplementation with the NAD-precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) ameliorates energetic derangement and symptoms in mouse models of mitochondrial disorders. Whether these pharmacological approaches also improve bioenergetics of human cells harboring mitochondrial defects is unknown. It is also unclear whether the same signaling cascade is prompted by PARP-1 inhibitors and NR supplementation to improve mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, we show that human fibroblasts mutant for the NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 1 (NDUFS1) subunit of respiratory complex I have similar ATP, NAD, and mitochondrial content compared with control cells, but show reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Interestingly, mutant cells also show increased transcript levels of mitochondrial DNA but not nuclear DNA respiratory complex subunits, suggesting activation of a compensatory response. At variance with prior work in mice, however, NR supplementation, but not PARP-1 inhibition, increased intracellular NAD content in NDUFS1 mutant human fibroblasts. Conversely, PARP-1 inhibitors, but not NR supplementation, increased transcription of mitochondrial transcription factor A and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes constitutively induced in mutant cells. Still, both NR and PARP-1 inhibitors restored mitochondrial membrane potential and increased organelle content as well as oxidative activity of NDUFS1-deficient fibroblasts. Overall, data provide the first evidence that in human cells harboring a mitochondrial respiratory defect exposure to NR or PARP-1, inhibitors activate different signaling pathways that are not invariantly prompted by NAD increases, but equally able to improve energetic

  20. Lateral gene transfer of an ABC transporter complex between major constituents of the human gut microbiome

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    Meehan Conor J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several links have been established between the human gut microbiome and conditions such as obesity and inflammatory bowel syndrome. This highlights the importance of understanding what properties of the gut microbiome can affect the health of the human host. Studies have been undertaken to determine the species composition of this microbiome and infer functional profiles associated with such host properties. However, lateral gene transfer (LGT between community members may result in misleading taxonomic attributions for the recipient organisms, thus making species-function links difficult to establish. Results We identified a peptides/nickel transport complex whose components differed in abundance based upon levels of host obesity, and assigned the encoded proteins to members of the microbial community. Each protein was assigned to several distinct taxonomic groups, with moderate levels of agreement observed among different proteins in the complex. Phylogenetic trees of these proteins produced clusters that differed greatly from taxonomic attributions and indicated that habitat-directed LGT of this complex is likely to have occurred, though not always between the same partners. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that certain membrane transport systems may be an important factor within an obese-associated gut microbiome and that such complexes may be acquired several times by different strains of the same species. Additionally, an example of individual proteins from different organisms being transferred into one operon was observed, potentially demonstrating a functional complex despite the donors of the subunits being taxonomically disparate. Our results also highlight the potential impact of habitat-directed LGT on the resident microbiota.

  1. Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and vinculin-talin-integrin system in human adult cardiac muscle.

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    Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Gaeta, Roberto; Di Mauro, Debora; Arco, Alba; Consolo, Angela; Santoro, Giuseppe; Trimarchi, Fabio; Favaloro, Angelo

    2009-02-01

    Costameres were identified, for the first time, in skeletal and cardiac muscle, as regions associated with the sarcolemma, consisting of densely clustered patches of vinculin; they have many characteristics common to the cell-extracellular matrix-type of adherens junctions. Costameres are considered 'proteic machinery' and they appear to comprise two protein complexes, the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) and the vinculin-talin-integrin system. In comparison to skeletal muscle, few studies have focused on cardiac muscle regarding these two complexes, and study is generally relative to dystrophin or to cardiac diseases, such as cardiomyopathies. However, insufficient data are available on these proteins in healthy human cardiomyocytes. For this reason, we performed an immunohistochemical study using human cardiac muscle fibers, in order to define the real distribution and the spatial relationship between the proteins in these two complexes. Our data showed a real costameric distribution of DGC and of the vinculin-talin-integrin system; all tested proteins were present in T-tubule and in intercalated disks. Moreover, our data demonstrated that all tested proteins of DGC colocalized with each other, as all tested components of the vinculin-talin-integrin system, and that all tested proteins of DGC colocalized with all tested proteins of the vinculin-talin-integrin system. Finally, all tested proteins of the two complexes were localized in the region of the sarcolemma over the I band, in 100% of our observations. The present study, for the first time, analyzed the majority of proteins of DGC and of the vinculin-talin-integrin system in cardiac muscle fibers, and it confirmed that DGC and the vinculin-talin-integrin system have a role in the transduction of mechanical force to the extracellular matrix. Finally it attributed a key role in the regulation of action potential duration to cardiac myocytes.

  2. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

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    Castoria, Gabriella; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the conservation of this process across divergent cancer

  3. Multistructure index in revealing complexity of regulatory mechanisms of human cardiovascular system at rest and orthostatic stress in healthy humans

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    Makowiec, Danuta; Graff, Beata; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2017-02-01

    Biological regulation is sufficiently complex to pose an enduring challenge for characterization of both its equilibrium and transient non-equilibrium dynamics. Two univariate but coupled observables, heart rate and systolic blood pressure, are commonly characterized in the benchmark example of the human cardiovascular regulatory system. Asymmetric distributions of accelerations and decelerations of heart rate, as well as rises and falls in systolic blood pressure, recorded in humans during a head-up tilt test provide insights into the dynamics of cardiovascular response to a rapid, controlled deregulation of the system's homeostasis. The baroreflex feedback loop is assumed to be the fundamental physiological mechanism for ensuring homeostatic blood supply to distant organs at rest and during orthostatic stress, captured in a classical beat-to-beat autoregressive model of baroreflex by de Boer et al. (1987). For model corroboration, a multistructure index statistic is proposed, seamlessly evaluating the size spectrum of magnitudes of neural reflexes such as baroreflex, responsible for maintaining the homeostatic dynamics. The multistructure index exposes a distinctly different dynamics of multiscale asymmetry between results obtained from real-life signals recorded from healthy subjects and those simulated using both the classical and perturbed versions of the model. Nonlinear effects observed suggest the pronounced presence of complex mechanisms resulting from baroreflex regulation when a human is at rest, which is aggravated in the system's response to orthostatic stress. Using our methodology of multistructure index, we therefore show a marked difference between model and real-life scenarios, which we attribute to multiscale asymmetry of non-linear origin in real-life signals, which we are not reproducible by the classical model.

  4. Distribution of CPP-Protein Complexes in Freshly Resected Human Tissue Material

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    Ülo Langel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Interest in cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs as delivery agents has fuelled a large number of studies conducted on cultured cells and in mice. However, only a few studies have been devoted to the behaviour of CPPs in human tissues. Therefore, we performed ex vivo tissue-dipping experiments where we studied the distribution of CPP-protein complexes in samples of freshly harvested human tissue material. We used the carcinoma or hyperplasia-containing specimens of the uterus and the cervix, obtained as surgical waste from nine hysterectomies. Our aim was to evaluate the tissue of preference (epithelial versus muscular/connective tissue, carcinoma versus adjacent histologically normal tissue for two well-studied CPPs, the transportan and the TAT-peptide. We complexed biotinylated CPPs with avidin--galactosidase (ABG, which enabled us to apply whole-mount X-gal staining as a robust detection method. Our results demonstrate that both peptides enhanced the tissue distribution of ABG. The enhancing effect of the tested CPPs was more obvious in the normal tissue and in some specimens we detected a striking selectivity of CPP-ABG complexes for the normal tissue. This unexpected finding encourages the evaluation of CPPs as local delivery agents in non-malignant situations, for example in the intrauterine gene therapy of benign gynaecological diseases.

  5. The human CTC1/STN1/TEN1 complex regulates telomere maintenance in ALT cancer cells

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    Huang, Chenhui; Jia, Pingping; Chastain, Megan; Shiva, Olga; Chai, Weihang, E-mail: wchai@wsu.edu

    2017-06-15

    Maintaining functional telomeres is important for long-term proliferation of cells. About 15% of cancer cells are telomerase-negative and activate the alternative-lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway to maintain their telomeres. Recent studies have shown that the human CTC1/STN1/TEN1 complex (CST) plays a multi-faceted role in telomere maintenance in telomerase-expressing cancer cells. However, the role of CST in telomere maintenance in ALT cells is unclear. Here, we report that human CST forms a functional complex localizing in the ALT-associated PML bodies (APBs) in ALT cells throughout the cell cycle. Suppression of CST induces telomere instabilities including telomere fragility and elevates telomeric DNA recombination, leading to telomere dysfunction. In addition, CST deficiency significantly diminishes the abundance of extrachromosomal circular telomere DNA known as C-circles and t-circles. Suppression of CST also results in multinucleation in ALT cells and impairs cell proliferation. Our findings imply that the CST complex plays an important role in regulating telomere maintenance in ALT cells. - Highlights: • CST localizes at telomeres and ALT-associated PML bodies in ALT cells throughout the cell cycle. • CST is important for promoting telomeric DNA replication in ALT cells. • CST deficiency decreases ECTR formation and increases T-SCE. • CST deficiency impairs ALT cell proliferation and results in multinucleation.

  6. Metagenomic predictions: from microbiome to complex health and environmental phenotypes in humans and cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M Ross

    Full Text Available Mammals have a large cohort of endo- and ecto- symbiotic microorganisms (the microbiome that potentially influence host phenotypes. There have been numerous exploratory studies of these symbiotic organisms in humans and other animals, often with the aim of relating the microbiome to a complex phenotype such as body mass index (BMI or disease state. Here, we describe an efficient methodology for predicting complex traits from quantitative microbiome profiles. The method was demonstrated by predicting inflammatory bowel disease (IBD status and BMI from human microbiome data, and enteric greenhouse gas production from dairy cattle rumen microbiome profiles. The method uses unassembled massively parallel sequencing (MPS data to form metagenomic relationship matrices (analogous to genomic relationship matrices used in genomic predictions to predict IBD, BMI and methane production phenotypes with useful accuracies (r = 0.423, 0.422 and 0.466 respectively. Our results show that microbiome profiles derived from MPS can be used to predict complex phenotypes of the host. Although the number of biological replicates used here limits the accuracy that can be achieved, preliminary results suggest this approach may surpass current prediction accuracies that are based on the host genome. This is especially likely for traits that are largely influenced by the gut microbiota, for example digestive tract disorders or metabolic functions such as enteric methane production in cattle.

  7. Human Reconstituted Nasal Epithelium, a promising in vitro model to assess impacts of environmental complex mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Gaëlle; Mignon, Virginie; Momas, Isabelle; Achard, Sophie; Seta, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Considering the impact of respiratory diseases around the world, appropriate experimental tools to help understand the mechanisms involved in such diseases are becoming essential. Our aim was to investigate the cellular and morphological reactivity of a human Reconstituted Nasal Epithelium (hRNE) to evaluate the impact of environmental complex mixture (ECM), with tobacco smoke as a model, after three weeks of repeated exposures. Staining of hRNE showed a multilayered ciliated epithelium, with a regular cilia beats, and a mucus production. When hRNE was exposed to ECM for 5 min once or twice a week, during 3 weeks, significant changes occurred: IL-8 production significantly increased 24h after the first exposure compared with Air-exposure and only during the first week, without any loss of tissue integrity. Immunostaining of F-actin cytoskeleton showed a modification in cellular morphology (number and diameter). Taken together our results indicate that hRNE is well suited to study the cellular and morphological effects of repeated exposures to an environmental complex mixture. Human reconstituted epithelium models are currently the best in vitro representation of human respiratory tract physiology, and also the most robust for performing repeated exposures to atmospheric pollutants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Involvement of human ORC and TRF2 in pre-replication complex assembly at telomeres.

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    Tatsumi, Yasutoshi; Ezura, Kai; Yoshida, Kazumasa; Yugawa, Takashi; Narisawa-Saito, Mako; Kiyono, Tohru; Ohta, Satoshi; Obuse, Chikashi; Fujita, Masatoshi

    2008-10-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds to replication origins to regulate the cell cycle-dependent assembly of pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs). We have found a novel link between pre-RC assembly regulation and telomere homeostasis in human cells. Biochemical analyses showed that human ORC binds to TRF2, a telomere sequence-binding protein that protects telomeres and functions in telomere length homeostasis, via the ORC1 subunit. Immunostaining further revealed that ORC and TRF2 partially co-localize in nuclei, whereas chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses confirmed that pre-RCs are assembled at telomeres in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Over-expression of TRF2 stimulated ORC and MCM binding to chromatin and RNAi-directed TRF2 silencing resulted in reduced ORC binding and pre-RC assembly at telomeres. As expected from previous reports, TRF2 silencing induced telomere elongation. Interestingly, ORC1 silencing by RNAi weakened the TRF2 binding as well as the pre-RC assembly at telomeres, suggesting that ORC and TRF2 interact with each other to achieve stable binding. Furthermore, ORC1 silencing also resulted in modest telomere elongation. These data suggest that ORC might be involved in telomere homeostasis in human cells.

  9. Signatures of natural selection on genetic variants affecting complex human traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge; Muglia, Louis J; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Akey, Joshua M; Williams, Scott M

    2013-12-01

    It has recently been hypothesized that polygenic adaptation, resulting in modest allele frequency changes at many loci, could be a major mechanism behind the adaptation of complex phenotypes in human populations. Here we leverage the large number of variants that have been identified through genome-wide association (GWA) studies to comprehensively study signatures of natural selection on genetic variants associated with complex traits. Using population differentiation based methods, such as F ST and phylogenetic branch length analyses, we systematically examined nearly 1300 SNPs associated with 38 complex phenotypes. Instead of detecting selection signatures at individual variants, we aimed to identify combined evidence of natural selection by aggregating signals across many trait associated SNPs. Our results have revealed some general features of polygenic selection on complex traits associated variants. First, natural selection acting on standing variants associated with complex traits is a common phenomenon. Second, characteristics of selection for different polygenic traits vary both temporarily and geographically. Third, some studied traits (e.g. height and urate level) could have been the primary targets of selection, as indicated by the significant correlation between the effect sizes and the estimated strength of selection in the trait associated variants; however, for most traits, the allele frequency changes in trait associated variants might have been driven by the selection on other correlated phenotypes. Fourth, the changes in allele frequencies as a result of selection can be highly stochastic, such that, polygenic adaptation may accelerate differentiation in allele frequencies among populations, but generally does not produce predictable directional changes. Fifth, multiple mechanisms (pleiotropy, hitchhiking, etc) may act together to govern the changes in allele frequencies of genetic variants associated with complex traits.

  10. Complex epithelial remodeling underlie the fusion event in early fetal development of the human penile urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Joel; Overland, Maya; Sinclair, Adriane; Cao, Mei; Yue, Xuan; Cunha, Gerald; Baskin, Laurence

    We recently described a two-step process of urethral plate canalization and urethral fold fusion to form the human penile urethra. Canalization ("opening zipper") opens the solid urethral plate into a groove, and fusion ("closing zipper") closes the urethral groove to form the penile urethra. We hypothesize that failure of canalization and/or fusion during human urethral formation can lead to hypospadias. Herein, we use scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analysis of transverse serial sections to better characterize development of the human fetal penile urethra as contrasted to the development of the human fetal clitoris. Eighteen 7-13 week human fetal external genitalia specimens were analyzed by SEM, and fifteen additional human fetal specimens were sectioned for histologic analysis. SEM images demonstrate canalization of the urethral/vestibular plate in the developing male and female external genitalia, respectively, followed by proximal to distal fusion of the urethral folds in males only. The fusion process during penile development occurs sequentially in multiple layers and through the interlacing of epidermal "cords". Complex epithelial organization is also noted at the site of active canalization. The demarcation between the epidermis of the shaft and the glans becomes distinct during development, and the epithelial tag at the distal tip of the penile and clitoral glans regresses as development progresses. In summary, SEM analysis of human fetal specimens supports the two-zipper hypothesis of formation of the penile urethra. The opening zipper progresses from proximal to distal along the shaft of the penis and clitoris into the glans in identical fashion in both sexes. The closing zipper mechanism is active only in males and is not a single process but rather a series of layered fusion events, uniquely different from the simple fusion of two epithelial surfaces as occurs in formation of the palate and neural tube. Copyright © 2016 International Society

  11. In vitro tomographic image of human pulp-dentin complex: optical coherence tomography and histology.

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    Braz, Ana K S; Kyotoku, Bernardo B C; Gomes, Anderson S L

    2009-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive imaging method, was used in this work to image the pulp-dentin complex. Pulp and dentin are integrally connected in the sense that physiologic and pathologic reactions in one of the tissues will also affect the other. An OCT system with 6-mum spatial resolution at 800 nm was used to image the pulp-dentin complex of in vitro samples. Five intact human maxillary premolars scheduled for surgical extraction were used in this in vitro study. The occlusal surfaces of teeth were polished with wet 600-, 1,000-, and 1,200-grit aluminum oxide abrasive paper perpendicular to the long axis of teeth, producing a plane on that surface. The images of pulp-dentin complex were taken by scanning the occlusal surface in a mesiodistal direction. The laser penetrated into the teeth structure and a tomographic image of pulp-dentin complex, parallel to the long axis of teeth, was obtained. Histological and OCT images were analyzed and compared. The results showed the capability of the OCT technique to generate images of the boundaries of pulp and its relation to the dentin. It could be clearly seen that the OCT image provided the insight into dentinal substrate about 0.65-mm deep (corrected for the dentin refractive index). OCT can be used in the future to prevent iatrogenic exposures of the pulp, complementing other existing methods, and will permit a more predictive prognosis of treatments.

  12. Sulfonanilide Derivatives in Identifying Novel Aromatase Inhibitors by Applying Docking, Virtual Screening, and MD Simulations Studies

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    Shailima Rampogu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death noticed in women across the world. Of late the most successful treatments rendered are the use of aromatase inhibitors (AIs. In the current study, a two-way approach for the identification of novel leads has been adapted. 81 chemical compounds were assessed to understand their potentiality against aromatase along with the four known drugs. Docking was performed employing the CDOCKER protocol available on the Discovery Studio (DS v4.5. Exemestane has displayed a higher dock score among the known drug candidates and is labeled as reference. Out of 81 ligands 14 have exhibited higher dock scores than the reference. In the second approach, these 14 compounds were utilized for the generation of the pharmacophore. The validated four-featured pharmacophore was then allowed to screen Chembridge database and the potential Hits were obtained after subjecting them to Lipinski’s rule of five and the ADMET properties. Subsequently, the acquired 3,050 Hits were escalated to molecular docking utilizing GOLD v5.0. Finally, the obtained Hits were consequently represented to be ideal lead candidates that were escalated to the MD simulations and binding free energy calculations. Additionally, the gene-disease association was performed to delineate the associated disease caused by CYP19A1.

  13. Aromatase and steroid receptors in gynecomastia and male breast carcinoma: an immunohistochemical study.

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    Sasano, H; Kimura, M; Shizawa, S; Kimura, N; Nagura, H

    1996-08-01

    Hormonal factors have been implicated in the development of male breast disorders, including carcinoma and gynecomastia. We studied the expression of aromatase and estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and androgen (AR) receptors by immunohistochemistry in male breast carcinoma (15 cases) and gynecomastia (30 cases) to evaluate their possible significance in these disorders. Relatively strong aromatase immunoreactivity was observed in all cases of carcinoma, but in only 11 of 30 cases (37%) of gynecomastia. ER and PR expression was observed in the nuclei of ductal cells in all the cases of gynecomastia. More than 10% of the carcinoma cells were positive for ER and PR in 9 of 15 (60%) and 10 of 15 (67%) carcinomas, respectively. AR immunoreactivity was observed in nuclei of both epithelial and non-epithelial cells. AR was present in ductal or carcinoma cells in 13 of 15 (87%) cases of carcinoma and in all 30 (100%) cases of gynecomastia. The mean percentage of ER-, PR-, and AR-positive cells were significantly higher in gynecomastia than in carcinoma. There was a close association of AR with ER (P gynecomastia, but there was a significant inverse correlation between AR and ER (P estrogen concentration and the development of male breast carcinoma.

  14. Long-term safety of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of breast cancer

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    Jean-Marc A Nabholtz

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Marc A NabholtzBreast Cancer Research Institute La Prandie, Valojoulx, FranceAbstract: Following promising data for metastatic breast cancer in terms of efficacy and safety profile, third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AI, anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane, underwent a full development in early setting. If recent results consistently show the superiority of these agents over tamoxifen, the therapeutic strategies of AIs in adjuvant setting are still debated. Beyond the choice of clinical strategy, the long duration of exposure to AI in adjuvant setting required a full determination of the long-term toxicity profile of these agents. While all three AIs have either favorable (decreased incidence of hot flashes, gynecologic and thromboembolic side-effects or unfavorable (skeletal complications, arthralgia, musculoskeletal pain, sexual dysfunction class adverse events, some variability between AIs has been reported in side-effects as well as gastrointestinal, urogenital, neurologic, and visual disturbances, confirming the lack of interchangeability between the three AIs. The overall therapeutic index of AIs appears today superior to that of tamoxifen with proven improved efficacy and better toxicity profile. This review will explore the results from the available adjuvant AIs trials with a particular emphasis on safety profiles, quality of life, and therapeutic index, helping to define the present role of AIs in the adjuvant management of postmenopausal patients with breast cancer.Keywords: breast cancer, aromatase inhibitors, adjuvant, safety profile

  15. Study on the effect of aromatase inhibitors and antiestrogens on the sex differentiation of broiler chicks

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    E.A Valizadeh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available During the development of chick embryo, the genotype of the zygote determines the nature of the gonads, which thereafter creates the male or female phenotype. Differentiation of gonads during the period called “critical period for sexual differentiation “is accompanied with beginning of secretion of sexual hormones. Every change in the rate of steroidal hormones concentration during this critical period, affects on the structure of gonads. Therefore, injection of aromatase inhibitors (which blocks the synthesis of estrogen from testostron in 5th day of incubation into the eggs, causes the production of males with female genotype. These sex reversal females have bilateral testes with complete spermatogenesis, having normal physical appearance and behavior. In this study, 14-α-hydroxy 3,6,17, androstan-trion inhibitor (1mg/egg was injected into the eggs. Furthermore, the effect of three anti-estrogens (which blocks the estrogen receptor Tamoxifen, and Clomiphen Citrate and GAR79 were studied. Injection of aromatase inhibitors into the eggs during incubation period caused statistically significant (p

  16. Immunoexpression of androgen receptors and aromatase in testes of patient with Klinefelter's syndrome.

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    Stanisław Fracki

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter's syndrome (47, XXY is the most common chromosome aneuploidy in men and is usually characterized by underdeveloped testes and sterility. The aim of the present study was to detect cellular distribution of androgen receptors (AR and aromatase in testes of patient with KS. The tissue sections were processed for morphological and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, levels of FSH, LH, PRL, estradiol, and testosterone were measured in the plasma. Morphological analysis revealed a complete absence of spermatogenesis. No germ cells were present in seminiferous tubules. In some tubules, nests of apparently degenerating Sertoli cells were found. In the interstitium, Leydig cell hyperplasia was observed. Using immunohistochemistry, nuclear AR staining was detected in Sertoli cells and peritubular cells, whereas in Leydig cells the staining was exclusively cytoplasmic. The immunostaining of aromatase was detected in the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells and Leydig cells. Increased levels of gonadotropins and decreased level of testosterone concomitantly with the cytoplasmic localization of AR in Leydig cells might contribute to the impaired testicular function in patient with KS.

  17. The critical phase for visual control of human walking over complex terrain.

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    Matthis, Jonathan Samir; Barton, Sean L; Fajen, Brett R

    2017-08-08

    To walk efficiently over complex terrain, humans must use vision to tailor their gait to the upcoming ground surface without interfering with the exploitation of passive mechanical forces. We propose that walkers use visual information to initialize the mechanical state of the body before the beginning of each step so the resulting ballistic trajectory of the walker's center-of-mass will facilitate stepping on target footholds. Using a precision stepping task and synchronizing target visibility to the gait cycle, we empirically validated two predictions derived from this strategy: (1) Walkers must have information about upcoming footholds during the second half of the preceding step, and (2) foot placement is guided by information about the position of the target foothold relative to the preceding base of support. We conclude that active and passive modes of control work synergistically to allow walkers to negotiate complex terrain with efficiency, stability, and precision.

  18. Ethics in Publishing: Complexity Science and Human Factors Offer Insights to Develop a Just Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurin, Tarcisio Abreu

    2016-12-01

    While ethics in publishing has been increasingly debated, there seems to be a lack of a theoretical framework for making sense of existing rules of behavior as well as for designing, managing and enforcing such rules. This letter argues that systems-oriented disciplines, such as complexity science and human factors, offer insights into new ways of dealing with ethics in publishing. Some examples of insights are presented. Also, a call is made for empirical studies that unveil the context and details of both retracted papers and the process of writing and publishing academic papers. This is expected to shed light on the complexity of the publication system as well as to support the development of a just culture, in which all participants are accountable.

  19. Studies on stabilities of some human chorionic gonadotropin complexes with {beta}-emitting radionuclides

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    Maiti, Moumita [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sen, Kamalika [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 APC Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Sen, Souvik [Malda Town Divisional Railway Hospital, Malda 732102 (India); Lahiri, Susanta, E-mail: susanta.lahiri@saha.ac.i [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a peptide hormone, whose one of the structural subunits is identical to that of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). As a consequence, the receptors of TSH also act as receptor for hCG hormone. Keeping in mind this interesting property of hCG we have studied the complex formation ability of various no-carrier-added {beta}-emitting isotopes of {sup 61}Cu (3.3 h), {sup 62}Zn (9.2 h), {sup 90}Nb (14.60 h) and {sup 99}Mo (66.02 h) with hCG molecule. Stability of the hCG-M (M=metal ions) complexes was investigated by dialysis with respect to triple distilled water and ringer lactate solution, which has the same composition as extracellular fluid.

  20. Structures of human exonuclease I DNA complexes suggest a unified mechanism for nuclease family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orans, Jillian; McSweeney, Elizabeth A.; Iyer, Ravi R.; Hast, Michael A.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Modrich, Paul; Beese, Lorena S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Human exonuclease 1 (hExo1) plays important roles in DNA repair and recombination processes that maintain genomic integrity. It is a member of the 5′ structure-specific nuclease family of exonucleases and endonucleases that includes FEN-1, XPG, and GEN1. We present structures of hExo1 in complex with a DNA substrate, followed by mutagenesis studies, and propose a common mechanism by which this nuclease family recognizes and processes diverse DNA structures. hExo1 induces a sharp bend in the DNA at nicks or gaps. Frayed 5′ ends of nicked duplexes resemble flap junctions, unifying the mechanisms of endo- and exo-nucleolytic processing. Conformational control of a mobile region in the catalytic site suggests a mechanism for allosteric regulation by binding to protein partners. The relative arrangement of substrate binding sites in these enzymes provides an elegant solution to a complex geometrical puzzle of substrate recognition and processing. PMID:21496642

  1. Crystal Structures of Inhibitir Complexes of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus (HTLV-1) Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander (NCI); (Kyoto)

    2010-09-17

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  2. Crystal structures of inhibitor complexes of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander (NCI); (Kyoto)

    2010-09-28

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  3. The major histocompatibility complex: a paradigm for studies of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allcock, Richard J N

    2012-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6 is one of the most intensively studied regions of the human genome and has many features which make it unique. It is the source of much research interest because of its role in autoimmune and infectious disease susceptibility, and of diagnostic interest because of its role in transplantation and rejection. It is the most gene-dense and SNP-rich region of the genome, with large number of complex haplotypes and other features which must be taken into account when analysing the MHC in the laboratory. This article provides a brief overview of the MHC highlighting some of the issues that must be considered when developing new methods and assays.

  4. Twin-based DNA methylation analysis takes the center stage of studies of human complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Li, Shuxia; Tan, Qihua

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of complex diseases is characterized by the interaction between the genome and environmental conditions and the interface of epigenetics may be a central mechanism. Current technologies already allow us high-throughput profiling of epigenetic patterns at genome level. However, our...... and complex traits. In the era of functional genomics, the valuable samples of twins are helping to bridge the gap between gene activity and environmental conditions through epigenetic mechanisms unlimited to DNA sequence variations. We review the recent progresses in using twins to study disease...... understanding of the epigenetic processes remains limited. Twins are special samples in genetic studies due to their genetic similarity and rearing-environment sharing. In the past decades, twins have made a great contribution in dissecting the genetic and environmental contributions to human diseases...

  5. Noise and complexity in human postural control: interpreting the different estimations of entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Christopher K; Silver, Tobin A; Hong, S Lee; Ryu, Joong Hyun; Studenka, Breanna E; Hughes, Charmayne M L; Haddad, Jeffrey M

    2011-03-17

    Over the last two decades, various measures of entropy have been used to examine the complexity of human postural control. In general, entropy measures provide information regarding the health, stability and adaptability of the postural system that is not captured when using more traditional analytical techniques. The purpose of this study was to examine how noise, sampling frequency and time series length influence various measures of entropy when applied to human center of pressure (CoP) data, as well as in synthetic signals with known properties. Such a comparison is necessary to interpret data between and within studies that use different entropy measures, equipment, sampling frequencies or data collection durations. The complexity of synthetic signals with known properties and standing CoP data was calculated using Approximate Entropy (ApEn), Sample Entropy (SampEn) and Recurrence Quantification Analysis Entropy (RQAEn). All signals were examined at varying sampling frequencies and with varying amounts of added noise. Additionally, an increment time series of the original CoP data was examined to remove long-range correlations. Of the three measures examined, ApEn was the least robust to sampling frequency and noise manipulations. Additionally, increased noise led to an increase in SampEn, but a decrease in RQAEn. Thus, noise can yield inconsistent results between the various entropy measures. Finally, the differences between the entropy measures were minimized in the increment CoP data, suggesting that long-range correlations should be removed from CoP data prior to calculating entropy. The various algorithms typically used to quantify the complexity (entropy) of CoP may yield very different results, particularly when sampling frequency and noise are different. The results of this study are discussed within the context of the neural noise and loss of complexity hypotheses.

  6. Noise and complexity in human postural control: interpreting the different estimations of entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K Rhea

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the last two decades, various measures of entropy have been used to examine the complexity of human postural control. In general, entropy measures provide information regarding the health, stability and adaptability of the postural system that is not captured when using more traditional analytical techniques. The purpose of this study was to examine how noise, sampling frequency and time series length influence various measures of entropy when applied to human center of pressure (CoP data, as well as in synthetic signals with known properties. Such a comparison is necessary to interpret data between and within studies that use different entropy measures, equipment, sampling frequencies or data collection durations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The complexity of synthetic signals with known properties and standing CoP data was calculated using Approximate Entropy (ApEn, Sample Entropy (SampEn and Recurrence Quantification Analysis Entropy (RQAEn. All signals were examined at varying sampling frequencies and with varying amounts of added noise. Additionally, an increment time series of the original CoP data was examined to remove long-range correlations. Of the three measures examined, ApEn was the least robust to sampling frequency and noise manipulations. Additionally, increased noise led to an increase in SampEn, but a decrease in RQAEn. Thus, noise can yield inconsistent results between the various entropy measures. Finally, the differences between the entropy measures were minimized in the increment CoP data, suggesting that long-range correlations should be removed from CoP data prior to calculating entropy. CONCLUSIONS: The various algorithms typically used to quantify the complexity (entropy of CoP may yield very different results, particularly when sampling frequency and noise are different. The results of this study are discussed within the context of the neural noise and loss of complexity hypotheses.

  7. Modelling of spatially complex human-ecosystem, rural-urban and rich-poor interactions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naude, AH

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available from Latin America, World Development, 33, pp. 237-253. Perrons D. (2001) The New Economy and Uneven Geographical Development: Towards a More Holistic Framework for Economic Geography, Economic Geography Research Group: Working Paper Series 00..., Department of Geography, University of the Aegean. 1 MODELLING OF SPATIALLY COMPLEX HUMAN-ECOSYSTEM, RURAL-URBAN AND RICH-POOR INTERACTIONS Andries Naudé1, David Le Maitre1, Tom de Jong2, Greg Forsyth1 Gerbrand Mans1 and Wim Hugo3 1Council...

  8. Structure of the human autophagy initiating kinase ULK1 in complex with potent inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Michael B; Novotny, Chris J; Shokat, Kevan M

    2015-01-16

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that involves the degradation of cellular components for energy maintenance and cytoplasmic quality control that has recently gained interest as a novel target for a variety of human diseases, including cancer. A prime candidate to determine the potential therapeutic benefit of targeting autophagy is the kinase ULK1, whose activation initiates autophagy. Here, we report the first structures of ULK1, in complex with multiple potent inhibitors. These structures show features unique to the enzyme and will provide a path for the rational design of selective compounds as cellular probes and potential therapeutics.

  9. Expression of aromatase in the embryonic brain of the olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea), and the effect of bisphenol-A in sexually differentiated embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Picos, Patsy; Sifuentes-Romero, Itzel; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; Hernández-Cornejo, Rubí; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Gasca, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    Brain aromatase participates in several biological processes, such as regulation of the reproductive-endocrine axis, memory, stress, sexual differentiation of the nervous system, male sexual behavior, and brain repair. Here we report the isolation and expression of brain aromatase in olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) embryos incubated at male- and female-promoting temperatures (MPT and FPT, respectively), at the thermosensitive period (TSP) and the sex-differentiated period. Also, aromatase expression was assessed in differentiated embryos exposed to bisphenol-A (BPA) during the TSP. BPA is a monomer of polycarbonate plastics and is considered an endocrine-disrupting compound. Normal aromatase expression was measured in both forebrain and hindbrain, showing higher expression levels in the forebrain of differentiated embryos at both incubation temperatures. Although no significant differences were detected in the hindbrain, expression was slightly higher at MPT. BPA did not affect aromatase expression neither in forebrains or hindbrains from embryos incubated at MPT, whereas at FPT an inverted U-shape curve was observed in forebrains with significant differences at lower concentrations, whereas in hindbrains a non-significant increment was observed at higher concentrations. Our data indicate that both incubation temperature and developmental stage are critical factors affecting aromatase expression in the forebrain. Because of the timing and location of aromatase expression in the brain, we suggest that brain aromatase may participate in the imprinting of sexual trends related to reproduction and sexual behavior at the onset of sex differentiation, and BPA exposure may impair aromatase function in the female forebrain.

  10. Targeted Metabolomics Approach To Detect the Misuse of Steroidal Aromatase Inhibitors in Equine Sports by Biomarker Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, George Ho Man; Ho, Emmie Ngai Man; Leung, David Kwan Kon; Wong, Kin Sing; Wan, Terence See Ming

    2016-01-05

    The use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is prohibited in both human and equine sports. The conventional approach in doping control testing for AAS (as well as other prohibited substances) is accomplished by the direct detection of target AAS or their characteristic metabolites in biological samples using hyphenated techniques such as gas chromatography or liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Such an approach, however, falls short when dealing with unknown designer steroids where reference materials and their pharmacokinetics are not available. In addition, AASs with fast elimination times render the direct detection approach ineffective as the detection window is short. A targeted metabolomics approach is a plausible alternative to the conventional direct detection approach for controlling the misuse of AAS in sports. Because the administration of AAS of the same class may trigger similar physiological responses or effects in the body, it may be possible to detect such administrations by monitoring changes in the endogenous steroidal expression profile. This study attempts to evaluate the viability of using the targeted metabolomics approach to detect the administration of steroidal aromatase inhibitors, namely androst-4-ene-3,6,17-trione (6-OXO) and androsta-1,4,6-triene-3,17-dione (ATD), in horses. Total (free and conjugated) urinary concentrations of 31 endogenous steroids were determined by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for a group of 2 resting and 2 in-training thoroughbred geldings treated with either 6-OXO or ATD. Similar data were also obtained from a control (untreated) group of in-training thoroughbred geldings (n = 28). Statistical processing and chemometric procedures using principle component analysis and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) have highlighted 7 potential biomarkers that could be used to differentiate urine samples obtained from the control and the treated groups

  11. Colour and luminance contrasts predict the human detection of natural stimuli in complex visual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas E; Rojas, Bibiana; Mappes, Johanna; Rautiala, Petri; Kemp, Darrell J

    2017-09-01

    Much of what we know about human colour perception has come from psychophysical studies conducted in tightly-controlled laboratory settings. An enduring challenge, however, lies in extrapolating this knowledge to the noisy conditions that characterize our actual visual experience. Here we combine statistical models of visual perception with empirical data to explore how chromatic (hue/saturation) and achromatic (luminant) information underpins the detection and classification of stimuli in a complex forest environment. The data best support a simple linear model of stimulus detection as an additive function of both luminance and saturation contrast. The strength of each predictor is modest yet consistent across gross variation in viewing conditions, which accords with expectation based upon general primate psychophysics. Our findings implicate simple visual cues in the guidance of perception amidst natural noise, and highlight the potential for informing human vision via a fusion between psychophysical modelling and real-world behaviour. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Aromatase inhibitors versus tamoxifen in early breast cancer: patient-level meta-analysis of the randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dowsett, M.; Forbes, J. F.; Bradley, R.; Ingle, J.; Aihara, T.; Bliss, J.; Boccardo, F.; Coates, A.; Coombes, R. C.; Cuzick, J.; Dubsky, P.; Gnant, M.; Kaufmann, M.; Kilburn, L.; Perrone, F.; Rea, D.; Thurlimann, B.; van de Velde, C.; Pan, H.; Peto, R.; Davies, C.; Gray, R.; Burrett, J.; Clarke, M.; Duane, F.; Evans, V.; Gettins, L.; Godwin, J.; Liu, H.; McGale, P.; MacKinnon, E.; McHugh, T.; James, S.; Morris, P.; Read, S.; Taylor, C.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Bergh, J.; Pritchard, K.; Albain, K.; Anderson, S.; Arriagada, R.; Barlow, W.; Bergsten-Nordstrom, E.; Buyse, M.; Cameron, D.; Coleman, R.; Correa, C.; Costantino, J.; Davidson, N.; Di Leo, A.; Ewertz, M.; Forbes, J.; Gelber, R.; Geyer, C.; Gianni, L.; Goldhirsch, A.; Hayes, D.; Hill, C.; Janni, W.; Martin, M.; Norton, L.; Ohashi, Y.; Paik, S.; Perez, E.; Piccart, M.; Pierce, L.; Raina, V.; Ravdin, P.; Robertson, J.; Rutgers, E.; Sparano, J.; Swain, S.; Viale, G.; von Minckwitz, G.; Wang, X.; Whelan, T.; Wilcken, N.; Winer, E.; Wolmark, N.; Wood, W.; Abe, O.; Abe, R.; Enomoto, K.; Kikuchi, K.; Koyama, H.; Masuda, H.; Nomura, Y.; Sakai, K.; Sugimachi, K.; Toi, M.; Tominaga, T.; Uchino, J.; Yoshida, M.; Haybittle, J. L.; Leonard, C. F.; Calais, G.; Garaud, P.; Collett, V.; Delmestri, A.; Sayer, J.; Harvey, V. J.; Holdaway, I. M.; Kay, R. G.; Mason, B. H.; Bartsch, R.; Fesl, C.; Fohler, H.; Greil, R.; Jakesz, R.; Lang, A.; Luschin-Ebengreuth, G.; Marth, C.; Mlineritsch, B.; Samonigg, H.; Singer, C. F.; Steger, G. G.; Stoger, H.; Canney, P.; Yosef, H. M. A.; Focan, C.; Peek, U.; Oates, G. D.; Powell, J.; Durand, M.; Mauriac, L.; Dolci, S.; Larsimont, D.; Nogaret, J. M.; Philippson, C.; Piccart, M. J.; Masood, M. B.; Parker, D.; Price, J. J.; Lindsay, M. A.; Mackey, J.; Hupperets, P. S. G. J.; Bates, T.; Blamey, R. W.; Chetty, U.; Ellis, I. O.; Mallon, E.; Morgan, D. A. L.; Patnick, J.; Pinder, S.; Olivotto, I.; Ragaz, J.; Berry, D.; Broadwater, G.; Cirrincione, C.; Muss, H.; Weiss, R. B.; Abu-Zahra, H. T.; Portnoj, S. M.; Bowden, S.; Brookes, C.; Dunn, J.; Fernando, I.; Lee, M.; Poole, C.; Spooner, D.; Barrett-Lee, P. J.; Mansel, R. E.; Monypenny, I. J.; Gordon, N. H.; Davis, H. L.; Sestak, I.; Lehingue, Y.; Romestaing, P.; Dubois, J. B.; Delozier, T.; Griffon, B.; Mace Lesec'h, J.; Brain, E.; de La Lande, B.; Mouret-Fourme, E.; Mustacchi, G.; Petruzelka, L.; Pribylova, O.; Owen, J. R.; Harbeck, N.; Janicke, F.; Meisner, C.; Schmitt, M.; Thomssen, C.; Meier, P.; Shan, Y.; Shao, Y. F.; Zhao, D. B.; Chen, Z. M.; Pan, H. C.; Howell, A.; Swindell, R.; Burrett, J. A.; Cutter, D.; Kerr, A.; Mannu, G.; Albano, J.; de Oliveira, C. F.; Gervasio, H.; Gordilho, J.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jensen, M.-B.; Johansen, H.; Mouridsen, H.; Palshof, T.; Gelman, R. S.; Harris, J. R.; Henderson, C.; Shapiro, C. L.; Christiansen, P.; Moller, S.; Mouridsen, H. T.; Trampisch, H. J.; Dalesio, O.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Rodenhuis, S.; van Tinteren, H.; Comis, R. L.; Davidson, N. E.; Robert, N.; Sledge, G.; Solin, L. J.; Sparano, J. A.; Tormey, D. C.; Dixon, J. M.; Forrest, P.; Jack, W.; Kunkler, I.; Rossbach, J.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Treurniet-Donker, A. D.; van Putten, W. L. J.; Rotmensz, N.; Veronesi, U.; Bartelink, H.; Bijker, N.; Bogaerts, J.; Cardoso, F.; Cufer, T.; Julien, J. P.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Cunningham, M. P.; Huovinen, R.; Joensuu, H.; Costa, A.; Bonadonna, G.; Valagussa, P.; Goldstein, L. J.; Bonneterre, J.; Fargeot, P.; Fumoleau, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Luporsi, E.; Namer, M.; Eiermann, W.; Hilfrich, J.; Jonat, W.; Kreienberg, R.; Schumacher, M.; Bastert, G.; Rauschecker, H.; Sauer, R.; Sauerbrei, W.; Schauer, A.; Blohmer, J. U.; Costa, S. D.; Eidtmann, H.; Gerber, B.; Jackisch, C.; Loibl, S.; de Schryver, A.; Vakaet, L.; Belfiglio, M.; Nicolucci, A.; Pellegrini, F.; Pirozzoli, M. C.; Sacco, M.; Valentini, M.; McArdle, C. S.; Smith, D. C.; Stallard, S.; Dent, D. M.; Gudgeon, C. A.; Hacking, A.; Murray, E.; Panieri, E.; Werner, I. D.; Carrasco, E.; Segui, M. A.; Galligioni, E.; Leone, B.; Vallejo, C. T.; Zwenger, A.; Lopez, M.; Erazo, A.; Medina, J. Y.; Horiguchi, J.; Takei, H.; Fentiman, I. S.; Hayward, J. L.; Rubens, R. D.; Skilton, D.; Scheurlen, H.; Sohn, H. C.; Untch, M.; Dafni, U.; Markopoulos, C.; Fountzilas, G.; Mavroudis, D.; Klefstrom, P.; Blomqvist, C.; Saarto, T.; Gallen, M.; Tinterri, C.; Margreiter, R.; de Lafontan, B.; Mihura, J.; Roche, H.; Asselain, B.; Salmon, R. J.; Vilcoq, J. R.; Andre, F.; Delaloge, S.; Koscielny, S.; Michiels, S.; Rubino, C.; A'Hern, R.; Ellis, P.; Yarnold, J. R.; Benraadt, J.; Kooi, M.; van de Velde, A. O.; van Dongen, J. A.; Vermorken, J. B.; Castiglione, M.; Colleoni, M.; Collins, J.; Gelber, R. D.; Lindtner, J.; Price, K. N.; Regan, M. M.; Rudenstam, C. M.; Senn, H. J.; Thuerlimann, B.; Bliss, J. M.; Chilvers, C. E. D.; Hall, E.; Marty, M.; Possinger, K.; Schmid, P.; Wallwiener, D.; Foster, L.; George, W. D.; Stewart, H. J.; Stroner, P.; Borovik, R.; Hayat, H.; Inbar, M. J.; Peretz, T.; Robinson, E.; Bruzzi, P.; del Mastro, L.; Pronzato, P.; Sertoli, M. R.; Venturini, M.; Camerini, T.; de Palo, G.; Di Mauro, M. G.; Formelli, F.; Amadori, D.; Martoni, A.; Pannuti, F.; Camisa, R.; Cocconi, G.; Colozza, A.; Passalacqua, R.; Aogi, K.; Takashima, S.; Ikeda, T.; Inokuchi, K.; Sawa, K.; Sonoo, H.; Sadoon, M.; Tulusan, A. H.; Kohno, N.; Miyashita, M.; Takao, S.; Ahn, J.-H.; Jung, K. H.; Korzeniowski, S.; Skolyszewski, J.; Ogawa, M.; Yamashita, J.; Bastiaannet, E.; van de Water, W.; van Nes, J. G. H.; Christiaens, R.; Neven, P.; Paridaens, R.; van den Bogaert, W.; Braun, S.; Martin, P.; Romain, S.; Janauer, M.; Seifert, M.; Sevelda, P.; Zielinski, C. C.; Hakes, T.; Hudis, C. A.; Wittes, R.; Giokas, G.; Kondylis, D.; Lissaios, B.; de la Huerta, R.; Sainz, M. G.; Ro, J.; Altemus, R.; Camphausen, K.; Cowan, K.; Danforth, D.; Lichter, A.; Lippman, M.; O'Shaughnessy, J.; Pierce, L. J.; Steinberg, S.; Venzon, D.; Zujewski, J. A.; D'Amico, C.; Lioce, M.; Paradiso, A.; Chapman, J.-A. W.; Gelmon, K.; Goss, P. E.; Levine, M. N.; Meyer, R.; Parulekar, W.; Pater, J. L.; Pritchard, K. I.; Shepherd, L. E.; Tu, D.; Ohno, S.; Bass, G.; Brown, A.; Bryant, J.; Dignam, J.; Fisher, B.; Mamounas, E. P.; Redmond, C.; Wickerham, L.; Hozumi, Y.; Baum, M.; Jackson, I. M.; Palmer, M. K.; Ingle, J. N.; Suman, V. J.; Bengtsson, N. O.; Emdin, S.; Jonsson, H.; Lythgoe, J. P.; Kissin, M.; Erikstein, B.; Hannisdal, E.; Jacobsen, A. B.; Varhaug, J. E.; Gundersen, S.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Host, H.; Nissen-Meyer, N. N.; Mitchell, A. K.; Robertson, J. F. R.; Ueo, H.; Di Palma, M.; Mathe, G.; Misset, J. L.; Levine, M.; Morimoto, K.; Takatsuka, Y.; Crossley, E.; Harris, A.; Talbot, D.; Taylor, M.; di Blasio, B.; Ivanov, V.; Paltuev, R.; Semiglazov, V.; Brockschmidt, J.; Cooper, M. R.; Falkson, C. I.; Hadji, P.; Makris, A.; Parton, M.; Pennert, K.; Powles, T. J.; Smith, I. E.; Gazet, J. C.; Browne, L.; Graham, P.; Corcoran, N.; Clack, G.; van Poznak, C.; Businico, A.; Deshpande, N.; di Martino, L.; Douglas, P.; Lindtner, A.; Notter, G.; Bryant, A. J. S.; Ewing, G. H.; Firth, L. A.; Krushen-Kosloski, J. L.; Nissen-Meyer, R.; Anderson, H.; Killander, F.; Malmstrom, P.; Ryden, L.; Arnesson, L.-G.; Carstensen, J.; Dufmats, M.; Fohlin, H.; Nordenskjold, B.; Soderberg, M.; Carpenter, J. T.; Murray, N.; Royle, G. T.; Simmonds, P. D.; Crowley, J.; Gralow, J.; Hortobagyi, G.; Livingston, R.; Martino, S.; Osborne, C. K.; Ravdin, P. M.; Adolfsson, J.; Bondesson, T.; Celebioglu, F.; Dahlberg, K.; Fornander, T.; Fredriksson, I.; Frisell, J.; Goransson, E.; Iiristo, M.; Johansson, U.; Lenner, E.; Lofgren, L.; Nikolaidis, P.; Perbeck, L.; Rotstein, S.; Sandelin, K.; Skoog, L.; Svane, G.; af Trampe, E.; Wadstrom, C.; Maibach, R.; Hakama, M.; Holli, K.; Isola, J.; Rouhento, K.; Saaristo, R.; Safra, T.; Brenner, H.; Hercbergs, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Paterson, A. H. G.; Fyles, A.; Meakin, J. W.; Panzarella, T.; Bahi, J.; Reid, M.; Spittle, M.; Bishop, H.; Bundred, N. J.; Forsyth, S.; Pinder, S. E.; Deutsch, G. P.; Kwong, D. L. W.; Pai, V. R.; Senanayake, F.; Martin, A. L.; Rubagotti, A.; Hackshaw, A.; Houghton, J.; Ledermann, J.; Monson, K.; Tobias, J. S.; Carlomagno, C.; de Laurentiis, M.; de Placido, S.; Williams, L.; Bell, R.; Coleman, R. E.; Dodwell, D.; Hinsley, S.; Marshall, H. C.; Solomayer, E.; Fehm, T.; Horsman, J. M.; Lester, J.; Winter, M. C.; Broglio, K.; Buzdar, A. U.; Hsu, L.; Love, R. R.; Ahlgren, J.; Garmo, H.; Holmberg, L.; Liljegren, G.; Lindman, H.; Warnberg, F.; Asmar, L.; Jones, S. E.; Aft, R.; Gluz, O.; Liedtke, C.; Nitz, U.; Litton, A.; Wallgren, A.; Karlsson, P.; Linderholm, B. K.; Chlebowski, R. T.; Caffier, H.; Brufsky, A. M.; Llombart, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal ways of using aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen as endocrine treatment for early breast cancer remains uncertain. Methods We undertook meta-analyses of individual data on 31 920 postmenopausal women with oestrogen-receptor-positive early breast cancer in the randomised trials

  13. Breast Cancer, Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy, and Sexual Functioning: A Pilot Study of the Effects of Vaginal Testosterone Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Dahir, DNP, IF

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: The use of a compounded testosterone vaginal cream applied daily for 4 weeks improves reported sexual health quality of life in women with breast cancer taking AIs. Dahir M and Travers‐Gustafson D. Breast cancer, aromatase inhibitor therapy, and sexual functioning: A pilot study of the effects of vaginal testosterone therapy. Sex Med 2014;2:8–15.

  14. Review of hormone-based treatments in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer focusing on aromatase inhibitors and fulvestrant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Knoop, Ann S; Jessing, Christina A R

    2016-01-01

    -line option. In general, the efficacy of the different aromatase inhibitors and fulvestrant was similar in tamoxifen-refractory patients. A randomised phase II trial of palbociclib plus letrozole versus letrozole alone showed significantly increased progression-free survival (PFS) when compared with endocrine...

  15. Ubiquitous polygenicity of human complex traits: genome-wide analysis of 49 traits in Koreans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yang

    Full Text Available Recent studies in population of European ancestry have shown that 30% ~ 50% of heritability for human complex traits such as height and body mass index, and common diseases such as schizophrenia and rheumatoid arthritis, can be captured by common SNPs and that genetic variation attributed to chromosomes are in proportion to their length. Using genome-wide estimation and partitioning approaches, we analysed 49 human quantitative traits, many of which are relevant to human diseases, in 7,170 unrelated Korean individuals genotyped on 326,262 SNPs. For 43 of the 49 traits, we estimated a nominally significant (P<0.05 proportion of variance explained by all SNPs on the Affymetrix 5.0 genotyping array ([Formula: see text]. On average across 47 of the 49 traits for which the estimate of h(G(2 is non-zero, common SNPs explain approximately one-third (range of 7.8% to 76.8% of narrow sense heritability. The estimate of h(G(2 is highly correlated with the proportion of SNPs with association P<0.031 (r(2 = 0.92. Longer genomic segments tend to explain more phenotypic variation, with a correlation of 0.78 between the estimate of variance explained by individual chromosomes and their physical length, and 1% of the genome explains approximately 1% of the genetic variance. Despite the fact that there are a few SNPs with large effects for some traits, these results suggest that polygenicity is ubiquitous for most human complex traits and that a substantial proportion of the "missing heritability" is captured by common SNPs.

  16. Cognitive engineering models: A prerequisite to the design of human-computer interaction in complex dynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter examines a class of human-computer interaction applications, specifically the design of human-computer interaction for the operators of complex systems. Such systems include space systems (e.g., manned systems such as the Shuttle or space station, and unmanned systems such as NASA scientific satellites), aviation systems (e.g., the flight deck of 'glass cockpit' airplanes or air traffic control) and industrial systems (e.g., power plants, telephone networks, and sophisticated, e.g., 'lights out,' manufacturing facilities). The main body of human-computer interaction (HCI) research complements but does not directly address the primary issues involved in human-computer interaction design for operators of complex systems. Interfaces to complex systems are somewhat special. The 'user' in such systems - i.e., the human operator responsible for safe and effective system operation - is highly skilled, someone who in human-machine systems engineering is sometimes characterized as 'well trained, well motivated'. The 'job' or task context is paramount and, thus, human-computer interaction is subordinate to human job interaction. The design of human interaction with complex systems, i.e., the design of human job interaction, is sometimes called cognitive engineering.

  17. Diffusion-tensor MRI reveals the complex muscle architecture of the human forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froeling, Martijn; Nederveen, Aart J; Heijtel, Dennis F R; Lataster, Arno; Bos, Clemens; Nicolay, Klaas; Maas, Mario; Drost, Maarten R; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2012-07-01

    To design a time-efficient patient-friendly clinical diffusion tensor MRI protocol and postprocessing tool to study the complex muscle architecture of the human forearm. The 15-minute examination was done using a 3 T system and consisted of: T(1) -weighted imaging, dual echo gradient echo imaging, single-shot spin-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) diffusion tensor MRI. Postprocessing comprised of signal-to-noise improvement by a Rician noise suppression algorithm, image registration to correct for motion and eddy currents, and correction of susceptibility-induced deformations using magnetic field inhomogeneity maps. Per muscle one to five regions of interest were used for fiber tractography seeding. To validate our approach, the reconstructions of individual muscles from the in vivo scans were compared to photographs of those dissected from a human cadaver forearm. Postprocessing proved essential to allow muscle segmentation based on combined T(1) -weighted and diffusion tensor data. The protocol can be applied more generally to study human muscle architecture in other parts of the body. The proposed protocol was able to visualize the muscle architecture of the human forearm in great detail and showed excellent agreement with the dissected cadaver muscles. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. In Vitro Culture Conditions for Maintaining a Complex Population of Human Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Soo Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A stable intestinal microbiota is important in maintaining human physiology and health. Although there have been a number of studies using in vitro and in vivo approaches to determine the impact of diet and xenobiotics on intestinal microbiota, there is no consensus for the best in vitro culture conditions for growth of the human gastrointestinal microbiota. To investigate the dynamics and activities of intestinal microbiota, it is important for the culture conditions to support the growth of a wide range of intestinal bacteria and maintain a complex microbial community representative of the human gastrointestinal tract. Here, we compared the bacterial community in three culture media: brain heart infusion broth and high- and low-carbohydrate medium with different growth supplements. The bacterial community was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE, pyrosequencing and real-time PCR. Based on the molecular analysis, this study indicated that the 3% fecal inoculum in low-concentration carbohydrate medium with 1% autoclaved fecal supernatant provided enhanced growth conditions to conduct in vitro studies representative of the human intestinal microbiota.

  19. Management of adenomyosis in infertile women: comparison between laparotomic resection and administration of aromatase inhibitor (Experience in 55 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajuddin Rajuddin

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to observe the results of adenomyosis mangement with resection and administration of aromatase inhibitor. Cases of ademyosis in infertile women were collected for three years (January 1999 to December 2001 and the diagnoses were confirmed using transvaginal USG. Cases were grouped into two groups, i.e. group 1 (undergoing laparotomic resection and group 2 (receiving treatment with aromatase inhibitor of anastrozole. Both groups were evaluated for changes in clinical symptoms, rate of successful pregnancy, and postoperative recurrency rate. During three years as many as 1619 infertility cases were managed, and among which 66 (4.07% cases of adenomyosis were diagnosed with transvaginal USG. As many as 55 cases were analyzed, i.e., 32 cases underwent resection and 23 cases received aromatase inhibitor. Of 32 cases of surgical resection, the histopathological results showed 30 (93.75% cases of adenomyosis and 2 (6.25% cases of uterus myoma. In the group undergoing resection three cases (9.4% were successfully pregnant, i.e., two cases had live birth, one case ended up with 6-week abortion. Moreover, 25 (78.1% cases were not pregnant and 4 (12.5% cases had recurrency, while 24 (75.35% cases experienced disappearance of symptoms yet not pregnant. On the other hand, of 23 cases in the group receiving aromatase inhibitor 2 (8.6% cases were able to be pregnant, one case had live birth and another case ended up with abortion, while 14 (59.1% cases had disappearance of symptoms yet not pregnant. During three months of treatment with aromatase inhibitor, a reduction in the lesion size between 7.31 mm3 and 25.90 mm3 were observed with CI 95% (p < 0.001. In conclusion, treatment with aromatase inihibitor did not heal lesions, but only reduced the size of adenomyosis lesions. On the other hand, resection could heal lesions, yet recurrency of disease may occur (12.5% after one postoperative year. (Med J Indones 2006; 15

  20. Onchocerciasis transmission in Ghana: the human blood index of sibling species of the Simulium damnosum complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberton, Poppy H L; Cheke, Robert A; Walker, Martin; Winskill, Peter; Crainey, J Lee; Boakye, Daniel A; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y; Tirados, Iñaki; Wilson, Michael D; Tetteh-Kumah, Anthony; Otoo, Sampson; Post, Rory J; Basañez, María-Gloria

    2016-08-05

    Vector-biting behaviour is important for vector-borne disease (VBD) epidemiology. The proportion of blood meals taken on humans (the human blood index, HBI), is a component of the biting rate per vector on humans in VBD transmission models. Humans are the definitive host of Onchocerca volvulus, but the simuliid vectors feed on a range of animals and HBI is a key indicator of the potential for human onchocerciasis transmission. Ghana has a diversity of Simulium damnosum complex members, which are likely to vary in their HBIs, an important consideration for parameterization of onchocerciasis control and elimination models. Host-seeking and ovipositing S. damnosum (sensu lato) (s.l.) were collected from seven villages in four Ghanaian regions. Taxa were morphologically and molecularly identified. Blood meals from individually stored blackfly abdomens were used for DNA profiling, to identify previous host choice. Household, domestic animal, wild mammal and bird surveys were performed to estimate the density and diversity of potential blood hosts of blackflies. A total of 11,107 abdomens of simuliid females (which would have obtained blood meal(s) previously) were tested, with blood meals successfully amplified in 3,772 (34 %). A single-host species was identified in 2,857 (75.7 %) of the blood meals, of which 2,162 (75.7 %) were human. Simulium soubrense Beffa form, S. squamosum C and S. sanctipauli Pra form were the most anthropophagic (HBI = 0.92, 0.86 and 0.70, respectively); S. squamosum E, S. yahense and S. damnosum (sensu stricto) (s.s.)/S. sirbanum were the most zoophagic (HBI = 0.44, 0.53 and 0.63, respectively). The degree of anthropophagy decreased (but not statistically significantly) with increasing ratio of non-human/human blood hosts. Vector to human ratios ranged from 139 to 1,198 blackflies/person. DNA profiling can successfully identify blood meals from host-seeking and ovipositing blackflies. Host choice varies according to sibling

  1. Controlling your impulses: electrical stimulation of the human supplementary motor complex prevents impulsive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieser, Laure; van den Wildenberg, Wery; Hasbroucq, Thierry; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Burle, Borís

    2015-02-18

    To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy humans leaves action urges unchanged but prevents them from turning into overt errors. Subjects performed a choice reaction-time task known to trigger impulsive responses, leading to fast errors that can be revealed by analyzing accuracy as a function of poststimulus time. Yet, such fast errors are only the tip of the iceberg: electromyography (EMG) revealed fast subthreshold muscle activation in the incorrect response hand in an even larger proportion of overtly correct trials, revealing covert response impulses not discernible in overt behavior. Analyzing both overt and covert response tendencies enables to gauge the ability to prevent these incorrect impulses from turning into overt action errors. Hyperpolarizing the supplementary motor complex using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) preserves action impulses but prevents their behavioral expression. This new combination of detailed behavioral, EMG, and tDCS techniques clarifies the neurophysiology of impulse control, and may point to avenues for improving impulse control deficits in various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/333010-06$15.00/0.

  2. Human-Chromatin-Related Protein Interactions Identify a Demethylase Complex Required for Chromosome Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Marcon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  3. SSFSE sequence functional MRI of the human cervical spinal cord with complex finger tapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Chuhai [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: xiechuhai@hotmail.com; Kong Kangmei [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: kongkm@vip.sina.com; Guan Jitian [Department of Medical Imaging, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: jtguan@126.com; Chen Yexi [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: yexichen@21cn.com; He Jiankang [Department of Medical Imaging, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: colin3727@sina.com; Qi Weili [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: qiwl@sina.com; Wang Xinjia [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: xj.wang2000@163.com; Shen Zhiwei [Department of Medical Imaging, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: zwshen@stu.edu.cn; Wu Renhua [Department of Medical Imaging, Second Affiliated Hospital to Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041 (China)], E-mail: rhwu@stu.edu.cn

    2009-04-15

    Purpose: Functional MR imaging of the human cervical spinal cord was carried out on volunteers during alternated rest and a complex finger tapping task, in order to detect image intensity changes arising from neuronal activity. Methods: Functional MR imaging data using single-shot fast spin-echo sequence (SSFSE) with echo time 42.4 ms on a 1.5 T GE Clinical System were acquired in eight subjects performing a complex finger tapping task. Cervical spinal cord activation was measured both in the sagittal and transverse imaging planes. Postprocessing was performed by AFNI (Analysis of Functional Neuroimages) software system. Results: Intensity changes (5.5-7.6%) were correlated with the time course of stimulation and were consistently detected in both sagittal and transverse imaging planes of the cervical spinal cord. The activated regions localized to the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord in agreement with the neural anatomy. Conclusion: Functional MR imaging signals can be reliably detected with finger tapping activity in the human cervical spinal cord using a SSFSE sequence with 42.4 ms echo time. The anatomic location of neural activity correlates with the muscles used in the finger tapping task.

  4. A CMC1-knockout reveals translation-independent control of human mitochondrial complex IV biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourens, Myriam; Barrientos, Antoni

    2017-03-01

    Defects in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (CIV) frequently cause encephalocardiomyopathies. Human CIV assembly involves 14 subunits of dual genetic origin and multiple nucleus-encoded ancillary factors. Biogenesis of the mitochondrion-encoded copper/heme-containing COX1 subunit initiates the CIV assembly process. Here, we show that the intermembrane space twin CX9C protein CMC1 forms an early CIV assembly intermediate with COX1 and two assembly factors, the cardiomyopathy proteins COA3 and COX14. A TALEN-mediated CMC1 knockout HEK293T cell line displayed normal COX1 synthesis but decreased CIV activity owing to the instability of newly synthetized COX1. We demonstrate that CMC1 stabilizes a COX1-COA3-COX14 complex before the incorporation of COX4 and COX5a subunits. Additionally, we show that CMC1 acts independently of CIV assembly factors relevant to COX1 metallation (COX10, COX11, and SURF1) or late stability (MITRAC7). Furthermore, whereas human COX14 and COA3 have been proposed to affect COX1 mRNA translation, our data indicate that CMC1 regulates turnover of newly synthesized COX1 prior to and during COX1 maturation, without affecting the rate of COX1 synthesis. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. α-1 Antitrypsin regulates human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by soluble immune complexes and IL-8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the protein α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) causes a chronic lung disease in humans that is characterized by excessive mobilization of neutrophils into the lung. However, the reason for the increased neutrophil burden has not been fully elucidated. In this study we have demonstrated using human neutrophils that serum AAT coordinates both CXCR1- and soluble immune complex (sIC) receptor-mediated chemotaxis by divergent pathways. We demonstrated that glycosylated AAT can bind to IL-8 (a ligand for CXCR1) and that AAT-IL-8 complex formation prevented IL-8 interaction with CXCR1. Second, AAT modulated neutrophil chemotaxis in response to sIC by controlling membrane expression of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) Fc receptor FcγRIIIb. This process was mediated through inhibition of ADAM-17 enzymatic activity. Neutrophils isolated from clinically stable AAT-deficient patients were characterized by low membrane expression of FcγRIIIb and increased chemotaxis in response to IL-8 and sIC. Treatment of AAT-deficient individuals with AAT augmentation therapy resulted in increased AAT binding to IL-8, increased AAT binding to the neutrophil membrane, decreased FcγRIIIb release from the neutrophil membrane, and normalization of chemotaxis. These results provide new insight into the mechanism underlying the effect of AAT augmentation therapy in the pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency.

  6. Structural Disorder in the Complex of Human Pregnane X Receptor and the Macrolide Antibiotic Rifampicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Orans, Jillian; Moore, Linda B.; Xue, Yu; Peng, Li; Collins, Jon L.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Lambert, Millard H.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R. (U. of Texas-SMED); (UNC)

    2010-07-13

    The human nuclear xenobiotic receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), detects a variety of structurally distinct endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and controls expression of genes central to drug and cholesterol metabolism. The macrolide antibiotic rifampicin, a front-line treatment for tuberculosis, is an established PXR agonist and, at 823 Da, is one of the largest known ligands for the receptor. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of human PXR in complex with rifampicin. We also use structural and mutagenesis data to examine the origins of the directed promiscuity exhibited by the PXRs across species. Three structurally flexible loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket of PXR are disordered in this crystal structure, including the 200-210 region that is part of a sequence insert novel to the promiscuous PXRs relative to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The 4-methyl-1-piperazinyl ring of rifampicin, which would lie adjacent to the disordered protein regions, is also disordered and not observed in the structure. Taken together, our results indicate that one wall of the PXR ligand-binding cavity can remain flexible even when the receptor is in complex with an activating ligand. These observations highlight the key role that structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous response to xenobiotics.

  7. Human prion protein binds Argonaute and promotes accumulation of microRNA effector complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbings, Derrick; Leblanc, Pascal; Jay, Florence; Pontier, Dominique; Michel, Fabrice; Schwab, Yannick; Alais, Sandrine; Lagrange, Thierry; Voinnet, Olivier

    2012-04-08

    Despite intense research in the context of neurodegenerative diseases associated with its misfolding, the endogenous human prion protein PrP(C) (or PRNP) has poorly understood physiological functions. Whereas most PrP(C) is exposed to the extracellular environment, conserved domains result in transmembrane forms of PrP(C) that traffic in the endolysosomal system and are linked to inherited and infectious neuropathologies. One transmembrane PrP(C) variant orients the N-terminal 'octarepeat' domain into the cytoplasm. Here we demonstrate that the octarepeat domain of human PrP(C) contains GW/WG motifs that bind Argonaute (AGO) proteins, the essential components of microRNA (miRNA)-induced silencing complexes (miRISCs). Transmembrane PrP(C) preferentially binds AGO, and PrP(C) promotes formation or stability of miRISC effector complexes containing the trinucleotide repeat-containing gene 6 proteins (TNRC6) and miRNA-repressed mRNA. Accordingly, effective repression of several miRNA targets requires PrP(C). We propose that dynamic interactions between PrP(C)-enriched endosomes and subcellular foci of AGO underpin these effects.

  8. Anatomically-specific intratubular and interstitial biominerals in the human renal medullo-papillary complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Chen

    Full Text Available Limited information exists on the anatomically-specific early stage events leading to clinically detectable mineral aggregates in the renal papilla. In this study, quantitative multiscale correlative maps of structural, elemental and biochemical properties of whole medullo-papillary complexes from human kidneys were developed. Correlative maps of properties specific to the uriniferous and vascular tubules using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and immunolocalization of noncollagenous proteins (NCPs along with their association with anatomy specific biominerals were obtained. Results illustrated that intratubular spherical aggregates primarily form at the proximal regions distant from the papillary tip while interstitial spherical and fibrillar aggregates are distally located near the papillary tip. Biominerals at the papillary tip were closely localized with 10 to 50 μm diameter vasa recta immunolocalized for CD31 inside the medullo-papillary complex. Abundant NCPs known to regulate bone mineralization were localized within nanoparticles, forming early pathologic mineralized regions of the complex. Based on the physical association between vascular and urothelial tubules, results from light and electron microscopy techniques suggested that these NCPs could be delivered from vasculature to prompt calcification of the interstitial regions or they might be synthesized from local vascular smooth muscle cells after transdifferentiation into osteoblast-like phenotypes. In addition, results provided insights into the plausible temporal events that link the anatomically specific intratubular mineral aggregates with the interstitial biomineralization processes within the functional unit of the kidney.

  9. Reconstitution of recombinant human LSm complexes for biochemical, biophysical, and cell biological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaric, Bozidarka L; Kambach, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Sm and Sm-like (LSm) proteins are an ancient family of proteins present in all branches of life. Having originally arisen as RNA chaperones and stabilizers, the family has diversified greatly and fulfills a number of central tasks in various RNA processing events, ranging from pre-mRNA splicing to histone mRNA processing to mRNA degradation. Defects in Sm/LSm protein-containing ribonucleoprotein assembly and function lead to severe medical disorders like spinal muscular atrophy. Sm and LSm proteins always assemble into and function in the form of ringlike hexameric or heptameric complexes whose composition and architecture determine their intracellular location and RNA and effector protein binding specificity and function Sm/LSm complexes that have been assembled in vitro from recombinant components provide a flexible and invaluable tool for detailed cell biological, biochemical, and biophysical studies on these biologically and medically important proteins. We describe here protocols for the construction of bacterial LSm coexpression vectors, expression and purification of LSm proteins and subcomplexes, and the in vitro reconstitution of fully functional human LSm1-7 and LSm2-8 heptameric complexes.

  10. Microsurgical and Tractographic Anatomy of the Supplementary Motor Area Complex in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Baran; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Middlebrooks, Erik H; Karadag, Ali; Ovalioglu, Talat Cem; Jagadeesan, Bharathi; Sandhu, Gauravjot; Tanriover, Necmettin; Grande, Andrew W

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the microsurgical anatomy of the fiber tract connections of the supplementary motor area (SMA) and pre-SMA, and examine its potential functional role with reference to clinical trials in the literature. Ten postmortem formalin-fixed human brains (20 sides) and 1 cadaveric head were prepared following Klingler's method. The fiber dissection was performed in a stepwise fashion, from lateral to medial and also from medial to lateral, under an operating microscope, with 3D images captured at each stage. Our findings were supported by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging tractography in 2 healthy subjects. The connections of the SMA complex, composed of the pre-SMA and the SMA proper, are composed of short "U" association fibers and the superior longitudinal fasciculus I, cingulum, claustrocortical fibers, callosal fibers, corticospinal tract, frontal aslant tract, and frontostriatal tract. The claustrocortical fibers may play an important role in the integration of motor, language, and limbic functions of the SMA complex. The frontostriatal tract connects the pre-SMA to the putamen and caudate nucleus, and also forms parts of both the internal capsule and the dorsal external capsule. The SMA complex has numerous connections throughout the cerebrum. An understanding of these connections is important for presurgical planning for lesions in the frontal lobe and helps explain symptoms related to SMA injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrated Central-Autonomic Multifractal Complexity In The Heart Rate Variability of Healthy Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der Chyan Bill Lin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduce a novel approach to examine the heart-brain interaction underlying the multifractality in the heart rate variability of healthy humans. Via the autonomic perturbation induced by the passive head-up-tilt (HUT, empirical supports for the central-autonomic fractal correlation (CAFC are presented based on the fractal properties in simultaneously recorded electroencephalography (EEG and heart beat interval data. In particular, we show the measure of CAFC varies according to the fractal complexity of HRV. The result implies the change towards more (less complex HRV fractal complexity is associated with a stronger (weaker CAFC and is tested significantly different from the surrogate data. Using the HRV and EEG physiological correlates in the frequency domain, we further show that CAFCis significantly linked to the EEG Beta band activities and the HRV spectral measures in the supine position. These findings suggest a potential arousal factor underlying the physiological processing of the central influence in the HRV scale-free dynamics.

  12. Sarcoglycan complex in human normal and pathological prostatic tissue: an immunohistochemical and RT-PCR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Bramanti, Placido; Favaloro, Angelo; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Trimarchi, Fabio; Di Mauro, Debora; Rinaldi, Carmela; Speciale, Francesco; Inferrera, Antonino; Santoro, Giuseppe; Arena, Salvatore; Patricolo, Mario; Magno, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    The sarcoglycan complex is a trans-membrane system playing a key role in mechano-signaling the connection from the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. While b-, d-, and e-sarcoglycans are widely distributed, g- and a-sarcoglycans are expressed exclusively in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Insufficient data are available on the distribution of sarcoglycans in nonmuscular tissue. In the present study, we used immunohistochemical and RT-PCR techniques to study the sarcoglycans also in normal human glandular tissue, a type of tissue never studied in relation to the sarcoglycan complex, with the aim of verifying the real wider distribution of this complex. To understand the role of sarcoglycans, we tested specimens collected from patients affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia and adenocarcinoma. For the first time, our results showed that all sarcoglycans are detectable in normal samples both in epithelial and in myoepithelial cells; in pathological prostate, sarcoglycans appeared severely reduced in number or were absent. These data demonstrated that all sarcoglycans have a wider distribution suggesting a new unknown role for these proteins. The decreased number of sarcoglycans, containing cadherin domain homologs in samples of prostate affected by hyperplasia, and the absence of proteins in prostate biopsies, in cases affected by adenocarcinoma, could be responsible for the loss of adhesion between epithelial cells, which in turn facilitates the progression of benign tumors and the invasive potential of malignant tumors.

  13. Human dihydrofolate reductase and thymidylate synthase form a complex in vitro and co-localize in normal and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Anna; Jarmuła, Adam; Przybylska, Dorota; Mosieniak, Grażyna; Szczepanowska, Joanna; Kowalkowska, Anna; Rode, Wojciech; Cieśla, Joanna

    2017-05-01

    Enzymes involved in thymidylate biosynthesis, thymidylate synthase (TS), and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) are well-known targets in cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time, that human TS and DHFR form a strong complex in vitro and co-localize in human normal and colon cancer cell cytoplasm and nucleus. Treatment of cancer cells with methotrexate or 5-fluorouracil did not affect the distribution of either enzyme within the cells. However, 5-FU, but not MTX, lowered the presence of DHFR-TS complex in the nucleus by 2.5-fold. The results may suggest the sequestering of TS by FdUMP in the cytoplasm and thereby affecting the translocation of DHFR-TS complex to the nucleus. Providing a strong likelihood of DHFR-TS complex formation in vivo, the latter complex is a potential new drug target in cancer therapy. In this paper, known 3D structures of human TS and human DHFR, and some protozoan bifunctional DHFR-TS structures as templates, are used to build an in silico model of human DHFR-TS complex structure, consisting of one TS dimer and two DHFR monomers. This complex structure may serve as an initial 3D drug target model for prospective inhibitors targeting interfaces between the DHFR and TS enzymes.

  14. Literature and Cinema from "Adaptation" to Re-creation: Coping with the Complexity of Human Recollection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Testa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Early 20th-century avant-gardes put a premium on the notion of "originality" and so created a cultural context in which "adaptation" -- in particular, lit-to cinema adaptation -- later came to be construed by film theory as a kind of derivative, inferior notion. This article offers the proof, based on work on the little-known original Russian sources, that none other than Èizenshtein opined differently, so much so that he preferred to argue instead for the use of the term "re-creation"; and that later semiotic theory, especially thanks to Iurii Lotman, provides us with the tools to develop the "re-creation" concept fully. In the process of re-creation, which is always a process of cultural re-contextualization, the original literary complexity lost in the transmutation must be made up in specific cinematic ways, in order to offer a final re-created artefact worthy of recollection by human society. In times of an overburdened human ability to remember historic sufferings, re-created artefacts that lose information vis-a-vis the original will be quite justly forgotten. On this basis, the article concludes with an elaboration on contemporary Italian cinema -- especially some commercially successful noirs -- drawn from literature (or rather, books of fiction and pinpoints the nature of one of that type of cinema's recurrent shortcomings. The essential defect of such films is identified in their inability to make up by cinematic means for the loss of complexity which they endure in the transition from one medium to another. This is all the more true when, as in the case of the noirs examined here, complexity is already scant in the original books in the first place.

  15. Targeting Androgen Receptor/Src Complex Impairs the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Fibrosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Background Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Experimental Findings: We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. Conclusion This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the

  16. Applying mass spectrometry-based qualitative proteomics to human amygdaloid complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín eFernández-Irigoyen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The amygdaloid complex is a key brain structure involved in the expression of behaviours and emotions such as learning, fear, and anxiety. Brain diseases including depression, epilepsy, autism, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer`s disease, have been associated with amygdala dysfunction. For several decades, neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, volumetric, and cognitive approaches have been the gold standard techniques employed to characterize the amygdala functionality. However, little attention has been focused specifically on the molecular composition of the human amygdala from the perspective of proteomics. We have performed a global proteome analysis employing protein and peptide fractionation methods followed by nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS, detecting expression of at least 1820 protein species in human amygdala, corresponding to 1814 proteins which represent a 9-fold increase in proteome coverage with respect to previous proteomic profiling of the rat amygdala. Gene ontology analysis were used to determine biological process represented in human amygdala highlighting molecule transport, nucleotide binding, and oxidoreductase and GTPase activities. Bioinformatic analyses have revealed that nearly 4% of identified proteins have been previously associated to neurodegenerative syndromes, and 26% of amygdaloid proteins were also found to be present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. In particular, a subset of amygdaloid proteins was mainly involved in axon guidance, synaptic vesicle release, L1CAM interactome, and signaling pathways transduced by NGF and NCAM1. Taken together, our data contributes to the repertoire of the human brain proteome, serving as a reference library to provide basic information for understanding the neurobiology of the human amygdala.

  17. Retrospective analysis of main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human complex traits

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    Brasch-Andersen Charlotte

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The etiology of multifactorial human diseases involves complex interactions between numerous environmental factors and alleles of many genes. Efficient statistical tools are demanded in identifying the genetic and environmental variants that affect the risk of disease development. This paper introduces a retrospective polytomous logistic regression model to measure both the main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human discrete and continuous complex traits. In this model, combinations of genotypes at two interacting loci or of environmental exposure and genotypes at one locus are treated as nominal outcomes of which the proportions are modeled as a function of the disease trait assigning both main and interaction effects and with no assumption of normality in the trait distribution. Performance of our method in detecting interaction effect is compared with that of the case-only model. Results Results from our simulation study indicate that our retrospective model exhibits high power in capturing even relatively small effect with reasonable sample sizes. Application of our method to data from an association study on the catalase -262C/T promoter polymorphism and aging phenotypes detected significant main and interaction effects for age-group and allele T on individual's cognitive functioning and produced consistent results in estimating the interaction effect as compared with the popular case-only model. Conclusion The retrospective polytomous logistic regression model can be used as a convenient tool for assessing both main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human multifactorial diseases involving genetic and non-genetic factors as well as categorical or continuous traits.

  18. The interaction between aromatase, metalloproteinase 2,9 and cd44 in breast cancer A interação entre aromatase, metalloproteinase 2, 9 e cd44 no câncer de mama

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    Fábio Bagnoli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study intends to verify the expression levels and correlation of aromatase, matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 and CD44 in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC when both are found in the same breast. METHODS: One hundred and ten cases were evaluated by tissue microarray (TMA and immunohistochemically screened with anti-aromatase polyclonal antibodies, anti-MMP-2 monoclonal antibodies, anti-MMP-9 policlonal antibodies and anti-CD44 monoclonal antibodies. RESULTS: Aromatase was expressed in IDC and DCIS in 63 (57.3% and 60 (67% of the cases respectively; MMP-2 was similarly expressed in IDC and DCIS in 15 (13.60% cases; MMP-9 was positively expressed in IDC and DCIS in 83 (75.50% and 82 (74.50% cases, respectively; CD44 was positively expressed in IDC and DCIS in 49 (44.50% and 48 (42.60% of the cases, respectively; all of them were highly correlated (pOBJETIVO: O objetivo desse estudo é verificar as expressões e correlações da aromatase, metalloproteinase 2 da matriz (MMP2, metalloproteinase 9 da matriz (MMP-9 e CD44 no carcinoma ductal in situ (CDIS e carcinoma ductal infiltrativo (CDI quando ambos estão presentes simultaneamente na mesma mama. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 110 casos pelo método de tissue microarray (TMA e através da utilização de anticorpos policlonais antiaromatase, anticorpos monoclonais anti-MMP-2, anticorpos policlonais anti-MMP-9 e anticorpos monoclonais anti-CD44. RESULTADOS: A aromatase estava expressa de forma positiva no CDI e CDIS em 63 (57,3% e 60 (67% casos, respectivamente. A expressão de MMP-2 estava expressa de forma positiva em 15 (13,6% casos tanto no CDI, quanto no CDIS. A expressão da MMP-9 estava expressa de forma positiva em 83 (75,5% e 82 (74,5% casos de CDI e CDIS, respectivamente. A expressão de CD44 estava expressa de forma positiva em 49 (44,5% e 48 (42,6% casos de CDI e CDIS, respectivamente. Todos eles

  19. Management of bone loss in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitors

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    Margarida Cepa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, but despite survival rates improvement, it is still the second major cause of cancer related death. In postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER dependent breast cancer, hormone therapy is an option, either by direct inhibition of ER using tamoxifen or by aromatase inhibition, resulting in decreased estrogen production. In this paper these two endocrine therapy approaches are compared in terms of their impact on bone health. Guidance for the prevention of bone loss and occurrence of fractures in postmenopausal women receiving AIs is also proposed. Despite intervention strategies to maintain bone health in AI-treated patients are not well established, recommendations by international societies to identify women with high risk of fracture and advice on the preventive anti-fracture therapy are exposed. Finally, available therapeutic options for management of bone loss in patients receiving AIs are presented. The search strategy for this literature review was conducted by using the key words “aromatase inhibitor*” and “bone loss” OR “aromatase inhibitor*” and “osteoporosis” in the MEDLINE/PubMed database. Nowadays, hormone-responsive breast cancer in postmenopausal women is preferably being treated with AIs instead of tamoxifen, due to clear benefits in disease-free survival and reduced recurrence. AIs have an advantageous side effect profile compared to tamoxifen, however all AIs have detrimental long-term effects on bone, due to nearly complete depletion of estrogens, resulting in increased bone loss and increased risk of fracture. Current recommendations state that all women treated with AIs should be evaluated for their fracture risk prior to initiation of AI-treatment, taking in consideration individual bone mineral density and several risk factors. The thresholds to introduce preventive therapy and drugs proposed differ among the available recommendations

  20. Management of bone loss in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepa, M; Vaz, C

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, but despite survival rates improvement, it is still the second major cause of cancer related death. In postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER) dependent breast cancer, hormone therapy is an option, either by direct inhibition of ER using tamoxifen or by aromatase inhibition, resulting in decreased estrogen production. In this paper these two endocrine therapy approaches are compared in terms of their impact on bone health. Guidance for the prevention of bone loss and occurrence of fractures in postmenopausal women receiving AIs is also proposed. Despite intervention strategies to maintain bone health in AI-treated patients are not well established, recommendations by international societies to identify women with high risk of fracture and advice on the preventive anti-fracture therapy are exposed. Finally, available therapeutic options for management of bone loss in patients receiving AIs are presented. The search strategy for this literature review was conducted by using the key words "aromatase inhibitor*" and "bone loss" OR "aromatase inhibitor*" and "osteoporosis" in the MEDLINE/PubMed database. Nowadays, hormone-responsive breast cancer in postmenopausal women is preferably being treated with AIs instead of tamoxifen, due to clear benefits in disease-free survival and reduced recurrence. AIs have an advantageous side effect profile compared to tamoxifen, however all AIs have detrimental long-term effects on bone, due to nearly complete depletion of estrogens, resulting in increased bone loss and increased risk of fracture. Current recommendations state that all women treated with AIs should be evaluated for their fracture risk prior to initiation of AI-treatment, taking in consideration individual bone mineral density and several risk factors. The thresholds to introduce preventive therapy and drugs proposed differ among the available recommendations. Lifestyle modifications and adequate

  1. Extended adjuvant aromatase inhibition after sequential endocrine therapy (DATA): a randomised, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G; van Hellemond, Irene E G; Peer, Petronella G M; Swinkels, Astrid C P; Smorenburg, Carolien H; van der Sangen, Maurice J C; Kroep, Judith R; De Graaf, Hiltje; Honkoop, Aafke H; Erdkamp, Frans L G; van den Berkmortel, Franchette W P J; de Boer, Maaike; de Roos, Wilfred K; Linn, Sabine C; Imholz, Alexander L T; Seynaeve, Caroline M

    2017-10-11

    The effect of extended adjuvant aromatase inhibition in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer after sequential endocrine therapy of tamoxifen followed by an aromatase inhibitor for a 5-year treatment period still needs clarification. To address this issue, we began the DATA study to assess different durations of anastrozole therapy after tamoxifen. DATA was a prospective, randomised, open-label, multicentre, phase 3 study done in 79 hospitals in the Netherlands. We randomly assigned postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer with no signs of disease recurrence after 2-3 years of adjuvant tamoxifen to either 3 or 6 years of anastrozole treatment (1 mg orally once a day) in a 1:1 ratio. We used TENALEA (Trans European Network for Clinical Trials Services) for the randomisation procedure. Stratification factors were nodal status, hormone receptor status, HER2 status, and tamoxifen treatment duration. The primary study endpoint of this analysis was disease-free survival starting beyond 3 years after randomisation (adapted disease-free survival). Here we report the final analysis from the DATA trial, which is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00301457. Between June 28, 2006, and Aug 10, 2009, we screened 1912 patients of whom 955 were assigned to the 3-year group and 957 to the 6-year anastrozole treatment group. 1860 patients were eligible (931 in the 6-year group and 929 in the 3-year group) and 1660 were disease free 3 years after randomisation. The 5-year adapted disease-free survival was 83·1% (95% CI 80·0-86·3) in the 6-year group and 79·4% (76·1-82·8) in the 3-year group (hazard ratio [HR] 0·79 [95% CI 0·62-1·02]; p=0·066). Patients in the 6-year treatment group had more adverse events than those in the 3-year treatment group, including all-grade arthralgia or myalgia (478 [58%] of 827 in the 6-year treatment group vs 438 [53%] of 833 in the 3-year treatment group) and osteopenia or osteoporosis (173 [21%] vs

  2. KI motifs of human Knl1 enhance assembly of comprehensive spindle checkpoint complexes around MELT repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Veronica; Overlack, Katharina; Primorac, Ivana; van Gerwen, Suzan; Musacchio, Andrea

    2014-01-06

    The KMN network, a ten-subunit protein complex, mediates the interaction of kinetochores with spindle microtubules and recruits spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) constituents to halt cells in mitosis until attainment of sister chromatid biorientation. Two types of motifs in the KMN subunit Knl1 interact with SAC proteins. Lys-Ile (KI) motifs, found in vertebrates, interact with the TPR motifs of Bub1 and BubR1. Met-Glu-Leu-Thr (MELT) repeats, ubiquitous in evolution, recruit the Bub3/Bub1 complex in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The exact contributions of KI and MELT motifs to SAC signaling and chromosome alignment are unclear. We report here that KI motifs cooperate strongly with the neighboring single MELT motif in the N-terminal 250 residues (Knl1(1-250)) of human Knl1 to seed a comprehensive assembly of SAC proteins. In cells depleted of endogenous Knl1, kinetochore-targeted Knl1(1-250) suffices to restore SAC and chromosome alignment. Individual MELT repeats outside of Knl1(1-250), which lack flanking KI motifs, establish qualitatively similar sets of interactions, but less efficiently. MELT sequences on Knl1 emerge from our analysis as the platforms on which SAC complexes become assembled. Our results show that KI motifs are enhancers of MELT function in assembling SAC signaling complexes, and that they might have evolved to limit the expansion of MELT motifs by providing a more robust mechanism of SAC signaling around a single MELT. We shed light on the mechanism of Bub1 and BubR1 recruitment and identify crucial questions for future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human apolipoprotein A-I forms thermally stable complexes with anionic but not with zwitterionic phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surewicz, W K; Epand, R M; Pownall, H J; Hui, S W

    1986-12-05

    The mechanism of the association of human plasma apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) with the acidic phospholipids, dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), egg yolk phosphatidylglycerol, and dioleoylphosphatidylserine as well as with the zwitterionic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) has been studied using turbidimetry, circular dichroism, high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry, and electron microscopy. The association of apo A-I with multilamellar liposomes of acidic phospholipids is rapid over a broad temperature range at and above the temperature of the lipid gel to liquid crystalline transition, Tc. This is in contrast to zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine which recombines with apo A-I only over a narrow temperature range around Tc. The complex of apo A-I with DMPC denatures at elevated temperatures giving rise to a calorimetrically detectable transition. The temperature range and width of this transition is shown to be markedly dependent on the heating rate. This is again in contrast to apo A-I recombinants with DMPG which show no calorimetrically detectable thermal denaturation, at least in a temperature range up to 100 degrees C. Also circular dichroism data indicate high resistance of apo A-I to thermal unfolding in the presence of DMPG. It is concluded that the complexes of apo A-I with DMPC are thermodynamically stable only at temperatures near Tc, whereas above and below this temperature range the stability of these recombinants is determined by kinetic factors. In contrast, complexes of apo A-I with DMPG and other acidic phospholipids may be thermodynamically stable over a wide temperature range greater than or equal to Tc. In spite of these fundamental differences between zwitterionic and acidic phospholipids in their mode of association with apo A-I, the binding affinity and the morphology of the recombinants are similar. Both apo A-I X DMPC and apo A-I X DMPG complexes form lipoprotein particles having a discoidal shape.

  4. Tracking a Subset of Skeleton Joints: An Effective Approach towards Complex Human Activity Recognition

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    Muhammad Latif Anjum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a robust algorithm for complex human activity recognition for natural human-robot interaction. The algorithm is based on tracking the position of selected joints in human skeleton. For any given activity, only a few skeleton joints are involved in performing the activity, so a subset of joints contributing the most towards the activity is selected. Our approach of tracking a subset of skeleton joints (instead of tracking the whole skeleton is computationally efficient and provides better recognition accuracy. We have developed both manual and automatic approaches for the selection of these joints. The position of the selected joints is tracked for the duration of the activity and is used to construct feature vectors for each activity. Once the feature vectors have been constructed, we use a Support Vector Machines (SVM multiclass classifier for training and testing the algorithm. The algorithm has been tested on a purposely built dataset of depth videos recorded using Kinect camera. The dataset consists of 250 videos of 10 different activities being performed by different users. Experimental results show classification accuracy of 83% when tracking all skeleton joints, 95% when using manual selection of subset joints, and 89% when using automatic selection of subset joints.

  5. Structure of the human [kappa]-opioid receptor in complex with JDTic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Mileni, Mauro; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Vardy, Eyal; Liu, Wei; Thompson, Aaron A.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Carroll, F. Ivy; Mascarella, S. Wayne; Westkaemper, Richard B.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (VCU); (Scripps); (UNC); (Res. Tri. Inst.)

    2013-04-25

    Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and - in the case of {kappa}-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) - dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human {kappa}-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human {kappa}-OR. Modelling of other important {kappa}-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for {kappa}-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human {kappa}-OR.

  6. Genome-Wide Prediction of DNA Methylation Using DNA Composition and Sequence Complexity in Human

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    Chengchao Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a significant role in transcriptional regulation by repressing activity. Change of the DNA methylation level is an important factor affecting the expression of target genes and downstream phenotypes. Because current experimental technologies can only assay a small proportion of CpG sites in the human genome, it is urgent to develop reliable computational models for predicting genome-wide DNA methylation. Here, we proposed a novel algorithm that accurately extracted sequence complexity features (seven features and developed a support-vector-machine-based prediction model with integration of the reported DNA composition features (trinucleotide frequency and GC content, 65 features by utilizing the methylation profiles of embryonic stem cells in human. The prediction results from 22 human chromosomes with size-varied windows showed that the 600-bp window achieved the best average accuracy of 94.7%. Moreover, comparisons with two existing methods further showed the superiority of our model, and cross-species predictions on mouse data also demonstrated that our model has certain generalization ability. Finally, a statistical test of the experimental data and the predicted data on functional regions annotated by ChromHMM found that six out of 10 regions were consistent, which implies reliable prediction of unassayed CpG sites. Accordingly, we believe that our novel model will be useful and reliable in predicting DNA methylation.

  7. Genomic approaches uncover increasing complexities in the regulatory landscape at the human SCL (TAL1 locus.

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    Pawandeep Dhami

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The SCL (TAL1 transcription factor is a critical regulator of haematopoiesis and its expression is tightly controlled by multiple cis-acting regulatory elements. To elaborate further the DNA elements which control its regulation, we used genomic tiling microarrays covering 256 kb of the human SCL locus to perform a concerted analysis of chromatin structure and binding of regulatory proteins in human haematopoietic cell lines. This approach allowed us to characterise further or redefine known human SCL regulatory elements and led to the identification of six novel elements with putative regulatory function both up and downstream of the SCL gene. They bind a number of haematopoietic transcription factors (GATA1, E2A LMO2, SCL, LDB1, CTCF or components of the transcriptional machinery and are associated with relevant histone modifications, accessible chromatin and low nucleosomal density. Functional characterisation shows that these novel elements are able to enhance or repress SCL promoter activity, have endogenous promoter function or enhancer-blocking insulator function. Our analysis opens up several areas for further investigation and adds new layers of complexity to our understanding of the regulation of SCL expression.

  8. The human Major Histocompatibility Complex as a paradigm in genomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandiedonck, Claire; Knight, Julian C

    2009-09-01

    Since its discovery more than 50 years ago, the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) on chromosome 6p21.3 has been at the forefront of human genetic research. Here, we review from a historical perspective the major advances in our understanding of the nature and consequences of genetic variation which have involved the MHC, as well as highlighting likely future directions. As a consequence of its particular genomic structure, its remarkable polymorphism and its early implication in numerous diseases, the MHC has been considered as a model region for genomics, being the first substantial region to be sequenced and establishing fundamental concepts of linkage disequilibrium, haplotypic structure and meiotic recombination. Recently, the MHC became the first genomic region to be entirely re-sequenced for common haplotypes, while studies mapping gene expression phenotypes across the genome have strongly implicated variation in the MHC. This review shows how the MHC continues to provide new insights and remains in the vanguard of contemporary research in human genomics.

  9. Neandertal demise: an archaeological analysis of the modern human superiority complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Paola; Roebroeks, Wil

    2014-01-01

    Neandertals are the best-studied of all extinct hominins, with a rich fossil record sampling hundreds of individuals, roughly dating from between 350,000 and 40,000 years ago. Their distinct fossil remains have been retrieved from Portugal in the west to the Altai area in central Asia in the east and from below the waters of the North Sea in the north to a series of caves in Israel in the south. Having thrived in Eurasia for more than 300,000 years, Neandertals vanished from the record around 40,000 years ago, when modern humans entered Europe. Modern humans are usually seen as superior in a wide range of domains, including weaponry and subsistence strategies, which would have led to the demise of Neandertals. This systematic review of the archaeological records of Neandertals and their modern human contemporaries finds no support for such interpretations, as the Neandertal archaeological record is not different enough to explain the demise in terms of inferiority in archaeologically visible domains. Instead, current genetic data suggest that complex processes of interbreeding and assimilation may have been responsible for the disappearance of the specific Neandertal morphology from the fossil record.

  10. Neandertal demise: an archaeological analysis of the modern human superiority complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Villa

    Full Text Available Neandertals are the best-studied of all extinct hominins, with a rich fossil record sampling hundreds of individuals, roughly dating from between 350,000 and 40,000 years ago. Their distinct fossil remains have been retrieved from Portugal in the west to the Altai area in central Asia in the east and from below the waters of the North Sea in the north to a series of caves in Israel in the south. Having thrived in Eurasia for more than 300,000 years, Neandertals vanished from the record around 40,000 years ago, when modern humans entered Europe. Modern humans are usually seen as superior in a wide range of domains, including weaponry and subsistence strategies, which would have led to the demise of Neandertals. This systematic review of the archaeological records of Neandertals and their modern human contemporaries finds no support for such interpretations, as the Neandertal archaeological record is not different enough to explain the demise in terms of inferiority in archaeologically visible domains. Instead, current genetic data suggest that complex processes of interbreeding and assimilation may have been responsible for the disappearance of the specific Neandertal morphology from the fossil record.

  11. Expanding the Scope of Organizational Behavior Management: Relational Frame Theory and the Experimental Analysis of Complex Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Steven C.; Bunting, Kara; Herbst, Scott; Bond, Frank W.; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2006-01-01

    Behavior analysis in general and applied behavior analysis in particular requires a well developed, empirically supported, and useful approach to human language and cognition in order to fulfill its mission of providing a relatively adequate comprehensive account of complex human behavior. This article introduces a series of articles in which the…

  12. Characterization to species level of Mycobacterium avium complex strains from human immunodeficiency virus-positive and -negative patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Kyriakopoulos, A M; Tassios, P. T.; Matsiota-Bernard, P; Marinis, E; Tsaousidou, S; Legakis, N J

    1997-01-01

    Forty human clinical Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex strains isolated in Greece were characterized to the species level by PCR with three sets of primers specific for one or both species. M. avium predominated in both human immunodeficiency virus-positive and -negative patients, but the frequency of M. intracellulare isolation appeared to be higher in the latter.

  13. Low-density crystal packing of human protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit in complex with resorufin or other ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klopffleisch, Karsten; Niefind, Karsten; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2012-01-01

    A low-resolution structure of the catalytic subunit CK2α of human protein kinase CK2 (formerly known as casein kinase 2) in complex with the ATP-competitive inhibitor resorufin is presented. The structure supplements previous human CK2α structures in which the interdomain hinge/helix αD region...

  14. Assignment of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) gene(s) to human chromosome 2 in rodent-human somatic cell hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbschleb-Voogt, E; Grzeschik, K H; Pearson, P L; Meera Khan, P

    1981-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper indicate that the expression of human adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human-rodent somatic cell hybrids is influenced by the state of confluency of the cells and the background rodent genome. Thus, the complement of the L-cell derived A9 or B82 mouse parent apparently prevents the expression of human ADCP in the interspecific somatic cell hybrids. In the a3, E36, or RAG hybrids the human ADCP expression was not prevented by the rodent genome and was found to be proportional to the degree of confluency of the cell in the culture as in the case of primary human fibroblasts. An analysis of human chromosomes, chromosome specific enzyme markers, and ADCP in a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids optimally maintained and harvested at full confluency has shown that the expression of human ADCP in the mouse (RAG)-human as well as in the hamster (E36 or a3)-human hybrids is determined by a gene(s) in human chromosome 2 and that neither chromosome 6 nor any other of the chromosomes of man carry any gene(s) involved in the formation of human ADCP at least in the Chinese hamster-human hybrids. A series of rodent-human hybrid clones exhibiting a mitotic separation of IDH1 and MDH1 indicated that ADCP is most probably situated between corresponding loci in human chromosome 2.

  15. Cellular responses induced by Cu(II quinolinonato complexes in human tumor and hepatic cells

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    Trávníček Zdeněk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspired by the unprecedented historical success of cisplatin, one of the most important research directions in bioinorganic and medicinal chemistry is dedicated to the development of new anticancer compounds with the potential to surpass it in antitumor activity, while having lower unwanted side-effects. Therefore, a series of copper(II mixed-ligand complexes of the type [Cu(qui(L]Y · xH2O (1–6, where Hqui = 2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H-quinolinone, Y = NO3 (1, 3, 5 or BF4 (2, 4, 6, and L = 1,10-phenanthroline (phen (1, 2, 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen (3, 4 and bathophenanthroline (bphen (5, 6, was studied for their in vitro cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines (A549 lung carcinoma, HeLa cervix epitheloid carcinoma, G361 melanoma cells, A2780 ovarian carcinoma, A2780cis cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma, LNCaP androgen-sensitive prostate adenocarcinoma and THP-1 monocytic leukemia. Results The tested complexes displayed a stronger cytotoxic effect against all the cancer cells as compared to cisplatin. The highest cytotoxicity was found for the complexes 4 (IC50 = 0.36 ± 0.05 μM and 0.56 ± 0.15 μM, 5 (IC50 = 0.66 ± 0.07 μM and 0.73 ± 0.08 μM and 6 (IC50 = 0.57 ± 0.11 μM and 0.70 ± 0.20 μM against A2780, and A2780cis respectively, as compared with the values of 12.0 ± 0.8 μM and 27.0 ± 4.6 μM determined for cisplatin. Moreover, the tested complexes were much less cytotoxic to primary human hepatocytes than to the cancer cells. The complexes 5 and 6 exhibited significantly high ability to modulate secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α (2873 ± 238 pg/mL and 3284 ± 139 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively and IL-1β (1177 ± 128 pg/mL and 1087 ± 101 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively tested on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells as compared with the values of 1173

  16. Human sex hormone-binding globulin gene expression- multiple promoters and complex alternative splicing

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    Rosner William

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG regulates free sex steroid concentrations in plasma and modulates rapid, membrane based steroid signaling. SHBG is encoded by an eight exon-long transcript whose expression is regulated by a downstream promoter (PL. The SHBG gene was previously shown to express a second major transcript of unknown function, derived from an upstream promoter (PT, and two minor transcripts. Results We report that transcriptional expression of the human SHBG gene is far more complex than previously described. PL and PT direct the expression of at least six independent transcripts each, resulting from alternative splicing of exons 4, 5, 6, and/or 7. We mapped two transcriptional start sites downstream of PL and PT, and present evidence for a third SHBG gene promoter (PN within the neighboring FXR2 gene; PN regulates the expression of at least seven independent SHBG gene transcripts, each possessing a novel, 164-nt first exon (1N. Transcriptional expression patterns were generated for human prostate, breast, testis, liver, and brain, and the LNCaP, MCF-7, and HepG2 cell lines. Each expresses the SHBG transcript, albeit in varying abundance. Alternative splicing was more pronounced in the cancer cell lines. PL- PT- and PN-derived transcripts were most abundant in liver, testis, and prostate, respectively. Initial findings reveal the existence of a smaller immunoreactive SHBG species in LNCaP, MCF-7, and HepG2 cells. Conclusion These results extend our understanding of human SHBG gene transcription, and raise new and important questions regarding the role of novel alternatively spliced transcripts, their function in hormonally responsive tissues including the breast and prostate, and the role that aberrant SHBG gene expression may play in cancer.

  17. Induction of Female-to-Male Sex Change in Adult Zebrafish by Aromatase Inhibitor Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, Kanae; Miyaoku, Kaori; Roy, Shimi Rani; Murono, Yuki; Sago, Tomohiro; Itagaki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaru; Tokumoto, Toshinobu

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated whether undifferentiated germ and/or somatic stem cells remain in the differentiated ovary of a species that does not undergo sex changes under natural conditions and retain their sexual plasticity. The effect of aromatase inhibitor (AI)-treatment on sexually mature female zebrafish was examined. A 5-month AI treatment caused retraction of the ovaries after which testes-like organs appeared, and cyst structures filled with spermatozoa-like cells were observed in sections of these tissues. Electron microscopic observations revealed that these cells appeared as large sperm heads without tails. Sperm formation was re-examined after changing the diet to an AI-free food. A large number of normal sperm were obtained after eight weeks, and no formation of ovarian tissue was observed. Artificial fertilization using sperm from the sex-changed females was successful. These results demonstrated that sex plasticity remains in the mature ovaries of this species.

  18. Complexity, Compassion and Self-Organisation: Human Evolution and the Vulnerable Ape Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick P. Winder

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans are agents capable of helping others, learning new behaviours and forgetting old ones. The evolutionary approach to archaeological systems has therefore been hampered by the 'modern synthesis' - a gene-centred model of evolution as a process that eliminates those that cannot handle stress. The result has been a form of environmental determinism that explains human evolution in terms of heroic struggles and selective winnowing. Biologists committed to the modern synthesis have either dismissed agency as a delusion wrought in our bodies by natural selection, or imposed a sharp, Cartesian split between 'natural' and 'artificial' ecologies. We revisit the seminal literature of evolutionary biology and show that the paradigmatic fault lines of 21st century anthropology can be traced back to the 19th century and beyond. Lamarck had developed a two-factor evolutionary theory - one factor an endogenous tendency to become more advanced and complex, the other an exogenous constraint that drove organisms into conformity with environment. Darwin tried to eliminate the progressive tendency and imposed linearity constraints on evolution that Thomas Henry Huxley rejected. When experimental evidence falsified Darwin's linear hypothesis, the race began to develop a new, gene-centred model of evolution. This became the modern synthesis. The modern synthesis is now under pressure from the evidence of anthropology, sociology, palaeontology, ecology and genetics. An 'extended synthesis' is emerging. If evolution is adequately summarised by the aphorism survival of the fittest, then 'fitness' cannot always be defined in the heroic sense of 'better able to compete and reproduce'. The fittest organisms are often those that evade selective winnowing, even when their ability to compete and reproduce has been compromised by their genes. Characteristically human traits like language, abstraction, compassion and altruism may have arisen as coping strategies that

  19. Investigating the Regulation and Potential Role of Nonhypoxic Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) in Aromatase Inhibitor Resistant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    obese and overweight patients with ER+ breast cancer to neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy. My role in this clinical trial is to analyze HIF-1 and...with drug resistance in different cancer cell types, including chronic myeloid leukemia cells (Zhao et al. Oncogene. 2010), gastric cancer cells (Liu...Hypoxia- Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) in Aromatase Inhibitor Resistant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Armina Kazi CONTRACTING

  20. Prevention of aromatase inhibitor-induced bone loss with alendronate in postmenopausal women: The BATMAN Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Anna J; Yee Yap, Saw; White, Karen; Beith, Jane; Abdi, Ehtesham; Broad, Adam; Sewak, Sanjeev; Lee, Chooi; Sambrook, Philip; Pocock, Nicholas; Henry, Margaret J; Yeow, Elaine G; Bell, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Postmenopausal women on aromatase inhibitors (AI) are at risk of aromatase inhibitor-associated bone loss (AIBL) and fractures. In 2005 Osteoporosis Australia proposed an algorithm for bisphosphonate intervention. Three hundred and three postmenopausal women with early breast cancer (EBC) were enrolled (osteoporotic, n=25; osteopaenic, n=146; normal bone mineral density (BMD), n=126). Weekly alendronate (70 mg) treatment efficacy as triggered by the algorithm in preventing bone loss was evaluated. All patients received anastrozole (1 mg daily), calcium and vitamin D. All osteoporotic patients received alendronate at baseline. Eleven out of the 146 (7.5%) osteopaenic patients commenced alendronate within 18 months of participation and eleven commenced after. One hundred and twenty four out of the 146 (84.9%) osteopaenic patients and all 126 with normal baseline BMD did not trigger the algorithm. At three years, lumbar spine mean BMD increased (15.6%, p<0.01) in the osteoporotic group. BMD in the osteopaenic group with early intervention significantly increased at three years (6.3%, p=0.02). No significant change was seen in the late intervention group. No change was observed in those with osteopaenia without alendronate. There was a significant drop in lumbar spine (-5.4%) and hip (-4.5%) mean BMD, in the normal BMD group, none of whom received alendronate. Fracture data will be presented. In postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive EBC, BMD improved over time when a bisphosphonate is administered with anastrozole in osteoporotic patients using an osteoporosis schedule. Subjects with normal baseline BMD experienced the greatest BMD loss, although none became osteoporotic.

  1. Combining dissimilarities in a Hyper Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space for complex human cancer prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Merino, Manuel; Blanco, Angela; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarrays provide rich profiles that are used in cancer prediction considering the gene expression levels across a collection of related samples. Support Vector Machines (SVM) have been applied to the classification of cancer samples with encouraging results. However, they rely on Euclidean distances that fail to reflect accurately the proximities among sample profiles. Then, non-Euclidean dissimilarities provide additional information that should be considered to reduce the misclassification errors. In this paper, we incorporate in the nu-SVM algorithm a linear combination of non-Euclidean dissimilarities. The weights of the combination are learnt in a (Hyper Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space) HRKHS using a Semidefinite Programming algorithm. This approach allows us to incorporate a smoothing term that penalizes the complexity of the family of distances and avoids overfitting. The experimental results suggest that the method proposed helps to reduce the misclassification errors in several human cancer problems.

  2. Using virtual humans and computer animations to learn complex motor skills: a case study in karate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spanlang Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning motor skills is a complex task involving a lot of cognitive issues. One of the main issues consists in retrieving the relevant information from the learning environment. In a traditional learning situation, a teacher gives oral explanations and performs actions to provide the learner with visual examples. Using virtual reality (VR as a tool for learning motor tasks is promising. However, it raises questions about the type of information this kind of environments can offer. In this paper, we propose to analyze the impact of virtual humans on the perception of the learners. As a case study, we propose to apply this research problem to karate gestures. The results of this study show no significant difference on the after training performance of learners confronted to three different learning environments (traditional group, video and VR.

  3. Human broadly neutralizing antibodies to the envelope glycoprotein complex of hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giang, Erick; Dorner, Marcus; Prentoe, Jannick C

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects ∼2% of the world's population. It is estimated that there are more than 500,000 new infections annually in Egypt, the country with the highest HCV prevalence. An effective vaccine would help control this expanding global health burden. HCV is highly variable......, and an effective vaccine should target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Conserved B-cell epitopes overlapping the CD81 receptor-binding site (CD81bs) on the E2 viral envelope glycoprotein have been reported previously and provide promising vaccine targets. In this study, we isolated 73 human m......bs on the E1E2 complex, has an exceptionally broad neutralizing activity toward diverse HCV genotypes and protects against heterologous HCV challenge in a small animal model. The mAb panel will be useful for the design and development of vaccine candidates to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies...

  4. Interplay between Human Cytomegalovirus and Intrinsic/Innate Host Responses: A Complex Bidirectional Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Giada; Cerboni, Cristina; Santoni, Angela; Landini, Maria Paola; Landolfo, Santo; Gatti, Deborah; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Varani, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and its host is a complex process that begins with viral attachment and entry into host cells, culminating in the development of a specific adaptive response that clears the acute infection but fails to eradicate HCMV. We review the viral and cellular partners that mediate early host responses to HCMV with regard to the interaction between structural components of virions (viral glycoproteins) and cellular receptors (attachment/entry receptors, toll-like receptors, and other nucleic acid sensors) or intrinsic factors (PML, hDaxx, Sp100, viperin, interferon inducible protein 16), the reactions of innate immune cells (antigen presenting cells and natural killer cells), the numerous mechanisms of viral immunoevasion, and the potential exploitation of events that are associated with early phases of virus-host interplay as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:22701276

  5. A novel therapeutic strategy for experimental stroke using docosahexaenoic acid complexed to human albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belayev Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite tremendous efforts in ischemic stroke research and significant improvements in patient care within the last decade, therapy is still insufficient. There is a compelling, urgent need for safe and effective neuroprotective strategies to limit brain injury, facilitate brain repair, and improve functional outcome. Recently, we reported that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6, n-3 complexed to human albumin (DHA-Alb is highly neuroprotective after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo in young rats. This review highlights the potency of DHA-Alb therapy in permanent MCAo and aged rats and whether protection persists with chronic survival. We discovered that a novel therapy with DHA-Alb improved behavioral outcomes accompanied by attenuation of lesion volumes even when animals were allowed to survive three weeks after experimental stroke. This treatment might provide the basis for future therapeutics for patients suffering from ischemic stroke.

  6. Munc18-1 Controls SNARE Protein Complex Assembly during Human Sperm Acrosomal Exocytosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Facundo; Zanetti, M. Natalia; Mayorga, Luis S.; Tomes, Claudia N.

    2012-01-01

    The spermatozoon is a very specialized cell capable of carrying out a limited set of functions with high efficiency. Sperm are then excellent model cells to dissect fundamental processes such as regulated exocytosis. The secretion of the single dense-core granule of mammalian spermatozoa relies on the same highly conserved molecules and goes through the same stages as exocytosis in other types of cells. In this study, we describe the presence of Munc18-1 in human sperm and show that this protein has an essential role in acrosomal exocytosis. We observed that inactivation of endogenous Munc18-1 with a specific antibody precluded the stabilization of trans-SNARE complexes and inhibited acrosomal exocytosis. Addition of recombinant Munc18-1 blocked secretion by sequestering monomeric syntaxin, an effect that was rescued by α-soluble NSF attachment protein. By electron microscopy, we observed that both the anti-Munc18-1 antibody and recombinant Munc18-1 inhibited the docking of the acrosome to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, our results indicate that Munc18-1 plays a key role in the dynamics of trans-SNARE complex assembly and/or stabilization, a process that is necessary for the docking of the outer acrosomal membrane to the plasma membrane and subsequent fusion pore opening. PMID:23091057

  7. Structure of Human O-GlcNAc Transferase and its Complex with a Peptide Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Lazarus; Y Nam; J Jiang; P Sliz; S Walker

    2011-12-31

    The essential mammalian enzyme O-linked {beta}-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (O-GlcNAc transferase, here OGT) couples metabolic status to the regulation of a wide variety of cellular signalling pathways by acting as a nutrient sensor. OGT catalyses the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) to serines and threonines of cytoplasmic, nuclear and mitochondrial proteins, including numerous transcription factors, tumour suppressors, kinases, phosphatases and histone-modifying proteins. Aberrant glycosylation by OGT has been linked to insulin resistance, diabetic complications, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Despite the importance of OGT, the details of how it recognizes and glycosylates its protein substrates are largely unknown. We report here two crystal structures of human OGT, as a binary complex with UDP (2.8 {angstrom} resolution) and as a ternary complex with UDP and a peptide substrate (1.95 {angstrom}). The structures provide clues to the enzyme mechanism, show how OGT recognizes target peptide sequences, and reveal the fold of the unique domain between the two halves of the catalytic region. This information will accelerate the rational design of biological experiments to investigate OGT's functions; it will also help the design of inhibitors for use as cellular probes and help to assess its potential as a therapeutic target.

  8. Structural characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 in complex with azole-based inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Roman, Gheorghe; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2010-03-01

    The development of inhibitors specific for heme oxygenases (HO) aims to provide powerful tools in understanding the HO system. Based on the lead structure (2S, 4S)-2-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-2-[(1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl]-4-[((4-aminophenyl)thio)methyl]-1,3-dioxolane (azalanstat, QC-1) we have synthesized structural modifications to develop novel and selective HO inhibitors. The structural study of human HO-1 (hHO-1) in complex with a select group of the inhibitors was initiated using X-ray crystallographic techniques. Comparison of the structures of four such compounds each in complex with hHO-1 revealed a common binding mode, despite having different structural fragments. The compounds bind to the distal side of heme through an azole "anchor" which coordinates with the heme iron. An expansion of the distal pocket, mainly due to distal helix flexibility, allows accommodation of the compounds without displacing heme or the critical Asp140 residue. Rather, binding displaces a catalytically critical water molecule and disrupts an ordered hydrogen-bond network involving Asp140. The presence of a triazole "anchor" may provide further stability via a hydrogen bond with the protein. A hydrophobic pocket acts to stabilize the region occupied by the phenyl or adamantanyl moieties of these compounds. Further, a secondary hydrophobic pocket is formed via "induced fit" to accommodate bulky substituents at the 4-position of the dioxolane ring. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrical Stimulus Controlled Binding/Unbinding of Human Thrombin-Aptamer Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosai, Agnivo; Ma, Xiao; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Shrotriya, Pranav

    2016-11-01

    The binding/unbinding of the human thrombin and its 15-mer single stranded DNA aptamer, under the application of external stimulus in the form of electrostatic potential/electric field, is investigated by a combination of continuum analysis and atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. In agreement with the experiments that demonstrate the influence of electrostatic potential on the thrombin/aptamer complex, our computations show that the application of positive electric field successfully unbinds the thrombin from the aptamer. Results from umbrella sampling simulations reveal that there is a decrease in the free energy of binding between the thrombin and aptamer in presence of positive electric fields. Hydrogen bonding and non-bonded interaction energies, and hence the free energy of binding, between the thrombin and its aptamer reduce as the applied electric field is shifted from negative to positive values. Our analyses demonstrate that application of electrical stimulus modifies the molecular interactions within the complex and consequently, electrical field can be used to modulate the association between the thrombin and its aptamer.

  10. Can transcriptomics provide insight into the chemopreventive mechanisms of complex mixtures of phytochemicals in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breda, Simone G J; Wilms, Lonneke C; Gaj, Stan; Jennen, Danyel G J; Briedé, Jacob J; Helsper, Johannes P; Kleinjans, Jos C S; de Kok, Theo M C M

    2014-05-10

    Blueberries contain relatively large amounts of different phytochemicals, which are suggested to have chemopreventive properties, but little information is available on the underlying molecular modes of action. This study investigates whole genome gene expression changes in lymphocytes of 143 humans after a 4-week blueberry-apple juice dietary intervention. Differentially expressed genes and genes correlating with the extent of antioxidant protection were identified in four subgroups. The magnitude of the preventive effect after the intervention differed between these four subgroups. Furthermore, subjects in two groups carried genetic polymorphisms that were previously found to influence the chemopreventive response. Pathway analysis of the identified genes showed strong but complex gene expression changes in pathways signaling for apoptosis, immune response, cell adhesion, and lipid metabolism. These pathways indicate increased apoptosis, upgraded growth control, induced immunity, reduced platelet aggregation and activation, blood glucose homeostasis, and regulation of fatty acid metabolism. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that combining transcriptomic data with phenotypic markers of oxidative stress may provide insight into the relevant cellular processes and genetic pathways, which contribute to the antioxidant response of complex mixtures of phytochemicals, such as found in blueberry-apple juice.

  11. Signal Complexity of Human Intracranial EEG Tracks Successful Associative-Memory Formation across Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Timothy C; Sreekumar, Vishnu; Inati, Sara K; Zaghloul, Kareem A

    2018-02-14

    Memory performance is highly variable among individuals. Most studies examining human memory, however, have largely focused on the neural correlates of successful memory formation within individuals, rather than the differences among them. As such, what gives rise to this variability is poorly understood. Here, we examined intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings captured from 43 participants (23 male) implanted with subdural electrodes for seizure monitoring as they performed a paired-associates verbal memory task. We identified three separate but related signatures of neural activity that tracked differences in successful memory formation across individuals. High-performing individuals consistently exhibited less broadband power, flatter power spectral density slopes, and greater complexity in their iEEG signals. Furthermore, within individuals across three separate time scales ranging from seconds to days, successful recall was positively associated with these same metrics. Our data therefore suggest that memory ability across individuals can be indexed by increased neural signal complexity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show that participants whose intracranial EEG exhibits less low-frequency power, flatter power spectrums, and greater sample entropy overall are better able to memorize associations, and that the same metrics track fluctuations in memory performance across time within individuals. These metrics together signify greater neural signal complexity, which may index the brain's ability to flexibly engage with information and generate separable memory representations. Critically, the current set of results provides a unique window into the neural markers of individual differences in memory performance, which have hitherto been underexplored. Copyright © 2018 the authors 0270-6474/18/381744-12$15.00/0.

  12. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  13. ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) Machinery Is Essential for Acrosomal Exocytosis in Human Sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocognoni, Cristian A; Berberián, María Victoria; Mayorga, Luis S

    2015-11-01

    The sperm acrosome reaction is a unique, regulated exocytosis characterized by the secretion of the acrosomal content and the release of hybrid vesicles formed by patches of the outer acrosomal and plasma membranes. In previous reports, we have shown that inward invaginations of the acrosomal membrane delineate ring-shaped membrane microdomains that contact the plasma membrane. We have postulated that the opening and expansion of fusion pores along these rings trigger acrosomal exocytosis. The invaginations of the acrosomal membrane topologically resemble the deformations of the endosomal membrane leading to the assembly of luminal vesicles in multivesicular bodies. In fact, intra-acrosomal vesicles are also formed during acrosomal exocytosis. Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) participates in the organization of membrane microdomains that are invaginated and released as intraluminal vesicles in endosomes. We report here that members of ESCRT I (TSG101), ESCRT III (CHMP4), and the AAA ATPase VPS4 are present in the acrosomal region of the human sperm. Perturbing the function of these factors with antibodies or recombinant proteins inhibited acrosomal exocytosis in permeabilized cells. A similar effect was observed with a dominant-negative mutant of VPS4A cross-linked to a cell-penetrating peptide in nonpermeabilized sperm stimulated with a calcium ionophore. When the function of ESCRTs was inhibited, acrosomes showed abnormal deformation of the acrosomal membrane, and SNARE proteins that participate in acrosomal exocytosis failed to be stabilized in neurotoxin-resistant complexes. However, the growing of membrane invaginations was not blocked, and numerous intra-acrosomal vesicles were observed. These observations indicate that ESCRT-mediated processes are essential for acrosomal secretion, implicating these multifunctional complexes in an exocytic event crucial for sperm-egg fusion. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  14. Reengineering of the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: from disintegration to highly active agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin; Hezaveh, Samira; Tatur, Jana; Zeng, An-Ping; Jandt, Uwe

    2017-02-20

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) plays a central role in cellular metabolism and regulation. As a metabolite-channeling multi-enzyme complex it acts as a complete nanomachine due to its unique geometry and by coupling a cascade of catalytic reactions using 'swinging arms'. Mammalian and specifically human PDC (hPDC) is assembled from multiple copies of E1 and E3 bound to a large E2/E3BP 60-meric core. A less restrictive and smaller catalytic core, which is still active, is highly desired for both fundamental research on channeling mechanisms and also to create a basis for further modification and engineering of new enzyme cascades. Here, we present the first experimental results of the successful disintegration of the E2/E3BP core while retaining its activity. This was achieved by C-terminal α-helixes double truncations (eight residues from E2 and seven residues from E3BP). Disintegration of the hPDC core via double truncations led to the formation of highly active (approximately 70% of wildtype) apparently unordered clusters or agglomerates and inactive non-agglomerated species (hexamer/trimer). After additional deletion of N-terminal 'swinging arms', the aforementioned C-terminal truncations also caused the formation of agglomerates of minimized E2/E3BP complexes. It is likely that these 'swinging arm' regions are not solely responsible for the formation of the large agglomerates. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yun-Hee [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Patel, Mulchand S., E-mail: mspatel@buffalo.edu [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  16. Structural context for mobilization of a human tRNA synthetase from its cytoplasmic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Pengfei; Zhang, Hui-Min; Shapiro, Ryan; Marshall, Alan G; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Guo, Min

    2011-05-17

    Human lysyl-tRNA synthetase is bound to the multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) that maintains and regulates the aminoacylation and nuclear functions of LysRS. The p38 scaffold protein binds LysRS to the MSC and, only with the appropriate cue, mobilizes LysRS for redirection to the nucleus to interact with the microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF). In recent work, an (α(2))(2) LysRS tetramer crystallized to yield a high-resolution structure and raised the question of how LysRS is arranged (dimer or tetramer) in the MSC to interact with p38. To understand the structural organization of the LysRS-p38 complex that regulates LysRS mobilization, we investigated the complex by use of small angle X-ray scattering and hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry in solution. The structure revealed a surprising α(2)β(1):β(1)α(2) organization in which a dimeric p38 scaffold holds two LysRS α(2) dimers in a parallel configuration. Each of the N-terminal 48 residues of p38 binds one LysRS dimer and, in so doing, brings two copies of the LysRS dimer into the MSC. The results suggest that this unique geometry, which reconfigures the LysRS tetramer from α(2):α(2) to α(2)β(1):β(1)α(2), is designed to control both retention and mobilization of LysRS from the MSC.

  17. Embryological ontogeny of aromatase gene expression in Chrysemys picta and Apalone mutica turtles: comparative patterns within and across temperature-dependent and genotypic sex-determining mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Nicole; Shikano, Takahito

    2007-01-01

    Although the role of aromatase in many estrogen-dependent reproductive and metabolic functions is well documented in vertebrates, its involvement in the ovarian development of species exhibiting temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) is incompletely understood. This is partly due to the conflicting temporal and spatial pattern of aromatase expression and activity across taxa. To help resolve this ongoing debate, we compared for the first time the embryological ontogeny of aromatase expression in turtles possessing genotypic sex determination (GSD) (Apalone mutica) and TSD (Chrysemys picta) incubated under identical conditions. As anticipated, we found no significant thermal differences in aromatase expression at any stage examined (prior to until the end of the thermosensitive period) in A. mutica. Surprisingly, the same was true for C. picta. When placed in a phylogenetic context, our results suggest that aromatase expression is evolutionarily plastic with respect to sex determination in reptiles, and that differences between reptilian TSD and GSD are not aromatase-driven. Further research across TSD and GSD species is warranted to fully decipher the evolution of functional differences among sex-determining mechanisms.

  18. MULTIPLE HUMAN TRACKING IN COMPLEX SITUATION BY DATA ASSIMILATION WITH PEDESTRIAN BEHAVIOR MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Nakanishi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A new method of multiple human tracking is proposed. The key concept is that to assume a tracking process as a data assimilation process. Despite the importance of understanding pedestrian behavior in public space with regard to achieving more sophisticated space design and flow control, automatic human tracking in complex situation is still challenging when people move close to each other or are occluded by others. For this difficulty, we stochastically combine existing tracking method by image processing with simulation models of walking behavior. We describe a system in a form of general state space model and define the components of the model according to the review on related works. Then we apply the proposed method to the data acquired at the ticket gate of the railway station. We show the high performance of the method, as well as compare the result with other model to present the advantage of integrating the behavior model to the tracking method. We also show the method's ability to acquire passenger flow information such as ticket gate choice and OD data automatically from the tracking result.

  19. Structure of human heat-shock transcription factor 1 in complex with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudegger, Tobias; Verghese, Jacob; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit; Hartl, F Ulrich; Bracher, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Heat-shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) has a central role in mediating the protective response to protein conformational stresses in eukaryotes. HSF1 consists of an N-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD), a coiled-coil oligomerization domain, a regulatory domain and a transactivation domain. Upon stress, HSF1 trimerizes via its coiled-coil domain and binds to the promoters of heat shock protein-encoding genes. Here, we present cocrystal structures of the human HSF1 DBD in complex with cognate DNA. A comparative analysis of the HSF1 paralog Skn7 from Chaetomium thermophilum showed that single amino acid changes in the DBD can switch DNA binding specificity, thus revealing the structural basis for the interaction of HSF1 with cognate DNA. We used a crystal structure of the coiled-coil domain of C. thermophilum Skn7 to develop a model of the active human HSF1 trimer in which HSF1 embraces the heat-shock-element DNA.

  20. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of the Coronal Pulp and Apical Pulp Complex in Human Immature Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Seunghye; Shin, Yooseok; Lee, Hyo-Seol; Jeon, Mijeong; Kim, Seong-Oh; Cho, Sung-Won; Ruparel, Nikita B; Song, Je Seon

    2016-05-01

    This study determined the gene expression profiles of the human coronal pulp (CP) and apical pulp complex (APC) with the aim of explaining differences in their functions. Total RNA was isolated from the CP and APC, and gene expression was analyzed using complementary DNA microarray technology. Gene ontology analysis was used to classify the biological function. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining were performed to verify microarray data. In the microarray analyses, expression increases of at least 2-fold were present in 125 genes in the APC and 139 genes in the CP out of a total of 33,297 genes. Gene ontology class processes found more genes related to immune responses, cell growth and maintenance, and cell adhesion in the APC, whereas transport and neurogenesis genes predominated in the CP. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the microarray results, with DMP1, CALB1, and GABRB1 strongly expressed in the CP, whereas SMOC2, SHH, BARX1, CX3CR1, SPP1, COL XII, and LAMC2 were strongly expressed in the APC. The expression levels of genes related to dentin mineralization, neurogenesis, and neurotransmission are higher in the CP in human immature teeth, whereas those of immune-related and tooth development-related genes are higher in the APC. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Capturing complex human behaviors in representative sports contexts with a single camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ricardo; Araújo, Duarte; Fernandes, Orlando; Fonseca, Cristina; Correia, Vanda; Gazimba, Vítor; Travassos, Bruno; Esteves, Pedro; Vilar, Luís; Lopes, José

    2010-01-01

    In the last years, several motion analysis methods have been developed without considering representative contexts for sports performance. The purpose of this paper was to explain and underscore a straightforward method to measure human behavior in these contexts. Procedures combining manual video tracking (with TACTO device) and bidimensional reconstruction (through direct linear transformation) using a single camera were used in order to capture kinematic data required to compute collective variable(s) and control parameter(s). These procedures were applied to a 1vs1 association football task as an illustrative subphase of team sports and will be presented in a tutorial fashion. Preliminary analysis of distance and velocity data identified a collective variable (difference between the distance of the attacker and the defender to a target defensive area) and two nested control parameters (interpersonal distance and relative velocity). Findings demonstrated that the complementary use of TACTO software and direct linear transformation permit to capture and reconstruct complex human actions in their context in a low dimensional space (information reduction).

  2. Orientation of loci within the human major histocompatibility complex by chromosomal in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, C C; Kirsch, I R; Nance, W E; Evans, G A; Korman, A J; Strominger, J L

    1984-05-01

    We have determined the localization and orientation of two genetic probes within the human major histocompatibility complex by chromosomal in situ hybridization. Our data indicate that a cloned genomic probe cross-hybridizing to HLA-A, -B, and -C heavy chain loci is homologous to sequences located on chromosome 6 at band p21.3 while a subclone of the genomic HLA-DR alpha-chain gene corresponding to the nonpolymorphic p34 protein is homologous to sequences in band 6p21.1. Our data suggest that this technique may permit the estimation of map distances between linked gene loci, assuming a uniform frequency of map units in the human genome. The relative positions of these genes was confirmed in a mother and son carrying a chromosome rearrangement involving 6p and 14p in which the sequences hybridizing to a DR alpha-chain genomic clone were found at the distal end of the 6p--chromosome [der(6)] while the sequences hybridizing to the HLA-A, -B, -C alpha-chain probe were found in the 14p+ chromosome [der(14)].

  3. Balancing Human-machine Interface (HMI) Design in Complex Supervisory Tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Junsu [Khalifa Univ. of Science, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Kim, Arryum; Jang, Inseok; Seong, Poonghyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Human performance aspects such as plant performance, personnel task performance, situation awareness, cognitive workload, teamwork, and anthropomorphic/physiological factor are evaluated with the HUPESS. Even though the HUPESS provides evaluation results in each of the performance aspects for the integrated system validation (ISV), additional researches have been needed to develop methods on how to find out design deficiency leading to poor performance and give a solution for design improvement in HMI. The authors have developed a method of HMI design improvement for the monitoring and detection tasks which was named as 'DEMIS (Difficulty Evaluation Method in Information Searching)'. The DEMIS is a HMI evaluation method which bridge poor performance and design improvement. Lessons learned from the existing studies lead to a question about how to optimize the whole HMI design. Human factors principles provide the foundation for guidelines of various codes and standards in designing HMIs. Also in NPPs, a lot of guidelines directly from various codes and standard and derived from various research and development projects are available for designing MCR HMIs. In this study, a balancing principle and relevant two measures for HMI design optimization are proposed to be used in the HMI design of complex supervisory tasks in NPPs. The balancing principle is that a HMI element (e. g., an indicator or a push button) should be designed according to its importance.

  4. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang; (Harvard-Med); (UMM-MED)

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  5. Analysing human mobility patterns of hiking activities through complex network theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lera, Isaac; Pérez, Toni; Guerrero, Carlos; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Juiz, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The exploitation of high volume of geolocalized data from social sport tracking applications of outdoor activities can be useful for natural resource planning and to understand the human mobility patterns during leisure activities. This geolocalized data represents the selection of hike activities according to subjective and objective factors such as personal goals, personal abilities, trail conditions or weather conditions. In our approach, human mobility patterns are analysed from trajectories which are generated by hikers. We propose the generation of the trail network identifying special points in the overlap of trajectories. Trail crossings and trailheads define our network and shape topological features. We analyse the trail network of Balearic Islands, as a case of study, using complex weighted network theory. The analysis is divided into the four seasons of the year to observe the impact of weather conditions on the network topology. The number of visited places does not decrease despite the large difference in the number of samples of the two seasons with larger and lower activity. It is in summer season where it is produced the most significant variation in the frequency and localization of activities from inland regions to coastal areas. Finally, we compare our model with other related studies where the network possesses a different purpose. One finding of our approach is the detection of regions with relevant importance where landscape interventions can be applied in function of the communities.

  6. Human Cytomegalovirus Vaccine Based on the Envelope gH/gL Pentamer Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Joy; Campo, John; Johnson, Erica; Flechsig, Christin; Newell, Maegan; Tran, Elaine; Ortiz, Jose; La Rosa, Corinna; Herrmann, Andreas; Longmate, Jeff; Chakraborty, Rana; Barry, Peter A.; Diamond, Don J.

    2014-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) utilizes two different pathways for host cell entry. HCMV entry into fibroblasts requires glycoproteins gB and gH/gL, whereas HCMV entry into epithelial and endothelial cells (EC) requires an additional complex composed of gH, gL, UL128, UL130, and UL131A, referred to as the gH/gL-pentamer complex (gH/gL-PC). While there are no established correlates of protection against HCMV, antibodies are thought to be important in controlling infection. Neutralizing antibodies (NAb) that prevent gH/gL-PC mediated entry into EC are candidates to be assessed for in vivo protective function. However, these potent NAb are predominantly directed against conformational epitopes derived from the assembled gH/gL-PC. To address these concerns, we constructed Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) viruses co-expressing all five gH/gL-PC subunits (MVA-gH/gL-PC), subsets of gH/gL-PC subunits (gH/gL or UL128/UL130/UL131A), or the gB subunit from HCMV strain TB40/E. We provide evidence for cell surface expression and assembly of complexes expressing full-length gH or gB, or their secretion when the corresponding transmembrane domains are deleted. Mice or rhesus macaques (RM) were vaccinated three times with MVA recombinants and serum NAb titers that prevented 50% infection of human EC or fibroblasts by HCMV TB40/E were determined. NAb responses induced by MVA-gH/gL-PC blocked HCMV infection of EC with potencies that were two orders of magnitude greater than those induced by MVA expressing gH/gL, UL128-UL131A, or gB. In addition, MVA-gH/gL-PC induced NAb responses that were durable and efficacious to prevent HCMV infection of Hofbauer macrophages, a fetal-derived cell localized within the placenta. NAb were also detectable in saliva of vaccinated RM and reached serum peak levels comparable to NAb titers found in HCMV hyperimmune globulins. This vaccine based on a translational poxvirus platform co-delivers all five HCMV gH/gL-PC subunits to achieve robust humoral

  7. Recombinant adenoviral vector-lipofectAMINE complex for gene transduction into human T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nicola, M; Milanesi, M; Magni, M; Bregni, M; Carlo-Stella, C; Longoni, P; Tomanin, R; Ravagnani, F; Scarpa, M; Jordan, C; Gianni, A M

    1999-07-20

    We have evaluated, as a vector for gene transfer into human T lymphocytes, a recombinant adenovirus (rAd-MFG-AP) carrying a modified, membrane-exposed, alkaline phosphatase (AP) as reporter gene. CD3+ cells were selected from the buffy coat of healthy donors by the immunomagnetic technique. The positive cell population, comprising 96+/-2% CD3+ cells, was cultured with clinical-grade cytokine(s) for 3-7 days prior to rAd-MFG-AP transduction and the transgene expression was evaluated 48 hr later by indirect immunofluorescence flow cytometry assay with an anti-alkaline phosphatase antibody. The best efficiency of transduction was achieved on incubation of CD3+ cells with IL-2 plus either IL-12 (AP+ cells, 12+/-3%) or IL-7 (AP+ cells, 11+/-3%). To increase further the efficiency of transduction, we have combined LipofectAMINE and rAd-MFG-AP with the aim to enhance the uptake of viral particles into the target cells. The percentage of CD3+ cells transduced by rAd-MFG-AP-LipofectAMINE complex was 24+/-4% (range, 20-35%) after incubation with IL-2 plus IL-7 and 22+/-4% (range, 18-32%) after incubation with II-2 plus IL-12. Forty-eight hours after the incubation with rAd-MFG-AP, the transduced T lymphocytes were subjected to fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fractionated into AP+ and AP- cell subpopulations. The AP+ cell fraction, comprising 96.8% of AP+ cells, was evaluated by FACScan analysis for T lymphocyte surface antigens. The immunophenotyping of the transduced T lymphocytes has shown that there was not a particular subtype of T lymphocytes more susceptible to rAd-MFG-AP transduction. In addition, the transgene expression did not modify T lymphocyte functions, as demonstrated by results obtained by cytotoxicity assay before and after rAd-MFG-AP-LipofectAMINE complex transduction. In conclusion, human T lymphocytes can be efficiently transduced, under clinically applicable conditions, by adenovirus-LipofectAMINE complex after 7 days of culture with IL-2 and IL

  8. Heart failure induces significant changes in nuclear pore complex of human cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Tarazón

    Full Text Available AIMS: The objectives of this study were to analyse the effect of heart failure (HF on several proteins of nuclear pore complex (NPC and their relationship with the human ventricular function. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 88 human heart samples from ischemic (ICM, n = 52 and dilated (DCM, n = 36 patients undergoing heart transplant and control donors (CNT, n = 9 were analyzed by Western blot. Subcellular distribution of nucleoporins was analysed by fluorescence and immunocytochemistry. When we compared protein levels according to etiology, ICM showed significant higher levels of NDC1 (65%, p<0.0001, Nup160 (88%, p<0.0001 and Nup153 (137%, p = 0.004 than those of the CNT levels. Furthermore, DCM group showed significant differences for NDC1 (41%, p<0.0001, Nup160 (65%, p<0.0001, Nup153 (155%, p = 0.006 and Nup93 (88%, p<0.0001 compared with CNT. However, Nup155 and translocated promoter region (TPR did not show significant differences in their levels in any etiology. Regarding the distribution of these proteins in cell nucleus, only NDC1 showed differences in HF. In addition, in the pathological group we obtained good relationship between the ventricular function parameters (LVEDD and LVESD and Nup160 (r = -0382, p = 0.004; r = -0.290, p = 0.033; respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows alterations in specific proteins (NDC1, Nup160, Nup153 and Nup93 that compose NPC in ischaemic and dilated human heart. These changes, related to ventricular function, could be accompanied by alterations in the nucleocytoplasmic transport. Therefore, our findings may be the basis for a new approach to HF management.

  9. Structure of a Human Astrovirus Capsid-Antibody Complex and Mechanistic Insights into Virus Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Campos, Jocelyn; Perez, Edmundo I.; Yin, Lu; Alexander, David L.; DuBois, Rebecca M. (UCSC)

    2016-11-02

    ABSTRACT

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. There are no vaccines or antiviral therapies against HAstV disease. Several lines of evidence point to the presence of protective antibodies in healthy adults as a mechanism governing protection against reinfection by HAstV. However, development of anti-HAstV therapies is hampered by the gap in knowledge of protective antibody epitopes on the HAstV capsid surface. Here, we report the structure of the HAstV capsid spike domain bound to the neutralizing monoclonal antibody PL-2. The antibody uses all six complementarity-determining regions to bind to a quaternary epitope on each side of the dimeric capsid spike. We provide evidence that the HAstV capsid spike is a receptor-binding domain and that the antibody neutralizes HAstV by blocking virus attachment to cells. We identify patches of conserved amino acids that overlap the antibody epitope and may comprise a receptor-binding site. Our studies provide a foundation for the development of therapies to prevent and treat HAstV diarrheal disease.

    IMPORTANCEHuman astroviruses (HAstVs) infect nearly every person in the world during childhood and cause diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Despite the prevalence of this virus, little is known about how antibodies in healthy adults protect them against reinfection. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a complex of the HAstV capsid protein and a virus-neutralizing antibody. We show that the antibody binds to the outermost spike domain of the capsid, and we provide evidence that the antibody blocks virus attachment to human cells. Importantly, our findings suggest that a subunit-based vaccine focusing the immune system on the HAstV capsid spike domain could be effective in protecting children against HAstV disease.

  10. Complex signatures of selection for the melanogenic loci TYR, TYRP1 and DCT in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyano María

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The observed correlation between ultraviolet light incidence and skin color, together with the geographical apportionment of skin reflectance among human populations, suggests an adaptive value for the pigmentation of the human skin. We have used Affymetrix U133a v2.0 gene expression microarrays to investigate the expression profiles of a total of 9 melanocyte cell lines (5 from lightly pigmented donors and 4 from darkly pigmented donors plus their respective unirradiated controls. In order to reveal signatures of selection in loci with a bearing on skin pigmentation in humans, we have resequenced between 4 to 5 kb of the proximal regulatory regions of three of the most differently expressed genes, in the expectation that variation at regulatory regions might account for intraespecific morphological diversity, as suggested elsewhere. Results Contrary to our expectations, expression profiles did not cluster the cells into unirradiated versus irradiated melanocytes, or into lightly pigmented versus darkly pigmented melanocytes. Instead, expression profiles correlated with the presence of Bovine Pituitary Extract (known to contain α-MSH in the media. This allowed us to differentiate between melanocytes that are synthesizing melanin and those that are not. TYR, TYRP1 and DCT were among the five most differently expressed genes between these two groups. Population genetic analyses of sequence haplotypes of the proximal regulatory flanking-regions included Tajima's D, HEW and DHEW neutrality tests analysis. These were complemented with EHH tests (among others in which the significance was obtained by a novel approach using extensive simulations under the coalescent model with recombination. We observe strong evidence for positive selection for TYRP1 alleles in Africans and for DCT and TYRP1 in Asians. However, the overall picture reflects a complex pattern of selection, which might include overdominance for DCT in Europeans

  11. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin increases aromatase (CYP19) mRNA stability in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ming Yan; Huang, Hui; Leung, Lai K

    2010-04-12

    Dioxins are industrial pollutants that can be bio-accumulative in our food chain. Humans can be exposed to this class of pollutant through contaminated food, air, drinking water, etc. Displaying both pro- and anti-estrogenic properties, these pollutants are also known as endocrine disruptors. The link between breast cancer and TCDD exposure has not been resolved, although TCDD is classified as 'known human carcinogen'. Estrogen is a documented risk factor for breast carcinogenesis. In the present study, effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD) on estrogen synthesis was investigated in the breast cancer cells MCF-7. Our results showed that TCDD increased the aromatase activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR and western blot analysis verified the induced expression by 2-3-fold; however, gene reporter assay revealed that the promoter activity of exons I.3 and II was not elevated. Further investigation indicated that TCDD slowed down the CYP19 mRNA degradation with concurrent activation of ERK. The ERK inhibitor U0126 could reverse the extended stability of the transcripts. In summary this study demonstrated that TCDD might induce a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism of gene expression in breast cancer cells.

  12. Categorial Ontology of Complex Systems, Meta-Systems and Levels: The Emergence of Life, Human Consciousness and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Glazebrook

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Relational structures of organisms and the human mind are naturally represented in terms of novel variable topology concepts, non-Abelian categories and Higher Dimensional Algebra{ relatively new concepts that would be defined in
    this tutorial paper. A unifying theme of local-to-global approaches to organismic development, evolution and human consciousness leads to novel patterns of relations that emerge in super- and ultra- complex systems in terms of compositions of local procedures [1]. The claim is defended in this paper that human consciousness is unique and should be viewed as an ultra-complex, global process of processes, at a meta-level not sub{summed by, but compatible with, human brain dynamics [2]-[5]. The emergence of consciousness and its existence
    are considered to be dependent upon an extremely complex structural and functional unit with an asymmetric network topology and connectivities{the human brain. However, the appearance of human consciousness is shown to be critically dependent upon societal co-evolution, elaborate language-symbolic communication and `virtual', higher dimensional, non{commutative processes involving separate space and time perceptions. Theories of the mind are approached from the theory of levels and ultra-complexity viewpoints that throw
    new light on previous semantic models in cognitive science. Anticipatory systems and complex causality at the top levels of reality are discussed in the context of psychology, sociology and ecology. A paradigm shift towards non-commutative, or more generally, non-Abelian theories of highly complex dynamics [6] is suggested to unfold now in physics, mathematics, life and cognitive sciences, thus leading to the realizations of higher dimensional algebras in neurosciences and psychology, as well as in human genomics, bioinformatics and interactomics. The presence of strange attractors in modern society dynamics gives rise to very serious concerns for the future

  13. The role of aromatase inhibitors in ameliorating deleterious effects of ovarian stimulation on outcome of infertility treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diamond Michael P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clinical utilization of ovulation stimulation to facilitate the ability of a couple to conceive has not only provided a valuable therapeutic approach, but has also yielded extensive information on the physiology of ovarian follicular recruitment, endometrial receptivity and early embryo competency. One of the consequences of the use of fertility enhancing agents for ovarian stimulation has been the creation of a hyperestrogenic state, which may influence each of these parameters. Use of aromatase inhibitors reduces hyperestrogenism inevitably attained during ovarian stimulation. In addition, the adjunct use of aromatase inhibitors during ovarian stimulation reduces amount of gonadotropins required for optimum stimulation. The unique approach of reducing hyperestrogenism, as well as lowering amount of gonadotropins without affecting the number of mature ovarian follicles is an exciting strategy that could result in improvement in the treatment outcome by ameliorating the deleterious effects of the ovarian stimulation on follicular development, endometrial receptivity, as well as oocyte and embryo quality.

  14. Improved synthesis and molecular modeling of 4beta,19-dihydroxyandrost-5-en-17-one, an excellent inhibitor of aromatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Yamada, Keiko; Watari, Yoko; Ando, Momoko

    2002-05-01

    4Beta,19-dihydroxyandrost-5-en-17-one (6) is an excellent competitive inhibitor of estrogen synthetase (aromatase). Alternate, improved synthesis of this inhibitor was established. Treatment of 19-(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)androst-4-en-17-one (8) with m-chloroperbenzoic acid gave a 1.4:1 mixture of 4alpha,5alpha-epoxide 9 and its 4beta,5beta-isomer 10. The mixture was reacted with diI. HClO4 in dioxane to produce principally 4beta,5alpha-diol 11 (80%) of which acetylation followed by dehydration with SOCl2 yielded 4beta,19-diacetoxy-5-ene compound 14 in good yield. Alkaline hydrolysis of diacetate 14 gave 4beta,19-diol 6. The minimum energy conformation of the powerfull aromatase inhibitor 6 was obtained with the PM3 method and compared with that of the structurally related diol steroid, 4-ene-5beta,19-diol 3, a weak competitive inhibitor.

  15. Influence of Triazine Herbicide Exposure on Guppies (Poecilia sphenops) Aromatase Activities, Altered Sex Steroid Concentration and Vitellogenin Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanth, S; Arul, G; Karthikeyeni, S; Kumar, T S V; Vignesh, V; Manimegalai, M; Bupesh, G; Thirumurugan, R; Subramanian, P

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a herbicide is one the most toxic and sustaining pollutants in aquatic environment. It is detectable in surface water and in underground sources of drinking water. Many studies indicate that atrazine might be a potent endocrine disrupting xenobiotic. There are limited studies have revealed that the effects of atrazine on sex steroids hormones, vitellogenin and induction of aromatase, gonadosomatic index and hepatosomatic index. In this study, juvenile Poecilia sphenops fish was exposed to three different (0.83, 1.25 and 2.5 ppm) concentration of atrazine for 100 d. Changes in plasma and gonadal content and concentrations of sex steroids and vitellogenin protein in poecilia sphenops under laboratory conditions were assessed. The low level of the atrazine show estrogenic effect in males, as determined by a shortage of testosterone induction. Present study suggests that low induction of plasma vitellogenin and aromatase in male fish become suitable biomarkers of exposure to estrogenic chemicals.

  16. Structure-activity relationships and docking studies of synthetic 2-arylindole derivatives determined with aromatase and quinone reductase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Allan M; Yu, Xufen; Park, Eun-Jung; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Lin, Yan; Pezzuto, John M; Sun, Dianqing

    2017-12-15

    In our ongoing effort of discovering anticancer and chemopreventive agents, a series of 2-arylindole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated toward aromatase and quinone reductase 1 (QR1). Biological evaluation revealed that several compounds (e.g., 2d, IC 50  = 1.61 μM; 21, IC 50  = 3.05 μM; and 27, IC 50  = 3.34 μM) showed aromatase inhibitory activity with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) values in the low micromolar concentrations. With regard to the QR1 induction activity, 11 exhibited the highest QR1 induction ratio (IR) with a low concentration to double activity (CD) value (IR = 8.34, CD = 2.75 μM), while 7 showed the most potent CD value of 1.12 μM. A dual acting compound 24 showed aromatase inhibition (IC 50  = 9.00 μM) as well as QR1 induction (CD = 5.76 μM) activities. Computational docking studies using CDOCKER (Discovery Studio 3.5) provided insight in regard to the potential binding modes of 2-arylindoles within the aromatase active site. Predominantly, the 2-arylindoles preferred binding with the 2-aryl group toward a small hydrophobic pocket within the active site. The C-5 electron withdrawing group on indole was predicted to have an important role and formed a hydrogen bond with Ser478 (OH). Alternatively, meta-pyridyl analogs may orient with the pyridyl 3'-nitrogen coordinating with the heme group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ovarian tumors with functioning stroma: a clinicopathologic study with special reference to serum estrogen level, stromal morphology, and aromatase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Noriko; Hayasaka, Tadashi; Takeda, Junko; Osakabe, Mitsumasa; Kurachi, Hirohisa

    2013-11-01

    Ovarian tumors with functioning stroma often show estrogenic manifestations. The range of serum estrogen level, however, has not been analyzed, nor the correlation with the stromal morphology. We reviewed the preoperative serum level of estradiol (E2) in 20 postmenopausal ovarian tumors that contained lutein- or theca-like cells in the stroma. Tumor histology included mucinous (n=7), endometrioid (n=4), clear (n=4), or Brenner tumor (n=2), carcinosarcoma (n=2), and Krukenberg tumor (n=1). Overall, the preoperative serum level of E2 ranged widely from 12.1 to 162.4 pg/mL (reference range, 10-30 pg/mL). The range of serum E2 was 24.9 to 162.4 pg/mL (mean, 58.0 pg/mL) in 7 tumors containing lutein-like cells, and 12.1 to 157.8 pg/mL (mean, 57.0 pg/mL) in 13 tumors containing theca-like cells alone. There was no significant difference in the serum E2 level between the 2 groups. To determine whether the functioning stroma is capable of final conversion of androgens to estrogens, the expression of P450 aromatase was examined immunohistochemically. P450 aromatase was exclusively expressed in the stromal cells, both lutein- and theca-like cells, in 16 tumors. In all tumors, however, it was focally or sparsely distributed, and there was no correlation between the immunoreactivity for P450 aromatase and the serum E2 level. These findings indicate that the functioning stroma, regardless of cell morphology, has a capacity for converting androgens to estrogens, but a significant amount of serum estrogens is finally qualified in the aromatase-rich peripheral tissues.

  18. Protein kinases responsible for the phosphorylation of the nuclear egress core complex of human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Eric; Milbradt, Jens; Svrlanska, Adriana; Strojan, Hanife; Häge, Sigrun; Kraut, Alexandra; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Amin, Bushra; Sonnewald, Uwe; Couté, Yohann; Marschall, Manfred

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear egress of herpesvirus capsids is mediated by a multi-component nuclear egress complex (NEC) assembled by a heterodimer of two essential viral core egress proteins. In the case of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), this core NEC is defined by the interaction between the membrane-anchored pUL50 and its nuclear cofactor, pUL53. NEC protein phosphorylation is considered to be an important regulatory step, so this study focused on the respective role of viral and cellular protein kinases. Multiply phosphorylated pUL50 varieties were detected by Western blot and Phos-tag analyses as resulting from both viral and cellular kinase activities. In vitro kinase analyses demonstrated that pUL50 is a substrate of both PKCα and CDK1, while pUL53 can also be moderately phosphorylated by CDK1. The use of kinase inhibitors further illustrated the importance of distinct kinases for core NEC phosphorylation. Importantly, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses identified five major and nine minor sites of pUL50 phosphorylation. The functional relevance of core NEC phosphorylation was confirmed by various experimental settings, including kinase knock-down/knock-out and confocal imaging, in which it was found that (i) HCMV core NEC proteins are not phosphorylated solely by viral pUL97, but also by cellular kinases; (ii) both PKC and CDK1 phosphorylation are detectable for pUL50; (iii) no impact of PKC phosphorylation on NEC functionality has been identified so far; (iv) nonetheless, CDK1-specific phosphorylation appears to be required for functional core NEC interaction. In summary, our findings provide the first evidence that the HCMV core NEC is phosphorylated by cellular kinases, and that the complex pattern of NEC phosphorylation has functional relevance.

  19. Learning, adaptation, and the complexity of human and natural interactions in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Wilson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Here, I explore the system-level consequences of learning and adaptation among fish and fishers. The fundamental idea is that the cost of acquiring the knowledge needed to resolve uncertainty is the principal driver of social and spatial organization. This cost limits agents' actions and leads them to prefer relatively persistent associations with familiar agents and places. When all agents act in this way, the regularity and self-reinforcing nature of familiarity leads to the emergence of a self-organized system. Systems like this are characterized by diverse, place-based, and relatively durable groups, groups of groups, and rough hierarchical structure. This occurs in both the natural and human parts of the system. The costs of resolving uncertainty also determine the interactions of fish and fishers. The uncertainty of search leads fishers preferentially to target older fish and aggregations of fish. These are the repositories and mechanisms for the replication of the knowledge needed for self-organization. The loss of this information selectively, but unintentionally, disrupts the behavioral regularity that organizes the natural system, leading eventually to its disorganization. From this theoretical perspective, sustainable fishing requires conservation of the knowledge in DNA and memory because this is the fundamental basis for the self-organization of the natural system. Collective action is also subject to the costs of resolving uncertainty. In complex systems, these costs are minimized at the local level in the system, where the most direct, but not the only, feedback occurs. This implies the need for multiscale governance with an emphasis on collective learning through localized science and user participation. Finally, the complexity of ecosystem interactions argues for qualitative harvesting rules governing how, when, and where fishing takes place. These rules are most likely to generate a persistent signal and rapid learning, but

  20. A third component of the human cytomegalovirus terminase complex is involved in letermovir resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Sunwen

    2017-12-01

    Letermovir is a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) terminase inhibitor that was clinically effective in a Phase III prevention trial. In vitro studies have shown that viral mutations conferring letermovir resistance map primarily to the UL56 component of the terminase complex and uncommonly to UL89. After serial culture of a baseline CMV laboratory strain under letermovir, mutation was observed in a third terminase component in 2 experiments, both resulting in amino acid substitution P91S in gene UL51 and adding to a pre-existing UL56 mutation. Recombinant phenotyping indicated that P91S alone conferred 2.1-fold increased letermovir resistance (EC50) over baseline, and when combined with UL56 mutation S229F or R369M, multiplied the level of resistance conferred by those mutations by 3.5-7.7-fold. Similarly a combination of UL56 mutations S229F, L254F and L257I selected in the same experiment conferred 54-fold increased letermovir EC50 over baseline, but 290-fold when combined with UL51 P91S. The P91S mutant was not perceptibly growth impaired. Although pUL51 is essential for normal function of the terminase complex, its biological significance is not well understood. Letermovir resistance mutations mapping to 3 separate genes, and their multiplier effect on the level of resistance, suggest that the terminase components interactively contribute to the structure of a letermovir antiviral target. The diagnostic importance of the UL51 P91S mutation arises from its potential to augment the letermovir resistance of some UL56 mutations at low fitness cost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inferring condition-specific targets of human TF-TF complexes using ChIP-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chia-Chun; Chen, Min-Hsuan; Lin, Sheng-Yi; Andrews, Erik H; Cheng, Chao; Liu, Chun-Chi; Chen, Jeremy J W

    2017-01-10

    Transcription factors (TFs) often interact with one another to form TF complexes that bind DNA and regulate gene expression. Many databases are created to describe known TF complexes identified by either mammalian two-hybrid experiments or data mining. Lately, a wealth of ChIP-seq data on human TFs under different experiment conditions are available, making it possible to investigate condition-specific (cell type and/or physiologic state) TF complexes and their target genes. Here, we developed a systematic pipeline to infer Condition-Specific Targets of human TF-TF complexes (called the CST pipeline) by integrating ChIP-seq data and TF motifs. In total, we predicted 2,392 TF complexes and 13,504 high-confidence or 127,994 low-confidence regulatory interactions amongst TF complexes and their target genes. We validated our predictions by (i) comparing predicted TF complexes to external TF complex databases, (ii) validating selected target genes of TF complexes using ChIP-qPCR and RT-PCR experiments, and (iii) analysing target genes of select TF complexes using gene ontology enrichment to demonstrate the accuracy of our work. Finally, the predicted results above were integrated and employed to construct a CST database. We built up a methodology to construct the CST database, which contributes to the analysis of transcriptional regulation and the identification of novel TF-TF complex formation in a certain condition. This database also allows users to visualize condition-specific TF regulatory networks through a user-friendly web interface.

  2. Marginal growth increase, altered bone quality and polycystic ovaries in female prepubertal rats after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor exemestane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gool, Sandy A; Wit, Jan M; De Schutter, Tineke; De Clerck, Nora; Postnov, Andreï A; Kremer Hovinga, Sandra; van Doorn, Jaap; Veiga, Sergio J; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Karperien, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Aromatase inhibition has been proposed as a potential approach for growth enhancement in children with short stature, but detailed animal studies are lacking. To assess the effect and potential adverse effects of aromatase inhibition on growth in female rats. Prepubertal Wistar rats received intramuscular injections with placebo or the aromatase inhibitor exemestane at a dose of 10, 30 or 100 mg/kg/week (E10, E30, E100) for 3 weeks. A control group was ovariectomized (OVX). Weight and length gain, tibia and femur length, growth plate width, organ weights, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels, and histology of the ovaries, uterus and brain were analyzed. X-ray microtomography of femora was performed. E100 significantly increased weight gain and growth plate width, but less prominently than OVX. Trabecular number and thickness were decreased in E100 and OVX in the metaphysis and epiphysis. E100 significantly decreased ovarian weight and multiple cysts were seen upon histological evaluation. No significant effects were found on IGF-I levels and brain morphology in E100. E10 and E30 had no effects on growth. A high dose of exemestane marginally increases axial and appendicular growth in female rats, at the expense of osteopenia and polycystic ovaries.

  3. Metal complexes as allosteric effectors of human hemoglobin: an NMR study of the interaction of the gadolinium(III) bis(m-boroxyphenylamide)diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid complex with human oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aime, S; Digilio, G; Fasano, M; Paoletti, S; Arnelli, A; Ascenzi, P

    1999-05-01

    The boronic functionalities on the outer surface of the Gd(III) bis(m-boroxyphenylamide)DTPA complex (Gd(III)L) enable it to bind to fructosamine residues of oxygenated glycated human adult hemoglobin. The formation of the macromolecular adduct can be assessed by NMR spectroscopy via observation of the enhancement of the solvent water proton relaxation rate. Unexpectedly, a strong binding interaction was also observed for the oxygenated unglycated human adult hemoglobin, eventually displaying a much higher relaxation enhancement. From relaxation rate measurements it was found that two Gd(III)L complexes interact with one hemoglobin tetramer (KD = 1.0 x 10(-5) M and 4.6 x 10(-4) M, respectively), whereas no interaction has been observed with monomeric hemoproteins. A markedly higher affinity of the Gd(III)L complex has been observed for oxygenated and aquo-met human adult hemoglobin derivatives with respect to the corresponding deoxy derivative. Upon binding, a net change in the quaternary structure of hemoglobin has been assessed by monitoring the changes in the high-resolution 1H-NMR spectrum of the protein as well as in the Soret absorption band. On the basis of these observations and the 11B NMR results obtained with the diamagnetic La(III)L complex, we suggest that the interaction between the lanthanide complex and deoxygenated, oxygenated, and aquo-met derivatives of human adult hemoglobin takes place at the 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) binding site, through the formation of N-->B coordinative bonds at His143beta and His2beta residues of different beta-chains. The stronger binding to the oxygenated form is then responsible for a shift of the allosteric equilibrium toward the high-affinity R-state. Accordingly, Gd(III)L affinity for oxygenated human fetal hemoglobin (lacking His143beta) is significantly lower than that observed for the unglycated human adult tetramer.

  4. Complexity of Complement Resistance Factors Expressed by Acinetobacter baumannii Needed for Survival in Human Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Larrayoz, Amaro F; Elhosseiny, Noha M; Chevrette, Marc G; Fu, Yang; Giunta, Peter; Spallanzani, Raúl G; Ravi, Keerthikka; Pier, Gerald B; Lory, Stephen; Maira-Litrán, Tomás

    2017-10-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterial pathogen with increasing impact in healthcare settings, due in part to this organism's resistance to many antimicrobial agents, with pneumonia and bacteremia as the most common manifestations of disease. A significant proportion of clinically relevant A. baumannii strains are resistant to killing by normal human serum (NHS), an observation supported in this study by showing that 12 out of 15 genetically diverse strains of A. baumannii are resistant to NHS killing. To expand our understanding of the genetic basis of A. baumannii serum resistance, a transposon (Tn) sequencing (Tn-seq) approach was used to identify genes contributing to this trait. An ordered Tn library in strain AB5075 with insertions in every nonessential gene was subjected to selection in NHS. We identified 50 genes essential for the survival of A. baumannii in NHS, including already known serum resistance factors, and many novel genes not previously associated with serum resistance. This latter group included the maintenance of lipid asymmetry genetic pathway as a key determinant in protecting A. baumannii from the bactericidal activity of NHS via the alternative complement pathway. Follow-up studies validated the role of eight additional genes identified by Tn-seq in A. baumannii resistance to killing by NHS but not by normal mouse serum, highlighting the human species specificity of A. baumannii serum resistance. The identification of a large number of genes essential for serum resistance in A. baumannii indicates the degree of complexity needed for this phenotype, which might reflect a general pattern that pathogens rely on to cause serious infections. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Molecular viability testing of bacterial pathogens from a complex human sample matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris M Weigel

    Full Text Available Assays for bacterial ribosomal RNA precursors (pre-rRNA have been shown to distinguish viable from inactivated bacterial cells in drinking water samples. Because the synthesis of pre-rRNA is rapidly induced by nutritional stimulation, viable bacteria can be distinguished from inactivated cells and free nucleic acids by measuring the production of species-specific pre-rRNA in samples that have been briefly stimulated with nutrients. Here, pre-rRNA analysis was applied to bacteria from serum, a human sample matrix. In contrast to drinking water, serum is rich in nutrients that might be expected to mask the effects of nutritional stimulation. Reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR assays were used to detect pre-rRNA of four bacterial species: Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. These species were chosen for their clinical significance and phylogenetic diversity (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. To maximize resolving power, pre-rRNA was normalized to genomic DNA of each pathogen. When viable cells were shifted from serum to bacteriological culture medium, rapid replenishment of pre-rRNA was always observed. Cells of P. aeruginosa that were inactivated in the presence of serum exhibited no pre-rRNA response to nutritional stimulation, despite strong genomic DNA signals in these samples. When semi-automated methods were used, pre-rRNA analysis detected viable A. baumannii cells in serum at densities of ≤100 CFU/mL in <5.5 hours. Originally developed for rapid microbiological analysis of drinking water, ratiometric pre-rRNA analysis can also assess the viability of bacterial cells derived from human specimens, without requiring bacteriological culture.

  6. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen (Sanofi); (Michigan); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  7. Direct Regulation of Aromatase B Expression by 17β-Estradiol and Dopamine D1 Receptor Agonist in Adult Radial Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lei; Esau, Crystal; Trudeau, Vance L

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase cytochrome P450arom (cyp19) is the only enzyme that has the ability to convert androgens into estrogens. Estrogens, which are produced locally in the vertebrate brain play many fundamental roles in neuroendocrine functions, reproductive functions, socio-sexual behaviors, and neurogenesis. Radial glial cells (RGCs) are neuronal progenitor cells that are abundant in fish brains and are the exclusive site of aromatase B expression and neuroestrogen synthesis. Using a novel in vitro RGC culture preparation we studied the regulation of aromatase B by 17β-estradiol (E2) and dopamine (DA). We have established that activation of the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) by SKF 38393 up-regulates aromatase B gene expression most likely through the phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB). This up-regulation can be enhanced by low concentration of E2 (100 nM) through increasing the expression of D1R and the level of p-CREB protein. However, a high concentration of E2 (1 μM) and D1R agonist together failed to up-regulate aromatase B, potentially due to attenuation of esr2b expression and p-CREB levels. Furthermore, we found the up-regulation of aromatase B by E2 and DA both requires the involvement of esr1 and esr2a. The combined effect of E2 and DA agonist indicates that aromatase B in the adult teleost brain is under tight control by both steroids and neurotransmitters to precisely regulate neuroestrogen levels.

  8. The effect of oral contraceptives on aromatase and Cox-2 expression in the endometrium of patients with idiopathic menorrhagia or adenomyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia H Jr

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hugo Maia Jr,1–3 Clarice Haddad,3 Nathaniel Pinheiro,4 Julio Casoy31School of Medicine, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil; 2Itaigara Memorial Day Hospital, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil; 3CEPARH (Centro de Pesquisas e Assistência em Reprodução Humana, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil; 4Imagepat Pathology Laboratory, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, BrazilBackground: The presence of aromatase and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 expression was investigated in the endometrium of patients with idiopathic menorrhagia or adenomyosis. The effect of oral contraceptives administered in extended regimens on the endometrial expression of these enzymes was also investigated.Methods and results: Aromatase expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in the endometrial glands and stroma of patients with idiopathic menorrhagia or adenomyosis. There was no difference in the percentage of aromatase expression in the endometria between the two groups. The mean intensity of Cox-2 expression in the glandular epithelium also did not differ significantly between the groups. Among the patients using oral contraceptives in extended regimens, the relative decrease in both aromatase and Cox-2 expression was significantly greater in amenorrheic patients compared with those who were experiencing breakthrough bleeding.Conclusion: The presence of aromatase expression in the endometrium is associated with the occurrence of menorrhagia, irrespective of the presence of adenomyosis. Continuous expression of these enzymes in the endometrium of users of oral contraceptives in extended regimens is positively associated with the presence of breakthrough bleeding. This suggests a role for both aromatase and Cox-2 in the etiology of abnormal uterine bleeding.Keywords: menorrhagia, aromatase, endometrium, Cox-2, adenomyosis

  9. Crystal Structure of the Human NKX2.5 Homeodomain in Complex with DNA Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, Lagnajeet; Genis, Caroli; Scone, Peyton; Weinberg, Ellen O.; Kasahara, Hideko; Nam, Hyun-Joo (BU-M); (Florida); (Texas)

    2012-10-16

    NKX2.5 is a homeodomain containing transcription factor regulating cardiac formation and function, and its mutations are linked to congenital heart disease. Here we provide the first report of the crystal structure of the NKX2.5 homeodomain in complex with double-stranded DNA of its endogenous target, locating within the proximal promoter -242 site of the atrial natriuretic factor gene. The crystal structure, determined at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, demonstrates that NKX2.5 homeodomains occupy both DNA binding sites separated by five nucleotides without physical interaction between themselves. The two homeodomains show identical conformation despite the differences in the DNA sequences they bind, and no significant bending of the DNA was observed. Tyr54, absolutely conserved in NK2 family proteins, mediates sequence-specific interaction with the TAAG motif. This high resolution crystal structure of NKX2.5 protein provides a detailed picture of protein and DNA interactions, which allows us to predict DNA binding of mutants identified in human patients.

  10. Numerous polymorphic microsatellites in the human prion gene complex (including PRNP, PRND and PRNT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Siegfried; Peischl, Tania; Melchinger, Elke; Geldermann, Hermann

    2004-03-31

    Microsatellite sites were analysed with DNA screening software by using about 148 kilobases (kb) of the human genomic DNA sequence GenBank accession number (acc. no.) which includes the genes PRNP, PRND and PRNT. Regarding microsatellites (MS) with at least four repeats and base replacements within the repetitive motifs<10%, 127 sites were found. Sixteen of the sites were analysed and nine of them proved to be polymorphic with up to nine alleles per site. Frequencies<0.95 of the predominant allele were observed for all polymorphic sites, and frequencies<0.4 for four sites. Some allelic DNA sequences were not only different in microsatellite repeats but also in flanking regions. Distances between microsatellite sites were in average of 1.2 kb and allow the identification of a number of further informative markers in the prion protein gene complex. The large number of polymorphic sites within a narrow chromosomal interval can be applied to study the origin of alleles as well as the association to the incidence of diseases.

  11. Biological studies of samarium-153 bleomycin complex in human breast cancer murine xenografts for therapeutic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami-Samani, A. [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir Univ. of Tech., Tehran (Iran); Ghannadi-Maragheh, M. [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir Univ. of Tech., Tehran (Iran); Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Lab. (RRDL), Nuclear Science and Technology Research Inst. (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran); Jalilian, A.R.; Mazidi, M. [Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Lab. (RRDL), Nuclear Science and Technology Research Inst. (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran)

    2010-07-01

    In this work, a potential therapeutic DNA targeting agent, {sup 153}Sm-bleomycin complex ({sup 153}Sm-BLM), was developed and the tumor accumulation studies were performed using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and scarification studies. {sup 153}Sm-BLM was prepared at optimized conditions (room temperature, 4-8 h, 0.1 mg bleomycin for 740-3700 MBq {sup 153}SmCl{sub 3}, radiochemical purity over 98%, HPLC, specific activity = 55 TBq/mmol). {sup 153}Sm-BLM was administered into human breast cancer murine xenografts and the biodistribution and imaging studies were performed up to 48 h. {sup 153}Sm-BLM demonstrated superior tumor accumulation properties in contrast with the other radiolabeled bleomycins with tumor:blood ratios of 41, 72 and 182 at 4, 24 and 48 h, respectively, and tumor:muscle ratios of 23, 33 and > 1490 at 4, 24 and 48 h, respectively, while administered intravenously. The SPECT images also demonstrated the obvious tumor uptake at the chest region of the breast-tumor bearing mice. These initial experiments demonstrate significant accumulation of {sup 153}Sm-BLM in tumor tissues. (orig.)

  12. Proteomic identification of dysferlin-interacting protein complexes in human vascular endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Cleo; Utokaparch, Soraya; Sharma, Arpeeta; Yu, Carol; Abraham, Thomas; Borchers, Christoph [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, Institute for Heart and Lung Health, Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of Victoria - Genome BC Proteomics Centre, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Bernatchez, Pascal, E-mail: pbernatc@mail.ubc.ca [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, Institute for Heart and Lung Health, Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of Victoria - Genome BC Proteomics Centre, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi-directional (inward and outward) movement of GFP-dysferlin in COS-7 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin interacts with key signaling proteins for transcytosis in EC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin mediates trafficking of vesicles carrying protein cargos in EC. -- Abstract: Dysferlin is a membrane-anchored protein known to facilitate membrane repair in skeletal muscles following mechanical injury. Mutations of dysferlin gene impair sarcolemma integrity, a hallmark of certain forms of muscular dystrophy in patients. Dysferlin contains seven calcium-dependent C2 binding domains, which are required to promote fusion of intracellular membrane vesicles. Emerging evidence reveal the unexpected expression of dysferlin in non-muscle, non-mechanically active tissues, such as endothelial cells, which cast doubts over the belief that ferlin proteins act exclusively as membrane repair proteins. We and others have shown that deficient trafficking of membrane bound proteins in dysferlin-deficient cells, suggesting that dysferlin might mediate trafficking of client proteins. Herein, we describe the intracellular trafficking and movement of GFP-dysferlin positive vesicles in unfixed reconstituted cells using live microscopy. By performing GST pull-down assays followed by mass spectrometry, we identified dysferlin binding protein complexes in human vascular endothelial cells. Together, our data further support the claims that dysferlin not only mediates membrane repair but also trafficking of client proteins, ultimately, help bridging dysferlinopathies to aberrant membrane signaling.

  13. Understanding Social Complexity Within the Wildland-Urban Interface: A New Species of Human Habitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paveglio, Travis B.; Jakes, Pamela J.; Carroll, Matthew S.; Williams, Daniel R.

    2009-06-01

    The lack of knowledge regarding social diversity in the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) or an in-depth understanding of the ways people living there interact to address common problems is concerning, perhaps even dangerous, given that community action is necessary for successful wildland fire preparedness and natural resource management activities. In this article, we lay out the knowledge and preliminary case study evidence needed to begin systematically documenting the differing levels and types of adaptive capacity WUI communities have for addressing collective problems such as wildland fire hazard. In order to achieve this end, we draw from two theoretical perspectives encompassing humans' interactions with their environment, including (1) Kenneth Wilkinson's interactional approach to community, (2) and certain elements of place literature. We also present case study research on wildfire protection planning in two drastically different California communities to illustrate how social diversity influences adaptive capacity to deal with hazards such as wildland fire. These perspectives promote an image of the WUI not as a monolithic entity but a complex mosaic of communities with different needs and existing capacities for wildland fire and natural resource management.

  14. Biophysical study on the interaction between two palladium(II) complexes and human serum albumin by Multispectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidifar, Maryam, E-mail: saeidifar@merc.ac.ir [Department of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Materials and Energy Research Center, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan [Department of Chemistry, University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbar Saboury, Ali [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The interaction of [Pd(bpy)(n-pr-dtc)]Br (I) and ([Pd(phen)(n-pr-dtc)]Br (II) (bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline and n-pr-dtc=n-propyldithiocarbamate) with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using fluorescence, UV–vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy techniques under simulative physiological conditions (pH=7.4). It was observed that the two complexes interact with HSA via static fluorescence quenching. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that the binding process was spontaneous and that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces play a major role in the association of the HSA–Pd(II) complexes. The activation energy (E{sub a}), binding constant (K{sub b}) and number of binding sites (n) of the HSA–Pd(II) complexes were calculated from fluorescence data at 293 K, 303 K and 311 K. The conformational alternations of protein secondary structure in the presence of Pd(II) complexes were demonstrated using synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, UV–vis absorption and circular dichroism techniques. Furthermore, the apparent distance between donor (HSA) and acceptor (Pd(II) complexes) was determined using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The binding studies between these complexes and HSA give us key insights into the transportation, distribution and toxicity of newly design antitumor Pd(II) complexes in human blood. - Highlights: • The HSA binding properties of two Palladium (II) complexes were studied. • Static quenching mechanism is effective in the interaction of HSA with Pd(II) complexes. • Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces were involved in the Pd(II) complexes–HSA interaction. • 3D fluorescence was used to study the interaction between two complexes and HSA.

  15. Practical guidance for the management of aromatase inhibitor-associated bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadji, P; Body, J-J; Aapro, M S; Brufsky, A; Coleman, R E; Guise, T; Lipton, A; Tubiana-Hulin, M

    2008-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that women with breast cancer are at increased risk of fracture compared with their age-matched peers. Current treatment guidelines are inadequate for averting fractures in osteopenic women, especially those receiving aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy. Therefore, we sought to identify clinically relevant risk factors for fracture that can be used to assess overall fracture risk and to provide practical guidance for preventing and treating bone loss in women with breast cancer receiving AI therapy. Systematic review of pertinent information from published literature and meeting abstracts through December 2007 was carried out to identify factors contributing to fracture risk in women with breast cancer. An evidence-based medicine approach was used to select risk factors that can be used to determine when to initiate bisphosphonate treatment of aromatase inhibitor-associated bone loss (AIBL). Fracture risk factors were chosen from large, well-designed, controlled, population-based trials in postmenopausal women. Evidence from multiple prospective clinical trials in women with breast cancer was used to validate AI therapy as a fracture risk factor. Overall, eight fracture risk factors were validated in women with breast cancer: AI therapy, T-score 65 years, low body mass index (BMI 6 months, and smoking. Treatment recommendations were derived from randomized clinical trials. The authors recommend the following for preventing and treating AIBL in women with breast cancer. All patients initiating AI therapy should receive calcium and vitamin D supplements. Any patient initiating or receiving AI therapy with a T-score >/=-2.0 and no additional risk factors should be monitored every 1-2 years for change in risk status and bone mineral density (BMD). Any patient initiating or receiving AI therapy with a T-score 65 years, low BMI (6 months, and smoking-should receive bisphosphonate therapy. BMD should be monitored every 2 years, and treatment should

  16. Properties of human disease genes and the role of genes linked to Mendelian disorders in complex disease aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spataro, Nino; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Navarro, Arcadi; Bosch, Elena

    2017-02-01

    Do genes presenting variation that has been linked to human disease have different biological properties than genes that have never been related to disease? What is the relationship between disease and fitness? Are the evolutionary pressures that affect genes linked to Mendelian diseases the same to those acting on genes whose variation contributes to complex disorders? The answers to these questions could shed light on the architecture of human genetic disorders and may have relevant implications when designing mapping strategies in future genetic studies. Here we show that, relative to non-disease genes, human disease (HD) genes have specific evolutionary profiles and protein network properties. Additionally, our results indicate that the mutation-selection balance renders an insufficient account of the evolutionary history of some HD genes and that adaptive selection could also contribute to shape their genetic architecture. Notably, several biological features of HD genes depend on the type of pathology (complex or Mendelian) with which they are related. For example, genes harbouring both causal variants for Mendelian disorders and risk factors for complex disease traits (Complex-Mendelian genes), tend to present higher functional relevance in the protein network and higher expression levels than genes associated only with complex disorders. Moreover, risk variants in Complex-Mendelian genes tend to present higher odds ratios than those on genes associated with the same complex disorders but with no link to Mendelian diseases. Taken together, our results suggest that genetic variation at genes linked to Mendelian disorders plays an important role in driving susceptibility to complex disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Antitumor activity of a Trans-thiosemicarbazone schiff base palladium (II) complex on human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingchang; Luo, Haiqing; Xu, Qinjuan; Lin, Lirong; Zhang, Bing

    2017-02-21

    The development of transition-metal-based antitumor drug candidates increases the metallopharmaceuticals study dramatically. Two trans-thiosemicarbazone-based, Schiff base palladium (Pd) (II) complexes, DMABTSPd (TSPd) and DMABPTSPd (PTSPd), were prepared and characterized as described in our previous study. Here, we investigated whether the two complexes have antitumor effect on human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines, BGC-823 and SGC-7901, compared with normal human gastric mucosal epithelial cell line, Ges-1. The results show that the Pd complex with the bare amino group (DMABTSPd(TSPd)) can inhibit cell viabilities and induce apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma cells, rather than the Pd complex without the bare amino group (DMABPTSPd (PTSPd)). This occurs via a mitochondrial-related pathway by down-regulating the level of Bcl-2 expression and up-regulating the level of Bid expression. Meanwhile, DMABTSPd (TSPd) suppressed tumor growth via a mitochondrial-related pathway in a nude mouse tumor xenograft model derived from BGC-823 cells. These findings demonstrate that DMABTSPd (TSPd) is worthy of further structural optimization and representing a promising Pd complex for the development of a new antitumor therapeutic agent.

  18. Biophysical characterization of the complex between human papillomavirus E6 protein and synapse-associated protein 97

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine Ngang; Bach, Anders; Engström, Åke

    2011-01-01

    The E6 protein of human papillomavirus exhibits complex interaction patterns with several host proteins and their roles in HPV mediated oncogenesis have proved challenging to study. Here we use several biophysical techniques to explore the binding of E6 to the three PDZ domains of the tumor...

  19. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M

    2001-01-01

    convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...

  20. Aerodynamic calculations of the Sienna towers buildings complex with respect to human vibrations comfort of their users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Piotr; Flaga, Łukasz; Flaga, Andrzej

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents aerodynamic calculations of the Sienna Towers high buildings complex in Warsaw using authors mathematical model of the considered issue. Human vibrations comfort criteria were checked according to ISO/6897. Dynamic coefficients used in the calculations were obtained from wind tunnel tests.

  1. A model of the complex between human beta-microseminoprotein and CRISP-3 based on NMR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghasriani, Houman; Fernlund, Per; Udby, Lene

    2008-01-01

    beta-Microseminoprotein (MSP), a 10kDa seminal plasma protein, forms a tight complex with cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3) from granulocytes. The 3D structure of human MSP has been determined but there is as yet no 3D structure for CRISP-3. We have now studied the complex between human...... MSP and CRISP-3 with multidimensional NMR. (15)N-HSQC spectra show substantial differences between free and complexed hMSP. Using several 3D-NMR spectra of triply labeled hMSP in complex with a recombinant N-terminal domain of CRISP-3, most of the backbone of hMSP could be assigned. The data show...... that only one side of hMSP, comprising beta-strands 1, 4, 5, and 8 are affected by the complex formation, indicating that beta-strands 1 and 8 form the main binding surface. Based on this we present a tentative structure for the hMSP-CRISP-3 complex using the known crystal structure of triflin as a model...

  2. A model of the complex between human beta-microseminoprotein and CRISP-3 based on NMR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasriani, Houman; Fernlund, Per; Udby, Lene; Drakenberg, Torbjörn

    2009-01-09

    beta-Microseminoprotein (MSP), a 10kDa seminal plasma protein, forms a tight complex with cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3) from granulocytes. The 3D structure of human MSP has been determined but there is as yet no 3D structure for CRISP-3. We have now studied the complex between human MSP and CRISP-3 with multidimensional NMR. (15)N-HSQC spectra show substantial differences between free and complexed hMSP. Using several 3D-NMR spectra of triply labeled hMSP in complex with a recombinant N-terminal domain of CRISP-3, most of the backbone of hMSP could be assigned. The data show that only one side of hMSP, comprising beta-strands 1, 4, 5, and 8 are affected by the complex formation, indicating that beta-strands 1 and 8 form the main binding surface. Based on this we present a tentative structure for the hMSP-CRISP-3 complex using the known crystal structure of triflin as a model of CRISP-3.

  3. Network complexity as a measure of information processing across resting-state networks: Evidence from the Human Connectome Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Mcdonough

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An emerging field of research focused on fluctuations in brain signals has provided evidence that the complexity of those signals, as measured by entropy, conveys important information about network dynamics (e.g., local and distributed processing. While much research has focused on how neural complexity differs in populations with different age groups or clinical disorders, substantially less research has focused on the basic understanding of neural complexity in populations with young and healthy brain states. The present study used resting-state fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project (Van Essen et al., 2013 to test the extent that neural complexity in the BOLD signal, as measured by multiscale entropy 1 would differ from random noise, 2 would differ between four major resting-state networks previously associated with higher-order cognition, and 3 would be associated with the strength and extent of functional connectivity—a complementary method of estimating information processing. We found that complexity in the BOLD signal exhibited different patterns of complexity from white, pink, and red noise and that neural complexity was differentially expressed between resting-state networks, including the default mode, cingulo-opercular, left and right frontoparietal networks. Lastly, neural complexity across all networks was negatively associated with functional connectivity at fine scales, but was positively associated with functional connectivity at coarse scales. The present study is the first to characterize neural complexity in BOLD signals at a high temporal resolution and across different networks and might help clarify the inconsistencies between neural complexity and functional connectivity, thus informing the mechanisms underlying neural complexity.

  4. Differential maturation of brain signal complexity in the human auditory and visual system

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    Sarah Lippe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain development carries with it a large number of structural changes at the local level which impact on the functional interactions of distributed neuronal networks for perceptual processing. Such changes enhance information processing capacity, which can be indexed by estimation of neural signal complexity. Here, we show that during development, EEG signal complexity increases from one month to 5 years of age in response to auditory and visual stimulation. However, the rates of change in complexity were not equivalent for the two responses. Infants’ signal complexity for the visual condition was greater than auditory signal complexity, whereas adults showed the same level of complexity to both types of stimuli. The differential rates of complexity change may reflect a combination of innate and experiential factors on the structure and function of the two sensory systems.

  5. Transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue identifies reduced expression of complement complex C1Q Genes in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peijie; Nicholls, Laura; Assareh, Hassan; Fang, Zhiming; Amos, Timothy G; Edwards, Richard J; Assareh, Amelia A; Voineagu, Irina

    2016-06-06

    MECP2, the gene mutated in the majority of Rett syndrome cases, is a transcriptional regulator that can activate or repress transcription. Although the transcription regulatory function of MECP2 has been known for over a decade, it remains unclear how transcriptional dysregulation leads to the neurodevelopmental disorder. Notably, little convergence was previously observed between the genes abnormally expressed in the brain of Rett syndrome mouse models and those identified in human studies. Here we carried out a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue from Rett syndrome brain using both RNA-seq and microarrays. We identified over two hundred differentially expressed genes, and identified the complement C1Q complex genes (C1QA, C1QB and C1QC) as a point of convergence between gene expression changes in human and mouse Rett syndrome brain. The results of our study support a role for alterations in the expression level of C1Q complex genes in RTT pathogenesis.

  6. The sex-specific associations of the aromatase gene with Alzheimer's disease and its interaction with IL10 in the Epistasis Project

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    Medway, Christopher; Combarros, Onofre; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Butler, Helen T; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; de Bruijn, Renée F A G; Koudstaal, Peter J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ikram, M Arfan; Mateo, Ignacio; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual; Lehmann, Michael G; Heun, Reinhard; Kölsch, Heike; Deloukas, Panos; Hammond, Naomi; Coto, Eliecer; Alvarez, Victoria; Kehoe, Patrick G; Barber, Rachel; Wilcock, Gordon K; Brown, Kristelle; Belbin, Olivia; Warden, Donald R; Smith, A David; Morgan, Kevin; Lehmann, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    Epistasis between interleukin-10 (IL10) and aromatase gene polymorphisms has previously been reported to modify the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, although the main effects of aromatase variants suggest a sex-specific effect in AD, there has been insufficient power to detect sex-specific epistasis between these genes to date. Here we used the cohort of 1757 AD patients and 6294 controls in the Epistasis Project. We replicated the previously reported main effects of aromatase polymorphisms in AD risk in women, for example, adjusted odds ratio of disease for rs1065778 GG=1.22 (95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.48, P=0.03). We also confirmed a reported epistatic interaction between IL10 rs1800896 and aromatase (CYP19A1) rs1062033, again only in women: adjusted synergy factor=1.94 (1.16–3.25, 0.01). Aromatase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of estrogens, is expressed in AD-relevant brain regions ,and is downregulated during the disease. IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Given that estrogens have neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory activities and regulate microglial cytokine production, epistasis is biologically plausible. Diminishing serum estrogen in postmenopausal women, coupled with suboptimal brain estrogen synthesis, may contribute to the inflammatory state, that is a pathological hallmark of AD. PMID:23736221

  7. Successful treatment of low-grade endometrial cancer in premenopausal women with an aromatase inhibitor after failure with oral or intrauterine progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straubhar, Alli; Soisson, Andrew P; Dodson, Mark; Simons, Elise

    2017-08-01

    Young women with endometrial intraepithelial hyperplasia or low-grade endometrial carcinoma are potential candidates for conservative fertility sparing therapy utilizing progesterone rather than hysterectomy. High-dose progesterone treatment is associated with 55-80% initial response but high relapse rates. Using aromatase inhibitors in conjunction with high-dose progesterone has largely been unstudied. Three obese premenopausal women with endometrial cancer failed to respond to oral or intrauterine progesterone as first line therapy. Due to their desire to continue to pursue fertility sparing treatment options, an aromatase inhibitor was added to their treatment regimen. This resulted in resolution of their malignancy in each case. In obese premenopausal women, the mechanism of malignant transformation in endometrial carcinoma is considered to be an association with relatively high levels of serum estrogen from peripheral conversion of androgens to estrone in adipose tissue with a deficiency in progesterone exposure due to chronic anovulation. Using aromatase inhibitors seems reasonable as an adjunct to progesterone given the high likelihood that this population has a significant proportion of their estrogen production coming from peripheral conversion in adipose tissue. This case series is unique in that each woman initially failed to respond to progesterone but had resolution when an aromatase inhibitor was added to their treatment regimen. This would suggest that obese women with low grade malignancy or hyperplasia who have no radiographic evidence of deep myometrial invasion, ovarian or retroperitoneal metastases and who wish to retain their fertility may be treated with intrauterine progesterone and an aromatase inhibitor.

  8. Sexual dimorphism in the glucose homeostasis phenotype of the Aromatase Knockout (ArKO) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sinderen, Michelle; Steinberg, Gregory; Jorgensen, Sebastian B; Honeyman, Jane; Chow, Jenny D Y; Simpson, Evan R; Jones, Margaret E E; Boon, Wah Chin

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the effects of estrogens on glucose homeostasis using the Aromatase Knockout (ArKO) mouse, which is unable to convert androgens into estrogens. The ArKO mouse is a model of total estrogen ablation which develops symptoms of metabolic syndrome. To determine the development and progression of whole body state of insulin resistance of ArKO mice, comprehensive whole body tolerance tests were performed on WT, ArKO and estrogen administrated mice at 3 and 12 months of age. The absence of estrogens in the male ArKO mice leads to hepatic insulin resistance, glucose and pyruvate intolerance from 3 to 12 months with consistent improvement upon estrogen treatment. Estrogen absence in the female ArKO mice leads to glucose intolerance without pyruvate intolerance or insulin resistance. The replacement of estrogens in the female WT and ArKO mice exhibited both insulin sensitizing and resistance effects depending on age and dosage. In conclusion, this study presents information on the sexually dimorphic roles of estrogens on glucose homeostasis regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome-wide epigenetic profiling of breast cancer tumors treated with aromatase inhibitors

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    Ekaterina Nevedomskaya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aromatase inhibitors (AI are extensively used in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers, however resistance to AI treatment is commonly observed. Apart from Estrogen receptor (ERα expression, no predictive biomarkers for response to AI treatment are clinically applied. Yet, since other therapeutic options exist in the clinic, such as tamoxifen, there is an urgent medical need for the development of treatment-selective biomarkers, enabling personalized endocrine treatment selection in breast cancer. In the described dataset, ERα chromatin binding and histone marks H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 were assessed in a genome-wide manner by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP combined with massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq. These datasets were used to develop a classifier to stratify breast cancer patients on outcome after AI treatment in the metastatic setting. Here we describe in detail the data and quality control metrics, as well as the clinical information associated with the study, published by Jansen et al. [1]. The data is publicly available through the GEO database with accession number GSE40867.

  10. Increased Sclerostin Levels after Further Ablation of Remnant Estrogen by Aromatase Inhibitors

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    Wonjin Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSclerostin is a secreted Wnt inhibitor produced almost exclusively by osteocytes, which inhibits bone formation. Aromatase inhibitors (AIs, which reduce the conversion of steroids to estrogen, are used to treat endocrine-responsive breast cancer. As AIs lower estrogen levels, they increase bone turnover and lower bone mass. We analyzed changes in serum sclerostin levels in Korean women with breast cancer who were treated with an AI.MethodsWe included postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive breast cancer (n=90; mean age, 57.7 years treated with an AI, and compared them to healthy premenopausal women (n=36; mean age, 28.0 years. The subjects were randomly assigned to take either 5 mg alendronate with 0.5 µg calcitriol (n=46, or placebo (n=44 for 6 months.ResultsPostmenopausal women with breast cancer had significantly higher sclerostin levels compared to those in premenopausal women (27.8±13.6 pmol/L vs. 23.1±4.8 pmol/L, P0.05.ConclusionSerum sclerostin levels increased with absolute deficiency of residual estrogens in postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive breast cancer who underwent AI therapy with concurrent bone loss.

  11. The effect of aromatase inhibition on the sexual differentiation of the sheep brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, C E; Schrunk, J M; Stadelman, H L; Resko, J A; Stormshak, F

    2006-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that aromatization of testosterone to estradiol is necessary for sexual differentiation of the sheep brain. Pregnant ewes (n = 10) were treated with the aromatase inhibitor 1,4,6- androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD) during the period of gestation when the sheep brain is maximally sensitive to the behavior-modifying effects of exogenous testosterone (embryonic d 50-80; 147 d is term). Control (n = 10) ewes received vehicle injections. Fifteen control lambs (7 males and 8 females) and 17 ATD-exposed lambs (7 males and 10 females) were evaluated for sexually dimorphic behavioral and neuroendocrine traits as adults. Prenatal ATD exposure had no significant effect on serum concentrations of androgen at birth, growth rates, expression of juvenile play behaviors, or the onset of puberty in male and female lambs. Rams exposed to ATD prenatally exhibited a modest, but significant, decrease in mounting behavior at 18 mo of age. However, prenatal ATD exposure did not interfere with defeminization of adult sexual partner preferences, receptive behavior, or the LH surge mechanism. In summary, our results indicate that aromatization is necessary for complete behavioral masculinization in sheep. However, before we can conclude that aromatization does not play a role in defeminization of the sheep brain, it will be necessary to evaluate whether intrauterine exposure of male fetuses to higher doses of ATD for a more extended period of time can disrupt normal neuroendocrine and behavioral development.

  12. A pilot study of website information regarding aromatase inhibitors: dietary supplement interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Cara L; Hsieh, Angela A; Sweet, Erin S; Tippens, Kimberly M; McCune, Jeannine S

    2011-11-01

    Patients who have hormone receptor-positive breast cancer and who are taking aromatase inhibitors (AIs) should understand the benefits and risks of concomitant dietary supplement (DS) use. The International Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) encourages patients to discuss DS use with their health care practitioners. The objective was to conduct a pilot study rating Internet websites from the perspective of health care practitioners for information about AI-DS interactions. Five (5) Internet websites suggested by SIO were evaluated using the DISCERN instrument rating tool. The available AI-DS information on these websites was rated by 4 evaluators: 2 naturopathic doctors, 1 oncology pharmacy resident, and a pharmacy student. The overall rankings ranged from 1.6 to 3.9, with considerable variability in the type of information available from the websites. The interevaluator rankings of the websites ranged from 0.44 to 0.89. The evaluators consistently found the most reliable, unbiased, and comprehensive information on AI-DS interactions at the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center websites. However, more than one database was needed for provision of optimal patient information on AI-DS interactions. In order to effectively advise patients regarding AI-DS interactions, more than one website should be evaluated to assess the potential efficacy and safety of DS in women whose breast cancer is being treated with an AI. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  13. PERFORMANSI TIGA GENOTIPE IKAN NILA YANG DIBERI PAKAN AROMATASE INHIBITOR PADA TAHAP PEMBESARAN

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    Didik Ariyanto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ikan nila jantan XY mempunyai laju pertumbuhan lebih cepat dibanding ikan betina XX, sehingga budidaya ikan nila tunggal kelamin jantan lebih menguntungkan. Salah satu metode produksi massal benih ikan nila tunggal kelamin jantan adalah melalui sex reversal, yaitu dengan menambahkan hormon sintetik 17a-metiltestosteron (mt atau dapat juga dengan memberikan bahan aromatase inhibitor (AI. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengevaluasi performansi benih tiga genotipe (XX, XY, dan YY ikan nila yang diberi bahan AI pada tahap pembesaran. Bahan utama adalah benih ikan nila genotipe XX, XY, dan YY yang diberi bahan AI. Benih dengan penambahan hormon mt digunakan sebagai kontrol (+. Sebagai pembanding digunakan populasi campuran antara jantan dan betina. Benih berumur 95 hari setelah menetas dengan bobot rata-rata 20 g/ekor dipelihara dalam jaring yang ditempatkan di kolam pembesaran selama 120 hari. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa populasi tunggal kelamin jantan genotipe XY maupun jantan hasil sex reversal genotipe XX mempunyai laju pertumbuhan dan hasil panen lebih baik dibandingkan populasi campuran XX-XY. Semua perlakuan dan genotipe yang berbeda tidak memberikan dampak yang berbeda nyata terhadap nilai keragaman ukuran, sintasan, maupun nilai food conversion ratio, kecuali pada genotipe YY. Organ reproduksi pada semua genotipe dan perlakuan berkembang normal

  14. Anticancer effect of dentatin and dentatin-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin complex on human colon cancer (HT-29) cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Abboodi, Ashwaq Shakir; Rasedee, Abdullah; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Alkaby, Wafaa Abd Alwahed; Ghaji, Mostafa Saddam; Waziri, Peter M; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Dentatin (DEN) (5-methoxy-2, 2-dimethyl-10-(1, 1-dimethyl-2propenyl) dipyran-2-one), a natural compound present in the roots of Clausena excavata Burm f, possesses pro-apoptotic and antiproliferative effects in various cancer cells. Because of its hydrophobicity, it is believed that its complexation with hydroxy-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) will make it a potent inhibitor of cancer cell growth. In the current work, the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induced by DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex were demonstrated in human colon HT-29 cancer cells. Materials and methods After the human colon HT-29 cancer cells were treated with DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex, their effects on the expression of apoptotic-regulated gene markers in mitochondria-mediated apoptotic and death receptor pathways were detected by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These markers included caspases-9, 3, and 8, cytochrome c, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, p53, p21, cyclin A as well as the Bcl-2 family of proteins. Results At 3, 6, 12, and 24 µg/mL exposure, DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex significantly affected apoptosis in HT-29 cells through the down-regulation of Bcl-2 and cyclin A in turn, and up-regulation of Bax, p53, p21, cytochrome c at both protein and mRNA levels. DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex also decreased cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and induced caspases-3, -8, and -9. Conclusion Results of this study indicate that the apoptotic pathway caused by DEN and DEN-HPβCD complex are mediated by the regulation of caspases and Bcl-2 families in human colon HT-29 cancer cells. The results also suggest that DEN-HPβCD complex may have chemotherapeutic benefits for colon cancer patients. PMID:29200826

  15. The human milk protein-lipid complex HAMLET sensitizes bacterial pathogens to traditional antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura R; Clementi, Emily A; Hakansson, Anders P

    2012-01-01

    The fight against antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to public health of our time. The inevitable development of resistance following the introduction of novel antibiotics has led to an urgent need for the development of new antibacterial drugs with new mechanisms of action that are not susceptible to existing resistance mechanisms. One such compound is HAMLET, a natural complex from human milk that kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) using a mechanism different from common antibiotics and is immune to resistance-development. In this study we show that sublethal concentrations of HAMLET potentiate the effect of common antibiotics (penicillins, macrolides, and aminoglycosides) against pneumococci. Using MIC assays and short-time killing assays we dramatically reduced the concentrations of antibiotics needed to kill pneumococci, especially for antibiotic-resistant strains that in the presence of HAMLET fell into the clinically sensitive range. Using a biofilm model in vitro and nasopharyngeal colonization in vivo, a combination of HAMLET and antibiotics completely eradicated both biofilms and colonization in mice of both antibiotic-sensitive and resistant strains, something each agent alone was unable to do. HAMLET-potentiation of antibiotics was partially due to increased accessibility of antibiotics to the bacteria, but relied more on calcium import and kinase activation, the same activation pathway HAMLET uses when killing pneumococci by itself. Finally, the sensitizing effect was not confined to species sensitive to HAMLET. The HAMLET-resistant respiratory species Acinetobacter baumanii and Moraxella catarrhalis were all sensitized to various classes of antibiotics in the presence of HAMLET, activating the same mechanism as in pneumococci. Combined these results suggest the presence of a conserved HAMLET-activated pathway that circumvents antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The ability to activate this pathway may extend

  16. Complex nature of SNP genotype effects on gene expression in primary human leucocytes

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    Dinesen Lotte C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association studies have been hugely successful in identifying disease risk variants, yet most variants do not lead to coding changes and how variants influence biological function is usually unknown. Methods We correlated gene expression and genetic variation in untouched primary leucocytes (n = 110 from individuals with celiac disease – a common condition with multiple risk variants identified. We compared our observations with an EBV-transformed HapMap B cell line dataset (n = 90, and performed a meta-analysis to increase power to detect non-tissue specific effects. Results In celiac peripheral blood, 2,315 SNP variants influenced gene expression at 765 different transcripts (cis expression quantitative trait loci, eQTLs. 135 of the detected SNP-probe effects (reflecting 51 unique probes were also detected in a HapMap B cell line published dataset, all with effects in the same allelic direction. Overall gene expression differences within the two datasets predominantly explain the limited overlap in observed cis-eQTLs. Celiac associated risk variants from two regions, containing genes IL18RAP and CCR3, showed significant cis genotype-expression correlations in the peripheral blood but not in the B cell line datasets. We identified 14 genes where a SNP affected the expression of different probes within the same gene, but in opposite allelic directions. By incorporating genetic variation in co-expression analyses, functional relationships between genes can be more significantly detected. Conclusion In conclusion, the complex nature of genotypic effects in human populations makes the use of a relevant tissue, large datasets, and analysis of different exons essential to enable the identification of the function for many genetic risk variants in common diseases.

  17. Modulation of Innate Host Factors by Mycobacterium avium Complex in Human Macrophages Includes Interleukin 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Nancy; Rekka, Sofia; Gliozzi, Maria; Feng, Carl G.; Amarnath, Shoba; Orenstein, Jan M.; Wahl, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although opportunistic infections due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) have been less common since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, globally, human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)–positive patients remain predisposed to these infections. Absence of a properly functioning acquired immune response allows MAC persistence within macrophages localized in lymph nodes coinfected with HIV and MAC. Although a deficiency in interferon γ appears to play a part in the ability of MAC to deflect the macrophage-associated antimicrobial attack, questions about this process remain. Our study examines the ability of MAC to regulate interleukin 17 (IL-17), a proinflammatory cytokine involved in host cell recruitment. Methods. Coinfected lymph nodes were examined for IL-17 by immunohistochemical analysis. In vitro, macrophages exposed to mycobacteria were evaluated for transcription activities, proteins, and signaling pathways responsible for IL-17 expression. Infected macrophages were also analyzed for expression of interleukin 21 (IL-21) and negative regulators of immune responses. Results. Infection of macrophages triggered synthesis of IL-17, correlating with IL-17 expression by macrophages in coinfected lymph nodes. Infected macrophages exposed to exogenous IL-17 expressed CXCL10, which favors recruitment of new macrophages as targets for infection. Blockade of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways suppressed mycobacteria-induced IL-17 expression. MAC triggered expression of IL-21, IRF4, and STAT3 genes related to IL-17 regulation, as well as expression of the negative immunoregulators CD274(PD-L1) and suppressors of cytokine signaling. Conclusions. MAC-infected macrophages can provide an alternative source for IL-17 that favors accumulation of new targets for perpetuating bacterial and viral infection while suppressing host antimicrobial immune responses. PMID

  18. The human milk protein-lipid complex HAMLET sensitizes bacterial pathogens to traditional antimicrobial agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R Marks

    Full Text Available The fight against antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to public health of our time. The inevitable development of resistance following the introduction of novel antibiotics has led to an urgent need for the development of new antibacterial drugs with new mechanisms of action that are not susceptible to existing resistance mechanisms. One such compound is HAMLET, a natural complex from human milk that kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus using a mechanism different from common antibiotics and is immune to resistance-development. In this study we show that sublethal concentrations of HAMLET potentiate the effect of common antibiotics (penicillins, macrolides, and aminoglycosides against pneumococci. Using MIC assays and short-time killing assays we dramatically reduced the concentrations of antibiotics needed to kill pneumococci, especially for antibiotic-resistant strains that in the presence of HAMLET fell into the clinically sensitive range. Using a biofilm model in vitro and nasopharyngeal colonization in vivo, a combination of HAMLET and antibiotics completely eradicated both biofilms and colonization in mice of both antibiotic-sensitive and resistant strains, something each agent alone was unable to do. HAMLET-potentiation of antibiotics was partially due to increased accessibility of antibiotics to the bacteria, but relied more on calcium import and kinase activation, the same activation pathway HAMLET uses when killing pneumococci by itself. Finally, the sensitizing effect was not confined to species sensitive to HAMLET. The HAMLET-resistant respiratory species Acinetobacter baumanii and Moraxella catarrhalis were all sensitized to various classes of antibiotics in the presence of HAMLET, activating the same mechanism as in pneumococci. Combined these results suggest the presence of a conserved HAMLET-activated pathway that circumvents antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The ability to activate this

  19. Complex and changing patterns of natural selection explain the evolution of the human hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Mark; Roseman, Charles C

    2015-08-01

    Causal explanations for the dramatic changes that occurred during the evolution of the human hip focus largely on selection for bipedal function and locomotor efficiency. These hypotheses rest on two critical assumptions. The first-that these anatomical changes served functional roles in bipedalism-has been supported in numerous analyses showing how postcranial changes likely affected locomotion. The second-that morphological changes that did play functional roles in bipedalism were the result of selection for that behavior-has not been previously explored and represents a major gap in our understanding of hominin hip evolution. Here we use evolutionary quantitative genetic models to test the hypothesis that strong directional selection on many individual aspects of morphology was responsible for the large differences observed across a sample of fossil hominin hips spanning the Plio-Pleistocene. Our approach uses covariance among traits and the differences between relatively complete fossils to estimate the net selection pressures that drove the major transitions in hominin hip evolution. Our findings show a complex and changing pattern of natural selection drove hominin hip evolution, and that many, but not all, traits hypothesized to play functional roles in bipedalism evolved as a direct result of natural selection. While the rate of evolutionary change for all transitions explored here does not exceed the amount expected if evolution was occurring solely through neutral processes, it was far above rates of evolution for morphological traits in other mammalian groups. Given that stasis is the norm in the mammalian fossil record, our results suggest that large shifts in the adaptive landscape drove hominin evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Apoptosis-like death in bacteria induced by HAMLET, a human milk lipid-protein complex.

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    Anders P Hakansson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is the primary means for eliminating unwanted cells in multicellular organisms in order to preserve tissue homeostasis and function. It is characterized by distinct changes in the morphology of the dying cell that are orchestrated by a series of discrete biochemical events. Although there is evidence of primitive forms of programmed cell death also in prokaryotes, no information is available to suggest that prokaryotic death displays mechanistic similarities to the highly regulated programmed death of eukaryotic cells. In this study we compared the characteristics of tumor and bacterial cell death induced by HAMLET, a human milk complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that HAMLET-treated bacteria undergo cell death with mechanistic and morphologic similarities to apoptotic death of tumor cells. In Jurkat cells and Streptococcus pneumoniae death was accompanied by apoptosis-like morphology such as cell shrinkage, DNA condensation, and DNA degradation into high molecular weight fragments of similar sizes, detected by field inverse gel electrophoresis. HAMLET was internalized into tumor cells and associated with mitochondria, causing a rapid depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and bound to and induced depolarization of the pneumococcal membrane with similar kinetic and magnitude as in mitochondria. Membrane depolarization in both systems required calcium transport, and both tumor cells and bacteria were found to require serine protease activity (but not caspase activity to execute cell death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that many of the morphological changes and biochemical responses associated with apoptosis are present in prokaryotes. Identifying the mechanisms of bacterial cell death has the potential to reveal novel targets for future antimicrobial therapy and to further our understanding of core activation mechanisms of cell death in eukaryote cells.

  1. Apoptosis-like death in bacteria induced by HAMLET, a human milk lipid-protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakansson, Anders P; Roche-Hakansson, Hazeline; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-03-10

    Apoptosis is the primary means for eliminating unwanted cells in multicellular organisms in order to preserve tissue homeostasis and function. It is characterized by distinct changes in the morphology of the dying cell that are orchestrated by a series of discrete biochemical events. Although there is evidence of primitive forms of programmed cell death also in prokaryotes, no information is available to suggest that prokaryotic death displays mechanistic similarities to the highly regulated programmed death of eukaryotic cells. In this study we compared the characteristics of tumor and bacterial cell death induced by HAMLET, a human milk complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid. We show that HAMLET-treated bacteria undergo cell death with mechanistic and morphologic similarities to apoptotic death of tumor cells. In Jurkat cells and Streptococcus pneumoniae death was accompanied by apoptosis-like morphology such as cell shrinkage, DNA condensation, and DNA degradation into high molecular weight fragments of similar sizes, detected by field inverse gel electrophoresis. HAMLET was internalized into tumor cells and associated with mitochondria, causing a rapid depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and bound to and induced depolarization of the pneumococcal membrane with similar kinetic and magnitude as in mitochondria. Membrane depolarization in both systems required calcium transport, and both tumor cells and bacteria were found to require serine protease activity (but not caspase activity) to execute cell death. Our results suggest that many of the morphological changes and biochemical responses associated with apoptosis are present in prokaryotes. Identifying the mechanisms of bacterial cell death has the potential to reveal novel targets for future antimicrobial therapy and to further our understanding of core activation mechanisms of cell death in eukaryote cells.

  2. Human centromedian-parafascicular complex signals sensory cues for goal-oriented behavior selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Inga M; Beck, Anne-Kathrin; Bräuer, Susann; Schwabe, Kerstin; Abdallat, Mahmoud; Sandmann, Pascale; Dengler, Reinhard; Rieger, Jochem W; Krauss, Joachim K

    2017-05-15

    Experimental research has shown that the centromedian-parafascicular complex (CM-Pf) of the intralaminar thalamus is activated in attentional orienting and processing of behaviorally relevant stimuli. These observations resulted in the hypothesis that the CM-Pf plays a pivotal role in goal-oriented behavior selection. We here set out to test this hypothesis with electrophysiological recordings from patients with electrodes implanted in CM-Pf for deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. Six patients participated in (1) an auditory three-class oddball experiment, which required a button press to target tones, but not to standard and deviant tones and in (2) a multi-speaker experiment with a target word that required attention selection and a target image that required response selection. Subjects showed transient neural responses (8-15Hz) to the target tone and the target word. Two subjects additionally showed transient neural responses (15-25Hz) to the target image. All sensory target stimuli were related to an internal goal and required a behavior selection (attention selection, response selection). In group analyses, neural responses were greater to target tones than deviant and standard tones and to target words than other task-relevant words that did not require attention selection. The transient neural responses occurred after the target stimuli but prior to the overt behavioral response. Our results demonstrate that in human subjects the CM-Pf is involved in signaling sensory inputs related to goal-oriented selection of behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Differential association of protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welting, Tim J M; Kikkert, Bastiaan J; van Venrooij, Walther J; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2006-07-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in nucleolar and mitochondrial RNA processing events. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein particle, which is structurally related to RNase P, an endoribonuclease involved in pre-tRNA processing. Most of the protein components of RNase MRP have been reported to be associated with RNase P as well. In this study we determined the association of these protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P particles by glycerol gradient sedimentation and coimmunoprecipitation. In agreement with previous studies, RNase MRP sedimented at 12S and 60-80S. In contrast, only a single major peak was observed for RNase P at 12S. The analysis of individual protein subunits revealed that hPop4 (also known as Rpp29), Rpp21, Rpp20, and Rpp25 only sedimented in 12S fractions, whereas hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 were also found in 60-80S fractions. In agreement with their cosedimentation with RNase P RNA in the 12S peak, coimmunoprecipitation with VSV-epitope-tagged protein subunits revealed that hPop4, Rpp21, and in addition Rpp14 preferentially associate with RNase P. These data show that hPop4, Rpp21, and Rpp14 may not be associated with RNase MRP. Furthermore, Rpp20 and Rpp25 appear to be associated with only a subset of RNase MRP particles, in contrast to hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 (and possibly also hPop5), which are probably associated with all RNase MRP complexes. Our data are consistent with a transient association of Rpp20 and Rpp25 with RNase MRP, which may be inversely correlated to its involvement in pre-rRNA processing.

  4. Evidence supporting oral sensitivity to complex carbohydrates independent of sweet taste sensitivity in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Y Q Low

    Full Text Available Compared to simple sugars, complex carbohydrates have been assumed invisible to taste. However, two recent studies proposed that there may be a perceivable taste quality elicited by complex carbohydrates independent of sweet taste. There is precedent with behavioural studies demonstrating that rats are very attracted to complex carbohydrates, and that complex carbohydrates are preferred to simple sugars at low concentrations. This suggests that rats may have independent taste sensors for simple sugars and complex carbohydrates. The aim of this paper is to investigate oral sensitivities of two different classes of complex carbohydrates (a soluble digestible and a soluble non-digestible complex carbohydrate, and to compare these to other caloric and non-nutritive sweeteners in addition to the prototypical tastes using two commonly used psychophysical measures. There were strong correlations between the detection thresholds and mean intensity ratings for complex carbohydrates (maltodextrin, oligofructose (r = 0.94, P 0.05. However, moderate correlations were observed between perceived intensities of complex carbohydrates and sweeteners (r = 0.48-0.61, P < 0.05. These data provide evidence that complex carbohydrates can be sensed in the oral cavity over a range of concentrations independent of sweet taste sensitivity at low concentrations, but with partial overlap with sweet taste intensity at higher concentrations.

  5. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  6. Metabolites from invasive pests inhibit mitochondrial complex II: A potential strategy for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.ferramosca@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Conte, Annalea; Guerra, Flora; Felline, Serena [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Rimoli, Maria Grazia [Dipartimento di Farmacia, Università di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Mollo, Ernesto [Istituto di Chimica Biomolecolare, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pozzuoli (Italy); Zara, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Terlizzi, Antonio [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-05-13

    The red pigment caulerpin, a secondary metabolite from the marine invasive green algae Caulerpa cylindracea can be accumulated and transferred along the trophic chain, with detrimental consequences on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Despite increasing research efforts to understand how caulerpin modifies fish physiology, little is known on the effects of algal metabolites on mammalian cells. Here we report for the first time the mitochondrial targeting activity of both caulerpin, and its closely related derivative caulerpinic acid, by using as experimental model rat liver mitochondria, a system in which bioenergetics mechanisms are not altered. Mitochondrial function was tested by polarographic and spectrophotometric methods. Both compounds were found to selectively inhibit respiratory complex II activity, while complexes I, III, and IV remained functional. These results led us to hypothesize that both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in cell lines with defects in mitochondrial complex I. Ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells are a good example of cell lines with a defe