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Sample records for human ancestral repeats

  1. Structure, organization, and sequence of alpha satellite DNA from human chromosome 17: evidence for evolution by unequal crossing-over and an ancestral pentamer repeat shared with the human X chromosome.

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    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1986-09-01

    The centromeric regions of all human chromosomes are characterized by distinct subsets of a diverse tandemly repeated DNA family, alpha satellite. On human chromosome 17, the predominant form of alpha satellite is a 2.7-kilobase-pair higher-order repeat unit consisting of 16 alphoid monomers. We present the complete nucleotide sequence of the 16-monomer repeat, which is present in 500 to 1,000 copies per chromosome 17, as well as that of a less abundant 15-monomer repeat, also from chromosome 17. These repeat units were approximately 98% identical in sequence, differing by the exclusion of precisely 1 monomer from the 15-monomer repeat. Homologous unequal crossing-over is suggested as a probable mechanism by which the different repeat lengths on chromosome 17 were generated, and the putative site of such a recombination event is identified. The monomer organization of the chromosome 17 higher-order repeat unit is based, in part, on tandemly repeated pentamers. A similar pentameric suborganization has been previously demonstrated for alpha satellite of the human X chromosome. Despite the organizational similarities, substantial sequence divergence distinguishes these subsets. Hybridization experiments indicate that the chromosome 17 and X subsets are more similar to each other than to the subsets found on several other human chromosomes. We suggest that the chromosome 17 and X alpha satellite subsets may be related components of a larger alphoid subfamily which have evolved from a common ancestral repeat into the contemporary chromosome-specific subsets.

  2. Anatomy, Medical Education, and Human Ancestral Variation

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    Strkalj, Goran; Spocter, Muhammad A.; Wilkinson, A. Tracey

    2011-01-01

    It is argued in this article that the human body both in health and disease cannot be fully understood without adequately accounting for the different levels of human variation. The article focuses on variation due to ancestry, arguing that the inclusion of information pertaining to ancestry in human anatomy teaching materials and courses should…

  3. Anatomy, Medical Education, and Human Ancestral Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strkalj, Goran; Spocter, Muhammad A.; Wilkinson, A. Tracey

    2011-01-01

    It is argued in this article that the human body both in health and disease cannot be fully understood without adequately accounting for the different levels of human variation. The article focuses on variation due to ancestry, arguing that the inclusion of information pertaining to ancestry in human anatomy teaching materials and courses should…

  4. Ancestral origin of the ATTCT repeat expansion in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10.

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    Teresa Almeida

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by cerebellar ataxia and seizures. The disease is caused by a large ATTCT repeat expansion in the ATXN10 gene. The first families reported with SCA10 were of Mexican origin, but the disease was soon after described in Brazilian families of mixed Portuguese and Amerindian ancestry. The origin of the SCA10 expansion and a possible founder effect that would account for its geographical distribution have been the source of speculation over the last years. To unravel the mutational origin and spread of the SCA10 expansion, we performed an extensive haplotype study, using closely linked STR markers and intragenic SNPs, in families from Brazil and Mexico. Our results showed (1 a shared disease haplotype for all Brazilian and one of the Mexican families, and (2 closely-related haplotypes for the additional SCA10 Mexican families; (3 little or null genetic distance in small normal alleles of different repeat sizes, from the same SNP lineage, indicating that they are being originated by a single step mechanism; and (4 a shared haplotype for pure and interrupted expanded alleles, pointing to a gene conversion model for its generation. In conclusion, we show evidence for an ancestral common origin for SCA10 in Latin America, which might have arisen in an ancestral Amerindian population and later have been spread into the mixed populations of Mexico and Brazil.

  5. Flavor in the context of ancestral human diets

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    Richard Wrangham

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Given that nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution, to understand the evolutionary biology of human flavor perception we need to know what kinds of foods have been sufficiently important in the human past for natural selection to favor specific mechanisms for perceiving and digesting them. Humans share with great apes a long prehistory of specializing on eating ripe fruits. Wild ripe fruits have much less sugar and more fiber than domestic fruits, but are similar in tending to offer two main tastes, sweet mixed with sour. While a preference for sweetness is easily explained, the attraction of a sweet-sour combination is still uncertain. A plausible explanation is that because mild acidity inhibits microbial growth, it signals a low probability of toxins. Whatever the explanation, the human preference for a combination of sweet and sour tastes appears to be a strong response reflecting our frugivorous ancestry. However for at least 2 million years fruit-eating has been less important for humans than it is for most other primates. Humans specialized dietarily in two respects, composition and processing. First, though composition varies widely, for their body size humans select items of unusually high caloric density. Thus compared to great apes, hunter-gatherers consume less fiber and more starch and lipids. They do so by eating much less foliage and fruit than great apes do, and more roots and animal-derived foods including both meats and honey [1]. Although meat is often regarded as important because it provides protein, great ape diets provide more than enough protein from fruits and foliage alone: fat is a more critical component of meat. Honey from honey-bees Apis mellifera has a surprisingly large role in the human evolutionary diet, i.e. for African hunter-gatherers. It is a strongly preferred item which can be the predominant sources of calories: hunter-gatherers eat as much as 1 kg per day for weeks at a time

  6. Number of ancestral human species: a molecular perspective.

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    Curnoe, D; Thorne, A

    2003-01-01

    Despite the remarkable developments in molecular biology over the past three decades, anthropological genetics has had only limited impact on systematics in human evolution. Genetics offers the opportunity to objectively test taxonomies based on morphology and may be used to supplement conventional approaches to hominid systematics. Our analyses, examining chromosomes and 46 estimates of genetic distance, indicate there may have been only around 4 species on the direct line to modern humans and 5 species in total. This contrasts with current taxonomies recognising up to 23 species. The genetic proximity of humans and chimpanzees has been used to suggest these species are congeneric. Our analysis of genetic distances between them is consistent with this proposal. It is time that chimpanzees, living humans and all fossil humans be classified in Homo. The creation of new genera can no longer be a solution to the complexities of fossil morphologies. Published genetic distances between common chimpanzees and bonobos, along with evidence for interbreeding, suggest they should be assigned to a single species. The short distance between humans and chimpanzees also places a strict limit on the number of possible evolutionary 'side branches' that might be recognised on the human lineage. All fossil taxa were genetically very close to each other and likely to have been below congeneric genetic distances seen for many mammals. Our estimates of genetic divergence suggest that periods of around 2 million years are required to produce sufficient genetic distance to represent speciation. Therefore, Neanderthals and so-called H. erectus were genetically so close to contemporary H. sapiens they were unlikely to have been separate species. Thus, it is likely there was only one species of human (H. sapiens) for most of the last 2 million years. We estimate the divergence time of H. sapiens from 16 genetic distances to be around 1.7 Ma which is consistent with evidence for the earliest

  7. Neanderthal and Denisova genetic affinities with contemporary humans: introgression versus common ancestral polymorphisms.

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    Lowery, Robert K; Uribe, Gabriel; Jimenez, Eric B; Weiss, Mark A; Herrera, Kristian J; Regueiro, Maria; Herrera, Rene J

    2013-11-01

    Analyses of the genetic relationships among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans have suggested that 1-4% of the non-Sub-Saharan African gene pool may be Neanderthal derived, while 6-8% of the Melanesian gene pool may be the product of admixture between the Denisovans and the direct ancestors of Melanesians. In the present study, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity among a worldwide collection of contemporary human populations with respect to the genetic constitution of these two archaic hominins and Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee). We partitioned SNPs into subsets, including those that are derived in both archaic lineages, those that are ancestral in both archaic lineages and those that are only derived in one archaic lineage. By doing this, we have conducted separate examinations of subsets of mutations with higher probabilities of divergent phylogenetic origins. While previous investigations have excluded SNPs from common ancestors in principal component analyses, we included common ancestral SNPs in our analyses to visualize the relative placement of the Neanderthal and Denisova among human populations. To assess the genetic similarities among the various hominin lineages, we performed genetic structure analyses to provide a comparison of genetic patterns found within contemporary human genomes that may have archaic or common ancestral roots. Our results indicate that 3.6% of the Neanderthal genome is shared with roughly 65.4% of the average European gene pool, which clinally diminishes with distance from Europe. Our results suggest that Neanderthal genetic associations with contemporary non-Sub-Saharan African populations, as well as the genetic affinities observed between Denisovans and Melanesians most likely result from the retention of ancient mutations in these populations.

  8. Genomic structure and evolution of the ancestral chromosome fusion site in 2q13-2q14.1 and paralogous regions on other human chromosomes.

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    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J

    2002-11-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13-2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%-99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ~100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans.

  9. Genomic Structure and Evolution of the Ancestral Chromosome Fusion Site in 2q13–2q14.1 and Paralogous Regions on Other Human Chromosomes

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    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13–2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%–99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ∼100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans. [Supplemental material is available online at http://www.genome.org. The following individuals kindly provided reagents, samples, or unpublished information as indicated in the paper: T. Newman, C. Harris, and J. Young.] PMID:12421751

  10. Human Genetic Ancestral Composition Correlates with the Origin of Mycobacterium leprae Strains in a Leprosy Endemic Population

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    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Cortés, Edwin; Beltrán, Camilo; Romero, Marcela; Badel-Mogollón, Jaime E.; Bedoya, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that leprosy originated in Africa, extended to Asia and Europe, and arrived in the Americas during European colonization and the African slave trade. Due to colonization, the contemporary Colombian population is an admixture of Native-American, European and African ancestries. Because microorganisms are known to accompany humans during migrations, patterns of human migration can be traced by examining genomic changes in associated microbes. The current study analyzed 118 leprosy cases and 116 unrelated controls from two Colombian regions endemic for leprosy (Atlantic and Andean) in order to determine possible associations of leprosy with patient ancestral background (determined using 36 ancestry informative markers), Mycobacterium leprae genotype and/or patient geographical origin. We found significant differences between ancestral genetic composition. European components were predominant in Andean populations. In contrast, African components were higher in the Atlantic region. M. leprae genotypes were then analyzed for cluster associations and compared with the ancestral composition of leprosy patients. Two M. leprae principal clusters were found: haplotypes C54 and T45. Haplotype C54 associated with African origin and was more frequent in patients from the Atlantic region with a high African component. In contrast, haplotype T45 associated with European origin and was more frequent in Andean patients with a higher European component. These results suggest that the human and M. leprae genomes have co-existed since the African and European origins of the disease, with leprosy ultimately arriving in Colombia during colonization. Distinct M. leprae strains followed European and African settlement in the country and can be detected in contemporary Colombian populations. PMID:26360617

  11. Human Genetic Ancestral Composition Correlates with the Origin of Mycobacterium leprae Strains in a Leprosy Endemic Population.

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    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Cortés, Edwin; Beltrán, Camilo; Romero, Marcela; Badel-Mogollón, Jaime E; Bedoya, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that leprosy originated in Africa, extended to Asia and Europe, and arrived in the Americas during European colonization and the African slave trade. Due to colonization, the contemporary Colombian population is an admixture of Native-American, European and African ancestries. Because microorganisms are known to accompany humans during migrations, patterns of human migration can be traced by examining genomic changes in associated microbes. The current study analyzed 118 leprosy cases and 116 unrelated controls from two Colombian regions endemic for leprosy (Atlantic and Andean) in order to determine possible associations of leprosy with patient ancestral background (determined using 36 ancestry informative markers), Mycobacterium leprae genotype and/or patient geographical origin. We found significant differences between ancestral genetic composition. European components were predominant in Andean populations. In contrast, African components were higher in the Atlantic region. M. leprae genotypes were then analyzed for cluster associations and compared with the ancestral composition of leprosy patients. Two M. leprae principal clusters were found: haplotypes C54 and T45. Haplotype C54 associated with African origin and was more frequent in patients from the Atlantic region with a high African component. In contrast, haplotype T45 associated with European origin and was more frequent in Andean patients with a higher European component. These results suggest that the human and M. leprae genomes have co-existed since the African and European origins of the disease, with leprosy ultimately arriving in Colombia during colonization. Distinct M. leprae strains followed European and African settlement in the country and can be detected in contemporary Colombian populations.

  12. Polymorphic GGC repeat differentially regulates human reelin gene expression levels.

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    Persico, A M; Levitt, P; Pimenta, A F

    2006-10-01

    The human gene encoding Reelin (RELN), a pivotal protein in neurodevelopment, includes a polymorphic GGC repeat in its 5' untranslated region (UTR). CHO cells transfected with constructs encompassing the RELN 5'UTR with 4-to-13 GGC repeats upstream of the luciferase reporter gene show declining luciferase activity with increasing GGC repeat number (P autism.

  13. Ancestral sleep.

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    de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Moreno, Claudia; Lowden, Arne; Louzada, Fernando; Marqueze, Elaine; Levandovski, Rosa; Pilz, Luisa K; Valeggia, Claudia; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Golombek, Diego A; Czeisler, Charles A; Skene, Debra J; Duffy, Jeanne F; Roenneberg, Till

    2016-04-01

    While we do not yet understand all the functions of sleep, its critical role for normal physiology and behaviour is evident. Its amount and temporal pattern depend on species and condition. Humans sleep about a third of the day with the longest, consolidated episode during the night. The change in lifestyle from hunter-gatherers via agricultural communities to densely populated industrialized centres has certainly affected sleep, and a major concern in the medical community is the impact of insufficient sleep on health [1,2]. One of the causal mechanisms leading to insufficient sleep is altered exposure to the natural light-dark cycle. This includes the wide availability of electric light, attenuated exposure to daylight within buildings, and evening use of light-emitting devices, all of which decrease the strength of natural light-dark signals that entrain circadian systems [3].

  14. Calibrating the Human Mutation Rate via Ancestral Recombination Density in Diploid Genomes.

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    Mark Lipson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The human mutation rate is an essential parameter for studying the evolution of our species, interpreting present-day genetic variation, and understanding the incidence of genetic disease. Nevertheless, our current estimates of the rate are uncertain. Most notably, recent approaches based on counting de novo mutations in family pedigrees have yielded significantly smaller values than classical methods based on sequence divergence. Here, we propose a new method that uses the fine-scale human recombination map to calibrate the rate of accumulation of mutations. By comparing local heterozygosity levels in diploid genomes to the genetic distance scale over which these levels change, we are able to estimate a long-term mutation rate averaged over hundreds or thousands of generations. We infer a rate of 1.61 ± 0.13 × 10-8 mutations per base per generation, which falls in between phylogenetic and pedigree-based estimates, and we suggest possible mechanisms to reconcile our estimate with previous studies. Our results support intermediate-age divergences among human populations and between humans and other great apes.

  15. Evolution of the human diet: linking our ancestral diet to modern functional foods as a means of chronic disease prevention.

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    Jew, Stephanie; AbuMweis, Suhad S; Jones, Peter J H

    2009-10-01

    The evolution of the human diet over the past 10,000 years from a Paleolithic diet to our current modern pattern of intake has resulted in profound changes in feeding behavior. Shifts have occurred from diets high in fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and seafood to processed foods high in sodium and hydrogenated fats and low in fiber. These dietary changes have adversely affected dietary parameters known to be related to health, resulting in an increase in obesity and chronic disease, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and cancer. Some intervention trials using Paleolithic dietary patterns have shown promising results with favorable changes in CVD and diabetes risk factors. However, such benefits may be offset by disadvantages of the Paleolithic diet, which is low in vitamin D and calcium and high in fish potentially containing environmental toxins. More advantageous would be promotion of foods and food ingredients from our ancestral era that have been shown to possess health benefits in the form of functional foods. Many studies have investigated the health benefits of various functional food ingredients, including omega-3 fatty acids, polyphenols, fiber, and plant sterols. These bioactive compounds may help to prevent and reduce incidence of chronic diseases, which in turn could lead to health cost savings ranging from $2 to $3 billion per year as estimated by case studies using omega-3 and plant sterols as examples. Thus, public health benefits should result from promotion of the positive components of Paleolithic diets as functional foods.

  16. Ancient human genomes suggest three ancestral populations for present-day Europeans

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    Lazaridis, Iosif; Patterson, Nick; Mittnik, Alissa; Renaud, Gabriel; Mallick, Swapan; Kirsanow, Karola; Sudmant, Peter H.; Schraiber, Joshua G.; Castellano, Sergi; Lipson, Mark; Berger, Bonnie; Economou, Christos; Bollongino, Ruth; Fu, Qiaomei; Bos, Kirsten I.; Nordenfelt, Susanne; Li, Heng; de Filippo, Cesare; Prüfer, Kay; Sawyer, Susanna; Posth, Cosimo; Haak, Wolfgang; Hallgren, Fredrik; Fornander, Elin; Rohland, Nadin; Delsate, Dominique; Francken, Michael; Guinet, Jean-Michel; Wahl, Joachim; Ayodo, George; Babiker, Hamza A.; Bailliet, Graciela; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Barrantes, Ramiro; Bedoya, Gabriel; Ben-Ami, Haim; Bene, Judit; Berrada, Fouad; Bravi, Claudio M.; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B. J.; Cali, Francesco; Churnosov, Mikhail; Cole, David E. C.; Corach, Daniel; Damba, Larissa; van Driem, George; Dryomov, Stanislav; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Fedorova, Sardana A.; Romero, Irene Gallego; Gubina, Marina; Hammer, Michael; Henn, Brenna M.; Hervig, Tor; Hodoglugil, Ugur; Jha, Aashish R.; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Khusainova, Rita; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kittles, Rick; Kivisild, Toomas; Klitz, William; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Kushniarevich, Alena; Laredj, Leila; Litvinov, Sergey; Loukidis, Theologos; Mahley, Robert W.; Melegh, Béla; Metspalu, Ene; Molina, Julio; Mountain, Joanna; Näkkäläjärvi, Klemetti; Nesheva, Desislava; Nyambo, Thomas; Osipova, Ludmila; Parik, Jüri; Platonov, Fedor; Posukh, Olga; Romano, Valentino; Rothhammer, Francisco; Rudan, Igor; Ruizbakiev, Ruslan; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Sajantila, Antti; Salas, Antonio; Starikovskaya, Elena B.; Tarekegn, Ayele; Toncheva, Draga; Turdikulova, Shahlo; Uktveryte, Ingrida; Utevska, Olga; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Voevoda, Mikhail; Winkler, Cheryl; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Zalloua, Pierre; Zemunik, Tatijana; Cooper, Alan; Capelli, Cristian; Thomas, Mark G.; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Villems, Richard; Comas, David; Sukernik, Rem; Metspalu, Mait; Meyer, Matthias; Eichler, Evan E.; Burger, Joachim; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pääbo, Svante; Kelso, Janet; Reich, David; Krause, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genomes of a ~7,000 year old farmer from Germany and eight ~8,000 year old hunter-gatherers from Luxembourg and Sweden. We analyzed these and other ancient genomes1–4 with 2,345 contemporary humans to show that most present Europeans derive from at least three highly differentiated populations: West European Hunter-Gatherers (WHG), who contributed ancestry to all Europeans but not to Near Easterners; Ancient North Eurasians (ANE) related to Upper Paleolithic Siberians3, who contributed to both Europeans and Near Easterners; and Early European Farmers (EEF), who were mainly of Near Eastern origin but also harbored WHG-related ancestry. We model these populations’ deep relationships and show that EEF had ~44% ancestry from a “Basal Eurasian” population that split prior to the diversification of other non-African lineages. PMID:25230663

  17. Mechanisms of trinucleotide repeat instability during human development.

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    McMurray, Cynthia T

    2010-11-01

    Trinucleotide expansion underlies several human diseases. Expansion occurs during multiple stages of human development in different cell types, and is sensitive to the gender of the parent who transmits the repeats. Repair and replication models for expansions have been described, but we do not know whether the pathway involved is the same under all conditions and for all repeat tract lengths, which differ among diseases. Currently, researchers rely on bacteria, yeast and mice to study expansion, but these models differ substantially from humans. We need now to connect the dots among human genetics, pathway biochemistry and the appropriate model systems to understand the mechanism of expansion as it occurs in human disease.

  18. ABO (histo) blood group phenotype development and human reproduction as they relate to ancestral IgM formation: A hypothesis.

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    Arend, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a histo (blood) group) ABO phenotype and the exclusion of an autoreactive IgM or isoagglutinin activity arise apparently in identical glycosylation of complementary domains on cell surfaces and plasma proteins. The fundamental O-glycan emptiness of the circulating IgM, which during the neonatal amino acid sequencing of the variable regions is exerting germline-specific O-GalNAc glycan-reactive serine/threonine residues that in the plasma of the adult human blood group O individuals apparently remain associated with the open glycosidic sites on the ABOH convertible red cell surface, must raise suggestions on a transient expression of developmental glycans, which have been "lost" over the course of maturation. In fact, while the mammalian non-somatic, embryogenic stem cell (ESC)- germ cell (GC) transformation is characterized by a transient and genetically as-yet-undefined trans-species-functional O-GalNAc glycan expression, in the C57BL/10 mouse such expression was potentially identified in growth-dependent, blood group A-like GalNAc glycan-bearing, ovarian glycolipids complementary with the syngeneic anti-A reactive IgM, which does not appear in early ovariectomized animals. This non-somatically encoded, polyreactive, ancestral IgM molecule has not undergone clonal selection and does primarily not differentiate between self and non-self and might, due to amino acid hydroxyl groups, highly suggest substrate competition with subsequent O-glycosylations in ongoing ESC-GC transformations and affecting GC maturation. However, the membrane-bound somatic N/O-glycotransferases, which initiate, after formation of the zygote, the complex construction of the human ABO phenotypes in the trans cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, are associated and/or completed with soluble enzyme versions exerting identical specificities in plasma and likely competing vice versa by glycosylation of neonatal IgM amino acids, where they suggest to accomplish the clearance of anti

  19. Repeated vitrification/warming of human sperm gives better results than repeated slow programmable freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teraporn Vutyavanich; Worashorn Lattiwongsakorn; Waraporn Piromlertamorn; Sudarat Samchimchom

    2012-01-01

    In this study,we compared the effects of repeated freezing/thawing of human sperm by our in-house method of rapid freezing with slow programmable freezing.Sperm samples from 11 normozoospermic subjects were processed through density gradients and divided into three aliquots:non-frozen,rapid freezing and slow programmable freezing.Sperm in the rapid freezing group had better motility and viability than those in the slow freezing group (P<O.01) after the first,second and third cycles of freezing/thawing,but there was no difference in morphology.In the second experiment,rapid freezing was repeated three times in 20 subjects.The samples from each thawing cycle were evaluated for DNA fragmentation using the alkaline comet assay.DNA fragmentation began to increase considerably after the second cycle of freezing/thawing,but to a level that was not clinically important.In the third experiment,rapid freezing was done repeatedly in 10 subjects,until no motile sperm were observed after thawing.The median number of repeated freezing/thawing that yielded no motile sperm was seven (range:5-8,mean:6.8).In conclusion,we demonstrated that repeated freezing/thawing of processed semen using our rapid freezing method gave better results than standard slow programmable freezing.This method can help maximize the usage of precious cryopreserved sperm samples in assisted reproduction technology.

  20. The Ancestral Gene for Transcribed, Low-Copy Repeats in the Prader-Willi/Angleman Region Encodes a Large Protein Implicated in Protein Trafficking that is Deficient in Mice with Neuromuscular and

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    Ji, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Transcribed, low-copy repeat elements are associated with the breakpoint regions of common deletions in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. We report here the identification of the ancestral gene ( HERC2 ) and a family of duplicated, truncated copies that comprise these low-copy repeats. This gene encodes a highly conserved giant protein, HERC2, that is distantly related to p532 (HERC1), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) implicated in vesicular trafficking. The mouse genome contains a single Herc2 locus, located in the jdf2 (juvenile development and fertility-2) interval of chromosome 7C. We have identified single nucleotide splice junction mutations in Herc2 in three independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced jdf2 mutant alleles, each leading to exon skipping with premature termination of translation and/or deletion of conserved amino acids. Therefore, mutations in Herc2 lead to the neuromuscular secretory vesicle and sperm acrosome defects, other developmental abnormalities and juvenile lethality of jdf2 mice. Combined, these findings suggest that HERC2 is an important gene encoding a GEF involved in protein trafficking and degradation pathways in the cell.

  1. Repeat Sequences and Base Correlations in Human Y Chromosome Palindromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neng-zhi Jin; Zi-xian Liu; Yan-jiao Qi; Wen-yuan Qiu

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of information theory and statistical methods, we use mutual information, n-tuple entropy and conditional entropy, combined with biological characteristics, to analyze the long range correlation and short range correlation in human Y chromosome palindromes. The magnitude distribution of the long range correlation which can be reflected by the mutual information is P5>P5a>P5b (P5a and P5b are the sequences that replace solely Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats with random uncorrelated sequences in human Y chromosome palindrome 5, respectively); and the magnitude distribution of the short range correlation which can be reflected by the n-tuple entropy and the conditional entropy is P5>P5a>P5b>random uncorrelated sequence. In other words, when the Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats replace with random uncorrelated sequence, the long range and short range correlation decrease gradually. However, the random uncorrelated sequence has no correlation. This research indicates that more repeat sequences result in stronger correlation between bases in human Y chromosome. The analyses may be helpful to understand the special structures of human Y chromosome palindromes profoundly.

  2. Dating the origin and dispersal of Human Papillomavirus type 16 on the basis of ancestral human migrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Frati, Elena Rosanna; Martinelli, Marianna; Bianchi, Silvia; Amendola, Antonella; Ebranati, Erika; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Galli, Massimo; Lai, Alessia; Tanzi, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    A major limitation when reconstructing the origin and evolution of HPV-16 is the lack of reliable substitution rate estimates for the viral genes. On the basis of the hypothesis of human HPV-16 co-divergence, we estimated a mean evolutionary rate of 1.47×10(-7) (95% HPD=0.64-2.47×10(-7)) subs/site/year for the viral LCR region. The results of a Bayesian phylogeographical analysis suggest that the currently circulating HPV-16 most probably originated in Africa about 110 thousand years ago (Kya), before giving rise to four known geographical lineages: the Asian/European lineage, which most probably originated in Asia a mean 38 Kya, and the Asian/American and two African lineages, which probably respectively originated about 33 and 27 Kya. These data closely reflect current hypotheses concerning modern human expansion based on studies of mitochondrial DNA phylogeny. The correlation between ancient human migration and the present HPV phylogeny may be explained by the co-existence of modes of transmission other than sexual transmission.

  3. An ancestral miR-1304 allele present in Neanderthals regulates genes involved in enamel formation and could explain dental differences with modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Valenzuela, Maria; Ramírez, Oscar; Rosas, Antonio; García-Vargas, Samuel; de la Rasilla, Marco; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Espinosa-Parrilla, Yolanda

    2012-07-01

    Genetic changes in regulatory elements are likely to result in phenotypic effects that might explain population-specific as well as species-specific traits. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are posttranscriptional repressors involved in the control of almost every biological process. These small noncoding RNAs are present in various phylogenetic groups, and a large number of them remain highly conserved at the sequence level. MicroRNA-mediated regulation depends on perfect matching between the seven nucleotides of its seed region and the target sequence usually located at the 3' untranslated region of the regulated gene. Hence, even single changes in seed regions are predicted to be deleterious as they may affect miRNA target specificity. In accordance to this, purifying selection has strongly acted on these regions. Comparison between the genomes of present-day humans from various populations, Neanderthal, and other nonhuman primates showed an miRNA, miR-1304, that carries a polymorphism on its seed region. The ancestral allele is found in Neanderthal, nonhuman primates, at low frequency (~5%) in modern Asian populations and rarely in Africans. Using miRNA target site prediction algorithms, we found that the derived allele increases the number of putative target genes for the derived miRNA more than ten-fold, indicating an important functional evolution for miR-1304. Analysis of the predicted targets for derived miR-1304 indicates an association with behavior and nervous system development and function. Two of the predicted target genes for the ancestral miR-1304 allele are important genes for teeth formation, enamelin, and amelotin. MicroRNA overexpression experiments using a luciferase-based assay showed that the ancestral version of miR-1304 reduces the enamelin- and amelotin-associated reporter gene expression by 50%, whereas the derived miR-1304 does not have any effect. Deletion of the corresponding target sites for miR-1304 in these dental genes avoided their repression

  4. Alu repeats as markers for human population genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bazan, H. [Louisiana State Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). Medical Center] [and others

    1993-09-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 97.9% nucleotide identity with each other and an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence. HS Alu family members are thought to be derived from a single source ``master`` gene, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 in. and 3 in. unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allows the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of an Alu repeat. Individual HS Alu sequences were found to be either monomorphic or dimorphic for the presence or absence of each repeat. The monomorphic HS Alu family members inserted in the human genome after the human/great ape divergence (which is thought to have occurred 4--6 million years ago), but before the radiation of modem man. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem man (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project as well. HS Alu family member insertion dimorphism differs from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) because individuals share HS Alu family member insertions based upon identity by descent from a common ancestor as a result of a single event which occurred one time within the human population. The VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times within a population and are identical by state only.

  5. Trinucleotide repeat expansions catalyzed by human cell-free extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer R Stevens; Elaine E Lahue; Guo-Min Li; Robert S Lahue

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions cause 17 heritable human neurological disorders.In some diseases,somatic expansions occur in non-proliferating tissues such as brain where DNA replication is limited.This finding stimulated significant interest in replication-independent expansion mechanisms.Aberrant DNA repair is a likely source,based in part on mouse studies showing that somatic expansions are provoked by the DNA repair protein MutSβ (Msh2-Msh3complex).Biochemical studies to date used cell-free extracts or purified DNA repair proteins to yield partial reactions at triplet repeats.The findings included expansions on one strand but not the other,or processing of DNA hairpin structures thought to be important intermediates in the expansion process.However,it has been difficult to recapitulate complete expansions in vitro,and the biochemical role of MutSβ remains controversial.Here,we use a novel in vitro assay to show that human cell-free extracts catalyze expansions and contractions of trinucleotide repeats without the requirement for DNA replication.The extract promotes a size range of expansions that is similar to certain diseases,and triplet repeat length and sequence govern expansions in vitro as in vivo.MutSβ stimulates expansions in the extract,consistent with aberrant repair of endogenous DNA damage as a source of expansions.Overall,this biochemical system retains the key characteristics of somatic expansions in humans and mice,suggesting that this important mutagenic process can be restored in the test tube.

  6. Ancestral Relationships Using Metafounders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarra, Andres; Christensen, Ole Fredslund; Vitezica, Zulma G

    2015-01-01

    due to finite size of the ancestral population and connections between populations. This complicates the conciliation of both approaches and, in particular, combining pedigree with genomic relationships. We present a coherent theoretical framework to consider base population in pedigree relationships....... We suggest a conceptual framework that considers each ancestral population as a finite-sized pool of gametes. This generates across-individual relationships and contrasts with the classical view where each population is considered as an infinite, unrelated pool. Several ancestral populations may......Recent use of genomic (marker-based) relationships shows that relationships exist within and across base population (breeds or lines). However, current treatment of pedigree relationships is unable to consider relationships within or across base populations, although such relationships must exist...

  7. Zinc-finger directed double-strand breaks within CAG repeat tracts promote repeat instability in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, David; Moye, Christopher; Morton, Jason; Sykoudis, Kristen; Lin, Yunfu; Carroll, Dana; Wilson, John H

    2009-06-16

    Expanded triplet repeats have been identified as the genetic basis for a growing number of neurological and skeletal disorders. To examine the contribution of double-strand break repair to CAG x CTG repeat instability in mammalian systems, we developed zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) that recognize and cleave CAG repeat sequences. Engineered ZFNs use a tandem array of zinc fingers, fused to the FokI DNA cleavage domain, to direct double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a site-specific manner. We first determined that the ZFNs cleave CAG repeats in vitro. Then, using our previously described tissue culture assay for identifying modifiers of CAG repeat instability, we found that transfection of ZFN-expression vectors induced up to a 15-fold increase in changes to the CAG repeat in human and rodent cell lines, and that longer repeats were much more sensitive to cleavage than shorter ones. Analysis of individual colonies arising after treatment revealed a spectrum of events consistent with ZFN-induced DSBs and dominated by repeat contractions. We also found that expressing a dominant-negative form of RAD51 in combination with a ZFN, dramatically reduced the effect of the nuclease, suggesting that DSB-induced repeat instability is mediated, in part, through homology directed repair. These studies identify a ZFN as a useful reagent for characterizing the effects of DSBs on CAG repeats in cells.

  8. Statistical analysis of simple repeats in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, F.; Liò, P.

    2005-03-01

    The human genome contains repetitive DNA at different level of sequence length, number and dispersion. Highly repetitive DNA is particularly rich in homo- and di-nucleotide repeats, while middle repetitive DNA is rich of families of interspersed, mobile elements hundreds of base pairs (bp) long, among which belong the Alu families. A link between homo- and di-polymeric tracts and mobile elements has been recently highlighted. In particular, the mobility of Alu repeats, which form 10% of the human genome, has been correlated with the length of poly(A) tracts located at one end of the Alu. These tracts have a rigid and non-bendable structure and have an inhibitory effect on nucleosomes, which normally compact the DNA. We performed a statistical analysis of the genome-wide distribution of lengths and inter-tract separations of poly(X) and poly(XY) tracts in the human genome. Our study shows that in humans the length distributions of these sequences reflect the dynamics of their expansion and DNA replication. By means of general tools from linguistics, we show that the latter play the role of highly-significant content-bearing terms in the DNA text. Furthermore, we find that such tracts are positioned in a non-random fashion, with an apparent periodicity of 150 bases. This allows us to extend the link between repetitive, highly mobile elements such as Alus and low-complexity words in human DNA. More precisely, we show that Alus are sources of poly(X) tracts, which in turn affect in a subtle way the combination and diversification of gene expression and the fixation of multigene families.

  9. Clusters of ancestrally related genes that show paralogy in whole or in part are a major feature of the genomes of humans and other species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Walker

    Full Text Available Arrangements of genes along chromosomes are a product of evolutionary processes, and we can expect that preferable arrangements will prevail over the span of evolutionary time, often being reflected in the non-random clustering of structurally and/or functionally related genes. Such non-random arrangements can arise by two distinct evolutionary processes: duplications of DNA sequences that give rise to clusters of genes sharing both sequence similarity and common sequence features and the migration together of genes related by function, but not by common descent. To provide a background for distinguishing between the two, which is important for future efforts to unravel the evolutionary processes involved, we here provide a description of the extent to which ancestrally related genes are found in proximity.Towards this purpose, we combined information from five genomic datasets, InterPro, SCOP, PANTHER, Ensembl protein families, and Ensembl gene paralogs. The results are provided in publicly available datasets (http://cgd.jax.org/datasets/clustering/paraclustering.shtml describing the extent to which ancestrally related genes are in proximity beyond what is expected by chance (i.e. form paraclusters in the human and nine other vertebrate genomes, as well as the D. melanogaster, C. elegans, A. thaliana, and S. cerevisiae genomes. With the exception of Saccharomyces, paraclusters are a common feature of the genomes we examined. In the human genome they are estimated to include at least 22% of all protein coding genes. Paraclusters are far more prevalent among some gene families than others, are highly species or clade specific and can evolve rapidly, sometimes in response to environmental cues. Altogether, they account for a large portion of the functional clustering previously reported in several genomes.

  10. Repeatability and reliability of human eye in visual shade selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özat, P B; Tuncel, İ; Eroğlu, E

    2013-12-01

    Deficiencies in the human visual percep-tion system have challenged the efficiency of the visual shade-matching protocol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the repeatability and reliability of human eye in visual shade selection. Fifty-four volunteering dentists were asked to match the shade of an upper right central incisor tooth of a single subject. The Vita 3D-Master shade guide was used for the protocol. Before each shade-matching procedure, the definitive codes of the shade tabs were hidden by an opaque strip and the shade tabs were placed into the guide randomly. The procedure was repeated 1 month later to ensure that visual memory did not affect the results. The L*, a* and b* values of the shade tabs were measured with a dental spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade) to produce quantitative values to evaluate the protocol. The paired samples t-test and Pearson correlation test were used to compare the 1st and 2nd selections. The Yates-corrected chi-square test was use to compare qualitative values. Statistical significance was accepted at P shade matching, but they are able to select clinically acceptable shades.

  11. The chromatin remodeller ATRX: a repeat offender in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, David; Higgs, Douglas R; Gibbons, Richard J

    2013-09-01

    The regulation of chromatin structure is of paramount importance for a variety of fundamental nuclear processes, including gene expression, DNA repair, replication, and recombination. The ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling factor ATRX (α thalassaemia/mental retardation X-linked) has emerged as a key player in each of these processes. Exciting recent developments suggest that ATRX plays a variety of key roles at tandem repeat sequences within the genome, including the deposition of a histone variant, prevention of replication fork stalling, and the suppression of a homologous recombination-based pathway of telomere maintenance. Here, we provide a mechanistic overview of the role of ATRX in each of these processes, and propose how they may be connected to give rise to seemingly disparate human diseases.

  12. GFP-based fluorescence assay for CAG repeat instability in cultured human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz A Santillan

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeats can be highly unstable, mutating far more frequently than point mutations. Repeats typically mutate by addition or loss of units of the repeat. CAG repeat expansions in humans trigger neurological diseases that include myotonic dystrophy, Huntington disease, and several spinocerebellar ataxias. In human cells, diverse mechanisms promote CAG repeat instability, and in mice, the mechanisms of instability are varied and tissue-dependent. Dissection of mechanistic complexity and discovery of potential therapeutics necessitates quantitative and scalable screens for repeat mutation. We describe a GFP-based assay for screening modifiers of CAG repeat instability in human cells. The assay exploits an engineered intronic CAG repeat tract that interferes with expression of an inducible GFP minigene. Like the phenotypes of many trinucleotide repeat disorders, we find that GFP function is impaired by repeat expansion, in a length-dependent manner. The intensity of fluorescence varies inversely with repeat length, allowing estimates of repeat tract changes in live cells. We validate the assay using transcription through the repeat and engineered CAG-specific nucleases, which have previously been reported to induce CAG repeat instability. The assay is relatively fast and should be adaptable to large-scale screens of chemical and shRNA libraries.

  13. Improved set of short-tandem-repeat polymorphisms for screening the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Bo; Vaske, D.; Weber, J.L. [Marshfield Medical Research Foundation, WI (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Short-tandem-repeat (microsatellite) DNA polymorphisms are widely used for screening the human and other genomes in initial linkage mapping. Since the average spacing between polymorphisms in genome screens is usually {ge}10 cM and since many thousands of human short-tandem-repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) are now available, optimal subsets of STRPs must be selected for screening. Two screening sets of STRPs for humans have been described in the literature, both of which are based primarily on dinucleotide-repeat polymorphisms. Here we describe our eighth and most recent human screening set, which is based almost entirely on trinucleotide-and tetranucleotide-repeat polymorphisms. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Identification of the porcine homologous of human disease causing trinucleotide repeat sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Thomsen, Bo; Sølvsten, Christina Ane Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    expansion in the repeat number of intragenic trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) is associated with a variety of inherited human neurodegenerative diseases. To study the compositionof TNRs in a mammalian species representing an evolutionary intermediate between humans and arodents, we describe in this p...

  15. Are palaeoscolecids ancestral ecdysozoans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Thomas H P; Dong, Xiping; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2010-01-01

    The reconstruction of ancestors is a central aim of comparative anatomy and evolutionary developmental biology, not least in attempts to understand the relationship between developmental and organismal evolution. Inferences based on living taxa can and should be tested against the fossil record, which provides an independent and direct view onto historical character combinations. Here, we consider the nature of the last common ancestor of living ecdysozoans through a detailed analysis of palaeoscolecids, an early and extinct group of introvert-bearing worms that have been proposed to be ancestral ecdysozoans. In a review of palaeoscolecid anatomy, including newly resolved details of the internal and external cuticle structure, we identify specific characters shared with various living nematoid and scalidophoran worms, but not with panarthropods. Considered within a formal cladistic context, these characters provide most overall support for a stem-priapulid affinity, meaning that palaeoscolecids are far-removed from the ecdysozoan ancestor. We conclude that previous interpretations in which palaeoscolecids occupy a deeper position in the ecdysozoan tree lack particular morphological support and rely instead on a paucity of preserved characters. This bears out a more general point that fossil taxa may appear plesiomorphic merely because they preserve only plesiomorphies, rather than the mélange of primitive and derived characters anticipated of organisms properly allocated to a position deep within animal phylogeny.

  16. Systematic exchanges between nucleotides: Genomic swinger repeats and swinger transcription in human mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-11-07

    Chargaff׳s second parity rule, quasi-equal single strand frequencies for complementary nucleotides, presumably results from insertion of repeats and inverted repeats during sequence genesis. Vertebrate mitogenomes escape this rule because repeats are counterselected: their hybridization produces loop bulges whose deletion is deleterious. Some DNA/RNA sequences match mitogenomes only after assuming one among 23 systematic nucleotide exchanges (swinger DNA/RNA: nine symmetric, e.g. A ↔ C; and 14 asymmetric, e.g. A → C → G → A). Swinger-transformed repeats do not hybridize, escaping selection against deletions due to bulge formation. Blast analyses of the human mitogenome detect swinger repeats for all 23 swinger types, more than in randomized sequences with identical length and nucleotide contents. Mean genomic swinger repeat lengths increase with observed human swinger RNA frequencies: swinger repeat and swinger RNA productions appear linked, perhaps by swinger RNA retrotranscription. Mean swinger repeat lengths are proportional to reading frame retrievability, post-swinger transformation, by the natural circular code. Genomic swinger repeats confirm at genomic level, independently of swinger RNA detection, occurrence of swinger polymerizations. They suggest that repeats, and swinger repeats in particular, contribute to genome genesis.

  17. Repeated dose pharmacokinetics of pancopride in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salva, P; Costa, J; Pérez-Campos, A; Martínez-Tobed, A

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of pancopride after repeated oral dose administration of 20 mg pancopride in tablet form once a day for 5 d in 12 healthy male volunteers. Plasma levels were measured by HPLC using a solid phase extraction method and automated injection. The minimum quantification limit of pancopride in plasma was 2 ng mL-1. The maximum plasma concentration (mean +/- SD) after the first dose was 92.5 +/- 41.5 ng ML-1 and tmax was 1.7 +/- 0.9 h. The elimination half-life (t1/2) was 14.3 +/- 6.9 h. The area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC) was 997 +/- 396 ng h mL-1. The maximum plasma concentration (mean +/- SD) at steady state (day 5) was 101.8 +/- 36.9 ng mL-1 and tmax was 2.2 +/- 1.2 h. The elimination half-life (t1/2) was 16.3 +/- 2.7 h and the minimum plasma concentration (Cssmin) was 16.6 +/- 6.9 ng mL-1. The area under the concentration-time curve during the dosing interval (AUCss tau) was 995 +/- 389 ng h mL-1. The average plasma concentration at steady state (Cssav) was 43.3 +/- 16.1 ng mL-1 and the experimental accumulation ratio (RAUC) was 1.34 +/- 0.19, whereas the mean theoretical value (R) was 1.40 +/- 0.29. The results obtained showed a good correlation between the experimental plasma levels and the expected values calculated using a repeated dose two-compartment model assessed by means of the Akaike value. It is concluded that the pharmacokinetics of pancopride are not modified after repeated dose administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Dose estimation for repeated phosphorus-32 ingestion in human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, J.H.; Tseng, C.L.; Hsieh, W.A.; Hung, D.Z.; Chang, W.P. E-mail: wpc94@mailsrv.ym.edu.tw

    2001-01-15

    Dose estimation was conducted for internal phosphorus-32 exposure in one young male subject from repeated oral mis-ingestion for >1 year. Since disclosure for previous continuous contamination, a series of urine samples were collected from this individual weekly for a period of >2 months. P-32 radioactivity in urine samples were measured by the acid precipitation method. Estimation for retrospective total effective dose equivalent received by this subject was conducted for cumulative internal dose estimation. A minimum of 9.4 mSv was estimated for an assumed single ingestion. As this was a rare case in radiation protection and internal radiation dosimetry, its implications were of considerable significance.

  19. Isolation and characterization of human cerebellum cDNAs containing polymorphic CAG trinucleotide repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, S.; Onodera, O.; Tanaka, H. [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It has been discovered that neurologic diseases such as X linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, Huntington`s disease, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) are caused by unstable expansions of CAG repeats, which shed a light on a new mechanism of human hereditary diseases. The genetic anticipation, a common genetic feature in these diseases, can be explained by the trinucleotide repeat expansions, and an inverse correlation between the ages of onset and the numbers of trinucleotide repeats is demonstrated in these diseases. Furthermore, there have been diseases such as spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) and Machado-Joseph disease showing similar genetic anticipation, which suggests that their causative mutations are unstable expansions of trinucleotide repeats. To identify candidate genes for neurodegenerative diseases which are expressed in human cerebellum and contain CAG repeats, we screened a human cerebellum cDNA library with an oligonucleotide (CAG){sub 10}, labelled with [{gamma}{sup 32}P]ATP. Out of 78 clones we have isolated, 43 clones were partially sequenced and 31 clones were shown to contain CAG or CTG tinucleotide repeats. From homology searches, 12 of the 59 clones were identified to contain known sequences including human MAR/SAR DNA binding protein, human glial fibrillary acidic protein, human myelin transcription factor 1, human neuronal growth protein 43 and human myocyte-specific enhancer 2. From 6 clones out of the 43 novel genes, we were able to develop primer pairs flanking CAG repeats and determined chromosomal localizations with human and rodent hybrid mapping panels. These CAG repeats were shown to be polymorphic and mapped to 1, 15, 17 and 18. These novel cDNAs will be useful as candidate genes for hereditary neurologic diseases showing genetic anticipation.

  20. Genetics and epigenetics of repeat derepression in human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, P.E.

    2016-01-01

    A large part of the human genome consists of repetitive DNA. In this thesis two human diseases have been studied in which deregulation of repetitive DNA is a central feature: facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and immunodeficiency, centromere instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrom

  1. GAA triplet-repeats cause nucleosome depletion in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Xing, Yongqiang; Liu, Guoqing; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Xiujuan; Li, Guohong; Cai, Lu

    2015-08-01

    Although there have been many investigations into how trinucleotide repeats affect nucleosome formation and local chromatin structure, the nucleosome positioning of GAA triplet-repeats in the human genome has remained elusive. In this work, the nucleosome occupancy around GAA triplet-repeats across the human genome was computed statistically. The results showed a nucleosome-depleted region in the vicinity of GAA triplet-repeats in activated and resting CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the A-tract was frequently adjacent to the upstream region of GAA triplet-repeats and could enhance the depletion surrounding GAA triplet-repeats. In vitro chromatin reconstitution assays with GAA-containing plasmids also demonstrated that the inserted GAA triplet-repeats destabilized the ability of recombinant plasmids to assemble nucleosomes. Our results suggested that GAA triplet-repeats have lower affinity to histones and can change local nucleosome positioning. These findings may be helpful for understanding the mechanism of Friedreich's ataxia, which is associated with GAA triplet-repeats at the chromatin level.

  2. Large-scale analysis of tandem repeat variability in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duitama, Jorge; Zablotskaya, Alena; Gemayel, Rita; Jansen, An; Belet, Stefanie; Vermeesch, Joris R; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Froyen, Guy

    2014-05-01

    Tandem repeats are short DNA sequences that are repeated head-to-tail with a propensity to be variable. They constitute a significant proportion of the human genome, also occurring within coding and regulatory regions. Variation in these repeats can alter the function and/or expression of genes allowing organisms to swiftly adapt to novel environments. Importantly, some repeat expansions have also been linked to certain neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, accurate sequencing of tandem repeats could contribute to our understanding of common phenotypic variability and might uncover missing genetic factors in idiopathic clinical conditions. However, despite long-standing evidence for the functional role of repeats, they are largely ignored because of technical limitations in sequencing, mapping and typing. Here, we report on a novel capture technique and data filtering protocol that allowed simultaneous sequencing of thousands of tandem repeats in the human genomes of a three generation family using GS-FLX-plus Titanium technology. Our results demonstrated that up to 7.6% of tandem repeats in this family (4% in coding sequences) differ from the reference sequence, and identified a de novo variation in the family tree. The method opens new routes to look at this underappreciated type of genetic variability, including the identification of novel disease-related repeats.

  3. Isolation and characterization of human brain genes with (CCA){sub n} trinucleotide repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longshore, J.W.; Finley, W.H.; Descartes, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Expansion of trinucleotide repeats has been described as a new form of mutation. To date, only the expansion of (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n} repeats have been associated with disease. Expansion of (CAG){sub n} repeats has been found to cause Huntington`s disease, Kennedy`s disease, myotonic dystrophy, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy. (CGG){sub n} repeat expansion has been implicated in the fragile X syndrome and FRAXE mental retardation. In an effort to identify other potential repeats as candidates for expansion, a DNA linguistics approach was used to study 10 Mb of human DNA sequences in GenBank. Our study found the (CCA){sub n} repeat and the disease-associated (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n} repeats to be over-represented in the human genome. The (CCA){sub n} repeat also shares other characteristics with (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n}, making it a good candidate for expansion. Trinucleotide repeat numbers in disease-associated genes are normally polymorphic in a population. Therefore, by studying genes for polymorphisms, candidate genes may be identified. Twelve sequences previously deposited in GenBank with at least five tandem copies of (CCA) were studied and no polymorphisms were found. To identify other candidate genes, a human hippocampus cDNA library was screened with a (CCA){sub 8} probe. This approach identified 19 novel expressed sequences having long tandem (CCA){sub n} repeats which are currently under investigation for polymorphisms. Genes with polymorphic repeats may serve as markers for linkage studies or as candidate genes for genetic diseases showing anticipation.

  4. Tandem Repeat Analysis for Surveillance of Human Salmonella Typhimurium Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torpdahl, Mia; Sørensen, Gitte; Lindstedt, Bjørn-Arne

    2007-01-01

    In Denmark, as part of the national laboratory-based surveillance system of human enteric infections, all Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates are currently subtyped by using phage typing, antimicrobial resistance profiles, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). We evaluated th...

  5. Short Tandem Repeats in Human Exons: A Target for Disease Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villesen Palle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years it has been demonstrated that structural variations, such as indels (insertions and deletions, are common throughout the genome, but the implications of structural variations are still not clearly understood. Long tandem repeats (e.g. microsatellites or simple repeats are known to be hypermutable (indel-rich, but are rare in exons and only occasionally associated with diseases. Here we focus on short (imperfect tandem repeats (STRs which fall below the radar of conventional tandem repeat detection, and investigate whether STRs are targets for disease-related mutations in human exons. In particular, we test whether they share the hypermutability of the longer tandem repeats and whether disease-related genes have a higher STR content than non-disease-related genes. Results We show that validated human indels are extremely common in STR regions compared to non-STR regions. In contrast to longer tandem repeats, our definition of STRs found them to be present in exons of most known human genes (92%, 99% of all STR sequences in exons are shorter than 33 base pairs and 62% of all STR sequences are imperfect repeats. We also demonstrate that STRs are significantly overrepresented in disease-related genes in both human and mouse. These results are preserved when we limit the analysis to STRs outside known longer tandem repeats. Conclusion Based on our findings we conclude that STRs represent hypermutable regions in the human genome that are linked to human disease. In addition, STRs constitute an obvious target when screening for rare mutations, because of the relatively low amount of STRs in exons (1,973,844 bp and the limited length of STR regions.

  6. Mutagenic effect of cadmium on tetranucleotide repeats in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slebos, Robbert J.C. [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States) and Department of Otolaryngology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)]. E-mail: r.slebos@vanderbilt.edu; Li Ming [Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Evjen, Amy N. [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Coffa, Jordy [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Shyr, Yu [Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Yarbrough, Wendell G. [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Cadmium is a human carcinogen that affects cell proliferation, apoptosis and DNA repair processes that are all important to carcinogenesis. We previously demonstrated that cadmium inhibits DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in yeast cells and in human cell-free extracts (H.W. Jin, A.B. Clark, R.J.C. Slebos, H. Al-Refai, J.A. Taylor, T.A. Kunkel, M.A. Resnick, D.A. Gordenin, Cadmium is a mutagen that acts by inhibiting mismatch repair, Nat. Genet. 34 (3) (2003) 326-329), but cadmium also inhibits DNA excision repair. For this study, we selected a panel of three hypermutable tetranucleotide markers (MycL1, D7S1482 and DXS981) and studied their suitability as readout for the mutagenic effects of cadmium. We used a clonal derivative of the human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080 to assess mutation levels in microsatellites after cadmium and/or N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) exposure to study effects of cadmium in the presence or absence of base damage. Mutations were measured in clonally expanded cells obtained by limiting dilution after exposure to zero dose, 0.5 {mu}M cadmium, 5 nM MNNG or a combination of 0.5 {mu}M cadmium and 5 nM MNNG. Exposure of HT1080-C1 to cadmium led to statistically significant increases in microsatellite mutations, either with or without concurrent exposure to MNNG. A majority of the observed mutant molecules involved 4-nucleotide shifts consistent with DNA slippage mutations that are normally repaired by MMR. These results provide evidence for the mutagenic effects of low, environmentally relevant levels of cadmium in intact human cells and suggest that inhibition of DNA repair is involved.

  7. Evolutionarily different alphoid repeat DNA on homologous chromosomes in human and chimpanzee.

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, A L; Laursen, H B; Jones, C; Bak, A L

    1992-01-01

    Centromeric alphoid DNA in primates represents a class of evolving repeat DNA. In humans, chromosomes 13 and 21 share one subfamily of alphoid DNA while chromosomes 14 and 22 share another subfamily. We show that similar pairwise homogenizations occur in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), where chromosomes 14 and 22, homologous to human chromosomes 13 and 21, share one partially homogenized alphoid DNA subfamily and chromosomes 15 and 23, homologous to human chromosomes 14 and 22, share anothe...

  8. Ancestral process and diffusion model with selection

    CERN Document Server

    Mano, Shuhei

    2008-01-01

    The ancestral selection graph in population genetics introduced by Krone and Neuhauser (1997) is an analogue to the coalescent genealogy. The number of ancestral particles, backward in time, of a sample of genes is an ancestral process, which is a birth and death process with quadratic death and linear birth rate. In this paper an explicit form of the number of ancestral particle is obtained, by using the density of the allele frequency in the corresponding diffusion model obtained by Kimura (1955). It is shown that fixation is convergence of the ancestral process to the stationary measure. The time to fixation of an allele is studied in terms of the ancestral process.

  9. Selection pressure on human STR loci and its relevance in repeat expansion disease

    KAUST Repository

    Shimada, Makoto K.

    2016-06-11

    Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) comprise repeats of one to several base pairs. Because of the high mutability due to strand slippage during DNA synthesis, rapid evolutionary change in the number of repeating units directly shapes the range of repeat-number variation according to selection pressure. However, the remaining questions include: Why are STRs causing repeat expansion diseases maintained in the human population; and why are these limited to neurodegenerative diseases? By evaluating the genome-wide selection pressure on STRs using the database we constructed, we identified two different patterns of relationship in repeat-number polymorphisms between DNA and amino-acid sequences, although both patterns are evolutionary consequences of avoiding the formation of harmful long STRs. First, a mixture of degenerate codons is represented in poly-proline (poly-P) repeats. Second, long poly-glutamine (poly-Q) repeats are favored at the protein level; however, at the DNA level, STRs encoding long poly-Qs are frequently divided by synonymous SNPs. Furthermore, significant enrichments of apoptosis and neurodevelopment were biological processes found specifically in genes encoding poly-Qs with repeat polymorphism. This suggests the existence of a specific molecular function for polymorphic and/or long poly-Q stretches. Given that the poly-Qs causing expansion diseases were longer than other poly-Qs, even in healthy subjects, our results indicate that the evolutionary benefits of long and/or polymorphic poly-Q stretches outweigh the risks of long CAG repeats predisposing to pathological hyper-expansions. Molecular pathways in neurodevelopment requiring long and polymorphic poly-Q stretches may provide a clue to understanding why poly-Q expansion diseases are limited to neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  10. Genome-wide identification of human- and primate-specific core promoter short tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushehri, A; Barez, M R Mashhoudi; Mansouri, S K; Biglarian, A; Ohadi, M

    2016-08-01

    Recent reports of a link between human- and primate-specific genetic factors and human/primate-specific characteristics and diseases necessitate genome-wide identification of those factors. We have previously reported core promoter short tandem repeats (STRs) of extreme length (≥6-repeats) that have expanded exceptionally in primates vs. non-primates, and may have a function in adaptive evolution. In the study reported here, we extended our study to the human STRs of ≥3-repeats in the category of penta and hexaucleotide STRs, across the entire human protein coding gene core promoters, and analyzed their status in several superorders and orders of vertebrates, using the Ensembl database. The ConSite software was used to identify the transcription factor (TF) sets binding to those STRs. STR specificity was observed at different levels of human and non-human primate (NHP) evolution. 73% of the pentanucleotide STRs and 68% of the hexanucleotide STRs were found to be specific to human and NHPs. AP-2alpha, Sp1, and MZF were the predominantly selected TFs (90%) binding to the human-specific STRs. Furthermore, the number of TF sets binding to a given STR was found to be a selection factor for that STR. Our findings indicate that selected STRs, the cognate binding TFs, and the number of TF set binding to those STRs function as switch codes at different levels of human and NHP evolution and speciation.

  11. Molecular cloning and expression of a novel human cDNA containing CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Chen, B K; Qiu, Y; Sonobe, H; Ohtsuki, Y

    1997-12-19

    A novel human cDNA containing CAG repeats, designated B120, was cloned by PCR amplification. An approximately 300-bp 3' untranslated region in this cDNA was followed by a 3426-bp coding region containing the CAG repeats. A computer search failed to find any significant homology between this cDNA and previously reported genes. The number of CAG trinucleotide repeats appeared to vary from seven to 12 in analyses of genomic DNA from healthy volunteers. An approximately 8-kb band was detected in brain, skeletal muscle and thymus by Northern blot analysis. The deduced amino-acid sequence had a polyglutamine chain encoded by CAG repeats as well as glutamine- and tyrosine-rich repeats, which has also been reported for several RNA binding proteins. We immunized mice with recombinant gene product and established a monoclonal antibody to it. On Western immunoblotting, this antibody detected an approximately 120-kDa protein in human brain tissue. In addition, immunohistochemical staining showed that the cytoplasm of neural cells was stained with this antibody. These findings indicated that B120 is a novel cDNA with a CAG repeat length polymorphism and that its gene product is a cytoplasmic protein with a molecular mass of 120 kDa.

  12. Chromatin structure of repeating CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG sequences in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2007-05-01

    In eukaryotic cells, chromatin structure organizes genomic DNA in a dynamic fashion, and results in regulation of many DNA metabolic processes. The CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeating sequences involved in several neuromuscular degenerative diseases display differential abilities for the binding of histone octamers. The effect of the repeating DNA on nucleosome assembly could be amplified as the number of repeats increases. Also, CpG methylation, and sequence interruptions within the triplet repeats exert an impact on the formation of nucleosomes along these repeating DNAs. The two most common triplet expansion human diseases, myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X syndrome, are caused by the expanded CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeats, respectively. In addition to the expanded repeats and CpG methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling factors, and noncoding RNA have been shown to coordinate the chromatin structure at both myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X loci. Alterations in chromatin structure at these two loci can affect transcription of these disease-causing genes, leading to disease symptoms. These observations have brought a new appreciation that a full understanding of disease gene expression requires a knowledge of the structure of the chromatin domain within which the gene resides.

  13. The human TTAGGG repeat factors 1 and 2 bind to a subset of interstitial telomeric sequences and satellite repeats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Simonet; Elena Giulotto; Frederique Magdinier; Béatrice Horard; Pascal Barbry; Rainer Waldmann; Eric Gison; Laure-Emmanuelle Zaragosi; Claude Philippe; Kevin Lebrigand; Clémentine Schouteden; Adeline Augereau; Serge Bauwens; Jing Ye; Marco Santagostino

    2011-01-01

    The study of the proteins that bind to telomeric DNA in mammals has provided a deep understanding of the mech anisms involved in chromosome-end protection. However, very little is known on the binding of these proteins to nontelomeric DNA sequences. The TTAGGG DNA repeat proteins 1 and 2 (TRF1 and TRF2) bind to mammalian telomeres as part of the shelterin complex and are essential for maintaining chromosome end stability. In this study, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing to map at high sensitivity and resolution the human chromosomal sites to which TRF1 and TRF2 bind. While most of the identified sequences correspond to telomeric regions, we showed that these two proteins also bind to extratelomeric sites. The vast majority of these extratelomeric sites contains interstitial telomeric sequences (or ITSs). However, we also identified non-iTS sites, which correspond to centromeric and pericentromeric satellite DNA. Interestingly, the TRF-binding sites are often located in the proximity of genes or within introns. We propose that TRF1 and TRF2 couple the functional state of telomeres to the long-range organization of chromosomes and gene regulation networks by binding to extratelomeric sequences.

  14. A novel tandem repeat sequence located on human chromosome 4p: isolation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, M; Fukushige, S; Lefevre, C; Hadano, S; Ikeda, J E

    1997-06-01

    In an effort to analyze the genomic region of the distal half of human chromosome 4p, to where Huntington disease and other diseases have been mapped, we have isolated the cosmid clone (CRS447) that was likely to contain a region with specific repeat sequences. Clone CRS447 was subjected to detailed analysis, including chromosome mapping, restriction mapping, and DNA sequencing. Chromosome mapping by both a human-CHO hybrid cell panel and FISH revealed that CRS447 was predominantly located in the 4p15.1-15.3 region. CRS447 was shown to consist of tandem repeats of 4.7-kb units present on chromosome 4p. A single EcoRI unit was subcloned (pRS447), and the complete sequence was determined as 4752 nucleotides. When pRS447 was used as a probe, the number of copies of this repeat per haploid genome was estimated to be 50-70. Sequence analysis revealed that it contained two internal CA repeats and one putative ORF. Database search established that this sequence was unreported. However, two homologous STS markers were found in the database. We concluded that CRS447/pRS447 is a novel tandem repeat sequence that is mainly specific to human chromosome 4p.

  15. Tracing the origin and geographic distribution of an ancestral form of the modern human Y chromosome Reconstrucción del origen y distribución geográfica de una forma ancestral del cromosoma Y del hombre moderno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIO M BRAVI

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available We screened a total of 841 Y chromosomes representing 36 human populations of wide geographical distribution for the presence of a Y-specific Alu insert (YAP+ chromosomes. The Alu element was found in 77 cases. We tested five biallelic and eight polyallelic markers in 70 out of the 77 YAP+ chromosomes. We could identify the existence of a hierarchical and chronological structuring of ancestral and derived YAP+ lineages giving rise to four haplogroups, 14 subhaplogroups and 60 haplotypes. Moreover, we propose a monophyletic origin for each one of the YAP+ lineages. Out-of-Africa and out_of-Asia models have been suggested to explain the origin and evolution of ancestral and derived YAP+ elements. We analyse the evidence supporting these two hypotheses and we conclude that the information available supports better the out-of-Africa modelSe buscó la presencia de un inserto Alu Y-específico (cromosomas YAP+ en un total de 841 cromosomas Y provenientes de 36 poblaciones humanas de amplia distribución geográfica. El elemento Alu se encontró en 77 casos. En 70 de los 77 cromosomas YAP+ se testificaron cinco marcadores bialélicos y ocho polialélicos. Se pudo identificar la existencia de una estructura jerárquica y cronológica de linajes YAP+ ancestrales y derivados, la cual generó cuatro haplogrupos, 14 subhaplogrupos, y 60 haplotipos. Se propone un origen monofilético para cada linaje YAP+. Dos modelos intentan explicar el origen y evolución de los cromosomas YAP+ ancestrales y derivados: (i origen del inserto Alu en Africa y posterior migración a otros continentes ("out-of-Africa"; (ii origen en Asia con subsecuente migración a otras áreas geográficas ("out-of-Asia". El análisis de la evidencia que apoya estos dos modelos nos permite sugerir que la hipótesis más probable es el origen africano con subsecuente dispersión fuera de Africa

  16. Evolutionary trend of exceptionally long human core promoter short tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohadi, M; Mohammadparast, S; Darvish, H

    2012-10-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are variable elements that play a significant role in genome evolution by creating and maintaining quantitative genetic variation. Because of their proximity to the +1 transcription start site (TSS) and polymorphic nature, core promoter STRs may be considered a novel source of variation across species. In a genome-scale analysis of the entire human protein-coding genes annotated in the GeneCards database (19,927), we analyze the prevalence and repeat numbers of different classes of core promoter STRs in the interval between -120 and +1 to the TSS. We also analyze the evolutionary trend of exceptionally long core promoter STRs of ≥6-repeats. 133 genes (~2%) had core promoter STRs of ≥6-repeats. In the majority of those genes, the STR motifs were found to be conserved across evolution. Di-nucleotide repeats had the highest representation in the human core promoter long STRs (72 genes). Tri- (52 genes), tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide STRs (9 genes) were also present in the descending prevalence. The majority of those genes (84 genes) revealed directional expansion of core promoter STRs from mouse to human. However, in a number of genes, the difference in average allele size across species was sufficiently small that there might be a constraint on the evolution of average allele size. Random drift of STRs from mouse to human was also observed in a minority of genes. Future work on the genes listed in the current study may further our knowledge into the potential importance of core promoter STRs in human evolution.

  17. Ancestral trees for modeling stem cell lineages genetically rather than functionally: understanding mutation accumulation and distinguishing the restrictive cancer stem cell propagation theory and the unrestricted cell propagation theory of human tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Darryl K; Kern, Scott E

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells either could be rare or common in tumors, constituting the major distinction between the two fundamentally opposed theoretical models of tumor progression: A newer and restrictive stem cell propagation model, in which the stem cells are a small and special minority of the tumor cells, and a standard older model, an unrestricted cell proliferation theory, in which many or most tumor cells are capable of indefinite generations of cell division. Stem cells of tumors are difficult to quantitate using functional assays, and the validity of the most common assays is seriously questioned. Nonetheless, stem cells are an essential component of any tumorigenesis model. Alternative approaches to studying tumor stem cells should be explored. Cell populations can be conceived of as having a genealogy, a relationship of cells to their ancestral lineage, from the zygote to the adult cells or neoplasms. Models using ancestral trees thus offer an anatomic and genetic means to "observe" stem cells independent of artificial conditions. Ancestral trees broaden our attention backward along a lineage, to the zygote stage, and thereby add insight into how the mutations of tumors accumulate. It is possible that a large fraction of mutations in a tumor originate from normal, endogenous, replication errors (nearly all being passenger mutations) occurring prior to the emergence of the first transformed cell. Trees can be constructed from experimental measurements - molecular clocks - of real human tissues and tumors. Detailed analysis of single-cell methylation patterns, heritable yet slightly plastic, now can provide this information in the necessary depth. Trees based on observations of molecular clocks may help us to distinguish between competing theories regarding the proliferative properties among cells of actual human tumors, to observe subtle and difficult phenomena such as the extinction of stem lineages, and to address the origins and rates of mutations in various

  18. Human Short Tandem Repeat (STR Markers for Paternity Testing in Pig-Tailed Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DYAH PERWITASARI-FARAJALLAH

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of human short tandem repeat (STR or microsatellite loci markers for assessing paternity and genetic structure of pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina breeding colony. Four human microsatellite primer pairs located at human map position D1S548, D3S1768, D5S820, and D2S1777, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for pig-tailed macaques. Four loci were found to be clearly and reliably amplified, and three loci exhibited high levels of genetic heterogeneity. These loci were sufficiently informative to differentiate discretely between related and unrelated pairs.

  19. Marked variation in predicted and observed variability of tandem repeat loci across the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shields Denis C

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tandem repeat (TR variants in the human genome play key roles in a number of diseases. However, current models predicting variability are based on limited training sets. We conducted a systematic analysis of TRs of unit lengths 2–12 nucleotides in Whole Genome Shotgun (WGS sequences to define the extent of variation of 209,214 unique repeat loci throughout the genome. Results We applied a multivariate statistical model to predict TR variability. Predicted heterozygosity correlated with heterozygosity in the CEPH polymorphism database (correlation ρ = 0.29, p Conclusion Variability among 2–12-mer TRs in the genome can be modeled by a few parameters, which do not markedly differ according to unit length, consistent with a common mechanism for the generation of variability among such TRs. Analysis of the distributions of observed and predicted variants across the genome showed a general concordance, indicating that the repeat variation dataset does not exhibit strong regional ascertainment biases. This revealed a deficit of variant repeats in chromosomes 19 and Y – likely to reflect a reduction in 2-mer repeats in the former and a reduced level of recombination in the latter – and excesses in chromosomes 6, 13, 20 and 21.

  20. Repeated high-intensity exercise modulates Ca(2+) sensitivity of human skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, K D; Hvid, L G; Willis, S J;

    2016-01-01

    The effects of short-term high-intensity exercise on single fiber contractile function in humans are unknown. Therefore, the purposes of this study were: (a) to access the acute effects of repeated high-intensity exercise on human single muscle fiber contractile function; and (b) to examine whether...... the fourth sprint with respect to Ca(2+) sensitivity and maximal Ca(2+) -activated force. To investigate the oxidative effects of exercise on single fiber contractile function, a subset of fibers was incubated with dithiothreitol (DTT) before analysis. Ca(2+) sensitivity was enhanced by exercise in both MHC...... I (17%, P exercise. In conclusion, repeated high-intensity exercise increased Ca(2+) sensitivity in both MHC I and MHC II...

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 long terminal repeat: analysis of regulatory elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Arya, S. K.; Gallo, R C

    1988-01-01

    The long terminal repeats (LTRs) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and a related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac) contain cis-acting positive regulatory elements upstream and the major transactivator gene (tat) response element and a possible negative regulatory element downstream of the transcriptional initiation site. The tat response element of HIV-2 and of SIVmac was more complex than that of HIV-1. Two structurally similar subelements within the HIV-2 tat response ...

  2. Human mitochondrial mTERF wraps around DNA through a left-handed superhelical tandem repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Menéndez, Nereida; Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Rubio-Cosials, Anna; Arnan, Carme; Montoya, Julio; Jacobs, Howard T; Bernadó, Pau; Coll, Miquel; Usón, Isabel; Solà, Maria

    2010-07-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) processes is slowly being characterized at a structural level. We present here crystal structures of human mitochondrial regulator mTERF, a transcription termination factor also implicated in replication pausing, in complex with double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the tRNA(Leu)(UUR) gene sequence. mTERF comprises nine left-handed helical tandem repeats that form a left-handed superhelix, the Zurdo domain.

  3. Expression, tandem repeat copy number variation and stability of four macrosatellite arrays in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick Brian P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrosatellites are some of the largest variable number tandem repeats in the human genome, but what role these unusual sequences perform is unknown. Their importance to human health is clearly demonstrated by the 4q35 macrosatellite D4Z4 that is associated with the onset of the muscle degenerative disease facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Nevertheless, many other macrosatellite arrays in the human genome remain poorly characterized. Results Here we describe the organization, tandem repeat copy number variation, transmission stability and expression of four macrosatellite arrays in the human genome: the TAF11-Like array located on chromosomes 5p15.1, the SST1 arrays on 4q28.3 and 19q13.12, the PRR20 array located on chromosome 13q21.1, and the ZAV array at 9q32. All are polymorphic macrosatellite arrays that at least for TAF11-Like and SST1 show evidence of meiotic instability. With the exception of the SST1 array that is ubiquitously expressed, all are expressed at high levels in the testis and to a lesser extent in the brain. Conclusions Our results extend the number of characterized macrosatellite arrays in the human genome and provide the foundation for formulation of hypotheses to begin assessing their functional role in the human genome.

  4. Resistance of human spermatozoa to cryoinjury in repeated cycles of thaw-refreezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Verza Jr.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the resistance of human spermatozoa to cryoinjury in repeated cycles of thaw-refreezing by using the fast liquid nitrogen vapor method. Material and Methods: Semen specimens were obtained from sixteen normal and oligozoospermic individuals who required disposal at the sperm bank. Five of them had testicular cancer. Specimens were thawed and an aliquot was removed for analysis. The remaining specimens were refrozen without removing the cryomedia. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles were performed until no motile sperm were observed. Sperm motility, number of motile spermatozoa and viability were determined after thawing. Resistance to cryoinjury was compared between groups and also after each refreezing cycle within groups. Results: Motile spermatozoa were recovered after five and two refreeze-thawing cycles in normozoospermic and oligozoospermic specimens, respectively. There were no significant differences in the recovery of motile spermatozoa between thaws within each group of normal and oligozoospermic specimens, but percentage motility and total number of motile spermatozoa were significantly lower in the oligozoospermic one. Specimens from men with cancer were exposed to six refreeze-thawing cycles. Although recovery of motile spermatozoa was significantly impaired after each thawing, there were no significant differences in the recovery of motile sperm between thaws in cancer and non-cancer groups. Conclusions: Human spermatozoa resist repeated cryopreservation using the fast liquid nitrogen vapor method. Normozoospermic specimens withstand refreezing for an average two cycles longer than oligozoospermic ones. Specimens from cancer patients seem to resist repeated cryoinjury similarly to non-cancer counterparts. Resistance to repeated cryoinjury was related to the initial semen quality.

  5. Impact of Alu repeats on the evolution of human p53 binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirotin Michael V

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 tumor suppressor protein is involved in a complicated regulatory network, mediating expression of ~1000 human genes. Recent studies have shown that many p53 in vivo binding sites (BSs reside in transposable repeats. The relationship between these BSs and functional p53 response elements (REs remains unknown, however. We sought to understand whether the p53 REs also reside in transposable elements and particularly in the most-abundant Alu repeats. Results We have analyzed ~160 functional p53 REs identified so far and found that 24 of them occur in repeats. More than half of these repeat-associated REs reside in Alu elements. In addition, using a position weight matrix approach, we found ~400,000 potential p53 BSs in Alu elements genome-wide. Importantly, these putative BSs are located in the same regions of Alu repeats as the functional p53 REs - namely, in the vicinity of Boxes A/A' and B of the internal RNA polymerase III promoter. Earlier nucleosome-mapping experiments showed that the Boxes A/A' and B have a different chromatin environment, which is critical for the binding of p53 to DNA. Here, we compare the Alu-residing p53 sites with the corresponding Alu consensus sequences and conclude that the p53 sites likely evolved through two different mechanisms - the sites overlapping with the Boxes A/A' were generated by CG → TG mutations; the other sites apparently pre-existed in the progenitors of several Alu subfamilies, such as AluJo and AluSq. The binding affinity of p53 to the Alu-residing sites generally correlates with the age of Alu subfamilies, so that the strongest sites are embedded in the 'relatively young' Alu repeats. Conclusions The primate-specific Alu repeats play an important role in shaping the p53 regulatory network in the context of chromatin. One of the selective factors responsible for the frequent occurrence of Alu repeats in introns may be related to the p53-mediated regulation of Alu

  6. (TG/CAn repeats in human gene families: abundance and selective patterns of distribution according to function and gene length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Srinivasan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creation of human gene families was facilitated significantly by gene duplication and diversification. The (TG/CAn repeats exhibit length variability, display genome-wide distribution, and are abundant in the human genome. Accumulation of evidences for their multiple functional roles including regulation of transcription and stimulation of recombination and splicing elect them as functional elements. Here, we report analysis of the distribution of (TG/CAn repeats in human gene families. Results The 1,317 human gene families were classified into six functional classes. Distribution of (TG/CAn repeats were analyzed both from a global perspective and from a stratified perspective based on their biological properties. The number of genes with repeats decreased with increasing repeat length and several genes (53% had repeats of multiple types in various combinations. Repeats were positively associated with the class of Signaling and communication whereas, they were negatively associated with the classes of Immune and related functions and of Information. The proportion of genes with (TG/CAn repeats in each class was proportional to the corresponding average gene length. The repeat distribution pattern in large gene families generally mirrored the global distribution pattern but differed particularly for Collagen gene family, which was rich in repeats. The position and flanking sequences of the repeats of Collagen genes showed high conservation in the Chimpanzee genome. However the majority of these repeats displayed length polymorphism. Conclusion Positive association of repeats with genes of Signaling and communication points to their role in modulation of transcription. Negative association of repeats in genes of Information relates to the smaller gene length, higher expression and fundamental role in cellular physiology. In genes of Immune and related functions negative association of repeats perhaps relates to the smaller gene

  7. Mapping of the {alpha}{sub 4} subunit gene (GABRA4) to human chromosome 4 defines an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 1} gene cluster: Further evidence that modern GABA{sub a} receptor gene clusters are derived from an ancestral cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, P.J.; Farb, D.H.; Russek, S.J. [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-10

    We demonstrated previously that an {alpha}{sub 1}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} gene cluster of the {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptor is located on human chromosome 5q34-q35 and that an ancestral {alpha}-{beta}-{gamma} gene cluster probably spawned clusters on chromosomes 4, 5, and 15. Here, we report that the {alpha}{sub 4} gene (GABRA4) maps to human chromosome 4p14-q12, defining a cluster comprising the {alpha}{sub 2}, {alpha}{sub 4}, {beta}{sub 1}, and {gamma}{sub 1} genes. The existence of an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 4 and an {alpha}{sub 1}-{alpha}{sub 6}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 5 provides further evidence that the number of ancestral GABA{sub A} receptor subunit genes has been expanded by duplication within an ancestral gene cluster. Moreover, if duplication of the {alpha} gene occurred before duplication of the ancestral gene cluster, then a heretofore undiscovered subtype of a subunit should be located on human chromosome 15q11-q13 within an {alpha}{sub 5}-{alpha}{sub x}-{beta}{sub 3}-{gamma}{sub 3} gene cluster at the locus for Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Enzymatic amplification of synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides: implications for triplet repeat expansions in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behn-Krappa, A; Doerfler, W

    1994-01-01

    The triplet repeat sequences (CGG)n, (GCT)n, and (CAG)n, which naturally occur in the human genome, can be autonomously expanded in human DNA by an as yet unknown mechanism. These in part excessive expansions have been causally related to human genetic diseases, the fragile X (Martin-Bell) syndrome, to myotonic dystrophy (Curschmann-Steinert), to spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy disease), and recently to Huntington disease. A GCC trinucleotide repeat was found to be expanded and methylated in the fragile site FRAXE on the human X chromosome. These findings were associated with mental retardation (Knight et al., 1993). In spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), a polymorphic CAG repeat was found to be unstable and expanded in individuals with that disease (Orr et al., 1993). We have demonstrated in in vitro experiments that the synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides (CGG)17, (CGG)12, (GCC)17, (CG)25, (CTG)17, or (CAG)17 plus (GTC)17, in the absence of added natural DNA, can be expanded with Taq polymerase in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Some expansion can already be detected after 4 PCR cycles. The E. coli Klenow DNA polymerase also functions in a similar amplification and expansion reaction performed at 37 degrees C without cycling. Other oligodeoxyribonucleotides, like, (CGG)7, (CGGT)13, or (TAA)17, are devoid of this property or have very low activity. The cytidine-methylated polymers (GCC)17 or (CG)25 yield expansion products of considerably reduced chain lengths. The expansion of the polymer (CGG)17 is affected by cytidine methylation to a lesser degree. A specific sequence and/or secondary structure and high CG content appear to be requirements for this expansion reaction by a possible slippage mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. The coding region of the human c-mos pseudogene contains Alu repeat insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabarovsky, E R; Chumakov, I M; Prassolov, V S; Kisselev, L L

    1984-10-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of an 841-bp fragment derived from a segment of the human genome previously cloned by Chumakov et al. [Gene 17 (1982) 19-26] and Zabarovsky et al. [Gene 23 (1983) 379-384] and containing regions homologous to the viral mos gene probe. This sequence displays homology with part of the coding region of the human and murine c-mos genes, contains several termination codons, and is interrupted by two Alu-family elements flanked by short direct repeats. Probably, the progenitor of the human c-mos gene was duplicated approximately at the time of mammalian divergence, was converted to a pseudogene, and acquired insertions of two Alu elements.

  10. Estimation of the ancestral effective population sizes of African great apes under different selection regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-08-01

    Reliable estimates of ancestral effective population sizes are necessary to unveil the population-level phenomena that shaped the phylogeny and molecular evolution of the African great apes. Although several methods have previously been applied to infer ancestral effective population sizes, an analysis of the influence of the selective regime on the estimates of ancestral demography has not been thoroughly conducted. In this study, three independent data sets under different selective regimes were used were composed to tackle this issue. The results showed that selection had a significant impact on the estimates of ancestral effective population sizes of the African great apes. The inference of the ancestral demography of African great apes was affected by the selection regime. The effects, however, were not homogeneous along the ancestral populations of great apes. The effective population size of the ancestor of humans and chimpanzees was more impacted by the selection regime when compared to the same parameter in the ancestor of humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. Because the selection regime influenced the estimates of ancestral effective population size, it is reasonable to assume that a portion of the discrepancy found in previous studies that inferred the ancestral effective population size may be attributable to the differential action of selection on the genes sampled.

  11. Transcription-induced CAG repeat contraction in human cells is mediated in part by transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yunfu; Wilson, John H

    2007-09-01

    Expansions of CAG repeat tracts in the germ line underlie several neurological diseases. In human patients and mouse models, CAG repeat tracts display an ongoing instability in neurons, which may exacerbate disease symptoms. It is unclear how repeats are destabilized in nondividing cells, but it cannot involve DNA replication. We showed previously that transcription through CAG repeats induces their instability (Y. Lin, V. Dion, and J. H. Wilson, Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 13:179-180). Here, we present a genetic analysis of the link between transcription-induced repeat instability and nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. We show that short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CSB, a component specifically required for transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER), and knockdowns of ERCC1 and XPG, which incise DNA adjacent to damage, stabilize CAG repeat tracts. These results suggest that TC-NER is involved in the pathway for transcription-induced CAG repeat instability. In contrast, knockdowns of OGG1 and APEX1, key components involved in base excision repair, did not affect repeat instability. In addition, repeats are stabilized by knockdown of transcription factor IIS, consistent with a requirement for RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) to backtrack from a transcription block. Repeats also are stabilized by knockdown of either BRCA1 or BARD1, which together function as an E3 ligase that can ubiquitinate arrested RNAPII. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, which stabilizes repeats, confirms proteasome involvement. We integrate these observations into a tentative pathway for transcription-induced CAG repeat instability that can account for the contractions observed here and potentially for the contractions and expansions seen with human diseases.

  12. Repeated tongue lift movement induces neuroplasticity in corticomotor control of tongue and jaw muscles in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komoda, Yoshihiro; Lida, Takashi; Kothari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated tongue lift training (TLT) on the excitability of the corticomotor representation of the human tongue and jaw musculature. Sixteen participants performed three series of TLT for 41min on each of 5 consecutive days. Each TLT series consisted of two....... EMG recordings from the left and right tongue dorsum and masseter muscles were made at three pressure levels (5kPa, 10kPa, 100% tongue lift), and tongue, masseter, and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) MEPs were measured. There were no significant day-to-day differences in the tongue pressure during...

  13. Positive Selection of a Pre-Expansion CAG Repeat of the Human SCA2 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A region of approximately one megabase of human Chromosome 12 shows extensive linkage disequilibrium in Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe. This strikingly large linkage disequilibrium block was analyzed with statistical and experimental methods to determine whether natural selection could be implicated in shaping the current genome structure. Extended Haplotype Homozygosity and Relative Extended Haplotype Homozygosity analyses on this region mapped a core region of the strongest conserved haplotype to the exon 1 of the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene (SCA2. Direct DNA sequencing of this region of the SCA2 gene revealed a significant association between a pre-expanded allele [(CAG(8CAA(CAG(4CAA(CAG(8] of CAG repeats within exon 1 and the selected haplotype of the SCA2 gene. A significantly negative Tajima's D value (-2.20, p < 0.01 on this site consistently suggested selection on the CAG repeat. This region was also investigated in the three other populations, none of which showed signs of selection. These results suggest that a recent positive selection of the pre-expansion SCA2 CAG repeat has occurred in Utah residents with European ancestry.

  14. Positive selection of a pre-expansion CAG repeat of the human SCA2 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuli Yu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A region of approximately one megabase of human Chromosome 12 shows extensive linkage disequilibrium in Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe. This strikingly large linkage disequilibrium block was analyzed with statistical and experimental methods to determine whether natural selection could be implicated in shaping the current genome structure. Extended Haplotype Homozygosity and Relative Extended Haplotype Homozygosity analyses on this region mapped a core region of the strongest conserved haplotype to the exon 1 of the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene (SCA2. Direct DNA sequencing of this region of the SCA2 gene revealed a significant association between a pre-expanded allele [(CAG8CAA(CAG4CAA(CAG8] of CAG repeats within exon 1 and the selected haplotype of the SCA2 gene. A significantly negative Tajima's D value (-2.20, p < 0.01 on this site consistently suggested selection on the CAG repeat. This region was also investigated in the three other populations, none of which showed signs of selection. These results suggest that a recent positive selection of the pre-expansion SCA2 CAG repeat has occurred in Utah residents with European ancestry.

  15. A model of human nasal epithelial cells adapted for direct and repeated exposure to airborne pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Gaëlle; Achard, Sophie; Loret, Thomas; Desauziers, Valérie; Momas, Isabelle; Seta, Nathalie

    2014-08-17

    Airway epithelium lining the nasal cavity plays a pivotal role in respiratory tract defense and protection mechanisms. Air pollution induces alterations linked to airway diseases such as asthma. Only very few in vitro studies to date have succeeded in reproducing physiological conditions relevant to cellular type and chronic atmospheric pollution exposure. We therefore, set up an in vitro model of human Airway Epithelial Cells of Nasal origin (hAECN) close to real human cell functionality, specifically adapted to study the biological effects of exposure to indoor gaseous pollution at the environmental level. hAECN were exposed under air-liquid interface, one, two, or three-times at 24 h intervals for 1 h, to air or formaldehyde (200 μg/m(3)), an indoor air gaseous pollutant. All experiments were ended at day 4, when both cellular viability and cytokine production were assessed. Optimal adherence and confluence of cells were obtained 96 h after cell seeding onto collagen IV-precoated insert. Direct and repeated exposure to formaldehyde did not produce any cellular damage or IL-6 production change, although weak lower IL-8 production was observed only after the third exposure. Our model is significantly better than previous ones due to cell type and the repeated exposure protocol.

  16. Intergenic and repeat transcription in human, chimpanzee and macaque brains measured by RNA-Seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augix Guohua Xu

    Full Text Available Transcription is the first step connecting genetic information with an organism's phenotype. While expression of annotated genes in the human brain has been characterized extensively, our knowledge about the scope and the conservation of transcripts located outside of the known genes' boundaries is limited. Here, we use high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq to characterize the total non-ribosomal transcriptome of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque brain. In all species, only 20-28% of non-ribosomal transcripts correspond to annotated exons and 20-23% to introns. By contrast, transcripts originating within intronic and intergenic repetitive sequences constitute 40-48% of the total brain transcriptome. Notably, some repeat families show elevated transcription. In non-repetitive intergenic regions, we identify and characterize 1,093 distinct regions highly expressed in the human brain. These regions are conserved at the RNA expression level across primates studied and at the DNA sequence level across mammals. A large proportion of these transcripts (20% represents 3'UTR extensions of known genes and may play roles in alternative microRNA-directed regulation. Finally, we show that while transcriptome divergence between species increases with evolutionary time, intergenic transcripts show more expression differences among species and exons show less. Our results show that many yet uncharacterized evolutionary conserved transcripts exist in the human brain. Some of these transcripts may play roles in transcriptional regulation and contribute to evolution of human-specific phenotypic traits.

  17. Evidence for integration of retroviral vectors in a novel human repeat sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdi-Haidar, B.; Friedmann, T. [USCD School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Retroviruses have become attractive vehicles for the introduction of foreign genes into mammalian cells not only for gene therapy but also to serve as anchor points for long-range mapping purposes. The information relating to retroviral integration in mammalian cells is derived mostly from studies of rodent genomes. The absence of information regarding integration sites of murine-based retroviral vectors in human cells has prompted us to investigate the characteristics of integration sites in the human genome. We have constructed a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vector that carries the pUC8 origin of replication and the chloramphenicol resistance gene to allow the rescue of the flanking genomic sequences in plasmid form. We have infected human primary fibroblasts and myoblasts with this retroviral vector and isolated independently transduced clones. Genomic DNA was obtained from independent clones and the genomic fragment carrying the provirus-host sequence boundary was isolated after digestion of the genomic DNA, circularization, and transformation by electroporation of E. coli C cells to chloramphenicol resistance. Restriction map and nucleotide sequence analysis of the rescued plasmids showed that a number of the clones shared the same integration site within the human genome. We have used the nucleotide sequence information about the human DNA adjacent to the 3{prime}LTR to design a PCR-based assay diagnostic for this common integration site. Analysis revealed the presence of the same integration site in four out of twelve human primary fibroblast clones infected with this specific retroviral vector, and in one out of twelve human primary myoblast clones infected with a second retroviral vector. Further analysis revealed the common integration site to be a previously unreported primate repeat present in monkey and human genomes and absent from rodent, bovine and avian genomes.

  18. When directed evolution met ancestral enzyme resurrection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The directed evolution of ancestral -resurrected- enzymes can give a new twist in protein engineering approaches towards more versatile and robust biocatalysts. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. The ancestral eutherian karyotype is present in Xenarthra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Svartman

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular studies have led recently to the proposal of a new super-ordinal arrangement of the 18 extant Eutherian orders. From the four proposed super-orders, Afrotheria and Xenarthra were considered the most basal. Chromosome-painting studies with human probes in these two mammalian groups are thus key in the quest to establish the ancestral Eutherian karyotype. Although a reasonable amount of chromosome-painting data with human probes have already been obtained for Afrotheria, no Xenarthra species has been thoroughly analyzed with this approach. We hybridized human chromosome probes to metaphases of species (Dasypus novemcinctus, Tamandua tetradactyla, and Choloepus hoffmanii representing three of the four Xenarthra families. Our data allowed us to review the current hypotheses for the ancestral Eutherian karyotype, which range from 2n = 44 to 2n = 48. One of the species studied, the two-toed sloth C. hoffmanii (2n = 50, showed a chromosome complement strikingly similar to the proposed 2n = 48 ancestral Eutherian karyotype, strongly reinforcing it.

  20. The ancestral eutherian karyotype is present in Xenarthra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svartman, Marta; Stone, Gary; Stanyon, Roscoe

    2006-07-01

    Molecular studies have led recently to the proposal of a new super-ordinal arrangement of the 18 extant Eutherian orders. From the four proposed super-orders, Afrotheria and Xenarthra were considered the most basal. Chromosome-painting studies with human probes in these two mammalian groups are thus key in the quest to establish the ancestral Eutherian karyotype. Although a reasonable amount of chromosome-painting data with human probes have already been obtained for Afrotheria, no Xenarthra species has been thoroughly analyzed with this approach. We hybridized human chromosome probes to metaphases of species (Dasypus novemcinctus, Tamandua tetradactyla, and Choloepus hoffmanii) representing three of the four Xenarthra families. Our data allowed us to review the current hypotheses for the ancestral Eutherian karyotype, which range from 2n = 44 to 2n = 48. One of the species studied, the two-toed sloth C. hoffmanii (2n = 50), showed a chromosome complement strikingly similar to the proposed 2n = 48 ancestral Eutherian karyotype, strongly reinforcing it.

  1. Repeated tongue lift movement induces neuroplasticity in corticomotor control of tongue and jaw muscles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoda, Yoshihiro; Iida, Takashi; Kothari, Mohit; Komiyama, Osamu; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Kawara, Misao; Sessle, Barry; Svensson, Peter

    2015-11-19

    This study investigated the effect of repeated tongue lift training (TLT) on the excitability of the corticomotor representation of the human tongue and jaw musculature. Sixteen participants performed three series of TLT for 41 min on each of 5 consecutive days. Each TLT series consisted of two pressure levels (5 kPa and 10 kPa). All participants underwent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in four sessions: (1) before TLT on Day 1 (baseline), (2) after TLT on Day 1, (3) before TLT on Day 5, and (4) after TLT on Day 5. EMG recordings from the left and right tongue dorsum and masseter muscles were made at three pressure levels (5 kPa, 10 kPa, 100% tongue lift), and tongue, masseter, and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) MEPs were measured. There were no significant day-to-day differences in the tongue pressure during maximum voluntary contractions. The amplitudes and thresholds of tongue and masseter MEPs after TLT on Day 5 were respectively higher and lower than before TLT on Day 1 (Ptongue and masseter MEP areas; no significant changes occurred in MEP onset latencies. FDI MEP parameters (amplitude, threshold, area, latency) were not significantly different between the four sessions. Our findings suggest that repeated TLT can trigger neuroplasticity reflected in increased excitability of the corticomotor representation of not only the tongue muscles but also the masseter muscles.

  2. GASP: Gapped Ancestral Sequence Prediction for proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shields Denis C

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of ancestral protein sequences from multiple sequence alignments is useful for many bioinformatics analyses. Predicting ancestral sequences is not a simple procedure and relies on accurate alignments and phylogenies. Several algorithms exist based on Maximum Parsimony or Maximum Likelihood methods but many current implementations are unable to process residues with gaps, which may represent insertion/deletion (indel events or sequence fragments. Results Here we present a new algorithm, GASP (Gapped Ancestral Sequence Prediction, for predicting ancestral sequences from phylogenetic trees and the corresponding multiple sequence alignments. Alignments may be of any size and contain gaps. GASP first assigns the positions of gaps in the phylogeny before using a likelihood-based approach centred on amino acid substitution matrices to assign ancestral amino acids. Important outgroup information is used by first working down from the tips of the tree to the root, using descendant data only to assign probabilities, and then working back up from the root to the tips using descendant and outgroup data to make predictions. GASP was tested on a number of simulated datasets based on real phylogenies. Prediction accuracy for ungapped data was similar to three alternative algorithms tested, with GASP performing better in some cases and worse in others. Adding simple insertions and deletions to the simulated data did not have a detrimental effect on GASP accuracy. Conclusions GASP (Gapped Ancestral Sequence Prediction will predict ancestral sequences from multiple protein alignments of any size. Although not as accurate in all cases as some of the more sophisticated maximum likelihood approaches, it can process a wide range of input phylogenies and will predict ancestral sequences for gapped and ungapped residues alike.

  3. GASP: Gapped Ancestral Sequence Prediction for proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Richard J; Shields, Denis C

    2004-09-06

    The prediction of ancestral protein sequences from multiple sequence alignments is useful for many bioinformatics analyses. Predicting ancestral sequences is not a simple procedure and relies on accurate alignments and phylogenies. Several algorithms exist based on Maximum Parsimony or Maximum Likelihood methods but many current implementations are unable to process residues with gaps, which may represent insertion/deletion (indel) events or sequence fragments. Here we present a new algorithm, GASP (Gapped Ancestral Sequence Prediction), for predicting ancestral sequences from phylogenetic trees and the corresponding multiple sequence alignments. Alignments may be of any size and contain gaps. GASP first assigns the positions of gaps in the phylogeny before using a likelihood-based approach centred on amino acid substitution matrices to assign ancestral amino acids. Important outgroup information is used by first working down from the tips of the tree to the root, using descendant data only to assign probabilities, and then working back up from the root to the tips using descendant and outgroup data to make predictions. GASP was tested on a number of simulated datasets based on real phylogenies. Prediction accuracy for ungapped data was similar to three alternative algorithms tested, with GASP performing better in some cases and worse in others. Adding simple insertions and deletions to the simulated data did not have a detrimental effect on GASP accuracy. GASP (Gapped Ancestral Sequence Prediction) will predict ancestral sequences from multiple protein alignments of any size. Although not as accurate in all cases as some of the more sophisticated maximum likelihood approaches, it can process a wide range of input phylogenies and will predict ancestral sequences for gapped and ungapped residues alike.

  4. Repeat use of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2 for second level lumbar arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kern; Dumonski, Mark; Stanley, Tom; Ponnappan, Ravi; Phillips, Frank M

    2011-02-01

    Prospective randomized controlled animal model. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the readministration of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) induces an immune response and inhibits successful fusion in repeat posterolateral spinal surgery. Little research has been performed on the effectiveness or immunoreactivity of rhBMP-2 (Infuse, Medtronic, Memphis, TN) in the context of its reuse in posterolateral fusion spinal surgery at adjacent levels. A total of 34 New Zealand White rabbits underwent posterior intertransverse process fusion with the use of rhBMP-2 delivered on an absorbable collagen sponge (rhBMP-2/ACS). Two rabbits were killed early leaving 32 total rabbits. Serologic studies (Type I bovine collagen and rhBMP-2 antibodies) were obtained at 2-week intervals throughout the experiment. At 10 weeks, posteroanterior radiographs confirmed solid fusion masses in all rabbits. The 32 rabbits were randomly separated into 2 groups of 16, and each group underwent an adjacent level, bilateral intertransverse process fusion with either rhBMP-2/ACS or iliac crest. There was no statistical difference in fusion rates with repeat use of rhBMP-2 (n = 15/16, 94%) or iliac crest (n = 11/16, 69%) (P = 0.17) at the adjacent level. Four rabbits (n = 4/32, 13%) developed rhBMP-2 antibodies. Of these 4 rabbits, 1 developed anti-rhBMP antibodies after the first exposure and 3 developed antibodies after the second surgery. Eight rabbits (n = 8/32, 25%) developed collagen antibodies with 7 rabbits developing antibodies after the first exposure and 1 rabbit developing antibodies after the second exposure. The development of antibodies did not effect fusion rates. No rabbit demonstrated evidence of a systemic or anaphylactic reaction to repeat exposure to rhBMP-2. rhBMP-2 appears to be successful in promoting intertransverse fusions when used in both primary and repeat fusion environments. The infrequent development of antibodies to rhBMP-2 after

  5. Variation in effects of non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk factors according to the human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DRB1*01:01 allele and ancestral haplotype 8.1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia S Wang

    Full Text Available Genetic variations in human leukocyte antigens (HLA are critical in host responses to infections, transplantation, and immunological diseases. We previously identified associations with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL and the HLA-DRB1*01:01 allele and extended ancestral haplotype (AH 8.1 (HLA-A*01-B*08-DR*03-TNF-308A. To illuminate how HLA alleles and haplotypes may influence NHL etiology, we examined potential interactions between HLA-DRB1*01:01 and AH 8.1, and a wide range of NHL risk factors among 685 NHL cases and 646 controls from a United States population-based case-control study. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals by HLA allele or haplotype status, adjusted for sex, age, race and study center for NHL and two major subtypes using polychotomous unconditional logistic regression models. The previously reported elevation in NHL risk associated with exposures to termite treatment and polychlorinated biphenyls were restricted to individuals who did not possess HLA-DRB1*01:01. Previous associations for NHL and DLBCL with decreased sun exposure, higher BMI, and autoimmune conditions were statistically significant only among those with AH 8.1, and null among those without AH 8.1. Our results suggest that NHL risk factors vary in their association based on HLA-DRB1*01:01 and AH 8.1 status. Our results further suggest that certain NHL risk factors may act through a common mechanism to alter NHL risk. Finally, control participants with either HLA-DRB1*01:01 or AH 8.1 reported having a family history of NHL twice as likely as those who did not have either allele or haplotype, providing the first empirical evidence that HLA associations may explain some of the well-established relationship between family history and NHL risk.

  6. Improved haplotype analysis of human myelin basic protein short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, G; Umetsu, K; Yuasa, I; Suzuki, T

    2000-06-01

    We report an improved haplotype analysis of the human myelin basic protein gene (MBP) short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism. The polymorphic G-->A transition and 2 conventional STR polymorphisms, MBPA and MBPB, were simultaneously determined by an amplified product length polymorphism technique. After the MBPC fragments containing MBPA and MBPB were amplified, the linkage of these 2 STR loci was determined by a second amplification, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, of the isolated MBPC fragments. The present haplotype analysis dispensed with family studies for the haplotyping of MBPA and MBPB. Polymorphisms of the MBP loci studied in German and Japanese populations showed a high genomic variation. Haplotype analysis of the MBP loci showed distinct differences between the German and the Japanese populations. Consequently, haplotype analysis of the MBP loci promises to be useful in forensic identification and paternity testing.

  7. The response of human nasal and bronchial organotypic tissue cultures to repeated whole cigarette smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talikka, Marja; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Mathis, Carole; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Merg, Celine; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Florian; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is linked to the development of respiratory diseases, and there is a need to understand the mechanisms whereby CS causes damage. Although animal models have provided valuable insights into smoking-related respiratory tract damage, modern toxicity testing calls for reliable in vitro models as alternatives for animal experimentation. We report on a repeated whole mainstream CS exposure of nasal and bronchial organotypic tissue cultures that mimic the morphological, physiological, and molecular attributes of the human respiratory tract. Despite the similar cellular staining and cytokine secretion in both tissue types, the transcriptomic analyses in the context of biological network models identified similar and diverse biological processes that were impacted by CS-exposed nasal and bronchial cultures. Our results demonstrate that nasal and bronchial tissue cultures are appropriate in vitro models for the assessment of CS-induced adverse effects in the respiratory system and promising alternative to animal experimentation.

  8. Purification of proteins specifically binding human endogenous retrovirus K long terminal repeat by affinity elution chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, D O; Zavalova, L L; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G

    2002-11-01

    A novel affinity elution procedure for purification of DNA-binding proteins was developed and employed to purify to near homogeneity the proteins recognizing a 21 base pair sequence within the long terminal repeat of human endogenous retroviruses K. The approach involves loading the initial protein mixture on a heparin-agarose column and elution of protein(s) of interest with a solution of double-stranded oligonucleotide containing binding sites of the protein(s). The affinity elution has several advantages over conventional DNA-affinity chromatography: (i) it is easier and faster, permitting to isolate proteins in a 1 day-one stage procedure; (ii) yield of a target protein is severalfold higher than that in DNA-affinity chromatography; (iii) it is not necessary to prepare a special affinity support for each factor to be isolated. Theaffinity elution could be a useful alternative to conventional DNA-affinity chromatography.

  9. Triplet repeat sequences in human DNA can be detected by hybridization to a synthetic (5'-CGG-3')17 oligodeoxyribonucleotide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behn-Krappa, A; Mollenhauer, J; Doerfler, W

    1993-01-01

    The seemingly autonomous amplification of naturally occurring triplet repeat sequences in the human genome has been implicated in the causation of human genetic disease, such as the fragile X (Martin-Bell) syndrome, myotonic dystrophy (Curshmann-Steinert), spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy...

  10. Repeatedly positive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA polymerase chain reaction in human immunodeficiency virus-exposed seroreverting infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, S S; Tetali, S; Abrams, E J; Paul, M O; Pahwa, S G

    1995-08-01

    Three human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-exposed children who had repeatedly positive DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for HIV in > or = 5 samples before seroreversion to HIV-negative status are reported. The children belong to a cohort of 210 infants who were born to HIV-infected mothers and were tested at intervals of 1 to 3 months by HIV viral culture, PCR, and p24 antigen; only the PCR was positive in > or = 5 samples in the children reported here. Their clinical features were indistinguishable from other seroreverters. All three children had a transient drop in CD4:CD8 ratio to < 1.0. The transiently positive DNA PCR in HIV-exposed infants may indicate either that HIV infection was eliminated by a strong host immune response or that infection was caused by an attenuated/defective strain of virus.

  11. Analysis of the trinucleotide CAG repeat from the human mitochondrial DNA polymerase gene in healthy and diseased individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovio, A; Tiranti, V; Bednarz, A L; Suomalainen, A; Spelbrink, J N; Lecrenier, N; Melberg, A; Zeviani, M; Poulton, J; Foury, F; Jacobs, H T

    1999-01-01

    The human nuclear gene (POLG) for the catalytic subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma) contains a trinucleotide CAG microsatellite repeat within the coding sequence. We have investigated the frequency of different repeat-length alleles in populations of diseased and healthy individuals. The predominant allele of 10 CAG repeats was found at a very similar frequency (approximately 88%) in both Finnish and ethnically mixed population samples, with homozygosity close to the equilibrium prediction. Other alleles of between 5 and 13 repeat units were detected, but no larger, expanded alleles were found. A series of 51 British myotonic dystrophy patients showed no significant variation from controls, indicating an absence of generalised CAG repeat instability. Patients with a variety of molecular lesions in mtDNA, including sporadic, clonal deletions, maternally inherited point mutations, autosomally transmitted mtDNA depletion and autosomal dominant multiple deletions showed no differences in POLG trinucleotide repeat-length distribution from controls. These findings rule out POLG repeat expansion as a common pathogenic mechanism in disorders characterised by mitochondrial genome instability.

  12. Gene expression in human skeletal muscle: alternative normalization method and effect of repeated biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundby, Carsten; Nordsborg, Nikolai; Kusuhara, Keiko; Kristensen, Kristina Møller; Neufer, P Darrell; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2005-10-01

    The reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method has lately become widely used to determine transcription and mRNA content in rodent and human muscle samples. However, the common use of endogenous controls for correcting for variance in cDNA between samples is not optimal. Specifically, we investigated (1) a new normalization method based on determining the cDNA content by the flourophores PicoGreen and OliGreen, (2) effect of repeated muscle biopsies on mRNA gene expression, and (3) the spatial heterogeneity in mRNA expression across the muscle. Standard curves using oligo standards revealed a high degree of sensitivity and linearity (2.5-45 ng; R2>0.99) with OliGreen reagent, as was the case for OliGreen analyses with standard curves constructed from serial dilutions of representative RT samples (R2 >0.99 for a ten times dilution range of a representative reversed transcribed (RT) sample). Likewise, PicoGreen reagent detected the RNA:DNA hybrid content in RT samples with great sensitivity. Standard curves constructed from both double-stranded lambda DNA (1-10 ng) and from serial dilutions of representative RT samples consistently resulted in linearity with R2 >0.99. The present determination of cDNA content in reversed transcribed human skeletal muscle RNA samples by both PicoGreen and OliGreen analyses suggests that these fluorophores provide a potential alternative normalization procedure for human gene expression studies. In addition, the present study shows that multiple muscle biopsies obtained from the same muscle do not influence the mRNA response induced by an acute exercise bout for any of the genes examined.

  13. Repeated Exposure to Dissection Does Not Influence Students’ Attitudes towards Human Body Donation for Anatomy Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of unclaimed bodies for anatomical dissection has been the main method of instruction at our institution. There is however a shortage of cadavers for dissection given the increase in the number of medical schools as well as in the number of students enrolling in these schools. This shortage could be mitigated by having voluntary human body donation programs. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of medical students and surgical residents towards body donation for anatomy learning. We conducted an online survey involving 72 first-year medical students and 41 surgical residents at University of Nairobi who had completed one year of anatomy dissection. For the medical students, this was their first dissection experience while it was the second exposure for the surgery trainees. Most of the surgical trainees (70.7% and medical students (68.1% were opposed to self-body donation. This was mainly due to cultural (37% and religious (20% barriers. Surprisingly, of those not willing to donate themselves, 67.9% (82.8% surgical trainees, 59.2% medical students would recommend the practice to other people. Exposure to repeated dissection does not change the perceptions towards body donation. It is noteworthy that culture and religion rank high as clear barriers amongst this “highly informed” group of potential donors.

  14. Homogeneity of fascicle architecture following repeated contractions in the human gastrocnemius medialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil M; Dewhurst, Susan; Bampouras, Theodoros M

    2015-12-01

    This investigation sought to determine the effects of fatigue on fascicle architecture across the length of the human gastrocnemius medialis (GM). With institutional ethical approval, fifteen healthy males performed repeated isometric plantar flexion maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) until peak force fell 30% below baseline. Brightness-mode ultrasound was used to determine fascicle length and pennation angle at rest and during MVC prior to and following the fatiguing contractions. The results show a significant increase in fascicle length during MVC in the distal (2.8 mm, 8.1%) middle, (4.9 mm, 14.1%), and proximal (5.2 mm, 14.7%) regions post-fatigue compared to pre-fatigue (p MVC in the distal (3.3°, 8.8%), middle (3.9°, 9.4%), and proximal (2.9°, 6.9%) regions post-fatigue compared to pre-fatigue (p < 0.05). These changes, however, were not region specific. These are the first results to show that fascicle shortening within the GM remains homogeneous following fatigue, suggesting that the fascicles were fatigued in a similar pattern throughout the muscle. The significant reduction of fascicle shortening may reflect an additional strategy to maintain an optimal force output in fatigued conditions, although future work is needed to confirm this notion.

  15. Repeated Exposure to Dissection Does Not Influence Students' Attitudes towards Human Body Donation for Anatomy Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Mandela, Pamela; Saidi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    The use of unclaimed bodies for anatomical dissection has been the main method of instruction at our institution. There is however a shortage of cadavers for dissection given the increase in the number of medical schools as well as in the number of students enrolling in these schools. This shortage could be mitigated by having voluntary human body donation programs. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of medical students and surgical residents towards body donation for anatomy learning. We conducted an online survey involving 72 first-year medical students and 41 surgical residents at University of Nairobi who had completed one year of anatomy dissection. For the medical students, this was their first dissection experience while it was the second exposure for the surgery trainees. Most of the surgical trainees (70.7%) and medical students (68.1%) were opposed to self-body donation. This was mainly due to cultural (37%) and religious (20%) barriers. Surprisingly, of those not willing to donate themselves, 67.9% (82.8% surgical trainees, 59.2% medical students) would recommend the practice to other people. Exposure to repeated dissection does not change the perceptions towards body donation. It is noteworthy that culture and religion rank high as clear barriers amongst this "highly informed" group of potential donors.

  16. Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesins Contribute to Streptococcus gordonii-Induced Maturation of Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eun Byeol; Kim, Sun Kyung; Seo, Ho Seong; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the induction of immunity by recognition, capture, process, and presentation of antigens from infectious microbes. Streptococcus gordonii is able to cause life-threatening systemic diseases such as infective endocarditis. Serine-rich repeat (SRR) glycoproteins of S. gordonii are sialic acid-binding adhesins mediating the bacterial adherence to the host and the development of infective endocarditis. Thus, the SRR adhesins are potentially involved in the bacterial adherence to DCs and the maturation and activation of DCs required for the induction of immunity to S. gordonii. Here, we investigated the phenotypic and functional changes of human monocyte-derived DCs treated with wild-type S. gordonii or the SRR adhesin-deficient mutant. The mutant poorly bound to DCs and only weakly increased the expression of CD83, CD86, MHC class II, and PD-L1 on DCs compared with the wild-type. In addition, the mutant induced lower levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 than the wild-type in DCs. When DCs sensitized with the mutant were co-cultured with autologous T cells, they induced weaker proliferation and activation of T cells than DCs stimulated with the wild-type. Blockade of SRR adhesin with 3′-sialyllactose markedly reduced S. gordonii binding and internalization, causing attenuation of the bacterial immunostimulatory potency in DC maturation. Collectively, our results suggest that SRR adhesins of S. gordonii are important for maturation and activation of DCs.

  17. Linking short tandem repeat polymorphisms with cytosine modifications in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhou; Zheng, Yinan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Cong; Joyce, Brian Thomas; Kibbe, Warren A; Hou, Lifang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Inter-individual variation in cytosine modifications has been linked to complex traits in humans. Cytosine modification variation is partially controlled by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), known as modified cytosine quantitative trait loci (mQTL). However, little is known about the role of short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs), a class of structural genetic variants, in regulating cytosine modifications. Utilizing the published data on the International HapMap Project lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), we assessed the relationships between 721 STRPs and the modification levels of 283,540 autosomal CpG sites. Our findings suggest that, in contrast to the predominant cis-acting mode for SNP-based mQTL, STRPs are associated with cytosine modification levels in both cis-acting (local) and trans-acting (distant) modes. In local scans within the ±1 Mb windows of target CpGs, 21, 9, and 21 cis-acting STRP-based mQTL were detected in CEU (Caucasian residents from Utah, USA), YRI (Yoruba people from Ibadan, Nigeria), and the combined samples, respectively. In contrast, 139,420, 76,817, and 121,866 trans-acting STRP-based mQTL were identified in CEU, YRI, and the combined samples, respectively. A substantial proportion of CpG sites detected with local STRP-based mQTL were not associated with SNP-based mQTL, suggesting that STRPs represent an independent class of mQTL. Functionally, genetic variants neighboring CpG-associated STRPs are enriched with genome-wide association study (GWAS) loci for a variety of complex traits and diseases, including cancers, based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) GWAS Catalog. Therefore, elucidating these STRP-based mQTL in addition to SNP-based mQTL can provide novel insights into the genetic architectures of complex traits.

  18. Derepression of an endogenous long terminal repeat activates the CSF1R proto-oncogene in human lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamprecht, Bjoern; Walter, Korden; Kreher, Stephan; Kumar, Raman; Hummel, Michael; Lenze, Dido; Koechert, Karl; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Richter, Julia; Soler, Eric; Stadhouders, Ralph; Joehrens, Korinna; Wurster, Kathrin D.; Callen, David F.; Harte, Michael F.; Giefing, Maciej; Barlow, Rachael; Stein, Harald; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Janz, Martin; Cockerill, Peter N.; Siebert, Reiner; Doerken, Bernd; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian genomes contain many repetitive elements, including long terminal repeats (LTRs), which have long been suspected to have a role in tumorigenesis. Here we present evidence that aberrant LTR activation contributes to lineage-inappropriate gene expression in transformed human cells and that s

  19. Instability of human TATA-binding protein CAG triplet repeats during amplification by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, F C; van der Vliet, P C; Timmers, H T

    1994-09-13

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of a TATA-binding protein cDNA that contains CAG triplet repeats results in heterogeneous products. This is caused by a variable loss in the number of CAG triplets. Sequence analysis of PCR products suggests that instability increases with repeat length.

  20. Repeated increases in blood flow, independent of exercise, enhance conduit artery vasodilator function in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naylor, L.H.; Carter, H.; Fitzsimons, M.G.; Cable, N.T.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the importance of repeated increases in blood flow to conduit artery adaptation, using an exercise-independent repeated episodic stimulus. Recent studies suggest that exercise training improves vasodilator function of conduit arteries via shear stress-mediated

  1. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic mutations from dynamic DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard R Sinden; Vladimir N Potaman; Elena A Oussatcheva; Christopher E Pearson; Yuri L Lyubchenko; Luda S Shlyakhtenko

    2002-02-01

    Fourteen genetic neurodegenerative diseases and three fragile sites have been associated with the expansion of (CTG)n•(CAG)n, (CGG)n•(CCG)n, or (GAA)n•(TTC)n repeat tracts. Different models have been proposed for the expansion of triplet repeats, most of which presume the formation of alternative DNA structures in repeat tracts. One of the most likely structures, slipped strand DNA, may stably and reproducibly form within triplet repeat sequences. The propensity to form slipped strand DNA is proportional to the length and homogeneity of the repeat tract. The remarkable stability of slipped strand DNA may, in part, be due to loop-loop interactions facilitated by the sequence complementarity of the loops and the dynamic structure of three-way junctions formed at the loop-outs.

  2. Human pharmacology of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) after repeated doses taken 4 h apart Human pharmacology of MDMA after repeated doses taken 4 h apart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Magí; Tomillero, Angels; Pérez-Mañá, Clara; Yubero, Samanta; Papaseit, Esther; Roset, Pere-Nolasc; Pujadas, Mitona; Torrens, Marta; Camí, Jordi; de la Torre, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) is a popular psychostimulant, frequently associated with multiple administrations over a short period of time. Repeated administration of MDMA in experimental settings induces tolerance and metabolic inhibition. The aim is to determine the acute pharmacological effects and pharmacokinetics resulting from two consecutive 100mg doses of MDMA separated by 4h. Ten male volunteers participated in a randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial. The four conditions were placebo plus placebo, placebo plus MDMA, MDMA plus placebo, and MDMA plus MDMA. Outcome variables included pharmacological effects and pharmacokinetic parameters. After a second dose of MDMA, most effects were similar to those after a single dose, despite a doubling of MDMA concentrations (except for systolic blood pressure and reaction time). After repeated MDMA administration, a 2-fold increase was observed in MDMA plasma concentrations. For a simple dose accumulation MDMA and MDA concentrations were higher (+23.1% Cmax and +17.1% AUC for MDMA and +14.2% Cmax and +10.3% AUC for MDA) and HMMA and HMA concentrations lower (-43.3% Cmax and -39.9% AUC for HMMA and -33.2% Cmax and -35.1% AUC for HMA) than expected, probably related to MDMA metabolic autoinhibition. Although MDMA concentrations doubled after the second dose, most pharmacological effects were similar or slightly higher in comparison to the single administration, except for systolic blood pressure and reaction time which were greater than predicted. The pharmacokinetic-effects relationship suggests that when MDMA is administered at a 4h interval there exists a phenomenon of acute tolerance to its effects.

  3. Repeated short climatic change affects the epidermal differentiation program and leads to matrix remodeling in a human organotypic skin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutrand, Laetitia-Barbollat; Thépot, Amélie; Muther, Charlotte; Boher, Aurélie; Robic, Julie; Guéré, Christelle; Vié, Katell; Damour, Odile; Lamartine, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Human skin is subject to frequent changes in ambient temperature and humidity and needs to cope with these environmental modifications. To decipher the molecular response of human skin to repeated climatic change, a versatile model of skin equivalent subject to “hot–wet” (40°C, 80% relative humidity [RH]) or “cold–dry” (10°C, 40% RH) climatic stress repeated daily was used. To obtain an exhaustive view of the molecular mechanisms elicited by climatic change, large-scale gene expression DNA microarray analysis was performed and modulated function was determined by bioinformatic annotation. This analysis revealed several functions, including epidermal differentiation and extracellular matrix, impacted by repeated variations in climatic conditions. Some of these molecular changes were confirmed by histological examination and protein expression. Both treatments (hot–wet and cold–dry) reduced the expression of genes encoding collagens, laminin, and proteoglycans, suggesting a profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Strong induction of the entire family of late cornified envelope genes after cold–dry exposure, confirmed at protein level, was also observed. These changes correlated with an increase in epidermal differentiation markers such as corneodesmosin and a thickening of the stratum corneum, indicating possible implementation of defense mechanisms against dehydration. This study for the first time reveals the complex pattern of molecular response allowing adaption of human skin to repeated change in its climatic environment.

  4. Integrity of the human centromere DNA repeats is protected by CENP-A, CENP-C, and CENP-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, Simona; Funabiki, Hironori

    2017-02-21

    Centromeres are highly specialized chromatin domains that enable chromosome segregation and orchestrate faithful cell division. Human centromeres are composed of tandem arrays of α-satellite DNA, which spans up to several megabases. Little is known about the mechanisms that maintain integrity of the long arrays of α-satellite DNA repeats. Here, we monitored centromeric repeat stability in human cells using chromosome-orientation fluorescent in situ hybridization (CO-FISH). This assay detected aberrant centromeric CO-FISH patterns consistent with sister chromatid exchange at the frequency of 5% in primary tissue culture cells, whereas higher levels were seen in several cancer cell lines and during replicative senescence. To understand the mechanism(s) that maintains centromere integrity, we examined the contribution of the centromere-specific histone variant CENP-A and members of the constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN), CENP-C, CENP-T, and CENP-W. Depletion of CENP-A and CCAN proteins led to an increase in centromere aberrations, whereas enhancing chromosome missegregation by alternative methods did not, suggesting that CENP-A and CCAN proteins help maintain centromere integrity independently of their role in chromosome segregation. Furthermore, superresolution imaging of centromeric CO-FISH using structured illumination microscopy implied that CENP-A protects α-satellite repeats from extensive rearrangements. Our study points toward the presence of a centromere-specific mechanism that actively maintains α-satellite repeat integrity during human cell proliferation.

  5. Transcellular activation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat in cocultured lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, A; Weinberger, J; Weinberger, O K

    1992-01-01

    One of the unexplained aspects of the progression of AIDS is that immunological abnormalities are detectable before CD4+ T-helper cell depletion occurs (A.R. Gruters, F.G. Terpstra, R. De Jong, C.J.M. Van Noesel, R.A.W. Van Lier, and F. Miedema, Eur. J. Immunol. 20:1039-1044, 1990; F. Miedema, A.J. Chantal-Petit, F.G. Terpstra, J.K.M.E. Schattenkerk, F. de Wolf, B.J.M. Al, M. Roos, J.M.A. Lang, S.A. Danner, J. Goudsmit, and P.T.A. Schellekens, J. Clin. Invest. 82:1908-1914, 1988; G.M. Shearer, D.C. Bernstein, K.S. Tung, C.S. Via, R. Redfield, S.Z. Salahuddin, and R.C. Gallo, J. Immunol. 137:2514-2521, 1986). In this report, we describe a mechanism by which human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected cells can influence neighboring HIV-1-infected T lymphocytes and uninfected T cells as well. We have examined the interaction of T-cell and macrophage cell lines that are transfected with HIV-1 DNA by using cocultured lymphocytes. The HIV-1 constructs we used lack a functional pol gene and therefore do not produce infectious virus. Cocultivation results in the transcellular activation of the HIV long terminal repeat in the cocultured T cells. This transcellular activation is evident in as little as 3 h of cocultivation, at ratios of HIV-expressing cells to target cells as low as 1:1,000, and is dependent on the Tat-responsive element. The demonstration that a small number of HIV-expressing cells can affect a large number of uninfected bystander cells in a short period of time suggests a mechanism by which global immune dysfunction can precede the high prevalence of infected cells. Images PMID:1602543

  6. Computational study of the human dystrophin repeats: interaction properties and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Baptiste; Giudice, Emmanuel; Nicolas, Aurélie; Delalande, Olivier; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Dystrophin is a large protein involved in the rare genetic disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It functions as a mechanical linker between the cytoskeleton and the sarcolemma, and is able to resist shear stresses during muscle activity. In all, 75% of the dystrophin molecule consists of a large central rod domain made up of 24 repeat units that share high structural homology with spectrin-like repeats. However, in the absence of any high-resolution structure of these repeats, the molecular basis of dystrophin central domain's functions has not yet been deciphered. In this context, we have performed a computational study of the whole dystrophin central rod domain based on the rational homology modeling of successive and overlapping tandem repeats and the analysis of their surface properties. Each tandem repeat has very specific surface properties that make it unique. However, the repeats share enough electrostatic-surface similarities to be grouped into four separate clusters. Molecular dynamics simulations of four representative tandem repeats reveal specific flexibility or bending properties depending on the repeat sequence. We thus suggest that the dystrophin central rod domain is constituted of seven biologically relevant sub-domains. Our results provide evidence for the role of the dystrophin central rod domain as a scaffold platform with a wide range of surface features and biophysical properties allowing it to interact with its various known partners such as proteins and membrane lipids. This new integrative view is strongly supported by the previous experimental works that investigated the isolated domains and the observed heterogeneity of the severity of dystrophin related pathologies, especially Becker muscular dystrophy.

  7. Computational study of the human dystrophin repeats: interaction properties and molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baptiste Legrand

    Full Text Available Dystrophin is a large protein involved in the rare genetic disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. It functions as a mechanical linker between the cytoskeleton and the sarcolemma, and is able to resist shear stresses during muscle activity. In all, 75% of the dystrophin molecule consists of a large central rod domain made up of 24 repeat units that share high structural homology with spectrin-like repeats. However, in the absence of any high-resolution structure of these repeats, the molecular basis of dystrophin central domain's functions has not yet been deciphered. In this context, we have performed a computational study of the whole dystrophin central rod domain based on the rational homology modeling of successive and overlapping tandem repeats and the analysis of their surface properties. Each tandem repeat has very specific surface properties that make it unique. However, the repeats share enough electrostatic-surface similarities to be grouped into four separate clusters. Molecular dynamics simulations of four representative tandem repeats reveal specific flexibility or bending properties depending on the repeat sequence. We thus suggest that the dystrophin central rod domain is constituted of seven biologically relevant sub-domains. Our results provide evidence for the role of the dystrophin central rod domain as a scaffold platform with a wide range of surface features and biophysical properties allowing it to interact with its various known partners such as proteins and membrane lipids. This new integrative view is strongly supported by the previous experimental works that investigated the isolated domains and the observed heterogeneity of the severity of dystrophin related pathologies, especially Becker muscular dystrophy.

  8. Repeat remote ischaemic pre-conditioning for improved cardiovascular function in humans: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Epps

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Repeated RIPC exposure has produced evidence of improvements in endothelial dependent vasodilation, ulcer healing and blood pressure but no benefit in non-endothelial dependent vasodilation, cutaneous vascular conductance or cardiorespiratory fitness. The optimal delivery of RIPC remains unclear, but at least 3 or preferably 4, 5 min exposures appears to be most beneficial, at least for reducing blood pressure. Aside from those undertaking cardiac surgery, other study populations with endothelial dysfunction may benefit from repeat exposure to RIPC.

  9. The origin and evolution of variable number tandem repeat of CLEC4M gene in the global human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    Full Text Available CLEC4M is a C-type lectin gene serving as cell adhesion receptor and pathogen recognition receptor. It recognizes several pathogens of important public health concern. In particular, a highly polymorphic variable number tandem repeat (VNTR at the neck-region of CLEC4M had been associated with genetic predisposition to some infectious diseases. To gain insight into the origin and evolution of this VNTR in CLEC4M, we studied 21 Africans, 20 Middle Easterns, 35 Europeans, 38 Asians, 13 Oceania, and 18 Americans (a total of 290 chromosomes from the (Human Genome Diversity Panel HGDP-CEPH panel; these samples covered most of alleles of this VNTR locus present in human populations. We identified a limited number of haplotypes among the basic repeat subunits that is 69 base pairs in length. Only 8 haplotypes were found. Their sequence identities were determined in the 290 chromosomes. VNTR alleles of different repeat length (from 4 to 9 repeats were analyzed for composition and orientation of these subunits. Our results showed that the subunit configuration of the same repeat number of VNTR locus from different populations were, in fact, virtually identical. It implies that most of the VNTR alleles existed before dispersion of modern humans outside Africa. Further analyses indicate that the present diversity profile of this locus in worldwide populations is generated from the effect of migration of different tribes and neutral evolution. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that the origin of the VNTR alleles were arisen by independent (separate mutation events and caused by differential allele advantage and natural selection as suggested by previous report based on SNP data.

  10. Effect of repeated forearm muscle cooling on the adaptation of skeletal muscle metabolism in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Takayuki; Wijayanto, Titis; Watanuki, Shigeki; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated cooling of forearm muscle on adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism. It is hypothesized that repeated decreases of muscle temperature would increase the oxygen consumption in hypothermic skeletal muscle. Sixteen healthy males participated in this study. Their right forearm muscles were locally cooled to 25 °C by cooling pads attached to the skin. This local cooling was repeated eight times on separate days for eight participants (experimental group), whereas eight controls received no cold exposure. To evaluate adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism, a local cooling test was conducted before and after the repeated cooling period. Change in oxy-hemoglobin content in the flexor digitorum at rest and during a 25-s isometric handgrip (10% maximal voluntary construction) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy at every 2 °C reduction in forearm muscle temperature. The arterial blood flow was occluded for 15 s by upper arm cuff inflation at rest and during the isometric handgrip. The oxygen consumption in the flexor digitorum muscle was evaluated by a slope of the oxy-hemoglobin change during the arterial occlusion. In the experimental group, resting oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle did not show any difference between pre- and post-intervention, whereas muscle oxygen consumption during the isometric handgrip was significantly higher in post-intervention than in pre-test from thermoneutral baseline to 31 °C muscle temperature (P < 0.05). This result indicated that repeated local muscle cooling might facilitate oxidative metabolism in the skeletal muscle. In summary, skeletal muscle metabolism during submaximal isometric handgrip was facilitated after repeated local muscle cooling.

  11. Optimized ancestral state reconstruction using Sankoff parsimony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiente Gabriel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parsimony methods are widely used in molecular evolution to estimate the most plausible phylogeny for a set of characters. Sankoff parsimony determines the minimum number of changes required in a given phylogeny when a cost is associated to transitions between character states. Although optimizations exist to reduce the computations in the number of taxa, the original algorithm takes time O(n2 in the number of states, making it impractical for large values of n. Results In this study we introduce an optimization of Sankoff parsimony for the reconstruction of ancestral states when ultrametric or additive cost matrices are used. We analyzed its performance for randomly generated matrices, Jukes-Cantor and Kimura's two-parameter models of DNA evolution, and in the reconstruction of elongation factor-1α and ancestral metabolic states of a group of eukaryotes, showing that in all cases the execution time is significantly less than with the original implementation. Conclusion The algorithms here presented provide a fast computation of Sankoff parsimony for a given phylogeny. Problems where the number of states is large, such as reconstruction of ancestral metabolism, are particularly adequate for this optimization. Since we are reducing the computations required to calculate the parsimony cost of a single tree, our method can be combined with optimizations in the number of taxa that aim at finding the most parsimonious tree.

  12. Repeated static contractions increase mitochondrial vulnerability toward oxidative stress in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlin, Kent; Nielsen, Jens Steen; Mogensen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Repeated static contractions (RSC) induce large fluctuations in tissue oxygen tension and increase the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study investigated the effect of RSC on muscle contractility, mitochondrial respiratory function, and in vitro sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+...

  13. Tandem repeats and G-rich sequences are enriched at human CNV breakpoints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promita Bose

    Full Text Available Chromosome breakage in germline and somatic genomes gives rise to copy number variation (CNV responsible for genomic disorders and tumorigenesis. DNA sequence is known to play an important role in breakage at chromosome fragile sites; however, the sequences susceptible to double-strand breaks (DSBs underlying CNV formation are largely unknown. Here we analyze 140 germline CNV breakpoints from 116 individuals to identify DNA sequences enriched at breakpoint loci compared to 2800 simulated control regions. We find that, overall, CNV breakpoints are enriched in tandem repeats and sequences predicted to form G-quadruplexes. G-rich repeats are overrepresented at terminal deletion breakpoints, which may be important for the addition of a new telomere. Interstitial deletions and duplication breakpoints are enriched in Alu repeats that in some cases mediate non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR between the two sides of the rearrangement. CNV breakpoints are enriched in certain classes of repeats that may play a role in DNA secondary structure, DSB susceptibility and/or DNA replication errors.

  14. Effect of repeated forearm muscle cooling on the adaptation of skeletal muscle metabolism in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Takayuki; Wijayanto, Titis; Watanuki, Shigeki; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated cooling of forearm muscle on adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism. It is hypothesized that repeated decreases of muscle temperature would increase the oxygen consumption in hypothermic skeletal muscle. Sixteen healthy males participated in this study. Their right forearm muscles were locally cooled to 25 °C by cooling pads attached to the skin. This local cooling was repeated eight times on separate days for eight participants (experimental group), whereas eight controls received no cold exposure. To evaluate adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism, a local cooling test was conducted before and after the repeated cooling period. Change in oxy-hemoglobin content in the flexor digitorum at rest and during a 25-s isometric handgrip (10% maximal voluntary construction) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy at every 2 °C reduction in forearm muscle temperature. The arterial blood flow was occluded for 15 s by upper arm cuff inflation at rest and during the isometric handgrip. The oxygen consumption in the flexor digitorum muscle was evaluated by a slope of the oxy-hemoglobin change during the arterial occlusion. In the experimental group, resting oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle did not show any difference between pre- and post-intervention, whereas muscle oxygen consumption during the isometric handgrip was significantly higher in post-intervention than in pre-test from thermoneutral baseline to 31 °C muscle temperature ( P muscle cooling might facilitate oxidative metabolism in the skeletal muscle. In summary, skeletal muscle metabolism during submaximal isometric handgrip was facilitated after repeated local muscle cooling.

  15. Short- and long-term effects of unpredictable repeated negative stimuli on Japanese quail's fear of humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Laurence

    Full Text Available Numerous aversive events occur in poultry production, and if repeated and unpredictable, can result in an impaired welfare. Some events such as handling can be perceived negatively and it is of interest to understand how humans' behaviour could affect poultry's behaviours and especially its avoidance of humans. Our aim was to evaluate short- and long-lasting effects of a 3-week procedure involving unpredictable repeated negative stimuli (URNS applied during the post-juvenile period on quail's reactivity to humans. We compared the reactions of two sets of quail: URNS was applied to one set (treated quail and the other set was left undisturbed (control quail. When two weeks old, treated quail were exposed to a variety of negative stimuli, either applied automatically or involving human presence. One and seven weeks after the termination of the procedure, the reactivity of control and treated quail to a passive human being was evaluated. Furthermore, the experimenter with her hand on a trough containing a mealworm assessed the propensity of quail of both groups to habituate to feed close to a human being. In the presence of a seated observer, treated quail were more inhibited and more alert than control quail. Likewise, seven weeks after the end of the URNS procedure, more treated than control quail adopted a fear posture. Moreover, whereas control quail spent as much time in the different areas of their cages, treated quail spent more time in the rear part of their cages. Finally, whereas control quail habituated gradually to feed near the experimenter's hand, treated quail did not. All these tests evidence negative short- and long-term effects on treated quail's reactivity to a passive human being and on their habituation to a human being when her presence is positively reinforced. This highlights the importance of young poultry's experience with humans in production.

  16. Short- and long-term effects of unpredictable repeated negative stimuli on Japanese quail's fear of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Agathe; Lumineau, Sophie; Calandreau, Ludovic; Arnould, Cécile; Leterrier, Christine; Boissy, Alain; Houdelier, Cécilia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous aversive events occur in poultry production, and if repeated and unpredictable, can result in an impaired welfare. Some events such as handling can be perceived negatively and it is of interest to understand how humans' behaviour could affect poultry's behaviours and especially its avoidance of humans. Our aim was to evaluate short- and long-lasting effects of a 3-week procedure involving unpredictable repeated negative stimuli (URNS) applied during the post-juvenile period on quail's reactivity to humans. We compared the reactions of two sets of quail: URNS was applied to one set (treated quail) and the other set was left undisturbed (control quail). When two weeks old, treated quail were exposed to a variety of negative stimuli, either applied automatically or involving human presence. One and seven weeks after the termination of the procedure, the reactivity of control and treated quail to a passive human being was evaluated. Furthermore, the experimenter with her hand on a trough containing a mealworm assessed the propensity of quail of both groups to habituate to feed close to a human being. In the presence of a seated observer, treated quail were more inhibited and more alert than control quail. Likewise, seven weeks after the end of the URNS procedure, more treated than control quail adopted a fear posture. Moreover, whereas control quail spent as much time in the different areas of their cages, treated quail spent more time in the rear part of their cages. Finally, whereas control quail habituated gradually to feed near the experimenter's hand, treated quail did not. All these tests evidence negative short- and long-term effects on treated quail's reactivity to a passive human being and on their habituation to a human being when her presence is positively reinforced. This highlights the importance of young poultry's experience with humans in production.

  17. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Unpredictable Repeated Negative Stimuli on Japanese Quail's Fear of Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Agathe; Lumineau, Sophie; Calandreau, Ludovic; Arnould, Cécile; Leterrier, Christine; Boissy, Alain; Houdelier, Cécilia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous aversive events occur in poultry production, and if repeated and unpredictable, can result in an impaired welfare. Some events such as handling can be perceived negatively and it is of interest to understand how humans' behaviour could affect poultry's behaviours and especially its avoidance of humans. Our aim was to evaluate short- and long-lasting effects of a 3-week procedure involving unpredictable repeated negative stimuli (URNS) applied during the post-juvenile period on quail's reactivity to humans. We compared the reactions of two sets of quail: URNS was applied to one set (treated quail) and the other set was left undisturbed (control quail). When two weeks old, treated quail were exposed to a variety of negative stimuli, either applied automatically or involving human presence. One and seven weeks after the termination of the procedure, the reactivity of control and treated quail to a passive human being was evaluated. Furthermore, the experimenter with her hand on a trough containing a mealworm assessed the propensity of quail of both groups to habituate to feed close to a human being. In the presence of a seated observer, treated quail were more inhibited and more alert than control quail. Likewise, seven weeks after the end of the URNS procedure, more treated than control quail adopted a fear posture. Moreover, whereas control quail spent as much time in the different areas of their cages, treated quail spent more time in the rear part of their cages. Finally, whereas control quail habituated gradually to feed near the experimenter's hand, treated quail did not. All these tests evidence negative short- and long-term effects on treated quail's reactivity to a passive human being and on their habituation to a human being when her presence is positively reinforced. This highlights the importance of young poultry's experience with humans in production. PMID:24668017

  18. Isolation of human minisatellite loci detected by synthetic tandem repeat probes: direct comparison with cloned DNA fingerprinting probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Vergnaud, G; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-08-01

    As a direct comparison with cloned 'DNA fingerprinting' probes, we present the results of screening an ordered array Charomid library for hypervariable human loci using synthetic tandem repeat (STR) probes. By recording the coordinates of positive hybridization signals, the subset of clones within the library detected by each STR probe can be defined, and directly compared with the set of clones detected by naturally occurring (cloned) DNA fingerprinting probes. The STR probes vary in the efficiency of detection of polymorphic minisatellite loci; among the more efficient probes, there is a strong overlap with the sets of clones detected by the DNA fingerprinting probes. Four new polymorphic loci were detected by one or more of the STR probes but not by any of the naturally occurring repeats. Sequence comparisons with the probe(s) used to detect the locus suggest that a relatively poor match, for example 10 out of 14 bases in a limited region of each repeat, is sufficient for the positive detection of tandem repeats in a clone in this type of library screening by hybridization. These results not only provide a detailed evaluation of the usefulness of STR probes in the isolation of highly variable loci, but also suggest strategies for the use of these multi-locus probes in screening libraries for clones from hypervariable loci.

  19. Determination of microsatellite repeats in the human thyroid peroxidase (TPOX) gene using an automated gene analysis system with nanoscale engineered biomagnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takahito; Maruyama, Kohei; Takeyama, Haruko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2007-04-15

    The number of repeat in the microsatellite region (AATG)(5-14) of the human thyroid peroxidase gene (TOPX) was determined using an automated DNA analysis system with nano-scale engineered biomagnetite. Thermal melting curve analysis of DNA duplexes on biomagnetite indicated that shorter repeat sequences (less than 9 repeats) were easily discriminated. However, it was difficult to determine the number of repeats at more than nine. In order to improve the selectivity of this method for the longer repeats, a "double probe hybridization assay" was performed in which an intermediate probe was used to replace a target repeat sequence having more than 9 repeats with a shorter sequence possessing less than 9 repeats. Thermal probe melting curve analyses and Tm determination confirmed that the target with 10 repeats was converted to 5 repeats, 11 repeats converted to 4 and 12 to 3, respectively. Furthermore, rapid determination of repeat numbers was possible by measuring fluorescence intensities obtained by probe dissociation at 56 and 66 degrees C, and 40, 60 and 80 degrees C for signal normalization.

  20. Visualization and quantitative analysis of extrachromosomal telomere-repeat DNA in individual human cells by Halo-FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komosa, Martin; Root, Heather; Meyn, M Stephen

    2015-02-27

    Current methods for characterizing extrachromosomal nuclear DNA in mammalian cells do not permit single-cell analysis, are often semi-quantitative and frequently biased toward the detection of circular species. To overcome these limitations, we developed Halo-FISH to visualize and quantitatively analyze extrachromosomal DNA in single cells. We demonstrate Halo-FISH by using it to analyze extrachromosomal telomere-repeat (ECTR) in human cells that use the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) pathway(s) to maintain telomere lengths. We find that GM847 and VA13 ALT cells average ∼80 detectable G/C-strand ECTR DNA molecules/nucleus, while U2OS ALT cells average ∼18 molecules/nucleus. In comparison, human primary and telomerase-positive cells contain 300), range widely in length (200 kb) and are composed of primarily G- or C-strand telomere-repeat DNA. Halo-FISH enables, for the first time, the simultaneous analysis of ECTR DNA and chromosomal telomeres in a single cell. We find that ECTR DNA comprises ∼15% of telomere-repeat DNA in GM847 and VA13 cells, but FISH can facilitate the study of a wide variety of extrachromosomal DNA in mammalian cells.

  1. Consolidation effect of repeated processing of declarative knowledge in mental experiences during human sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolli, Carlo; Fagioli, Igino; Mazzetti, Michela; Tuozzi, Giovanni

    2006-05-15

    Sleep may positively influence declarative memory through the processing, which transforms items of declarative knowledge into contents of mental sleep experience (MSE). A prediction from this general hypothesis is that the consolidation level should be higher for the output of items repeatedly processed and transformed into identical or very similar (so-called interrelated) contents of distinct MSEs of the same night rather than for the output of items presumably processed once (that is, all other, non-interrelated contents). Two experiments examined whether and how far the frequency and long-term retention of interrelated contents depend on the repeated processing of given items rather than on the experimental procedure applied for detection of interrelated contents. This procedure entails both multiple awakenings and a verbal report of MSE after awakening. Multiple awakenings could facilitate the re-access and elaboration of some contents into the subsequent (i.e. contiguous) MSE rather than non-contiguous MSEs; verbal reports could enhance the delayed recall of interrelated contents in as much as repeatedly encoded. The first experiment showed that interrelated contents were more frequent and better retained than both non-interrelated and pseudo-interrelated (i.e. by-chance similar or identical) contents, and even more in pairs of contiguous than non-contiguous MSEs collected from the first four periods of REM sleep on each experimental night. The second experiment showed that the frequency and retention rate of interrelated contents, while higher than those of non-interrelated and pseudo-interrelated contents, were not significantly different in pairs of MSEs which were verbally or mentally recalled after awakening provoked during the first four periods of REM sleep in each experimental night. Taken together, these findings indicate that the advantage provided by repeated processing during REM sleep for the consolidation of the output of items of declarative

  2. Influence of repeated daily menthol exposure on human temperature regulation and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, D Jason; Weston, Neil; House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    A single exposure to menthol can, depending on concentration, enhance both cool sensations and encourage body heat storage. This study tested whether there is an habituation in either response after repeated-daily exposures. Twenty-two participants were assigned to one of three spray groups: Control (CON; n=6), 0.05% L-menthol (M(0.05%); n=8), and 0.2% L-menthol (M(0.2%); n=8). On Monday (20°C, 50% rh) participants were sprayed with 100 mL of solution and undertook 40 min of cycling at 45% of their peak power (Ex1), from Tuesday to Thursday (30°C, 50% rh) they were sprayed twice daily whilst resting (R1 to R6), Friday was a repeat of Monday (Ex2). Thermal sensation (TS), thermal comfort, perceived exertion, irritation, rectal and skin temperature (Tsk), skin blood flow (SkBF) and sweat rate were monitored. A two-way ANOVA (alpha=0.05) compared responses from the beginning (Ex1, R1) and end (Ex2, R5) of the testing week. M(0.2%) induced significantly (PMenthol caused a heat storage response, mediated by vasoconstriction, at the beginning and end of the week, suggesting the habituation of TS occurred in a pathway specific to sensation. In summary, the cooling influence of 0.2% menthol habituates after repeated-daily exposures, but with no habituation in heat storage.

  3. [Mutation in microsatellite repeats of DNA and embryonal death in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, T V; Nazarenko, S A

    2000-07-01

    In the analysis of tetranucleotide DNA repeats inheritance carried out in 55 families with a history of spontaneous miscarriages and normal karyotypes in respect to 21 loci located on seven autosomes, 8 embryos (14.5%) demonstrating 12 cases of the presence of alleles absent in both parents were described. The study of chromosome segregation using other DNA markers permitted highly probable exclusion of false paternity as well as uniparental disomy as the reasons for parent/child allele mismatches. The high probability of paternity together with the presence of a "new" allele at any offspring locus points to the mutation having occurred during game-togenesis in one of the parents. Examination of mutation in spontaneous abortuses revealed an increased number of tandem repeat units at microsatellite loci in three cases and an decreased number of these repeats in six cases. In two abortuses, a third allele absent in both parents, which resulted from a somatic mutation that occurred during embryonic development, was observed. The prevalence of the male germline mutations, revealed during investigation of the mutation origin, was probably associated with an increased number of DNA replication cycles in sperm compared to the oocytes. In spontaneous abortuses, the mean mutation rate of the tetranucleotide repeat complexes analyzed was 9.8 x 10(-3) per locus per gamete per generation. This was about five times higher than the spontaneous mutation rate of these STR loci. It can be suggested that genome instability detected at the level of repeated DNA sequences can involve not only genetically neutral loci but also active genomic regions crucial for embryonic viability. This results in cell death and termination of embryonic development. Our findings indicate that the death of embryos with normal karyotypes in most cases is associated with an increased frequency of germline and somatic microsatellite mutations. The data of the present study also provide a practical tool for

  4. Which came first: The lizard or the egg? Robustness in phylogenetic reconstruction of ancestral states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, April M; Lyons, Kathleen M; Brandley, Matthew C; Hillis, David M

    2015-09-01

    Changes in parity mode between egg-laying (oviparity) and live-bearing (viviparity) have occurred repeatedly throughout vertebrate evolution. Oviparity is the ancestral amniote state, and viviparity has evolved many times independently within amniotes (especially in lizards and snakes), with possibly a few reversions to oviparity. In amniotes, the shelled egg is considered a complex structure that is unlikely to re-evolve if lost (i.e., it is an example of Dollo's Principle). However, a recent ancestral state reconstruction analysis concluded that viviparity was the ancestral state of squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes), and that oviparity re-evolved from viviparity many times throughout the evolutionary history of squamates. Here, we re-evaluate support for this provocative conclusion by testing the sensitivity of the analysis to model assumptions and estimates of squamate phylogeny. We found that the models and methods used for parity mode reconstruction are highly sensitive to the specific estimate of phylogeny used, and that the point estimate of phylogeny used to suggest that viviparity is the root state of the squamate tree is far from an optimal phylogenetic solution. The ancestral state reconstructions are also highly sensitive to model choice and specific values of model parameters. A method that is designed to account for biases in taxon sampling actually accentuates, rather than lessens, those biases with respect to ancestral state reconstructions. In contrast to recent conclusions from the same data set, we find that ancestral state reconstruction analyses provide highly equivocal support for the number and direction of transitions between oviparity and viviparity in squamates. Moreover, the reconstructions of ancestral parity state are highly dependent on the assumptions of each model. We conclude that the common ancestor of squamates was oviparous, and subsequent evolutionary transitions to viviparity were common, but reversals to oviparity were

  5. Inheritance of the 8.1 ancestral haplotype in recurrent pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid M; Nielsen, Henriette S; Steffensen, Rudi;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH) (HLA-A1, C7, B8, C4AQ0, C4B1, DR3, DQ2) is a remarkably long and conserved haplotype in the human major histocompatibility complex. It has been associated with both beneficial and detrimental effects, consistent with antagonistic pleiotr...

  6. Structural and Biochemical Consequences of Disease-Causing Mutations in the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of the Human TRPV4 Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Hitoshi; Procko, Erik; Sotomayor, Marcos; Gaudet, Rachelle (Harvard-Med); (Harvard)

    2012-10-23

    The TRPV4 calcium-permeable cation channel plays important physiological roles in osmosensation, mechanosensation, cell barrier formation, and bone homeostasis. Recent studies reported that mutations in TRPV4, including some in its ankyrin repeat domain (ARD), are associated with human inherited diseases, including neuropathies and skeletal dysplasias, probably because of the increased constitutive activity of the channel. TRPV4 activity is regulated by the binding of calmodulin and small molecules such as ATP to the ARD at its cytoplasmic N-terminus. We determined structures of ATP-free and -bound forms of human TRPV4-ARD and compared them with available TRPV-ARD structures. The third inter-repeat loop region (Finger 3 loop) is flexible and may act as a switch to regulate channel activity. Comparisons of TRPV-ARD structures also suggest an evolutionary link between ARD structure and ATP binding ability. Thermal stability analyses and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ATP increases stability in TRPV-ARDs that can bind ATP. Biochemical analyses of a large panel of TRPV4-ARD mutations associated with human inherited diseases showed that some impaired thermal stability while others weakened ATP binding ability, suggesting molecular mechanisms for the diseases.

  7. Molecular cloning and long terminal repeat sequences of human endogenous retrovirus genes related to types A and B retrovirus genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, M.

    1986-06-01

    By using a DNA fragment primarily encoding the reverse transcriptase (pol) region of the Syrian hamster intracisternal A particle (IAP; type A retrovirus) gene as a probe, human endogenous retrovirus genes, tentatively termed HERV-K genes, were cloned from a fetal human liver gene library. Typical HERV-K genes were 9.1 or 9.4 kilobases in length, having long terminal repeats (LTRs) of ca. 970 base pairs. Many structural features commonly observed on the retrovirus LTRs, such as the TATAA box, polyadenylation signal, and terminal inverted repeats, were present on each LTR, and a lysine (K) tRNA having a CUU anticodon was identified as a presumed primer tRNA. The HERV-K LTR, however, had little sequence homology to either the IAP LTR or other typical oncovirus LTRs. By filter hybridization, the number of HERV-K genes was estimated to be ca. 50 copies per haploid human genome. The cloned mouse mammary tumor virus (type B) gene was found to hybridize with both the HERV-K and IAP genes to essentially the same extent.

  8. Ancestral polyploidy in seed plants and angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yuannian; Wickett, Norman J; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj; Chanderbali, André S; Landherr, Lena; Ralph, Paula E; Tomsho, Lynn P; Hu, Yi; Liang, Haiying; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Clifton, Sandra W; Schlarbaum, Scott E; Schuster, Stephan C; Ma, Hong; Leebens-Mack, Jim; dePamphilis, Claude W

    2011-05-05

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD), or polyploidy, followed by gene loss and diploidization has long been recognized as an important evolutionary force in animals, fungi and other organisms, especially plants. The success of angiosperms has been attributed, in part, to innovations associated with gene or whole-genome duplications, but evidence for proposed ancient genome duplications pre-dating the divergence of monocots and eudicots remains equivocal in analyses of conserved gene order. Here we use comprehensive phylogenomic analyses of sequenced plant genomes and more than 12.6 million new expressed-sequence-tag sequences from phylogenetically pivotal lineages to elucidate two groups of ancient gene duplications-one in the common ancestor of extant seed plants and the other in the common ancestor of extant angiosperms. Gene duplication events were intensely concentrated around 319 and 192 million years ago, implicating two WGDs in ancestral lineages shortly before the diversification of extant seed plants and extant angiosperms, respectively. Significantly, these ancestral WGDs resulted in the diversification of regulatory genes important to seed and flower development, suggesting that they were involved in major innovations that ultimately contributed to the rise and eventual dominance of seed plants and angiosperms. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  9. Crystal structures of the human G3BP1 NTF2-like domain visualize FxFG Nup Repeat Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vognsen, Tina Reinholdt; Möller, Ingvar Rúnar; Kristensen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Ras GTPase Activating Protein SH3 Domain Binding Protein (G3BP) is a potential anti-cancer drug target implicated in several cellular functions. We have used protein crystallography to solve crystal structures of the human G3BP1 NTF2-like domain both alone and in complex with an FxFG Nup repeat...... crystal form might indicate a novel ligand binding site that, however, remains to be validated. The crystal structures give insight into the nuclear transportation mechanisms of G3BP and provide a basis for future structure based drug design....

  10. Rapid isolation of antibody from a synthetic human antibody library by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Sun Yim

    Full Text Available Antibodies and their derivatives are the most important agents in therapeutics and diagnostics. Even after the significant progress in the technology for antibody screening from huge libraries, it takes a long time to isolate an antibody, which prevents a prompt action against the spread of a disease. Here, we report a new strategy for isolating desired antibodies from a combinatorial library in one day by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. First, we constructed a library of synthetic human antibody in which single-chain variable fragment (scFv was expressed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. After labeling the cells with fluorescent antigen probes, the highly fluorescent cells were sorted by using a high-speed cell sorter, and these cells were reused without regeneration in the next round of sorting. After repeating this sorting, the positive clones were completely enriched in several hours. Thus, we screened the library against three viral antigens, including the H1N1 influenza virus, Hepatitis B virus, and Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Finally, the potential antibody candidates, which show K(D values between 10 and 100 nM against the target antigens, could be successfully isolated even though the library was relatively small (∼ 10(6. These results show that repeated FACS screening without regeneration of the sorted cells can be a powerful method when a rapid response to a spreading disease is required.

  11. Repeat-element driven activation of proto-oncogenes in human malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Björn; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    Recent data demonstrated that the aberrant activity of endogenous repetitive elements of the DNA in humans can drive the expression of proto-oncogenes. This article summarizes these results and gives an outlook on the impact of these findings on the pathogenesis and therapy of human cancer.

  12. High throughput multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) of Staphylococcus aureus from human, animal and food sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, Daniel; Schwarz, Stefan; Bergonier, Dominique; Brisabois, Anne; Feßler, Andrea T; Gilbert, Florence B; Kadlec, Kristina; Lebeau, Benoit; Loisy-Hamon, Fabienne; Treilles, Michaël; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, a relevant pathogen in veterinary medicine, and a major cause of food poisoning. Epidemiological investigation tools are needed to establish surveillance of S. aureus strains in humans, animals and food. In this study, we investigated 145 S. aureus isolates recovered from various animal species, disease conditions, food products and food poisoning events. Multiple Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA), known to be highly efficient for the genotyping of human S. aureus isolates, was used and shown to be equally well suited for the typing of animal S. aureus isolates. MLVA was improved by using sixteen VNTR loci amplified in two multiplex PCRs and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis ensuring a high throughput and high discriminatory power. The isolates were assigned to twelve known clonal complexes (CCs) and--a few singletons. Half of the test collection belonged to four CCs (CC9, CC97, CC133, CC398) previously described as mostly associated with animals. The remaining eight CCs (CC1, CC5, CC8, CC15, CC25, CC30, CC45, CC51), representing 46% of the animal isolates, are common in humans. Interestingly, isolates responsible for food poisoning show a CC distribution signature typical of human isolates and strikingly different from animal isolates, suggesting a predominantly human origin.

  13. High throughput multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA of Staphylococcus aureus from human, animal and food sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sobral

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, a relevant pathogen in veterinary medicine, and a major cause of food poisoning. Epidemiological investigation tools are needed to establish surveillance of S. aureus strains in humans, animals and food. In this study, we investigated 145 S. aureus isolates recovered from various animal species, disease conditions, food products and food poisoning events. Multiple Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR analysis (MLVA, known to be highly efficient for the genotyping of human S. aureus isolates, was used and shown to be equally well suited for the typing of animal S. aureus isolates. MLVA was improved by using sixteen VNTR loci amplified in two multiplex PCRs and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis ensuring a high throughput and high discriminatory power. The isolates were assigned to twelve known clonal complexes (CCs and--a few singletons. Half of the test collection belonged to four CCs (CC9, CC97, CC133, CC398 previously described as mostly associated with animals. The remaining eight CCs (CC1, CC5, CC8, CC15, CC25, CC30, CC45, CC51, representing 46% of the animal isolates, are common in humans. Interestingly, isolates responsible for food poisoning show a CC distribution signature typical of human isolates and strikingly different from animal isolates, suggesting a predominantly human origin.

  14. Repeated short climatic change affects the epidermal differentiation program and leads to matrix remodeling in a human organotypic skin model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutrand LB

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laetitia-Barbollat Boutrand,1 Amélie Thépot,2 Charlotte Muther,3 Aurélie Boher,2 Julie Robic,4 Christelle Guéré,4 Katell Vié,4 Odile Damour,5 Jérôme Lamartine1,3 1Departement de Biologie, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, 2LabSkinCreations, 3CNRS UMR5305, Laboratoire de Biologie Tissulaire et d’Ingénierie Thérapeutique (LBTI, Lyon, 4Laboratoires Clarins, Cergy-Pontoise, 5Banque de Tissus et Cellules, Hospices Civiles de Lyon, Lyon, France Abstract: Human skin is subject to frequent changes in ambient temperature and humidity and needs to cope with these environmental modifications. To decipher the molecular response of human skin to repeated climatic change, a versatile model of skin equivalent subject to “hot–wet” (40°C, 80% relative humidity [RH] or “cold–dry” (10°C, 40% RH climatic stress repeated daily was used. To obtain an exhaustive view of the molecular mechanisms elicited by climatic change, large-scale gene expression DNA microarray analysis was performed and modulated function was determined by bioinformatic annotation. This analysis revealed several functions, including epidermal differentiation and extracellular matrix, impacted by repeated variations in climatic conditions. Some of these molecular changes were confirmed by histological examination and protein expression. Both treatments (hot–wet and cold–dry reduced the expression of genes encoding collagens, laminin, and proteoglycans, suggesting a profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Strong induction of the entire family of late cornified envelope genes after cold–dry exposure, confirmed at protein level, was also observed. These changes correlated with an increase in epidermal differentiation markers such as corneodesmosin and a thickening of the stratum corneum, indicating possible implementation of defense mechanisms against dehydration. This study for the first time reveals the complex pattern of molecular response allowing

  15. Reconstructing ancestral ranges in historical biogeography: properties and prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kristin S. LAMM; Benjamin D. REDELINGS

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a proliferation of quantitative methods for biogeographic inference. In particular, novel parametric approaches represent exciting new opportunities for the study of range evolution. Here, we review a selection of current methods for biogeographic analysis and discuss their respective properties. These methods include generalized parsimony approaches, weighted ancestral area analysis, dispersal-vicariance analysis, the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis model and other maximum likelihood approaches, and Bayesian stochastic mapping of ancestral ranges, including a novel approach to inferring range evolution in the context of island biogeography. Some of these methods were developed specifically for problems of ancestral range reconstruction, whereas others were designed for more general problems of character state reconstruction and subsequently applied to the study of ancestral ranges. Methods for reconstructing ancestral history on a phylogenetic tree differ not only in the types of ancestral range states that are allowed, but also in the various historical events that may change the ancestral ranges. We explore how the form of allowed ancestral ranges and allowed transitions can both affect the outcome of ancestral range estimation. Finally, we mention some promising avenues for future work in the development of model-based approaches to biogeographic analysis.

  16. DRPLA transgenic mouse substrains carrying single copy of full-length mutant human DRPLA gene with variable sizes of expanded CAG repeats exhibit CAG repeat length- and age-dependent changes in behavioral abnormalities and gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazushi; Zhou, Jiayi; Sato, Toshiya; Takao, Keizo; Miyagawa, Tsuyoshi; Oyake, Mutsuo; Yamada, Mitunori; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2012-05-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder with intellectual deterioration and various motor deficits including ataxia, choreoathetosis, and myoclonus, caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the DRPLA gene. Longer expanded CAG repeats contribute to an earlier age of onset, faster progression, and more severe neurological symptoms in DRPLA patients. In this study, we have established DRPLA transgenic mouse lines (sublines) harboring a single copy of the full-length mutant human DRPLA gene carrying various lengths of expanded CAG repeats (Q76, Q96, Q113, and Q129), which have clearly shown motor deficits and memory disturbance whose severity increases with the length of expanded CAG repeats and age, and successfully replicated the CAG repeat length- and age-dependent features of DRPLA patients. Neuronal intranuclear accumulation of the mutant DRPLA protein has been suggested to cause transcriptional dysregulation, leading to alteration in gene expression and neuronal dysfunction. In this study, we have conducted a comprehensive analysis of gene expression profiles in the cerebrum and cerebellum of transgenic mouse lines at 4, 8, and 12 weeks using multiple microarray platforms, and demonstrated that both the number and expression levels of the altered genes are highly dependent on CAG repeat length and age in both brain regions. Specific groups of genes and their function categories were identified by further agglomerative cluster analysis and gene functional annotation analysis. Calcium signaling and neuropeptide signaling, among others, were implicated in the pathophysiology of DRPLA. Our study provides unprecedented CAG-repeat-length-dependent mouse models of DRPLA, which are highly valuable not only for elucidating the CAG-repeat-length-dependent pathophysiology of DRPLA but also for developing therapeutic strategies for DRPLA.

  17. Mitochondrial tolerance to single and repeat exposure to simulated sunlight in human epidermal and dermal skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J; Murphy, J E J

    2016-12-01

    Sunlight represents the primary threat to mitochondrial integrity in skin given the unique nature of the mitochondrial genome and its proximity to the electron transport chain. The accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is a key factor in many human pathologies and this is linked to key roles of mitochondrial function in terms of energy production and cell regulation. The main objective of this study was to evaluate solar radiation induced changes in mitochondrial integrity, function and dynamics in human skin cells using a Q-Sun solar simulator to deliver a close match to the intensity of summer sunlight. Spontaneously immortalised human skin epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT) and Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDFn) were divided into two groups. Group A were irradiated once and Group B twice 7days apart and evaluated using cell survival, viability and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mass at 1, 4 and 7days post one exposure for Group A and 1, 4, 7 and 14days post second exposure for Group B. Viability and survival of HaCaT and HDFn cells decreased after repeat exposure to Simulated Sunlight Irradiation (SSI) with no recovery. HDFn cells showed no loss in MMP after one or two exposures to SSI compared to HaCaT cells which showed a periodic loss of MMP after one exposure with a repeat exposure causing a dramatic decrease from which cells did not recover. Mitochondrial Mass in exposed HDFn cells was consistent with control after one or two exposures to SSI; however mitochondrial mass was significantly decreased in HaCaT cells. Data presented here suggests that mitochondria in epidermal cells are more sensitive to sunlight damage compared to mitochondria in dermal cells, despite their origin, confirming a skin layer specific sensitivity to sunlight, but not as expected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Exons I and VII of the gene (Ker10) encoding human keratin 10 undergo structural rearrangements within repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, A V; Buchman, V L; Bliskovsky, V V; Shvets YuP; Kisselev, L L

    1992-07-15

    A genomic fragment containing the K51 gene previously isolated from a rat genomic library by hybridization with the v-mos probe in nonstringent conditions [Chumakov et al., Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 290 (1986) 1252-1254], resembles a human keratin type-I-encoding gene [Shvets et al., Mol. Biol. 24 (1990) 663-677]. This genomic clone, K51, has been used as a probe to search for related human genes. A recombinant clone, HK51, with a 1.5-kb insert, was isolated from a human embryonic skin cDNA library, and its nucleotide (nt) sequence was determined. Analysis has shown that the cloned cDNA encodes human keratin 10 (Ker10). All presently known nt sequences of the human Ker10-encoding gene (Ker10) are not identical. Differences are concentrated in the 5'-end of the first exon and in the middle of the seventh exon within repeats. In spite of structural rearrangements in two of eight exons, the reading frame and position of the stop codon are preserved. The genetic rearrangements cause changes in hydrophobicity profiles of the N and C termini of Ker10. It was also noticed that insertion of one nt leads to the formation of an unusual 3'-end of the transcript.

  19. Comparisons of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and viromes in human saliva reveal bacterial adaptations to salivary viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, David T; Salzman, Julia; Relman, David A

    2012-09-01

    Explorations of human microbiota have provided substantial insight into microbial community composition; however, little is known about interactions between various microbial components in human ecosystems. In response to the powerful impact of viral predation, bacteria have acquired potent defences, including an adaptive immune response based on the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/Cas system. To improve our understanding of the interactions between bacteria and their viruses in humans, we analysed 13 977 streptococcal CRISPR sequences and compared them with 2 588 172 virome reads in the saliva of four human subjects over 17 months. We found a diverse array of viruses and CRISPR spacers, many of which were specific to each subject and time point. There were numerous viral sequences matching CRISPR spacers; these matches were highly specific for salivary viruses. We determined that spacers and viruses coexist at the same time, which suggests that streptococcal CRISPR/Cas systems are under constant pressure from salivary viruses. CRISPRs in some subjects were just as likely to match viral sequences from other subjects as they were to match viruses from the same subject. Because interactions between bacteria and viruses help to determine the structure of bacterial communities, CRISPR-virus analyses are likely to provide insight into the forces shaping the human microbiome.

  20. Molecular characterization of long terminal repeat sequences from Brazilian human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Geraldo A; Monteiro-Cunha, Joana P; Fernandes, Flora M C; Mota-Miranda, Aline C A; Brites, Carlos; Alcantara, Luiz C J; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Morgado, Mariza G

    2013-05-01

    HIV-1 provirus activation is under control of the long terminal repeat (LTR)-5' viral promoter region, which presents remarkable genetic variation among HIV-1 subtypes. It is possible that molecular features of the LTR contribute to the unusual profile of the subtype C epidemic in the Brazilian Southern region. To characterize the LTR of Brazilian HIV isolates, we analyzed sequences from 21 infected individuals from Porto Alegre and Salvador cities. Sequences were compared with subtype B and C reference strains from different countries. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 17 (81%) samples were subtype B and four (19%) were subtype C. Common patterns of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in subtypes B and C sequences were confirmed and other potential TFBS specific for subtype C were found. Brazilian subtype C sequences contained an additional NF-κB biding site, as previously described for the majority of subtype C isolates. The high level of LTR polymorphisms identified in this study might be important for viral fitness.

  1. Common 5' beta-globin RFLP haplotypes harbour a surprising level of ancestral sequence mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Matthew T; Clegg, John B; Harding, Rosalind M

    2003-07-01

    Blocks of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the human genome represent segments of ancestral chromosomes. To investigate the relationship between LD and genealogy, we analysed diversity associated with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) haplotypes of the 5' beta-globin gene complex. Genealogical analyses were based on sequence alleles that spanned a 12.2-kb interval, covering 3.1 kb around the psibeta gene and 6.2 kb of the delta-globin gene and its 5' flanking sequence known as the R/T region. Diversity was sampled from a Kenyan Luo population where recent malarial selection has contributed to substantial LD. A single common sequence allele spanning the 12.2-kb interval exclusively identified the ancestral chromosome bearing the "Bantu" beta(s) (sickle-cell) RFLP haplotype. Other common 5' RFLP haplotypes comprised interspersed segments from multiple ancestral chromosomes. Nucleotide diversity was similar between psibeta and R/T-delta-globin but was non-uniformly distributed within the R/T-delta-globin region. High diversity associated with the 5' R/T identified two ancestral lineages that probably date back more than 2 million years. Within this genealogy, variation has been introduced into the 3' R/T by gene conversion from other ancestral chromosomes. Diversity in delta-globin was found to lead through parts of the main genealogy but to coalesce in a more recent ancestor. The well-known recombination hotspot is clearly restricted to the region 3' of delta-globin. Our analyses show that, whereas one common haplotype in a block of high LD represents a long segment from a single ancestral chromosome, others are mosaics of short segments from multiple ancestors related in genealogies of unsuspected complexity.

  2. Gene expression in human skeletal muscle: alternative normalization method and effect of repeated biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Nordsborg, Nikolai; Kusuhara, K.

    2005-01-01

    The reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method has lately become widely used to determine transcription and mRNA content in rodent and human muscle samples. However, the common use of endogenous controls for correcting for variance in cDNA between samples is not optimal. Spec...

  3. Urinary excretion of phthalates and paraben after repeated whole-body topical application in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janjua, Nadeem Rezaq; Frederiksen, Hanne; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2008-01-01

    Diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and butyl paraben (BP) are man-made chemicals used in personal care products, such as lotions and creams. Exposure to these chemicals causes a variety of adverse reproductive outcomes in animal studies. Humans can be exposed to these chemicals...

  4. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events.

  5. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) genotyping of human Brucella isolates in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Bee Yong; Ahmad, Norazah; Hashim, Rohaidah; Mohamed Zahidi, Jama'ayah; Thong, Kwai Lin; Koh, Xiu Pei; Mohd Noor, Azura

    2015-06-02

    Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. It can cause acute febrile illness in human and is a major health problem. Studies in human brucellosis in Malaysia is limited and so far no genotyping studies has been done on Brucella isolates. The aim of the study was to determine the genetic diversity among Brucella species isolated from human brucellosis, obtained over a 6-year period (2009-2014). In this study, the genotypic characteristics of 43 human Brucella melitensis isolates were analysed using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) which consisted of eight minisatellite loci (panel 1) and eight microsatellite loci; panels 2A (3 microsatellite loci) and panel 2B (5 microsatellite loci). Two human Brucella suis isolates were also investigated using the MLVA assay. Using panel 1 (MLVA8), two genotypes namely genotype 43 and 44 were obtained from the 43 B. melitensis isolates. Using the combination of panels 1 and 2A loci (MLVA11), two genotypes were obtained while using the complete panels 1, 2A and 2B, nine genotypes were obtained. The polymorphisms in using the complete panels (MLVA16) were observed in three loci from panel 2B, which showed a diversity index higher than 0.17. All B. melitensis isolates were closely related to the East Mediterranean group. For B. suis isolates, only genotype 6 and genotype 33 were obtained using panel 1 and MLVA11 respectively. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed a low genetic diversity among B. melitensis and B. suis isolates from human patients. Based on the MLVA16 assay, B. melitensis belonging to the East Mediterranean group is responsible for the vast majority of Brucella infections in our Malaysian patients. To our knowledge, this is the first genotyping study of human Brucella isolates in Malaysia.

  6. A novel function of RNAs arising from the long terminal repeat of human endogenous retrovirus 9 in cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lai; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Candotti, Fabio; Grajkowski, Andrzej; Beaucage, Serge L; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Calvert, Valerie; Juhl, Hartmut; Mills, Frederick; Mason, Karen; Shastri, Neal; Chik, Josh; Xu, Cynthia; Rosenberg, Amy S

    2013-01-01

    The human genome contains approximately 50 copies of the replication-defective human endogenous retrovirus 9 (ERV-9) and thousands of copies of its solitary long term repeat (sLTR) element. While some sLTRs are located upstream of critical genes and have enhancer activity, other sLTRs are located within introns and may be transcribed as RNAs. We found that intronic RNAs arising from U3 sLTRs of ERV-9 were expressed as both sense (S) and antisense (AS) transcripts in all human cells tested but that expression levels differed in malignant versus nonmalignant cells. In nonmalignant cells, AS was expressed at higher levels than S and at higher levels than in malignant cells; in malignant cells, AS was expressed at amounts equivalent to those of S RNA. Critically, U3 AS RNA was found to physically bind to key transcription factors for cellular proliferation, including NF-Y, p53, and sp1, indicating that such RNA transcripts may function as decoy targets or traps for NF-Y and thus inhibit the growth of human cancer cells. Indeed, short U3 oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) based on these RNA sequences ably inhibited proliferation of cancer cell lines driven by cyclins B1/B2, the gene targets of NF-Y.

  7. In vitro kinetics of amiodarone and its major metabolite in two human liver cell models after acute and repeated treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomponio, Giuliana; Savary, Camille C; Parmentier, Céline; Bois, Frederic; Guillouzo, André; Romanelli, Luca; Richert, Lysiane; Di Consiglio, Emma; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-12-25

    The limited value of in vitro toxicity data for the in vivo extrapolation has been often attributed to the lack of kinetic data. Here the in vitro kinetics of amiodarone (AMI) and its mono-N-desethyl (MDEA) metabolite was determined and modelled in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and HepaRG cells, after single and repeated administration of clinically relevant concentrations. AMI bioavailability was influenced by adsorption to the plastic and the presence of protein in the medium (e.g. 10% serum protein reduced the uptake by half in HepaRG cells). The cell uptake was quick (within 3h), AMI metabolism was efficient and a dynamic equilibrium was reached in about a week after multiple dosing. In HepaRG cells the metabolic clearance was higher than in PHH and increased over time, as well as CYP3A4. The interindividual variability in MDEA production in PHHs was not proportional to the differences in CYP3A4 activities, suggesting the involvement of other CYPs and/or AMI-related CYP inhibition. After repeated treatment AMI showed a slight potential for bioaccumulation, whereas much higher intracellular MDEA levels accumulated over time, especially in the HepaRG cells, associated with occurrence of phospholipidosis. The knowledge of in vitro biokinetics is important to transform an actual in vitro concentration-effect into an in vivo dose-effect relationship by using appropriate modelling, thus improving the in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation.

  8. Human tandem-repeat-type galectins bind bacterial non-βGal polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knirel, Yu A.; Gabius, H.-J.; Blixt, Klas Ola;

    2014-01-01

    ), prompted us to establish an array with bacterial polysaccharides. We addressed the question whether sugar determinants other than β-galactosides may be docking sites, using human galectins-4, -8, and -9. Positive controls with histo-blood group ABH-epitopes and the E. coli 086 polysaccharide ascertained...... the suitability of the set-up. Significant signal generation, depending on type of galectin and polysacchride, was obtained. Presence of cognate β-galactoside-related epitopes within a polysaccharide chain or its branch will not automatically establish binding properties, and structural constellations lacking...

  9. Repeated Structural Imaging Reveals Nonlinear Progression of Experience-Dependent Volume Changes in Human Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Elisabeth; Kühn, Simone; Verrel, Julius; Mårtensson, Johan; Bodammer, Nils Christian; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lövdén, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Evidence for experience-dependent structural brain change in adult humans is accumulating. However, its time course is not well understood, as intervention studies typically consist of only 2 imaging sessions (before vs. after training). We acquired up to 18 structural magnetic resonance images over a 7-week period while 15 right-handed participants practiced left-hand writing and drawing. After 4 weeks, we observed increases in gray matter of both left and right primary motor cortices relative to a control group; 3 weeks later, these differences were no longer reliable. Time-series analyses revealed that gray matter in the primary motor cortices expanded during the first 4 weeks and then partially renormalized, in particular in the right hemisphere, despite continued practice and increasing task proficiency. Similar patterns of expansion followed by partial renormalization are also found in synaptogenesis, cortical map plasticity, and maturation, and may qualify as a general principle of structural plasticity. Research on human brain plasticity needs to encompass more than 2 measurement occasions to capture expansion and potential renormalization processes over time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Ancestral Area Analysis of the Genus Caragara (Leguminosae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGMing-Li

    2004-01-01

    Caragana has a temperate Asian distribution. Based on the phylogeny and 13 distributionalareas of this genus, its ancestral area was studied via the ancestral area analysis suggested by Bremer(1992), Ronquist (1994) and Hausdorf (1997). The results indicate that three areas, Far East-NortheastChina, Altai-Sayan and North China-Qinling Mountains (Mts) are likely the ancestral areas. Linking to theviewpoints of the Holarctic origin for north temperate flora, Far East-Northeast China seems more likely tobe the ancestral area. According to the three ancestral areas isolated geographically and the analysis inthe present study, as well as former biogeographical analysis of this genus, it is suggested that Caraganaspeciation is mainly in the mode of vicariance rather than dispersal, and dispersed is often in shortdistance.

  11. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis genotyping of human Brucella isolates from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Selçuk; Ivanov, Ivan N; Durmaz, Riza; Bayraktar, Mehmet Refik; Ayaslioglu, Ergin; Uyanik, M Hamidullah; Aliskan, Hikmet; Yasar, Ekrem; Bayramoglu, Gülçin; Arslantürk, Ahmet; Vergnaud, Gilles; Kantardjiev, Todor V

    2011-09-01

    A multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to investigate the epidemiological relationship and genetic diversity among 162 human Brucella isolates collected from all geographic regions of Turkey in an 8-year period (2001 to 2008). The isolates were genotyped by using an MLVA assay developed in Orsay, France (MLVA-16(Orsay)) including eight minisatellite (panel 1) and eight microsatellite (panel 2, subdivided into 2A and 2B) markers. Panels 1 and 2A distinguish 14 genotypes; two of these represented 85% of the strains. Panel 2B displayed a very high discriminatory power. Three loci from panel 2B had diversity index values higher than 0.74. MLVA-16(Orsay) yielded 105 genotypes; 73 were represented by a unique isolate, and 32 included two to eight isolates. The isolates from different patients within the same outbreak or from the same patient before first-line therapy and after relapse showed identical genotypes. A number of MLVA genotypes appeared to be partially restricted to some geographic areas and displayed no annual variation, possibly reflecting persistence of genotypes in certain areas for a time span of at least a decade. This study, representing the first molecular typing results of human Brucella isolates from Turkey, indicated that Turkish human Brucella melitensis isolates were most closely related to the neighboring countries' isolates included in the East Mediterranean group.

  12. Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis Genotyping of Human Brucella Isolates from Turkey▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Selçuk; Ivanov, Ivan N.; Durmaz, Rıza; Bayraktar, Mehmet Refik; Ayaşlıoğlu, Ergin; Uyanık, M. Hamidullah; Alışkan, Hikmet; Yaşar, Ekrem; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Arslantürk, Ahmet; Vergnaud, Gilles; Kantardjiev, Todor V.

    2011-01-01

    A multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to investigate the epidemiological relationship and genetic diversity among 162 human Brucella isolates collected from all geographic regions of Turkey in an 8-year period (2001 to 2008). The isolates were genotyped by using an MLVA assay developed in Orsay, France (MLVA-16Orsay) including eight minisatellite (panel 1) and eight microsatellite (panel 2, subdivided into 2A and 2B) markers. Panels 1 and 2A distinguish 14 genotypes; two of these represented 85% of the strains. Panel 2B displayed a very high discriminatory power. Three loci from panel 2B had diversity index values higher than 0.74. MLVA-16Orsay yielded 105 genotypes; 73 were represented by a unique isolate, and 32 included two to eight isolates. The isolates from different patients within the same outbreak or from the same patient before first-line therapy and after relapse showed identical genotypes. A number of MLVA genotypes appeared to be partially restricted to some geographic areas and displayed no annual variation, possibly reflecting persistence of genotypes in certain areas for a time span of at least a decade. This study, representing the first molecular typing results of human Brucella isolates from Turkey, indicated that Turkish human Brucella melitensis isolates were most closely related to the neighboring countries' isolates included in the East Mediterranean group. PMID:21795514

  13. Evolution of human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein genes and surrounding Alu repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, C M; Easteal, S; Board, P G

    1990-04-01

    There is a mosaic pattern of variation between the two tandemly arranged human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein genes. Both the synonymous and the nonsynonymous sites of exons 3 and 4 are more divergent than the rest of the gene, suggesting that they have had a different evolutionary history. Comparisons of the two gene sequences with rat AGP indicate that exons 3 and 4 of AGP2 have been evolving without functional constraint since their divergence from AGP1. It is proposed that the conserved region of the gene has been homogenized recently by gene conversion with the homologous regions of AGP1. The Alu sequences surrounding the genes appear to have been involved in both the gene duplication and the gene conversion events.

  14. Repeatability of corticospinal and spinal measures during lengthening and shortening contractions in the human tibialis anterior muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Tallent

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Elements of the human central nervous system (CNS constantly oscillate. In addition, there are also methodological factors and changes in muscle mechanics during dynamic muscle contractions that threaten the stability and consistency of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and perpherial nerve stimulation (PNS measures. PURPOSE: To determine the repeatability of TMS and PNS measures during lengthening and shortening muscle actions in the intact human tibialis anterior. METHODS: On three consecutive days, 20 males performed lengthening and shortening muscle actions at 15, 25, 50 and 80% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. The amplitude of the Motor Evoked Potentials (MEPs produced by TMS was measured at rest and during muscle contraction at 90° of ankle joint position. MEPs were normalised to Mmax determined with PNS. The corticospinal silent period was recorded at 80% MVC. Hoffman reflex (H-reflex at 10% isometric and 25% shortening and lengthening MVCs, and V-waves during MVCs were also evoked on each of the three days. RESULTS: With the exception of MEPs evoked at 80% shortening MVC, all TMS-derived measures showed good reliability (ICC = 0.81-0.94 from days 2 to 3. Confidence intervals (CI, 95% were lower between days 2 and 3 when compared to days 1 and 2. MEPs significantly increased at rest from days 1 to 2 (P = 0.016 and days 1 to 3 (P = 0.046. The H-reflex during dynamic muscle contraction was reliable across the three days (ICC = 0.76-0.84. V-waves (shortening, ICC = 0.77, lengthening ICC = 0.54 and the H-reflex at 10% isometric MVC (ICC = 0.66 was generally less reliable over the three days. CONCLUSION: Although it is well known that measures of the intact human CNS exhibit moment-to-moment fluctuations, careful experimental arrangements make it possible to obtain consistent and repeatable measurements of corticospinal and spinal excitability in the actively lengthening and shortening human

  15. The microcephalin ancestral allele in a Neanderthal individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high frequency (around 0.70 worldwide and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 million years ago, evolved under strong positive selection, and passed into the human gene pool by an episode of admixture circa 37,000 years ago. The geographic distribution of haplogroup D, with marked differences between Africa and Eurasia, suggested that the archaic human form admixing with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the first PCR amplification and high-throughput sequencing of nuclear DNA at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus from Neanderthal individual from Mezzena Rockshelter (Monti Lessini, Italy. We show that a well-preserved Neanderthal fossil dated at approximately 50,000 years B.P., was homozygous for the ancestral, non-D, allele. The high yield of Neanderthal mtDNA sequences of the studied specimen, the pattern of nucleotide misincorporation among sequences consistent with post-mortem DNA damage and an accurate control of the MCPH1 alleles in all personnel that manipulated the sample, make it extremely unlikely that this result might reflect modern DNA contamination. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MCPH1 genotype of the Monti Lessini (MLS Neanderthal does not prove that there was no interbreeding between anatomically archaic and modern humans in Europe, but certainly shows that speculations on a possible Neanderthal origin of what is now the most common MCPH1 haplogroup are not supported by empirical evidence from ancient DNA.

  16. Activation of the Long Terminal Repeat of Human Endogenous Retrovirus K by Melanoma-Specific Transcription Factor MITF-M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoko Katoh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The human and Old World primate genomes possess conserved endogenous retrovirus sequences that have been implicated in evolution, reproduction, and carcinogenesis. Human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-K with 5′LTR-gag-pro-pol-env-rec/np9-3′LTR sequences represents the newest retrovirus family that integrated into the human genome 1 to 5 million years ago. Although a high-level expression of HERV-K in melanomas, breast cancers, and terato-carcinomas has been demonstrated, the mechanism of the lineage-specific activation of the long terminal repeat (LTR remains obscure. We studied chromosomal HERV-K expression in MeWo melanoma cells in comparison with the basal expression in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells. Cloned LTR of HERV-K (HML-2.HOM was also characterized by mutation and transactivation experiments. We detected multiple transcriptional initiator (Inr sites in the LTR by rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends (5′ RACE. HEK293 and MeWo showed different Inr usage. The most potent Inr was associated with a TATA box and three binding motifs of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF. Both chromosomal HERV-K expression and the cloned LTR function were strongly activated in HEK293 by transfection with MITF-M, a melanocyte/melanoma–specific isoform of MITF. Coexpression of MITF and the HERV-K core antigen was detected in retinal pigmented epithelium by an immunofluorescence analysis. Although malignant melanoma lines MeWo, G361, and SK-MEL-28 showed enhanced HERV-K transcription compared with normal melanocytes, the level of MITF-M messenger RNA persisted from normal to transformed melanocytes. Thus, MITF-M may be a prerequisite for the pigmented cell lineage–specific function of HERV-K LTR, leading to the high-level expression in malignant melanomas.

  17. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) activity upon recombinant expression and purification of human telomerase in a bacterial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Debra T; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Larson, Amy C; Hansen, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase biogenesis is a highly regulated process that solves the DNA end-replication problem. Recombinant expression has so far been accomplished only within a eukaryotic background. Towards structural and functional analyses, we developed bacterial expression of human telomerase. Positive activity by the telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) was identified in cell extracts of Escherichia coli expressing a sequence-optimized hTERT gene, the full-length hTR RNA with a self-splicing hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, and the human heat shock complex of Hsp90, Hsp70, p60/Hop, Hsp40, and p23. The Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin did not affect post-assembly TRAP activity. By various purification methods, TRAP activity was also obtained upon expression of only hTERT and hTR. hTERT was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry in a ∼120 kDa SDS-PAGE fragment from a TRAP-positive purification fraction. TRAP activity was also supported by hTR constructs lacking the box H/ACA small nucleolar RNA domain. End-point TRAP indicated expression levels within 3-fold of that from HeLa carcinoma cells, which is several orders of magnitude below detection by the direct assay. These results represent the first report of TRAP activity from a bacterium and provide a facile system for the investigation of assembly factors and anti-cancer therapeutics independently of a eukaryotic setting.

  18. The Telomeric Repeats of Human Herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) Are Required for Efficient Virus Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallaschek, Nina; Sanyal, Anirban; Pirzer, Fabian; Gravel, Annie; Mori, Yasuko; Flamand, Louis; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2016-05-01

    Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and 6B (HHV-6B) are ubiquitous betaherpesviruses that infects humans within the first years of life and establishes latency in various cell types. Both viruses can integrate their genomes into telomeres of host chromosomes in latently infected cells. The molecular mechanism of viral integration remains elusive. Intriguingly, HHV-6A, HHV-6B and several other herpesviruses harbor arrays of telomeric repeats (TMR) identical to human telomere sequences at the ends of their genomes. The HHV-6A and HHV-6B genomes harbor two TMR arrays, the perfect TMR (pTMR) and the imperfect TMR (impTMR). To determine if the TMR are involved in virus integration, we deleted both pTMR and impTMR in the HHV-6A genome. Upon reconstitution, the TMR mutant virus replicated comparable to wild type (wt) virus, indicating that the TMR are not essential for HHV-6A replication. To assess the integration properties of the recombinant viruses, we established an in vitro integration system that allows assessment of integration efficiency and genome maintenance in latently infected cells. Integration of HHV-6A was severely impaired in the absence of the TMR and the virus genome was lost rapidly, suggesting that integration is crucial for the maintenance of the virus genome. Individual deletion of the pTMR and impTMR revealed that the pTMR play the major role in HHV-6A integration, whereas the impTMR only make a minor contribution, allowing us to establish a model for HHV-6A integration. Taken together, our data shows that the HHV-6A TMR are dispensable for virus replication, but are crucial for integration and maintenance of the virus genome in latently infected cells.

  19. The Telomeric Repeats of Human Herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A Are Required for Efficient Virus Integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Wallaschek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A and 6B (HHV-6B are ubiquitous betaherpesviruses that infects humans within the first years of life and establishes latency in various cell types. Both viruses can integrate their genomes into telomeres of host chromosomes in latently infected cells. The molecular mechanism of viral integration remains elusive. Intriguingly, HHV-6A, HHV-6B and several other herpesviruses harbor arrays of telomeric repeats (TMR identical to human telomere sequences at the ends of their genomes. The HHV-6A and HHV-6B genomes harbor two TMR arrays, the perfect TMR (pTMR and the imperfect TMR (impTMR. To determine if the TMR are involved in virus integration, we deleted both pTMR and impTMR in the HHV-6A genome. Upon reconstitution, the TMR mutant virus replicated comparable to wild type (wt virus, indicating that the TMR are not essential for HHV-6A replication. To assess the integration properties of the recombinant viruses, we established an in vitro integration system that allows assessment of integration efficiency and genome maintenance in latently infected cells. Integration of HHV-6A was severely impaired in the absence of the TMR and the virus genome was lost rapidly, suggesting that integration is crucial for the maintenance of the virus genome. Individual deletion of the pTMR and impTMR revealed that the pTMR play the major role in HHV-6A integration, whereas the impTMR only make a minor contribution, allowing us to establish a model for HHV-6A integration. Taken together, our data shows that the HHV-6A TMR are dispensable for virus replication, but are crucial for integration and maintenance of the virus genome in latently infected cells.

  20. Repeated assessment of exploration and novelty seeking in the human behavioral pattern monitor in bipolar disorder patients and healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpi Minassian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exploration and novelty seeking are cross-species adaptive behaviors that are dysregulated in bipolar disorder (BD and are critical features of the illness. While these behaviors have been extensively quantified in animals, multivariate human paradigms of exploration are lacking. The human Behavioral Pattern Monitor (hBPM, a human version of the animal open field, identified a signature pattern of hyper-exploration in manic BD patients, but whether exploratory behavior changes with treatment is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity of the hBPM to changes in manic symptoms, a necessary step towards elucidating the neurobiology underlying BD. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twelve acutely hospitalized manic BD subjects and 21 healthy volunteers were tested in the hBPM over three sessions; all subjects were retested one week after their first session and two weeks after their second session. Motor activity, spatial and entropic (degree of unpredictability patterns of exploration, and interactions with novel objects were quantified. Manic BD patients demonstrated greater motor activity, extensive and more unpredictable patterns of exploration, and more object interactions than healthy volunteers during all three sessions. Exploration and novelty-seeking slightly decreased in manic BD subjects over the three sessions as their symptoms responded to treatment, but never to the level of healthy volunteers. Among healthy volunteers, exploration did not significantly decrease over time, and hBPM measures were highly correlated between sessions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Manic BD patients showed a modest reduction in symptoms yet still demonstrated hyper-exploration and novelty seeking in the hBPM, suggesting that these illness features may be enduring characteristics of BD. Furthermore, behavior in the hBPM is not subject to marked habituation effects. The hBPM can be reliably used in a repeated-measures design

  1. The ancestral karyotype of Carnivora: comparison with that of platyrrhine monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrillaux, B; Couturier, J

    1983-01-01

    The karyotypes of six species of Carnivora (Mungos mungo, Paradoxurus hermaphroditus, Potos flavus, Mustela furo, Felis serval, and Halichoerus grypus), representative of five different families, were studied and compared. Correspondence between almost all chromosome segments was found, and a presumed ancestral karyotype of Carnivora is proposed. Analogies to human chromosomes are also given, and the results obtained are in excellent agreement with previously published gene mapping data on man and the domestic cat.

  2. Interrogation of the protein-protein interactions between human BRCA2 BRC repeats and RAD51 reveals atomistic determinants of affinity.

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    Daniel J Cole

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 controls the recombinase RAD51 in the reactions that mediate homologous DNA recombination, an essential cellular process required for the error-free repair of DNA double-stranded breaks. The primary mode of interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51 is through the BRC repeats, which are ∼35 residue peptide motifs that interact directly with RAD51 in vitro. Human BRCA2, like its mammalian orthologues, contains 8 BRC repeats whose sequence and spacing are evolutionarily conserved. Despite their sequence conservation, there is evidence that the different human BRC repeats have distinct capacities to bind RAD51. A previously published crystal structure reports the structural basis of the interaction between human BRC4 and the catalytic core domain of RAD51. However, no structural information is available regarding the binding of the remaining seven BRC repeats to RAD51, nor is it known why the BRC repeats show marked variation in binding affinity to RAD51 despite only subtle sequence variation. To address these issues, we have performed fluorescence polarisation assays to indirectly measure relative binding affinity, and applied computational simulations to interrogate the behaviour of the eight human BRC-RAD51 complexes, as well as a suite of BRC cancer-associated mutations. Our computational approaches encompass a range of techniques designed to link sequence variation with binding free energy. They include MM-PBSA and thermodynamic integration, which are based on classical force fields, and a recently developed approach to computing binding free energies from large-scale quantum mechanical first principles calculations with the linear-scaling density functional code onetep. Our findings not only reveal how sequence variation in the BRC repeats directly affects affinity with RAD51 and provide significant new insights into the control of RAD51 by human BRCA2, but also exemplify a palette of computational and

  3. Why Meillassoux’s Speculative Materialism Struggles with Ancestrality

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    Ciprian Jeler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that Quentin Meillassoux’s speculative materialism doesn’t offer us the means to account for the ancestral statements that the modern sciences produce, i.e. for the scientific statements about events preceding all forms of life. An analysis of the reasons why Meillassoux thinks that the problem of ancestrality problematizes the contemporary self-evidence of correlationism is first offered. The results of this analysis are then applied to speculative materialism itself and the consequences are not very promising: very much like correlationism, speculative materialism explicitly denies what I call the “generalized version of the realistic assumption of science” and, in so doing, renders scientific ancestral statements de jure unverifiable. Therefore, if correlationism is rendered suspicious by the issue of ancestrality, the same can be said of speculative materialism.

  4. Polymorphic tandem repeats within gene promoters act as modifiers of gene expression and DNA methylation in humans.

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    Quilez, Javier; Guilmatre, Audrey; Garg, Paras; Highnam, Gareth; Gymrek, Melissa; Erlich, Yaniv; Joshi, Ricky S; Mittelman, David; Sharp, Andrew J

    2016-05-05

    Despite representing an important source of genetic variation, tandem repeats (TRs) remain poorly studied due to technical difficulties. We hypothesized that TRs can operate as expression (eQTLs) and methylation (mQTLs) quantitative trait loci. To test this we analyzed the effect of variation at 4849 promoter-associated TRs, genotyped in 120 individuals, on neighboring gene expression and DNA methylation. Polymorphic promoter TRs were associated with increased variance in local gene expression and DNA methylation, suggesting functional consequences related to TR variation. We identified >100 TRs associated with expression/methylation levels of adjacent genes. These potential eQTL/mQTL TRs were enriched for overlaps with transcription factor binding and DNaseI hypersensitivity sites, providing a rationale for their effects. Moreover, we showed that most TR variants are poorly tagged by nearby single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) markers, indicating that many functional TR variants are not effectively assayed by SNP-based approaches. Our study assigns biological significance to TR variations in the human genome, and suggests that a significant fraction of TR variations exert functional effects via alterations of local gene expression or epigenetics. We conclude that targeted studies that focus on genotyping TR variants are required to fully ascertain functional variation in the genome. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Atomic model of human Rcd-1 reveals an armadillo-like-repeat protein with in vitro nucleic acid binding properties.

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    Garces, Robert G; Gillon, Wanda; Pai, Emil F

    2007-02-01

    Rcd-1, a protein highly conserved across eukaryotes, was initially identified as a factor essential for nitrogen starvation-invoked differentiation in fission yeast, and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog, CAF40, has been identified as part of the CCR4-NOT transcription complex, where it interacts with the NOT1 protein. Mammalian homologs are involved in various cellular differentiation processes including retinoic acid-induced differentiation and hematopoetic cell development. Here, we present the 2.2 A X-ray structure of the highly conserved region of human Rcd-1 and investigate possible functional abilities of this and the full-length protein. The monomer is made up of six armadillo repeats forming a solvent-accessible, positively-charged cleft 21-22 A wide that, in contrast to other armadillo proteins, stays fully exposed in the dimer. Prompted by this finding, we established that Rcd-1 can bind to single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides in vitro with the affinity of G/C/T > A. Mutation of an arginine residue within the cleft strongly reduced or abolished oligonucleotide binding. Rcd-1's ability to bind to nucleic acids, in addition to the previously reported protein-protein interaction with NOT1, suggests a new feature in Rcd-1's role in regulation of overall cellular differentiation processes.

  6. Structural model for the interaction of a designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein with the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.

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    V Chandana Epa

    Full Text Available Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins are a class of novel binding proteins that can be selected and evolved to bind to targets with high affinity and specificity. We are interested in the DARPin H10-2-G3, which has been evolved to bind with very high affinity to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. HER2 is found to be over-expressed in 30% of breast cancers, and is the target for the FDA-approved therapeutic monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Here, we use computational macromolecular docking, coupled with several interface metrics such as shape complementarity, interaction energy, and electrostatic complementarity, to model the structure of the complex between the DARPin H10-2-G3 and HER2. We analyzed the interface between the two proteins and then validated the structural model by showing that selected HER2 point mutations at the putative interface with H10-2-G3 reduce the affinity of binding up to 100-fold without affecting the binding of trastuzumab. Comparisons made with a subsequently solved X-ray crystal structure of the complex yielded a backbone atom root mean square deviation of 0.84-1.14 Ångstroms. The study presented here demonstrates the capability of the computational techniques of structural bioinformatics in generating useful structural models of protein-protein interactions.

  7. Inference of Ancestral Recombination Graphs through Topological Data Analysis.

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    Cámara, Pablo G; Levine, Arnold J; Rabadán, Raúl

    2016-08-01

    The recent explosion of genomic data has underscored the need for interpretable and comprehensive analyses that can capture complex phylogenetic relationships within and across species. Recombination, reassortment and horizontal gene transfer constitute examples of pervasive biological phenomena that cannot be captured by tree-like representations. Starting from hundreds of genomes, we are interested in the reconstruction of potential evolutionary histories leading to the observed data. Ancestral recombination graphs represent potential histories that explicitly accommodate recombination and mutation events across orthologous genomes. However, they are computationally costly to reconstruct, usually being infeasible for more than few tens of genomes. Recently, Topological Data Analysis (TDA) methods have been proposed as robust and scalable methods that can capture the genetic scale and frequency of recombination. We build upon previous TDA developments for detecting and quantifying recombination, and present a novel framework that can be applied to hundreds of genomes and can be interpreted in terms of minimal histories of mutation and recombination events, quantifying the scales and identifying the genomic locations of recombinations. We implement this framework in a software package, called TARGet, and apply it to several examples, including small migration between different populations, human recombination, and horizontal evolution in finches inhabiting the Galápagos Islands.

  8. Increasing the repeating units of ethylene glycol-based dimethacrylates directed toward reduced oxidative stress and co-stimulatory factors expression in human monocytic cells.

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    Tamura, Atsushi; Fukumoto, Izumi; Yui, Nobuhiko; Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    The ethylene glycol-based dimethacrylates are commonly used in biomaterials and dental restorative materials as a cross-linking agent. In this study, toxic effect of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylates (PEG-DMAs) with various ethylene glycol repeating units was investigated in terms of cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and the expression of co-stimulatory factors in human leukemia cell line (THP-1 cells) to verify the effect of ethylene glycol repeating units. Note that the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient of PEG-based dimethacrylates decreased with increasing the ethylene glycol repeating units, indicating that the hydrophilicity of PEG-DMAs increased with ethylene glycol repeating units. The toxic effect of PEG-DMAs such as cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and the expression of CD86 in treated THP-1 cells are reduced with increasing the ethylene glycol repeating units in PEG-DMAs. However, the expression of CD54 in treated THP-1 cells was not influenced with the ethylene glycol repeating units and the maximal expression level of CD54 was observed at the concentration range of 2-4 mM for all samples. Accordingly, hydrophilic character of PEG-DMAs with long ethylene glycol chains definitely alleviates the some toxic aspect of PEG-based DMAs. This finding would provide important insight into the design of new biomaterials and dental materials with superior biocompatibility. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Testing the reliability of software tools in sex and ancestry estimation in a multi-ancestral Brazilian sample.

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    Urbanová, Petra; Ross, Ann H; Jurda, Mikoláš; Nogueira, Maria-Ines

    2014-09-01

    In the framework of forensic anthropology osteometric techniques are generally preferred over visual examinations due to a higher level of reproducibility and repeatability; qualities that are crucial within a legal context. The use of osteometric methods has been further reinforced by incorporating statistically-based algorithms and large reference samples in a variety of user-friendly software applications. However, the continued increase in admixture of human populations have made the use of osteometric methods for estimation of ancestry much more complex, which confounds one of major requirements of ancestry assessment - intra-population homogeneity. The present paper tests the accuracy of ancestry and sex assessment using four identification software tools, specifically FORDISC 2.0, FORDISC 3.1.293, COLIPR 1.5.2 and 3D-ID 1.0. Software accuracy was tested in a sample of 174 documented human crania of Brazilian origin composed of different ancestral groups (i.e., European Brazilians, Afro-Brazilians, and Japanese Brazilians and of admixed ancestry). The results show that regardless of the software algorithm employed and composition of the reference database, all methods were able to allocate approximately 50% of Brazilian specimens to an appropriate major reference group. Of the three ancestral groups, Afro-Brazilians were especially prone to misclassification. Japanese Brazilians, by contrast, were shown to be relatively easily recognizable as being of Asian descent but at the same time showed a strong affinity towards Hispanic crania, in particularly when the classification based on FDB was carried out in FORDISC. For crania of admixed origin all of the algorithms showed a considerable higher rate of inconsistency with a tendency for misclassification into Asian and American Hispanic groups. Sex assessments revealed an overall modest to poor reliability (60-71% of correctly classified specimens) using the tested software programs with unbalanced individual

  10. Disruption of human papillomavirus 16 E6 gene by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas system in human cervical cancer cells

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    Yu L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lan Yu, Xiaoli Wang, Da Zhu, Wencheng Ding, Liming Wang, Changlin Zhang, Xiaohui Jiang, Hui Shen, Shujie Liao, Ding Ma, Zheng Hu, Hui Wang Cancer Biology Research Center, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China Abstract: High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV, especially HPV16, is considered a main causative agent of cervical cancer. Upon HPV infection, the viral oncoprotein E6 disrupts the host tumor-suppressor protein p53, thus promoting malignant transformation of normal cervical cells. Here, we used the newly developed programmable ribonucleic acid-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas system to disrupt the HPV16 E6 gene. We showed that HPV16 E6 deoxyribonucleic acid was cleaved at specific sites, leading to apoptosis and growth inhibition of HPV16-positive SiHa and CaSki cells, but not HPV-negative C33A or human embryonic kidney 293 cells. We also observed downregulation of the E6 protein and restoration of the p53 protein. These data proved that the HPV16 E6 ribonucleic acid-guided CRISPR/Cas system might be an effective therapeutic agent in treating HPV infection-related cervical malignancy. Keywords: CRISPR/Cas system, E6, p53, SiHa, CaSki, cervical cancer

  11. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 transactivates the long terminal repeat of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

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    Scala, G; Quinto, I; Ruocco, M R; Mallardo, M; Ambrosino, C; Squitieri, B; Tassone, P; Venuta, S

    1993-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected subjects show a high incidence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. This suggests that EBV may function as a cofactor that affects HIV-1 activation and may play a major role in the progression of AIDS. To test this hypothesis, we generated two EBV-negative human B-cell lines that stably express the EBNA2 gene of EBV. These EBNA2-positive cell lines were transiently transfected with plasmids that carry either the wild type or deletion mutants of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. There was a consistently higher HIV-1 LTR activation in EBNA2-expressing cells than in control cells, which suggested that EBNA2 proteins could activate the HIV-1 promoter, possibly by inducing nuclear factors binding to HIV-1 cis-regulatory sequences. To test this possibility, we used CAT-based plasmids carrying deletions of the NF-kappa B (pNFA-CAT), Sp1 (pSpA-CAT), or TAR (pTAR-CAT) region of the HIV-1 LTR and retardation assays in which nuclear proteins from EBNA2-expressing cells were challenged with oligonucleotides encompassing the NF-kappa B or Sp1 region of the HIV-1 LTR. We found that both the NF-kappa B and the Sp1 sites of the HIV-1 LTR are necessary for EBNA2 transactivation and that increased expression resulted from the induction of NF-kappa B-like factors. Moreover, experiments with the TAR-deleted pTAR-CAT and with the tat-expressing pAR-TAT plasmids indicated that endogenous Tat-like proteins could participate in EBNA2-mediated activation of the HIV-1 LTR and that EBNA2 proteins can synergize with the viral tat transactivator. Transfection experiments with plasmids expressing the EBNA1, EBNA3, and EBNALP genes did not cause a significant HIV-1 LTR activation. Thus, it appears that among the latent EBV genes tested, EBNA2 was the only EBV gene active on the HIV-1 LTR. The transactivation function of EBNA2 was also observed in the HeLa epithelial cell line

  12. Authentication of newly established human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (YM-1) using short tandem repeat (STR) profiling method.

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    Ayyoob, Khosravi; Masoud, Khoshnia; Vahideh, Kazeminejad; Jahanbakhsh, Asadi

    2016-03-01

    Cross-contamination during or early after establishment of a new cell line could result in the worldwide spread of a misidentified cell line. Therefore, newly established cell lines need to be authenticated by a reference standard method. This study was conducted to investigate the authenticity of a newly established epithelial cell line of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) called YM-1 using short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiling method. Primary human ESCC epithelial cells were cultured from the fresh tumor tissue of an adult female patient. Growth characteristics and epithelial originality of YM-1 cells were studied. Genomic DNA was isolated from YM-1 cells harvested at passage 22 and ESCC donor tumor sample on two different days to prevent probable DNA contamination. STR profiling was performed using AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus PCR Amplification Kit. To address whether YM-1 cells undergo genetic alteration as the passage number increases, STR profiling was performed again on harvested cells at passage 51. YM-1 cells grew as a monolayer with a population doubling time of 40.66 h. Epithelial originality of YM-1 cells was confirmed using ICC/IF staining of cytokeratins AE1/AE3. The STR profile of the ESCC donor tumor sample was the same with YM-1 cells at passage 22. However, STR profile of the donor tumor sample showed an off-ladder (OL) allele in their D7S820 locus. Also, re-profiling of YM-1 cells at passage 51 showed a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at D18S51 locus. This suggests that long-term culture of cell lines may alter their DNA profile. Comparison of the DNA fingerprinting results in DSMZ, and ATCC STR profiling databases confirmed unique identity of YM-1 cell line. This study provides an easy, fast, and reliable procedure for authentication of newly established cell lines, which helps in preventing the spread of misidentified cells and improving the reproducibility and validity of experiments, consequently.

  13. Yeast ancestral genome reconstructions: the possibilities of computational methods II.

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    Chauve, Cedric; Gavranovic, Haris; Ouangraoua, Aida; Tannier, Eric

    2010-09-01

    Since the availability of assembled eukaryotic genomes, the first one being a budding yeast, many computational methods for the reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and gene orders have been developed. The difficulty has always been to assess their reliability, since we often miss a good knowledge of the true ancestral genomes to compare their results to, as well as a good knowledge of the evolutionary mechanisms to test them on realistic simulated data. In this study, we propose some measures of reliability of several kinds of methods, and apply them to infer and analyse the architectures of two ancestral yeast genomes, based on the sequence of seven assembled extant ones. The pre-duplication common ancestor of S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata has been inferred manually by Gordon et al. (Plos Genet. 2009). We show why, in this case, a good convergence of the methods is explained by some properties of the data, and why results are reliable. In another study, Jean et al. (J. Comput Biol. 2009) proposed an ancestral architecture of the last common ancestor of S. kluyveri, K. thermotolerans, K. lactis, A. gossypii, and Z. rouxii inferred by a computational method. In this case, we show that the dataset does not seem to contain enough information to infer a reliable architecture, and we construct a higher resolution dataset which gives a good reliability on a new ancestral configuration.

  14. The ancestral flower of angiosperms and its early diversification

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    Sauquet, Hervé; von Balthazar, Maria; Magallón, Susana; Doyle, James A.; Endress, Peter K.; Bailes, Emily J.; Barroso de Morais, Erica; Bull-Hereñu, Kester; Carrive, Laetitia; Chartier, Marion; Chomicki, Guillaume; Coiro, Mario; Cornette, Raphaël; El Ottra, Juliana H. L.; Epicoco, Cyril; Foster, Charles S. P.; Jabbour, Florian; Haevermans, Agathe; Haevermans, Thomas; Hernández, Rebeca; Little, Stefan A.; Löfstrand, Stefan; Luna, Javier A.; Massoni, Julien; Nadot, Sophie; Pamperl, Susanne; Prieu, Charlotte; Reyes, Elisabeth; dos Santos, Patrícia; Schoonderwoerd, Kristel M.; Sontag, Susanne; Soulebeau, Anaëlle; Staedler, Yannick; Tschan, Georg F.; Wing-Sze Leung, Amy; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular phylogenetics and a series of important palaeobotanical discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of angiosperm diversification. Yet, the origin and early evolution of their most characteristic feature, the flower, remains poorly understood. In particular, the structure of the ancestral flower of all living angiosperms is still uncertain. Here we report model-based reconstructions for ancestral flowers at the deepest nodes in the phylogeny of angiosperms, using the largest data set of floral traits ever assembled. We reconstruct the ancestral angiosperm flower as bisexual and radially symmetric, with more than two whorls of three separate perianth organs each (undifferentiated tepals), more than two whorls of three separate stamens each, and more than five spirally arranged separate carpels. Although uncertainty remains for some of the characters, our reconstruction allows us to propose a new plausible scenario for the early diversification of flowers, leading to new testable hypotheses for future research on angiosperms. PMID:28763051

  15. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

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    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures.

  16. Chromosome painting in three-toed sloths: a cytogenetic signature and ancestral karyotype for Xenarthra

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    Azevedo Nathália F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenarthra (sloths, armadillos and anteaters represent one of four currently recognized Eutherian mammal supraorders. Some phylogenomic studies point to the possibility of Xenarthra being at the base of the Eutherian tree, together or not with the supraorder Afrotheria. We performed painting with human autosomes and X-chromosome specific probes on metaphases of two three-toed sloths: Bradypus torquatus and B. variegatus. These species represent the fourth of the five extant Xenarthra families to be studied with this approach. Results Eleven human chromosomes were conserved as one block in both B. torquatus and B. variegatus: (HSA 5, 6, 9, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 20, 21 and the X chromosome. B. torquatus, three additional human chromosomes were conserved intact (HSA 1, 3 and 4. The remaining human chromosomes were represented by two or three segments on each sloth. Seven associations between human chromosomes were detected in the karyotypes of both B. torquatus and B. variegatus: HSA 3/21, 4/8, 7/10, 7/16, 12/22, 14/15 and 17/19. The ancestral Eutherian association 16/19 was not detected in the Bradypus species. Conclusions Our results together with previous reports enabled us to propose a hypothetical ancestral Xenarthran karyotype with 48 chromosomes that would differ from the proposed ancestral Eutherian karyotype by the presence of the association HSA 7/10 and by the split of HSA 8 into three blocks, instead of the two found in the Eutherian ancestor. These same chromosome features point to the monophyly of Xenarthra, making this the second supraorder of placental mammals to have a chromosome signature supporting its monophyly.

  17. Glutamine repeat variants in human RUNX2 associated with decreased femoral neck BMD, broadband ultrasound attenuation and target gene transactivation.

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    Nigel A Morrison

    Full Text Available RUNX2 is an essential transcription factor required for skeletal development and cartilage formation. Haploinsufficiency of RUNX2 leads to cleidocranial displaysia (CCD a skeletal disorder characterised by gross dysgenesis of bones particularly those derived from intramembranous bone formation. A notable feature of the RUNX2 protein is the polyglutamine and polyalanine (23Q/17A domain coded by a repeat sequence. Since none of the known mutations causing CCD characterised to date map in the glutamine repeat region, we hypothesised that Q-repeat mutations may be related to a more subtle bone phenotype. We screened subjects derived from four normal populations for Q-repeat variants. A total of 22 subjects were identified who were heterozygous for a wild type allele and a Q-repeat variant allele: (15Q, 16Q, 18Q and 30Q. Although not every subject had data for all measures, Q-repeat variants had a significant deficit in BMD with an average decrease of 0.7SD measured over 12 BMD-related parameters (p = 0.005. Femoral neck BMD was measured in all subjects (-0.6SD, p = 0.0007. The transactivation function of RUNX2 was determined for 16Q and 30Q alleles using a reporter gene assay. 16Q and 30Q alleles displayed significantly lower transactivation function compared to wild type (23Q. Our analysis has identified novel Q-repeat mutations that occur at a collective frequency of about 0.4%. These mutations significantly alter BMD and display impaired transactivation function, introducing a new class of functionally relevant RUNX2 mutants.

  18. Evolution of sexes from an ancestral mating-type specification pathway.

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    Sa Geng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Male and female sexes have evolved repeatedly in eukaryotes but the origins of dimorphic sexes and their relationship to mating types in unicellular species are not understood. Volvocine algae include isogamous species such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, with two equal-sized mating types, and oogamous multicellular species such as Volvox carteri with sperm-producing males and egg-producing females. Theoretical work predicts genetic linkage of a gamete cell-size regulatory gene(s to an ancestral mating-type locus as a possible step in the evolution of dimorphic gametes, but this idea has not been tested. Here we show that, contrary to predictions, a single conserved mating locus (MT gene in volvocine algae-MID, which encodes a RWP-RK domain transcription factor-evolved from its ancestral role in C. reinhardtii as a mating-type specifier, to become a determinant of sperm and egg development in V. carteri. Transgenic female V. carteri expressing male MID produced functional sperm packets during sexual development. Transgenic male V. carteri with RNA interference (RNAi-mediated knockdowns of VcMID produced functional eggs, or self-fertile hermaphrodites. Post-transcriptional controls were found to regulate cell-type-limited expression and nuclear localization of VcMid protein that restricted its activity to nuclei of developing male germ cells and sperm. Crosses with sex-reversed strains uncoupled sex determination from sex chromosome identity and revealed gender-specific roles for male and female mating locus genes in sexual development, gamete fitness and reproductive success. Our data show genetic continuity between the mating-type specification and sex determination pathways of volvocine algae, and reveal evidence for gender-specific adaptations in the male and female mating locus haplotypes of Volvox. These findings will enable a deeper understanding of how a master regulator of mating-type determination in an ancestral unicellular species was

  19. Modelling the ancestral sequence distribution and model frequencies in context-dependent models for primate non-coding sequences

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    Baele Guy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent approaches for context-dependent evolutionary modelling assume that the evolution of a given site depends upon its ancestor and that ancestor's immediate flanking sites. Because such dependency pattern cannot be imposed on the root sequence, we consider the use of different orders of Markov chains to model dependence at the ancestral root sequence. Root distributions which are coupled to the context-dependent model across the underlying phylogenetic tree are deemed more realistic than decoupled Markov chains models, as the evolutionary process is responsible for shaping the composition of the ancestral root sequence. Results We find strong support, in terms of Bayes Factors, for using a second-order Markov chain at the ancestral root sequence along with a context-dependent model throughout the remainder of the phylogenetic tree in an ancestral repeats dataset, and for using a first-order Markov chain at the ancestral root sequence in a pseudogene dataset. Relaxing the assumption of a single context-independent set of independent model frequencies as presented in previous work, yields a further drastic increase in model fit. We show that the substitution rates associated with the CpG-methylation-deamination process can be modelled through context-dependent model frequencies and that their accuracy depends on the (order of the Markov chain imposed at the ancestral root sequence. In addition, we provide evidence that this approach (which assumes that root distribution and evolutionary model are decoupled outperforms an approach inspired by the work of Arndt et al., where the root distribution is coupled to the evolutionary model. We show that the continuous-time approximation of Hwang and Green has stronger support in terms of Bayes Factors, but the parameter estimates show minimal differences. Conclusions We show that the combination of a dependency scheme at the ancestral root sequence and a context

  20. Musculature in sipunculan worms: ontogeny and ancestral states.

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    Schulze, Anja; Rice, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetics suggests that the Sipuncula fall into the Annelida, although they are morphologically very distinct and lack segmentation. To understand the evolutionary transformations from the annelid to the sipunculan body plan, it is important to reconstruct the ancestral states within the respective clades at all life history stages. Here we reconstruct the ancestral states for the head/introvert retractor muscles and the body wall musculature in the Sipuncula using Bayesian statistics. In addition, we describe the ontogenetic transformations of the two muscle systems in four sipunculan species with different developmental modes, using F-actin staining with fluorescent-labeled phalloidin in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy. All four species, which have smooth body wall musculature and less than the full set of four introvert retractor muscles as adults, go through developmental stages with four retractor muscles that are eventually reduced to a lower number in the adult. The circular and sometimes the longitudinal body wall musculature are split into bands that later transform into a smooth sheath. Our ancestral state reconstructions suggest with nearly 100% probability that the ancestral sipunculan had four introvert retractor muscles, longitudinal body wall musculature in bands and circular body wall musculature arranged as a smooth sheath. Species with crawling larvae have more strongly developed body wall musculature than those with swimming larvae. To interpret our findings in the context of annelid evolution, a more solid phylogenetic framework is needed for the entire group and more data on ontogenetic transformations of annelid musculature are desirable.

  1. Ancestral gene synteny reconstruction improves extant species scaffolding.

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    Anselmetti, Yoann; Berry, Vincent; Chauve, Cedric; Chateau, Annie; Tannier, Eric; Bérard, Sèverine

    2015-01-01

    We exploit the methodological similarity between ancestral genome reconstruction and extant genome scaffolding. We present a method, called ARt-DeCo that constructs neighborhood relationships between genes or contigs, in both ancestral and extant genomes, in a phylogenetic context. It is able to handle dozens of complete genomes, including genes with complex histories, by using gene phylogenies reconciled with a species tree, that is, annotated with speciation, duplication and loss events. Reconstructed ancestral or extant synteny comes with a support computed from an exhaustive exploration of the solution space. We compare our method with a previously published one that follows the same goal on a small number of genomes with universal unicopy genes. Then we test it on the whole Ensembl database, by proposing partial ancestral genome structures, as well as a more complete scaffolding for many partially assembled genomes on 69 eukaryote species. We carefully analyze a couple of extant adjacencies proposed by our method, and show that they are indeed real links in the extant genomes, that were missing in the current assembly. On a reduced data set of 39 eutherian mammals, we estimate the precision and sensitivity of ARt-DeCo by simulating a fragmentation in some well assembled genomes, and measure how many adjacencies are recovered. We find a very high precision, while the sensitivity depends on the quality of the data and on the proximity of closely related genomes.

  2. Association analysis of a highly polymorphic CAG Repeat in the human potassium channel gene KCNN3 and migraine susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovcaric Mick

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is a polygenic multifactorial disease, possessing environmental and genetic causative factors with multiple involved genes. Mutations in various ion channel genes are responsible for a number of neurological disorders. KCNN3 is a neuronal small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel gene that contains two polyglutamine tracts, encoded by polymorphic CAG repeats in the gene. This gene plays a critical role in determining the firing pattern of neurons and acts to regulate intracellular calcium channels. Methods The present association study tested whether length variations in the second (more 3' polymorphic CAG repeat in exon 1 of the KCNN3 gene, are involved in susceptibility to migraine with and without aura (MA and MO. In total 423 DNA samples from unrelated individuals, of which 202 consisted of migraine patients and 221 non-migraine controls, were genotyped and analysed using a fluorescence labelled primer set on an ABI310 Genetic Analyzer. Allele frequencies were calculated from observed genotype counts for the KCNN3 polymorphism. Analysis was performed using standard contingency table analysis, incorporating the chi-squared test of independence and CLUMP analysis. Results Overall, there was no convincing evidence that KCNN3 CAG lengths differ between Caucasian migraineurs and controls, with no significant difference in the allelic length distribution of CAG repeats between the population groups (P = 0.090. Also the MA and MO subtypes did not differ significantly between control allelic distributions (P > 0.05. The prevalence of the long CAG repeat (>19 repeats did not reach statistical significance in migraineurs (P = 0.15, nor was there a significant difference between the MA and MO subgroups observed compared to controls (P = 0.46 and P = 0.09, respectively, or between MA vs MO (P = 0.40. Conclusion This association study provides no evidence that length variations of the second polyglutamine array in

  3. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  4. Molecular, physiological, and motor performance defects in DMSXL mice carrying >1,000 CTG repeats from the human DM1 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Huguet

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3'UTR of the DM protein kinase (DMPK gene. DMPK transcripts carrying CUG expansions form nuclear foci and affect splicing regulation of various RNA transcripts. Furthermore, bidirectional transcription over the DMPK gene and non-conventional RNA translation of repeated transcripts have been described in DM1. It is clear now that this disease may involve multiple pathogenic pathways including changes in gene expression, RNA stability and splicing regulation, protein translation, and micro-RNA metabolism. We previously generated transgenic mice with 45-kb of the DM1 locus and >300 CTG repeats (DM300 mice. After successive breeding and a high level of CTG repeat instability, we obtained transgenic mice carrying >1,000 CTG (DMSXL mice. Here we described for the first time the expression pattern of the DMPK sense transcripts in DMSXL and human tissues. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that DMPK antisense transcripts are expressed in various DMSXL and human tissues, and that both sense and antisense transcripts accumulate in independent nuclear foci that do not co-localize together. Molecular features of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in DMSXL mice (such as foci accumulation and mild missplicing, were associated with high mortality, growth retardation, and muscle defects (abnormal histopathology, reduced muscle strength, and lower motor performances. We have found that lower levels of IGFBP-3 may contribute to DMSXL growth retardation, while increased proteasome activity may affect muscle function. These data demonstrate that the human DM1 locus carrying very large expansions induced a variety of molecular and physiological defects in transgenic mice, reflecting DM1 to a certain extent. As a result, DMSXL mice provide an animal tool to decipher various aspects of the disease mechanisms. In addition, these mice can be used to test the preclinical impact of systemic

  5. Molecular, physiological, and motor performance defects in DMSXL mice carrying >1,000 CTG repeats from the human DM1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Aline; Medja, Fadia; Nicole, Annie; Vignaud, Alban; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Ferry, Arnaud; Decostre, Valérie; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Metzger, Friedrich; Hoeflich, Andreas; Baraibar, Martin; Gomes-Pereira, Mário; Puymirat, Jack; Bassez, Guillaume; Furling, Denis; Munnich, Arnold; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3'UTR of the DM protein kinase (DMPK) gene. DMPK transcripts carrying CUG expansions form nuclear foci and affect splicing regulation of various RNA transcripts. Furthermore, bidirectional transcription over the DMPK gene and non-conventional RNA translation of repeated transcripts have been described in DM1. It is clear now that this disease may involve multiple pathogenic pathways including changes in gene expression, RNA stability and splicing regulation, protein translation, and micro-RNA metabolism. We previously generated transgenic mice with 45-kb of the DM1 locus and >300 CTG repeats (DM300 mice). After successive breeding and a high level of CTG repeat instability, we obtained transgenic mice carrying >1,000 CTG (DMSXL mice). Here we described for the first time the expression pattern of the DMPK sense transcripts in DMSXL and human tissues. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that DMPK antisense transcripts are expressed in various DMSXL and human tissues, and that both sense and antisense transcripts accumulate in independent nuclear foci that do not co-localize together. Molecular features of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in DMSXL mice (such as foci accumulation and mild missplicing), were associated with high mortality, growth retardation, and muscle defects (abnormal histopathology, reduced muscle strength, and lower motor performances). We have found that lower levels of IGFBP-3 may contribute to DMSXL growth retardation, while increased proteasome activity may affect muscle function. These data demonstrate that the human DM1 locus carrying very large expansions induced a variety of molecular and physiological defects in transgenic mice, reflecting DM1 to a certain extent. As a result, DMSXL mice provide an animal tool to decipher various aspects of the disease mechanisms. In addition, these mice can be used to test the preclinical impact of systemic therapeutic

  6. Ancestral resurrection of anthropoid estrogen receptor β demonstrates functional consequences of positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckle, Amy; McGowen, Michael R; Xing, Jun; Chen, Caoyi; Sterner, Kirstin N; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2017-09-13

    Anthropoid primates arose during the Eocene approximately 55 million years ago (mya), and extant anthropoids share a most recent common ancestor ∼40mya. Paleontology has been very successful at describing the morphological phenotypes of extinct anthropoids. Less well understood is the molecular biology of these extinct species as well as the phenotypic consequences of evolutionary variation in their genomes. Here we resurrect the most recent common ancestral anthropoid estrogen receptor β gene (ESR2) and demonstrate that the function of this ancestral estrogen receptor has been maintained during human descent but was altered during early New World monkey (NWM) evolution by becoming a more potent transcriptional activator. We tested hypotheses of adaptive evolution in the protein coding sequences of ESR2, and determined that ESR2 evolved via episodic positive selection on the NWM stem lineage. We separately co-transfected ESR2 constructs for human, NWM, and the anthropoid ancestor along with reporter gene vectors and performed hormone binding dose response experiments that measure transactivation activity. We found the transactivation potentials of the ancestral and human sequences to be significantly lower (p<0.0001 in each comparison) than that of the NWM when treated with estradiol, the most prevalent estrogen. We conclude the difference in fold activation is due to positive selection in the NWM ERβ ligand binding domain. Our study validates inferential methods for detecting adaptive evolution that predict functional consequences of nucleotide substitutions and points a way toward examining the functional consequences of positive Darwinian selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. TPR repeats and ELTR pattern: length variation as a function evolution mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke-Qian

    2007-12-01

    TPR repeat was originally defined as a 34 amino acid structural repeat (TPR-34). Equal length tandem repeats (ELTR) was proposed to represent the ancestral repeat pattern. Length polymorphism of TPR repeats was analyzed using PATTINPROT, two new versions of TPR repeat of 40 and 42 amino acids were identified. These 'long' TPRs endow new functional capacities to the resulting proteins. A strong correlation between varied lengths and new functions supports the hypothesis that length variation is an underlying mechanism for the function evolution of repeat containing proteins.

  8. Differential responses of healthy and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseased human bronchial epithelial cells repeatedly exposed to air pollution-derived PM4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, B; Happillon, M; Antherieu, S; Hardy, E M; Alleman, L Y; Grova, N; Perdrix, E; Appenzeller, B M; Lo Guidice, J-M; Coddeville, P; Garçon, G

    2016-11-01

    While the knowledge of the underlying mechanisms by which air pollution-derived particulate matter (PM) exerts its harmful health effects is still incomplete, detailed in vitro studies are highly needed. With the aim of getting closer to the human in vivo conditions and better integrating a number of factors related to pre-existing chronic pulmonary inflammatory, we sought to develop primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-diseased human bronchial epithelial (DHBE) cells, grown at the air-liquid interface. Pan-cytokeratin and MUC5AC immunostaining confirmed the specific cell-types of both these healthy and diseased cell models and showed they are closed to human bronchial epithelia. Thereafter, healthy and diseased cells were repeatedly exposed to air pollution-derived PM4 at the non-cytotoxic concentration of 5 μg/cm(2). The differences between the oxidative and inflammatory states in non-exposed NHBE and COPD-DHBE cells indicated that diseased cells conserved their specific physiopathological characteristics. Increases in both oxidative damage and cytokine secretion were reported in repeatedly exposed NHBE cells and particularly in COPD-DHBE cells. Diseased cells repeatedly exposed had lower capacities to metabolize the organic chemicals-coated onto the air-pollution-derived PM4, such as benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), but showed higher sensibility to the formation of OH-B[a]P DNA adducts, because their diseased state possibly affected their defenses. Differential profiles of epigenetic hallmarks (i.e., global DNA hypomethylation, P16 promoter hypermethylation, telomere length shortening, telomerase activation, and histone H3 modifications) occurred in repeatedly exposed NHBE and particularly in COPD-DHBE cells. Taken together, these results closely supported the highest responsiveness of COPD-DHBE cells to a repeated exposure to air pollution-derived PM4. The use of these innovative in

  9. Economic analysis of human papillomavirus triage, repeat cytology, and immediate colposcopy in management of women with minor cytological abnormalities in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostensson, Ellinor; Fröberg, Maria; Hjerpe, Anders; Zethraeus, Niklas; Andersson, Sonia

    2010-10-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of using human papillomavirus testing (HPV triage) in the management of women with minor cytological abnormalities in Sweden. An economic analysis based on a clinical trial, complemented with data from published meta-analyses on accuracy of HPV triage. The study takes perspective of the Swedish healthcare system. The Swedish population-based cervical cancer screening program. A decision analytic model was constructed to evaluate cost-effectiveness of HPV triage compared to repeat cytology and immediate colposcopy with biopsy, stratifying by index cytology (ASCUS = atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and LSIL = low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) and age (23-60 years, cytological abnormalities. Today, immediate colposcopy with biopsy is a cost-effective alternative compared to HPV triage and repeat cytology.

  10. Evolution of outer membrane beta-barrels from an ancestral beta beta hairpin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmert, M; Biegert, A; Linke, D; Lupas, A N; Söding, J

    2010-06-01

    Outer membrane beta-barrels (OMBBs) are the major class of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria, and plastids. Their transmembrane domains consist of 8-24 beta-strands forming a closed, barrel-shaped beta-sheet around a central pore. Despite their obvious structural regularity, evidence for an origin by duplication or for a common ancestry has not been found. We use three complementary approaches to show that all OMBBs from Gram-negative bacteria evolved from a single, ancestral beta beta hairpin. First, we link almost all families of known single-chain bacterial OMBBs with each other through transitive profile searches. Second, we identify a clear repeat signature in the sequences of many OMBBs in which the repeating sequence unit coincides with the structural beta beta hairpin repeat. Third, we show that the observed sequence similarity between OMBB hairpins cannot be explained by structural or membrane constraints on their sequences. The third approach addresses a longstanding problem in protein evolution: how to distinguish between a very remotely homologous relationship and the opposing scenario of "sequence convergence." The origin of a diverse group of proteins from a single hairpin module supports the hypothesis that, around the time of transition from the RNA to the protein world, proteins arose by amplification and recombination of short peptide modules that had previously evolved as cofactors of RNAs.

  11. Emergence, Retention and Selection: A Trilogy of Origination for Functional De Novo Proteins from Ancestral LncRNAs in Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yu Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While some human-specific protein-coding genes have been proposed to originate from ancestral lncRNAs, the transition process remains poorly understood. Here we identified 64 hominoid-specific de novo genes and report a mechanism for the origination of functional de novo proteins from ancestral lncRNAs with precise splicing structures and specific tissue expression profiles. Whole-genome sequencing of dozens of rhesus macaque animals revealed that these lncRNAs are generally not more selectively constrained than other lncRNA loci. The existence of these newly-originated de novo proteins is also not beyond anticipation under neutral expectation, as they generally have longer theoretical lifespan than their current age, due to their GC-rich sequence property enabling stable ORFs with lower chance of non-sense mutations. Interestingly, although the emergence and retention of these de novo genes are likely driven by neutral forces, population genetics study in 67 human individuals and 82 macaque animals revealed signatures of purifying selection on these genes specifically in human population, indicating a proportion of these newly-originated proteins are already functional in human. We thus propose a mechanism for creation of functional de novo proteins from ancestral lncRNAs during the primate evolution, which may contribute to human-specific genetic novelties by taking advantage of existed genomic contexts.

  12. TU-C-12A-05: Repeatability Study of Reduced Field-Of-View Diffusion-Weighted MRI On Human Thyroid Gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla-Dave, A; Lu, Y; Hatzoglou, V; Stambuk, H; Mazaheri, Y [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Banerjee, S; Shankaranarayanan, A [GE Healthcare, Menlo Park, California (United States); Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the repeatability of reduced field-of-view diffusion-weighted imaging (rFOV DWI) in quantifying apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) for human thyroid glands in a clinical setting. Methods: Nine healthy human volunteers were enrolled and underwent 3T MRI exams. For each volunteer, 3 longitudinal exams (2 weeks apart) with 2 repetitive sessions within each exam, including rFOV and conventional full field-of-view (fFOV) DWI scans, were performed. In the acquired DWI images, a fixed-size region of interest (ROI; diameter=8mm) was placed on thyroid glands to calculate ADC. ADC was calculated using a monoexponential function with a noise correction scheme. The repeatability of ADC was assessed by using coefficient variation (CV) across sessions or exams, which was defined to be: r = 1-CV, 0 < r < 1, where CV=STD/m, STD is the standard deviation of ADC, and m is the average of ADC across sessions or exams. An experienced radiologist assessed and scored rFOV and fFOV DW images based on image characteristics (1, nondiagnostic; 2, poor; 3, satisfactory; 4, good; and 5, excellent).Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare ADC values, CV of ADC, repeatability of ADC across sessions and exams, and radiologic scores between rFOV and fFOV DWI techniques. Results: There was no significant difference in ADC values across sessions and exams either in rFOV or fFOV DWI. The average CVs of both rFOV and fFOV DWI were less than 13%. The repeatability of ADC measurement between rFOV and fFOV DWI was not significantly different. The overall image quality was significantly higher with rFOV DWI than with fFOV DWI. Conclusion: This study suggested that ADCs from both rFOV and fFOV DWI were repeatable, but rFOV DWI had superior imaging quality for human thyroid glands in a clinical setting.

  13. Expression and sub-cellular localization of leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains are related to antioxidant enzymes in human ependymoma and oligodendroglioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Yi; Lin Liu; Okechi Humphrey; Qianxue Chen; Shulan Huang

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated correlations between the expression of leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domain 1 (LRIG1) and antioxidant enzymes and related proteins, including manganese superoxide dismutase, glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic or regulatory subunit, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, in both human ependymoma and oligodendroglioma. Results revealed that the cytoplasmic expression of LRIG1 was associated with expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit in the human ependymoma, while the nuclear expression of LRIG1 was associated with expression of thioredoxin reductase. In human oligodendroglioma, the cytoplasmic expression of LRIG1 was associated with expression of the glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit. Both the nuclear and perinuclear expressions of LRIG1 were associated with expression of glutamate cysteine ligase regulatory subunit. These results indicated that several antioxidant enzymes and related proteins contributed to LRIG1 expression, and that these may participate in the antioxidation of the cells.

  14. Tyms double (2R) and triple repeat (3R) confers risk for human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Alexandre Medeiros; Sant'Ana, Thalita Araújo; Gomes, Adriana Vieira; de Lacerda Vidal, Aurora Karla; Muniz, Maria Tereza Cartaxo

    2014-12-01

    The oral cancer is responsible for approximately 3 % of cases of cancer in Brazil. Epidemiological studies have associated low folate intake with an increased risk of epithelial cancers, including oral cancer. Folic acid has a key role in DNA synthesis, repair, methylation and this is the basis of explanations for a putative role for folic acid in cancer prevention. The role of folic acid in carcinogenesis may be modulated by polymorphism C677T in MTHFR and tandem repeats 2R/3R in the promoter site of TYMS gene that are related to decreased enzymatic activity and quantity and availability of the enzyme, respectively. These events cause a decrease in the synthesis, repair and DNA methylation, which can lead to a disruption in the expression of tumor suppressor genes as TP53. The objective of this study was investigate the distribution of polymorphisms C677T and tandem repeats 2R/3R associated with the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). 53 paraffin-embedded samples from patients who underwent surgery but are no longer at the institution and 43 samples collected by method of oral exfoliation by cytobrush were selected. 132 healthy subjects were selected by specialists at the dental clinics of the Faculdade de Odontologia de Pernambuco-FOP. The MTHFR genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP, and the TYMS genotyping was performed by conventional PCR. Fisher's Exact test at significant level of 5 %. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used to measure the strength of association between genotype frequency and OSCC development. The results were statistically significant for the tandem repeats of the TYMS gene (p = 0.015). The TYMS 2R3R genotype was significantly associated with the development of OSCC (OR = 3.582; 95 % CI 1.240-10.348; p = 0.0262) and also the genotype 3R3R (OR = 3.553; 95 % CI 1.293-9.760; p = 0.0345). When analyzed together, the TYMS 2R3R + 3R3R genotypes also showed association (OR = 3.518; 95 % CI 11.188-10.348; p

  15. Effects of concentric and repeated eccentric exercise on muscle damage and calpain-calpastatin gene expression in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, K.; Overgaard, K.; Nedergaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the responsiveness of changes in Ca2+-content and calpain-calpastatin gene expression to concentric and eccentric single-bout and repeated exercise. An exercise group (n = 14) performed two bouts of bench-stepping exercise with 8 weeks between exercise bouts...... for muscle Ca2+-content and mRNA levels for calpain isoforms and calpastatin. Exercise reduced muscle strength and increased muscle soreness predominantly in the eccentric leg (P ... eccentric exercise bout (P eccentric exercise 24 h post-exercise (P

  16. Perianth evolution in Ranunculaceae: are petals ancestral in the family?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Nadot

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress has been made recently towards the elucidation of phylogenetic relationships among subfamilies and tribes of the Ranunculaceae – the most recent hypothesis was published in 2016 by our team. Although relationships among the 10 tribes of the subfamily Ranunculoideae remain incompletely supported, this hypothesis provides an interesting framework to address the key issue of the ancestral vs. derived nature of a differentiated perianth within the family, and at the level of Ranunculales as a whole. Here, we present ancestral state reconstructions for several perianth characters, such as differentiation into sepals and petals, shape of petals, presence/absence of nectaries, and petaloid or sepaloid aspect of sepals. Characters were scored using the PROTEUS database and optimized on the most recent phylogeny of Ranunculaceae using parsimony and maximum likelihood methods. The results are discussed with regard to recent evo-devo studies focused on identifying genes involved in floral organs identity (the so-called ABC model in Ranunculales.

  17. Using Resurrected Ancestral Proviral Proteins to Engineer Virus Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asunción Delgado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Proviral factors are host proteins hijacked by viruses for processes essential for virus propagation such as cellular entry and replication. Pathogens and their hosts co-evolve. It follows that replacing a proviral factor with a functional ancestral form of the same protein could prevent viral propagation without fatally compromising organismal fitness. Here, we provide proof of concept of this notion. Thioredoxins serve as general oxidoreductases in all known cells. We report that several laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins display substantial levels of functionality within Escherichia coli. Unlike E. coli thioredoxin, however, these ancestral thioredoxins are not efficiently recruited by the bacteriophage T7 for its replisome and therefore prevent phage propagation in E. coli. These results suggest an approach to the engineering of virus resistance. Diseases caused by viruses may have a devastating effect in agriculture. We discuss how the suggested approach could be applied to the engineering of plant virus resistance.

  18. Single-crossover recombination and ancestral recombination trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baake, Ellen; von Wangenheim, Ute

    2014-05-01

    We consider the Wright-Fisher model for a population of [Formula: see text] individuals, each identified with a sequence of a finite number of sites, and single-crossover recombination between them. We trace back the ancestry of single individuals from the present population. In the [Formula: see text] limit without rescaling of parameters or time, this ancestral process is described by a random tree, whose branching events correspond to the splitting of the sequence due to recombination. With the help of a decomposition of the trees into subtrees, we calculate the probabilities of the topologies of the ancestral trees. At the same time, these probabilities lead to a semi-explicit solution of the deterministic single-crossover equation. The latter is a discrete-time dynamical system that emerges from the Wright-Fisher model via a law of large numbers and has been waiting for a solution for many decades.

  19. Methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites near the polymorphic CAG repeat in the human androgen-receptor gene correlates with X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Moseley, A.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Belmont, J.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The human androgen-receptor gene (HUMARA; GenBank) contains a highly polymorphic trinucleotide repeat in the first exon. The authors have found that the methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites less than 100 pb away from this polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) correlates with X inactivation. The close proximity of the restriction-enzyme sites to the STR allows the development of a PCR assay that distinguishes between the maternal and paternal alleles and identifies their methylation status. The accuracy of this assay was tested on (a) DNA from hamster/human hybrid cell lines containing either an active or inactive human X chromosome; (b) DNA from normal males and females; and (c) DNA from females showing nonrandom patterns of X inactivation. Data obtained using this assay correlated substantially with those obtained using the PGK, HPRT, and M27[beta] probes, which detect X inactivation patterns by Southern blot analysis. In order to demonstrate one application of this assay, the authors examined X inactivation patterns in the B lymphocytes of potential and obligate carriers of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Resurrection of an ancestral 5S rRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox George E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to providing phylogenetic relationships, tree making procedures such as parsimony and maximum likelihood can make specific predictions of actual historical sequences. Resurrection of such sequences can be used to understand early events in evolution. In the case of RNA, the nature of parsimony is such that when applied to multiple RNA sequences it typically predicts ancestral sequences that satisfy the base pairing constraints associated with secondary structure. The case for such sequences being actual ancestors is greatly improved, if they can be shown to be biologically functional. Results A unique common ancestral sequence of 28 Vibrio 5S ribosomal RNA sequences predicted by parsimony was resurrected and found to be functional in the context of the E. coli cellular environment. The functionality of various point variants and intermediates that were constructed as part of the resurrection were examined in detail. When separately introduced the changes at single stranded positions and individual double variants at base-paired positions were also viable. An additional double variant was examined at a different base-paired position and it was also valid. Conclusions The results show that at least in the case of the 5S rRNAs considered here, ancestors predicted by parsimony are likely to be realistic when the prediction is not overly influenced by single outliers. It is especially noteworthy that the phenotype of the predicted ancestors could be anticipated as a cumulative consequence of the phenotypes of the individual variants that comprised them. Thus, point mutation data is potentially useful in evaluating the reasonableness of ancestral sequences predicted by parsimony or other methods. The results also suggest that in the absence of significant tertiary structure constraints double variants that preserve pairing in stem regions will typically be accepted. Overall, the results suggest that it will be feasible

  1. Resurrection of an ancestral 5S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Fox, George E

    2011-07-22

    In addition to providing phylogenetic relationships, tree making procedures such as parsimony and maximum likelihood can make specific predictions of actual historical sequences. Resurrection of such sequences can be used to understand early events in evolution. In the case of RNA, the nature of parsimony is such that when applied to multiple RNA sequences it typically predicts ancestral sequences that satisfy the base pairing constraints associated with secondary structure. The case for such sequences being actual ancestors is greatly improved, if they can be shown to be biologically functional. A unique common ancestral sequence of 28 Vibrio 5S ribosomal RNA sequences predicted by parsimony was resurrected and found to be functional in the context of the E. coli cellular environment. The functionality of various point variants and intermediates that were constructed as part of the resurrection were examined in detail. When separately introduced the changes at single stranded positions and individual double variants at base-paired positions were also viable. An additional double variant was examined at a different base-paired position and it was also valid. The results show that at least in the case of the 5S rRNAs considered here, ancestors predicted by parsimony are likely to be realistic when the prediction is not overly influenced by single outliers. It is especially noteworthy that the phenotype of the predicted ancestors could be anticipated as a cumulative consequence of the phenotypes of the individual variants that comprised them. Thus, point mutation data is potentially useful in evaluating the reasonableness of ancestral sequences predicted by parsimony or other methods. The results also suggest that in the absence of significant tertiary structure constraints double variants that preserve pairing in stem regions will typically be accepted. Overall, the results suggest that it will be feasible to resurrect additional meaningful 5S rRNA ancestors as well

  2. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Giannone

    Full Text Available Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography--tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS. After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  3. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Shen, Rong-Fong [National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health; Wang, Yisong [ORNL; Liu, Yie [National Institute on Aging, Baltimore

    2010-01-01

    Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping) is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS). After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  4. Bilingualism (Ancestral Language Maintenance) among Native American, Vietnamese American, and Hispanic American College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharry, Cheryl

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 21 Hispanic, 22 Native American, and 10 Vietnamese American college students found that adoption or maintenance of ancestral language was related to attitudes toward ancestral language, beliefs about parental attitudes, and integrative motivation (toward family and ancestral ethnic group). There were significant differences by gender…

  5. Ancestral facial morphology of Old World higher primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benefit, B R; McCrossin, M L

    1991-06-15

    Fossil remains of the cercopithecoid Victoria-pithecus recently recovered from middle Miocene deposits of Maboko Island (Kenya) provide evidence of the cranial anatomy of Old World monkeys prior to the evolutionary divergence of the extant subfamilies Colobinae and Cercopithecinae. Victoria-pithecus shares a suite of craniofacial features with the Oligocene catarrhine Aegyptopithecus and early Miocene hominoid Afropithecus. All three genera manifest supraorbital costae, anteriorly convergent temporal lines, the absence of a postglabellar fossa, a moderate to long snout, great facial height below the orbits, a deep cheek region, and anteriorly tapering premaxilla. The shared presence of these features in a catarrhine generally ancestral to apes and Old World monkeys, an early ape, and an early Old World monkey indicates that they are primitive characteristics that typified the last common ancestor of Hominoidea and Cercopithecoidea. These results contradict prevailing cranial morphotype reconstructions for ancestral catarrhines as Colobus- or Hylobates-like, characterized by a globular anterior braincase and orthognathy. By resolving several equivocal craniofacial morphocline polarities, these discoveries lay the foundation for a revised interpretation of the ancestral cranial morphology of Catarrhini more consistent with neontological and existing paleontological evidence.

  6. Three Huntington's Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Laureen; Neueder, Andreas; Földes, Gabor; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Hobbs, Carl; Jolinon, Nelly; Mioulane, Maxime; Sakai, Takao; Harding, Sian E; Ilic, Dusko

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ) motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients.

  7. Three Huntington's Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureen Jacquet

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients.

  8. Inferring genome-wide patterns of admixture in Qataris using fifty-five ancestral populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omberg, Larsson; Salit, Jacqueline; Hackett, Neil; Fuller, Jennifer; Matthew, Rebecca; Chouchane, Lotfi; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L; Bustamante, Carlos; Crystal, Ronald G; Mezey, Jason G

    2012-06-26

    Populations of the Arabian Peninsula have a complex genetic structure that reflects waves of migrations including the earliest human migrations from Africa and eastern Asia, migrations along ancient civilization trading routes and colonization history of recent centuries. Here, we present a study of genome-wide admixture in this region, using 156 genotyped individuals from Qatar, a country located at the crossroads of these migration patterns. Since haplotypes of these individuals could have originated from many different populations across the world, we have developed a machine learning method "SupportMix" to infer loci-specific genomic ancestry when simultaneously analyzing many possible ancestral populations. Simulations show that SupportMix is not only more accurate than other popular admixture discovery tools but is the first admixture inference method that can efficiently scale for simultaneous analysis of 50-100 putative ancestral populations while being independent of prior demographic information. By simultaneously using the 55 world populations from the Human Genome Diversity Panel, SupportMix was able to extract the fine-scale ancestry of the Qatar population, providing many new observations concerning the ancestry of the region. For example, as well as recapitulating the three major sub-populations in Qatar, composed of mainly Arabic, Persian, and African ancestry, SupportMix additionally identifies the specific ancestry of the Persian group to populations sampled in Greater Persia rather than from China and the ancestry of the African group to sub-Saharan origin and not Southern African Bantu origin as previously thought.

  9. In Vitro Study on Lethal Effect of Human Choroidal Melanoma OCM-1 Cell Line by Repeating-70℃Freeze Thawing%In Vitro Study on Lethal Effect of Human Choroidal Melanoma OCM-1 Cell Line by Repeating-70℃ Freeze Thawing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Liu; Yongping Li; Bo Zhang; Wenxin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of repeating -70℃ freeze thawing on human choroidal melanoma cell line OCM-1.Methods: OCM-1 cells were frozen by repeating -70℃ freeze thawing with various durations and frequencies. Then the inhibit rate of cells was examined by MTT essay.The cell viability was measured by monoclonal formation assay. We also used the HE staining, immunohistochemistry staining and the laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to investigate the morphological changes of the cells.Results: The growth of OCM-1 cells was inhibited by repeating -70℃ freeze thawing in time-dependent and frequency-dependent manners (P < 0.01). Different morphous including necrosis and apoptosis of the cells could be observed after -70℃ freeze thawing by the LSCM.Conclusion: Repeating -70℃ freeze thawing can not only kill cells directly and induce considerable cells to apoptosis, but also inhibit the growth of the survivals. The kill and wound ratio of the cells disposal with different times and frequencies present variance. And the distinction when treated with different frequencies during the same time is much more significant than different times with the same frequency, which guide clinical workers to choose repeating cryotherapy with short term method instead of single cryotherapy with long term in choroidal melanoma treatment.

  10. The presence of the ancestral insect telomeric motif in kissing bugs (Triatominae) rules out the hypothesis of its loss in evolutionarily advanced Heteroptera (Cimicomorpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Sebastián; Panzera, Francisco; Mora, Pablo; Vela, Jesús; Palomeque, Teresa; Lorite, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing data analysis on Triatoma infestans Klug, 1834 (Heteroptera, Cimicomorpha, Reduviidae) revealed the presence of the ancestral insect (TTAGG)n telomeric motif in its genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirms that chromosomes bear this telomeric sequence in their chromosomal ends. Furthermore, motif amount estimation was about 0.03% of the total genome, so that the average telomere length in each chromosomal end is almost 18 kb long. We also detected the presence of (TTAGG)n telomeric repeat in mitotic and meiotic chromosomes in other three species of Triatominae: Triatoma dimidiata Latreille, 1811, Dipetalogaster maxima Uhler, 1894, and Rhodnius prolixus Ståhl, 1859. This is the first report of the (TTAGG)n telomeric repeat in the infraorder Cimicomorpha, contradicting the currently accepted hypothesis that evolutionarily recent heteropterans lack this ancestral insect telomeric sequence.

  11. The presence of the ancestral insect telomeric motif in kissing bugs (Triatominae rules out the hypothesis of its loss in evolutionarily advanced Heteroptera (Cimicomorpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Pita

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing data analysis on Triatoma infestans Klug, 1834 (Heteroptera, Cimicomorpha, Reduviidae revealed the presence of the ancestral insect (TTAGGn telomeric motif in its genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirms that chromosomes bear this telomeric sequence in their chromosomal ends. Furthermore, motif amount estimation was about 0.03% of the total genome, so that the average telomere length in each chromosomal end is almost 18 kb long. We also detected the presence of (TTAGGn telomeric repeat in mitotic and meiotic chromosomes in other three species of Triatominae: Triatoma dimidiata Latreille, 1811, Dipetalogaster maxima Uhler, 1894, and Rhodnius prolixus Ståhl, 1859. This is the first report of the (TTAGGn telomeric repeat in the infraorder Cimicomorpha, contradicting the currently accepted hypothesis that evolutionarily recent heteropterans lack this ancestral insect telomeric sequence.

  12. Rotating waves during human sleep spindles organize global patterns of activity that repeat precisely through the night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Lyle; Piantoni, Giovanni; Koller, Dominik; Cash, Sydney S; Halgren, Eric; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2016-01-01

    During sleep, the thalamus generates a characteristic pattern of transient, 11-15 Hz sleep spindle oscillations, which synchronize the cortex through large-scale thalamocortical loops. Spindles have been increasingly demonstrated to be critical for sleep-dependent consolidation of memory, but the specific neural mechanism for this process remains unclear. We show here that cortical spindles are spatiotemporally organized into circular wave-like patterns, organizing neuronal activity over tens of milliseconds, within the timescale for storing memories in large-scale networks across the cortex via spike-time dependent plasticity. These circular patterns repeat over hours of sleep with millisecond temporal precision, allowing reinforcement of the activity patterns through hundreds of reverberations. These results provide a novel mechanistic account for how global sleep oscillations and synaptic plasticity could strengthen networks distributed across the cortex to store coherent and integrated memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17267.001 PMID:27855061

  13. Repeatability and interobserver reproducibility of Artemis-2 high-frequency ultrasound in determination of human corneal thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogbuehi KC

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Kelechi C Ogbuehi, Uchechukwu L OsuagwuOutpatient Clinic, Department of Optometry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to assess the repeatability and limits of agreement of corneal thickness values measured by a high-frequency ultrasound (Artemis-2, hand-held ultrasound pachymeter (DGH-500 and a specular microscope (SP-3000P.Methods: Central corneal thickness (CCT was analyzed in this prospective randomized study that included 32 patients (18 men and 14 women aged 21–24 years. Measurements were obtained in two sessions, one week apart, by two examiners with three devices in a randomized order. Nine measurements were taken (three with each device on one randomly selected eye of each patient in each measurement session. The coefficient of repeatability and interobserver reproducibility for the values of each method were calculated. The limits of agreement between techniques were also evaluated.Results: There were no significant differences in CCT values between sessions for each of the three devices (P > 0.05. The repeatability coefficients for the Artemis-2 (±8 µm/±9 µm were superior to those of the SP-3000P (±9 µm/±11 µm and DGH 500 (±12 µm/±12 µm in session 1/session 2 respectively, while the interobserver reproducibility index (differences between session 1 and session 2 was superior for the SP-3000P (±17 µm with respect to DHG-500 (±29 µm and the Artemis-2 (±31 µm. In session 1 and session 2, the limits of agreement between the techniques were 35 µm to -31 µm and 34 to -20 µm, respectively, for DGH-500 versus Artemis-2, 73 µm to 3 µm and 60 µm to 9 µm for Artemis-2 versus SP-3000P, and 58 µm to 22 µm and 72 µm to 10 µm for DGH-500 versus SP-3000P comparisons. The DGH-500 and Artemis-2 gave similar values (P > 0.05 in both sessions, but both (Artemis-2 and DGH-500 values were significantly greater than that of the SP-3000P (P < 0.05 in both sessions

  14. A base-modified PNA-graphene oxide platform as a turn-on fluorescence sensor for the detection of human telomeric repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabale, Pramod M.; George, Jerrin Thomas; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G.

    2014-08-01

    Given the biological and therapeutic significance of telomeres and other G-quadruplex forming sequences in human genome, it is highly desirable to develop simple methods to study these structures, which can also be implemented in screening formats for the discovery of G-quadruplex binders. The majority of telomere detection methods developed so far are laborious and use elaborate assay and instrumental setups, and hence, are not amenable to discovery platforms. Here, we describe the development of a simple homogeneous fluorescence turn-on method, which uses a unique combination of an environment-sensitive fluorescent nucleobase analogue, the superior base pairing property of PNA, and DNA-binding and fluorescence quenching properties of graphene oxide, to detect human telomeric DNA repeats of varying lengths. Our results demonstrate that this method, which does not involve a rigorous assay setup, would provide new opportunities to study G-quadruplex structures.Given the biological and therapeutic significance of telomeres and other G-quadruplex forming sequences in human genome, it is highly desirable to develop simple methods to study these structures, which can also be implemented in screening formats for the discovery of G-quadruplex binders. The majority of telomere detection methods developed so far are laborious and use elaborate assay and instrumental setups, and hence, are not amenable to discovery platforms. Here, we describe the development of a simple homogeneous fluorescence turn-on method, which uses a unique combination of an environment-sensitive fluorescent nucleobase analogue, the superior base pairing property of PNA, and DNA-binding and fluorescence quenching properties of graphene oxide, to detect human telomeric DNA repeats of varying lengths. Our results demonstrate that this method, which does not involve a rigorous assay setup, would provide new opportunities to study G-quadruplex structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  15. Transfer of genetic therapy across human populations: molecular targets for increasing patient coverage in repeat expansion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Miguel A; Curtis, Helen J; Douglas, Andrew G L; Hammond, Suzan M; O'Loughlin, Aisling J; Sobrido, Maria J; Scholefield, Janine; Wood, Matthew J A

    2016-02-01

    Allele-specific gene therapy aims to silence expression of mutant alleles through targeting of disease-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, SNP linkage to disease varies between populations, making such molecular therapies applicable only to a subset of patients. Moreover, not all SNPs have the molecular features necessary for potent gene silencing. Here we provide knowledge to allow the maximisation of patient coverage by building a comprehensive understanding of SNPs ranked according to their predicted suitability toward allele-specific silencing in 14 repeat expansion diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy 1, myotonic dystrophy 2, Huntington's disease and several spinocerebellar ataxias. Our systematic analysis of DNA sequence variation shows that most annotated SNPs are not suitable for potent allele-specific silencing across populations because of suboptimal sequence features and low variability (>97% in HD). We suggest maximising patient coverage by selecting SNPs with high heterozygosity across populations, and preferentially targeting SNPs that lead to purine:purine mismatches in wild-type alleles to obtain potent allele-specific silencing. We therefore provide fundamental knowledge on strategies for optimising patient coverage of therapeutics for microsatellite expansion disorders by linking analysis of population genetic variation to the selection of molecular targets.

  16. New Repeat Polymorphism in the AKT1 Gene Predicts Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Availability and Stimulant-Induced Dopamine Release in the Healthy Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumay, Elena; Wiers, Corinde E; Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Kim, Sung Won; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Sun, Hui; Tomasi, Dardo; Wong, Christopher T; Weinberger, Daniel R; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S; Volkow, Nora D

    2017-05-10

    The role of the protein kinase Akt1 in dopamine neurotransmission is well recognized and has been implicated in schizophrenia and psychosis. However, the extent to which variants in the AKT1 gene influence dopamine neurotransmission is not well understood. Here we investigated the effect of a newly characterized variant number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in AKT1 [major alleles: L- (eight repeats) and H- (nine repeats)] on striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor (DRD2) availability and on dopamine release in healthy volunteers. We used PET and [(11)C]raclopride to assess baseline DRD2 availability in 91 participants. In 54 of these participants, we also measured intravenous methylphenidate-induced dopamine release to measure dopamine release. Dopamine release was quantified as the difference in specific binding of [(11)C]raclopride (nondisplaceable binding potential) between baseline values and values following methylphenidate injection. There was an effect of AKT1 genotype on DRD2 availability at baseline for the caudate (F(2,90) = 8.2, p = 0.001) and putamen (F(2,90) = 6.6, p = 0.002), but not the ventral striatum (p = 0.3). For the caudate and putamen, LL showed higher DRD2 availability than HH; HL were in between. There was also a significant effect of AKT1 genotype on dopamine increases in the ventral striatum (F(2,53) = 5.3, p = 0.009), with increases being stronger in HH > HL > LL. However, no dopamine increases were observed in the caudate (p = 0.1) or putamen (p = 0.8) following methylphenidate injection. Our results provide evidence that the AKT1 gene modulates both striatal DRD2 availability and dopamine release in the human brain, which could account for its association with schizophrenia and psychosis. The clinical relevance of the newly characterized AKT1 VNTR merits investigation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The AKT1 gene has been implicated in schizophrenia and psychosis. This association is likely to reflect modulation of dopamine signaling by Akt1 kinase

  17. On the Potential Origins of the High Stability of Reconstructed Ancestral Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Devin L; Kaltenbach, Miriam; Tawfik, Dan S

    2016-10-01

    Ancestral reconstruction provides instrumental insights regarding the biochemical and biophysical characteristics of past proteins. A striking observation relates to the remarkably high thermostability of reconstructed ancestors. The latter has been linked to high environmental temperatures in the Precambrian era, the era relating to most reconstructed proteins. We found that inferred ancestors of the serum paraoxonase (PON) enzyme family, including the mammalian ancestor, exhibit dramatically increased thermostabilities compared with the extant, human enzyme (up to 30 °C higher melting temperature). However, the environmental temperature at the time of emergence of mammals is presumed to be similar to the present one. Additionally, the mammalian PON ancestor has superior folding properties (kinetic stability)-unlike the extant mammalian PONs, it expresses in E. coli in a soluble and functional form, and at a high yield. We discuss two potential origins of this unexpectedly high stability. First, ancestral stability may be overestimated by a "consensus effect," whereby replacing amino acids that are rare in contemporary sequences with the amino acid most common in the family increases protein stability. Comparison to other reconstructed ancestors indicates that the consensus effect may bias some but not all reconstructions. Second, we note that high stability may relate to factors other than high environmental temperature such as oxidative stress or high radiation levels. Foremost, intrinsic factors such as high rates of genetic mutations and/or of transcriptional and translational errors, and less efficient protein quality control systems, may underlie the high kinetic and thermodynamic stability of past proteins.

  18. Reconstructing an ancestral mammalian immune supercomplex from a marsupial major histocompatibility complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Belov

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The first sequenced marsupial genome promises to reveal unparalleled insights into mammalian evolution. We have used the Monodelphis domestica (gray short-tailed opossum sequence to construct the first map of a marsupial major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The MHC is the most gene-dense region of the mammalian genome and is critical to immunity and reproductive success. The marsupial MHC bridges the phylogenetic gap between the complex MHC of eutherian mammals and the minimal essential MHC of birds. Here we show that the opossum MHC is gene dense and complex, as in humans, but shares more organizational features with non-mammals. The Class I genes have amplified within the Class II region, resulting in a unique Class I/II region. We present a model of the organization of the MHC in ancestral mammals and its elaboration during mammalian evolution. The opossum genome, together with other extant genomes, reveals the existence of an ancestral "immune supercomplex" that contained genes of both types of natural killer receptors together with antigen processing genes and MHC genes.

  19. Repeatability of Corticospinal and Spinal Measures during Lengthening and Shortening Contractions in the Human Tibialis Anterior Muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tallent, Jamie; Goodall, Stuart; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Gibson, Alan St Clair; French, Duncan N.; Howatson, Glyn

    2012-01-01

    Elements of the human central nervous system (CNS) constantly oscillate. In addition, there are also methodological factors and changes in muscle mechanics during dynamic muscle contractions that threaten the stability and consistency of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and perpherial nerve s

  20. Estimation of hominoid ancestral population sizes under bayesian coalescent models incorporating mutation rate variation and sequencing errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ralph; Yang, Ziheng

    2008-09-01

    Estimation of population parameters for the common ancestors of humans and the great apes is important in understanding our evolutionary history. In particular, inference of population size for the human-chimpanzee common ancestor may shed light on the process by which the 2 species separated and on whether the human population experienced a severe size reduction in its early evolutionary history. In this study, the Bayesian method of ancestral inference of Rannala and Yang (2003. Bayes estimation of species divergence times and ancestral population sizes using DNA sequences from multiple loci. Genetics. 164:1645-1656) was extended to accommodate variable mutation rates among loci and random species-specific sequencing errors. The model was applied to analyze a genome-wide data set of approximately 15,000 neutral loci (7.4 Mb) aligned for human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaque. We obtained robust and precise estimates for effective population sizes along the hominoid lineage extending back approximately 30 Myr to the cercopithecoid divergence. The results showed that ancestral populations were 5-10 times larger than modern humans along the entire hominoid lineage. The estimates were robust to the priors used and to model assumptions about recombination. The unusually low X chromosome divergence between human and chimpanzee could not be explained by variation in the male mutation bias or by current models of hybridization and introgression. Instead, our parameter estimates were consistent with a simple instantaneous process for human-chimpanzee speciation but showed a major reduction in X chromosome effective population size peculiar to the human-chimpanzee common ancestor, possibly due to selective sweeps on the X prior to separation of the 2 species.

  1. Visual system evolution and the nature of the ancestral snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, B F; Sampaio, F L; Jared, C; Antoniazzi, M M; Loew, E R; Bowmaker, J K; Rodriguez, A; Hart, N S; Hunt, D M; Partridge, J C; Gower, D J

    2015-07-01

    The dominant hypothesis for the evolutionary origin of snakes from 'lizards' (non-snake squamates) is that stem snakes acquired many snake features while passing through a profound burrowing (fossorial) phase. To investigate this, we examined the visual pigments and their encoding opsin genes in a range of squamate reptiles, focusing on fossorial lizards and snakes. We sequenced opsin transcripts isolated from retinal cDNA and used microspectrophotometry to measure directly the spectral absorbance of the photoreceptor visual pigments in a subset of samples. In snakes, but not lizards, dedicated fossoriality (as in Scolecophidia and the alethinophidian Anilius scytale) corresponds with loss of all visual opsins other than RH1 (λmax 490-497 nm); all other snakes (including less dedicated burrowers) also have functional sws1 and lws opsin genes. In contrast, the retinas of all lizards sampled, even highly fossorial amphisbaenians with reduced eyes, express functional lws, sws1, sws2 and rh1 genes, and most also express rh2 (i.e. they express all five of the visual opsin genes present in the ancestral vertebrate). Our evidence of visual pigment complements suggests that the visual system of stem snakes was partly reduced, with two (RH2 and SWS2) of the ancestral vertebrate visual pigments being eliminated, but that this did not extend to the extreme additional loss of SWS1 and LWS that subsequently occurred (probably independently) in highly fossorial extant scolecophidians and A. scytale. We therefore consider it unlikely that the ancestral snake was as fossorial as extant scolecophidians, whether or not the latter are para- or monophyletic.

  2. Estimating ancestral geographical distributions: a Gondwanan origin for aphid parasitoids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belshaw, R; Dowton, M; Quicke, D L; Austin, A D

    2000-01-01

    We tested the published hypothesis of a Gondwanan origin for the overwhelmingly northern hemisphere aphid parasitoids (Aphidiinae) as follows: (i) finding their sister group by a phylogenetic analysis of the entire Braconidae (Insecta: Hymenopterai using sequence data from approximately 500 bp fragments of both the nuclear 28S (D2 region) and mitochondrial 16S rDNA genes, (ii) using this sister-group relationship and the more informative 28S D2 gene to estimate the phylogeny of the Aphidiinae and (iii) estimating the ancestral distribution for the Aphidiinae using maximum-likelihood and maximum-parsimony methods. Both methods indicated a Gondwanan origin. PMID:10737407

  3. A novel tRNA variable number tandem repeat at human chromosome 1q23.3 is implicated as a boundary element based on conservation of a CTCF motif in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2014-06-01

    The human genome contains numerous large tandem repeats, many of which remain poorly characterized. Here we report a novel transfer RNA (tRNA) tandem repeat on human chromosome 1q23.3 that shows extensive copy number variation with 9-43 repeat units per allele and displays evidence of meiotic and mitotic instability. Each repeat unit consists of a 7.3 kb GC-rich sequence that binds the insulator protein CTCF and bears the chromatin hallmarks of a bivalent domain in human embryonic stem cells. A tRNA containing tandem repeat composed of at least three 7.6-kb GC-rich repeat units reside within a syntenic region of mouse chromosome 1. However, DNA sequence analysis reveals that, with the exception of the tRNA genes that account for less than 6% of a repeat unit, the remaining 7.2 kb is not conserved with the notable exception of a 24 base pair sequence corresponding to the CTCF binding site, suggesting an important role for this protein at the locus.

  4. The effect of repeated freeze-thaw cycles on human muscle tissue visualized by postmortem computed tomography (PMCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klop, Anthony C; Vester, Marloes E M; Colman, Kerri L; Ruijter, Jan M; Van Rijn, Rick R; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether effects of repetitive freeze-thaw cycles, with various thawing temperatures, on human muscle tissue can be quantified using postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) technology. An additional objective was to determine the preferred thawing temperature for muscle tissue in this study. Human cadaver upper extremities were divided into two different thawing temperature groups and underwent a series of four freeze-thaw cycles in total. Axial CT scans were performed after each cycle. CT attenuation (in Hounsfield units, HU) was measured in four muscles of the upper extremities. HU values changed significantly with the introduction of each subsequent freeze-thaw cycle. Moreover, the changes in HU values were different for each thawing group. There was a significant increase of HU values in both groups between t0 and t1 . Unfrozen tissue showed large variation of HU values in all samples. It was possible to distinguish between samples thawed at different thawing temperatures based on their respective HU values. It is advisable to keep the number of freeze-thaw cycles to just one, if the human cadaveric tissue is to be used for educational purposes. The preferred thawing temperature in this study is 2°C. Clin. Anat. 30:799-804, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors Clinical Anatomy published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Clinical Anatomists.

  5. Comparison of Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Markers typing and IS1245 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism fingerprinting of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis from human and porcine origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marttila Harri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal mycobacterioses are regarded as a potential zoonotic risk and cause economical losses world wide. M. avium subsp. hominissuis is a slow-growing subspecies found in mycobacterial infected humans and pigs and therefore rapid and discriminatory typing methods are needed for epidemiological studies. The genetic similarity of M. avium subsp. hominissuis from human and porcine origins using two different typing methods have not been studied earlier. The objective of this study was to compare the IS1245 RFLP pattern and MIRU-VNTR typing to study the genetic relatedness of M. avium strains isolated from slaughter pigs and humans in Finland with regard to public health aspects. Methods A novel PCR-based genotyping method, variable number tandem repeat (VNTR typing of eight mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRUs, was evaluated for its ability to characterize Finnish Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis strains isolated from pigs (n = 16 and humans (n = 13 and the results were compared with those obtained by the conventional IS1245 RFLP method. Results The MIRU-VNTR results showed a discriminatory index (DI of 0,92 and the IS1245 RFLP resulted in DI 0,98. The combined DI for both methods was 0,98. The MIRU-VNTR test has the advantages of being simple, reproducible, non-subjective, which makes it suitable for large-scale screening of M. avium strains. Conclusions Both typing methods demonstrated a high degree of similarity between the strains of human and porcine origin. The parallel application of the methods adds epidemiological value to the comparison of the strains and their origins. The present approach and results support the hypothesis that there is a common source of M. avium subsp. hominissuis infection for pigs and humans or alternatively one species may be the infective source to the other.

  6. Analysis of polyglutamine-coding repeats in the TATA-binding protein in different human populations and in patients with schizophrenia an bipolar affective disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J. [Addenbrooke`s National Health Service Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Crow, T.J. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-09-20

    A new class of disease (including Huntington disease, Kennedy disease, and spinocerebellar ataxias types 1 and 3) results from abnormal expansions of CAG trinucleotides in the coding regions of genes. In all of these diseases the CAG repeats are thought to be translated into polyglutamine tracts. There is accumulating evidence arguing for CAG trinucleotide expansions as one of the causative disease mutations in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. We and others believe that the TATA-binding protein (TBP) is an important candidate to investigate in these diseases as it contains a highly polymorphic stretch of glutamine codons, which are close to the threshold length where the polyglutamine tracts start to be associated with disease. Thus, we examined the lengths of this polyglutamine repeat in normal unrelated East Anglians, South African Blacks, sub-Saharan Africans mainly from Nigeria, and Asian Indians. We also examined 43 bipolar affective disorder patients and 65 schizophrenic patients. The range of polyglutamine tract-lengths that we found in humans was from 26-42 codons. No patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia had abnormal expansions at this locus. 22 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Large-scale analysis of structural, sequence and thermodynamic characteristics of A-to-I RNA editing sites in human Alu repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenberg Eli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alu repeats in the human transcriptome undergo massive adenosine to inosine RNA editing. This process is selective, as editing efficiency varies greatly among different adenosines. Several studies have identified weak sequence motifs characterizing the editing sites, but these alone do not account for the large diversity observed. Results Here we build a dataset of 29,971 editing sites and use it to characterize editing preferences. We focus on structural aspects, studying the double-stranded RNA structure of the Alu repeats, and show the editing frequency of a given site to depend strongly on the micro-structure it resides in. Surprisingly, we find that interior loops, and especially the nucleotides at their edges, are more likely to be edited than helices. In addition, the sequence motifs characterizing editing sites vary with the micro-structure. Finally, we show that thermodynamic stability of the site is important for its editing. Conclusions Analysis of a large dataset of editing events reveals more information on sequence and structural motifs characterizing the A-to-I editing process

  8. Effect of variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism in the human dopamine transporter gene on conflict information processing according to event-related potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyu Han; Yuping Wang; Xin Wang; Ying Liu

    2010-01-01

    The dopamine transporter(DAT)is responsible for dopamine reuptake from the synaptic cleft.A variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism in the DAT gene is related to DAT availability and has been associated with cognition.With the advantage of high-time resolution,event-related potential is an important method to study the time course of human information processing.Previous results have suggested that dopamine exhibits a close relationship with conflicting information processing.Therefore,the present study assumed that conflicting information processing could be influenced by DAT variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism.To confirm this,the present study analyzed the influence of DAT genotypes on N270,which is presumed to reflect neural activity of conflict information processing in young healthy adults.A S1-S2 matching task was performed in healthy adults with 10/10 genotype(n = 14)and 10/9genotypes(n = 14),respectively,when event-related potentials were recorded.Results demonstrated that subjects with the 10/10 genotype exhibited shorter N270 latency and quicker reaction times compared with subjects with the 10/9 genotype.There were no differences in N270amplitude between the two genotypes.These results suggested that 10/10 genotype subjects more efficiently processed conflict information.

  9. Two novel DXZ4-associated long noncoding RNAs show developmental changes in expression coincident with heterochromatin formation at the human (Homo sapiens) macrosatellite repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Debbie M; Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2015-12-01

    On the male X and female active X chromosome (Xa), the macrosatellite repeat (MSR) DXZ4 is packaged into constitutive heterochromatin characterized by CpG methylation and histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine-9 (H3K9me3). In contrast, DXZ4 on the female inactive X chromosome (Xi), is packaged into euchromatin, is bound by the architectural protein CCCTC-binding factor, and mediates Xi-specific long-range cis contact with similarly packaged tandem repeats on the Xi. In cancer, male DXZ4 can inappropriately revert to a Xi-like state and other MSRs have been reported to adopt alternate chromatin configurations in response to disease. Given this plasticity, we sought to identify factors that might control heterochromatin at DXZ4. In human embryonic stem cells, we found low levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at DXZ4 and that this mark is lost upon differentiation as H3K9me3 is acquired. We identified two previously undescribed DXZ4 associated noncoding transcripts (DANT1 and DANT2) that are transcribed toward DXZ4 from promoters flanking the array. Each generates transcript isoforms that traverse the MSR. However, upon differentiation, enhancer of Zeste-2 silences DANT1, and DANT2 transcription terminates prior to entering DXZ4. These data support a model wherein DANT1 and/or DANT2 may function to regulate constitutive heterochromatin formation at this MSR.

  10. Two novel DXZ4-associated long noncoding RNAs show developmental changes in expression coincident with heterochromatin formation at the human (Homo sapiens) macrosatellite repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Debbie M.; Darrow, Emily M.; Chadwick, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    On the male X and female active X chromosome (Xa), the macrosatellite repeat (MSR) DXZ4 is packaged into constitutive heterochromatin characterized by CpG methylation and histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine-9 (H3K9me3). In contrast, DXZ4 on the female inactive X chromosome (Xi), is packaged into euchromatin, is bound by the architectural protein CCCTC-binding factor, and mediates Xi-specific long-range cis contact with similarly packaged tandem repeats on the Xi. In cancer, male DXZ4 can inappropriately revert to a Xi-like state and other MSRs have been reported to adopt alternate chromatin configurations in response to disease. Given this plasticity, we sought to identify factors that might control heterochromatin at DXZ4. In human embryonic stem cells, we found low levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at DXZ4, and that this mark is lost upon differentiation as H3K9me3 is acquired. We identified two previously undescribed DXZ4 associated non-coding transcripts (DANT1 and DANT2) that are transcribed towards DXZ4 from promoters flanking the array. Each generates transcript isoforms that traverse the MSR. However, upon differentiation, Enhancer of Zeste-2 silences DANT1, and DANT2 transcription terminates prior to entering DXZ4. These data support a model wherein DANT1 and/or DANT2 may function to regulate constitutive heterochromatin formation at this MSR. PMID:26188586

  11. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing the non-tandem repeat regions of the human mucin MUC4 in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesh Jain

    Full Text Available The MUC4 mucin is a high molecular weight, membrane-bound, and highly glycosylated protein. It is a multi-domain protein that is putatively cleaved into a large mucin-like subunit (MUC4α and a C-terminal growth-factor like subunit (MUC4β. MUC4 plays critical roles in physiological and pathological conditions and is aberrantly overexpressed in several cancers, including those of the pancreas, cervix, breast and lung. It is also a potential biomarker for the diagnosis, prognosis and progression of several malignancies. Further, MUC4 plays diverse functional roles in cancer initiation and progression as evident from its involvement in oncogenic transformation, proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, motility and invasion, and resistance to chemotherapy in human cancer cells. We have previously generated a monoclonal antibody 8G7, which is directed against the TR region of MUC4, and has been extensively used to study the expression of MUC4 in several malignancies. Here, we describe the generation of anti-MUC4 antibodies directed against the non-TR regions of MUC4. Recombinant glutathione-S-transferase (GST-fused MUC4α fragments, both upstream (MUC4α-N-Ter and downstream (MUC4α-C-Ter of the TR domain, were used as immunogens to immunize BALB/c mice. Following cell fusion, hybridomas were screened using the aforementioned recombinant proteins ad lysates from human pancreatic cell lines. Three anti MUC4α-N-Ter and one anti-MUC4α-C-Ter antibodies were characterized by several inmmunoassays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, immunoblotting, immunofluorescene, flow cytometry and immunoprecipitation using MUC4 expressing human pancreatic cancer cell lines. The antibodies also reacted with the MUC4 in human pancreatic tumor sections in immunohistochemical analysis. The new domain-specific anti-MUC4 antibodies will serve as important reagents to study the structure-function relationship of MUC4 domains and for the development of MUC4

  12. The ancestral process of long term seed bank models

    CERN Document Server

    Blath, Jochen; Kurt, Noemi; Spanò, Dario

    2012-01-01

    We present a new model for the evolution of genetic types in the presence of so-called seed banks, i.e., where individuals may obtain their genetic type from ancestors which have lived in the near as well as the very far past. The classical Wright-Fisher model, as well as a seed bank model with bounded age distribution considered by Kaj, Krone and Lascoux (2001) are special cases of our model. We discern three parameter regimes of the seed bank age distribution, which lead to substantially different behaviour in terms of genetic variability, in particular with respect to fixation of types and time to the most recent common ancestor. We prove that for age distributions with finite mean, the rescaled ancestral process converges to a time-changed Kingman coalescent, while in the case of infinite mean, ancestral lineages might not merge at all with positive probability. Further, we present a construction of the forward in time process in equilibrium. The mathematical methods are based on renewal theory, the urn p...

  13. Fast phylogeny reconstruction through learning of ancestral sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Mihaescu, Radu; Rao, Satish

    2008-01-01

    Given natural limitations on the length DNA sequences, designing phylogenetic reconstruction methods which are reliable under limited information is a crucial endeavor. There have been two approaches to this problem: reconstructing partial but reliable information about the tree (\\cite{Mo07, DMR08,DHJ06,GMS08}), and reaching "deeper" in the tree through reconstruction of ancestral sequences. In the latter category, \\cite{DMR06} settled an important conjecture of M.Steel, showing that, under the CFN model of evolution, all trees on $n$ leaves with edge lengths bounded by the Ising model phase transition can be recovered with high probability from genomes of length $O(\\log n)$ with a polynomial time algorithm. Their methods had a running time of $O(n^{10})$. Here we enhance our methods from \\cite{DHJ06} with the learning of ancestral sequences and provide an algorithm for reconstructing a sub-forest of the tree which is reliable given available data, without requiring a-priori known bounds on the edge lengths o...

  14. Transcellular activation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat in T lymphocytes requires CD4-gp120 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, A; Lowy, I; Weinberger, O K

    1992-01-01

    Cells expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) tat can transactivate the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) in cocultured T lymphocytes. In this report, we describe the molecular requirements for transcellular activation of the LTR in Jurkat cells. An analysis with deletion mutants and blocking antibodies demonstrated a requirement for env expression in addition to tat expression for transcellular activation to occur. The results suggest that the transient association of CD4 and gp120 in cocultured cells is required for tat-mediated transcellular activation. The events that follow CD4-gp120 binding in transactivation, however, do not require the gp120-neutralizing domain, in contrast to HIV-mediated fusion and infection. The consequences of this interaction on cellular function are currently under investigation. Images PMID:1351104

  15. Time course of the induction of homeostatic plasticity generated by repeated transcranial direct current stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, K; Seeber, A A; Thirugnanasambandam, N; Paulus, W; Nitsche, M A; Rothwell, J C

    2011-03-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed that control the amount of plasticity in neuronal circuits and guarantee dynamic stability of neuronal networks. Homeostatic plasticity suggests that the ease with which a synaptic connection is facilitated/suppressed depends on the previous amount of network activity. We describe how such homeostatic-like interactions depend on the time interval between two conditioning protocols and on the duration of the preconditioning protocol. We used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to produce short-lasting plasticity in the motor cortex of healthy humans. In the main experiment, we compared the aftereffect of a single 5-min session of anodal or cathodal tDCS with the effect of a 5-min tDCS session preceded by an identical 5-min conditioning session administered 30, 3, or 0 min beforehand. Five-minute anodal tDCS increases excitability for about 5 min. The same duration of cathodal tDCS reduces excitability. Increasing the duration of tDCS to 10 min prolongs the duration of the effects. If two 5-min periods of tDCS are applied with a 30-min break between them, the effect of the second period of tDCS is identical to that of 5-min stimulation alone. If the break is only 3 min, then the second session has the opposite effect to 5-min tDCS given alone. Control experiments show that these shifts in the direction of plasticity evolve during the 10 min after the first tDCS session and depend on the duration of the first tDCS but not on intracortical inhibition and facilitation. The results are compatible with a time-dependent "homeostatic-like" rule governing the response of the human motor cortex to plasticity probing protocols.

  16. Derived immune and ancestral pigmentation alleles in a 7,000-year-old Mesolithic European

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olalde, Inigo; Allentoft, Morten E.; Sanchez-Quinto, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Ancient genomic sequences have started to reveal the origin and the demographic impact of farmers from the Neolithic period spreading into Europe(1-3). The adoption of farming, stock breeding and sedentary societies during the Neolithic may have resulted in adaptive changes in genes associated...... at the La Brana-Arintero site in Leon, Spain, to retrieve a complete pre-agricultural European human genome. Analysis of this genome in the context of other ancient samples suggests the existence of a common ancient genomic signature across western and central Eurasia from the Upper Paleolithic...... to the Mesolithic. The La Brana individual carries ancestral alleles in several skin pigmentation genes, suggesting that the light skin of modern Europeans was not yet ubiquitous in Mesolithic times. Moreover, we provide evidence that a significant number of derived, putatively adaptive variants associated...

  17. Where did the chili get its spice? Biogeography of capsaicinoid production in ancestral wild chili species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewksbury, Joshua J; Manchego, Carlos; Haak, David C; Levey, Douglas J

    2006-03-01

    The biogeography of pungency in three species of wild chili in the chaco and surrounding highland habitats of southeastern Bolivia is described. We report that Capsicum chacoense, C. baccatum, and C. eximium are polymorphic for production of capsaicin and its analogs, such that completely pungent and completely nonpungent individuals co-occur in some populations. In C. chacoense, the density of plants and the proportion of pungent plants increased with elevation. Above 900 m, all individuals in all populations except two were pungent; nonpungent individuals in at least one of the two polymorphic populations were likely a result of spreading by humans. The occurrence of pungent and nonpungent individuals in three species of ancestral Capsicum and the geographic variation of pungency within species suggest that production of capsaicin and its analogs entails both costs and benefits, which shift from one locality to another. Determining the selection pressures behind such shifts is necessary to understand the evolution of pungency in chilies.

  18. Inheritance of the 8.1 ancestral haplotype in recurrent pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid M; Nielsen, Henriette S; Steffensen, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH) (HLA-A1, C7, B8, C4AQ0, C4B1, DR3, DQ2) is a remarkably long and conserved haplotype in the human major histocompatibility complex. It has been associated with both beneficial and detrimental effects, consistent with antagonistic....... The objective was to test the gestational drive theory for the 8.1AH in women with RPL and their live born children. METHODOLOGY: We investigated the inheritance of the 8.1AH from 82 heterozygous RPL women to 110 live born children. All participants were genotyped for HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 in DNA from EDTA...

  19. The specificity of stimulus-specific adaptation in human auditory cortex increases with repeated exposure to the adapting stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley, Paul M; Krumbholz, Katrin

    2013-12-01

    The neural response to a sensory stimulus tends to be more strongly reduced when the stimulus is preceded by the same, rather than a different, stimulus. This stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA) is ubiquitous across the senses. In hearing, SSA has been suggested to play a role in change detection as indexed by the mismatch negativity. This study sought to test whether SSA, measured in human auditory cortex, is caused by neural fatigue (reduction in neural responsiveness) or by sharpening of neural tuning to the adapting stimulus. For that, we measured event-related cortical potentials to pairs of pure tones with varying frequency separation and stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA). This enabled us to examine the relationship between the degree of specificity of adaptation as a function of frequency separation and the rate of decay of adaptation with increasing SOA. Using simulations of tonotopic neuron populations, we demonstrate that the fatigue model predicts independence of adaptation specificity and decay rate, whereas the sharpening model predicts interdependence. The data showed independence and thus supported the fatigue model. In a second experiment, we measured adaptation specificity after multiple presentations of the adapting stimulus. The multiple adapters produced more adaptation overall, but the effect was more specific to the adapting frequency. Within the context of the fatigue model, the observed increase in adaptation specificity could be explained by assuming a 2.5-fold increase in neural frequency selectivity. We discuss possible bottom-up and top-down mechanisms of this effect.

  20. Effect of the assignment of ancestral CpG state on the estimation of nucleotide substitution rates in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keightley Peter D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular evolutionary studies in mammals often estimate nucleotide substitution rates within and outside CpG dinucleotides separately. Frequently, in alignments of two sequences, the division of sites into CpG and non-CpG classes is based simply on the presence or absence of a CpG dinucleotide in either sequence, a procedure that we refer to as CpG/non-CpG assignment. Although it likely that this procedure is biased, it is generally assumed that the bias is negligible if species are very closely related. Results Using simulations of DNA sequence evolution we show that assignment of the ancestral CpG state based on the simple presence/absence of the CpG dinucleotide can seriously bias estimates of the substitution rate, because many true non-CpG changes are misassigned as CpG. Paradoxically, this bias is most severe between closely related species, because a minimum of two substitutions are required to misassign a true ancestral CpG site as non-CpG whereas only a single substitution is required to misassign a true ancestral non-CpG site as CpG in a two branch tree. We also show that CpG misassignment bias differentially affects fourfold degenerate and noncoding sites due to differences in base composition such that fourfold degenerate sites can appear to be evolving more slowly than noncoding sites. We demonstrate that the effects predicted by our simulations occur in a real evolutionary setting by comparing substitution rates estimated from human-chimp coding and intronic sequence using CpG/non-CpG assignment with estimates derived from a method that is largely free from bias. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that a common method of assigning sites into CpG and non CpG classes in pairwise alignments is seriously biased and recommends against the adoption of ad hoc methods of ancestral state assignment.

  1. A melodic contour repeatedly experienced by human near-term fetuses elicits a profound cardiac reaction one month after birth.

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    Carolyn Granier-Deferre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human hearing develops progressively during the last trimester of gestation. Near-term fetuses can discriminate acoustic features, such as frequencies and spectra, and process complex auditory streams. Fetal and neonatal studies show that they can remember frequently recurring sounds. However, existing data can only show retention intervals up to several days after birth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that auditory memories can last at least six weeks. Experimental fetuses were given precisely controlled exposure to a descending piano melody twice daily during the 35(th, 36(th, and 37(th weeks of gestation. Six weeks later we assessed the cardiac responses of 25 exposed infants and 25 naive control infants, while in quiet sleep, to the descending melody and to an ascending control piano melody. The melodies had precisely inverse contours, but similar spectra, identical duration, tempo and rhythm, thus, almost identical amplitude envelopes. All infants displayed a significant heart rate change. In exposed infants, the descending melody evoked a cardiac deceleration that was twice larger than the decelerations elicited by the ascending melody and by both melodies in control infants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, 3-weeks of prenatal exposure to a specific melodic contour affects infants 'auditory processing' or perception, i.e., impacts the autonomic nervous system at least six weeks later, when infants are 1-month old. Our results extend the retention interval over which a prenatally acquired memory of a specific sound stream can be observed from 3-4 days to six weeks. The long-term memory for the descending melody is interpreted in terms of enduring neurophysiological tuning and its significance for the developmental psychobiology of attention and perception, including early speech perception, is discussed.

  2. Origin of amphibian and avian chromosomes by fission, fusion, and retention of ancestral chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Stephen R.; Kump, D. Kevin; Putta, Srikrishna; Pauly, Nathan; Reynolds, Anna; Henry, Rema J.; Basa, Saritha; Walker, John A.; Smith, Jeramiah J.

    2011-01-01

    Amphibian genomes differ greatly in DNA content and chromosome size, morphology, and number. Investigations of this diversity are needed to identify mechanisms that have shaped the evolution of vertebrate genomes. We used comparative mapping to investigate the organization of genes in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), a species that presents relatively few chromosomes (n = 14) and a gigantic genome (>20 pg/N). We show extensive conservation of synteny between Ambystoma, chicken, and human, and a positive correlation between the length of conserved segments and genome size. Ambystoma segments are estimated to be four to 51 times longer than homologous human and chicken segments. Strikingly, genes demarking the structures of 28 chicken chromosomes are ordered among linkage groups defining the Ambystoma genome, and we show that these same chromosomal segments are also conserved in a distantly related anuran amphibian (Xenopus tropicalis). Using linkage relationships from the amphibian maps, we predict that three chicken chromosomes originated by fusion, nine to 14 originated by fission, and 12–17 evolved directly from ancestral tetrapod chromosomes. We further show that some ancestral segments were fused prior to the divergence of salamanders and anurans, while others fused independently and randomly as chromosome numbers were reduced in lineages leading to Ambystoma and Xenopus. The maintenance of gene order relationships between chromosomal segments that have greatly expanded and contracted in salamander and chicken genomes, respectively, suggests selection to maintain synteny relationships and/or extremely low rates of chromosomal rearrangement. Overall, the results demonstrate the value of data from diverse, amphibian genomes in studies of vertebrate genome evolution. PMID:21482624

  3. Inferring genome-wide patterns of admixture in Qataris using fifty-five ancestral populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omberg Larsson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Populations of the Arabian Peninsula have a complex genetic structure that reflects waves of migrations including the earliest human migrations from Africa and eastern Asia, migrations along ancient civilization trading routes and colonization history of recent centuries. Results Here, we present a study of genome-wide admixture in this region, using 156 genotyped individuals from Qatar, a country located at the crossroads of these migration patterns. Since haplotypes of these individuals could have originated from many different populations across the world, we have developed a machine learning method "SupportMix" to infer loci-specific genomic ancestry when simultaneously analyzing many possible ancestral populations. Simulations show that SupportMix is not only more accurate than other popular admixture discovery tools but is the first admixture inference method that can efficiently scale for simultaneous analysis of 50-100 putative ancestral populations while being independent of prior demographic information. Conclusions By simultaneously using the 55 world populations from the Human Genome Diversity Panel, SupportMix was able to extract the fine-scale ancestry of the Qatar population, providing many new observations concerning the ancestry of the region. For example, as well as recapitulating the three major sub-populations in Qatar, composed of mainly Arabic, Persian, and African ancestry, SupportMix additionally identifies the specific ancestry of the Persian group to populations sampled in Greater Persia rather than from China and the ancestry of the African group to sub-Saharan origin and not Southern African Bantu origin as previously thought.

  4. Allelic lineages of the ficolin genes (FCNs are passed from ancestral to descendant primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Hummelshøj

    Full Text Available The ficolins recognize carbohydrates and acetylated compounds on microorganisms and dying host cells and are able to activate the lectin pathway of the complement system. In humans, three ficolin genes have been identified: FCN1, FCN2 and FCN3, which encode ficolin-1, ficolin-2 and ficolin-3, respectively. Rodents have only two ficolins designated ficolin-A and ficolin-B that are closely related to human ficolin-1, while the rodent FCN3 orthologue is a pseudogene. Ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 have so far only been observed in humans. Thus, we performed a systematic investigation of the FCN genes in non-human primates. The exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FCN1-3 genes were sequenced in the following primate species: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, cynomolgus macaque, baboon and common marmoset. We found that the exon organisation of the FCN genes was very similar between all the non-human primates and the human FCN genes. Several variations in the FCN genes were found in more than one primate specie suggesting that they were carried from one species to another including humans. The amino acid diversity of the ficolins among human and non-human primate species was estimated by calculating the Shannon entropy revealing that all three proteins are generally highly conserved. Ficolin-1 and ficolin-2 showed the highest diversity, whereas ficolin-3 was more conserved. Ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 were present in non-human primate sera with the same characteristic oligomeric structures as seen in human serum. Taken together all the FCN genes show the same characteristics in lower and higher primates. The existence of trans-species polymorphisms suggests that different FCN allelic lineages may be passed from ancestral to descendant species.

  5. Global Alignment of Molecular Sequences via Ancestral State Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Andoni, Alexandr; Hassidim, Avinatan; Roch, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic techniques do not generally account for such common evolutionary events as site insertions and deletions (known as indels). Instead tree building algorithms and ancestral state inference procedures typically rely on substitution-only models of sequence evolution. In practice these methods are extended beyond this simplified setting with the use of heuristics that produce global alignments of the input sequences--an important problem which has no rigorous model-based solution. In this paper we consider a new version of the multiple sequence alignment in the context of stochastic indel models. More precisely, we introduce the following {\\em trace reconstruction problem on a tree} (TRPT): a binary sequence is broadcast through a tree channel where we allow substitutions, deletions, and insertions; we seek to reconstruct the original sequence from the sequences received at the leaves of the tree. We give a recursive procedure for this problem with strong reconstruction guarantees at low mut...

  6. The ancestral gene repertoire of animal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alié, Alexandre; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Sugimura, Itsuro; Manuel, Michaël; Sugano, Wakana; Mano, Akira; Satoh, Nori; Agata, Kiyokazu; Funayama, Noriko

    2015-12-22

    Stem cells are pivotal for development and tissue homeostasis of multicellular animals, and the quest for a gene toolkit associated with the emergence of stem cells in a common ancestor of all metazoans remains a major challenge for evolutionary biology. We reconstructed the conserved gene repertoire of animal stem cells by transcriptomic profiling of totipotent archeocytes in the demosponge Ephydatia fluviatilis and by tracing shared molecular signatures with flatworm and Hydra stem cells. Phylostratigraphy analyses indicated that most of these stem-cell genes predate animal origin, with only few metazoan innovations, notably including several partners of the Piwi machinery known to promote genome stability. The ancestral stem-cell transcriptome is strikingly poor in transcription factors. Instead, it is rich in RNA regulatory actors, including components of the "germ-line multipotency program" and many RNA-binding proteins known as critical regulators of mammalian embryonic stem cells.

  7. Detection of Weakly Conserved Ancestral Mammalian RegulatorySequences by Primate Comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qian-fei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Chanan, Sumita; Cheng,Jan-Fang; Rubin, Edward M.; Boffelli, Dario

    2006-06-01

    Genomic comparisons between human and distant, non-primatemammals are commonly used to identify cis-regulatory elements based onconstrained sequence evolution. However, these methods fail to detectcryptic functional elements, which are too weakly conserved among mammalsto distinguish from nonfunctional DNA. To address this problem, weexplored the potential of deep intra-primate sequence comparisons. Wesequenced the orthologs of 558 kb of human genomic sequence, coveringmultiple loci involved in cholesterol homeostasis, in 6 nonhumanprimates. Our analysis identified 6 noncoding DNA elements displayingsignificant conservation among primates, but undetectable in more distantcomparisons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that at least three ofthese 6 elements have regulatory function. Notably, the mouse orthologsof these three functional human sequences had regulatory activity despitetheir lack of significant sequence conservation, indicating that they arecryptic ancestral cis-regulatory elements. These regulatory elementscould still be detected in a smaller set of three primate speciesincluding human, rhesus and marmoset. Since the human and rhesus genomesequences are already available, and the marmoset genome is activelybeing sequenced, the primate-specific conservation analysis describedhere can be applied in the near future on a whole-genome scale, tocomplement the annotation provided by more distant speciescomparisons.

  8. The DUB/USP17 deubiquitinating enzymes: A gene family within a tandemly repeated sequence, is also embedded within the copy number variable Beta-defensin cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Christopher J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DUB/USP17 subfamily of deubiquitinating enzymes were originally identified as immediate early genes induced in response to cytokine stimulation in mice (DUB-1, DUB-1A, DUB-2, DUB-2A. Subsequently we have identified a number of human family members and shown that one of these (DUB-3 is also cytokine inducible. We originally showed that constitutive expression of DUB-3 can block cell proliferation and more recently we have demonstrated that this is due to its regulation of the ubiquitination and activity of the 'CAAX' box protease RCE1. Results Here we demonstrate that the human DUB/USP17 family members are found on both chromosome 4p16.1, within a block of tandem repeats, and on chromosome 8p23.1, embedded within the copy number variable beta-defensin cluster. In addition, we show that the multiple genes observed in humans and other distantly related mammals have arisen due to the independent expansion of an ancestral sequence within each species. However, it is also apparent when sequences from humans and the more closely related chimpanzee are compared, that duplication events have taken place prior to these species separating. Conclusions The observation that the DUB/USP17 genes, which can influence cell growth and survival, have evolved from an unstable ancestral sequence which has undergone multiple and varied duplications in the species examined marks this as a unique family. In addition, their presence within the beta-defensin repeat raises the question whether they may contribute to the influence of this repeat on immune related conditions.

  9. Ancestral dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exposure promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ancestral environmental exposures to a variety of environmental factors and toxicants have been shown to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease. The present work examined the potential transgenerational actions of the insecticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) on obesity and associated disease. Methods Outbred gestating female rats were transiently exposed to a vehicle control or DDT and the F1 generation offspring bred to generate the F2 generation and F2 generation bred to generate the F3 generation. The F1 and F3 generation control and DDT lineage rats were aged and various pathologies investigated. The F3 generation male sperm were collected to investigate methylation between the control and DDT lineage male sperm. Results The F1 generation offspring (directly exposed as a fetus) derived from the F0 generation exposed gestating female rats were not found to develop obesity. The F1 generation DDT lineage animals did develop kidney disease, prostate disease, ovary disease and tumor development as adults. Interestingly, the F3 generation (great grand-offspring) had over 50% of males and females develop obesity. Several transgenerational diseases previously shown to be associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity were observed in the testis, ovary and kidney. The transgenerational transmission of disease was through both female (egg) and male (sperm) germlines. F3 generation sperm epimutations, differential DNA methylation regions (DMR), induced by DDT were identified. A number of the genes associated with the DMR have previously been shown to be associated with obesity. Conclusions Observations indicate ancestral exposure to DDT can promote obesity and associated disease transgenerationally. The etiology of disease such as obesity may be in part due to environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance. PMID:24228800

  10. Comparative systems toxicology analysis of cigarette smoke and aerosol from a candidate modified risk tobacco product in organotypic human gingival epithelial cultures: A 3-day repeated exposure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Filippo; Titz, Bjoern; Sewer, Alain; Lo Sasso, Giuseppe; Scotti, Elena; Schlage, Walter K; Mathis, Carole; Leroy, Patrice; Majeed, Shoaib; Torres, Laura Ortega; Keppler, Brian R; Elamin, Ashraf; Trivedi, Keyur; Guedj, Emmanuel; Martin, Florian; Frentzel, Stefan; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2017-03-01

    Smoking is one of the major lifestyle-related risk factors for periodontal diseases. Modified risk tobacco products (MRTP) offer a promising alternative in the harm reduction strategy for adult smokers unable to quit. Using a systems toxicology approach, we investigated and compared the exposure effects of a reference cigarette (3R4F) and a heat-not-burn technology-based candidate MRTP, the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2. Human gingival epithelial organotypic cultures were repeatedly exposed (3 days) for 28 min at two matching concentrations of cigarette smoke (CS) or THS2.2 aerosol. Results showed only minor histopathological alterations and minimal cytotoxicity upon THS2.2 aerosol exposure compared to CS (1% for THS2.2 aerosol vs. 30% for CS, at the high concentration). Among the 14 proinflammatory mediators analyzed, only 5 exhibited significant alterations with THS2.2 exposure compared with 11 upon CS exposure. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis indicated a general reduction of the impact in THS2.2 aerosol-exposed samples with respect to CS (∼79% lower biological impact for the high THS2.2 aerosol concentration compared to CS, and 13 metabolites significantly perturbed for THS2.2 vs. 181 for CS). This study indicates that exposure to THS2.2 aerosol had a lower impact on the pathophysiology of human gingival organotypic cultures than CS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-Term Safety of Repeated Blood-Brain Barrier Opening via Focused Ultrasound with Microbubbles in Non-Human Primates Performing a Cognitive Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Downs

    Full Text Available Focused Ultrasound (FUS coupled with intravenous administration of microbubbles (MB is a non-invasive technique that has been shown to reliably open (increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB in multiple in vivo models including non-human primates (NHP. This procedure has shown promise for clinical and basic science applications, yet the safety and potential neurological effects of long term application in NHP requires further investigation under parameters shown to be efficacious in that species (500 kHz, 200-400 kPa, 4-5 μm MB, 2 minute sonication. In this study, we repeatedly opened the BBB in the caudate and putamen regions of the basal ganglia of 4 NHP using FUS with systemically-administered MB over 4-20 months. We assessed the safety of the FUS with MB procedure using MRI to detect edema or hemorrhaging in the brain. Contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI sequences showed a 98% success rate for openings in the targeted regions. T2-weighted and SWI sequences indicated a lack edema in the majority of the cases. We investigated potential neurological effects of the FUS with MB procedure through quantitative cognitive testing of' visual, cognitive, motivational, and motor function using a random dot motion task with reward magnitude bias presented on a touchpanel display. Reaction times during the task significantly increased on the day of the FUS with MB procedure. This increase returned to baseline within 4-5 days after the procedure. Visual motion discrimination thresholds were unaffected. Our results indicate FUS with MB can be a safe method for repeated opening of the BBB at the basal ganglia in NHP for up to 20 months without any long-term negative physiological or neurological effects with the parameters used.

  12. Expanded complexity of unstable repeat diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Urszula; McIvor, Elizabeth; Dent, Sharon Y.R.; Wells, Robert D.; Napierala, Marek.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable Repeat Diseases (URDs) share a common mutational phenomenon of changes in the copy number of short, tandemly repeated DNA sequences. More than 20 human neurological diseases are caused by instability, predominantly expansion, of microsatellite sequences. Changes in the repeat size initiate a cascade of pathological processes, frequently characteristic of a unique disease or a small subgroup of the URDs. Understanding of both the mechanism of repeat instability and molecular consequen...

  13. A brief history of human autosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Haig, D.

    1999-01-01

    Comparative gene mapping and chromosome painting permit the tentative reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes. The modern human karyotype is proposed to differ from that of the most recent common ancestor of catarrhine primates by two major rearrangements. The first was the fission of an ancestral chromosome to produce the homologues of human chromosomes 14 and 15. This fission occurred before the divergence of gibbons from humans and other apes. The second was the fusion of two ancestral chro...

  14. Convergent evolution of caffeine in plants by co-option of exapted ancestral enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruiqi; O'Donnell, Andrew J; Barboline, Jessica J; Barkman, Todd J

    2016-09-20

    Convergent evolution is a process that has occurred throughout the tree of life, but the historical genetic and biochemical context promoting the repeated independent origins of a trait is rarely understood. The well-known stimulant caffeine, and its xanthine alkaloid precursors, has evolved multiple times in flowering plant history for various roles in plant defense and pollination. We have shown that convergent caffeine production, surprisingly, has evolved by two previously unknown biochemical pathways in chocolate, citrus, and guaraná plants using either caffeine synthase- or xanthine methyltransferase-like enzymes. However, the pathway and enzyme lineage used by any given plant species is not predictable from phylogenetic relatedness alone. Ancestral sequence resurrection reveals that this convergence was facilitated by co-option of genes maintained over 100 million y for alternative biochemical roles. The ancient enzymes of the Citrus lineage were exapted for reactions currently used for various steps of caffeine biosynthesis and required very few mutations to acquire modern-day enzymatic characteristics, allowing for the evolution of a complete pathway. Future studies aimed at manipulating caffeine content of plants will require the use of different approaches given the metabolic and genetic diversity revealed by this study.

  15. Variable number of tandem repeat polymorphisms of DRD4: re-evaluation of selection hypothesis and analysis of association with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Eiji; Nakajima, Mizuho; Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Saitou, Naruya; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2009-01-01

    Associations have been reported between the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphisms in the exon 3 of dopamine D4 receptor gene gene and multiple psychiatric illnesses/traits. We examined the distribution of VNTR alleles of different length in a Japanese cohort and found that, as reported earlier, the size of allele ‘7R' was much rarer (0.5%) in Japanese than in Caucasian populations (∼20%). This presents a challenge to an earlier proposed hypothesis that positive selection favoring the allele 7R has contributed to its high frequency. To further address the issue of selection, we carried out sequencing of the VNTR region not only from human but also from chimpanzee samples, and made inference on the ancestral repeat motif and haplotype by use of a phylogenetic analysis program. The most common 4R variant was considered to be the ancestral haplotype as earlier proposed. However, in a gene tree of VNTR constructed on the basis of this inferred ancestral haplotype, the allele 7R had five descendent haplotypes in relatively long lineage, where genetic drift can have major influence. We also tested this length polymorphism for association with schizophrenia, studying two Japanese sample sets (one with 570 cases and 570 controls, and the other with 124 pedigrees). No evidence of association between the allele 7R and schizophrenia was found in any of the two data sets. Collectively, this study suggests that the VNTR variation does not have an effect large enough to cause either selection or a detectable association with schizophrenia in a study of samples of moderate size. PMID:19092778

  16. A new chromosomal phylogeny supports the repeated origin of vectorial capacity in malaria mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Kamali

    Full Text Available Understanding phylogenetic relationships within species complexes of disease vectors is crucial for identifying genomic changes associated with the evolution of epidemiologically important traits. However, the high degree of genetic similarity among sibling species confounds the ability to determine phylogenetic relationships using molecular markers. The goal of this study was to infer the ancestral-descendant relationships among malaria vectors and nonvectors of the Anopheles gambiae species complex by analyzing breakpoints of fixed chromosomal inversions in ingroup and several outgroup species. We identified genes at breakpoints of fixed overlapping chromosomal inversions 2Ro and 2Rp of An. merus using fluorescence in situ hybridization, a whole-genome mate-paired sequencing, and clone sequencing. We also mapped breakpoints of a chromosomal inversion 2La (common to An. merus, An. gambiae, and An. arabiensis in outgroup species using a bioinformatics approach. We demonstrated that the "standard" 2R+(p arrangement and "inverted" 2Ro and 2La arrangements are present in outgroup species Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus. The data indicate that the ancestral species of the An. gambiae complex had the 2Ro, 2R+(p, and 2La chromosomal arrangements. The "inverted" 2Ro arrangement uniquely characterizes a malaria vector An. merus as the basal species in the complex. The rooted chromosomal phylogeny implies that An. merus acquired the 2Rp inversion and that its sister species An. gambiae acquired the 2R+(o inversion from the ancestral species. The karyotype of nonvectors An. quadriannulatus A and B was derived from the karyotype of the major malaria vector An. gambiae. We conclude that the ability to effectively transmit human malaria had originated repeatedly in the complex. Our findings also suggest that saltwater tolerance originated first in An. merus and then independently in An. melas. The new chromosomal phylogeny will

  17. Estimating Ancestral Ranges: Testing Methods with a Clade of Neotropical Lizards (Iguania: Liolaemidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Establishing the ancestral ranges of distribution of a monophyletic clade, called the ancestral area, is one of the central objectives of historical biogeography. In this study, I used three common methodologies to establish the ancestral area of an important clade of Neotropical lizards, the family Liolaemidae. The methods used were: Fitch optimization, Weighted Ancestral Area Analysis and Dispersal-Vicariance Analysis (DIVA). A main difference from previous studies is that the areas used in the analysis are defined based on actual distributions of the species of Liolaemidae, instead of areas defined arbitrarilyor based on other taxa. The ancestral area of Liolaemidae found by Fitch optimization is Prepuna on Argentina, Central Chile and Coastal Peru. Weighted Ancestral Area Analysis found Central Chile, Coquimbo, Payunia, Austral Patagonia and Coastal Peru. Dispersal-Vicariance analysis found an ancestral area that includes almost all the areas occupied by Liolaemidae, except Atacama, Coquimbo and Austral Patagonia. The results can be resumed on two opposing hypothesis: a restricted ancestral area for the ancestor of Liolaemidae in Central Chile and Patagonia, or a widespread ancestor distributed along the Andes. Some limitations of the methods were identified, for example the excessive importance of plesiomorphic areas in the cladograms. PMID:22028873

  18. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  19. Repression of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 Long Terminal Repeat sense transcription by Sp1 recruitment to novel Sp1 binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauquenoy, Sylvain; Robette, Gwenaëlle; Kula, Anna; Vanhulle, Caroline; Bouchat, Sophie; Delacourt, Nadège; Rodari, Anthony; Marban, Céline; Schwartz, Christian; Burny, Arsène; Rohr, Olivier; Van Driessche, Benoit; Van Lint, Carine

    2017-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is characterized by viral latency in the majority of infected cells and by the absence of viremia. These features are thought to be due to the repression of viral sense transcription in vivo. Here, our in silico analysis of the HTLV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) promoter nucleotide sequence revealed, in addition to the four Sp1 binding sites previously identified, the presence of two additional potential Sp1 sites within the R region. We demonstrated that the Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors bound in vitro to these two sites and compared the binding affinity for Sp1 of all six different HTLV-1 Sp1 sites. By chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we showed Sp1 recruitment in vivo to the newly identified Sp1 sites. We demonstrated in the nucleosomal context of an episomal reporter vector that the Sp1 sites interfered with both the sense and antisense LTR promoter activities. Interestingly, the Sp1 sites exhibited together a repressor effect on the LTR sense transcriptional activity but had no effect on the LTR antisense activity. Thus, our results demonstrate the presence of two new functional Sp1 binding sites in the HTLV-1 LTR, which act as negative cis-regulatory elements of sense viral transcription. PMID:28256531

  20. Elongation Factor-Tu (EF-Tu) proteins structural stability and bioinformatics in ancestral gene reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Tremberger, G.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Holden, T.; Cheung, T.

    2013-09-01

    A paleo-experimental evolution report on elongation factor EF-Tu structural stability results has provided an opportunity to rewind the tape of life using the ancestral protein sequence reconstruction modeling approach; consistent with the book of life dogma in current biology and being an important component in the astrobiology community. Fractal dimension via the Higuchi fractal method and Shannon entropy of the DNA sequence classification could be used in a diagram that serves as a simple summary. Results from biomedical gene research provide examples on the diagram methodology. Comparisons between biomedical genes such as EEF2 (elongation factor 2 human, mouse, etc), WDR85 in epigenetics, HAR1 in human specificity, DLG1 in cognitive skill, and HLA-C in mosquito bite immunology with EF Tu DNA sequences have accounted for the reported circular dichroism thermo-stability data systematically; the results also infer a relatively less volatility geologic time period from 2 to 3 Gyr from adaptation viewpoint. Comparison to Thermotoga maritima MSB8 and Psychrobacter shows that Thermus thermophilus HB8 EF-Tu calibration sequence could be an outlier, consistent with free energy calculation by NUPACK. Diagram methodology allows computer simulation studies and HAR1 shows about 0.5% probability from chimp to human in terms of diagram location, and SNP simulation results such as amoebic meningoencephalitis NAF1 suggest correlation. Extensions to the studies of the translation and transcription elongation factor sequences in Megavirus Chiliensis, Megavirus Lba and Pandoravirus show that the studied Pandoravirus sequence could be an outlier with the highest fractal dimension and lowest entropy, as compared to chicken as a deviant in the DNMT3A DNA methylation gene sequences from zebrafish to human and to the less than one percent probability in computer simulation using the HAR1 0.5% probability as reference. The diagram methodology would be useful in ancestral gene

  1. UafB is a serine-rich repeat adhesin of Staphylococcus saprophyticus that mediates binding to fibronectin, fibrinogen and human uroepithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Nathan P; Beatson, Scott A; Totsika, Makrina; Ulett, Glen C; Alm, Richard A; Manning, Paul A; Schembri, Mark A

    2011-04-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is an important cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among young women, and is second only to uropathogenic Escherichia coli as the most frequent cause of UTI. The molecular mechanisms of urinary tract colonization by S. saprophyticus remain poorly understood. We have identified a novel 6.84 kb plasmid-located adhesin-encoding gene in S. saprophyticus strain MS1146 which we have termed uro-adherence factor B (uafB). UafB is a glycosylated serine-rich repeat protein that is expressed on the surface of S. saprophyticus MS1146. UafB also functions as a major cell surface hydrophobicity factor. To characterize the role of UafB we generated an isogenic uafB mutant in S. saprophyticus MS1146 by interruption with a group II intron. The uafB mutant had a significantly reduced ability to bind to fibronectin and fibrinogen. Furthermore, we show that a recombinant protein containing the putative binding domain of UafB binds specifically to fibronectin and fibrinogen. UafB was not involved in adhesion in a mouse model of UTI; however, we observed a striking UafB-mediated adhesion phenotype to human uroepithelial cells. We have also identified genes homologous to uafB in other staphylococci which, like uafB, appear to be located on transposable elements. Thus, our data indicate that UafB is a novel adhesin of S. saprophyticus that contributes to cell surface hydrophobicity, mediates adhesion to fibronectin and fibrinogen, and exhibits tropism for human uroepithelial cells.

  2. Simulated Conversations With Virtual Humans to Improve Patient-Provider Communication and Reduce Unnecessary Prescriptions for Antibiotics: A Repeated Measure Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite clear evidence that antibiotics do not cure viral infections, the problem of unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics in ambulatory care persists, and in some cases, prescribing patterns have increased. The overuse of antibiotics for treating viral infections has created numerous economic and clinical consequences including increased medical costs due to unnecessary hospitalizations, antibiotic resistance, disruption of gut bacteria, and obesity. Recent research has underscored the importance of collaborative patient-provider communication as a means to reduce the high rates of unnecessary prescriptions for antibiotics. However, most patients and providers do not feel prepared to engage in such challenging conversations. Objectives The aim of this pilot study was to assess the ability of a brief 15-min simulated role-play conversation with virtual humans to serve as a preliminary step to help health care providers and patients practice, and learn how to engage in effective conversations about antibiotics overuse. Methods A total of 69 participants (35 providers and 34 patients) completed the simulation once in one sitting. A pre-post repeated measures design was used to assess changes in patients’ and providers’ self-reported communication behaviors, activation, and preparedness, intention, and confidence to effectively communicate in the patient-provider encounter. Changes in patients’ knowledge and beliefs regarding antibiotic use were also evaluated. Results Patients experienced a short-term positive improvement in beliefs about appropriate antibiotic use for infection (F1,30=14.10, P=.001). Knowledge scores regarding the correct uses of antibiotics improved immediately postsimulation, but decreased at the 1-month follow-up (F1,30=31.16, P.10) Patients with lower levels of activation exhibited positive, short-term benefits in increased intent and confidence to discuss their needs and ask questions in the clinic visit, positive attitudes

  3. A minimal descriptor of an ancestral recombinations graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palamara Pier

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ancestral Recombinations Graph (ARG is a phylogenetic structure that encodes both duplication events, such as mutations, as well as genetic exchange events, such as recombinations: this captures the (genetic dynamics of a population evolving over generations. Results In this paper, we identify structure-preserving and samples-preserving core of an ARG G and call it the minimal descriptor ARG of G. Its structure-preserving characteristic ensures that all the branch lengths of the marginal trees of the minimal descriptor ARG are identical to that of G and the samples-preserving property asserts that the patterns of genetic variation in the samples of the minimal descriptor ARG are exactly the same as that of G. We also prove that even an unbounded G has a finite minimal descriptor, that continues to preserve certain (graph-theoretic properties of G and for an appropriate class of ARGs, our estimate (Eqn 8 as well as empirical observation is that the expected reduction in the number of vertices is exponential. Conclusions Based on the definition of this lossless and bounded structure, we derive local properties of the vertices of a minimal descriptor ARG, which lend itself very naturally to the design of efficient sampling algorithms. We further show that a class of minimal descriptors, that of binary ARGs, models the standard coalescent exactly (Thm 6.

  4. Deep phylogeny, ancestral groups and the four ages of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2010-01-12

    Organismal phylogeny depends on cell division, stasis, mutational divergence, cell mergers (by sex or symbiogenesis), lateral gene transfer and death. The tree of life is a useful metaphor for organismal genealogical history provided we recognize that branches sometimes fuse. Hennigian cladistics emphasizes only lineage splitting, ignoring most other major phylogenetic processes. Though methodologically useful it has been conceptually confusing and harmed taxonomy, especially in mistakenly opposing ancestral (paraphyletic) taxa. The history of life involved about 10 really major innovations in cell structure. In membrane topology, there were five successive kinds of cell: (i) negibacteria, with two bounding membranes, (ii) unibacteria, with one bounding and no internal membranes, (iii) eukaryotes with endomembranes and mitochondria, (iv) plants with chloroplasts and (v) finally, chromists with plastids inside the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Membrane chemistry divides negibacteria into the more advanced Glycobacteria (e.g. Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria) with outer membrane lipolysaccharide and primitive Eobacteria without lipopolysaccharide (deserving intenser study). It also divides unibacteria into posibacteria, ancestors of eukaryotes, and archaebacteria-the sisters (not ancestors) of eukaryotes and the youngest bacterial phylum. Anaerobic eobacteria, oxygenic cyanobacteria, desiccation-resistant posibacteria and finally neomura (eukaryotes plus archaebacteria) successively transformed Earth. Accidents and organizational constraints are as important as adaptiveness in body plan evolution.

  5. Allatotropin: An Ancestral Myotropic Neuropeptide Involved in Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzugaray, María Eugenia; Adami, Mariana Laura; Diambra, Luis Anibal; Hernandez-Martinez, Salvador; Damborenea, Cristina; Noriega, Fernando Gabriel; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell-cell interactions are a basic principle for the organization of tissues and organs allowing them to perform integrated functions and to organize themselves spatially and temporally. Peptidic molecules secreted by neurons and epithelial cells play fundamental roles in cell-cell interactions, acting as local neuromodulators, neurohormones, as well as endocrine and paracrine messengers. Allatotropin (AT) is a neuropeptide originally described as a regulator of Juvenile Hormone synthesis, which plays multiple neural, endocrine and myoactive roles in insects and other organisms. Methods A combination of immunohistochemistry using AT-antibodies and AT-Qdot nanocrystal conjugates was used to identify immunoreactive nerve cells containing the peptide and epithelial-muscular cells targeted by AT in Hydra plagiodesmica. Physiological assays using AT and AT- antibodies revealed that while AT stimulated the extrusion of the hypostome in a dose-response fashion in starved hydroids, the activity of hypostome in hydroids challenged with food was blocked by treatments with different doses of AT-antibodies. Conclusions AT antibodies immunolabeled nerve cells in the stalk, pedal disc, tentacles and hypostome. AT-Qdot conjugates recognized epithelial-muscular cell in the same tissues, suggesting the existence of anatomical and functional relationships between these two cell populations. Physiological assays indicated that the AT-like peptide is facilitating food ingestion. Significance Immunochemical, physiological and bioinformatics evidence advocates that AT is an ancestral neuropeptide involved in myoregulatory activities associated with meal ingestion and digestion. PMID:24143240

  6. Allatotropin: an ancestral myotropic neuropeptide involved in feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Alzugaray

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell-cell interactions are a basic principle for the organization of tissues and organs allowing them to perform integrated functions and to organize themselves spatially and temporally. Peptidic molecules secreted by neurons and epithelial cells play fundamental roles in cell-cell interactions, acting as local neuromodulators, neurohormones, as well as endocrine and paracrine messengers. Allatotropin (AT is a neuropeptide originally described as a regulator of Juvenile Hormone synthesis, which plays multiple neural, endocrine and myoactive roles in insects and other organisms. METHODS: A combination of immunohistochemistry using AT-antibodies and AT-Qdot nanocrystal conjugates was used to identify immunoreactive nerve cells containing the peptide and epithelial-muscular cells targeted by AT in Hydra plagiodesmica. Physiological assays using AT and AT- antibodies revealed that while AT stimulated the extrusion of the hypostome in a dose-response fashion in starved hydroids, the activity of hypostome in hydroids challenged with food was blocked by treatments with different doses of AT-antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: AT antibodies immunolabeled nerve cells in the stalk, pedal disc, tentacles and hypostome. AT-Qdot conjugates recognized epithelial-muscular cell in the same tissues, suggesting the existence of anatomical and functional relationships between these two cell populations. Physiological assays indicated that the AT-like peptide is facilitating food ingestion. SIGNIFICANCE: Immunochemical, physiological and bioinformatics evidence advocates that AT is an ancestral neuropeptide involved in myoregulatory activities associated with meal ingestion and digestion.

  7. Ancestral TSH mechanism signals summer in a photoperiodic mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, Elodie A; Lincoln, Gerald A; Fustin, Jean-Michel; Dardente, Hugues; Masson-Pévet, Mireille; Morgan, Peter J; Hazlerigg, David G

    2008-08-05

    In mammals, day-length-sensitive (photoperiodic) seasonal breeding cycles depend on the pineal hormone melatonin, which modulates secretion of reproductive hormones by the anterior pituitary gland [1]. It is thought that melatonin acts in the hypothalamus to control reproduction through the release of neurosecretory signals into the pituitary portal blood supply, where they act on pituitary endocrine cells [2]. Contrastingly, we show here that during the reproductive response of Soay sheep exposed to summer day lengths, the reverse applies: Melatonin acts directly on anterior-pituitary cells, and these then relay the photoperiodic message back into the hypothalamus to control neuroendocrine output. The switch to long days causes melatonin-responsive cells in the pars tuberalis (PT) of the anterior pituitary to increase production of thyrotrophin (TSH). This acts locally on TSH-receptor-expressing cells in the adjacent mediobasal hypothalamus, leading to increased expression of type II thyroid hormone deiodinase (DIO2). DIO2 initiates the summer response by increasing hypothalamic tri-iodothyronine (T3) levels. These data and recent findings in quail [3] indicate that the TSH-expressing cells of the PT play an ancestral role in seasonal reproductive control in vertebrates. In mammals this provides the missing link between the pineal melatonin signal and thyroid-dependent seasonal biology.

  8. Characterization of Reconstructed Ancestral Proteins Suggests a Change in Temperature of the Ancient Biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanuma, Satoshi

    2017-08-06

    Understanding the evolution of ancestral life, and especially the ability of some organisms to flourish in the variable environments experienced in Earth's early biosphere, requires knowledge of the characteristics and the environment of these ancestral organisms. Information about early life and environmental conditions has been obtained from fossil records and geological surveys. Recent advances in phylogenetic analysis, and an increasing number of protein sequences available in public databases, have made it possible to infer ancestral protein sequences possessed by ancient organisms. However, the in silico studies that assess the ancestral base content of ribosomal RNAs, the frequency of each amino acid in ancestral proteins, and estimate the environmental temperatures of ancient organisms, show conflicting results. The characterization of ancestral proteins reconstructed in vitro suggests that ancient organisms had very thermally stable proteins, and therefore were thermophilic or hyperthermophilic. Experimental data supports the idea that only thermophilic ancestors survived the catastrophic increase in temperature of the biosphere that was likely associated with meteorite impacts during the early history of Earth. In addition, by expanding the timescale and including more ancestral proteins for reconstruction, it appears as though the Earth's surface temperature gradually decreased over time, from Archean to present.

  9. Improvement of Bacillus circulans beta-amylase activity attained using the ancestral mutation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Kan; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Koikeda, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2010-07-01

    Thermostabilization of enzymes is one of the greatest challenges of protein engineering. The ancestral mutation method, which introduces ancestral residues into a target enzyme, has previously been developed and used to improve the thermostabilities of thermophilic enzymes. Herein, we report a study that used the ancestral mutation method to improve the thermostability of Bacillus circulans beta-amylase, a mesophilic enzyme. A bacterial, common-ancestral beta-amylase sequence was inferred using a phylogenetic tree composed of higher plant and bacterial amylase sequences. Eighteen mutants containing ancestral residues were designed, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Several of these mutants were more thermostable than that of the wild-type amylase. Notably, one mutant had both greater activity and greater thermostability. The relationship between the extent to which the amino acid residues within 5 A of the mutation site were evolutionarily conserved and the extent to which thermostability was improved was examined. Apparently, it is necessary to conserve the residues surrounding an ancestral residue if thermostability is to be improved by the ancestral mutation method.

  10. Evolutionary Psychology: How Psychological Mechanisms Shaped by Natural Selection for Ancestral Environments Produce Current Behaviours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Crawford

    2009-01-01

    The central purpose of this paper is to explain how Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection can be used in understanding current human behaviour. First, Darwin's logic is briefly described. Development is an important issue when applying evolutionary theory to human behaviour. The notion of innate developmental orga-nization of psychological mechanisms is introduced. The possible social and political outcomes produced when differ-ent levels of innate developmental organization are paired with different beliefs about it are considered. The notion of psychological mechanisms as evolved adaptations is considered in some detail. Then I discuss different ways evo-htionists think about how genes are involved in the development of adaptations. The paper concludes with a frame-work for considering how ancestral adaptations function in current environments and outlines some ways of studying them. In China and many other parts of the world people desire a more harmonious society. Ⅰ hope that this paper will be of some small help in achieving this great task.

  11. Crystal structure and size-dependent neutralization properties of HK20, a human monoclonal antibody binding to the highly conserved heptad repeat 1 of gp41.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Sabin

    Full Text Available The human monoclonal antibody (mAb HK20 neutralizes a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates by targeting the highly conserved heptad repeat 1 (HR1 of gp41, which is transiently exposed during HIV-1 entry. Here we present the crystal structure of the HK20 Fab in complex with a gp41 mimetic 5-Helix at 2.3 Å resolution. HK20 employs its heavy chain CDR H2 and H3 loops to bind into a conserved hydrophobic HR1 pocket that is occupied by HR2 residues in the gp41 post fusion conformation. Compared to the previously described HR1-specific mAb D5, HK20 approaches its epitope with a different angle which might favor epitope access and thus contribute to its higher neutralization breadth and potency. Comparison of the neutralization activities of HK20 IgG, Fab and scFv employing both single cycle and multiple cycle neutralization assays revealed much higher potencies for the smaller Fab and scFv over IgG, implying that the target site is difficult to access for complete antibodies. Nevertheless, two thirds of sera from HIV-1 infected individuals contain significant titers of HK20-inhibiting antibodies. The breadth of neutralization of primary isolates across all clades, the higher potencies for C-clade viruses and the targeting of a distinct site as compared to the fusion inhibitor T-20 demonstrate the potential of HK20 scFv as a therapeutic tool.

  12. Overexpression of collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1) is associated with tumour aggressiveness and poor prognosis in human non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Zunfu; He, Weiling; Lai, Yuanhui; Guo, Xuefeng; Chen, Sharon; Li, Shuhua; Wang, Yuefeng; Wang, Liantang

    2014-10-15

    Collagen triple helix repeat-containing 1 (CTHRC1), a novel oncogene, was identified to be aberrantly overexpressed in several malignant tumors. However, the expression profile of CTHRC1 and its clinical significance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unknown. In this study, we showed that CTHRC1 was evidently overexpressed in human NSCLC tissues and NSCLC cell lines at the protein and mRNA level. Ectopic up-regulation of CTHRC1 in cancer cells resulted in elevated invasive and proliferative abilities, which were attenuated by the specific CTHRC1 siRNA. The biological effect of CTHRC1 on metastasis and proliferation was mediated by the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Furthermore, CTHRC1 immunoreactivity was evidently overexpressed in paraffin-embedded NSCLC tissues (212/292, 72.60%) in comparison to corresponding adjacent non-cancerous tissues (6/66, 9.09%) (p<0.001). Clinicopathologic analysis showed that CTHRC1 expression was significantly correlated with differentiation degree (p<0.001), clinical stage (p<0.001), T classification (p<0.001), lymph node metastasis (p=0.013) and distant metastasis (p<0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with high CTHRC1 expression had poorer overall survival rates than those with low CTHRC1 expression. Multivariate analysis indicated that CTHRC1 expression was an independent prognostic factor for the overall survival of NSCLC patients. Collectively, CTHRC1 plays important roles in NSCLC progression, and the evaluation of CTHRC1 expression could serve as a potential marker for metastasis progression and prognosis in NSCLC patients.

  13. Identification of the ancestral killer immunoglobulin-like receptor gene in primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coggill Penny

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR are essential immuno-surveillance molecules. They are expressed on natural killer and T cells, and interact with human leukocyte antigens. KIR genes are highly polymorphic and contribute vital variability to our immune system. Numerous KIR genes, belonging to five distinct lineages, have been identified in all primates examined thus far and shown to be rapidly evolving. Since few KIR remain orthologous between species, with only one of them, KIR2DL4, shown to be common to human, apes and monkeys, the evolution of the KIR gene family in primates remains unclear. Results Using comparative analyses, we have identified the ancestral KIR lineage (provisionally named KIR3DL0 in primates. We show KIR3DL0 to be highly conserved with the identification of orthologues in human (Homo sapiens, common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes, gorilla (Gorilla gorilla, rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta and common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus. We predict KIR3DL0 to encode a functional molecule in all primates by demonstrating expression in human, chimpanzee and rhesus monkey. Using the rhesus monkey as a model, we further show the expression profile to be typical of KIR by quantitative measurement of KIR3DL0 from an enriched population of natural killer cells. Conclusion One reason why KIR3DL0 may have escaped discovery for so long is that, in human, it maps in between two related leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor clusters outside the known KIR gene cluster on Chromosome 19. Based on genomic, cDNA, expression and phylogenetic data, we report a novel lineage of immunoglobulin receptors belonging to the KIR family, which is highly conserved throughout 50 million years of primate evolution.

  14. Reconstructing the ancestral butterfly eye: focus on the opsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Adriana D

    2008-06-01

    The eyes of butterflies are remarkable, because they are nearly as diverse as the colors of wings. Much of eye diversity can be traced to alterations in the number, spectral properties and spatial distribution of the visual pigments. Visual pigments are light-sensitive molecules composed of an opsin protein and a chromophore. Most butterflies have eyes that contain visual pigments with a wavelength of peak absorbance, lambda(max), in the ultraviolet (UV, 300-400 nm), blue (B, 400-500 nm) and long wavelength (LW, 500-600 nm) part of the visible light spectrum, respectively, encoded by distinct UV, B and LW opsin genes. In the compound eye of butterflies, each individual ommatidium is composed of nine photoreceptor cells (R1-9) that generally express only one opsin mRNA per cell, although in some butterfly eyes there are ommatidial subtypes in which two opsins are co-expressed in the same photoreceptor cell. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of opsin cDNAs from the five butterfly families, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Nymphalidae, Lycaenidae and Riodinidae, and comparative analysis of opsin gene expression patterns from four of the five families, I propose a model for the patterning of the ancestral butterfly eye that is most closely aligned with the nymphalid eye. The R1 and R2 cells of the main retina expressed UV-UV-, UV-B- or B-B-absorbing visual pigments while the R3-9 cells expressed a LW-absorbing visual pigment. Visual systems of existing butterflies then underwent an adaptive expansion based on lineage-specific B and LW opsin gene multiplications and on alterations in the spatial expression of opsins within the eye. Understanding the molecular sophistication of butterfly eye complexity is a challenge that, if met, has broad biological implications.

  15. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  16. β-Propeller blades as ancestral peptides in protein evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus O Kopec

    Full Text Available Proteins of the β-propeller fold are ubiquitous in nature and widely used as structural scaffolds for ligand binding and enzymatic activity. This fold comprises between four and twelve four-stranded β-meanders, the so called blades that are arranged circularly around a central funnel-shaped pore. Despite the large size range of β-propellers, their blades frequently show sequence similarity indicative of a common ancestry and it has been proposed that the majority of β-propellers arose divergently by amplification and diversification of an ancestral blade. Given the structural versatility of β-propellers and the hypothesis that the first folded proteins evolved from a simpler set of peptides, we investigated whether this blade may have given rise to other folds as well. Using sequence comparisons, we identified proteins of four other folds as potential homologs of β-propellers: the luminal domain of inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1-LD, type II β-prisms, β-pinwheels, and WW domains. Because, with increasing evolutionary distance and decreasing sequence length, the statistical significance of sequence comparisons becomes progressively harder to distinguish from the background of convergent similarities, we complemented our analyses with a new method that evaluates possible homology based on the correlation between sequence and structure similarity. Our results indicate a homologous relationship of IRE1-LD and type II β-prisms with β-propellers, and an analogous one for β-pinwheels and WW domains. Whereas IRE1-LD most likely originated by fold-changing mutations from a fully formed PQQ motif β-propeller, type II β-prisms originated by amplification and differentiation of a single blade, possibly also of the PQQ type. We conclude that both β-propellers and type II β-prisms arose by independent amplification of a blade-sized fragment, which represents a remnant of an ancient peptide world.

  17. Test-retest repeatability of the pupil light response to blue and red light stimuli in normal human eyes using a novel pupillometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Kristina; Sander, Birgit; Milea, Dan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the repeatability of pupil responses to colored light stimuli in healthy subjects using a prototype chromatic pupillometer. One eye of 10 healthy subjects was tested twice in the same day using monochromatic light exposure at two selected wavelengths (660 and 470¿nm......, we have developed a novel prototype of color pupillometer which demonstrates good repeatability in evoking and recording the pupillary response to a bright blue and red light stimulus....

  18. Molecular, Physiological, and Motor Performance Defects in DMSXL Mice Carrying >1,000 CTG Repeats from the Human DM1 Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Huguet; Fadia Medja; Annie Nicole; Alban Vignaud; Céline Guiraud-Dogan; Arnaud Ferry; Valérie Decostre; Jean-Yves Hogrel; Friedrich Metzger; Andreas Hoeflich; Martin Baraibar; Mário Gomes-Pereira; Jack Puymirat; Guillaume Bassez; Denis Furling

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3'UTR of the DM protein kinase (DMPK) gene. DMPK transcripts carrying CUG expansions form nuclear foci and affect splicing regulation of various RNA transcripts. Furthermore, bidirectional transcription over the DMPK gene and non-conventional RNA translation of repeated transcripts have been described in DM1. It is clear now that this disease may involve multiple pathogenic pathways including changes in gene ...

  19. Impacts of plant-based foods in ancestral hominin diets on the metabolism and function of gut microbiota in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Gary S; Walton, Gemma E; Swann, Jonathan R; Psichas, Arianna; Costabile, Adele; Johnson, Laura P; Sponheimer, Matt; Gibson, Glenn R; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2014-05-20

    Ancestral human populations had diets containing more indigestible plant material than present-day diets in industrialized countries. One hypothesis for the rise in prevalence of obesity is that physiological mechanisms for controlling appetite evolved to match a diet with plant fiber content higher than that of present-day diets. We investigated how diet affects gut microbiota and colon cells by comparing human microbial communities with those from a primate that has an extreme plant-based diet, namely, the gelada baboon, which is a grazer. The effects of potato (high starch) versus grass (high lignin and cellulose) diets on human-derived versus gelada-derived fecal communities were compared in vitro. We especially focused on the production of short-chain fatty acids, which are hypothesized to be key metabolites influencing appetite regulation pathways. The results confirmed that diet has a major effect on bacterial numbers, short-chain fatty acid production, and the release of hormones involved in appetite suppression. The potato diet yielded greater production of short-chain fatty acids and hormone release than the grass diet, even in the gelada cultures, which we had expected should be better adapted to the grass diet. The strong effects of diet on hormone release could not be explained, however, solely by short-chain fatty acid concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy found changes in additional metabolites, including betaine and isoleucine, that might play key roles in inhibiting and stimulating appetite suppression pathways. Our study results indicate that a broader array of metabolites might be involved in triggering gut hormone release in humans than previously thought. One theory for rising levels of obesity in western populations is that the body's mechanisms for controlling appetite evolved to match ancestral diets with more low-energy plant foods. We investigated this idea by comparing the effects of diet on appetite suppression pathways

  20. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  1. An ancestral role for the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle S. McCommis

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Altogether, these studies suggest that the MPC plays an important and ancestral role in insulin-secreting cells in mediating glucose sensing, regulating insulin secretion, and controlling systemic glycemia.

  2. Analysis of the stone ancestral hall of Guo’s tomb on Xiaotang mountainin Han dynasty architectural features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国庆

    2014-01-01

    The stone ancestral hall of Guo’s tomb in Xiaotang mountain is the earliest existing buildings on the ground in China. It has a very high historical, cultural and artistic value, and it was described by the ancient and modern scholars and experts in their books and articles. But the study of architectural of ancestral hall was emphasized from 1930s, and became a brilliant star in the Chinese historic buildings. In this article, the architectural characteristics of the stone ancestral hall are discussed through fieldworks, in order to clarify the real architecture appearance of the ancestral hall and refer more informations for comprehensive study of Xiaotang stone ancestral hall.

  3. The microcephalin ancestral allele in a Neanderthal individual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lari, Martina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Milani, Lucio;

    2010-01-01

    The high frequency (around 0.70 worldwide) and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years) of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1) locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 mil...... with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal....

  4. Widely divergent transcriptional patterns between SLE patients of different ancestral backgrounds in sorted immune cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shruti; Jin, Zhongbo; Rosenzweig, Elizabeth; Rao, Swapna; Ko, Kichul; Niewold, Timothy B

    2015-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease of uncertain etiology. Patients from different ancestral backgrounds demonstrate differences in clinical manifestations and autoantibody profiles. We examined genome-wide transcriptional patterns in major immune cell subsets across different ancestral backgrounds. Peripheral blood was collected from African-American (AA) and European-American (EA) SLE patients and controls. CD4 T-cells, CD8 T-cells, monocytes, and B cells were purified by flow sorting, and each cell subset from each subject was run on a genome-wide expression array. Cases were compared to controls of the same ancestral background. The overlap in differentially expressed gene (DEG) lists between different cell types from the same ancestral background was modest (type between different ancestral backgrounds. IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression was not up-regulated synchronously in all cell types from a given patient, for example a given subject could have high ISG expression in T and B cells, but not in monocytes. AA subjects demonstrated more concordance in ISG expression between cell types from the same individual, and AA patients demonstrated significant down-regulation of metabolic gene expression which was not observed in EA patients. ISG expression was significantly decreased in B cells in patients taking immunosuppressants, while ISGs in other cell types did not differ with medication use. In conclusion, gene expression was strikingly different between immune cell subsets and between ancestral backgrounds in SLE patients. These findings emphasize the critical importance of studying multiple ancestral backgrounds and multiple cell types in gene expression studies. Ancestral backgrounds which are not studied will not benefit from personalized medicine strategies in SLE.

  5. Random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RRACE) allows for cloning of multiple novel human cDNA fragments containing (CAG)n repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J P; McKnight, C; VanEpps, S; Kelley, M R

    1995-04-03

    We describe a new technique for isolating cDNA fragments in which (i) either a partial sequence of the cDNA is known or (ii) a repeat sequence is utilized. We have used this technique, termed random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (random RACE), to isolate a number of trinucleotide repeat (CAG)n-containing genes. Using the random RACE (RRACE) technique, we have isolated over a hundred (CAG)n-containing genes. The results of our initial analysis of ten clones indicate that three are identical to previously cloned (CAG)n-containing genes. Three of our clones matched with expressed sequence tags, one of which contained a CA repeat. The remaining four clones did not match with any sequence in GenBank. These results indicate that this approach provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating trinucleotide repeat-containing cDNA fragments. Finally, this technique may be used for purposes other than cloning repeat-containing cDNA fragments. If only a partial sequence of a gene is known, our system, described here, provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating a fragment of the gene of interest.

  6. The survival effect in memory: does it hold into old age and non-ancestral scenarios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lixia; Lau, Karen P L; Truong, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The survival effect in memory refers to the memory enhancement for materials encoded in reference to a survival scenario compared to those encoded in reference to a control scenario or with other encoding strategies. The current study examined whether this effect is well maintained in old age by testing young (ages 18-29) and older adults (ages 65-87) on the survival effect in memory for words encoded in ancestral and/or non-ancestral modern survival scenarios relative to a non-survival control scenario. A pilot study was conducted to select the best matched comparison scenarios based on potential confounding variables, such as valence and arousal. Experiment 1 assessed the survival effect with a well-matched negative control scenario in both young and older adults. The results showed an age-equivalent survival effect across an ancestral and a non-ancestral modern survival scenario. Experiment 2 replicated the survival effect in both age groups with a positive control scenario. Taken together, the data suggest a robust survival effect that is well preserved in old age across ancestral and non-ancestral survival scenarios.

  7. Comparative Genomics of Facultative Bacterial Symbionts Isolated from European Orius Species Reveals an Ancestral Symbiotic Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorui Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pest control in agriculture employs diverse strategies, among which the use of predatory insects has steadily increased. The use of several species within the genus Orius in pest control is widely spread, particularly in Mediterranean Europe. Commercial mass rearing of predatory insects is costly, and research efforts have concentrated on diet manipulation and selective breeding to reduce costs and improve efficacy. The characterisation and contribution of microbial symbionts to Orius sp. fitness, behaviour, and potential impact on human health has been neglected. This paper provides the first genome sequence level description of the predominant culturable facultative bacterial symbionts associated with five Orius species (O. laevigatus, O. niger, O. pallidicornis, O. majusculus, and O. albidipennis from several geographical locations. Two types of symbionts were broadly classified as members of the genera Serratia and Leucobacter, while a third constitutes a new genus within the Erwiniaceae. These symbionts were found to colonise all the insect specimens tested, which evidenced an ancestral symbiotic association between these bacteria and the genus Orius. Pangenome analyses of the Serratia sp. isolates offered clues linking Type VI secretion system effector–immunity proteins from the Tai4 sub-family to the symbiotic lifestyle.

  8. Test-retest repeatability of the pupil light response to blue and red light stimuli in normal human eyes using a novel pupillometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Kristina; Sander, Birgit; Milea, Dan;

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the repeatability of pupil responses to colored light stimuli in healthy subjects using a prototype chromatic pupillometer. One eye of 10 healthy subjects was tested twice in the same day using monochromatic light exposure at two selected wavelengths (660 and 470 nm...... stimulation as the total area between a reference line representing baseline pupil size and the line representing actual pupil size over 20 s (area under the curve). There was no significant difference in the repeated measure compared to the first test for any of the pupil response parameters. In conclusion......, we have developed a novel prototype of color pupillometer which demonstrates good repeatability in evoking and recording the pupillary response to a bright blue and red light stimulus....

  9. The mechanistic basis of hemoglobin adaptation in the high-flying barheaded goose: insights from ancestral protein resurrection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Amit; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    of this text-book example of biochemical adaptation. Previous hypotheses about the molecular basis of the evolved increase in Hb-O2 affinity were tested by engineering BHGspecific mutations into recombinant human Hb. This approach can provide important insights, but one problem with such ‘horizontal......’ comparisons – swapping residues between proteins of contemporary species – is that the focal mutations are introduced into a sequence context that may not be evolutionarily relevant. If mutations have context-dependent effects, then introducing BHG-specific substitutions into human Hb may not recapitulate...... the functional effects of causative mutations on the genetic background in which they actually occurred during evolution (i.e., in the BHG ancestor). An alternative ‘vertical’ approach is to reconstruct and resurrect ancestral proteins to test the effects of historical mutations on the genetic background...

  10. The pig story (tiboi sakkoko Storytelling of kinship, memories of the past, and rights to plots of ancestral land in Mentawai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juniator Tulius

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines some significant elements of the pig story (tiboi sakkoko. This tale contains crucial information about the collective identity, ancestors and historical events affecting particular Mentawai kin-groups. As families do not preserve their culture and traditions in written form, storytellers of kin-groups have narrated the pig story from generation to generation so as to preserve it carefully. In the course of time, storytellers establish particular ways of telling their stories so as to remember the content and plot of the stories easily. Through the pig story, members of kin groups also recollect their ancestral place of origin and plots of ancestral lands. The role of human memory is indispensable to recalling all these important elements. Therefore, this paper analyses memories of the past of different family generations. To achieve its aims, this paper also evaluates the roles of family stories in the culture and traditions of Mentawai society.

  11. The microcephalin ancestral allele in a Neanderthal individual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lari, Martina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Milani, Lucio;

    2010-01-01

    The high frequency (around 0.70 worldwide) and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years) of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1) locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1...

  12. Use of multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) to investigate genetic diversity of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from human, food, and veterinary sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateva, Gergana; Pedersen, Karl; Sørensen, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    -locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) and compared results with antimicrobial resistance (AMR) determinations for 100 S. Typhimurium strains isolated in Bulgaria during 2008-2012 (50 veterinary/food and 50 human isolates). Results showed that isolates were divided into 80 and 34 groups using......). No clustering of isolates related to susceptibility/resistance to antimicrobials, source of isolation, or year of isolation was observed. Some MLVA types were found in both human and veterinary/food isolates, indicating a possible route of transmission. A majority (83%) of the isolates were found...

  13. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  14. Petrologic, tectonic, and metallogenic evolution of the Ancestral Cascades magmatic arc, Washington, Oregon, and northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Bray, Edward A.; John, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Present-day High Cascades arc magmatism was preceded by ~40 m.y. of nearly cospatial magmatism represented by the ancestral Cascades arc in Washington, Oregon, and northernmost California (United States). Time-space-composition relations for the ancestral Cascades arc have been synthesized from a recent compilation of more than 4000 geochemical analyses and associated age data. Neither the composition nor distribution of ancestral Cascades magmatism was uniform along the length of the ancestral arc through time. Initial (>40 to 36 Ma) ancestral Cascades magmatism (mostly basalt and basaltic andesite) was focused at the north end of the arc between the present-day locations of Mount Rainier and the Columbia River. From 35 to 18 Ma, initial basaltic andesite and andesite magmatism evolved to include dacite and rhyolite; magmatic activity became more voluminous and extended along most of the arc. Between 17 and 8 Ma, magmatism was focused along the part of the arc coincident with the northern two-thirds of Oregon and returned to more mafic compositions. Subsequent ancestral Cascades magmatism was dominated by basaltic andesite to basalt prior to the post–4 Ma onset of High Cascades magmatism. Transitional tholeiitic to calc-alkaline compositions dominated early (before 40 to ca. 25 Ma) ancestral Cascades eruptive products, whereas the majority of the younger arc rocks have a calc-alkaline affinity. Tholeiitic compositions characteristic of the oldest ancestral arc magmas suggest development associated with thin, immature crust and slab window processes, whereas the younger, calc-alkaline magmas suggest interaction with thicker, more evolved crust and more conventional subduction-related magmatic processes. Presumed changes in subducted slab dip through time also correlate with fundamental magma composition variation. The predominance of mafic compositions during latest ancestral arc magmatism and throughout the history of modern High Cascades magmatism probably

  15. Test-retest repeatability of the pupil light response to blue and red light stimuli in normal human eyes using a novel pupillometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina eHerbst

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the repeatability of pupil responses to colored light stimuli in healthy subjects using a prototype chromatic pupillometer. One eye of 10 healthy subjects was tested twice in the same day using monochromatic light exposure at 2 selected wavelengths (660 nm and 470 nm, intensity 300 cd/m2 presented continuously for 20 seconds. Pupil responses were recorded in real time before, during and after light exposure. Maximal contraction amplitude and sustained contraction amplitude were calculated. In addition, we quantified the summed pupil response during continuous light stimulation as the total area between a reference line representing baseline pupil size and the line representing actual pupil size over 20 seconds (area under the curve. There was no significant difference in the repeated measure compared to the first test for any of the pupil response parameters. In conclusion, we have developed a novel prototype of color pupillometer which demonstrates good repeatability in evoking and recording the pupillary response to a bright blue and red light stimulus.

  16. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  17. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  18. Burden of Recurrent and Ancestral Mutations in Families With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Samantha Barratt; Bagnall, Richard D; Ingles, Jodie; Van Tintelen, J Peter; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetically heterogeneous myocardial disease with >1000 causal variants identified. Nonunique variants account for disease in many families. We sought to characterize nonunique variants in Australian families and determine whether they arise from common ancestral mutations or recurrent mutation events. Genetic test results of 467 index patients from apparently unrelated families with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were evaluated. Causal variants were found in 185 of 467 (40%) families. Nonunique variants accounted for 122 of 185 (66%) families. The most common single genetic cause of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the recurrent MYBPC3 (myosin-binding protein-C) variant c.1504C>T, p.Arg502Trp, which was found in 13 of 185 (7%) families with a causal variant identified. Thirteen variants in MYBPC3 and MYH7 (myosin heavy chain 7) were each identified >3 times and accounted for 78 of 185 (42%) hypertrophic cardiomyopathy families with a causal variant. Haplotype analysis of these 13 variants was performed on 126 individuals from 70 Australian families, and 11 variants arose through recurrent mutation events. Two variants, MYBPC3 c.1928-2A>G and MYH7 c.2681A>G, p.Glu894Gly, were found on 1 haplotype in 6 families each, supportive of a single mutation event inherited from a common ancestor. The majority of families with a causal variant identified have a nonunique variant. Discovery of the genetic origins of human disease forms a fundamental basis for improved understanding of disease pathogenesis and phenotype development. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Does body posture influence hand preference in an ancestral primate model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leliveld Lisette

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of human handedness and its evolution in primates is presently under debate. Current hypotheses suggest that body posture (postural origin hypothesis and bipedalism hypothesis have an important impact on the evolution of handedness in primates. To gain insight into the origin of manual lateralization in primates, we studied gray mouse lemurs, suggested to represent the most ancestral primate condition. First, we investigated hand preference in a simple food grasping task to explore the importance of hand usage in a natural foraging situation. Second, we explored the influence of body posture by applying a forced food grasping task with varying postural demands (sit, biped, cling, triped. Results The tested mouse lemur population did not prefer to use their hands alone to grasp for food items. Instead, they preferred to pick them up using a mouth-hand combination or the mouth alone. If mouth usage was inhibited, they showed an individual but no population level handedness for all four postural forced food grasping tasks. Additionally, we found no influence of body posture on hand preference in gray mouse lemurs. Conclusion Our results do not support the current theories of primate handedness. Rather, they propose that ecological adaptation indicated by postural habit and body size of a given species has an important impact on hand preference in primates. Our findings suggest that small-bodied, quadrupedal primates, adapted to the fine branch niche of dense forests, prefer mouth retrieval of food and are less manually lateralized than large-bodied species which consume food in a more upright, and less stable body posture.

  20. Streptococcus thermophilus Biofilm Formation: A Remnant Trait of Ancestral Commensal Life?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Couvigny

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have a long history of use in food production and preservation. Their adaptation to food environments has profoundly modified their features, mainly through genomic flux. Streptococcus thermophilus, one of the most frequent starter culture organisms consumed daily by humans emerged recently from a commensal ancestor. As such, it is a useful model for genomic studies of bacterial domestication processes. Many streptococcal species form biofilms, a key feature of the major lifestyle of these bacteria in nature. However, few descriptions of S. thermophilus biofilms have been reported. An analysis of the ability of a representative collection of natural isolates to form biofilms revealed that S. thermophilus was a poor biofilm producer and that this characteristic was associated with an inability to attach firmly to surfaces. The identification of three biofilm-associated genes in the strain producing the most biofilms shed light on the reasons for the rarity of this trait in this species. These genes encode proteins involved in crucial stages of biofilm formation and are heterogeneously distributed between strains. One of the biofilm genes appears to have been acquired by horizontal transfer. The other two are located in loci presenting features of reductive evolution, and are absent from most of the strains analyzed. Their orthologs in commensal bacteria are involved in adhesion to host cells, suggesting that they are remnants of ancestral functions. The biofilm phenotype appears to be a commensal trait that has been lost during the genetic domestication of S. thermophilus, consistent with its adaptation to the milk environment and the selection of starter strains for dairy fermentations.

  1. Streptococcus thermophilus Biofilm Formation: A Remnant Trait of Ancestral Commensal Life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvigny, Benoit; Thérial, Claire; Gautier, Céline; Renault, Pierre; Briandet, Romain; Guédon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have a long history of use in food production and preservation. Their adaptation to food environments has profoundly modified their features, mainly through genomic flux. Streptococcus thermophilus, one of the most frequent starter culture organisms consumed daily by humans emerged recently from a commensal ancestor. As such, it is a useful model for genomic studies of bacterial domestication processes. Many streptococcal species form biofilms, a key feature of the major lifestyle of these bacteria in nature. However, few descriptions of S. thermophilus biofilms have been reported. An analysis of the ability of a representative collection of natural isolates to form biofilms revealed that S. thermophilus was a poor biofilm producer and that this characteristic was associated with an inability to attach firmly to surfaces. The identification of three biofilm-associated genes in the strain producing the most biofilms shed light on the reasons for the rarity of this trait in this species. These genes encode proteins involved in crucial stages of biofilm formation and are heterogeneously distributed between strains. One of the biofilm genes appears to have been acquired by horizontal transfer. The other two are located in loci presenting features of reductive evolution, and are absent from most of the strains analyzed. Their orthologs in commensal bacteria are involved in adhesion to host cells, suggesting that they are remnants of ancestral functions. The biofilm phenotype appears to be a commensal trait that has been lost during the genetic domestication of S. thermophilus, consistent with its adaptation to the milk environment and the selection of starter strains for dairy fermentations.

  2. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  3. In vitro nucleosome positioning features of DNA repeats sequence associated with human genetic disease%与人遗传病相关的DNA重复序列的体外核小体定位特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴荣; 赵宏宇; 蔡禄

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the nucleosome positioning of DNA repeats sequence ire vitro which can cause human genetic disease. Methods The recombinant plasmids containing (GAA)42, (ATTCT)43, (GCCT)18 and 601 sequence were cloned. The histone and plasmids were used to assemble chromatin structure ire vitro,and then analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis after micrococcal nuclease digestion. Results The plasmid containing ATTCT repeats sequence was easier to form nucleosome than GAA containing repeats sequence ire vitro. Conclusions The recombinant plasmids' ability to form chromatin structure was changed because of the insert of the different repeats sequence fragment.%目的 研究与人遗传病相关的DNA重复序列的体外核小体定位.方法 构建含有(GAA)42、(ATTCT)43、(GCCT)18和601序列的重组质粒,体外利用盐透析将质粒与组蛋白八聚体组装形成染色质结构,微球菌核酸酶消化后,用琼脂糖凝胶电泳分析染色质的结构.结果 含有ATTCT重复序列的质粒较含GAA重复序列质粒在体外易于形成核小体.结论 在重组质粒中,由于引入的重复序列片段形成核小体能力的不同会影响其局部染色质结构.

  4. Ancestral TCDD exposure promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of imprinted gene Igf2: Methylation status and DNMTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Chen, Xi; Liu, Yanan; Xie, Qunhui; Sun, Yawen; Chen, Jingshan; Leng, Ling; Yan, Huan; Zhao, Bin; Tang, Naijun

    2015-12-01

    Ancestral TCDD exposure could induce epigenetic transgenerational phenotypes, which may be mediated in part by imprinted gene inheritance. The aim of our study was to evaluate the transgenerational effects of ancestral TCDD exposure on the imprinted gene insulin-like growth factor-2 (Igf2) in rat somatic tissue. TCDD was administered daily by oral gavage to groups of F0 pregnant SD rats at dose levels of 0 (control), 200 or 800 ng/kg bw during gestation day 8-14. Animal transgenerational model of ancestral exposure to TCDD was carefully built, avoiding sibling inbreeding. Hepatic Igf2 expression of the TCDD male progeny was decreased concomitantly with hepatic damage and increased activities of serum hepatic enzymes both in the F1 and F3 generation. Imprinted Control Region (ICR) of Igf2 manifested a hypermethylated pattern, whereas methylation status in the Differentially Methylated Region 2 (DMR2) showed a hypomethylated manner in the F1 generation. These epigenetic alterations in these two regions maintained similar trends in the F3 generation. Meanwhile, the expressions of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B) changed in a non-monotonic manner both in the F1 and F3 generation. This study provides evidence that ancestral TCDD exposure may promote epigenetic transgenerational alterations of imprinted gene Igf2 in adult somatic tissue.

  5. Assessing the prediction fidelity of ancestral reconstruction by a library approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Rogovsky, Hagit; Stern, Adi; Penn, Osnat; Kobl, Iris; Pupko, Tal; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-11-01

    Ancestral reconstruction is a powerful tool for studying protein evolution as well as for protein design and engineering. However, in many positions alternative predictions with relatively high marginal probabilities exist, and thus the prediction comprises an ensemble of near-ancestor sequences that relate to the historical ancestor. The ancestral phenotype should therefore be explored for the entire ensemble, rather than for the sequence comprising the most probable amino acid at all positions [the most probable ancestor (mpa)]. To this end, we constructed libraries that sample ensembles of near-ancestor sequences. Specifically, we identified positions where alternatively predicted amino acids are likely to affect the ancestor's structure and/or function. Using the serum paraoxonases (PONs) enzyme family as a test case, we constructed libraries that combinatorially sample these alternatives. We next characterized these libraries, reflecting the vertebrate and mammalian PON ancestors. We found that the mpa of vertebrate PONs represented only one out of many different enzymatic phenotypes displayed by its ensemble. The mammalian ancestral library, however, exhibited a homogeneous phenotype that was well represented by the mpa. Our library design strategy that samples near-ancestor ensembles at potentially critical positions therefore provides a systematic way of examining the robustness of inferred ancestral phenotypes.

  6. Language Shift and Maintenance in Multilingual Mauritius: The Case of Indian Ancestral Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissoonauth, Anu

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a research study conducted in Mauritius between June and July 2009. The aim of this research was to investigate the use of Indian ancestral languages in the domestic domain by the younger generations. The data were collected in the field by means of a questionnaire and interviews from a quota sample of secondary school…

  7. Remarkable selective constraints on exonic dinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2014-09-01

    Long dinucleotide repeats found in exons present a substantial mutational hazard: mutations at these loci occur often and generate frameshifts. Here, we provide clear and compelling evidence that exonic dinucleotides experience strong selective constraint. In humans, only 18 exonic dinucleotides have repeat lengths greater than six, which contrasts sharply with the genome-wide distribution of dinucleotides. We genotyped each of these dinucleotides in 200 humans from eight 1000 Genomes Project populations and found a near-absence of polymorphism. More remarkably, divergence data demonstrate that repeat lengths have been conserved across the primate phylogeny in spite of what is likely considerable mutational pressure. Coalescent simulations show that even a very low mutation rate at these loci fails to explain the anomalous patterns of polymorphism and divergence. Our data support two related selective constraints on the evolution of exonic dinucleotides: a short-term intolerance for any change to repeat length and a long-term prevention of increases to repeat length. In general, our results implicate purifying selection as the force that eliminates new, deleterious mutants at exonic dinucleotides. We briefly discuss the evolution of the longest exonic dinucleotide in the human genome--a 10 x CA repeat in fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1)--that should possess a considerably greater mutation rate than any other exonic dinucleotide and therefore generate a large number of deleterious variants. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Invasion of Ancestral Mammals into Dim-light Environments Inferred from Adaptive Evolution of the Phototransduction Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yonghua; Wang, Haifeng; Hadly, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Nocturnality is a key evolutionary innovation of mammals that enables mammals to occupy relatively empty nocturnal niches. Invasion of ancestral mammals into nocturnality has long been inferred from the phylogenetic relationships of crown Mammalia, which is primarily nocturnal, and crown Reptilia, which is primarily diurnal, although molecular evidence for this is lacking. Here we used phylogenetic analyses of the vision genes involved in the phototransduction pathway to predict the diel activity patterns of ancestral mammals and reptiles. Our results demonstrated that the common ancestor of the extant Mammalia was dominated by positive selection for dim-light vision, supporting the predominate nocturnality of the ancestral mammals. Further analyses showed that the nocturnality of the ancestral mammals was probably derived from the predominate diurnality of the ancestral amniotes, which featured strong positive selection for bright-light vision. Like the ancestral amniotes, the common ancestor of the extant reptiles and various taxa in Squamata, one of the main competitors of the temporal niches of the ancestral mammals, were found to be predominate diurnality as well. Despite this relatively apparent temporal niche partitioning between ancestral mammals and the relevant reptiles, our results suggested partial overlap of their temporal niches during crepuscular periods. PMID:28425474

  9. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  10. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  11. Comparative genomics and molecular dynamics of DNA repeats in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Guy-Franck; Kerrest, Alix; Dujon, Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Repeated elements can be widely abundant in eukaryotic genomes, composing more than 50% of the human genome, for example. It is possible to classify repeated sequences into two large families, "tandem repeats" and "dispersed repeats." Each of these two families can be itself divided into subfamilies. Dispersed repeats contain transposons, tRNA genes, and gene paralogues, whereas tandem repeats contain gene tandems, ribosomal DNA repeat arrays, and satellite DNA, itself subdivided into satellites, minisatellites, and microsatellites. Remarkably, the molecular mechanisms that create and propagate dispersed and tandem repeats are specific to each class and usually do not overlap. In the present review, we have chosen in the first section to describe the nature and distribution of dispersed and tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes in the light of complete (or nearly complete) available genome sequences. In the second part, we focus on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the fast evolution of two specific classes of tandem repeats: minisatellites and microsatellites. Given that a growing number of human neurological disorders involve the expansion of a particular class of microsatellites, called trinucleotide repeats, a large part of the recent experimental work on microsatellites has focused on these particular repeats, and thus we also review the current knowledge in this area. Finally, we propose a unified definition for mini- and microsatellites that takes into account their biological properties and try to point out new directions that should be explored in a near future on our road to understanding the genetics of repeated sequences.

  12. Expansion of CAG triplet repeats by human DNA polymerases λ and β in vitro, is regulated by flap endonuclease 1 and DNA ligase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Hübscher, Ulrich; Maga, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by the expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeats (TNR) in the N-terminal region of coding sequence of the Huntingtin's (HTT) gene. This results in the addition of a poly-glutamine tract within the Huntingtin protein, resulting in its pathological form. The mechanism by which TRN expansion takes place is not yet fully understood. We have recently shown that DNA polymerase (Pol) β can promote the microhomology-mediated end joining and triplet expansion of a substrate mimicking a double strand break in the TNR region of the HTT gene. Here we show that TNR expansion is dependent on the structure of the DNA substrate, as well as on the two essential Pol β co-factors: flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) and DNA ligase 1 (Lig1). We found that Fen1 significantly stimulated TNR expansion by Pol β, but not by the related enzyme Pol λ, and subsequent ligation of the DNA products by Lig1. Interestingly, the deletion of N-terminal domains of Pol λ, resulted in an enzyme which displayed properties more similar to Pol β, suggesting a possible evolutionary mechanism. These results may suggest a novel mechanism for somatic TNR expansion in HD.

  13. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: Implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis. PMID:25245072

  14. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  15. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  16. Dissociation between the time courses of femoral artery blood flow and pulmonary VO2 during repeated bouts of heavy knee extension exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuba, Yoshiyuki; Ohe, Yukie; Miura, Akira; Kitano, Asami; Endo, Masako; Sato, Hironori; Miyachi, Motohiko; Koga, Shunsaku; Fukuda, Osamu

    2004-05-01

    It has frequently been demonstrated that prior heavy cycling exercise facilitates pulmonary O(2) kinetics at the onset of subsequent heavy exercise. This might be due to improved muscle perfusion via acidosis-induced vasodilating effects. However, it is difficult to measure the blood flow (BF) to the working muscles (via the femoral artery) during cycling exercise. We therefore selected supine knee extension (KE) exercise as an alternative, and investigated whether the faster O(2) kinetics in the 2nd bout was matched by proportionally faster BF kinetics to the exercising muscle. Nine healthy subjects (aged 21-44 years) volunteered to participate in this study. The protocol consisted of two consecutive 6-min KE exercise bouts in a supine position (work rate: 70-75% of peak power) separated by a 6-min baseline rest (EX1 to EX2). During the protocol, a pulsed Doppler ultrasound technique was utilized to continuously measure the BF in the right femoral artery. The protocol was repeated at least 6 times to characterize the precise kinetics. In agreement with previous studies using cycling exercise, the O(2) kinetics in the 2nd bout were facilitated compared with that in the 1st bout [mean +/-s.d. of the 'effective' time constant (tau): EX1, 68.6 +/- 15.9, versus EX2, 58.0 +/- 14.4 s. Phase II-tau: EX1, 48.7 +/- 9.0, versus EX2, 41.2 +/- 13.3 s. Empirical index of the slow component (Delta O(2(6-3))): EX1, 78 +/- 44, versus EX2, 57 +/- 36 ml min(-1) (P 0.05)]. It was concluded that the faster pulmonary O(2) kinetics during heavy KE exercise following prior heavy exercise was not associated with a similar modulation in the BF to the working muscles.

  17. Biosynthesis of highly enriched 13C-lycopene for human metabolic studies using repeated batch tomato cell culturing with 13C-glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Nancy E.; Rogers, Randy B.; Lu, Chi-Hua; Conlon, Lauren E.; Lila, Mary Ann; Clinton, Steven K.; Erdman, John W

    2013-01-01

    While putative disease-preventing lycopene metabolites are found in both tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) products and in their consumers, mammalian lycopene metabolism is poorly understood. Advances in tomato cell culturing techniques offer an economical tool for generation of highly-enriched 13C-lycopene for human bioavailability and metabolism studies. To enhance the 13C-enrichment and yields of labeled lycopene from the hp-1 tomato cell line, cultures were first grown in 13C-glucose media fo...

  18. The human [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13 is rich in highly polymorphic (CA)[sub n] repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatt, K.; Lalande, M. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States)); Sinnett, D. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptor [beta]33 (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 (GABRA5) subunit genes have been localized to the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome region of chromosome 15q11-q13. GABRB3, which encompasses 250 kb, is located 100 kb proximal of GABRA5, with the two genes arranged in head-to-head transcriptional orientation. In screening 135 kb of cloned DNA within a 260-kb interval extending from within GABRB3 to the 5[prime] end of GABRA5, 10 new (CA), repeats have been identified. Five of these have been analyzed in detail and found to be highly polymorphic, with the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranging from 0.7 to 0.85 and with heterozygosities of 67 to 94%. In the clones from GABRB3/GABRA5 region, therefore, the frequency of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 is 1 per 27 kb. Previous estimates of the density of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 in the human genome have been approximately 10-fold lower. The GABRB3/GABRA5 region appears, therefore, to be enriched for highly informative (CA)[sub n]. This set of closely spaced, short tandem repeat polymorphisms will be useful in the molecular analyses of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and in high-resolution studies of genetic recombination within this region. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Expression, purification and crystallization of the ancestral androgen receptor-DHT complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Jennifer K; Ortlund, Eric A

    2013-09-01

    Steroid receptors (SRs) are a closely related family of ligand-dependent nuclear receptors that mediate the transcription of genes critical for development, reproduction and immunity. SR dysregulation has been implicated in cancer, inflammatory diseases and metabolic disorders. SRs bind their cognate hormone ligand with exquisite specificity, offering a unique system to study the evolution of molecular recognition. The SR family evolved from an estrogen-sensitive ancestor and diverged to become sensitive to progestagens, corticoids and, most recently, androgens. To understand the structural mechanisms driving the evolution of androgen responsiveness, the ancestral androgen receptor (ancAR1) was crystallized in complex with 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and a fragment of the transcriptional mediator/intermediary factor 2 (Tif2). Crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution and the resulting structure will permit a direct comparison with its progestagen-sensitive ancestor, ancestral steroid receptor 2 (AncSR2).

  20. Origin of an ancient hormone/receptor couple revealed by resurrection of an ancestral estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Gabriel V; Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Pitrat, Delphine; Billas, Isabelle M L; Bonneton, François; Moras, Dino; Hasserodt, Jens; Lecointre, Guillaume; Laudet, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    The origin of ancient ligand/receptor couples is often analyzed via reconstruction of ancient receptors and, when ligands are products of metabolic pathways, they are not supposed to evolve. However, because metabolic pathways are inherited by descent with modification, their structure can be compared using cladistic analysis. Using this approach, we studied the evolution of steroid hormones. We show that side-chain cleavage is common to most vertebrate steroids, whereas aromatization was co-opted for estrogen synthesis from a more ancient pathway. The ancestral products of aromatic activity were aromatized steroids with a side chain, which we named "paraestrols." We synthesized paraestrol A and show that it effectively binds and activates the ancestral steroid receptor. Our study opens the way to comparative studies of biologically active small molecules.

  1. Transitions between the Arabidopsis-type and the human-type telomere sequence in green algae (clade Caudivolvoxa, Chlamydomonadales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulnečková, Jana; Ševčíková, Tereza; Lukešová, Alena; Sýkorová, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures that distinguish native chromosomal ends from double-stranded breaks. They are maintained by telomerase that adds short G-rich telomeric repeats at chromosomal ends in most eukaryotes and determines the TnAmGo sequence of canonical telomeres. We employed an experimental approach that was based on detection of repeats added by telomerase to identify the telomere sequence type forming the very ends of chromosomes. Our previous studies that focused on the algal order Chlamydomonadales revealed several changes in telomere motifs that were consistent with the phylogeny and supported the concept of the Arabidopsis-type sequence being the ancestral telomeric motif for green algae. In addition to previously described independent transitions to the Chlamydomonas-type sequence, we report that the ancestral telomeric motif was replaced by the human-type sequence in the majority of algal species grouped within a higher order clade, Caudivolvoxa. The Arabidopsis-type sequence was apparently retained in the Polytominia clade. Regarding the telomere sequence, the Chlorogonia clade within Caudivolvoxa bifurcates into two groups, one with the human-type sequence and the other group with the Arabidopsis-type sequence that is solely formed by the Chlorogonium species. This suggests that reversion to the Arabidopsis-type telomeric motif occurred in the common ancestral Chlorogonium species. The human-type sequence is also synthesized by telomerases of algal strains from Arenicolinia, Dunaliellinia and Stephanosphaerinia, except a distinct subclade within Stephanosphaerinia, where telomerase activity was not detected and a change to an unidentified telomeric motif might arise. We discuss plausible reasons why changes in telomeric motifs were tolerated during evolution of green algae.

  2. Natural environments, ancestral diets, and microbial ecology: is there a modern "paleo-deficit disorder"? Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Alan C; Katzman, Martin A; Balanzá-Martínez, Vicent

    2015-03-10

    Famed microbiologist René J. Dubos (1901-1982) was an early pioneer in the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) construct. In the 1960s, he conducted groundbreaking research concerning the ways in which early-life experience with nutrition, microbiota, stress, and other environmental variables could influence later-life health outcomes. He recognized the co-evolutionary relationship between microbiota and the human host. Almost 2 decades before the hygiene hypothesis, he suggested that children in developed nations were becoming too sanitized (vs. our ancestral past) and that scientists should determine whether the childhood environment should be "dirtied up in a controlled manner." He also argued that oft-celebrated growth chart increases via changes in the global food supply and dietary patterns should not be equated to quality of life and mental health. Here in the second part of our review, we reflect the words of Dubos off contemporary research findings in the areas of diet, the gut-brain-axis (microbiota and anxiety and depression) and microbial ecology. Finally, we argue, as Dubos did 40 years ago, that researchers should more closely examine the relevancy of silo-sequestered, reductionist findings in the larger picture of human quality of life. In the context of global climate change and the epidemiological transition, an allergy epidemic and psychosocial stress, our review suggests that discussions of natural environments, urbanization, biodiversity, microbiota, nutrition, and mental health, are often one in the same.

  3. Mechanisms for the Evolution of a Derived Function in the Ancestral Glucocorticoid Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Sean Michael; Ortlund, Eric A; Thornton, Joseph W. (Emory-MED); (Harvard); (Oregon)

    2012-03-16

    Understanding the genetic, structural, and biophysical mechanisms that caused protein functions to evolve is a central goal of molecular evolutionary studies. Ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) offers an experimental approach to these questions. Here we use ASR to shed light on the earliest functions and evolution of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a steroid-activated transcription factor that plays a key role in the regulation of vertebrate physiology. Prior work showed that GR and its paralog, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), duplicated from a common ancestor roughly 450 million years ago; the ancestral functions were largely conserved in the MR lineage, but the functions of GRs - reduced sensitivity to all hormones and increased selectivity for glucocorticoids - are derived. Although the mechanisms for the evolution of glucocorticoid specificity have been identified, how reduced sensitivity evolved has not yet been studied. Here we report on the reconstruction of the deepest ancestor in the GR lineage (AncGR1) and demonstrate that GR's reduced sensitivity evolved before the acquisition of restricted hormone specificity, shortly after the GR-MR split. Using site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, and computational analyses of protein stability to recapitulate and determine the effects of historical mutations, we show that AncGR1's reduced ligand sensitivity evolved primarily due to three key substitutions. Two large-effect mutations weakened hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions within the ancestral protein, reducing its stability. The degenerative effect of these two mutations is extremely strong, but a third permissive substitution, which has no apparent effect on function in the ancestral background and is likely to have occurred first, buffered the effects of the destabilizing mutations. Taken together, our results highlight the potentially creative role of substitutions that partially degrade protein structure and

  4. Ancestral genes can control the ability of horizontally acquired loci to confer new traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Deborah Chen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Horizontally acquired genes typically function as autonomous units conferring new abilities when introduced into different species. However, we reasoned that proteins preexisting in an organism might constrain the functionality of a horizontally acquired gene product if it operates on an ancestral pathway. Here, we determine how the horizontally acquired pmrD gene product activates the ancestral PmrA/PmrB two-component system in Salmonella enterica but not in the closely related bacterium Escherichia coli. The Salmonella PmrD protein binds to the phosphorylated PmrA protein (PmrA-P, protecting it from dephosphorylation by the PmrB protein. This results in transcription of PmrA-dependent genes, including those conferring polymyxin B resistance. We now report that the E. coli PmrD protein can activate the PmrA/PmrB system in Salmonella even though it cannot do it in E. coli, suggesting that these two species differ in an additional component controlling PmrA-P levels. We establish that the E. coli PmrB displays higher phosphatase activity towards PmrA-P than the Salmonella PmrB, and we identified a PmrB subdomain responsible for this property. Replacement of the E. coli pmrB gene with the Salmonella homolog was sufficient to render E. coli resistant to polymyxin B under PmrD-inducing conditions. Our findings provide a singular example whereby quantitative differences in the biochemical activities of orthologous ancestral proteins dictate the ability of a horizontally acquired gene product to confer species-specific traits. And they suggest that horizontally acquired genes can potentiate selection at ancestral loci.

  5. Temperature-dependent respiration-growth relations in ancestral maize cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce N. Smith; Jillian L. Walker; Rebekka L. Stone; Angela R. Jones; Lee D. Hansen

    2001-01-01

    Shoots from 4- to 6-day old seedlings of seven ancestral or old cultivars of Zea mays L. were placed in a calorimeter. Dark metabolic heat rate (q) and CO2 production rate (RCO2) were measured at nine temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 °C). Temperature dependencies of q and RCO2 were used to model response of both growth and substrate carbon conversion...

  6. A Multi-Functional Tubulovesicular Network as the Ancestral Eukaryotic Endomembrane System

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Carlos González-Sánchez; Ricardo Costa; Damien P Devos

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the eukaryotic endomembrane system is still the subject of much speculation. We argue that the combination of two recent hypotheses addressing the eukaryotic endomembrane’s early evolution supports the possibility that the ancestral membranes were organised as a multi-functional tubulovesicular network. One of the potential selective advantages provided by this organisation was the capacity to perform endocytosis. This possibility is illustrated by membrane organisations observe...

  7. Phylogenomic analysis of vertebrate thrombospondins reveals fish-specific paralogues, ancestral gene relationships and a tetrapod innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Josephine C

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thrombospondins (TSPs are evolutionarily-conserved, extracellular, calcium-binding glycoproteins with important roles in cell-extracellular matrix interactions, angiogenesis, synaptogenesis and connective tissue organisation. Five TSPs, designated TSP-1 through TSP-5, are encoded in the human genome. All but one have known roles in acquired or inherited human diseases. To further understand the roles of TSPs in human physiology and pathology, it would be advantageous to extend the repertoire of relevant vertebrate models. In general the zebrafish is proving an excellent model organism for vertebrate biology, therefore we set out to evaluate the status of TSPs in zebrafish and two species of pufferfish. Results We identified by bioinformatics that three fish species encode larger numbers of TSPs than vertebrates, yet all these sequences group as homologues of TSP-1 to -4. By phylogenomic analysis of neighboring genes, we uncovered that, in fish, a TSP-4-like sequence is encoded from the gene corresponding to the tetrapod TSP-5 gene. Thus, all TSP genes show conservation of synteny between fish and tetrapods. In the human genome, the TSP-1, TSP-3, TSP-4 and TSP-5 genes lie within paralogous regions that provide insight into the ancestral genomic context of vertebrate TSPs. Conclusion A new model for TSP evolution in vertebrates is presented. The TSP-5 protein sequence has evolved rapidly from a TSP-4-like sequence as an innovation in the tetrapod lineage. TSP biology in fish is complicated by the presence of additional lineage- and species-specific TSP paralogues. These novel results give deeper insight into the evolution of TSPs in vertebrates and open new directions for understanding the physiological and pathological roles of TSP-4 and TSP-5 in humans.

  8. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  9. Reconstructed ancestral enzymes suggest long-term cooling of Earth's photic zone since the Archean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Amanda K.; Schopf, J. William; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Akanuma, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2017-05-01

    Paleotemperatures inferred from the isotopic compositions (δ18O and δ30Si) of marine cherts suggest that Earth’s oceans cooled from 70 ± 15 °C in the Archean to the present ˜15 °C. This interpretation, however, has been subject to question due to uncertainties regarding oceanic isotopic compositions, diagenetic or metamorphic resetting of the isotopic record, and depositional environments. Analyses of the thermostability of reconstructed ancestral enzymes provide an independent method by which to assess the temperature history inferred from the isotopic evidence. Although previous studies have demonstrated extreme thermostability in reconstructed archaeal and bacterial proteins compatible with a hot early Earth, taxa investigated may have inhabited local thermal environments that differed significantly from average surface conditions. We here present thermostability measurements of reconstructed ancestral enzymatically active nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs) derived from light-requiring prokaryotic and eukaryotic phototrophs having widely separated fossil-based divergence ages. The ancestral environmental temperatures thereby determined for these photic-zone organisms--shown in modern taxa to correlate strongly with NDK thermostability--are inferred to reflect ancient surface-environment paleotemperatures. Our results suggest that Earth's surface temperature decreased over geological time from ˜65-80 °C in the Archean, a finding consistent both with previous isotope-based and protein reconstruction-based interpretations. Interdisciplinary studies such as those reported here integrating genomic, geologic, and paleontologic data hold promise for providing new insight into the coevolution of life and environment over Earth history.

  10. Ancestral informative marker selection and population structure visualization using sparse Laplacian eigenfunctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available Identification of a small panel of population structure informative markers can reduce genotyping cost and is useful in various applications, such as ancestry inference in association mapping, forensics and evolutionary theory in population genetics. Traditional methods to ascertain ancestral informative markers usually require the prior knowledge of individual ancestry and have difficulty for admixed populations. Recently Principal Components Analysis (PCA has been employed with success to select SNPs which are highly correlated with top significant principal components (PCs without use of individual ancestral information. The approach is also applicable to admixed populations. Here we propose a novel approach based on our recent result on summarizing population structure by graph laplacian eigenfunctions, which differs from PCA in that it is geometric and robust to outliers. Our approach also takes advantage of the priori sparseness of informative markers in the genome. Through simulation of a ring population and the real global population sample HGDP of 650K SNPs genotyped in 940 unrelated individuals, we validate the proposed algorithm at selecting most informative markers, a small fraction of which can recover the similar underlying population structure efficiently. Employing a standard Support Vector Machine (SVM to predict individuals' continental memberships on HGDP dataset of seven continents, we demonstrate that the selected SNPs by our method are more informative but less redundant than those selected by PCA. Our algorithm is a promising tool in genome-wide association studies and population genetics, facilitating the selection of structure informative markers, efficient detection of population substructure and ancestral inference.

  11. What was the ancestral sex-determining mechanism in amniote vertebrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2016-02-01

    Amniote vertebrates, the group consisting of mammals and reptiles including birds, possess various mechanisms of sex determination. Under environmental sex determination (ESD), the sex of individuals depends on the environmental conditions occurring during their development and therefore there are no sexual differences present in their genotypes. Alternatively, through the mode of genotypic sex determination (GSD), sex is determined by a sex-specific genotype, i.e. by the combination of sex chromosomes at various stages of differentiation at conception. As well as influencing sex determination, sex-specific parts of genomes may, and often do, develop specific reproductive or ecological roles in their bearers. Accordingly, an individual with a mismatch between phenotypic (gonadal) and genotypic sex, for example an individual sex-reversed by environmental effects, should have a lower fitness due to the lack of specialized, sex-specific parts of their genome. In this case, evolutionary transitions from GSD to ESD should be less likely than transitions in the opposite direction. This prediction contrasts with the view that GSD was the ancestral sex-determining mechanism for amniote vertebrates. Ancestral GSD would require several transitions from GSD to ESD associated with an independent dedifferentiation of sex chromosomes, at least in the ancestors of crocodiles, turtles, and lepidosaurs (tuataras and squamate reptiles). In this review, we argue that the alternative theory postulating ESD as ancestral in amniotes is more parsimonious and is largely concordant with the theoretical expectations and current knowledge of the phylogenetic distribution and homology of sex-determining mechanisms.

  12. Ancestral state reconstruction, rate heterogeneity, and the evolution of reptile viviparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Benedict; Lee, Michael S Y

    2015-05-01

    Virtually all models for reconstructing ancestral states for discrete characters make the crucial assumption that the trait of interest evolves at a uniform rate across the entire tree. However, this assumption is unlikely to hold in many situations, particularly as ancestral state reconstructions are being performed on increasingly large phylogenies. Here, we show how failure to account for such variable evolutionary rates can cause highly anomalous (and likely incorrect) results, while three methods that accommodate rate variability yield the opposite, more plausible, and more robust reconstructions. The random local clock method, implemented in BEAST, estimates the position and magnitude of rate changes on the tree; split BiSSE estimates separate rate parameters for pre-specified clades; and the hidden rates model partitions each character state into a number of rate categories. Simulations show the inadequacy of traditional models when characters evolve with both asymmetry (different rates of change between states within a character) and heterotachy (different rates of character evolution across different clades). The importance of accounting for rate heterogeneity in ancestral state reconstruction is highlighted empirically with a new analysis of the evolution of viviparity in squamate reptiles, which reveal a predominance of forward (oviparous-viviparous) transitions and very few reversals.

  13. Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Yields Insights into Adaptive Evolution of Binding Specificity in Solute-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Ben E; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-02-18

    The promiscuous functions of proteins are an important reservoir of functional novelty in protein evolution, but the molecular basis for binding promiscuity remains elusive. We used ancestral protein reconstruction to experimentally characterize evolutionary intermediates in the functional expansion of the polar amino acid-binding protein family, which has evolved to bind a variety of amino acids with high affinity and specificity. High-resolution crystal structures of an ancestral arginine-binding protein in complex with l-arginine and l-glutamine show that the promiscuous binding of l-glutamine is enabled by multi-scale conformational plasticity, water-mediated interactions, and selection of an alternative conformational substate productive for l-glutamine binding. Evolution of specialized glutamine-binding proteins from this ancestral protein was achieved by displacement of water molecules from the protein-ligand interface, reducing the entropic penalty associated with the promiscuous interaction. These results provide a structural and thermodynamic basis for the co-option of a promiscuous interaction in the evolution of binding specificity.

  14. Diverse adaptations of an ancestral gill: a common evolutionary origin for wings, breathing organs, and spinnerets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damen, Wim G M; Saridaki, Theodora; Averof, Michalis

    2002-10-01

    Changing conditions of life impose new requirements on the morphology and physiology of an organism. One of these changes is the evolutionary transition from aquatic to terrestrial life, leading to adaptations in locomotion, breathing, reproduction, and mechanisms for food capture. We have shown previously that insects' wings most likely originated from one of the gills of ancestral aquatic arthropods during their transition to life on land. Here we investigate the fate of these ancestral gills during the evolution of another major arthropod group, the chelicerates. We examine the expression of two developmental genes, pdm/nubbin and apterous, that participate in the specification of insects' wings and are expressed in particular crustacean epipods/gills. In the horseshoe crab, a primitively aquatic chelicerate, pdm/nubbin is specifically expressed in opisthosomal appendages that give rise to respiratory organs called book gills. In spiders (terrestrial chelicerates), pdm/nubbin and apterous are expressed in successive segmental primordia that give rise to book lungs, lateral tubular tracheae, and spinnerets, novel structures that are used by spiders to breathe on land and to spin their webs. Combined with morphological and palaeontological evidence, these observations suggest that fundamentally different new organs (wings, air-breathing organs, and spinnerets) evolved from the same ancestral structure (gills) in parallel instances of terrestrialization.

  15. Single chain fragment variable antibodies developed by using as target the 3rd fibronectin type III homologous repeat fragment of human neural cell adhesion molecule L1 promote cell migration and neuritogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dan-Yang; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Xuan-Jun; Schachner, Melitta; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2015-01-15

    L1CAM plays important roles during ontogeny, including promotion of neuronal cell migration and neuritogenesis, and stimulation of axonal outgrowth, fasciculation and myelination. These functions are at least partially exerted through a 16-mer amino acid sequence in the third fibronectin type III-like repeat of L1, which associates with several interaction partners, including integrins, other adhesion molecules and growth factor receptors. Here, using the Tomlinson I library for phage display, we obtained two single-chain variable fragment antibodies (scFvs) against this peptide sequence of human L1, hereafter called H3 peptide. Both scFvs recognize the H3 peptide and the extracellular domain of L1, as tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of L1 expresssing cells. Furthermore, both scFvs reduce U-87 MG cell adhesion to fibronectin, while stimulating cell migration. Application of scFvs to human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells promote process outgrowth. Similar to triggering of endogenous L1 functions at the cell surface, both scFvs activate the signal transducers Erk and Src in these cells. Our results indicate that scFvs against a functionally pivotal domain in L1 trigger its regeneration-beneficial functions in vitro, encouraging thoughts on therapy of neurodegenerative diseases in the hope to ameliorate human nervous system diseases.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-03-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses.

  17. In vitro systems toxicology approach to investigate the effects of repeated cigarette smoke exposure on human buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlage, Walter K.; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Geertz, Marcel; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking has been associated with diseases of the lung, pulmonary airways and oral cavity. Cytologic, genomic and transcriptomic changes in oral mucosa correlate with oral pre-neoplasia, cancer and inflammation (e.g. periodontitis). Alteration of smoking-related gene expression changes in oral epithelial cells is similar to that in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells. Using a systems toxicology approach, we have previously assessed the impact of cigarette smoke (CS) seen as perturbations of biological processes in human nasal and bronchial organotypic epithelial culture models. Here, we report our further assessment using in vitro human oral organotypic epithelium models. We exposed the buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures to CS at the air–liquid interface. CS exposure was associated with increased secretion of inflammatory mediators, induction of cytochrome P450s activity and overall weak toxicity in both tissues. Using microarray technology, gene-set analysis and a novel computational modeling approach leveraging causal biological network models, we identified CS impact on xenobiotic metabolism-related pathways accompanied by a more subtle alteration in inflammatory processes. Gene-set analysis further indicated that the CS-induced pathways in the in vitro buccal tissue models resembled those in the in vivo buccal biopsies of smokers from a published dataset. These findings support the translatability of systems responses from in vitro to in vivo and demonstrate the applicability of oral organotypical tissue models for an impact assessment of CS on various tissues exposed during smoking, as well as for impact assessment of reduced-risk products. PMID:25046638

  18. In vitro systems toxicology approach to investigate the effects of repeated cigarette smoke exposure on human buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlage, Walter K; Iskandar, Anita R; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Geertz, Marcel; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-10-01

    Smoking has been associated with diseases of the lung, pulmonary airways and oral cavity. Cytologic, genomic and transcriptomic changes in oral mucosa correlate with oral pre-neoplasia, cancer and inflammation (e.g. periodontitis). Alteration of smoking-related gene expression changes in oral epithelial cells is similar to that in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells. Using a systems toxicology approach, we have previously assessed the impact of cigarette smoke (CS) seen as perturbations of biological processes in human nasal and bronchial organotypic epithelial culture models. Here, we report our further assessment using in vitro human oral organotypic epithelium models. We exposed the buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures to CS at the air-liquid interface. CS exposure was associated with increased secretion of inflammatory mediators, induction of cytochrome P450s activity and overall weak toxicity in both tissues. Using microarray technology, gene-set analysis and a novel computational modeling approach leveraging causal biological network models, we identified CS impact on xenobiotic metabolism-related pathways accompanied by a more subtle alteration in inflammatory processes. Gene-set analysis further indicated that the CS-induced pathways in the in vitro buccal tissue models resembled those in the in vivo buccal biopsies of smokers from a published dataset. These findings support the translatability of systems responses from in vitro to in vivo and demonstrate the applicability of oral organotypical tissue models for an impact assessment of CS on various tissues exposed during smoking, as well as for impact assessment of reduced-risk products.

  19. Cre/loxP-mediated excision of a neomycin resistance expression unit from an integrated retroviral vector increases long terminal repeat-driven transcription in human hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernex, C; Dubreuil, P; Mannoni, P; Bagnis, C

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant retroviruses are currently the most attractive vehicles for gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. Retroviral vectors often contain an easily selectable marker gene in addition to the gene of interest. However, the presence and selection for expression of the selectable gene often result in a significant reduction of the expression of the gene of interest in the transduced cells. In order to circumvent this problem, we have developed a Cre/loxP recombination system for specific excision of the selectable expression unit from integrated retroviruses. A retroviral vector, containing both a neomycin resistance expression unit flanked by loxP sites and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor cDNA, was used to transduce the human hematopoietic K-562 cell line. Four transduced cell clones were then superinfected with a retrovirus containing a Cre recombinase expression unit. Molecular analyses of 30 doubly transduced subclones showed a strict correlation between cre expression and loxP-flanked selectable cassette excision, thus implying that Cre recombinase activity is very efficient in a retroviral context. Moreover, the excision of the selectable cassette results in a significant increase of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor transcription driven by the retroviral promoter. PMID:9311833

  20. Biosynthesis of highly enriched 13C-lycopene for human metabolic studies using repeated batch tomato cell culturing with 13C-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nancy Engelmann; Rogers, Randy B; Lu, Chi-Hua; Conlon, Lauren E; Lila, Mary Ann; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2013-08-15

    While putative disease-preventing lycopene metabolites are found in both tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) products and in their consumers, mammalian lycopene metabolism is poorly understood. Advances in tomato cell culturing techniques offer an economical tool for generation of highly-enriched (13)C-lycopene for human bioavailability and metabolism studies. To enhance the (13)C-enrichment and yields of labelled lycopene from the hp-1 tomato cell line, cultures were first grown in (13)C-glucose media for three serial batches and produced increasing proportions of uniformly labelled lycopene (14.3±1.2%, 39.6±0.5%, and 48.9±1.5%) with consistent yields (from 5.8 to 9 mg/L). An optimised 9-day-long (13)C-loading and 18-day-long labelling strategy developed based on glucose utilisation and lycopene yields, yielded (13)C-lycopene with 93% (13)C isotopic purity, and 55% of isotopomers were uniformly labelled. Furthermore, an optimised acetone and hexane extraction led to a fourfold increase in lycopene recovery from cultures compared to a standard extraction.

  1. Repeated exposure of human fibroblasts to ionizing radiation reveals an adaptive response that is not mediated by interleukin-6 or TGF-{beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieriks, Birger, E-mail: birger.dieriks@ugent.be [Bio-imaging and Cytometry Unit, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium); De Vos, Winnok [Bio-imaging and Cytometry Unit, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Baatout, Sarah [Bio-imaging and Cytometry Unit, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Radiobiology Unit, Laboratory Molecular and Cellular Biology, Radiobiology Unit, Belgian Nuclear Research Center, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Van Oostveldt, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.VanOostveldt@UGent.be [Bio-imaging and Cytometry Unit, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2011-10-01

    Exposing cells to a low dose can protect them against a subsequent higher exposure. This phenomenon is known as adaptive response and is frequently observed in a variety of cells. Even though similarities are suspected with other non-targeted effects, such as bystander effects, the exact mechanism behind adaptive response is not fully clarified. In this study human primary fibroblasts were tested for their response to ionizing radiation (IR) after administrating a low priming dose (0.1-0.5 Gy). Both the abundance of {gamma}H2AX as a marker for double-stranded breaks and the levels of cytokines, secreted in the medium, were monitored in time. Upon challenge, IR-primed cells showed modified {gamma}H2AX spot size distributions and altered repair kinetics, consistent with an adaptive response. In addition, 24 h after priming with IR, four cytokines were significantly upregulated in the medium - GM-CSF (1.33x); IL6 (4.24x); IL8 (1.33x); TGF-{beta} (1.46x). In order to mimick the protective effect of IR priming, we primed the cells with either IL6 or TGF-{beta}. This did not elicit an altered {gamma}H2AX response as observed in IR-primed cells, indicating that the adaptive response in these primary fibroblasts is regulated in an IL-6 and TGF-{beta} independent manner.

  2. Methylation at global LINE-1 repeats in human blood are affected by gender but not by age or natural hormone cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman El-Maarri

    Full Text Available Previously, we reported on inter-individual and gender specific variations of LINE-1 methylation in healthy individuals. In this study, we investigated whether this variability could be influenced by age or sex hormones in humans. To this end, we studied LINE-1 methylation in vivo in blood-derived DNA from individuals aged 18 to 64 years and from young healthy females at various hormone levels during the menstrual cycle. Our results show that no significant association with age was observed. However, the previously reported increase of LINE-1 methylation in males was reconfirmed. In females, although no correlation between LINE-1 or Alu methylation and hormone levels was observed, a significant stable individual specific level of methylation was noted. In vitro results largely confirmed these findings, as neither estrogen nor dihydrotestosterone affected LINE-1 or Alu methylation in Hek293T, HUVEC, or MDA-kb2 cell lines. In contrast, a decrease in methylation was observed in estrogen-treated T47-Kbluc cell lines strongly expressing estrogen receptor. The very low expression of estrogen receptor in blood cells could explain the observed insensitivity of methylation at LINE-1 to natural hormonal variations in females. In conclusion, neither natural cycle of hormones nor age has a detectable effect on the LINE-1 methylation in peripheral blood cells, while gender remains an important factor.

  3. Preference of the recombination sites involved in the formation of extrachromosomal copies of the human alphoid Sau3A repeat family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, R; Oishi, M; Kiyama, R

    1995-01-01

    The human alphoid Sau3A repetitive family DNA is one of the DNA species that are actively amplified to form extrachromosomal circular DNA in several cell lines. The circularization takes place between two of the five approximately 170 bp subunits with an average of 73.1% homology as well as between identical subunits. To investigate the nature of the recombination reaction, we cloned and analyzed the subunits containing recombination junctions. Analysis of a total of 68 junctions revealed that recombination had occurred preferentially at four positions 10-25 (A), 40-50 (B), 85-90 (C) and 135-160 (D) in the 170bp subunit structure. Two regions (B and C) were overlapped with the regions with higher homology between subunits, while other two regions (A and D) cannot be explained solely by the regional homology between the subunits. These regions were located at both junctions of the nucleosomal and the linker region, and overlapped with the binding motifs for alpha protein and CENP-B. Approximately 90% of the recombination occurred between the subunits located next but one (+/- 2 shift), although the frequency of recombination between the adjoining subunits (+/- 1 shift) was approximately 10%. Images PMID:8559653

  4. Duplication and relocation of the functional DPY19L2 gene within low copy repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Joseph

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low copy repeats (LCRs are thought to play an important role in recent gene evolution, especially when they facilitate gene duplications. Duplicate genes are fundamental to adaptive evolution, providing substrates for the development of new or shared gene functions. Moreover, silencing of duplicate genes can have an indirect effect on adaptive evolution by causing genomic relocation of functional genes. These changes are theorized to have been a major factor in speciation. Results Here we present a novel example showing functional gene relocation within a LCR. We characterize the genomic structure and gene content of eight related LCRs on human Chromosomes 7 and 12. Two members of a novel transmembrane gene family, DPY19L, were identified in these regions, along with six transcribed pseudogenes. One of these genes, DPY19L2, is found on Chromosome 12 and is not syntenic with its mouse orthologue. Instead, the human locus syntenic to mouse Dpy19l2 contains a pseudogene, DPY19L2P1. This indicates that the ancestral copy of this gene has been silenced, while the descendant copy has remained active. Thus, the functional copy of this gene has been relocated to a new genomic locus. We then describe the expansion and evolution of the DPY19L gene family from a single gene found in invertebrate animals. Ancient duplications have led to multiple homologues in different lineages, with three in fish, frogs and birds and four in mammals. Conclusion Our results show that the DPY19L family has expanded throughout the vertebrate lineage and has undergone recent primate-specific evolution within LCRs.

  5. Studies of an expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, P.; Wang, S.; Merry, D. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the androgen receptor gene (AR{sup exp}). AR{sup exp} repeats expand further or contract in approximately 25% of transmissions. Analogous {open_quotes}dynamic mutations{close_quotes} have been reported in other expanded trinucleotide repeat disorders. We have been developing a mouse model of this disease using a transgenic approach. Expression of the SBMA AR was documented in transgenic mice with an inducible promoter. No phenotypic effects of transgene expression were observed. We have extended our previous results on stability of the expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice in two lines carrying AR{sup exp}. Tail DNA was amplified by PCR using primers spanning the repeat on 60 AR{sup exp} transgenic mice from four different transgenic lines. Migration of the PCR product through an acrylamide gel showed no change of the 45 CAG repeat length in any progeny. Similarly, PCR products from 23 normal repeat transgenics showed no change from the repeat length of the original construct. Unlike the disease allele in humans, the expanded repeat AR cDNA in transgenic mice showed no change in repeat length with transmission. The relative stability of CAG repeats seen in the transgenic mice may indicate either differences in the fidelity of replicative enzymes, or differences in error identification and repair between mice and humans. Integration site or structural properties of the transgene itself might also play a role.

  6. A phase 1 study evaluating the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of repeat dosing with a human IL-13 antibody (CAT-354 in subjects with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roskos Lorin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IL-13 has been implicated in the development of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. This study investigated the multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and safety profile of human anti-IL-13 antibody (CAT-354 in adults with asthma. Methods This was a multiple-dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 study in asthmatics (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] ≥ 80% predicted. Subjects were randomised to receive three intravenous infusions of CAT-354 (1 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg or placebo at 28-day intervals. Blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic measurements. Safety was assessed by adverse events, vital signs, ECGs, laboratory and pulmonary function parameters. Results Twenty-three subjects (aged 21-60 years, FEV1 88-95% predicted received ≥ 1 dose of study medication. The half-life of CAT-354 was 12-17 days and was dose-independent. The maximum serum concentration and area under the curve were dose-dependent. Clearance (2.2-2.6 mL/day/kg and volume of distribution (44-57 mL/kg were both low and dose-independent. The observed maximum serum concentration after each dose increased slightly from dose 1 through dose 3 at all dose levels, consistent with an accumulation ratio of 1.4 to 1.7 for area under the curve. Most adverse events were deemed mild to moderate and unrelated to study medication. One SAE was reported and deemed unrelated to study drug. There were no effects of clinical concern for vital signs, ECG, laboratory or pulmonary parameters. Conclusions CAT-354 exhibited linear pharmacokinetics and an acceptable safety profile. These findings suggest that at the doses tested, CAT-354 can be safely administered in multiple doses to patients with asthma. Trial registration NCT00974675.

  7. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  8. Evidence that the ancestral haplotype in Australian hemochromatosis patients may be associated with a common mutation in the gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.H.G.; Powell, L.W.; Leggett, B.A. [Univ. of Queensland (Australia)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Hemochromatosis (HC) is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism for which neither the gene nor biochemical defect have yet been identified. The aim of this study was to look for clinical evidence that the predominant ancestral haplotype in Australian patients is associated with a common mutation in the gene. We compared indices of iron metabolism and storage in three groups of HC patients categorized according to the presence of the ancestral haplotype (i.e., patients with two copies, one copy, and no copies of the ancestral haplotype). We also examined iron indices in two groups of HC heterozygotes (those with the ancestral haplotype and those without) and in age-matched controls. These analyses indicate that (i) HC patients with two copies of the ancestral haplotype show significantly more severe expression of the disorder than those with one copy or those without, (ii) HC heterozygotes have partial clinical expression, which may be influenced by the presence of the ancestral haplotype in females but not in males, and (iii) the high population frequency of the HC gene may be the result of the selective advantage conferred by protecting heterozygotes against iron deficiency. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Repeated whole cigarette smoke exposure alters cell differentiation and augments secretion of inflammatory mediators in air-liquid interface three-dimensional co-culture model of human bronchial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shinkichi; Ito, Shigeaki

    2017-02-01

    In vitro models of human bronchial epithelium are useful for toxicological testing because of their resemblance to in vivo tissue. We constructed a model of human bronchial tissue which has a fibroblast layer embedded in a collagen matrix directly below a fully-differentiated epithelial cell layer. The model was applied to whole cigarette smoke (CS) exposure repeatedly from an air-liquid interface culture while bronchial epithelial cells were differentiating. The effects of CS exposure on differentiation were determined by histological and gene expression analyses on culture day 21. We found a decrease in ciliated cells and perturbation of goblet cell differentiation. We also analyzed the effects of CS exposure on the inflammatory response, and observed a significant increase in secretion of IL-8, GRO-α, IL-1β, and GM-CSF. Interestingly, secretion of these mediators was augmented with repetition of whole CS exposure. Our data demonstrate the usefulness of our bronchial tissue model for in vitro testing and the importance of exposure repetition in perturbing the differentiation and inflammation processes.

  10. What was the ancestral function of decidual stromal cells? A model for the evolution of eutherian pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Arun Rajendra; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-04-01

    In human and mouse, decidual stromal cells (DSC) are necessary for the establishment (implantation) and the maintenance of pregnancy by preventing inflammation and the immune rejection of the semi-allograft conceptus. DSC originated along the stem lineage of eutherian mammals, coincidental with the origin of invasive placentation. Surprisingly, in many eutherian lineages decidual cells are lost after the implantation phase of pregnancy, making it unlikely that DSC are necessary for the maintenance of pregnancy in these animals. In order to understand this variation, we review the literature on the fetal-maternal interface in all major eutherian clades Euarchontoglires, Laurasiatheria, Xenarthra and Afrotheria, as well as the literature about the ancestral eutherian species. We conclude that maintaining pregnancy may not be a shared derived function of DSC among all eutherian mammals. Rather, we propose that DSC originated to manage the inflammatory reaction associated with invasive implantation. We envision that this happened in a stem eutherian that had invasive placenta but still a short gestation. We further propose that extended gestation evolved independently in the major eutherian clades explaining why the major lineages of eutherian mammals differ with respect to the mechanisms maintaining pregnancy.

  11. Repeats in transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Seema

    2013-06-01

    Transforming acidic coiled-coil proteins (TACC1, 2, and 3) are essential proteins associated with the assembly of spindle microtubules and maintenance of bipolarity. Dysregulation of TACCs is associated with tumorigenesis, but studies of microsatellite instability in TACC genes have not been extensive. Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat instability is known to cause many types of cancer. The present in silico analysis of SSRs in human TACC gene sequences shows the presence of mono- to hexa-nucleotide repeats, with the highest densities found for mono- and di-nucleotide repeats. Density of repeats is higher in introns than in exons. Some of the repeats are present in regulatory regions and retained introns. Human TACC genes show conservation of many repeat classes. Microsatellites in TACC genes could be valuable markers for monitoring numerical chromosomal aberrations and or cancer.

  12. Role of DNA Polymerases in Repeat-Mediated Genome Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik A. Shah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of simple DNA repeats cause numerous hereditary diseases in humans. We analyzed the role of DNA polymerases in the instability of Friedreich’s ataxia (GAAn repeats in a yeast experimental system. The elementary step of expansion corresponded to ∼160 bp in the wild-type strain, matching the size of Okazaki fragments in yeast. This step increased when DNA polymerase α was mutated, suggesting a link between the scale of expansions and Okazaki fragment size. Expandable repeats strongly elevated the rate of mutations at substantial distances around them, a phenomenon we call repeat-induced mutagenesis (RIM. Notably, defects in the replicative DNA polymerases δ and ∊ strongly increased rates for both repeat expansions and RIM. The increases in repeat-mediated instability observed in DNA polymerase δ mutants depended on translesion DNA polymerases. We conclude that repeat expansions and RIM are two sides of the same replicative mechanism.

  13. The mitochondrial genome structure of Xenoturbella bocki (phylum Xenoturbellida is ancestral within the deuterostomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfear Robert

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial genome comparisons contribute in multiple ways when inferring animal relationships. As well as primary sequence data, rare genomic changes such as gene order, shared gene boundaries and genetic code changes, which are unlikely to have arisen through convergent evolution, are useful tools in resolving deep phylogenies. Xenoturbella bocki is a morphologically simple benthic marine worm recently found to belong among the deuterostomes. Here we present analyses comparing the Xenoturbella bocki mitochondrial gene order, genetic code and control region to those of other metazoan groups. Results The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Xenoturbella bocki was determined. The gene order is most similar to that of the chordates and the hemichordates, indicating that this conserved mitochondrial gene order might be ancestral to the deuterostome clade. Using data from all phyla of deuterostomes, we infer the ancestral mitochondrial gene order for this clade. Using inversion and breakpoint analyses of metazoan mitochondrial genomes, we test conflicting hypotheses for the phylogenetic placement of Xenoturbella and find a closer affinity to the hemichordates than to other metazoan groups. Comparative analyses of the control region reveal similarities in the transcription initiation and termination sites and origin of replication of Xenoturbella with those of the vertebrates. Phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial sequence indicate a weakly supported placement as a basal deuterostome, a result that may be the effect of compositional bias. Conclusion The mitochondrial genome of Xenoturbella bocki has a very conserved gene arrangement in the deuterostome group, strikingly similar to that of the hemichordates and the chordates, and thus to the ancestral deuterostome gene order. Similarity to the hemichordates in particular is suggested by inversion and breakpoint analysis. Finally, while phylogenetic analyses of the

  14. Clumped isotope paleothermometry of the Mio-Pliocene freshwater Lake Mohave. Lower ancestral Colorado River, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, K. A.; Huntington, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    The fluvio-lacustrine deposits of the Bouse Formation are an archive of ancestral Colorado River integration in the Late Miocene and Early Pliocene. In Mohave Valley along the California-Arizona-Nevada border, exposures of the Bouse Formation are observed ~400 m above the modern river elevation, which has been interpreted as evidence of tectonic uplift following a regionally extensive marine incursion and integration of the ancestral Colorado River by capture. However, recent investigations instead favor a "top-down" process of river integration by sequential infilling of freshwater lakes that does not require subsequent tectonic uplift. Accurate interpretation of the Bouse Formation's depositional environment is needed to test these models and ultimately, constrain the timing and mechanism of southwestern Colorado Plateau uplift. To further constrain interpretations of depositional environment, we present new clumped isotope analyses with major and trace element geochemistry and scanning electron microscopy of carbonate samples from the Bouse Formation in Mohave Valley. Here the Bouse Formation contains three distinct facies: basal marl and limestone overlain by thick beds of calcareous claystone interbedded with siltstone and sandstone and locally overlain by tufa. Bulk geochemistry of all facies is consistent with a similar freshwater source yet each facies is isotopically distinct, potentially indicating a strong influence of facies-specific fractionation processes. Carbonate formation temperatures measured in tufa samples are variable, suggesting multiple generations of calcite precipitation. Formation temperatures from basal marl and claystone samples are generally consistent with near-surface lake temperatures, broadly supporting a lacustrine depositional environment and "top-down" process of ancestral Colorado River integration. More broadly, our results quantify the variability in carbonate formation temperatures with different lacustrine facies and

  15. Analysis of ancestral and functionally relevant CD5 variants in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmen Cenit

    Full Text Available CD5 plays a crucial role in autoimmunity and is a well-established genetic risk factor of developing RA. Recently, evidence of positive selection has been provided for the CD5 Pro224-Val471 haplotype in East Asian populations. The aim of the present work was to further analyze the functional relevance of non-synonymous CD5 polymorphisms conforming the ancestral and the newly derived haplotypes (Pro224-Ala471 and Pro224-Val471, respectively as well as to investigate the potential role of CD5 on the development of SLE and/or SLE nephritis.The CD5 SNPs rs2241002 (C/T; Pro224Leu and rs2229177 (C/T; Ala471Val were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination assays in a total of 1,324 controls and 681 SLE patients of Spanish origin. In vitro analysis of CD3-mediated T cell proliferative and cytokine response profiles of healthy volunteers homozygous for the above mentioned CD5 haplotypes were also analyzed.T-cell proliferation and cytokine release were significantly increased showing a bias towards to a Th2 profile after CD3 cross-linking of peripheral mononuclear cells from healthy individuals homozygous for the ancestral Pro224-Ala471 (CC haplotype, compared to the more recently derived Pro224-Val471 (CT. The same allelic combination was statistically associated with Lupus nephritis.The ancestral Ala471 CD5 allele confers lymphocyte hyper-responsiveness to TCR/CD3 cross-linking and is associated with nephritis in SLE patients.

  16. Sandals as Icons: Representations in Ancestral Pueblo Rock Art and Effigies in Stone and Wood

    OpenAIRE

    Polly Schaafsma

    2016-01-01

    Dating the late 1000s to the mid-1200s CE, petroglyphs of sandal images are among others that distinguish ancient Pueblo rock art in the San Juan and Little Colorado River drainages on the Colorado Plateau from Ancestral Pueblo rock art elsewhere across the Southwest. The sandal “track” also has counterparts  as effigies in stone and wood often found in ceremonial contexts in Pueblo sites. These representations reflect the sandal styles of the times, both plain in contour and the jog-toed var...

  17. On the ancestral recruitment of metalloproteinases into the venom of snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casewell, Nicholas R

    2012-09-15

    Tracing the evolutionary history of proteins can reveal insights into gene alterations responsible for changes in structure and function. Here, the origin of snake venom metalloproteinases was rigorously reassessed using phylogenetics and the reconstruction of ancestral sequences. Basal SVMPs are most closely related to ADAM 7, 28 and decysin-1 proteins. Reconstructing the evolutionary history of these proteins and their hypothetical ancestors reveals progressive alterations in the amino acid composition and structural characteristics of ADAMs/SVMPs through evolutionary time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sustainability of ancestral methods of agricultural production in Perú: ¿keep or replace?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Eduardo Vargas Huanca

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the success of some Andean products such as quinoa, potatoes or maca in international food trade and the growing environmental degradation facing developing countries, resulting from intensive exploitation activities; Our research seeks to show the trend that is assumed from the academic / scientific community and public officials in the food sector in Peru, against the need to maintain sustainable various ancestral modes of agricultural production (case quinoa, for it analyze quantitative and qualitative obtained from public institutions and Peruvian universities.

  19. A Multi-Functional Tubulovesicular Network as the Ancestral Eukaryotic Endomembrane System

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    Juan Carlos González-Sánchez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the eukaryotic endomembrane system is still the subject of much speculation. We argue that the combination of two recent hypotheses addressing the eukaryotic endomembrane’s early evolution supports the possibility that the ancestral membranes were organised as a multi-functional tubulovesicular network. One of the potential selective advantages provided by this organisation was the capacity to perform endocytosis. This possibility is illustrated by membrane organisations observed in current organisms in the three domains of life. Based on this, we propose a coherent model of autogenous eukaryotic endomembrane system evolution in which mitochondria are involved at a late stage.

  20. A multi-functional tubulovesicular network as the ancestral eukaryotic endomembrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Costa, Ricardo; Devos, Damien P

    2015-03-24

    The origin of the eukaryotic endomembrane system is still the subject of much speculation. We argue that the combination of two recent hypotheses addressing the eukaryotic endomembrane's early evolution supports the possibility that the ancestral membranes were organised as a multi-functional tubulovesicular network. One of the potential selective advantages provided by this organisation was the capacity to perform endocytosis. This possibility is illustrated by membrane organisations observed in current organisms in the three domains of life. Based on this, we propose a coherent model of autogenous eukaryotic endomembrane system evolution in which mitochondria are involved at a late stage.

  1. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  2. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  3. Consistency and inconsistency of consensus methods for inferring species trees from gene trees in the presence of ancestral population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGiorgio, Michael; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2016-08-01

    In the last few years, several statistically consistent consensus methods for species tree inference have been devised that are robust to the gene tree discordance caused by incomplete lineage sorting in unstructured ancestral populations. One source of gene tree discordance that has only recently been identified as a potential obstacle for phylogenetic inference is ancestral population structure. In this article, we describe a general model of ancestral population structure, and by relying on a single carefully constructed example scenario, we show that the consensus methods Democratic Vote, STEAC, STAR, R(∗) Consensus, Rooted Triple Consensus, Minimize Deep Coalescences, and Majority-Rule Consensus are statistically inconsistent under the model. We find that among the consensus methods evaluated, the only method that is statistically consistent in the presence of ancestral population structure is GLASS/Maximum Tree. We use simulations to evaluate the behavior of the various consensus methods in a model with ancestral population structure, showing that as the number of gene trees increases, estimates on the basis of GLASS/Maximum Tree approach the true species tree topology irrespective of the level of population structure, whereas estimates based on the remaining methods only approach the true species tree topology if the level of structure is low. However, through simulations using species trees both with and without ancestral population structure, we show that GLASS/Maximum Tree performs unusually poorly on gene trees inferred from alignments with little information. This practical limitation of GLASS/Maximum Tree together with the inconsistency of other methods prompts the need for both further testing of additional existing methods and development of novel methods under conditions that incorporate ancestral population structure.

  4. The Rhodomonas salina mitochondrial genome: bacteria-like operons, compact gene arrangement and complex repeat region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauth, Amy M; Maier, Uwe G; Lang, B Franz; Burger, Gertraud

    2005-01-01

    To gain insight into the mitochondrial genome structure and gene content of a putatively ancestral group of eukaryotes, the cryptophytes, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA of Rhodomonas salina. The 48 063 bp circular-mapping molecule codes for 2 rRNAs, 27 tRNAs and 40 proteins including 23 components of oxidative phosphorylation, 15 ribosomal proteins and two subunits of tat translocase. One potential protein (ORF161) is without assigned function. Only two introns occur in the genome; both are present within cox1 belong to group II and contain RT open reading frames. Primitive genome features include bacteria-like rRNAs and tRNAs, ribosomal protein genes organized in large clusters resembling bacterial operons and the presence of the otherwise rare genes such as rps1 and tatA. The highly compact gene organization contrasts with the presence of a 4.7 kb long, repeat-containing intergenic region. Repeat motifs approximately 40-700 bp long occur up to 31 times, forming a complex repeat structure. Tandem repeats are the major arrangement but the region also includes a large, approximately 3 kb, inverted repeat and several potentially stable approximately 40-80 bp long hairpin structures. We provide evidence that the large repeat region is involved in replication and transcription initiation, predict a promoter motif that occurs in three locations and discuss two likely scenarios of how this highly structured repeat region might have evolved.

  5. On the historical biogeography of global Galliformes:ancestral range and diversification patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Background:In this study, the ancestral distributional ranges and the tempo of diversification patterns of global Galliformes were investigated. Methods:Different diversification models characterizing possible tempo patterns were fitted and compared onto the phylogenetic tree for the 197 Galliforme species, consisting of a constant-speciation and constant-extinction model (CONSTANT), a decreasing-speciation and constant-extinction model (SPVAR), a constant-speciation and increasing-extinction model (EXVAR) and a decreasing-speciation and increasing-extinction model (BOTHVAR). Ancestral range reconstruction was conducted using the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis model. Results:A constant-diversification-rate (CONSTANT) model best quantified the historical speciation patterns of this avian assemblage through model selection. Clade age and species richness are significantly and positively correlated. The most recent common ancestor for Galliformes species was originally found in the disjunctive regions between Southeast Asia and North America. High-frequency dispersal events were identified across the whole evolutionary time. Conclusions:The constant diversification rate for global Gal iforme species implied that there were no diversification rate-shifting trends for Galliformes species. The present study may contribute to the understanding of the ecology and diversity patterns of Galliformes from the perspective of historical biogeography, although some limitations existed.

  6. Evolution of steroid receptors from an estrogen-sensitive ancestral receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Geeta N; Thornton, Joseph W

    2011-03-01

    Members of the steroid hormone receptor (SR) family activate transcription from different DNA response elements and are regulated by distinct hormonal ligands. Understanding the evolutionary process by which this diversity arose can provide insight into how and why SRs function as they do. Here we review the characteristics of the ancient receptor protein from which the SR family descends by a process of gene duplication and divergence. Several orthogonal lines of evidence - bioinformatic, phylogenetic, and experimental - indicate that this ancient SR had the capacity to activate transcription from DNA estrogen response elements in response to estrogens. Duplication and divergence of the ancestral SR gene subsequently generated new receptors that were activated by other steroid hormones, including progestagens, androgens, and corticosteroids. The androgen and progesterone receptors recruited as their ligands steroids that were previously present as biochemical intermediates in the synthesis of estrogens. This process is an example of molecular exploitation--the evolution of new molecular interactions when an older molecule, which previously had a different function, is co-opted as a binding partner by a newly evolved molecule. The primordial interaction between the ancestral steroid receptor and estrogens may itself have evolved due to an early molecular exploitation event.

  7. Internal structural variations in a debris-avalanche deposit from ancestral Mount Shasta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, T.; Glicken, H.

    1986-01-01

    Various parameters of the internal structure of a debris-avalanche deposit from ancestral Mount Shasta (size and percentage of block facies in each exposure, number and width of jigsaw cracks, and number of rounded clasts in matrix facies) were measured in order to study flow and emplacement mechanisms. Three types of coherent blocks were identified: blocks of massive or brecciated lava flows or domes, blocks of layered volcaniclastic deposits, and blocks of accidental material, typically from sedimentary units underlying Shasta Valley. The mean maximum dimension of the three largest blocks of layered volcaniclastic material is 220 m, and that of the lava blocks, 110 m. This difference may reflect plastic deformation of blocks of layered volcaniclastic material; blocks of massive or brecciated volcanic rock deformated brittly and may have split into several smaller blocks. The blocks in the deposit are one order of magnitude larger, and the height of collapse 1100 m higher, than the Pungarehu debris-avalanche deposit at Mount Egmont, New Zealand, although the degree of fracturing is about the same.This suggests either that the Shasta source material was less broken, or that the intensity of any accompanying explosion was smaller at ancestral Mount Shasta. The Shasta debris-avalanche deposit covered the floor of a closed basin; the flanks of the basin may have retarded the opening of jigsaw cracks and the formation of stretched and deformed blocks such as those of the Pungarehu debris-avalanche deposit. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Bearing the unbearable: ancestral transmission through dreams and moving metaphors in the analtyic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Judith

    2012-11-01

    This paper explores how untold and unresolved intergenerational trauma may be transmitted through unconscious channels of communication, manifesting in the dreams of descendants. Unwitting carriers for that which was too horrific for their ancestors to bear, descendants may enter analysis through an unconscious need to uncover past secrets, piece together ancestral histories before the keys to comprehending their terrible inheritance die with their forebears. They seek the relational containment of the analytic relationship to provide psychological conditions to bear the unbearable, know the unknowable, speak the unspeakable and redeem the unredeemable. In the case of 'Rachael', initial dreams gave rise to what Hobson (1984) called 'moving metaphors of self' in the analytic field. Dream imagery, projective and introjective processes in the transference-countertransference dynamics gradually revealed an unknown ancestral history. I clarify the back and forth process from dream to waking dream thoughts to moving metaphors and differentiate the moving metaphor from a living symbol. I argue that the containment of the analytic relationship nested within the security of the analytic space is a necessary precondition for such healing processes to occur. © 2012, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  9. QTL linkage analysis of connected populations using ancestral marker and pedigree information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, Marco C A M; Totir, L Radu; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Winkler, Christopher R; Boer, Martin P; Smith, Oscar S

    2012-04-01

    The common assumption in quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage mapping studies that parents of multiple connected populations are unrelated is unrealistic for many plant breeding programs. We remove this assumption and propose a Bayesian approach that clusters the alleles of the parents of the current mapping populations from locus-specific identity by descent (IBD) matrices that capture ancestral marker and pedigree information. Moreover, we demonstrate how the parental IBD data can be incorporated into a QTL linkage analysis framework by using two approaches: a Threshold IBD model (TIBD) and a Latent Ancestral Allele Model (LAAM). The TIBD and LAAM models are empirically tested via numerical simulation based on the structure of a commercial maize breeding program. The simulations included a pilot dataset with closely linked QTL on a single linkage group and 100 replicated datasets with five linkage groups harboring four unlinked QTL. The simulation results show that including parental IBD data (similarly for TIBD and LAAM) significantly improves the power and particularly accuracy of QTL mapping, e.g., position, effect size and individuals' genotype probability without significantly increasing computational demand.

  10. Cambrian cinctan echinoderms shed light on feeding in the ancestral deuterostome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Imran A; Zamora, Samuel; Falkingham, Peter L; Phillips, Jeremy C

    2015-11-07

    Reconstructing the feeding mode of the latest common ancestor of deuterostomes is key to elucidating the early evolution of feeding in chordates and allied phyla; however, it is debated whether the ancestral deuterostome was a tentaculate feeder or a pharyngeal filter feeder. To address this, we evaluated the hydrodynamics of feeding in a group of fossil stem-group echinoderms (cinctans) using computational fluid dynamics. We simulated water flow past three-dimensional digital models of a Cambrian fossil cinctan in a range of possible life positions, adopting both passive tentacular feeding and active pharyngeal filter feeding. The results demonstrate that an orientation with the mouth facing downstream of the current was optimal for drag and lift reduction. Moreover, they show that there was almost no flow to the mouth and associated marginal groove under simulations of passive feeding, whereas considerable flow towards the animal was observed for active feeding, which would have enhanced the transport of suspended particles to the mouth. This strongly suggests that cinctans were active pharyngeal filter feeders, like modern enteropneust hemichordates and urochordates, indicating that the ancestral deuterostome employed a similar feeding strategy.

  11. Ancestral state reconstruction infers phytopathogenic origins of sooty blotch and flyspeck fungi on apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Siti Izera; Batzer, Jean Carlson; Harrington, Thomas C; Crous, Pedro W; Lavrov, Dennis V; Li, Huanyu; Gleason, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Members of the sooty blotch and flyspeck (SBFS) complex are epiphytic fungi in the Ascomycota that cause economically damaging blemishes of apples worldwide. SBFS fungi are polyphyletic, but approx. 96% of SBFS species are in the Capnodiales. Evolutionary origins of SBFS fungi remain unclear, so we attempted to infer their origins by means of ancestral state reconstruction on a phylogenetic tree built utilizing genes for the nuc 28S rDNA (approx. 830 bp from near the 59 end) and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2). The analyzed taxa included the well-known genera of SBFS as well as non-SBFS fungi from seven families within the Capnodiales. The non-SBFS taxa were selected based on their distinct ecological niches, including plant-parasitic and saprophytic species. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that most SBFS species in the Capnodiales are closely related to plant-parasitic fungi. Ancestral state reconstruction provided strong evidence that plant-parasitic fungi were the ancestors of the major SBFS lineages. Knowledge gained from this study may help to better understand the ecology and evolution of epiphytic fungi. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  12. Ancestral protein resurrection and engineering opportunities of the mamba aminergic toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Guillaume; Alili, Doria; Protte, Adèle; Upert, Gregory; Gilles, Nicolas; Tepshi, Livia; Stura, Enrico A; Mourier, Gilles; Servent, Denis

    2017-06-02

    Mamba venoms contain a multiplicity of three-finger fold aminergic toxins known to interact with various α-adrenergic, muscarinic and dopaminergic receptors with different pharmacological profiles. In order to generate novel functions on this structural scaffold and to avoid the daunting task of producing and screening an overwhelming number of variants generated by a classical protein engineering strategy, we accepted the challenge of resurrecting ancestral proteins, likely to have possessed functional properties. This innovative approach that exploits molecular evolution models to efficiently guide protein engineering, has allowed us to generate a small library of six ancestral toxin (AncTx) variants and associate their pharmacological profiles to key functional substitutions. Among these variants, we identified AncTx1 as the most α1A-adrenoceptor selective peptide known to date and AncTx5 as the most potent inhibitor of the three α2 adrenoceptor subtypes. Three positions in the ρ-Da1a evolutionary pathway, positions 28, 38 and 43 have been identified as key modulators of the affinities for the α1 and α2C adrenoceptor subtypes. Here, we present a first attempt at rational engineering of the aminergic toxins, revealing an epistasis phenomenon.

  13. On the historical biogeography of global Galliformes: ancestral range and diversification patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhua; Chen

    2014-01-01

    Background: In this study, the ancestral distributional ranges and the tempo of diversification patterns of global Galliformes were investigated.Methods: Different diversification models characterizing possible tempo patterns were fitted and compared onto the phylogenetic tree for the 197 Galliforme species, consisting of a constant-speciation and constant-extinction model(CONSTANT), a decreasing-speciation and constant-extinction model(SPVAR), a constant-speciation and increasing-extinction model(EXVAR) and a decreasing-speciation and increasing-extinction model(BOTHVAR).Ancestral range reconstruction was conducted using the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis model.Results: A constant-diversification-rate(CONSTANT) model best quantified the historical speciation patterns of this avian assemblage through model selection. Clade age and species richness are significantly and positively correlated. The most recent common ancestor for Galliformes species was originally found in the disjunctive regions between Southeast Asia and North America. High-frequency dispersal events were identified across the whole evolutionary time.Conclusions: The constant diversification rate for global Galliforme species implied that there were no diversification rate-shifting trends for Galliformes species. The present study may contribute to the understanding of the ecology and diversity patterns of Galliformes from the perspective of historical biogeography, although some limitations existed.

  14. Evidence for Ancestral Programming of Resilience in a Two-Hit Stress Model

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    Jamshid Faraji

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In a continuously stressful environment, the effects of recurrent prenatal stress (PS may accumulate across generations and alter stress vulnerability and resilience. Here, we report in female rats that a family history of recurrent ancestral PS facilitates certain aspects of movement performance, and that these benefits are abolished by the experience of a second hit, induced by a silent ischemia during adulthood. Female F4-generation rats with and without a family history of cumulative multigenerational PS (MPS were tested for skilled motor function before and after the induction of a minor ischemic insult by endothelin-1 infusion into the primary motor cortex. MPS resulted in improved skilled motor abilities and blunted hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis function compared to non-stressed rats. Deep sequencing revealed downregulation of miR-708 in MPS rats along with upregulation of its predicted target genes Mapk10 and Rasd2. Through miR-708 stress may regulate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway activity. Hair trace elemental analysis revealed an increased Na/K ratio, which suggests a chronic shift in adrenal gland function. The ischemic lesion activated the HPA axis in MPS rats only; the lesion, however, abolished the advantage of MPS in skilled reaching. The findings indicate that MPS generates adaptive flexibility in movement, which is challenged by a second stressor, such as a neuropathological condition. Thus, a second “hit” by a stressor may limit behavioral flexibility and neural plasticity associated with ancestral stress.

  15. The mosaic of ancestral karyotype blocks in the Sinapis alba L. genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew N; Parkin, Isobel A P; Lydiate, Derek J

    2011-01-01

    The organisation of the Sinapis alba genome, comprising 12 linkage groups (n = 12), was compared with the Brassicaceae ancestral karyotype (AK) genomic blocks previously described in other crucifer species. Most of the S. alba genome falls into conserved triplicated genomic blocks that closely match the AK-defined genomic blocks found in other crucifer species including the A, B, and C genomes of closely related Brassica species. In one instance, an S. alba linkage group (S05) was completely collinear with one AK chromosome (AK1), the first time this has been observed in a member of the Brassiceae tribe. However, as observed for other members of the Brassiceae tribe, ancestral genomic blocks were fragmented in the S. alba genome, supporting previously reported comparative chromosome painting describing rearrangements of the AK karyotype prior to the divergence of the Brassiceae from other crucifers. The presented data also refute previous phylogenetic reports that suggest S. alba was more closely related to Brassica nigra (B genome) than to B. rapa (A genome) and B. oleracea (C genome). A comparison of the S. alba and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes revealed many regions of conserved gene order, which will facilitate access to the rich genomic resources available in the model species A. thaliana for genetic research in the less well-resourced crop species S. alba.

  16. Ancestral Protein Reconstruction and Circular Permutation for Improving the Stability and Dynamic Range of FRET Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Ben E; Whitfield, Jason H; Sanchez-Romero, Inmaculada; Herde, Michel K; Henneberger, Christian; Janovjak, Harald; Jackson, Colin J

    2017-01-01

    Small molecule biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) enable small molecule signaling to be monitored with high spatial and temporal resolution in complex cellular environments. FRET sensors can be constructed by fusing a pair of fluorescent proteins to a suitable recognition domain, such as a member of the solute-binding protein (SBP) superfamily. However, naturally occurring SBPs may be unsuitable for incorporation into FRET sensors due to their low thermostability, which may preclude imaging under physiological conditions, or because the positions of their N- and C-termini may be suboptimal for fusion of fluorescent proteins, which may limit the dynamic range of the resulting sensors. Here, we show how these problems can be overcome using ancestral protein reconstruction and circular permutation. Ancestral protein reconstruction, used as a protein engineering strategy, leverages phylogenetic information to improve the thermostability of proteins, while circular permutation enables the termini of an SBP to be repositioned to maximize the dynamic range of the resulting FRET sensor. We also provide a protocol for cloning the engineered SBPs into FRET sensor constructs using Golden Gate assembly and discuss considerations for in situ characterization of the FRET sensors.

  17. Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreadbury, Ian

    2012-01-01

    A novel hypothesis of obesity is suggested by consideration of diet-related inflammation and evolutionary medicine. The obese homeostatically guard their elevated weight. In rodent models of high-fat diet-induced obesity, leptin resistance is seen initially at vagal afferents, blunting the actions of satiety mediators, then centrally, with gastrointestinal bacterial-triggered SOCS3 signaling implicated. In humans, dietary fat and fructose elevate systemic lipopolysaccharide, while dietary glucose also strongly activates SOCS3 signaling. Crucially however, in humans, low-carbohydrate diets spontaneously decrease weight in a way that low-fat diets do not. Furthermore, nutrition transition patterns and the health of those still eating diverse ancestral diets with abundant food suggest that neither glycemic index, altered fat, nor carbohydrate intake can be intrinsic causes of obesity, and that human energy homeostasis functions well without Westernized foods containing flours, sugar, and refined fats. Due to being made up of cells, virtually all “ancestral foods” have markedly lower carbohydrate densities than flour- and sugar-containing foods, a property quite independent of glycemic index. Thus the “forgotten organ” of the gastrointestinal microbiota is a prime candidate to be influenced by evolutionarily unprecedented postprandial luminal carbohydrate concentrations. The present hypothesis suggests that in parallel with the bacterial effects of sugars on dental and periodontal health, acellular flours, sugars, and processed foods produce an inflammatory microbiota via the upper gastrointestinal tract, with fat able to effect a “double hit” by increasing systemic absorption of lipopolysaccharide. This model is consistent with a broad spectrum of reported dietary phenomena. A diet of grain-free whole foods with carbohydrate from cellular tubers, leaves, and fruits may produce a gastrointestinal microbiota consistent with our evolutionary condition

  18. Molecular characterization of tat gene and long terminal repeat region of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 detected among the injecting drug users (IDUs) of Manipur, India: identification of BC recombinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullick, Ranajoy; Sengupta, Satarupa; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2010-02-01

    The tat gene of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) is responsible for the initiation and elongation of viral transcription through the LTR (long terminal repeat) transactivation process. Our study included structural and functional analyses of the tat gene and LTR region of 35 injecting drug users (IDUs) from Manipur (a north-eastern state in India and a potential source of HIV-1 recombinants) in order to search for the recombinants and variation in the transactivation process if any due to recombination. Analysis showed prevalence of subtype C with few BC recombinants for the tat gene showing identical recombination breakpoints. Phylogenetic analysis of the LTR region of those IDU strains showed strong resemblance to Indian subtype C forming a completely separate cluster from the other global C LTR sequences. The TAR element (transactivator response region) in all the LTR sequences was fairly conserved. Further study of the transactivation rate of the C and BC tat for the Manipur C LTR showed almost equal transactivity in both the cases. This is the first report of characterisation of tat gene and LTR region of HIV-1 samples among IDUs from north-eastern India.

  19. Assessment of the safety of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin: reverse mutation assay, acute and 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity in rats, and acute no-effect level for diarrhea in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yuko; Kishimoto, Yuka; Tagami, Hiroyuki; Kanahori, Sumiko

    2013-01-01

    A series of safety assessments were performed on hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin prepared by converting the reducing terminal glucose of resistant maltodextrin into sorbitol. The reverse mutation assay did not show mutagenicity. Acute and 90-day subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats showed no death was observed in any groups, including the group receiving the highest single dose of 10 g/kg body weight or the highest dose of 5 g/kg body weight per day for 90 days. Mucous or watery stools were observed in the hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin treatment group on the acute study, which were transient and were associated with the osmotic pressure caused by intake of the high concentrations. Subchronic study showed dose-dependent increases in the weights of cecum alone, cecal contents alone, and cecum with cecal contents as well as hypertrophy of the cecal mucosal epithelium, which are considered to be common physiological responses after intake of indigestible carbohydrates. These results indicated that the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin was 10 g/kg body weight or more on the acute oral toxicity study and 5.0 g/kg body weight/day or more on the 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity study in rats. Further study performed in healthy adult humans showed that the acute no-effect level of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin for diarrhea was 0.8 g/kg body weight for men and more than 1.0 g/kg body weight for women. The results of the current safety assessment studies suggest that hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin is safe for human consumption.

  20. Use of multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) to investigate genetic diversity of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from human, food, and veterinary sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateva, Gergana; Pedersen, Karl; Sørensen, Gitte; Asseva, Galina; Daskalov, Hristo; Petrov, Petar; Kantardjiev, Todor; Alexandar, Irina; Löfström, Charlotta

    2017-08-23

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium is the most common zoonotic pathogen in Bulgaria. To allow efficient outbreak investigations and surveillance in the food chain, accurate and discriminatory methods for typing are needed. This study evaluated the use of multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) and compared results with antimicrobial resistance (AMR) determinations for 100 S. Typhimurium strains isolated in Bulgaria during 2008-2012 (50 veterinary/food and 50 human isolates). Results showed that isolates were divided into 80 and 34 groups using MLVA and AMR, respectively. Simpson's index of diversity was determined to 0.994 ± 0.003 and 0.945 ± 0.012. The most frequently encountered MLVA profiles were 3-11-9-NA-211 (n = 5); 3-12-9-NA-211 (n = 3); 3-12-11-21-311 (n = 3); 3-17-10-NA-311 (n = 3); 2-20-9-7-212 (n = 3); and 2-23-NA-NA-111 (n = 3). No clustering of isolates related to susceptibility/resistance to antimicrobials, source of isolation, or year of isolation was observed. Some MLVA types were found in both human and veterinary/food isolates, indicating a possible route of transmission. A majority (83%) of the isolates were found to be resistant against at least one antimicrobial and 44% against ≥4 antimicrobials. Further studies are needed to verify MLVA usefulness over a longer period of time and with more isolates, including outbreak strains. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Change Detection Advantage for Animals: An Effect of Ancestral Priorities or Progeny of Experimental Design?

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    Thomas Hagen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The “animate monitoring” hypothesis proposes that humans are evolutionarily predisposed to recruit attention toward animals. Support for this has repeatedly been obtained through the change detection paradigm where animals are detected faster than artifacts. The present study shows that the advantage for animals does not stand up to more rigorous experimental controls. Experiment 1 used artificially generated change detection scenes and counterbalanced identical target objects across two sets of scenes. Results showed that detection performance is determined more by the surrounding scene than semantic category. Experiment 2 used photographs from the original studies and replaced the target animals with artifacts in the exact same locations, such that the surrounding scene was kept constant while manipulating the target category. Results replicated the original studies when photos were not manipulated but agreed with the findings of our first experiment in that the advantage shifted to the artifacts when object categories replaced each other in the original scenes. A third experiment used inverted and blurred images so as to disrupt high-level perception but failed to erase the advantage for animals. Hence, the present set of results questions whether the supposed attentional advantage for animals can be supported by evidence from the change detection paradigm.

  2. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

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    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  3. Independent intrachromosomal recombination events underlie the pericentric inversions of chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes homologous to human chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goidts, Violaine; Szamalek, Justyna M; de Jong, Pieter J; Cooper, David N; Chuzhanova, Nadia; Hameister, Horst; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2005-09-01

    Analyses of chromosomal rearrangements that have occurred during the evolution of the hominoids can reveal much about the mutational mechanisms underlying primate chromosome evolution. We characterized the breakpoints of the pericentric inversion of chimpanzee chromosome 18 (PTR XVI), which is homologous to human chromosome 16 (HSA 16). A conserved 23-kb inverted repeat composed of satellites, LINE and Alu elements was identified near the breakpoints and could have mediated the inversion by bringing the chromosomal arms into close proximity with each other, thereby facilitating intrachromosomal recombination. The exact positions of the breakpoints may then have been determined by local DNA sequence homologies between the inversion breakpoints, including a 22-base pair direct repeat. The similarly located pericentric inversion of gorilla (GGO) chromosome XVI, was studied by FISH and PCR analysis. The p- and q-arm breakpoints of the inversions in PTR XVI and GGO XVI were found to occur at slightly different locations, consistent with their independent origin. Further, FISH studies of the homologous chromosomal regions in macaque and orangutan revealed that the region represented by HSA BAC RP11-696P19, which spans the inversion breakpoint on HSA 16q11-12, was derived from the ancestral primate chromosome homologous to HSA 1. After the divergence of orangutan from the other great apes approximately 12 million years ago (Mya), a duplication of the corresponding region occurred followed by its interchromosomal transposition to the ancestral chromosome 16q. Thus, the most parsimonious interpretation is that the gorilla and chimpanzee homologs exhibit similar but nonidentical derived pericentric inversions, whereas HSA 16 represents the ancestral form among hominoids.

  4. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  5. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  6. REPdenovo: Inferring De Novo Repeat Motifs from Short Sequence Reads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Chu

    Full Text Available Repeat elements are important components of eukaryotic genomes. One limitation in our understanding of repeat elements is that most analyses rely on reference genomes that are incomplete and often contain missing data in highly repetitive regions that are difficult to assemble. To overcome this problem we develop a new method, REPdenovo, which assembles repeat sequences directly from raw shotgun sequencing data. REPdenovo can construct various types of repeats that are highly repetitive and have low sequence divergence within copies. We show that REPdenovo is substantially better than existing methods both in terms of the number and the completeness of the repeat sequences that it recovers. The key advantage of REPdenovo is that it can reconstruct long repeats from sequence reads. We apply the method to human data and discover a number of potentially new repeats sequences that have been missed by previous repeat annotations. Many of these sequences are incorporated into various parasite genomes, possibly because the filtering process for host DNA involved in the sequencing of the parasite genomes failed to exclude the host derived repeat sequences. REPdenovo is a new powerful computational tool for annotating genomes and for addressing questions regarding the evolution of repeat families. The software tool, REPdenovo, is available for download at https://github.com/Reedwarbler/REPdenovo.

  7. Toward more accurate ancestral protein genotype-phenotype reconstructions with the use of species tree-aware gene trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussin, Mathieu; Hobbs, Joanne K; Szöllősi, Gergely J; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Arcus, Vickery L; Gouy, Manolo

    2015-01-01

    The resurrection of ancestral proteins provides direct insight into how natural selection has shaped proteins found in nature. By tracing substitutions along a gene phylogeny, ancestral proteins can be reconstructed in silico and subsequently synthesized in vitro. This elegant strategy reveals the complex mechanisms responsible for the evolution of protein functions and structures. However, to date, all protein resurrection studies have used simplistic approaches for ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR), including the assumption that a single sequence alignment alone is sufficient to accurately reconstruct the history of the gene family. The impact of such shortcuts on conclusions about ancestral functions has not been investigated. Here, we show with simulations that utilizing information on species history using a model that accounts for the duplication, horizontal transfer, and loss (DTL) of genes statistically increases ASR accuracy. This underscores the importance of the tree topology in the inference of putative ancestors. We validate our in silico predictions using in vitro resurrection of the LeuB enzyme for the ancestor of the Firmicutes, a major and ancient bacterial phylum. With this particular protein, our experimental results demonstrate that information on the species phylogeny results in a biochemically more realistic and kinetically more stable ancestral protein. Additional resurrection experiments with different proteins are necessary to statistically quantify the impact of using species tree-aware gene trees on ancestral protein phenotypes. Nonetheless, our results suggest the need for incorporating both sequence and DTL information in future studies of protein resurrections to accurately define the genotype-phenotype space in which proteins diversify.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferases in opisthokonts reveals unexpected ancestral complexity and novel modern biosynthetic components.

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    Heather C Smart

    Full Text Available Glycerolipid synthesis represents a central metabolic process of all forms of life. In the last decade multiple genes coding for enzymes responsible for the first step of the pathway, catalyzed by glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, have been described, and characterized primarily in model organisms like Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mice. Notoriously, the fungal enzymes share low sequence identity with their known animal counterparts, and the nature of their homology is unclear. Furthermore, two mitochondrial GPAT isoforms have been described in animal cells, while no such enzymes have been identified in Fungi. In order to determine if the yeast and mammalian GPATs are representative of the set of enzymes present in their respective groups, and to test the hypothesis that metazoan orthologues are indeed absent from the fungal clade, a comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis was performed including organisms spanning the breadth of the Opisthokonta supergroup. Surprisingly, our study unveiled the presence of 'fungal' orthologs in the basal taxa of the holozoa and 'animal' orthologues in the basal holomycetes. This includes a novel clade of fungal homologues, with putative peroxisomal targeting signals, of the mitochondrial/peroxisomal acyltransferases in Metazoa, thus potentially representing an undescribed metabolic capacity in the Fungi. The overall distribution of GPAT homologues is suggestive of high relative complexity in the ancestors of the opisthokont clade, followed by loss and sculpting of the complement in the descendent lineages. Divergence from a general versatile metabolic model, present in ancestrally deduced GPAT complements, points to distinctive contributions of each GPAT isoform to lipid metabolism and homeostasis in contemporary organisms like humans and their fungal pathogens.

  9. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  10. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  11. A phenol-enriched cuticle is ancestral to lignin evolution in land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Hugues; Alber, Annette; Horst, Nelly A.; Basilio Lopes, Alexandra; Fich, Eric A.; Kriegshauser, Lucie; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Ullmann, Pascaline; Herrgott, Laurence; Erhardt, Mathieu; Pineau, Emmanuelle; Ehlting, Jürgen; Schmitt, Martine; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Reski, Ralf; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2017-01-01

    Lignin, one of the most abundant biopolymers on Earth, derives from the plant phenolic metabolism. It appeared upon terrestrialization and is thought critical for plant colonization of land. Early diverging land plants do not form lignin, but already have elements of its biosynthetic machinery. Here we delete in a moss the P450 oxygenase that defines the entry point in angiosperm lignin metabolism, and find that its pre-lignin pathway is essential for development. This pathway does not involve biochemical regulation via shikimate coupling, but instead is coupled with ascorbate catabolism, and controls the synthesis of the moss cuticle, which prevents desiccation and organ fusion. These cuticles share common features with lignin, cutin and suberin, and may represent the extant representative of a common ancestor. Our results demonstrate a critical role for the ancestral phenolic metabolism in moss erect growth and cuticle permeability, consistent with importance in plant adaptation to terrestrial conditions. PMID:28270693

  12. Novel ancestral Dysferlin splicing mutation which migrated from the Iberian peninsula to South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernengo, Luis; Oliveira, Jorge; Krahn, Martin; Vieira, Emilia; Santos, Rosário; Carrasco, Luisa; Negrão, Luís; Panuncio, Ana; Leturcq, France; Labelle, Veronique; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Mesa, Rosario; Pizzarossa, Carlos; Lévy, Nicolas; Rodriguez, Maria-Mirta

    2011-05-01

    Primary dysferlinopathies are a group of recessive heterogeneous muscular dystrophies. The most common clinical presentations are Miyoshi myopathy and LGMD2B. Additional presentations range from isolated hyperCKemia to severe functional disability. Symptomatology begins in the posterior muscle compartment of the calf and its clinical course progresses slowly in Miyoshi myopathy whereas LGMD2B involves predominantly the proximal muscles of the lower limbs. The age of onset ranges from 13 to 60years in Caucasians. We present five patients that carry a novel mutation in the exon12/intron12 boundary: c.1180_1180+7delAGTGCGTG (r.1054_1284del). We provide evidence of a founder effect due to a common ancestral origin of this mutation, detected in heterozygosity in four patients and in homozygosity in one patient.

  13. On the ancestral compatibility of two phylogenetic trees with nested taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llabrés, Mercè; Rocha, Jairo; Rosselló, Francesc; Valiente, Gabriel

    2006-09-01

    Compatibility of phylogenetic trees is the most important concept underlying widely-used methods for assessing the agreement of different phylogenetic trees with overlapping taxa and combining them into common supertrees to reveal the tree of life. The notion of ancestral compatibility of phylogenetic trees with nested taxa was recently introduced. In this paper we analyze in detail the meaning of this compatibility from the points of view of the local structure of the trees, of the existence of embeddings into a common supertree, and of the joint properties of their cluster representations. Our analysis leads to a very simple polynomial-time algorithm for testing this compatibility, which we have implemented and is freely available for download from the BioPerl collection of Perl modules for computational biology.

  14. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  15. Genes Suggest Ancestral Colour Polymorphisms Are Shared across Morphologically Cryptic Species in Arctic Bumblebees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H Williams

    Full Text Available Our grasp of biodiversity is fine-tuned through the process of revisionary taxonomy. If species do exist in nature and can be discovered with available techniques, then we expect these revisions to converge on broadly shared interpretations of species. But for the primarily arctic bumblebees of the subgenus Alpinobombus of the genus Bombus, revisions by some of the most experienced specialists are unusual for bumblebees in that they have all reached different conclusions on the number of species present. Recent revisions based on skeletal morphology have concluded that there are from four to six species, while variation in colour pattern of the hair raised questions as to whether at least seven species might be present. Even more species are supported if we accept the recent move away from viewing species as morphotypes to viewing them instead as evolutionarily independent lineages (EILs using data from genes. EILs are recognised here in practice from the gene coalescents that provide direct evidence for their evolutionary independence. We show from fitting both general mixed Yule/coalescent (GMYC models and Poisson-tree-process (PTP models to data for the mitochondrial COI gene that there is support for nine species in the subgenus Alpinobombus. Examination of the more slowly evolving nuclear PEPCK gene shows further support for a previously unrecognised taxon as a new species in northwestern North America. The three pairs of the most morphologically similar sister species are separated allopatrically and prevented from interbreeding by oceans. We also find that most of the species show multiple shared colour patterns, giving the appearance of mimicry among parts of the different species. However, reconstructing ancestral colour-pattern states shows that speciation is likely to have cut across widespread ancestral polymorphisms, without or largely without convergence. In the particular case of Alpinobombus, morphological, colour-pattern, and

  16. Ancestral state reconstruction by comparative analysis of a GRN kernel operating in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkenbrack, Eric M; Ako-Asare, Kayla; Miller, Emily; Tekelenburg, Saira; Thompson, Jeffrey R; Romano, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Diverse sampling of organisms across the five major classes in the phylum Echinodermata is beginning to reveal much about the structure and function of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) in development and evolution. Sea urchins are the most studied clade within this phylum, and recent work suggests there has been dramatic rewiring at the top of the skeletogenic GRN along the lineage leading to extant members of the euechinoid sea urchins. Such rewiring likely accounts for some of the observed developmental differences between the two major subclasses of sea urchins-cidaroids and euechinoids. To address effects of topmost rewiring on downstream GRN events, we cloned four downstream regulatory genes within the skeletogenic GRN and surveyed their spatiotemporal expression patterns in the cidaroid Eucidaris tribuloides. We performed phylogenetic analyses with homologs from other non-vertebrate deuterostomes and characterized their spatiotemporal expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WMISH). Our data suggest the erg-hex-tgif subcircuit, a putative GRN kernel, exhibits a mesoderm-specific expression pattern early in Eucidaris development that is directly downstream of the initial mesodermal GRN circuitry. Comparative analysis of the expression of this subcircuit in four echinoderm taxa allowed robust ancestral state reconstruction, supporting hypotheses that its ancestral function was to stabilize the mesodermal regulatory state and that it has been co-opted and deployed as a unit in mesodermal subdomains in distantly diverged echinoderms. Importantly, our study supports the notion that GRN kernels exhibit structural and functional modularity, locking down and stabilizing clade-specific, embryonic regulatory states.

  17. Evolutionary history of assassin bugs (insecta: hemiptera: Reduviidae: insights from divergence dating and ancestral state reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Song Hwang

    Full Text Available Assassin bugs are one of the most successful clades of predatory animals based on their species numbers (∼6,800 spp. and wide distribution in terrestrial ecosystems. Various novel prey capture strategies and remarkable prey specializations contribute to their appeal as a model to study evolutionary pathways involved in predation. Here, we reconstruct the most comprehensive reduviid phylogeny (178 taxa, 18 subfamilies to date based on molecular data (5 markers. This phylogeny tests current hypotheses on reduviid relationships emphasizing the polyphyletic Reduviinae and the blood-feeding, disease-vectoring Triatominae, and allows us, for the first time in assassin bugs, to reconstruct ancestral states of prey associations and microhabitats. Using a fossil-calibrated molecular tree, we estimated divergence times for key events in the evolutionary history of Reduviidae. Our results indicate that the polyphyletic Reduviinae fall into 11-14 separate clades. Triatominae are paraphyletic with respect to the reduviine genus Opisthacidius in the maximum likelihood analyses; this result is in contrast to prior hypotheses that found Triatominae to be monophyletic or polyphyletic and may be due to the more comprehensive taxon and character sampling in this study. The evolution of blood-feeding may thus have occurred once or twice independently among predatory assassin bugs. All prey specialists evolved from generalist ancestors, with multiple evolutionary origins of termite and ant specializations. A bark-associated life style on tree trunks is ancestral for most of the lineages of Higher Reduviidae; living on foliage has evolved at least six times independently. Reduviidae originated in the Middle Jurassic (178 Ma, but significant lineage diversification only began in the Late Cretaceous (97 Ma. The integration of molecular phylogenetics with fossil and life history data as presented in this paper provides insights into the evolutionary history of

  18. Magmatism and Epithermal Gold-Silver Deposits of the Southern Ancestral Cascade Arc, Western Nevada and Eastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, David A.; du Bray, Edward A.; Henry, Christopher D.; Vikre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Many epithermal gold-silver deposits are temporally and spatially associated with late Oligocene to Pliocene magmatism of the southern ancestral Cascade arc in western Nevada and eastern California. These deposits, which include both quartz-adularia (low- and intermediate-sulfidation; Comstock Lode, Tonopah, Bodie) and quartz-alunite (high-sulfidation; Goldfield, Paradise Peak) types, were major producers of gold and silver. Ancestral Cascade arc magmatism preceded that of the modern High Cascades arc and reflects subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America. Ancestral arc magmatism began about 45 Ma, continued until about 3 Ma, and extended from near the Canada-United States border in Washington southward to about 250 km southeast of Reno, Nevada. The ancestral arc was split into northern and southern segments across an inferred tear in the subducting slab between Mount Shasta and Lassen Peak in northern California. The southern segment extends between 42°N in northern California and 37°N in western Nevada and was active from about 30 to 3 Ma. It is bounded on the east by the northeast edge of the Walker Lane. Ancestral arc volcanism represents an abrupt change in composition and style of magmatism relative to that in central Nevada. Large volume, caldera-forming, silicic ignimbrites associated with the 37 to 19 Ma ignimbrite flareup are dominant in central Nevada, whereas volcanic centers of the ancestral arc in western Nevada consist of andesitic stratovolcanoes and dacitic to rhyolitic lava domes that mostly formed between 25 and 4 Ma. Both ancestral arc and ignimbrite flareup magmatism resulted from rollback of the shallowly dipping slab that began about 45 Ma in northeast Nevada and migrated south-southwest with time. Most southern segment ancestral arc rocks have oxidized, high potassium, calc-alkaline compositions with silica contents ranging continuously from about 55 to 77 wt%. Most lavas are porphyritic and contain coarse plagioclase

  19. Complementary innate (anti-A-specific) IgM emerging from ontogenic O-GalNAc-transferase depletion: (Innate IgM complementarity residing in ancestral antigen completeness).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The murine and the human genome have global properties in common. So the murine anti-A-specific complementary IgM and related human innate isoagglutinin represent developmental, 2-mercaptoethanol-sensitive, complement-binding glycoproteins, which do not arise from any measurable environmentally-induced or auto- immune response. The murine anti-A certainly originates from a cell surface- or cell adhesion molecule, which in the course of germ cell development becomes devoid of O-GalNAc-transferase and is released into the circulation. In human sera the enzyme occurs exclusively in those of blood group A- and AB subjects, while in group O(H) an identically encoded protein lets expect an opposite function and appears in conjunction with a complementary anti-A reactive glycoprotein. Since O-glycosylations rule the carbohydrate metabolism in growth and reproduction processes, we propose that the ancestral histo-(blood)-group A molecule arises in the course of O-GalNAc-glycosylations of glycolipids and protein envelops at progenitor cell surfaces. Germ cell development postulates embryonic stem cell fidelity, which is characterised by persistent production of α-linked O-GalNAc-glycans. They are determined by the A-allele within the human, "complete" histo (blood) group AB(O) structure that in early ontogeny is hypothesised to be synthesised independently from the final phenotype. The structure either passes "completely" through the germline, in transferase-secreting mature tissues becoming the "complete" phenotype AB, or disappears in exhaustive glycotransferase depletion from the differentiating cell surfaces and leaves behind the "incomplete" blood group O-phenotype, which has released a transferase- and O-glycan-depleted, complementary glycoprotein (IgM) into the circulation. The process implies, that in humans the different blood phenotypes evolve from a "complete" AB(O) molecular complex in a distinct enzymatic and/or complement cascade suggesting O

  20. CTG trinucleotide repeat "big jumps": large expansions, small mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Gomes-Pereira

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeat expansions are the genetic cause of numerous human diseases, including fragile X mental retardation, Huntington disease, and myotonic dystrophy type 1. Disease severity and age of onset are critically linked to expansion size. Previous mouse models of repeat instability have not recreated large intergenerational expansions ("big jumps", observed when the repeat is transmitted from one generation to the next, and have never attained the very large tract lengths possible in humans. Here, we describe dramatic intergenerational CTG*CAG repeat expansions of several hundred repeats in a transgenic mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1, resulting in increasingly severe phenotypic and molecular abnormalities. Homozygous mice carrying over 700 trinucleotide repeats on both alleles display severely reduced body size and splicing abnormalities, notably in the central nervous system. Our findings demonstrate that large intergenerational trinucleotide repeat expansions can be recreated in mice, and endorse the use of transgenic mouse models to refine our understanding of triplet repeat expansion and the resulting pathogenesis.

  1. Histone deacetylase complexes promote trinucleotide repeat expansions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Debacker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of DNA trinucleotide repeats cause at least 17 inherited neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington's disease. Expansions can occur at frequencies approaching 100% in affected families and in transgenic mice, suggesting that specific cellular proteins actively promote (favor expansions. The inference is that expansions arise due to the presence of these promoting proteins, not their absence, and that interfering with these proteins can suppress expansions. The goal of this study was to identify novel factors that promote expansions. We discovered that specific histone deacetylase complexes (HDACs promote CTG•CAG repeat expansions in budding yeast and human cells. Mutation or inhibition of yeast Rpd3L or Hda1 suppressed up to 90% of expansions. In cultured human astrocytes, expansions were suppressed by 75% upon inhibition or knockdown of HDAC3, whereas siRNA against the histone acetyltransferases CBP/p300 stimulated expansions. Genetic and molecular analysis both indicated that HDACs act at a distance from the triplet repeat to promote expansions. Expansion assays with nuclease mutants indicated that Sae2 is one of the relevant factors regulated by Rpd3L and Hda1. The causal relationship between HDACs and expansions indicates that HDACs can promote mutagenesis at some DNA sequences. This relationship further implies that HDAC3 inhibitors being tested for relief of expansion-associated gene silencing may also suppress somatic expansions that contribute to disease progression.

  2. Transcriptional landscape of ncRNA and Repeat elements in somatic cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosheh, Yanal

    2016-12-01

    The advancement of Nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) sequencing technology has enabled many projects targeted towards the identification of genome structure and transcriptome complexity of organisms. The first conclusions of the human and mouse projects have underscored two important, yet unexpected, findings. First, while almost the entire genome is transcribed, only 5% of it encodes for proteins. Thereby, most transcripts are noncoding RNA. This includes both short RNA (<200 nucleotides (nt)) comprising piRNAs; microRNAs (miRNAs); endogenous Short Interfering RNAs (siRNAs) among others, and includes lncRNA (>200nt). Second, a significant portion of the mammalian genome (45%) is composed of Repeat Elements (REs). RE are mostly relics of ancestral viruses that during evolution have invaded the host genome by producing thousands of copies. Their roles within their host genomes have yet to be fully explored considering that they sometimes produce lncRNA, and have been shown to influence expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Moreover, because some REs can still mobilize within host genomes, host genomes have evolved mechanisms, mainly epigenetic, to maintain REs under tight control. Recent reports indicate that REs activity is regulated in somatic cells, particularily in the brain, suggesting a physiological role of RE mobilization during normal development. In this thesis, I focus on the analysis of ncRNAs, specifically REs; piRNAs; lncRNAs in human and mouse post-mitotic somatic cells. The main aspects of this analysis are: Using sRNA-Seq, I show that piRNAs, a class of ncRNAs responsible for the silencing of Transposable elements (TEs) in testes, are present also in adult mouse brain. Furthermore, their regulation shows only a subset of testes piRNAs are expressed in the brain and may be controlled by known neurogenesis factors. To investigate the dynamics of the transcriptome during cellular differentiation, I examined deep RNA-Seq and Cap

  3. Intersection of opposing pedagogical frameworks: Native Hawaiian ancestral stories and scientific inquiry in a high school science class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanahele-Mossman, Huihui

    Inquiry is defined as "an examination into facts and principles." In science education science inquiry is a process through which important discoveries are made by students through scientific methodology. The most important step in this process is forming the right question. The questions formed by students are usually the wrong questions which deem the remainder of the inquiry process impotent. This research will look at the pedagogy of ancestral stories for a solution. For the researcher, ancestral stories were a source of wonderment and learning not only from the lessons the stories revealed but mainly from the questions that still remained after the stories were told. Questions such as "why does the eel only swim near that part?", or "why does the story only talk about the uhu?" are examples of questions that remained after experiencing an ancestral narrative. The research questions were composed for the purpose of finding compatibility between the two pedagogies. The first research question which reads "how can Native Hawaiian ancestral stories encourage an increased level of student driven interactions at all levels of feedback from Native Hawaiian students in science classroom" focuses the research on the level of student feedback that initiate questions. Question two which reads "how can teachers of Native Hawaiian students facilitate the construction of science inquiry projects from ancestral stories" addresses the skill of the teacher and imbeds the concept of pedagogical knowledge into the literature. The last research question "how do analysis and discussion of the stories connect Native Hawaiian students to their ancestral intelligence" examines the role of identity and identity to ancestral intelligence. The method intended for this research was Grounded theory which allows the researcher to develop principles, concepts and theories based on the data presented. Another method utilized in this research is an undocumented but culturally imbedded method

  4. Analysis of repeated measures data

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M Ataharul

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad range of statistical techniques to address emerging needs in the field of repeated measures. It also provides a comprehensive overview of extensions of generalized linear models for the bivariate exponential family of distributions, which represent a new development in analysing repeated measures data. The demand for statistical models for correlated outcomes has grown rapidly recently, mainly due to presence of two types of underlying associations: associations between outcomes, and associations between explanatory variables and outcomes. The book systematically addresses key problems arising in the modelling of repeated measures data, bearing in mind those factors that play a major role in estimating the underlying relationships between covariates and outcome variables for correlated outcome data. In addition, it presents new approaches to addressing current challenges in the field of repeated measures and models based on conditional and joint probabilities. Markov models of first...

  5. Analysis on the reconstruction accuracy of the Fitch method for inferring ancestral states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünewald Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As one of the most widely used parsimony methods for ancestral reconstruction, the Fitch method minimizes the total number of hypothetical substitutions along all branches of a tree to explain the evolution of a character. Due to the extensive usage of this method, it has become a scientific endeavor in recent years to study the reconstruction accuracies of the Fitch method. However, most studies are restricted to 2-state evolutionary models and a study for higher-state models is needed since DNA sequences take the format of 4-state series and protein sequences even have 20 states. Results In this paper, the ambiguous and unambiguous reconstruction accuracy of the Fitch method are studied for N-state evolutionary models. Given an arbitrary phylogenetic tree, a recurrence system is first presented to calculate iteratively the two accuracies. As complete binary tree and comb-shaped tree are the two extremal evolutionary tree topologies according to balance, we focus on the reconstruction accuracies on these two topologies and analyze their asymptotic properties. Then, 1000 Yule trees with 1024 leaves are generated and analyzed to simulate real evolutionary scenarios. It is known that more taxa not necessarily increase the reconstruction accuracies under 2-state models. The result under N-state models is also tested. Conclusions In a large tree with many leaves, the reconstruction accuracies of using all taxa are sometimes less than those of using a leaf subset under N-state models. For complete binary trees, there always exists an equilibrium interval [a, b] of conservation probability, in which the limiting ambiguous reconstruction accuracy equals to the probability of randomly picking a state. The value b decreases with the increase of the number of states, and it seems to converge. When the conservation probability is greater than b, the reconstruction accuracies of the Fitch method increase rapidly. The reconstruction

  6. Owenia fusiformis - a basally branching annelid suitable for studying ancestral features of annelid neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Conrad; Vöcking, Oliver; Kourtesis, Ioannis; Hausen, Harald

    2016-06-16

    Comparative investigations on bilaterian neurogenesis shed light on conserved developmental mechanisms across taxa. With respect to annelids, most studies focus on taxa deeply nested within the annelid tree, while investigations on early branching groups are almost lacking. According to recent phylogenomic data on annelid evolution Oweniidae represent one of the basally branching annelid clades. Oweniids are thought to exhibit several plesiomorphic characters, but are scarcely studied - a fact that might be caused by the unique morphology and unusual metamorphosis of the mitraria larva, which seems to be hardly comparable to other annelid larva. In our study, we compare the development of oweniid neuroarchitecture with that of other annelids aimed to figure out whether oweniids may represent suitable study subjects to unravel ancestral patterns of annelid neural development. Our study provides the first data on nervous system development in basally branching annelids. Based on histology, electron microscopy and immunohistochemical investigations we show that development and metamorphosis of the mitraria larva has many parallels to other annelids irrespective of the drastic changes in body shape during metamorphosis. Such significant changes ensuing metamorphosis are mainly from diminution of a huge larval blastocoel and not from major restructuring of body organization. The larval nervous system features a prominent apical organ formed by flask-shaped perikarya and circumesophageal connectives that interconnect the apical and trunk nervous systems, in addition to serially arranged clusters of perikarya showing 5-HT-LIR in the ventral nerve cord, and lateral nerves. Both 5-HT-LIR and FMRFamide-LIR are present in a distinct nerve ring underlying the equatorial ciliary band. The connections arising from these cells innervate the circumesophageal connectives as well as the larval brain via dorsal and ventral neurites. Notably, no distinct somata with 5-HT -LIR in the

  7. The effect of sex on the repeatability of evolution in different environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachapelle, Josianne; Colegrave, Nick

    2017-04-01

    The adaptive function of sex has been extensively studied, while less consideration has been given to the potential downstream consequences of sex on evolution. Here, we investigate one such potential consequence, the effect of sex on the repeatability of evolution. By affecting the repeatability of evolution, sex could have important implications for biodiversity, and for our ability to make predictions about the outcome of environmental change. We allowed asexual and sexual populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to evolve in novel environments and monitored both their change in fitness and variance in fitness after evolution. Sex affected the repeatability of evolution by changing the importance of the effect of selection, chance, and ancestral constraints on the outcome of the evolutionary process. In particular, the effects of sex were highly dependent on the initial genetic composition of the population and on the environment. Given the lack of a consistent effect of sex on repeatability across the environments used here, further studies to dissect in more detail the underlying reasons for these differences as well as studies in additional environments are required if we are to have a general understanding of the effects of sex on the repeatability of evolution. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Correction of Hirschsprung-Associated Mutations in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/Cas9, Restores Neural Crest Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Frank Pui-Ling; Lau, Sin-Ting; Wong, John Kwong-Leong; Gui, Hongsheng; Wang, Reeson Xu; Zhou, Tingwen; Lai, Wing Hon; Tse, Hung-Fat; Tam, Paul Kwong-Hang; Garcia-Barcelo, Maria-Mercedes; Ngan, Elly Sau-Wai

    2017-07-01

    Hirschsprung disease is caused by failure of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) to fully colonize the bowel, leading to bowel obstruction and megacolon. Heterozygous mutations in the coding region of the RET gene cause a severe form of Hirschsprung disease (total colonic aganglionosis). However, 80% of HSCR patients have short-segment Hirschsprung disease (S-HSCR), which has not been associated with genetic factors. We sought to identify mutations associated with S-HSCR, and used the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 gene editing system to determine how mutations affect ENCC function. We created induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from 1 patient with total colonic aganglionosis (with the G731del mutation in RET) and from 2 patients with S-HSCR (without a RET mutation), as well as RET(+/-) and RET(-/-) iPSCs. IMR90-iPSC cells were used as the control cell line. Migration and differentiation capacities of iPSC-derived ENCCs were analyzed in differentiation and migration assays. We searched for mutation(s) associated with S-HSCR by combining genetic and transcriptome data from patient blood- and iPSC-derived ENCCs, respectively. Mutations in the iPSCs were corrected using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. ENCCs derived from all iPSC lines, but not control iPSCs, had defects in migration and neuronal lineage differentiation. RET mutations were associated with differentiation and migration defects of ENCCs in vitro. Genetic and transcriptome analyses associated a mutation in the vinculin gene (VCL M209L) with S-HSCR. CRISPR/Cas9 correction of the RET G731del and VCL M209L mutations in iPSCs restored the differentiation and migration capacities of ENCCs. We identified mutations in VCL associated with S-HSCR. Correction of this mutation in iPSC using CRISPR/Cas9 editing, as well as the RET G731del mutation that causes Hirschsprung disease with total colonic aganglionosis, restored ENCC function. Our study demonstrates how human i

  9. Recombination dynamics of a human Y-chromosomal palindrome: rapid GC-biased gene conversion, multi-kilobase conversion tracts, and rare inversions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pille Hallast

    Full Text Available The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY includes eight large inverted repeats (palindromes in which arm-to-arm similarity exceeds 99.9%, due to gene conversion activity. Here, we studied one of these palindromes, P6, in order to illuminate the dynamics of the gene conversion process. We genotyped ten paralogous sequence variants (PSVs within the arms of P6 in 378 Y chromosomes whose evolutionary relationships within the SNP-defined Y phylogeny are known. This allowed the identification of 146 historical gene conversion events involving individual PSVs, occurring at a rate of 2.9-8.4×10(-4 events per generation. A consideration of the nature of nucleotide change and the ancestral state of each PSV showed that the conversion process was significantly biased towards the fixation of G or C nucleotides (GC-biased, and also towards the ancestral state. Determination of haplotypes by long-PCR allowed likely co-conversion of PSVs to be identified, and suggested that conversion tract lengths are large, with a mean of 2068 bp, and a maximum in excess of 9 kb. Despite the frequent formation of recombination intermediates implied by the rapid observed gene conversion activity, resolution via crossover is rare: only three inversions within P6 were detected in the sample. An analysis of chimpanzee and gorilla P6 orthologs showed that the ancestral state bias has existed in all three species, and comparison of human and chimpanzee sequences with the gorilla outgroup confirmed that GC bias of the conversion process has apparently been active in both the human and chimpanzee lineages.

  10. Instability of trinucleotidic repeats during chromatin remodeling in spermatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Olivier; Grégoire, Marie-Chantal; Arguin, Mélina; Brazeau, Marc-André; Leduc, Frédéric; Marois, Isabelle; Richter, Martin V; Boissonneault, Guylain

    2014-11-01

    Transient DNA breaks and evidence of DNA damage response have recently been reported during the chromatin remodeling process in haploid spermatids, creating a potential window of enhanced genetic instability. We used flow cytometry to achieve separation of differentiating spermatids into four highly purified populations using transgenic mice harboring 160 CAG repeats within exon 1 of the human Huntington disease gene (HTT). Trinucleotic repeat expansion was found to occur immediately following the chromatin remodeling steps, confirming the genetic instability of the process and pointing to the origin of paternal anticipation observed in some trinucleotidic repeats diseases.

  11. Linking SNPs to CAG repeat length in Huntington's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanzhao; Kennington, Lori A; Rosas, H Diana; Hersch, Steven; Cha, Jang-Ho; Zamore, Phillip D; Aronin, Neil

    2008-11-01

    Allele-specific silencing using small interfering RNAs targeting heterozygous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a promising therapy for human trinucleotide repeat diseases such as Huntington's disease. Linking SNP identities to the two HTT alleles, normal and disease-causing, is a prerequisite for allele-specific RNA interference. Here we describe a method, SNP linkage by circularization (SLiC), to identify linkage between CAG repeat length and nucleotide identity of heterozygous SNPs using Huntington's disease patient peripheral blood samples.

  12. PCR-free digital minisatellite tandem repeat genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuchao; Seo, Tae Seok

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrated a proof-of-concept for novel minisatellite tandem repeat typing, called PCR-free digital VNTR (variable number tandem repeat) typing, which is composed of three steps: a ligation reaction instead of PCR thermal cycling, magnetic bead-based solid-phase capture for purification, and an elongated sample stacking microcapillary electrophoresis (μCE) for sensitive digital coding of repeat number. We designed a 16-bp fluorescently labeled ligation probe which is complementary to a repeat unit of a biotinylated synthetic template mimicking the human D1S80 VNTR locus and is randomly hybridized with the minisatellite tandem repeats. A quick isothermal ligation reaction was followed to link the adjacent ligation probes on the DNA templates, and then the ligated products were purified by streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. After a denaturing step, a large amount of ligated products whose size difference was equivalent to the repeat unit were released and recovered. Through the elongated sample stacking μCE separation on a microdevice, the fluorescence signal of the ligated products was generated in the electropherogram and the peak number was directly counted which was exactly matched with the repeat number of VNTR locus. We could successfully identify the minisatellite tandem repeat number with only 5 fmol of DNA template in 30 min.

  13. Anomalously high variation in postnatal development is ancestral for dinosaurs but lost in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Christopher T.; Nesbitt, Sterling J.

    2016-12-01

    Compared with all other living reptiles, birds grow extremely fast and possess unusually low levels of intraspecific variation during postnatal development. It is now clear that birds inherited their high rates of growth from their dinosaurian ancestors, but the origin of the avian condition of low variation during development is poorly constrained. The most well-understood growth trajectories of later Mesozoic theropods (e.g., Tyrannosaurus, Allosaurus) show similarly low variation to birds, contrasting with higher variation in extant crocodylians. Here, we show that deep within Dinosauria, among the earliest-diverging dinosaurs, anomalously high intraspecific variation is widespread but then is lost in more derived theropods. This style of development is ancestral for dinosaurs and their closest relatives, and, surprisingly, this level of variation is far higher than in living crocodylians. Among early dinosaurs, this variation is widespread across Pangaea in the Triassic and Early Jurassic, and among early-diverging theropods (ceratosaurs), this variation is maintained for 165 million years to the end of the Cretaceous. Because the Late Triassic environment across Pangaea was volatile and heterogeneous, this variation may have contributed to the rise of dinosaurian dominance through the end of the Triassic Period.

  14. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral "Salicoid" Genome Duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-06-27

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the "salicoid" duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants.

  15. Nondecarboxylating and decarboxylating isocitrate dehydrogenases: oxalosuccinate reductase as an ancestral form of isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoshima, Miho; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2008-03-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus catalyzes the reduction of oxalosuccinate, which corresponds to the second step of the reductive carboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate in the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. In this study, the oxidation reaction catalyzed by H. thermophilus ICDH was kinetically analyzed. As a result, a rapid equilibrium random-order mechanism was suggested. The affinities of both substrates (isocitrate and NAD+) toward the enzyme were extremely low compared to other known ICDHs. The binding activities of isocitrate and NAD+ were not independent; rather, the binding of one substrate considerably promoted the binding of the other. A product inhibition assay demonstrated that NADH is a potent inhibitor, although 2-oxoglutarate did not exhibit an inhibitory effect. Further chromatographic analysis demonstrated that oxalosuccinate, rather than 2-oxoglutarate, is the reaction product. Thus, it was shown that H. thermophilus ICDH is a nondecarboxylating ICDH that catalyzes the conversion between isocitrate and oxalosuccinate by oxidation and reduction. This nondecarboxylating ICDH is distinct from well-known decarboxylating ICDHs and should be categorized as a new enzyme. Oxalosuccinate-reducing enzyme may be the ancestral form of ICDH, which evolved to the extant isocitrate oxidative decarboxylating enzyme by acquiring higher substrate affinities.

  16. Fixation Probability in a Two-Locus Model by the Ancestral Recombination–Selection Graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Sabin; Kermany, Amir R.

    2012-01-01

    We use the ancestral influence graph (AIG) for a two-locus, two-allele selection model in the limit of a large population size to obtain an analytic approximation for the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele A. We assume that this new mutant is introduced at a given locus into a finite population in which a previous mutant allele B is already segregating with a wild type at another linked locus. We deduce that the fixation probability increases as the recombination rate increases if allele A is either in positive epistatic interaction with B and allele B is beneficial or in no epistatic interaction with B and then allele A itself is beneficial. This holds at least as long as the recombination fraction and the selection intensity are small enough and the population size is large enough. In particular this confirms the Hill–Robertson effect, which predicts that recombination renders more likely the ultimate fixation of beneficial mutants at different loci in a population in the presence of random genetic drift even in the absence of epistasis. More importantly, we show that this is true from weak negative epistasis to positive epistasis, at least under weak selection. In the case of deleterious mutants, the fixation probability decreases as the recombination rate increases. This supports Muller’s ratchet mechanism to explain the accumulation of deleterious mutants in a population lacking recombination. PMID:22095080

  17. Ancestral gene duplication enabled the evolution of multifunctional cellulases in stick insects (Phasmatodea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelomi, Matan; Heckel, David G; Pauchet, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    The Phasmatodea (stick insects) have multiple, endogenous, highly expressed copies of glycoside hydrolase family 9 (GH9) genes. The purpose for retaining so many was unknown. We cloned and expressed the enzymes in transfected insect cell lines, and tested the individual proteins against different plant cell wall component poly- and oligosaccharides. Nearly all isolated enzymes were active against carboxymethylcellulose, however most could also degrade glucomannan, and some also either xylan or xyloglucan. The latter two enzyme groups were each monophyletic, suggesting the evolution of these novel substrate specificities in an early ancestor of the order. Such enzymes are highly unusual for Metazoa, for which no xyloglucanases had been reported. Phasmatodea gut extracts could degrade multiple plant cell wall components fully into sugar monomers, suggesting that enzymatic breakdown of plant cell walls by the entire Phasmatodea digestome may contribute to the Phasmatodea nutritional budget. The duplication and neofunctionalization of GH9s in the ancestral Phasmatodea may have enabled them to specialize as folivores and diverge from their omnivorous ancestors. The structural changes enabling these unprecedented activities in the cellulases require further study.

  18. Multiple chromosomal rearrangements structured the ancestral vertebrate Hox-bearing protochromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent J Lynch

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available While the proposal that large-scale genome expansions occurred early in vertebrate evolution is widely accepted, the exact mechanisms of the expansion--such as a single or multiple rounds of whole genome duplication, bloc chromosome duplications, large-scale individual gene duplications, or some combination of these--is unclear. Gene families with a single invertebrate member but four vertebrate members, such as the Hox clusters, provided early support for Ohno's hypothesis that two rounds of genome duplication (the 2R-model occurred in the stem lineage of extant vertebrates. However, despite extensive study, the duplication history of the Hox clusters has remained unclear, calling into question its usefulness in resolving the role of large-scale gene or genome duplications in early vertebrates. Here, we present a phylogenetic analysis of the vertebrate Hox clusters and several linked genes (the Hox "paralogon" and show that different phylogenies are obtained for Dlx and Col genes than for Hox and ErbB genes. We show that these results are robust to errors in phylogenetic inference and suggest that these competing phylogenies can be resolved if two chromosomal crossover events occurred in the ancestral vertebrate. These results resolve conflicting data on the order of Hox gene duplications and the role of genome duplication in vertebrate evolution and suggest that a period of genome reorganization occurred after genome duplications in early vertebrates.

  19. Ancestral origins of the prion protein gene D178N mutation in the Basque Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Ana B; Barreau, Christian; Coupry, Isabelle; Yagüe, Jordi; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Galdós-Alcelay, Luis; Ibáñez, Agustín; Digón, Antón; Fernández-Manchola, Ignacio; Goizet, Cyril; Castro, Azucena; Cuevas, Nerea; Alvarez-Alvarez, Maite; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Arveiler, Benoît; Zarranz, Juan J

    2005-06-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD) are familial prion diseases with autosomal dominant inheritance of the D178N mutation. FFI has been reported in at least 27 pedigrees around the world. Twelve apparently unrelated FFI and fCJD pedigrees with the characteristic D178N mutation have been reported in the Prion Diseases Registry of the Basque Country since 1993. The high incidence of familial prion diseases in this region may reflect a unique ancestral origin of the chromosome carrying this mutation. In order to investigate this putative founder effect, we developed "happy typing", a new approach to the happy mapping method, which consists of the physical isolation of large haploid genomic DNA fragments and their analysis by the Polymerase Chain Reaction in order to perform haplotypic analysis instead of pedigree analysis. Six novel microsatellite markers, located in a 150-kb genomic segment flanking the PRNP gene were characterized for typing haploid DNA fragments of 285 kb in size. A common haplotype was found in patients from the Basque region, strongly suggesting a founder effect. We propose that "happy typing" constitutes an efficient method for determining disease-associated haplotypes, since the analysis of a single affected individual per pedigree should provide sufficient evidence.

  20. Sandals as Icons: Representations in Ancestral Pueblo Rock Art and Effigies in Stone and Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polly Schaafsma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dating the late 1000s to the mid-1200s CE, petroglyphs of sandal images are among others that distinguish ancient Pueblo rock art in the San Juan and Little Colorado River drainages on the Colorado Plateau from Ancestral Pueblo rock art elsewhere across the Southwest. The sandal “track” also has counterparts  as effigies in stone and wood often found in ceremonial contexts in Pueblo sites. These representations reflect the sandal styles of the times, both plain in contour and the jog-toed variety, the latter characterized by a projection where the little toe is positioned. These representations are both plain and patterned,  as are their material sandal counterparts. Their significance  as symbolic icons is their dominant aspect, and a ritual meaning is implicit.  As a component of a symbol system that was radically altered after 1300 CE, however, there is no ethnographic information that provides clues as to the sandal icon’s meaning. While there is no significant pattern of its associations with other symbolic content in the petroglyph panels, in some western San Juan sites cases a relationship to the hunt can be inferred. It is suggested that the track itself could refer to a deity, a mythological hero, or the carver ’s social identity. In conclusion, however, no clear meaning of the images themselves is forthcoming, and further research beckons.

  1. Ancestral feeding state of ruminants reconsidered: earliest grazing adaptation claims a mixed condition for Cervidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azanza Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specialised leaf-eating is almost universally regarded as the ancestral state of all ruminants, yet little evidence can be cited in support of this assumption, apart from the fact that all early ruminants had low crowned cheek teeth. Instead, recent years have seen the emergence evidence contradicting the conventional view that low tooth crowns always indicate leaf-eating and high tooth crowns grass-eating. Results Here we report the results of two independent palaeodietary reconstructions for one of the earliest deer, Procervulus ginsburgi from the Early Miocene of Spain, suggesting that despite having lower tooth crowns than any living ruminant, this species included a significant proportion of grass in its diet. Conclusion The phylogenetic distribution of feeding styles strongly supports that leaf-grass mixed feeding was the original feeding style of deer, and that later dietary specialization on leaves or grass occurred independently in several lineages. Evidence for other ruminant clades suggests that facultative mixed feeding may in fact have been the primitive dietary state of the Ruminantia, which would have been morphologically expressed only under specific environmental factors.

  2. A PCA-based method for ancestral informative markers selection in structured populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Identification of population structure can help trace population histories and identify disease genes. Structured association (SA) is a commonly used approach for population structure identification and association mapping. A major issue with SA is that its performance greatly depends on the informa-tiveness and the numbers of ancestral informative markers (AIMs). Present major AIM selection meth-ods mostly require prior individual ancestry information, which is usually not available or uncertain in practice. To address this potential weakness, we herein develop a novel approach for AIM selection based on principle component analysis (PCA), which does not require prior ancestry information of study subjects. Our simulation and real genetic data analysis results suggest that, with equivalent AIMs, PCA-based selected AIMs can significantly increase the accuracy of inferred individual ancestries compared with traditionally randomly selected AIMs. Our method can easily be applied to whole genome data to select a set of highly informative AIMs in population structure, which can then be used to identify potential population structure and correct possible statistical biases caused by population stratification.

  3. Clinical and demographic factors and outcome of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in relation to population ancestral origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Benoît; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Boumédiene, Farid; Labrunie, Anaïs; Couratier, Philippe; Babron, Marie-Claude; Leutenegger, Anne Louise; Preux, Pierre Marie; Beghi, Ettore

    2016-03-01

    To review how the phenotype and outcome of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) change with variations in population ancestral origin (PAO). Knowledge of how PAO modifies ALS phenotype may provide important insight into the risk factors and pathogenic mechanisms of the disease. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature concerning differences in phenotype and outcome of ALS that relate to PAO. A review of 3111 records identified 78 population-based studies. The 40 that were included covered 40 geographical areas in 10 subcontinents. Around 12,700 ALS cases were considered. The results highlight the phenotypic heterogeneity of ALS at time of onset [age, sex ratio (SR), bulbar onset], age at diagnosis, occurrence of comorbidities in the first year after diagnosis, and outcome (survival). Subcontinent is a major explanatory factor for the variability of the ALS phenotype in population-based studies. Some markers of ALS phenotype were homogeneously distributed in western countries (SR, mean age at onset/diagnosis) but their distributions in other subcontinents were remarkably different. Other markers presented variations in European subcontinents (familial ALS, bulbar onset) and in other continents. As a consequence, ALS outcome strongly varied, with a median survival time from onset ranging from 24 months (Northern Europe) to 48 months (Central Asia). This review sets the scene for a collaborative study involving a wide international consortium to investigate, using a standard methodology, the link between ancestry, environment, and ALS phenotype.

  4. Transgenerational actions of environmental compounds on reproductive disease and identification of epigenetic biomarkers of ancestral exposures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Manikkam

    Full Text Available Environmental factors during fetal development can induce a permanent epigenetic change in the germ line (sperm that then transmits epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in the absence of any subsequent exposure. The epigenetic transgenerational actions of various environmental compounds and relevant mixtures were investigated with the use of a pesticide mixture (permethrin and insect repellant DEET, a plastic mixture (bisphenol A and phthalates, dioxin (TCDD and a hydrocarbon mixture (jet fuel, JP8. After transient exposure of F0 gestating female rats during the period of embryonic gonadal sex determination, the subsequent F1-F3 generations were obtained in the absence of any environmental exposure. The effects on the F1, F2 and F3 generations pubertal onset and gonadal function were assessed. The plastics, dioxin and jet fuel were found to promote early-onset female puberty transgenerationally (F3 generation. Spermatogenic cell apoptosis was affected transgenerationally. Ovarian primordial follicle pool size was significantly decreased with all treatments transgenerationally. Differential DNA methylation of the F3 generation sperm promoter epigenome was examined. Differential DNA methylation regions (DMR were identified in the sperm of all exposure lineage males and found to be consistent within a specific exposure lineage, but different between the exposures. Several genomic features of the DMR, such as low density CpG content, were identified. Exposure-specific epigenetic biomarkers were identified that may allow for the assessment of ancestral environmental exposures associated with adult onset disease.

  5. Mouthparts of the Burgess Shale fossils Odontogriphus and Wiwaxia: implications for the ancestral molluscan radula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin R

    2012-10-22

    The Middle Cambrian lophotrochozoans Odontogriphus omalus and Wiwaxia corrugata have been interpreted as stem-group members of either the Mollusca, the Annelida, or a group containing Mollusca + Annelida. The case for each classification rests on the organisms' unusual mouthparts, whose two to three tooth-rows resemble both the molluscan radula and the jaws of certain annelid worms. Despite their potential significance, these mouthparts have not previously been described in detail. This study examined the feeding apparatuses of over 300 specimens from the 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale, many of which were studied for the first time. Rather than denticulate plates, each tooth row comprises a single axial tooth that is flanked on each side by eight to 16 separate shoehorn-shaped teeth. Tooth rows sat on a grooved basal tongue, and two large lobes flanked the apparatus. New observations--the shape, distribution and articulation of the individual teeth, and the mouthparts' mode of growth--are incompatible with an annelid interpretation, instead supporting a classification in Mollusca. The ancestral molluscan radula is best reconstructed as unipartite with a symmetrical medial tooth, and Odontogriphus and Wiwaxia as grazing deposit-feeders.

  6. DNA replication fidelity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by an ancestral prokaryotic proofreader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Jeremy M; Lang, Ulla F; Chase, Michael R; Ford, Christopher B; Gerrick, Elias R; Gawande, Richa; Coscolla, Mireia; Gagneux, Sebastien; Fortune, Sarah M; Lamers, Meindert H

    2015-06-01

    The DNA replication machinery is an important target for antibiotic development in increasingly drug-resistant bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although blocking DNA replication leads to cell death, disrupting the processes used to ensure replication fidelity can accelerate mutation and the evolution of drug resistance. In Escherichia coli, the proofreading subunit of the replisome, the ɛ exonuclease, is essential for high-fidelity DNA replication; however, we find that the corresponding subunit is completely dispensable in M. tuberculosis. Rather, the mycobacterial replicative polymerase DnaE1 itself encodes an editing function that proofreads DNA replication, mediated by an intrinsic 3'-5' exonuclease activity within its PHP domain. Inactivation of the DnaE1 PHP domain increases the mutation rate by more than 3,000-fold. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of DNA replication proofreading in the bacterial kingdom suggests that E. coli is a phylogenetic outlier and that PHP domain-mediated proofreading is widely conserved and indeed may be the ancestral prokaryotic proofreader.

  7. The hypothetical ancestral animal. the Urmetazoa: telomerase activity in sponges (Porifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISABEL M. MÜLLER

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Sponges (Porifera represent the lowest metazoan phylum, characterized by a pronounced plasticity in the determination of cell lineages, and they are the closest related taxon to the hypothetical ancestral animal, the Urmetazoa, from which the metazoan lineages diverged. In a first approach to elucidate the molecular mechanisms controlling the switch from the cell lineage with a putative indefinite growth capacity to senescent, somatic cells, the activity of the telomerase as an indicator for immortality has been determined. The studies were performed with the marine demosponges Suberites domuncula and Geodia cydonium, in vivo with tissue but also in vitro using the primmorph system. Primmorphs are formed from dissociated cells which have retained their proliferation potency. It was found that the activity of telomerase in tissue of both sponges is high. Based on this and additional findings it is assumed that the separation of the senescent sponge cell lineage from the immortal germ-/somatic cell lineage is triggered by the loss of contact to cell adhesion factors. First evidence is included which suggests that the final progress of the senescent, telomerase-negative cells to cell death is caused by apoptosis.

  8. Bacterial community composition and diversity in an ancestral ant fungus symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Katrin; Ishak, Heather D; Linksvayer, Timothy A; Mueller, Ulrich G

    2015-07-01

    Fungus-farming ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae, Attini) exhibit some of the most complex microbial symbioses because both macroscopic partners (ants and fungus) are associated with a rich community of microorganisms. The ant and fungal microbiomes are thought to serve important beneficial nutritional and defensive roles in these symbioses. While most recent research has investigated the bacterial communities in the higher attines (e.g. the leaf-cutter ant genera Atta and Acromyrmex), which are often associated with antibiotic-producing Actinobacteria, very little is known about the microbial communities in basal lineages, labeled as 'lower attines', which retain the ancestral traits of smaller and more simple societies. In this study, we used 16S amplicon pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial communities of the lower attine ant Mycocepurus smithii among seven sampling sites in central Panama. We discovered that ant and fungus garden-associated microbiota were distinct from surrounding soil, but unlike the situation in the derived fungus-gardening ants, which show distinct ant and fungal microbiomes, microbial community structure of the ants and their fungi were similar. Another surprising finding was that the abundance of actinomycete bacteria was low and instead, these symbioses were characterized by an abundance of Lactobacillus and Pantoea bacteria. Furthermore, our data indicate that Lactobacillus strains are acquired from the environment rather than acquired vertically.

  9. Anomalously high variation in postnatal development is ancestral for dinosaurs but lost in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Christopher T; Nesbitt, Sterling J

    2016-12-20

    Compared with all other living reptiles, birds grow extremely fast and possess unusually low levels of intraspecific variation during postnatal development. It is now clear that birds inherited their high rates of growth from their dinosaurian ancestors, but the origin of the avian condition of low variation during development is poorly constrained. The most well-understood growth trajectories of later Mesozoic theropods (e.g., Tyrannosaurus, Allosaurus) show similarly low variation to birds, contrasting with higher variation in extant crocodylians. Here, we show that deep within Dinosauria, among the earliest-diverging dinosaurs, anomalously high intraspecific variation is widespread but then is lost in more derived theropods. This style of development is ancestral for dinosaurs and their closest relatives, and, surprisingly, this level of variation is far higher than in living crocodylians. Among early dinosaurs, this variation is widespread across Pangaea in the Triassic and Early Jurassic, and among early-diverging theropods (ceratosaurs), this variation is maintained for 165 million years to the end of the Cretaceous. Because the Late Triassic environment across Pangaea was volatile and heterogeneous, this variation may have contributed to the rise of dinosaurian dominance through the end of the Triassic Period.

  10. Ancestral state reconstruction for Dendroctonus bark beetles: evolution of a tree killer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, John D; Anderson, Frank E; Kelley, Scott T

    2012-06-01

    While most bark beetles attack only dead or weakened trees, many species in the genus Dendroctonus have the ability to kill healthy conifers through mass attack of the host tree, and can exhibit devastating outbreaks. Other species in this group are able to successfully colonize trees in small numbers without killing the host. We reconstruct the evolution of these ecological and life history traits, first classifying the extant Dendroctonus species by attack type (mass or few), outbreaks (yes or no), host genus (Pinus and others), location of attacks on the tree (bole, base, etc.), whether the host is killed (yes or no), and if the larvae are gregarious or have individual galleries (yes or no). We then estimated a molecular phylogeny for a data set of cytochrome oxidase I sequences sampled from nearly all Dendroctonus species, and used this phylogeny to reconstruct the ancestral state at various nodes on the tree, employing maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods. Our reconstructions suggest that extant Dendroctonus species likely evolved from an ancestor that killed host pines through mass attack of the bole, had individual larvae, and exhibited outbreaks. The ability to colonize a host tree in small numbers (as well as gregarious larvae and attacks at the tree base) apparently evolved later, possibly as two separate events in different clades. It is likely that tree mortality and outbreaks have been continuing features of the interaction between conifers and Dendroctonus bark beetles.

  11. A PCA-based method for ancestral informative markers selection in structured populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng; ZHANG Lei; DENG Hong-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Identification of population structure can help trace population histories and identify disease genes.Structured association (SA) is a commonly used approach for population structure identification and association mapping. A major issue with SA is that its performance greatly depends on the informativeness and the numbers of ancestral informative markers (AIMs). Present major AIM selection methods mostly require prior individual ancestry information, which is usually not available or uncertain in practice. To address this potential weakness, we herein develop a novel approach for AIM selection based on principle component analysis (PCA), which does not require prior ancestry information of study subjects. Our simulation and real genetic data analysis results suggest that, with equivalent AIMs,PCA-based selected AIMs can significantly increase the accuracy of inferred individual ancestries compared with traditionally randomly selected AIMs. Our method can easily be applied to whole genome data to select a set of highly informative AIMs in population structure, which can then be used to identify potential population structure and correct possible statistical biases caused by population stratification.

  12. A general method for the detection of large CAG repeat expansions by fluorescent PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, J P; Barron, L H; Goudie, D; Kelly, K; Dow, D.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Brock, D J

    1996-01-01

    The expansion of a tandemly repeated trinucleotide sequence, CAG, is the mutational mechanism for several human genetic diseases. We present a generally applicable PCR amplification method using a fluorescently labelled locus specific primer flanking the CAG repeat together with paired primers amplifying from multiple priming sites within the CAG repeat. Triplet repeat primed PCR (TP PCR) gives a characteristic ladder on the fluorescence trace enabling the rapid identification of large pathog...

  13. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective ...... of paternal germ-line repeat sequence instability of the expanded SCA2 locus.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 10 October 2012; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2012.231....

  14. Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spreadbury I

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ian SpreadburyGastrointestinal Diseases Research Unit, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: A novel hypothesis of obesity is suggested by consideration of diet-related inflammation and evolutionary medicine. The obese homeostatically guard their elevated weight. In rodent models of high-fat diet-induced obesity, leptin resistance is seen initially at vagal afferents, blunting the actions of satiety mediators, then centrally, with gastrointestinal bacterial-triggered SOCS3 signaling implicated. In humans, dietary fat and fructose elevate systemic lipopolysaccharide, while dietary glucose also strongly activates SOCS3 signaling. Crucially however, in humans, low-carbohydrate diets spontaneously decrease weight in a way that low-fat diets do not. Furthermore, nutrition transition patterns and the health of those still eating diverse ancestral diets with abundant food suggest that neither glycemic index, altered fat, nor carbohydrate intake can be intrinsic causes of obesity, and that human energy homeostasis functions well without Westernized foods containing flours, sugar, and refined fats. Due to being made up of cells, virtually all "ancestral foods" have markedly lower carbohydrate densities than flour- and sugar-containing foods, a property quite independent of glycemic index. Thus the "forgotten organ" of the gastrointestinal microbiota is a prime candidate to be influenced by evolutionarily unprecedented postprandial luminal carbohydrate concentrations. The present hypothesis suggests that in parallel with the bacterial effects of sugars on dental and periodontal health, acellular flours, sugars, and processed foods produce an inflammatory microbiota via the upper gastrointestinal tract, with fat able to effect a "double hit" by increasing systemic absorption of lipopolysaccharide. This model is consistent with a broad spectrum of reported dietary phenomena. A diet of grain-free whole foods with carbohydrate from cellular

  15. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  16. 客家祠堂的文化内涵研究--以三明客家祠堂为例%Study on the Culture Connotation of Hakka Ancestral Hall---Taking Sanming Hakka Ancestral Hall as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓珍

    2014-01-01

    Hakka ancestral hall is the most important place of Hakka clan ancestors,and it is an emotion carrier of Hakka as well, which contains rich cultural connotation. Sanming,as an important part of Fujian,Guangdong and Jiangxi Hakka stronghold,has a large number of Hakka ancestral halls. The name、couplets and architectural pattern of Hakka ancestral hall reflect how deeply the con-cept of ancestor worship of Hakka is;The pedigree of a clan、temple monument and ancestral hall couplets reflect how difficult Hakka' s migration path is;Its ancestor's instruction and function reflect how strong Hakka's concept of farming-reading is;Its site selection and layout reflect how prosperous Feng Shui Culture in Hakka is. They are the windows through which we can know Hakka history and Hak-ka culture.%客家祠堂是客家宗族祭祖的首要重地,也是客家人的情感载体,蕴含着丰富的文化内涵。三明作为闽粤赣边客家大本营的重要地区,拥有大量的客家祠堂,其堂号、楹联、建筑格局反映了客家人崇祖观念之深;其族谱、祠碑、楹联反映了客家人移民道路之艰;其祖训、功能反映出客家人耕读思想之重;其选址、布局反映出客家人风水文化之盛。客家祠堂是研究与理解客家历史文化的重要窗口。

  17. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  18. Extreme variation in patterns of tandem repeats in mitochondrial control region of yellow-browed tits (Sylviparus modestus, Paridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Nian; Zhang, Hongli; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Huang, Yuan; Lei, Fumin

    2015-08-19

    To investigate the evolutionary pattern and origins of tandem repeats in the mitochondrial control region of the yellow-browed tit (Sylviparus modestus), the control region and another four mitochondrial loci from fifteen individuals were analyzed. A 117-bp tandem repeat unit that repeated once, twice or three times in different individuals was found, and a rarely reported arrangement for this tandem repeats region that a 5' imperfect copy at its downstream and a 3' imperfect copy at its upstream was observed. The haplotype network, phylogenetic trees, and ancestral state reconstruction of the combined dataset of five loci suggested multiple origins of the same repeat number. The turnover model via slipped-strand mispairing was introduced to interpret the results, because mispairing occurred so frequently that multiple origins of certain repeat number were observed. Insertion via recombination should be a better explanation for the origin of this tandem repeat unit, considering characteristics of the combined sequence of the 3' and 5' imperfect copy, including identification of its homolog in other passerines and its predicted secondary structure.

  19. CAG trinucleotide RNA repeats interact with RNA-binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, B.A.; Eberwine, J.; Spencer, C. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Genes associated with several neurological diseases are characterized by the presence of an abnormally long trinucleotide repeat sequence. By way of example, Huntington`s disease (HD), is characterized by selective neuronal degeneration associated with the expansion of a polyglutamine-encoding CAG tract. Normally, this CAG tract is comprised of 11-34 repeats, but in HD it is expanded to >37 repeats in affected individuals. The mechanism by which CAG repeats cause neuronal degeneration is unknown, but it has been speculated that the expansion primarily causes abnormal protein functioning, which in turn causes HD pathology. Other mechanisms, however, have not been ruled out. Interactions between RNA and RNA-binding proteins have previously been shown to play a role in the expression of several eukaryotic genes. Herein, we report the association of cytoplasmic proteins with normal length and extended CAG repeats, using gel shift and LJV crosslinking assays. Cytoplasmic protein extracts from several rat brain regions, including the striatum and cortex, sites of neuronal degeneration in HD, contain a 63-kD RNA-binding protein that specifically interacts with these CAG-repeat sequences. These protein-RNA interactions are dependent on the length of the CAG repeat, with longer repeats binding substantially more protein. Two CAG repeat-binding proteins are present in human cortex and striatum; one comigrates with the rat protein at 63 kD, while the other migrates at 49 kD. These data suggest mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins may be involved in the pathological course of trinucleotide repeat-associated neurological diseases. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Thermotolerant Yeast Strains Adapted by Laboratory Evolution Show Trade-Off at Ancestral Temperatures and Preadaptation to Other Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspeta, Luis; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    . Thermotolerant yeast strains showed horizontal displacement of their thermal reaction norms to higher temperatures. Hence, their optimal and maximum growth temperatures increased by about 3°C, whereas they showed a growth trade-off at temperatures below 34°C. Computational analysis of the physical properties...... in the ancestral strain. The latter is an advantageous attribute for acquiring thermotolerance and correlates with the reduction of yeast functions associated with loss of respiration capacity. This trait caused glycerol overproduction that was associated with the growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures....... In combination with altered sterol composition of cellular membranes, glycerol overproduction was also associated with yeast osmotolerance and improved tolerance of high concentrations of glucose and ethanol. Our study shows that thermal adaptation of yeast is suitable for improving yeast resistance...

  1. Identification of a new Newcastle disease virus isolate from Indonesia represents an ancestral lineage of class II genotype XIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Naomi L; Widen, Steve G; Wood, Thomas G; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Vasilakis, Nikos; Tesh, Robert B

    2013-08-01

    An unknown virus was isolated from a mosquito pool collected in Jakarta during routine surveillance in 1979. Analysis of the sample using the Illumina platform resulted in the identification of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolate. The sequence of the isolate indicated that it is an ancestral lineage of class II, genotype XIII. The source of the isolate is unusual, as newcastle disease virus is not believed to be vector-borne, although this mosquito pool was processed in a laboratory also handling samples for avian influenza surveillance and it is possible that this resulted in cross-contamination. This NDV isolate is still ancestral to most extant genotype XIII strains and provides a useful insight into historic NDV evolution.

  2. Breadth of T cell responses after immunization with adenovirus vectors encoding ancestral antigens or polyvalent papillomavirus antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2017-01-01

    - either by inducing cross-reactive T cells or by administering a polyvalent vaccine. To test these strategies, we designed 3 ancestral and 2 circulating sequences based on the two domains of the E1 and E2 proteins of papillomaviruses (PVs) that exhibit the highest degree of conservation in comparison...... to the other PV proteins. The PV sequences were fused to a T cell adjuvant, the murine invariant chain and encoded in a recombinant adenoviral vector which was administered to naïve outbred mice. By measuring T cell responses induced by these different vaccines and towards peptide pools representing 3...... circulating strains and a putative ancestor of oncogenic HPVs, we showed that the ancestral vaccine antigen has to be approximately 90% identical to the circulating PVs before a marked drop of ~90% mean CD8+ T cell responses ensues. Interestingly, the combination of two or three type-specific PV vaccines did...

  3. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  4. Exploring the past and the future of protein evolution with ancestral sequence reconstruction: the 'retro' approach to protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumulya, Yosephine; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2017-01-01

    A central goal in molecular evolution is to understand the ways in which genes and proteins evolve in response to changing environments. In the absence of intact DNA from fossils, ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) can be used to infer the evolutionary precursors of extant proteins. To date, ancestral proteins belonging to eubacteria, archaea, yeast and vertebrates have been inferred that have been hypothesized to date from between several million to over 3 billion years ago. ASR has yielded insights into the early history of life on Earth and the evolution of proteins and macromolecular complexes. Recently, however, ASR has developed from a tool for testing hypotheses about protein evolution to a useful means for designing novel proteins. The strength of this approach lies in the ability to infer ancestral sequences encoding proteins that have desirable properties compared with contemporary forms, particularly thermostability and broad substrate range, making them good starting points for laboratory evolution. Developments in technologies for DNA sequencing and synthesis and computational phylogenetic analysis have led to an escalation in the number of ancient proteins resurrected in the last decade and greatly facilitated the use of ASR in the burgeoning field of synthetic biology. However, the primary challenge of ASR remains in accurately inferring ancestral states, despite the uncertainty arising from evolutionary models, incomplete sequences and limited phylogenetic trees. This review will focus, firstly, on the use of ASR to uncover links between sequence and phenotype and, secondly, on the practical application of ASR in protein engineering. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Genotype-based ancestral background consistently predicts efficacy and side effects across treatments in CATIE and STAR*D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Adkins

    Full Text Available Only a subset of patients will typically respond to any given prescribed drug. The time it takes clinicians to declare a treatment ineffective leaves the patient in an impaired state and at unnecessary risk for adverse drug effects. Thus, diagnostic tests robustly predicting the most effective and safe medication for each patient prior to starting pharmacotherapy would have tremendous clinical value. In this article, we evaluated the use of genetic markers to estimate ancestry as a predictive component of such diagnostic tests. We first estimated each patient's unique mosaic of ancestral backgrounds using genome-wide SNP data collected in the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE (n = 765 and the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D (n = 1892. Next, we performed multiple regression analyses to estimate the predictive power of these ancestral dimensions. For 136/89 treatment-outcome combinations tested in CATIE/STAR*D, results indicated 1.67/1.84 times higher median test statistics than expected under the null hypothesis assuming no predictive power (p<0.01, both samples. Thus, ancestry showed robust and pervasive correlations with drug efficacy and side effects in both CATIE and STAR*D. Comparison of the marginal predictive power of MDS ancestral dimensions and self-reported race indicated significant improvements to model fit with the inclusion of MDS dimensions, but mixed evidence for self-reported race. Knowledge of each patient's unique mosaic of ancestral backgrounds provides a potent immediate starting point for developing algorithms identifying the most effective and safe medication for a wide variety of drug-treatment response combinations. As relatively few new psychiatric drugs are currently under development, such personalized medicine offers a promising approach toward optimizing pharmacotherapy for psychiatric conditions.

  6. Evolutionary site-number changes of ribosomal DNA loci during speciation: complex scenarios of ancestral and more recent polyploid events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Marcela; Moreno-Saiz, Juan C; Galián, José A; Rosselló, Josep A

    2015-11-16

    Several genome duplications have been identified in the evolution of seed plants, providing unique systems for studying karyological processes promoting diversification and speciation. Knowledge about the number of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci, together with their chromosomal distribution and structure, provides clues about organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. In this work, we aim to elucidate the evolutionary dynamics of karyological and rDNA site-number variation in all known taxa of subtribe Vellinae, showing a complex scenario of ancestral and more recent polyploid events. Specifically, we aim to infer the ancestral chromosome numbers and patterns of chromosome number variation, assess patterns of variation of both 45S and 5S rDNA families, trends in site-number change of rDNA loci within homoploid and polyploid series, and reconstruct the evolutionary history of rDNA site number using a phylogenetic hypothesis as a framework. The best-fitting model of chromosome number evolution with a high likelihood score suggests that the Vellinae core showing x = 17 chromosomes arose by duplication events from a recent x = 8 ancestor. Our survey suggests more complex patterns of polyploid evolution than previously noted for Vellinae. High polyploidization events (6x, 8x) arose independently in the basal clade Vella castrilensis-V. lucentina, where extant diploid species are unknown. Reconstruction of ancestral rDNA states in Vellinae supports the inference that the ancestral number of loci in the subtribe was two for each multigene family, suggesting that an overall tendency towards a net loss of 5S rDNA loci occurred during the splitting of Vellinae ancestors from the remaining Brassiceae lineages. A contrasting pattern for rDNA site change in both paleopolyploid and neopolyploid species was linked to diversification of Vellinae lineages. This suggests dynamic and independent changes in rDNA site number during speciation processes and a

  7. [Evolutionary history of Metazoa, ancestral status of the bilateria clonal reproduction, and semicolonial origin of the mollusca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, A V

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary history of any metazoan group is a history of the entire ontogenetic cycles instead of separate stages and genes only. Ontogeny in the most objective way links two key components of the biological systematics: historically-independent characters attribution and phylogeny itself. A general theory encompassing "static" traditional taxonomy and dynamic evolutionary process, based on the ontogenetic transformation of the organisms' shape is suggested here to term as ontogenetic systematics. As an important practical implication of the ontogenetic systematics, a new model of the bilaterian metazoans evolution is suggested. The new model considers asexual clonal reproduction as a central feature of the ancestral ontogenetic cycles of basal Bilateria. The new scenario resolves several notable contradictions, e.g. morphological, ontogenetic and molecular similarities of Pogonophora, Vestimentifera, Phoronida simultaneously to protostomian Spiralia (Lophotrochozoa) and Deuterostomia. The suggested model implies individuation (possibly multiple) of ancestral semicolonial sedentary group as a major factor of the basal Bilateria diversification. In the late Ediacaran and early Cambrian thus existed ancestral bilaterian group that shared characters of both Spiralia and Deuterostomia and possessed polyp-shape body and cephalic secretory shield (like in modern Pterobranchia and Vestimentifera), that later on reduced in various lines. This ancestral taxon in rank of supraphylum is suggested to term as Carmaphora (shield-bearers). Presence of the enigmatic sedentary fossil of the genus Cloudina with vestimentiferan-like tubes and evident clonal reproduction already in the late Ediacaran, and most recent found of an unquestionable pterobranch already in the early Cambrian support the new model of Bilateria evolution.

  8. EAMJ Dec. Repeatability.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... Results:Kappa values for four-week repeatability for the wheeze and asthma questions were 0.61 ... for logistic, cultural and ethical reasons, to use ... individual with baseline forced expiratory volume in .... period is likely to also include the effects of true ... data, the writing of the manuscript or the decision.

  9. CHAAJ (JUEGO DE PELOTA MESOAMERICANO: UN jUEGO ANCESTRAL ENTRE EMERGENCIAS CULTURALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairzinho Francisco Panqueba Cifuentes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Los juegos de pelota mesoamericanos son manifestaciones corporales que han sido exploradasprincipalmente desde perspectivas arqueológicas e históricas, pero también han sido retomadosdesde distintas iniciativas para ponerlos en práctica. Desde la frontera entre Estados Unidos conMéxico, pasando por distintos Estados del país “azteca”, son practicadas diferentes modalidades deeste juego. Sin embargo, decir que el chaaj en Mesoamérica es hoy en día una alternativa recreativay deportiva, es quedarse corto respecto a su ya demostrado potencial. La sacralidad manifestada através de los movimientos corporales está ofreciendo opciones de innovación en varios espacios de lassociedades actuales. En su dimensión ceremonial, revela una comunicación ancestral muy actual. Allíse ponen en juego los códices, las interpretaciones arqueológicas y los conocimientos territoriales depersonas sabedoras de las comunidades. En su dimensión lúdica, el juego reúne elementos culturales,deportivos y pedagógicos. Ha sido una práctica corporal, técnica y motora ejecutada constantementeen algunas regiones mexicanas y guatemaltecas. No obstante su antigüedad, en los últimos años seviene registrando una promoción inusitada, en medio de los actuales tiempos de cambio que fueronanunciados desde tiempos inmemoriales por los sabedores y las sabedoras mayas.

  10. The ancestral activation promiscuity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases from oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn Misty L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in algae and plants. In oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, ADP-Glc PPase is mainly activated by 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA and to a lesser extent by other metabolites. In this work, we analyzed the activation promiscuity of ADP-Glc PPase subunits from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120, the green alga Ostreococcus tauri, and potato (Solanum tuberosum tuber by comparing a specificity constant for 3-PGA, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP, fructose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate. Results The 3-PGA specificity constant for the enzymes from Anabaena (homotetramer, O. tauri, and potato tuber was considerably higher than for other activators. O. tauri and potato tuber enzymes were heterotetramers comprising homologous small and large subunits. Conversely, the O. tauri small subunit (OtaS homotetramer was more promiscuous because its FBP specificity constant was similar to that for 3-PGA. To explore the role of both OtaS and OtaL (O. tauri large subunit in determining the specificity of the heterotetramer, we knocked out the catalytic activity of each subunit individually by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, the mutants OtaSD148A/OtaL and OtaS/OtaLD171A had higher specificity constants for 3-PGA than for FBP. Conclusions After gene duplication, OtaS seemed to have lost specificity for 3-PGA compared to FBP. This was physiologically and evolutionarily feasible because co-expression of both subunits restored the specificity for 3-PGA of the resulting heterotetrameric wild type enzyme. This widespread promiscuity seems to be ancestral and intrinsic to the enzyme family. Its presence could constitute an efficient evolutionary mechanism to accommodate the ADP-Glc PPase regulation to different metabolic needs.

  11. Evolution of neural crest and placodes: amphioxus as a model for the ancestral vertebrate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, L. Z.; Holland, N. D.

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies of protochordates (ascidian tunicates and amphioxus) have given insights into possible ancestors of 2 of the characteristic features of the vertebrate head: neural crest and placodes. The neural crest probably evolved from cells on either side of the neural plate-epidermis boundary in a protochordate ancestral to the vertebrates. In amphioxus, homologues of several vertebrate neural crest marker genes (BMP2/4, Pax3/7, Msx, Dll and Snail) are expressed at the edges of the neural plate and/or adjacent nonneural ectoderm. Some of these markers are also similarly expressed in tunicates. In protochordates, however, these cells, unlike vertebrate neural crest, neither migrate as individuals through embryonic tissues nor differentiate into a wide spectrum of cell types. Therefore, while the protochordate ancestor of the vertebrates probably had the beginnings of a genetic programme for neural crest formation, this programme was augmented in the earliest vertebrates to attain definitive neural crest. Clear homologues of vertebrate placodes are lacking in protochordates. However, both amphioxus and tunicates have ectodermal sensory cells. In tunicates these are all primary neurons, sending axons to the central nervous system, while in amphioxus, the ectodermal sensory cells include both primary neurons and secondary neurons lacking axons. Comparisons of developmental gene expression suggest that the anterior ectoderm in amphioxus may be homologous to the vertebrate olfactory placode, the only vertebrate placode with primary, not secondary, neurons. Similarly, biochemical, morphological and gene expression data suggest that amphioxus and tunicates also have homologues of the adenohypophysis, one of the few vertebrate structures derived from nonneurogenic placodes. In contrast, the origin of the other vertebrate placodes is very uncertain.

  12. Evidence-based green algal genomics reveals marine diversity and ancestral characteristics of land plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Baren, Marijke J.; Bachy, Charles; Reistetter, Emily Nahas; Purvine, Samuel O.; Grimwood, Jane; Sudek, Sebastian; Yu, Hang; Poirier, Camille; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Wong, Chee-Hong; Smith, Richard D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wei, Chia-Lin; Schmutz, Jeremy; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2016-03-31

    Prasinophytes are widespread marine green algae that are related to plants. Abundance of the genus Micromonas has reportedly increased in the Arctic due to climate-induced changes. Thus, studies of these organisms are important for marine ecology and understanding Virdiplantae evolution and diversification. We generated evidence-based Micromonas gene models using proteomics and RNA-Seq to improve prasinophyte genomic resources. First, sequences of four chromosomes in the 22 Mb Micromonas pusilla (CCMP1545) genome were finished. Comparison with the finished 21 Mb Micromonas commoda (RCC299) shows they share less than 8,142of ~10,000 protein-encoding genes, depending on the analysis method. Unlike RCC299 and other sequenced eukaryotes, CCMP1545 has two abundant repetitive intron types and a high percent (26%) GC splice donors. Micromonas has more genus-specific protein families (19%) than other genome sequenced prasinophytes (11%). Comparative analyses using predicted proteomes from other prasinophytes reveal proteins likely related to scale formation and ancestral photosynthesis. Our studies also indicate that peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis enzymes have been lost in multiple independent events in select prasinophytes and most plants. However, CCMP1545, polar Micromonas CCMP2099 and prasinophytes from other claasses retain the entire PG pathway, like moss and glaucophyte algae. Multiple vascular plants that share a unique bi-domain protein also have the pathway, except the Penicillin-Binding-Protein. Alongside Micromonas experiments using antibiotics that halt bacterial PG biosynthesis, the findings highlight unrecognized phylogenetic complexity in the PG-pathway retention and implicate a role in chloroplast structure of division in several extant Vridiplantae lineages. Extensive differences in gene loss and architecture between related prasinophytes underscore their extensive divergence. PG biosynthesis genes from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont that became the

  13. Regionalization of the shark hindbrain: a survey of an ancestral organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel eRodríguez-Moldes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cartilaginous fishes (chondrichthyans represent an ancient radiation of vertebrates currently considered the sister group of the group of gnathostomes with a bony skeleton that gave rise to land vertebrates. This out-group position makes chondrichthyans essential in assessing the ancestral organization of the brain of jawed vertebrates. To gain knowledge about hindbrain evolution we have studied its development in a shark, the lesser spotted dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula by analyzing the expression of some developmental genes and the origin and distribution of specific neuronal populations, which may help to identify hindbrain subdivisions and boundaries and the topology of specific cell groups. We have characterized three developmental periods that will serve as a framework to compare the development of different neuronal systems and may represent a suitable tool for comparing the absolute chronology of development among vertebrates. The expression patterns of Pax6, Wnt8 and Hoxa2 genes in early embryos of S. canicula showed close correspondence to what has been described in other vertebrates and helped to identify the anterior rhombomeres. Also in these early embryos, the combination of Pax6 with protein markers of migrating neuroblasts (DCX and early differentiating neurons (general: HuC/D; neuron type specific: GAD, the GABA synthesizing enzyme revealed the organization of S. canicula hindbrain in both transverse segmental units corresponding to visible rhombomeres and longitudinal columns. Later in development, when the interrhombomeric boundaries fade away, accurate information about S. canicula hindbrain subdivisions was achieved by comparing the expression patterns of Pax6 and GAD, serotonin (serotoninergic neurons, tyrosine hydroxylase (catecholaminergic neurons, choline acetyltransferase (cholinergic neurons and calretinin (a calcium-binding protein. The patterns observed revealed many topological correspondences with other vertebrates

  14. Estimating ancestral proportions in a multi-ethnic US sample: implications for studies of admixed populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levran Orna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was designed to determine the ancestral composition of a multi-ethnic sample collected for studies of drug addictions in New York City and Las Vegas, and to examine the reliability of self-identified ethnicity and three-generation family history data. Ancestry biographical scores for seven clusters corresponding to world major geographical regions were obtained using STRUCTURE, based on genotypes of 168 ancestry informative markers (AIMs, for a sample of 1,291 African Americans (AA, European Americans (EA, and Hispanic Americans (HA along with data from 1,051 HGDP-CEPH ‘diversity panel’ as a reference. Self-identified ethnicity and family history data, obtained in an interview, were accurate in identifying the individual major ancestry in the AA and the EA samples (approximately 99% and 95%, respectively but were not useful for the HA sample and could not predict the extent of admixture in any group. The mean proportions of the combined clusters corresponding to European and Middle Eastern populations in the AA sample, revealed by AIMs analysis, were 0.13. The HA subjects, predominantly Puerto Ricans, showed a highly variable hybrid contribution pattern of clusters corresponding to Europe (0.27, Middle East (0.27, Africa (0.20, and Central Asia (0.14. The effect of admixture on allele frequencies is demonstrated for two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (118A > G, 17 C > T of the mu opioid receptor gene (OPRM1. This study reiterates the importance of AIMs in defining ancestry, especially in admixed populations.

  15. Paraphyly of organelle DNAs in Cycas Sect. Asiorientales due to ancient ancestral polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Tsai-Wen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study addresses the apportionment of genetic diversity between Cycas revoluta and C. taitungensis, species that constitute the section Asiorientales and represent a unique, basal lineage of the Laurasian genus Cycas. Fossil evidence indicates divergence of the section from the rest of Cycas at least 30 million years ago. Geographically, C. taitungensis is limited to Taiwan whereas C. revoluta is found in the Ryukyu Archipelago and on mainland China. Results The phylogenies of ribosomal ITS region of mtDNA and the intergenic spacer between atpB and rbcL genes of cpDNA were reconstructed. Phylogenetic analyses revealed paraphyly of both loci in the two species and also in the section Asiorientales. The lack of reciprocal monophyly between these long isolated sections is likely due to persistent shared ancestral polymorphisms. Molecular dating estimated that mt- and cp DNA lineages coalesced to the most recent common ancestors (TMRCA about 327 (mt and 204 MYA (cp, corresponding with the divergence of cycad sections in the Mesozoic. Conclusion Fates of newly derived mutations of cycads follow Klopfstein et al.'s surfing model where the majority of new mutations do not spread geographically and remain at low frequencies or are eventually lost by genetic drift. Only successful 'surfing mutations' reach very high frequencies and occupy a large portion of a species range. These mutations exist as dominant cytotypes across populations and species. Geographical subdivision is lacking in both species, even though recurrent gene flow by both pollen and seed is severely limited. In total, the contrasting levels between historical and ongoing gene flow, large population sizes, a long lifespan, and slow mutation rates in both organelle DNAs have all likely contributed to the unusually long duration of paraphyly in cycads.

  16. Evolution of neural crest and placodes: amphioxus as a model for the ancestral vertebrate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, L. Z.; Holland, N. D.

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies of protochordates (ascidian tunicates and amphioxus) have given insights into possible ancestors of 2 of the characteristic features of the vertebrate head: neural crest and placodes. The neural crest probably evolved from cells on either side of the neural plate-epidermis boundary in a protochordate ancestral to the vertebrates. In amphioxus, homologues of several vertebrate neural crest marker genes (BMP2/4, Pax3/7, Msx, Dll and Snail) are expressed at the edges of the neural plate and/or adjacent nonneural ectoderm. Some of these markers are also similarly expressed in tunicates. In protochordates, however, these cells, unlike vertebrate neural crest, neither migrate as individuals through embryonic tissues nor differentiate into a wide spectrum of cell types. Therefore, while the protochordate ancestor of the vertebrates probably had the beginnings of a genetic programme for neural crest formation, this programme was augmented in the earliest vertebrates to attain definitive neural crest. Clear homologues of vertebrate placodes are lacking in protochordates. However, both amphioxus and tunicates have ectodermal sensory cells. In tunicates these are all primary neurons, sending axons to the central nervous system, while in amphioxus, the ectodermal sensory cells include both primary neurons and secondary neurons lacking axons. Comparisons of developmental gene expression suggest that the anterior ectoderm in amphioxus may be homologous to the vertebrate olfactory placode, the only vertebrate placode with primary, not secondary, neurons. Similarly, biochemical, morphological and gene expression data suggest that amphioxus and tunicates also have homologues of the adenohypophysis, one of the few vertebrate structures derived from nonneurogenic placodes. In contrast, the origin of the other vertebrate placodes is very uncertain.

  17. Toxic and nontoxic components of botulinum neurotoxin complex are evolved from a common ancestral zinc protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inui, Ken [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Sagane, Yoshimasa [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Miyata, Keita [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Suzuki, Tomonori [Department of Bacteriology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Shikamori, Yasuyuki [Agilent Technologies International Japan, Ltd. Takaura-cho 9-1, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0033 (Japan); Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Watanabe, Toshihiro, E-mail: t-watana@bioindustry.nodai.ac.jp [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BoNT and NTNHA proteins share a similar protein architecture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA and BoNT were both identified as zinc-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA does not have a classical HEXXH zinc-coordinating motif similar to that found in all serotypes of BoNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homology modeling implied probable key residues involved in zinc coordination. -- Abstract: Zinc atoms play an essential role in a number of enzymes. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent toxin known in nature, is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. Here we identify the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA), one of the BoNT-complex constituents, as a zinc-binding protein, along with BoNT. A protein structure classification database search indicated that BoNT and NTNHA share a similar domain architecture, comprising a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase-like, BoNT coiled-coil motif and concanavalin A-like domains. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that every single NTNHA molecule contains a single zinc atom. This is the first demonstration of a zinc atom in this protein, as far as we know. However, the NTNHA molecule does not possess any known zinc-coordinating motif, whereas all BoNT serotypes possess the classical HEXXH motif. Homology modeling of the NTNHA structure implied that a consensus K-C-L-I-K-X{sub 35}-D sequence common among all NTNHA serotype molecules appears to coordinate a single zinc atom. These findings lead us to propose that NTNHA and BoNT may have evolved distinct functional specializations following their branching out from a common ancestral zinc protein.

  18. Are Hox genes ancestrally involved in axial patterning? Evidence from the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxane Chiori

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The early evolution and diversification of Hox-related genes in eumetazoans has been the subject of conflicting hypotheses concerning the evolutionary conservation of their role in axial patterning and the pre-bilaterian origin of the Hox and ParaHox clusters. The diversification of Hox/ParaHox genes clearly predates the origin of bilaterians. However, the existence of a "Hox code" predating the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor and supporting the deep homology of axes is more controversial. This assumption was mainly based on the interpretation of Hox expression data from the sea anemone, but growing evidence from other cnidarian taxa puts into question this hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hox, ParaHox and Hox-related genes have been investigated here by phylogenetic analysis and in situ hybridisation in Clytia hemisphaerica, an hydrozoan species with medusa and polyp stages alternating in the life cycle. Our phylogenetic analyses do not support an origin of ParaHox and Hox genes by duplication of an ancestral ProtoHox cluster, and reveal a diversification of the cnidarian HOX9-14 genes into three groups called A, B, C. Among the 7 examined genes, only those belonging to the HOX9-14 and the CDX groups exhibit a restricted expression along the oral-aboral axis during development and in the planula larva, while the others are expressed in very specialised areas at the medusa stage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cross species comparison reveals a strong variability of gene expression along the oral-aboral axis and during the life cycle among cnidarian lineages. The most parsimonious interpretation is that the Hox code, collinearity and conservative role along the antero-posterior axis are bilaterian innovations.

  19. When ancestral heritage is a source of discomfort: culture, pre-object relatedness, and self-alienation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kradin, Richard L

    2012-04-01

    The ancestral claims on an individual can evoke mental conflict when they involve separating from an ethnic group whose beliefs and customs are devalued by the dominant culture. However, these claims are engraved on the psyche early in development by caretakers to the level of pre-object relatedness, where contents and affect tones are implicit and may be unavailable for later psychoanalytical interventions. In addition, as the anthropologist Clifford Geertz notes, one's culture of origin precedes the development of psyche and creates its own set of claims that must be renegotiated when one encounters a different domain of cultural symbols, a confrontation that can produce psychological dissonance and self-alienation. In this paper, three cases are examined in which mental conflicts were evoked by attempts at divesting ancestral claims in response to conscious efforts to assimilate into the dominant culture. These patients suffered from separation guilt and unstable self-esteem and reported dream imagery suggesting psychological imbalance. The requirement to carefully delineate the ancestral claims on psyche as well as those contents and affects that may not be accessible to therapeutic intervention is emphasized, and the importance of compromise and acceptance with respect to the psychological demands of the unconscious are considered.

  20. Genomes of Helicobacter pylori from native Peruvians suggest admixture of ancestral and modern lineages and reveal a western type cag-pathogenicity island

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    Rahman Syed

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is presumed to be co-evolved with its human host and is a highly diverse gastric pathogen at genetic levels. Ancient origins of H. pylori in the New World are still debatable. It is not clear how different waves of human migrations in South America contributed to the evolution of strain diversity of H. pylori. The objective of our 'phylogeographic' study was to gain fresh insights into these issues through mapping genetic origins of H. pylori of native Peruvians (of Amerindian ancestry and their genomic comparison with isolates from Spain, and Japan. Results For this purpose, we attempted to dissect genetic identity of strains by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST of the 7 housekeeping genes (atpA, efp, ureI, ppa, mutY, trpC, yphC and the sequence analyses of the babB adhesin and oipA genes. The whole cag pathogenicity-island (cagPAI from these strains was analyzed using PCR and the geographic type of cagA phosphorylation motif EPIYA was determined by gene sequencing. We observed that while European genotype (hp-Europe predominates in native Peruvian strains, approximately 20% of these strains represent a sub-population with an Amerindian ancestry (hsp-Amerind. All of these strains however, irrespective of their ancestral affiliation harbored a complete, 'western' type cagPAI and the motifs surrounding it. This indicates a possible acquisition of cagPAI by the hsp-Amerind strains from the European strains, during decades of co-colonization. Conclusion Our observations suggest presence of ancestral H. pylori (hsp-Amerind in Peruvian Amerindians which possibly managed to survive and compete against the Spanish strains that arrived to the New World about 500 years ago. We suggest that this might have happened after native Peruvian H. pylori strains acquired cagPAI sequences, either by new acquisition in cag-negative strains or by recombination