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Sample records for human antibody binding

  1. An Insertion Mutation That Distorts Antibody Binding Site Architecture Enhances Function of a Human Antibody

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    Krause, Jens C.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Smith, Patricia B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Crowe, Jr., James E. (Vanderbilt); (Scripps); (CDC)

    2011-09-02

    The structural and functional significance of somatic insertions and deletions in antibody chains is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a naturally occurring three-amino-acid insertion within the influenza virus-specific human monoclonal antibody 2D1 heavy-chain variable region reconfigures the antibody-combining site and contributes to its high potency against the 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses. The insertion arose through a series of events, including a somatic point mutation in a predicted hot-spot motif, introduction of a new hot-spot motif, a molecular duplication due to polymerase slippage, a deletion due to misalignment, and additional somatic point mutations. Atomic resolution structures of the wild-type antibody and a variant in which the insertion was removed revealed that the three-amino-acid insertion near the base of heavy-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) H2 resulted in a bulge in that loop. This enlarged CDR H2 loop impinges on adjacent regions, causing distortion of the CDR H1 architecture and its displacement away from the antigen-combining site. Removal of the insertion restores the canonical structure of CDR H1 and CDR H2, but binding, neutralization activity, and in vivo activity were reduced markedly because of steric conflict of CDR H1 with the hemagglutinin antigen.

  2. Germline V-genes sculpt the binding site of a family of antibodies neutralizing human cytomegalovirus

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    Thomson, Christy A.; Bryson, Steve; McLean, Gary R.; Creagh, A. Louise; Pai, Emil F.; Schrader, John W. (Toronto); (UBC)

    2008-10-17

    Immunoglobulin genes are generated somatically through specialized mechanisms resulting in a vast repertoire of antigen-binding sites. Despite the stochastic nature of these processes, the V-genes that encode most of the antigen-combining site are under positive evolutionary selection, raising the possibility that V-genes have been selected to encode key structural features of binding sites of protective antibodies against certain pathogens. Human, neutralizing antibodies to human cytomegalovirus that bind the AD-2S1 epitope on its gB envelope protein repeatedly use a pair of well-conserved, germline V-genes IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Here, we present crystallographic, kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the binding site of such an antibody and that of its primary immunoglobulin ancestor. These show that these germline V-genes encode key side chain contacts with the viral antigen and thereby dictate key structural features of the hypermutated, high-affinity neutralizing antibody. V-genes may thus encode an innate, protective immunological memory that targets vulnerable, invariant sites on multiple pathogens.

  3. Reduced binding of human antibodies to cells from GGTA1/CMAH KO pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlak, C; Paris, L L; Lutz, A J; Sidner, R A; Estrada, J; Li, P; Tector, M; Tector, A J

    2014-08-01

    Xenotransplantation using genetically modified pig organs could solve the donor organ shortage problem. Two inactivated genes that make humans unique from pigs are GGTA1 and CMAH, the products of which produce the carbohydrate epitopes, aGal and Neu5Gc that attract preformed human antibody. When the GGTA1 and CMAH genes were deleted in pigs, human antibody binding was reduced in preliminary analysis. We analyzed the binding of human IgM and IgG from 121 healthy human serum samples for binding to GGTA1 KO and GGTA1/CMAH KO peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We analyzed a sub population for reactivity toward genetically modified pig PBMCs as compared to chimpanzee and human PBMCs. Deletion of the GGTA1 and CMAH genes in pigs improved the crossmatch results beyond those observed with chimpanzees. Sorting the 121 human samples tested against the GGTA1/CMAH KO pig PBMCs did not reveal a distinguishing feature such as blood group, age or gender. Modification of genes to make pig carbohydrates more similar to humans has improved the crossmatch with human serum significantly.

  4. Broadly neutralizing human antibody that recognizes the receptor-binding pocket of influenza virus hemagglutinin

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    Whittle, James R.R.; Zhang, Ruijun; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (Novartis); (US-FDA); (Duke)

    2011-09-20

    Seasonal antigenic drift of circulating influenza virus leads to a requirement for frequent changes in vaccine composition, because exposure or vaccination elicits human antibodies with limited cross-neutralization of drifted strains. We describe a human monoclonal antibody, CH65, obtained by isolating rearranged heavy- and light-chain genes from sorted single plasma cells, coming from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent influenza vaccine. The crystal structure of a complex of the hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 strain A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 with the Fab of CH65 shows that the tip of the CH65 heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) inserts into the receptor binding pocket on HA1, mimicking in many respects the interaction of the physiological receptor, sialic acid. CH65 neutralizes infectivity of 30 out of 36 H1N1 strains tested. The resistant strains have a single-residue insertion near the rim of the sialic-acid pocket. We conclude that broad neutralization of influenza virus can be achieved by antibodies with contacts that mimic those of the receptor.

  5. The effect of polyamines on the binding of anti-DNA antibodies from patients with SLE and normal human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Stearns, Nancy A; Li, Xingfu; Pisetsky, David S

    2014-07-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To elucidate specificity further, the effect of polyamines on the binding of anti-DNA antibodies from patients with lupus was tested by ELISA to calf thymus (CT) DNA; we also assessed the binding of plasmas of patients and normal human subjects (NHS) to Micrococcus luteus (MC) DNA. As these studies showed, spermine can dose-dependently inhibit SLE anti-DNA binding to CT DNA and can promote dissociation of preformed immune complexes. With MC DNA as antigen, spermine failed to inhibit the NHS anti-DNA binding. Studies using plasmas adsorbed to a CT DNA cellulose affinity indicated that SLE plasmas are mixtures of anti-DNA that differ in inhibition by spermine and binding to conserved and non-conserved determinants. Together, these studies demonstrate that spermine can influence the binding of anti-DNA autoantibodies and may contribute to the antigenicity of DNA.

  6. Discrepancy Between Tumor Antigen Distribution and Radiolabeled Antibody Binding in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model of Human Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Il; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key

    2017-04-01

    Biodistribution of antibodies is vital to successful immunoscintigraphy/immunotherapy, and it is assumed to be similar to antigen distribution. We measured and compared the binding pattern of radiolabeled antibody to tissue antigen distribution in a nude mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. We transplanted 10(7) FEM-XII human melanoma cells into the right flank of five nude mice. For the control, we transplanted 5 × 10(6) LS174T human colon cancer cells into the left flank. Two weeks later, 10 μCi of (131)I-labeled melanoma-associated 96.5 monoclonal antibody (targeting p97 antigen) was intravenously injected. Three days later, we sacrificed the mice and evaluated 96.5 antibody binding and concentration in the tumors by ex vivo quantitative autoradiography (QAR). Two months later, we incubated adjacent tumor tissue slices in various concentrations of (125)I-labeled 96.5 MoAb and evaluated the distribution/concentration of p97 antigen by in vitro QAR. p97 antigen distribution was homogeneous in the tumors (total antigen concentration [Bmax] = 17.36-38.36 pmol/g). In contrast, radiolabeled 96.5 antibody binding was heterogenous between location within the tumor (estimated bound antigen concentration = 0.7-6.6 pmol/g). No quantifiable parameters were found to be related with radiolabeled antibody binding and tumor antigen distribution. Antibody-bound tumor antigen to total antigen ratios ranged between 2% and 38%. Heterogeneous features of target antibody binding were observed in contrast to relatively homogenous feature of tumor antigen. We did not identify any correlations between p97 antigen distribution and 96.5 antibody binding in melanoma tissue. Radiolabeled 96.5 antibody binding patterns within melanoma cannot be predicted based on p97 antigen distribution in the tumor, which needs to be further studied with several other methods and more subjects in the future.

  7. Neutralization of biological activity and inhibition of receptor binding by antibodies against human thrombopoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, T; Kuwaki, T; Matsumoto, A; Morita, H; Watarai, H; Inagaki, Y; Ohashi, H; Ogami, K; Miyazaki, H; Kato, T

    1998-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is a recently isolated cytokine that primarily regulates megakaryocytopoiesis and thrombopoiesis. We recently reported the development of a variety of antibodies (Abs) to synthetic peptides of human (h)TPO and to recombinant human TPO (rhTPO). In this study, we characterized the Abs and mapped immunologically distinct areas of the molecule. Among the five different antipeptide polyclonal Abs, only one, raised against synthetic peptide D8 to Q28, neutralized the TPO-dependent growth of FDCP-2 cells expressing human Mpl (FDCP-hMpl5 cells). One out of seven anti-rhTPO monoclonal Abs, designated as TN1, also showed neutralizing activity. TN1 was found to be specifically reactive with two proteolytic fragments, residues S1 to R117 and A60 to K122 of hTPO, indicating that the epitope(s) of TN1 is localized in residues A60 to R117 of the molecule. These two neutralizing Abs inhibited the binding of biotinylated rhTPO to FDCP-hMpl5 cells. On the other hand, the other Abs, which reacted with five polypeptides of S47 to D62, L108 to A126, N172 to A190, S262 to T284, and P306 to G332 of hTPO, did not show either the neutralizing activity or the ability to inhibit the binding of biotinylated rhTPO to the cell surface hMpl. These findings indicate that two regions, residues D8 to Q28 and A60 to R117 of hTPO, may contain the domains associated with its receptor, C-Mpl. These Abs characterized here are valuable for studying the structural analysis and the biological function of hTPO mediated by its receptor.

  8. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies.

  9. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-120 interface

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is providing important insights regarding the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in 1 ). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific mAb, termed 35O22, which binds novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with an IC50

  10. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface

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    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Imamichi, Hiromi; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark [NIH

    2015-10-15

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies is providing important insights into the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in ref. 1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific monoclonal antibody, termed 35O22, which binds a novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) <50 μg ml-1. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg ml-1, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed that it bound to a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current monoclonal-antibody-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis and vaccine design.

  11. Characterization of human-type monoclonal antibodies against reduced form of hemin binding protein 35 from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y; Okano, S; Shiroza, T; Tahara, T; Nakazawa, K; Kataoka, S; Ishida, I; Kobayashi, T; Yoshie, H; Abiko, Y

    2011-12-01

    The gram-negative anaerobe Porphyromonas gingivalis has been implicated as an important pathogen in the development of adult periodontitis, and its colonization of subgingival sites is critical in the pathogenic process. We previously identified a 35 kDa surface protein (hemin binding protein 35; HBP35) from P. gingivalis that exhibited coaggregation activity, while additional analysis suggested that this protein possessed an ability to bind heme molecules. For development of passive immunotherapy for periodontal diseases, human-type monoclonal antibodies have been prepared using HBP35 as an antigen in TransChromo mice. In the present study, we focused on a single antibody, TCmAb-h13, which is known to inhibit heme binding to recombinant HBP35. The aim of our investigation was to clarify the redox-related function of HBP35 and consider the benefits of human-type monoclonal antibodies. To examine the antigen recognition capability of TCmAbs with immunoblotting and Biacore techniques, we used the native form as well as several Cys-to-Ser variants of recombinant HBP35. We found that the redox state of recombinant HBP35 was dependent on two Cys residues, (48) C and (51) C, in the thioredoxin active center (WCGxCx). Furthermore, TCmAb-h13 recognized the reduced forms of recombinant HBP35, indicating its inhibitory effect on P. gingivalis growth. Hemin binding protein 35 appears to be an important molecule involved in recognition of the redox state of environmental conditions. In addition, TCmAb-h13 had an inhibitory effect on heme binding to recombinant HBP35, thereby interfering with P. gingivalis growth. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Cross-Reactive Human IgM-Derived Monoclonal Antibodies that Bind to HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins

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    Barton F. Haynes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Elicitation of antibodies with potent and broad neutralizing activity against HIV by immunization remains a challenge. Several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs isolated from humans with HIV-1 infection exhibit such activity but vaccine immunogens based on structures containing their epitopes have not been successful for their elicitation. All known broadly neutralizing mAbs (bnmAbs are immunoglobulin (Ig Gs (IgGs and highly somatically hypermutated which could impede their elicitation. Ig Ms (IgMs are on average significantly less divergent from germline antibodies and are relevant for the development of vaccine immunogens but are underexplored compared to IgGs. Here we describe the identification and characterization of several human IgM-derived mAbs against HIV-1 which were selected from a large phage-displayed naive human antibody library constructed from blood, lymph nodes and spleens of 59 healthy donors. These antibodies bound with high affinity to recombinant envelope glycoproteins (gp140s, Envs of HIV-1 isolates from different clades. They enhanced or did not neutralize infection by some of the HIV-1 primary isolates using CCR5 as a coreceptor but neutralized all CXCR4 isolates tested although weakly. One of these antibodies with relatively low degree of somatic hypermutation was more extensively characterized. It bound to a highly conserved region partially overlapping with the coreceptor binding site and close to but not overlapping with the CD4 binding site. These results suggest the existence of conserved structures that could direct the immune response to non-neutralizing or even enhancing antibodies which may represent a strategy used by the virus to escape neutralizing immune responses. Further studies will show whether such a strategy plays a role in HIV infection of humans, how important that role could be, and what the mechanisms of infection enhancement are. The newly identified mAbs could be used as reagents to further

  13. Functional implications of the binding mode of a human conformation-dependent V2 monoclonal antibody against HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Brett; Sampson, Jared; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2014-04-01

    Data from the RV144 HIV vaccine trial indicated that gp120 V2 antibodies were associated with a lower risk of infection; thus, the mapping of V2 epitopes can contribute to the design of an effective HIV vaccine. We solved the crystal structure of human monoclonal antibody (MAb) 2158, which targets a conformational V2 epitope overlapping the α4β7 integrin binding site, and constructed a full-length model of V1V2. Comparison of computational energy stability to experimental enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results identified a hydrophobic core that stabilizes the V2 region for optimal 2158 binding, as well as residues that directly mediate side chain interactions with MAb 2158. These data define the binding surface recognized by MAb 2158 and offer a structural explanation for why a mismatched mutation at position 181 (I181X) in the V2 loop was associated with a higher vaccine efficiency in the RV144 clinical vaccine trial. Correlate analysis of the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial suggested that the presence of antibodies to the second variable region (V2) of HIV-1 gp120 was responsible for the modest protection observed in the trial. V2 is a highly variable and immunogenic region, and structural information on its antigenic landscape will be important for rational design of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Using X-ray crystallography, computational design tools, and mutagenesis assays, we carried out a detailed and systematic investigation of the epitope recognition of human V2 MAb 2158 and demonstrated that its epitope region overlaps the integrin binding site within V2. In addition, we propose a structure-based mechanism for mismatching of the isoleucine at position 181 and the increased vaccine efficacy seen in the RV144 vaccine trial.

  14. Human smooth muscle autoantibody. Its identification as antiactin antibody and a study of its binding to "nonmuscular" cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbiani, G; Ryan, G B; Lamelin, J P; Vassalli, P; Majno, G; Bouvier, C A; Cruchaud, A; Lüscher, E F

    1973-09-01

    When human serum containing smooth muscle autoantibodies (SMA) is incubated with extracts containing thrombosthenin (the contractile material of platelets) or thrombosthenin-A (the actin-like moiety of thrombosthenin), it loses its ability to bind to smooth muscle. Such binding is also diminished when SMA serum is incubated with lysed platelets; this effect is not seen if the SMA serum is incubated with intact platelets. The incubation of other autoantibodies (such as antimitochondrial or antinuclear antibodies) with thrombosthenin does not affect their binding to the specific antigens. It appears that SMA is directed against the actin fraction of thrombosthenin-ie, SMA is an antiactin antibody. Hence the name of antiactin autoantibody (AAA) seems more appropriate than smooth muscle autoantibody (SMA). A study of the distribution of antiactin autoantibody binding in rat, rabbit and man shows that several "nonmuscular" structures contain actin under normal conditions; these include megakaryocytes and platelets, normal rat hepatocytes, the brush borders of renal tubules, the periphery of epithelial cells of the intestine, polymorphs and lymphocytes in lymph nodes (but not thymic cortical lymphocytes). In addition, certain cell types (such as granulation tissue fibroblasts, cultivated fibroblasts, hepatocytes or regenerating liver and epidermal cells growing over a skin wound) can reversibly acquire a massive network of actin-containing microfilaments resembling those in smooth muscle.

  15. Exchanging murine and human immunoglobulin constant chains affects the kinetics and thermodynamics of antigen binding and chimeric antibody autoreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Torres

    Full Text Available Mouse-human chimeric antibodies composed of murine variable (V and human (C chains are useful therapeutic reagents. Consequently, we investigated whether heterologous C-regions from mice and humans affected specificity and affinity, and determined the contribution of C(H glycosylation to antigen binding. The interaction of a 12-mer peptide mimetic with monoclonal antibody (mAb 18B7 to Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan, and its chimeric (ch and deglycosylated forms were studied by surface plasmon resonance. The equilibrium and rate association constants for the chAb were higher than for mAb 18B7. V region affinity was not affected by C(H region glycosylation whereas heterologous C region of the same isotype altered the Ab binding affinity and the specificity for self-antigens. Structural models displayed local differences that implied changes on the connectivity of residues. These findings suggest that V region conformational changes can be dictated by the C(H domains through an allosteric effect involving networks of highly connected amino acids.

  16. Crystal structure of human TWEAK in complex with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing antibody reveals insights into receptor binding.

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    Alfred Lammens

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK is a multifunctional cytokine playing a key role in tissue regeneration and remodeling. Dysregulation of TWEAK signaling is involved in various pathological processes like autoimmune diseases and cancer. The unique interaction with its cognate receptor Fn14 makes both ligand and receptor promising targets for novel therapeutics. To gain insights into this important signaling pathway, we determined the structure of soluble human TWEAK in complex with the Fab fragment of an antibody selected for inhibition of receptor binding. In the crystallized complex TWEAK is bound by three Fab fragments of the neutralizing antibody. Homology modeling shows that Fab binding overlaps with the putative Fn14 binding site of TWEAK. Docking of the Fn14 cysteine rich domain (CRD to that site generates a highly complementary interface with perfectly opposing charged and hydrophobic residues. Taken together the presented structure provides new insights into the biology of TWEAK and the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway, which will help to optimize the therapeutic strategy for treatment of related cancer types and autoimmune diseases.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of fucose reducing effects in a humanized antibody on Fcγ receptor binding and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shan; Quarmby, Valerie; Gao, Xiaoying; Ying, Yong; Lin, Linda; Reed, Chae; Fong, Chris; Lau, Wendy; Qiu, Zhihua J; Shen, Amy; Vanderlaan, Martin; Song, An

    2012-01-01

    The presence or absence of core fucose in the Fc region N-linked glycans of antibodies affects their binding affinity toward FcγRIIIa as well as their antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. However, the quantitative nature of this structure-function relationship remains unclear. In this study, the in vitro biological activity of an afucosylated anti-CD20 antibody was fully characterized. Further, the effect of fucose reduction on Fc effector functions was quantitatively evaluated using the afucosylated antibody, its "regular" fucosylated counterpart and a series of mixtures containing varying proportions of "regular" and afucosylated materials. Compared with the "regular" fucosylated antibody, the afucosylated antibody demonstrated similar binding interactions with the target antigen (CD20), C1q and FcγRIa, moderate increases in binding to FcγRIIa and IIb, and substantially increased binding to FcγRIIIa. The afucosylated antibodies also showed comparable complement-dependent cytotoxicity activity but markedly increased ADCC activity. Based on EC 50 values derived from dose-response curves, our results indicate that the amount of afucosylated glycan in antibody samples correlate with both FcγRIIIa binding activity and ADCC activity in a linear fashion. Furthermore, the extent of ADCC enhancement due to fucose depletion was not affected by the FcγRIIIa genotype of the effector cells.

  18. Comparison of 5 monoclonal antibodies for immunopurification of human butyrylcholinesterase on Dynabeads: KD values, binding pairs, and amino acid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Targosova, Katarina; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A; Johnson, Rudolph C; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2015-10-05

    Human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) is a stoichiometric bioscavenger of nerve agents and organophosphorus pesticides. Mass spectrometry methods detect stable nerve agent adducts on the active site serine of HuBChE. The first step in sample preparation is immunopurification of HuBChE from plasma. Our goal was to identify monoclonal antibodies that could be used to immunopurify HuBChE on Dynabeads Protein G. Mouse anti-HuBChE monoclonal antibodies were obtained in the form of ascites fluid, dead hybridoma cells stored frozen at -80 °C for 30 years, or recently frozen hybridoma cells. RNA from 4 hybridoma cell lines was amplified by PCR for determination of their nucleotide and amino acid sequences. Full-length light and heavy chains were expressed, and the antibodies purified from culture medium. A fifth monoclonal was purchased. The 5 monoclonal antibodies were compared for ability to capture HuBChE from human plasma on Dynabeads Protein G. In addition, they were evaluated for binding affinity by Biacore and ELISA. Epitope mapping by pairing analysis was performed on the Octet Red96 instrument. The 5 monoclonal antibodies, B2 12-1, B2 18-5, 3E8, mAb2, and 11D8, had similar KD values of 10(-9) M for HuBChE. Monoclonal B2 18-5 outperformed the others in the Dynabeads Protein G assay where it captured 97% of the HuBChE in 0.5 ml plasma. Pairing analysis showed that 3E8 and B2 12-1 share the same epitope, 11D8 and B2 18-5 share the same epitope, but mAb2 and B2 12-1 or mAb2 and 3E8 bind to different epitopes on HuBChE. B2 18-5 was selected for establishment of a stable CHO cell line for production of mouse anti-HuBChE monoclonal.

  19. Construction of TNF-binding proteins by grafting hypervariable regions of F10 antibody on human fibronectin domain scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskaya, L E; Shingarova, L N; Kryukova, E A; Boldyreva, E F; Yakimov, S A; Guryanova, S V; Novoseletsky, V N; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of various diseases. To study the possibility of constructing TNF-binding proteins by grafting hypervariable regions of immunoglobulins (CDR), we have replaced amino acid sequences of loops from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin ((10)Fn3) by amino acid sequences of CDR from the light and heavy chains of the anti-TNF antibody F10. The assessment of TNF-binding properties of the resulting proteins by ELISA has revealed the highest activity of Hd3 containing sequences CDR-H1 and CDR-H2 of the antibody F10 and of Hd2 containing sequences CDR-H1 and CDR-H3. The proteins constructed by us on the fibronectin domain scaffold specifically bound TNF during Western blotting and also weakened its cytotoxic effect on L929 line cells. The highest neutralizing activity was demonstrated by the proteins Hd2 and Hd3, which induced, respectively, 10- and 50-fold increase in the EC(50) of TNF.

  20. Trimeresurus venom inhibition of anti-HPA-1a and anti-HPA-1b antibody binding to human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodar, S J; Stone, D L; Sinor, L T

    1995-01-01

    A solid-phase red cell adherence assay was used to demonstrate the specific inhibitory effect of seven species of Trimeresurus snake venom on the binding of HPA-1a- and HPA-1b-specific platelet antibodies. Trimeresurus venom did not inhibit the binding of HLA-, HPA-3a-, HPA-3b-, HPA-4a-, HPA-5a-, and HPA-5b-specific platelet antibodies. Venom from other genera of snakes, including representatives from Agkistrodon, Ancistrodon, Bitis, Bothrops, Bungarus, Causus, Crotalus, Dendroaspis, Ecis, Micrurus, Naja, Notechis, Ophiophagus, Pseudechis, Sepedon (Hemachatus), and Vipera, all failed to specifically inhibit anti-HPA-1a and HPA-1b binding. These results may indicate that the component in Trimeresurus snake venom previously reported to bind to the platelet GPIIb-IIIa complex, inhibiting fibrinogen binding, binds close to the HPA-1a and HPA-1b epitopes.

  1. Selection of Human Antibody Fragments Which Bind Novel Breast Tumor Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    6157-6162, 1998. 32-38 Appendix 2: Adams et al. Brit. J. Cancer 77: 1405-1412, 1998. 39-47 Appendix 3: Becerril et al. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm...James D. Marks M.D., Ph.D. Appendix 3 page (48) Towards selection of internalizing antibodies from phage libraries Baltazar Becerril , Marie-Alix Poul and

  2. Interleukin 1-induced down-regulation of antibody binding to CD4 molecules on human lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, N; Christensen, L D; Ødum, Niels

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is involved in the early activation of T lymphocytes. The CD4 antigen, described as a phenotypic marker of helper T cells, is also important in early T-cell activation by its ability to bind to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells, and to transmit positive (and...

  3. A human blood-brain barrier transcytosis assay reveals antibody transcytosis influenced by pH-dependent receptor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadassah Sade

    Full Text Available We have adapted an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier, the immortalized human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3, to quantitatively measure protein transcytosis. After validating the receptor-mediated transport using transferrin, the system was used to measure transcytosis rates of antibodies directed against potential brain shuttle receptors. While an antibody to the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R was exclusively recycled to the apical compartment, the fate of antibodies to the transferrin receptor (TfR was determined by their relative affinities at extracellular and endosomal pH. An antibody with reduced affinity at pH5.5 showed significant transcytosis, while pH-independent antibodies of comparable affinities at pH 7.4 remained associated with intracellular vesicular compartments and were finally targeted for degradation.

  4. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. A single dose of neuron-binding human monoclonal antibody improves spontaneous activity in a murine model of demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Denic

    Full Text Available Our laboratory demonstrated that a natural human serum antibody, sHIgM12, binds to neurons in vitro and promotes neurite outgrowth. We generated a recombinant form, rHIgM12, with identical properties. Intracerebral infection with Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV of susceptible mouse strains results in chronic demyelinating disease with progressive axonal loss and neurologic dysfunction similar to progressive forms of multiple sclerosis. To study the effects of rHIgM12 on the motor function of TMEV-infected mice, we monitored spontaneous nocturnal activity over many weeks. Nocturnal behavior is a sensitive measure of rodent neurologic function because maximal activity changes are expected to occur during the normally active night time monitoring period. Mice were placed in activity boxes eight days prior to treatment to collect baseline spontaneous activity. After treatment, activity in each group was continuously recorded over 8 weeks. We chose a long 8-week monitoring period for two reasons: (1 we previously demonstrated that IgM induced remyelination is present by 5 weeks post treatment, and (2 TMEV-induced demyelinating disease in this strain progresses very slowly. Due to the long observation periods and large data sets, differences among treatment groups may be difficult to appreciate studying the original unfiltered recordings. To clearly delineate changes in the highly fluctuating original data we applied three different methods: (1 binning, (2 application of Gaussian low-pass filters (GF and (3 polynomial fitting. Using each of the three methods we showed that compared to control IgM and saline, early treatment with rHIgM12 induced improvement in both horizontal and vertical motor function, whereas later treatment improved only horizontal activity. rHIgM12 did not alter activity of normal, uninfected mice. This study supports the hypothesis that treatment with a neuron-binding IgM not only protects neurons in vitro, but

  6. Increment in Drug Loading on an Antibody-Drug Conjugate Increases Its Binding to the Human Neonatal Fc Receptor in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, Guillaume; Respaud, Renaud; Arnoult, Christophe; Henriquet, Corinne; Dhommée, Christine; Viaud-Massuard, Marie-Claude; Heuze-Vourc'h, Nathalie; Joubert, Nicolas; Pugnière, Martine; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie

    2016-04-04

    Antibody-drug conjugates, such as brentuximab vedotin (BTXv), are an innovative category of monoclonal antibodies. BTXv is bioconjugated via the chemical reduction of cysteine residues involved in disulfide bonds. Species of BTXv containing zero, two, four, six, or eight vedotin molecules per antibody coexist in the stock solution. We investigated the influence of drug loading on the binding of the antibody to FcRn, a major determinant of antibody pharmacokinetics in humans. We developed a hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) method for separating the different species present in the stock solution of BTXv, and we purified and characterized the collected species before use. We assessed the binding of these different species to FcRn in a cellular assay based on flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance. HIC separated the different species of BTXv and allowed their collection at adequate levels of purity. Physicochemical characterization showed that species with higher levels of drug loading tended to form more aggregates. FcRn binding assays showed that the most conjugated species, particularly those with saturated loading, interacted more strongly than unconjugated BTXv with the FcRn.

  7. Differences in human skin between the epidermal growth factor receptor distribution detected by EGF binding and monoclonal antibody recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    , the eccrine sweat glands, capillary system, and the hair follicle outer root sheath, generally similar in pattern to that previously reported for full-thickness rat skin and human epidermis. The same areas also bound EGF-R1 but in addition the monoclonal antibody recognized a cone of melanin containing...

  8. Immunologic characterization of monoclonal antibodies that modulate human IgE binding to the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebecque, S; Dolecek, C; Laffer, S; Visco, V; Denépoux, S; Pin, J J; Guret, C; Boltz-Nitulescu, G; Weyer, A; Valenta, R

    1997-03-01

    Bet v 1 and homologous proteins represent major allergens for almost 95% of patients allergic to tree pollen and approximately 70% of those allergic to fruits and vegetables. As yet, no continuous (sequential) IgE epitopes have been determined for Bet v 1, and evidence has accumulated that Bet v 1 IgE epitopes belong to the conformational (discontinuous) type. A panel of 85 mouse monoclonal anti-Bet v 1 antibodies was raised as a tool with which to study the interaction of human IgE antibodies with Bet v 1. The epitopes of selected monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were characterized by mapping with synthetic overlapping peptides and by cross-competition experiments. Cross-reactivity of Bet v 1-specific mAbs with tree and plant food allergens was investigated by Western blotting. The influence of Bet v 1-specific mAbs on the IgE-Bet v 1 interaction was studied by competition assays with immobilized purified recombinant Bet v 1 and by basophil histamine release experiments. Antibodies that increased the IgE binding to Bet v 1 up to fivefold could be defined, whereas others inhibited IgE binding to Bet v 1 up to 99% and competed with the Bet v 1-induced histamine release from patients' basophils. The activity of the enhancing antibodies is interpreted as a stabilization of Bet v 1 states/IgE epitopes, which are either more accessible for certain IgE antibodies or are recognized with higher affinity. Those mAbs that competed with the Bet v 1-IgE interaction, if humanized or produced as recombinant antibody fragments, might be considered as potential tools for local allergy therapy.

  9. A human antibody to the CD4 binding site of gp120 capable of highly potent but sporadic cross clade neutralization of primary HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes S Gach

    Full Text Available Primary isolates of HIV-1 resist neutralization by most antibodies to the CD4 binding site (CD4bs on gp120 due to occlusion of this site on the trimeric spike. We describe 1F7, a human CD4bs monoclonal antibody that was found to be exceptionally potent against the HIV-1 primary isolate JR-FL. However, 1F7 failed to neutralize a patient-matched primary isolate, JR-CSF even though the two isolates differ by <10% in gp120 at the protein level. In an HIV-1 cross clade panel (n = 157, 1F7 exhibited moderate breadth, but occasionally achieved considerable potency. In binding experiments using monomeric gp120s of select resistant isolates and domain-swap chimeras between JR-FL and JR-CSF, recognition by 1F7 was limited by sequence polymorphisms involving at least the C2 region of Env. Putative N-linked glycosylation site (PNGS mutations, notably at position 197, allowed 1F7 to neutralize JR-CSF potently without improving binding to the cognate, monomeric gp120. In contrast, flow cytometry experiments using the same PNGS mutants revealed that 1F7 binding is enhanced on cognate trimeric Env. BN-PAGE mobility shift experiments revealed that 1F7 is sensitive to the diagnostic mutation D368R in the CD4 binding loop of gp120. Our data on 1F7 reinforce how exquisitely targeted CD4bs antibodies must be to achieve cross neutralization of two closely related primary isolates. High-resolution analyses of trimeric Env that show the orientation of glycans and polymorphic elements of the CD4bs that affect binding to antibodies like 1F7 are desirable to understand how to promote immunogenicity of more conserved elements of the CD4bs.

  10. A murine monoclonal antibody that binds N-terminal extracellular segment of human protease-activated receptor-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangawa, Takeshi; Nogi, Terukazu; Takagi, Junichi

    2008-10-01

    Abstract A monoclonal antibody that recognizes native G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) is generally difficult to obtain. Protease-activated receptor-4 (PAR4) is a GPCR that plays an important role in platelet activation as a low-affinity thrombin receptor. By immunizing peptide corresponding to the N-terminal segment of human PAR4, we obtained a monoclonal antibody that recognizes cell surface expressed PAR4. Epitope mapping using a series of artificial fusion proteins that carry PAR4-derived peptide revealed that the recognition motif is fully contained within the 6-residue portion adjacent to the thrombin cleavage site. The antibody blocked PAR4 peptide cleavage by thrombin, suggesting its utility in the functional study of PAR4 signaling.

  11. Antibodies to Phospholipids and Liposomes: Binding of Antibodies to Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    LIPOSOMES: BINDING OF ANTIBODIES TO CELLS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) W.E. FOGLER , G. M. SWARTZ, AND C.R. ALVING 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE...Elsevier BBA 73693 Antibodies to phospholipids and liposomes: binding of antibodies to cells William E. Fogler *, Glenn M. Swartz, Jr. and Carl R. Alving...Immunol. 21. Research Associateship from the U.S. National 12863-86812Hall. T. and Esser, K. (1984) 3. Immunol. 132. 2059-2063 Research Council. 13 Fogler

  12. Relationship between the loss of neutralizing antibody binding and fusion activity of the F protein of human respiratory syncytial virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarisky Robert T

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To elucidate the relationship between resistance to HRSV neutralizing antibodies directed against the F protein and the fusion activity of the F protein, a recombinant approach was used to generate a panel of mutations in the major antigenic sites of the F protein. These mutant proteins were assayed for neutralizing mAb binding (ch101F, palivizumab, and MAb19, level of expression, post-translational processing, cell surface expression, and fusion activity. Functional analysis of the fusion activity of the panel of mutations revealed that the fusion activity of the F protein is tolerant to multiple changes in the site II and IV/V/VI region in contrast with the somewhat limited spectrum of changes in the F protein identified from the isolation of HRSV neutralizing antibody virus escape mutants. This finding suggests that aspects other than fusion activity may limit the spectrum of changes tolerated within the F protein that are selected for by neutralizing antibodies.

  13. A human monoclonal IgE antibody that binds to MGL_1304, a major allergen in human sweat, without activation of mast cells and basophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kaori; Hiragun, Makiko; Hiragun, Takaaki; Kan, Takanobu; Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Yanase, Yuhki; Tanaka, Akio; Takahagi, Shunsuke; Hide, Michihiro

    MGL_1304, a major allergen in human sweat for patients with atopic dermatitis and/or cholinergic urticaria, is secreted from Malassezia globosa on human skin. The amounts of MGL_1304 and IgE against MGL_1304 are evaluated by the histamine release test using basophils or mast cells sensitized with serum containing IgE against MGL_1304, and enzyme linked sorbent assay (ELISA) using MGL_1304 and anti-MGL_1304 antibodies. Here, we identified a human monoclonal IgE (ABS-IgE) that binds to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) and MGL_1304 with high affinity (KD = 1.99 nM) but does not release histamine from basophils and mast cells. An ELISA using ABS-IgE as a standard IgE revealed that the amount of IgE against MGL_1304 (1000 U/ml) in the standard sera of patients with AD, employed in our previous report, is 32 ng/ml. A sandwich ELISA using ABS-IgE as a detection antibody showed approximately 10 times lower detection limit for MGL_1304 than ELISA in which MGL_1304 is directly bound to an ELISA plate. Moreover, ABS-IgE prevented histamine release from mast cells and basophils by neutralizing MGL_1304 not only in a free form in solution, but also on FcεRI expressed on the cell surface without cell activation. ABS-IgE may be used both to quantify the amount of MGL_1304 and anti-MGL_1304 IgE, and possibly for the treatment of diseases caused/aggravated by type I allergy to MGL_1304.

  14. Identification and characterization of a broadly cross-reactive HIV-1 human monoclonal antibody that binds to both gp120 and gp41.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yun Zhang

    Full Text Available Identification of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs may assist vaccine immunogen design. Here we report a novel human monoclonal antibody (mAb, designated m43, which co-targets the gp120 and gp41 subunits of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env. M43 bound to recombinant gp140 s from various primary isolates, to membrane-associated Envs on transfected cells and HIV-1 infected cells, as well as to recombinant gp120 s and gp41 fusion intermediate structures containing N-trimer structure, but did not bind to denatured recombinant gp140 s and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs mutant, gp120 D368R, suggesting that the m43 epitope is conformational and overlaps the CD4bs on gp120 and the N-trimer structure on gp41. M43 neutralized 34% of the HIV-1 primary isolates from different clades and all the SHIVs tested in assays based on infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs by replication-competent virus, but was less potent in cell line-based pseudovirus assays. In contrast to CD4, m43 did not induce Env conformational changes upon binding leading to exposure of the coreceptor binding site, enhanced binding of mAbs 2F5 and 4E10 specific for the membrane proximal external region (MPER of gp41 Envs, or increased gp120 shedding. The overall modest neutralization activity of m43 is likely due to the limited binding of m43 to functional Envs which could be increased by antibody engineering if needed. M43 may represent a new class of bnAbs targeting conformational epitopes overlapping structures on both gp120 and gp41. Its novel epitope and possibly new mechanism(s of neutralization could helpdesign improved vaccine immunogens and candidate therapeutics.

  15. Anti-human IgE monoclonal antibodies recognizing epitopes related to the binding sites of high and low affinity IgE receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, H; Nishimura, S; Kosada, Y; Hata, S; Takagi, S; Hosoi, S; Ezumi, K; Ide, M; Harada, S

    1994-01-01

    Anti-human IgE monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced and eight clones recognizing epitopes on native IgE were selected. Epitopes were mapped by a competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting and a multi-pin peptide technology. Four sites (one each in the C epsilon 1, C epsilon 2, C epsilon 2/C epsilon 3 junction and C epsilon 3) were recognized by the mAbs. The relationship between the four epitopes and the binding sites of high and low affinity IgE receptors (Fc epsilon RI and Fc epsilon RII, respectively) was studied using a monovalent Fab fragment of each mAb as a binding inhibitor. The IgE-Fc epsilon RII binding was clearly inhibited by the mAb recognizing the C epsilon 2/C epsilon 3 junction, suggesting that Fc epsilon RII binds to a rather limited area around the C epsilon 2/C epsilon 3 junction. The IgE-Fc epsilon RI binding, on the other hand, was scarcely inhibited by any single mAb. However, the binding was inhibited when the epitope in C epsilon 2 was blocked simultaneously with that at the C epsilon 2/C epsilon 3 junction or with that in C epsilon 3, indicating that these three distinct epitopes are related to the Fc epsilon RI binding sites. When these three epitopes were shown in the stereograph of human IgE, the Fc epsilon RI binding area was spread largely on the groove side between C epsilon 2 and C epsilon 3 domains. These results suggest that Fc epsilon RI acquires the high affinity through multiple bindings.

  16. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sture Lindegren

    Full Text Available The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics.

  17. Human Antibodies Can Cross Guinea Pig Placenta and Bind Its Neonatal Fc Receptor: Implications for Studying Immune Prophylaxis and Therapy during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Budo Struble

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite increased use of monoclonal and polyclonal antibody therapies, including during pregnancy, there is little data on appropriate animal models that could humanely be used to understand determinants of protection and to evaluate safety of these biologics in the mother and the developing fetus. Here, we demonstrate that pregnant guinea pigs can transport human IgG transplacentally at the end of pregnancy. We also observe that human IgG binds to an engineered soluble variant of the guinea pig neonatal Fc receptor in vitro in a manner similar to that demonstrated for the human variant, suggesting that this transplacental transport mirrors the receptor-based mechanism seen in humans. Using an intravenous antihepatitis B-specific immune globulin preparation as an example, we show that this transport results in neutralizing activity in the mother and the newborn that would potentially be prophylactic against hepatitis B viral infection. These preliminary data lay the groundwork for introducing pregnant guinea pigs as an appropriate model for the evaluation of antibody therapies and advancing the health of women and neonates.

  18. Mechanism of human antibody-mediated neutralization of Marburg virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyak, Andrew I; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Murin, Charles D; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Slaughter, James C; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-26

    The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of antibody-GP complexes reveal that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP, but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV-neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition.

  19. Conformational analysis of human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCB1 in lipid nanodiscs and inhibition by the antibodies MRK16 and UIC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Tasha K; Kwon, Hyewon; Atkins, William M

    2011-11-11

    The human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1), mediates the ATP-dependent efflux of a variety of drugs. As a result, P-gp plays a critical role in tumor cell drug resistance and the pharmacokinetic properties of most drugs. P-gp exhibits extraordinary substrate and inhibitor promiscuity, resulting in a wide range of possible drug-drug interactions. Inhibitory antibodies have long been considered as a possible strategy to modulate P-gp-dependent cancer cell drug resistance, and it is widely suggested that the antibodies MRK16 and UIC2 inhibit P-gp by capturing a single isoform and preventing flux through the catalytic cycle. Although the crystal structures of many bacterial whole transporters, as well as isolated nucleotide-binding domains, have been solved, high resolution structural data for mammalian ABC transporters are currently lacking. It has been extremely difficult to determine the detailed mechanism of transport of P-gp, in part because it is difficult to obtain purified protein in well defined lipid systems. Here we exploit surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to probe conformational changes associated with these intermediate states for P-gp in lipid bilayer nanodiscs. The results indicate that P-gp in nanodiscs undergoes functionally relevant ligand-dependent conformational changes and that previously described inhibitory antibodies bind to multiple nucleotide-bound states but not the ADP-VO(4)-trapped state, which mimics the post-hydrolysis state. The results also suggest that the substrate drug vinblastine is released at stages that precede or follow the post-hydrolysis ADP-PO(4)·P-gp complex.

  20. A glycoconjugate antigen based on the recognition motif of a broadly neutralizing human immunodeficiency virus antibody, 2G12, is immunogenic but elicits antibodies unable to bind to the self glycans of gp120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astronomo, Rena D; Lee, Hing-Ken; Scanlan, Christopher N

    2008-01-01

    The glycan shield of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 contributes to viral evasion from humoral immune responses. However, the shield is recognized by the HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody (Ab), 2G12, at a relatively conserved cluster of oligomannose glycans. The discovery of 2G...... of Man(9)GlcNAc(2) inhibits 2G12 binding to gp120 as efficiently as Man(9)GlcNAc(2) itself, indicating the potential use of Man(4) as a building block for creating immunogens. Here, we describe the development of neoglycoconjugates displaying variable copy numbers of Man(4) on bovine serum albumin (BSA...

  1. Recombinant Protein Truncation Strategy for Inducing Bactericidal Antibodies to the Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Protein of Neisseria meningitidis and Circumventing Potential Cross-Reactivity with Human FK506-Binding Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Bielecka, Magdalena K.; Devos, Nathalie; Gilbert, Mélanie; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Weynants, Vincent; Heckels, John E.; Christodoulides, Myron

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMIP) protein of Neisseria meningitidis induces significant serum bactericidal antibody production in mice and is a candidate meningococcal vaccine antigen. However, bioinformatics analysis of MIP showed some amino acid sequence similarity to human FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) in residues 166 to 252 located in the globular domain of the protein. To circumvent the potential concern over generating antibodies that could recognize human protein...

  2. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Xia, Di

    2016-07-27

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space groupP1), with unit-cell parametersa= 40.67,b= 44.91,c= 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.

  3. Mutagenesis of the aspartic acid ligands in human serum transferrin: lobe-lobe interaction and conformation as revealed by antibody, receptor-binding and iron-release studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A; He, Q Y; Tam, B; MacGillivray, R A; Woodworth, R

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant non-glycosylated human serum transferrin and mutants in which the liganding aspartic acid (D) in one or both lobes was changed to a serine residue (S) were produced in a mammalian cell system and purified from the tissue culture media. Significant downfield shifts of 20, 30, and 45 nm in the absorption maxima were found for the D63S-hTF, D392S-hTF and the double mutant, D63S/D392S-hTF when compared to wild-type hTF. A monoclonal antibody to a sequential epitope in the C-lobe of hTF reported affinity differences between the apo- and iron-forms of each mutant and the control. Cell-binding studies performed under the same buffer conditions used for the antibody work clearly showed that the mutated lobe(s) had an open cleft. It is not clear whether the receptor itself may play a role in promoting the open conformation or whether the iron remains in the cleft. PMID:9461487

  4. Crystal structure and size-dependent neutralization properties of HK20, a human monoclonal antibody binding to the highly conserved heptad repeat 1 of gp41.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Sabin

    Full Text Available The human monoclonal antibody (mAb HK20 neutralizes a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates by targeting the highly conserved heptad repeat 1 (HR1 of gp41, which is transiently exposed during HIV-1 entry. Here we present the crystal structure of the HK20 Fab in complex with a gp41 mimetic 5-Helix at 2.3 Å resolution. HK20 employs its heavy chain CDR H2 and H3 loops to bind into a conserved hydrophobic HR1 pocket that is occupied by HR2 residues in the gp41 post fusion conformation. Compared to the previously described HR1-specific mAb D5, HK20 approaches its epitope with a different angle which might favor epitope access and thus contribute to its higher neutralization breadth and potency. Comparison of the neutralization activities of HK20 IgG, Fab and scFv employing both single cycle and multiple cycle neutralization assays revealed much higher potencies for the smaller Fab and scFv over IgG, implying that the target site is difficult to access for complete antibodies. Nevertheless, two thirds of sera from HIV-1 infected individuals contain significant titers of HK20-inhibiting antibodies. The breadth of neutralization of primary isolates across all clades, the higher potencies for C-clade viruses and the targeting of a distinct site as compared to the fusion inhibitor T-20 demonstrate the potential of HK20 scFv as a therapeutic tool.

  5. Conformation-controlled binding kinetics of antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are large, extremely flexible molecules, whose internal dynamics is certainly key to their astounding ability to bind antigens of all sizes, from small hormones to giant viruses. In this paper, we build a shape-based coarse-grained model of IgG molecules and show that it can be used to generate 3D conformations in agreement with single-molecule Cryo-Electron Tomography data. Furthermore, we elaborate a theoretical model that can be solved exactly to compute the binding rate constant of a small antigen to an IgG in a prescribed 3D conformation. Our model shows that the antigen binding process is tightly related to the internal dynamics of the IgG. Our findings pave the way for further investigation of the subtle connection between the dynamics and the function of large, flexible multi-valent molecular machines.

  6. Effect of pH on antigen binding by clonotypic antibodies with different isoelectric points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Y.; Miyai, K.; Hata, N.; Iijima, Y.

    1987-02-01

    Polyclonal rabbit antibodies to thyroxine, human myoglobin, human growth hormone, human thyrotropin, human alpha-fetoprotein, and human thyroglobulin were fractionated into clonotypic antibodies with different isoelectric points by agarose isoelectric focusing or chromatofocusing. The effect of pH on the binding of these antigens by their respective clonotypic antibodies was assessed by radioimmunoassay. The profiles of the pH effect differed both for different antigens and for different pI's of the antibodies used. The pH optima in the radioimmunoassays for protein antigens were found to be expressed as a function of pI and molecular weight of both antigen and antibody molecules.

  7. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...... into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive...... and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps...

  8. Modified cytokeratins expressed on the surface of carcinoma cells undergo endocytosis upon binding of human monoclonal antibody and its recombinant Fab fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, H J; Garrigues, U; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Previously, we have reported on successful imaging of colon, rectal, and pancreatic carcinomas in patients by using a radiolabeled all-human monoclonal antibody, COU-1, directed against modified cytokeratin. To further develop this antibody for use as an immunoconjugate, COU-1 was cloned by phage...

  9. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovar...

  10. Identification and Characterization of a Broadly Cross-Reactive HIV-1 Human Monoclonal Antibody That Binds to Both gp120 and gp41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Yuan, Tingting; Li, Jingjing; Borges, Andrew Rosa; Watkins, Jennifer D.; Guenaga, Javier; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Yanping; Wilson, Richard; Li, Yuxing; Polonis, Victoria R.; Pincus, Seth H.; Ruprecht, Ruth M.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) may assist vaccine immunogen design. Here we report a novel human monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated m43, which co-targets the gp120 and gp41 subunits of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). M43 bound to recombinant

  11. [Human single chain antibodies directed to tumor necrosis factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikhrova, M A; Batanova, T A; Lebedev, L R; Shingarova, L N; Frank, L A; Kirpichnikov, M P; Tikunova, N V

    2011-01-01

    Six unique phage antibodies to human TNF have been selected from a combinatorial library of human single chain fragment variable. ELISA and Western-blotting was used to study selected phage antibodies binding with TNF. The specificity of selected antibodies was determined by binding with interferon alpha and gamma, bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin and ubiquitin. Two antibodies, sA1 and sB3, were converted into a soluble single-chain antibody form and their affinity was 2.5 and 13.7 nM respectively.

  12. Computational modeling of the Fc αRI receptor binding in the Fc α domain of the human antibody IgA: Normal Modes Analysis (NMA) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Manori; Posgai, Monica; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Ibrahim, George; Stan, George; Herr, Andrew; George Stan Group Collaboration; Herr's Group Team

    2014-03-01

    Fc αRI receptor binding in the Fc α domain of the antibody IgA triggers immune effector responses such as phagocytosis and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in eukaryotic cells. Fc α is a dimer of heavy chains of the IgA antibody and each Fc α heavy chain which consisted of two immunoglobulin constant domains, CH2 and CH3, can bind one Fc αRI molecule at the CH2-CH3 interface forming a 2:1 stoichiometry. Experimental evidences confirmed that Fc αRI binding to the Fc α CH2-CH3 junction altered the kinetics of HAA lectin binding at the distant IgA1 hinge. Our focus in this research was to understand the conformational changes and the network of residues which co-ordinate the receptor binding dynamics of the Fc α dimer complex. Structure-based elastic network modeling was used to compute normal modes of distinct Fc α configurations. Asymmetric and un-liganded Fc α configurations were obtained from the high resolution crystal structure of Fc α-Fc αRI 2:1 symmetric complex of PDB ID 1OW0. Our findings confirmed that Fc αRI binding, either in asymmetric or symmetric complex with Fc α, propagated long-range conformational changes across the Fc domains, potentially also impacting the distant IgA1 hinge.

  13. A Cross-Reactive Human Single-Chain Antibody for Detection of Major Fish Allergens, Parvalbumins, and Identification of a Major IgE-Binding Epitope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merima Bublin

    Full Text Available Fish allergy is associated with moderate to severe IgE-mediated reactions to the calcium binding parvalbumins present in fish muscle. Allergy to multiple fish species is caused by parvalbumin-specific cross-reactive IgE recognizing conserved epitopes. In this study, we aimed to produce cross-reactive single chain variable fragment (scFv antibodies for the detection of parvalbumins in fish extracts and the identification of IgE epitopes. Parvalbumin-specific phage clones were isolated from the human ETH-2 phage display library by three rounds of biopanning either against cod parvalbumin or by sequential biopanning against cod (Gad m 1, carp (Cyp c 1 and rainbow trout (Onc m 1 parvalbumins. While biopanning against Gad m 1 resulted in the selection of clones specific exclusively for Gad m 1, the second approach resulted in the selection of clones cross-reacting with all three parvalbumins. Two clones, scFv-gco9 recognizing all three parvalbumins, and scFv-goo8 recognizing only Gad m 1 were expressed in the E. coli non-suppressor strain HB2151 and purified from the periplasm. scFv-gco9 showed highly selective binding to parvalbumins in processed fish products such as breaded cod sticks, fried carp and smoked trout in Western blots. In addition, the scFv-gco9-AP produced as alkaline phosphatase fusion protein, allowed a single-step detection of the parvalbumins. In competitive ELISA, scFv-gco9 was able to inhibit binding of IgE from fish allergic patients' sera to all three β-parvalbumins by up to 80%, whereas inhibition by scFv-goo8 was up to 20%. 1H/15N HSQC NMR analysis of the rGad m 1:scFv-gco9 complex showed participation of amino acid residues conserved among these three parvalbumins explaining their cross-reactivity on a molecular level. In this study, we have demonstrated an approach for the selection of cross-reactive parvalbumin-specific antibodies that can be used for allergen detection and for mapping of conserved epitopes.

  14. The 1.7 A X-ray crystal structure of the porcine factor VIII C2 domain and binding analysis to anti-human C2 domain antibodies and phospholipid surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caileen M Brison

    Full Text Available The factor VIII C2 domain is essential for binding to activated platelet surfaces as well as the cofactor activity of factor VIII in blood coagulation. Inhibitory antibodies against the C2 domain commonly develop following factor VIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A patients, or they may spontaneously arise in cases of acquired hemophilia. Porcine factor VIII is an effective therapeutic for hemophilia patients with inhibitor due to its low cross-reactivity; however, the molecular basis for this behavior is poorly understood. In this study, the X-ray crystal structure of the porcine factor VIII C2 domain was determined, and superposition of the human and porcine C2 domains demonstrates that most surface-exposed differences cluster on the face harboring the "non-classical" antibody epitopes. Furthermore, antibody-binding results illustrate that the "classical" 3E6 antibody can bind both the human and porcine C2 domains, although the inhibitory titer to human factor VIII is 41 Bethesda Units (BU/mg IgG versus 0.8 BU/mg IgG to porcine factor VIII, while the non-classical G99 antibody does not bind to the porcine C2 domain nor inhibit porcine factor VIII activity. Further structural analysis of differences between the electrostatic surface potentials suggest that the C2 domain binds to the negatively charged phospholipid surfaces of activated platelets primarily through the 3E6 epitope region. In contrast, the G99 face, which contains residue 2227, should be distal to the membrane surface. Phospholipid binding assays indicate that both porcine and human factor VIII C2 domains bind with comparable affinities, and the human K2227A and K2227E mutants bind to phospholipid surfaces with similar affinities as well. Lastly, the G99 IgG bound to PS-immobilized factor VIII C2 domain with an apparent dissociation constant of 15.5 nM, whereas 3E6 antibody binding to PS-bound C2 domain was not observed.

  15. Human anti-mouse antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, G G

    2000-06-01

    Human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) are human immunoglobulins with specificity for mouse immunoglobulins. This topic currently is of interest because of the increased use of monoclonal mouse antibodies as diagnostic reagents both for in vitro laboratory measurements and for in vivo imaging studies. Monoclonal mouse antibodies also are being used therapeutically. This short article reviews the production of HAMA in patients receiving monoclonal antibodies and illustrates the potential ways that HAMA can interfere with immunoassay measurements. Methods for measuring and neutralizing HAMA also are discussed.

  16. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  17. Phage display derived human monoclonal antibodies isolated by binding to the surface of live primary breast cancer cells recognize GRP78

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Charlotte G; Rasmussen, Nicolaj; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2007-01-01

    Clinical trials using monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against cell-surface markers have yielded encouraging therapeutic results in several cancer types. Generally, however, anticancer antibodies are only efficient against a subpopulation of cancers, and there is a strong need for identification of no...... therapies including mAb-based immunotherapy. Our results suggest that the human antibody Ab39 may be a useful starting point for further genetic optimization that could render it a useful diagnostic and therapeutic reagent for a variety of cancers...

  18. Detection of human antibodies binding with smooth and rough LPSs from Proteus mirabilis O3 strains S1959, R110, R45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleńska-Olender, J; Durlik, K; Konieczna, I; Kowalska, P; Gawęda, J; Kaca, W

    2017-09-09

    Bacteria of the genus Proteus of the family Enterobacteriaceae are facultative human pathogens responsible mainly for urinary tract and wound infections, bacteremia and the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have analyzed and compared by ELISA the titer of antibodies in plasmas of healthy individuals and in sera of rheumatoid arthritis patients recognizing a potential host cross-reactive epitope (lysine-galacturonic acid epitopes) present in Proteus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In our experiments LPSs isolated from two mutants of smooth Proteus mirabilis 1959 (O3), i.e. strains R110 and R45, were used. R110 (Ra type mutant) is lacking the O-specific polysaccharide, but possesses a complete core oligosaccharide, while R45 (Re type) has a reduced core oligosaccharide and contains two 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid residues and one of 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinopyranose residues. Titer of P. mirabilis S1959 LPS-specific-antibodies increased with the age of blood donors. RA and blood donors' sera contained antibodies against S and Ra and Re type of P. mirabilis O3 LPSs. Antibodies recognizing lysine-galacturonic acid epitopes of O3 LPS were detected by ELISA in some plasmas of healthy individuals and sera of rheumatoid arthritis patients. RA patients antibodies reacting with P. mirabilis S1959 S and R LPSs may indicate a potential role of anti-LPS antibodies in molecular mimicry in RA diseases.

  19. The use of ammonium sulphate precipitation method for the determination of antigen-binding capacity and affinity of anti-tetanus antibodies in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alausa, O K

    1975-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of anti-tetanus antibodies produced in human serum in response to tetanus toxoid immunization was carried out by employing the non-specific precipitation effect of ammonium sulphate described by Farr (1958). The results showed that the method was sensitive and was able to differentiate between immune and non-immune persons. The effects of booster dose injection on the quantity and quality of antibodies produced during immunization were discussed, and the possible use of the method to predict the amount of immunogen, the timing and number of injections required for optimal host response in immunization schedules was suggested.

  20. Binding of antibodies to the extractable nuclear antigens SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La is induced on the surface of human keratinocytes by ultraviolet light (UVL): Implications for the pathogenesis of photosensitive cutaneous lupus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, F.; Kashihara-Sawami, M.; Lyons, M.B.; Norris, D.A. (Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the non-histone nucleoprotein antigens SS-A/Ro, SS-B/La, and RNP are highly associated with photosensitive cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). In order to better understand the potential mechanisms of ultraviolet (UV) light on photosensitivity in patients with cutaneous LE, we designed immunopathologic in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate the effects of UV on the binding of such autoantibodies to the surface of human keratinocytes, one major target of immunologic damage in photosensitive LE. Short-term 2% paraformaldehyde fixation of suspensions of cultured human keratinocytes previously incubated with monospecific antiserum probes enabled the detection of ENA expression on the cell surface by flow-cytometry analysis. UVB light (280-320 nm) induced the binding of monospecific antibody probes for SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La on keratinocytes in a dose-dependent pattern with maximal induction observed at the dose of 200 mJ/cm2 UVB. Binding of SS-A/Ro, SS-B/La, and RNP antibody was augmented strongly, but binding of anti-Sm was very weak. In contrast, UVA (320-400 nm) light had no effect on the induction of binding of these antibody probes. Identical results were seen by standard immunofluorescence techniques. Hydroxyurea-treated keratinocytes showed similar induction of those antigens by UVB irradiation, which suggested that ENA expression on cultured keratinocytes by UVB were cell-cycle independent. Tunicamycin, an inhibitor of glycosylation of proteins, reduced UVB light effect on the SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La antigen's expression. These in vitro FACS analyses revealed that ENA augmentation on the keratinocyte cell surface was dose dependent, UVB dependent, glycosylation dependent, and cell-cycle independent. In vivo ENA augmentation on the keratinocyte surface was examined in suction blister epidermal roofs.

  1. A Human Antibody That Binds to the Sixth Ig-Like Domain of VCAM-1 Blocks Lung Cancer Cell Migration In Vitro

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    Mi Ra Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 is closely associated with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the relevance and role of VCAM-1 in lung cancer have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we found that VCAM-1 was highly overexpressed in lung cancer tissue compared with that of normal lung tissue, and high VCAM-1 expression correlated with poor survival in lung cancer patients. VCAM-1 knockdown reduced migration of A549 human lung cancer cells into Matrigel, and competitive blocking experiments targeting the Ig-like domain 6 of VCAM-1 (VCAM-1-D6 demonstrated that the VCAM-1-D6 domain was critical for VCAM-1 mediated A549 cell migration into Matrigel. Next, we developed a human monoclonal antibody specific to human and mouse VCAM-1-D6 (VCAM-1-D6 huMab, which was isolated from a human synthetic antibody library using phage display technology. Finally, we showed that VCAM-1-D6 huMab had a nanomolar affinity for VCAM-1-D6 and that it potently suppressed the migration of A549 and NCI-H1299 lung cancer cell lines into Matrigel. Taken together, these results suggest that VCAM-1-D6 is a key domain for regulating VCAM-1-mediated lung cancer invasion and that our newly developed VCAM-1-D6 huMab will be a useful tool for inhibiting VCAM-1-expressing lung cancer cell invasion.

  2. Circulating chromatin-anti-chromatin antibody complexes bind with high affinity to dermo-epidermal structures in murine and human lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fismen, S; Hedberg, A; Fenton, K A

    2009-01-01

    Murine and human lupus nephritis are characterized by glomerular deposits of electron-dense structures (EDS). Dominant components of EDS are chromatin fragments and IgG antibodies. Whether glomerular EDS predispose for similar deposits in skin is unknown. We analysed (i) whether dermo-epidermal i...... were present in capillary lumina in glomeruli and skin of all nephritic individuals. Thus, chromatin-IgG complexes accounting for lupus nephritis seem to reach skin through circulation, but other undetermined factors are required for these complexes to deposit within skin membranes....

  3. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-11

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective.

  4. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective. PMID:27626445

  5. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective.

  6. Mechanism of quinine-dependent monoclonal antibody binding to platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougie, Daniel W; Peterson, Julie; Rasmussen, Mark; Aster, Richard H

    2015-10-29

    Drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) that cause acute thrombocytopenia upon drug exposure are nonreactive in the absence of the drug but bind tightly to a platelet membrane glycoprotein, usually α(IIb)/β3 integrin (GPIIb/IIIa) when the drug is present. How a drug promotes binding of antibody to its target is unknown and is difficult to study with human DDAbs, which are poly-specific and in limited supply. We addressed this question using quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which, in vitro and in vivo, closely mimic antibodies that cause thrombocytopenia in patients sensitive to quinine. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we found that quinine binds with very high affinity (K(D) ≈ 10⁻⁹ mol/L) to these mAbs at a molar ratio of ≈ 2:1 but does not bind detectably to an irrelevant mAb. Also using SPR analysis, GPIIb/IIIa was found to bind monovalently to immobilized mAb with low affinity in the absence of quinine and with fivefold greater affinity (K(D) ≈ 2.2 × 10⁻⁶) when quinine was present. Measurements of quinine-dependent binding of intact mAb and fragment antigen-binding (Fab) fragments to platelets showed that affinity is increased 10 000- to 100 000-fold by bivalent interaction between antibody and its target. Together, the findings indicate that the first step in drug-dependent binding of a DDAb is the interaction of the drug with antibody, rather than with antigen, as has been widely thought, where it induces structural changes that enhance the affinity/specificity of antibody for its target epitope. Bivalent binding may be essential for a DDAb to cause thrombocytopenia.

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies That Bind to the Ly6 Domain of GPIHBP1 Abolish the Binding of LPL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xuchen; Sleeman, Mark W; Miyashita, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    GPIHBP1, an endothelial cell protein, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the interstitial spaces and shuttles it to its site of action inside blood vessels. For years, studies of human GPIHBP1 have been hampered by an absence of useful antibodies. We reasoned that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) agai......GPIHBP1, an endothelial cell protein, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the interstitial spaces and shuttles it to its site of action inside blood vessels. For years, studies of human GPIHBP1 have been hampered by an absence of useful antibodies. We reasoned that monoclonal antibodies (m......, we report the development of a panel of human GPIHBP1-specific mAbs. Two mAbs against GPIHBP1's Ly6 domain, RE3 and RG3, abolished LPL binding, while an antibody against the acidic domain, RF4, did not. Also, mAbs RE3 and RG3 bound with reduced affinity to a mutant GPIHBP1 containing an Ly6 domain...

  8. Structural basis for quinine-dependent antibody binding to platelet integrin αIIbβ3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianghai; Zhu, Jieqing; Bougie, Daniel W; Aster, Richard H; Springer, Timothy A

    2015-10-29

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) is caused by antibodies that react with specific platelet-membrane glycoproteins when the provoking drug is present. More than 100 drugs have been implicated as triggers for this condition, quinine being one of the most common. The cause of DITP in most cases appears to be a drug-induced antibody that binds to a platelet membrane glycoprotein only when the drug is present. How a soluble drug promotes binding of an otherwise nonreactive immunoglobulin to its target, leading to platelet destruction, is uncertain, in part because of the difficulties of working with polyclonal human antibodies usually available only in small quantities. Recently, quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies were developed that recognize a defined epitope on the β-propeller domain of the platelet integrin αIIb subunit (GPIIb) only when the drug is present and closely mimic the behavior of antibodies found in human patients with quinine-induced thrombocytopenia in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate specific, high-affinity binding of quinine to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of these antibodies and define in crystal structures the changes induced in the CDR by this interaction. Because no detectable binding of quinine to the target integrin could be demonstrated in previous studies, the findings indicate that a hybrid paratope consisting of quinine and reconfigured antibody CDR plays a critical role in recognition of its target epitope by an antibody and suggest that, in this type of drug-induced immunologic injury, the primary reaction involves binding of the drug to antibody CDRs, causing it to acquire specificity for a site on a platelet integrin.

  9. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays.

  10. Discovery of diverse and functional antibodies from large human repertoire antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwimmer, Lauren J; Huang, Betty; Giang, Hoa; Cotter, Robyn L; Chemla-Vogel, David S; Dy, Francis V; Tam, Eric M; Zhang, Fangjiu; Toy, Pamela; Bohmann, David J; Watson, Susan R; Beaber, John W; Reddy, Nithin; Kuan, Hua-Feng; Bedinger, Daniel H; Rondon, Isaac J

    2013-05-31

    Phage display antibody libraries have a proven track record for the discovery of therapeutic human antibodies, increasing the demand for large and diverse phage antibody libraries for the discovery of new therapeutics. We have constructed naïve antibody phage display libraries in both Fab and scFv formats, with each library having more than 250 billion clones that encompass the human antibody repertoire. These libraries show high fidelity in open reading frame and expression percentages, and their V-gene family distribution, VH-CDR3 length and amino acid usage mirror the natural diversity of human antibodies. Both the Fab and scFv libraries show robust sequence diversity in target-specific binders and differential V-gene usage for each target tested, supporting the use of libraries that utilize multiple display formats and V-gene utilization to maximize antibody-binding diversity. For each of the targets, clones with picomolar affinities were identified from at least one of the libraries and for the two targets assessed for activity, functional antibodies were identified from both libraries.

  11. Recombinant protein truncation strategy for inducing bactericidal antibodies to the macrophage infectivity potentiator protein of Neisseria meningitidis and circumventing potential cross-reactivity with human FK506-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecka, Magdalena K; Devos, Nathalie; Gilbert, Mélanie; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Weynants, Vincent; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-02-01

    A recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMIP) protein of Neisseria meningitidis induces significant serum bactericidal antibody production in mice and is a candidate meningococcal vaccine antigen. However, bioinformatics analysis of MIP showed some amino acid sequence similarity to human FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) in residues 166 to 252 located in the globular domain of the protein. To circumvent the potential concern over generating antibodies that could recognize human proteins, we immunized mice with recombinant truncated type I rMIP proteins that lacked the globular domain and the signal leader peptide (LP) signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 22) and contained the His purification tag at either the N or C terminus (C-term). The immunogenicity of truncated rMIP proteins was compared to that of full (i.e., full-length) rMIP proteins (containing the globular domain) with either an N- or C-terminal His tag and with or without the LP sequence. By comparing the functional murine antibody responses to these various constructs, we determined that C-term His truncated rMIP (-LP) delivered in liposomes induced high levels of antibodies that bound to the surface of wild-type but not Δmip mutant meningococci and showed bactericidal activity against homologous type I MIP (median titers of 128 to 256) and heterologous type II and III (median titers of 256 to 512) strains, thereby providing at least 82% serogroup B strain coverage. In contrast, in constructs lacking the LP, placement of the His tag at the N terminus appeared to abrogate bactericidal activity. The strategy used in this study would obviate any potential concerns regarding the use of MIP antigens for inclusion in bacterial vaccines.

  12. Acquisition of Functional Antibodies That Block the Binding of Erythrocyte-Binding Antigen 175 and Protection Against Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Vashti; Ramsland, Paul A.; Guy, Andrew J.; Siba, Peter M.; Mueller, Ivo; Richards, Jack S.; Beeson, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The targets and mechanisms of human immunity to malaria are poorly understood, which poses a major barrier to malaria vaccine development. Antibodies play a key role in human immunity and may act by inhibiting receptor-binding functions of key merozoite invasion ligands. Antibodies to the major invasion ligand and vaccine candidate, erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 (EBA-175), have been linked with protection, but how these antibodies function has not been established. Methods. We developed 2 new assays that quantify the ability of antibodies to inhibit binding of EBA-175 to its erythrocyte receptor, glycophorin A, using either native or recombinant EBA-175. Binding-inhibitory antibodies were evaluated in a longitudinal cohort study of Papua New Guinean children and related to risk of malaria, age, infection status, and markers of parasite exposure. Results. Binding-inhibition assays (BIAs) were reproducible, and the 2 assays had a high level of agreement. Inhibitory antibodies were common among children, acquired in association with markers of increasing parasite exposure, and high in those children with active infection. Inhibitory antibodies correlated with total immunoglobulin G levels to the EBA-175 binding domain (region II). Importantly, binding-inhibitory antibodies were significantly associated with protection from symptomatic malaria when measured using either BIA. Conclusions. Findings suggest that naturally acquired binding-inhibitory antibodies are an important functional mechanism that contributes to protection against malaria and further supports the potential of EBA-175 as a vaccine candidate. Identifying vaccines and approaches that induce potent binding-inhibitory antibodies may be a valuable strategy in the development of highly efficacious malaria vaccines. PMID:26136391

  13. Acquisition of Functional Antibodies That Block the Binding of Erythrocyte-Binding Antigen 175 and Protection Against Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Vashti; Ramsland, Paul A; Guy, Andrew J; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Richards, Jack S; Beeson, James G

    2015-10-15

    The targets and mechanisms of human immunity to malaria are poorly understood, which poses a major barrier to malaria vaccine development. Antibodies play a key role in human immunity and may act by inhibiting receptor-binding functions of key merozoite invasion ligands. Antibodies to the major invasion ligand and vaccine candidate, erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 (EBA-175), have been linked with protection, but how these antibodies function has not been established. We developed 2 new assays that quantify the ability of antibodies to inhibit binding of EBA-175 to its erythrocyte receptor, glycophorin A, using either native or recombinant EBA-175. Binding-inhibitory antibodies were evaluated in a longitudinal cohort study of Papua New Guinean children and related to risk of malaria, age, infection status, and markers of parasite exposure. Binding-inhibition assays (BIAs) were reproducible, and the 2 assays had a high level of agreement. Inhibitory antibodies were common among children, acquired in association with markers of increasing parasite exposure, and high in those children with active infection. Inhibitory antibodies correlated with total immunoglobulin G levels to the EBA-175 binding domain (region II). Importantly, binding-inhibitory antibodies were significantly associated with protection from symptomatic malaria when measured using either BIA. Findings suggest that naturally acquired binding-inhibitory antibodies are an important functional mechanism that contributes to protection against malaria and further supports the potential of EBA-175 as a vaccine candidate. Identifying vaccines and approaches that induce potent binding-inhibitory antibodies may be a valuable strategy in the development of highly efficacious malaria vaccines. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Recombinant anti-human melanoma antibodies are versatile molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, D; Natali, P G; Petrul, H; Soldani, P; Nicotra, M R; Vola, R; Rivella, A; Creighton, A M; Neri, P; Mariani, M

    1996-08-01

    The low cost, high versatility, and reliable production of bacterially produced recombinant antibody fragments speeds up the development of tumor-targeting agents. High-quality recombinant anti-melanoma antibodies are much sought after in the scientific community. We cloned the murine antibody 225.28S, currently used in radioimmunoimaging of human melanoma lesions, in single-chain Fv configuration (scFv) for soluble expression in bacteria. The recombinant antibody fragment conserved the binding specificity of the parental antibody. In order to arm the scFv(225.28S) with biologically useful effector functions, we developed vectors for soluble expression of scFv(225.28S) in bacteria that allow both covalent and noncovalent chemical antibody modification at positions that do not interfere with antigen binding. An expression vector was developed that appends a cysteine residue at the C-terminal extremity of the recombinant antibody, thus allowing reaction with thiol-specific reagents, including 99mTc labeling, at a position that does not interfere with antigen binding. The scFv(225.28S) was also successfully expressed with a casein kinase II substrate tag that enables efficient and stable 32P labeling. For noncovalent antibody modification, we developed an expression vector that appends the human calmodulin gene at the C-terminal extremity of scFv(225.28S). The calmodulin domain is poorly immunogenic and can be targeted with chemically modified high-affinity calmodulin ligands. The recombinant anti-human melanoma antibodies described in this article should prove useful "building blocks" for the development of anti-melanoma diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  15. Monoclonal Anti—CD4 Antibody MT310 Binds HIV-1 gp120 Binding Site on CD4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tests show the monoclonal anti—CD4 antibody (mAb) MT310 recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4 as part of its mechanism for strongly inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of CD4+ T cells. In competition tests, mAb MT310 and mAb Leu3a (an anti-CD4 mAb recognizing the gp120-binding site) all inhibited gp120-binding to CD4+ T lymphocytes, while mAb MT405 did not. This result suggests that MT310, like Leu3a, recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4. To further confirm whether MT310 recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4, we prepared rabbit anti-idiotypic antisera (Ab2) against MT310 (Ab1). The anti-idiotypic antisera against MT310 inhibited binding of MT310 and Leu3a to human CD4+ T lymphocytes, but did not block binding of MT151 with the second domain of CD4, while rabbit anti-idiotypic antisera to MT151 could block binding of itself to these cells, but could not inhibit the binding of MT310 and Leu3a, further indicating that MT310 recognized the gp120-binding site on CD4.

  16. Probing cocaine-antibody interactions in buffer and human serum.

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    Muthu Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite progress in cocaine immunotherapy, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of antibodies which bind to cocaine and its metabolites are not well understood. It is also not clear how the interactions between them differ in a complex matrix such as the serum present in the human body. In the present study, we have used microscale thermophoresis (MST, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR we have evaluated the affinity properties of a representative mouse monoclonal (mAb08 as well as those of polyclonal antibodies purified from vaccinated mouse and human patient serum. RESULTS: MST analysis of fluorescently tagged mAb08 binding to cocaine reveals an approximately 15 fold decrease in its equilibrium dissociation constant in 20-50% human serum compared with that in saline buffer. A similar trend was also found using enriched polyclonal antibodies purified from vaccinated mice and patient serum, for which we have used fluorescently tagged bovine serum albumin conjugated to succinyl norcocaine (BSA-SNC. This conjugate closely mimics both cocaine and the hapten used to raise these antibodies. The ITC data also revealed that cocaine has a moderate affinity of about 2 µM to 20% human serum and very little interaction with human serum albumin or nonspecific human IgG at that concentration range. In a SPR inhibition experiment, the binding of mAb08 to immobilized BSA-SNC was inhibited by cocaine and benzoylecgonine in a highly competitive manner, whereas the purified polyclonal antibodies from vaccinated humans and mice, revealed preferential selectivity to pharmacologically active cocaine but not to the inactive metabolite benzoylecgonine. We have also developed a simple binding model to simulate the challenges associated with cocaine immunotherapy using the variable quantitative and kinetic properties of the antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: High sensitivity calorimetric determination of antibody binding to

  17. Antibody binding to Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis cell fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Katherine A.; Bowden, George H.; Richmond, Dorothy A.; Sheridan, Michael J.; Cole, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective To determine which cell fraction(s) of Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 serve as the best source of antigens recognized by salivary SIgA antibodies in infants. Design Whole cells of 38 reference and wild-type isolates of Streptococcus mitis, S. oralis, S. gordonii, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and E. faecalis were fractionated into cell walls CW), protease-treated cell walls (PTCW), cell membranes (CM) and cell protein (CP). Whole cells and these fractions were tested for binding by rabbit anti-S. mitis SK145 and anti-S. oralis SK100 sera, and also by salivary SIgA antibodies from infants and adults. Results Anti-SK145 and anti-SK100 sera bound whole cells and fractions of all strains of S. mitis and S. oralis variably. Cluster analysis of antibody binding data placed the strains into S. mitis, S. oralis and ‘Non-S. mitis/non-S. oralis’ clusters. Antigens from CW and CM best discriminated S. mitis from S. oralis. CM bound the most infant salivary SIgA antibody and PTCW bound the least. In contrast, adult salivary SIgA antibody bound all of the cell fractions and at higher levels. Conclusions Presumably the relatively short period of immune stimulation and immunological immaturity in infants, in contrast to adults, result in low levels of salivary SIgA antibody that preferentially bind CM of S. mitis but not PTCW. By utilizing isolated cell walls and membranes as sources of antigens for proteomics it may be possible to identify antigens common to oral streptococci and dissect the fine specificity of salivary SIgA antibodies induced by oral colonization by S. mitis. PMID:17904095

  18. New monoclonal antibodies directed against human renin. Powerful tools for the investigation of the renin system.

    OpenAIRE

    Galen, F X; Devaux, C.; Atlas, S; Guyenne, T; Menard, J; Corvol, P; Simon, D.; Cazaubon, C; Richer, P; Badouaille, G

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against human renin were obtained by the fusing of myeloma cells with spleen cells from Balb/c or high-responder Biozzi mice injected with pure tumoral or highly purified renal renin. These procedures resulted in the production of seven stable monoclonal antibodies to human renin. Antibodies in the hybridoma culture medium were screened by binding to pure iodinated renin or insolubilized renin in a solid phase assay. The concentration of purified antibodies that...

  19. Does antibody binding to diverse antigens predict future infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, J P; Waite, J L; Holden, K Z; Clayton, D H

    2014-11-01

    We studied diverse antigen binding in hosts and the outcome of parasitism. We used captive-bred F1 descendants of feral rock pigeons (Columba livia) challenged with blood-feeding flies (Hippoboscidae) and a protozoan parasite (Haemoproteus). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and immunoblots were used to test (i) whether pre-infection IgY antigen binding predicts parasite fitness and (ii) whether antigen binding changes after infection. Assays used extracts from three pigeon parasites (northern fowl mite, Salmonella bacteria and avian pox virus), as well as nonparasitic molecules from cattle, chicken and keyhole limpet. Binding to hippoboscid and S. enterica extracts were predictive of hippoboscid fly fitness. Binding to extracts from hippoboscids, pox virus and nonparasitic organisms was predictive of Haemoproteus infection levels. Antigen binding to all extracts increased after parasite challenge, despite the fact that birds were only exposed to flies and Haemoproteus. Immunoblots suggested innate Ig binding to parasite-associated molecular markers and revealed that new antigens were bound in extracts after infection. These data suggest that host antibody binding to diverse antigens predicts parasite fitness even when the antigens are not related to the infecting parasite. We discuss the implications of these data for the study of host-parasite immunological interaction. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Phosphonate-anchored monolayers for antibody binding to magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbenishty-Shamir, Helly; Gilert, Roni; Gotman, Irena; Gutmanas, Elazar Y; Sukenik, Chaim N

    2011-10-04

    Targeted delivery of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to a specific tissue can be achieved by conjugation with particular biological ligands on an appropriately functionalized IONP surface. To take best advantage of the unique magnetic properties of IONPs and to maximize their blood half-life, thin, strongly bonded, functionalized coatings are required. The work reported herein demonstrates the successful application of phosphonate-anchored self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as ultrathin coatings for such particles. It also describes a new chemical approach to the anchoring of antibodies on the surface of SAM-coated IONPs (using nucleophilic aromatic substitution). This anchoring strategy results in stable, nonhydrolyzable, covalent attachment and allows the reactivity of the particles toward antibody binding to be activated in situ, such that prior to the activation the modified surface is stable for long-term storage. While the SAMs do not have the well-packed crystallinity of other such monolayers, their structure was studied using smooth model substrates based on an iron oxide layer on a double-side polished silicon wafer. In this way, atomic force microscopy, ellipsometry, and contact angle goniometry (tools that could not be applied to the nanoparticles' surfaces) could contribute to the determination of their monomolecular thickness and uniformity. Finally, the successful conjugation of IgG antibodies to the SAM-coated IONPs such that the antibodies retain their biological activity is verified by their complexation to a secondary fluorescent antibody.

  1. Development of sandwich ELISA for testing bovine β-lactoglobulin allergenic residues by specific polyclonal antibody against human IgE binding epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengfa; Li, Xin; Gao, Jinyan; Tong, Ping; Chen, Hongbing

    2017-07-15

    Bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG) is the main allergen in cows' milk, and the most commonly used method for detecting BLG is enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, antibodies used in commercial ELISA kits do not recognize specifically BLG IgE epitopes. Here, an antibody specific to IgE linear epitopes for BLG was used to develop a sandwich ELISA using a rabbit anti-BLG polyclonal antibody. The linear range for BLG detection was 31.25-8000ng/mL and limit of detection was 1.96ng/mL. BLG content in dairy samples was determined, and there was a good agreement between this immunoassay and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with high recovery. Additionally, BLG content in food samples had an average recovery of 104.25%. Allergenic residues were also detected in hydrolyzed infant formulas. The method developed could be a practical approach to determine BLG and its allergenic residues in food with a high degree of sensitivity, reliability and recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to human laminin α4 chain globular domain inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and binding of α6β1 integrin and MCAM to α4-laminins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Taichi; Wondimu, Zenebech; Oikawa, Yuko; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Virtanen, Ismo; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    α4-Laminins, such as laminins 411 and 421, are mesenchymal laminins expressed by vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, leukocytes and other normal cell types. These laminins are recognized by α6β1 and α6β4 integrins and MCAM (CD146), and promote adhesion and migration of the cells. α4-Laminins are also expressed and secreted by some tumor cells and strongly promote tumor cell migration. Moreover, the abluminal side of blood and/or lymphatic vessels and the nerve perineurium, common tracks of tumor cell dissemination, express α4-laminins, and these laminin isoforms, when expressed in the stroma, may contribute to tumor invasion. In the present study, we examined ten mAbs to human laminin α4 chain for their reactivity with the isolated laminin α4 globular domain, their ability to inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and their effect on the binding of α6β1 integrin and MCAM to both α4-laminins. Most of the mAbs reacted with the laminin α4 globular domain, but only two, mAbs FC10 and 084, significantly inhibited tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminin-411. When used in combination, these antibodies practically abolished the cell adhesion and migration on laminin-411 and significantly reduced the cellular responses on laminin-421. Accordingly, mAbs FC10 and 084 significantly inhibited the binding of purified α6β1 integrin and MCAM to laminins 411 and 421. These results indicate that mAbs to the laminin α4 globular domain are able to inhibit tumor cell adhesion and migration on laminins 411 and 421, and that α6β1 integrin and MCAM bind α4-laminins at very close sites on the globular domain. These reagents contribute to a better understanding of the biology of α4-laminins and may have a therapeutic potential in malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  3. A comparative study of capillary electrophoresis and isothermal titration calorimetry for the determination of binding constant of human serum albumin to monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrási, Melinda; Lehoczki, Gábor; Nagy, Zoltán; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Pungor, András; Gáspár, Attila

    2015-06-01

    This paper focuses on the investigation of the interactions between the anti-HSA-mAb and its protein antigen using CZE, ACE, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The CZE revealed the formation of the anti-HSA-mAb·HSA and anti-HSA-mAb·(HSA)2 complexes and the binding constants determined by plotting the amount of the bound anti-HSA-mAb as a function of the concentration of HSA. The ACE provided information on the binding strength from the change in effective electrophoretic mobility of the anti-HSA-mAb. These two separation techniques estimated the presence of two binding sites. The equilibrium dissociation constant values obtained by CZE and ACE were found to be 2.26 × 10(-6) M for anti-HSA-mAb·HSA, 1.22 × 10(-6) M for anti-HSA-mAb·(HSA)2 and 4.45 × 10(-8) M for anti-HSA-mAb·HSA, 1.08 × 10(-7) M for anti-HSA-mAb·(HSA)2 , respectively. The dissociation constant data obtained by ACE were in congruence with the values obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry (2.74 × 10(-8) M, 1.04 × 10(-7) M). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Generation of human antibody fragments against Streptococcus mutans using a phage display chain shuffling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common oral diseases and dental caries can be prevented effectively by passive immunization. In humans, passive immunotherapy may require the use of humanized or human antibodies to prevent adverse immune responses against murine epitopes. Therefore we generated human single chain and diabody antibody derivatives based on the binding characteristics of the murine monoclonal antibody Guy's 13. The murine form of this antibody has been used successfully to prevent Streptococcus mutans colonization and the development of dental caries in non-human primates, and to prevent bacterial colonization in human clinical trials. Results The antibody derivatives were generated using a chain-shuffling approach based on human antibody variable gene phage-display libraries. Like the parent antibody, these derivatives bound specifically to SAI/II, the surface adhesin of the oral pathogen S. mutans. Conclusions Humanization of murine antibodies can be easily achieved using phage display libraries. The human antibody fragments bind the antigen as well as the causative agent of dental caries. In addition the human diabody derivative is capable of aggregating S. mutans in vitro, making it a useful candidate passive immunotherapeutic agent for oral diseases.

  5. Antisperm antibodies and human reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, J H

    2010-01-01

    To present strategies in diagnosing and treating infertility related to antisperm antibodies. Antisperm antibodies (ASA) were detected on sperm using the direct immunobead (IBD) test. Treatments included intrauterine insemination (IUI) with pretreatment with chymotrypsin/galactose vs. in vitro fertilization (IVF) with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Intrauterine insemination with protein digestive enzyme treatment was much more effective than IUI without enzymatic therapy. However IVF with ICSI provided three times the pregnancy rate for males with sperm coated with ASA than IUI with chymotrypsin treated sperm. It is advisable to include measurement for ASA on the initial semen analysis. However, another option is to perform it initially only with an abnormal post-coital test. The decision for IUI with chymotrypsin pretreatment of the sperm vs. IVF with ICSI may depend on insurance and financial issues.

  6. Quartz crystal microbalance for the cardiac markers/antibodies binding kinetic measurements in the plasma samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, L. E.; Shumyantseva, V. V.; Archakov, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was exploited for cardiac markers detection and kinetic studies of immunochemical reaction of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and human heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) with the corresponding monoclonal antibodies in undiluted plasma (serum) and standard solutions. The QCM technique allowed to dynamically monitor the kinetic differences in specific interactions and nonspecific sorption, without multiple labeling procedures and separation steps. The affinity binding process was characterized by the association (ka) and the dissociation (kd) kinetic constants and the equilibrium association (K) constant, all of which were obtained from experimental data.

  7. Modeling the Role of Epitope Arrangement on Antibody Binding Stoichiometry in Flaviviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Daniel R; Khavrutskii, Ilja; Wallqvist, Anders; Chaudhury, Sidhartha

    2016-10-18

    Cryo-electron-microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of flaviviruses reveal significant variation in epitope occupancy across different monoclonal antibodies that have largely been attributed to epitope-level differences in conformation or accessibility that affect antibody binding. The consequences of these variations for macroscopic properties such as antibody binding and neutralization are the results of the law of mass action-a stochastic process of innumerable binding and unbinding events between antibodies and the multiple binding sites on the flavivirus in equilibrium-that cannot be directly imputed from structure alone. We carried out coarse-grained spatial stochastic binding simulations for nine flavivirus antibodies with epitopes defined by cryo-EM or x-ray crystallography to assess the role of epitope spatial arrangement on antibody-binding stoichiometry, occupancy, and neutralization. In our simulations, all epitopes were equally competent for binding, representing the upper limit of binding stoichiometry that results from epitope spatial arrangement alone. Surprisingly, our simulations closely reproduced the relative occupancy and binding stoichiometry observed in cryo-EM, without having to account for differences in epitope accessibility or conformation, suggesting that epitope spatial arrangement alone may be sufficient to explain differences in binding occupancy and stoichiometry between antibodies. Furthermore, we found that there was significant heterogeneity in binding configurations even at saturating antibody concentrations, and that bivalent antibody binding may be more common than previously thought. Finally, we propose a structure-based explanation for the stoichiometric threshold model of neutralization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The Influence of Enterococcus faecalis on the Morphology and the Antibody-Binding Capacity of the Intestinal Bacteria of Ten Healthy Human Volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G.; Deddens, B.; Wilkinson, M.; Waaij, D. van der

    1995-01-01

    The influence of Enterococcus faecalis on the morphology of the bacterial cells which make up the gut microflora and on the levels of circulating IgG bound to the gut microflora was assessed. After 29 days of pretreatment monitoring, ten healthy human volunteers ingested 10^7 viable cells of E. faec

  9. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Memczak

    Full Text Available Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing.

  10. SINGLE CHAIN VARIABLE FRAGMENTS OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST DIPHTHERIA TOXIN B-SUBUNIT ISOLATED FROM PHAGE DISPLAY HUMAN ANTIBODY LIBRARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliinyk O. S.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin is an exoantigen of Corynebacterium diphtheriae that inhibits protein synthesis and kills sensitive cells. The aim of this study was to obtain human recombinant single-chain variable fragment (scFv antibodies against receptor-binding B subunit of diphtheria toxin. 12 specific clones were selected after three rounds of a phage display naїve (unimmunized human antibody library against recombinant B-subunit. scFv DNA inserts from these 12 clones were digested with MvaI, and 6 unique restriction patterns were found. Single-chain antibodies were expressed in Escherichia coli XL1-blue. The recombinant proteins were characterized by immunoblotting of bacterial extracts and detection with an anti-E-tag antibody. The toxin B-subunit-binding function of the single-chain antibody was shown by ELISA. The affinity constants for different clones were found to be from 106 to 108 М–1. Due to the fact, that these antibody fragments recognized epitopes in the receptor-binding Bsubunit of diphtheria toxin, further studies are interesting to evaluate their toxin neutralization properties and potential for therapeutic applications. Obtained scFv-antibodies can also be used for detection and investigation of biological properties of diphtheria toxin.

  11. Selection of apoptotic cell specific human antibodies from adult bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Grönwall

    Full Text Available Autoreactive antibodies that recognize neo-determinants on apoptotic cells in mice have been proposed to have protective, homeostatic and immunoregulatory properties, although our knowledge about the equivalent antibodies in humans has been much more limited. In the current study, human monoclonal antibodies with binding specificity for apoptotic cells were isolated from the bone marrow of healthy adults using phage display technology. These antibodies were shown to recognize phosphorylcholine (PC-associated neo-determinants. Interestingly, three of the four identified apoptotic cell-specific antibody clones were encoded by VH3 region rearrangements with germline or nearly germline configuration without evidence of somatic hypermutation. Importantly, the different identified antibody clones had diverse heavy chain CDR3 and deduced binding surfaces as suggested by structure modeling. This may suggest a potentially great heterogeneity in human antibodies recognizing PC-related epitopes on apoptotic cells. To re-construct the postulated structural format of the parental anti-PC antibody, the dominant clone was also expressed as a recombinant human polymeric IgM, which revealed a substantially increased binding reactivity, with dose-dependent and antigen-inhibitable binding of apoptotic cells. Our findings may have implication for improved prognostic testing and therapeutic interventions in human inflammatory disease.

  12. A novel antibody humanization method based on epitopes scanning and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Zhang

    Full Text Available 1-17-2 is a rat anti-human DEC-205 monoclonal antibody that induces internalization and delivers antigen to dendritic cells (DCs. The potentially clinical application of this antibody is limited by its murine origin. Traditional humanization method such as complementarity determining regions (CDRs graft often leads to a decreased or even lost affinity. Here we have developed a novel antibody humanization method based on computer modeling and bioinformatics analysis. First, we used homology modeling technology to build the precise model of Fab. A novel epitope scanning algorithm was designed to identify antigenic residues in the framework regions (FRs that need to be mutated to human counterpart in the humanization process. Then virtual mutation and molecular dynamics (MD simulation were used to assess the conformational impact imposed by all the mutations. By comparing the root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs of CDRs, we found five key residues whose mutations would destroy the original conformation of CDRs. These residues need to be back-mutated to rescue the antibody binding affinity. Finally we constructed the antibodies in vitro and compared their binding affinity by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance (SPR assay. The binding affinity of the refined humanized antibody was similar to that of the original rat antibody. Our results have established a novel method based on epitopes scanning and MD simulation for antibody humanization.

  13. Site-directed antibody immobilization using a protein A-gold binding domain fusion protein for enhanced SPR immunosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan-Franco, Elena; Caruz, Antonio; Pedrajas, J R; Lechuga, Laura M

    2013-04-07

    We have implemented a novel strategy for the oriented immobilization of antibodies onto a gold surface based on the use of a fusion protein, the protein A-gold binding domain (PAG). PAG consists of a gold binding peptide (GBP) coupled to the immunoglobulin-binding domains of staphylococcal protein A. This fusion protein provides an easy and fast oriented immobilization of antibodies preserving its native structure, while leaving the antigen binding sites (Fab) freely exposed. Using this immobilization strategy, we have demonstrated the performance of the immunosensing of the human Growth Hormone by SPR. A limit of detection of 90 ng mL(-1) was obtained with an inter-chip variability lower than 7%. The comparison of this method with other strategies for the direct immobilization of antibodies over gold surfaces has showed the enhanced sensitivity provided by the PAG approach.

  14. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B;

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...

  15. Human milk sIgA molecules contain various combinations of different antigen-binding sites resulting in a multiple binding specificity of antibodies and enzymatic activities of abzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey E Sedykh

    Full Text Available In the classic paradigm, immunoglobulins are monospecific molecules that have stable structures and two or more identical antigen-binding sites. However, we show here for the first time that the sIgA pool of human milk contains, depending on the donor, only 35±5% λ-sIgAs, 48±7% κ-sIgAs, and 17±4% of chimeric λ-κ-sIgAs. sIgA preparations contained no traces of canonical enzymes. However, all sIgA fractions eluted from several specific affinity sorbents under the conditions destroying even strong immune complexes demonstrated high catalytic activities in hydrolysis of ATP, DNA, and oligosaccharides, and phosphorylation of proteins, lipids, and oligosaccharides. Sequential re-chromatographies of the sIgA fractions with high affinity to one affinity sorbents on the second, third and then fourth affinity sorbents bearing other immobilized antigens led to the distribution of Abs and all catalytic activities all over the profiles of these chromatographies; in all cases some fractions eluted from affinity sorbents only under the conditions destroying strong immune complexes. In vitro, only an addition of reduced glutathione and milk plasma containing no Abs to two sIgA fractions with different affinity for DNA-cellulose led to a transition of up to 11-20% of Ab from one fraction to the other. Our data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between different IgA and sIgA molecules. In addition, it cannot be excluded that during the penetration of IgAs through the specific milk barrier, the secretory component (S and the join chain (J can combine molecules of dimeric H(2L(2 λ-IgAs and κ-IgAs against different antigens forming many different variants of H(4L(4SJ sIgA molecules. Therefore, some chimeric molecules of sIgA can contain from two to four HL-fragments to various antigens interacting with high affinity with different sorbents and catalyzing various chemical reactions. Our data essentially expand the ideas concerning

  16. Preparation and validation of radio iodinated recombinant human IL-10 for the measurement of natural human antibodies against IL-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lemos Rieper, Carina; Galle, Pia; Svenson, Morten

    2009-01-01

    activity of 75 cpm/pg. Validation of the tracer confirmed preserved antibody epitopes and receptor binding ability. A robust Radio Immuno Assay (RIA) was developed and validated to detect natural human anti-IL-10 antibodies based on the formation of (125)I-labeled IL-10-IgG complexes in solution...

  17. General in vitro method to analyze the interactions of synthetic polymers with human antibody repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soshee, Anandakumar; Zürcher, Stefan; Spencer, Nicholas D; Halperin, Avraham; Nizak, Clément

    2014-01-13

    Recent reports on the hitherto underestimated antigenicity of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), which is widely used for pharmaceutical applications, highlight the need for efficient testing of polymer antigenicity and for a better understanding of its molecular origins. With this goal in mind, we have used the phage-display technique to screen large, recombinant antibody repertoires of human origin in vitro for antibodies that bind poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). PVP is a neutral synthetic polymer of industrial and clinical interest that is also a well-known model antigen in animal studies, thus allowing the comparison of in vitro and in vivo responses. We have identified 44 distinct antibodies that bind specifically to PVP. Competitive binding assays show that the PVP-antibody binding constant is proportional to the polymerization degree of PVP and that specific binding is detected down to the vinylpyrrolidone (VP) monomer level. Statistical analysis of anti-PVP antibody sequences identifies an amino-acid motif that is shared by many phage-display-selected anti-PVP antibodies that are similar to a previously described natural anti-PVP antibody. This suggests a role for this motif in specific antibody/PVP interactions. Interestingly, sequence analysis also suggests that only a single antibody chain containing this shared motif is responsible for antibody binding to PVP, as confirmed upon systematic deletion of either antibody chain for 90% of selected anti-PVP antibodies. Overall, a large number of antibodies in the human repertoires we have screened bind specifically to PVP through a small number of shared amino acid motifs, and preliminary comparison points to significant correlations between the sequences of phage-display-selected anti-PVP antibodies and their natural counterparts isolated from immunized mice in previous studies. This study pioneers the use of antibody phage-display to explore the antigenicity of biotechnologically relevant polymers. It also paves the

  18. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p PBS over 60 min of circulation. The high adsorption capacity towards anthrax toxin PA of the

  19. Comparative study of random and oriented antibody immobilization techniques on the binding capacity of immunosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausaite-Minkstimiene, A; Ramanaviciene, A; Kirlyte, J; Ramanavicius, A

    2010-08-01

    A comparative study of four different antibody immobilization techniques that are suitable for modification of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chip (SPR-chip) is reported. Antibodies against human growth hormone (anti-HGH) were used as the model system. The evaluated SPR-chip modification techniques were (i) random immobilization of intact anti-HGH (intact-anti-HGH) via self-assembled monolayer (SAM) based on 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA); (ii) random immobilization of intact-anti-HGH within carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) hydrogel by direct covalent amine coupling technique; (iii) oriented coupling of intact-anti-HGH via Fc-fragment to protein-G layer assembled on SAM consisting of MUA (MUA/pG); (iv) oriented immobilization of fragmented anti-HGH antibodies (frag-anti-HGH) via their native thiol-groups directly coupled to the gold. To liberate these thiol groups, the intact-anti-HGH was chemically "divided" into two frag-anti-HGH fragments by chemical reduction with 2-mercaptoethylamine (2-MEA). Optimal concentration of 2-MEA for preparation of anti-HGH was 15 mM. The surface concentration of immobilized antibodies and the antigen binding capacity for all four differently modified SPR-chips was evaluated and compared. The maximum surface concentration of immobilized intact-anti-HGH was obtained by immobilizing the antibody within CMD-hydrogel. The maximal antigen binding capacity was obtained by SPR-chip based on intact-anti-HGH immobilized via MUA/pG. The immobilization based on application of frag-anti-HGH was found to be the most suitable for design of SPR-immunosensor for HGH detection, due to its sufficient antigen binding capacity, simplicity, and low cost in respect to the currently evaluated techniques.

  20. Exquisite specificity and peptide epitope recognition promiscuity, properties shared by antibodies from sharks to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchalonis, J J; Adelman, M K; Robey, I F; Schluter, S F; Edmundson, A B

    2001-01-01

    This review considers definitions of the specificity of antibodies including the development of recent concepts of recognition polyspecificity and epitope promiscuity. Using sets of homologous and unrelated peptides derived from the sequences of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor chains we offer operational definitions of cross-reactivity by investigating correlations of either identities in amino acid sequence, or in hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity profiles with degree of binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Polyreactivity, or polyspecificity, are terms used to denote binding of a monoclonal antibody or purified antibody preparation to large complex molecules that are structurally unrelated, such as thyroglobulin and DNA. As a first approximation, there is a linear correlation between degree of sequence identity or hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and antigenic cross-binding. However, catastrophic interchanges of amino acids can occur where changing of one amino acid out of 16 in a synthetic peptide essentially eliminates binding to certain antibodies. An operational definition of epitope promiscuity for peptides is the case where two peptides show little or no identity in amino acid sequence but bind strongly to the same antibody as shown by either direct binding or competitive inhibition. Analysis of antibodies of humans and sharks, the two most divergent species in evolution to express antibodies and the combinatorial immune response, indicates that the capacity for both exquisite specificity and epitope recognition promiscuity are essential conserved features of individual vertebrate antibodies.

  1. Monoclonal antibody to human endothelial cell surface internalization and liposome delivery in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskaya, O V; Trubetskoy, V S; Domogatsky, S P; Rudin, A V; Popov, N V; Danilov, S M; Nikolayeva, M N; Klibanov, A L; Torchilin, V P

    1988-02-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb), E25, is described that binds to the surface of cultured human endothelial cells. Upon binding E25 is rapidly internalized and digested intracellularly. Selective liposome targeting to the surface of the cells is performed using a biotinylated E25 antibody and an avidin-biotin system. Up to 30% of the cell-adherent liposomal lipid is internalized.

  2. Efficient generation of human IgA monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, Valérie; Mouquet, Hugo

    2015-07-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundant antibody isotype produced in humans. IgA antibodies primarily ensure immune protection of mucosal surfaces against invading pathogens, but also circulate and are present in large quantities in blood. IgAs are heterogeneous at a molecular level, with two IgA subtypes and the capacity to form multimers by interacting with the joining (J) chain. Here, we have developed an efficient strategy to rapidly generate human IgA1 and IgA2 monoclonal antibodies in their monomeric and dimeric forms. Recombinant monomeric and dimeric IgA1/IgA2 counterparts of a prototypical IgG1 monoclonal antibody, 10-1074, targeting the HIV-1 envelope protein, were produced in large amounts after expression cloning and transient transfection of 293-F cells. 10-1074 IgAs were FPLC-purified using a novel affinity-based resin engrafted with anti-IgA chimeric Fabs, followed by a monomers/multimers separation using size exclusion-based FPLC. ELISA binding experiments confirmed that the artificial IgA class switching of 10-1074 did not alter its antigen recognition. In summary, our technical approach allows the very efficient production of various forms of purified recombinant human IgA molecules, which are precious tools in dissecting IgA B-cell responses in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and studying the biology, function and therapeutic potential of IgAs.

  3. Selection and characterization of a human neutralizing antibody to human fibroblast growth factor-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Jun [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Science, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Xiang, Jun-Jian, E-mail: txjj@jnu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Antibody Engineering, College of Life Sciences and Technologies, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Science, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Li, Dan [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Science, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Deng, Ning; Wang, Hong; Gong, Yi-Ping [Laboratory of Antibody Engineering, College of Life Sciences and Technologies, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2010-04-09

    Compelling evidences suggest that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) plays important roles in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Molecules blocking the FGF-2 signaling have been proposed as anticancer agents. Through screening of a human scFv phage display library, we have isolated several human single-chain Fv fragments (scFvs) that bind to human FGF-2. After expression and purification in bacteria, one scFv, named 1A2, binds to FGF-2 with a high affinity and specificity, and completes with FGF-2 binding to its receptor. This 1A2 scFv was then cloned into the pIgG1 vector and expressed in 293T cells. The purified hIgG1-1A2 antibody showed a high binding affinity of 8 x 10{sup -9} M to rhFGF-2. In a set of vitro assays, it inhibited various biological activities of FGF-2 such as the proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. More importantly, hIgG1-1A2 antibody also efficiently blocked the growth while inducing apoptosis of glioma cells. For the first time, we generated a human anti-FGF-2 antibody with proven in vitro anti-tumor activity. It may therefore present a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of cancers that are dependent on FGF-2 signaling for growth and survival.

  4. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  5. Activation of human complement by immunoglobulin G antigranulocyte antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, P K; Currie, M S; Logue, G L

    1982-01-01

    The ability of antigranulocyte antibody to fix the third component of complement (C3) to the granulocyte surface was investigated by an assay that quantitates the binding of monoclonal anti-C3 antibody to paraformaldehyde-fixed cells preincubated with Felty's syndrome serum in the presence of human complement. The sera from 7 of 13 patients with Felty's syndrome bound two to three times as much C3 to granulocytes as sera from patients with uncomplicated rheumatoid arthritis. The complement-activating ability of Felty's syndrome serum seemed to reside in the monomeric IgG-containing serum fraction. For those sera capable of activating complement, the amount of C3 fixed to granulocytes was proportional to the amount of granulocyte-binding IgG present in the serum. Thus, complement fixation appeared to be a consequence of the binding of antigranulocyte antibody to the cell surface. These studies suggest a role for complement-mediated injury in the pathophysiology of immune granulocytopenia, as has been demonstrated for immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:7174786

  6. Rifampicin-dependent antibodies bind a similar or identical epitope to glycoprotein IX-specific quinine-dependent antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, J K; Lopez, J A; Gaudry, L E; Chong, B H

    2000-01-01

    The drug-dependent antibody of a patient with rifampicin-induced thrombocytopenia was characterized using the antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAIPA assay), flow cytometry, and immunoprecipitation. The antibody was found to bind glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX but not GPIIb-IIIa because (1

  7. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-05

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weizao, E-mail: chenw3@mail.nih.gov [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Feng, Yang [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Wang, Yanping [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); The Basic Research Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S. [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  9. Characterization of Two Human Monoclonal Antibodies Neutralizing Influenza A H7N9 Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Zhang, Weijia; Xue, Ying; Pang, XingHuo; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    H7N9 was a cause of significant global health concern due to its severe infection and approximately 35% mortality in humans. By screening a Fab antibody phage library derived from patients who recovered from H7N9 infections, we characterized two human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs), HNIgGD5 and HNIgGH8. The epitope of these two antibodies was dependent on two residues in the receptor binding site at positions V186 and L226 of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein. Both antibodies possessed high neutralizing activity. PMID:26063436

  10. A camelid single-domain antibody neutralizes botulinum neurotoxin A by blocking host receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Guorui; Lam, Kwok-ho; Weisemann, Jasmin; Peng, Lisheng; Krez, Nadja; Perry, Kay; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Dong, Min; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng (BCH); (Cornell); (Tufts CTSI); (UCI); (MHH)

    2017-08-07

    Antibody treatment is currently the only available countermeasure for botulism, a fatal illness caused by flaccid paralysis of muscles due to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) intoxication. Among the seven major serotypes of BoNT/A-G, BoNT/A poses the most serious threat to humans because of its high potency and long duration of action. Prior to entering neurons and blocking neurotransmitter release, BoNT/A recognizes motoneurons via a dual-receptor binding process in which it engages both the neuron surface polysialoganglioside (PSG) and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2). Previously, we identified a potent neutralizing antitoxin against BoNT/A1 termed ciA-C2, derived from a camelid heavy-chain-only antibody (VHH). In this study, we demonstrate that ciA-C2 prevents BoNT/A1 intoxication by inhibiting its binding to neuronal receptor SV2. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structure of ciA-C2 in complex with the receptor-binding domain of BoNT/A1 (HCA1) at 1.68 Å resolution. The structure revealed that ciA-C2 partially occupies the SV2-binding site on HCA1, causing direct interference of HCA1 interaction with both the N-glycan and peptide-moiety of SV2. Interestingly, this neutralization mechanism is similar to that of a monoclonal antibody in clinical trials, despite that ciA-C2 is more than 10-times smaller. Taken together, these results enlighten our understanding of BoNT/A1 interactions with its neuronal receptor, and further demonstrate that inhibiting toxin binding to the host receptor is an efficient countermeasure strategy.

  11. Antiphospholipid Antibodies Bind ATP: A putative Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Neuronal Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chapman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL generated in experimental animals cross-react with ATP. We therefore examined the possibility that aPL IgG from human subjects bind to ATP by affinity column and an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Sera with high levels of aPL IgG were collected from 12 patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS. IgG fractions from 10 of 12 APS patients contained aPL that could be affinity-bound to an ATP column and completely eluted with NaCl 0.5 M. A significant (>50% inhibition of aPL IgG binding by ATP 5 mM was found in the majority. Similar inhibition was obtained with ADP but not with AMP or cAMP. All the affinity purified anti-ATP antibodies also bound β2-glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI, also known as apolipoprotein H suggesting that, similar to most pathogenic aPL, their binding depends on this serum cofactor. We further investigated this possibility and found that the binding of β2-GPI to the ATP column was similar to that of aPL IgG in that most was reversed by NaCl 0.5 M. Furthermore, addition of β2-GPI to aPL IgG significantly increased the amount of aPL binding to an ATP column. We conclude that aPL IgG bind ATP, probably through β2-GPI. This binding could interfere with the normal extracellular function of ATP and similar neurotransmitters.

  12. Quantifying cell binding kinetics mediated by surface-bound blood type B antigen to immobilized antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI BaoXia; CHEN Juan; LONG Mian

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion is crucial to many biological processes, such as inflammatory responses, tumor metastasis and thrombosis formation. Recently a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based BIAcore biosensor has been extended to determine cell binding mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions. How such cell binding is quantitatively governed by kinetic rates and regulating factors, however, has been poorly understood. Here we developed a novel assay to determine the binding kinetics of surface-bound biomolecular interactions using a commercial BIAcore 3000 biosensor. Human red blood cells (RBCs) presenting blood group B antigen and CM5 chip bearing immobilized anti-B monoclonal antibody (mAb) were used to obtain the time courses of response unit, or sensorgrams, when flowing RBCs over the chip surface. A cellular kinetic model was proposed to correlate the sensorgrams with kinetic rates. Impacts of regulating factors, such as cell concentration,flow duration and rate, antibody-presenting level, as well as Ph value and osmotic pressure of suspending medium were tested systematically, which imparted the confidence that the approach can be applied to kinetic measurements of cell adhesion mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions.These results provided a new insight into quantifying cell binding using a commercial SPR-based BIAcore biosensor.

  13. Recognition determinants of broadly neutralizing human antibodies against dengue viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvinski, Alexander; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Barba-Spaeth, Giovanna; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Kikuti, Carlos M; Navarro Sanchez, M Erika; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Wongwiwat, Wiyada; Haouz, Ahmed; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Shepard, William E; Desprès, Philippe; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Dussart, Philippe; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Screaton, Gavin R; Rey, Félix A

    2015-04-02

    Dengue disease is caused by four different flavivirus serotypes, which infect 390 million people yearly with 25% symptomatic cases and for which no licensed vaccine is available. Recent phase III vaccine trials showed partial protection, and in particular no protection for dengue virus serotype 2 (refs 3, 4). Structural studies so far have characterized only epitopes recognized by serotype-specific human antibodies. We recently isolated human antibodies potently neutralizing all four dengue virus serotypes. Here we describe the X-ray structures of four of these broadly neutralizing antibodies in complex with the envelope glycoprotein E from dengue virus serotype 2, revealing that the recognition determinants are at a serotype-invariant site at the E-dimer interface, including the exposed main chain of the E fusion loop and the two conserved glycan chains. This 'E-dimer-dependent epitope' is also the binding site for the viral glycoprotein prM during virus maturation in the secretory pathway of the infected cell, explaining its conservation across serotypes and highlighting an Achilles' heel of the virus with respect to antibody neutralization. These findings will be instrumental for devising novel immunogens to protect simultaneously against all four serotypes of dengue virus.

  14. SINGLE CHAIN VARIABLE FRAGMENTS OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST DIPHTHERIA TOXIN B-SUBUNIT ISOLATED FROM PHAGE DISPLAY HUMAN ANTIBODY LIBRARY

    OpenAIRE

    Oliinyk O. S.; Kaberniuk A. A.; Kolibo D. V.; Komisarenko S. V.

    2014-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is an exoantigen of Corynebacterium diphtheriae that inhibits protein synthesis and kills sensitive cells. The aim of this study was to obtain human recombinant single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies against receptor-binding B subunit of diphtheria toxin. 12 specific clones were selected after three rounds of a phage display naїve (unimmunized) human antibody library against recombinant B-subunit. scFv DNA inserts from these 12 clones were digested with MvaI, an...

  15. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus-Like Particle Binding to Target Cells by Antiviral Antibodies in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Daniel; Barth, Heidi; Gissler, Bettina; Schürmann, Peter; Adah, Mohammed I.; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Pape, Gerd R.; Depla, Erik; Jacobs, Dirk; Maertens, Geert; Patel, Arvind H.; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Liang, T. Jake; Blum, Hubert E.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic viral hepatitis worldwide. The study of antibody-mediated virus neutralization has been hampered by the lack of an efficient and high-throughput cell culture system for the study of virus neutralization. The HCV structural proteins have been shown to assemble into noninfectious HCV-like particles (HCV-LPs). Similar to serum-derived virions, HCV-LPs bind and enter human hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines. In this study, we developed an HCV-LP-based model system for a systematic functional analysis of antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C. We demonstrate that cellular HCV-LP binding was specifically inhibited by antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C in a dose-dependent manner. Using a library of homologous overlapping envelope peptides covering the entire HCV envelope, we identified an epitope in the N-terminal E2 region (SQKIQLVNTNGSWHI; amino acid positions 408 to 422) as one target of human antiviral antibodies inhibiting cellular particle binding. Using a large panel of serum samples from patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C, we demonstrated that the presence of antibodies with inhibition of binding activity was not associated with viral clearance. In conclusion, antibody-mediated inhibition of cellular HCV-LP binding represents a convenient system for the functional characterization of human anti-HCV antibodies, allowing the mapping of envelope neutralization epitopes targeted by naturally occurring antiviral antibodies. PMID:15308699

  16. Mechanisms of allergen-antibody interaction of cockroach allergen Bla g 2 with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit IgE antibody binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Glesner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cockroach allergy is strongly associated with asthma, and involves the production of IgE antibodies against inhaled allergens. Reports of conformational epitopes on inhaled allergens are limited. The conformational epitopes for two specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb that interfere with IgE antibody binding were identified by X-ray crystallography on opposite sites of the quasi-symmetrical cockroach allergen Bla g 2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mutational analysis of selected residues in both epitopes was performed based on the X-ray crystal structures of the allergen with mAb Fab/Fab' fragments, to investigate the structural basis of allergen-antibody interactions. The epitopes of Bla g 2 for the mAb 7C11 or 4C3 were mutated, and the mutants were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, circular dichroism, and/or mass spectrometry. Mutants were tested for mAb and IgE antibody binding by ELISA and fluorescent multiplex array. Single or multiple mutations of five residues from both epitopes resulted in almost complete loss of mAb binding, without affecting the overall folding of the allergen. Preventing glycosylation by mutation N268Q reduced IgE binding, indicating a role of carbohydrates in the interaction. Cation-π interactions, as well as electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, were important for mAb and IgE antibody binding. Quantitative differences in the effects of mutations on IgE antibody binding were observed, suggesting heterogeneity in epitope recognition among cockroach allergic patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Analysis by site-directed mutagenesis of epitopes identified by X-ray crystallography revealed an overlap between monoclonal and IgE antibody binding sites and provided insight into the B cell repertoire to Bla g 2 and the mechanisms of allergen-antibody recognition, including involvement of carbohydrates.

  17. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  18. CD4 binding site broadly neutralizing antibody selection of HIV-1 escape mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreja, Hanna; Pade, Corinna; Chen, Lei; McKnight, Áine

    2015-07-01

    All human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) viruses use CD4 to enter cells. Consequently, the viral envelope CD4-binding site (CD4bs) is relatively conserved, making it a logical neutralizing antibody target. It is important to understand how CD4-binding site variation allows for escape from neutralizing antibodies. Alanine scanning mutagenesis identifies residues in antigenic sites, whereas escape mutant selection identifies viable mutants. We selected HIV-1 to escape CD4bs neutralizing mAbs b12, A12 and HJ16. Viruses that escape from A12 and b12 remained susceptible to HJ16, VRC01 and J3, whilst six different viruses that escape HJ16 remained sensitive to A12, b12 and J3. In contrast, their sensitivity to VRC01 was variable. Triple HJ16/A12/b12-resistant virus proved that HIV-1 could escape multiple broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, but still retain sensitivity to VRC01 and the llama-derived J3 nanobody. This antigenic variability may reflect that occurring in circulating viruses, so studies like this can predict immunologically relevant antigenic forms of the CD4bs for inclusion in HIV-1 vaccines.

  19. Selective binding of anti-DNA antibodies to native dsDNA fragments of differing sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccellini, Melissa B; Busto, Patricia; Debatis, Michelle; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Viglianti, Gregory A

    2012-03-30

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by the development of autoantibodies directed against a limited subset of nuclear antigens, including DNA. DNA-specific B cells take up mammalian DNA through their B cell receptor, and this DNA is subsequently transported to an endosomal compartment where it can potentially engage TLR9. We have previously shown that ssDNA-specific B cells preferentially bind to particular DNA sequences, and antibody specificity for short synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Since CpG-rich DNA, the ligand for TLR9 is found in low abundance in mammalian DNA, we sought to determine whether antibodies derived from DNA-reactive B cells showed binding preference for CpG-rich native dsDNA, and thereby select immunostimulatory DNA for delivery to TLR9. We examined a panel of anti-DNA antibodies for binding to CpG-rich and CpG-poor DNA fragments. We show that a number of anti-DNA antibodies do show preference for binding to certain native dsDNA fragments of differing sequence, but this does not correlate directly with the presence of CpG dinucleotides. An antibody with preference for binding to a fragment containing optimal CpG motifs was able to promote B cell proliferation to this fragment at 10-fold lower antibody concentrations than an antibody that did not selectively bind to this fragment, indicating that antibody binding preference can influence autoreactive B cell responses.

  20. Discovery and Characterization of Phage Display-Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies against RSV F Glycoprotein.

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    Zhifeng Chen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly and in immunosuppressed populations. The vast majority of neutralizing antibodies isolated from human subjects target the RSV fusion (F glycoprotein, making it an attractive target for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Currently, Synagis® (palivizumab is the only FDA approved antibody drug for the prevention of RSV infection, and there is a great need for more effective vaccines and therapeutics. Phage display is a powerful tool in antibody discovery with the advantage that it does not require samples from immunized subjects. In this study, Morphosys HuCAL GOLD® phage libraries were used for panning against RSV prefusion and postfusion F proteins. Panels of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against RSV F protein were discovered following phage library panning and characterized. Antibodies binding specifically to prefusion or postfusion F proteins and those binding both conformations were identified. 3B1 is a prototypic postfusion F specific antibody while 2E1 is a prototypic prefusion F specific antibody. 2E1 is a potent broadly neutralizing antibody against both RSV A and B strains. Epitope mapping experiments identified a conformational epitope spanning across three discontinuous sections of the RSV F protein, as well as critical residues for antibody interaction.

  1. Lack of association between mannose binding lectin and antibody responses after acellular pertussis vaccinations.

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    Kirsi Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is one of the key molecules in innate immunity and its role in human vaccine responses is poorly known. This study aimed to investigate the possible association of MBL polymorphisms with antibody production after primary and booster vaccinations with acellular pertussis vaccines in infants and adolescents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five hundred and sixty eight subjects were included in this study. In the adolescent cohort 355 subjects received a dose of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (dTpa vaccine ten years previously. Follow-up was performed at 3, 5 and 10 years. Infant cohort consisted of 213 subjects, who had received three primary doses of DTaP vaccine at 3, 5, and 12 months of age according to Finnish immunization program. Blood samples were collected before the vaccinations at 2,5 months of age and after the vaccinations at 13 months and 2 years of age. Concentrations of IgG antibodies to pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin and antibodies to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids were measured by standardized enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of MBL2 gene exon1 (codons 52, 54, 57 were examined. MBL serum concentration was also measured from the adolescent cohort. No association was found with MBL2 exon 1 polymorphisms and antibody responses against vaccine antigens, after primary and booster dTpa vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that MBL polymorphisms do not affect the production and persistence of antibodies after acellular pertussis vaccination. Our finding also suggests that MBL might not be involved in modulating antibody responses to the vaccines made of purified bacterial proteins.

  2. DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 Human IgG Antibody Produced by AnaptysBio, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    ECBC-TR-1339 DARPA ANTIBODY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM STANDARDIZED TEST BED FOR ANTIBODY...CHARACTERIZATION: CHARACTERIZATION OF AN MS2 HUMAN IGG ANTIBODY PRODUCED BY ANAPTYSBIO, INC. DARPA ATP Standardized Test Bed for Antibody...Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 human IgG antibody produced by AnaptysBio DARPA ATP Standardized Test Bed for Antibody

  3. The human antibody response to the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Casey C Perley

    Full Text Available Vaccine-induced human antibodies to surface components of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumonia are correlated with protection. Monoclonal antibodies to surface components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also protective in animal models. We have characterized human antibodies that bind to the surface of live M. tuberculosis.Plasma from humans with latent tuberculosis (TB infection (n = 23, active TB disease (n = 40, and uninfected controls (n = 9 were assayed by ELISA for reactivity to the live M. tuberculosis surface and to inactivated M. tuberculosis fractions (whole cell lysate, lipoarabinomannan, cell wall, and secreted proteins.When compared to uninfected controls, patients with active TB disease had higher antibody titers to the surface of live M. tuberculosis (Δ = 0.72 log10, whole cell lysate (Δ = 0.82 log10, and secreted proteins (Δ = 0.62 log10, though there was substantial overlap between the two groups. Individuals with active disease had higher relative IgG avidity (Δ = 1.4 to 2.6 to all inactivated fractions. Surprisingly, the relative IgG avidity to the live M. tuberculosis surface was lower in the active disease group than in uninfected controls (Δ =  -1.53, p = 0.004. Patients with active disease had higher IgG than IgM titers for all inactivated fractions (ratios, 2.8 to 10.1, but equal IgG and IgM titers to the live M. tuberculosis surface (ratio, 1.1. Higher antibody titers to the M. tuberculosis surface were observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 0.55 log10, p = 0.008, foreign-born (Δ = 0.61 log10, p = 0.004, or HIV-seronegative (Δ = 0.60 log10, p = 0.04. Higher relative IgG avidity scores to the M. tuberculosis surface were also observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 1.12, p < 0.001 and foreign-born (Δ = 0.87, p = 0.01.Humans with active TB disease produce antibodies to the surface of M. tuberculosis with low avidity and with a low IgG/IgM ratio

  4. The Human Antibody Response to the Surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, Casey C.; Frahm, Marc; Click, Eva M.; Dobos, Karen M.; Ferrari, Guido; Stout, Jason E.; Frothingham, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccine-induced human antibodies to surface components of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumonia are correlated with protection. Monoclonal antibodies to surface components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also protective in animal models. We have characterized human antibodies that bind to the surface of live M. tuberculosis. Methods Plasma from humans with latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (n = 23), active TB disease (n = 40), and uninfected controls (n = 9) were assayed by ELISA for reactivity to the live M. tuberculosis surface and to inactivated M. tuberculosis fractions (whole cell lysate, lipoarabinomannan, cell wall, and secreted proteins). Results When compared to uninfected controls, patients with active TB disease had higher antibody titers to the surface of live M. tuberculosis (Δ = 0.72 log10), whole cell lysate (Δ = 0.82 log10), and secreted proteins (Δ = 0.62 log10), though there was substantial overlap between the two groups. Individuals with active disease had higher relative IgG avidity (Δ = 1.4 to 2.6) to all inactivated fractions. Surprisingly, the relative IgG avidity to the live M. tuberculosis surface was lower in the active disease group than in uninfected controls (Δ = –1.53, p = 0.004). Patients with active disease had higher IgG than IgM titers for all inactivated fractions (ratios, 2.8 to 10.1), but equal IgG and IgM titers to the live M. tuberculosis surface (ratio, 1.1). Higher antibody titers to the M. tuberculosis surface were observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 0.55 log10, p = 0.008), foreign-born (Δ = 0.61 log10, p = 0.004), or HIV-seronegative (Δ = 0.60 log10, p = 0.04). Higher relative IgG avidity scores to the M. tuberculosis surface were also observed in active disease patients who were BCG-vaccinated (Δ = 1.12, p<0.001) and foreign-born (Δ = 0.87, p = 0.01). Conclusions/Significance Humans

  5. The Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Prion Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodemer, Walter

    Detection of PrP and its pathological isoform(s) is the key to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. There is ample evidence that PrP isoforms constitute a major component of an unknown and perhaps unconventional infectious agent. An etiological relationship between human and zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may be revealed with monoclonal antibodies. Knowledge of the conformational transition rendering a nonpathogenic, almost ubiquitous cellular protein into a pathogenic one is crucial to defining pathomechanisms. The stepwise or even continuous formation of pathogenic molecules can be monitored. Any improvement in the early diagnosis could help to conceive new therapeutic measures which are not currently available. Determination of PrP isoforms in tissue, cells, or body fluids may be of prognostic value. Many experimental approaches in molecular medicine and molecular biology of the prion protein already rely on monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies such as the single-chain Fv may soon replace traditional hybridoma techniques. Binding affinity can easily be manipulated by a number of techniques, including in vitro mutagenesis - a step which could never be carried out using the traditional hybridoma technology. Monoclonal antibodies are and will remain an essential support for ongoing research on the prion protein in general and on the unconventional infectious prions.

  6. RA8, A human anti-CD25 antibody against human treg cells

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    Arias, Robyn; Flanagan, Meg; Miller, Keith D.; Nien, Yu-Chih; Hu, Peisheng; Gray, Dixon; Khawli, Leslie A.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2007-06-01

    Although anti-CD25 antibodies exist for clinical use in patients, there is a need for the development of a human Treg antibody that will abrogate the immunosuppressive function of this small but critical T cell subtype. Based upon mounting evidence that the level of Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment correlates with clinical prognosis and stage in man, it appears that Treg cells play an important role in the tumor's ability to overcome host immune responses. In mice, the rat anti-mouse CD25 antibody PC61 causes depletion of CD25-bearing Treg cells both peripherally in lymphatic tissues and in the tumor microenvironment, without inducing symptoms of autoimmunity. A similar antibody, though with the ability to delete Treg cells specifically, would be an important new tool for reversing tumor escape associated with Treg immunosuppression in man. To begin to generate such a reagent, we now describe the development of a human anti-CD25 antibody using a novel yeast display library. The target antigen CD25-Fc was constructed and used for five rounds of selection using a non-immune yeast display library that contained as many as 109 single chain variable fragments (scFv). Two unique clones with low KD values (RA4 and RA8) were then selected to construct fully human anti-CD25 antibodies (IgG1/kappa) for stable expression. One antibody, RA8, showed excellent binding to human CD25+ cell lines and to human Treg cells and appears to be an excellent candidate for the generation of a human reagent that may be used in man for the immunotherapy of cancer.

  7. Inhibition of mouse acrosome reaction and sperm-zona pellucida binding by anti-human sperm membrane protein 1 antibody%抗人精子膜蛋白抗体1对小鼠精子顶体反应和精子-透明带结合的抑制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.Y.Cheng; J.L.Shi; M.Wang; Y.Q.Hu; C.M.Liu; Y.F.Wang; C.Xu

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the possible functions of human sperm membrane protein (hSMP-1) in the process of fertilization.Methods: A 576-bp cDNA fragment of HSD-1 gene coding for the extracellular domain of hSMP-1 was cloned and expressed. The localization of this protein on human and mouse sperm was determined by indirect immunofluorescent staining by using anti-recombinant hSMP-1 (anti-rhSMP-1) antibodies. Sperm acrosome reaction and spermzona pellucida (ZP) binding assay were carried out in 10-week-old BALB/c mice. Results: Recombinant hSMP-1 was successfully cloned and expressed. The expression of the native protein was limited on the acrosome of human and mouse sperm. Treatment of anti-rhSMP-1 antibodies significantly decreased the average number of sperms bound to each egg. Meanwhile, the percentage of acrosome reaction was decreased in comparison to pre-immune control after treatment with anti-rhSMP-1 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results suggest that anti-rhSMP-1 antibody inhibited mouse acrosome reaction and sperm-ZP binding.

  8. Neutralization of botulinum neurotoxin by a human monoclonal antibody specific for the catalytic light chain.

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    Sharad P Adekar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT are a family of category A select bioterror agents and the most potent biological toxins known. Cloned antibody therapeutics hold considerable promise as BoNT therapeutics, but the therapeutic utility of antibodies that bind the BoNT light chain domain (LC, a metalloprotease that functions in the cytosol of cholinergic neurons, has not been thoroughly explored. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used an optimized hybridoma method to clone a fully human antibody specific for the LC of serotype A BoNT (BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody demonstrated potent in vivo neutralization when administered alone and collaborated with an antibody specific for the HC. In Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells, the 4LCA antibody prevented the cleavage of the BoNT/A proteolytic target, SNAP-25. Unlike an antibody specific for the HC, the 4LCA antibody did not block entry of BoNT/A into cultured cells. Instead, it was taken up into synaptic vesicles along with BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody also directly inhibited BoNT/A catalytic activity in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: An antibody specific for the BoNT/A LC can potently inhibit BoNT/A in vivo and in vitro, using mechanisms not previously associated with BoNT-neutralizing antibodies. Antibodies specific for BoNT LC may be valuable components of an antibody antidote for BoNT exposure.

  9. Trimerization of the HIV Transmembrane Domain in Lipid Bilayers Modulates Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichart, Timothy M; Baksh, Michael M; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Fiedler, Jason D; Sligar, Stephen G; Finn, M G; Zwick, Michael B; Dawson, Philip E

    2016-02-18

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV gp41 is an established target of antibodies that neutralize a broad range of HIV isolates. To evaluate the role of the transmembrane (TM) domain, synthetic MPER-derived peptides were incorporated into lipid nanoparticles using natural and designed TM domains, and antibody affinity was measured using immobilized and solution-based techniques. Peptides incorporating the native HIV TM domain exhibit significantly stronger interactions with neutralizing antibodies than peptides with a monomeric TM domain. Furthermore, a peptide with a trimeric, three-helix bundle TM domain recapitulates the binding profile of the native sequence. These studies suggest that neutralizing antibodies can bind the MPER when the TM domain is a three-helix bundle and this presentation could influence the binding of neutralizing antibodies to the virus. Lipid-bilayer presentation of viral antigens in Nanodiscs is a new platform for evaluating neutralizing antibodies.

  10. Fully human antagonistic antibodies against CCR4 potently inhibit cell signaling and chemotaxis.

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    Urs B Hagemann

    Full Text Available CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4 represents a potentially important target for cancer immunotherapy due to its expression on tumor infiltrating immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs and on tumor cells in several cancer types and its role in metastasis.Using phage display, human antibody library, affinity maturation and a cell-based antibody selection strategy, the antibody variants against human CCR4 were generated. These antibodies effectively competed with ligand binding, were able to block ligand-induced signaling and cell migration, and demonstrated efficient killing of CCR4-positive tumor cells via ADCC and phagocytosis. In a mouse model of human T-cell lymphoma, significant survival benefit was demonstrated for animals treated with the newly selected anti-CCR4 antibodies.For the first time, successful generation of anti- G-protein coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR antibodies using human non-immune library and phage display on GPCR-expressing cells was demonstrated. The generated anti-CCR4 antibodies possess a dual mode of action (inhibition of ligand-induced signaling and antibody-directed tumor cell killing. The data demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity in vivo is mediated, at least in part, through Fc-receptor dependent effector mechanisms, such as ADCC and phagocytosis. Anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibodies inhibiting receptor signaling have potential as immunomodulatory antibodies for cancer.

  11. Anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies from patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy bind to cerebellar astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchin, Stéphanie; Coffin, Christine; Viader, Fausto; Ruf, Jean; Carayon, Pierre; Potier, Francette; Portier, Estelle; Comby, Elisabeth; Allouche, Stéphane; Ollivier, Yann; Reznik, Yves; Ballet, Jean Jacques

    2007-12-01

    A cohort of 10 Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) patients, 33 patients with unrelated neurological symptoms, 12 Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients and 4 healthy adult donors was studied to explore the neurological targets of anti-thyroperoxidase (TPO) autoantibodies (aAb) in HE. High levels of anti-TPO aAb were only detected in HE group's cerebrospinal fluids. In immunofluorescence assays on monkey brain cerebellum sections, both HE patients' sera and anti-TPO monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were able to bind cerebellar cells expressing glial fibrillary acid protein. Normal human astrocytes from primary cultures also reacted with anti-TPO mAb. Specific astrocyte binding of anti-TPO aAb suggests a role of these aAb in the HE pathogenesis.

  12. Isolation of Human Antibodies Against Hepatitis E From Phage Display Library by Metal Affinity Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To isolate human antibodies against hepatitis E virus from phage display library by a new method of panning phage antibody library based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). Methods Phage antibody library was allowed to mix with hex-His tagged expressed HEV specific antigen, NE2, in solution for adequate binding before affinity resin for hex-His was added. The non-specific phage antibodies were removed by extensive washing and the specific bound phage antibodies could then be eluted to infect TG1 or repeat the binding process for subsequent rounds of purification. The specificity of the selected human antibodies were tested by antigen competitive ELISA, human sera blocking ELISA, scFv expression, and sequence analysis. Results His-NE2 specific recombinant phages were successfully enriched after panning procedure. Two individual phage clones, 126 and 138, showed 50% inhibition in NE2 antigen competition ELISA and obvious blocking effect by HEV positive serum in blocking ELISA. Soluble scFv of 126, 138 bound to NE2 specifically. Conclusion Two specific human phage antibodies against hepatitis E virus (HEV) from phage display library were isolated by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The immobilized metal affinity chromatography applied to phage antibody selection was a helpful supplement to the selection in solution.

  13. Structure of a Human Astrovirus Capsid-Antibody Complex and Mechanistic Insights into Virus Neutralization

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    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Campos, Jocelyn; Perez, Edmundo I.; Yin, Lu; Alexander, David L.; DuBois, Rebecca M. (UCSC)

    2016-11-02

    ABSTRACT

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. There are no vaccines or antiviral therapies against HAstV disease. Several lines of evidence point to the presence of protective antibodies in healthy adults as a mechanism governing protection against reinfection by HAstV. However, development of anti-HAstV therapies is hampered by the gap in knowledge of protective antibody epitopes on the HAstV capsid surface. Here, we report the structure of the HAstV capsid spike domain bound to the neutralizing monoclonal antibody PL-2. The antibody uses all six complementarity-determining regions to bind to a quaternary epitope on each side of the dimeric capsid spike. We provide evidence that the HAstV capsid spike is a receptor-binding domain and that the antibody neutralizes HAstV by blocking virus attachment to cells. We identify patches of conserved amino acids that overlap the antibody epitope and may comprise a receptor-binding site. Our studies provide a foundation for the development of therapies to prevent and treat HAstV diarrheal disease.

    IMPORTANCEHuman astroviruses (HAstVs) infect nearly every person in the world during childhood and cause diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Despite the prevalence of this virus, little is known about how antibodies in healthy adults protect them against reinfection. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a complex of the HAstV capsid protein and a virus-neutralizing antibody. We show that the antibody binds to the outermost spike domain of the capsid, and we provide evidence that the antibody blocks virus attachment to human cells. Importantly, our findings suggest that a subunit-based vaccine focusing the immune system on the HAstV capsid spike domain could be effective in protecting children against HAstV disease.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to intermediate filament proteins of human cells: unique and cross-reacting antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gown, A M; Vogel, A M

    1982-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated against the intermediate filament proteins of different human cells. The reactivity of these antibodies with the different classes of intermediate filament proteins was determined by indirect immunofluorescence on cultured cells, immunologic indentification on SDS polyacrylamide gels ("wester blot" experiments), and immunoperoxidase assays on intact tissues. The following four antibodies are described: (a) an antivimentin antibody generated against human fibroblast cytoskeleton; (b), (c) two antibodies that recognize a 54-kdalton protein in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells; and (d) an antikeratin antibody made to stratum corneum that recognizes proteins of molecular weight 66 kdaltons and 57 kdaltons. The antivimentin antibody reacts with vimentin (58 kdaltons), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and keratins from stratum corneum, but does not recognize hepatoma intermediate filaments. In immunofluorescence assays, the antibody reacts with mesenchymal cells and cultured epithelial cells that express vimentin. This antibody decorates the media of blood vessels in tissue sections. One antihepatoma filament antibody reacts only with the 54 kdalton protein of these cells and, in immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase assays, only recognizes epithelial cells. It reacts with almost all nonsquamous epithelium. The other antihepatoma filament antibody is much less selective, reacting with vimentin, GFAP, and keratin from stratum corneum. This antibody decorates intermediate filaments of both mesenchymal and epithelial cells. The antikeratin antibody recognizes 66-kdalton and 57-kdalton proteins in extracts of stratum corneum and also identifies proteins of similar molecular weights in all cells tested. However, by immunofluorescence, this antibody decorates only the intermediate filaments of epidermoid carcinoma cells. When assayed on tissue sections, the antibody reacts with squamous epithelium and some, but not all

  15. Recombinant human antibody fragment against tetanus toxoid produced by phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantam, B.; Sridevi, N. V.; Shukra, A. M.; Sugumar, P.; Samuel, S.

    2014-01-01

    Phage display technology is a powerful in vitro method for the identification of specific monoclonal antibodies (antibody fragments) to an antigenic target and allows the rapid generation and selection of high affinity, fully human antibodies directed toward any disease target appropriate for antibody therapy. In the present study, we exploited the phage display technology for the selection of an antigen binding fragment (Fabs) toward tetanus toxoid using human naïve phage antibody library constructed from peripheral blood lymphocytes of naïve human donors. The phages displaying Fab were subjected to three rounds of bio-panning with tetanus toxoid as antigen on a solid phase. The high affinity antibody fragments were expressed in HB2151 strain of Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The binding activity and specificity of the antibody fragment was established by its reactivity toward tetanus toxoid and non-reactivity toward other related toxins as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot analysis. The selected Fab fragment forming the antigen-binding complexes with the toxoid in flocculation assay indicates that the Fab may have a potential neutralizing ability toward antigen. PMID:24678405

  16. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Neubauer, George H; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T; Barouch, Dan H

    2015-01-01

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Method for generation of peptide-specific IgY antibodies directed to Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen binding protein epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Maciej; Grzywa, Renata; Łupicka-Słowik, Agnieszka; Skoreński, Marcin; Bobrek, Kamila; Nowak, Daria; Boivin, Stephane; Brown, Eric L; Oleksyszyn, Józef; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    The IgY antibodies offer an attractive alternative to mammalian IgGs in research, diagnosis and medicine. The isolation of immunoglobulin Y from the egg yolks is efficient and economical, causing minimal suffering to animals. Here we present the methodology for the production of IgY antibodies specific to Staphylococcus aureus fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) and its peptidyl epitope (spanning residues 127-140). The Efb is an extracellular, adhesion protein which binds both human fibrinogen and complement C3 protein thus contributing to the high infectious potential of this pathogen. The selected epitope of Efb protein is responsible for the interaction with C3. The immunochemical characterization of both anti-Efb and epitope-specific IgY antibodies revealed their similar avidity, titer, and reactivity profile, although some differences in the hen's immune response to administered antigens is discussed.

  19. Label-free detection and characterization of the binding of hemagglutinin protein and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yiwen; Zhong, Junlan; Zhang, Cunlin; Zuo, Jian; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-03-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is the main surface glycoprotein of the influenza A virus. The H9N2 subtype influenza A virus is recognized as the most possible pandemic strain as it has crossed the species barrier, infecting swine and humans. We use terahertz spectroscopy to study the hydration shell formation around H9 subtype influenza A virus's HA protein (H9 HA) as well as the detection of antigen binding of H9 HA with the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody. We observe a remarkable concentration dependent nonlinear response of the H9 HA, which reveals the formation process of the hydration shell around H9 HA molecules. Furthermore, we show that terahertz dielectric properties of the H9 HA are strongly affected by the presence of the monoclonal antibody F10 and that the terahertz dielectric loss tangent can be used to detect the antibody binding at lower concentrations than the standard ELISA test.

  20. A two-in-one antibody engineered from a humanized interleukin 4 antibody through mutation in heavy chain complementarity-determining regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chingwei V; Koenig, Patrick; Fuh, Germaine

    2014-01-01

    A mono-specific antibody may recruit a second antigen binding specificity, thus converting to a dual-specific Two-in-One antibody through mutation at the light chain complementarity-determining regions (CDRs). It is, however, unknown whether mutation at the heavy chain CDRs may evolve such dual specificity. Herein, we examined the CDRs of a humanized interleukin 4 (IL4) antibody using alanine scanning and structural modeling, designed libraries of mutants in regions that tolerate mutation, and isolated dual specific antibodies harboring mutation at the heavy chain CDRs only. We then affinity improved an IL4/IL5 dual specific antibody to variants with dissociation constants in the low nanomolar range for both antigens. The results demonstrate the full capacity of antibodies to evolve dual binding specificity.

  1. Two Escape Mechanisms of Influenza A Virus to a Broadly Neutralizing Stalk-Binding Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ning; Swem, Lee R; Reichelt, Mike; Chen-Harris, Haiyin; Luis, Elizabeth; Park, Summer; Fouts, Ashley; Lupardus, Patrick; Wu, Thomas D; Li, Olga; McBride, Jacqueline; Lawrence, Michael; Xu, Min; Tan, Man-Wah

    2016-06-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting the stalk region of influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) are effective in blocking virus infection both in vitro and in vivo. The highly conserved epitopes recognized by these antibodies are critical for the membrane fusion function of HA and therefore less likely to be permissive for virus mutational escape. Here we report three resistant viruses of the A/Perth/16/2009 strain that were selected in the presence of a broadly neutralizing stalk-binding antibody. The three resistant viruses harbor three different mutations in the HA stalk: (1) Gln387Lys; (2) Asp391Tyr; (3) Asp391Gly. The Gln387Lys mutation completely abolishes binding of the antibody to the HA stalk epitope. The other two mutations, Asp391Tyr and Asp391Gly, do not affect antibody binding at neutral pH and only slightly reduce binding at low pH. Interestingly, they enhance the fusion ability of the HA, representing a novel mechanism that allows productive membrane fusion even in the presence of antibody and hence virus escape from antibody neutralization. Therefore, these mutations illustrate two different resistance mechanisms used by IAV to escape broadly neutralizing stalk-binding antibodies. Compared to the wild type virus, the resistant viruses release fewer progeny viral particles during replication and are more sensitive to Tamiflu, suggesting reduced viral fitness.

  2. Antibody binding to p-Si using LANL SAM chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Aaron S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06

    This NMSBA-sponsored project involves the attachment of antibodies to polymeric silicon (p-Si) surfaces, with the ultimate goal of attaching antibodies to nanowires for Vista Therapeutics, Inc. (Santa Fe, NM). This presentation describes the functionalization of p-Si surfaces. the activation of terminal carboxylates on these surfaces, the conjugation of antibodies, and the analyses undertaken at each step. The results of this work show that antibody conjugation is possible on p-Si coatings using the well-known EDC/NHS activation chemistry.

  3. Development and applications of AlphaScreen-based FcRn binding assay to characterize monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang; Lee, Ho Young; Wong, Pin Yee; Jiang, Guoying; Gazzano-Santoro, Hélène

    2015-05-01

    IgG antibodies are important pharmaceutical molecules that successfully treat a variety of human diseases. The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) interacts with IgG Fc in the CH2-CH3 domain and plays a key role in IgG antibody homeostasis and affects its pharmacokinetic properties. An in vitro FcRn binding assay could be a highly valuable complementary tool to assess IgG antibody pharmacokinetics in IgG engineering and screening during the early optimization stage. In addition, it could be useful in biological characterization studies for antibody minor variants, process optimization, and comparability study at later stages of antibody development. Here we developed a homogeneous AlphaScreen-based FcRn assay to assess the binding of FcRn to IgG antibody in vitro. The assay is found to be accurate, precise, specific, and simple: donor beads loaded with FcRn and acceptor beads loaded with IgG1 mAb1 are mixed together with sample IgG at various dilutions and incubated for 1h before acquiring data with a fluorescence reader. This assay can run up to four samples per plate in 2h, which is time and cost effective compared with other FcRn binding methods such as cell-based fluorescent-activated cell scan and surface plasma resonance. Our data demonstrated that this assay is suitable for assessing the FcRn binding in vitro and provides a platform approach that can be readily applied to various antibodies. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Human single chain antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor:gene cloning, high-level expression, affinity maturation and bioactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Using antibody phage display technique,a human single chain antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been cloned.The antibody expression reached 45% of the total bacterial proteins.The purification and refolding of the antibody were completed in one step by using gel filtration chromatograph.ELISA analysis showed that the antibody not only specifically bound to human VEGF,but also competitively inhibited VEGF reacting with its receptors.In order to raise the affinity of the single chain antibody,its heavy chain variable region was randomly mutated using error-prone PCR and an antibody mutant library was constructed,from which a mutant with higher affinity was screened out.The three-dimensional structure and binding affinity of wild type and mutant antibody were compared.Our study provided a potential reagent for tumor angiogenic therapy and a significant model for antibody high-level expression and affinity maturation.

  5. Human single chain antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor: gene cloning, high-level expression, affinity maturation and bioactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎锡蕴[1; 汤健[2; 吴小平[3; 王凤采[4; 李建生[5; 杨东玲[6

    2000-01-01

    Using antibody phage display technique, a human single chain antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been cloned. The antibody expression reached 45% of the total bacterial proteins. The purification and refolding of the antibody were completed in one step by using gel filtration chromatograph. ELISA analysis showed that the antibody not only specifically bound to human VEGF, but also competitively inhibited VEGF reacting with its receptors. In order to raise the affinity of the single chain antibody, its heavy chain variable region was randomly mutated using error-prone PCR and an antibody mutant library was constructed, from which a mutant with higher affinity was screened out. The three-dimensional structure and binding affinity of wild type and mutant antibody were compared. Our study provided a potential reagent for tumor angiogenic therapy and a significant model for antibody high-level expression and affinity maturation.

  6.  De novo isolation of antibodies with pH-dependent binding properties

    OpenAIRE

    Bonvin, Pauline; Venet, Sophie; Fontaine, Gaëlle; Ravn, Ulla; Gueneau, Franck; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Proudfoot, Amanda; Fischer, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    pH-dependent antibodies are engineered to release their target at a slightly acidic pH, a property making them suitable for clinical as well as biotechnological applications. Such antibodies were previously obtained by histidine scanning of pre-existing antibodies, a labor-intensive strategy resulting in antibodies that displayed residual binding to their target at pH 6.0. We report here the de novo isolation of pH-dependent antibodies selected by phage display from libraries enriched in hist...

  7. Human Monoclonal Antibodies as a Countermeasure Against Botulinum Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    REPORT Human monoclonal antibodies as a countermeasure against Botulinum toxins 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: In this report, we...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 31-Aug-2012 Human monoclonal antibodies as a countermeasure against Botulinum toxins Report Title ABSTRACT In this report...DTRA Final Report: Human monoclonal antibodies as a countermeasure against Botulinum toxins   Page 1 of 22 DTRA Final Report: Human monoclonal

  8. New Insights into the Functional Behavior of Antibodies as Revealed by Binding Studies on an Anti-Uranium Monoclonal Antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Diane A.; Xia Li; Haini Yu; Blake, Robert C.

    2004-03-17

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop immunoassays for chelated uranium(VI) on a hand-held flow fluorimeter, an anti-uranium monoclonal antibody designated as 8A11 was fluorescently labeled using two different strategies. When 8A11 was coupled via reactive lysines to either ALEXATM 488 or Cy5TM, the resulting fluorescent antibody conjugate exhibited positive cooperativity in the presence of its antigen, U(VI) chelated with 2,9-dicarboxy-1,10-phenanthroline (U(VI)-DCP). That is, when one of the two binding sites on the covalently modified 8A11 was occupied with bound antigen, the affinity of the remaining site on the antibody for U(VI)-DCP appeared to increase. Unmodified 8A11 bound U(VI)-DCP with the expected hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of antigen, consistent with independent and equal binding of ligand at both sites. Proteolytic cleavage of the fluorescently conjugated 8A11 to produce the fluorescent monovalent Fab fragment yielded an active preparation that now bound U(VI)-DCP with no evidence of positive cooperativity. Although, in principle, any divalent antibody has the potential to exhibit positive cooperativity in its binding interactions with its antigen, very little literature precedent for this type of behavior exists. Native 8A11 was also noncovalently labeled with highly fluorescent ZENONTM reagents. These reagents are fluorescently-labeled Fab fragments of goat anti-mouse antibodies that bind to the Fc portion of 8A11. These high-affinity, monovalent fluorescent reagents permitted the intact 8A11 mouse antibody to be labeled in situ with no covalent modifications. Incubation of the 8A11 with ZENON 647 produced a fluorescent protein complex that showed an 8-fold higher affinity for U(VI)-DCP than did the free 8A11 alone. Again, very few literature precedents exist for this phenomenon, where agents that bind to the Fc portion of an intact antibody change the affinity of the antibody for the antigen at the structurally distant Fab portion

  9. Development of Phage-Based Antibody Fragment Reagents for Affinity Enrichment of Bacterial Immunoglobulin G Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säll, Anna; Sjöholm, Kristoffer; Waldemarson, Sofia; Happonen, Lotta; Karlsson, Christofer; Persson, Helena; Malmström, Johan

    2015-11-06

    Disease and death caused by bacterial infections are global health problems. Effective bacterial strategies are required to promote survival and proliferation within a human host, and it is important to explore how this adaption occurs. However, the detection and quantification of bacterial virulence factors in complex biological samples are technically demanding challenges. These can be addressed by combining targeted affinity enrichment of antibodies with the sensitivity of liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-SRM MS). However, many virulence factors have evolved properties that make specific detection by conventional antibodies difficult. We here present an antibody format that is particularly well suited for detection and analysis of immunoglobulin G (IgG)-binding virulence factors. As proof of concept, we have generated single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies that specifically target the IgG-binding surface proteins M1 and H of Streptococcus pyogenes. The binding ability of the developed scFv is demonstrated against both recombinant soluble protein M1 and H as well as the intact surface proteins on a wild-type S. pyogenes strain. Additionally, the capacity of the developed scFv antibodies to enrich their target proteins from both simple and complex backgrounds, thereby allowing for detection and quantification with LC-SRM MS, was demonstrated. We have established a workflow that allows for affinity enrichment of bacterial virulence factors.

  10. The characteristics of human antibody targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in vivo for radioimmunotherapy in a small animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jung; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byoung Soo; Cheon, Gi Jeong [Korea Institue of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Kwang Won; Chang, Ki Hwan; Shin, Yong Won; Ryoo, Kyung Hwan; Shin, Yong Nam; Kim, Se Ho [Green Cross Corp., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as an oncogene has led to the development of anticancer therapeutics directed against EGFR, including Erbitux for colon cancer. Many therapeutic approaches are aimed at the EGFR. Erbitux is example of monoclonal antibody inhibitors. The monoclonal antibodies block the extracellular ligand binding domain. EGFR4-2, IgG human monoclonal antibody, has been developed on the basis of human antibody gene library in Green Cross Corp. Small animal imaging is useful for preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled antibody to see biodistribution and targeting ability at serial time points in same animals

  11. Anti Zn antibodies: cross reactivity and competitive binding with heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarada, N C; Thamaraiselvi, K; Vijayalakshmi, M A

    2008-01-15

    Monoclonal antibodies of IgM class, specific to IDA-Zn were used for evaluating their Zn(2+) binding efficiency in the presence of trace metal ions such as Cr(3+) Cr(6+), Cu(2+) and Cd(2+). In the present work, antibody raised against the hapten IDA-Zn(II) was pre-incubated with different metal ions and the binding capacity to the specific hapten was tested using ELISA and immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) techniques. IMAC was carried out with the free antibody and antibody pre-incubated with selected heavy metal ions using Sepharose IDA-Zn(2+) column and the same samples were tested using a hapten specific ELISA with non-protein hapten carrier. Different effects were observed after pre-incubation with metal ions. Cr(3+) exhibited synergistic binding where as antagonism was detected with Cd(2+). The synergistic effect observed with Cr(3+) suggests involvement of binding sites other than that of zinc and conformational changes that result from Cr(3+) binding. It is probable that, this binding event also increases the accessibility of the zinc binding sites on IgM. On the same lines, the antagonism observed with Cd(2+) could be attributed to structural changes resulting in reduced accessibility to zinc binding sites. In case of Cr(6+), no appreciable change in binding to IDA-Zn was observed while Cu(2+) showed competitive binding.

  12. VH-VL orientation prediction for antibody humanization candidate selection: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujotzek, Alexander; Lipsmeier, Florian; Harris, Seth F; Benz, Jörg; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Georges, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Antibody humanization describes the procedure of grafting a non-human antibody's complementarity-determining regions, i.e., the variable loop regions that mediate specific interactions with the antigen, onto a β-sheet framework that is representative of the human variable region germline repertoire, thus reducing the number of potentially antigenic epitopes that might trigger an anti-antibody response. The selection criterion for the so-called acceptor frameworks (one for the heavy and one for the light chain variable region) is traditionally based on sequence similarity. Here, we propose a novel approach that selects acceptor frameworks such that the relative orientation of the 2 variable domains in 3D space, and thereby the geometry of the antigen-binding site, is conserved throughout the process of humanization. The methodology relies on a machine learning-based predictor of antibody variable domain orientation that has recently been shown to improve the quality of antibody homology models. Using data from 3 humanization campaigns, we demonstrate that preselecting humanization variants based on the predicted difference in variable domain orientation with regard to the original antibody leads to subsets of variants with a significant improvement in binding affinity.

  13. Inhibition of tumorigenesis driven by different Wnt proteins requires blockade of distinct ligand-binding regions by LRP6 antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenberg, Seth A.; Charlat, Olga; Daley, Michael P.; Liu, Shanming; Vincent, Karen J.; Stuart, Darrin D.; Schuller, Alwin G.; Yuan, Jing; Ospina, Beatriz; Green, John; Yu, Qunyan; Walsh, Renee; Schmitz, Rita; Heine, Holger; Bilic, Sanela; Ostrom, Lance; Mosher, Rebecca; Hartlepp, K. Felix; Zhu, Zhenping; Fawell, Stephen; Yao, Yung-Mae; Stover, David; Finan, Peter M.; Porter, Jeffery A.; Sellers, William R.; Klagge, Ingo M.; Cong, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Disregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been linked to various human diseases, including cancers. Inhibitors of oncogenic Wnt signaling are likely to have a therapeutic effect in cancers. LRP5 and LRP6 are closely related membrane coreceptors for Wnt proteins. Using a phage-display library, we identified anti-LRP6 antibodies that either inhibit or enhance Wnt signaling. Two classes of LRP6 antagonistic antibodies were discovered: one class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt1, whereas the second class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt3a. Epitope-mapping experiments indicated that Wnt1 class-specific antibodies bind to the first propeller and Wnt3a class-specific antibodies bind to the third propeller of LRP6, suggesting that Wnt1- and Wnt3a-class proteins interact with distinct LRP6 propeller domains. This conclusion is further supported by the structural functional analysis of LRP5/6 and the finding that the Wnt antagonist Sclerostin interacts with the first propeller of LRP5/6 and preferentially inhibits the Wnt1-class proteins. We also show that Wnt1 or Wnt3a class-specific anti-LRP6 antibodies specifically block growth of MMTV-Wnt1 or MMTV-Wnt3 xenografts in vivo. Therapeutic application of these antibodies could be limited without knowing the type of Wnt proteins expressed in cancers. This is further complicated by our finding that bivalent LRP6 antibodies sensitize cells to the nonblocked class of Wnt proteins. The generation of a biparatopic LRP6 antibody blocks both Wnt1- and Wnt3a-mediated signaling without showing agonistic activity. Our studies provide insights into Wnt-induced LRP5/6 activation and show the potential utility of LRP6 antibodies in Wnt-driven cancer. PMID:20713706

  14. Species-specific and cross-reactive IgG1 antibody binding to viral capsid protein 1 (VP1 antigens of human rhinovirus species A, B and C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jua Iwasaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human rhinoviruses (HRV are associated with upper and lower respiratory illnesses, including severe infections causing hospitalization in both children and adults. Although the clinical significance of HRV infections is now well established, no detailed investigation of the immune response against HRV has been performed. The purpose of this study was to assess the IgG1 antibody response to the three known HRV species, HRV-A, -B and -C in healthy subjects. METHODS: Recombinant polypeptides of viral capsid protein 1 (VP1 from two genotypes of HRV-A, -B and -C were expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST fusion proteins and purified by affinity and then size exclusion chromatography. The presence of secondary structures similar to the natural antigens was verified by circular dichroism analysis. Total and species-specific IgG1 measurements were quantitated by immunoassays and immunoabsorption using sera from 63 healthy adults. RESULTS: Most adult sera reacted with the HRV VP1 antigens, at high titres. As expected, strong cross-reactivity between HRV genotypes of the same species was found. A high degree of cross-reactivity between different HRV species was also evident, particularly between HRV-A and HRV-C. Immunoabsorption studies revealed HRV-C specific titres were markedly and significantly lower than the HRV-A and HRV-B specific titres (P<0.0001. A truncated construct of HRV-C VP1 showed greater specificity in detecting anti-HRV-C antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: High titres of IgG1 antibody were bound by the VP1 capsid proteins of HRV-A, -B and -C, but for the majority of people, a large proportion of the antibody to HRV-C was cross-reactive, especially to HRV-A. The improved specificity found for the truncated HRV-C VP1 indicates species-specific and cross-reactive regions could be defined.

  15. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Julie M; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Fong, Rachel H; Kahle, Kristen M; Smit, Jolanda M; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J; Crowe, James E; Fremont, Daved H; Rossmann, Michael G; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-11-19

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphaviruses. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis, loss-of-function recombinant proteins and viruses, and multiple functional assays, we determined that broadly neutralizing MAbs block multiple steps in the viral lifecycle, including entry and egress, and bind to a conserved epitope on the B domain of the E2 glycoprotein. A 16 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of a Fab fragment bound to CHIKV E2 B domain provided an explanation for its neutralizing activity. Binding to the B domain was associated with repositioning of the A domain of E2 that enabled cross-linking of neighboring spikes. Our results suggest that B domain antigenic determinants could be targeted for vaccine or antibody therapeutic development against multiple alphaviruses of global concern.

  16. Production of monoclonal antibodies to human glomerular basement membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mino,Yasuaki

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the technique of somatic cell fusion, we produced monoclonal antibodies to collagenase-digested human glomerular basement membrane (GBM. Fourteen monoclonal antibodies which reacted with normal human kidney in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF studies were produced. An analysis of the binding patterns indicated that the antigens recognized could be divided into six broad groups. Monoclonal antibody B3-H10 (Group 1 reacted with only GBM in a fine granular pattern. A5-B12 and B5-C2 (Group 2 reacted with GBM and peritubular capillary in a linear pattern. B2-A12 (Group 3 reacted with only epithelial cells. Al-C9 and A4-E2 (Group 4 showed a mesangial pattern in glomerulus and a lineal pattern in tubular basement membrane (TBM, Bowman's capsule and peritubular capillary. A1-E1, A1-E11, A2-E6, A3-B6, A4-F8 and B5-H2 (Group 5 recognized determinants common to GBM, TBM, Bowman's capsule and/or peritubular capillary. A3-F1 and B5-E10 (Group 6 reacted with TBM and Bowman's capsule. The staining pattern of B3-H10 (Group 1 was characteristic because it was not linear, but finely granular along the GBM. The staining pattern of B2-A12 (Group 3 was also characteristic because only epithelial cells were stained, and processes of epithelial cells were observed as fine fibrils. To the best of our knowledge, these two types of monoclonal antibodies have not been reported previously.

  17. λ Light Chain Bias Associated With Enhanced Binding and Function of Anti-HIV Env Glycoprotein Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Mohammad M; Farshidpour, Maham; Brown, Eric P; Ouyang, Xin; Seaman, Michael S; Pazgier, Marzena; Ackerman, Margaret E; Robinson, Harriet; Tomaras, Georgia; Parsons, Matthew S; Charurat, Manhattan; DeVico, Anthony L; Redfield, Robert R; Lewis, George K

    2016-01-01

    The humoral response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains incompletely understood. In this report, we describe biased λ light chain use during the HIV Env glycoprotein (Env) response in HIV infection and vaccination. We examined HIV Env binding (and neutralization) in the context of light chain use in subjects with acute HIV infection, chronic HIV infection, and among HIV vaccinees. In all populations tested, there was a λ chain bias for HIV Env binding antibodies, compared with other HIV antigens (such as p24) or tetanus toxoid. In subjects with chronic HIV infection, a λ bias was noted for neutralization, with λ antibodies accounting for up to 90% of all neutralization activity observed. This is the first report of antibody function in a human infection being tied to light chain use. In HIV infection, antibodies expressing λ light chains tended to have longer CDRL3s, increased light chain contact with HIV Env, and less hypermutation in the heavy chain, compared with antibodies using the κ light chain. These data also support an evolutionary model for the understanding the various κ to λ light chain ratios observed across species and suggest that the λ light chain bias against HIV provides the host an advantage in developing a more efficient humoral response. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Radiometric immunosorbent assay for the detection of anti-hormone-binding protein antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, E.A.; Dame, M.C.; DeLuca, H.F.

    1986-02-15

    A radiometric immunosorbent assay (RISA) for the detection of monoclonal antibodies to hormone-binding proteins has been developed. The assay involves incubating hybridoma supernatants in microtiter wells that have been coated with goat anti-mouse IgG antibodies. Any mouse IgG in the test supernatant is thus specifically retained in the wells. Radioactive ligand-binding protein complexes are then incubated in the wells. The presence of anti-binding protein antibodies in the supernatant is indicated by specific retention of radioactive ligand-binding protein complexes in the wells. Crude antigen preparations, such as tissue homogenates, can be used to detect antibodies. The assay is capable of detecting antibody at concentrations 20 ng/ml (approx. 100 pM IgG). The RISA has been used successfully to screen for monoclonal antibodies to the intracellular receptor for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ and should be useful for the detection of antibodies to ligand-binding proteins in general.

  19. A minimal model of peptide binding predicts ensemble properties of serum antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiff Victor

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The importance of peptide microarrays as a tool for serological diagnostics has strongly increased over the last decade. However, interpretation of the binding signals is still hampered by our limited understanding of the technology. This is in particular true for arrays probed with antibody mixtures of unknown complexity, such as sera. To gain insight into how signals depend on peptide amino acid sequences, we probed random-sequence peptide microarrays with sera of healthy and infected mice. We analyzed the resulting antibody binding profiles with regression methods and formulated a minimal model to explain our findings. Results Multivariate regression analysis relating peptide sequence to measured signals led to the definition of amino acid-associated weights. Although these weights do not contain information on amino acid position, they predict up to 40-50% of the binding profiles' variation. Mathematical modeling shows that this position-independent ansatz is only adequate for highly diverse random antibody mixtures which are not dominated by a few antibodies. Experimental results suggest that sera from healthy individuals correspond to that case, in contrast to sera of infected ones. Conclusions Our results indicate that position-independent amino acid-associated weights predict linear epitope binding of antibody mixtures only if the mixture is random, highly diverse, and contains no dominant antibodies. The discovered ensemble property is an important step towards an understanding of peptide-array serum-antibody binding profiles. It has implications for both serological diagnostics and B cell epitope mapping.

  20. Binding of antibodies to acetylcholine receptors in Electrophorus and Torpedo electroplax membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Antisera against purified acetylcholine receptors from the electric tissues of Torpedo californica and of Electrophorus electricus were raised in rabbits. The antisera contain antibodies which bind to both autologous and heterologous receptors in solution as shown by an immunoprecipitation assay. Antibodies in both types of antisera bind specifically to the postjunctional membrane on the innervated surface of the intact electroplax from Electrophorus electric tissue as demonstrated by an indirect immunohistochemical procedure using horseradish peroxidase conjugated to anti-rabbit IgG. Only anti- Electrophorus receptor antisera, however, cause inhibition of the receptor-mediated depolarization of the intact Electrophorus electroplax. The lack of inhibition by anti-Torpedo receptor antibodies, which do bind, suggests that the receptor does not undergo extensive movement during activity. The binding of anti-Torpedo antibodies to receptor-rich vesicles prepared by subcellular fractionation of Torpedo electric tissue was demonstrated by both direct and indirect immunohistochemical methods using ferritin conjugates. These vesicles can be conveniently collected and prepared for electron microscopy on Millipore filters, a procedure requiring only 25 micrograms of membrane protein per filter. In addition, it was possible to visualize the binding of anti-Torpedo receptor antibodies directly, without ferritin. These anti-Torpedo receptor antibodies, however, do not inhibit the binding of acetylcholine or of alpha- neurotoxin to receptor in Torpedo microsacs but do inhibit binding of alpha-neurotoxin to Torpedo receptor in Triton X-100 solution. It is likely that the principal antigenic determinants on receptor are at sites other than the acetylcholine-binding sites and that inhibition of receptor function, when it occurs, may be due to a stabilization by antibody binding of an inactive conformational state. PMID:344325

  1. Design of meningococcal factor H binding protein mutant vaccines that do not bind human complement factor H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-08-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a human species-specific ligand for the complement regulator, factor H (fH). In recent studies, fHbp vaccines in which arginine at position 41 was replaced by serine (R41S) had impaired fH binding. The mutant vaccines elicited bactericidal responses in human fH transgenic mice superior to those elicited by control fHbp vaccines that bound human fH. Based on sequence similarity, fHbp has been classified into three variant groups. Here we report that although R41 is present in fHbp from variant groups 1 and 2, the R41S substitution eliminated fH binding only in variant group 1 proteins. To identify mutants in variant group 2 with impaired fH binding, we generated fHbp structural models and predicted 63 residues influencing fH binding. From these, we created 11 mutants with one or two amino acid substitutions in a variant group 2 protein and identified six that decreased fH binding. Three of these six mutants retained conformational epitopes recognized by all six anti-fHbp monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) tested and elicited serum complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titers in wild-type mice that were not significantly different from those obtained with the control vaccine. Thus, fHbp amino acid residues that affect human fH binding differ across variant groups. This result suggests that fHbp sequence variation induced by immune selection also affects fH binding motifs via coevolution. The three new fHbp mutants from variant group 2, which do not bind human fH, retained important epitopes for eliciting bactericidal antibodies and may be promising vaccine candidates.

  2. Development of porcine ficolin-alpha monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies for determining the binding capacity of multiple GlcNAc-binding proteins to bacterial danger components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahid, M Abu; Ross, Steven J; Umiker, Benjamin R; Li, Huapeng; Sugii, Sunji; Bari, Latiful

    2016-02-01

    Ficolins are a group of oligomeric defense proteins assembled from collagen-like stalks and fibrinogen-like domains that have common biochemical specificity for N-acetyl-d-glucose amine (GlcNAc) and can function as opsonins. In this report, GlcNAc-binding protein (GBP) purified from porcine nonimmune serum was biochemically characterized as ficolin-α. Ficolin-α was used as an immunogen to generate both rabbit polyclonal and murine monoclonal anti-ficolin-α antibodies, which are not yet commercially available. GBPs have been shown to be present in many animals, including humans; however, their functions are largely unknown. GBPs from chicken, dog, horse, bovine, and human sera were isolated using various chromatography methods. Interestingly, anti-ficolin-α antibody showed cross-reaction with those animal sera GBPs. Furthermore, anti-ficolin-α antibody was reactive with the GlcNAc eluate of Escherichia coli O26-bound and Salmonella-bound porcine serum proteins. Functionally, GBPs and bacteria-reactive pig serum proteins were able to bind with pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as lipopolysaccharides and lipoteichoic acids. Our studies demonstrate that ficolin-α specific antibody was reactive with GBPs from many species as well as bacteria-reactive serum proteins. These proteins may play important roles in innate immunity by sensing danger components that can lead to antibacterial activity.

  3. Differences in Glycoprotein Complex Receptor Binding Site Accessibility Prompt Poor Cross-Reactivity of Neutralizing Antibodies between Closely Related Arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Rachel B; Phillips, Elisabeth K; Ayithan, Natarajan; Maury, Wendy

    2017-04-01

    The glycoprotein complex (GPC) of arenaviruses, composed of stable signal peptide, GP1, and GP2, is the only antigen correlated with antibody-mediated neutralization. However, despite strong cross-reactivity of convalescent antisera between related arenavirus species, weak or no cross-neutralization occurs. Two closely related clade B viruses, Machupo virus (MACV) and Junín virus (JUNV), have nearly identical overall GPC architecture and share a host receptor, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1). Given structural and functional similarities of the GP1 receptor binding site (RBS) of these viruses and the recent demonstration that the RBS is an important target for neutralizing antibodies, it is not clear how these viruses avoid cross-neutralization. To address this, MACV/JUNV chimeric GPCs were assessed for interaction with a group of α-JUNV GPC monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and mouse antisera against JUNV or MACV GPC. All six MAbs targeted GP1, with those that neutralized JUNV GPC-pseudovirions competing with each other for RBS binding. However, these MAbs were unable to bind to a chimeric GPC composed of JUNV GP1 containing a small disulfide bonded loop (loop 10) unique to MACV GPC, suggesting that this loop may block MAbs interaction with the GP1 RBS. Consistent with this loop causing interference, mouse anti-JUNV GPC antisera that solely neutralized pseudovirions bearing autologous GP1 provided enhanced neutralization of MACV GPC when this loop was removed. Our studies provide evidence that loop 10, which is unique to MACV GP1, is an important impediment to binding of neutralizing antibodies and contributes to the poor cross-neutralization of α-JUNV antisera against MACV.IMPORTANCE Multiple New World arenaviruses can cause severe disease in humans, and some geographic overlap exists among these viruses. A vaccine that protects against a broad range of New World arenaviruses is desirable for purposes of simplicity, cost, and broad protection against multiple National

  4. Human Cell Line-Derived Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Felix; Danielczyk, Antje; Goletz, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    IgA antibodies have great potential to improve the functional diversity of current IgG antibody-based cancer immunotherapy options. However, IgA production and purification is not well established, which can at least in part be attributed to the more complex glycosylation as compared to IgG antibodies. IgA antibodies possess up to five N-glycosylation sites within their constant region of the heavy chain as compared to one site for IgG antibodies. The human GlycoExpress expression system was developed to produce biotherapeutics with optimized glycosylation and used here to generate a panel of IgA isotype antibodies directed against targets for solid (TA-mucin 1, Her2, EGFR, Thomsen–Friedenreich) and hematological (CD20) cancer indications. The feasibility of good manufacturing practice was shown by the production of 11 g IgA within 35 days in a one liter perfusion bioreactor, and IgA antibodies in high purity were obtained after purification. The monoclonal IgA antibodies possessed a high sialylation degree, and no non-human glycan structures were detected. Kinetic analysis revealed increased avidity antigen binding for IgA dimers as compared to monomeric antibodies. The IgA antibodies exhibited potent Fab- and Fc-mediated functionalities against cancer cell lines, whereby especially granulocytes are recruited. Therefore, for patients who do not sufficiently benefit from therapeutic IgG antibodies, IgA antibodies may complement current regiment options and represent a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. In conclusion, a panel of novel biofunctional IgA antibodies with human glycosylation was successfully generated.

  5. Human Cell Line-Derived Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Hart

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IgA antibodies have great potential to improve the functional diversity of current IgG antibody-based cancer immunotherapy options. However, IgA production and purification is not well established, which can at least in part be attributed to the more complex glycosylation as compared to IgG antibodies. IgA antibodies possess up to five N-glycosylation sites within their constant region of the heavy chain as compared to one site for IgG antibodies. The human GlycoExpress expression system was developed to produce biotherapeutics with optimized glycosylation and used here to generate a panel of IgA isotype antibodies directed against targets for solid (TA-mucin 1, Her2, EGFR, Thomsen–Friedenreich and hematological (CD20 cancer indications. The feasibility of good manufacturing practice was shown by the production of 11 g IgA within 35 days in a one liter perfusion bioreactor, and IgA antibodies in high purity were obtained after purification. The monoclonal IgA antibodies possessed a high sialylation degree, and no non-human glycan structures were detected. Kinetic analysis revealed increased avidity antigen binding for IgA dimers as compared to monomeric antibodies. The IgA antibodies exhibited potent Fab- and Fc-mediated functionalities against cancer cell lines, whereby especially granulocytes are recruited. Therefore, for patients who do not sufficiently benefit from therapeutic IgG antibodies, IgA antibodies may complement current regiment options and represent a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. In conclusion, a panel of novel biofunctional IgA antibodies with human glycosylation was successfully generated.

  6. Binding induced conformational changes of proteins correlate with their intrinsic fluctuations: a case study of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keskin Ozlem

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How antibodies recognize and bind to antigens can not be totally explained by rigid shape and electrostatic complimentarity models. Alternatively, pre-existing equilibrium hypothesis states that the native state of an antibody is not defined by a single rigid conformation but instead with an ensemble of similar conformations that co-exist at equilibrium. Antigens bind to one of the preferred conformations making this conformation more abundant shifting the equilibrium. Results Here, two antibodies, a germline antibody of 36–65 Fab and a monoclonal antibody, SPE7 are studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of antibody-antigen recognition and to understand how a single antibody recognizes different antigens. An elastic network model, Anisotropic Network Model (ANM is used in the calculations. Pre-existing equilibrium is not restricted to apply to antibodies. Intrinsic fluctuations of eight proteins, from different classes of proteins, such as enzymes, binding and transport proteins are investigated to test the suitability of the method. The intrinsic fluctuations are compared with the experimentally observed ligand induced conformational changes of these proteins. The results show that the intrinsic fluctuations obtained by theoretical methods correlate with structural changes observed when a ligand is bound to the protein. The decomposition of the total fluctuations serves to identify the different individual modes of motion, ranging from the most cooperative ones involving the overall structure, to the most localized ones. Conclusion Results suggest that the pre-equilibrium concept holds for antibodies and the promiscuity of antibodies can also be explained this hypothesis: a limited number of conformational states driven by intrinsic motions of an antibody might be adequate to bind to different antigens.

  7. Generation and characterization of human B lymphocyte stimulator blocking monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Weiliang; Zhang, Jianjun; Pei, Lili; Fang, Shuping; Liu, Honghao; Wang, Ruixue; Su, Yunpeng

    2016-09-01

    The cytokine, B lymphocyte stimulator (Blys) is essential for activation and proliferation of B cells and is involved in the pathogenesis of B-cell mediated autoimmune diseases. Based on its essential activity, Blys may be a potential therapeutic target for human autoimmune diseases. In this article, we have described the development of a novel humanized anti-Blys antibody, NMB04, that binds with high affinity and specificity to both soluble and membrane bound Blys. This monoclonal antibody has the potential to block Blys binding to all its three receptors, TACI, BCMA and BR-3. Further in vivo studies revealed that NMB04 possessed more potent inhibitory activity against human Blys as compared to an existing antibody, Belimumab. Therefore, NMB04 may have potential as a therapeutic candidate targeting autoimmune diseases.

  8. Effect of the Protein Corona on Antibody-Antigen Binding in Nanoparticle Sandwich Immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Puig, Helena; Bosch, Irene; Carré-Camps, Marc; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2017-01-18

    We investigated the effect of the protein corona on the function of nanoparticle (NP) antibody (Ab) conjugates in dipstick sandwich immunoassays. Ab specific for Zika virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) were conjugated to gold NPs, and another anti-NS1 Ab was immobilized onto the nitrocellulose membrane. Sandwich immunoassay formation was influenced by whether the strip was run in corona forming conditions, i.e., in human serum. Strips run in buffer or pure solutions of bovine serum albumin exhibited false positives, but those run in human serum did not. Serum pretreatment of the nitrocellulose also eliminated false positives. Corona formation around the NP-Ab in serum was faster than the immunoassay time scale. Langmuir binding analysis determined how the immobilized Ab affinity for the NP-Ab/NS1 was impacted by corona formation conditions, quantified as an effective dissociation constant, KD(eff). Results show that corona formation mediates the specificity and sensitivity of the antibody-antigen interaction of Zika biomarkers in immunoassays, and plays a critical but beneficial role.

  9. Molecular characterization of the variable heavy and light chain regions of five HIV-1 specific human monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M.M. van der Donk; M. Schutten (Martin); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.W.J. van der Heijden (Roger)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractWe have reported the generation and characterization of four HIV-1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies. Three antibodies recognize a conformational epitope within the CD4-binding site of HIV-1 gp120 and one recognizes a linear epitope located within the hypervariable V3 domain of gp

  10. Construction of human antibody gene libraries and selection of antibodies by phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Kügler, Jonas; Wilke, Sonja; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Antibody phage display is the most commonly used in vitro selection technology and has yielded thousands of useful antibodies for research, diagnostics, and therapy.The prerequisite for successful generation and development of human recombinant antibodies using phage display is the construction of a high-quality antibody gene library. Here, we describe the methods for the construction of human immune and naive scFv gene libraries.The success also depends on the panning strategy for the selection of binders from these libraries. In this article, we describe a panning strategy that is high-throughput compatible and allows parallel selection in microtiter plates.

  11. HIV-1 binding and neutralizing antibodies of injecting drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouverney E.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated a stronger seroreactivity against some synthetic peptides responsible for inducing neutralizing antibodies in injecting drug users (IDU compared to that of individuals sexually infected with HIV-1 (S, but the effectiveness in terms of the neutralizing ability of these antibodies has not been evaluated. Our objective was to study the humoral immune response of IDU by determining the specificity of their antibodies and the presence of neutralizing antibodies. The neutralization capacity against the HIV-1 isolate MN (genotype B, the primary HIV-1 isolate 95BRRJ021 (genotype F, and the seroreactivity with peptides known to induce neutralizing antibodies, from the V2 and V3 loops of different HIV-1 subtypes, were analyzed. Seroreactivity indicates that IDU plasma are more likely to recognize a broader range of peptides than S plasma, with significantly higher titers, especially of V3 peptides. Similar neutralization frequencies of the MN isolate were observed in plasma of the IDU (16/47 and S (20/60 groups in the 1:10 dilution. The neutralization of the 95BRRJ021 isolate was more frequently observed for plasma from the S group (15/23 than from the IDU group (15/47, P = 0.0108. No correlation between neutralization and seroreactivity with the peptides tested was observed. These results suggest that an important factor responsible for the extensive and broad humoral immune response observed in IDU is their infection route. There was very little difference in neutralizing antibody response between the IDU and S groups despite their differences in seroreactivity and health status.

  12. Identification of actin binding protein, ABP-280, as a binding partner of human Lnk adaptor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X; Li, Y; Schembri-King, J; Jakes, S; Hayashi, J

    2000-08-01

    Human Lnk (hLnk) is an adaptor protein with multiple functional domains that regulates T cell activation signaling. In order to identify cellular Lnk binding partners, a yeast two-hybrid screening of human spleen cDNA library was carried out using human hLnk as bait. A polypeptide sequence identical to the C-terminal segment of the actin binding protein (ABP-280) was identified as a hLnk binding protein. The expressed hLnk and the FLAG tagged C-terminal 673 amino acid residues of ABP-280 or the endogenous ABP-280 in COS-7 cells could be co-immunoprecipitated using antibodies either to hLnk, FLAG or ABP-280, respectively. Furthermore, immunofluorescence confocal microscope showed that hLnk and ABP-280 co-localized at the plasma membrane and at juxtanuclear region of COS-7 cells. In Jurkat cells, the endogenous hLnk also associates with the endogenous ABP-280 indicating that the association of these two proteins is physiological. The interacting domains of both proteins were mapped using yeast two-hybrid assays. Our results indicate that hLnk binds to the residues 2006-2454 (repeats 19-23C) of ABP-280. The domain in hLnk that associates with ABP-280 was mapped to an interdomain region of 56 amino acids between pleckstrin homology and Src homology 2 domains. These results suggest that hLnk may exert its regulatory role through its association with ABP-280.

  13. Diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis and visceral leishmaniasis based on the detection of anti-parasite-enzyme antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowy, N K; Schell, D; Schäfer, C; Overath, P

    1991-08-01

    A sensitive diagnostic assay for parasitic infections based on the detection of anti-enzyme antibodies is presented. All serum antibodies produced in response to parasite antigens are immobilized via their Fc domain on matrix-bound protein G. Incubation of the immobilized antibodies with saturating amounts of parasite extract results in the binding of all recognized antigens, including those directed against a specific and readily measurable enzyme. The amount of bound enzyme is proportional to the anti-enzyme antibody concentration in the serum. The application of this principle is demonstrated for the diagnosis of both human African trypanosomiasis and visceral leishmaniasis by the detection of antibodies against parasite acid phosphatases.

  14. Antibody response to recombinant human coagulation factor VIII in a new rat model of severe hemophilia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfgren, Karin Maria; Sondergaard, H.; Skov, Søren

    2016-01-01

    studies,antibodies developed after 4–6 administrations ofrhFVIII, and neutralizing antibodies reached levels simi-lar to human patients (range 1–111 BU, median 6.0 BU)at the end of the study. There was no significant differ-ence between the two studies or between genotypes intime to response or levels...... reached for binding and neu-tralizing antibodies. Interestingly, early spontaneousbleeds were associated with a faster antibody response. Conclusions: Following intravenous administration ofhuman FVIII, according to a clinical prophylaxis regi-men, a robust and reproducible antibody response is seenin...

  15. Characterization of Binding Epitopes of CA125 Monoclonal Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos-Silva, Lara; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Halim, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    The most used cancer serum biomarker is the CA125 immunoassay for ovarian cancer that detects the mucin glycoprotein MUC16. Several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) including OC125 and M11 are used in CA125 assays. However, despite considerable efforts, our knowledge of the molecular characteristics...

  16. Differences in the interaction of acetylcholine receptor antibodies with receptor from normal, denervated and myasthenic human muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Lefvert, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of acetylcholine receptor antibodies with different kinds of human skeletal muscle receptor was investigated. The reaction of most receptor antibodies was strongest with receptor from a patient with myasthenia gravis and with receptor from denervated muscle. Results obtained with these receptors were well correlated. The binding of most receptor antibodies to receptor from functionally normal muscle was much weaker and also qualitatively different. In a few patients with moder...

  17. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X. M.; Ruker, F.; Casale, E.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 degrees. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  18. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  19. A monoclonal antibody against human MUDENG protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagley, Yadav; Choi, Jun-Ha; Wickramanayake, Dimuthu Dhammika; Choi, Geun-Yeol; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Oh, Jae-Wook

    2013-08-01

    MUDENG (mu-2-related death-inducing gene, MuD) encodes a predicted ∼54-kDa protein in humans, considered to be involved in trafficking proteins from endosomes toward other membranous compartments as well as in inducing cell death. Here we report on the generation of a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the middle domain of human (h) MuD. This IgG sub 1 MAb, named M3H9, recognizes residues 244-326 in the middle domain of the MuD protein. Thus, the MuD proteins expressed in an astroglioma cell line and primary astrocytes can be detected by the M3H9 MAb. We showed that M3H9 MAb can be useful in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot experiments. In addition, M3H9 MAb can detect the expression of the MuD protein in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded mouse ovary and uterus tissues. These results indicate that the MuD MAb M3H9 could be useful as a new biomarker of hereditary spastic paraplegia and other related diseases.

  20. Imidazole binding to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, M C; Ceballos, A; Mariño, E; Cachaza, J M; Domínguez-Gil, A; Kuemmerle, H P

    1988-06-01

    Imidazole is a substance released by the organism when a new salicylate derivative, imidazole salicylate is administered. A study was made of the binding of imidazole to human serum albumin by an in vitro assay employing an ultrafiltration technique. For the concentration range that imidazole was found in plasma following administration of the drug to healthy volunteers, the mean binding percentages were: 12.1 +/- 1.8 and 19.7 +/- 3.1 at 37 degrees C and 25 degrees C, respectively. The results obtained in the study follow a model entailing three equal and independent binding sites of imidazole to serum albumin and the values of the corresponding constants were determined. Apparently, the presence in the plasma samples of sodium salicylate at a concentration of 100 micrograms/ml does not affect the binding of imidazole to human serum albumin.

  1. Endocytosis of Integrin-Binding Human Picornaviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirjo Merilahti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Picornaviruses that infect humans form one of the largest virus groups with almost three hundred virus types. They include significant enteroviral pathogens such as rhino-, polio-, echo-, and coxsackieviruses and human parechoviruses that cause wide range of disease symptoms. Despite the economic importance of picornaviruses, there are no antivirals. More than ten cellular receptors are known to participate in picornavirus infection, but experimental evidence of their role in cellular infection has been shown for only about twenty picornavirus types. Three enterovirus types and one parechovirus have experimentally been shown to bind and use integrin receptors in cellular infection. These include coxsackievirus A9 (CV-A9, echovirus 9, and human parechovirus 1 that are among the most common and epidemic human picornaviruses and bind to αV-integrins via RGD motif that resides on virus capsid. In contrast, echovirus 1 (E-1 has no RGD and uses integrin α2β1 as cellular receptor. Endocytosis of CV-A9 has recently been shown to occur via a novel Arf6- and dynamin-dependent pathways, while, contrary to collagen binding, E-1 binds inactive β1 integrin and enters via macropinocytosis. In this paper, we review what is known about receptors and endocytosis of integrin-binding human picornaviruses.

  2. Endocytosis of integrin-binding human picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merilahti, Pirjo; Koskinen, Satu; Heikkilä, Outi; Karelehto, Eveliina; Susi, Petri

    2012-01-01

    Picornaviruses that infect humans form one of the largest virus groups with almost three hundred virus types. They include significant enteroviral pathogens such as rhino-, polio-, echo-, and coxsackieviruses and human parechoviruses that cause wide range of disease symptoms. Despite the economic importance of picornaviruses, there are no antivirals. More than ten cellular receptors are known to participate in picornavirus infection, but experimental evidence of their role in cellular infection has been shown for only about twenty picornavirus types. Three enterovirus types and one parechovirus have experimentally been shown to bind and use integrin receptors in cellular infection. These include coxsackievirus A9 (CV-A9), echovirus 9, and human parechovirus 1 that are among the most common and epidemic human picornaviruses and bind to αV-integrins via RGD motif that resides on virus capsid. In contrast, echovirus 1 (E-1) has no RGD and uses integrin α2β1 as cellular receptor. Endocytosis of CV-A9 has recently been shown to occur via a novel Arf6- and dynamin-dependent pathways, while, contrary to collagen binding, E-1 binds inactive β1 integrin and enters via macropinocytosis. In this paper, we review what is known about receptors and endocytosis of integrin-binding human picornaviruses.

  3. Endowing self-binding feature restores the activities of a loss-of-function chimerized anti-GM2 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunfeng; Russ, Michael; Retter, Marc; Fanger, Gary; Morgan, Charles; Kohler, Heinz; Muller, Sybille

    2007-02-01

    Our previous studies have described a rare type of antibody that spontaneously binds to itself, or homodimerizes. This self-binding, or autophilic antibody provides stronger protection against bacterial infection than a non-self-binding antibody with identical specificity and affinity, due to an increase of polymeric avidity. Furthermore, we have shown that a peptide derived from the self-binding domain of the autophilic T15 antibody can be crosslinked to the Fc carbohydrate of monoclonal antibodies specific for the B-cell receptor of B-cell tumors. These peptide-crosslinked antibodies can exert self-binding properties, leading to an increase in binding efficiency to the target cells as well as an increase in potential to induce apoptosis. Herein, we report a novel finding that crosslinking of the autophilic T15 peptide rescues a loss-of-function chimerized (ch) anti-GM2 antibody. The parental antibody demonstrates in vivo anti-tumor activity against melanoma xenografts. The T15 peptide-conjugated antibody shows the ability to bind to itself, as well as an increased binding to its antigen, ganglioside GM2. Moreover, the peptide-conjugated antibody also demonstrates an increased ability to bind to two GM2-positive tumor cell lines and notably important, restores its ability to induce apoptosis in two types of tumor cells. These results provide strong support for the clinical potential of the autophilic technology.

  4. A New Glycan-Dependent CD4-Binding Site Neutralizing Antibody Exerts Pressure on HIV-1 In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia T Freund

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The CD4 binding site (CD4bs on the envelope glycoprotein is a major site of vulnerability that is conserved among different HIV-1 isolates. Many broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs to the CD4bs belong to the VRC01 class, sharing highly restricted origins, recognition mechanisms and viral escape pathways. We sought to isolate new anti-CD4bs bNAbs with different origins and mechanisms of action. Using a gp120 2CC core as bait, we isolated antibodies encoded by IGVH3-21 and IGVL3-1 genes with long CDRH3s that depend on the presence of the N-linked glycan at position-276 for activity. This binding mode is similar to the previously identified antibody HJ16, however the new antibodies identified herein are more potent and broad. The most potent variant, 179NC75, had a geometric mean IC80 value of 0.42 μg/ml against 120 Tier-2 HIV-1 pseudoviruses in the TZM.bl assay. Although this group of CD4bs glycan-dependent antibodies can be broadly and potently neutralizing in vitro, their in vivo activity has not been tested to date. Here, we report that 179NC75 is highly active when administered to HIV-1-infected humanized mice, where it selects for escape variants that lack a glycan site at position-276. The same glycan was absent from the virus isolated from the 179NC75 donor, implying that the antibody also exerts selection pressure in humans.

  5. Novel peptide ligand with high binding capacity for antibody purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, L. N.; Gustavsson, P. E.; Michael, R.

    2012-01-01

    Small synthetic ligands for protein purification have become increasingly interesting with the growing need for cheap chromatographic materials for protein purification and especially for the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Today, Protein A-based chromatographic resins are the most ......-aggregated IgG, indicating that the ligand could be used both as a primary purification step of IgG as well as a subsequent polishing step. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Co-receptor Binding Site Antibodies Enable CD4-Mimetics to Expose Conserved Anti-cluster A ADCC Epitopes on HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Richard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has evolved a sophisticated strategy to conceal conserved epitopes of its envelope glycoproteins (Env recognized by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC-mediating antibodies. These antibodies, which are present in the sera of most HIV-1-infected individuals, preferentially recognize Env in its CD4-bound conformation. Accordingly, recent studies showed that small CD4-mimetics (CD4mc able to “push” Env into this conformation sensitize HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC mediated by HIV+ sera. Here we test whether CD4mc also expose epitopes recognized by anti-cluster A monoclonal antibodies such as A32, thought to be responsible for the majority of ADCC activity present in HIV+ sera and linked to decreased HIV-1 transmission in the RV144 trial. We made the surprising observation that CD4mc are unable to enhance recognition of HIV-1-infected cells by this family of antibodies in the absence of antibodies such as 17b, which binds a highly conserved CD4-induced epitope overlapping the co-receptor binding site (CoRBS. Our results indicate that CD4mc initially open the trimeric Env enough to allow the binding of CoRBS antibodies but not anti-cluster A antibodies. CoRBS antibody binding further opens the trimeric Env, allowing anti-cluster A antibody interaction and sensitization of infected cells to ADCC. Therefore, ADCC responses mediated by cluster A antibodies in HIV-positive sera involve a sequential opening of the Env trimer on the surface of HIV-1-infected cells. The understanding of the conformational changes required to expose these vulnerable Env epitopes might be important in the design of new strategies aimed at fighting HIV-1.

  7. A recombinant, fully human monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity constructed from phage-displayed antibody fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, GA; Heijnen, IAFM; Cuomo, ME; Koningsberger, JC; Boel, E; de Vries, ARV; Loyson, SAJ; Helfrich, W; Henegouwen, GPV; van Meijer, M; de Kruif, J; Logtenberg, T

    1999-01-01

    A single-chain Fv antibody fragment specific for the tumor-associated Ep-CAM molecule was isolated from a semisynthetic phage display library and converted into an intact, fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (huMab), The purified huMab had an affinity of 5 nM and effectively mediated tumor cell kil

  8. Correlation between anti-interferon-β binding and neutralizing antibodies in interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P E H; Sellebjerg, F; Søndergaard, H B;

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of binding antibodies (BAbs), neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and MX1 mRNA expression are used to analyse the immunological reactions in patients with MS treated with IFN-β. The correlations between these are yet not fully understood.......Measurements of binding antibodies (BAbs), neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and MX1 mRNA expression are used to analyse the immunological reactions in patients with MS treated with IFN-β. The correlations between these are yet not fully understood....

  9. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suarez Jorge E

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720 which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes.

  10. Antibody to E1 peptide of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 inhibits virus binding and entry to HepG2 cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Awady, Mostafa K; Tabll, Ashraf A; Atef, Khaled; Yousef, Samar S; Omran, Moataza H; El-Abd, Yasmin; Bader-Eldin, Noha G; Salem, Ahmad M; Zohny, Samir F; El-Garf, Wael T

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the neutralizing activity of antibodies against E1 region of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Specific polyclonal antibody was raised via immunization of New Zealand rabbits with a synthetic peptide that had been derived from the E1 region of HCV and was shown to be highly conserved among HCV published genotypes. METHODS: Hyper-immune HCV E1 antibodies were incubated over night at 4 °C with serum samples positive for HCV RNA, with viral loads ranging from 615 to 3.2 million IU/ mL. Treated sera were incubated with HepG2 cells for 90 min. Blocking of viral binding and entry into cells by anti E1 antibody were tested by means of RT-PCR and flow cytometry. RESULTS: Direct immunostaining using FITC conjugated E1 antibody followed by Flow cytometric analysis showed reduced mean fluorescence intensity in samples pre-incubated with E1 antibody compared with untreated samples. Furthermore, 13 out of 18 positive sera (72%) showed complete inhibition of infectivity as detected by RT-PCR. CONCLUSION: In house produced E1 antibody, blocks binding and entry of HCV virion infection to target cells suggesting the involvement of this epitope in virus binding and entry. Isolation of these antibodies that block virus attachment to human cells are useful as therapeutic reagents. PMID:16688798

  11. Antibody to E1 peptide of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 inhibits virus binding and entry to HepG2 cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa K EL-Awady; Wael T El-Garf; Ashraf A Tabll; Khaled Atef; Samar S Yousef; Moataza H Omran; Yasmin El-Abd; Noha G Bader-Eldin; Ahmad M Salem; Samir F Zohny

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the neutralizing activity of antibodies against E1 region of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Specific polyclonal antibody was raised via immunization of New Zealand rabbits with a synthetic peptide that had been derived from the E1 region of HCV and was shown to be highly conserved among HCV published genotypes.METHODS: Hyper-immune HCV E1 antibodies were incubatecd over night at 4 ℃ with serum samples positive for HCV RNA, with viral loads ranging from 615 to 3.2 million IU/mL. Treated sera were incubated with HepG2 cells for 90 min. Blocking of viral binding and entry into cells by anti E1 antibody were tested by means of RTPCR and flow cytometry.RESULTS: Direct immunostaining using FTTC conjugated E1 antibody followed by Flow cytometric analysis showed reduced mean fluorescence intensity in samples pre-incubated with E1 antibody compared with untreated samples. Furthermore, 13 out of 18 positive sera (72%)showed complete inhibition of infectivity as detected by RT-PCR.CONCLUSION: In house produced E1 antibody, blocks binding and entry of HCV virion infection to target cells suggesting the involvement of this epitope in virus binding and entry. Isolation of these antibodies that block virus attachment to human cells are useful as therapeutic reagents.

  12. CONSTRUCTION AND EXPRESSION OF A HUMAN-MOUSE CHIMERIC ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN BLADDER CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白银; 王琰; 周丽君; 俞莉章

    2001-01-01

    To construct and express a human-mouse chimeric antibody against human bladder cancer. Method: The variable region genes of anti-human bladder cancer monoclonal antibody BDI-1 were cloned by RT-PCR. A human-mouse chimeric antibody expression vector was constructed and transfected into CHO cells. The chimeric antibody against bladder cancer was expressed and characterized. Result: Eukaryotic expression vector of the chimeric antibody against human bladder carcinoma was successfully constructed, and was expressed in eukaryotic cells; the expressed chimeric antibody ch-BDI showed same specificity as its parent McAb against human bladder cancer cells. Conclusion: The constructed chimeric antibody was expressed successfully in eukaryotic cells, and the chimeric antibody had desired affinity against human bladder cancer cells.

  13. Fully Human VH Single Domains That Rival the Stability and Cleft Recognition of Camelid Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet, Romain; Dudgeon, Kip; Christie, Mary; Langley, David; Christ, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Human VH single domains represent a promising class of antibody fragments with applications as therapeutic modalities. Unfortunately, isolated human VH domains also generally display poor biophysical properties and a propensity to aggregate. This has encouraged the development of non-human antibody domains as alternative means of antigen recognition and, in particular, camelid (VHH) domains. Naturally devoid of light chain partners, these domains are characterized by favorable biophysical properties and propensity for cleft binding, a highly desirable characteristic, allowing the targeting of cryptic epitopes. In contrast, previously reported structures of human VH single domains had failed to recapitulate this property. Here we report the engineering and characterization of phage display libraries of stable human VH domains and the selection of binders against a diverse set of antigens. Unlike "camelized" human domains, the domains do not rely on potentially immunogenic framework mutations and maintain the structure of the VH/VL interface. Structure determination in complex with hen egg white lysozyme revealed an extended VH binding interface, with complementarity-determining region 3 deeply penetrating into the active site cleft, highly reminiscent of what has been observed for camelid domains. Taken together, our results demonstrate that fully human VH domains can be constructed that are not only stable and well expressed but also rival the cleft binding properties of camelid antibodies.

  14. Antiidiotypic antibody related to the 84 kD human sperm membrane protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUJUN; WANGLINFANG; 等

    1990-01-01

    Wistar rats were inoculated with purified YWK-I antibody.The anti-idiotypic antibodies were isolated from rat sera by successive passage over affinity chromatography columns of YWK-I mAb and normal mouse Igs.Specificity of anti-Id antibody was established by ELISA.The 84kD protein inhibited the binding of anti-Id to YWK-I mAb,but failed to repress antibody against normal mouse Ig binding to YWK-I mAb.In competitive inhibition assay,84kD protein had shown the ability to compete with anti-Id binding to YWK-I mAb in a dose-dependent manner.Crude sperm extract showed a lower competitive ability.No effect was found with the irrelevant 36kD sperm protein.The antisera from the Balb/C micr immunized with AId contained Ab3 that reacted with 84kD sperm protein.The binding of anti-Id to YWK-I mAb was inhibited by Ab3 in a dose-dependent fashion and Ab3 was shown to be able to induce human sperm agglutination.These results indicate that anti-Id which may mimic an epitope of the 84kD protein could be exploited as an antigen to raise antibodies against sperm protein.

  15. Directed evolution of antibody fragments with monovalent femtomolar antigen-binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, E T; Midelfort, K S; Wittrup, K D

    2000-09-26

    Single-chain antibody mutants have been evolved in vitro with antigen-binding equilibrium dissociation constant K(d) = 48 fM and slower dissociation kinetics (half-time > 5 days) than those for the streptavidin-biotin complex. These mutants possess the highest monovalent ligand-binding affinity yet reported for an engineered protein by over two orders of magnitude. Optimal kinetic screening of randomly mutagenized libraries of 10(5)-10(7) yeast surface-displayed antibodies enabled a >1,000-fold decrease in the rate of dissociation after four cycles of affinity mutagenesis and screening. The consensus mutations are generally nonconservative by comparison with naturally occurring mouse Fv sequences and with residues that do not contact the fluorescein antigen in the wild-type complex. The existence of these mutants demonstrates that the antibody Fv architecture is not intrinsically responsible for an antigen-binding affinity ceiling during in vivo affinity maturation.

  16. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowall, S. D.; Graham, V. A.; Corbin-Lickfett, K.; Empig, C.; Schlunegger, K.; Bruce, C. B.; Easterbrook, L.; Hewson, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus. PMID:25815346

  17. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Dowall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus.

  18. Rheumatoid factor interference in immunogenicity assays for human monoclonal antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarewicz, Suzanna; Miller, Jill M; Swanson, Steven J; Moxness, Michael S

    2010-05-31

    Rheumatoid factors (RFs) are endogenous human antibodies that bind to human gamma globulins. RFs demonstrate preferential binding to aggregated gamma globulins and are involved in the clearing mechanism of immune complexes. Immunoassays designed to measure human anti-human antibodies (HAHA) after administration of monoclonal antibody therapeutics are thus vulnerable to interference from RFs. When using a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) bridging immunoassay, samples from subjects with rheumatoid arthritis demonstrated much higher baseline reactivity than healthy subjects. Interference was found to be dependent on the aggregation state of the therapeutic antibody that had been conjugated with the detection reagent (ruthenium). Size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) demonstrated that of the total integrated peaks, as little as 0.55% high molecular weight aggregates (>600kDa) were sufficient to cause increased reactivity. Stability studies of the ruthenium and biotin conjugated therapeutic antibody indicated that storage time, temperature and buffer formulation were critical in maintaining the integrity of the reagents. Through careful SE-HPLC monitoring we were able to choose appropriate storage and buffer conditions which led to a reduction in the false reactivity rate in therapeutic-naïve serum from a rheumatoid arthritis population.

  19. Characterization of a novel inhibitory human monoclonal antibody directed against Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskus, Dominika J; Królik, Michał; Bethke, Susanne; Spiegel, Holger; Kapelski, Stephanie; Seidel, Melanie; Addai-Mensah, Otchere; Reimann, Andreas; Klockenbring, Torsten; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Fendel, Rolf

    2016-12-21

    Malaria remains a major challenge to global health causing extensive morbidity and mortality. Yet, there is no efficient vaccine and the immune response remains incompletely understood. Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1), a leading vaccine candidate, plays a key role during merozoite invasion into erythrocytes by interacting with Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2). We generated a human anti-AMA1-antibody (humAbAMA1) by EBV-transformation of sorted B-lymphocytes from a Ghanaian donor and subsequent rescue of antibody variable regions. The antibody was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana and in HEK239-6E, characterized for binding specificity and epitope, and analyzed for its inhibitory effect on Plasmodium falciparum. The generated humAbAMA1 shows an affinity of 106-135 pM. It inhibits the parasite strain 3D7A growth in vitro with an expression system-independent IC50-value of 35 μg/ml (95% confidence interval: 33 μg/ml-37 μg/ml), which is three to eight times lower than the IC50-values of inhibitory antibodies 4G2 and 1F9. The epitope was mapped to the close proximity of the RON2-peptide binding groove. Competition for binding between the RON2-peptide and humAbAMA1 was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy measurements. The particularly advantageous inhibitory activity of this fully human antibody might provide a basis for future therapeutic applications.

  20. Molluskan Hemocyanins Activate the Classical Pathway of the Human Complement System through Natural Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro-Bauerle, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Sosoniuk-Roche, Eduardo; Vallejos, Gerardo; López, Mercedes N.; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; Aguilar-Guzmán, Lorena; Valck, Carolina; Ferreira, Arturo; Becker, María Inés

    2017-01-01

    Molluskan hemocyanins are enormous oxygen-carrier glycoproteins that show remarkable immunostimulatory properties when inoculated in mammals, such as the generation of high levels of antibodies, a strong cellular reaction, and generation of non-specific antitumor immune responses in some types of cancer, particularly for superficial bladder cancer. These proteins have the ability to bias the immune response toward a Th1 phenotype. However, despite all their current uses with beneficial clinical outcomes, a clear mechanism explaining these properties is not available. Taking into account reports of natural antibodies against the hemocyanin of the gastropod Megathura crenulata [keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)] in humans as well as other vertebrate species, we report here for the first time, the presence, in sera from unimmunized healthy donors, of antibodies recognizing, in addition to KLH, two other hemocyanins from gastropods with documented immunomodulatory capacities: Fisurella latimarginata hemocyanin (FLH) and Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). Through an ELISA screening, we found IgM and IgG antibodies reactive with these hemocyanins. When the capacity of these antibodies to bind deglycosylated hemocyanins was studied, no decreased interaction was detected. Moreover, in the case of FLH, deglycosylation increased antibody binding. We evaluated through an in vitro complement deposition assay whether these antibodies activated the classical pathway of the human complement system. The results showed that all three hemocyanins and their deglycosylated counterparts elicited this activation, mediated by C1 binding to immunoglobulins. Thus, this work contributes to the understanding on how the complement system could participate in the immunostimulatory properties of hemocyanins, through natural, complement-activating antibodies reacting with these proteins. Although a role for carbohydrates cannot be completely ruled out, in our experimental setting

  1. Evaluation of a new flow cytometry crossmatch procedure for simultaneous detection of cytotoxicity and antibody binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alheim, M; Paul, P K; Hauzenberger, D-M; Wikström, A-C

    2013-08-01

    In this study we have evaluated an alternative 96-well format flow cytometry based (FCtox) method which enable simultaneous detection of cytotoxicity and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibody binding. Comparable results were obtained in side-by-side comparisons with conventional complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and flow cytometric crossmatch (FCXM) in terms of sensitivity and specificity. There was 91 and 93% agreement between results obtained by FCtox and CDC for T and B cells, respectively. In addition, comparable results were obtained with FCtox IgG and FCXM IgG for both T and B cells. Furthermore, compared with a recently developed and highly sensitive Luminex based C1q assay we obtained close to 90% method agreement with the FCtox assay. Our alternative cytotoxicity and IgG binding assay which exhibit low intra-and inter-assay variation will improve the workflow and speed up the pre-transplant testing and also allow continuous monitoring of assay performance and proper quality assurance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Detection of anti-liver cell membrane antibody using a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo-Yeo, A.; McSorley, C.; McFarlane, B.M.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Mowat, A.P.; Vergani, D.

    1989-02-01

    A radioimmunometric technique for the detection of autoantibodies to liver membrane antigens has been developed using Alexander cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. After incubation of Alexander cells with serum, antimembrane antibodies were detected by addition of /sup 125/I-labeled Protein A. Binding ratios in 15 children with uncontrolled autoimmune chronic active hepatitis and in seven children with primary sclerosing cholangitis were significantly higher than in 18 age-matched normal controls. Nine patients with inactive autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, 13 with alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and five with fulminant hepatic failure had ratios similar to controls. In nine patients with Wilson's disease, there was a modest but significant increase in binding ratio. In four children with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, binding ratios fell during effective immunosuppressive therapy. Sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis gave normal results, excluding that binding derives from Fc-mediated immune complex capture. A positive correlation was found between Alexander cell binding values and anti-liver-specific protein antibody titers, suggesting that the two assays detect antibodies against shared antigenic determinants. The Alexander cell assay is a simple, rapid and sensitive technique to detect antibody to liver cell membrane antigens.

  3. Antibodies to left-handed Z-DNA bind to interband regions of Drosophila polytene chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, Alfred; Pardue, Mary Lou; Lafer, Eileen M.; Möller, Achim; Stollar, B. David; Rich, Alexander

    1981-12-01

    Antibodies which are specific to the Z-DNA conformation have been purified and characterized on the basis of their binding to three different DNA polymers which can form this left-handed helix. These antibodies bind specifically to polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster as visualized by fluorescent staining. The staining is found in the interband regions and its intensity varies among different interbands in a reproducible manner. This is the first identification of the Z-DNA conformation in material of biological origin.

  4. Neutralisation and binding of VHS virus by monovalent antibody fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupit, P.M.; Lorenzen, Niels; Strachan, G.

    2001-01-01

    appeared to recognise a broader range of virus isolates. The variable domains of these two antibodies differ by only four residues (Lorenzen et al., 2000a. Fish Shellfish Immunol. 10, 129-142). To further study the mechanism of neutralisation, Fab fragments as well as a series of recombinant bacterial...... single chain antibody (scAb) fragments were generated from the three anti-VHSV Mabs and their variable domain genes, respectively. Fabs and scAbs derived from the neutralising Mabs were both able to neutralise the VHSV type 1 isolate DK-F1. In addition, a series of scAb fragments were produced using...... the 3F1H10 variable heavy (VH) chain and variable light (V kappa) chain domains but containing, either alone or in dual combination, each of the four different residues present in 3F1A2. The dissociation constants of Mabs 3F1H10 and 3F1A2 and their respective Fab and scAb fragments were measured...

  5. Quantitative radiommunoassay for DNA-binding antibodies. [Iodine 131, Iodine 125

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.H.; Guyer, R.L.; Minami, R.M.; Teplitz, R.L.

    1981-09-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) is described for the measurement of serum immunoglobulins capable of binding to double-standard or single-standard DNA. DNA attached to Sephadex G-50 by ultraviolet radiation was used as a solid- phase immunoabsorbent for DNA-binding proteins from serum. Goat anti-human (GAH) IgG (/sup 125/I-labeled) were used to detect the human immunoglobulins bound onto the washed DNA-Sephadex. The quantities of immunoglobulins bound were determined by comparison with a standard curve constructed by dilution of a plasma from an systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patient containing known amounts of bound, DNA-specific IgM and IgG. Another RIA was employed for measuring levels of IgG and IgM. In combination with measurements of the total serum IgM and IgG, the RIA allowed for the determination of the fraction of the total serum IgM or IgG that was specific for double- or single-standard DNA. For a pool of normal human sera the quantities were as follows: 0.04% of the total IgM and 0.001% of the total IgG bound double-standard DNA; 0.22% of the total IgM and 0.05% of the total IgG bound single-stranded DNA. This capability is important because information regarding the quantitative measurement of antibodies to DNA and their class determination may be of significance in monitoring the status of subjects with SLE.

  6. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of human c-Met neutralizing monoclonal antibody CE-355621

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Neil R.; Jani, Jitesh P.; Hillerman, Stephen; Tsaparikos, Konstantinos E.; Barbacci-Tobin, Elsa G.; Knauth, Elisabeth; Putz Jr., Henry; Campbell, Mary; Karam, George A.; Chrunyk, Boris; Gebhard, David F.; Green, Larry L.; Xu, Jinghai J.; Dunn, Margaret C.; Coskran, Tim M.; Lapointe, Jean-Martin; Cohen, Bruce D.; Coleman, Kevin G.; Bedian, Vahe; Vincent, Patrick; Kajiji, Shama; Steyn, Stefan J.; Borzillo, Gary V.; Los, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    The c-Met proto-oncogene is a multifunctional receptor tyrosine kinase that is stimulated by its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), to induce cell growth, motility and morphogenesis. Dysregulation of c-Met function, through mutational activation or overexpression, has been observed in many types of cancer and is thought to contribute to tumor growth and metastasis by affecting mitogenesis, invasion, and angiogenesis. We identified human monoclonal antibodies that bind to the extracellular domain of c-Met and inhibit tumor growth by interfering with ligand-dependent c-Met activation. We identified antibodies representing four independent epitope classes that inhibited both ligand binding and ligand-dependent activation of c-Met in A549 cells. In cells, the antibodies antagonized c-Met function by blocking receptor activation and by subsequently inducing downregulation of the receptor, translating to phenotypic effects in soft agar growth and tubular morphogenesis assays. Further characterization of the antibodies in vivo revealed significant inhibition of c-Met activity (≥ 80% lasting for 72–96 h) in excised tumors corresponded to tumor growth inhibition in multiple xenograft tumor models. Several of the antibodies identified inhibited the growth of tumors engineered to overexpress human HGF and human c-Met (S114 NIH 3T3) when grown subcutaneously in athymic mice. Furthermore, lead candidate antibody CE-355621 inhibited the growth of U87MG human glioblastoma and GTL-16 gastric xenografts by up to 98%. The findings support published pre-clinical and clinical data indicating that targeting c-Met with human monoclonal antibodies is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. PMID:23007574

  7. Epitope-distal effects accompany the binding of two distinct antibodies to hepatitis B virus capsids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bereszczak, J.Z.; Rose, R.J.; Duijn, E. van; Watts, N.R.; Wingfield, P.T.; Steven, A.C.; Heck, A.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of humans by hepatitis B virus (HBV) induces the copious production of antibodies directed against the capsid protein (Cp). A large variety of anticapsid antibodies have been identified that differ in their epitopes. These data, and the status of the capsid as a major clinical antigen, mot

  8. In-capillary detection of fast antibody-peptide binding using fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuqin; Qiu, Lin; Qin, Haifang; Ding, Shumin; Liu, Li; Teng, Yiwan; Chen, Yao; Wang, Cheli; Li, Jinchen; Wang, Jianhao; Jiang, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a technique for detecting the fast binding of antibody-peptide inside a capillary. Anti-HA was mixed and interacted with FAM-labeled HA tag (FAM-E4 ) inside the capillary. Fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE-FL) was employed to measure and record the binding process. The efficiency of the antibody-peptide binding on in-capillary assays was found to be affected by the molar ratio. Furthermore, the stability of anti-HA-FAM-E4 complex was investigated as well. The results indicated that E4 YPYDVPDYA (E4) or TAMRA-E4 YPYDVPDYA (TAMRA-E4) had the same binding priorities with anti-HA. The addition of excess E4 or TAMRA-E4 could lead to partial dissociation of the complex and take a two-step mechanism including dissociation and association. This method can be applied to detect a wide range of biomolecular interactions.

  9. RNA recognition by a human antibody against brain cytoplasmic 200 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Euihan; Lee, Jungmin; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Park, Insoo; Lee, Younghoon

    2014-06-01

    Diverse functional RNAs participate in a wide range of cellular processes. The RNA structure is critical for function, either on its own or as a complex form with proteins and other ligands. Therefore, analysis of the RNA conformation in cells is essential for understanding their functional mechanisms. However, no appropriate methods have been established as yet. Here, we developed an efficient strategy for panning and affinity maturation of anti-RNA human monoclonal antibodies from a naïve antigen binding fragment (Fab) combinatorial phage library. Brain cytoplasmic 200 (BC200) RNA, which is also highly expressed in some tumors, was used as an RNA antigen. We identified MabBC200-A3 as the optimal binding antibody. Mutagenesis and SELEX experiments showed that the antibody recognized a domain of BC200 in a structure- and sequence-dependent manner. Various breast cancer cell lines were further examined for BC200 RNA expression using conventional hybridization and immunoanalysis with MabBC200-A3 to see whether the antibody specifically recognizes BC200 RNA among the total purified RNAs. The amounts of antibody-recognizable BC200 RNA were consistent with hybridization signals among the cell lines. Furthermore, the antibody was able to discriminate BC200 RNA from other RNAs, supporting the utility of this antibody as a specific RNA structure-recognizing probe. Intriguingly, however, when permeabilized cells were subjected to immunoanalysis instead of purified total RNA, the amount of antibody-recognizable RNA was not correlated with the cellular level of BC200 RNA, indicating that BC200 RNA exists as two distinct forms (antibody-recognizable and nonrecognizable) in breast cancer cells and that their distribution depends on the cell type. Our results clearly demonstrate that anti-RNA antibodies provide an effective novel tool for detecting and analyzing RNA conformation.

  10. An antibody against the surfactant protein A (SP-A)-binding domain of the SP-A receptor inhibits T cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samten, Buka; Townsend, James C; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Barnes, Peter F; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2008-07-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) suppresses lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 secretion, in part, by binding to its receptor, SP-R210. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we studied the effect of antibodies against the SP-A-binding (neck) domain (alpha-SP-R210n) or nonbinding C-terminal domain (alpha-SP-R210ct) of SP-R210 on human peripheral blood T cell immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We demonstrated that both antibodies bind to more than 90% of monocytes and 5-10% of CD3+ T cells in freshly isolated PBMC. Stimulation of PBMC from healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative-positive (PPD+)] with heat-killed M. tuberculosis induced increased antibody binding to CD3+ cells. Increased antibody binding suggested enhanced expression of SP-R210, and this was confirmed by Western blotting. The antibodies (alpha-SP-R210n) cross-linking the SP-R210 through the SP-A-binding domain markedly inhibited cell proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion by PBMC from PPD+ donors in response to heat-killed M. tuberculosis, whereas preimmune IgG and antibodies (alpha-SP-R210ct) cross-linking SP-R210 through the non-SP-A-binding, C-terminal domain had no effect. Anti-SP-R210n also decreased M. tuberculosis-induced production of TNF-alpha but increased production of IL-10. Inhibition of IFN-gamma production by alpha-SP-R210n was abrogated by the combination of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10 and TGF-beta1. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that SP-A, via SP-R210, suppresses cell-mediated immunity against M. tuberculosis via a mechanism that up-regulates secretion of IL-10 and TGF-beta1.

  11. Structural Insights for Engineering Binding Proteins Based on Non-Antibody Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these “alternative” scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering stra...

  12. Direct detection of antibody concentration and affinity in human serum using microscale thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippok, Svenja; Seidel, Susanne A I; Duhr, Stefan; Uhland, Kerstin; Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Jenne, Dieter; Braun, Dieter

    2012-04-17

    The direct quantification of both the binding affinity and absolute concentration of disease-related biomarkers in biological fluids is particularly beneficial for differential diagnosis and therapy monitoring. Here, we extend microscale thermophoresis to target immunological questions. Optically generated thermal gradients were used to deplete fluorescently marked antigens in 2- and 10-fold-diluted human serum. We devised and validated an autocompetitive strategy to independently fit the concentration and dissociation constant of autoimmune antibodies against the cardiac β1-adrenergic receptor related to dilated cardiomyopathy. As an artificial antigen, the peptide COR1 was designed to mimic the second extracellular receptor loop. Thermophoresis resolved antibody concentrations from 2 to 200 nM and measured the dissociation constant as 75 nM. The approach quantifies antibody binding in its native serum environment within microliter volumes and without any surface attachments. The simplicity of the mix and probe protocol minimizes systematic errors, making thermophoresis a promising detection method for personalized medicine.

  13. Humanized versus murine anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies for immunoscintigraphic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, Alejo A. Morales; Duconge, Jorge; Alvarez-Ruiz, Daniel; Becquer-Viart, Maria de Los Angeles; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Fernandez, Eduardo; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando

    2000-02-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized antibody h-R3 (IgG{sub 1}), which binds to an extracellular domain of EGF-R, was used to evaluate the biodistribution on nude mice xenografted with A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. Results are compared with its murine version ior egf/r3 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Twenty-one athymic female 4NMRI nu/nu mice were injected intravenously with 10 {mu}g/100 {mu}Ci of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled mAbs. The mAb ior C5 that recognizes an antigen expressed preferentially on the surface of malignant and cytoplasm of normal colorectal cells was used as negative control. Immunoreactivity of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled mAbs was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay on A431 cell line and the immunoreactive fractions determined by Lindmo method. Among all organs significant accumulation was found in tumor (6.14{+-}2.50 %ID/g, 5.06{+-}2.61 %ID/g for murine and humanized mAbs, respectively) 4 h after injection. The immunoreactive fractions were found to be 0.88 and 0.81 for murine and humanized mAb, respectively. Thus, we expect better results using the humanized mAb h-R3 for diagnostic immunoscintigraphy.

  14. Solid phase measurements of antibody and lectin binding to xenogenic carbohydrate antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2004-01-01

    a naturally occurring subfraction from human serum, to Galalpha containing neoglycoproteins and mouse laminin that were immobilized on microtiter plates. RESULTS: Galalpha reactive antibodies with similar monosaccharide specificity have distinct structural preference for sugar ligands. Laminin...

  15. Efficient Methods To Isolate Human Monoclonal Antibodies from Memory B Cells and Plasma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    In this article, we highlight the advantages of isolating human monoclonal antibodies from the human memory B cells and plasma cell repertoires by using high-throughput cellular screens. Memory B cells are immortalized with high efficiency using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the presence of a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, while plasma cells are maintained in single-cell cultures by using interleukin 6 (IL-6) or stromal cells. In both cases, multiple parallel assays, including functional assays, can be used to identify rare cells that produce antibodies with unique properties. Using these methods, we have isolated potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies against a variety of viruses, in particular, a pan-influenza-A-neutralizing antibody and an antibody that neutralizes four different paramyxoviruses. Given the high throughput and the possibility of directly screening for function (rather than just binding), these methods are instrumental to implement a target-agnostic approach to identify the most effective antibodies and, consequently, the most promising targets for vaccine design. This approach is exemplified by the identification of unusually potent cytomegalovirus-neutralizing antibodies that led to the identification of the target, a pentameric complex that we are developing as a candidate vaccine.

  16. Milk matrix effects on antibody binding analyzed by elisa and biolayer interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) was employed to study the impact of the milk matrix on the binding of ricin to asialofetuin (ASF) and to antibodies. This optical sensing platform utilized ligands immobilized covalently or via biotin-streptavidin linkage, and the results were compared to those obtained...

  17. Simplifying complex sequence information: a PCP-consensus protein binds antibodies against all four Dengue serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, David M; Lewis, Jessica A; Lu, Wenzhe; Schein, Catherine H

    2012-09-14

    Designing proteins that reflect the natural variability of a pathogen is essential for developing novel vaccines and drugs. Flaviviruses, including Dengue (DENV) and West Nile (WNV), evolve rapidly and can "escape" neutralizing monoclonal antibodies by mutation. Designing antigens that represent many distinct strains is important for DENV, where infection with a strain from one of the four serotypes may lead to severe hemorrhagic disease on subsequent infection with a strain from another serotype. Here, a DENV physicochemical property (PCP)-consensus sequence was derived from 671 unique sequences from the Flavitrack database. PCP-consensus proteins for domain 3 of the envelope protein (EdomIII) were expressed from synthetic genes in Escherichia coli. The ability of the purified consensus proteins to bind polyclonal antibodies generated in response to infection with strains from each of the four DENV serotypes was determined. The initial consensus protein bound antibodies from DENV-1-3 in ELISA and Western blot assays. This sequence was altered in 3 steps to incorporate regions of maximum variability, identified as significant changes in the PCPs, characteristic of DENV-4 strains. The final protein was recognized by antibodies against all four serotypes. Two amino acids essential for efficient binding to all DENV antibodies are part of a discontinuous epitope previously defined for a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The PCP-consensus method can significantly reduce the number of experiments required to define a multivalent antigen, which is particularly important when dealing with pathogens that must be tested at higher biosafety levels.

  18. Human antibody fragments specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor selected from large non-immunised phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souriau, Christelle; Rothacker, Julie; Hoogenboom, Hennie R; Nice, Edouard

    2004-09-01

    Antibodies to EGFR have been shown to display anti-tumour effects mediated in part by inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, and by enhancement of apoptosis. Humanised antibodies are preferred for clinical use to reduce complications with HAMA and HAHA responses frequently seen with murine and chimaeric antibodies. We have used depletion and subtractive selection strategies on cells expressing the EGFR to sample two large antibody fragment phage display libraries for the presence of human antibodies which are specific for the EGFR. Four Fab fragments and six scFv fragments were identified, with affinities of up to 2.2nM as determined by BIAcore analysis using global fitting of the binding curves to obtain the individual rate constants (ka and kd). This overall approach offers a generic screening method for the identification of growth factor specific antibodies and antibody fragments from large expression libraries and has potential for the rapid development of new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents.

  19. De Novo Sequencing and Resurrection of a Human Astrovirus-Neutralizing Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, Walter A; Morgenstern, David; Bern, Marshall; Ueberheide, Beatrix M; Sanchez-Fauquier, Alicia; DuBois, Rebecca M

    2016-05-13

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics targeting cancer, autoimmune diseases, inflammatory diseases, and infectious diseases are growing exponentially. Although numerous panels of mAbs targeting infectious disease agents have been developed, their progression into clinically useful mAbs is often hindered by the lack of sequence information and/or loss of hybridoma cells that produce them. Here we combine the power of crystallography and mass spectrometry to determine the amino acid sequence and glycosylation modification of the Fab fragment of a potent human astrovirus-neutralizing mAb. We used this information to engineer a recombinant antibody single-chain variable fragment that has the same specificity as the parent monoclonal antibody to bind to the astrovirus capsid protein. This antibody can now potentially be developed as a therapeutic and diagnostic agent.

  20. Microscale characterization of the binding specificity and affinity of a monoclonal antisulfotyrosyl IgG antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, K.S.; Bradbury, A.R.; Heegaard, N.H.;

    2008-01-01

    peptides and proteins. The data show that the anti-Tyr(SO(3)H) antibody is completely specific for compounds containing sulfated tyrosyls. Affinity electrophoresis experiments allowed us to estimate dissociation constants for sulfated hirudin fragment (56-65), gastrin-17, and cholecystokinin octapeptide...... (CCK8) in the 1-3 microM range. The affinity of the antibody toward complement 4 protein that contains three sulfotyrosines was analyzed by surface plasmon resonance technology and modeled according to a bivalent-binding model which yielded a K(d1) of 20.1 microM for the monovalent complex. The same...... binding was studied by CE and found to be in the micromolar scale albeit with some uncertainty due to complex separation patterns. The work illustrates the amount of information on antibody-antigen interactions that may be obtained with microelectrophoretic methods consuming minute quantities of material...

  1. Investigations on antibody binding to a micro-cantilever coated with a BAM pesticide residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Michael; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef; Schmid, Silvan;

    2011-01-01

    The attachment of an antibody to an antigen-coated cantilever has been investigated by repeated experiments, using a cantilever-based detection system by Cantion A/S. The stress induced by the binding of a pesticide residue BAM (2,6 dichlorobenzamide) immobilized on a cantilever surface to anti......-BAM antibody is measured using the CantiLab4© system from Cantion A/S with four gold-coated cantilevers and piezo resistive readout. The detection mechanism is in principle label-free, but fluorescent-marked antibodies have been used to subsequently verify the binding on the cantilever surface. The bending...... and increase in mass of each cantilever has also been investigated using a light interferometer and a Doppler Vibrometer. The system has been analyzed during repeated measurements to investigate whether the CantiLab4© system is a suited platform for a pesticide assay system. © 2011 Bache et al....

  2. Investigations on antibody binding to a micro-cantilever coated with a BAM pesticide residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamand Jens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The attachment of an antibody to an antigen-coated cantilever has been investigated by repeated experiments, using a cantilever-based detection system by Cantion A/S. The stress induced by the binding of a pesticide residue BAM (2,6 dichlorobenzamide immobilized on a cantilever surface to anti-BAM antibody is measured using the CantiLab4© system from Cantion A/S with four gold-coated cantilevers and piezo resistive readout. The detection mechanism is in principle label-free, but fluorescent-marked antibodies have been used to subsequently verify the binding on the cantilever surface. The bending and increase in mass of each cantilever has also been investigated using a light interferometer and a Doppler Vibrometer. The system has been analyzed during repeated measurements to investigate whether the CantiLab4© system is a suited platform for a pesticide assay system.

  3. Preferential germline usage and VH/VL pairing observed in human antibodies selected by mRNA display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Kutskova, Yuliya A; Hong, Feng; Memmott, John E; Zhong, Suju; Jenkinson, Megan D; Hsieh, Chung-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Since the invention of phage display, in vitro antibody display technologies have revolutionized the field of antibody discovery. In combination with antibody libraries constructed with sequences of human origin, such technologies enable accelerated therapeutic antibody discovery while bypassing the laborious animal immunization and hybridoma generation processes. Many in vitro display technologies developed since aim to differentiate from phage display by displaying full-length IgG proteins, utilizing eukaryotic translation system and codons, increasing library size or real-time kinetic selection by fluorescent activated cell sorting. We report here the development of an mRNA display technology and an accompanying HCDR3 size spectratyping monitor for human antibody discovery. Importantly, the mRNA display technology maintains a monovalent linkage between the mRNA (genotype) and display binding protein (phenotype), which minimizes avidity effect common in other display systems and allows for a stringent affinity and off-rate selection. The mRNA display technology successfully identified 100 human antibodies in 15 different selections against various targets from naïve human antibody libraries. These antibodies in general have high affinity and diversity. By analyzing the germline usage and combination of antibodies selected by the mRNA display technology, we identified trends and determined the productivity of each germline subgroup in the libraries that could serve as the knowledge base for constructing fully synthetic, next generation antibody libraries.

  4. Origin, diversity and maturation of human antiviral antibodies analyzed by high-throughput sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponraj ePrabakaran

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of how antibodies are generated and function could help develop effective vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics against viruses such as HIV-1, SARS Coronavirus (CoV, and Hendra and Nipah viruses (henipaviruses. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs against the HIV-1 were observed in patients, elicitation of such bnAbs remains a major challenge when compared to other viral targets. We previously hypothesized that HIV-1 could have evolved a strategy to evade the immune system due to absent or very weak binding of germline antibodies to the conserved epitopes that may not be sufficient to initiate and/or maintain an effective immune response. To further explore our hypothesis, we used the 454 sequence analysis of a large naïve library of human IgM antibodies which had been used for selecting antibodies against SARS Coronavirus (CoV receptor-binding domain (RBD, and soluble G proteins (sG of Hendra and Nipah viruses (henipaviruses. We found that the human IgM repertoires from the 454 sequencing have diverse germline usages, recombination patterns, junction diversity and a lower extent of somatic mutation. In this study, we identified germline intermediates of antibodies specific to HIV-1 and other viruses as observed in normal individuals, and compared their genetic diversity and somatic mutation level along with available structural and functional data. Further computational analysis will provide framework for understanding the underlying genetic and molecular determinants related to maturation pathways of antiviral bnAbs that could be useful for applying novel approaches to the design of effective vaccine immunogens and antibody-based therapeutics.

  5. Commercially available antibodies against human and murine histamine H₄-receptor lack specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beermann, Silke; Seifert, Roland; Neumann, Detlef

    2012-02-01

    Antibodies are important tools to detect expression and localization of proteins within the living cell. However, for a series of commercially available antibodies which are supposed to recognize G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), lack of specificity has been described. In recent publications, antisera against the histamine H₄-receptor (H₄R), which is a member of the GPCR family, have been used to demonstrate receptor expression. However, a comprehensive characterization of these antisera has not been performed yet. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to evaluate the specificity of three commercially available H₄R antibodies. Sf9 insect cells and HEK293 cells expressing recombinant murine and human H₄R, spleen cells obtained from H₄⁻/⁻ and from wild-type mice, and human CD20⁺ and CD20⁻ peripheral blood cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot using three commercially available H₄R antibodies. Our results show that all tested H₄R antibodies bind to virtually all cells, independently of the expression of H₄R, thus in an unspecific fashion. Also in Western blot, the H₄R antibodies do not bind to the specified protein. Our data underscore the importance of stringent evaluation of antibodies using valid controls, such as cells of H₄R⁻/⁻ mice, to show true receptor expression and antigen specificity. Improved validation of commercially available antibodies prior to release to the market would avoid time-consuming and expensive validation assays by the user.

  6. Development and characterization of human monoclonal antibodies that neutralize multiple TGFβ isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedinger, Daniel; Lao, Llewelyn; Khan, Shireen; Lee, Steve; Takeuchi, Toshihiko; Mirza, Amer M

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)β levels are elevated in, and drive the progression of, numerous disease states such as advanced metastatic cancer and systemic and ocular fibrosis. There are 3 main isoforms, TGFβ1, 2, and 3. As multiple TGFβ isoforms are involved in disease processes, maximal therapeutic efficacy may require neutralization of 2 or more of the TGFβ isoforms. Fully human antibody phage display libraries were used to discover a number of antibodies that bind and neutralize various combinations of TGFβ1, 2 or 3. The primary panning did not yield any uniformly potent pan-isoform neutralizing antibodies; therefore, an antibody that displayed potent TGFβ 1, 2 inhibition, but more modest affinity versus TGFβ3, was affinity matured by shuffling with a light chain sub-library and further screening. This process yielded a high affinity pan-isoform neutralizing clone. Antibodies were analyzed and compared by binding affinity, as well as receptor and epitope competition by surface plasmon resonance methods. The antibodies were also shown to neutralize TGFβ effects in vitro in 3 assays: 1) interleukin (IL)-4 induced HT-2 cell proliferation; 2) TGFβ-mediated IL-11 release by A549 cells; and 3) decreasing SMAD2 phosphorylation in Detroit 562 cells. The antibodies' potency in these in vitro assays correlated well with their isoform-specific affinities. Furthermore, the ability of the affinity-matured clone to decrease tumor burden in a Detroit 562 xenograft study was superior to that of the parent clone. This affinity-matured antibody acts as a very potent inhibitor of all 3 main isoforms of TGFβ and may have utility for therapeutic intervention in human disease.

  7. Cross-arm binding efficiency of an EGFR x c-Met bispecific antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Songmao; Moores, Sheri; Jarantow, Stephen; Pardinas, Jose; Chiu, Mark; Zhou, Honghui; Wang, Weirong

    2016-01-01

    Multispecific proteins, such as bispecific antibodies (BsAbs), that bind to two different ligands are becoming increasingly important therapeutic agents. Such BsAbs can exhibit markedly increased target binding and target residence time when both pharmacophores bind simultaneously to their targets. The cross-arm binding efficiency (χ) describes an increase in apparent affinity when a BsAb binds to the second target or receptor (R2) following its binding to the first target or receptor (R1) on the same cell. χ is an intrinsic characteristic of a BsAb mostly related to the binding epitopes on R1 and R2. χ can have significant impacts on the binding to R2 for BsAbs targeting two receptors on the same cell. JNJ-61186372, a BsAb that targets epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-Met, was used as the model compound for establishing a method to characterize χ. The χ for JNJ-61186372 was successfully determined via fitting of in vitro cell binding data to a ligand binding model that incorporated χ. The model-derived χ value was used to predict the binding of JNJ-61186372 to individual EGFR and c-Met receptors on tumor cell lines, and the results agreed well with the observed IC50 for EGFR and c-Met phosphorylation inhibition by JNJ-61186372. Consistent with the model, JNJ-61186372 was shown to be more effective than the combination therapy of anti-EGFR and anti-c-Met monovalent antibodies at the same dose level in a mouse xenograft model. Our results showed that χ is an important characteristic of BsAbs, and should be considered for rationale design of BsAbs targeting two membrane bound targets on the same cell.

  8. Sperm-immobilizing monoclonal antibody to human seminal plasma antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, M; Watanabe, T; Maruyama, S; Koyama, K; Isojima, S

    1980-01-01

    Rat spleen cells immunized to human azoospermic semen (a mixture of seminal plasma components) and mouse myeloma cells (P3/X63 Ag8U1; P3U1) (Marguilies et al., 1976) were successfully fused with polyethylene glycol (PEG 1500) and 19 of 89 fused cell cultures were found to produce sperm-immobilizing antibody. The cells that produced antibody indicating the highest sperm-immobilizing activity were distributed into wells for further recloning and 10 clones producing sperm-immobilizing antibody were established. The clone (1C4) producing the highest antibody titre was found to produce a large amount of IgG in culture supernatants and to contain a mixture of rat and mouse chromosomes. It was proved by immunodiffusion test that the monoclonal antibody was produced to the human seminal plasma antigen No. 7 which is common to human milk protein. Using this hybridoma which produced a large amount of monoclonal sperm-immobilizing antibody, a new method could be developed for purifying human seminal plasma antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography with bound antibody from the hybridoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6783353

  9. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J. (SAIC); (NCI)

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  10. Antibody protection reveals extended epitopes on the human TSH receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauf Latif

    Full Text Available Stimulating, and some blocking, antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR have conformation-dependent epitopes reported to involve primarily the leucine rich repeat region of the ectodomain (LRD. However, successful crystallization of TSHR residues 22-260 has omitted important extracellular non-LRD residues including the hinge region which connects the TSHR ectodomain to the transmembrane domain and which is involved in ligand induced signal transduction. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to determine if TSHR antibodies (TSHR-Abs have non-LRD binding sites outside the LRD. To obtain this information we employed the method of epitope protection in which we first protected TSHR residues 1-412 with intact TSHR antibodies and then enzymatically digested the unprotected residues. Those peptides remaining were subsequently delineated by mass spectrometry. Fourteen out of 23 of the reported stimulating monoclonal TSHR-Ab crystal contact residues were protected by this technique which may reflect the higher binding energies of certain residues detected in this approach. Comparing the protected epitopes of two stimulating TSHR-Abs we found both similarities and differences but both antibodies also contacted the hinge region and the amino terminus of the TSHR following the signal peptide and encompassing cysteine box 1 which has previously been shown to be important for TSH binding and activation. A monoclonal blocking TSHR antibody revealed a similar pattern of binding regions but the residues that it contacted on the LRD were again distinct. These data demonstrated that conformationally dependent TSHR-Abs had epitopes not confined to the LRDs but also incorporated epitopes not revealed in the available crystal structure. Furthermore, the data also indicated that in addition to overlapping contact regions within the LRD, there are unique epitope patterns for each of the antibodies which may contribute to their functional heterogeneity.

  11. Molecular Determinants for Antibody Binding on Group 1 House Dust Mite Allergens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Pomés, Anna; Glesner, Jill; Vailes, Lisa D.; Osinski, Tomasz; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Majorek, Karolina A.; Heymann, Peter W.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Minor, Wladek; Chapman, Martin D. (INDOOR Bio.); (UV); (UVHS)

    2012-07-11

    House dust mites produce potent allergens, Der p 1 and Der f 1, that cause allergic sensitization and asthma. Der p 1 and Der f 1 are cysteine proteases that elicit IgE responses in 80% of mite-allergic subjects and have proinflammatory properties. Their antigenic structure is unknown. Here, we present crystal structures of natural Der p 1 and Der f 1 in complex with a monoclonal antibody, 4C1, which binds to a unique cross-reactive epitope on both allergens associated with IgE recognition. The 4C1 epitope is formed by almost identical amino acid sequences and contact residues. Mutations of the contact residues abrogate mAb 4C1 binding and reduce IgE antibody binding. These surface-exposed residues are molecular targets that can be exploited for development of recombinant allergen vaccines.

  12. Use of a Monoclonal Antibody to Purify the Tetrodotoxin Binding Component from the Electroplax of Electrophorus electricus

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama, H; Withy, R M; Raftery, M A

    1982-01-01

    The tetrodotoxin binding component of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel from Electrophorus electricus electroplax was purified by using a monoclonal antibody. An impure preparation of tetrodotoxin binding component was mixed with the pure monoclonal antibody, and the immune complex so formed was isolated by affinity chromatography on a protein A-Sepharose column. Excess antibody was removed by ion-exchange chromatography. The purified material has a specific activity of over 1,800 pmol of ...

  13. Development and characterization of a human antibody reference panel against erythropoietin suitable for the standardization of ESA immunogenicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytych, Daniel T; Barger, Troy E; King, Chadwick; Grauer, Stephanie; Haldankar, Raj; Hsu, Eric; Wu, Michelle Min; Shiwalkar, Mukta; Sanchez, Sergio; Kuck, Andrew; Civoli, Francesca; Sun, Jilin; Swanson, Steven J

    2012-08-31

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) has been used therapeutically for more than two decades in the treatment of anemia. Although EPO is generally well tolerated, in rare cases, patients have developed anti-EPO antibodies that can negatively impact safety and efficacy. Therefore, the detection of antibodies against EPO is a regulatory requirement during clinical development and post-approval. Although it is a rare phenomenon, antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a serious complication than can result from antibodies that develop and neutralize EPO as well as endogenous erythropoietin. Currently, there are no universally accepted analytical methods to detect the full repertoire of binding and neutralizing anti-EPO antibodies. A number of different methods that differ in terms of antibodies detected and assay sensitivities are used by different manufacturers. There is also a lack of antibody reference reagents, and therefore no consistent basis for detecting and measuring anti-EPO antibodies. Reference reagents, with established ranges, are essential to monitor the safety and efficacy of all erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) structurally related to human erythropoietin. This is the first report of the development and characterization of a panel of fully human antibodies against EPO suitable as reference reagents. The characteristics of antibodies within the panel were selected based on the prevalence of non-neutralizing IgG and IgM antibodies in non-PRCA patients and neutralizing IgG antibodies, including IgG1 and IgG4, in antibody-mediated PRCA subjects. The reference panel includes antibodies of high- and low-affinity with binding specificity to neutralizing and non-neutralizing erythropoietin epitopes. The subclass of human antibodies in this reference panel includes an IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4, as well as an IgM isotype. This antibody panel could help select appropriate immunogenicity assays, guide validation, and monitor assay performance

  14. Simulation and Theory of Antibody Binding to Crowded Antigen-Covered Surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano De Michele

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce a fully flexible coarse-grained model of immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies parametrized directly on cryo-EM data and simulate the binding dynamics of many IgGs to antigens adsorbed on a surface at increasing densities. Moreover, we work out a theoretical model that allows to explain all the features observed in the simulations. Our combined computational and theoretical framework is in excellent agreement with surface-plasmon resonance data and allows us to establish a number of important results. (i Internal flexibility is key to maximize bivalent binding, flexible IgGs being able to explore the surface with their second arm in search for an available hapten. This is made clear by the strongly reduced ability to bind with both arms displayed by artificial IgGs designed to rigidly keep a prescribed shape. (ii The large size of IgGs is instrumental to keep neighboring molecules at a certain distance (surface repulsion, which essentially makes antigens within reach of the second Fab always unoccupied on average. (iii One needs to account independently for the thermodynamic and geometric factors that regulate the binding equilibrium. The key geometrical parameters, besides excluded-volume repulsion, describe the screening of free haptens by neighboring bound antibodies. We prove that the thermodynamic parameters govern the low-antigen-concentration regime, while the surface screening and repulsion only affect the binding at high hapten densities. Importantly, we prove that screening effects are concealed in relative measures, such as the fraction of bivalently bound antibodies. Overall, our model provides a valuable, accurate theoretical paradigm beyond existing frameworks to interpret experimental profiles of antibodies binding to multi-valent surfaces of different sorts in many contexts.

  15. Simulation and Theory of Antibody Binding to Crowded Antigen-Covered Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Michele, Cristiano; De Los Rios, Paolo; Foffi, Giuseppe; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a fully flexible coarse-grained model of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies parametrized directly on cryo-EM data and simulate the binding dynamics of many IgGs to antigens adsorbed on a surface at increasing densities. Moreover, we work out a theoretical model that allows to explain all the features observed in the simulations. Our combined computational and theoretical framework is in excellent agreement with surface-plasmon resonance data and allows us to establish a number of important results. (i) Internal flexibility is key to maximize bivalent binding, flexible IgGs being able to explore the surface with their second arm in search for an available hapten. This is made clear by the strongly reduced ability to bind with both arms displayed by artificial IgGs designed to rigidly keep a prescribed shape. (ii) The large size of IgGs is instrumental to keep neighboring molecules at a certain distance (surface repulsion), which essentially makes antigens within reach of the second Fab always unoccupied on average. (iii) One needs to account independently for the thermodynamic and geometric factors that regulate the binding equilibrium. The key geometrical parameters, besides excluded-volume repulsion, describe the screening of free haptens by neighboring bound antibodies. We prove that the thermodynamic parameters govern the low-antigen-concentration regime, while the surface screening and repulsion only affect the binding at high hapten densities. Importantly, we prove that screening effects are concealed in relative measures, such as the fraction of bivalently bound antibodies. Overall, our model provides a valuable, accurate theoretical paradigm beyond existing frameworks to interpret experimental profiles of antibodies binding to multi-valent surfaces of different sorts in many contexts. PMID:26967624

  16. Human DC-SIGN binds specific human milk glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Alexander J; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Duska-McEwen, Geralyn; Buck, Rachael H; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D

    2016-05-15

    Human milk glycans (HMGs) are prebiotics, pathogen receptor decoys and regulators of host physiology and immune responses. Mechanistically, human lectins (glycan-binding proteins, hGBP) expressed by dendritic cells (DCs) are of major interest, as these cells directly contact HMGs. To explore such interactions, we screened many C-type lectins and sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) expressed by DCs for glycan binding on microarrays presenting over 200 HMGs. Unexpectedly, DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) showed robust binding to many HMGs, whereas other C-type lectins failed to bind, and Siglec-5 and Siglec-9 showed weak binding to a few glycans. By contrast, most hGBP bound to multiple glycans on other microarrays lacking HMGs. An α-linked fucose residue was characteristic of HMGs bound by DC-SIGN. Binding of DC-SIGN to the simple HMGs 2'-fucosyl-lactose (2'-FL) and 3-fucosyl-lactose (3-FL) was confirmed by flow cytometry to beads conjugated with 2'-FL or 3-FL, as well as the ability of the free glycans to inhibit DC-SIGN binding. 2'-FL had an IC50 of ∼1 mM for DC-SIGN, which is within the physiological concentration of 2'-FL in human milk. These results demonstrate that DC-SIGN among the many hGBP expressed by DCs binds to α-fucosylated HMGs, and suggest that such interactions may be important in influencing immune responses in the developing infant.

  17. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Broadly Neutralizing against Influenza B Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasugi, Mayo; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Yamashita, Akifumi; Kawashita, Norihito; Du, Anariwa; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Misaki, Ryo; Kuhara, Motoki; Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Nakaya, Takaaki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has the ability to evade host immune surveillance through rapid viral genetic drift and reassortment; therefore, it remains a continuous public health threat. The development of vaccines producing broadly reactive antibodies, as well as therapeutic strategies using human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) with global reactivity, has been gathering great interest recently. Here, three hybridoma clones producing HuMAbs against influenza B virus, designated 5A7, 3A2 and 10C4, were prepared using peripheral lymphocytes from vaccinated volunteers, and were investigated for broad cross-reactive neutralizing activity. Of these HuMAbs, 3A2 and 10C4, which recognize the readily mutable 190-helix region near the receptor binding site in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, react only with the Yamagata lineage of influenza B virus. By contrast, HuMAb 5A7 broadly neutralizes influenza B strains that were isolated from 1985 to 2006, belonging to both Yamagata and Victoria lineages. Epitope mapping revealed that 5A7 recognizes 316G, 318C and 321W near the C terminal of HA1, a highly conserved region in influenza B virus. Indeed, no mutations in the amino acid residues of the epitope region were induced, even after the virus was passaged ten times in the presence of HuMAb 5A7. Moreover, 5A7 showed significant therapeutic efficacy in mice, even when it was administered 72 hours post-infection. These results indicate that 5A7 is a promising candidate for developing therapeutics, and provide insight for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza B virus. PMID:23408886

  18. Isolation of human anti-serum albumin Fab antibodies with an extended serum-half life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyeon-Ju; Kim, Hye-Jin; Cha, Sang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The serum albumin (SA) has been exploited to generate long-acting biotherapeutics by taking advantage of the FcRn-mediated recycling mechanism in a direct or an indirect way. Since Fab fragments have been proven to be clinically safe for human usage, we assumed that human anti-SA Fab antibodies could have a great potential as a carrier molecule to extend the serum half-life of therapeutic proteins. We, herein, had attempted to isolate anti-SA Fab antibodies from HuDVFab-8L antibody library via a phage display technology, and identified eight discrete human Fab antibodies. One of the Fab antibodies, SL335, showed the strongest binding reactivity to human SA with nM range of affinity at both pH 6 and pH 7.4, and cross-reacted to SAs from various species including rat, mouse, canine and monkey. The in vivo pharmacokinetic assay using a rat model indicated that SL335 has approximately 10 fold longer serum half-life and 26 to 44-fold increase in AUC0 → ∞ compared to the negative control Fab molecule in both intravenous and subcutaneous administrations. Knowing that Fabs have proven to be safe in clinics for a long time, SL335 seems to have a great potential in generating long-acting protein drugs by tagging effector molecules with either chemical conjugation or genetic fusion.

  19. Binding of HIV-1 gp41-directed neutralizing and non-neutralizing fragment antibody binding domain (Fab and single chain variable fragment (ScFv antibodies to the ectodomain of gp41 in the pre-hairpin and six-helix bundle conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Louis

    Full Text Available We previously reported a series of antibodies, in fragment antigen binding domain (Fab formats, selected from a human non-immune phage library, directed against the internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR of HIV-1 gp41. Broadly neutralizing antibodies from that series bind to both the fully exposed N-HR trimer, representing the pre-hairpin intermediate state of gp41, and to partially-exposed N-HR helices within the context of the gp41 six-helix bundle. While the affinities of the Fabs for pre-hairpin intermediate mimetics vary by only 2 to 20-fold between neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, differences in inhibition of viral entry exceed three orders of magnitude. Here we compare the binding of neutralizing (8066 and non-neutralizing (8062 antibodies, differing in only four positions within the CDR-H2 binding loop, in Fab and single chain variable fragment (ScFv formats, to several pre-hairpin intermediate and six-helix bundle constructs of gp41. Residues 56 and 58 of the mini-antibodies are shown to be crucial for neutralization activity. There is a large differential (≥ 150-fold in binding affinity between neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies to the six-helix bundle of gp41 and binding to the six-helix bundle does not involve displacement of the outer C-terminal helices of the bundle. The binding stoichiometry is one six-helix bundle to one Fab or three ScFvs. We postulate that neutralization by the 8066 antibody is achieved by binding to a continuum of states along the fusion pathway from the pre-hairpin intermediate all the way to the formation of the six-helix bundle, but prior to irreversible fusion between viral and cellular membranes.

  20. Native Mass Spectrometry, Ion mobility, and Collision-Induced Unfolding Categorize Malaria Antigen/Antibody Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yining; Salinas, Nichole D.; Chen, Edwin; Tolia, Niraj H.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is a promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. Recently, we reported the epitopes on PvDBP region II (PvDBP-II) for three inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (2D10, 2H2, and 2C6). In this communication, we describe the combination of native mass spectrometry and ion mobility (IM) with collision induced unfolding (CIU) to study the conformation and stabilities of three malarial antigen-antibody complexes. These complexes, when collisionally activated, undergo conformational changes that depend on the location of the epitope. CIU patterns for PvDBP-II in complex with antibody 2D10 and 2H2 are highly similar, indicating comparable binding topology and stability. A different CIU fingerprint is observed for PvDBP-II/2C6, indicating that 2C6 binds to PvDBP-II on an epitope different from 2D10 and 2H2. This work supports the use of CIU as a means of classifying antigen-antibody complexes by their epitope maps in a high throughput screening workflow. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Contribution of the trifluoroacetyl group in the thermodynamics of antigen-antibody binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Masayuki; Saito, Minoru; Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the binding of the 7C8 antibody to the chloramphenicol phosphonate antigens-one containing a trifluoroacetyl group (CP-F) and the other containing an acetyl group (CP-H)-by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The thermodynamic difference due to the substitution of F by H was evaluated using free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We have previously shown that another antibody, namely, 6D9, binds more weakly to CP-H than to CP-F, mainly due to the different hydration free energies of the dissociated state and not due to the unfavorable hydrophobic interactions with the antibody in the bound state. Unlike in the binding of the trifluoroacetyl group with 6D9, in its binding with 7C8, it is exposed to the solvent, as seen in the crystal structure of the complex of 7C8 with CP-F. The thermodynamic analysis performed in this study showed that the binding affinity of 7C8 for CP-H is similar to that for CP-F, but this binding to CP-H is accompanied with less favorable enthalpy and more favorable entropy changes. The free energy calculations indicated that, upon the substitution of F by H, enthalpy and entropy changes in the associated and dissociated states were decreased, but the magnitude of enthalpy and entropy changes in the dissociated state was larger than that in the associated state. The differences in binding free energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes determined by the free energy calculations for the substitution of F by H are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Characterization of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirley, Terence L; Norman, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Variations of post-translational modifications are important for stability and in vivo behavior of therapeutic antibodies. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (h2E2) was characterized for heterogeneity of N-linked glycosylation and disulfide bonds. In addition, charge heterogeneity, which is partially due to the presence or absence of C-terminal lysine on the heavy chains, was examined. For cocaine overdose therapy, Fab fragments may be therapeutic, and thus, a simplified method of generation, purification, and characterization of the Fab fragment generated by Endoproteinase Lys-C digestion was devised. Both the intact h2E2 antibody and purified Fab fragments were analyzed for their affinities for cocaine and 2 of its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene, by fluorescence quenching of intrinsic antibody tyrosine and tryptophan fluorescence resulting from binding of these drugs. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements are in agreement with recently published radioligand and ELISA binding assays. The dissociation constants determined for the h2E2 monoclonal and its Fab fragment are approximately 1, 5, and 20 nM for cocaethylene, cocaine, and benzoylecgonine, respectively. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching (emission at 330 nm) was measured after either excitation of tyrosine and tryptophan (280 nm) or selective excitation of tryptophan alone (295 nm). More accurate binding constants are obtained using tryptophan selective excitation at 295 nm, likely due to interfering absorption of cocaine and metabolites at 280 nm. These quenching results are consistent with multiple tryptophan and tyrosine residues in or near the predicted binding location of cocaine in a previously published 3-D model of this antibody's variable region.

  3. The kinetics of antibody binding to Plasmodium falciparum VAR2CSA PfEMP1 antigen and modelling of PfEMP1 antigen packing on the membrane knobs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Lars M; Salanti, Ali; Dobrilovic, Tina

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Infected humans make protective antibody responses to the PfEMP1 adhesion antigens exported by Plasmodium falciparum parasites to the erythrocyte membrane, but little is known about the kinetics of this antibody-receptor binding reaction or how the topology of PfEMP1 on the ...

  4. STUDY OF ESTROGEN BINDING SITE ON HUMAN EJACULATED SPERMATOZOA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHUJin-Shong; WANGYi-Fei

    1989-01-01

    The specific estrogen binding site for 17β-estradiol has been investigated on human spermatozoa by electron microscopec autoradiography. The results show that the binding sites were distributed over the surface of human spermatozoa: acrosomal cap, equatorial

  5. Recombinant human MDM2 oncoprotein shows sequence composition selectivity for binding to both RNA and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challen, Christine; Anderson, John J; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; Lunec, John

    2012-03-01

    MDM2 is a 90 kDa nucleo-phosphoprotein that binds p53 and other proteins contributing to its oncogenic properties. Its structure includes an amino proximal p53 binding site, a central acidic domain and a carboxy region which incorporates Zinc and Ring Finger domains suggestive of nucleic acid binding or transcription factor function. It has previously been reported that a bacculovirus expressed MDM2 protein binds RNA in a sequence-specific manner through the Ring Finger domain, however, its ability to bind DNA has yet to be examined. We report here that a bacterially expressed human MDM2 protein binds both DNA as well as the previously defined RNA consensus sequence. DNA binding appears selective and involves the carboxy-terminal domain of the molecule. RNA binding is inhibited by an MDM2 specific antibody, which recognises an epitope within the carboxy region of the protein. Selection cloning and sequence analysis of MDM2 DNA binding sequences, unlike RNA binding sequences, revealed no obvious DNA binding consensus sequence, but preferential binding to oligopurine:pyrimidine-rich stretches. Our results suggest that the observed preferential DNA binding may occur through the Zinc Finger or in a charge-charge interaction through the Ring Finger, thereby implying potentially different mechanisms for DNA and RNA MDM2 binding.

  6. Anti-epitope antibody,a novel site-directed antibody against human acetylcholinesterase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-mei ZHANG; Gang LIU; Man-ji SUN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct synthetic antigens using the epitope of human brain acetylcholinesterase (hbAChE) for induction and detection of the specific antibody against the epitope, and to analyse the immunogenicity of the antibody.METHODS: The epitope (RTVLVSMNYR, amino acids 143-152) of hbAChE was chemically synthesized, coupled with the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) to construct an artificial immunogen (KLH-epitope), and injected into rabbits to raise antibody. The epitope conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the detection antigen. The specificity of the antibody was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The immunoreaction between the anti-recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE)polyclonal antibody and the biotinylated-epitope was examined by indirect ELISA. RESULTS: The erythrocyte AChE, the hbAChE, rhBChE and the BSA-epitope all immunoreacted with the anti-epitope antibody against the epitope (143-152) of hbAChE, whereas the torpedo AChE did not. CONCLUSION: The hbAChE, the human erythrocyte AChE and hBChE share the conservative antigenic epitope RTVLVSMNYR, hence they can all immunoreact with the anti-epitope antibody. Since the epitope of hbAChE is less similar with the aligned amino acid sequences of AChE of Torpedo californica or Torpedo marmorata, there is not any immunoreactivity between them. The R, M, and N residues in the epitope seem to be necessary radicals for the conservation of antigenicity.

  7. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  8. Structural basis for Marburg virus neutralization by a cross-reactive human antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Takao; Fusco, Marnie L; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Lee, Jeffrey E; Flyak, Andrew I; Matsuoka, Rei; Kohda, Daisuke; Yanagi, Yusuke; Hammel, Michal; Crowe, James E; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2015-02-26

    The filoviruses, including Marburg and Ebola, express a single glycoprotein on their surface, termed GP, which is responsible for attachment and entry of target cells. Filovirus GPs differ by up to 70% in protein sequence, and no antibodies are yet described that cross-react among them. Here, we present the 3.6 Å crystal structure of Marburg virus GP in complex with a cross-reactive antibody from a human survivor, and a lower resolution structure of the antibody bound to Ebola virus GP. The antibody, MR78, recognizes a GP1 epitope conserved across the filovirus family, which likely represents the binding site of their NPC1 receptor. Indeed, MR78 blocks binding of the essential NPC1 domain C. These structures and additional small-angle X-ray scattering of mucin-containing MARV and EBOV GPs suggest why such antibodies were not previously elicited in studies of Ebola virus, and provide critical templates for development of immunotherapeutics and inhibitors of entry.

  9. Viraemia suppressed in HIV-1-infected humans by broadly neutralizing antibody 3BNC117.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Marina; Klein, Florian; Lorenzi, Julio C C; Seaman, Michael S; West, Anthony P; Buckley, Noreen; Kremer, Gisela; Nogueira, Lilian; Braunschweig, Malte; Scheid, Johannes F; Horwitz, Joshua A; Shimeliovich, Irina; Ben-Avraham, Sivan; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; Platten, Martin; Lehmann, Clara; Burke, Leah A; Hawthorne, Thomas; Gorelick, Robert J; Walker, Bruce D; Keler, Tibor; Gulick, Roy M; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Schlesinger, Sarah J; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-06-25

    HIV-1 immunotherapy with a combination of first generation monoclonal antibodies was largely ineffective in pre-clinical and clinical settings and was therefore abandoned. However, recently developed single-cell-based antibody cloning methods have uncovered a new generation of far more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 (refs 4, 5). These antibodies can prevent infection and suppress viraemia in humanized mice and nonhuman primates, but their potential for human HIV-1 immunotherapy has not been evaluated. Here we report the results of a first-in-man dose escalation phase 1 clinical trial of 3BNC117, a potent human CD4 binding site antibody, in uninfected and HIV-1-infected individuals. 3BNC117 infusion was well tolerated and demonstrated favourable pharmacokinetics. A single 30 mg kg(-1) infusion of 3BNC117 reduced the viral load in HIV-1-infected individuals by 0.8-2.5 log10 and viraemia remained significantly reduced for 28 days. Emergence of resistant viral strains was variable, with some individuals remaining sensitive to 3BNC117 for a period of 28 days. We conclude that, as a single agent, 3BNC117 is safe and effective in reducing HIV-1 viraemia, and that immunotherapy should be explored as a new modality for HIV-1 prevention, therapy and cure.

  10. SARS Patients-derived Human Recombinant Antibodies to S and M Proteins Efficiently Neutralize SARS-Coronavirus Infectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI-FANG LIANG; KONG-XING WU; ZHAO-HUI XIONG; QI JIN; DE-XIN LI; RUN-LEI DU; JING-ZHI LIU; CHUAN LI; QUAN-FU ZHANG; LU-LU HAN; JIAN-SHI YU; SHU-MIN DUAN; XIAO-FANG WANG

    2005-01-01

    Objective To develop a specific SARS virus-targeted antibody preparation for emergent prophylaxis and treatment of SARS virus infection. Methods By using phage display technology, we constructed a naive antibody library from convalescent SARS patient lymphocytes. To obtain the neutralizing antibody to SARS virus surface proteins, the library panning procedure was performed on purified SARS virions and the specific Fab antibody clones were enriched by four rounds of repeated panning procedure and screened by highthroughput selection. The selected Fab antibodies expressed in the periplasma of E. Coli were soluble and further purified and tested for their binding properties and antiviral function to SARS virus. The functional Fab antibodies were converted to full human IgG antibodies with recombinant baculovirus/insect cell systems and their neutralizing activities were further determined. Results After four rounds of the panning, a number of SARS-CoV virus-targeted human recombinant Fab antibodies were isolated from the SARS patient antibody library. Most of these were identified to recognize both natural and recombinant SARS spike (S) proteins, two Fab antibodies were specific for the virus membrane (M) protein, only one bound to SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein. The SARS-CoV S and M protein-targeted Fab or IgG antibodies showed significant neutralizing activities in cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibition neutralization test, these antibodies were able to completely neutralize the SARS virus and protect the Vero cells from CPE after virus infection. However, the N protein-targeted Fab or IgG antibodies failed to neutralize the virus. In addition, the SARS N protein-targeted human Fab antibody reacted with the denatured N proteins, whereas none of the S and M protein specific neutralizing antibodies did. These results suggested that the S and M protein-specific neutralizing antibodies could recognize conformational epitopes which might be involved in the binding of virions

  11. Identification of a human monoclonal antibody to replace equine diphtheria antitoxin for treatment of diphtheria intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevigny, Leila M; Booth, Brian J; Rowley, Kirk J; Leav, Brett A; Cheslock, Peter S; Garrity, Kerry A; Sloan, Susan E; Thomas, William; Babcock, Gregory J; Wang, Yang

    2013-11-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) has been the cornerstone of the treatment of Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection for more than 100 years. Although the global incidence of diphtheria has declined steadily over the last quarter of the 20th century, the disease remains endemic in many parts of the world, and significant outbreaks still occur. DAT is an equine polyclonal antibody that is not commercially available in the United States and is in short supply globally. A safer, more readily available alternative to DAT would be desirable. In the current study, we obtained human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) directly from antibody-secreting cells in the circulation of immunized human volunteers. We isolated a panel of diverse hMAbs that recognized diphtheria toxoid, as well as a variety of recombinant protein fragments of diphtheria toxin. Forty-five unique hMAbs were tested for neutralization of diphtheria toxin in in vitro cytotoxicity assays with a 50% effective concentration of 0.65 ng/ml for the lead candidate hMAb, 315C4. In addition, 25 μg of 315C4 completely protected guinea pigs from intoxication in an in vivo lethality model, yielding an estimated relative potency of 64 IU/mg. In comparison, 1.6 IU of DAT was necessary for full protection from morbidity and mortality in this model. We further established that our lead candidate hMAb binds to the receptor-binding domain of diphtheria toxin and physically blocks the toxin from binding to the putative receptor, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor. The discovery of a specific and potent human neutralizing antibody against diphtheria toxin holds promise as a potential therapeutic.

  12. Structural Studies of Neuropilin/Antibody Complexes Provide Insights Into Semaphorin And VEGF Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleton, B.A.; Wu, P.; Maloney, J.; Yin, J.; Liang, W.-C.; Stawicki, S.; Mortara, K.; Bowman, K.A.; Elliott, J.Michael.; Desmarais, W.; Koch, A.W.; Wu, Y.; Watts, R.J.; Wiesmann, C.

    2009-06-01

    Neuropilins (Nrps) are co-receptors for class 3 semaphorins and vascular endothelial growth factors and important for the development of the nervous system and the vasculature. The extracellular portion of Nrp is composed of two domains that are essential for semaphorin binding (a1a2), two domains necessary for VEGF binding (b1b2), and one domain critical for receptor dimerization (c). We report several crystal structures of Nrp1 and Nrp2 fragments alone and in complex with antibodies that selectively block either semaphorin or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) binding. In these structures, Nrps adopt an unexpected domain arrangement in which the a2, b1, and b2 domains form a tightly packed core that is only loosely connected to the a1 domain. The locations of the antibody epitopes together with in vitro experiments indicate that VEGF and semaphorin do not directly compete for Nrp binding. Based upon our structural and functional data, we propose possible models for ligand binding to neuropilins.

  13. Conformational antibody binding to a native, cell-free expressed GPCR in block copolymer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoog, Hans-Peter M; Lin JieRong, Esther M; Banerjee, Sourabh; Décaillot, Fabien M; Nallani, Madhavan

    2014-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a key role in physiological processes and are attractive drug targets. Their biophysical characterization is, however, highly challenging because of their innate instability outside a stabilizing membrane and the difficulty of finding a suitable expression system. We here show the cell-free expression of a GPCR, CXCR4, and its direct embedding in diblock copolymer membranes. The polymer-stabilized CXCR4 is readily immobilized onto biosensor chips for label-free binding analysis. Kinetic characterization using a conformationally sensitive antibody shows the receptor to exist in the correctly folded conformation, showing binding behaviour that is commensurate with heterologously expressed CXCR4.

  14. Conformational antibody binding to a native, cell-free expressed GPCR in block copolymer membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter M de Hoog

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs play a key role in physiological processes and are attractive drug targets. Their biophysical characterization is, however, highly challenging because of their innate instability outside a stabilizing membrane and the difficulty of finding a suitable expression system. We here show the cell-free expression of a GPCR, CXCR4, and its direct embedding in diblock copolymer membranes. The polymer-stabilized CXCR4 is readily immobilized onto biosensor chips for label-free binding analysis. Kinetic characterization using a conformationally sensitive antibody shows the receptor to exist in the correctly folded conformation, showing binding behaviour that is commensurate with heterologously expressed CXCR4.

  15. Binding Potency of Heparin Immobilized on Activated Charcoal for DNA Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snezhkova, E A; Tridon, A; Evrard, B; Nikolaev, V G; Uvarov, V Yu; Tsimbalyuk, R S; Ivanuk, A A; Komov, V V; Sakhno, L A

    2016-02-01

    In vitro experiments showed that heparin adsorbed on activated charcoal can bind antibodies raised against native and single-stranded DNA in a diluted sera pool with a high level of these DNA. Thus, heparin used as anticoagulant during hemosorption procedure can demonstrate supplementary therapeutic activity resulting from its interaction with various agents involved in acute and chronic inflammatory reactions such as DNA- and RNA-binding substances, proinflammatory cytokines, complement components, growth factors, etc. Research and development of heparin-containing carbonic adsorbents for the therapy of numerous inflammatory and autoimmune diseases seems to be a promising avenue in hematology.

  16. Human antibody and antigen response to IncA antibody of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, P Y; Hsu, M C; Huang, C T; Li, S Y

    2007-01-01

    The high prevalence of C. trachomatis worldwide has underscored the importance of identifying specific immunogenic antigens in facilitating diagnosis as well as vaccine development. The aim of this study is to evaluate IncA antibody and antigen production in natural human infections. Our temporal expression study showed that IncA transcription and protein expression could be detected as early as 4 hours after the start of infection. Antibody responses could be detected in urine and genital swab samples from C. trachomatis-positive patients. It is especially interesting to note that the IncA antigen could be detected in urine. In conclusion, we have identified IncA as an important antigen in human. The potential applicability of the IncA antibody or antigen in the diagnosis as well as to vaccine development for C. trachomatis is also discussed.

  17. Binding of a neutralizing antibody to dengue virus alters the arrangement of surface glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lok, Shee-Mei; Kostyuchenko, Victor; Nybakken, Grant E.; Holdaway, Heather A.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Sukupolvi-Petty, Soila; Sedlak, Dagmar; Fremont, Daved H.; Chipman, Paul R.; Roehrig, John T.; Diamond, Michael S.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue); (WU-MED); (CDC)

    2008-04-02

    The monoclonal antibody 1A1D-2 has been shown to strongly neutralize dengue virus serotypes 1, 2 and 3, primarily by inhibiting attachment to host cells. A crystal structure of its antigen binding fragment (Fab) complexed with domain III of the viral envelope glycoprotein, E, showed that the epitope would be partially occluded in the known structure of the mature dengue virus. Nevertheless, antibody could bind to the virus at 37 degrees C, suggesting that the virus is in dynamic motion making hidden epitopes briefly available. A cryo-electron microscope image reconstruction of the virus:Fab complex showed large changes in the organization of the E protein that exposed the epitopes on two of the three E molecules in each of the 60 icosahedral asymmetric units of the virus. The changes in the structure of the viral surface are presumably responsible for inhibiting attachment to cells.

  18. New Anti-Nodal Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting the Nodal Pre-Helix Loop Involved in Cripto-1 Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalia Focà

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nodal is a potent embryonic morphogen belonging to the TGF-β superfamily. Typically, it also binds to the ALK4/ActRIIB receptor complex in the presence of the co-receptor Cripto-1. Nodal expression is physiologically restricted to embryonic tissues and human embryonic stem cells, is absent in normal cells but re-emerges in several human cancers, including melanoma, breast, and colon cancer. Our aim was to obtain mAbs able to recognize Nodal on a major CBR (Cripto-Binding-Region site and to block the Cripto-1-mediated signalling. To achieve this, antibodies were raised against hNodal(44–67 and mAbs generated by the hybridoma technology. We have selected one mAb, named 3D1, which strongly associates with full-length rhNodal (KD 1.4 nM and recognizes the endogenous protein in a panel of human melanoma cell lines by western blot and FACS analyses. 3D1 inhibits the Nodal-Cripto-1 binding and blocks Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Data suggest that inhibition of the Nodal-Cripto-1 axis is a valid therapeutic approach against melanoma and 3D1 is a promising and interesting agent for blocking Nodal-Cripto mediated tumor development. These findings increase the interest for Nodal as both a diagnostic and prognostic marker and as a potential new target for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Preexisting human antibodies neutralize recently emerged H7N9 influenza strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry Dunand, Carole J.; Leon, Paul E.; Kaur, Kaval; Tan, Gene S.; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Andrews, Sarah; Huang, Min; Qu, Xinyan; Huang, Yunping; Salgado-Ferrer, Marlene; Ho, Irvin Y.; Taylor, William; Hai, Rong; Wrammert, Jens; Ahmed, Rafi; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and seasonal persistence of pathogenic H7N9 influenza viruses in China have raised concerns about the pandemic potential of this strain, which, if realized, would have a substantial effect on global health and economies. H7N9 viruses are able to bind to human sialic acid receptors and are also able to develop resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors without a loss in fitness. It is not clear whether prior exposure to circulating human influenza viruses or influenza vaccination confers immunity to H7N9 strains. Here, we demonstrate that 3 of 83 H3 HA-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated by individuals that had previously undergone influenza A virus vaccination were able to neutralize H7N9 viruses and protect mice against homologous challenge. The H7N9-neutralizing antibodies bound to the HA stalk domain but exhibited a difference in their breadth of reactivity to different H7 influenza subtypes. Mapping viral escape mutations suggested that these antibodies bind at least two different epitopes on the stalk region. Together, these results indicate that these broadly neutralizing antibodies may contribute to the development of therapies against H7N9 strains and may also be effective against pathogenic H7 strains that emerge in the future. PMID:25689254

  20. Flow cytometry-based assay to evaluate human serum MUC1-Tn antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Elssen, Catharina H M J; Clausen, Henrik; Germeraad, Wilfred T V

    2011-01-01

    to detect antibodies binding to the underglycosylated MUC1 protein. This cellular system is complementary to the previously published methods to detect MUC1 serum antibodies, since the antibodies to the native protein are evaluated and therefore it can be effectively used for MUC1 antibody monitoring...

  1. Enhanced human receptor binding by H5 haemagglutinins

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Xiao, Haixia; Martin, Stephen R.; Coombs, Peter J.; Liu, Junfeng; Collins, Patrick J.; Vachieri, Sebastien G.; Walker, Philip A.; Lin, Yi Pu; McCauley, John W.; Gamblin, Steven J.; John J Skehel

    2014-01-01

    Mutant H5N1 influenza viruses have been isolated from humans that have increased human receptor avidity. We have compared the receptor binding properties of these mutants with those of wild-type viruses, and determined the structures of their haemagglutinins in complex with receptor analogues. Mutants from Vietnam bind tighter to human receptor by acquiring basic residues near the receptor binding site. They bind more weakly to avian receptor because they lack specific interactions between As...

  2. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Xiao

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252 and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254 by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  3. Current status of cancer immunodetection with radiolabeled human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, R; Abdel-Nabi, H; Serafini, A; Pecking, A; Klein, J L; Hanna, M G

    1993-04-01

    The use of radiolabeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) for cancer immunodetection has been limited by the development of human antimouse antibodies (HAMA). Human monoclonal antibodies do not elicit a significant human antihuman (HAHA) response. The generation and production of human monoclonal antibodies met with technical difficulties that resulted in delaying their clinical testing. Human monoclonal antibodies of all isotypes have been obtained. Most were immunoglobulin (Ig) M directed against intracellular antigens. Two antibodies, 16.88 (IgM) and 88BV59 (IgG3k), recognize different epitopes on a tumor-associated antigen, CTA 16.88, homologous to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. CTA 16.88 is expressed by most epithelial-derived tumors including carcinomas of the colon, pancreas, breast, ovary, and lung. The in vivo targeting by these antibodies is related to their localization in nonnecrotic areas of tumors. Repeated administration of 16.88 over 5 weeks to a cumulative dose of 1,000 mg did not elicit a HAHA response. Two of 53 patients developed a low titer of HAHA 1 to 3 months after a single administration of 88BV59. Planar imaging of colorectal cancer with Iodine-131 (131I)-16.88 was positive in two studies in 9 of 12 and 16 of 20 patients preselected by immunohistochemistry. Tumors less than 2 cm in diameter are usually not detected. The lack of immunogenicity and long tumor residence time (average = 17 days) makes 16.88 a good candidate for therapy. Radioimmunlymphoscintigraphy with indium-111 (111In)-LiLo-16.88 administered by an intramammary route was used in the presurgical staging of primary breast cancer. The negative predictive value of lymph node metastases for tumors less than 3 cm was 90.5%. Planar and single photon emission computed tomography imaging of colorectal carcinoma with technetium-99m (99mTc) 88BV59 was compared with computed tomography (CT) scan in 36 surgical patients. The antibody scan was more sensitive than the CT scan in detecting

  4. Technical note: Protozoa-specific antibodies raised in sheep plasma bind to their target protozoa in the rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Y J; Rea, S M; Popovski, S; Skillman, L C; Wright, A-D G

    2014-12-01

    Binding of IgG antibodies to Entodinium spp. in the rumen of sheep (Ovis aries) was investigated by adding IgG, purified from plasma, directly into the rumen. Plasma IgG was sourced from sheep that had or had not been immunized with a vaccine containing whole fixed Entodinium spp. cells. Ruminal fluid was sampled approximately 2 h after each antibody dosing. Binding of protozoa by a specific antibody was detected using an indirect fluorescent antibody test. An antibody titer in the ruminal fluid was determined by ELISA, and the concentration of ruminal fluid ammonia-N and ruminal pH were also determined. Entodinium spp. and total protozoa from IgG-infused sheep were enumerated by microscopic counts. Two-hourly additions of IgG maintained a low antibody titer in the rumen for 12 h and the binding of the antibody to the rumen protozoa was demonstrated. Increased ammonia-N concentrations and altered ruminal fluid pH patterns indicated that additional fermentation of protein was occurring in the rumen after addition of IgG. No reduction in numbers of Entodinium spp. was observed (P>0.05). Although binding of antibodies to protozoa has been demonstrated in the rumen, it is unclear how much cell death occurred. On the balance of probability, it would appear that the antibody was degraded or partially degraded, and the impact of this on protozoal populations and the measurement of a specific titer is also unclear.

  5. The Mesenchymal Precursor Cell Marker Antibody STRO-1 Binds to Cell Surface Heat Shock Cognate 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitter, Stephen; Gronthos, Stan; Ooi, Soo Siang; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2016-12-27

    Since its discovery more than 25 years ago, the STRO-1 antibody has played a fundamental role in defining the hierarchical nature of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) and their progeny. STRO-1 antibody binding remains a hallmark of immature pluripotent MPC. Despite the significance of STRO-1 in the MPC field, the identity of the antigen has remained elusive. Using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, coupled with Western blotting and Tandem mass spectroscopy, we have identified the STRO-1 antigen as heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70;HSPA8). STRO-1 binds to immune-precipitated HSC70 and siRNA-mediated knock down of HSPA8 reduced STRO-1 binding. STRO-1 surface binding does not correlate with HSC70 expression and sequestration of cholesterol reduces STRO-1 surface binding, suggesting that the plasma membrane lipid composition may be an important determinant in the presentation of HSC70 on the cell surface. HSC70 is present on the surface of STRO-1(+) but not STRO-1(-) cell lines as assessed by cell surface biotinylation and recombinant HSC70 blocks STRO-1 binding to the cell surface. The STRO-1 epitope on HSC70 was mapped to the ATPase domain using a series of deletion mutants in combination with peptide arrays. Deletion of the first four amino acids of the consensus epitope negated STRO-1 binding. Notably, in addition to HSC70, STRO-1 cross-reacts with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), however all the clonogenic cell activity is restricted to the STRO-1(BRIGHT) /HSP70(-) fraction. These results provide important insight into the properties that define multipotent MPC and provide the impetus to explore the role of cell surface HSC70 in MPC biology. Stem Cells 2016.

  6. Monoclonal Antibody 16D10 to the C-Terminal Domain of the Feto-Acinar Pancreatic Protein Binds to Membrane of Human Pancreatic Tumoral SOJ-6 Cells and Inhibits the Growth of Tumor Xenografts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicot-Dubois, Laurence; Aubert, Muriel; Franceschi, Cécile; Mas, Eric; Silvy, Françoise; Crotte, Christian; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Lombardo, Dominique; Sadoulet, Marie-Odile

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Feto-acinar pancreatic protein (FAPP) characterized by mAbJ28 reactivity is a specific component associated with ontogenesis and behaves as an oncodevelopment-associated antigen. We attempted to determine whether pancreatic tumoral SOJ-6 cells are expressed at their surface FAPP antigens and to examine if specific antibodies directed against these FAPP epitopes could decrease the growth of pancreatic tumors in a mice model. For this purpose, we used specific antibodies against either the whole FAPP, the O-glycosylated C-terminal domain, or the N-terminal domain of the protein. Our results indicate that SOJ-6 cells expressed at their surface a 32-kDa peptide corresponding to the C-terminal domain of the FAPP. Furthermore, we show, by using endoproteinase Lys-C or geldanamycin, a drug able to impair the FAPP secretion, that this 32-kDa peptide expressed on the SOJ-6 cell surface comes from the degradation of the FAPP. Finally, an in vivo prospective study using a preventative tumor model in nude mice indicates that targeting this peptide by the use of mAb16D10 inhibits the growth of SOJ-6 xenografts. The specificity of mAb16D10 for pancreatic tumors and the possibility to obtain recombinant structures of mucin-like peptides recognized by mAb16D10 and mAbJ28 are promising tools in immunologic approaches to cure pancreatic cancers. PMID:15720797

  7. Motility assays using myosin attached to surfaces through specific binding to monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, D A; Bourdieu, L; Kinose, F; Libchaber, A

    1995-04-01

    We have analyzed the dependence of actin filament movement on the mode of myosin attachment to surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies that bind to three distinct sites were used to tether myosin to nitrocellulose-coated glass. One antibody reacts with an epitope on the regulatory light chain located at the head-rod junction. The other two react with sites in the rod domain, one in the S2 region near the S2-LMM hinge, and the other at the C terminus of the myosin rod. These monoclonal antibodies were used to provide increasing flexibility in the mode of attachment. Fast skeletal muscle myosin monomers were bound to the surfaces through the specific interaction with these monoclonal antibodies and the sliding movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments analyzed by video microscopy. Each of these antibodies produced stable, myosin-coated surfaces that supported uniform movement of actin over the course of several hours. Attachment of myosin through the anti-S2 and anti-LMM monoclonal antibodies yielded a maximum velocity of 10 microns/s at 30 degrees C, whereas attachment through anti-LC2 produced a lower velocity of 4-5 microns/s. Each antibody showed a characteristic minimum myosin density below which sliding movement was no longer supported and an exponential dependence of actin filament velocity on myosin surface density below Vmax. Maximum sliding velocity was achieved over a range of myosin surface densities. Thus, the specific mode of attachment can influence the characteristic velocity of actin filament movement and the surface density needed to support movement. These data are being used to analyze the dynamics of sliding filament assays and evaluate estimates of the average number of motor molecules per unit length of actin required to support movement.

  8. A MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN BETA-GLUCURONIDASE FOR APPLICATION IN ANTIBODY-DIRECTED ENZYME PRODRUG THERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, Hidde; VANMUIJEN, M; SCHEFFER, G; SCHEPER, RJ; PINEDO, HM; BOVEN, E

    1995-01-01

    The selectivity of anticancer agents may be improved by antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT), The immunogenicity of antibody-enzyme conjugates and the low tumor to normal tissue ratio calls for the use of a human enzyme and the development of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against that enzy

  9. Antioxidant flavonoids bind human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakis, C. D.; Tarantilis, P. A.; Polissiou, M. G.; Diamantoglou, S.; Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.

    2006-10-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a principal extracellular protein with a high concentration in blood plasma and carrier for many drugs to different molecular targets. Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants and prevent DNA damage. The antioxidative protections are related to their binding modes to DNA duplex and complexation with free radicals in vivo. However, flavonoids are known to inhibit the activities of several enzymes such as calcium phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, tyrosine protein kinase from rat lung, phosphorylase kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and DNA topoisomerases that exhibit the importance of flavonoid-protein interaction. This study was designed to examine the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with quercetin (que), kaempferol (kae) and delphinidin (del) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration of 0.25 mM (final) and various drug contents of 1 μM-1 mM. FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polyphenolic binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of flavonoid complexation on protein secondary structure. The spectroscopic results showed that flavonoids are located along the polypeptide chains through H-bonding interactions with overall affinity constant of Kque = 1.4 × 10 4 M -1, Kkae = 2.6 × 10 5 M -1 and Kdel = 4.71 × 10 5 M -1. The protein secondary structure showed no alterations at low pigment concentration (1 μM), whereas at high flavonoid content (1 mM), major reduction of α-helix from 55% (free HSA) to 42-46% and increase of β-sheet from 15% (free HSA) to 17-19% and β-anti from 7% (free HSA) to 10-20% occurred in the flavonoid-HSA adducts. The major reduction of HSA α-helix is indicative of a partial protein unfolding upon flavonoid interaction.

  10. Single cycle structure-based humanization of an anti-nerve growth factor therapeutic antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Covaceuszach

    Full Text Available Most forms of chronic pain are inadequately treated by present therapeutic options. Compelling evidence has accumulated, demonstrating that Nerve Growth Factor (NGF is a key modulator of inflammatory and nociceptive responses, and is a promising target for the treatment of human pathologies linked to chronic and inflammatory pain. There is therefore a growing interest in the development of therapeutic molecules antagonising the NGF pathway and its nociceptor sensitization actions, among which function-blocking anti-NGF antibodies are particularly relevant candidates.In this respect, the rat anti-NGF αD11 monoclonal antibody (mAb is a potent antagonist, able to effectively antagonize rodent and human NGF in a variety of in vitro and in vivo systems. Here we show that mAb αD11 displays a significant analgesic effect in two different models of persistent pain in mice, with a remarkable long-lasting activity. In order to advance αD11 mAb towards its clinical application in man, anti-NGF αD11 mAb was humanized by applying a novel single cycle strategy based on the a priori experimental determination of the crystal and molecular structure of the parental Fragment antigen-binding (Fab. The humanized antibody (hum-αD11 was tested in vitro and in vivo, showing that the binding mode and the NGF neutralizing biological activities of the parental antibody are fully preserved, with even a significant affinity improvement. The results firmly establish hum-αD11 as a lead candidate for clinical applications in a therapeutic area with a severe unmet medical need. More generally, the single-cycle structure-based humanization method represents a considerable improvement over the standard humanization methods, which are intrinsically empirical and require several refinement cycles.

  11. Single Cycle Structure-Based Humanization of an Anti-Nerve Growth Factor Therapeutic Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Marinelli, Sara; Krastanova, Ivet; Ugolini, Gabriele; Pavone, Flaminia; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Most forms of chronic pain are inadequately treated by present therapeutic options. Compelling evidence has accumulated, demonstrating that Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is a key modulator of inflammatory and nociceptive responses, and is a promising target for the treatment of human pathologies linked to chronic and inflammatory pain. There is therefore a growing interest in the development of therapeutic molecules antagonising the NGF pathway and its nociceptor sensitization actions, among which function-blocking anti-NGF antibodies are particularly relevant candidates. In this respect, the rat anti-NGF αD11 monoclonal antibody (mAb) is a potent antagonist, able to effectively antagonize rodent and human NGF in a variety of in vitro and in vivo systems. Here we show that mAb αD11 displays a significant analgesic effect in two different models of persistent pain in mice, with a remarkable long-lasting activity. In order to advance αD11 mAb towards its clinical application in man, anti-NGF αD11 mAb was humanized by applying a novel single cycle strategy based on the a priori experimental determination of the crystal and molecular structure of the parental Fragment antigen-binding (Fab). The humanized antibody (hum-αD11) was tested in vitro and in vivo, showing that the binding mode and the NGF neutralizing biological activities of the parental antibody are fully preserved, with even a significant affinity improvement. The results firmly establish hum-αD11 as a lead candidate for clinical applications in a therapeutic area with a severe unmet medical need. More generally, the single-cycle structure-based humanization method represents a considerable improvement over the standard humanization methods, which are intrinsically empirical and require several refinement cycles. PMID:22403636

  12. Antigen binding of human IgG Fabs mediate ERK-associated proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yue-Jin; Mancino, Anne; Pashov, Anastas; Whitehead, Tracy; Stanley, Joseph; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Serum-circulating antibody can be linked to poor outcomes in some cancer patients. To investigate the role of human antibodies in regulating tumor cell growth, we constructed a recombinant cDNA expression library of human IgG Fab from a patient with breast cancer. Clones were screened from the library with breast tumor cell lysate. Sequence analysis of the clones showed somatic hypermutations when compared to their closest VH/VL germ-line genes. Initial characterizations focused on five clones. All tested clones displayed stronger binding to antigen derived from primary breast cancers and established breast cancer cell lines than to normal breast tissues. In vitro functional studies showed that four out of five tested clones could stimulate the growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, and one out of five was able to promote MCF-7 cell growth as well. Involvement of ERK2 pathway was observed. By 1H-NMR spectra and Western blot analysis, it was evident that two tested antibody Fabs are capable of interacting with sialic acid. Our study suggests a possible role for human antibody in promoting tumor cell growth by direct binding of IgG Fab to breast tumor antigen. Such studies prompt speculation regarding the role of serum antibodies in mediating tumor growth as well as their contribution to disease progression.

  13. Broad epitope coverage of a human in vitro antibody library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, Arvind; Lynaugh, Heather; Yu, Yao; Miles, Adam; Eckman, Josh; Schutz, Kevin; Piffath, Crystal; Boland, Nadthakarn; Durand, Stéphanie; Boland, Todd; Vásquez, Maximiliano; Xu, Yingda; Abdiche, Yasmina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Successful discovery of therapeutic antibodies hinges on the identification of appropriate affinity binders targeting a diversity of molecular epitopes presented by the antigen. Antibody campaigns that yield such broad “epitope coverage” increase the likelihood of identifying candidates with the desired biological functions. Accordingly, epitope binning assays are employed in the early discovery stages to partition antibodies into epitope families or “bins” and prioritize leads for further characterization and optimization. The collaborative program described here, which used hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) as a model antigen, combined 3 key capabilities: 1) access to a diverse panel of antibodies selected from a human in vitro antibody library; 2) application of state-of-the-art high-throughput epitope binning; and 3) analysis and interpretation of the epitope binning data with reference to an exhaustive set of published antibody:HEL co-crystal structures. Binning experiments on a large merged panel of antibodies containing clones from the library and the literature revealed that the inferred epitopes for the library clones overlapped with, and extended beyond, the known structural epitopes. Our analysis revealed that nearly the entire solvent-exposed surface of HEL is antigenic, as has been proposed for protein antigens in general. The data further demonstrated that synthetic antibody repertoires provide as wide epitope coverage as those obtained from animal immunizations. The work highlights molecular insights contributed by increasingly higher-throughput binning methods and their broad utility to guide the discovery of therapeutic antibodies representing a diverse set of functional epitopes. PMID:27748644

  14. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies.

  15. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-12-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae.

  16. A human PrM antibody that recognizes a novel cryptic epitope on dengue E glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Annie Hoi Yi; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Chow, Angelia Yee; Lim, Angeline Pei Chiew; Lok, Shee Mei; Moreland, Nicole J; Vasudevan, Subhash G; MacAry, Paul A; Ooi, Eng Eong; Hanson, Brendon J

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major mosquito-borne pathogen infecting up to 100 million people each year; so far no effective treatment or vaccines are available. Recently, highly cross-reactive and infection-enhancing pre-membrane (prM)-specific antibodies were found to dominate the anti-DENV immune response in humans, raising concern over vaccine candidates that contain native dengue prM sequences. In this study, we have isolated a broadly cross-reactive prM-specific antibody, D29, during a screen with a non-immunized human Fab-phage library against the four serotypes of DENV. The antibody is capable of restoring the infectivity of virtually non-infectious immature DENV (imDENV) in FcγR-bearing K562 cells. Remarkably, D29 also cross-reacted with a cryptic epitope on the envelope (E) protein located to the DI/DII junction as evidenced by site-directed mutagenesis. This cryptic epitope, while inaccessible to antibody binding in a native virus particle, may become exposed if E is not properly folded. These findings suggest that generation of anti-prM antibodies that enhance DENV infection may not be completely avoided even with immunization strategies employing E protein alone or subunits of E proteins.

  17. Generation and characterization of the human neutralizing antibody fragment Fab091 against rabies virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen LI; Feng ZHANG; Hong LIN; Zhong-can WANG; Xin-jian LIU; Zhen-qing FENG; Jin ZHU; Xiao-hong GUAN

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To transform the human anti-rabies virus glycoprotein (anti-RABVG) single-chain variable fragment (scFv) into a Fab fragment and to analyze its immunological activity.Methods: The Fab gene was amplified using overlap PCR and inserted into the vector pComb3XSS. The recombinant vector was then transformed into E coli Top10F' for expression and purification. The purified Fab was characterized using SDS-PAGE, Western blotting,indirect ELISA, competitive ELISA, and the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization test (FAVN), respectively, and examined in a Kunming mouse challenge model in vivo.Results: A recombinant vector was constructed. The Fab was expressed in soluble form In E coll Top10F'. Specific binding of the Fab to rabies virus was confirmed by indirect ELISA and immunoprecipitation (IP). The neutralizing antibody titer of Fab was 10.26 IU/mL.The mouse group treated with both vaccine and human rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG)/Fab091 (32 IU/kg) showed protection against rabies, compared with the control group (P<0.05, Logrank test).Conclusion: The antibody fragment Fab was shown to be a neutralizing antibody against RABVG. It can be used together with other monoclonal antibodies for post-exposure prophylaxis of rabies virus in future studies.

  18. Generation and epitope analysis of human monoclonal antibody isotypes with specificity for the timothy grass major allergen Phl p 5a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, J.; Diethers, A.; Seismann, H.;

    2011-01-01

    of the antibodies with the allergen was assessed. Applicability in allergy diagnostics was confirmed by establishment of artificial human sera. Functionality of both antibodies was further demonstrated in receptor binding studies and mediator release assays using humanised rat basophil leukaemia cells (RBL-SX38...

  19. Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar trophozoites in the liver of hamsters: in vivo binding of antibodies and complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Maria A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human amoebiasis is caused by the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica that lives in the large intestine of hosts, where can produce asymptomatic colonization until severe invasive infections with blood diarrhea and spreading to other organs. The amoebic abscesses in liver are the most frequent form of amoebiasis outside intestine and still there are doubts about the pathogenic mechanisms involved in their formation. In this study we evaluated the in situ binding of antibodies, C3 and C9 complement components on trophozoites, in livers of hamsters infected with E. histolytica or E. dispar. These parameters were correlated with the extension of the hepatic lesions observed in these animals and with trophozoites survivor. Methods Hamsters were inoculated intra-hepatically with 100,000 trophozoites of E. histolytica or E. dispar strain and necropsied 12, 24, 48, 72, 144 and 192 h after inoculation. Antibodies, C3 and C9 binding to trophozoites were detected by immunohistochemistry. The estimation of the necrosis area and the number of labeled trophozoites was performed using digital morphometry analysis. Results In the liver sections of animals inoculated with the amoebas, the binding of antibodies to E. histolytica trophozoites was significantly lower than to E. dispar trophozoites. Trophozoites of E. dispar were also more frequently vacuolated and high labeled cellular debris observed in the lesions. Positive diffuse reaction to C3 complement component was more intense in livers of animals inoculated with E. histolytica after 24 and 72 h of infection. C3(+ and C9(+ trophozoites were detected in the vascular lumen, granulomas and inside and in the border of necrotic areas of both infected group animals. C3(+ and C9(+ trophozoite debris immunostaining was higher in livers of E. dispar than in livers of E. histolytica. A positive correlation between necrotic areas and number of C9(+ trophozoites was observed in animals

  20. Aquaporin-4 Mz Isoform: Brain Expression, Supramolecular Assembly and Neuromyelitis Optica Antibody Binding%Aquaporin-4Mz Isoform: Brain Expression, Supramolecular Assembly and Neuromyelitis Optica Antibody Binding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea Rossi; Jonathan M.Crane; A.S.Verkman

    2011-01-01

    水通道蛋白4(AQP4)表达于大脑和脊髓的星形胶质细胞.2种主要的AQP4亚型,Ml和M23,均有表达,具有不同的翻译起始点.研究表明,一种较新的亚型Mz表达于大鼠,其翻译起始点位于M1的翻译起始点上游126bp.通过C端标记的抗 AQP4 抗体SDS和非变性胶免疫印迹技术,大鼠大脑中的Mz被检测到为39 kDa大小的条带.Mz因其提前终止密码子,在人类和小鼠大脑中并不表达.通过单粒子追踪和非变性胶电泳技术检测,发现大鼠Mz可形成正交粒子阵列(OAPs).本文发现,Mz与M1类似,在细胞浆膜内迅速扩散,并不形成OAPs.但是,当与M23共表达时,Mz通过与M23形成异四聚体可与OAPs关联.意外的是,Mz表达的细胞极弱地与视神经脊髓炎自身抗体(NMO-IgG)结合,小于M1表达细胞的5倍.切割分析提示,Met-1上游的31-41残基参与NMO-IgG与Mz之间较弱的结合.总之,Mz AQP4在大鼠中低量表达,但不表达于人和小鼠的大脑;自身无法形成OAPs,除非与M23 AQP4形成异四聚体;因AQP4/NMO-IgG结合点的N端功能,一般不能与NMO-IgG结合.%Water channel aquaporin-4(AQP4) is expressed in astrocytes throughout brain and spinal cord. Two major AQP4 isoforms are expressed, Ml and M23, having different translation initiation sites. A longer isoform (Mz)has been reported in rat with translation initiation 126-bp upstream from that of M1. By immunoblot analysis of SDS and native gels probed with a C-terminus anti-AQP4 antibody, Mz was detected in rat brain as a distinct band of size -39 kDa. Mz was absent in human and mouse brain because of in-frame stop codons. The ability of rat Mz to form orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs) was investigated by single particle tracking and native gel electrophoresis. We found that Mz, like M1, diffused rapidly in the cell plasma membrane and did not form OAPs. However, when co-ex-pressed with M23, Mz associated in OAPs by forming heterotetramers with M23. Unexpectedly, Mz

  1. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Larsen, Carsten Schade;

    2000-01-01

    Neutralizing cytokine antibodies are found in healthy and diseased individuals, including patients treated with recombinant cytokines. Identification of CCR-5 as co-receptor for HIV has focused interest on CC chemokines and their potential therapeutic use. Chemokine-binding components in plasma...... of HIV-infected patients were therefore assessed by radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. IgG from 4/505 HIV patients and 9/2000 healthy controls (p>0.05) bound rMIP-1alpha and rMIP-1beta, but not rRANTES. No other plasma factors bound the chemokines. The antibodies inhibited receptor binding of both...... chemokines. There was no association between presence of antibodies and disease stage or HIV progression rate. Three of 11 patients treated with rIL-2 developed IgG antibodies suppressing cellular binding and growth promotion of rIL-2. Hence, circulating factors, including antibodies MIP-1alpha/MIP-1beta...

  2. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Schade Larsen, C

    2000-01-01

    chemokines. There was no association between presence of antibodies and disease stage or HIV progression rate. Three of 11 patients treated with rIL-2 developed IgG antibodies suppressing cellular binding and growth promotion of rIL-2. Hence, circulating factors, including antibodies MIP-1alpha/MIP-1beta......Neutralizing cytokine antibodies are found in healthy and diseased individuals, including patients treated with recombinant cytokines. Identification of CCR-5 as co-receptor for HIV has focused interest on CC chemokines and their potential therapeutic use. Chemokine-binding components in plasma...... of HIV-infected patients were therefore assessed by radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. IgG from 4/505 HIV patients and 9/2000 healthy controls (p>0.05) bound rMIP-1alpha and rMIP-1beta, but not rRANTES. No other plasma factors bound the chemokines. The antibodies inhibited receptor binding of both...

  3. Rescue and expression of human immunoglobulin genes to generate functional human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A P; Parry, N; Peakman, T C; Crowe, J S

    1992-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibody production has been hampered for many years by the instability of cell lines and low levels of expression of the antibodies. We describe here the rescue of human immunoglobulin genes utilizing micro-mRNA preparation from a small number of human hybridoma cells and conventional cDNA cloning. This allows cloning and immediate high-level expression from full-length human heavy and light chain cDNA molecules and provides a mechanism to rescue whole human monoclonal antibodies of proven efficacy.

  4. Modular synthesis of N-glycans and arrays for the hetero-ligand binding analysis of HIV antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivatare, Sachin S.; Chang, Shih-Huang; Tsai, Tsung-I.; Tseng, Susan Yu; Shivatare, Vidya S.; Lin, Yih-Shyan; Cheng, Yang-Yu; Ren, Chien-Tai; Lee, Chang-Chun David; Pawar, Sujeet; Tsai, Charng-Sheng; Shih, Hao-Wei; Zeng, Yi-Fang; Liang, Chi-Hui; Kwong, Peter D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2016-04-01

    A new class of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) from HIV donors has been reported to target the glycans on gp120—a glycoprotein found on the surface of the virus envelope—thus renewing hope of developing carbohydrate-based HIV vaccines. However, the version of gp120 used in previous studies was not from human T cells and so the glycosylation pattern could be somewhat different to that found in the native system. Moreover, some antibodies recognized two different glycans simultaneously and this cannot be detected with the commonly used glycan microarrays on glass slides. Here, we have developed a glycan microarray on an aluminium-oxide-coated glass slide containing a diverse set of glycans, including homo- and mixed N-glycans (high-mannose, hybrid and complex types) that were prepared by modular chemo-enzymatic methods to detect the presence of hetero-glycan binding behaviours. This new approach allows rapid screening and identification of optimal glycans recognized by neutralizing antibodies, and could speed up the development of HIV-1 vaccines targeting cell surface glycans.

  5. An anti-human ICAM-1 antibody inhibits rhinovirus-induced exacerbations of lung inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Traub

    Full Text Available Human rhinoviruses (HRV cause the majority of common colds and acute exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Effective therapies are urgently needed, but no licensed treatments or vaccines currently exist. Of the 100 identified serotypes, ∼90% bind domain 1 of human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 as their cellular receptor, making this an attractive target for development of therapies; however, ICAM-1 domain 1 is also required for host defence and regulation of cell trafficking, principally via its major ligand LFA-1. Using a mouse anti-human ICAM-1 antibody (14C11 that specifically binds domain 1 of human ICAM-1, we show that 14C11 administered topically or systemically prevented entry of two major groups of rhinoviruses, HRV16 and HRV14, and reduced cellular inflammation, pro-inflammatory cytokine induction and virus load in vivo. 14C11 also reduced cellular inflammation and Th2 cytokine/chemokine production in a model of major group HRV-induced asthma exacerbation. Interestingly, 14C11 did not prevent cell adhesion via human ICAM-1/LFA-1 interactions in vitro, suggesting the epitope targeted by 14C11 was specific for viral entry. Thus a human ICAM-1 domain-1-specific antibody can prevent major group HRV entry and induction of airway inflammation in vivo.

  6. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Julie M.; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A.; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Fong, Rachel H.; Kahle, Kristen M.; Smit, Jolanda M.; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Crowe, James E.; Fremont, Daved H.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphav

  7. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Julie M.; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A.; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Fong, Rachel H.; Kahle, Kristen M.; Smit, Jolanda M.; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Crowe, James E.; Fremont, Daved H.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphav

  8. Inhibiting angiogenesis with human single-chain variable fragment antibody targeting VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hossien; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Ebrahimizadeh, Walead; Dehbidi, Gholamreza Rafiei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific angiogenesis factor which has crucial roles in the angiogenesis of tumors. Anti-angiogenesis agents can inhibit growth and metastasis of tumor cells. Single-chain variable fragments (scFv) have the same affinity as whole antibodies and smaller size, thus result in more tissue permeability and higher production yield. In this research we aim to isolate a human scFv antibody against VEGF that inhibits angiogenesis. For that, we have used human scFv phage library to isolate a specific scFv antibody against binding site of VEGF. The human scFv phage library was amplified according to the manufacture protocol and panned against recombinant VEGF. ScFv antibody was isolated after five rounds of panning. Phage ELISA was used for detection of the highest affinity binder (HR6). Soluble HR6 scFv was expressed in non-suppressor strain of Escherichia coli HB2151 and purified using Ni-NTA chromatography. In vivo and in vitro function of the HR6 scFv was analyzed by chorioallantoic membrane assay and endothelial cell proliferation assay on VEGF stimulated HUVECs. Result of the cross reactivity showed that HR6 scFv specifically bounds to VEGF. The affinity was calculated to be 1.8×10(-7)M. HR6 could stop HUVEC proliferation in a dose dependent manner and anti-angiogenesis activity was observed using 10μg of HR6 in chorioallantoic membrane assay. In this work, we demonstrate that a HR6 scFv selected from human library phage display specifically blocks VEGF signaling, furthermore, this scFv has an anti-angiogenesis effect and because of its small size has more tissue diffusion. The HR6 antibody was isolated form a human library thus, it is not immunogenic for humans and could serve as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer.

  9. Development of a sensitive and specific epitope-blocking ELISA for universal detection of antibodies to human enterovirus 71 strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD in young children. It is often associated with severe neurological diseases and mortalities in recent outbreaks across the Asia Pacific region. Currently, there is no efficient universal antibody test available to detect EV71 infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present study, an epitope-blocking ELISA was developed to detect specific antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human or animal sera. The assay relies on a novel monoclonal antibody (Mab 1C6 that specifically binds to capsid proteins in whole EV71 viruses without any cross reaction to any EV71 capsid protein expressed alone. The sensitivity and specificity of the epitope-blocking ELISA for EV71 was evaluated and compared to microneutralization using immunized animal sera to multiple virus genotypes of EV71 and coxsackieviruses. Further, 200 serum sample from human individuals who were potentially infected with EV71 viruses were tested in both the blocking ELISA and microneutralization. Results indicated that antibodies to EV71 were readily detected in immunized animals or human sera by the epitope blocking ELISA whereas specimens with antibodies to other enteroviruses yielded negative results. This assay is not only simpler to perform but also shows higher sensitivity and specificity as compared to microneutralization. CONCLUSION: The epitope-blocking ELISA based on a unique Mab 1C6 provided highly sensitive and 100% specific detection of antibodies to human EV71 viruses in human sera.

  10. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Christian [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Madshus, Inger Helene [Institute of Pathology, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Stang, Espen, E-mail: espsta@rr-research.no [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-12-10

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  11. Using engineered single-chain antibodies to correlate molecular binding properties and nanoparticle adhesion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jered B; Pepper, Lauren R; Boder, Eric T; Hammer, Daniel A

    2011-11-15

    Elucidation of the relationship between targeting molecule binding properties and the adhesive behavior of therapeutic or diagnostic nanocarriers would aid in the design of optimized vectors and lead to improved efficacy. We measured the adhesion of 200-nm-diameter particles under fluid flow that was mediated by a diverse array of molecular interactions, including recombinant single-chain antibodies (scFvs), full antibodies, and the avidin/biotin interaction. Within the panel of scFvs, we used a family of mutants that display a spectrum of binding kinetics, allowing us to compare nanoparticle adhesion to bond chemistry. In addition, we explored the effect of molecular size by inserting a protein linker into the scFv fusion construct and by employing scFvs that are specific for targets with vastly different sizes. Using computational models, we extracted multivalent kinetic rate constants for particle attachment and detachment from the adhesion data and correlated the results to molecular binding properties. Our results indicate that the factors that increase encounter probability, such as adhesion molecule valency and size, directly enhance the rate of nanoparticle attachment. Bond kinetics had no influence on scFv-mediated nanoparticle attachment within the kinetic range tested, however, but did appear to affect antibody/antigen and avidin/biotin mediated adhesion. We attribute this finding to a combination of multivalent binding and differences in bond mechanical strength between recombinant scFvs and the other adhesion molecules. Nanoparticle detachment probability correlated directly with adhesion molecule valency and size, as well as the logarithm of the affinity for all molecules tested. On the basis of this work, scFvs can serve as viable targeting receptors for nanoparticles, but improvements to their bond mechanical strength would likely be required to fully exploit their tunable kinetic properties and maximize the adhesion efficiency of nanoparticles that

  12. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  13. [New antibodies in cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Knuth, A

    2004-09-22

    Since the development of hybridoma technology in 1975 monoclonal antibodies with pre-defined specificity can be produced. Only twenty years later did it become possible to make therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies in oncology. To this end it was necessary to attach the antigen-binding site of a mouse antibody onto the scaffold of a human antibody molecule. Such chimeric or "humanized" antibodies may be used in passive immunotherapy without eliciting an immune response. Rituximab and trastuzumab are such humanized antibodies. They are used today routinely in the treatment of malignant lymphoma and breast cancer, respectively. These antibodies are usually used in combination with conventional cytostatic anticancer drugs.

  14. Molecular evolution of broadly neutralizing Llama antibodies to the CD4-binding site of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Laura E; Rutten, Lucy; Frampton, Dan; Anderson, Ian; Granger, Luke; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Dekkers, Gillian; Strokappe, Nika M; Seaman, Michael S; Koh, Willie; Grippo, Vanina; Kliche, Alexander; Verrips, Theo; Kellam, Paul; Fassati, Ariberto; Weiss, Robin A

    2014-12-01

    To date, no immunization of humans or animals has elicited broadly neutralizing sera able to prevent HIV-1 transmission; however, elicitation of broad and potent heavy chain only antibodies (HCAb) has previously been reported in llamas. In this study, the anti-HIV immune responses in immunized llamas were studied via deep sequencing analysis using broadly neutralizing monoclonal HCAbs as a guides. Distinct neutralizing antibody lineages were identified in each animal, including two defined by novel antibodies (as variable regions called VHH) identified by robotic screening of over 6000 clones. The combined application of five VHH against viruses from clades A, B, C and CRF_AG resulted in neutralization as potent as any of the VHH individually and a predicted 100% coverage with a median IC50 of 0.17 µg/ml for the panel of 60 viruses tested. Molecular analysis of the VHH repertoires of two sets of immunized animals showed that each neutralizing lineage was only observed following immunization, demonstrating that they were elicited de novo. Our results show that immunization can induce potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies in llamas with features similar to human antibodies and provide a framework to analyze the effectiveness of immunization protocols.

  15. Molecular evolution of broadly neutralizing Llama antibodies to the CD4-binding site of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E McCoy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, no immunization of humans or animals has elicited broadly neutralizing sera able to prevent HIV-1 transmission; however, elicitation of broad and potent heavy chain only antibodies (HCAb has previously been reported in llamas. In this study, the anti-HIV immune responses in immunized llamas were studied via deep sequencing analysis using broadly neutralizing monoclonal HCAbs as a guides. Distinct neutralizing antibody lineages were identified in each animal, including two defined by novel antibodies (as variable regions called VHH identified by robotic screening of over 6000 clones. The combined application of five VHH against viruses from clades A, B, C and CRF_AG resulted in neutralization as potent as any of the VHH individually and a predicted 100% coverage with a median IC50 of 0.17 µg/ml for the panel of 60 viruses tested. Molecular analysis of the VHH repertoires of two sets of immunized animals showed that each neutralizing lineage was only observed following immunization, demonstrating that they were elicited de novo. Our results show that immunization can induce potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies in llamas with features similar to human antibodies and provide a framework to analyze the effectiveness of immunization protocols.

  16. Molecular Evolution of Broadly Neutralizing Llama Antibodies to the CD4-Binding Site of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Laura E.; Rutten, Lucy; Frampton, Dan; Anderson, Ian; Granger, Luke; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Dekkers, Gillian; Strokappe, Nika M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Koh, Willie; Grippo, Vanina; Kliche, Alexander; Verrips, Theo; Kellam, Paul; Fassati, Ariberto; Weiss, Robin A.

    2014-01-01

    To date, no immunization of humans or animals has elicited broadly neutralizing sera able to prevent HIV-1 transmission; however, elicitation of broad and potent heavy chain only antibodies (HCAb) has previously been reported in llamas. In this study, the anti-HIV immune responses in immunized llamas were studied via deep sequencing analysis using broadly neutralizing monoclonal HCAbs as a guides. Distinct neutralizing antibody lineages were identified in each animal, including two defined by novel antibodies (as variable regions called VHH) identified by robotic screening of over 6000 clones. The combined application of five VHH against viruses from clades A, B, C and CRF_AG resulted in neutralization as potent as any of the VHH individually and a predicted 100% coverage with a median IC50 of 0.17 µg/ml for the panel of 60 viruses tested. Molecular analysis of the VHH repertoires of two sets of immunized animals showed that each neutralizing lineage was only observed following immunization, demonstrating that they were elicited de novo. Our results show that immunization can induce potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies in llamas with features similar to human antibodies and provide a framework to analyze the effectiveness of immunization protocols. PMID:25522326

  17. Computational design of an epitope-specific Keap1 binding antibody using hotspot residues grafting and CDR loop swapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Taylor, Richard D.; Griffin, Laura; Coker, Shu-Fen; Adams, Ralph; Ceska, Tom; Shi, Jiye; Lawson, Alastair D. G.; Baker, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of monoclonal antibodies often require careful selection of binders that recognize specific epitopes on the target molecule to exert a desired modulation of biological function. Here we present a proof-of-concept application for the rational design of an epitope-specific antibody binding with the target protein Keap1, by grafting pre-defined structural interaction patterns from the native binding partner protein, Nrf2, onto geometrically matched positions of a set of antibody scaffolds. The designed antibodies bind to Keap1 and block the Keap1-Nrf2 interaction in an epitope-specific way. One resulting antibody is further optimised to achieve low-nanomolar binding affinity by in silico redesign of the CDRH3 sequences. An X-ray co-crystal structure of one resulting design reveals that the actual binding orientation and interface with Keap1 is very close to the design model, despite an unexpected CDRH3 tilt and VH/VL interface deviation, which indicates that the modelling precision may be improved by taking into account simultaneous CDR loops conformation and VH/VL orientation optimisation upon antibody sequence change. Our study confirms that, given a pre-existing crystal structure of the target protein-protein interaction, hotspots grafting with CDR loop swapping is an attractive route to the rational design of an antibody targeting a pre-selected epitope. PMID:28128368

  18. [Neutralizing Monoclonal and Chimeric Antibodies to Human IFN-γ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, M V; Aliev, T K; Solopova, O N; Pozdnyakova, L P; Korobova, S V; Yakimov, S A; Sveshnikov, P G; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2015-01-01

    Autoiminune disorders are chronic diseases characterized by abnormal immune response directed against self-antigens that leads to tissue damage and violation of its normal functioning. Such diseases often result in disability or even death of patients. Nowadays a number of monoclonal antibodies to pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors are successfully used for the targeted treatment of autoimmune diseases. One of the perspective targets in autoimmune disease therapy is interferon gamma, a key cytokine in Th1 cells differentiation, activation of macrophages, and inflammation. In the present work, 5 monoclonal antibodies to human IFN-γ were obtained. For the development of potential therapeutic agent, we have performed neutralizing activity and affinity analysis of the antibodies. Based on the data obtained, the monoclonal antibody F1 was selected. This antibody has a dissociation constant 1.7 x 10(-9) M and IC90 = 8.9 ± 2.0 nM measured upon antibody inhibition of the IFN-γ-induced HLA-DR expression on the surface of U937 cells. We have constructed a bicistronic vector for the production of recombinant chimeric Fab fragment F1 chim in E. coli cells. The recombinant chimeric Fab fragment Fl chim neutralizes IFN-γ activity in vitro and has a dissociation constant 1.8 x 10(-9) M.

  19. Secondary Mechanisms of Affinity Maturation in the Human Antibody Repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan S. Briney

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available V(DJ recombination and somatic hypermutation (SHM are the primary mechanisms for diversification of the human antibody repertoire. These mechanisms allow for rapid humoral immune responses to a wide range of pathogenic challenges. V(DJ recombination efficiently generate a virtually limitless diversity through random recombination of variable (V, diversity (D and joining (J genes with diverse nontemplated junctions between the selected gene segments. Following antigen stimulation, affinity maturation by SHM produces antibodies with refined specificity mediated by mutations typically focused in complementarity determining regions (CDRs, which form the bulk of the antigen recognition site. While V(DJ recombination and SHM are responsible for much of the diversity of the antibody repertoire, there are several secondary mechanisms that, while less frequent, make substantial contributions to antibody diversity including V(DDJ recombination (or D-D fusion, somatic-hypermutation-associated insertions and deletions, and affinity maturation and antigen contact by non-CDR regions of the antibody. In addition to enhanced diversity, these mechanisms allow the production of antibodies that are critical to response to a variety of viral and bacterial pathogens but that would be difficult to generate using only the primary mechanisms of diversification.

  20. Calcium-binding proteins from human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogstad, G.O.; Krutnes, M.B.; Solum, N.O.

    1983-06-01

    Calcium-binding platelet proteins were examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis of solubilized platelets against antibodies to whole platelets followed by incubation of the immunoplates with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ and autoradiography. When the immunoplates had been pretreated with EDTA at pH 9.0 in order to remove divalent cations, three immunoprecipitates were markedly labelled with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. These corresponded to the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex, glycoprotein Ia and a presently unidentified antigen termed G18. These antigens were membrane-bound and surface-oriented. When an excess of EDTA was introduced in the incubation media the results revealed that the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex and antigen G18, but not glycoprotein Ia, contained sites with a stronger affinity for calcium than has EDTA at pH 7.4. Immunoprecipitates of the separate glycoproteins IIb and IIIa both bound calcium in the same manner as the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. As another approach, platelet-rich plasma was incubated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ prior to crossed immunoelectrophoresis of the solubilized platelets. A single immunoprecipitate was weakly labelled. This did not correspond to any of the immunoprecipitates which were visible after staining with Coomassie blue. The labelling of this antigen was markedly increased when the platelet-rich plasma had been preincubated with EDTA and in this case a weak labelling of the glycoprotein IIB-IIIa precipitate also became apparent. No increased incorporation of calcium occured in any of these immunoprecipitates when the platelets were aggregated with ADP in the presence of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/.

  1. An efficiently cleaved HIV-1 clade C Env selectively binds to neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Boliar

    Full Text Available An ideal HIV-1 Env immunogen is expected to mimic the native trimeric conformation for inducing broadly neutralizing antibody responses. The native conformation is dependent on efficient cleavage of HIV-1 Env. The clade B isolate, JRFL Env is efficiently cleaved when expressed on the cell surface. Here, for the first time, we report the identification of a native clade C Env, 4-2.J41 that is naturally and efficiently cleaved on the cell surface as confirmed by its biochemical and antigenic characteristics. In addition to binding to several conformation-dependent neutralizing antibodies, 4-2.J41 Env binds efficiently to the cleavage-dependent antibody PGT151; thus validating its native cleaved conformation. In contrast, 4-2.J41 Env occludes non-neutralizing epitopes. The cytoplasmic-tail of 4-2.J41 Env plays an important role in maintaining its conformation. Furthermore, codon optimization of 4-2.J41 Env sequence significantly increases its expression while retaining its native conformation. Since clade C of HIV-1 is the prevalent subtype, identification and characterization of this efficiently cleaved Env would provide a platform for rational immunogen design.

  2. A human-mouse hybridoma producing monoclonal antibody against human sperm coating antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyurkchiev, S D; Shigeta, M; Koyama, K; Isojima, S

    1986-01-01

    Since anti-sperm antibodies were first discovered in the sera of women, the relationship of these antibodies to sterility has been studied by many investigators. In order to determine the antigens of spermatozoa responsible for raising antibodies to spermatozoa in humans, many studies have been carried out by purifying human spermatozoa cell membrane and seminal plasma components. Since it was found that the purification was difficult by physiochemical procedures, the immunoaffinity chromatography bound monoclonal antibody (Mab) to spermatozoa antigens was attempted for this purpose. The establishment of hybridomas producing Mabs to human seminal plasma and human spermatozoa was reported by Shigeta et al. (1980), Isojima, Koyoma & Fujiwara (1982), Lee et al. (1982) and Isahakia & Alexander (1984). The ordinary approaches to obtain the Mabs consisted of xenogenic immunization with human semen and cell fusion of immunized spleen cells with mouse myeloma cells. However, the antigenic epitopes of human spermatozoa, which induced antibody production, are xenogenic for the mouse, and therefore there is a possibility that there is a difference in recognized antigenic epitopes in humans as isotypic and in mice as xenogenic. In order to study these antigenic epitopes, which correspond to antibodies against spermatozoa in women, the establishment of human-mouse hybridomas, which produced anti-semen antibodies as produced in sterile women, became essential. In these studies, we used recently developed cell fusion techniques to fuse immunized human peripheral lymphocytes with mouse myeloma cells. PMID:3456978

  3. Antibodies against Human Cytomegalovirus in the Pathogenesis of Systemic Sclerosis: A Gene Array Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by immunological abnormalities, vascular damage, and fibroblast proliferation. We have previously shown that a molecular mimicry mechanism links antibodies against the human-cytomegalovirus-derived protein UL94 to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. The UL94 epitope shows homology with NAG-2, a surface molecule highly expressed on endothelial cells. Anti-UL94 peptide antibodies purified from patients' sera induce apoptosis of endothelial cells upon engagement of the NAG-2-integrin complex. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We show here that NAG-2 is expressed on dermal fibroblasts and that anti-UL94 antibodies bind to fibroblasts. We have used the gene array strategy (Affimetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze the transcriptional profile in response to a 4-h and an 8-h treatment with antibodies against the UL94 peptide in endothelial cells and dermal fibroblasts. Exposure of endothelial cells to anti-UL94 antibodies had a profound impact on gene expression, resulting in the upregulation of 1,645 transcripts. Several gene clusters were upregulated including genes encoding adhesion molecules, chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs, growth factors, and molecules involved in apoptosis. Following antibody stimulation, dermal fibroblasts showed an upregulation of 989 transcripts and acquired a "scleroderma-like" phenotype. Indeed, genes involved in extracellular matrix deposition, growth factors, chemokines, and cytokines were upregulated. We confirmed the microarray results by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and by measuring some of the corresponding proteins with ELISA and Western blotting. CONCLUSION: Our results show that anti-human-cytomegalovirus antibodies may be linked to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis not only by inducing endothelial cell activation and apoptosis but also by causing activation of fibroblasts, one of the hallmarks of the disease.

  4. Antibodies against human cytomegalovirus in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis: a gene array approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lunardi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by immunological abnormalities, vascular damage, and fibroblast proliferation. We have previously shown that a molecular mimicry mechanism links antibodies against the human-cytomegalovirus-derived protein UL94 to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. The UL94 epitope shows homology with NAG-2, a surface molecule highly expressed on endothelial cells. Anti-UL94 peptide antibodies purified from patients' sera induce apoptosis of endothelial cells upon engagement of the NAG-2-integrin complex. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We show here that NAG-2 is expressed on dermal fibroblasts and that anti-UL94 antibodies bind to fibroblasts. We have used the gene array strategy (Affimetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze the transcriptional profile in response to a 4-h and an 8-h treatment with antibodies against the UL94 peptide in endothelial cells and dermal fibroblasts. Exposure of endothelial cells to anti-UL94 antibodies had a profound impact on gene expression, resulting in the upregulation of 1,645 transcripts. Several gene clusters were upregulated including genes encoding adhesion molecules, chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs, growth factors, and molecules involved in apoptosis. Following antibody stimulation, dermal fibroblasts showed an upregulation of 989 transcripts and acquired a "scleroderma-like" phenotype. Indeed, genes involved in extracellular matrix deposition, growth factors, chemokines, and cytokines were upregulated. We confirmed the microarray results by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and by measuring some of the corresponding proteins with ELISA and Western blotting. CONCLUSION: Our results show that anti-human-cytomegalovirus antibodies may be linked to the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis not only by inducing endothelial cell activation and apoptosis but also by causing activation of fibroblasts, one of the hallmarks of the disease.

  5. A plasmid containing the human metallothionein II gene can function as an antibody-assisted electrophoretic biosensor for heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Dennis C; Starr, Clarise R; Lyon, Wanda J

    2016-01-01

    Different forms of heavy metals affect biochemical systems in characteristic ways that cannot be detected with typical metal analysis methods like atomic absorption spectrometry. Further, using living systems to analyze interaction of heavy metals with biochemical systems can be laborious and unreliable. To generate a reliable easy-to-use biologically-based biosensor system, the entire human metallothionein-II (MT-II) gene was incorporated into a plasmid (pUC57-MT) easily replicated in Escherichia coli. In this system, a commercial polyclonal antibody raised against human metal-responsive transcription factor-1 protein (MTF-1 protein) could modify the electrophoretic migration patterns (i.e. cause specific decreases in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility) of the plasmid in the presence or absence of heavy metals other than zinc (Zn). In the study here, heavy metals, MTF-1 protein, and polyclonal anti-MTF-1 antibody were used to assess pUC57-MT plasmid antibody-assisted electrophoretic mobility. Anti-MTF-1 antibody bound both MTF-1 protein and pUC57-MT plasmid in a non-competitive fashion such that it could be used to differentiate specific heavy metal binding. The results showed that antibody-inhibited plasmid migration was heavy metal level-dependent. Zinc caused a unique mobility shift pattern opposite to that of other metals tested, i.e. Zn blocked the antibody ability to inhibit plasmid migration, despite a greatly increased affinity for DNA by the antibody when Zn was present. The Zn effect was reversed/modified by adding MTF-1 protein. Additionally, antibody inhibition of plasmid mobility was resistant to heat pre-treatment and trypsinization, indicating absence of residual DNA extraction-resistant bacterial DNA binding proteins. DNA binding by anti-DNA antibodies may be commonly enhanced by xenobiotic heavy metals and elevated levels of Zn, thus making them potentially effective tools for assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in aqueous solutions and

  6. Epitope Mapping of Ibalizumab, a Humanized Anti-CD4 Monoclonal Antibody with Anti-HIV-1 Activity in Infected Patients▿

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Ruijiang; Franco, David; Kao, Chia-Ying; Yu, Faye; Huang, Yaoxing; Ho, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). With its unique specificity for domain 2 of CD4, this antibody potently and broadly blocks HIV-1 infection in vitro by inhibiting a postbinding step required for viral entry but without interfering with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-mediated immune function. In clinical trials, ibalizumab has demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity in patients...

  7. Structure of the Fab fragment of the anti-murine EGFR antibody 7A7 and exploration of its receptor binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Ariel; Mackenzie, Jenny; Garrido, Greta; Friemann, Rosmarie; López-Requena, Alejandro; Moreno, Ernesto; Krengel, Ute

    2011-07-01

    The EGF receptor is an important target of cancer immunotherapies. The 7A7 monoclonal antibody has been raised against the murine EGFR, but it cross-reacts with the human receptor. The results from experiments using immune-competent mice can therefore, in principle, be extrapolated to the corresponding scenario in humans. In this work we report the crystal structure of the 7A7 Fab at an effective resolution of 1.4Å. The antibody binding site comprises a deep pocket, located at the interface between the light and heavy chains, with major contributions from CDR loops H1, H2, H3 and L1. Binding experiments show that 7A7 recognizes a site on the EGFR extracellular domain that is not accessible in its most stable conformations, but that becomes exposed upon treatment with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This suggests a recognition mechanism similar to that proposed for mAb 806.

  8. Analysis of the binding loops configuration and surface adaptation of different crystallized single-domain antibodies in response to various antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qaraghuli, Mohammed M; Ferro, Valerie A

    2017-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have revolutionized the biomedical field through their ubiquitous utilization in different diagnostics and therapeutic applications. Despite this widespread use, their large size and structural complexity have limited their versatility in specific applications. The antibody variable region that is responsible for binding antigen is embodied within domains that can be rescued individually as single-domain antibody (sdAb) fragments. Because of the unique characteristics of sdAbs, such as low molecular weight, high physicochemical stability, and the ability to bind antigens inaccessible to conventional antibodies, they represent a viable alternative to full-length antibodies. Consequently, 149 crystal structures of sdAbs, originating from human (VH), camelids (VHH), or sharks (VNAR), were retrieved from the Protein Data Bank, and their structures were compared. The 3 types of sdAbs displayed complementarity determining regions (CDRs) with different lengths and configurations. CDR3 of the VHH and VNAR domains were dominated by pleated and extended orientations, respectively. Although VNAR showed the smallest average molecular weight and molecular surface area compared with VHH and VH antibodies. However, the solvent accessible surface area measurements of the 3 tested sdAbs types were very similar. All the antihapten VHH antibodies showed pleated CDR3, which were sufficient to create a binding pocket to accommodate haptens (methotrexate and azo dyes) in terms of shape and electrostatic potential. The sdAbs that recognized lysozyme showed more diversity in their CDR3 orientation to enable them to recognize various topographies of lysozyme. Subsequently, the three sdAb classes were different in size and surface area and have shown distinguishable ability to optimize their CDR length and orientation to recognize different antigen classes.

  9. Development of a Time and Cost Benefit Antibody Binding Test-Based Method for Determination of Rabies Vaccine Potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Vahid; Mojtabavi, Nazanin; Janani, Alireza; Mousavi, Tahereh; Hadjati, Jamshid; Khosravy, Mohammad Sadeq; Ahangari Cohan, Reza

    2017-01-24

    This study is an improvement on the antibody binding test, known as ABT method, to develop a simple and fast method in comparison with NIH for determination of rabies vaccine potency. In the current study, several commercial human and veterinary vaccines were tested using both modified ABT and NIH methods. The ED50 was calculated using the probit method and the relative potency of each vaccine was measured based on the reference vaccine. The test was repeated four times to calculate the reproducibility of the method. Statistical analysis indicated that there was no significant difference between the result obtained from NIH and modified ABT method for either human or veterinary vaccines (p > 0.05). In addition, the linearity of the method (R(2)) was calculated as 0.94 by serial dilution of a test vaccine. Coefficient variances were determined as less than and more than 10% for the human and veterinary rabies vaccines, respectively. In conclusion, the findings suggest that the modified method could be considered as an alternative approach for rabies vaccine potency determination in in-process quality control tests at industrial scale. It is a time and cost benefit method and accuracy may further be increased by employing monoclonal antibodies against trimeric form of G glycoprotein. However, the use of serum samples may be useful compared with an artificial mix of antibodies because other components from the serum samples could have a positive impact on cell sensitivity and mimic more the complexity of the immune response. Although the modified test has solved a fundamental problem, it is still not sensitive enough for veterinary vaccine assessment and needs further modifications to obtain the acceptability criteria.

  10. A murine monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody detects a common idiotope on human, mouse and rabbit antibodies to allergen Lol p IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, E M; Dzuba-Fischer, J M; Rector, E S; Sehon, A H; Kisil, F T

    1991-09-01

    A syngeneic mouse monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody (anti-Id), designated as B1/1, was generated against a monoclonal antibody (MoAb 91) specific for Ryegrass pollen allergen Lol p IV. This anti-Id recognized an idiotope (Id) that was also present on other monoclonal antibodies with the same specificity as MoAb 91. Observations that (i) the anti-Id inhibited the binding of MoAb 91 to Lol p IV and (ii) the Id-anti-Id interaction could be inhibited by Lol p IV indicated that the Id was located within or near the antigen combining site. These properties served to characterize B1/1 as an internal image anti-Id. Evidence that an immune response in different species to Lol p IV elicits the formation of antibodies which express a common Id was provided by the observations that (i) the Id-anti-Id interactions could be inhibited by mouse, human and rabbit antisera to Lol p IV and (ii) the binding of these antisera to Lol p IV could be inhibited by the anti-Id. Interestingly, the internal image anti-Id B1/1 also recognized an Id on a monoclonal antibody which was directed to an epitope of Lol p IV, different from that recognized by MoAb 91.

  11. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human breast milk: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Elle; Robinson, Steven E; Amato, Carol; McMillan, Colette; Westcott, Jay; Wolf, Tiffany; Robinson, William A

    2014-04-01

    Recently, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have been introduced for the treatment of advanced melanoma and other diseases. It remains unclear whether these drugs can be safely administered to women who are breast feeding because of the potential hazardous side effects for nursing infants. One such therapy for metastatic melanoma is ipilimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-antigen-4, and is the preferred treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma when other molecular therapies are not viable. This study measured ipilimumab levels in the breast milk of a patient undergoing treatment that were enough to raise concerns for a nursing infant exposed to ipilimumab.

  12. Improved glucose metabolism in vitro and in vivo by an allosteric monoclonal antibody that increases insulin receptor binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Corbin

    Full Text Available Previously we reported studies of XMetA, an agonist antibody to the insulin receptor (INSR. We have now utilized phage display to identify XMetS, a novel monoclonal antibody to the INSR. Biophysical studies demonstrated that XMetS bound to the human and mouse INSR with picomolar affinity. Unlike monoclonal antibody XMetA, XMetS alone had little or no agonist effect on the INSR. However, XMetS was a strong positive allosteric modulator of the INSR that increased the binding affinity for insulin nearly 20-fold. XMetS potentiated insulin-stimulated INSR signaling ∼15-fold or greater including; autophosphorylation of the INSR, phosphorylation of Akt, a major enzyme in the metabolic pathway, and phosphorylation of Erk, a major enzyme in the growth pathway. The enhanced signaling effects of XMetS were more pronounced with Akt than with Erk. In cultured cells, XMetS also enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose transport. In contrast to its effects on the INSR, XMetS did not potentiate IGF-1 activation of the IGF-1 receptor. We studied the effect of XMetS treatment in two mouse models of insulin resistance and diabetes. The first was the diet induced obesity mouse, a hyperinsulinemic, insulin resistant animal, and the second was the multi-low dose streptozotocin/high-fat diet mouse, an insulinopenic, insulin resistant animal. In both models, XMetS normalized fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance. In concert with its ability to potentiate insulin action at the INSR, XMetS reduced insulin and C-peptide levels in both mouse models. XMetS improved the response to exogenous insulin without causing hypoglycemia. These data indicate that an allosteric monoclonal antibody can be generated that markedly enhances the binding affinity of insulin to the INSR. These data also suggest that an INSR monoclonal antibody with these characteristics may have the potential to both improve glucose metabolism in insulinopenic type 2 diabetes mellitus and correct

  13. Monoclonal Antibody Production against Human Spermatozoal Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jedi-Tehrani

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As monoclonal antibodies are potential tools for characterization of soluble or cellular surface antigens, use of these proteins has always been considered in infertility and reproduction research. Therefore, in this study, monoclonal antibodies against human sperm surface antigens were produced. Material and Methods: To produce specific clones against human sperm surface antigens, proteins were extracted using solubilization methods. Balb/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with the proteins using complete Freund’s adjuvant in the first injection and incomplete Adjuvant in the following booster injections. Hybridoma cells producing ASA were cloned by limiting dilution. Results: Five stable ASA producing hybridoma clones were achieved and their antibody isotypes were determined by ELISA. All the isotypes were of IgG class. Their cross reactivity with rat and mice spermatozoa was examined but they did not have any cross reactivity. Conclusion: The produced antibodies can be used in further studies to characterize and evaluate each of the antigens present on human sperm surface and determining their role in fertilization.

  14. Antibody binding site mapping of SARS-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain by a combination of yeast surface display and phage peptide library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jingxue; Wen, Kun; Mou, Zhirong; Zou, Liyun; Che, Xiaoyan; Ni, Bing; Wu, Yuzhang

    2009-12-01

    The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike (S) protein plays an important role in viral infection, and is a potential major neutralizing determinant. In this study, three hybridoma cell lines secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against the RBD of the S protein were generated and their exact binding sites were identified. Using yeast surface display, the binding sites of these antibodies were defined to two linear regions on the RBD: S(337-360) and S(380-399). Using these monoclonal antibodies in phage peptide library screening identified 10 distinct mimotopes 12 amino acids in length. Sequence comparison between native epitopes and these mimotopes further confirmed the binding sites, and revealed key amino acid residues involved in antibody binding. None of these antibodies could neutralize the murine leukemia virus pseudotyped expressing the SARS-CoV spike protein (MLV/SARS-CoV). However, these mAbs could be useful in the diagnosis of SARS-CoV due to their exclusive reactivity with SARS-CoV. Furthermore, this study established a feasible platform for epitope mapping. Yeast surface display combined with phage peptide library screening provides a convenient strategy for the identification of epitope peptides from certain antigenic proteins.

  15. Structural and functional characterization of a human IgG monoclonal antiphospholipid antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Nadine; Häuser, Friederike; Lorenz, Mareike; Lackner, Karl J; von Landenberg, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are likely involved in the pathogenesis of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). This study analyzes the structural and functional characteristics of a human monoclonal aPL (HL7G) from the IgG2 subtype with λ light chains generated from a patient with primary APS and recurrent cerebral microemboli. DNA encoding the variable region of heavy and light chains of the antibody was sequenced, analyzed, and compared to HL5B a previously described monoclonal aPL from the same patient. Both antibodies are derived from the same germline genes. HL7G had similar but more extensive somatic mutations in the CDR1 and 2 regions than HL5B, indicating that both antibodies are closely related and derived by a T cell-dependent antigen driven process. In ELISA assays HL7G bound to cardiolipin and several other phospholipid antigens in the absence of protein cofactors. Different from HL5B this aPL bound to β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPII). This suggests that reactivity of aPL against β2GPI is determined by only few specific amino acid exchanges. HL7G was able to induce tissue factor (TF) as one of the procoagulant effects of aPL. Our data suggest that the binding specificity of aPL is only of limited value to predict the biological effect and the pathophysiological impact of the antibodies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression and purification of human ARP1 protein and rapid preparation of polyclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingjuan; Zou, Rongjiang; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zong, Ying; Gao, Yun; Wang, Lianghua; Jiao, Binghua

    2013-01-01

    Angiopoietin-related protein 1 (ARP1) is one of the antiangiogenic factors and plays an important role in endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and blood vessel network formation. Here a rapid method to prepare ARP1 polyclonal antibody in 1 month was developed. The gene of fibrinogen homology domain (FD) for ARP1 was cloned and the protein was expressed in a soluble form of MBP-FD fused protein. The MBP-FD protein was purified using amylose affinity chromatography of maltose-binding protein. Polyclonal antibodies against MBP-FD were obtained through immunization in BALB/c mice. The titer was determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the antibody specificity was assessed by Western blot. The full-length ARP1 protein in stable form expressed in transfected human large lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 was detected by immunocytochemistry (ICC) analysis using ARP1 polyclonal antibodies. The result shows that the antibody possesses good specificity and sensitivity. This work provides a substantial base for the further studies of ARP1 function and associated mechanisms. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Preparative Biochemistry and Biotechnology to view the supplemental file.

  17. Anti-HIV-1 response elicited in rabbits by anti-idiotype monoclonal antibodies mimicking the CD4-binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Burioni

    Full Text Available Antibodies against conserved epitopes on HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env, such as the gp120 CD4-binding site (CD4bs, could contribute to protection against HIV-1. Env-based immunogens inducing such a response could be a major component of future anti-HIV-1 strategies. In this proof-of-concept study we describe the generation of two anti-idiotype (AI murine antibodies mimicking the CD4bs epitope. Sera were collected from long-term non-progressor patients to obtain CD4bs-directed IgG, through sequential purification steps. The purified IgG were then used as Fab fragments to immunize mice for hybridoma generation. Two hybridomas (P1 and P2, reacting only against the CD4bs-directed IgG, were identified and characterized. The P1 and P2 antibodies were shown to recognize the idiotype of the broadly neutralizing anti-CD4bs human mAb b12. Both P1 and P2 Fabs were able to induce a strong anti-gp120 response in rabbits. Moreover, the rabbits' sera were shown to neutralize two sensitive tier 1 strains of HIV-1 in an Env-pseudotype neutralization assay. In particular, 3/5 rabbits in the P1 group and 1/5 in the P2 group showed greater than 80% neutralizing activity against the HXB2 pseudovirus. Two rabbits also neutralized the pseudovirus HIV-MN. Overall, these data describe the first anti-idiotypic vaccine approach performed to generate antibodies to the CD4bs of the HIV-1 gp120. Although future studies will be necessary to improve strength and breadth of the elicited neutralizing response, this proof-of-concept study documents that immunogens designed on the idiotype of broadly neutralizing Abs are feasible and could help in the design of future anti-HIV strategies.

  18. Studies to assess the biological relevance of anti-Tamm-Horsfall protein antibodies detected by direct-binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J S; Groufsky, A; Lynn, K L

    1987-11-01

    1. A role has been suggested for anti-Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) antibodies in renal disease based on the results of immunoassays of pathological sera. The putative autoantibodies have not been isolated from such sera nor have definitive inhibition studies of their binding been carried out. We have carried out such studies using rabbit anti-THP antibodies as control reagents. 2. Urinary THP prepared by salt precipitation was used to prepare four immunoabsorbent columns by covalent coupling to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. After washing with a variety of dissociating agents to remove any non-covalently bound subunit THP, each column was incubated with normal and immune rabbit serum. Fractions washed and eluted from columns were tested for anti-THP antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and THP antigen by radioimmunoassay, and showed NH4SCN (3 mol/l) and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) (6 mol/l) equivalent and sodium dodecyl sulphate (20 g/l) to be inferior in their capacity to produce immunoabsorbent THP capable of isolating specific antibodies from immune rabbit serum. 3. The column treated with GuHCl (6 mol/l) was used further in attempts to isolate putative anti-THP antibodies from five patients, who had a history of urinary tract infections and whose sera showed strong binding by ELISA. 4. Results from direct and inhibition ELISA experiments on fractions collected after washing and elution with all sera suggested that the putative human anti-THP antibodies were of very low affinity and/or directed against non-subunit THP. 5. The pathological relevance of human anti-THP antibodies measured by ELISA remains to be established.

  19. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes...... neutralization of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1 is incremental rather than all or none and that each MAb binding an Env oligomer reduces the likelihood of infection....... are coexpressed. By the coexpression of Env glycoproteins that either can or cannot bind a neutralizing MAb in an env transcomplementation assay, virions were generated in which the proportion of MAb binding sites could be regulated. As the proportion of MAb binding sites in Env chimeric virus increased, MAb...

  20. The Efficacy of Humanized Antibody against the Sporothrix Antigen, gp70, in Promoting Phagocytosis and Reducing Disease Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, José R. F.; Santiago, Karla L.; Kaihami, Gilberto H.; Maranhão, Andrea Q.; de Macedo Brígido, Marcelo; de Almeida, Sandro R.

    2017-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis distributed worldwide and is frequently reported in countries with tropical climates, as Latin America countries. We previously demonstrated that mice with sporotrichosis produce specific antibodies against a 70-kDa fungal protein, indicating that specific antibodies against this molecule may help to control the sporotrichosis. IgG1 monoclonal antibody was generated, and called mAbP6E7, in mice against a 70-kDa glycoprotein (gp70) of S. schenckii. The mAbP6E7 showed prophylactic and therapeutic activity against sporotrichosis. However, this antibody has a murine origin, and this can generate an immune response when administered to humans, precluding its use for a prolonged time. For its possible use in the treatment of human sporotrichosis, we humanized the mAbP6E7 by genetic engineering. Once expressed, the humanized antibodies had good stability and were able to bind to the 70-kDa cell wall antigens of Sporothrix schenckii and S. brasiliensis. The humanized P6E7 were able to opsonize S. schenckii yeasts, thus increasing the phagocytic index in human monocyte-derived macrophages. The treatment with humanized P6E7 decreased fungal burden in vivo. These data suggest that humanized P6E7 may have a therapeutic role in sporotrichosis.

  1. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao M.; Rueker, Florian; Casale, Elena; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 deg. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  2. Studies of nontarget-mediated distribution of human full-length IgG1 antibody and its FAb fragment in cardiovascular and metabolic-related tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Pia; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Svensson, Lena; Ahnmark, Andrea; Flodin, Christine; Wanag, Ewa; Screpanti-Sundqvist, Valentina; Gennemark, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of full-length nontargeted antibody and its antigen-binding fragment (FAb) were evaluated for a range of tissues primarily of interest for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Mice were intravenously injected with a dose of 10 mg/kg of either human IgG1or its FAb fragment; perfused tissues were collected at a range of time points over 3 weeks for the human IgG1 antibody and 1 week for the human FAb antibody. Tissues were homogenized and antibody concentrations were measured by specific immunoassays on the Gyros system. Exposure in terms of maximum concentration (Cmax ) and area under the curve was assessed for all nine tissues. Tissue exposure of full-length antibody relative to plasma exposure was found to be between 1% and 10%, except for brain (0.2%). Relative concentrations of FAb antibody were the same, except for kidney tissue, where the antibody concentration was found to be ten times higher than in plasma. However, the absolute tissue uptake of full-length IgG was significantly higher than the absolute tissue uptake of the FAb antibody. This study provides a reference PK state for full-length whole and FAb antibodies in tissues related to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases that do not include antigen or antibody binding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  3. In Vitro Characterization of Human Cytomegalovirus-Targeting Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies LJP538 and LJP539

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hetalkumar D.; Nikitin, Pavel; Gesner, Thomas; Lin, James J.; Barkan, David T.; Ciferri, Claudio; Carfi, Andrea; Akbarnejad Yazdi, Tahmineh; Skewes-Cox, Peter; Wiedmann, Brigitte; Jarousse, Nadine; Zhong, Weidong; Feire, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is usually benign in healthy individuals but can cause life-threatening disease in those with compromised immune systems. Approved drugs available to treat HCMV disease, including ganciclovir, cidofovir, and foscarnet, have significant toxicities that limit their use in certain patient populations. LJP538 and LJP539 are human monoclonal antibodies that are being evaluated as immunoglobulin therapeutics. The antibodies target glycoproteins gB and the gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131a pentameric complex, respectively. Here we present an in vitro characterization of these antibodies. We show that LJP538 and LJP539 are more potent than a marketed immunoglobulin at inhibiting HCMV infection of various cell lines relevant to pathogenesis. We find that LJP538 and LJP539 are active against a panel of clinical isolates in vitro and demonstrate minor-to-moderate synergy in combination. Passage of HCMV in the presence of LJP538 or LJP539 alone resulted in resistance-associated mutations that mapped to the target genes. However, no loss of susceptibility to the combination of antibodies was observed for >400 days in culture. Finally, the binding regions of LJP538 and LJP539 are conserved among clinical isolates. Taken together, these data support the use of LJP538 and LJP539 in combination for clinical trials in HCMV patients. PMID:27270290

  4. Antibody response to recombinant human coagulation factor VIII in a new rat model of severe hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, K M; Søndergaard, H; Skov, S; Weldingh, K N; Tranholm, M; Wiinberg, B

    2016-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies toward FVIII replacement therapy (inhibitors) are the most serious treatment-related complication in hemophilia A (HA). A rat model of severe HA (F8(-/-) ) has recently been developed, but an immunological characterization is needed to determine the value of using the model for research into inhibitor development. Characterize the antibody response towards recombinant human coagulation factor VIII (rhFVIII) in the HA rat, following a human prophylactic dosing regimen. Two identical studies were performed, which included a total of 17 homozygous HA rats (F8(-/-) , 0% FVIII activity), 12 heterozygous rats (F8(+/-) ), and 12 wild-type (F8(+/+) ) rats. All rats received intravenous injections of rhFVIII at 50 IU kg(-1) twice weekly for 4 weeks. Predosing blood samples were analyzed for binding and neutralizing anti-rhFVIII antibodies at weeks 1-7. In both studies, antibodies developed after 4-6 administrations of rhFVIII, and neutralizing antibodies reached levels similar to human patients (range 1-111 BU, median 6.0 BU) at the end of the study. There was no significant difference between the two studies or between genotypes in time to response or levels reached for binding and neutralizing antibodies. Interestingly, early spontaneous bleeds were associated with a faster antibody response. Following intravenous administration of human FVIII, according to a clinical prophylaxis regimen, a robust and reproducible antibody response is seen in this HA rat model, suggesting that the model is useful for intervention studies with the aim of suppressing, delaying, or preventing the inhibitor response. Also, bleeds seem to have an adjuvant effect on the immune response. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  5. Primary structure and functional scFv antibody expression of an antibody against the human protooncogen c-myc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, P; Breitling, F; Little, M; Dübel, S

    1997-06-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy- and light-chain variable region (Vh and Vl) genes were isolated from Myc1-9E10 hybridoma cells, which secreted monoclonal antibody against human oncogen c-myc. The expression vector pOPE52-c-myc was constructed for the recombinant production in E. coli. A 30 kDa single chain fragment (scFv) expression product was found in the periplasmic space by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. A significant fraction was processed correctly as demonstrated with an antiserum recognizing the processed aminoterminus only. The specific binding of the scFv fragment to the peptide epitope of the maternal monoclonal antibody was demonstrated and the primary sequence of the variable regions was determined. Sequence comparison with previously published partial Vh and Vl sequences from this hybridoma cell line revealed a genetic heterogeneity for the light chain variable region. The potential use of this scFv as a new tool for detection and purification of tagged proteins, for adding costimulatory signals to the surface of cancer cells as well as for analyzing c-myc function in the living cell by cytoplasmic expression is discussed.

  6. Identification, using isoenzyme electrophoresis and monoclonal antibodies, of Leishmania isolated from humans and wild animals of Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimori, T; Grimaldi, G; Kreutzer, R D; Gomez, E A; McMahon-Pratt, D; Tesh, R B; Hashiguchi, Y

    1989-02-01

    Six strains of Leishmania isolated from wild mammals and humans on the Pacific Coast of Ecuador were identified by isoenzyme electrophoresis and by their reactivity patterns to a cross-panel of specific monoclonal antibodies using a radioimmune binding assay. Single isolates from Sciurus vulgaris, Potos flavus, and Tamandua tetradactyla were identified as Leishmania amazonensis. Three other strains, isolated from cutaneous lesions of humans, were identified as Leishmania panamensis.

  7. Binding of disodium cromoglycate to human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa de Aspuru, Eduardo; Zatón, Ana M. L.

    1998-07-01

    The binding of several benzopiranone derivatives to human serum albumin was determined. The antiallergic drug disodium cromoglycate binds weakly to serum albumin. However, its precursors, chromones of smaller size, were able to bind in a hydrophobic pocket in the protein, and are carried by serum albumin in blood.

  8. Phase I study of anticolon cancer humanized antibody A33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welt, Sydney; Ritter, Gerd; Williams, Clarence; Cohen, Leonard S; John, Mary; Jungbluth, Achim; Richards, Elizabeth A; Old, Lloyd J; Kemeny, Nancy E

    2003-04-01

    Humanized A33 (huA33; IgG1) monoclonal antibody detects a determinant expressed by 95% of colorectal cancers and can activate immune cytolytic mechanisms. The present study was designed to (a) define the toxicities and maximum tolerated dose of huA33 and (b) determine huA33 immunogenicity. Patients (n = 11) with advanced chemotherapy-resistant colorectal cancer received 4-week cycles of huA33 at 10, 25, or 50 mg/m(2)/week. Serum samples were analyzed using biosensor technology for evidence of human antihuman antibody (HAHA) response. Eight of 11 patients developed a HAHA response. Significant toxicity was limited to four patients who developed high HAHA titers. In two of these cases, infusion-related reactions such as fevers, rigors, facial flushing, and changes in blood pressure were observed, whereas in the other two cases, toxicity consisted of skin rash, fever, or myalgia. Of three patients who remained HAHA negative, one achieved a radiographic partial response, with reduction of serum carcinoembryonic antigen from 80 to 3 ng/ml. Four patients had radiographic evidence of stable disease (2, 4, 6, and 12 months), with significant reductions (>25%) in serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels in two cases. The complementarity-determining region-grafted huA33 antibody is immunogenic in the majority of colon cancer patients (73%). HAHA activity can be measured reproducibly and quantitatively by BIACORE analysis. Whereas the huA33 construct tested here may be too immunogenic for further clinical development, the antitumor effects observed in the absence of antibody-mediated toxicity and in this heavily pretreated patient population warrant clinical testing of other IgG1 humanized versions of A33 antibody.

  9. Allosteric inactivation of a trypsin-like serine protease by an antibody binding to the 37- and 70-loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Lund, Ida K; Liu, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Serine protease catalytic activity is in many cases regulated by conformational changes initiated by binding of physiological modulators to exosites located distantly from the active site. Inhibitory monoclonal antibodies binding to such exosites are potential therapeutics and offer opportunities...... criteria similar to the E* conformation described for other serine proteases. Hence, agents targeting serine protease conformation through binding to exosites in the 37- and 70-loops represent a new class of potential therapeutics....

  10. Serum or breast milk immunoglobulins mask the self-reactivity of human natural IgG antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Manoylov, Iliyan; Dimitrov, Jordan D; Tchorbanov, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    B cells producing IgG antibodies specific to a variety of self- or foreign antigens are a normal constituent of the immune system of all healthy individuals. These naturally occurring IgG antibodies are found in the serum, external secretions, and pooled human immunoglobulin preparations. They bind with low affinity to antigens, which can also be targets for pathologic autoantibodies. An enhancement of naturally occurring IgG autoantibody activity was observed after treatment of human IgG molecules with protein-destabilizing agents. We have investigated the interactions of human immunoglobulins that were obtained from serum or from breast milk of healthy individuals or IVIg with human liver antigens. Proteins from an individual serum or milk were isolated by two methods, one of which included exposure to low pH and the other did not. Purified serum, mucosal IgM, IgA, and the fraction containing immunoglobulin G F(ab')2 fragments each inhibited the binding of a single donor or pooled IgG to human liver antigens. Our study presents findings regarding the role of the breast milk or serum antibodies in blocking the self-reactivity of IgG antibodies. It supports the suggestion that not IVIg only, but also the pooled human IgM and IgA might possess a potent beneficial immunomodulatory activity in autoimmune patients.

  11. A First-in-Human Study To Assess the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Cytomegalovirus in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dole, Kiran; Segal, Florencia Pereyra; Feire, Adam; Magnusson, Baldur; Rondon, Juan C; Vemula, Janardhana; Yu, Jing; Pang, Yinuo; Pertel, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause significant disease in immunocompromised patients and treatment options are limited by toxicities. CSJ148 is a combination of two anti-HCMV human monoclonal antibodies (LJP538 and LJP539) that bind to and inhibit the function of viral HCMV glycoprotein B (gB) and the pentameric complex, consisting of glycoproteins gH, gL, UL128, UL130, and UL131. Here, we evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous dose of LJP538 or LJP539 or their combination in healthy volunteers. Adverse events and laboratory abnormalities occurred sporadically with similar incidence between antibody and placebo groups and without any apparent relationship to dose. No subject who received antibody developed a hypersensitivity, infusion-related reaction or anti-drug antibodies. After intravenous administration, both LJP538 and LJP539 demonstrated typical human IgG1 pharmacokinetic properties, with slow clearances, limited volumes of distribution, and long terminal half-lives. The pharmacokinetic parameters were linear and dose proportional for both antibodies across the 50-fold range of doses evaluated in the study. There was no apparent impact on pharmacokinetics when the antibodies were administered alone or in combination. CSJ148 and the individual monoclonal antibodies were safe and well tolerated, with pharmacokinetics as expected for human immunoglobulin.

  12. Enhanced binding of antibodies generated during chronic HIV infection to mucus component MUC16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Arangassery Rosemary; Fahrbach, Kelly; Smith, Archer; Mahan, Alison; Karim, Marcus; Licht, Anna; Zvonar, Ivan; Tedesco, Jacquelynn; Anderson, Meegan; Chapel, Anais; Suscovich, Todd; Malaspina, David; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Kim, Arthur; Lauer, Georg; Altfeld, Marcus; Pillai, Shiv; Szleifer, Igal; Kelleher, Neil L.; Kiser, Patrick F.; Hope, Thomas J.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of HIV across mucosal barriers accounts for the majority of HIV infections worldwide. Thus, efforts aimed at enhancing protective immunity at these sites are a top priority, including increasing virus-specific antibodies (Abs) and antiviral activity at mucosal sites. Mucin proteins, including the largest cell-associated mucin, MUC16, help form mucus to provide a physical barrier to incoming pathogens. Here we describe a natural interaction between Abs and MUC16 that is enhanced in specific disease settings such as chronic HIV infection. Binding to MUC16 was independent of IgG subclass, but strongly associated with shorter Ab glycan profiles, with agalactosylated (G0) Abs demonstrating the highest binding to MUC16. Binding of Abs to epithelial cells was diminished following MUC16-knockdown, and the MUC16 N-linked glycans were critical for binding. Further, agalactosylated VRC01 captured HIV more efficiently in MUC16. These data point to a novel opportunity to enrich Abs at mucosal sites by targeting Abs to MUC16 through changes in Fc-glycosylation, potentially blocking viral movement and sequestering the virus far from the epithelial border. Thus, next-generation vaccines or monoclonal therapeutics may enhance protective immunity by tuning Ab glycosylation to promote the enrichment of Abs at mucosal barriers. PMID:26960182

  13. A variety of human monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor isolated from a phage antibody library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Gene; Kondo, Mariko; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2016-11-04

    When the technology for constructing human antibody (Ab) libraries using a phage-display system was developed, many researchers in Ab-related fields anticipated that it would be widely applied to the development of pharmaceutical drugs against various diseases, including cancers. However, successful examples of such applications are very limited. Moreover, researchers who utilize phage-display technology now show divergent ways of thinking about phage Ab libraries. For example, there is debate about what should be the source of VH and VL genes for the construction of libraries to cover the whole repertoire of Abs present in the human body. In the immune system, the introduction of mutations into V genes followed by selection based on binding activity, termed Ab maturation, is required for the production of Abs exhibiting high affinity to the antigen (Ag). Therefore, introduction of mutations and selection are required for isolation of Abs with high affinity after isolation of clones from phage Ab libraries. We constructed a large human Ab library termed AIMS, developed a screening method termed ICOS, and succeeded in isolating many human monoclonal Abs (mAbs) that specifically and strongly bind to various tumor-associated Ags. Eight anti-EGFR mAbs were included, which we characterized. These mAbs showed various different activities against EGFR-expressing cancer cells. In this paper, we describe these data and discuss the possibility and necessity that the mAbs isolated from the AIMS library might be developed as therapeutic drugs against cancers without introduction of mutations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Crystal Structures of Mite Allergens Der f 1 and Der p 1 Reveal Differences in Surface-Exposed Residues that May Influence Antibody Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Chapman, Martin D.; Vailes, Lisa D.; Stura, Enrico A.; Saint-Remy, Jean-Marie; Minor, Wladek; Pomés, Anna; (INDOOR Bio.); (CEAS); (Leuven); (UV)

    2009-12-01

    The Group 1 mite allergens, Der f 1 and Der p 1, are potent allergens excreted by Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, respectively. The human IgE antibody responses to the Group 1 allergens show more cross-reactivity than the murine IgG antibody responses which are largely species-specific. Here, we report the crystal structure of the mature form of Der f 1, which was isolated from its natural source, and a new, high-resolution structure of mature recombinant Der p 1. Unlike Der p 1, Der f 1 is monomeric both in the crystalline state and in solution. Moreover, no metal binding is observed in the structure of Der f 1, despite the fact that all amino acids involved in Ca{sup 2+} binding in Der p 1 are completely conserved in Der f 1. Although Der p 1 and Der f 1 share extensive sequence identity, comparison of the crystal structures of both allergens revealed structural features which could explain the differences in murine and human IgE antibody responses to these allergens. There are structural differences between Der f 1 and Der p 1 which are unevenly distributed on the allergens' surfaces. This uneven spatial arrangement of conserved versus altered residues could explain both the specificity and cross-reactivity of antibodies against Der f 1 and Der p 1.

  15. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  16. The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte invasion ligand Pfrh4 as a target of functional and protective human antibodies against malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Reiling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquired antibodies are important in human immunity to malaria, but key targets remain largely unknown. Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding-homologue-4 (PfRh4 is important for invasion of human erythrocytes and may therefore be a target of protective immunity. METHODS: IgG and IgG subclass-specific responses against different regions of PfRh4 were determined in a longitudinal cohort of 206 children in Papua New Guinea (PNG. Human PfRh4 antibodies were tested for functional invasion-inhibitory activity, and expression of PfRh4 by P. falciparum isolates and sequence polymorphisms were determined. RESULTS: Antibodies to PfRh4 were acquired by children exposed to P. falciparum malaria, were predominantly comprised of IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses, and were associated with increasing age and active parasitemia. High levels of antibodies, particularly IgG3, were strongly predictive of protection against clinical malaria and high-density parasitemia. Human affinity-purified antibodies to the binding region of PfRh4 effectively inhibited erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum merozoites and antibody levels in protected children were at functionally-active concentrations. Although expression of PfRh4 can vary, PfRh4 protein was expressed by most isolates derived from the cohort and showed limited sequence polymorphism. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence suggests that PfRh4 is a target of antibodies that contribute to protective immunity to malaria by inhibiting erythrocyte invasion and preventing high density parasitemia. These findings advance our understanding of the targets and mechanisms of human immunity and evaluating the potential of PfRh4 as a component of candidate malaria vaccines.

  17. Belimumab: anti-BLyS human monoclonal antibody, anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody, BmAb, human monoclonal antibody to B-lymphocyte stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Belimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of B-lymphocyte stimulator, or BLyS. Belimumab is in phase III trials for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has completed a phase II trial in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); the product may also have potential in the treatment of other autoimmune disorders. In May 2001, Cambridge Antibody Technology (now MedImmune) completed its discovery programme and Human Genome Sciences identified belimumab as a candidate for clinical development. More than 1000 distinct human antibodies specific to BLyS were characterized by the collaboration.B-lymphocyte stimulator is a naturally occurring protein discovered by Human Genome Sciences that stimulates B-lymphocytes to develop into mature B cells. Laboratory studies have indicated that higher than normal levels of B-lymphocyte stimulator may contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as SLE and RA. Human Genome Sciences (HGS) and Cambridge Antibody Technology signed a collaborative agreement in August 1999 to study the B-lymphocyte stimulator as a human protein target. HGS is also developing other BLyS products. In March 2000, HGS and Cambridge Antibody Technology expanded their agreement into a 10-year collaboration and product development alliance, providing Human Genome Sciences with the right to use the antibody technology of Cambridge Antibody Technology to fully develop human antibodies for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Cambridge Antibody Technology will receive royalty payments on product sales from HGS, as well as the development and milestone payments it has already received. Belimumab will be manufactured in Human Genome Sciences' manufacturing facility, located in Rockville, MD, USA. HGS holds commercial rights to the drug. In July 2005, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) exercised its co-development and co-promotion option to belimumab. In an agreement made in June 1996, HGS had

  18. Studies of neutralising antibodies to SV40 in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, P; Pipkin, P; Jarzebek, Z; Knowles, W

    2003-07-01

    It has been suggested that the low levels of antibody to the simian polyoma virus SV40 found in human sera may be linked to the use of polio vaccines. Panels of sera from areas of the world with different vaccination histories were examined to see if consistent differences could be identified. In a total of 2,054 sera from the United Kingdom, 692 from Africa and 923 from Poland taken between 1985 and 1997, the seroprevalence was generally between 3 and 5%, although exceptionally one collection from Morocco had a prevalence of 100%, and one from Poland of 0.4%. The seroprevalence showed no obvious age-dependent increase and titres were low compared to post infection animal sera. The results are consistent with previous studies and reveal no general geographically based differences related to possible differences in vaccination history, but the origin of the SV40 antibody in human sera remains to be established.

  19. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M;

    1991-01-01

    . This inhibition was found in infection of both lymphocytic cells and monocytoid cells. Viruses tested included six HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates propagated in different cells, as well as infectious plasma from AIDS patients. The antiviral effect of anti-Tn MAbs occurred by specific binding of the MAb to the virus......The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells...

  20. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1991-01-01

    The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells......; this binding was inhibitable by pure Tn antigen, and indications were found that this inhibition occurred at a pre-entry step. Boosting the naturally occurring low-titer anti-Tn activity may be of prophylactic value, as suggested by the in vitro neutralization found in this study....

  1. A new sialyloligosaccharide from human milk: isolation and characterization using anti-oligosaccharide antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, P A; Smith, D F

    1984-03-01

    A previously undescribed sialyloligosaccharide has been isolated from human milk using a specific anti-sialyloligosaccharide antibody. Structural studies of the radiolabeled oligosaccharide by enzyme degradation and binding by specific anti-oligosaccharide sera are consistent with the following structure: (sequence in text) The oligosaccharide is present only in milk from donors who secrete A, B, or H blood group substances; this is consistent with the requirement of at least one copy of the Se (Secretor) gene necessary for the synthesis of oligosaccharides with Fuc alpha 1-2Gal . . . linkages.

  2. A new sialyloligosaccharide from human milk: isolation and characterization using anti-oligosaccharide antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, P.A.; Smith, D.F.

    1984-03-01

    A previously undescribed sialyloligosaccharide has been isolated from human milk using a specific anti-sialyloligosaccharide antibody. Structural studies of the radiolabeled oligosaccharide by enzyme degradation and binding by specific anti-oligosaccharide sera are consistent with the following structure: (sequence in text) The oligosaccharide is present only in milk from donors who secrete A, B, or H blood group substances; this is consistent with the requirement of at least one copy of the Se (Secretor) gene necessary for the synthesis of oligosaccharides with Fuc alpha 1-2Gal . . . linkages.

  3. Trichinella spiralis Paramyosin Binds Human Complement C1q and Inhibits Classical Complement Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Sun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-Pmy as a defense mechanism. Ts-Pmy is a functional protein with binding activity to human complement C8 and C9 and thus plays a role in evading the attack of the host's immune system. In the present study, the binding activity of Ts-Pmy to human complement C1q and its ability to inhibit classical complement activation were investigated.The binding of recombinant and natural Ts-Pmy to human C1q were determined by ELISA, Far Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Binding of recombinant Ts-Pmy (rTs-Pmy to C1q inhibited C1q binding to IgM and consequently inhibited C3 deposition. The lysis of antibody-sensitized erythrocytes (EAs elicited by the classical complement pathway was also inhibited in the presence of rTs-Pmy. In addition to inhibiting classical complement activation, rTs-Pmy also suppressed C1q binding to THP-1-derived macrophages, thereby reducing C1q-induced macrophages migration.Our results suggest that T. spiralis paramyosin plays an important role in immune evasion by interfering with complement activation through binding to C1q in addition to C8 and C9.

  4. Isolation of a high affinity neutralizing monoclonal antibody against 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus that binds at the 'Sa' antigenic site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachiket Shembekar

    Full Text Available Influenza virus evades host immunity through antigenic drift and shift, and continues to circulate in the human population causing periodic outbreaks including the recent 2009 pandemic. A large segment of the population was potentially susceptible to this novel strain of virus. Historically, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been fundamental tools for diagnosis and epitope mapping of influenza viruses and their importance as an alternate treatment option is also being realized. The current study describes isolation of a high affinity (K(D = 2.1±0.4 pM murine MAb, MA2077 that binds specifically to the hemagglutinin (HA surface glycoprotein of the pandemic virus. The antibody neutralized the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus in an in vitro microneutralization assay (IC(50 = 0.08 µg/ml. MA2077 also showed hemagglutination inhibition activity (HI titre of 0.50 µg/ml against the pandemic virus. In a competition ELISA, MA2077 competed with the binding site of the human MAb, 2D1 (isolated from a survivor of the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic on pandemic H1N1 HA. Epitope mapping studies using yeast cell-surface display of a stable HA1 fragment, wherein 'Sa' and 'Sb' sites were independently mutated, localized the binding site of MA2077 within the 'Sa' antigenic site. These studies will facilitate our understanding of antigen antibody interaction in the context of neutralization of the pandemic influenza virus.

  5. The role of antigen specificity in the binding of murine monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies to microparticles from apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Marion, Tony N; Pisetsky, David S

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and markers of underlying immune system disturbances. These antibodies bind to both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA, mediating pathogenesis by forming immune complexes. As shown recently, DNA in blood exists in both free and particulate forms, with DNA representing an important component of microparticles. Microparticles are membrane-bound vesicles containing nuclear molecules, released by membrane blebbing during cell death and activation. A panel of monoclonal NZB/NZW F1 anti-DNA antibodies was tested for binding to microparticles generated from apoptotic THP-1 and Jurkat cells. These studies showed that only certain anti-DNA antibodies in the panel, specific for double-stranded DNA, bound to microparticles. Binding to particles was reduced by soluble DNA or DNase treatment. Together, these results indicate that particle binding is a feature of only certain anti-DNA antibodies, reflecting immunochemical properties of the antibodies and the nature of the exposed DNA antigens.

  6. Effect of variations in peptide sequence on anti-human milk fat globule membrane antibody reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, P X; Reynolds, K; Pietersz, G A; McKenzie, I F

    1991-02-01

    Monoclonal anti-mucine antibodies BC1, BC2 and BC3 produced using human milk fat globule membrane react with a synthetic peptide p1-24 (PDTRPAPGSTAPPAHGVTSAPDTR) representing the repeating amino acid sequence of the mucin core protein. The minimum epitope recognized by these three monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in p1-24 was contained in the five amino acids APDTR. To analyse the variation of position of the epitope, various modifications of the APDTR sequence were made by synthesizing peptides and testing by direct binding and inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Firstly, peptides p13-32 and C-p13-32, in which the epitope APDTR was placed in the middle instead of the C-terminal as in p1-24, were examined. These peptides had a greater reaction with mAb BC1, BC2 and BC3 compared with the reaction with p1-24. Secondly, A-p1-24 and TSA-p1-24 were made wherein two APDTR epitopes were present--these peptides were shown to bind two IgG antibody molecules. Finally, the contribution of each amino acid in the APDTR epitope was studied using the pepscan polyethylene rods, making all 20 of the amino acid substitutions in each position for SAPDTR (the minimum epitope APDTR with an adjacent amino acid S). In the 120 peptides examined there were some 'permissible' substitutions in A, D and T but not in P or R for BC1 and BC2; there were more 'permissible' substitutions for BC3; different substitution patterns were found with each antibody and some substitutions gave an increased reaction compared with the native peptide SAPDTR. The studies are of value in analysing the reaction of antibodies with epitopes expressed in breast cancer and in determining the antigenicity of synthetic peptides.

  7. Discovery Of Human Antibodies Against Spitting Cobra Toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, Laura; Lohse, Brian; Harrison, Robert

    spitting cobras are among the most medically important snakes in sub-Saharan regions due to the severity of the clinical outcomes caused by their cytotoxic venom, which is derived from cytotoxins of the 3FTx toxin family and PLA2. Here we report the results of our progress in identifying human antibodies...... targeting relevant toxins from the venom of the black necked spitting cobra (Naja nigricolis)....

  8. Most neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies target novel epitopes requiring both Lassa virus glycoprotein subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James E.; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Cross, Robert W.; Yenni, Rachael E.; Elliott, Deborah H.; Rouelle, Julie A.; Kannadka, Chandrika B.; Smira, Ashley A.; Garry, Courtney E.; Bradley, Benjamin T.; Yu, Haini; Shaffer, Jeffrey G.; Boisen, Matt L.; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Zandonatti, Michelle A.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson; de la Torre, Juan C.; Andersen, Kristian G.; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Gbakie, Michael; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J.; Fonnie, Richard; Jalloh, Simbirie C.; Kargbo, Brima; Vandi, Mohamed A.; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Ikponmwosa, Odia; Asogun, Danny A.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Follarin, Onikepe A.; Schieffelin, John S.; Pitts, Kelly R.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Kulakoski, Peter C.; Wilson, Russell B.; Happi, Christian T.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Gevao, Sahr M.; Khan, S. Humarr; Grant, Donald S.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever is a severe multisystem disease that often has haemorrhagic manifestations. The epitopes of the Lassa virus (LASV) surface glycoproteins recognized by naturally infected human hosts have not been identified or characterized. Here we have cloned 113 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for LASV glycoproteins from memory B cells of Lassa fever survivors from West Africa. One-half bind the GP2 fusion subunit, one-fourth recognize the GP1 receptor-binding subunit and the remaining fourth are specific for the assembled glycoprotein complex, requiring both GP1 and GP2 subunits for recognition. Notably, of the 16 mAbs that neutralize LASV, 13 require the assembled glycoprotein complex for binding, while the remaining 3 require GP1 only. Compared with non-neutralizing mAbs, neutralizing mAbs have higher binding affinities and greater divergence from germline progenitors. Some mAbs potently neutralize all four LASV lineages. These insights from LASV human mAb characterization will guide strategies for immunotherapeutic development and vaccine design. PMID:27161536

  9. Norfloxacin binds to human fecal material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, C; Lindqvist, L; Nord, C E

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies have reported very high (120 to 2,700 mg/kg) concentrations of norfloxacin in feces after therapeutic doses. MICs for fecal microorganisms are with few exceptions far below these levels. Nevertheless, clinical investigations show that the main part of the aerobic gram-positive and the anaerobic microflora remains unaffected after norfloxacin administration. In this study, the binding of [14C]norfloxacin to fecal material was analyzed. The binding of a group of nonlabeled quinolones to feces and the interactions between Enterococcus faecium, Bacteroides fragilis, and norfloxacin were also investigated. The results showed that norfloxacin has the ability to bind to feces. The specific binding was reversible, saturated after 90 min of incubation at 37 degrees C, and increased linearly with fecal concentration. Scatchard plots and nonlinear regression computer analyses revealed two different binding classes. The primary specific binding had a dissociation constant (KD) of 1.0 microM and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 0.12 mumol/g of feces. The KD and Bmax of the secondary, more unspecific binding were 450 microM and 11.8 mumol/g of feces, respectively. The binding of unlabeled ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin, and norfloxacin to feces was comparable to that of [14C]norfloxacin. The results of norfloxacin binding to suspensions of B. fragilis suggested that the main part of the binding is to the bacterial fraction of feces. In the presence of 8.0 g (dry weight) of B. fragilis per liter, the MBC of norfloxacin for E. faecium increased from 8 to 256 micrograms/ml. The finding of the present study indicated that binding of norfloxacin to feces may explain the paradox of high fecal concentrations of norfloxacin versus the actual effect on the normal gastrointestinal microflora. PMID:2854456

  10. Flow-Cytometric Isolation of Human Antibodies from a Nonimmune Saccharomyces cerevisiae Surface Display Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldhaus, Michael (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Siegel, Robert W.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Opresko, Lee (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Coleman, James R.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Feldhaus, Jane M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Yeung, Yik A.(Massachusetts Institute Of Tec); Cochran, Jennifer R.(Massachusetts Institute Of Tec); Heinzelman, Peter (Massachusetts Institute Of Tec); Colby, David (Massachusetts Institute Of Tec); Swers, Jeffrey (Massachusetts Institute Of Tec); Graff, Christilyn (Massachusetts Institute Of Tec); Wiley, H Steven (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wittrup, K D.(Massachusetts Institute Of Tec)

    2003-02-28

    A nonimmune library of 109 human antibody scFv fragments has been cloned and expressed on the surface of yeast, and nanomolar-affinity scFvs routinely obtained by magnetic bead screening and flow cytometric sorting. The yeast library can be amplified 1010-fold without measurable loss of clonal diversity, enabling effectively indefinite expansion of the library. The expression, stability, and antigen binding properties of more than 50 isolated scFv clones were assessed directly on the yeast cell surface by immunofluorescent labeling and flow cytometry, obviating separate subcloning, expression, and purification steps and thereby expediting the isolation of novel affinity reagents. The ability to use multiplex library screening demonstrates the utility of this approach for high throughput antibody isolation for proteomics applications.

  11. Structural and molecular basis for Ebola virus neutralization by protective human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misasi, John; Gilman, Morgan S A; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Gui, Miao; Cagigi, Alberto; Mulangu, Sabue; Corti, Davide; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Cunningham, James; Muyembe-Tamfun, Jean Jacques; Baxa, Ulrich; Graham, Barney S; Xiang, Ye; Sullivan, Nancy J; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-03-18

    Ebola virus causes hemorrhagic fever with a high case fatality rate for which there is no approved therapy. Two human monoclonal antibodies, mAb100 and mAb114, in combination, protect nonhuman primates against all signs of Ebola virus disease, including viremia. Here, we demonstrate that mAb100 recognizes the base of the Ebola virus glycoprotein (GP) trimer, occludes access to the cathepsin-cleavage loop, and prevents the proteolytic cleavage of GP that is required for virus entry. We show that mAb114 interacts with the glycan cap and inner chalice of GP, remains associated after proteolytic removal of the glycan cap, and inhibits binding of cleaved GP to its receptor. These results define the basis of neutralization for two protective antibodies and may facilitate development of therapies and vaccines.

  12. Decorin is a novel VEGFR-2-binding antagonist for the human extravillous trophoblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Gausal A; Girish, Gannareddy V; Lala, Neena; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M; Lala, Peeyush K

    2011-08-01

    Extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) of the human placenta invade the uterine decidua and its arteries to ensure successful placentation. We previously identified two decidua-derived molecules, TGF-β and a TGF-β-binding proteoglycan decorin (DCN), as negative regulators of EVT proliferation, migration, and invasiveness and reported that DCN acts via multiple tyrosine kinase receptors [epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R), IGF receptor-1 (IGFR1), and vascular endothelial growth factor 2 receptor (VEGFR-2)]. Because binding of DCN to VEGFR-2 has never been reported earlier, present study explored this binding, the approximate location of VEGFR-2-binding site in DCN, and its functional role in our human first trimester EVT cell line HTR-8/SVneo. Based on far-Western blotting and coimmunoprecipitation studies, we report that DCN binds both native (EVT expressed) and recombinant VEGFR-2 and that this binding is abrogated with a VEGFR-2 blocking antibody, indicating an overlap between the ligand-binding and the DCN-binding domains of VEGFR-2. We determined that (125)I-labeled VEGF-E (a VEGFR-2 specific ligand) binds EVT with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 566 pM, and DCN displaced this binding with an inhibition constant (K(i)) of 3.93-5.78 nM, indicating a 7- to 10-fold lower affinity of DCN for VEGFR-2. DCN peptide fragments derived from the leucine rich repeat 5 domain that blocked DCN-VEGFR-2 interactions or VEGF-E binding in EVT cells also blocked VEGF-A- and VEGF-E-induced EVT cell proliferation and migration, indicative of functional VEGFR-2-binding sites of DCN. Finally, DCN inhibited VEGF-E-induced EVT migration by interfering with ERK1/2 activation. Our findings reveal a novel role of DCN as an antagonistic ligand for VEGFR-2, having implications for pathophysiology of preeclampsia, a trophoblast hypoinvasive disorder in pregnancy, and explain its antiangiogenic function.

  13. Detection of antibodies to bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan in human sera. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heymer, B.; Schleifer, K.H.; Read, S.; Zabriskie, J.B.; Krause, R.M.

    1976-07-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the measurement of antibodies to peptidoglycan in human sera including patients with rheumatic feaver and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The assay is based on the percentage of binding of the hapten /sup 125/I-L-Ala-..gamma..-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, the major peptide determinant of peptidoglycan. Because of differences in the avidity of the antibodies in different sera, the amount of antibody was expressed as pentapeptide hapten-binding capacity (pentapeptide-HBC in ng/ml of serum). Fourteen out of 105 normal blood donors had a pentapeptide-HBC value greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml serum. Values in healthy children 5 to 18 years of age were less than or equal to 50 ng/ml. Sixty-eight percent of the individuals with rheumatic fever had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml, an indication that streptococcal infections can stimulate an immune response to peptidoglycan. Thirty-five percent of the patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml. Such a finding points to a possible association between bacterial infections and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against influenza virus from vaccinated healthy donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Mizuta, Hiroyuki [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oshita, Masatoshi; Ideno, Shoji [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Yunoki, Mikihiro [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kuhara, Motoki [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano 396-0002 (Japan); Yamamoto, Naomasa [Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ohu University, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-8611 (Japan); Okuno, Yoshinobu [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa 768-0061 (Japan); Ikuta, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: ikuta@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-09-11

    Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) prepared from patients with viral infections could provide information on human epitopes important for the development of vaccines as well as potential therapeutic applications. Through the fusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of five influenza-vaccinated volunteers, with newly developed murine-human chimera fusion partner cells, named SPYMEG, we obtained 10 hybridoma clones stably producing anti-influenza virus antibodies: one for influenza A H1N1, four for influenza A H3N2 and five for influenza B. Surprisingly, most of the HuMAbs showed broad reactivity within subtype and four (two for H3N2 and two for B) showed broad neutralizing ability. Importantly, epitope mapping revealed that the two broad neutralizing antibodies to H3N2 derived from different donors recognized the same epitope located underneath the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin globular region that is highly conserved among H3N2 strains.

  15. Novel Prostate Specific Antigen plastic antibody designed withcharged binding sites for an improved protein binding and itsapplication in a biosensor of potentiometric transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Rebelo, Tânia S. C. R.; Santos, C.; Costa-Rodrigues, J.; Fernandes, M. H.; Noronha, João P. C.; Sales, M. Goreti F.

    2014-01-01

    This work shows that the synthesis of protein plastic antibodies tailored with selected charged monomersaround the binding site enhances protein binding. These charged receptor sites are placed over a neutralpolymeric matrix, thus inducing a suitable orientation the protein reception to its site. This is confirmed bypreparing control materials with neutral monomers and also with non-imprinted template. This concepthas been applied here to Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), the protein of choice...

  16. Generation and Characterization of Novel Human IRAS Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imidazoline receptors were first proposed by Bousquet et al., when they studied antihypertensive effect of clonidine. A strong candidate for I1R, known as imidazoline receptor antisera-selected protein (IRAS, has been cloned from human hippocampus. We reported that IRAS mediated agmatine-induced inhibition of opioid dependence in morphine-dependent cells. To elucidate the functional and structure properties of I1R, we developed the newly monoclonal antibody against the N-terminal hIRAS region including the PX domain (10–120aa through immunization of BALB/c mice with the NusA-IRAS fusion protein containing an IRAS N-terminal (10–120aa. Stable hybridoma cell lines were established and monoclonal antibodies specifically recognized full-length IRAS proteins in their native state by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. Monoclonal antibodies stained in a predominantly punctate cytoplasmic pattern when applied to IRAS-transfected HEK293 cells by indirect immunofluorescence assays and demonstrated excellent reactivity in flow immunocytometry. These monoclonal antibodies will provide powerful reagents for the further investigation of hIRAS protein functions.

  17. Dengue viruses are enhanced by distinct populations of serotype cross-reactive antibodies in human immune sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruklanthi de Alwis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV are mosquito-borne flaviviruses of global importance. DENV exist as four serotypes, DENV1-DENV4. Following a primary infection, individuals produce DENV-specific antibodies that bind only to the serotype of infection and other antibodies that cross-react with two or more serotypes. People exposed to a secondary DENV infection with another serotype are at greater risk of developing more severe forms of dengue disease. The increased risk of severe dengue in people experiencing repeat DENV infections appear to be due, at least in part, to the ability of pre-existing serotype cross-reactive antibodies to form virus-antibody complexes that can productively infect Fcγ receptor-bearing target cells. While the theory of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE is supported by several human and small animal model studies, the specific viral antigens and epitopes recognized by enhancing human antibodies after natural infections have not been fully defined. We used antibody-depletion techniques to remove DENV-specific antibody sub-populations from primary DENV-immune human sera. The effects of removing specific antibody populations on ADE were tested both in vitro using K562 cells and in vivo using the AG129 mouse model. Removal of serotype cross-reactive antibodies ablated enhancement of heterotypic virus infection in vitro and antibody-enhanced mortality in vivo. Further depletion studies using recombinant viral antigens showed that although the removal of DENV E-specific antibodies using recombinant E (rE protein resulted in a partial reduction in DENV enhancement, there was a significant residual enhancement remaining. Competition ADE studies using prM-specific Fab fragments in human immune sera showed that both rE-specific and prM-specific antibodies in primary DENV-immune sera significantly contribute to enhancement of heterotypic DENV infection in vitro. Identification of the targets of DENV-enhancing antibodies should contribute to

  18. Strongyloides stercoralis excretory/secretory protein strongylastacin specifically recognized by IgE antibodies in infected human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharajalu, Ravi; Parandaman, Vijayalakshmi; Ndao, Momar; Andersen, John F; Neva, Franklin A

    2011-02-01

    The infective, microscopic Strongyloides stercoralis larvae in contaminated soil can penetrate human skin with the help of excretory/secretory proteases. These proteases play a critical role in infection and transmigration of the parasite to the intestines. Strongylastacin is similar to astacin (from the digestive gland of the crayfish Astacus astacus), a multi-domain protein with a signal peptide, a pro-enzyme, a catalytic domain containing the zinc binding consensus astacin family signature sequence HEXXHXXGFXHEXXRXDR, and a second conserved zinc binding motif SIMHY at N- terminal region. An EGF-1 like domain and a CUB domain are located at the COOH- terminal. In this study, the excretory/secretory Strongylastacin gene from S. stercoralis infective larval stage was cloned and expressed as a 45 kDa in Escherichia coli. Immunoblot analysis showed the presence of natural IgG antibodies against strongylastacin in six infected and six non-endemic normal sera. These findings were confirmed in an ELISA of 32 S. stercoralis infected and 32 presumed normal human sera; all contained natural anti-strongylastacin IgG antibodies. By contrast, IgE antibodies specific to strongylastacin were present in sera from individuals infected with S. stercoralis but not in uninfected control sera. Moreover, recombinant strongylastacin did not cross-react with IgE antibodies either from patients infected with filaria or patients with tropical pulmonary eosinophilic (TPE) who had increased IgE antibodies. The present authors conclude that strongylastacin, an excretory/secretory antigen, elicits specific IgE antibodies in S. stercoralis infected humans. Non-specific IgG antibodies to strongylastacin are present in both infected and normal humans. Further investigation is needed to understand the role of the host protective response against strongylastacin.

  19. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Schade Larsen, C;

    2000-01-01

    of HIV-infected patients were therefore assessed by radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. IgG from 4/505 HIV patients and 9/2000 healthy controls (p>0.05) bound rMIP-1alpha and rMIP-1beta, but not rRANTES. No other plasma factors bound the chemokines. The antibodies inhibited receptor binding of both...... chemokines. There was no association between presence of antibodies and disease stage or HIV progression rate. Three of 11 patients treated with rIL-2 developed IgG antibodies suppressing cellular binding and growth promotion of rIL-2. Hence, circulating factors, including antibodies MIP-1alpha/MIP-1beta...

  20. Radioimmunoassay of bovine, ovine and porcine luteinizing hormone with a monoclonal antibody and a human tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosberg, M.; Tagle, R.; Madej, A.; Molina, J.R.; Carlsson, M.-A.

    1993-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for bovine (bLH), ovine (oLH) and porcine (pLH) luteinizing hormone was developed using a human [sup 125]ILH tracer from a commercial kit and a monoclonal antibody (518B7) specific for LH but with low species specificity. Standard curves demonstrated similar binding kinetics when bLH, oLH and pLH were incubated with tracer and antibody for 2 h at room temperature. A 30-min delay in the addition of the tracer gave sufficient sensitivity when analysing pLH. Separation of antibody-bound LH from free hormone was achieved by using second antibody-coated micro Sepharose beads. The assay was validated and the performance compared with that of an RIA currently in use for determination of bLH (coefficient of correlation: 0.99 and 0.98). Regardless of the standards used, intra-assay coefficients of variation were <10% for LH concentrations exceeding 1 [mu]g/L. The inter-assay coefficients of variation were <15%. The assay was used for clinical evaluation demonstrating the pre-ovulatory LH surge in two cyclic cows, LH pulsatility in an oophorectomized ewe and LH response to GnRH injection in a boar. (au) (7 refs.).

  1. Design of cyclic peptides that bind protein surfaces with antibody-like affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward, Steven W; Fiacco, Stephen; Austin, Ryan J; Roberts, Richard W

    2007-09-21

    There is a pressing need for new molecular tools to target protein surfaces with high affinity and specificity. Here, we describe cyclic messenger RNA display with a trillion-member covalent peptide macrocycle library. Using this library, we have designed a number of high-affinity, redox-insensitive, cyclic peptides that target the signaling protein G alpha i1. In addition to cyclization, our library construction took advantage of an expanded genetic code, utilizing nonsense suppression to insert N-methylphenylalanine as a 21st amino acid. The designed macrocycles exhibit several intriguing features. First, the core motif seen in all of the selected variants is the same and shares an identical context with respect to the macrocyclic scaffold, consistent with the idea that selection simultaneously optimizes both the cyclization chemistry and the structural placement of the binding epitope. Second, detailed characterization of one molecule, cyclic G alpha i binding peptide (cycGiBP), demonstrates substantially enhanced proteolytic stability relative to that of the parent linear molecule. Third and perhaps most important, the cycGiBP peptide binds the target with very high affinity ( K i approximately 2.1 nM), similar to those of many of the best monoclonal antibodies and higher than that of the betagamma heterodimer, an endogenous G alpha i1 ligand. Overall the work provides a general route to design novel, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands that target protein surfaces.

  2. The Presence, Persistence and Functional Properties of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein II Antibodies Are Influenced by HLA Class II Allelic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Leticia M.; Lima, Barbara A. S.; Sousa, Taís N.; Alves, Jéssica R. S.; Rocha, Roberto S.; Fontes, Cor J. F.; Sanchez, Bruno A. M.; Adams, John H.; Brito, Cristiana F. A.; Pires, Douglas E. V.; Ascher, David B.; Sell, Ana Maria; Carvalho, Luzia H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax infects red blood cells through a key pathway that requires interaction between Duffy binding protein II (DBPII) and its receptor on reticulocytes, the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC). A high proportion of P. vivax-exposed individuals fail to develop antibodies that inhibit DBPII-DARC interaction, and genetic factors that modulate this humoral immune response are poorly characterized. Here, we investigate if DBPII responsiveness could be HLA class II-linked. Methodology/Principal Findings A community-based open cohort study was carried out in an agricultural settlement of the Brazilian Amazon, in which 336 unrelated volunteers were genotyped for HLA class II (DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 loci), and their DBPII immune responses were monitored over time (baseline, 6 and 12 months) by conventional serology (DBPII IgG ELISA-detected) and functional assays (inhibition of DBPII–erythrocyte binding). The results demonstrated an increased susceptibility of the DRB1*13:01 carriers to develop and sustain an anti-DBPII IgG response, while individuals with the haplotype DRB1*14:02-DQA1*05:03-DQB1*03:01 were persistent non-responders. HLA class II gene polymorphisms also influenced the functional properties of DBPII antibodies (BIAbs, binding inhibitory antibodies), with three alleles (DRB1*07:01, DQA1*02:01 and DQB1*02:02) comprising a single haplotype linked with the presence and persistence of the BIAbs response. Modelling the structural effects of the HLA-DRB1 variants revealed a number of differences in the peptide-binding groove, which is likely to lead to altered antigen binding and presentation profiles, and hence may explain the differences in subject responses. Conclusions/Significance The current study confirms the heritability of the DBPII antibody response, with genetic variation in HLA class II genes influencing both the development and persistence of IgG antibody responses. Cellular studies to increase

  3. Proteasome activator complex PA28 identified as an accessible target in prostate cancer by in vivo selection of human antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, David; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Ximénez-Embún, Pilar; Fernández-Periáñez, Rodrigo; Martín, M. Teresa; Molina-Privado, Irene; Ruppen-Cañás, Isabel; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Cañamero, Marta; Cuesta, Ángel M.; Compte, Marta; Kremer, Leonor; Bellas, Carmen; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Guijarro-Muñoz, Irene; Sanz, Laura; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Antibody cancer therapies rely on systemically accessible targets and suitable antibodies that exert a functional activity or deliver a payload to the tumor site. Here, we present proof-of-principle of in vivo selection of human antibodies in tumor-bearing mice that identified a tumor-specific antibody able to deliver a payload and unveils the target antigen. By using an ex vivo enrichment process against freshly disaggregated tumors to purge the repertoire, in combination with in vivo biopanning at optimized phage circulation time, we have identified a human domain antibody capable of mediating selective localization of phage to human prostate cancer xenografts. Affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry analysis showed that the antibody recognizes the proteasome activator complex PA28. The specificity of soluble antibody was confirmed by demonstrating its binding to the active human PA28αβ complex. Whereas systemically administered control phage was confined in the lumen of blood vessels of both normal tissues and tumors, the selected phage spread from tumor vessels into the perivascular tumor parenchyma. In these areas, the selected phage partially colocalized with PA28 complex. Furthermore, we found that the expression of the α subunit of PA28 [proteasome activator complex subunit 1 (PSME1)] is elevated in primary and metastatic human prostate cancer and used anti-PSME1 antibodies to show that PSME1 is an accessible marker in mouse xenograft tumors. These results support the use of PA28 as a tumor marker and a potential target for therapeutic intervention in prostate cancer. PMID:23918357

  4. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Schade Larsen, C; Odum, N; Skinhøj, P; Bendtzen, K

    2000-02-01

    Neutralizing cytokine antibodies are found in healthy and diseased individuals, including patients treated with recombinant cytokines. Identification of CCR-5 as co-receptor for HIV has focused interest on CC chemokines and their potential therapeutic use. Chemokine-binding components in plasma of HIV-infected patients were therefore assessed by radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. IgG from 4/505 HIV patients and 9/2000 healthy controls (p>0.05) bound rMIP-1alpha and rMIP-1beta, but not rRANTES. No other plasma factors bound the chemokines. The antibodies inhibited receptor binding of both chemokines. There was no association between presence of antibodies and disease stage or HIV progression rate. Three of 11 patients treated with rIL-2 developed IgG antibodies suppressing cellular binding and growth promotion of rIL-2. Hence, circulating factors, including antibodies MIP-1alpha/MIP-1beta, are uncommon in healthy individuals and HIV patients, and are apparently without prognostic significance. In contrast to earlier reports, IL-2 antibodies were found only in HIV patients treated with rIL-2.

  5. Multiple binding modes of ibuprofen in human serum albumin identified by absolute binding free energy calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Evoli, Stefania

    2016-11-10

    Human serum albumin possesses multiple binding sites and transports a wide range of ligands that include the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen. A complete map of the binding sites of ibuprofen in albumin is difficult to obtain in traditional experiments, because of the structural adaptability of this protein in accommodating small ligands. In this work, we provide a set of predictions covering the geometry, affinity of binding and protonation state for the pharmaceutically most active form (S-isomer) of ibuprofen to albumin, by using absolute binding free energy calculations in combination with classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular docking. The most favorable binding modes correctly reproduce several experimentally identified binding locations, which include the two Sudlow\\'s drug sites (DS2 and DS1) and the fatty acid binding sites 6 and 2 (FA6 and FA2). Previously unknown details of the binding conformations were revealed for some of them, and formerly undetected binding modes were found in other protein sites. The calculated binding affinities exhibit trends which seem to agree with the available experimental data, and drastically degrade when the ligand is modeled in a protonated (neutral) state, indicating that ibuprofen associates with albumin preferentially in its charged form. These findings provide a detailed description of the binding of ibuprofen, help to explain a wide range of results reported in the literature in the last decades, and demonstrate the possibility of using simulation methods to predict ligand binding to albumin.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus antibodies and the vaccine problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, F; Weiss, R A

    2014-05-01

    Despite the great advances made in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection with antiretroviral drug treatment, a safe and efficacious HIV vaccine has yet to be developed. Here, we discuss why clinical trials and vaccine development for HIV have so far been disappointing, with an emphasis on the lack of protective antibodies. We review approaches for developing appropriate HIV immunogens and the stimulation of long-lasting B-cell responses with antibody maturation. We conclude that candidate reagents in the pipeline for HIV vaccine development are unlikely to be particularly effective. Although the major funders of HIV vaccine research and development are placing increasing emphasis on clinical product development, a genuine breakthrough in preventing HIV infection through vaccines is more likely to come from novel immunogen research.

  7. Mechanism of Collaborative Enhancement of Binding of Paired Antibodies to Distinct Epitopes of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, Raisa; Greineder, Colin F; Villa, Carlos H; Hood, Elizabeth D; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Sun, Jing; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Abraham, Valsamma; DeLisser, Horace M; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to extracellular epitopes of human and mouse Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (CD31 or PECAM-1) stimulate binding of other mAbs to distinct adjacent PECAM-1 epitopes. This effect, dubbed Collaborative Enhancement of Paired Affinity Ligands, or CEPAL, has been shown to enhance delivery of mAb-targeted drugs and nanoparticles to the vascular endothelium. Here we report new insights into the mechanism underlying this effect, which demonstrates equivalent amplitude in the following models: i) cells expressing a full length PECAM-1 and mutant form of PECAM-1 unable to form homodimers; ii) isolated fractions of cellular membranes; and, iii) immobilized recombinant PECAM-1. These results indicate that CEPAL is mediated not by interference in cellular functions or homophilic PECAM-1 interactions, but rather by conformational changes within the cell adhesion molecule induced by ligand binding. This mechanism, mediated by exposure of partially occult epitopes, is likely to occur in molecules other than PECAM-1 and may represent a generalizable phenomenon with valuable practical applications.

  8. The role of monogamous bivalency and Fc interactions in the binding of anti-DNA antibodies to DNA antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Nancy A; Pisetsky, David S

    2016-05-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies can bind DNA avidly by monogamous bivalency, a mechanism which requires the interaction of both Fab combining regions with antigenic determinants on the same polynucleotide. To explore further this mechanism, we tested Fab and F(ab')2 fragments prepared from IgG from patient plasmas in an ELISA with native DNA antigen, detecting antibody with a peroxidase conjugated anti-Fab reagent. These studies showed that Fab fragments, which can only bind monovalently, had negligible activity. Although bivalent F(ab')2 fragments would be predicted to bind DNA, these fragments also showed poor anti-DNA activity. Control studies showed that the fragments retained antibody activity to tetanus toxoid and an EBV antigen preparation. Together, these findings suggest that anti-DNA avidity depends on monogamous bivalency, with the antibody Fc portion also influencing DNA binding, in a mechanism which can be termed Fc-dependent monogamous bivalency.

  9. Isoforms of Hsp70-binding human LDL in adult Schistosoma mansoni worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Adriana S A; Cavalcanti, Marília G S; Zingali, Russolina B; Lima-Filho, José L; Chaves, Maria E C

    2015-03-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is one of the most common parasites infecting humans. They are well adapted to the host, and this parasite's longevity is a consequence of effective escape from the host immune system. In the blood circulation, lipoproteins not only help to conceal the worm from attack by host antibodies but also act as a source of lipids for S. mansoni. Previous SEM studies showed that the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles present on the surface of adult S. mansoni worms decreased in size when the incubation time increased. In this study, immunocytochemical and proteomic analyses were used to locate and identify S. mansoni binding proteins to human plasma LDL. Ultrathin sections of adult worms were cut transversely from the anterior, medial and posterior regions of the parasite. Immunocytochemical experiments revealed particles of gold in the tegument, muscle region and spine in male worms and around vitelline cells in females. Immunoblotting and 2D-electrophoresis using incubations with human serum, anti-LDL antibodies and anti-chicken IgG peroxidase conjugate were performed to identify LDL-binding proteins in S. mansoni. Analysis of the binding proteins using LC-MS identified two isoforms of the Hsp70 chaperone in S. mansoni. Hsp70 is involved in the interaction with apoB in the cytoplasm and its transport to the endoplasmic reticulum. However, further studies are needed to clarify the functional role of Hsp70 in S. mansoni, mainly related to the interaction with human LDL.

  10. Maturation of shark single-domain (IgNAR) antibodies: evidence for induced-fit binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfield, Robyn L; Dooley, Helen; Verdino, Petra; Flajnik, Martin F; Wilson, Ian A

    2007-03-23

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  11. Maturation of Shark Single-Domain (IgNAR) Antibodies: Evidence for Induced-Fit Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanfield, R.L.; Dooley, H.; Verdino, P.; Flajnik, M.F.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Maryland U.

    2007-07-13

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  12. Validation of a Flow Cytometry Based Binding Assay for Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibody Recognizing EGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedeño-Arias, Mercedes; Sánchez-Ramírez, Javier; Blanco-Santana, Rancés; Rengifo-Calzado, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    An ideal test used to characterize a product must be appropriate for the measurement of product quality, manufacturing consistency, product stability, and comparability studies. Flow cytometry has been successfully applied to the examination of antibodies and receptors on membrane surfaces; however, to date, the analytical validation of cytometry based assays is limited. Here we report on the validation of a flow cytometry-based assay used in the evaluation of nimotuzumab binding to cells over-expressing EGFR on cell surface. The assay was validated by examining, assay robustness, specificity, repeatability and intermediate precision. The assay was highly specific, robust for all studied factors except for cell fixation with 1% paraformaldehyde and met criteria for precision with RSD < 2%. In addition the assay has stability-indicating properties evidenced by the ability to detect changes in mAb degraded samples. Most importantly, the assay demonstrated to be useful for its intended use. PMID:21886904

  13. Identification of CD4-Binding Site Dependent Plasma Neutralizing Antibodies in an HIV-1 Infected Indian Individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Lubina; Makhdoomi, Muzamil Ashraf; Kumar, Sanjeev; Nair, Ambili; Andrabi, Raiees; Clark, Brenda E; Auyeung, Kate; Bhattacharya, Jayanta; Vajpayee, Madhu; Wig, Naveet; Pantophlet, Ralph; Luthra, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting antibody specificities in the plasma of HIV-1 infected individuals that develop broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) is likely to provide useful information for refining target epitopes for vaccine design. Several studies have reported CD4-binding site (CD4bs) antibodies as neutralization determinants in the plasma of subtype B-infected individuals; however there is little information on the prevalence of CD4bs specificities in HIV-infected individuals in India. Here, we report on the presence of CD4bs antibodies and their contribution to virus neutralization in the plasma from a cohort of HIV-1 infected Indian individuals. Plasma from 11 of the 140 HIV-1 infected individuals (7.9%) studied here exhibited cross-neutralization activity against a panel of subtype B and C viruses. Analyses of these 11 plasma samples for the presence of CD4bs antibodies using two CD4bs-selective probes (antigenically resurfaced HXB2gp120 core protein RSC3 and hyperglycosylated JRFLgp120 mutant ΔN2mCHO) revealed that five (AIIMS 617, 619, 627, 642, 660) contained RSC3-reactive plasma antibodies and only one (AIIMS 660) contained ΔN2mCHO-reactive antibodies. Plasma antibody depletion and competition experiments confirmed that the neutralizing activity in the AIIMS 660 plasma was dependent on CD4bs antibodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report specifically on the presence of CD4bs antibodies in the plasma of a cohort of HIV-1 infected Indian donors. The identification of CD4bs dependent neutralizing antibodies in an HIV-1 infected Indian donor is a salient finding of this study and is supportive of ongoing efforts to induce similar antibodies by immunization.

  14. Identification of CD4-Binding Site Dependent Plasma Neutralizing Antibodies in an HIV-1 Infected Indian Individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubina Khan

    Full Text Available Dissecting antibody specificities in the plasma of HIV-1 infected individuals that develop broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs is likely to provide useful information for refining target epitopes for vaccine design. Several studies have reported CD4-binding site (CD4bs antibodies as neutralization determinants in the plasma of subtype B-infected individuals; however there is little information on the prevalence of CD4bs specificities in HIV-infected individuals in India. Here, we report on the presence of CD4bs antibodies and their contribution to virus neutralization in the plasma from a cohort of HIV-1 infected Indian individuals. Plasma from 11 of the 140 HIV-1 infected individuals (7.9% studied here exhibited cross-neutralization activity against a panel of subtype B and C viruses. Analyses of these 11 plasma samples for the presence of CD4bs antibodies using two CD4bs-selective probes (antigenically resurfaced HXB2gp120 core protein RSC3 and hyperglycosylated JRFLgp120 mutant ΔN2mCHO revealed that five (AIIMS 617, 619, 627, 642, 660 contained RSC3-reactive plasma antibodies and only one (AIIMS 660 contained ΔN2mCHO-reactive antibodies. Plasma antibody depletion and competition experiments confirmed that the neutralizing activity in the AIIMS 660 plasma was dependent on CD4bs antibodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report specifically on the presence of CD4bs antibodies in the plasma of a cohort of HIV-1 infected Indian donors. The identification of CD4bs dependent neutralizing antibodies in an HIV-1 infected Indian donor is a salient finding of this study and is supportive of ongoing efforts to induce similar antibodies by immunization.

  15. Surfactant protein D binds to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope protein gp120 and inhibits HIV replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meschi, Joseph; Crouch, Erika C; Skolnik, Paul;

    2005-01-01

    The envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contains highly conserved mannosylated oligosaccharides. These glycoconjugates contribute to resistance to antibody neutralization, and binding to cell surface lectins on macrophages and dendritic cells. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL......) binds to gp120 and plays a role in defence against the virus. In this study it is demonstrated that surfactant protein D (SP-D) binds to gp120 and inhibits HIV infectivity at significantly lower concentrations than MBL. The binding of SP-D was mediated by its calcium-dependent carbohydrate...... defence against HIV. A chimeric protein containing the N-terminal and collagen domains of SP-D linked to the neck and carbohydrate-recognition domains of MBL (called SP-D/MBL(neck+CRD)) had greater ability to bind to gp120 and inhibit virus replication than either SP-D or MBL. The enhanced binding of SP...

  16. Intramolecular trimerization, a novel strategy for making multispecific antibodies with controlled orientation of the antigen binding domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Alanes, Natalia Nuñez del Prado; Compte, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a new strategy that allows the rapid and efficient engineering of mono and multispecific trivalent antibodies. By fusing single-domain antibodies from camelid heavy-chain-only immunoglobulins (VHHs) to the N-terminus of a human collagen XVIII trimerization domain (TIEXVIII) we p...

  17. DNA-binding specificities of human transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolma, Arttu; Yan, Jian; Whitington, Thomas; Toivonen, Jarkko; Nitta, Kazuhiro R; Rastas, Pasi; Morgunova, Ekaterina; Enge, Martin; Taipale, Mikko; Wei, Gonghong; Palin, Kimmo; Vaquerizas, Juan M; Vincentelli, Renaud; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Hughes, Timothy R; Lemaire, Patrick; Ukkonen, Esko; Kivioja, Teemu; Taipale, Jussi

    2013-01-17

    Although the proteins that read the gene regulatory code, transcription factors (TFs), have been largely identified, it is not well known which sequences TFs can recognize. We have analyzed the sequence-specific binding of human TFs using high-throughput SELEX and ChIP sequencing. A total of 830 binding profiles were obtained, describing 239 distinctly different binding specificities. The models represent the majority of human TFs, approximately doubling the coverage compared to existing systematic studies. Our results reveal additional specificity determinants for a large number of factors for which a partial specificity was known, including a commonly observed A- or T-rich stretch that flanks the core motifs. Global analysis of the data revealed that homodimer orientation and spacing preferences, and base-stacking interactions, have a larger role in TF-DNA binding than previously appreciated. We further describe a binding model incorporating these features that is required to understand binding of TFs to DNA.

  18. Expression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Neutralizing Antibody Fragments Using Human Vaginal Lactobacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcobal, Angela; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Wenlei; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Jia, Letong; Lee, Peter P.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Parks, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Eradication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by vaccination with epitopes that produce broadly neutralizing antibodies is the ultimate goal for HIV prevention. However, generating appropriate immune responses has proven difficult. Expression of broadly neutralizing antibodies by vaginal colonizing lactobacilli provides an approach to passively target these antibodies to the mucosa. We tested the feasibility of expressing single-chain and single-domain antibodies (dAbs) in Lactobacillus to be used as a topical microbicide/live biotherapeutic. Lactobacilli provide an excellent platform to express anti-HIV proteins. Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been identified against epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope and have been made into active antibody fragments. We tested single-chain variable fragment m9 and dAb-m36 and its derivative m36.4 as prototype antibodies. We cloned and expressed the antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 in Lactobacillus jensenii-1153 and tested the expression levels and functionality. We made a recombinant L. jensenii 1153-1128 that expresses dAb-m36.4. All antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 were expressed by lactobacilli. However, we noted the smaller m36/m36.4 were expressed to higher levels, ≥3 μg/ml. All L. jensenii-expressed antibody fragments bound to gp120/CD4 complex; Lactobacillus-produced m36.4 inhibited HIV-1BaL in a neutralization assay. Using a TZM-bl assay, we characterized the breadth of neutralization of the m36.4. Delivery of dAbs by Lactobacillus could provide passive transfer of these antibodies to the mucosa and longevity at the site of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26950606

  19. Reactivity of eleven anti-human leucocyte monoclonal antibodies with lymphocytes from several domestic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete; Larsen, Else Bang

    1988-01-01

    Nine commercially available monoclonal antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies from The American Type Culture Collection, raised against various human leucocyte surface antigens, were tested on lymphocytes from cow, sheep, goat, swine, horse, cat, dog, mink, and rabbit as well as man. Four...... antibodies bound to lymphocytes from some of the animals. These were the antibodies against CD8 and CD4 antigen, the antibody to C3b-receptor, and the antibody to the HLA-DR antigen. The CD8 antigen-reactive antibody reacted with lymphocytes from mink, cat, dog, and sheep, while the CD4 antigen...

  20. Human monoclonal antibodies to West Nile virus identify epitopes on the prM protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Amanda E; Kalantarov, Gavreel F; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Trakht, Ilya; Blair, Carol D; Roehrig, John T

    2011-02-05

    Hybridoma cell lines (2E8, 8G8 and 5G12) producing fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) specific for the pre-membrane (prM) protein of West Nile virus (WNV) were prepared using a human fusion partner cell line, MFP-2, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes from a blood donor diagnosed with WNV fever in 2004. Using site-directed mutagenesis of a WNV-like particle (VLP) we identified 4 amino acid residues in the prM protein unique to WNV and important in the binding of these hMAbs to the VLP. Residues V19 and L33 are important epitopes for the binding of all three hMAbs. Mutations at residue, T20 and T24 affected the binding of hMAbs, 8G8 and 5G12 only. These hMAbs did not significantly protect AG129 interferon-deficient mice or Swiss Webster outbred mice from WNV infection.

  1. Expression cloning and production of human heavy-chain-only antibodies from murine transgenic plasma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); R. Janssens (Rick); Boer, E. (Ernie de); Rademaker, R. (Rik); Kloess, J. (Johannes); J.J. Skehel (John ); Grosveld, F. (Frank)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSeveral technologies have been developed to isolate human antibodies against different target antigens as a source of potential therapeutics, including hybridoma technology, phage and yeast display systems. For conventional antibodies, this involves either random pairing of VH and

  2. Phage display-derived human antibodies in clinical development and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 3 decades, monoclonal antibodies have become the most important class of therapeutic biologicals on the market. Development of therapeutic antibodies was accelerated by recombinant DNA technologies, which allowed the humanization of murine monoclonal antibodies to make them more similar to those of the human body and suitable for a broad range of chronic diseases like cancer and autoimmune diseases. In the early 1990s in vitro antibody selection technologies were developed that enabled the discovery of "fully" human antibodies with potentially superior clinical efficacy and lowest immunogenicity. Antibody phage display is the first and most widely used of the in vitro selection technologies. It has proven to be a robust, versatile platform technology for the discovery of human antibodies and a powerful engineering tool to improve antibody properties. As of the beginning of 2016, 6 human antibodies discovered or further developed by phage display were approved for therapy. In 2002, adalimumab (Humira®) became the first phage display-derived antibody granted a marketing approval. Humira® was also the first approved human antibody, and it is currently the best-selling antibody drug on the market. Numerous phage display-derived antibodies are currently under advanced clinical investigation, and, despite the availability of other technologies such as human antibody-producing transgenic mice, phage display has not lost its importance for the discovery and engineering of therapeutic antibodies. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview about phage display-derived antibodies that are approved for therapy or in clinical development. A selection of these antibodies is described in more detail to demonstrate different aspects of the phage display technology and its development over the last 25 years.

  3. Impact of linker and conjugation chemistry on antigen binding, Fc receptor binding and thermal stability of model antibody-drug conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acchione, Mauro; Kwon, Hyewon; Jochheim, Claudia M; Atkins, William M

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) with biotin as a model cargo tethered to IgG1 mAbs via different linkers and conjugation methods were prepared and tested for thermostability and ability to bind target antigen and Fc receptor. Most conjugates demonstrated decreased thermostability relative to unconjugated antibody, based on DSC, with carbohydrate and amine coupled ADCs showing the least effect compared with thiol coupled conjugates. A strong correlation between biotin-load and loss of stability is observed with thiol conjugation to one IgG scaffold, but the stability of a second IgG scaffold is relatively insensitive to biotin load. The same correlation for amine coupling was less significant. Binding of antibody to antigen and Fc receptor was investigated using surface plasmon resonance. None of the conjugates exhibited altered antigen affinity. Fc receptor FcγIIb (CD32b) interactions were investigated using captured antibody conjugate. Protein G and Protein A, known inhibitors of Fc receptor (FcR) binding to IgG, were also used to extend the analysis of the impact of conjugation on Fc receptor binding. H10NPEG4 was the only conjugate to show significant negative impact to FcR binding, which is likely due to higher biotin-load compared with the other ADCs. The ADC aHISNLC and aHISTPEG8 demonstrated some loss in affinity for FcR, but to much lower extent. The general insensitivity of target binding and effector function of the IgG1 platform to conjugation highlight their utility. The observed changes in thermostability require consideration for the choice of conjugation chemistry, depending on the system being pursued and particular application of the conjugate.

  4. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  5. Critical epitopes in the nucleocapsid protein of SFTS virus recognized by a panel of SFTS patients derived human monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SFTS virus (SFTSV is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs recognized the nucleocapsid (N protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection.

  6. Complement deposition induced by binding of anti-contactin-1 auto-antibodies is modified by immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appeltshauser, Luise; Weishaupt, Andreas; Sommer, Claudia; Doppler, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies associated with auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins like contactin-1 are reported to respond poorly to treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG). A reason might be that IVIG interacts with the complement pathway and these auto-antibodies often belong to the IgG4 subclass that does not activate complement. However, some patients do show a response to IVIG, especially at the beginning of the disease. This corresponds with the finding of coexisting IgG subclasses IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3. We therefore aimed to investigate complement deposition and activation by samples of three patients with anti-contactin-1 IgG auto-antibodies of different subclasses as a potential predictor for response to IVIG. Complement deposition and activation was measured by cell binding and ELISA based assays, and the effect of IVIG on complement deposition was assessed by addition of different concentrations of IVIG. Binding of anti-contactin-1 auto-antibodies of all three patients induced complement deposition and activation with the strongest effect shown by the serum of a patient with predominance of IgG3 auto-antibodies. IVIG led to a reduction of complement deposition in a dose-dependent manner, but did not reduce binding of auto-antibodies to contactin-1. We conclude that complement deposition may contribute to the pathophysiology of anti-contactin-1 associated neuropathy, particularly in patients with predominance of the IgG3 subclass. The proportion of different auto-antibody subclasses may be a predictor for the response to IVIG in patients with auto-antibodies against paranodal proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clearance of human IgG1-sensitised red blood cells in vivo in humans relates to the in vitro properties of antibodies from alternative cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L Armour

    Full Text Available We previously produced a recombinant version of the human anti-RhD antibody Fog-1 in the rat myeloma cell line, YB2/0. When human, autologous RhD-positive red blood cells (RBC were sensitised with this IgG1 antibody and re-injected, they were cleared much more rapidly from the circulation than had been seen earlier with the original human-mouse heterohybridoma-produced Fog-1. Since the IgG have the same amino acid sequence, this disparity is likely to be due to alternative glycosylation that results from the rat and mouse cell lines. By comparing the in vitro properties of YB2/0-produced Fog-1 IgG1 and the same antibody produced in the mouse myeloma cell line NS0, we now have a unique opportunity to pinpoint the cause of the difference in ability to clear RBC in vivo. Using transfected cell lines that express single human FcγR, we showed that IgG1 made in YB2/0 and NS0 cell lines bound equally well to receptors of the FcγRI and FcγRII classes but that the YB2/0 antibody was superior in FcγRIII binding. When measuring complexed IgG binding, the difference was 45-fold for FcγRIIIa 158F, 20-fold for FcγRIIIa 158V and approximately 40-fold for FcγRIIIb. The dissimilarity was greater at 100-fold in monomeric IgG binding assays with FcγRIIIa. When used to sensitise RBC, the YB2/0 IgG1 generated 100-fold greater human NK cell antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and had a 103-fold advantage over the NS0 antibody in activating NK cells, as detected by CD54 levels. In assays of monocyte activation and macrophage adherence/phagocytosis, where FcγRI plays major roles, RBC sensitised with the two antibodies produced much more similar results. Thus, the alternative glycosylation profiles of the Fog-1 antibodies affect only FcγRIII binding and FcγRIII-mediated functions. Relating this to the in vivo studies confirms the importance of FcγRIII in RBC clearance.

  8. Seroepidemiology of Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) L2 and Generation of L2-Specific Human Chimeric Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Joshua W; Jagu, Subhashini; Wu, Wai-Hong; Viscidi, Raphael P; Macgregor-Das, Anne; Fogel, Jessica M; Kwak, Kihyuck; Daayana, Sai; Kitchener, Henry; Stern, Peter L; Gravitt, Patti E; Trimble, Cornelia L; Roden, Richard B S

    2015-01-01

    Presently, the seroprevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) minor capsid antigen L2-reactive antibody is not well understood, and no serologic standard exists for L2-specific neutralizing antibodies...

  9. Production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies against RAI3 and its expression in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer Hans

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RAI3 is an orphan G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR that has been associated with malignancy and may play a role in the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Although its exact function in normal and malignant cells remains unclear and evidence supporting its role in oncogenesis is controversial, its abundant expression on the surface of cancer cells would make it an interesting target for the development of antibody-based therapeutics. To investigate the link with cancer and provide more evidence for its role, we carried out a systematic analysis of RAI3 expression in a large set of human breast cancer specimens. Methods We expressed recombinant human RAI3 in bacteria and reconstituted the purified protein in liposomes to raise monoclonal antibodies using classical hybridoma techniques. The specific binding activity of the antibodies was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, western blot and immunocytochemistry. We carried out a systematic immunohistochemical analysis of RAI3 expression in human invasive breast carcinomas (n = 147 and normal breast tissues (n = 44 using a tissue microarray. In addition, a cDNA dot blot hybridisation assay was used to investigate a set of matched normal and cancerous breast tissue specimens (n = 50 as well as lymph node metastases (n = 3 for RAI3 mRNA expression. Results The anti-RAI3 monoclonal antibodies bound to recombinant human RAI3 protein with high specificity and affinity, as shown by ELISA, western blot and ICC. The cDNA dot blot and immunohistochemical experiments showed that both RAI3 mRNA and RAI3 protein were abundantly expressed in human breast carcinoma. However, there was no association between RAI3 protein expression and prognosis based on overall and recurrence-free survival. Conclusion We have generated a novel, highly-specific monoclonal antibody that detects RAI3 in formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. This is the first study to report a systematic

  10. Mannosylerythritol lipid, a yeast extracellular glycolipid, shows high binding affinity towards human immunoglobulin G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikegami Toru

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been many attempts to develop new materials with stability and high affinity towards immunoglobulins. Some of glycolipids such as gangliosides exhibit a high affinity toward immunoglobulins. However, it is considerably difficult to develop these glycolipids into the practical separation ligand due to their limited amounts. We thus focused our attention on the feasible use of "mannosylerythritol lipid A", a yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, as an alternative ligand for immunoglobulins, and undertook the investigation on the binding between mannosylerythritol lipid A (MEL-A and human immunoglobulin G (HIgG. Results In ELISA assay, MEL-A showed nearly the same binding affinity towards HIgG as that of bovine ganglioside GM1. Fab of human IgG was considered to play a more important role than Fc in the binding of HIgG by MEL-A. The bound amount of HIgG increased depending on the attached amount of MEL-A onto poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (polyHEMA beads, whereas the amount of human serum albumin slightly decreased. Binding-amount and -selectivity of HIgG towards MEL-A were influenced by salt species, salt concentration and pH in the buffer solution. The composite of MEL-A and polyHEMA, exhibited a significant binding constant of 1.43 × 106 (M-1 for HIgG, which is approximately 4-fold greater than that of protein A reported. Conclusions MEL-A shows high binding-affinity towards HIgG, and this is considered to be due to "multivalent effect" based on the binding molar ratio. This is the first report on the binding of a natural human antibody towards a yeast glycolipid.

  11. MCP-1 binds to oxidized LDL and is carried by lipoprotein(a) in human plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Philipp; Tafelmeier, Maria; Chittka, Dominik; Choi, Soo-Ho; Zhang, Li; Byun, Young Sup; Almazan, Felicidad; Yang, Xiaohong; Iqbal, Navaid; Chowdhury, Punam; Maisel, Alan; Witztum, Joseph L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoprotein oxidation plays an important role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) induces profound inflammatory responses in vascular cells, such as production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2], a key chemokine in the initiation and progression of vascular inflammation. Here we demonstrate that OxLDL also binds MCP-1 and that the OxLDL-bound MCP-1 retains its ability to recruit monocytes. A human MCP-1 mutant in which basic amino acids Arg-18 and Lys-19 were replaced with Ala did not bind to OxLDL. The MCP-1 binding to OxLDL was inhibited by the monoclonal antibody E06, which binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) in OxLDL. Because OxPLs are carried by lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] in human plasma, we tested to determine whether Lp(a) binds MCP-1. Recombinant wild-type but not mutant MCP-1 added to human plasma bound to Lp(a), and its binding was inhibited by E06. Lp(a) captured from human plasma contained MCP-1 and the Lp(a)-associated endogenous MCP-1 induced monocyte migration. These results demonstrate that OxLDL and Lp(a) bind MCP-1 in vitro and in vivo and that OxPLs are major determinants of the MCP-1 binding. The association of MCP-1 with OxLDL and Lp(a) may play a role in modulating monocyte trafficking during atherogenesis. PMID:23667177

  12. Screening of Human Antibody Fab Fragment against HBsAg and the Construction of its dsFv Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Jia, Jiyun Yu, Hongbin Song, Xuelin Liu, Weina Ma, Yuanyong Xu, Chuanfu Zhang, Shicun Dong, Qiao Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to pursue the techniques involving the screening of the human antibody Fab fragment against hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg and the construction of its disulfide-stabilized Fv fragment (dsFv. The phage antibody Fab fragments against HBsAg were screened from the human combinatorial immunoglobulin library. Sequence analysis revealed that its heavy chain gene was complete, but the light chain gene was lost. To improve the affinity of the antibody by chain shuffling, a human antibody light chain gene repertoire was generated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR from the human peripheral blood lymphocytes. A phage antibody sub-library was then constructed by inserting the light chain gene repertoire into the phagmid that contained the Fd gene. Five clones with appreciably higher absorbance than that of the original clone were obtained, which indicated that the affinity of the light chain-shuffled phage antibodies was improved. Then, the mutated genes of dsFv against HBsAg were constructed by using PCR-based point mutagenesis method. Purified VH and VL proteins were folded into a 25-kDa protein, designated as anti-HBsAg dsFv. ELISA and competition ELISA revealed that the dsFv maintained the specificity of the Fab by binding to HBsAg, even through with a lower binding activity. These results have facilitated the undertaking of further functional analyses of the constructed dsFv, and may therefore provide an improved technique for the production and application of dsFvs against HBsAg.

  13. Structural models of antibody variable fragments: A method for investigating binding mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Samuel; Brard, Frédéric; Coquerel, Gérard; Perez, Guy; Tron, François

    1998-03-01

    The value of comparative molecular modeling for elucidating structure-function relationships was demonstrated by analyzing six anti-nucleosome autoantibody variable fragments. Structural models were built using the automated procedure developed in the COMPOSER software, subsequently minimized with the AMBER force field, and validated according to several standard geometric and chemical criteria. Canonical class assignment from Chothia and Lesk's [Chottin and Lesk, J. Mol. Biol., 196 (1987) 901; Chothia et al., Nature, 342 (1989) 877] work was used as a supplementary validation tool for five of the six hypervariable loops. The analysis, based on the hypothesis that antigen binding could occur through electrostatic interactions, reveals a diversity of possible binding mechanisms of anti-nucleosome or anti-histone antibodies to their cognate antigen. These results lead us to postulate that anti-nucleosome autoantibodies could have different origins. Since both anti-DNA and anti-nculeosome autoantibodies are produced during the course of systemic lupus erythematosus, a non-organ specific autoimmune disease, a comparative structural and electrostatic analysis of the two populations of autoantibodies may constitute a way to elucidate their origin and the role of the antigen in tolerance breakdown. The present study illustrates some interests, advantages and limits of a methodology based on the use of comparative modeling and analysis of molecular surface properties.

  14. Humanization of JAA-F11, a Highly Specific Anti-Thomsen-Friedenreich Pancarcinoma Antibody and In Vitro Efficacy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Tati

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available JAA-F11 is a highly specific mouse monoclonal to the Thomsen-Friedenreich Antigen (TF-Ag which is an alpha-O-linked disaccharide antigen on the surface of ~80% of human carcinomas, including breast, lung, colon, bladder, ovarian, and prostate cancers, and is cryptic on normal cells. JAA-F11 has potential, when humanized, for cancer immunotherapy for multiple cancer types. Humanization of JAA-F11, was performed utilizing complementarity determining regions grafting on a homology framework. The objective herein is to test the specificity, affinity and biology efficacy of the humanized JAA-F11 (hJAA-F11. Using a 609 target glycan array, 2 hJAA-F11 constructs were shown to have excellent chemical specificity, binding only to TF-Ag alpha-linked structures and not to TF-Ag beta-linked structures. The relative affinity of these hJAA-F11 constructs for TF-Ag was improved over the mouse antibody, while T20 scoring predicted low clinical immunogenicity. The hJAA-F11 constructs produced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in breast and lung tumor lines shown to express TF-Ag by flow cytometry. Internalization of hJAA-F11 into cancer cells was also shown using a surface binding ELISA and confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Both the naked hJAA-F11 and a maytansine-conjugated antibody (hJAA-F11-DM1 suppressed in vivo tumor progression in a human breast cancer xenograft model in SCID mice. Together, our results support the conclusion that the humanized antibody to the TF-Ag has potential as an adjunct therapy, either directly or as part of an antibody drug conjugate, to treat breast cancer, including triple negative breast cancer which currently has no targeted therapy, as well as lung cancer.

  15. Stimulation of chymosin secretion by simultaneous expression with chymosin-binding llama single-domain antibody fragments in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.M.; Smits, C.B.; Geus, de B.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of coexpression of chymosin and chymosin-binding llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) on the secretion of chymosin by Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. A VHH expression library containing chymosin-specific VHHs was obtained by immunization of a llama and coexpressed with

  16. Prolonged in vivo residence times of llama single-domain antibody fragments in pigs by binding to porcine immunoglobulins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.M.; Solt, van C.B.; Fijten, H.P.D.; Setten, van M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The therapeutic parenteral application of llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) is hampered by their small size, resulting in a fast elimination from the body. Here we describe a method to increase the serum half-life of VHHs in pigs by fusion to another VHH binding to porcine immunoglobulin

  17. Generation of a haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex-specific Fab antibody blocking the binding of the complex to CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Ivo R; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Madsen, Mette

    2003-01-01

    During intravascular hemolysis hemoglobin (Hb) binds to haptoglobin (Hp) leading to endocytosis of the complex by the macrophage receptor, CD163. In the present study, we used a phage-display Fab antibody strategy to explore if the complex formation between Hp and Hb leads to exposure of antigenic...

  18. Engineering HIV envelope protein to activate germline B cell receptors of broadly neutralizing anti-CD4 binding site antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Andrew T; Hoot, Sam; Dreyer, Anita M; Lippy, Adriana; Stuart, Andrew; Cohen, Kristen W; Jardine, Joseph; Menis, Sergey; Scheid, Johannes F; West, Anthony P; Schief, William R; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2013-04-08

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV are believed to be a critical component of the protective responses elicited by an effective HIV vaccine. Neutralizing antibodies against the evolutionarily conserved CD4-binding site (CD4-BS) on the HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) are capable of inhibiting infection of diverse HIV strains, and have been isolated from HIV-infected individuals. Despite the presence of anti-CD4-BS broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) epitopes on recombinant Env, Env immunization has so far failed to elicit such antibodies. Here, we show that Env immunogens fail to engage the germline-reverted forms of known bnAbs that target the CD4-BS. However, we found that the elimination of a conserved glycosylation site located in Loop D and two glycosylation sites located in variable region 5 of Env allows Env-binding to, and activation of, B cells expressing the germline-reverted BCRs of two potent broadly neutralizing antibodies, VRC01 and NIH45-46. Our results offer a possible explanation as to why Env immunogens have been ineffective in stimulating the production of such bNAbs. Importantly, they provide key information as to how such immunogens can be engineered to initiate the process of antibody-affinity maturation against one of the most conserved Env regions.

  19. Generation of high-affinity fully human anti-interleukin-8 antibodies from its cDNA by two-hybrid screening and affinity maturation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ling; Azam, Mark; Lin, Yu-Huei; Sheridan, James; Wei, Shuanghong; Gupta, Gigi; Singh, Rakesh K; Pauling, Michelle H; Chu, Waihei; Tran, Antares; Yu, Nai-Xuan; Hu, Jiefeng; Wang, Wei; Long, Hao; Xiang, Dong; Zhu, Li; Hua, Shao-Bing

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a technology for rapidly generating novel and fully human antibodies by simply using the antigen DNA. A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was constructed in a yeast two-hybrid vector with high complexity. After cloning cDNA encoding the mature sequence of human interleukin-8 (hIL8) into the yeast two-hybrid system vector, we have screened the human scFv antibody library and obtained three distinct scFv clones that could specifically bind to hIL8. One clone was chosen for further improvement by a novel affinity maturation process using the error-prone PCR of the scFv sequence followed by additional rounds of yeast two-hybrid screening. The scFv antibodies of both primary and affinity-matured scFv clones were expressed in E. coli. All purified scFvs showed specific binding to hIL8 in reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation and ELISA assays. All scFvs, as well as a fully human IgG antibody converted from one of the scFv clones and expressed in the mammalian cells, were able to effectively inhibit hIL8 in neutrophil chemotaxis assays. The technology described can generate fully human antibodies with high efficiency and low cost.

  20. The human enhancer blocker CTC-binding factor interacts with the transcription factor Kaiso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Kelly, Kevin F; Filion, Guillaume J P; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Magdinier, Frédérique; Menoni, Hervé; Nordgaard, Curtis L; Daniel, Juliet M; Gilson, Eric

    2005-12-30

    CTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a DNA-binding protein of vertebrates that plays essential roles in regulating genome activity through its capacity to act as an enhancer blocker. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify protein partners of CTCF that could regulate its activity. Using full-length CTCF as bait we recovered Kaiso, a POZ-zinc finger transcription factor, as a specific binding partner. The interaction occurs through a C-terminal region of CTCF and the POZ domain of Kaiso. CTCF and Kaiso are co-expressed in many tissues, and CTCF was specifically co-immunoprecipitated by several Kaiso monoclonal antibodies from nuclear lysates. Kaiso is a bimodal transcription factor that recognizes methylated CpG dinucleotides or a conserved unmethylated sequence (TNGCAGGA, the Kaiso binding site). We identified one consensus unmethylated Kaiso binding site in close proximity to the CTCF binding site in the human 5' beta-globin insulator. We found, in an insulation assay, that the presence of this Kaiso binding site reduced the enhancer-blocking activity of CTCF. These data suggest that the Kaiso-CTCF interaction negatively regulates CTCF insulator activity.

  1. Insight into the modified Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor interactions: using a computational binding free energy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Chuang, Lea-Yea

    2015-01-01

    Antibody drugs are very useful tools for the treatment of many chronic diseases. Recently, however, patients and doctors have encountered the problem of drug resistance. How to improve the affinity of antibody drugs has therefore become a pressing issue. Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1. This study investigates the mutation residues of the complementarity determining regions of Ibalizumab. We propose using the wild and mutations of Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor complex structures, molecular dynamics techniques, alanine-scanning mutagenesis calculations and solvated interaction energies methods to predict the binding free energy of the Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor complex structures. This work found that revealed three key positions (31th, 32th and 33th in HCDR-1) of the residues may play an important role in Ibalizumab-human CD4 receptor complex interactions. Therefore, bioengineering substitutions of the three key positions and increasing number of intermolecular interactions (HCDR-1 of Ibalizumab/human CD4 receptor) might improve the binding affinities of this complex structure.

  2. Engineering human cells for in vivo secretion of antibody and non-antibody therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, David; Sanz, Laura; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2011-12-01

    Purified proteins such as antibodies are widely used as therapeutic agents in clinical medicine. However, clinical-grade proteins for therapeutic use require sophisticated technologies and are extremely expensive to produce. In vivo secretion of therapeutic proteins by genetically engineered human cells may advantageously replace injection of highly purified proteins. The use of gene transfer methods circumvents problems related to large-scale production and purification and offers additional benefits by achieving sustained concentrations of therapeutic protein with a syngenic glycosylation pattern that make the protein potentially less immunogenic. The feasibility of the in vivo production of therapeutic proteins by diverse cells/tissues has now been demonstrated using different techniques, such as ex vivo genetically modified cells and in vivo gene transfer mediated by viral vectors.

  3. SPECIFIC BINDING OF HUMAN BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN (2A) WITH MOUSE OSTEOBLASTIC CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘新平; 陈苏民; 陈南春; 高磊; 赵忠良

    1996-01-01

    Human bone morphogenetic protein 2A (hBMP2A) cDNA terminal 567 nucleotides were cloned and expressed in a phage display vector pCSM2I. Hulnata BMP2A C-terminal peptide displayed on the surface of the phage can bind specifically to the sttrface of mouse osteoblastie cell (MC3T3) membrane. ELISA assay showed a positive signal of the binding by using antibody against M13 phage gene 8 protein. After labeling with 3HTdR,the counts of the binding groups were 3 to 10 times higher than the control groups. It suggests that the'surface of MC3T3 cells exist the recepzor for hBMP2A.

  4. Purification of full-length human Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor: polyclonal antibody preparation for immunological characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mallampati SARADHI; Biji KRISHNA; Gauranga MUKHOPADHYAY; Rakesh K TYAGI

    2005-01-01

    Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor (PXR; or Steroid and Xenobiotic Receptor, SXR), a new member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is thought to modulate a network of genes that are involved in xenobiotic metabolism and elimination. To further explore the role of PXR in body's homeostatic mechanisms, we for the first time, report successful prokaryotic expression and purification of full-length PXR and preparation of polyclonal antibody against the whole protein. Thefull-length cDNA encoding a 434 amino acids protein was sub-cloned into prokaryotic expression vector, pET-30b and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells for efficient over expression. The inclusion body fraction, containing the expressed recombinant protein, was purified first by solubilizing in sarcosine extraction buffer and then by affinity column chromatography using Ni-NTA His-Bind matrix. The efficacy of anti-PXR antibody was confirmed by immunocytology, Western blot analysis, EMSA and immunohistochemistry. The antibody obtained was capable of detecting human and mouse PXR with high specificity and sensitivity. Immunofluorescence staining of COS-1 cells transfected with human or mouse PXR showed a clear nuclear localization. Results from immunohistochemistry showed that level of PXR in liver sections is immunologically detectable in the nuclei. Similar to exogenously transfected PXR, Western blot analysis of cell extract from HepG2 and COLO320DM cells revealed a major protein band for endogenous PXR having the expected molecular weight of 50 kDa. Relevance of other immunodetectable bands with reference to PXR isoforms and current testimony are evaluated. Advantages of antibody raised against full-length PXR protein for functional characterization of receptor is discussed and its application for clinical purposes is envisaged.

  5. The antibody preparation and expression of human Pescadillo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao; NING Kang; ZHU JianHua; LI JieZhi; HUANG CuiFen; LIU AiJun; YE QiNong; LI JiePing; WANG XiaoHui; SUN Yan; YUAN Bin; YANG ZhiHong; JIANG YanChao; ZENG Min; DING LiHua

    2007-01-01

    To explore the biological roles of human Pescadillo and investigate its potential effect on tumorigene sis, the eDNA of Pescadillo was fused with that of GST. After purification and elution, the purified GST-Pescadillo fusion protein was obtained, and the antibody against the fusion protein was generated.Endogenous Pescadillo protein was observed to be remarkably induced by estrogen. It was mainly distributed in the tissues such as breast, ovary and intestine, all of which contain proliferating cells,and was also detected in many cell lines of human cancer: renal carcinoma, hepatoma, ovarian cancer,colon carcinoma, and breast cancer. The expression level of Pescadillo was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues compared with their paired margin tissues. Taken together, these data suggest that Pescadillo may play important roles in the initiation and development of cancer and may be a potential target in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  6. The antibody preparation and expression of human Pescadillo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To explore the biological roles of human Pescadillo and investigate its potential effect on tumorigene- sis, the cDNA of Pescadillo was fused with that of GST. After purification and elution, the purified GST-Pescadillo fusion protein was obtained, and the antibody against the fusion protein was generated. Endogenous Pescadillo protein was observed to be remarkably induced by estrogen. It was mainly distributed in the tissues such as breast, ovary and intestine, all of which contain proliferating cells, and was also detected in many cell lines of human cancer: renal carcinoma, hepatoma, ovarian cancer, colon carcinoma, and breast cancer. The expression level of Pescadillo was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues compared with their paired margin tissues. Taken together, these data suggest that Pescadillo may play important roles in the initiation and development of cancer and may be a po- tential target in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  7. Development of a PBPK model for monoclonal antibodies and simulation of human and mice PBPK of a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Tomi; Heiskanen, Tomas; Kairemo, Kalevi

    2009-01-01

    Physiology based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and simulation is a useful method for prediction of biodistribution of both macromolecules and small molecules. It can enhance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of biodistribution and hence may help in rational design of macromolecules used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In this review we discuss PBPK modeling and simulation of a radiolabelled Monoclonal Antibody ((111)In-DOTA-hAFP31 IgG) ("MAB") in mice without tumor and in a human with tumor. This study is part of Xemet Co.'s effort to develop a more accurate and reliable PBPK model and simulation platform, which is applicable both for small molecules and macromolecules. The simulated results were fitted to experimental time series data by varying parameters which were not fixed a priori. It was demonstrated that the PBPK model describes the main features of the pharmacokinetics of the studied systems. It was also shown that simulation can be used for evaluating the parameters of the system and scaling up the pharmacokinetics of MAB from mice to man. We identified several areas of improvement and further development needed to improve the accuracy of PBPK simulation for MAB and other macromolecules. It was concluded that the transvascular permeabilities are the most important parameters and more research is needed to enable prediction of permeabilities from molecular characteristics of macromolecules. It would also be necessary to understand better and describe with a more detailed model the microstructure of the tumor and to measure or predict the antigen concentration in tumor. Non-specific, non-saturable binding in other organs/tissues should be understood better and the kinetic constants of the binding should be measured experimentally. Although the metabolism and clearance were neglected in this study they need to be included in more detailed studies. Also the intracellular trafficking of macromolecules, which was not included in this study

  8. Detection of vitamin D binding protein on the surface of cytotrophoblasts isolated from human placentae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestler, J.E.; McLeod, J.F.; Kowalski, M.A.; Strauss, J.F. 3d.; Haddad, J.G. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Vitamin D binding protein (DBP), a Mr 56,000-58,000 alpha 2-glycoprotein, is the major serum protein involved in the transport of vitamin D sterols. Recently it has been suggested that DBP may also be involved in immunoglobulin G binding to cells. Because the trophoblast is involved in the transport of molecules such as vitamin D and immunoglobulin G to the fetus, we asked whether DBP could be detected on the surface of human placental trophoblast cells. Cytotrophoblasts purified from human term placentae were fixed and made permeant with Triton X-100 and examined by indirect immunofluorescence after incubation with a monoclonal antibody to DBP. Greater than 90% of these cells stained positively, whereas no staining was observed with nonimmune antiserum. The presence of DBP on/in the surface of cytotrophoblasts could also be demonstrated by fluorescent cytometry. When cell surface-associated proteins of cytotrophoblasts were radioiodinated, a Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could be immunoisolated from the cell lysate with a purified monospecific polyclonal antibody to DBP. Immunoisolation of this radiolabeled protein was prevented by the addition of excess unlabeled human DBP to the cell lysate before incubation with antibody. This Mr 57,000 radiolabeled protein could also be isolated by affinity chromatography selecting for proteins that bind to globular actin. When cytotrophoblasts were incubated with (/sup 35/S)methionine for 3 or 18 h, active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated by immunoisolation techniques. These studies demonstrate the presence of DBP on the surface of well washed, human cytotrophoblasts. This DBP may be maternally derived, since active synthesis of DBP could not be demonstrated.

  9. Human monoclonal antibodies to a novel cluster of conformational epitopes on HCV E2 with resistance to neutralization escape in a genotype 2a isolate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Zhen-yong; Xia, Jinming; Wang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    The majority of broadly neutralizing antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV) are against conformational epitopes on the E2 glycoprotein. Many of them recognize overlapping epitopes in a cluster, designated as antigenic domain B, that contains residues G530 and D535. To gain information on other...... regions that will be relevant for vaccine design, we employed yeast surface display of antibodies that bound to genotype 1a H77C E2 mutant proteins containing a substitution either at Y632A (to avoid selecting non-neutralizing antibodies) or D535A. A panel of nine human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs......) was isolated and designated as HC-84-related antibodies. Each HMAb neutralized cell culture infectious HCV (HCVcc) with genotypes 1-6 envelope proteins with varying profiles, and each inhibited E2 binding to the viral receptor CD81. Five of these antibodies neutralized representative genotypes 1-6 HCVcc...

  10. Antibody Binding Alters the Characteristics and Contents of Extracellular Vesicles Released by Histoplasma capsulatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos Baltazar, Ludmila; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Choi, Hyungwon; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew

    2016-03-30

    ABSTRACT

    Histoplasma capsulatumproduces extracellular vesicles containing virulence-associated molecules capable of modulating host machinery, benefiting the pathogen. Treatment ofH. capsulatumcells with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can change the outcome of infection in mice. We evaluated the sizes, enzymatic contents, and proteomic profiles of the vesicles released by fungal cells treated with either protective MAb 6B7 (IgG1) or nonprotective MAb 7B6 (IgG2b), both of which bindH. capsulatumheat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). Our results showed that treatment with either MAb was associated with changes in size and vesicle loading. MAb treatments reduced vesicle phosphatase and catalase activities compared to those of vesicles from untreated controls. We identified 1,125 proteins in vesicles, and 250 of these manifested differences in abundance relative to that of proteins in vesicles isolated from yeast cells exposed to Hsp60-binding MAbs, indicating that surface binding of fungal cells by MAbs modified protein loading in the vesicles. The abundance of upregulated proteins in vesicles upon MAb 7B6 treatment was 44.8% of the protein quantities in vesicles from fungal cells treated with MAb 6B7. Analysis of orthologous proteins previously identified in vesicles from other fungi showed that different ascomycete fungi have similar proteins in their extracellular milieu, many of which are associated with virulence. Our results demonstrate that antibody binding can modulate fungal cell responses, resulting in differential loading of vesicles, which could alter fungal cell susceptibility to host defenses. This finding provides additional evidence that antibody binding modulates microbial physiology and suggests a new function for specific immunoglobulins through alterations of fungal secretion.

    IMPORTANCEDiverse fungal species release extracellular vesicles, indicating that this is a

  11. i-bodies, Human Single Domain Antibodies That Antagonize Chemokine Receptor CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Katherine; Dolezal, Olan; Cao, Benjamin; Nilsson, Susan K; See, Heng B; Pfleger, Kevin D G; Roche, Michael; Gorry, Paul R; Pow, Andrew; Viduka, Katerina; Lim, Kevin; Lu, Bernadine G C; Chang, Denison H C; Murray-Rust, Thomas; Kvansakul, Marc; Perugini, Matthew A; Dogovski, Con; Doerflinger, Marcel; Zhang, Yuan; Parisi, Kathy; Casey, Joanne L; Nuttall, Stewart D; Foley, Michael

    2016-06-10

    CXCR4 is a G protein-coupled receptor with excellent potential as a therapeutic target for a range of clinical conditions, including stem cell mobilization, cancer prognosis and treatment, fibrosis therapy, and HIV infection. We report here the development of a fully human single-domain antibody-like scaffold termed an "i-body," the engineering of which produces an i-body library possessing a long complementarity determining region binding loop, and the isolation and characterization of a panel of i-bodies with activity against human CXCR4. The CXCR4-specific i-bodies show antagonistic activity in a range of in vitro and in vivo assays, including inhibition of HIV infection, cell migration, and leukocyte recruitment but, importantly, not the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells. Epitope mapping of the three CXCR4 i-bodies AM3-114, AM4-272, and AM3-523 revealed binding deep in the binding pocket of the receptor.

  12. A method for identification of the peptides that bind to a clone of thyroid-stimulating antibodies in the serum of Graves' disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Chan Hyun; Lee, Mi Hwa; Cho, Bo Youn; Chae, Chi-Bom

    2003-04-01

    A method was developed for identification of the peptide sequences that bind to thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) clones from phage-displayed peptide library. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified from the serum of a Graves' disease patient that stimulates the synthesis of cAMP in the cells that express TSH receptor (TSHR). The IgG that binds to TSHR was purified by an affinity column packed with the resin cross-linked with the extracellular domain of human TSHR. The receptor-binding IgG was then mixed with phages that display linear or cyclic peptides at the end of tail protein pIII. The bound phages were eluted with acidic glycine after extensive washing. From sequencing of the pIII gene of the bound phages, one can deduce the sequences of the peptides that bind to the receptor-binding IgG. Each peptide sequence was then tested for inhibition of the synthesis of cAMP from thyroid cells induced by the serum of a Graves' patient. In this way, one can obtain the peptides that bind to a clone of TSAb. We obtained a peptide sequence that inhibits the action of TSAb at an extremely low concentration (<10(-14) M). Such a peptide will be useful for various studies on TSAb.

  13. Biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system for the improvement of chondrocyte adhesion to scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Zhou, Jian; Shen, Longxiang; Ruan, Yuhui; Dong, Jian; Guo, Changan; Chen, Zhengrong

    2014-04-01

    The clinical need for improved treatment options for patients with cartilage injuries has motivated tissue-engineering studies aimed at the in vitro generation of cell-based implants with functional properties. The success of tissue-engineered repair of cartilage may depend on the rapid and efficient adhesion of transplanted cells to the scaffold. In the present study, chondrocyte-scaffold constructs were engineered by planting porcine chondrocytes into nonporous chitosan membranes and 3D porous chitosan scaffolds that were treated with or without biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system and avidin-biotin binding system. The spreading area, cell exfoliation rates, cell proliferation rates, histological analysis, DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and mRNA expression were investigated to evaluate the efficiency of biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system for the improvement of cell adhesion to scaffolds in the cartilage tissue. The results showed that the biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system improved cell adhesion to scaffolds effectively. These studies suggest that this binding system has the potential to provide improved tissue-engineered cartilage for clinical applications.

  14. Analysis of human chorionic gonadotropin-monoclonal antibody interaction in BIAcore

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Banerjee Ashish; Gundlupet Satyanarayana Murthy

    2004-03-01

    Kinetic studies of macromolecular ligand-ligate interaction have generated ample interest since the advent of plasmon resonance based instruments like BIAcore. Most of the studies reported in literature assume a simple 1 : 1 Langmuir binding and complete reversibility of the system. However we observed that in a high affinity antigen-antibody system [human chorionic gonadotropin-monoclonal antibody (hCG-mAb)] dissociation is insignificant and the sensogram data cannot be used to measure the equilibrium and kinetic parameters. At low concentrations of mAb the complete sensogram could be fitted to a single exponential. Interestingly we found that at higher mAb concentrations, the binding data did not conform to a simple bimolecular model. Instead, the data fitted a two-step model, which may be because of surface heterogeneity of affinity sites. In this paper, we report on the global fit of the sensograms. We have developed a method by which a single two-minute sensogram can be used in high affinity systems to measure the association rate constant of the reaction and the functional capacity of the ligand (hCG) immobilized on the chip. We provide a rational explanation for the discrepancies generally observed in most of the BIAcore sensograms.

  15. Mucosal adjuvanticity of fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3: systemic and local antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisheng Dang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that a bacterial fibronectin attachment protein (FAP is able to stimulate strong systemic and mucosal antibody responses when it is used alone or co-administrated with other antigens (Ags. Thus, it has been suggested to be a promising adjuvant candidate for the development of efficient vaccines. However, the co-administered Ags and FAP were cloned, expressed and purified individually to date. In a recent study, we first evaluated the adjuvanticity of a fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP, 24 amino acids of Mycobacterium avium FAP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3 (Em-TSP3 by detecting systemic and local antibody responses in intranasally (i.n. immunized BALB/c mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Em-TSP3 and FBP fragments were linked with a GSGGSG linker and expressed as a single fusion protein (Em-TSP3-FBP using the pBAD/Thio-TOPO expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized i.n. with recombinant Em-TSP3-FBP (rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG and the systemic and local antibody responses were detected by ELISA. The results showed that both rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG evoked strong serum IgG (p<0.001 and IgG1 responses (p<0.001, whereas only the latter induced a high level IgG2α production (p<0.001, compared to that of rEm-TSP3 alone without any adjuvant. There were no significant differences in IgG and IgG1 production between the groups. Low level of serum IgA and IgM were detected in both groups. The tendency of Th1 and Th2 cell immune responses were assessed via detecting the IgG1/IgG2α ratio after the second and third immunizations. The results indicated that i.n. immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP resulted in an increased IgG1/IgG2α ratio (a Th2 tendency, while rEm-TSP3+CpG caused a rapid Th1 response that later shifted to a Th2 response. Immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP provoked significantly stronger IgA antibody responses in intestine (p<0.05, lung (p<0.001 and spleen (p<0.001 compared to those

  16. Structure of a human rhinovirus-bivalently bound antibody complex: implications for viral neutralization and antibody flexibility.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The structure of a neutralizing immunoglobulin (monoclonal antibody mAb17-IA), bound to human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14), has been determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction. The antibody bound bivalently across icosahedral twofold axes of the virus, and there were no detectable conformational changes in the capsid. Thus, bivalently bound IgGs do not appear to cause gross deformations in the capsid. Differences between the electron density of the constant domains of the bound ...

  17. Marsupial and monotreme serum immunoglobulin binding by proteins A, G and L and anti-kangaroo antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Paola K; Hartley, Carol A; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-12-01

    Serological studies are often conducted to examine exposure to infectious agents in wildlife populations. However, specific immunological reagents for wildlife species are seldom available and can limit the study of infectious diseases in these animals. This study examined the ability of four commercially available immunoglobulin-binding reagents to bind serum immunoglobulins from 17 species within the Marsupialia and Monotremata. Serum samples were assessed for binding, using immunoblots and ELISAs (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), to three microbially-derived proteins - staphylococcal protein A, streptococcal protein G and peptostreptococcal protein L. Additionally, an anti-kangaroo antibody was included for comparison. The inter- and intra-familial binding patterns of the reagents to serum immunoglobulins varied and evolutionary distance between animal species was not an accurate predictor of the ability of reagents to bind immunoglobulins. Results from this study can be used to inform the selection of appropriate immunological reagents in future serological studies in these clades.

  18. An ELISA for detection of antibodies against influenza A nucleoprotein in humans and various animal species.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. de Boer; W. Back; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA double antibody sandwich blocking ELISA, using a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against influenza A nucleoprotein (NP) was developed to detect antibodies against influenza. Collections of serum samples were obtained from human and various animal species. All influenza A subtypes induced ant

  19. Engineered antibody CH2 domains binding to nucleolin: Isolation, characterization and improvement of aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De-Zhi; Gong, Rui; Zheng, Jun; Chen, Xi-Hai; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Zhao, Qi

    2017-02-12

    Smaller recombinant antibody fragments are now emerging as alternatives of conventional antibodies. Especially, immunoglobulin (Ig) constant CH2 domain and engineered CH2 with improved stability are promising as scaffolds for selection of specific binders to various antigens. We constructed a yeast display library based on an engineered human IgG1 CH2 scaffold with diversified loop regions. A group of CH2 binders were isolated from this yeast display library by panning against nucleolin, which is a tumor-associated antigen involved in cell proliferation, tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. Out of 20 mutants, we selected 3 clones exhibiting relatively high affinities to nucleolin on yeasts. However, recombinant CH2 mutants aggregated when they were expressed. To find the mechanism of the aggregation, we employed computational prediction approaches through structural homology models of CH2 binders. The analysis of potential aggregation prone regions (APRs) and solvent accessible surface areas (ASAs) indicated two hydrophobic residues, Val264 and Leu309, in the β-sheet, in which replacement of both charged residues led to significantly decrease of the protein aggregation. The newly identified CH2 binders could be improved to use as candidate therapeutics or research reagents in the future.

  20. Cloning, expression and purification of binding domains of lethal factor and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis in Escherichia coli and evaluation of their related murine antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mehdi; Honari, Hossein; Kooshk, Mohammad Reza Ashrafi

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax is common disease between human and animals caused by Bacillus anthracis. The cell binding domain of protective antigen (PAD4) and the binding domain of lethal factor (LFD1) have high immunogenicity potential and always were considered as a vaccine candidate against anthrax. The aims of this study are cloning and expressing of PAD4 and LFD1 in Escherichia coli, purification of the recombinant proteins and determination of their immunogenicity through evaluating of the relative produced polyclonal antibodies in mice. PAD4 and LFD1 genes were cloned in pET28a(+) vector and expressed in E. coli Bl21(DE3)PlysS. Expression and purification of the two recombinant proteins were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting techniques. The PAD4 and LFD1 were purified using Ni(+)-NTA affinity chromatography (95-98 %), yielding 37.5 and 45 mg/l of culture, respectively. The antigens were injected three times into mice and production of relative antibodies was evaluated by ELISA test. The results showed that both PAD4 and LFD1 are immunogenic, but LFD1 has higher potential to stimulate Murine immune system. With regard to the high level of LFD1 and PAD4 expression and also significant increment in produced polyclonal antibodies, these recombinant proteins can be considered as a recombinant vaccine candidate against anthrax.

  1. Two ScFv antibody libraries derived from identical VL-VH framework with different binding site designs display distinct binding profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huovinen, Tuomas; Syrjänpää, Markku; Sanmark, Hanna; Brockmann, Eeva-Christine; Azhayev, Alex; Wang, Qi; Vehniäinen, Markus; Lamminmäki, Urpo

    2013-10-01

    In directed evolution experiments, a single randomization scheme of an antibody gene does not provide optimal diversity for recognition of all sizes of antigens. In this study, we have expanded the recognition potential of our universal library, termed ScFvP, with a second distinct diversification scheme. In the second library, termed ScFvM, diversity was designed closer to the center of the antigen binding site in the same antibody framework as earlier. Also, the CDR-H3 loop structures were redesigned to be shorter, 5-12 aa and mostly without the canonical salt bridge between Arg106H and Asp116H to increase the flexibility of the loop and to allow more space in the center of the paratope for binding smaller targets. Antibodies were selected from the two libraries against various antigens separately and as a mixture. The origin and characteristics of the retrieved antibodies indicate that complementary diversity results in complementary functionality widening the spectrum of targets amenable for selection.

  2. Definition of glomerular antigens by monoclonal antibodies produced against a human glomerular membrane fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, T J; Callus, M S; Donovan, L C; Baird, H

    1990-10-01

    Experimental animal models of glomerulonephritis (GN) produced by direct antibody binding to non-basement membrane glomerular capillary wall antigens do not to date have human parallels. To examine the potential for this form of humoral glomerular injury in man, we sought to define discrete human non-GBM glomerular antigenic targets using hybridoma technology. Mice were immunised intraperitoneally with 20-100 micrograms of a human glomerular membrane fraction (HGMF). Six fusions have yielded 12 stable reagents defined by positive glomerular indirect immunofluorescence (IF) and microELISA using HGMF as the screening antigen. Subclass analysis of ascitic McAbs indicated several IgG1, one IgG2b, and three IgM reagents. Distinctive IF patterns of reactivity with epithelial, endothelial or mesangial structures have been observed, with or without peritubular capillary, tubular basement membrane and vessel wall reactivity. Seven normal non-renal human organs and the kidneys of rat, rabbit and sheep have shown patterns characteristic of each individual McAb, restricted to human or with species cross reactivity. To partially characterise McAb-reactive antigens, detergent-solubilised renal cortex and collagenase-solubilised GBM (CS-GBM) extracts have been probed by immunoblot. A unique McAb 7-5Q, reactive with glomerular and tubular epithelial structures, binds major bands of approximately 107 KD and 93 KD in detergent solubilised cortex and a single band of similar size by immunoprecipitation (110 KD). 5-3A (a human-restricted linear-reacting McAb) binds bands of 20-200 KD (major band 58 KD) in CS-GBM. In conclusion, distinct species-restricted and more broadly disposed glomerular epitopes are definable in man by McAbs and are potential targets for humoral injury. Purification of these antigens will allow assay for circulating putative nephritogenic auto-antibody and potentially, McAbs may be useful in screening urine for evidence of occult structural renal disease.

  3. Binding of chemical carcinogens to macromolecules in cultured human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1977-01-01

    Metabolic activation of different chemical classes of carcinogens was studied in cultured human colon epithelia. Human colon epithelia were maintained in explant culture up to 4 days. Binding of benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylnitrosamine, and 1,2- dimethylhydrazine was found in both cell DNA and protein....... 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine methylated DNA at both N·7 and 0-6 positions of guanin....

  4. Covalent binding of the flavonoid quercetin to human serum albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaldas, M.I.; Walle, U.K.; Woude, van der H.; McMillan, J.M.; Walle, T.

    2005-01-01

    Quercetin is an abundant flavonoid in the human diet with numerous biological activities, which may contribute to the prevention of human disease but also may be potentially harmful. Quercetin is oxidized in cells to products capable of covalently binding to cellular proteins, a process that may be

  5. Binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes with compensation for saturable binding to filters and its implication for binding studies with brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, O.M.; Wood, K.M.; Williams, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Apparent specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes at high concentrations of imipramine showed deviation from that expected of a single binding site, a result consistent with a low-affinity binding site. The deviation was due to displaceable, saturable binding to the glass fibre filters used in the assays. Imipramine, chloripramine, desipramine, and fluoxetine inhibited binding to filters whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine and ethanol were ineffective. Experimental conditions were developed that eliminated filter binding, allowing assay of high- and low-affinity binding to membranes. Failure to correct for filter binding may lead to overestimation of binding parameters, Bmax and KD for high-affinity binding to membranes, and may also be misinterpreted as indicating a low-affinity binding component in both platelet and brain membranes. Low-affinity binding (KD less than 2 microM) of imipramine to human platelet membranes was demonstrated and its significance discussed.

  6. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies to histone 2B. Localization of epitopes and analysis of binding to chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, W G; Fellows, G; Turner, B M

    1986-06-16

    Two mouse monoclonal IgM antibodies have been isolated which bind to histone 2B (H2B), as shown by protein blotting and immunostaining and by solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA). One of these (HBC-7) was specific for H2B by both techniques whereas the other (2F8) cross-reacted with histone H1 by RIA. Both antibodies failed to recognize H2B limit peptides from trypsin-digested chromatin and did not bind to Drosophila H2B, which differs extensively from vertebrate H2B only in the N-terminal region. These findings indicate that both antibodies recognize epitopes within the trypsin-sensitive, N-terminal region comprising residues 1-20. Binding of antibody HBC-7 was inhibited by in vitro ADP-ribosylation of H2B at glutamic acid residue 2. This strongly suggests that the epitope recognized by HBC-7 is located at the N-terminus of H2B, probably between residues 1 and 8. We have used solid-phase radioimmunoassay to investigate factors which influence the accessibility of this epitope in chromatin. Removal of H1 ('stripping') from high-molecular-mass chromatin had no effect on HBC-7 binding, nor was any difference observed between binding to stripped chromatin and to 146-base-pair (bp) core particles derived from it by nuclease digestion. These results suggest that accessibility of the N-terminal region of H2B is not influenced by H1 itself or by the size or conformation of linker DNA. In contrast, binding of antibody HBC-7 to 146-bp core particles derived from unstripped chromatin was reduced by up to 70%. Binding was restored by exposure of these core particles to the conditions used for stripping. Analysis of the protein content of core particle preparations from stripped and unstripped chromatin suggests that these findings may be attributable to redistribution of non-histone proteins during nuclease digestion. Pre-treatment of high-molecular-mass chromatin or 146-bp core particles with the intercalating dye ethidium bromide resulted in a severalfold increase in binding

  7. Characterization of Palytoxin Binding to HaCaT Cells Using a Monoclonal Anti-Palytoxin Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Florio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin (PLTX is the reference compound for a group of potent marine biotoxins, for which the molecular target is Na+/K+-ATPase. Indeed, ouabain (OUA, a potent blocker of the pump, is used to inhibit some PLTX effects in vitro. However, in an effort to explain incomplete inhibition of PLTX cytotoxicity, some studies suggest the possibility of two different binding sites on Na+/K+-ATPase. Hence, this study was performed to characterize PLTX binding to intact HaCaT keratinocytes and to investigate the ability of OUA to compete for this binding. PLTX binding to HaCaT cells was demonstrated by immunocytochemical analysis after 10 min exposure. An anti-PLTX monoclonal antibody-based ELISA showed that the binding was saturable and reversible, with a Kd of 3 × 10−10 M. However, kinetic experiments revealed that PLTX binding dissociation was incomplete, suggesting an additional, OUA-insensitive, PLTX binding site. Competitive experiments suggested that OUA acts as a negative allosteric modulator against high PLTX concentrations (0.3–1.0 × 10−7 M and possibly as a non-competitive antagonist against low PLTX concentrations (0.1–3.0 × 10−9 M. Antagonism was supported by PLTX cytotoxicity inhibition at OUA concentrations that displaced PLTX binding (1 × 10−5 M. However, this inhibition was incomplete, supporting the existence of both OUA-sensitive and -insensitive PLTX binding sites.

  8. Trimeric gp120-specific bovine monoclonal antibodies require cysteine and aromatic residues in CDRH3 for high affinity binding to HIV Env

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center, Rob J.; Bebbington, Jonathan; Cuthbertson, Jack; Khoury, Georges; Lichtfuss, Marit; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We isolated HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific memory B cells from a cow that had developed high titer polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) with broad neutralizing activity after a long duration vaccination with HIV-1AD8 Env gp140 trimers. We cloned the bovine IgG matched heavy (H) and light (L) chain variable (V) genes from these memory B cells and constructed IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with either a human constant (C)-region/bovine V-region chimeric or fully bovine C and V regions. Among 42 selected Ig+ memory B cells, two mAbs (6A and 8C) showed high affinity binding to gp140 Env. Characterization of both the fully bovine and human chimeric isoforms of these two mAbs revealed them as highly type-specific and capable of binding only to soluble AD8 uncleaved gp140 trimers and covalently stabilized AD8 SOSIP gp140 cleaved trimers, but not monomeric gp120. Genomic sequence analysis of the V genes showed the third heavy complementarity-determining region (CDRH3) of 6A mAb was 21 amino acids in length while 8C CDRH3 was 14 amino acids long. The entire V heavy (VH) region was 27% and 25% diverged for 6A and 8C, respectively, from the best matched germline V genes available, and the CDRH3 regions of 6A and 8C were 47.62% and 78.57% somatically mutated, respectively, suggesting a high level of somatic hypermutation compared with CDRH3 of other species. Alanine mutagenesis of the VH genes of 6A and 8C, showed that CDRH3 cysteine and tryptophan amino acids were crucial for antigen binding. Therefore, these bovine vaccine-induced anti-HIV antibodies shared some of the notable structural features of elite human broadly neutralizing antibodies, such as CDRH3 size and somatic mutation during affinity-maturation. However, while the 6A and 8C mAbs inhibited soluble CD4 binding to gp140 Env, they did not recapitulate the neutralizing activity of the polyclonal antibodies against HIV infection. PMID:27996375

  9. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E by a Humanized Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Yağmur; Selby, Katja; Miethe, Sebastian; Frenzel, André; Liu, Yvonne; Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Pelat, Thibaut; Urbain, Remi; Fontayne, Alexandre; Thullier, Philippe; Sesardic, Dorothea; Lindström, Miia; Hust, Michael; Korkeala, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause botulism and are the deadliest naturally-occurring substances known to humans. BoNTs have been classified as one of the category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, indicating their potential use as bioweapons. To counter bio-threat and naturally-occurring botulism cases, well-tolerated antibodies by humans that neutralize BoNTs are relevant. In our previous work, we showed the neutralizing potential of macaque (Macaca fascicularis)-derived scFv-Fc (scFv-Fc ELC18) by in vitro endopeptidase immunoassay and ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay by targeting the light chain of the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E). In the present study, we germline-humanized scFv-Fc ELC18 into a full IgG hu8ELC18 to increase its immunotolerance by humans. We demonstrated the protection and prophylaxis capacity of hu8ELC18 against BoNT/E in a mouse model. A concentration of 2.5 ng/mouse of hu8ELC18 protected against 5 mouse lethal dose (MLD) in a mouse protection assay and complete neutralization of 1 LD50 of pure BoNT/E toxin was achieved with 8 ng of hu8ELC18 in mouse paralysis assay. Furthermore, hu8ELC18 protected mice from 5 MLD if injected up to 14 days prior to intraperitoneal BoNT/E administration. This newly-developed humanized IgG is expected to have high tolerance in humans. PMID:27626446

  10. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E by a Humanized Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yağmur Derman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs cause botulism and are the deadliest naturally-occurring substances known to humans. BoNTs have been classified as one of the category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, indicating their potential use as bioweapons. To counter bio-threat and naturally-occurring botulism cases, well-tolerated antibodies by humans that neutralize BoNTs are relevant. In our previous work, we showed the neutralizing potential of macaque (Macaca fascicularis-derived scFv-Fc (scFv-Fc ELC18 by in vitro endopeptidase immunoassay and ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay by targeting the light chain of the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E. In the present study, we germline-humanized scFv-Fc ELC18 into a full IgG hu8ELC18 to increase its immunotolerance by humans. We demonstrated the protection and prophylaxis capacity of hu8ELC18 against BoNT/E in a mouse model. A concentration of 2.5 ng/mouse of hu8ELC18 protected against 5 mouse lethal dose (MLD in a mouse protection assay and complete neutralization of 1 LD50 of pure BoNT/E toxin was achieved with 8 ng of hu8ELC18 in mouse paralysis assay. Furthermore, hu8ELC18 protected mice from 5 MLD if injected up to 14 days prior to intraperitoneal BoNT/E administration. This newly-developed humanized IgG is expected to have high tolerance in humans.

  11. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostova, Ekaterina; Ben Adiba, Carine; Dietler, Giovanni; Sekatskii, Sergey K.

    2016-01-01

    Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs) offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b) against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor. PMID:27727183

  12. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostova, Ekaterina; Ben Adiba, Carine; Dietler, Giovanni; Sekatskii, Sergey K

    2016-10-11

    Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs) offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b) against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor.

  13. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Rostova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor.

  14. Equatorial segment protein (ESP) is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowicz, M J; Digilio, L; Klotz, K; Shetty, J; Flickinger, C J; Herr, J C

    2008-01-01

    The equatorial segment of the sperm head is known to play a role in fertilization; however, the specific sperm molecules contributing to the integrity of the equatorial segment and in binding and fusion at the oolemma remain incomplete. Moreover, identification of molecular mediators of fertilization that are also immunogenic in humans is predicted to advance both the diagnosis and treatment of immune infertility. We previously reported the cloning of Equatorial Segment Protein (ESP), a protein localized to the equatorial segment of ejaculated human sperm. ESP is a biomarker for a subcompartment of the acrosomal matrix that can be traced through all stages of acrosome biogenesis (Wolkowicz et al, 2003). In the present study, ESP immunoreacted on Western blots with 4 (27%) of 15 antisperm antibody (ASA)-positive serum samples from infertile male patients and 2 (40%) of 5 ASA-positive female sera. Immunofluorescent studies revealed ESP in the equatorial segment of 89% of acrosome-reacted sperm. ESP persisted as a defined equatorial segment band on 100% of sperm tightly bound to the oolemma of hamster eggs. Antisera to recombinant human ESP inhibited both oolemmal binding and fusion of human sperm in the hamster egg penetration assay. The results indicate that ESP is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion. Defined recombinant sperm immunogens, such as ESP, may offer opportunities for differential diagnosis of immune infertility.

  15. Neutralization and Binding Profile of Monoclonal Antibodies Generated Against Influenza A H1N1 Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembekar, Nachiket; Mallajosyula, Vamsee V Aditya; Malik, Ankita; Saini, Ashok; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) provide scope for the development of better therapeutics and diagnostic tools. Herein, we describe the binding and neutralization profile(s) for a panel of murine MAbs generated against influenza A H1N1 viruses elicited by immunization with pandemic H1 recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA)/whole virus or seasonal H1 rHA. Neutralizing MAbs, MA-2070 and MA-M, were obtained after pandemic A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) virus/rHA immunization(s). Both MAbs reacted specifically with rHA from A/California/07/2009 and A/England/195/2009 in ELISA. MA-2070 bound rHA of A/California/07/2009 with high affinity (KD = 51.36 ± 9.20 nM) and exhibited potent in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 2.50 μg/mL). MA-2070 bound within the stem domain of HA. MA-M exhibited both hemagglutination inhibition (HI, 1.50 μg/mL) and in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 0.66 μg/mL) activity against the pandemic A/California/07/2009 virus and showed higher binding affinity (KD = 9.80 ± 0.67 nM) than MA-2070. MAb, MA-H generated against the seasonal A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 (H1N1) rHA binds within the head domain and bound the seasonal H1N1 (A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 and A/New Caledonia/20/1990) rHAs with high affinity (KD; 0.72-8.23 nM). MA-H showed high HI (2.50 μg/mL) and in vitro neutralization (IC50 = 2.61 μg/mL) activity against the A/Solomon Islands/03/2006 virus. All 3 MAbs failed to react in ELISA with rHA from various strains of H2N2, H3N2, H5N1, H7N9, and influenza virus B, suggesting their specificity for either pandemic or seasonal H1N1 influenza virus. The MAbs reported here may be useful in developing diagnostic assays.

  16. Covalent Binding of Antibodies to Cellulose Paper Discs and Their Applications in Naked-eye Colorimetric Immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yanfen; Gelder, Victor Van; Amaladoss, Anburaj; Patel, Kadamb Haribhai

    2016-10-21

    This report presents two methods for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies on cellulose filter paper grade No. 1 (medium-flow filter paper) discs and grade No. 113 (fast-flow filter paper) discs. These cellulose paper discs were grafted with amine functional groups through a silane coupling technique before the antibodies were immobilized on them. Periodate oxidation and glutaraldehyde cross-linking methods were used to graft capture antibodies on the cellulose paper discs. In order to ensure the maximum binding capacity of the capture antibodies to their targets after immobilization, the effects of various concentrations of sodium periodate, glutaraldehyde, and capture antibodies on the surface of the paper discs were investigated. The antibodies that were coated on the amine-functionalized cellulose paper discs through a glutaraldehyde cross-linking agent showed enhanced binding activity to the target when compared to the periodate oxidation method. IgG (in mouse reference serum) was used as a reference target in this study to test the application of covalently immobilized antibodies through glutaraldehyde. A new paper-based, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was successfully developed and validated for the detection of IgG. This method does not require equipment, and it can detect 100 ng/ml of IgG. The fast-flow filter paper was more sensitive than the medium-flow filter paper. The incubation period of this assay was short and required small sample volumes. This naked-eye, colorimetric immunoassay can be extended to detect other targets that are identified with conventional ELISA.

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection.

  18. Heavy chain-only IgG2b llama antibody effects near-pan HIV-1 neutralization by recognizing a CD4-induced epitope that includes elements of coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Priyamvada; Luongo, Timothy S; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Matz, Julie; Schmidt, Stephen D; Louder, Mark K; Kessler, Pascal; Yang, Yongping; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Lei; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Martin, Loïc; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D

    2013-09-01

    The conserved HIV-1 site of coreceptor binding is protected from antibody-directed neutralization by conformational and steric restrictions. While inaccessible to most human antibodies, the coreceptor site has been shown to be accessed by antibody fragments. In this study, we used X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and pseudovirus neutralization to characterize the gp120-envelope glycoprotein recognition and HIV-1 neutralization of a heavy chain-only llama antibody, named JM4. We describe full-length IgG2b and IgG3 versions of JM4 that target the coreceptor-binding site and potently neutralize over 95% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Contrary to established trends that show improved access to the coreceptor-binding region by smaller antibody fragments, the single-domain (VHH) version of JM4 neutralized less well than the full-length IgG2b version of JM4. The crystal structure at 2.1-Å resolution of VHH JM4 bound to HIV-1 YU2 gp120 stabilized in the CD4-bound state by the CD4-mimetic miniprotein, M48U1, revealed a JM4 epitope that combined regions of coreceptor recognition (including the gp120 bridging sheet, V3 loop, and β19 strand) with gp120 structural elements involved in recognition of CD4 such as the CD4-binding loop. The structure of JM4 with gp120 thus defines a novel CD4-induced site of vulnerability involving elements of both coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites. The potently neutralizing JM4 IgG2b antibody that targets this newly defined site of vulnerability adds to the expanding repertoire of broadly neutralizing antibodies that effectively neutralize HIV-1 and thereby potentially provides a new template for vaccine development and target for HIV-1 therapy.

  19. Naturally Acquired Binding-Inhibitory Antibodies to Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein in Pregnant Women Are Associated with Higher Birth Weight in a Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Pilar; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Menegon, Michela; Martínez-Espinosa, Flor E.; Padilla, Norma; Bôtto-Menezes, Camila; Malheiro, Adriana; Hans, Dhiraj; Castellanos, Maria Eugenia; Robinson, Leanne; Samol, Paula; Kochar, Swati; Kochar, Sanjay K.; Kochar, Dhanpat K.; Desai, Meghna; Sanz, Sergi; Quintó, Llorenç; Mayor, Alfredo; Rogerson, Stephen; Mueller, Ivo; Severini, Carlo; del Portillo, Hernando A.; Bardají, Azucena; Chitnis, Chetan C.; Menéndez, Clara; Dobaño, Carlota

    2017-01-01

    A vaccine to eliminate malaria would need a multi-stage and multi-species composition to achieve robust protection, but the lack of knowledge about antigen targets and mechanisms of protection precludes the development of fully efficacious malaria vaccines, especially for Plasmodium vivax (Pv). Pregnant women constitute a risk population who would greatly benefit from a vaccine preventing the adverse events of Plasmodium infection during gestation. We hypothesized that functional immune responses against putative targets of naturally acquired immunity to malaria and vaccine candidates will be associated with protection against malaria infection and/or poor outcomes during pregnancy. We measured (i) IgG responses to a large panel of Pv and Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) antigens, (ii) the capacity of anti-Pv ligand Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) antibodies to inhibit binding to Duffy antigen, and (iii) cellular immune responses to two Pv antigens, in a subset of 1,056 pregnant women from Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, India, and Papua New Guinea (PNG). There were significant intraspecies and interspecies correlations for most antibody responses (e.g., PfMSP119 versus PfAMA1, Spearman’s rho = 0.81). Women from PNG and Colombia had the highest levels of IgG overall. Submicroscopic infections seemed sufficient to boost antibody responses in Guatemala but not antigen-specific cellular responses in PNG. Brazil had the highest percentage of Duffy binding inhibition (p-values versus Colombia: 0.040; Guatemala: 0.047; India: 0.003, and PNG: 0.153) despite having low anti-PvDBP IgG levels. Almost all antibodies had a positive association with present infection, and coinfection with the other species increased this association. Anti-PvDBP, anti-PfMSP1, and anti-PfAMA1 IgG levels at recruitment were positively associated with infection at delivery (p-values: 0.010, 0.003, and 0.023, respectively), suggesting that they are markers of malaria exposure. Peripheral blood

  20. Generation of monoclonal antibodies to native active human glycosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    using monoclonal antibodies therefore provides an excellent strategy to analyze the glycosylation process in cells. A major drawback has been difficulties in generating antibodies to glycosyltransferases and validating their specificities. Here we describe a simple strategy for generating...

  1. Human norovirus binding to select bacteria representative of the human gut microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almand, Erin A.; Outlaw, Janie; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2017-01-01

    Recent reports describe the ability of select bacterial strains to bind human norovirus, although the specificity of such interactions is unknown. The purpose of this work was to determine if a select group of bacterial species representative of human gut microbiota bind to human norovirus, and if so, to characterize the intensity and location of that binding. The bacteria screened included naturally occurring strains isolated from human stool (Klebsiella spp., Citrobacter spp., Bacillus spp., Enterococcus faecium and Hafnia alvei) and select reference strains (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter cloacae). Binding in PBS was evaluated to three human norovirus strains (GII.4 New Orleans 2009 and Sydney 2012, GI.6) and two surrogate viruses (Tulane virus and Turnip Crinkle Virus (TCV)) using a suspension assay format linked to RT-qPCR for quantification. The impact of different overnight culture media prior to washing on binding efficiency in PBS was also evaluated, and binding was visualized using transmission electron microscopy. All bacteria tested bound the representative human norovirus strains with high efficiency (90% binding efficiency) (p>0.05); there was selective binding for Tulane virus and no binding observed for TCV. Binding efficiency was highest when bacteria were cultured in minimal media (90% bound), but notably decreased when cultured in enriched media (1–3 log10 unbound or 0.01 –structures, without apparent localization. The findings reported here further elucidate and inform the dynamics between human noroviruses and enteric bacteria with implications for norovirus pathogenesis. PMID:28257478

  2. INTRACEREBRAL AND SUBCUTANEOUS XENOGRAFTS OF HUMAN SCLC IN THE NUDE RAT - COMPARISON OF MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY LOCALIZATION AND TUMOR-INFILTRATING LYMPHOCYTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULTE, JWM; GO, KG; ZUIDERVEEN, F; THE, TH; DELEIJ, L

    1993-01-01

    In the WAG/Rij nude rat, subcutaneous (s.c.) and intracerebral (i.c.) xenografts of the human SCLC cell line GLC-28 were evaluated for their growth behavior, in vivo monoclonal antibody binding and presence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. For the i.c. xenografts, two models of cerebral tumor grow

  3. Unique carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are required for high affinity binding between FcgammaRIII and antibodies lacking core fucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Claudia; Grau, Sandra; Jäger, Christiane; Sondermann, Peter; Brünker, Peter; Waldhauer, Inja; Hennig, Michael; Ruf, Armin; Rufer, Arne Christian; Stihle, Martine; Umaña, Pablo; Benz, Jörg

    2011-08-02

    Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key immune effector mechanism, relies on the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to Fcγ receptors expressed on immune cells. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a large increase in affinity for FcγRIIIa leading to an improved receptor-mediated effector function. Although afucosylated IgGs exist naturally, a next generation of recombinant therapeutic, glycoenginereed antibodies is currently being developed to exploit this finding. In this study, the crystal structures of a glycosylated Fcγ receptor complexed with either afucosylated or fucosylated Fc were determined allowing a detailed, molecular understanding of the regulatory role of Fc-oligosaccharide core fucosylation in improving ADCC. The structures reveal a unique type of interface consisting of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions between glycans of the receptor and the afucosylated Fc. In contrast, in the complex structure with fucosylated Fc, these contacts are weakened or nonexistent, explaining the decreased affinity for the receptor. These findings allow us to understand the higher efficacy of therapeutic antibodies lacking the core fucose and also suggest a unique mechanism by which the immune system can regulate antibody-mediated effector functions.

  4. Functional Transplant of a Dengue Virus Serotype 3 (DENV3)-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibody Epitope into DENV1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, William B.; Yount, Boyd L.; Royal, Scott R.; de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Widman, Douglas G.; Smith, Scott A.; Crowe, James E.; Pfaff, Jennifer M.; Kahle, Kristen M.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Ibarra, Kristie D.; Harris, Eva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes, DENV1 through 4, are endemic throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world. While first infection confers long-term protective immunity against viruses of the infecting serotype, a second infection with virus of a different serotype carries a greater risk of severe dengue disease, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Recent studies demonstrate that humans exposed to DENV infections develop neutralizing antibodies that bind to quaternary epitopes formed by the viral envelope (E) protein dimers or higher-order assemblies required for the formation of the icosahedral viral envelope. Here we show that the quaternary epitope target of the human DENV3-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) 5J7 can be partially transplanted into a DENV1 strain by changing the core residues of the epitope contained within a single monomeric E molecule. MAb 5J7 neutralized the recombinant DENV1/3 strain in cell culture and was protective in a mouse model of infection with the DENV1/3 strain. However, the 5J7 epitope was only partially recreated by transplantation of the core residues because MAb 5J7 bound and neutralized wild-type (WT) DENV3 better than the DENV1/3 recombinant. Our studies demonstrate that it is possible to transplant a large number of discontinuous residues between DENV serotypes and partially recreate a complex antibody epitope, while retaining virus viability. Further refinement of this approach may lead to new tools for measuring epitope-specific antibody responses and new vaccine platforms. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus is the most important mosquito-borne pathogen of humans worldwide, with approximately one-half the world's population living in regions where dengue is endemic. Dengue immunity following infection is robust and thought to be conferred by antibodies raised against the infecting virus. However, the specific viral components that these antibodies recognize and how they

  5. Repeated Vaccination of Cows with HIV Env gp140 during Subsequent Pregnancies Elicits and Sustains an Enduring Strong Env-Binding and Neutralising Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center, Rob J.; Gonelli, Christopher; Muller, Brian; Mackenzie, Charlene; Khoury, Georges; Lichtfuss, Marit; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian F. J.

    2016-01-01

    An important feature of a potential vaccine against HIV is the production of broadly neutralising antibodies (BrNAbs) capable of potentially blocking infectivity of a diverse array of HIV strains. BrNAbs naturally arise in some HIV infected individuals after several years of infection and their serum IgG can neutralise various HIV strains across different subtypes. We previously showed that vaccination of cows with HIV gp140 AD8 trimers resulted in a high titre of serum IgG against HIV envelope (Env) that had strong BrNAb activity. These polyclonal BrNAbs concentrated into the colostrum during the late stage of pregnancy and can be harvested in vast quantities immediately after calving. In this study, we investigated the effect of prolonged HIV gp140 vaccination on bovine colostrum IgG HIV Env-binding and BrNAb activity over subsequent pregnancies. Repeated immunisation led to a maintained high titre of HIV Env specific IgG in the colostrum batches, but this did not increase through repeated cycles. Colostrum IgG from all batches also strongly competed with sCD4 binding to gp140 Env trimer and with human-derived monoclonal VRC01 and b12 BrNAbs that bind the CD4 binding site (CD4bs). Furthermore, competition neutralisation assays using RSC3 Env gp120 protein core and a derivative CD4bs mutant, RSC3 Δ371I/P363N, showed that CD4bs neutralising antibodies contribute to the neutralising activity of all batches of purified bovine colostrum IgG. This result indicates that the high IgG titre/avidity of anti-CD4bs antibodies with BrNAb activity was achieved during the first year of vaccination and was sustained throughout the years of repeated vaccinations in the cow tested. Although IgG of subsequent colostrum batches may have a higher avidity towards the CD4bs, the overall breadth in neutralisation was not enhanced. This implies that the boosting vaccinations over 4 years elicited a polyclonal antibody response that maintained the proportion of both neutralising and non

  6. Repeated Vaccination of Cows with HIV Env gp140 during Subsequent Pregnancies Elicits and Sustains an Enduring Strong Env-Binding and Neutralising Antibody Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Heydarchi

    Full Text Available An important feature of a potential vaccine against HIV is the production of broadly neutralising antibodies (BrNAbs capable of potentially blocking infectivity of a diverse array of HIV strains. BrNAbs naturally arise in some HIV infected individuals after several years of infection and their serum IgG can neutralise various HIV strains across different subtypes. We previously showed that vaccination of cows with HIV gp140 AD8 trimers resulted in a high titre of serum IgG against HIV envelope (Env that had strong BrNAb activity. These polyclonal BrNAbs concentrated into the colostrum during the late stage of pregnancy and can be harvested in vast quantities immediately after calving. In this study, we investigated the effect of prolonged HIV gp140 vaccination on bovine colostrum IgG HIV Env-binding and BrNAb activity over subsequent pregnancies. Repeated immunisation led to a maintained high titre of HIV Env specific IgG in the colostrum batches, but this did not increase through repeated cycles. Colostrum IgG from all batches also strongly competed with sCD4 binding to gp140 Env trimer and with human-derived monoclonal VRC01 and b12 BrNAbs that bind the CD4 binding site (CD4bs. Furthermore, competition neutralisation assays using RSC3 Env gp120 protein core and a derivative CD4bs mutant, RSC3 Δ371I/P363N, showed that CD4bs neutralising antibodies contribute to the neutralising activity of all batches of purified bovine colostrum IgG. This result indicates that the high IgG titre/avidity of anti-CD4bs antibodies with BrNAb activity was achieved during the first year of vaccination and was sustained throughout the years of repeated vaccinations in the cow tested. Although IgG of subsequent colostrum batches may have a higher avidity towards the CD4bs, the overall breadth in neutralisation was not enhanced. This implies that the boosting vaccinations over 4 years elicited a polyclonal antibody response that maintained the proportion of both

  7. Structural comparison of four different antibodies interacting with human papillomavirus 16 and mechanisms of neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Jian [Department of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Bywaters, Stephanie M.; Brendle, Sarah A. [Department of Pathology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Lee, Hyunwook; Ashley, Robert E. [Department of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Makhov, Alexander M.; Conway, James F. [Department of Structural Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3501 5th Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Christensen, Neil D. [Department of Pathology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Hafenstein, Susan, E-mail: shafenstein@hmc.psu.edu [Department of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was used to solve the structures of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) complexed with fragments of antibody (Fab) from three different neutralizing monoclonals (mAbs): H16.1A, H16.14J, and H263.A2. The structure-function analysis revealed predominantly monovalent binding of each Fab with capsid interactions that involved multiple loops from symmetry related copies of the major capsid protein. The residues identified in each Fab-virus interface map to a conformational groove on the surface of the capsomer. In addition to the known involvement of the FG and HI loops, the DE loop was also found to constitute the core of each epitope. Surprisingly, the epitope mapping also identified minor contributions by EF and BC loops. Complementary immunological assays included mAb and Fab neutralization. The specific binding characteristics of mAbs correlated with different neutralizing behaviors in pre- and post-attachment neutralization assays. - Highlights: • We present HPV16-Fab complexes from neutralizing mAbs: H16.1A, H16.14J, and H263.A2. • The structure-function analysis revealed predominantly monovalent binding of each mAb. • Capsid–Fab interactions involved multiple loops from symmetry related L1 proteins. • Besides the known FG and HI loops, epitope mapping also identified DE, EF, and BC loops. • Neutralizing assays complement the structures to show multiple neutralization mechanisms.

  8. Chimeric antibody with human constant regions and mouse variable regions directed against carcinoma-associated antigen 17-1A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L.K.; Curtis, P.; Rakowicz-Szulczynska, E.; Ghrayeb, J.; Chang, N.; Morrison, S.L.; Koprowski, H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have cloned the genomic DNA fragments encoding the heavy and light chain variable regions of monoclonal antibody 17-1A, and they have inserted them into mammalian expression vectors containing genomic DNA segments encoding human ..gamma..3 and kappa constant regions. The transfer of these expression vectors containing mouse-human chimeric immunoglobulin genes into Sp2/0 mouse myeloma cells resulted in the production of functional IgG that retained the specific binding to the surface antigen 17-1A expressed on colorectal carcinoma cells.

  9. Proteoliposome-based selection of a recombinant antibody fragment against the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharni; Nomura, Yayoi; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Hino, Tomoya; Abe, Hitomi; Nakada-Nakura, Yoshiko; Sato, Yumi; Iwanari, Hiroko; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Asada, Hidetsugu; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Murata, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takuya; Hamakubo, Takao; Iwata, So; Nomura, Norimichi

    2014-12-01

    The development of antibodies against human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has achieved limited success, which has mainly been attributed to their low stability in a detergent-solubilized state. We herein describe a method that can generally be applied to the selection of phage display libraries with human GPCRs reconstituted in liposomes. A key feature of this approach is the production of biotinylated proteoliposomes that can be immobilized on the surface of streptavidin-coupled microplates or paramagnetic beads and used as a binding target for antibodies. As an example, we isolated a single chain Fv fragment from an immune phage library that specifically binds to the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor with nanomolar affinity. The selected antibody fragment recognized the GPCR in both detergent-solubilized and membrane-embedded forms, which suggests that it may be a potentially valuable tool for structural and functional studies of the GPCR. The use of proteoliposomes as immunogens and screening bait will facilitate the application of phage display to this difficult class of membrane proteins.

  10. False-positive myeloperoxidase binding activity due to DNA/anti-DNA antibody complexes: a source for analytical error in serologic evaluation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethwa, H S; Nachman, P H; Falk, R J; Jennette, J C

    2000-09-01

    Anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies (anti-MPO) are a major type of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). While evaluating anti-MPO monoclonal antibodies from SCG/Kj mice, we observed several hybridomas that appeared to react with both MPO and DNA. Sera from some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) also react with MPO and DNA. We hypothesized that the MPO binding activity is a false-positive result due to the binding of DNA, contained within the antigen binding site of anti-DNA antibodies, to the cationic MPO. Antibodies from tissue culture supernatants from 'dual reactive' hybridomas were purified under high-salt conditions (3 M NaCl) to remove any antigen bound to antibody. The MPO and DNA