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Sample records for human adrenocortical cells

  1. Nesfatin-1 inhibits proliferation and enhances apoptosis of human adrenocortical H295R cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Tan, Bee K; Rucinski, Marcin; Kawan, Mohamed; Hu, Jiamiao; Kaur, Jaspreet; Patel, Vanlata H; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; Komarowska, Hanna; Lehnert, Hendrik; Randeva, Harpal S

    2015-07-01

    NUCB2/nesfatin and its proteolytically cleaved product nesfatin-1 are recently discovered anorexigenic hypothalamic neuroproteins involved in energy homeostasis. It is expressed both centrally and in peripheral tissues, and appears to have potent metabolic actions. NUCB2/nesfatin neurons are activated in response to stress. Central nesfatin-1 administration elevates circulating ACTH and corticosterone levels. Bilateral adrenalectomy increased NUCB2/nesfatin mRNA levels in rat paraventricular nuclei. To date, studies have not assessed the effects of nesfatin-1 stimulation on human adrenocortical cells. Therefore, we investigated the expression and effects of nesfatin-1 in a human adrenocortical cell model (H295R). Our findings demonstrate that NUCB2 and nesfatin-1 are expressed in human adrenal gland and human adrenocortical cells (H295R). Stimulation with nesfatin-1 inhibits the growth of H295R cells and promotes apoptosis, potentially via the involvement of Bax, BCL-XL and BCL-2 genes as well as ERK1/2, p38 and JNK1/2 signalling cascades. This has implications for understanding the role of NUCB2/nesfatin in adrenal zonal development. NUCB2/nesfatin may also be a therapeutic target for adrenal cancer. However, further studies using in vivo models are needed to clarify these concepts. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. Resveratrol inhibits steroidogenesis in human fetal adrenocortical cells at the end of first trimester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savchuk, Iuliia; Morvan, Marie-Line; Søeborg, Tue

    2017-01-01

    SCOPE: Resveratrol has a diverse array of healthful effects on metabolic parameters in different experimental paradigms but has also potential to inhibit steroidogenesis in rodent adrenals. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of resveratrol on human fetal adrenal...... steroidogenesis at gestational weeks (GW) 9-12. METHODS AND RESULTS: Adrenals from aborted fetuses (GW10-12) were used to prepare primary cultures of human fetal adrenocortical cells (HFAC). HFAC were treated in the presence or absence of ACTH (10 ng/ml) with or without resveratrol (10 μM) for 24 hours....... The production of steroids by HFAC was analyzed by gas and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem/mass spectrometry. The expression of steroidogenic enzymes at GW 9-12 was quantified by automated Western blotting. We observed that resveratrol significantly suppressed synthesis of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA...

  3. Human Adrenocortical Remodeling Leading to Aldosterone-Producing Cell Cluster Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshiro Nishimoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The immunohistochemical detection of aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2 and steroid 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1 has enabled the identification of aldosterone-producing cell clusters (APCCs in the subcapsular portion of the human adult adrenal cortex. We hypothesized that adrenals have layered zonation in early postnatal stages and are remodeled to possess APCCs over time. Purposes. To investigate changes in human adrenocortical zonation with age. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed adrenal tissues prepared from 33 autopsied patients aged between 0 and 50 years. They were immunostained for CYP11B2 and CYP11B1. The percentage of APCC areas over the whole adrenal area (AA/WAA, % and the number of APCCs (NOA, APCCs/mm2 were calculated by four examiners. Average values were used in statistical analyses. Results. Adrenals under 11 years old had layered zona glomerulosa (ZG and zona fasciculata (ZF without apparent APCCs. Some adrenals had an unstained (CYP11B2/CYP11B1-negative layer between ZG and ZF, resembling the rat undifferentiated cell zone. Average AA/WAA and NOA correlated with age, suggesting that APCC development is associated with aging. Possible APCC-to-APA transitional lesions were incidentally identified in two adult adrenals. Conclusions. The adrenal cortex with layered zonation remodels to possess APCCs over time. APCC generation may be associated with hypertension in adults.

  4. Role of ALADIN in human adrenocortical cells for oxidative stress response and steroidogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Jühlen

    Full Text Available Triple A syndrome is caused by mutations in AAAS encoding the protein ALADIN. We investigated the role of ALADIN in the human adrenocortical cell line NCI-H295R1 by either over-expression or down-regulation of ALADIN. Our findings indicate that AAAS knock-down induces a down-regulation of genes coding for type II microsomal cytochrome P450 hydroxylases CYP17A1 and CYP21A2 and their electron donor enzyme cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, thereby decreasing biosynthesis of precursor metabolites required for glucocorticoid and androgen production. Furthermore we demonstrate that ALADIN deficiency leads to increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and alteration in redox homeostasis after paraquat treatment. Finally, we show significantly impaired nuclear import of DNA ligase 1, aprataxin and ferritin heavy chain 1 in ALADIN knock-down cells. We conclude that down-regulating ALADIN results in decreased oxidative stress response leading to alteration in steroidogenesis, highlighting our knock-down cell model as an important in-vitro tool for studying the adrenal phenotype in triple A syndrome.

  5. Mutual effects of melatonin and activin on induction of aldosterone production by human adrenocortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takayuki; Otsuka, Fumio; Tsukamoto-Yamauchi, Naoko; Inagaki, Kenichi; Hosoya, Takeshi; Nakamura, Eri; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Komatsubara, Motoshi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2015-08-01

    Melatonin has been reported to suppress adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secretion in the anterior pituitary and cortisol production in the adrenal by different mechanisms. However, the effect of melatonin on aldosterone production has remained unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of melatonin in the regulation of aldosterone production using human adrenocortical H295R cells by focusing on the activin system expressed in the adrenal. Melatonin receptor MT1 mRNA and protein were expressed in H295R cells and the expression levels of MT1 were increased by activin treatment. Activin increased ACTH-induced, but not angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced, aldosterone production. Melatonin alone did not affect basal synthesis of either aldosterone or cortisol. However, melatonin effectively enhanced aldosterone production induced by co-treatment with ACTH and activin, although melatonin had no effect on aldosterone production induced by Ang II in combination with activin. These changes in steroidogenesis became apparent when the steroid production was evaluated by the ratio of aldosterone/cortisol. Melatonin also enhanced dibutyryl-AMP-induced aldosterone/cortisol levels in the presence of activin, suggesting a functional link to the cAMP-PKA pathway for induction of aldosterone production by melatonin and activin. In accordance with the data for steroids, ACTH-induced, but not Ang II-induced, cAMP synthesis was also amplified by co-treatment with melatonin and activin. Furthermore, the ratio of ACTH-induced mRNA level of CYP11B2 compared with that of CYP17 was amplified in the condition of treatment with both melatonin and activin. In addition, melatonin increased expression of the activin type-I receptor ALK-4 but suppressed expression of inhibitory Smads6/7, leading to the enhancement of Smad2 phosphorylation. Collectively, the results showed that melatonin facilitated aldosterone production induced by ACTH and activin via the cAMP-PKA pathway. The results also

  6. Inheritable stimulatory effects of caffeine on steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression and cortisol production in human adrenocortical cells.

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    Ping, Jie; Lei, You-Ying; Liu, Lian; Wang, Ting-ting; Feng, Ying-hong; Wang, Hui

    2012-01-05

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world. It can elevate the level of glucocorticoid which is involved in metabolism regulation, stress response, and immune function. However, the specific mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Glucocorticoid is steroid hormone synthesized in adrenal cortex and the key rate-limiting step in its biosynthesis is mediated by steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). This study was designed to investigate the direct effects and inheritable epigenetic mechanisms of caffeine on cortisol production and StAR expression in human adrenocortical cells. The human adrenocortical cell line NCI-H295A was cultured with 0.4-40μM caffeine. There was a significant increase of the cortisol production in cells. In both acutely and chronically caffeine-treated cell groups, mRNA and protein expressions of StAR were stimulated in a dose-dependent manner. DNA methylation detection via bisulfite-sequencing PCR (BSP) uncovered a single site CpG demethylation at nt -682 within the StAR promoter region. Then we investigated how long the increased StAR expression and the single CpG demethylation could last. The caffeine was withdrawn after 48h of treatment and then the cells were continually subcultured for up to 5 and 10 passages, respectively. The results showed that the StAR expression at post-caffeine passage 10 still increased, as compared with that in the control. The caffeine-induced demethylation at nt -682 in StAR promoter underwent a similar time course as StAR expression does. The present study reveals the direct effect and possible inheritable epigenetic mechanism of caffeine on steroidogenesis in human adrenocortical cells and has implications for our understanding of the consumption of caffeine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cortisol stimulates secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone in human adrenocortical cells through inhibition of 3betaHSD2.

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    Topor, Lisa Swartz; Asai, Masato; Dunn, James; Majzoub, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Initiating factors leading to production of adrenal androgens are poorly defined. Cortisol is present in high concentrations within the adrenal gland, and its production rises with growth during childhood. Our aim was to characterize the effect of cortisol and other glucocorticoids on androgen secretion from a human adrenocortical cell line and from nonadrenal cells transfected with CYP17A1 or HSD3B2. This study was performed in cultured cells, at an academic medical center. The effects of cortisol upon steroid production in human adrenal NCI-H295R cells were measured by immunoassay, tandem mass spectrometry, and thin-layer chromatography. The effects of cortisol upon the activities of 17, 20 lyase and 3βHSD2 were measured in NCI-H295R cells and in transfected COS-7 cells. Cortisol markedly and rapidly stimulated dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a dose-dependent manner at cortisol concentrations ≥50 μM. Cortisone and 11-deoxycortisol were also potent stimulators of DHEA secretion, whereas prednisolone and dexamethasone were not. Treatment with cortisol did not affect expression of CYP17A1 or HSD3B2 mRNAs. Stimulation of DHEA secretion by cortisol was associated with competitive inhibition of 3βHSD2 activity. Cortisol inhibits 3βHSD2 activity in adrenal cells and in COS-7 cells transfected with HSD3B2. Thus, it is possible that intraadrenal cortisol may participate in the regulation of adrenal DHEA secretion through inhibition of 3βHSD2. We hypothesize that a rise in intraadrenal cortisol during childhood growth may lead to inhibition of 3βHSD2 activity and contribute to the initiation of adrenarche.

  8. Cortisol Stimulates Secretion of Dehydroepiandrosterone in Human Adrenocortical Cells Through Inhibition of 3βHSD2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topor, Lisa Swartz; Asai, Masato; Dunn, James; Majzoub, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Initiating factors leading to production of adrenal androgens are poorly defined. Cortisol is present in high concentrations within the adrenal gland, and its production rises with growth during childhood. Objective: Our aim was to characterize the effect of cortisol and other glucocorticoids on androgen secretion from a human adrenocortical cell line and from nonadrenal cells transfected with CYP17A1 or HSD3B2. Design/Setting: This study was performed in cultured cells, at an academic medical center. Methods: The effects of cortisol upon steroid production in human adrenal NCI-H295R cells were measured by immunoassay, tandem mass spectrometry, and thin-layer chromatography. The effects of cortisol upon the activities of 17, 20 lyase and 3βHSD2 were measured in NCI-H295R cells and in transfected COS-7 cells. Results: Cortisol markedly and rapidly stimulated dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a dose-dependent manner at cortisol concentrations ≥50 μm. Cortisone and 11-deoxycortisol were also potent stimulators of DHEA secretion, whereas prednisolone and dexamethasone were not. Treatment with cortisol did not affect expression of CYP17A1 or HSD3B2 mRNAs. Stimulation of DHEA secretion by cortisol was associated with competitive inhibition of 3βHSD2 activity. Conclusions: Cortisol inhibits 3βHSD2 activity in adrenal cells and in COS-7 cells transfected with HSD3B2. Thus, it is possible that intraadrenal cortisol may participate in the regulation of adrenal DHEA secretion through inhibition of 3βHSD2. We hypothesize that a rise in intraadrenal cortisol during childhood growth may lead to inhibition of 3βHSD2 activity and contribute to the initiation of adrenarche. PMID:20943790

  9. Antiandrogenic mechanisms of pesticides in human LNCaP prostate and H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Christina N; Rivest, Patricia; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Several pesticides suspected or known to have endocrine disrupting effects were screened for pro- or antiandrogenic properties by determining their effects on proliferation, prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) secretion and androgen receptor (AR) expression, and AR phosphorylation in androgen-dependent LNCaP human prostate cancer cells, as well as on the expression and catalytic activity of the enzyme CYP17 in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells, an in vitro model of steroidogenesis. Effects on SRD5A gene expression were determined in both cell lines. Benomyl, vinclozolin, and prochloraz, but not atrazine, concentration dependently (1-30 μM) decreased dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-stimulated proliferation of LNCaP cells. All pesticides except atrazine decreased DHT-stimulated PSA secretion, AR nuclear accumulation, and AR phosphorylation on serines 81 and 213 in LNCaP cells. Benomyl and prochloraz, but not vinclozolin or atrazine, decreased levels of CYP17 gene and protein expression, as well as catalytic activity in H295R cells. In the case of prochloraz, some of these effects corresponded with cytotoxicity. H295R cells expressed AR protein and SRD5A1, but not SRD5A2 transcripts. SRD5A1 gene expression in H295R cells was increased by 10 nM DHT, whereas in LNCaP cells significant induction was observed by 0.1 nM DHT. AR protein expression in H295R cells was not increased by DHT. Vinclozolin decreased DHT-induced SRD5A1 gene expression in LNCaP, but not H295R cells, indicating a functional difference of AR between the cell lines. In conclusion, pesticides may exert antiandrogenic effects through several mechanisms that are cell type-specific, including AR antagonism and down-regulation or catalytic inhibition of androgen biosynthetic enzymes, such as CYP17 and SRD5A1. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Unmasking a Growth-promoting Effect of the Adrenocorticotropic Hormone in Y1 Mouse Adrenocortical Tumor Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Claudimara F. P. Lotfi; Zana Todorovic; Hugo A. Armelin; Bernard P. Schimmer

    1997-01-01

    The adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) inhibits the growth of Y1 mouse adrenocortical tumor cells as well as normal adrenocortical cells in culture but stimulates adrenocortical cell growth in vivo...

  11. Neuroendocrine regulation of frog adrenocortical cells by neurotensin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicard, F.; D, D.E.G.; Gras, M.; Leprince, J.; Conlon, J.M.; Roubos, E.W.; Vaudry, H.; Delarue, C.

    2005-01-01

    We previously characterized the primary structure of neurotensin (NT) from an extract of the intestine of the frog Rana esculenta. In this study, we provide evidence for the involvement of NT in the neurocrine regulation of the secretory activity of frog adrenocortical cells. Immunohistochemical

  12. Acute self-suppression of corticosteroidogenesis in isolated adrenocortical cells.

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    Carsia, R V; Malamed, S

    1979-10-01

    The relation between steroidogenesis induced by ACTH and that induced by exogenous concentrations of glucocorticoids was studied in isolated adrenocortical cells. Exogenous corticosterone and cortisol, in concentrations within the production capacity of the adrenal gland, suppressed steroidogenesis induced by ACTH in rat and beef cells, respectively. The precursors pregnenolone and progesterone enhanced steroidogenesis in both rat and beef cells. Aldosterone in rat cells and 17 beta-estradiol in rat and beef cells had little if any effect on steroidogenesis. Either suppression or stimulation by exogenous steroids was acute, that is, after 2-h incubation for rat cells and 1-h incubation for beef cells. A direct suppressive action of end product glucocorticoids is indicated. This observed self-suppression of adrenocortical cells suggests the existence of a mechanism for the find adjustment of steroidogenesis that operates in addition to the classical control exerted by the anterior pituitary.

  13. Effects of Neonicotinoids on Promoter-Specific Expression and Activity of Aromatase (CYP19) in Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma (H295R) and Primary Umbilical Vein Endothelial (HUVEC) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron-Beaudoin, Élyse; Denison, Michael S; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme aromatase (CYP19; cytochrome P450 19) in humans undergoes highly tissue- and promoter-specific regulation. In hormone-dependent breast cancer, aromatase is over-expressed via several normally inactive promoters (PII, I.3, I.7). Aromatase biosynthesizes estrogens, which stimulate breast cancer cell proliferation. The placenta produces estrogens required for healthy pregnancy and the major placental CYP19 promoter is I.1. Exposure to certain pesticides, such as atrazine, is associated with increased CYP19 expression, but little is known about the effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on CYP19. We developed sensitive and robust RT-qPCR methods to detect the promoter-specific expression of CYP19 in human adrenocortical carcinoma (H295R) and primary umbilical vein endothelial (HUVEC) cells, and determined the potential promoter-specific disruption of CYP19 expression by atrazine and the commonly used neonicotinoids imidacloprid, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam. In H295R cells, atrazine concentration-dependently increased PII- and I.3-mediated CYP19 expression and aromatase catalytic activity. Thiacloprid and thiamethoxam induced PII- and I.3-mediated CYP19 expression and aromatase activity at relatively low concentrations (0.1-1.0 µM), exhibiting non-monotonic concentration-response curves with a decline in gene induction and catalytic activity at higher concentrations. In HUVEC cells, atrazine slightly induced overall (promoter-indistinct) CYP19 expression (30 µM) and aromatase activity (≥ 3 µM), without increasing I.1 promoter activity. None of the neonicotinoids increased CYP19 expression or aromatase activity in HUVEC cells. Considering the importance of promoter-specific (over)expression of CYP19 in disease (breast cancer) or during sensitive developmental periods (pregnancy), our newly developed RT-qPCR methods will be helpful tools in assessing the risk that neonicotinoids and other chemicals may pose to exposed women. © The Author 2015

  14. Griseofulvin inhibits the growth of adrenocortical cancer cells in vitro.

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    Bramann, E L; Willenberg, H S; Hildebrandt, B; Müller-Mattheis, V; Schott, M; Scherbaum, W A; Haase, M

    2013-04-01

    Supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy are associated with a malignant phenotype of tumor cells. Centrosomal clustering is a mechanism used by cancer cells with supernumerary centrosomes to solve the threatening problem of multipolar spindles. Griseofulvin is an antifungal substance that interferes with the microtubule apparatus and inhibits centrosomal clustering. It has also been demonstrated that griseofulvin inhibits the growth of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. However, it is not yet known whether treatment with griseofulvin inhibits growth of adrenocortical tumor cells. We studied the viability and antiproliferative effects of griseofulvin on cultured NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells using Wst-1-, BrdUrd-, and [³H]-thymidine assays. For the detection of apoptosis we used a caspase 3/7 cleavage assay and light microscopy techniques. We observed that incubation with griseofulvin for 24-48 h leads to a decrease in the viability and proliferation of NCI-H295R cells in a dose-dependent manner. Significant effects could be observed after incubation with griseofulvin as measured by Wst-1-, BrdUrd-, and [³H]dT- uptake assays. Apoptosis of NCI-H295R cells was increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 4.5-fold after incubation with griseofulvin 40 μM for 24 h as shown by caspase 3/7 cleavage assay and light microscopy. With regard to new treatment strategies for adrenocortical cancer, griseofulvin, and possibly other agents, which interfere with the microtubule apparatus and inhibit centrosomal clustering, may turn out to be interesting targets for further research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Fluconazole inhibits human adrenocortical steroidogenesis in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van der Pas (Rob); L.J. Hofland (Leo); J. Hofland (Johannes); A.E. Taylor (A.); W. Arlt (Wiebke); J. Steenbergen (Jacobie); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); F.H. de Jong (Frank); R.A. Feelders (Richard)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe antifungal agent ketoconazole is often used to suppress cortisol production in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS). However, ketoconazole has serious side effects and is hepatotoxic. Here, the in vitro effects of ketoconazole and fluconazole, which might be less toxic, on human

  16. Interleukin-6 increases the expression of key proteins associated with steroidogenesis in human NCI-H295R adrenocortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Janae; McIlmoil, Stephen; Williams, Brice J; Seager, Dennis C; Porter, James P; Judd, Allan M

    2017-03-01

    Mechanisms of interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced cortisol release (CR) were investigated by exposing H295R cells to IL-6 and determining mRNA/protein expression (PCR/western blots) for steroidogenic enzymes (SE), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) (enhances SE/StAR expression), activator protein 1 (AP-1) (regulates SE/StAR expression) and adrenal hypoplasia congenita-like protein (DAX-1) (inhibits SE/StAR expression). Promoter activity of StAR (SPA) was measured by a luciferase-coupled promoter. Cortisol release was increased by 10ng/mL IL-6 (24h P<0.01). Proteins/mRNAs (StAR, cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme, SF-1, AP-1) and SPA were increased by IL-6 (60min 1-50ng/mL IL-6; 5ng/mL IL-6 30-120min P<0.05). Four other SE proteins/mRNAs were also increased by 10ng/mL IL-6 (60min P<0.01). Protein/mRNA for DAX-1 was decreased by IL-6 (60min 1-50ng/mL IL-6; 5ng/mL IL-6 30-120min P<0.01). Phosphorylation of Janus kinase (JAK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) was increased by IL-6 (JAK2 60min 1-50ng/mL IL-6; 10ng/mL IL-6 5-60min P<0.05; STAT1 and STAT3 60min 10ng/mL IL-6 P<0.01). Inhibition of JAK/STAT with AG490 (10μM) or piceatannol (50μM) blocked (P<0.01 10ng/mL IL-6vs. IL-6 plus AG490 or piceatannol) IL-6-induced increases in SPA and StAR mRNA. In summary, IL-6-induced CR may be facilitated by increased StAR and SE mediated by increased SF-1 and AP-1, decreased DAX-1, and increased phosphorylation of JAK/STAT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Control of the adrenocortical cell cycle: interaction between FGF2 and ACTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Armelin

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available FGF2 elicits a strong mitogenic response in the mouse Y-1 adrenocortical tumor cell line, that includes a rapid and transient activation of the ERK-MAPK cascade and induction of the c-Fos protein. ACTH, itself a very weak mitogen, blocks the mitogenic response effect of FGF2 in the early and middle G1 phase, keeping both ERK-MAPK activation and c-Fos induction at maximal levels. Probing the mitogenic response of Y-1 cells to FGF2 with ACTH is likely to uncover reactions underlying the effects of this hormone on adrenocortical cell growth.

  18. The effects of the standardized extracts of Ginkgo biloba on steroidogenesis pathways and aromatase activity in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aromatase inhibitors that block estrogen synthesis are a proven first-line hormonal therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer. Although it is known that standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGb761) induces anti-carcinogenic effects like the aromatase inhibitors, the effects of EGb761 on steroidogenesis have not been studied yet. Therefore, the effects of EGb761 on steroidogenesis and aromatase activity was studied using a H295R cell model, which was a good in vitro model to predict effects on human adrenal steroidogenesis. Methods Cortisol, aldosterone, testosterone, and 17β-estradiol were evaluated in the H295R cells by competitive enzyme-linked immunospecific assay after exposure to EGb761. Real-time polymerase chain reaction were performed to evaluate effects on critical genes in steroid hormone production, specifically cytochrome P450 (CYP11/ 17/19/21) and the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (3β-HSD2 and 17β-HSD1/4). Finally, aromatase activities were measured with a tritiated water-release assay and by western blotting analysis. Results H295R cells exposed to EGb761 (10 and 100 μg/mL) showed a significant decrease in 17β-estradiol and testosterone, but no change in aldosterone or cortisol. Genes (CYP19 and 17β-HSD1) related to the estrogen steroidogenesis were significantly decreased by EGb761. EGb761 treatment of H295R cells resulted in a significant decrease of aromatase activity as measured by the direct and indirect assays. The coding sequence/ Exon PII of CYP19 gene transcript and protein level of CYP19 were significantly decreased by EGb761. Conclusions These results suggest that EGb761 could regulate steroidogenesis-related genes such as CYP19 and 17β-HSD1, and lead to a decrease in 17β-estradiol and testosterone. The present study provides good information on potential therapeutic effects of EGb761 on estrogen dependent breast cancer. PMID:27188280

  19. Fetal adrenal capsular cells serve as progenitor cells for steroidogenic and stromal adrenocortical cell lineages in M. musculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michelle A.; Acharya, Asha; Finco, Isabella; Swonger, Jessica M.; Elston, Marlee J.; Tallquist, Michelle D.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    The lineage relationships of fetal adrenal cells and adrenal capsular cells to the differentiated adrenal cortex are not fully understood. Existing data support a role for each cell type as a progenitor for cells of the adult cortex. This report reveals that subsets of capsular cells are descendants of fetal adrenocortical cells that once expressed Nr5a1. These fetal adrenocortical cell descendants within the adrenal capsule express Gli1, a known marker of progenitors of steroidogenic adrenal cells. The capsule is also populated by cells that express Tcf21, a known inhibitor of Nr5a1 gene expression. We demonstrate that Tcf21-expressing cells give rise to Nr5a1-expressing cells but only before capsular formation. After the capsule has formed, capsular Tcf21-expressing cells give rise only to non-steroidogenic stromal adrenocortical cells, which also express collagen 1a1, desmin and platelet-derived growth factor (alpha polypeptide) but not Nr5a1. These observations integrate prior observations that define two separate origins of adult adrenocortical steroidogenic cells (fetal adrenal cortex and/or the adrenal capsule). Thus, these observations predict a unique temporal and/or spatial role of adult cortical cells that arise directly from either fetal cortical cells or from fetal cortex-derived capsular cells. Last, the data uncover the mechanism by which two populations of fetal cells (fetal cortex derived Gli1-expressing cells and mesenchymal Tcf21-expressing mesenchymal cells) participate in the establishment of the homeostatic capsular progenitor cell niche of the adult cortex. PMID:24131628

  20. Aging of the rat adrenocortical cell: response to ACTH and cyclic AMP in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S; Carsia, R V

    1983-03-01

    To study intrinsic age-related changes in adrenocortical steroid production, cells isolated from rats of different ages (3 to 24 months) were used. Acute (2 hour) corticosterone production in response to stimulation by adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) was measured by radioimmunoassay. With age, adrenocortical cells lose much of their ability to produce corticosterone in the absence or presence of ACTH or cAMP. The loss is progressive from 6 to 24 months of age. Analysis of the data suggests that from 6 to 12 months, an intracellular steroidogenic lesion develops; in addition there may be a loss in ACTH receptors on the plasma membrane. After 12 months these defects increase and are accompanied by a decrease in receptor sensitivity to ACTH.

  1. Expression of adiponectin receptors in mouse adrenal glands and the adrenocortical Y-1 cell line: adiponectin regulates steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Sun, Fei; Cao, Huang-Ming; Ma, Qin-Yun; Pan, Chun-Ming; Ma, Jun-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Na; Jiang, He; Song, Huai-Dong; Chen, Ming-Dao

    2009-12-25

    Obesity is frequently associated with malfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and hyperaldosteronism, but the mechanism underlying this association remains unclear. Since the adrenal glands are embedded in adipose tissue, direct cross-talk between adipose tissue and the adrenal gland has been proposed. A previous study found that adiponectin receptor mRNA was expressed in human adrenal glands and aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). However, the expression of adiponectin receptors in adrenal glands has not been confirmed at the protein level or in other species. Furthermore, it is unclear whether adiponectin receptors expressed in adrenal cells are functional. We found, for the first time, that adiponectin receptor (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) mRNA and protein were expressed in mouse adrenal and adrenocortical Y-1 cells. However, adiponectin itself was not expressed in mouse adrenal or Y-1 cells. Furthermore, adiponectin acutely reduced basal levels of corticosterone and aldosterone secretion. ACTH-induced steroid secretion was also inhibited by adiponectin, and this was accompanied by a parallel change in the expression of the key genes involved in steroidogenesis. These findings indicate that adiponectin may take part in the modulation of steroidogenesis. Thus, adiponectin is likely to have physiological and/or pathophysiological significance as an endocrine regulator of adrenocortical function.

  2. The effect of types I and III interferons on adrenocortical cells and its possible implications for autoimmune Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesen, A; Edvardsen, K; Breivik, L; Husebye, E S; Bratland, E

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is caused by selective destruction of the hormone-producing cells of the adrenal cortex. As yet, little is known about the potential role played by environmental factors in this process. Type I and/or type III interferons (IFNs) are signature responses to virus infections, and have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune endocrine disorders such as type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroiditis. Transient development of AAD and exacerbation of established or subclinical disease, as well as the induction of autoantibodies associated with AAD, have been reported following therapeutic administration of type I IFNs. We therefore hypothesize that exposure to such IFNs could render the adrenal cortex susceptible to autoimmune attack in genetically predisposed individuals. In this study, we investigated possible immunopathological effects of type I and type III IFNs on adrenocortical cells in relation to AAD. Both types I and III IFNs exerted significant cytotoxicity on NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells and potentiated IFN-γ- and polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly (I : C)]-induced chemokine secretion. Furthermore, we observed increased expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules and up-regulation of 21-hydroxylase, the primary antigenic target in AAD. We propose that these combined effects could serve to initiate or aggravate an ongoing autoimmune response against the adrenal cortex in AAD. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  3. Nicotine-induced stimulation of steroidogenesis in adrenocortical cells of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R P; Warner, W

    1975-03-01

    1. The effect of nicotine on steroid production and release from trypsin-dispersed cat adrenocortical cells was investigated. 2. Nicotine, like adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH), elicited a dose-dependent increase in steroidogenesis, which depended upon the presence of calcium in the medium. 3. Augmented steroid production evoked by submaximal concentrations of ACTH monobutyryl cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (AMP), or prostaglandin E2 was further enhanced by steroidogenic concentrations of nicotine. 4. These results are discussed in relation to the possible mode of action of nicotine on cortical cells and to the potential consequences of smoking during stress.

  4. Rosiglitazone induces autophagy in H295R and cell cycle deregulation in SW13 adrenocortical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerquetti, Lidia; Sampaoli, Camilla [Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via di Grottarossa, 1035-00189 Rome (Italy); Research Center S. Pietro Hospital, Via Cassia, 600-00189 Rome (Italy); Amendola, Donatella; Bucci, Barbara [Research Center S. Pietro Hospital, Via Cassia, 600-00189 Rome (Italy); Masuelli, Laura [Department of Experimental Medicine, ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Marchese, Rodolfo [Research Center S. Pietro Hospital, Via Cassia, 600-00189 Rome (Italy); Misiti, Silvia [Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via di Grottarossa, 1035-00189 Rome (Italy); Research Center S. Pietro Hospital, Via Cassia, 600-00189 Rome (Italy); De Venanzi, Agostino; Poggi, Maurizio; Toscano, Vincenzo [Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via di Grottarossa, 1035-00189 Rome (Italy); Stigliano, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.stigliano@uniroma1.it [Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via di Grottarossa, 1035-00189 Rome (Italy); Research Center S. Pietro Hospital, Via Cassia, 600-00189 Rome (Italy)

    2011-06-10

    Thiazolidinediones, specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) ligands, used in type-2 diabetes therapy, show favourable effects in several cancer cells. In this study we demonstrate that the growth of H295R and SW13 adrenocortical cancer cells is inhibited by rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinediones member, even though the mechanisms underlying this effect appeared to be cell-specific. Treatment with GW9662, a selective PPAR-{gamma}-inhibitor, showed that rosiglitazone acts through both PPAR-{gamma}-dependent and -independent mechanisms in H295R, while in SW13 cells the effect seems to be independent of PPAR-{gamma}. H295R cells treated with rosiglitazone undergo an autophagic process, leading to morphological changes detectable by electron microscopy and an increased expression of specific proteins such as AMPK{alpha} and beclin-1. The autophagy seems to be independent of PPAR-{gamma} activation and could be related to an increase in oxidative stress mediated by reactive oxygen species production with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, triggered by rosiglitazone. In SW13 cells, flow cytometry analysis showed an arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with a decrease of cyclin E and cdk2 activity, following the administration of rosiglitazone. Our data show the potential role of rosiglitazone in the therapeutic approach to adrenocortical carcinoma and indicate the molecular mechanisms at the base of its antiproliferative effects, which appear to be manifold and cell-specific in adrenocortical cancer lines.

  5. The peripheral cytoplasm of adrenocortical cells: zone-specific responses to ACTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesser, K E; Cain, L D; Malamed, S

    1994-05-01

    Differences in the cytoskeletal protein actin in cells from the zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata would be of considerable interest because there is persuasive evidence that rat corticosteroids are secreted by mechanisms that are somewhat zone-specific. We have previously shown evidence that actin may be involved in steroid secretion, possibly in connection with changes in adrenocortical microvilli. However, the cells upon which the data were based were not separated according to zone of origin. Immunogold electron microscopy and morphometric procedures were used to determine whether ACTH-induced changes in the peripheral cytoplasm of isolated adrenocortical cells occur in both zona fasciculata and zona glomerulosa cells. Actin immunoreactivity was more concentrated in the cytoplasm adjacent to the plasma membrane (including the cytoplasm within the microvilli) than it was in the internal cytoplasm in cells from both zones (4-6 times more concentrated in zona glomerulosa cells and 3-6 times more concentrated in zona fasciculata cells). However, the mean aggregate microvillar surface length (microvillar index) of untreated zona fasciculata cells (previously reported (Loesser and Malamed, 1987)) was 23% greater than that of untreated zona glomerulosa cells. Although ACTH (at a maximal steroidogenic concentration) had no effect on the peripheral cytoplasmic actin concentration of zona glomerulosa cells, there was a 24% increase in the aggregate microvillar length. In contrast, in zona fasciculata cells, ACTH treatment was accompanied by an increase in peripheral cytoplasmic actin concentration of 58-64% and an increase in aggregate microvillar surface length of 40% (previously reported (Loesser and Malamed, 1987)), almost twice that for zona glomerulosa cells. The results suggest that ACTH-induced hormone release from zona fasciculata cells is mediated by increases in peripheral cytoplasmic actin and aggregate microvillar length; in zona glomerulosa cells such

  6. Adrenocortical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payabyab, Eden C.; Balasubramaniam, Sanjeeve; Edgerly, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    The development of new therapies has lagged behind for rare cancers without defined therapeutic targets. Adrenocortical cancer is no exception. Mitotane, an older agent considered "adrenolytic," is used both to control symptoms in advanced disease and as adjuvant therapy after surgical resection....... Molecular characterization of adrenocortical cancer has deepened our understanding of this genetically complex disease while identifying subgroups whose importance remains to be determined. Unfortunately, such studies have yet to demonstrate a therapeutic target for drug development, and to date......, no targeted therapy has achieved meaningful outcomes. Consequently, first-line therapy for metastatic disease remains a combination regimen of etoposide, doxorubicin, and cisplatinum established in a randomized clinical trial. In addition to evaluating recent studies in adrenocortical cancer, we raise one...

  7. Adrenocortical zonation, renewal, and remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjut ePihlajoki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The adrenal cortex is divided into concentric zones. In humans the major cortical zones are the zona glomerulosa, zona fasciculata, and zona reticularis. The adrenal cortex is a dynamic organ in which senescent cells are replaced by newly differentiated ones. This constant renewal facilitates organ remodeling in response to physiological demand for steroids. Cortical zones can reversibly expand, contract, or alter their biochemical profiles to accommodate needs. Pools of stem/progenitor cells in the adrenal capsule, subcapsular region, and juxtamedullary region can differentiate to repopulate or expand zones. Some of these pools appear to be activated only during specific developmental windows or in response to extreme physiological demand. Senescent cells can also be replenished through direct lineage conversion; for example, cells in the zona glomerulosa can transform into cells of the zona fasciculata. Adrenocortical cell differentiation, renewal, and function are regulated by a variety of endocrine/paracrine factors including adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin II, insulin-related growth hormones, luteinizing hormone, activin, and inhibin. Additionally, zonation and regeneration of the adrenal cortex are controlled by developmental signaling pathways, such as the sonic hedgehog, delta-like homologue 1, fibroblast growth factor, and WNT/β-catenin pathways. The mechanisms involved in adrenocortical remodeling are complex and redundant so as to fulfill the offsetting goals of organ homeostasis and stress adaptation.

  8. Cytodiagnosis of myxoid adrenocortical carcinoma and role of immunocytochemistry to differentiate it from renal cell carcinoma

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    Santosh Kumar Mondal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC is a rare malignancy and cytodiagnosis of this tumor is not routinely encountered by a cytopathologist. Here, we report a case of ACC initially diagnosed by computed tomography (CT-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC with the help of immunocytochemistry. A 48-year-old lady presented with flank pain and abdominal mass for the last 6 months. A CT scan of her abdomen revealed a large mass arising from the upper part of the left kidney. CT-guided FNAC was performed. Cytologic smears showed pleomorphic large cells arranged discretely and in small aggregates against a myxoid background. The cells had a high nucleocytoplasmic ratio, anisonucleosis and conspicuous nucleoli. Based on cytomorphology, differential diagnoses of ACC and renal cell carcinoma (RCC were made. On immunocytochemistry, the tumor cells were synaptophysin, inhibin, vimentin and Melan-A positive but cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen negative. Thus, a cytodiagnosis of myxoid ACC was made and histopathologic examination was suggested. Subsequent histologic examination and immunohistochemistry proved the case to be myxoid ACC.

  9. Sunitinib inhibits cell proliferation and alters steroidogenesis by down-regulation of HSD3B2 in adrenocortical carcinoma cells

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    Matthias eKroiss

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib is used in the treatment of several solid tumors. Animal experiments pointed to an adrenotoxic effect of sunitinib. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of key targets of sunitinib in human adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC tumor samples and investigated its in vitro effects in ACC cell lines.We carried out immunohistochemistry for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and its receptor (VEGF-R2 in 157 ACC samples and 9 normal adrenal glands. VEGF and VEGF-R2 protein were expressed in 72 and 99% of ACC samples, respectively. Using NCI-H295 and SW13 ACC cell lines, we investigated the effects of sunitinib on cell proliferation. Sunitinib reduced dose-dependently cell viability of both NCI-H295 and SW13 cells (SW13: 0.1 µM 96±7%, 1µM 90±9%*, 5µM 62±6%*, controls 100±9%; *p<0.05. To determine sunitinib effects on steroidogenesis, we measured steroid hormones in cell culture supernatant by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. We observed a pronounced decrease of cortisol secretion (1µM 90.1±1.5%*, 5µM 57.2±0.3%*, controls 100±2.4% and a concomitant increase in the DHEA/4-androstenedione and 17-hydroxypregnenolone/17-hydroxyprogesterone ratios, indicating specific inhibition of 3-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B2. In yeast microsomes transformed with HSD3B2, no direct inhibition of HSD3B2 by sunitinib was detected. Sunitinib induced down regulation of HSD3B2 mRNA and protein in ACC cell lines (mRNA: 1µM 44±16%*; 5µM 22±2%*; 10µM 19±4%*; protein: 1µM 82±8%; 5µM 63±8%*; 10µM 55±9%*. CYP11B1 was down-regulated at mRNA but not at protein level and CYP11A1 remained unchanged.In conclusion, target molecules of sunitinib are expressed in the vast majority of ACC samples. Sunitinib exhibits anti-proliferative effects in vitro, and appears to specifically block adrenal steroidogenesis by down-regulation of HSD3B2, rendering it a promising option for treatment of ACC.

  10. StAR Protein Stability in Y1 and Kin-8 Mouse Adrenocortical Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Barbara J; Hudson, Elizabeth A

    2015-03-04

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) protein expression is required for cholesterol transport into mitochondria to initiate steroidogenesis in the adrenal and gonads. STAR is synthesized as a 37 kDa precursor protein which is targeted to the mitochondria and imported and processed to an intra-mitochondrial 30 kDa protein. Tropic hormone stimulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway is the major contributor to the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of STAR synthesis. Many studies have focused on the mechanisms of cAMP-PKA mediated control of STAR synthesis while there are few reports on STAR degradation pathways. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of cAMP-PKA-dependent signaling on STAR protein stability. We have used the cAMP-PKA responsive Y1 mouse adrenocortical cells and the PKA-deficient Kin-8 cells to measure STAR phosphorylation and protein half-life. Western blot analysis and standard radiolabeled pulse-chase experiments were used to determine STAR phosphorylation status and protein half-life, respectively. Our data demonstrate that PKA-dependent STAR phosphorylation does not contribute to 30 kDa STAR protein stability in the mitochondria. We further show that inhibition of the 26S proteasome does not block precursor STAR phosphorylation or steroid production in Y1 cells. These data suggest STAR can maintain function and promote steroidogenesis under conditions of proteasome inhibition.

  11. Knockdown of SF-1 and RNF31 affects components of steroidogenesis, TGFβ, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in adrenocortical carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ehrlund

    Full Text Available The orphan nuclear receptor Steroidogenic Factor-1 (SF-1, NR5A1 is a critical regulator of development and homeostasis of the adrenal cortex and gonads. We recently showed that a complex containing E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF31 and the known SF-1 corepressor DAX-1 (NR0B1 interacts with SF-1 on target promoters and represses transcription of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR and aromatase (CYP19 genes. To further evaluate the role of SF-1 in the adrenal cortex and the involvement of RNF31 in SF-1-dependent pathways, we performed genome-wide gene-expression analysis of adrenocortical NCI-H295R cells where SF-1 or RNF31 had been knocked down using RNA interference. We find RNF31 to be deeply connected to cholesterol metabolism and steroid hormone synthesis, strengthening its role as an SF-1 coregulator. We also find intriguing evidence of negative crosstalk between SF-1 and both transforming growth factor (TGF β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. This crosstalk could be of importance for adrenogonadal development, maintenance of adrenocortical progenitor cells and the development of adrenocortical carcinoma. Finally, the SF-1 gene profile can be used to distinguish malignant from benign adrenocortical tumors, a finding that implicates SF-1 in the development of malignant adrenocortical carcinoma.

  12. Comparative CYP-dependent binding of the adrenocortical toxicants 3-methylsulfonyl-DDE and o,p'-DDD in Y-1 adrenal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansson, Veronica; Asp, Vendela; Bergman, Ake; Bergström, Ulrika; Brandt, Ingvar

    2007-11-01

    The environmental pollutant 3-MeSO(2)-DDE [2-(3-methylsulfonyl-4-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethene] is an adrenocortical toxicant in mice, specifically in the glucocorticoid-producing zona fasciculata, due to a cytochrome P450 11B1 (CYP11B1)-catalysed bioactivation and formation of covalently bound protein adducts. o,p'-DDD [2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane] is toxic and inhibits steroidogenesis in the human adrenal cortex after bioactivation by unidentified CYPs, but does not exert any toxic effects on the mouse adrenal. As a step towards determining in vitro/in vivo relationships for the CYP-catalysed binding and toxicity of 3-MeSO(2)-DDE and o,p'-DDD, we have investigated the irreversible protein binding of these two toxicants in the murine adrenocortical cell line Y-1. The irreversible binding of 3-MeSO(2)-DDE previously demonstrated in vivo was successfully reproduced and could be inhibited by the CYP-inhibitors etomidate, ketoconazole and metyrapone. Surprisingly, o,p'-DDD reached similar levels of binding as 3-MeSO(2)-DDE. The binding of o,p'-DDD was sensitive to etomidate and ketoconazole, but not to metyrapone. Moreover, GSH depletion increased the binding of 3-MeSO(2)-DDE, but not of o,p'-DDD, indicating an important role of GSH conjugation in the detoxification of the 3-MeSO(2)-DDE-derived reactive metabolite. In addition, the specificity of CYP11B1 in activating 3-MeSO(2)-DDE was investigated using structurally analogous compounds. None of the analogues produced histopathological lesions in the mouse adrenal in vivo following a single i.p. injection of 100 mg/kg body weight, but two of the compounds were able to decrease the irreversible binding of 3-MeSO(2)-DDE to Y-1 cells. These results indicate that the bioactivation of 3-MeSO(2)-DDE by CYP11B1 is highly structure-dependent. In conclusion, both 3-MeSO(2)-DDE and o,p'-DDD bind irreversibly to Y-1 cells despite differences in binding and adrenotoxicity in mice

  13. Processing of angiotensin II (A-II) and (Sar1,Ala8)A-II by cultured bovine adrenocortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozat, A; Penhoat, A; Saez, J M

    1986-06-01

    Bovine adrenocortical cells, cultured in a chemically defined medium, were used to study the fate of [125I] iodoangiotensin II ([125I]iodo-A-II) and its antagonist (Sar1,Ala8)A-II ([125I]iodo-Saralasin). The binding of both ligands was time and temperature dependent. The maximum specific binding at 37 C, which was reached within 1 h, was followed by a decline with a half-life of about 2 h and 8 h for [125I]iodo-A-II and [125I]iodo-Saralasin, respectively. The decrease of the specific binding was parallel to the appearance in the medium of degraded ligand. At 4 C, the binding of [125I]iodo-A-II was stable for 12 h and no degradation of ligand occurred. Under several experimental conditions, about 70% of the total [125I]iodo-A-II bound was internalized, whereas, in the case of [125I]iodo-Saralasin, less than 25% of the total bound ligand was internalized. These differences in the binding kinetics between A-II and its antagonist were mainly the differences in the rate of internalization of the bound ligands, more rapid for [125I]iodo-A-II (t1/2 approximately equal to 10 min) than for [125I]iodo-Saralasin (t1/2 = 90 min). On the other hand, the rate of degradation of internalized ligand was similar for both ligands (t1/2 = 15 min). Ionophore monensin enhanced the total cellular uptake of both ligands by increasing the amount of internalized ligands. Monensin did not modify the rate of internalization of the two ligands but markedly decreased their rate of degradation (t1/2 approximately equal to 60 min). These results indicate that both A-II and its antagonist are internalized and degraded by adrenocortical cells, but the rate of internalization of the antagonist is lower than that of the agonist. They also show that receptor-mediated endocytosis is the main pathway by which A-II is rapidly degraded by adrenocortical cells. Since A-II receptors are present in many tissues, the receptor-mediated degradation could explain the very short half-life in plasma of this

  14. The aurora kinase inhibitor AMG 900 increases apoptosis and induces chemosensitivity to anticancer drugs in the NCI-H295 adrenocortical carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Kleiton S; Andrade, Augusto F; Silveira, Vanessa S; Marco Antonio, David S; Vasconcelos, Elton J R; Antonini, Sonir R R; Tone, Luiz G; Scrideli, Carlos A

    2017-07-01

    Adrenocortical tumor (ACT) is a malignancy with a low incidence rate and the current therapy for advanced disease has a limited impact on overall patient survival. A previous study from our group suggested that elevated expression of aurora-A and aurora-B is associated with poor outcome in childhood ACT. Similar results were also reported for adult ACTs. The present in-vitro study shows that AMG 900 inhibits aurora kinases in adrenocortical carcinoma cells. AMG 900 inhibited cell proliferation in NCI-H295 cells as well as in the ACT primary cultures and caused apoptosis in the cell line NCI-H295. Furthermore, it potentialized the mitotane, doxorubicin, and etoposide effects on apoptosis induction and acted synergistically with mitotane and doxorubicin in the inhibition of proliferation. In addition, we found that AMG 900 activated Notch signaling and rendered the cells sensitive to the combination of AMG 900 and Notch signaling inhibition. Altogether, these data show that aurora kinases inhibition using AMG 900 may be an adjuvant therapy to treat patients with invasive or recurrent adrenocortical carcinomas.

  15. Processing of angiotensin II (A-II) and (Sar1,Ala8)A-II by cultured bovine adrenocortical cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crozat, A.; Penhoat, A.; Saez, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    Bovine adrenocortical cells, cultured in a chemically defined medium, were used to study the fate of (/sup 125/I) iodoangiotensin II ((/sup 125/I)iodo-A-II) and its antagonist (Sar1,Ala8)A-II ((/sup 125/I)iodo-Saralasin). The binding of both ligands was time and temperature dependent. The maximum specific binding at 37 C, which was reached within 1 h, was followed by a decline with a half-life of about 2 h and 8 h for (/sup 125/I)iodo-A-II and (/sup 125/I)iodo-Saralasin, respectively. The decrease of the specific binding was parallel to the appearance in the medium of degraded ligand. At 4 C, the binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-A-II was stable for 12 h and no degradation of ligand occurred. Under several experimental conditions, about 70% of the total (/sup 125/I)iodo-A-II bound was internalized, whereas, in the case of (/sup 125/I)iodo-Saralasin, less than 25% of the total bound ligand was internalized. These differences in the binding kinetics between A-II and its antagonist were mainly the differences in the rate of internalization of the bound ligands, more rapid for (/sup 125/I)iodo-A-II (t1/2 approximately equal to 10 min) than for (/sup 125/I)iodo-Saralasin (t1/2 = 90 min). On the other hand, the rate of degradation of internalized ligand was similar for both ligands (t1/2 = 15 min). Ionophore monensin enhanced the total cellular uptake of both ligands by increasing the amount of internalized ligands. Monensin did not modify the rate of internalization of the two ligands but markedly decreased their rate of degradation (t1/2 approximately equal to 60 min). These results indicate that both A-II and its antagonist are internalized and degraded by adrenocortical cells, but the rate of internalization of the antagonist is lower than that of the agonist.

  16. Psychobiological mechanisms underlying the social buffering of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis: a review of animal models and human studies across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostinar, Camelia E; Sullivan, Regina M; Gunnar, Megan R

    2014-01-01

    Discovering the stress-buffering effects of social relationships has been one of the major findings in psychobiology in the last century. However, an understanding of the underlying neurobiological and psychological mechanisms of this buffering is only beginning to emerge. An important avenue of this research concerns the neurocircuitry that can regulate the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. The present review is a translational effort aimed at integrating animal models and human studies of the social regulation of the HPA axis from infancy to adulthood, specifically focusing on the process that has been named social buffering. This process has been noted across species and consists of a dampened HPA axis stress response to threat or challenge that occurs with the presence or assistance of a conspecific. We describe aspects of the relevant underlying neurobiology when enough information exists and expose major gaps in our understanding across all domains of the literatures we aimed to integrate. We provide a working conceptual model focused on the role of oxytocinergic systems and prefrontal neural networks as 2 of the putative biological mediators of this process, and propose that the role of early experiences is critical in shaping later social buffering effects. This synthesis points to both general future directions and specific experiments that need to be conducted to build a more comprehensive model of the HPA social buffering effect across the life span that incorporates multiple levels of analysis: neuroendocrine, behavioral, and social. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Species-specific sensitivity to selenium-induced impairment of cortisol secretion in adrenocortical cells of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L L; Hontela, A

    2011-06-01

    Species differences in physiological and biochemical attributes exist even among closely related species and may underlie species-specific sensitivity to toxicants. Rainbow trout (RT) are more sensitive than brook trout (BT) to the teratogenic effects of selenium (Se), but it is not known whether all tissues exhibit this pattern of vulnerability. In this study, primary cultures of RT and BT adrenocortical cells were exposed to selenite (Na(2)SO(3)) and selenomethionine (Se-Met) to compare cell viability and ACTH-stimulated cortisol secretion in the two fish species. Cortisol, the primary stress hormone in fish, facilitates maintenance of homeostasis when fish are exposed to stressors, including toxicants. Cell viability was not affected by Se, but selenite impaired cortisol secretion, while Se-Met did not (RT and BT EC(50)>2000mg/L). RT cells were more sensitive (EC(50)=8.7mg/L) to selenite than BT cells (EC(50)=90.4mg/L). To identify the targets where Se disrupts cortisol synthesis, selenite-impaired RT and BT cells were stimulated with ACTH, dbcAMP, OH-cholesterol, and pregnenolone. Selenite acted at different steps in the cortisol biosynthesis pathway in RT and BT cells, confirming a species-specific toxicity mechanism. To test the hypothesis that oxidative stress mediates Se-induced toxicity, selenite-impaired RT cells were exposed to NAC, BSO and antioxidants (DETCA, ATA, Vit A, and Vit E). Inhibition of SOD by DETCA enhanced selenite-induced cortisol impairment, indicating that oxidative stress plays a role in Se toxicity; however, modifying GSH content of the cells did not have an effect. The results of this study, with two closely related salmonids, provided additional evidence for species-specific differences in sensitivity to Se which should be considered when setting thresholds and water quality guidelines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alterations of Phosphodiesterases in Adrenocortical Tumors

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    Fady Hannah-Shmouni

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the cyclic (c AMP-dependent signaling pathway have been implicated in the majority of benign adrenocortical tumors (ACTs causing Cushing syndrome (CS. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs are enzymes that regulate cyclic nucleotide levels, including cAMP. Inactivating mutations and other functional variants in PDE11A and PDE8B, two cAMP-binding PDEs, predispose to ACTs. The involvement of these two genes in ACTs was initially revealed by a genome-wide association study in patients with micronodular bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Thereafter, PDE11A or PDE8B genetic variants have been found in other ACTs, including macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias and cortisol-producing adenomas. In addition, down-regulation of PDE11A expression and inactivating variants of the gene have been found in hereditary and sporadic testicular germ cell tumors, as well as in prostatic cancer. PDEs confer an increased risk of ACT formation probably through, primarily, their action on cAMP levels, but other actions might be possible. In this report, we review what is known to date about PDE11A and PDE8B and their involvement in the predisposition to ACTs.

  19. Osthole, a coumadin analog from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, stimulates corticosterone secretion by increasing steroidogenic enzyme expression in mouse Y1 adrenocortical tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhiqiang; Fang, Zhaoqin; Lu, Wenli; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2015-12-04

    Osthole is an O-methylated coumadin, which was isolated and purified from the seeds of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson. Osthole is a commonly used traditional Chinese medicine to treat patients with Kidney-Yang deficiency patients, who exhibit clinical signs similar to those of glucocorticoid withdrawal. However, the mechanism of action of osthole is not fully understood. This study was designed to reveal the effects of osthole on corticosterone production in mouse Y1 cell. Mouse Y1 adrenocortical cells were used to evaluate corticosterone production, which was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Cell viability was tested using the MTT assay, and the mRNA and protein expression of genes encoding steroidogenic enzymes and transcription factors was monitored by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blotting, respectively. Osthole stimulated corticosterone secretion from mouse Y1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and osthole enhanced the effect of dibutyryl-cAMP (Bu2cAMP) on corticosterone production. Further, osthole also increased StAR and CYP11B1 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner and enhanced the expression of transcription factors such as HSD3B1, FDX1, POR and RXRα as well as immediate early genes such as NR4A1. Moreover, osthole significantly increased SCARB1(SRB1) mRNA and StAR protein expression in the presence or absence of Bu2cAMP; these proteins are an important for the transport of the corticosteroid precursor cholesterol transport into mitochondria. Our results show that the promotion of corticosterone biosynthesis and secretion is a novel effect of osthole, suggesting that this agent can be utilized for the prevention and treatment of Kidney-Yang deficiency syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetics of Adrenocortical Development and Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya

    2017-06-01

    This article links the understanding of developmental physiology of the adrenal cortex to adrenocortical tumor formation. Many molecular mechanisms that lead to formation of adrenocortical tumors have been discovered via next-generation sequencing approaches. The most frequently mutated genes in adrenocortical tumors are also factors in normal adrenal development and homeostasis, including those that alter the p53 and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. In addition, dysregulated protein kinase A signaling and ARMC5 mutations have been identified as key mediators of adrenocortical tumorigenesis. The growing understanding of genetic changes that orchestrate adrenocortical development and disease pave the way for potential targeted treatment strategies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Adrenocortical tumors in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Ribeiro

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Childhood adrenocortical tumors (ACT are rare. In the USA, only about 25 new cases occur each year. In Southern Brazil, however, approximately 10 times that many cases are diagnosed each year. Most cases occur in the contiguous states of São Paulo and Paraná. The cause of this higher rate has not been identified. Familial genetic predisposition to cancer (p53 mutations and selected genetic syndromes (Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome have been associated with childhood ACT in general but not with the Brazilian counterpart. Most of the affected children are young girls with classic endocrine syndromes (virilizing and/or Cushing. Levels of urinary 17-ketosteroids and plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S, which are abnormal in approximately 90% of the cases, provide the pivotal clue to a diagnosis of ACT. Typical imaging findings of pediatric ACT consist of a large, well-defined suprarenal tumor containing calcifications with a thin capsule and central necrosis or hemorrhage. The pathologic classification of pediatric ACT is troublesome. Even an experienced pathologist can find it difficult to differentiate carcinoma from adenoma. Surgery is the single most important procedure in the successful treatment of ACT. The role of chemotherapy in the management of childhood ACT has not been established although occasional tumors are responsive to mitotane or cisplatin-containing regimens. Because of the heterogeneity and rarity of the disease, prognostic factors have been difficult to establish in pediatric ACT. Patients with incomplete tumor resection or with metastatic disease at diagnosis have a dismal prognosis. In patients with localized and completely resected tumors, the size of the tumor has predictive value. Patients with large tumors have a much higher relapse rate than those with small tumors.

  2. Adrenocortical reserves in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbaht, Kemal; Gullu, Sevim

    2014-02-01

    Explicit data regarding the changes in adrenocortical reserves during hyperthyroidism do not exist. We aimed to document the capability (response) of adrenal gland to secrete cortisol and DHEA-S during hyperthyroidism compared to euthyroidism, and to describe factors associated with these responses. A standard-dose (0.25 mg/i.v.) ACTH stimulation test was performed to the same patients before hyperthyroidism treatment, and after attainment of euthyroidism. Baseline cortisol (Cor(0)), DHEA-S (DHEA-S(0)), cortisol binding globulin (CBG), ACTH, calculated free cortisol (by Coolen's equation = CFC), free cortisol index (FCI), 60-min cortisol (Cor(60)), and DHEA-S (DHEA-S(60)), delta cortisol (ΔCor), delta DHEA-S (ΔDHEA-S) responses were evaluated. Forty-one patients [22 females, 49.5 ± 15.2 years old, 32 Graves disease, nine toxic nodular goiter] had similar Cor(0), DHEA-S(0), CFC, FCI, and DHEA-S(60) in hyperthyroid and euthyroid states. Cor(60), ΔCor, and ΔDHEA-S were lower in hyperthyroidism. In four (10 %) patients the peak ACTH-stimulated cortisol values were lower than 18 μg/dL. When the test repeated after attainment of euthyroidism, all of the patients had normal cortisol response. Regression analysis demonstrated an independent association of Cor(60) with free T3 in hyperthyroidism. However, the predictors of CFC, FCI, and DHEA-S levels were serum creatinine levels in hyperthyroidism, and both creatinine and transaminase levels in euthyroidism. ACTH-stimulated peak cortisol, delta cortisol, and delta DHEA-S levels are decreased during hyperthyroidism, probably due to increased turnover. Since about 10 % of the subjects with hyperthyroidism are at risk for adrenal insufficiency, clinicians dealing with Graves' disease should be alert to the possibility of adrenal insufficiency during hyperthyroid stage.

  3. Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie T Manipadam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD is a rare cause of ACTH-independent Cushing′s syndrome and has characteristic gross and microscopic pathologic findings. We report a case of PPNAD in a 15-year-old boy, which was not associated with Carney′s complex. Bilateral adrenalectomy is the treatment of choice.

  4. Isolation of rat adrenocortical mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solinas, Paola [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Fujioka, Hisashi [Electron Microscopy Facility, Department of Pharmacology, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Tandler, Bernard [Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Hoppel, Charles L., E-mail: charles.hoppel@case.edu [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for isolation of adrenocortical mitochondria from the adrenal gland of rats is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purified isolated mitochondria show excellent morphological integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of oxidative phosphorylation are excellent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method increases the opportunity of direct analysis of adrenal mitochondria from small animals. -- Abstract: This report describes a relatively simple and reliable method for isolating adrenocortical mitochondria from rats in good, reasonably pure yield. These organelles, which heretofore have been unobtainable in isolated form from small laboratory animals, are now readily accessible. A high degree of mitochondrial purity is shown by the electron micrographs, as well as the structural integrity of each mitochondrion. That these organelles have retained their functional integrity is shown by their high respiratory control ratios. In general, the biochemical performance of these adrenal cortical mitochondria closely mirrors that of typical hepatic or cardiac mitochondria.

  5. Analysis of histological and immunohistochemical patterns of benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors by computerized morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Vertemati, Maurizio; Petrella, Duccio; Bonacina, Edgardo; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Duregon, Eleonora; Volante, Marco; Papotti, Mauro; Loli, Paola

    2017-07-01

    Diagnosis of benign and purely localized malignant adrenocortical lesions is still a complex issue. Moreover, histology-based diagnosis may suffer of a moment of subjectivity due to inter- and intra-individual variations. The aim of the present study was to assess, by computerized morphometry, the morphological features in benign and malignant adrenocortical neoplasms. Eleven adrenocortical adenomas (ACA) were compared with 18 adrenocortical cancers (ACC). All specimens were stained with H&E, cellular proliferation marker Ki-67 and reticulin. We generated a morphometric model based on the analysis of volume fractions occupied by Ki-67 positive and negative cells (nuclei and cytoplasm), vascular and inflammatory compartment; we also analyzed the surface fraction occupied by reticulin. We compared the quantitative data of Ki-67 obtained by morphometry with the quantification resulting from pathologist's visual reading. The volume fraction of Ki-67 positive cells in ACCs was higher than in ACAs. The volume fraction of nuclei in unit volume and the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio in both Ki-67 negative cells and Ki-67 positive cells were prominent in ACCs. The surface fraction of reticulin was considerably lower in ACCs. Our computerized morphometric model is simple, reproducible and can be used by the pathologist in the histological workup of adrenocortical tumors to achieve precise and reader-independent quantification of several morphological characteristics of adrenocortical tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Adrenocortical function in hospitalised patients with active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess whether adrenocortical function was compromised in patients with active tuberculosis (TB) during the first 5 days of therapy with either a rifampicin-based or ciprofloxacin-based regimen. Design: Patients were randomised into two groups of 10 each. Adrenocortical function was compared in both groups ...

  7. Feminizing adrenocortical tumors: Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Chentli

    2015-01-01

    On the biological point, estrogen overproduction with or without increase in other adrenal hormones are the main abnormalities. Radiological examination usually shows the tumor, describes its limits and its eventual metastases. Adrenal and endocrine origins are confirmed by biochemical assessments and histology, but that one is unable to distinguish between benign and malignant tumors, except if metastases are already present. Immunostaining using anti-aromatase antibodies is the only tool that distinguishes FAT from other adrenocortical tumors. Abdominal surgery is the best and the first line treatment. For large tumors (≥10 cm, an open access is preferred to coeliosurgery, but for the small ones, or when the surgeon is experienced, endoscopic surgery seems to give excellent results. Surgery can be preceded by adrenolytic agents such as ortho paraprime dichloro diphenyl dichloroethane (Mitotane, ketoconazole or by aromatase inhibitors, but till now there is not any controlled study to compare the benefit of different drugs. New anti-estrogens can be used too, but their results need to be confirmed in malignant tumors resistant to classical chemotherapy and to conventional radiotherapy. Targeted therapy can be used too, as in other adrenocortical tumors, but the results need to be confirmed.

  8. MicroRNA signature in massive macronodular adrenocortical disease and implications for adrenocortical tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimpaki, Eirini I.; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Moraitis, Andreas; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Massive macronodular adrenocortical disease (MMAD) may be caused by aberrant microRNA expression. To determine the microRNA profile in MMAD and identify putative microRNA-gene target pairs involved in adrenal tumorigenesis. Experimental design We performed microRNA microarray analysis in 10 patients with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome caused by MMAD (ages 39 - 60 years) and 4 normal adrenal cortex samples were used as controls. Microarray data were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Identification of potential microRNA-gene target pairs implicated in MMAD pathogenesis has been done by integrating our microRNA data with previously obtained cDNA microarray data. Experimental validation of specific microRNA gene targets was performed by transfection experiments and luciferase assay. Results A total of 37 microRNAs were differentially expressed between MMAD and normal tissues; 16 microRNAs were down-regulated, including miR-200b and miR-203, while 21 microRNAs were up-regulated, miR-210 and miR-484 among them. Comparison of microRNA data with different clinicopathological parameters revealed miR-130a and miR-382 as putative diagnostic MMAD markers. Interestingly, we detected miR-200b targeting directly Matrin 3 (MATR3) expression in an adrenocortical cancer cell line (H295R). Conclusions MicroRNAs appear to have distinct regulatory effects in MMAD, including an association with clinical presentation and severity of the disease, expressed by the degree of hypercortisolism. This is the first investigation of microRNAs in MMAD, a disease with complex pathogenesis; the data indicate that specific microRNAs such as miR-200b may play a significant role in MMAD formation and/or progression. PMID:19849700

  9. MicroRNA signature in massive macronodular adrenocortical disease and implications for adrenocortical tumourigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimpaki, Eirini I; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Moraitis, Andreas; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-06-01

    Massive macronodular adrenocortical disease (MMAD) may be caused by aberrant microRNA expression. To determine the microRNA profile in MMAD and identify putative microRNA-gene target pairs involved in adrenal tumourigenesis. We performed microRNA microarray analysis in 10 patients with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome caused by MMAD (ages 39-60 years) and four normal adrenal cortex samples were used as controls. Microarray data were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Identification of potential microRNA-gene target pairs implicated in MMAD pathogenesis has been performed by integrating our microRNA data with previously obtained cDNA microarray data. Experimental validation of specific microRNA gene targets was performed by transfection experiments and luciferase assay. A total of 37 microRNAs were differentially expressed between MMAD and normal tissues; 16 microRNAs were down-regulated, including miR-200b and miR-203, whereas 21 microRNAs were up-regulated, miR-210 and miR-484 among them. Comparison of microRNA data with different clinicopathological parameters revealed miR-130a and miR-382 as putative diagnostic MMAD markers. Interestingly, we detected miR-200b targeting directly Matrin 3 (MATR3) expression in an adrenocortical cancer cell line (H295R). MicroRNAs appear to have distinct regulatory effects in MMAD, including an association with clinical presentation and severity of the disease, expressed by the degree of hypercortisolism. This is the first investigation of microRNAs in MMAD, a disease with complex pathogenesis; the data indicate that specific microRNAs such as miR-200b may play a significant role in MMAD formation and/or progression.

  10. A Rare Case of Functioning Adrenocortical Oncocytoma Presenting as Cushing Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Tartaglia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functioning adrenocortical oncocytoma is very rare neoplasm. It is usually nonfunctional and benign and incidentally detected. Generally, these tumors originate in the kidneys, thyroid, parathyroid, and salivary or pituitary glands; they have also been reported in other sites including choroid plexus, respiratory tract, and larynx. Histologically, they are characterized by cells with eosinophilic granular cytoplasm and numerous packed mitochondria. We reported a case of a 44-year-old female who presented with Cushing syndrome for hypersecretion of cortisol due to adrenocortical oncocytoma. Magnetic resonance of abdomen revealed a right adrenal mass. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed and the tumor was pathologically confirmed as benign adrenocortical oncocytoma. After surgical treatment, Cushing’s syndrome resolved.

  11. Late recurrent adrenocortical carcinoma presenting radiologically as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Beltagy

    2016-07-01

    Jul 1, 2016 ... Abstract. Introduction: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with an estimated incidence of 1–2 per million people. It may recur, after complete surgical removal by local or distant metastasis. Observation: We report a case of late metastatic ACC presented as a mesenteric mass, 10 years ...

  12. Chiral effects in adrenocorticolytic action of o,p'-DDD (mitotane) in human adrenal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asp, V; Cantillana, T; Bergman, A; Brandt, I

    2010-03-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant disease with poor prognosis. The main pharmacological choice, o,p'-DDD (mitotane), produces severe adverse effects. Since o,p'-DDD is a chiral molecule and stereoisomers frequently possess different pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic properties, we isolated the two o,p'-DDD enantiomers, (R)-(+)-o,p'-DDD and (S)-(-)-o,p'-DDD, and determined their absolute structures. The effects of each enantiomer on cell viability and on cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion in the human adrenocortical cell line H295R were assessed. We also assayed the o,p'-DDD racemate and the m,p'- and p,p'-isomers. The results show small but statistically significant differences in activity of the o,p'-DDD enantiomers for all parameters tested. The three DDD isomers were equally potent in decreasing cell viability, but p,p'-DDD affected hormone secretion slightly less than the o,p'- and m,p'-isomers. The small chiral differences in direct effects on target cells alone do not warrant single enantiomer administration, but might reach importance in conjunction with possible stereochemical effects on pharmacokinetic processes in vivo.

  13. Novel markers of gonadectomy-induced adrenocortical neoplasia in the mouse and ferret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillebeeckx, Maximiliaan; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Gretzinger, Elisabeth; Yang, Wei; Thol, Franziska; Hiller, Theresa; Löbs, Ann-Kathrin; Röhrig, Theresa; Schrade, Anja; Cochran, Rebecca; Jay, Patrick Y.; Heikinheimo, Markku; Mitra, Robi D.; Wilson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Gonadectomy (GDX) induces sex steroid-producing adrenocortical tumors in certain mouse strains and in the domestic ferret. Transcriptome analysis and DNA methylation mapping were used to identify novel genetic and epigenetic markers of GDX-induced adrenocortical neoplasia in female DBA/2J mice. Markers were validated using a combination of laser capture microdissection, quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Microarray expression profiling of whole adrenal mRNA from ovariectomized vs. intact mice demonstrated selective upregulation of gonadal-like genes including Spinlw1 and Insl3 in GDX-induced adrenocortical tumors of the mouse. A complementary candidate gene approach identified Foxl2 as another gonadal-like marker expressed in GDX-induced neoplasms of the mouse and ferret. That both “male-specific” (Spinlw1) and “female-specific” (Foxl2) markers were identified is noteworthy and implies that the neoplasms exhibit mixed characteristics of male and female gonadal somatic cells. Genome-wide methylation analysis showed that two genes with hypomethylated promoters, Igfbp6 and Foxs1, are upregulated in GDX-induced adrenocortical neoplasms. These new genetic and epigenetic markers may prove useful for studies of steroidogenic cell development and for diagnostic testing. PMID:25289806

  14. The human cell atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international...... collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells...... in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early...

  15. Human memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, M; Küppers, R

    2016-12-01

    A key feature of the adaptive immune system is the generation of memory B and T cells and long-lived plasma cells, providing protective immunity against recurring infectious agents. Memory B cells are generated in germinal center (GC) reactions in the course of T cell-dependent immune responses and are distinguished from naive B cells by an increased lifespan, faster and stronger response to stimulation and expression of somatically mutated and affinity matured immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Approximately 40% of human B cells in adults are memory B cells, and several subsets were identified. Besides IgG(+) and IgA(+) memory B cells, ∼50% of peripheral blood memory B cells express IgM with or without IgD. Further smaller subpopulations have additionally been described. These various subsets share typical memory B cell features, but likely also fulfill distinct functions. IgM memory B cells appear to have the propensity for refined adaptation upon restimulation in additional GC reactions, whereas reactivated IgG B cells rather differentiate directly into plasma cells. The human memory B-cell pool is characterized by (sometimes amazingly large) clonal expansions, often showing extensive intraclonal IgV gene diversity. Moreover, memory B-cell clones are frequently composed of members of various subsets, showing that from a single GC B-cell clone a variety of memory B cells with distinct functions is generated. Thus, the human memory B-cell compartment is highly diverse and flexible. Several B-cell malignancies display features suggesting a derivation from memory B cells. This includes a subset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, hairy cell leukemia and marginal zone lymphomas. The exposure of memory B cells to oncogenic events during their generation in the GC, the longevity of these B cells and the ease to activate them may be key determinants for their malignant transformation.

  16. Shh signaling regulates adrenocortical development and identifies progenitors of steroidogenic lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Peter; Paul, Alex; Laufer, Ed

    2009-01-01

    The adrenal cortex is a critical steroidogenic endocrine tissue, generated at least in part from the coelomic epithelium of the urogenital ridge. Neither the intercellular signals that regulate cortical development and maintenance nor the lineage relationships within the adrenal are well defined. We have explored adrenal Shh activity and found that Shh is expressed in relatively undifferentiated steroidogenic cells, which signal to the overlying capsule and subjacent nonsteroidogenic mesenchyme cells that we also find are progenitors of steroidogenic lineages. Shh-expressing cells also generate all steroidogenic cell types, but not nonsteroidogenic ones. Shh mutant adrenals have a thin capsule and small cortex. Our findings both support a novel dual lineage, Shh-independent and Shh-dependent, model of adrenocortical development, and identify distinct populations of adrenocortical progenitor and candidate stem cells. PMID:19955443

  17. Adjuvant mitotane treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzolo, Massimo; Angeli, Alberto; Fassnacht, Martin; Daffara, Fulvia; Tauchmanova, Libuse; Conton, Pier Antonio; Rossetto, Ruth; Buci, Lisa; Sperone, Paola; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Reimondo, Giuseppe; Bollito, Enrico; Papotti, Mauro; Saeger, Wolfgang; Hahner, Stefanie; Koschker, Ann-Cathrin; Arvat, Emanuela; Ambrosi, Bruno; Loli, Paola; Lombardi, Gaetano; Mannelli, Massimo; Bruzzi, Paolo; Mantero, Franco; Allolio, Bruno; Dogliotti, Luigi; Berruti, Alfredo

    2007-06-07

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare neoplasm characterized by a high risk of recurrence after radical resection. Whether the use of mitotane is beneficial as an adjuvant treatment has been controversial. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant mitotane in prolonging recurrence-free survival. We performed a retrospective analysis involving 177 patients with adrenocortical cancer who had undergone radical surgery at 8 centers in Italy and 47 centers in Germany between 1985 and 2005. Adjuvant mitotane was administered to 47 Italian patients after radical surgery (mitotane group), whereas 55 Italian patients and 75 German patients (control groups 1 and 2, respectively) did not receive adjuvant treatment after surgery. Baseline features in the mitotane group and the control group from Italy were similar; the German patients were significantly older (P=0.03) and had more stage I or II adrenocortical carcinomas (P=0.02) than did patients in the mitotane group. Recurrence-free survival was significantly prolonged in the mitotane group, as compared with the two control groups (median recurrence-free survival, 42 months, as compared with 10 months in control group 1 and 25 months in control group 2). Hazard ratios for recurrence were 2.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77 to 4.78; P<0.001) and 1.97 (95% CI, 1.21 to 3.20; P=0.005), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that mitotane treatment had a significant advantage for recurrence-free survival. Adverse events associated with mitotane were mainly of grade 1 or 2, but temporary dose reduction was needed in 13% of patients. Adjuvant mitotane may prolong recurrence-free survival in patients with radically resected adrenocortical carcinoma. Copyright 2007 Massachusetts Medical Society.

  18. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  19. Steroid hormone related effects of marine persistent organic pollutants in human H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dungen, van den M.W.; Rijk, J.C.W.; Kampman, E.; Steegenga, W.T.; Murk, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) 126 and 153, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), tributyltin (TBT), and methylmercury (MeHg) can be

  20. [A case of infantile virilizing adrenocortical tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Y; Hirao, Y; Tsujimoto, S; Kurooka, K; Yoshida, K; Okamoto, S; Maruyama, Y; Okajima, E; Hosokawa, A; Okamoto, S

    1989-10-01

    The patient was a 16-month-old girl, born by mature natural delivery and weighing 3,320 g. Hirsutism was noted on birth. Development of pubic hair and hypertrophy of the labia minora were noted after 8 months. At the time of admission, the height was 80 cm and body weight 14.5 kg. Systemic obesity, facial acne, systemic hirsutism, low pitched voice and hypertrophied clitoris were observed. Androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate and cortisol showed high levels in the blood, and the urinary 17-KS was obviously high, along with an increase in urinary 17-OHCS. The subject did not respond to either the dexamethasone inhibition test or ACTH load test. The abdominal CT revealed a tumor in the front upper position of the left kidney, and adrenal scintigraphy disclosed an obvious accumulation image in the adrenal gland on the left side. Based on the diagnosis of a left adrenal tumor, left adrenalectomy was performed. The tumor measured 5.0 x 4.5 x 3.7 cm, and weighed 57 g. Histopathologically it was diagnosed as adrenocortical adenoma. The infantile virilizing adrenocortical tumor is reported together with some discussion of the literature.

  1. Blood Transfusion and Survival for Resected Adrenocortical Carcinoma: A Study from the United States Adrenocortical Carcinoma Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Caroline E; Postlewait, Lauren M; Ethun, Cecilia G; Tran, Thuy B; Prescott, Jason D; Pawlik, Timothy M; Wang, Tracy S; Glenn, Jason; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Phay, John E; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C; Jin, Linda X; Weber, Sharon M; Salem, Ahmed; Sicklick, Jason K; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C; Mansour, John C; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C; Kiernan, Colleen M; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I; Levine, Edward A; Staley, Charles A; Poultsides, George A; Maithel, Shishir K

    2017-07-01

    Perioperative blood transfusion is associated with decreased survival in pancreatic, gastric, and liver cancer. The effect of transfusion in adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) has not been studied. Patients with available transfusion data undergoing curative-intent resection of ACC from 1993 to 2014 at 13 institutions comprising the United States Adrenocortical Carcinoma Group were included. Factors associated with blood transfusion were determined. Primary and secondary end points were recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS), respectively. Out of 265 patients, 149 were included for analysis. Out of these, 57 patients (38.3%) received perioperative transfusions. Compared to nontransfused patients, transfused patients more commonly had stage 4 disease (46% vs 24%, P = 0.01), larger tumors (15.8 vs 10.2 cm, P Transfusion was associated with decreased RFS (8.9 vs 24.7 months, P = 0.006) and OS (22.8 vs 91.0 months, P transfusion, stage IV, hormonal hypersecretion, and adjuvant therapy were associated with decreased RFS. On multivariable analysis, only transfusion [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.0-2.9, P = 0.04], stage IV (HR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.7-5.9, P transfusion HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.1-3.8, P = 0.02; stage 4 HR = 6.2, 95% CI = 3.1-12.4, P 2 units of packed red blood cells in median RFS (8.9 vs 8.4 months, P = 0.95) or OS (26.5 vs 18.6 months, P = 0.63). Perioperative transfusion is associated with earlier recurrence and decreased survival after curative-intent resection of ACC. Strategies and protocols to minimize blood transfusion should be developed and followed.

  2. Human innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-11-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune responses. As such, ILCs make up interesting therapeutic targets for several diseases. In patients with allergy and asthma, group 2 innate lymphoid cells produce high amounts of IL-5 and IL-13, thereby contributing to type 2-mediated inflammation. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells are implicated in intestinal homeostasis and psoriasis pathology through abundant IL-22 production, whereas group 1 innate lymphoid cells are accumulated in chronic inflammation of the gut (inflammatory bowel disease) and lung (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), where they contribute to IFN-γ-mediated inflammation. Although the ontogeny of mouse ILCs is slowly unraveling, the development of human ILCs is far from understood. In addition, the growing complexity of the human ILC family in terms of previously unrecognized functional heterogeneity and plasticity has generated confusion within the field. Here we provide an updated view on the function and plasticity of human ILCs in tissue homeostasis and disease. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Atypical presentation of a hormonally active adrenocortical tumor in an adolescent leading to delayed diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Kerstin; Zanolari Calderari, Maura; Perren, Aurel; Cree, Ian; Mullis, Primus E; Flück, Christa E

    2011-01-01

    Adrenocortical tumors are rare in children and present with variable signs depending on the type of hormone excess. We herein describe the unusual presentation of a child with adrenocortical tumor and introduce the concept of in vitro chemosensitivity testing. A 10.5-year-old girl presented with hypertrichosis/hirsutism and weight loss. The weight loss and behavioral problems, associated with halted puberty and growth, led to the initial diagnosis of anorexia nervosa. However, subsequent weight gain but persisting arrest in growth and puberty and the appearance of central fat distribution prompted further evaluation. RESULTS AND FOLLOW-UP: 24h-urine free cortisol was elevated. Morning plasma ACTH was undetectable, while cortisol was elevated and circadian rhythmicity was absent. Thus a hormonally active adrenal cortical tumor (ACT) was suspected. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) a unilateral, encapsulated tumor was found which was subsequently removed surgically. Tissue was investigated histologically and for chemosensitivity in primary cell cultures. Although there were some risk factors for malignancy, the tumor was found to be a typical adenoma. Despite this histology, tumor cells survived in culture and were sensitive to cisplatin in combination with gemcitabine or paclitaxel. At surgery, the patient was started on hydrocortisone replacement which was unsuccessfully tapered over 3 months. Full recovery of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis occurred only after 3 years. The diagnosis of a hormonally active adrenocortical tumor is often delayed because of atypical presentation. Cortisol replacement following unilateral tumor excision is mandatory and may be required for months or years. Individualized chemosensitivity studies carried out on primary cultures established from the tumor tissue itself may provide a tool in evaluating the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drugs in the event that the adrenocortical tumor may prove to be carcinoma.

  4. Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease presenting with a unilateral adrenocortical nodule treated with bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaltsas Gregory

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease is a rare cause of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome. We report an uncommon primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease case presenting with a unilateral adrenocortical nodule and provide a brief overview of the existing literature. Case presentation A 27-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our Department with adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome. Its cause was initially considered a left adrenocortical adenoma based on computer tomography imaging. The patient underwent left laparoscopic adrenalectomy and histological examination revealed pigmented micronodular adrenal hyperplasia. Evaluation for the presence of Carney complex was negative. Six months later recurrence of hypercortisolism was documented and a right laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed further establishing the diagnosis of primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease. After a nine-year follow-up there is no evidence of residual disease. Conclusions Even though primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease is a rare cause of Cushing's syndrome, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome, especially because adrenal imaging can be misleading mimicking other adrenocortical diseases. Bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy is the preferred treatment in these subjects.

  5. Differential effects of antidepressants on glucocorticoid receptors in human primary blood cells and human monocytic U-937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiske, Andreas; Jesberg, Jutta; Krieg, Jürgen-Christian; Vedder, Helmut

    2003-04-01

    A number of data support the assumption that antidepressants (ADs) normalize the altered function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system involved in the pathophysiology of depressive disorder via direct effects on glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). In the present study, we examined the tricyclic ADs desipramine (DESI) and imipramine (IMI), the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor maprotiline (MAPRO), and the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic AD (NaSSA) mirtazapine (MIR) for their effects on GR expression in primary human leukocytes and in monocytic U-937 cells. Semiquantitative RT-PCR indicated that the ADs exert differential effects on GR-mRNA levels in both primary human leukocytes and U-937 cells: whereas MAPRO and IMI did not induce pronounced changes in GR-mRNA levels, DESI and MIR significantly decreased the amounts of GR-mRNA in both cell systems. Further characterization of the effects of MIR revealed a time dependency of the regulation with an initial increase of GR-mRNA levels above control levels after 2.5 h of treatment and a decrease after 4, 24, and 48 h of incubation. A dose-response analysis demonstrated maximal effects of MIR at a concentration of 10(-7) M. Immunohistochemical studies showed that MIR increased the GR protein levels in a time-dependent manner and that this upregulation appeared earlier by additional treatment with dexamethasone (DEX). A translocation of the GR protein from the cytoplasm to the nucleus was induced between 24 and 48 h of treatment with MIR and MIR/DEX, respectively. Taken together, our data further support the assumption that ADs influence the neuroendocrine and immune system via effects on cellular GRs.

  6. Protein kinase A subunit expression is altered in Bloom syndrome fibroblasts and the BLM protein is increased in adrenocortical hyperplasias: inverse findings for BLM and PRKAR1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyerdahl, S L; Boikos, S; Horvath, A; Giatzakis, C; Bossis, I; Stratakis, C A

    2008-06-01

    Bloom syndrome is a genetic disorder associated with chromosomal instability and a predisposition to tumors that is caused by germline mutations of the BLM gene, a RecQ helicase. Benign adrenocortical tumors display a degree of chromosomal instability that is more significant than benign tumors of other tissues. Cortisol-producing hyperplasias, such as primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), which has been associated with protein kinase A (PKA) abnormalities and/or PRKAR1A mutations, also show genomic instability. Another RecQ helicase, WRN, directly interacts with the PRKAR1B subunit of PKA. In this study, we have investigated the PRKAR1A expression in primary human Bloom syndrome cell lines with known BLM mutations and examined the BLM gene expression in PPNAD and other adrenal tumor tissues. PRKAR1A and other protein kinase A (PKA) subunits were expressed in Bloom syndrome cells and their level of expression differed by subunit and cell type. Overall, fibroblasts exhibited a significant decrease in protein expression of all PKA subunits except for PRKAR1A, a pattern that has been associated with neoplastic transformation in several cell types. The BLM protein was upregulated in PPNAD and other hyperplasias, compared to samples from normal adrenals and normal cortex, as well as samples from cortisol- and aldosterone-producing adenomas (in which BLM was largely absent). These data reveal an inverse relationship between BLM and PRKAR1A: BLM deficiency is associated with a relative excess of PRKAR1A in fibroblasts compared to other PKA subunits; and PRKAR1A deficiency is associated with increased BLM protein in adrenal hyperplasias.

  7. Imaging findings in pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, J. [International Outreach Program, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Department of Radiology, Instituto Materno Infantil de Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Ribeiro, R.C. [International Outreach Program, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Department of Hematology-Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee-Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Fletcher, B.D. [International Outreach Program, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee-Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, 332 N. Lauderdale St., Memphis, TN 38105 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee-Memphis, TN (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Background. Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC), a tumor that is rare among children, causes clinically evident hormonal disturbances. Imaging methods are used to stage disease and to plan surgical resection. Objective. To describe the findings of the various imaging methods used to evaluate ACC. Materials and methods. We reviewed the records of ten consecutive patients (mean age, 8.1 years) who presented from 1987 to 1998 with ACC. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) scanning; five underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; four underwent ultrasonography (US); and eight underwent radionuclide bone scans. Results. Seven patients presented with signs of hormonally functional tumors. Typical imaging findings consisted of a large, well-defined suprarenal tumor, containing calcifications (seven patients) with a thin capsule and central necrosis or hemorrhage (six patients). The inferior vena cava (IVC) was compressed by tumor in three patients, and ultrasonography demonstrated invasion of the IVC wall in one of these. Three patients' bone scans showed that the primary tumor took up radioactive tracer. Spread to lungs or liver or both was demonstrated in six patients. Conclusions. CT, US and MR imaging are effective methods of imaging the primary tumor. Chest CT and bone scintigraphy should be performed to detect metastases. The presence of a thin tumor capsule, a stellate central zone of necrosis, and evidence of hormonal function help distinguish ACC from neuroblastoma. (orig.)

  8. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  9. Mother-child adrenocortical synchrony; Moderation by dyadic relational behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Maayan; Apter-Levi, Yael; Vakart, Adam; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv; Zagoory-Sharon, Orna; Feldman, Ruth

    2017-03-01

    Mother-child adrenocortical synchrony, the coupling of cortisol (CT) secretion in mother and child, has been associated with shared parent-child experiences and maladaptive familial contexts. Yet, few studies tested adrenocortical synchrony in diurnal CT patterns. Guided by the bio-behavioral synchrony model, we examined whether mother-child relational behavior and maternal psychopathology may moderate the degree of concordance between mother and child's diurnal CT. Ninety-seven mothers and their six-year old children participated in two groups; mothers diagnosed with major depression disorder (N=28) and non-depressed controls (N=69). Mother-child interactions were observed and coded for dyadic reciprocity and dyadic tension and diurnal cortisol was collected from mother and child over two consecutive weekend days. Concordance between maternal and child's diurnal CT was found, significant above and beyond time of measurement. Maternal depression, while associated with attenuated child diurnal CT variability, was unrelated to adrenocortical synchrony. Higher child diurnal CT production predicted a stronger linkage between maternal and child's diurnal CT, suggesting that greater child physiological stress is associated with increased susceptibility to the influences of maternal stress physiology. Mother-child reciprocity was related to lower adrenocortical synchrony. Findings suggest that higher adrenocortical synchrony is associated with greater physiological stress and less adaptive dyadic relational patterns. Results raise the possibility that diurnal adrenocortical synchrony taps a unique aspect of HPA-axis functioning whose role in the cross-generational transfer of stress physiology requires further research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. ACAT-selective and nonselective DGAT1 inhibition: adrenocortical effects--a cross-species comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floettmann, Jan Eike; Buckett, Linda K; Turnbull, Andrew V; Smith, Tim; Hallberg, Carina; Birch, Alan; Lees, David; Jones, Huw B

    2013-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol O-Acyltransferase (ACAT) and Acyl-coenzyme A: diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes play important roles in synthesizing neutral lipids, and inhibitors of these enzymes have been investigated as potential treatments for diabetes and other metabolic diseases. Administration of a Acyl-coenzyme A: diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) inhibitor with very limited cellular selectivity over ACAT resulted in significant adrenocortical degenerative changes in dogs. These changes included macrosteatotic vacuolation associated with adrenocyte cell death in the zonae glomerulosa and fasciculata and minimal to substantial mixed inflammatory cell infiltration and were similar to those described previously for some ACAT inhibitors in dogs. In the mouse, similar but only transient adrenocortical degenerative changes were seen as well as a distinctive nondegenerative reduction in cortical fine vacuolation. In the marmoset, only the distinctive nondegenerative reduction in cortical fine vacuolation was observed, suggesting that the dog, followed by the mouse, is the most sensitive species for cortical degeneration. Biochemical analysis of adrenal cholesterol and cholesteryl ester indicated that the distinctive reduction in cortical fine vacuolation correlated with a significant reduction in cholesteryl ester in the mouse and marmoset, whereas no significant reduction in cholestryl ester, but an increase in free cholesterol was observed in dogs. Administration of a DGAT1 inhibitor with markedly improved selectivity over ACAT to the marmoset and the mouse resulted in no adrenal pathology at exposures sufficient to cause substantial DGAT1 but not ACAT inhibition, thereby implicating ACAT rather than DGAT1 inhibition as the probable cause of the observed adrenal changes. Recognizing that the distinctive nondegenerative reduction in cortical fine vacuolation in the mouse could be used as a histopathological biomarker for an in vivo model of

  11. Adrenocortical scintigraphy with {sup 131}I-6-beta-iodomethyl-norcholesterol (NP 59) in bilateral adrenocortical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Hernandez, G.; Pallares, F.J.C.; Avila y Avalos, C.R. de [Hospital Clinic Universitari de Valencia (Spain). Servei de Medicina Nuclear; Bartual, A.R.; Rodrigo, S.T.; Ampudia-Blasco, F.J. [Hospital Clinic Universitari de Valencia (Spain). Servei d`Endocrinologia

    1998-06-01

    A case of a 49-year-old man suffering from bilateral adrenocortical carcinoma with local and secondary rapid progression is reported. The results of adrenocortical scintigraphy (NP 59) and histological findings allowed the diagnosis. This case report and a literature review showed the importance of using adrenocortical scintigraphy as a complementary imaging procedure of CT or MR images. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wird ueber einen 49jaehrigen Mann berichtet, der an einem beidseitigen Nebennierenrinden-Karzinom mit schneller lokaler und sekundaerer Progression leidet. Die Ergebnisse der Nebennierenrinden-Szintigraphie (NP 59) und Histologie ermoeglichten die Diagnose: Dieser Fallbericht und ein Literaturueberblick zeigen die Bedeutung der Nebennierenrinden-Szintigraphie als ein zusaetzliches bildgebendes Verfahren neben CT und NMR. (orig.)

  12. Non-invasive measurement of adrenocortical activity in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measuring physiological stress reactions through the quantification of plasma cortisol often involves physical restraint, which acts as a stressor itself. Here, we present the validation of a non-invasive method for assessing adrenocortical activity as an indicator of stress in the bat-eared fox (Otocyon megalotis). By conducting ...

  13. Adrenocortical response to competitive athletics in students from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) as well as hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which results in an increase of cortisol secretion. Very little is known however about adrenocortical response at basal state, just before the onset of exercise (pre-exercise) and immediately ...

  14. Pathogenesis of canine cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    In dogs, hypercortisolism is one of the most frequently observed endocrine disorders, with an estimated incidence of about 1-2 cases per 1000 dogs per year. Approximately 15% of these cases is due to a cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumor (AT). Cortisol-secreting ATs are characterized by

  15. Diffusion inside living human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, N.; Jeon, J. -H.; Loft, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring lipid granules diffuse in the cytoplasm and can be used as tracers to map out the viscoelastic landscape inside living cells. Using optical trapping and single particle tracking we found that lipid granules exhibit anomalous diffusion inside human umbilical vein endothelial...... cells. For these cells the exact diffusional pattern of a particular granule depends on the physiological state of the cell and on the localization of the granule within the cytoplasm. Granules located close to the actin rich periphery of the cell move less than those located towards to the center...... of the cell or within the nucleus. Also, granules in cells which are stressed by intense laser illumination or which have attached to a surface for a long period of time move in a more restricted fashion than those within healthy cells. For granules diffusing in healthy cells, in regions away from the cell...

  16. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  17. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, Mette D.; Spits, Hergen

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are lymphoid cells that do not express rearranged receptors and have important effector and regulatory functions in innate immunity and tissue remodeling. ILCs are categorized into 3 groups based on their distinct patterns of cytokine production and the requirement of

  18. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune

  19. Environmental enrichment affects adrenocortical stress responses in the endangered black-footed ferret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poessel, S.A.; Biggins, D.E.; Santymire, R.M.; Livieri, T.M.; Crooks, K.R.; Angeloni, L.

    2011-01-01

    Potential stressors of wildlife living in captivity, such as artificial living conditions and frequent human contact, may lead to a higher occurrence of disease and reduced reproductive function. One successful method used by wildlife managers to improve general well-being is the provision of environmental enrichment, which is the practice of providing animals under managed care with environmental stimuli. The black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) is a highly-endangered carnivore species that was rescued from extinction by removal of the last remaining individuals from the wild to begin an ex situ breeding program. Our goal was to examine the effect of environmental enrichment on adrenocortical activity in ferrets by monitoring fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGM). Results demonstrated that enrichment lowered FGM in juvenile male ferrets, while increasing it in adult females; enrichment had no effect on FGM in juvenile females and adult males. These results correspond with our findings that juvenile males interacted more with the enrichment items than did adult females. However, we did not detect an impact of FGM on the incidence of disease or on the ability of ferrets to become reproductive during the following breeding season. We conclude that an environmental enrichment program could benefit captive juvenile male ferrets by reducing adrenocortical activity. ?? 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  20. Aldosterone and progesterone-secreting adrenocortical adenocarcinoma in a cat with a concurrent meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Leshinsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 12-year-old, male neutered domestic shorthair cat was referred for investigation of suspected hyperaldosteronism due to persistent hypokalaemia, hindlimb ataxia, weakness of 1 month’s duration and a left adrenal mass that was detected on abdominal ultrasound. Neurological examination findings at referral were suggestive of a concurrent left forebrain lesion. Hyperaldosteronism and concurrent hyperprogesteronism were confirmed on endocrine testing. On computed tomography (CT of the abdomen and thorax there was no evidence of local vascular invasion by the adrenal mass or of metastatic disease. CT and magnetic resonance imaging featured a large, focal rim-enhancing extra-axial left forebrain lesion consistent with a meningioma. Surgical excision of the forebrain mass was followed by adrenalectomy 2 weeks later. The tumours were classified on histopathology as a psammomatous meningioma and an adrenocortical adenocarcinoma, respectively. Immunohistochemical staining of the meningioma confirmed the presence of progesterone receptors. The cat remains well 2 years later. Relevance and novel information In humans, elevated serum progesterone levels have been associated with rapid growth of meningiomas due to the presence of progesterone receptors on the tumour. This is the first report of a cat with a progesterone and aldosterone-secreting adrenocortical adenocarcinoma and a concurrent meningioma. Clinicians should be aware of the potential effect of elevated progesterone on meningiomas in cats.

  1. Young female patient with testosterone-producing adrenocortical adenoma also showing signs of subclinical Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Y; Sasaki, M; Sasano, H; Suzuki, T; Kitamura, N; Tomoi, M; Yorifuji, H; Koshimura, K; Kato, Y

    1995-04-01

    A 28-year old female patient with virilization due to left adrenocortical adenoma was studied. The patient had clinical features of hyperandrogenism such as hirsutism and a low pitched voice, but not of hypercorticoidism. Plasma testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) were high. Although the basal plasma cortisol concentration and urinary excretion of 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (17-OHCS) were within the normal range, the absence of diurnal variation in plasma cortisol and loss of suppressibility by dexamethasone suggested constitutive secretion of cortisol by the tumor. Inappropriate cortisol secretion was also supported by blunted ACTH response to provocative stimuli. After successful removal of the left adrenal tumor, such endocrinological abnormalities were all normalized. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that tumor cells were positively stained for C21 hydroxylase cytochrome P-450 (P-450C21) and P-450(11) beta which convert 17-hydroxy (OH) progesterone to cortisol as well as P-450SCC, 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and P-450(17) alpha which are involved in testosterone biosynthesis. These findings suggest that adrenocortical adenoma secretes predominantly testosterone and constitutively cortisol in a young woman patient with virilization.

  2. Plurihormonal Cosecretion by a Case of Adrenocortical Oncocytic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Corrales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms (oncocytomas are extremely rare; only approximately 159 cases have been described so far. The majority are nonfunctional and benign. We describe an unusual case of a functional oncocytoma secreting an excess of glucocorticoids (cortisol and androgens (androstenedione and DHEAS, a pattern of plurihormonal cosecretion previously not reported in men, presenting with endocrine manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome. The neoplasm was considered to be of uncertain malignant potential (borderline according to the Lin-Weiss-Bisceglia criteria.

  3. Imaging of adrenal masses with emphasis on adrenocortical tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Because of the more widespread and frequent use of cross-sectional techniques, mainly computed tomography (CT), an increasing number of adrenal tumors are detected as incidental findings ("incidentalomas"). These incidentaloma patients are much more frequent than those undergoing imaging because of symptoms related to adrenal disease. CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are in most patients sufficient for characterization and follow-up of the incidentaloma. In a minor portion of patients, biochemical screening reveals a functional tumor and further diagnostic work-up and therapy need to be performed according to the type of hormonal overproduction. In oncological patients, especially when the morphological imaging criteria indicate an adrenal metastasis, biopsy of the lesion should be considered after pheochromocytoma is ruled out biochemically. In the minority of patients in whom CT and MRI fail to characterize the tumor and when time is of essence, functional imaging mainly by positron emission tomography (PET) is available using various tracers. The most used PET tracer, [(18)F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose ((18)FDG), is able to differentiate benign from malignant adrenal tumors in many patients. (11)C-metomidate ((11)C-MTO) is a more specialized PET tracer that binds to the 11-beta-hydroxylase enzyme in the adrenal cortex and thus makes it possible to differ adrenal tumors (benign adrenocortical adenoma and adrenocortical cancer) from those of non-adrenocortical origin.

  4. Conventional and novel strategies in the treatment of adrenocortical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.E. Schteingart

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical carcinoma is a highly malignant neoplasm with an incidence of two per million people per year. Several treatment strategies have resulted in temporary or partial tumor regression but very few cases have attained long survival. Surgical resection of the primary tumor and metastases is most effective. Several chemotherapeutic protocols have been employed with variable success. Mitotane (o,p'-DDD is an adrenalytic drug effective in inducing a tumor response in 33% of patients treated. Mitotane requires metabolic transformation for therapeutic action. Tumors may vary in their ability to metabolize mitotane and the ability of tumors to transform mitotane may predict the clinical response to the drug. Preliminary data show a possible correlation between metabolic activity of neoplastic adrenocortical tissue and response to mitotane. We have attempted to develop mitotane analogs with enhanced adrenalytic effect. Compared to mitotane, a di-chloro compound, the bromo-chloro and di-bromo analogs appear to have a greater effect. Future approaches to the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma are likely to be based on blocking or reversing the biological mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Angiogenic and chemotactic mechanisms may play a role in adrenal tumor growth and inhibition of these mechanisms may result in inhibition of tumor growth. New mitotane analogs with greater adrenalytic potential could be a promising approach to developing more effective and selective therapies for adrenal cancer. Alternative approaches should attempt to suppress tumor growth by means of compounds with anti-angiogenic and anti-chemotactic activity.

  5. Supportive behaviors in adolescent romantic relationships moderate adrenocortical attunement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Thao; Yeung, Ellen Wanheung; Rogers, Adam A; Poulsen, Franklin O; Kornienko, Olga; Granger, Douglas A

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated dyadic adrenocortical attunement within adolescent romantic relationships. An ethnically diverse sample (42% Latino) of adolescent heterosexual dating couples (N=91 dyads, Mage=16.5 years, SD=0.99) donated eight saliva samples (later assayed for cortisol) over the course of a 3-h laboratory session. Supportive behaviors were coded during a conflict and jealousy interaction task from video recordings, and participants completed pre-and-post task questionnaires. Parallel process latent growth models revealed a strong positive association between the couples' cortisol intercept, indicating that couples show attunement in initial levels of cortisol. Further, observed supportive behavior moderated the strength of the association between dyadic cortisol slopes. The results imply that low levels of supportive behavior predicted stronger adrenocortical attunement in the change in cortisol levels over time between adolescent romantic partners. These findings indicate that even early romantic relationships exhibit coordination of physiological activity. Findings raise the possibility that adrenocortical attunement may be a dyadic pathway through which the proximal social context of early romantic relationships is translated into risk or resilience in health and behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Rare Cause of Hypokalemia: Aldosterone-Secreting Adrenocortical Carcinoma Dear Editor,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethem Turgay Cerit

    2014-03-01

    .1 grams was removed, which was encapsulated and lobulated. Tumour diameter was 3.5 cm. Histopathological examination showed focal necrosis. The tumour infltrated its capsule and sinusoidal invasion was present. 20 mitotic cells/10 high power fields were seen. Ki-67 proliferation index was %25. Vimentine, synaptophysin and melan-A were positive, chromogranin was focal positive and pancreatin was negative with immunohistochemical examination. The tumor met five of the criteria of Weiss used in histological diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma (number of mitosis, nuclear atypia, atypical mitosis, capsular invasion and sinusoidal invasion. Pathological diagnosis was adrenocortical carcinoma. There were no sign of adrenal insufficiency during and after the surgery. He did not take any treatment after surgery. Serum potassium and aldosterone returned to normal after adrenalectomy. His symptoms such as weakness and pain were also resolved. One year after adrenalectomy, the patient is alive, normotensive, normokalemic and with no signs of recurrence of the primary adrenal tumor (Table 1. In summary, we reported the case of a 32-year-old male who initially presented with hypertension and severe hypokalemia and was found to have an aldosterone-secreting adrenocortical carcinoma. Aldosterone-producing adrenocortical carcinom (APAC is a rare cause of hypertension often diagnosed late. Aldosterone hypersecretion often concurs with that of other steroids, including glucocorticoids, estrogens or androgens. In most cases clinical picture reveals classical signs of Conn’s syndrome; hypertension and hypokalemia. Weakness and diffuse muscular pain are common due to severe hypokalemia, but these symptoms are not useful in differentiating APAC from an aldosterone secreting adenoma or hyperplasia (5. Although there are several reports suggesting increased serum levels of adrenal androgens such as DHEA-S may indicate adrenocortical carcinoma (2,6, normal levels does not rule out the

  7. Tetralogy of Fallot Associated With Invasive Adrenocortical Tumor in an Adult Woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Quintana, Efren; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Fayna; Alberiche-Ruano, Maria Pino; Martinez-Martin, Maria Soledad

    2012-01-01

    Migration of cardiac neural crest cells into the pharyngeal arches and the pharyngeal and splanchnic mesoderm contributes to the development of the cardiac outflow tract. The adrenal cortex is derived from the splanchnic mesoderm. Neuroblastoma is more prevalent in patients with congenital heart disease than in the general population, because both originate from embryonal neural crest-derived cells. Similarly, and in light of recent embryological findings, abnormal development or migration of splanchnic mesoderm, possibly due to an underlying genetic defect, could contribute to the association of adrenocortical carcinoma and tetralogy of Fallot. We present the case of a cardiologically asymptomatic 49-year-old woman with total correction of tetralogy of Fallot in the first year of life. PMID:23843811

  8. Pediatric adrenocortical neoplasms: can imaging reliably discriminate adenomas from carcinomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynt, Kelsey A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Smith, Ethan A.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Davenport, Matthew S.; Caoili, Elaine M. [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Else, Tobias [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-08-15

    There is a paucity of literature describing and comparing the imaging features of adrenocortical adenomas and carcinomas in children and adolescents. To document the CT and MRI features of adrenocortical neoplasms in a pediatric population and to determine whether imaging findings (other than metastatic disease) can distinguish adenomas from carcinomas. We searched institutional medical records to identify pediatric patients with adrenocortical neoplasms. Pre-treatment CT and MRI examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus, and pertinent imaging findings were documented. We also recorded relevant histopathological, demographic, clinical follow-up and survival data. We used the Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test to compare parametric and nonparametric continuous data, and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses to evaluate the diagnostic performances of tumor diameter and volume for discriminating carcinoma from adenoma. A P-value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Among the adrenocortical lesions, 9 were adenomas, 15 were carcinomas, and 1 was of uncertain malignant potential. There were no differences in mean age, gender or sidedness between adenomas and carcinomas. Carcinomas were significantly larger than adenomas based on mean estimated volume (581 ml, range 16-2,101 vs. 54 ml, range 3-197 ml; P-value = 0.003; ROC area under the curve = 0.92) and mean maximum transverse plane diameter (9.9 cm, range 3.0-14.9 vs. 4.4 cm, range 1.9-8.2 cm; P-value = 0.0001; ROC area under the curve = 0.92). Carcinomas also were more heterogeneous than adenomas on post-contrast imaging (13/14 vs. 2/9; odds ratio [OR] = 45.5; P-value = 0.001). Six of 13 carcinomas and 1 of 8 adenomas contained calcification at CT (OR = 6.0; P-value = 0.17). Seven of 15 children with carcinomas exhibited metastatic disease at diagnosis, and three had inferior vena cava invasion. Median

  9. Cushing syndrome caused by adrenocortical tumors and hyperplasias (corticotrophin-independent Cushing syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous Cushing syndrome (CS) is caused by excess adrenal glucocorticoid secretion that is adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-dependent or independent; ACTH-independent adrenocortical causes of CS account for up to 20% of CS in adults, and 15% in children over age 7 years. In younger children, ACTH-independent CS may account for as many as half of CS cases. In both adults and children, adrenocortical lesions causing CS include the common, isolated and sporadic, solitary cortisol-producing adenoma, the rare adrenocortical cancer, and a spectrum of recently recognized, bilateral hyperplasias (bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasias - BAHs): micronodular adrenal disease (MAD) and its pigmented variant, primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) are mostly genetic processes. Macronodular BAHs, ACTH-independent macronodular hyperplasia (AIMAH) or massive macronodular adrenocortical disease (MMAD) are less frequently genetic and almost never present in children (except in McCune-Albright syndrome); they present often with atypical CS in middle-aged or elderly adults. The majority of benign adrenocortical tumors associated with CS are associated with defects of the cyclic AMP signaling pathway, whereas adrenal cancer is linked to aberrant expression of growth factors and germline or somatic mutations of tumor suppressor genes such as TP53. Adrenalectomy is the preferred mode of treatment for all adrenocortical causes of CS. PMID:18493137

  10. Cushing's syndrome and big IGF-II associated hypoglycaemia in a patient with adrenocortical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Kazuhide; Takamura, Toshinari; Takeshita, Yumie; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Imaizumi, Noriko; Misu, Hirofumi; Taji, Komei; Kasahara, Kazuo; Oshinoya, Yukinosuke; Suzuki, Shioto; Ooi, Akishi; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman had a general health examination and was diagnosed with a non-functioning adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Despite surgery and chemotherapy with mitotane, the ACC progressed with metastases to the lymph nodes, liver and lung. Initially, she developed adrenal insufficiency and was treated with hydrocortisone. As the ACC progressed, it produced superabundant cortisol, resulting in clinically overt Cushing's syndrome. As the liver metastases grew, the patient developed hypoglycaemia with suppression of endogenous insulin secretion. She had to be given large quantities of glucose intravenously to remain normoglycaemic. The serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II/IGF-I ratio had increased to 84. We identified big IGF-II, a primary hormonal mediator of non-islet cell tumour hypoglycaemia (NICTH), in the serum and tumour using western blotting. This is the first case of ACC that showed both Cushing's syndrome and NICTH associated with big IGF-II.

  11. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-05

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest.

  12. Adrenocortical Adenoma and Central Serous Chorioretinopathy: A Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pastor-Idoate

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old man with bilateral central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR and body weight gain was diagnosed with Cushing’s syndrome secondary to an adrenocortical adenoma. The patient had high levels of free cortisol and the tumor was confirmed by histopathology. After surgery, cortisol levels decreased and the CSCR spontaneously resolved. This case highlights the role of cortisol in the pathogenesis of CSCR. A diagnosis of endogenous Cushing’s syndrome should be considered in patients with CSCR as an initial symptom.

  13. Adrenocortical function in hospitalised patients with active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-05-17

    May 17, 2006 ... development and persistence of pain in fibromyalgia – a promising paradigm. Pain. 2000; 86: 213-215. 12. Rook GA, Hernandez-Pando R. Pathogenic role, in human and murine tuberculosis, of changes in the peripheral metabolism of glucocorticoids and antiglucocorticoids. Pschyconeuroendocrinology ...

  14. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (TFH) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of TFH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on TFH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate TFH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing TFH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138(+) plasma and IgD(-)CD27(+) memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented TFH cell development. Added to TFH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on TFH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control TFH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the TFH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the TFH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Endocannabinoids and Human Sperm Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Zolese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamides (NAEs are naturally occurring signaling lipids consisting of amides and esters of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Usually they are present in a very small amounts in many mammalian tissues and cells, including human reproductive tracts and fluids. Recently, the presence of N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA, the most characterised member of endocannabinoids, and its congeners palmitoylethanolamide (PEA and oleylethanolamide (OEA in seminal plasma, oviductal fluid, and follicular fluids was demonstrated. AEA has been shown to bind not only type-1 (CB1 and type-2 (CB2 cannabinoid receptors, but also type-1 vanilloid receptor (TRPV1, while PEA and OEA are inactive with respect to classical cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 but activate TRPV1 or peroxisome proliferator activate receptors (PPARs. This review concerns the most recent experimental data on PEA and OEA, endocannabinoid-like molecules which appear to exert their action exclusively on sperm cells with altered features, such as membrane characteristics and kinematic parameters. Their beneficial effects on these cells could suggest a possible pharmacological use of PEA and OEA on patients affected by some forms of idiopathic infertility.

  16. Targeting polo-like kinase 1, a regulator of p53, in the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussey, Kimberly J; Bapat, Aditi; Linnehan, Claire; Wandoloski, Melissa; Dastrup, Erica; Rogers, Erik; Gonzales, Paul; Demeure, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive cancer with a 5 year survival rate of 20-30 %. Various factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ACC including dysregulation of the G2/M transition and aberrant activity of p53 and MDM2. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK-1) negatively modulates p53 functioning, promotes MDM2 activity through its phosphorylation, and is involved in the G2/M transition. Gene expression profiling of 44 ACC samples showed that increased expression of PLK-1 in 29 % of ACC. Consequently, we examined PLK-1's role in the modulation of the p53 signaling pathway in adrenocortical cancer. We used siRNA knock down PLK-1 and pharmacological inhibition of PLK-1 and MDM2 ACC cell lines SW-13 and H295R. We examined viability, protein expression, p53 transactivation, and induction of apoptosis. Knocking down expression of PLK-1 with siRNA or inhibition of PLK-1 by a small molecule inhibitor, BI-2536, resulted in a loss of viability of up to 70 % in the ACC cell lines H295R and SW-13. In xenograft models, BI-2536 demonstrated marked inhibition of growth of SW-13 with less inhibition of H295R. BI-2536 treatment resulted in a decrease in mutant p53 protein in SW-13 cells but had no effect on wild-type p53 protein levels in H295R cells. Additionally, inhibition of PLK-1 restored wild-type p53's transactivation and apoptotic functions in H295R cells, while these functions of mutant p53 were restored only to a smaller extent. Furthermore, inhibition of MDM2 with nutlin-3 reduced the viability of both the ACC cells and also reactivated wild-type p53's apoptotic function. Inhibition of PLK-1 sensitized the ACC cell lines to MDM2 inhibition and this dual inhibition resulted in an additive apoptotic response in H295R cells with wild-type p53. These preclinical studies suggest that targeting p53 through PLK-1 is an attractive chemotherapy strategy warranting further investigation in adrenocortical cancer.

  17. Stem cells in the human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Polyak, Kornelia

    2010-01-01

    The origins of the epithelial cells participating in the development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer of the human breast are poorly understood. However, emerging evidence suggests a role for adult tissue-specific stem cells in these processes. In a hierarchical manner, these generate the two main...... mammary cell lineages, producing an increasing number of cells with distinct properties. Understanding the biological characteristics of human breast stem cells and their progeny is crucial in attempts to compare the features of normal stem cells and cancer precursor cells and distinguish these from...... nonprecursor cells and cells from the bulk of a tumor. A historical overview of research on human breast stem cells in primary tissue and in culture reveals the progress that has been made in this area, whereas a focus on the cell-of-origin and reprogramming that occurs during neoplastic conversion provides...

  18. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  19. Effect of acupuncture on adrenocortical hormone production in rabbits with a central lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Y.Y.; Seto, K.; Saitoh, H.; Kawakami, M.

    A study was made of adrenocortical hormone production under electroacupuncture stimulation of the Tsu-San-Li locus in rabbits with a lesion in the fornix, stria terminalis, ventromedial nucleus or arcuate nucleus. In rabbits with a lesion in the stria terminalis or ventromedial nucleus, electroacupuncture stimulation of Tsu-San-Li resulted in no increase in phase 1 but an increase in phase 2 of adrenocortical hormone production. In rabbits with a lesion in the fornix or arcuate nucleus electroacupuncture stimulation of Tsu-San-Li was followed by increased adrenocortical hormone production in the both phases. These results show that the stria terminalis and the ventromedial nucleus play a major role in the augmentation of adrenocortical hormone production by electroacupuncture stimulation of Tsu-San-Li.

  20. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  1. Abdominal wall metastasis in scar after open resection of an adrenocortical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Gupta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old man patient presented with progressively increasing, occasionally painful lump in the left upper and central abdomen. Investigations revealed well-defined capsulated left adrenocortical carcinoma. Tumor was resected successfully along with left kidney. Tumor recurred in the abdominal surgical scar 1.5 years after surgery. We are reporting this case because of rarity of metastatic recurrence of an adrenocortical carcinoma in the abdominal surgical scar 1.5 years after resection of primary tumor.

  2. MicroRNAs as potential biomarkers in adrenocortical cancer: progress and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia eCHERRADI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignancy with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Over the last decade, pan-genomic analyses of genetic and epigenetic alterations and genome-wide expression profile studies allowed major advances in the understanding of the molecular genetics of adrenocortical carcinoma. Besides the well-known dysfunctional molecular pathways in adrenocortical tumors such as the IGF2 pathway, the Wnt pathway and TP53, high-throughput technologies enabled a more comprehensive genomic characterization of adrenocortical cancer. Integration of expression profile data with exome sequencing, SNP array analysis, methylation and microRNA profiling led to the identification of subgroups of malignant tumors with distinct molecular alterations and clinical outcomes. MicroRNAs post-transcriptionally silence their target gene expression either by degrading mRNA or by inhibiting translation. Although our knowledge of the contribution of deregulated microRNAs to the pathogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma is still in its infancy, recent studies support their relevance in gene expression alterations in these tumors. Some microRNAs have been shown to carry potential diagnostic and prognostic values while others may be good candidates for therapeutic interventions. With the emergence of disease-specific blood-borne microRNAs signatures, analyses of small cohorts of patients with adrenocortical carcinoma suggest that circulating microRNAs represent promising non-invasive biomarkers of malignancy or recurrence. However, some technical challenges still remain, and most of the microRNAs reported in the literature have not yet been validated in sufficiently powered and longitudinal studies. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge regarding the deregulation of tumor-associated and circulating microRNAs in adrenocortical carcinoma patients, while emphasizing their potential significance in adrenocortical carcinoma pathogenic

  3. Current and Emerging Therapeutic Options in Adrenocortical Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Stigliano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC is a very rare endocrine tumour, with variable prognosis, depending on tumour stage and time of diagnosis. The overall survival is five years from detection. Radical surgery is considered the therapy of choice in the first stages of ACC. However postoperative disease-free survival at 5 years is only around 30% and recurrence rates are frequent. o,p’DDD (ortho-, para’-, dichloro-, diphenyl-, dichloroethane, or mitotane, an adrenolytic drug with significant toxicity and unpredictable therapeutic response, is used in the treatment of ACC. Unfortunately, treatment for this aggressive cancer is still ineffective. Over the past years, the growing interest in ACC has contributed to the development of therapeutic strategies in order to contrast the neoplastic spread. In this paper we discuss the most promising therapies which can be used in this endocrine neoplasia.

  4. Virilization in a Girl with Adrenocortical Adenoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahniyah Haq

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of Cushing’s syndrome and virilization in a 15 year old girl which was suspected to be due to an adrenal carcinoma. She presented with features of virilization in addition to those of hypercortisilism. Her high androgen levels especially dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS were also in favor of an adrenal carcinoma. An unenhanced computerized tomography (CT scan showed a mass (size: 5.3 cm in the right adrenal gland with a soft tissue intensity of more than 10 HU which was suggestive of adrenal carcinoma. But, histopathology of the resected mass revealed a benign adrenocortical adenoma. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2012; 6(2: 70-72

  5. Ectopic, retroperitoneal adrenocortical carcinoma in the setting of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jesse P; Montgomery, Kathleen W; Tierney, Joshua; Gilbert, Jill; Solórzano, Carmen C; Idrees, Kamran

    2017-09-22

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is rare within the adult population. Ectopic ACC proves even rarer. This variant is formed by cortical fragments arrested during embryologic migration. ACC is also known to be associated with several genetic syndromes and has recently been linked to Lynch syndrome in 3% of cases. We present the case of a 68-year-old male with a confirmed diagnosis of Lynch syndrome secondary to a germline MSH2 mismatch-repair gene-mutation who presented with 2 months history of non-specific abdominal pain. After imaging work-up, the patient was found to have a right upper quadrant, retroperitoneal mass. Biochemical tests were without any evidence of a hormonally active process. Fine needle aspiration of the mass revealed a poorly differentiated carcinoma of unknown etiology. The lesion was resected and found to be consistent with ectopic ACC with an associated MSH2 mutation.

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junying; Vodyanik, Maxim A; Smuga-Otto, Kim; Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica; Frane, Jennifer L; Tian, Shulan; Nie, Jeff; Jonsdottir, Gudrun A; Ruotti, Victor; Stewart, Ron; Slukvin, Igor I; Thomson, James A

    2007-12-21

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows trans-acting factors present in the mammalian oocyte to reprogram somatic cell nuclei to an undifferentiated state. We show that four factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, and LIN28) are sufficient to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells that exhibit the essential characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells. These induced pluripotent human stem cells have normal karyotypes, express telomerase activity, express cell surface markers and genes that characterize human ES cells, and maintain the developmental potential to differentiate into advanced derivatives of all three primary germ layers. Such induced pluripotent human cell lines should be useful in the production of new disease models and in drug development, as well as for applications in transplantation medicine, once technical limitations (for example, mutation through viral integration) are eliminated.

  7. c-Myc-Dependent Cell Competition in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish S; Shah, Heta S; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2017-07-01

    Cell Competition is an interaction between cells for existence in heterogeneous cell populations of multicellular organisms. This phenomenon is involved in initiation and progression of cancer where heterogeneous cell populations compete directly or indirectly for the survival of the fittest based on differential gene expression. In Drosophila, cells having lower dMyc expression are eliminated by cell competition through apoptosis when present in the milieu of cells having higher dMyc expression. Thus, we designed a study to develop c-Myc (human homolog) dependent in vitro cell competition model of human cancer cells. Cells with higher c-Myc were transfected with c-myc shRNA to prepare cells with lower c-Myc and then co-cultured with the same type of cells having a higher c-Myc in equal ratio. Cells with lower c-Myc showed a significant decrease in numbers when compared with higher c-Myc cells, suggesting "loser" and "winner" status of cells, respectively. During microscopy, engulfment of loser cells by winner cells was observed with higher expression of JNK in loser cells. Furthermore, elimination of loser cells was prevented significantly, when co-cultured cells were treated with the JNK (apoptosis) inhibitor. Above results indicate elimination of loser cells in the presence of winner cells by c-Myc-dependent mechanisms of cell competition in human cancer cells. This could be an important mechanism in human tumors where normal cells are eliminated by c-Myc-overexpressed tumor cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1782-1791, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Knott, Jason G. [Developmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  9. Adrenocortical attunement in mother-child dyads: importance of situational and behavioral characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttle, Paula L; Serbin, Lisa A; Stack, Dale M; Schwartzman, Alex E; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A

    2011-09-01

    Synchronization of behavior, emotions and autonomic physiology in mother-child dyads is related to adaptive functioning in children. It is important to explore the possibility of "attunement", or systematic synchronization, of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis because it is sensitive to social information processing at an unconscious level. Due to limited research in humans, the present study aimed to demonstrate mother-child cortisol attunement in a human population, and examine how behavioral sensitivity may moderate this association. Saliva samples were collected from 75 mother-child dyads during a home visit. A free-play task was used to determine behavioral sensitivity within the dyad. Findings suggest that mother-child dyads demonstrate attunement of HPA axis activity and that attunement is particularly prominent during times of increased challenge. Furthermore, results suggest factors associated with behavioral sensitivity may influence attunement within the dyad. Bidirectional synchronization of adrenocortical levels may serve to positively impact later developmental outcomes in children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular regulation of human hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, P.L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Peter van Galen focuses on understanding the determinants that maintain the stem cell state. Using human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as a model, processes that govern self-renewal and tissue regeneration were investigated. Specifically, a role for microRNAs in balancing the human HSC

  11. Germline PRKACA amplification leads to Cushing syndrome caused by 3 adrenocortical pathologic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J Aidan; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the pathology of 5 patients with germline PRKACA copy number gain and Cushing syndrome: 4 males and 1 female, aged 2 to 43 years, including a mother and son. Imaging showed normal or slightly enlarged adrenal glands in 4 patients and a unilateral mass in the fifth. Biochemically, the patients had corticotropin-independent hypercortisolism. Four underwent bilateral adrenalectomy; unilateral adrenalectomy was performed in the patient with the adrenal mass. Pathologically, 3 patients, including the 1 with the tumor (adenoma), had primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease with extranodular cortical atrophy and mild intracapsular and extracapsular extension of cortical cells. The other 2 patients had cortical hyperplasia and prominent capsular and extracapsular micronodular cortical hyperplasia. Immunoperoxidase staining revealed differences for synaptophysin, inhibin-A, and Ki-67 (nuclei) in the atrophic cortices (patients 1, 2, and 3) and hyperplastic cortices (patients 4 and 5) and for Ki-67 (nuclei) and vimentin in the extracortical nodules in the 2 groups of patients. β-Catenin stained the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nuclei of the adenoma. The patients were well at follow-up (1-23 years); 24-hour urinary cortisol excretion was elevated in the patient who had unilateral adrenalectomy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long-te...

  13. Human cord blood cells can differentiate into retinal nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike-Kiriyama, Naoko; Adachi, Yasushi; Minamino, Keizo; Iwasaki, Masayoshi; Nakano, Keiji; Koike, Yasushi; Yamada, Haruhiko; Mukaide, Hiromi; Shigematsu, Akio; Mizokami, Tomomi; Matsumura, Miyo; Ikehara, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    Retinal degeneration and dystrophy are the major causes of blindness in the developed world. It has been reported that human cord blood cells (HCBCs) can differentiate into neuron-like cells in vitro. We have recently demonstrated that bone marrow cells (BMCs) of both mice and rats can differentiate into retinal nerve cells (RNCs). In the present study, we show the differentiation capacity of HCBCs into RNCs in vivo. We transplanted lineage-negative HCBCs into the subretinal space of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Two weeks after the transplantation, some of the transplanted cells expressed human nestin, human MAP2, human neuron specific enolase (NSE), beta-III tubulin and also rhodopsin. These results indicate that HCBCs can differentiate into RNCs and suggest that our new strategy could be used for the regeneration of retinal nerve cells in degenerative or dystrophic diseases.

  14. Human Satellite Cell Isolation and Xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Steven M; Tamaki, Stanley; Xu, Xiaoti; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells are mononucleated cells of the skeletal muscle lineage that exist beneath the basal lamina juxtaposed to the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers. It is widely accepted that satellite cells mediate skeletal muscle regeneration. Within the satellite cell pool of adult muscle are skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs), also called satellite stem cells, which fulfill criteria of tissue stem cells: They proliferate and their progeny either occupies the adult MuSC niche during self-renewal or differentiates to regenerate mature muscle fibers. Here, we describe robust methods for the isolation of enriched populations of human satellite cells containing MuSCs from fresh human muscle, utilizing mechanical and enzymatic dissociation and purification by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We also describe a process for xenotransplantation of human satellite cells into mouse muscle by injection into irradiated, immunodeficient, mouse leg muscle with concurrent notexin or bupivacaine muscle injury to increase engraftment efficiency. The engraftment of human MuSCs and the formation of human muscle can then be analyzed by histological and immunofluorescence staining, or subjected to in vivo experimentation.

  15. LONG-TERM RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR ADRENOCORTICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Britvin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adrenocortical cancer (ACC is a rare adrenal neoplasm with aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis, and with many unresolved problems of diagnostics, treatment and predictive factors. Aim: To identify the most significant clinical and morphological predictors of the outcome based on assessment of long-term results of surgical treatment of ACC patients. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included data on diagnosis and results of treatment of 73 ACC patients from 1999 to 2015. Results: Radical surgery was performed in 59 patients, and long-term results assessed in 52 of them (maximal duration of the follow-up was 12 years. The most favorable treatment results were seen in stages I and II of the disease, with a 5-year survival rate of 87%. The 5-year overall survival in patients with ACC stage III was significantly (p=0.042, multiple comparisons lower (48%. Two patients who had been operated with ACC stage IV (adrenalectomy with excision of a solid liver metastasis and atypical lung resection died of progressive tumor within 13 months after surgery. The survival rates in patients with stage III of the tumor were evaluated depending on the main clinical characteristics of the tumor. It was shown that the 5-year overall survival in non-functioning adrenocortical carcinomas was 59%, being significantly (p<0.05 better than that in patients with functionally active malignancies (22%. In the group of patients without metastases in the regional lymphatic nodes, the 5-year overall survival was 56%, whereas all patients with regional lymphatic metastases by the time of the surgery died from progression within 4 years after the intervention. There was an association between 5-year overall survival and the size of primary tumor, with significantly (p<0.05 lower numbers of 5-year overall survivors (29% among those with tumors of more than 10 cm in diameter, compared with 65% survival rate in those with tumors of less than 10

  16. Report on Liver Cell Transplantation Using Human Fetal Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosi, Giada; Chinnici, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    In an era of organ shortage, human fetuses donated after medically indicated abortion could be considered a potential liver donor for hepatic cell isolation. We investigated transplantation of fetal liver cells as a strategy to support liver functionality in end-stage liver disease. Here, we report our protocol of human fetal liver cells (hFLC) isolation in fetuses from 17 to 22 gestational weeks, and our clinical procedure of hFLC transplantation through the splenic artery.

  17. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  18. Energy Generation in the Human Body by the Human Cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We adapted the thermodynamics equation for energy generation in a diesel engine in modeling energy generation in human body by the human cells by doing a thorough study on both systems and saw that the process of energy generation is the same in them. We equally saw that the stages involved in energy generation ...

  19. Ex Vivo Expanded Human NK Cells Survive and Proliferate in Humanized Mice with Autologous Human Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Fatemeh; Nham, Tina; Poznanski, Sophie M; Chew, Marianne V; Shenouda, Mira M; Lee, Dean; Ashkar, Ali A

    2017-09-21

    Adoptive immune cell therapy is emerging as a promising immunotherapy for cancer. Particularly, the adoptive transfer of NK cells has garnered attention due to their natural cytotoxicity against tumor cells and safety upon adoptive transfer to patients. Although strategies exist to efficiently generate large quantities of expanded NK cells ex vivo, it remains unknown whether these expanded NK cells can persist and/or proliferate in vivo in the absence of exogenous human cytokines. Here, we have examined the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human cord blood-derived NK cells into humanized mice reconstituted with autologous human cord blood immune cells. We report that ex vivo expanded NK cells are able to survive and possibly proliferate in vivo in humanized mice without exogenous cytokine administration, but not in control mice that lack human immune cells. These findings demonstrate that the presence of autologous human immune cells supports the in vivo survival of ex vivo expanded human NK cells. These results support the application of ex vivo expanded NK cells in cancer immunotherapy and provide a translational humanized mouse model to test the lifespan, safety, and functionality of adoptively transferred cells in the presence of autologous human immune cells prior to clinical use.

  20. Percutaneous laser ablation of unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacella, Claudio M. [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)], E-mail: claudiomaurizio.pacella@fastwebnet.it; Stasi, Roberto; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Sara; Graziano, Filomena Maria; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Papini, Enrico [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Via San Francesco 50, Albano Laziale, Rome 00041 (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical benefits of percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) in patients with unresectable primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Patients and methods: Four patients with hepatic metastases from ACC and a Cushing's syndrome underwent ultrasound-guided PLA. In one case the procedure was performed also on the primary tumor. Results: After three sessions of PLA, the primary tumor of 15 cm was ablated by 75%. After 1-4 (median 1) sessions of PLA, five liver metastases ranging from 2 to 5 cm were completely ablated, while the sixth tumor of 12 cm was ablated by 75%. There were no major complications. Treatment resulted in an improvement of performance status and a reduction of the daily dosage of mitotane in all patients. The three patients with liver metastases presented a marked decrease of 24-h urine cortisol levels, an improved control of hypertension and a mean weight loss of 2.8 kg. After a median follow-up after PLA of 27.0 months (range, 9-48 months), two patients have died of tumor progression, while two other patients remain alive and free of disease. Conclusions: Percutaneous laser ablation is a feasible, safe and well tolerated procedure for the palliative treatment of unresectable primary and metastatic ACC. Further study is required to evaluate the impact of PLA on survival.

  1. Mesenchymal origin of multipotent human testis-derived stem cells in human testicular cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikhovskaya, J. V.; van Daalen, S. K. M.; Korver, C. M.; Repping, S.; van Pelt, A. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to mouse germ cell-derived pluripotent stem cells, the pluripotent state of human testis-derived embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like that spontaneously arise in primary testicular cell cultures remains controversial. Recent studies have shown that these cells closely resemble multipotent

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  3. Modeling human infertility with pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human fertility is dependent upon the correct establishment and differentiation of the germline. This is because no other cell type in the body is capable of passing a genome and epigenome from parent to child. Terminally differentiated germline cells in the adult testis and ovary are called gametes. However, the initial specification of germline cells occurs in the embryo around the time of gastrulation. Most of our knowledge regarding the cell and molecular events that govern human germline specification involves extrapolating scientific principles from model organisms, most notably the mouse. However, recent work using next generation sequencing, gene editing and differentiation of germline cells from pluripotent stem cells has revealed that the core molecular mechanisms that regulate human germline development are different from rodents. Here, we will discuss the major molecular pathways required for human germline differentiation and how pluripotent stem cells have revolutionized our ability to study the earliest steps in human embryonic lineage specification in order to understand human fertility.

  4. Cushing’s syndrome and big IGF-II associated hypoglycaemia in a patient with adrenocortical carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Kazuhide; Takamura, Toshinari; Takeshita, Yumie; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Imaizumi, Noriko; Misu, Hirofumi; Taji, Komei; Kasahara, Kazuo; Oshinoya, Yukinosuke; Suzuki, Shioto; Ooi, Akishi; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman had a general health examination and was diagnosed with a non-functioning adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Despite surgery and chemotherapy with mitotane, the ACC progressed with metastases to the lymph nodes, liver and lung. Initially, she developed adrenal insufficiency and was treated with hydrocortisone. As the ACC progressed, it produced superabundant cortisol, resulting in clinically overt Cushing’s syndrome. As the liver metastases grew, the patient developed hypoglycaemia with suppression of endogenous insulin secretion. She had to be given large quantities of glucose intravenously to remain normoglycaemic. The serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II/IGF-I ratio had increased to 84. We identified big IGF-II, a primary hormonal mediator of non-islet cell tumour hypoglycaemia (NICTH), in the serum and tumour using western blotting. This is the first case of ACC that showed both Cushing’s syndrome and NICTH associated with big IGF-II. PMID:22461853

  5. Cell communication in the basal cells of the human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heukelom, J S; Slaaf, D W; van der Leun, J C

    1972-10-01

    Electrotonic spread can be measured in the basal cells of the human epidermis. The communication between neighboring cells is high, whereas no leak to the intercellular spaces could be detected. The specific resistance of the membranes between the cells is about 10 Omegacm(2). This finding suggests that for those particles that are able to pass the cell membrane the intracellular path through the epidermis is at least as suitable as the path through the intercellular spaces.

  6. Calcium signaling in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apáti, Ágota; Berecz, Tünde; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2016-03-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide new tools for developmental and pharmacological studies as well as for regenerative medicine applications. Calcium homeostasis and ligand-dependent calcium signaling are key components of major cellular responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis. Interestingly, these phenomena have not been characterized in detail as yet in pluripotent human cell sates. Here we review the methods applicable for studying both short- and long-term calcium responses, focusing on the expression of fluorescent calcium indicator proteins and imaging methods as applied in pluripotent human stem cells. We discuss the potential regulatory pathways involving calcium responses in hPS cells and compare these to the implicated pathways in mouse PS cells. A recent development in the stem cell field is the recognition of so called "naïve" states, resembling the earliest potential forms of stem cells during development, as well as the "fuzzy" stem cells, which may be alternative forms of pluripotent cell types, therefore we also discuss the potential role of calcium homeostasis in these PS cell types. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eSnijders

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodelling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodelling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodelling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  8. Characterization of human satellite cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gloy, Sina

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells guarantee the regeneration of skeletal muscle until old age. They are genuine muscle stem cells that are localized in a characteristic anatomic localization between basal lamina and sarkolemma of each muscle fiber. On protein level they are characterized by their expression of the transcription factor Pax7 and different other markers like c-Met and CXCR4. Most of our knowledge is based on studies with mouse models. Due to their availability and remarkable capacity to regen...

  9. Cushing Syndrome in a 6-Month-Old Infant due to Adrenocortical Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volmar KeithE

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Cushing syndrome is rare in infancy and usually due to an adrenocortical tumor (ACT. We report an infant with Cushing syndrome due to adrenocortical carcinoma. The patient presented at six months of age with a three-month history of growth failure, rapid weight gain, acne, and irritability. Physical examination showed obesity, hypertension, and Cushingoid features. Biochemical evaluation showed very high serum cortisol, mildly elevated testosterone, and suppressed ACTH. Abdominal MRI revealed a heterogeneous right adrenal mass extending into the inferior vena cava. Evaluation for metastases was negative. The tumor was removed surgically en bloc. Pathologic examination demonstrated low mitotic rate, but capsular and vascular invasion. She received no adjuvant therapy. Her linear growth has improved and Cushingoid features resolved. Hormonal markers and quarterly PET scans have been negative for recurrence 24 months postoperatively. In conclusion, adrenocortical neoplasms in children are rare, but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome.

  10. Adrenocortical tumor in a cat secreting more than one type of corticosteroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Domit Guerios

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 14-year-old, spayed female domestic shorthair cat was evaluated because of a right adrenal mass. The referring veterinarian had started treatment for hypokalemia and systemic arterial hypertension. During the initial evaluation the cat was alert and responsive, and serum potassium concentration was within the reference range. Serum concentrations of aldosterone and progesterone were increased. Atrophy of the contralateral adrenal and an exaggerated response of cortisol to stimulation with adrenocorticotropic hormone suggested hypersecretion of cortisol. Unilateral adrenalectomy was performed and recovery was uneventful. Histologic examination of the mass revealed an adrenocortical tumor. After surgery, clinical signs of hypercortisolism, hyperaldosteronism and hyperprogesteronism were no longer observed, and neither potassium supplementation nor antihypertensive treatment were needed. Relevance and novel information In cases with an adrenocortical tumor, clinicians should investigate whether the tumor hypersecretes glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids, sex steroids or combinations of these. Hypersecretion of more than one adrenal hormone may occur in a cat with an adrenocortical tumor.

  11. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  12. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q D; Wang, J H; Condron, C; Bouchier-Hayes, D; Redmond, H P

    2001-04-01

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  13. Human hair genealogies and stem cell latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavaré Simon

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cells divide to reproduce themselves and produce differentiated progeny. A fundamental problem in human biology has been the inability to measure how often stem cells divide. Although it is impossible to observe every division directly, one method for counting divisions is to count replication errors; the greater the number of divisions, the greater the numbers of errors. Stem cells with more divisions should produce progeny with more replication errors. Methods To test this approach, epigenetic errors (methylation in CpG-rich molecular clocks were measured from human hairs. Hairs exhibit growth and replacement cycles and "new" hairs physically reappear even on "old" heads. Errors may accumulate in long-lived stem cells, or in their differentiated progeny that are eventually shed. Results Average hair errors increased until two years of age, and then were constant despite decades of replacement, consistent with new hairs arising from infrequently dividing bulge stem cells. Errors were significantly more frequent in longer hairs, consistent with long-lived but eventually shed mitotic follicle cells. Conclusion Constant average hair methylation regardless of age contrasts with the age-related methylation observed in human intestine, suggesting that error accumulation and therefore stem cell latency differs among tissues. Epigenetic molecular clocks imply similar mitotic ages for hairs on young and old human heads, consistent with a restart with each new hair, and with genealogies surreptitiously written within somatic cell genomes.

  14. Poliovirus persistence in human cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbère-Garapin, F; Jacques, S; Drillet, A S; Pavio, N; Couderc, T; Blondel, B; Pelletier, I

    2001-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) can persist in vivo in the intestine of immunocompromised hosts for years. Moreover, immunocompetent individuals who have survived paralytic poliomyelitis sometimes develop the post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), consisting of a variety of symptoms including new muscular atrophies. PPS may be due to PV persistence. We have developed models of PV persistence in neural cells and epidermoid cells. Cell determinants are of crucial importance for the establishment of persistent infections in human neuronal cells, whereas viral determinants play the primary role in human epidermoid HEp-2 cells. The results obtained with these in vitro models show the capacity of PV to persist and reveal a virus and cell co-evolution involving PV-receptor interactions. In addition, they suggest that several mechanisms are used by PV to establish and maintain persistent infections.

  15. Aldosterone-producing adrenocortical carcinoma with prominent hepatic metastasis diagnosed by liver biopsy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Kennosuke; Hayashi, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Masaya; Iuchi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Ebisawa, Takanori; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Sasano, Hironobu; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2016-01-16

    Aldosterone-producing adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignancy, which is usually diagnosed by histopathological examination of the excised tumor. In inoperable cases, aldosterone-producing ACC diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining of the metastatic tumor for Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 11β has not previously been reported and even in that case staining for adrenocortical-specific adrenal 4 binding protein/steroidogenic factor1 (Ad4BP/SF1) and steroidogenic enzymes has not been reported. We report the case of a 67-year-old Japanese woman with aldosterone-producing adrenocortical carcinoma. Laboratory findings showed severe hypopotassemia. Endocrinological examination revealed an increased plasma aldosterone concentration and suppressed plasma renin activity. Plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) was elevated. Diurnal variation in serum cortisol was lost and administration of 1 mg and 8 mg dexamethasone did not suppress serum cortisol levels. From the 24-h urine collection sample, urine aldosterone and urine cortisol levels were greatly increased. Therefore, autonomous excess production was observed for the three adrenal cortex hormones. Abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a right adrenal tumor and a huge liver tumor. Adrenocortical carcinoma with metastatic liver cancer was strongly suggested, however surgery could not be considered due to stage IV disease: the liver tumor was too large and cardiac ultrasonography indicated that her cardiac function was poor. Therefore, a liver biopsy was taken to properly determine the diagnosis. Immunohistochemical stains for Ad4BP/SF1 and steroidogenic enzymes were positive. Ad4BP/SF-1 was originally identified as a steroidogenic, tissue-specific transcription factor implicated in the expression of the steroidogenic CYP gene encoding cytochrome P450s. Hence we could diagnose the patient as having adrenocortical carcinoma with metastatic liver cancer. This rare case had severe

  16. Interaction of Staphylococci with Human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler K Nygaard

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human infections worldwide. The pathogen produces numerous molecules that can interfere with recognition and binding by host innate immune cells, an initial step required for the ingestion and subsequent destruction of microbes by phagocytes. To better understand the interaction of this pathogen with human immune cells, we compared the association of S. aureus and S. epidermidis with leukocytes in human blood. We found that a significantly greater proportion of B cells associated with S. epidermidis relative to S. aureus. Complement components and complement receptors were important for the binding of B cells with S. epidermidis. Experiments using staphylococci inactivated by ultraviolet radiation and S. aureus isogenic deletion mutants indicated that S. aureus secretes molecules regulated by the SaeR/S two-component system that interfere with the ability of human B cells to bind this bacterium. We hypothesize that the relative inability of B cells to bind S. aureus contributes to the microbe's success as a human pathogen.

  17. Hair cortisol measurement in mitotane-treated adrenocortical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenschijn, L; Quinkler, M; van Rossum, E F C

    2014-04-01

    The only approved drug for the treatment of adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is mitotane. Mitotane is adrenolytic and therefore, hydrocortisone replacement therapy is necessary. Since mitotane increases cortisol binding globulin (CBG) and induces CYP3A4 activity, high doses of hydrocortisone are thought to be required. Evaluation of hydrocortisone therapy in mitotane-treated patients has been difficult since there is no good marker to evaluate hydrocortisone therapy. Measurement of cortisol in scalp hair is a novel method that offers the opportunity to measure long-term cortisol levels. Our aim was to evaluate whether hair cortisol measurements could be useful in evaluating recent hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. Hair cortisol levels were measured in 15 mitotane-treated ACC patients on hydrocortisone substitution and 96 healthy individuals. Cortisol levels were measured in 3 cm hair segments, corresponding to a period of 3 months. Hair cortisol levels were higher in ACC patients compared to healthy individuals (pcortisol levels above the reference range. None of the patients had hair cortisol levels below normal. In contrast to hydrocortisone doses (β=0.03, p=0.93), hair cortisol levels were associated with BMI (β=0.53, p=0.042). There was no correlation between hair cortisol levels and hydrocortisone doses (β=0.41, p=0.13). Almost half of the ACC patients had high hair cortisol levels, suggesting long-term over-substitution of hydrocortisone in some of the patients, whereas none of the patients was under-substituted. Hair cortisol measurements might be useful in long-term monitoring hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Topoisomerase 2α and thymidylate synthase expression in adrenocortical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Elisa; Berruti, Alfredo; Sbiera, Silviu; Rapa, Ida; Oneda, Ester; Sperone, Paola; Ronchi, Cristina L; Ferrari, Laura; Grisanti, Salvatore; Germano, Antonina; Zaggia, Barbara; Scagliotti, Giorgio Vittorio; Fassnacht, Martin; Volante, Marco; Terzolo, Massimo; Papotti, Mauro

    2017-07-01

    Topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) and thymidylate synthase (TS) are known prognostic parameters in several tumors and also predictors of efficacy of anthracyclines, topoisomerase inhibitors and fluoropirimidines, respectively. Expression of TOP2A and TS mRNA was assessed in 98 patients with adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in a subset of 39 tumors. Ninety-two patients were radically resected for stage II-III disease and 38 of them received adjuvant mitotane. Twenty-six patients with metastatic disease received the EDP-M (etoposide, doxorubicin, Adriamycin, cisplatin plus mitotane). TOP2A and TS expression in ACC tissue was directly correlated with the clinical data. Both markers were not associated with either disease free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS) in multivariate analyses and failed to be associated to mitotane efficacy. Disease response or stabilization to EDP-M treatment was observed in 12/17 (71%) and 1/9 (11%) patients with high and low TOP2A expressing tumors (P = 0.0039) and 9/13 (69%) and 4/13 (31%) patients with high and low TS expressing ACC, respectively (P = 0.049). High TOP2A expression was significantly associated with longer time to progression (TTP) after EDP-M. TOP2A and TS proteins assessed by immunohistochemistry significantly correlated with mRNA expression. Immunohistochemical TOP2A expression was associated with a non-significant better response and longer TTP after EDP-M. TOP2A and TS were neither prognostic nor predictive of mitotane efficacy in ACC patients. The predictive role of TOP2A expression of EDP-M activity suggests a significant contribution of Adriamycin and etoposide for the efficacy of the EDP scheme. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  19. Human ES cells: Starting Culture from Frozen Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Trish, Erin; Dimos, John; Eggan, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Here we demonstrate how our lab begins a HuES human embryonic stem cell line culture from a frozen stock. First, a one to two day old ten cm plate of approximately one (to two) million irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells is rinsed with HuES media to remove residual serum and cell debris, and then HuES media added and left to equilibrate in the cell culture incubator. A frozen vial of cells from long term liquid nitrogen storage or a -80C freezer is sourced and quickly submer...

  20. Autophagy in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Tra

    Full Text Available Autophagy (macroautophagy is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of embryoid bodies. The precise roles of autophagy during early human embryonic development, remain however largely uncharacterized. Since human embryonic stem cells constitute a unique model system to study early human embryogenesis we investigated the occurrence of autophagy in human embryonic stem cells. We have, using lentiviral transduction, established multiple human embryonic stem cell lines that stably express GFP-LC3, a fluorescent marker for the autophagosome. Each cell line displays both a normal karyotype and pluripotency as indicated by the presence of cell types representative of the three germlayers in derived teratomas. GFP expression and labelling of autophagosomes is retained after differentiation. Baseline levels of autophagy detected in cultured undifferentiated hESC were increased or decreased in the presence of rapamycin and wortmannin, respectively. Interestingly, autophagy was upregulated in hESCs induced to undergo differentiation by treatment with type I TGF-beta receptor inhibitor SB431542 or removal of MEF secreted maintenance factors. In conclusion we have established hESCs capable of reporting macroautophagy and identify a novel link between autophagy and early differentiation events in hESC.

  1. Cell-to-cell communication in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia causing hypercortisolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herve eLefebvre

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been well established that, in the human adrenal gland, cortisol secretion is not only controlled by circulating corticotropin but is also influenced by a wide variety of bioactive signals, including conventional neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, released within the cortex by various cell types such as chromaffin cells, neurons, cells of the immune system, adipocytes and endothelial cells. These different types of cells are present in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia, a rare etiology of primary adrenal Cushing’s syndrome, where they appear intermingled with adrenocortical cells in the hyperplastic cortex. In addition, the genetic events which cause the disease favor abnormal adrenal differenciation that results in illicit expression of paracrine regulatory factors and their receptors in adrenocortical cells. All these defects constitute the molecular basis for aberrant autocrine/paracrine regulatory mechanisms which are likely to play a role in the pathophysiology of bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia-associated hypercortisolism. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on this topic as well as the therapeutic perspectives offered by this new pathophysiological concept.

  2. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  3. Quercetin Inhibits Cell Migration and Invasion in Human Osteosarcoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Haifeng; Hong, Wei; Fan, Pan; Qian, Dongyang; Zhu, Jianwei; Bai, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor associated with high mortality; however, no effective therapies for the disease have been developed. Several studies have focused on elucidating the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma and have aimed to develop novel therapies for the disease. Quercetin is a vital dietary flavonoid that has been shown to have a variety of anticancer effects, as it induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation and is involved in cell adhesion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Herein, we aimed to investigate the effects of quercetin on osteosarcoma migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo and to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects on osteosarcoma migration and invasion. Cell viability, cell cycle activity and cell apoptosis were measured using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, and cell migration and invasion were evaluated by wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression levels of several proteins of interest were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting, respectively. Moreover, a nude mouse model of human osteosarcoma lung metastasis was established to assess the anti-metastatic effects of quercetin in vivo. We noted no significant differences in cell cycle activity and apoptosis between HOS and MG63 cells and control cells. Treatment with quercetin significantly attenuated cell migration and invasion in HOS and MG63 cells compared with treatment with control medium. Moreover HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP2, and MMP9 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly downregulated in HOS cells treated with quercetin compared with HOS cells treated with controls. Additionally, treatment with quercetin attenuated metastatic lung tumor formation and growth in the nude mouse model of osteosarcoma compared with treatment with controls. Our findings regarding the inhibitory effects of quercetin on cell migration and invasion suggest that quercetin may have potential as a therapy for human

  4. 3 CFR - Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of July 30, 2009 Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research..., scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the extent...

  5. Maternal-child adrenocortical attunement in early childhood: continuity and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibel, Leah C; Granger, Douglas A; Blair, Clancy; Finegood, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated continuity and change in maternal-child hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis attunement in early childhood. Participants were drawn from a prospective study of 1,292 mother-child dyads, which were racially diverse, predominantly low-income, and non-urban. Child focused stress tasks designed to elicit anger, fear, and frustration were administered during early infancy, later infancy, and toddlerhood. Mothers' and children's saliva samples (later assayed for cortisol) were collected before and after the tasks. The strength of mother-child adrenocortical attunement was conserved across infancy and toddlerhood. The magnitude of maternal-child adrenocortical attunement decreased in response to the child-focused stress tasks. Maternal sensitivity and the child's task-related emotional reactivity moderated adrenocortical attunement across the task, with greater maternal sensitivity during a free-play, and lower levels of child emotional reactivity during the stress tasks, stabilizing attunement from pre- to post-task levels. The findings advance our understanding of individual differences in the social regulation of adrenocortical activity in early childhood. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Treatment with docetaxel and cisplatin in advanced adrenocortical carcinoma, a phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urup, Thomas; Pawlak, W Z; Petersen, P M

    2013-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare disease with a poor response to chemotherapy. Cisplatin is the most widely investigated drug in the treatment of ACC and in vitro studies have indicated activity of taxanes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin...

  7. Emotional and Adrenocortical Regulation in Early Adolescence: Prediction by Attachment Security and Disorganization in Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Gottfried; Zimmermann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine differences in emotion expression and emotion regulation in emotion-eliciting situations in early adolescence from a bio-psycho-social perspective, specifically investigating the influence of early mother-infant attachment and attachment disorganization on behavioural and adrenocortical responses. The…

  8. Major prognostic role of Ki67 in localized adrenocortical carcinoma after complete resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuschlein, Felix; Weigel, Jens; Saeger, Wolfgang; Kroiss, Matthias; Wild, Vanessa; Daffara, Fulvia; Libé, Rosella; Ardito, Arianna; Ghuzlan, Abir Al; Quinkler, Marcus; Oßwald, Andrea; Ronchi, Cristina L.; De Krijger, Ronald|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123933595; Feelders, Richard A.; Waldmann, Jens; Willenberg, Holger S.; Deutschbein, Timo; Stell, Anthony; Reincke, Martin; Papotti, Mauro; Baudin, Eric; Tissier, Frédérique; Haak, Harm R.; Loli, Paola; Terzolo, Massimo; Allolio, Bruno; Müller, Hans Helge; Fassnacht, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrence of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) even after complete (R0) resection occurs frequently. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify markers with prognostic value for patients in this clinical setting. Design, Setting, and Participants: From the German ACC registry, 319

  9. A Late Onset of Adrenocortical Cancer Assosiated with Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N S Kuznetsov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS is a genetic overgrowth disorder involving a predisposition to tumor development. The common features of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome include omphalocele, macroglos- sia and macrosomia. The increased risk for neoplasia is concentrated in the first eight years of life. However, this case presents a late onset of adrenocortical cancer assosiated with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

  10. Merkel cell distribution in the human eyelid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. May

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although Merkel cell carcinoma of the eye lid is reported frequently in the literature, only limited information exists about the distribution of Merkel cells in this tissue. Therefore, serial sections of 18 human cadaver eye lids (donors ages ranging between 63 and 97 years were stained for cytokeratin 20 in various planes. The overall appearance of Merkel cells in these samples was low and mainly located in the outer root layer of the cilia hair follicles. Merkel cells were more frequent in the middle, and almost not detectable at the nasal and temporal edges. The localization is in accordance with that of Merkel cell carcinoma, but concerning the scarce appearance within this adulthood group, a specific physiological role of these cells in the eye lid is difficult to establish.

  11. Cell pattern in adult human corneal endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H Wörner

    Full Text Available A review of the current data on the cell density of normal adult human endothelial cells was carried out in order to establish some common parameters appearing in the different considered populations. From the analysis of cell growth patterns, it is inferred that the cell aging rate is similar for each of the different considered populations. Also, the morphology, the cell distribution and the tendency to hexagonallity are studied. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that this phenomenon is analogous with cell behavior in other structures such as dry foams and grains in polycrystalline materials. Therefore, its driving force may be controlled by the surface tension and the mobility of the boundaries.

  12. Proliferation conditions for human satellite cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Beck-Nielsen, H; Schrøder, H D

    2001-01-01

    Primary satellite cell cultures have become an important tool as a model system for skeletal muscles. A common problem in human satellite cell culturing is fibroblast overgrowth. We combined N-CAM (Leu19) immunocytochemical staining of satellite cells (Sc) with stereological methods to estimate...... the fraction of Sc in culture. Evaluation of different culture conditions allowed us to find proliferation conditions preferentially for Sc: a) Sc should be cultured on surfaces coated with ECM-gel. b) Primary cell culture should be inoculated in DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum to increase cell...... adherence. c) Change of media to DMEM supplemented with 2% Ultroser-G and 2% FCS after 24 h.d) Before subcultivation, cells should be preplated for 30 min. The fractional content of Sc in passage four when applying this method of cultivation was 0.82 +/- 0.07 (mean +/- SE, N = 10). Our method enabled us...

  13. Neocortical glial cell numbers in human brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelvig, D.P.; Pakkenberg, H.; Stark, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    Stereological cell counting was applied to post-mortem neocortices of human brains from 31 normal individuals, age 18-93 years, 18 females (average age 65 years, range 18-93) and 13 males (average age 57 years, range 19-87). The cells were differentiated in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia...... while the total astrocyte number is constant through life; finally males have a 28% higher number of neocortical glial cells and a 19% higher neocortical neuron number than females. The overall total number of neocortical neurons and glial cells was 49.3 billion in females and 65.2 billion in males......, a difference of 24% with a high biological variance. These numbers can serve as reference values in quantitative studies of the human neocortex. (C) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  14. T-cell response in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Kemp, K; Ismail, A

    1999-01-01

    In the present communication we provide evidence for the existence of a Th1/Th2 dichotomy in the T-cell response to Leishmania antigens in human leishmaniasis. Our data suggest that the pattern of IL-4 and IFN-gamma response is polarised in these patients. Lymphocytes from individuals recovered...... from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) responded by IFN-gamma production following stimulation with Leishmania antigens whereas cells from patients recovered from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) showed a mixed pattern of IFN-gamma and IL-4 responses. The cells producing these cytokines were predominantly CD4......+. Furthermore, IL-10 plays an important role in the development of post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) from VL. The balance between the parasitic-specific T-cell response plays an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of Leishmania infections in humans....

  15. Lobaplatin arrests cell cycle progression in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chang-Jie

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC still is a big burden for China. In recent years, the third-generation platinum compounds have been proposed as potential active agents for HCC. However, more experimental and clinical data are warranted to support the proposal. In the present study, the effect of lobaplatin was assessed in five HCC cell lines and the underlying molecular mechanisms in terms of cell cycle kinetics were explored. Methods Cytotoxicity of lobaplatin to human HCC cell lines was examined using MTT cell proliferation assay. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. Expression of cell cycle-regulated genes was examined at both the mRNA (RT-PCR and protein (Western blot levels. The phosphorylation status of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs and retinoblastoma (Rb protein was also examined using Western blot analysis. Results Lobaplatin inhibited proliferation of human HCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. For the most sensitive SMMC-7721 cells, lobaplatin arrested cell cycle progression in G1 and G2/M phases time-dependently which might be associated with the down-regulation of cyclin B, CDK1, CDC25C, phosphorylated CDK1 (pCDK1, pCDK4, Rb, E2F, and pRb, and the up-regulation of p53, p21, and p27. Conclusion Cytotoxicity of lobaplatin in human HCC cells might be due to its ability to arrest cell cycle progression which would contribute to the potential use of lobaplatin for the management of HCC.

  16. Detection of adrenocortical autoantibodies in Addison's disease with a peroxidase-labelled protein A technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Silva

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical autoantibodies (ACA, present in 60-80% of patients with idiopathic Addison's disease, are conventionally detected by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF on frozen sections of adrenal glands. The large-scale use of IIF is limited in part by the need for a fluorescence microscope and the fact that histological sections cannot be stored for long periods of time. To circumvent these restrictions we developed a novel peroxidase-labelled protein A (PLPA technique for the detection of ACA in patients with Addison's disease and compared the results with those obtained with the classical IIF assay. We studied serum samples from 90 healthy control subjects and 22 patients with Addison's disease, who had been clinically classified into two groups: idiopathic (N = 13 and granulomatous (N = 9. ACA-PLPA were detected in 10/22 (45% patients: 9/13 (69% with the idiopathic form and 1/9 (11% with the granulomatous form, whereas ACA-IIF were detected in 11/22 patients (50%: 10/13 (77% with the idiopathic form and 1/9 (11% with the granulomatous form. Twelve of the 13 idiopathic addisonians (92% were positive for either ACA-PLPA or ACA-IIF, but only 7 were positive by both methods. In contrast, none of 90 healthy subjects was found to be positive for ACA. Thus, our study shows that the PLPA-based technique is useful, has technical advantages over the IIF method (by not requiring the use of a fluorescence microscope and by permitting section storage for long periods of time. However, since it is only 60% concordant with the ACA-IIF method, it should be considered complementary instead of an alternative method to IIF for the detection of ACA in human sera.

  17. Human ES cells: starting culture from frozen cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trish, Erin; Dimos, John; Eggan, Kevin

    2006-11-09

    Here we demonstrate how our lab begins a HuES human embryonic stem cell line culture from a frozen stock. First, a one to two day old ten cm plate of approximately one (to two) million irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells is rinsed with HuES media to remove residual serum and cell debris, and then HuES media added and left to equilibrate in the cell culture incubator. A frozen vial of cells from long term liquid nitrogen storage or a -80 C freezer is sourced and quickly submerged in a 37 C water bath for quick thawing. Cells in freezing media are then removed from the vial and placed in a large volume of HuES media. The large volume of HuES media facilitates removal of excess serum and DMSO, which can cause HuES human embryonic stem cells to differentiate. Cells are gently spun out of suspension, and then re-suspended in a small volume of fresh HuES media that is then used to seed the MEF plate. It is considered important to seed the MEF plate by gently adding the HuES cells in a drop wise fashion to evenly disperse them throughout the plate. The newly established HuES culture plate is returned to the incubator for 48 hrs before media is replaced, then is fed every 24 hours thereafter.

  18. Sodium Valproate Induces Cell Senescence in Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Mei An

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with epigenetic changes, including histone deacetylases (HDACs. Epigenetic modulation by HDAC inhibition is a potentially valuable approach for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. In present study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of sodium valproate (SVP, a known HDAC inhibitor, in human hepatocarcinoma cells. The results showed SVP inhibited the proliferation of Bel-7402 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Low dose SVP treatment caused a large and flat morphology change, positive SA-β-gal staining, and G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest in human hepatocarcinoma cells. Low dose SVP treatment also increased acetylation of histone H3 and H4 on p21 promoter, accompanied by up-regulation of p21 and down-regulation of RB phosphorylation. These observations suggested that a low dose of SVP could induce cell senescence in hepatocarcinoma cells, which might correlate with hyperacetylation of histone H3 and H4, up-regulation of p21, and inhibition of RB phosphorylation. Since the effective concentration inducing cell senescence in hepatocarcinoma cells is clinically available, whether a clinical dose of SVP could induce cell senescence in clinical hepatocarcinoma is worthy of further study.

  19. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    Orlando R, Stice SL. Membrane proteomic signatures of karyotypically normal and abnormal human embryonic stem cell lines and derivatives. Proteomics. 2011...format (96-,384-well) assays, 2) grow as adherent monolayers, and 3) possess a stable karyotype for multiple (>10) passages with a doubling time of ~36...derived neural progenitor cell line working stock has been amplified, characterized for karyotype and evaluated for the expression of neural progenitor

  20. Mast cells in human airways: the culprit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas S. Erjefält

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By virtue of their undisputed role in allergy, the study of airway mast cells has focused on nasal and bronchial mast cells and their involvement in allergic rhinitis and asthma. However, recent mechanistic and human studies suggest that peripheral mast cells also have an important role in asthma, as well as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory infections and lung fibrosis. Pathogenic roles include immune-modulatory, pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic activities. Importantly, mast cells also actively downregulate inflammation and participate in the defence against respiratory infections. Another complicating factor is the notorious mast cell heterogeneity, where each anatomical compartment of the lung harbours site-specific mast cell populations. Alveolar mast cells stand out as they lack the cardinal expression of the high affinity IgE receptor. Supporting the emerging concept of alveolar inflammation in asthma, alveolar mast cells shift to a highly FcϵRI-expressing phenotype in uncontrolled asthma. Site-specific and disease-associated mast cell changes have also recently been described in most other inflammatory conditions of the lung. Thus, in the exploration of new anti-mast cell treatment strategies the search has widened to include the lung periphery and the delicate task of identifying which of the countless potential roles are the critical disease modifying ones in a given clinical situation.

  1. SWCNTs induced autophagic cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jung; Zahari, Nur Elida M; Lee, Eun-Woo; Song, Jaewhan; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being actively introduced in electronics, computer science, aerospace, and other industries. Thus, the urgent need for toxicological studies on CNTs is mounting. In this study, we investigated the alterations in cellular response with morphological changes induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in BEAS-2B cells, a human bronchial epithelial cell line. At 24h after exposure, SWCNTs rapidly decreased ATP production and cell viability as well a slight increase in the number of cells in the subG1 and G1 phases. In addition, SWCNTs increased the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1, but not SOD-2, and the number of cells generating ROS. The concentration of Cu and Zn ions also increased in a dose-dependent manner in cells exposed to SWCNTs. SWCNTs significantly enhanced the release of nitric oxide, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 and up-regulated the expression of chemokine- and cytokine-related genes. Furthermore, the levels of autophagy-related genes, especially the DRAM1 gene, and the autophagosome formation-related proteins, were clearly up-regulated together with an increase of autophagosome-like vacuoles. Based on these results, we suggest that SWCNTs induce autophagic cell death through mitochondrial dysfunction and cytosolic damage in human bronchial epithelial cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-04-24

    Apr 24, 2009 ... Phenotypic plasticity is a phenomenon that describes the occurrence of 2 or more distinct phenotypes under diverse conditions. This article discusses the work carried out over the past few years in understanding the potential of human pancreatic islet-derived progenitors for cell replacement therapy in ...

  3. Melanopsin expressing human retinal ganglion cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Christensen, Anders Tolstrup; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    microscopy and 3D reconstruction of melanopsin immunoreactive (-ir) RGCs, we applied the criteria used in mouse on human melanopsin-ir RGCs. We identified M1, displaced M1, M2 and M4 cells. We found two other subtypes of melanopsin-ir RGCs, which were named "gigantic M1 (GM1)" and "gigantic displaced M1 (GDM...

  4. Human CD56bright NK Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Tatiana; Poli, Aurélie; Cuapio, Angelica

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells can be subdivided into various subsets based on the relative expression of CD16 and CD56. In particular, CD56(bright)CD16(-/dim) NK cells are the focus of interest. They are considered efficient cytokine producers endowed with immunoregulatory properties, but they can also become...... cytotoxic upon appropriate activation. These cells were shown to play a role in different disease states, such as cancer, autoimmunity, neuroinflammation, and infection. Although their phenotype and functional properties are well known and have been extensively studied, their lineage relationship with other...... NK cell subsets is not fully defined, nor is their precise hematopoietic origin. In this article, we summarize recent studies about CD56(bright) NK cells in health and disease and briefly discuss the current controversies surrounding them....

  5. Human embryonic stem cells: preclinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarda Kanchan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs have been extensively discussed in public and scientific communities for their potential in treating diseases and injuries. However, not much has been achieved in turning them into safe therapeutic agents. The hurdles in transforming hESCs to therapies start right with the way these cells are derived and maintained in the laboratory, and goes up-to clinical complications related to need for patient specific cell lines, gender specific aspects, age of the cells, and several post transplantation uncertainties. The different types of cells derived through directed differentiation of hESC and used successfully in animal disease and injury models are described briefly. This review gives a brief outlook on the present and the future of hESC based therapies, and talks about the technological advances required for a safe transition from laboratory to clinic.

  6. Susceptibility of human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xinzi; Qi, Lin; Li, Zhiguo; Chi, Hao; Lin, Wanjun; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Zesheng; Pan, Mingxin; Gao, Yi

    2013-12-01

    The risk of porcine endogenous retrovirus infection is a major barrier for pig-to-human xenotransplant. Porcine endogenous retrovirus, present in porcine cells, can infect many human and nonhuman primate cells in vitro, but there is no evidence available about in vitro infection of human liver cells. We investigated the susceptibility of different human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus. The supernatant from a porcine kidney cell line was added to human liver cells, including a normal hepatocyte cell line (HL-7702 cells), primary hepatocytes (Phh cells), and a liver stellate cell line (Lx-2 cells), and to human embryonic kidney cells as a reference control. Expression of the porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E in the human cells was evaluated with polymerase chain reaction, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot. The porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E was not expressed in any human liver cells (HL-7702, Phh, or Lx-2 cells) that had been exposed to supernatants from porcine kidney cell lines. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-specific fragments were amplified in human kidney cells. Human liver cells tested were not susceptible to infection by porcine endogenous retrovirus. Therefore, not all human cells are susceptible to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

  7. Clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and molecular studies in paediatric Cushing's syndrome due to primary nodular adrenocortical hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storr, Helen L; Mitchell, J H; Swords, F M

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary nodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PNAH) is a well recognized, but infrequently studied cause of paediatric Cushing's syndrome (CS). OBJECTIVE: To assess presentation, diagnosis, radiological imaging, treatment and molecular analysis of patients with childhood-onset CS due...

  8. Activation of Human T Cells in Hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itani, Hana A; McMaster, William G; Saleh, Mohamed A; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Kaszuba, Anna M; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H; Marshall, Andrew F; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M; Madhur, Meena S; Moore, Daniel J; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We used a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 versus 116 mm Hg for sham-treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta, and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45(+)) and T lymphocytes (CD3(+) and CD4(+)) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3(+)/CD45RO(+)) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T-cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating interleukin-17A producing CD4(+) T cells and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that produce interferon-γ in hypertensive compared with normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. White blood cells and cortisol after sleep deprivation and recovery sleep in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, P; Dickhaus, B; Schreiber, W; Clement, H W; Hasse, C; Hennig, J; Remschmidt, H; Krieg, J C; Wesemann, W; Opper, C

    2000-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has enriched our treatment programme for major depression. SD has been demonstrated to modify different host defence activities. There is some evidence that there are reciprocal relationships between immune function and increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity in depression. We therefore investigated the number of leukocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, B cells, T cells, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, NK cells and salivary cortisol in 10 healthy men before and after total SD (TSD) as well as after recovery sleep. Blood samples were drawn on 3 consecutive days at 7 am, 1 pm and 7 pm, respectively. Comparison of the 7 am values by contrast analysis yielded significant differences for granulocytes (p = 0.044) and NK cells (p = 0.001) after SD and recovery sleep. NK cells decreased and granulocytes increased after SD and after recovery sleep. Significant differences between single points in time across the day were found for granulocytes (p = 0.022), monocytes (p = 0.031), T cells (p = 0.005), helper T cells (p = 0.004), cytotoxic T cells (p = 0.005) and NK cells (p = 0.017). No significant difference could be detected for leukocytes, lymphocytes and B cells counts. These results favour the thesis that SD and recovery sleep lead to changes in the distribution of peripheral leukocytes, especially in a reduction of NK cells after SD and recovery sleep. The cortisol rhythm was affected neither by SD nor recovery sleep.

  10. How to make a human germ cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S Cooke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available How the primordial germ cell (PGC lineage, which eventually gives rise to spermatozoa in males and oocytes in females, is established in the developing mammalian embryo has been a critical topic in both developmental and reproductive biology for many years. There have been significant breakthroughs over the past two decades in establishing both the source of PGCs and the factors that regulate the specification of this lineage in mice, [1] but our understanding of the factors that control PGC development in the human is rudimentary. The SRY-related HMG-box (SOX family of transcription factors consists of 20 genes in humans and mice that are involved in the maintenance of pluripotency, male sexual development, and other processes. A recent paper in Cell has identified one member of this family, SOX17, as an essential factor for inducing the PGC lineage in humans. [2] Surprisingly, this protein does not appear to have a role in PGC specification in mice. This work not only introduces a new and important player to the field of germ cell specification, but also emphasizes the uniqueness of human PGC development compared to more extensively studied mouse models.

  11. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro...

  12. Increases in plasma levels of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides after running a marathon: are their effects partly counterbalanced by adrenocortical steroids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessner, Alexander; Ziegler, Sophie; Slany, Jörg; Billensteiner, Elke; Woloszczuk, Wolfgang; Geyer, Georg

    2003-12-01

    Long-distance running results in considerable stress. Little evidence exists about the role of the atrial and brain natriuretic peptides, ANP and BNP, deriving from the myocardium. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of running 42.195 km on changes in circulating natriuretic propeptides and adrenocortical steroids. We studied 17 male and 2 female runners (age: 28-62 Years) participating in a marathon. Blood samples were obtained before and immediately after the competition. proANP(1-98) and proANP(1-30) as well as Nt-proBNP(8-29) were determined by enzyme immunoassays. Runners finished the competition between 2 h 58 min and 4 h 25 min. We observed a more pronounced increase in proANP(1-98) (+58%) and proANP(1-30) (+99%, both Prunning may explain the pronounced increase in proANP. Other explanations for the observed rise in plasma levels might be a change in the permeability of myocardial cells and an impaired clearance. A rise in adrenocortical steroids may compensate for the negative influence of ANP on natriuresis and blood pressure. Positive effects of ANP during a marathon could be the regulation of body temperature by influencing sweat glands as well as the stimulation of lipolysis compensating for the enormous energy demand.

  13. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  15. Colony forming cell (CFC) assay for human hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Nayan J; Takeda, Akiko; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-12-18

    Human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells are usually obtained from bone marrow, cord blood, or peripheral blood and are used to study hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. They have the capacity to differentiate into lymphoid and myeloid lineages. The colony forming cell (CFC) assay is used to study the proliferation and differentiation pattern of hematopoietic progenitors by their ability to form colonies in a semisolid medium. The number and the morphology of the colonies formed by a fixed number of input cells provide preliminary information about the ability of progenitors to differentiate and proliferate. Cells can be harvested from individual colonies or from the whole plate to further assess their numbers and differentiation states using flow cytometry and morphologic evaluation of Giemsa-stained slides. This assay is useful for assessing myeloid but not lymphoid differentiation. The term myeloid in this context is used in its wider sense to encompass granulocytic, monocytic, erythroid, and megakaryocytic lineages. We have used this assay to assess the effects of oncogenes on the differentiation of primary human CD34+ cells derived from peripheral blood. For this purpose cells are transduced with either control retroviral construct or a construct expressing the oncogene of interest, in this case NUP98-HOXA9. We employ a commonly used retroviral vector, MSCV-IRES-GFP, that expresses a bicistronic mRNA that produces the gene of interest and a GFP marker. Cells are pre-activated by growing in the presence of cytokines for two days prior to retroviral transduction. After another two days, GFP+ cells are isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and mixed with a methylcellulose-containing semisolid medium supplemented with cytokines and incubated till colonies appear on the surface, typically 14 days. The number and morphology of the colonies are documented. Cells are then removed from the plates, washed, counted, and subjected to flow cytometry and

  16. Adrenocortical carcinoma with extension to the inferior vena cava and right atrium: 20-month-old girl with TP53 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry L. Levin, MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-month-old female presented with respiratory distress and a right adrenal mass extending into the inferior vena cava and right atrium. The mass was initially thought to be neuroblastoma. Pathology later revealed adrenocortical carcinoma. Inferior vena cava extension is far more common in adrenocortical carcinoma than neuroblastoma, and its presence should prompt clinical and laboratory evaluation for an adrenocortical tumor. The genetic findings in TP53 associated with this disease are discussed.

  17. The core regulatory network in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man-Sun; Kim, Dongsan; Kang, Nam Sook; Kim, Jeong-Rae

    2017-03-04

    In order to discover the common characteristics of various cell types in the human body, many researches have been conducted to find the set of genes commonly expressed in various cell types and tissues. However, the functional characteristics of a cell is determined by the complex regulatory relationships among the genes rather than by expressed genes themselves. Therefore, it is more important to identify and analyze a core regulatory network where all regulatory relationship between genes are active across all cell types to uncover the common features of various cell types. Here, based on hundreds of tissue-specific gene regulatory networks constructed by recent genome-wide experimental data, we constructed the core regulatory network. Interestingly, we found that the core regulatory network is organized by simple cascade and has few complex regulations such as feedback or feed-forward loops. Moreover, we discovered that the regulatory links from genes in the core regulatory network to genes in the peripheral regulatory network are much more abundant than the reverse direction links. These results suggest that the core regulatory network locates at the top of regulatory network and plays a role as a 'hub' in terms of information flow, and the information that is common to all cells can be modified to achieve the tissue-specific characteristics through various types of feedback and feed-forward loops in the peripheral regulatory networks. We also found that the genes in the core regulatory network are evolutionary conserved, essential and non-disease, non-druggable genes compared to the peripheral genes. Overall, our study provides an insight into how all human cells share a common function and generate tissue-specific functional traits by transmitting and processing information through regulatory network. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased human hybridoma formation by electrofusion of human B cells with heteromyeloma SPAM-8 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panova, I; Gustafsson, B

    1995-06-01

    A fusion protocol was designed for the optimal production of hybridomas following electrofusion of human B cells with cells of the heteromyeloma fusion partner SPAM-8. Peripheral blood lymphocytes showed an average fusion efficiency of 0.4 x 10(-4) whereas Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells showed fusion efficiencies ranging from 6.2 x 10(-4) to 9.0 x 10(-4). Similar results were obtained with bone marrow-derived lymphocytes. Trypsin treatment of the cells prior to electrofusion further increased the fusion efficiency to 12.3 x 10(-4). In comparison, conventional polyethylene glycol-induced fusion resulted in a fusion efficiency of 0.8 x 10(-4). Thus, electrofusion of human B cells with SPAM-8 heteromyeloma cells introduced a 15-fold increase in hybridoma formation as compared to the conventional fusion method.

  19. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  20. Characterizing motility dynamics in human RPE cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Furu; Miller, Donald T.

    2017-02-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, however, are often compromised in ageing and ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, but while in vivo biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. Recently we addressed this problem by using organelle motility as a novel contrast agent to enhance the RPE cell in conjunction with 3D resolution of adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) to section the RPE layer. In this study, we expand on the central novelty of our method - organelle motility - by characterizing the dynamics of the motility in individual RPE cells, important because of its direct link to RPE physiology. To do this, AO-OCT videos of the same retinal patch were acquired at approximately 1 min intervals or less, time stamped, and registered in 3D with sub-cellular accuracy. Motility was quantified by an exponential decay time constant, the time for motility to decorrelate the speckle field across an RPE cell. In two normal subjects, we found the decay time constant to be just 3 seconds, thus indicating rapid motility in normal RPE cells.

  1. Human dendritic cell culture and bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah E; Klein, Nigel; Dixon, Garth L J

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a key role in the development of natural immunity to microbes. The DC form a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune system by providing key instructions particularly to antigen naïve T-cells. The interaction of DC with T lymphocytes involves three signals: (1) antigen processing and presentation in context of MHC Class I and/or II, (2) expression of T cell co-stimulatory molecules, and (3) cytokine production. Studying the interactions of DCs with specific pathogens allows for better understanding of how protective immunity is generated, and may be particularly useful for assessing vaccine components. In this chapter, we describe methods to generate human monocyte-derived DCs and assess their maturation, activation, and function, using interaction with the gram-negative bacterial pathogen Neisseria meningitidis as a model.

  2. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Fukusumi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi. Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes.

  3. Imaging Findings of Pelvic Tumor Thrombosis Extending from Sacral Bone Metastasis of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Ishida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the imaging findings of a patient with adrenocortical carcinoma who showed pelvic tumor thrombosis extending from sacral bone metastasis. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography demonstrated extensive intraluminal filling defects in the pelvic veins. A lytic lesion in the sacrum was also noted and continuity between the sacral lesion and the filling defect in the branch of pelvic veins was indicated. The filling defects showed increased uptake on positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and single-photon emission computed tomography with 131I-iodomethylnorcholesterol, and fusion images with computed tomography aided the localization of the increased uptake areas. Multimodality imaging may be beneficial for the characterization and localization of lesions in patients suspected of having metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma.

  4. Hidden diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 unraveled during workup of virilization caused by adrenocortical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kharb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN1 is an autosomal dominant syndrome with classic triad of parathyroid hyperplasia, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, and pituitary adenomas. Other recognized manifestations include carcinoid, cutaneous or adrenocortical tumors. It is commonly presented with clinical features related to parathyroid, pancreas or pituitary lesions. Here, we have presented a case that had virilization and biochemical Cushing′s syndrome due to adrenocortical carcinoma as presenting feature of MEN1. Cushing′s syndrome in MEN1 is an extremely rare and usually late manifestation and most cases are due to corticotropin-producing pituitary adenomas. Although Cushing′s syndrome generally develops years after the more typical manifestations of MEN1 appear, it may be the primary manifestation of MEN1 syndrome particularly when related to adrenal adenoma or carcinoma.

  5. A genetic and molecular update on adrenocortical causes of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    Primary adrenal Cushing syndrome is the result of cortisol hypersecretion mainly by adenomas and, rarely, by bilateral micronodular or macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia. cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signalling is the major activator of cortisol secretion in the adrenal cortex. Many adenomas and hyperplasias associated with primary hypercortisolism carry somatic or germline mutations in genes that encode constituents of the cAMP-PKA pathway. In this Review, we discuss Cushing syndrome and its linkage to dysregulated cAMP-PKA signalling, with a focus on genetic findings in the past few years. In addition, we discuss the presence of germline inactivating mutations in ARMC5 in patients with primary bilateral macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia. This finding has implications for genetic counselling of affected patients; hitherto, most patients with this form of adrenal hyperplasia and Cushing syndrome were thought to have a sporadic and not a familial disorder.

  6. Functional Cardiomyocytes Derived From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Jianhua; Wilson, Gisela F; Soerens, Andrew G; Koonce, Chad H; Yu, Junying; Palecek, Sean P; Thomson, James A; Kamp, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells hold great promise for cardiovascular research and therapeutic applications, but the ability of human iPS cells to differentiate into functional cardiomyocytes has not yet been demonstrated...

  7. Paediatric Nonfunctioning Adrenocortical Carcinoma with Extension up to Right-Side Heart: Cardiac Surgery Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Iezzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignancy. Due to late diagnosis and no adequate effective adjuvant treatment, prognosis remains poor. Only approximately 30% of these malignancies are confined to the adrenal gland when they are diagnosed, as these tumors tend to be found years after their genesis. Cardiac involvement of adrenal carcinoma is very rare. We report a rare case of a 7-year-old female with right adrenal cortical carcinoma, involving the right-side heart.

  8. Increased adrenocortical response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in sport horses with equine glandular gastric disease (EGGD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, M D; Gerber, V; Bruckmaier, R M; van der Kolk, J H; Burger, D; Ramseyer, A

    2017-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that adrenocortical function would be altered in horses with equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS). Twenty-six sport horses competing at national or international levels in eventing (n=15) or endurance (n=11) were subjected to a gastroscopic examination and an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test. Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured before (baseline) and after (30, 60, 90, 120 and 150min) IV ACTH injection (1μg/kg bodyweight). Within EGUS, two distinct diseases, equine squamous gastric disease (ESGD) and equine glandular gastric disease (EGGD), can be distinguished. ESGD was diagnosed in 8/11 (73%; 95% confidence intervals [95%CI], 43-92%) endurance horses and 5/15 (33%; 95% CI, 14-58%) eventing horses. EGGD was observed in 9/11 (82%; 95% CI, 53-96%) endurance horses and 9/15 (60%; 95% CI, 35-81%) eventing horses. The presence or severity of ESGD was unrelated to the presence or severity of EGGD. ACTH stimulation induced a larger increase in cortisol concentration in horses with moderate EGGD than in horses with mild EGGD. Cortisol concentration during the entire sampling period (total increase in cortisol concentration during the entire sampling period [dAUC], 31.1±6.4ng/mL) and the highest measured concentration at a single time point (maximal increase in cortisol concentration [dMAX], 10.3±2.3ng/mL) were increased (P=0.005 and P=0.038, respectively), indicating that horses with glandular gastric disease exhibited increased adrenocortical responses to ACTH stimulation. These results suggest that EGGD might be associated with an enhanced adrenocortical sensitivity. Further investigations are warranted to confirm the association between adrenocortical sensitivity and EGGD and to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rare Presentation of Adrenocortical Carcinoma in a 4-Month-Old Boy

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Sonali; Waikar, Apoorva R.; Singh, Prabhsimranjot; Guarini, Ludovico; Jacobson-Dickman, Elka; Motaghedi, Roja; Kazachkova, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy and even rarer in infancy. Most of these tumors in pediatric age group are hormonally active and predominantly present with virilization. Cortisol hypersecretion presenting as Cushing syndrome is extremely rare and seen in older age groups. We report a 4-month-old infant who presented with linear growth arrest and excessive weight gain in early infancy, consequently diagnosed with ACC. On long-term follow-up for 7 years, he remained metastas...

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphism array profiling of adrenocortical tumors--evidence for an adenoma carcinoma sequence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina L Ronchi

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical tumors consist of benign adenomas and highly malignant carcinomas with a still incompletely understood pathogenesis. A total of 46 adrenocortical tumors (24 adenomas and 22 carcinomas were investigated aiming to identify novel genes involved in adrenocortical tumorigenesis. High-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism arrays (Affymetrix were used to detect copy number alterations (CNAs and copy neutral losses of heterozygosity (cnLOH. Genomic clustering showed good separation between adenomas and carcinomas, with best partition including only chromosome 5, which was highly amplified in 17/22 malignant tumors. The malignant tumors had more relevant genomic aberrations than benign tumors, such as a higher median number of recurrent CNA (2631 vs 94, CNAs >100 Kb (62.5 vs 7 and CN losses (72.5 vs 5.5, and a higher percentage of samples with cnLOH (91% vs 29%. Within the carcinoma cohort, a precise genetic pattern (i.e. large gains at chr 5, 7, 12, and 19, and losses at chr 1, 2, 13, 17, and 22 was associated with a better prognosis (overall survival: 72.2 vs 35.4 months, P=0.063. Interestingly, >70% of gains frequent in benign were also present in malignant tumors. Notch signaling was the most frequently involved pathway in both tumor entities. Finally, a CN gain at imprinted "IGF2" locus chr 11p15.5 appeared to be an early alteration in a multi-step tumor progression, followed by the loss of one or two alleles, associated with increased IGF2 expression, only in carcinomas. Our study serves as database for the identification of genes and pathways, such as Notch signaling, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. Using these data, we postulate an adenoma-carcinoma sequence for these tumors.

  11. Are There Low-Penetrance TP53 Alleles? Evidence from Childhood Adrenocortical Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Varley, Jennifer M.; McGown, Gail; Thorncroft, Mary; James, Louise A.; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Forster, Gill; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Harris, Martin; Kelsey, Anna M.; Birch, Jillian M.

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed a panel of 14 cases of childhood adrenocortical tumors unselected for family history and have identified germline TP53 mutations in >80%, making this the highest known incidence of a germline mutation in a tumor-suppressor gene in any cancer. The spectrum of germline TP53 mutations detected is remarkably limited. Analysis of tumor tissue for loss of constitutional heterozygosity, with respect to the germline mutant allele and the occurrence of other somatic TP53 mutations, in...

  12. Amplification of 9q34 in childhood adrenocortical tumors: a specific feature unrelated to ethnic origin or living conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiredo B.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical tumors (ACT in children under 15 years of age exhibit some clinical and biological features distinct from ACT in adults. Cell proliferation, hypertrophy and cell death in adrenal cortex during the last months of gestation and the immediate postnatal period seem to be critical for the origin of ACT in children. Studies with large numbers of patients with childhood ACT have indicated a median age at diagnosis of about 4 years. In our institution, the median age was 3 years and 5 months, while the median age for first signs and symptoms was 2 years and 5 months (N = 72. Using the comparative genomic hybridization technique, we have reported a high frequency of 9q34 amplification in adenomas and carcinomas. This finding has been confirmed more recently by investigators in England. The lower socioeconomic status, the distinctive ethnic groups and all the regional differences in Southern Brazil in relation to patients in England indicate that these differences are not important to determine 9q34 amplification. Candidate amplified genes mapped to this locus are currently being investigated and Southern blot results obtained so far have discarded amplification of the abl oncogene. Amplification of 9q34 has not been found to be related to tumor size, staging, or malignant histopathological features, nor does it seem to be responsible for the higher incidence of ACT observed in Southern Brazil, but could be related to an ACT from embryonic origin.

  13. Molecular aging and rejuvenation of human muscle stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Morgan E; Suetta, Charlotte; Conboy, Michael J.; Aagaard, Per; Mackey, Abigail; Kjaer, Michael; Conboy, Irina

    2009-01-01

    Very little remains known about the regulation of human organ stem cells (in general, and during the aging process), and most previous data were collected in short-lived rodents. We examined whether stem cell aging in rodents could be extrapolated to genetically and environmentally variable humans. Our findings establish key evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of human stem cell aging. We find that satellite cells are maintained in aged human skeletal muscle, but fail to activate in response ...

  14. Markers of T Cell Senescence in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are facing the aging of their population, and many more will face a similar obstacle in the near future, which could be a burden to many healthcare systems. Increased susceptibility to infections, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease, cancer as well as reduced efficacy of vaccination are important matters for researchers in the field of aging. As older adults show higher prevalence for a variety of diseases, this also implies higher risk of complications, including nosocomial infections, slower recovery and sequels that may reduce the autonomy and overall quality of life of older adults. The age-related effects on the immune system termed as “immunosenescence” can be exemplified by the reported hypo-responsiveness to influenza vaccination of the elderly. T cells, which belong to the adaptive arm of the immune system, have been extensively studied and the knowledge gathered enables a better understanding of how the immune system may be affected after acute/chronic infections and how this matters in the long run. In this review, we will focus on T cells and discuss the surface and molecular markers that are associated with T cell senescence. We will also look at the implications that senescent T cells could have on human health and diseases. Finally, we will discuss the benefits of having these markers for investigators and the future work that is needed to advance the field of T cell senescence markers.

  15. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Debates: A Confucian Argument

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. F.-C. Tsai

    2005-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell research can bring about major biomedical breakthroughs and thus contribute enormously to human welfare, yet it raises serious moral problems because it involves using human...

  16. Regulatory networks define phenotypic classes of human stem cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Franz-Josef; Laurent, Louise C.; Kostka, Dennis; Ulitsky, Igor; Williams, Roy; Lu, Christina; Park, In-Hyun; Rao, Mahendra?S.; Shamir, Ron; Schwartz, Philip H.; Schmidt, Nils O.; Loring, Jeanne F.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are defined as self-renewing cell populations that can differentiate into multiple distinct cell types. However, hundreds of different human cell lines from embryonic, fetal, and adult sources have been called stem cells, even though they range from pluripotent cells, typified by embryonic stem cells, which are capable of virtually unlimited proliferation and differentiation, to adult stem cell lines, which can generate a far more limited repertory of differentiated cell types. The...

  17. Human embryonic stem cells and microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu İskender

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs possess a great potential in the field of regenerative medicine by their virtue of pluripotent potential with indefinite proliferation capabilities. They can self renew themselves and differentiate into three embryonic germ layers. Although they are conventionally grown on mitotically inactivated mouse feeder cells, there are in vitro culture systems utilizing feeder cells of human origin in order to prevent cross-species contamination. Recently established in vitro culture systems suggested that direct interaction with feeder cells is not necessary but rather attachment to a substrate is required to ensure long-term, efficient hESC culture in vitro. This substrate is usually composed of a mixture of extracellular matrix components representing in vivo natural niche. In hESC biology, the mechanism of interaction of hESCs with extracellular matrix molecules remained insufficiently explored area of research due to their transient nature of interaction with the in vivo niche. However, an in vitro culture system established using extracellular matrix molecules may provide a safer alternative to culture systems with feeder cells while paving the way to Good Manufacturing Practice-GMP production of hESCs for therapeutic purposes. Therefore, it is essential to study the interaction of extracellular matrix molecules with hESCs in order to standardize in vitro culture systems for large-scale production of hESCs in a less labor-intensive way. This would not only provide valuable information regarding the mechanisms that control pluripotency but also serve to dissect the molecular signaling pathways of directed differentiation for prospective therapeutic applications in the future. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 486-495

  18. Arecoline is cytotoxic for human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mafaz; Cox, Stephen; Kelly, Elizabeth; Boadle, Ross; Zoellner, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis is a pre-malignant fibrotic condition caused by areca nut use and involves reduced mucosal vascularity. Arecoline is the principal areca nut alkaloid and is cytotoxic for epithelium and fibroblasts. Endothelial cell cycle arrest is reported on exposure to arecoline, as is cytotoxicity for endothelial-lung carcinoma hybrid cells. We here describe cytotoxicity for primary human endothelial cultures from seven separate donors. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of arecoline and examined by: phase-contrast microscopy, haemocytometer counts, transmission electron microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release and the methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium assay. Vacuolation and detachment of endothelium were observed at and above arecoline concentrations of 333 μg/ml or more. Ultrastructural features of cellular stress were seen after 24-h treatment with 111 μg/ml arecoline and included reduced ribosomal studding of endoplasmic reticulum, increased autophagolysosomal structures, increased vacuolation and reduced mitochondrial cristae with slight swelling. Similar changes were seen at 4 h with arecoline at 333 μg/ml or above, but with more severe mitochondrial changes including increased electron density of mitochondrial matrix and greater cristal swelling, while by 24 h, these cells were frankly necrotic. Haemocytometer counts were paralleled by both lactate dehydrogenase release and the methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium assays. Arecoline is cytotoxic via necrosis for endothelium, while biochemical assays indicate no appreciable cellular leakage before death and detachment, as well as no clear effect on mitochondrial function in viable cells. Arecoline toxicity may thus contribute to reduced vascularity in oral submucous fibrosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. ICAM-3 activation modulates cell-cell contacts of human bone marrow endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buul, J. D.; Mul, F. P. J.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Hordijk, P. L.

    2004-01-01

    The Ig-like cell adhesion molecule ICAM-3 is mainly expressed on human leukocytes and is involved in cell-cell interactions. Its expression on endothelium is observed during disorders such as Crohn's disease and in solid tumors. We found low but detectable expression of ICAM-3 on VE-cadherin-

  20. Human embryonic stem cells and patent protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Sanja M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of biotechnological research in modern diagnostics and therapeutics, on the one hand, and stimulative function of a patent, on the other hand, this work deals with the question of the possibility of pa-tent protection of human embryonic stem cells. Taking into account that this is a biotechnological invention, the key question that this paper highlights is the interpretation of the provisions of their patentability. Namely, thanks to the advanced methods of isolation, purification and preparation for implementation, modern patent systems do not exclude a priori living organisms from patent protection. Therefore, the analysis of representative administrative decisions or court rulings sought to define the criteria that would be applied in order to give patent protection to a certain biotechnological invention (stem cells while others do not.

  1. Expression of the ACTH receptor, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and steroidogenic enzymes in canine cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galac, S; Kool, M M J; Naan, E C; Daminet, S; Mol, J A; Kooistra, H S

    2010-11-01

    Studies of human adrenocortical tumors (ATs) causing Cushing's syndrome suggest that hypersecretion of cortisol is caused by altered expression of steroidogenic enzymes and that steroidogenesis can only be maintained when there is expression of the ACTH receptor (ACTH-R). Here we report the screening for the mRNA expression of the ACTH-R, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 21-hydroxylase (all in 38 cortisol-secreting ATs), 17α-hydroxylase, and 11β-hydroxylase (both in 28 cortisol-secreting ATs). Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was applied in all samples and was compared with that in normal canine adrenal glands. Messenger-RNA encoding StAR, steroidogenic enzymes, and ACTH-R were present in both normal adrenal glands and cortisol-secreting ATs. The amounts of mRNA encoding StAR and enzymes of the steroidogenic cluster needed for cortisol production did not differ significantly between either adenomas or carcinomas and normal adrenal glands. The amount of mRNA encoding ACTH-R was significantly lower in carcinomas than in normal adrenal glands (P = 0.008). In conclusion, RT-PCR analysis revealed no overexpression of StAR and steroidogenic enzymes in canine cortisol-secreting ATs. Significant downregulation of ACTH-R in carcinomas might be associated with the malignant character of the AT. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The similarity between human embryonic stem cell-derived epithelial cells and ameloblast-lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Wei; Linthicum, Logan; DenBesten, Pamela K; Zhang, Yan

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to compare epithelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to human ameloblast-lineage cells (ALCs), as a way to determine their potential use as a cell source for ameloblast regeneration. Induced by various concentrations of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), retinoic acid (RA) and lithium chloride (LiCl) for 7 days, hESCs adopted cobble-stone epithelial phenotype (hESC-derived epithelial cells (ES-ECs)) and expressed cytokeratin 14. Compared with ALCs and oral epithelial cells (OE), ES-ECs expressed amelogenesis-associated genes similar to ALCs. ES-ECs were compared with human fetal skin epithelium, human fetal oral buccal mucosal epithelial cells and human ALCs for their expression pattern of cytokeratins as well. ALCs had relatively high expression levels of cytokeratin 76, which was also found to be upregulated in ES-ECs. Based on the present study, with the similarity of gene expression with ALCs, ES-ECs are a promising potential cell source for regeneration, which are not available in erupted human teeth for regeneration of enamel.

  3. The similarity between human embryonic stem cell-derived epithelial cells and ameloblast-lineage cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Wei; Linthicum, Logan; DenBesten, Pamela K; Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare epithelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to human ameloblast-lineage cells (ALCs), as a way to determine their potential use as a cell source for ameloblast regeneration. Induced by various concentrations of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), retinoic acid (RA) and lithium chloride (LiCl) for 7 days, hESCs adopted cobble-stone epithelial phenotype (hESC-derived epithelial cells (ES-ECs)) and expressed cytokeratin 14. Compared with ALCs and oral epithelial cells (OE), ES-ECs expressed amelogenesis-associated genes similar to ALCs. ES-ECs were compared with human fetal skin epithelium, human fetal oral buccal mucosal epithelial cells and human ALCs for their expression pattern of cytokeratins as well. ALCs had relatively high expression levels of cytokeratin 76, which was also found to be upregulated in ES-ECs. Based on the present study, with the similarity of gene expression with ALCs, ES-ECs are a promising potential cell source for regeneration, which are not available in erupted human teeth for regeneration of enamel. PMID:23538640

  4. Eliminating acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from human testicular cell cultures: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadri-Ardekani, Hooman; Homburg, Christa H.; van Capel, Toni M. M.; van den Berg, Henk; van der Veen, Fulco; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; van Pelt, Ans M. M.; Repping, Sjoerd

    2014-01-01

    To study whether acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells survive in a human testicular cell culture system. Experimental laboratory study. Reproductive biology laboratory, academic medical center. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from three patients and testicular cells from three other patients.

  5. Derivation of human embryonic stem cells in defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Tenneille E; Levenstein, Mark E; Jones, Jeffrey M; Berggren, W Travis; Mitchen, Erika R; Frane, Jennifer L; Crandall, Leann J; Daigh, Christine A; Conard, Kevin R; Piekarczyk, Marian S; Llanas, Rachel A; Thomson, James A

    2006-02-01

    We have previously reported that high concentrations of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) support feeder-independent growth of human embryonic stem (ES) cells, but those conditions included poorly defined serum and matrix components. Here we report feeder-independent human ES cell culture that includes protein components solely derived from recombinant sources or purified from human material. We describe the derivation of two new human ES cell lines in these defined culture conditions.

  6. Radiosensitivity of Human Melanoma Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergoc, R. M.; Medina, V.; Cricco, G.; Mohamed, N.; Martin, G.; Nunez, M.; Croci, M.; Crescenti, E. J.; Rivera, E. S.

    2004-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a skin cancer resulting from the malign transformation of skin-pigment cells, the melanocytes. The radiotherapy, alone or in combination with other treatment, is an important therapy for this disease. the objective of this paper was to determine in vitro the radiosensitivity of two human melanoma cell lines with different metastatic capability: WM35 and MI/15, and to study the effect of drugs on radiobiological parameters. The Survival Curves were adjusted to the mathematical Linear-quadratic model using GrapsPad Prism software. Cells were seeded in RPMI medium (3000-3500 cells/flask), in triplicate and irradiated 24 h later. The irradiation was performed using an IBL 437C H Type equipment (189 TBq, 7.7 Gy/min) calibrated with a TLD 700 dosimeter. The range of Doses covered from 0 to 10 Gy and the colonies formed were counted at day 7th post-irradiation. Results obtained were: for WM35, {alpha}=0.37{+-}0.07 Gy''-1 and {beta}=0.06{+-}0.02 Gy''-2, for M1/15m {alpha}=0.47{+-}0.03 Gy''-1 and {beta}=0.06{+-}0.01 Gy''-2. The {alpha}/{beta} values WM35: {alpha}/{beta} values WM35: {alpha}/{beta}=6.07 Gy and M1/15: {alpha}/{beta}{sub 7}.33 Gy were similar, independently of their metastatic capabillity and indicate that both lines exhibit high radioresistance. Microscopic observation of irradiated cells showed multinuclear cells with few morphologic changes non-compatible with apoptosis. By means of specific fluorescent dyes and flow cytometry analysis we determined the intracellular levels of the radicals superoxide and hydrogen peroxide and their modulation in response to ionizing radiation. The results showed a marked decreased in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} intracellular levels with a simultaneous increase in superoxide that will be part of a mechanism responsible for induction of cell radioresistance. This response triggered by irradiated cells could not be abrogated by different treatments like histamine or the

  7. Interindividual variation in human T regulatory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Alessandra; D’Alise, Anna Morena; Raj, Towfique; Asinovski, Natasha; Phillips, Roxanne; Ergun, Ayla; Replogle, Joseph M.; Bernier, Angelina; Laffel, Lori; Stranger, Barbara E.; De Jager, Philip L.; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells enforce immune self-tolerance and homeostasis, and variation in some aspects of Treg function may contribute to human autoimmune diseases. Here, we analyzed population-level Treg variability by performing genome-wide expression profiling of CD4+ Treg and conventional CD4+ T (Tconv) cells from 168 donors, healthy or with established type-1 diabetes (T1D) or type-2 diabetes (T2D), in relation to genetic and immunologic screening. There was a range of variability in Treg signature transcripts, some almost invariant, others more variable, with more extensive variability for genes that control effector function (ENTPD1, FCRL1) than for lineage-specification factors like FOXP3 or IKZF2. Network analysis of Treg signature genes identified coregulated clusters that respond similarly to genetic and environmental variation in Treg and Tconv cells, denoting qualitative differences in otherwise shared regulatory circuits whereas other clusters are coregulated in Treg, but not Tconv, cells, suggesting Treg-specific regulation of genes like CTLA4 or DUSP4. Dense genotyping identified 110 local genetic variants (cis-expression quantitative trait loci), some of which are specifically active in Treg, but not Tconv, cells. The Treg signature became sharper with age and with increasing body-mass index, suggesting a tuning of Treg function with repertoire selection and/or chronic inflammation. Some Treg signature transcripts correlated with FOXP3 mRNA and/or protein, suggesting transcriptional or posttranslational regulatory relationships. Although no single transcript showed significant association to diabetes, overall expression of the Treg signature was subtly perturbed in T1D, but not T2D, patients. PMID:24610777

  8. Studies of innate immune systems against human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Rieko; Kitano, Etsuko; Maeda, Akira; Lo, Pei-Chi; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Masahito; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Miyagawa, Shuji

    2017-02-01

    Pigs are frequently used as animal models for experiments in the surgical field, including allo- and xeno-transplantation. Regeneration studies, including studies dealing with human- and monkey-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), have gradually progressed, with pigs sometimes being used as the scaffold. However, the immunological response of pigs against humans, especially innate immunities, remain unclear. This study reports on a comprehensive study of pig innate immunity against humans. Hemolytic complement activity of pig serum was measured using a microtitration technique. The pig natural anti-human antibody (Ab) was examined using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The reaction of pig natural killer (NK) cells and monocytes/macrophages against human cells was also assessed. Most of the pig complement titers were measured based on methods used in human complement assays. The alternative pathway for pig complement reacts with human cells, indicating that pig complement can react with human cells. Pig serum contains relatively high levels of natural antibodies, IgM and IgG, to human PBMC. Furthermore, the killing of NK cells- and monocyte/macrophage-mediated human cells was clearly confirmed. The collective findings indicate that the pig innate immunological systems, not only serum but also cellular factors, are able to recognize and injure human cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Nonrandom chromosomal changes in human malignant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J D

    1977-01-01

    The role of chromosomal changes in human malignant cells has been the subject of much debate. The observation of nonrandom chromosomal changes has become well recognized in chronic myelogenous leukemia, and more recently in acute myelogenous leukemia. In the present report, data are presented on the sites of duplication of chromosome No. 1 in hematologic disorders. Trisomy for region lq25 to lq32 was observed in every one of 34 patients whose cells showed duplication of some part of chromosome No. 1. Adjacent regions lq21 to lq25, and lq32 to lqter, also were trisomic in the majority of patients. Two patients had deletions, one of lq32 to qter, and the other, of lp32 to pter. The sites of chromosomal breaks leading to trisomy differ from those involved in balanced reciprocal translocations. Some of these sites are sometimes, but not always, vulnerable in constitutional chromosomal abnormalities. The nature of the proliferative advantage conferred on myeloid cells by these chromosomal changes is unknown.

  10. Human Cytomegalovirus Manipulation of Latently Infected Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, John H.; Reeves, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Primary infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in the establishment of a lifelong infection of the host which is aided by the ability of HCMV to undergo a latent infection. One site of HCMV latency in vivo is in haematopoietic progenitor cells, resident in the bone marrow, with genome carriage and reactivation being restricted to the cells of the myeloid lineage. Until recently, HCMV latency has been considered to be relatively quiescent with the virus being maintained essentially as a “silent partner” until conditions are met that trigger reactivation. However, advances in techniques to study global changes in gene expression have begun to show that HCMV latency is a highly active process which involves expression of specific latency-associated viral gene products which orchestrate major changes in the latently infected cell. These changes are argued to help maintain latent infection and to modulate the cellular environment to the benefit of latent virus. In this review, we will discuss these new findings and how they impact not only on our understanding of the biology of HCMV latency but also how they could provide tantalising glimpses into mechanisms that could become targets for the clearance of latent HCMV. PMID:24284875

  11. Stereological quantification of mast cells in human synovium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Herlin, T

    1999-01-01

    Mast cells participate in both the acute allergic reaction as well as in chronic inflammatory diseases. Earlier studies have revealed divergent results regarding the quantification of mast cells in the human synovium. The aim of the present study was therefore to quantify these cells in the human...... synovium, using stereological techniques. Different methods of staining and quantification have previously been used for mast cell quantification in human synovium. Stereological techniques provide precise and unbiased information on the number of cell profiles in two-dimensional tissue sections of......, in this case, human synovium. In 10 patients suffering from osteoarthritis a median of 3.6 mast cells/mm2 synovial membrane was found. The total number of cells (synoviocytes, fibroblasts, lymphocytes, leukocytes) present was 395.9 cells/mm2 (median). The mast cells constituted 0.8% of all the cell profiles...

  12. Systemic human T cell developmental processes in humanized mice cotransplanted with human fetal thymus/liver tissue and hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sung-Yeon; Chung, Yun Shin; Choi, Bongkum; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Jong-Hwa; Jun, Tae-Gook; Chang, Jun; Sprent, Jonathan; Surh, Charles D; Joh, Jae-won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2012-12-15

    In many humanized mouse models, there are few T cells in the engrafted human cell, whereas the number of B cells is high. We attempted to overcome this limitation and investigate whether the entire process of human T cell development arose similarly to the process in humans, as previously reported. To produce an advanced humanized mice model, we transplanted human fetal liver/thymus tissue subrenally and injected human CD34(+) stem cells intravenously into NOD/SCID/IL2Rgamma null (NSG) mice. Humanized mice transplanted with fetal thymus/liver tissues and fetal liver-derived CD34(+) stem cells (FLT+FLCD34) showed higher levels of human cells and T cells than mice transplanted with fetal liver-derived CD34(+) stem cells only (FLCD34). In the transplanted thymus tissue of FLT+FLCD34 mice, thymus seeding progenitors (TSPs), early thymic progenitors (ETPs), pre-T cells, and all the other human T cell populations were identified. In the periphery, FLT+FLCD34 mice have high levels of CD45RA(+) T cells; conversely, FLCD34 mice have higher levels of CD45RO(+) T cells. The CD45RO(+) T cells of FLCD34 mice proliferated rapidly after stimulation and exhibited innate T cells properties, expressing PLZF (promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein). Human T cells educated by mouse MHC II in mice without a human thymus differ from normal human T cells. On the basis of these findings, numerous T cell-tropic human diseases could be explored in our humanized mice and molecular aspects of human T cell development could be also studied extensively.

  13. Effect of lycopene on cell viability and cell cycle progression in human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoro Anderson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lycopene, a major carotenoid component of tomato, has a potential anticancer activity in many types of cancer. Epidemiological and clinical trials rarely provide evidence for mechanisms of the compound’s action, and studies on its effect on cancer of different cell origins are now being done. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of lycopene on cell cycle and cell viability in eight human cancer cell lines. Methods Human cell lines were treated with lycopene (1–5 μM for 48 and 96 h. Cell viability was monitored using the method of MTT. The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and apoptotic cells were identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick labeling (TUNEL and by DAPI. Results Our data showed a significant decrease in the number of viable cells in three cancer cells lines (HT-29, T84 and MCF-7 after 48 h treatment with lycopene, and changes in the fraction of cells retained in different cell cycle phases. Lycopene promoted also cell cycle arrest followed by decreased cell viability in majority of cell lines after 96 h, as compared to controls. Furthermore, an increase in apoptosis was observed in four cell lines (T-84, HT-29, MCF-7 and DU145 when cells were treated with lycopene. Conclusions Our findings show the capacity of lycopene to inhibit cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle in different phases and increase apoptosis, mainly in breast, colon and prostate lines after 96 h. These observations suggest that lycopene may alter cell cycle regulatory proteins depending on the type of cancer and the dose of lycopene administration. Taken together, these data indicated that the antiproliferative effect of lycopene was cellular type, time and dose-dependent.

  14. The effect of cell phones on human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Isbeih, Ibrahim N.; Saad, Dina

    2011-10-01

    The effect of cell phone radiation on human health is the subject of recent interest and study, as a result of the enormous increase in cell phone usage throughout the world. Cell phones use electromagnetic radiation in the microwave range, which some believe may be harmful to human health. Other digital wireless systems, such as data communication networks, produce similar radiation. The objective of this survey is to review the effects of cell phones on human health: A large body of research exists, both epidemiological and experimental, in non-human animals and in humans, of which the majority shows no definite causative relationship between exposure to cell phones and harmful biological effects in humans. This is often paraphrased simply as the balance of evidence showing no harm to humans from cell phones, although a significant number of individual studies do suggest such a relationship, or are inconclusive.

  15. New insights into human primordial germ cells and early embryonic development from single-cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Jörg; Wruck, Wasco; Adjaye, James

    2017-08-01

    Human preimplantation developmental studies are difficult to accomplish due to associated ethical and moral issues. Preimplantation cells are rare and exist only in transient cell states. From a single cell, it is very challenging to analyse the origination of the heterogeneity and complexity inherent to the human body. However, recent advances in single-cell technology and data analysis have provided new insights into the process of early human development and germ cell specification. In this Review, we examine the latest single-cell datasets of human preimplantation embryos and germ cell development, compare them to bulk cell analyses, and interpret their biological implications. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Trichloroethylene toxicity in a human hepatoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thevenin, E.; McMillian, J. [Medical Univ. of Charleston South Carolina, SC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The experiments conducted in this study were designed to determine the usefullness of hepatocyte cultures and a human hepatoma cell line as model systems for assessing human susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma due to exposure to trichloroethylene. The results from these studies will then be analyzed to determine if human cell lines can be used to conduct future experiments of this nature.

  17. Human Galectin-3 Promotes Trypanosoma cruzi Adhesion to Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kleshchenko, Yuliya Y.; Moody, Tapria N.; Furtak, Vyacheslav A.; Ochieng, Josiah; Lima, Maria F.; Villalta, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    Human galectin-3 binds to the surface of Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes and human coronary artery smooth muscle (CASM) cells. CASM cells express galectin-3 on their surface and secrete it. Exogenous galectin-3 increased the binding of T. cruzi to CASM cells. Trypanosome binding to CASM cells was enhanced when either T. cruzi or CASM cells were preincubated with galectin-3. Cells stably transfected with galectin-3 antisense show a dramatic decrease in galectin-3 expression and very little T...

  18. Enhanced casein kinase II activity in human tumour cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowald, K; Fischer, H; Issinger, O G

    1984-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) activity is enhanced as much as 2-3 fold in established and 4-5-fold in transformed human cell lines when compared to that of fibroblasts and primary human tumour cell cultures where CKII activity never exceeded a basic level. The high activity of CKII in transformed cells...

  19. Isolation and in vitro expansion of human colonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, P.; Sato, T.; Merlos-Suarez, A.; Barriga, F.M.; Iglesias, M.; Rossell, D.; Auer, H.; Gallardo, M.; Blasco, M.A.; Sancho, E.; Clevers, H.; Batlle, E.

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe the isolation of stem cells of the human colonic epithelium. Differential cell surface abundance of ephrin type-B receptor 2 (EPHB2) allows the purification of different cell types from human colon mucosa biopsies. The highest EPHB2 surface levels correspond to epithelial colonic

  20. A case of pediatric virilizing adrenocortical tumor resulting in hypothalamic-pituitary activation and central precocious puberty following surgical removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yoko; Oue, Takaharu; Oowari, Mitsugu; Soh, Hideki; Tachibana, Makiko; Kimura, Sadami; Kiyohara, Yuki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Bessyo, Kazuhiko; Mushiake, Sotaro; Homma, Keiko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Sasano, Hironobu; Ozono, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    We present a 6-year-old boy with a virilizing adrenocortical tumor who initially presented with peripheral precocious puberty. Development of facial acne, pubic hair and a growth spurt were noted at the age of five. A low-pitched voice as well as maturation of external genitalia was noted at the age of six. Both serum and urinary levels of adrenal androgens were elevated. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a large right suprarenal mass and he underwent surgical resection without any complications. The histological diagnosis was adrenocortical carcinoma according to the criteria of Weiss. Following surgical removal of the androgen-producing tumor, the patient subsequently developed hypothalamic-pituitary activation and demonstrated central precocious puberty. He was treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in order to delay further pubertal progression. Clinical follow-up of potential secondary effects of excess hormone secretion after removal is important in some pediatric patients with virilizing adrenocortical tumor.

  1. CD90 Expression on human primary cells and elimination of contaminating fibroblasts from cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisselbach, Lynn; Merges, Michael; Bossie, Alexis; Boyd, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Cluster Differentiation 90 (CD90) is a cell surface glycoprotein originally identified on mouse thymocytes. Although CD90 has been identified on a variety of stem cells and at varying levels in non-lymphoid tissues such as on fibroblasts, brain cells, and activated endothelial cells, the knowledge about the levels of CD90 expression on different cell types, including human primary cells, is limited. The goal of this study was to identify CD90 as a human primary cell biomarker and to develop an efficient and reliable method for eliminating unwanted or contaminating fibroblasts from human primary cell cultures suitable for research pursuant to cell based therapy technologies.

  2. Simulation of developing human neuronal cell networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Kerstin; Priwitzer, Barbara; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tietz, Lukas H B; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2016-08-30

    Microelectrode array (MEA) is a widely used technique to study for example the functional properties of neuronal networks derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-NN). With hESC-NN, we can investigate the earliest developmental stages of neuronal network formation in the human brain. In this paper, we propose an in silico model of maturating hESC-NNs based on a phenomenological model called INEX. We focus on simulations of the development of bursts in hESC-NNs, which are the main feature of neuronal activation patterns. The model was developed with data from developing hESC-NN recordings on MEAs which showed increase in the neuronal activity during the investigated six measurement time points in the experimental and simulated data. Our simulations suggest that the maturation process of hESC-NN, resulting in the formation of bursts, can be explained by the development of synapses. Moreover, spike and burst rate both decreased at the last measurement time point suggesting a pruning of synapses as the weak ones are removed. To conclude, our model reflects the assumption that the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory neurons during the maturation of a neuronal network and the spontaneous emergence of bursts are due to increased connectivity caused by the forming of new synapses.

  3. Human Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes: An Alternative ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical spills and associated deaths in the US has increased 2.6-fold and 16-fold from 1983 to 2012, respectfully. In addition, the number of chemicals to which humans are exposed to in the environment has increased almost 10-fold from 2001 to 2013 within the US. Internationally, a WHO report on the global composite impact of chemicals on health reported that 16% of the total burden of cardiovascular disease was attributed to environmental chemical exposure with 2.5 million deaths per year. Clearly, the cardiovascular system, at all its various developmental and life stages, represents a critical target organ system that can be adversely affected by existing and emerging chemicals (e.g., engineered nanomaterials) in a variety of environmental media. The ability to assess chemical cardiac risk and safety is critically needed but extremely challenging due to the number and categories of chemicals in commerce, as indicated. This presentation\\session will evaluate the use of adult human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes, and existing platforms, as an alternative model to evaluate environmental chemical cardiac toxicity as well as provide key information for the development of predictive adverse outcomes pathways associated with environmental chemical exposures. (This abstract does not represent EPA policy) Rapid and translatable chemical safety screening models for cardiotoxicity current status for informing regulatory decisions, a workshop sponsored by the Society

  4. Analysis of IGF and IGFBP as prognostic serum biomarkers for adrenocortical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dhaval; Ellis, Ryan; Howard, Brandi; Boufraqech, Myriem; Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Zhang, Lisa; Quezado, Martha M; Nilubol, Naris; Kebebew, Electron

    2014-10-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) lacks diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers to guide treatment. A consistently dysregulated pathway in ACC is the IGF signaling pathway, specifically overexpression of IGF2, IGF-I-receptor, and IGFBP2. The objective of this study was to perform a comprehensive analysis of serum IGF and IGFBP levels and to determine their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in ACC. Preoperative serum samples from 53 patients who underwent surgery for adrenocortical adenomas, 3 patients who underwent initial surgery for ACC, 16 patients who underwent reoperative surgery for ACC, and 5 healthy volunteer controls were analyzed. The serum concentration of IGF1, IGF2, IGFBP1, IGFBP2, and IGFBP3 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No difference in the levels of IGF2 (p = .231) and IGFBP2 (p = .511) was observed between patients with ACC, benign adrenocortical tumors, and healthy volunteers. IGF1, IGFBP1, and IGFBP3 levels were not detected. High IGFBP2 levels were associated with better overall survival (OS) (p = .001) and showed a trend toward better abdominal progression-free (APFS) survival (p = .070) in patients with ACC. A subanalysis of patients undergoing reoperation for recurrent ACC showed better OS with high levels of IGFBP2 (p = .003) and a trend toward better APFS (p = .107). There was no significant difference in IGF2 and IGFBP2 levels by extent of disease. IGF2 and IGFBP2 are not elevated in the serum of patients with ACC compared with patients with benign neoplasms and healthy volunteers. Elevated serum IGFBP2 is associated with better survival in patients with ACC and those undergoing reoperative surgery for recurrent ACC.

  5. The reticulin algorithm for adrenocortical tumor diagnosis: a multicentric validation study on 245 unpublished cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duregon, Eleonora; Fassina, Ambrogio; Volante, Marco; Nesi, Gabriella; Santi, Raffaella; Gatti, Gaia; Cappellesso, Rocco; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Ventura, Laura; Gambacorta, Marcello; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Loli, Paola; Mannelli, Massimo; Mantero, Franco; Berruti, Alfredo; Terzolo, Massimo; Papotti, Mauro

    2013-09-01

    The pathologic diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) still needs to be improved, because the renowned Weiss Score (WS) system has a poor reproducibility of some parameters and is difficult to apply in borderline cases and in ACC variants. The "reticulin algorithm" (RA) defines malignancy through an altered reticulin framework associated with 1 of the 3 following parameter: necrosis, high mitotic rate, and vascular invasion. This study aimed at validating the interobserver reproducibility of reticulin stain evaluation in an unpublished series of 245 adrenocortical tumors (61 adenomas and 184 carcinomas) from 5 Italian centers, classified according to the WS. Eight pathologists reviewed all reticulin-stained slides. After training, a second round of evaluation on discordant cases was performed 10 weeks later. The RA reclassified 67 cases (27%) as adenomas, including 44 with no reticulin alterations and 23 with an altered reticulin framework but lacking the subsequent parameters of the triad. The other 178 cases (73%) were carcinomas according to the above-mentioned criteria. A complete (8/8 pathologists) interobserver agreement was reached in 75% of cases (κ=0.702), irrespective of case derivation, pathologists' experience, and histologic variants, and was further improved when only those cases with high WS and clinically malignant behavior were considered. After the training, the overall agreement increased to 86%. We conclude that reticulin staining is a reliable technique and an easy-to-interpret system in adrenocortical tumors; moreover, it has a high interobserver reproducibility, which supports the notion of using such a method in the proposed 2-step RA approach for ACC diagnosis.

  6. Efficient and Fast Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapies have been used for repairing damaged brain tissue and helping functional recovery after brain injury. Aberrance neurogenesis is related with brain injury, and multipotential neural stem cells from human embryonic stem (hES cells provide a great promise for cell replacement therapies. Optimized protocols for neural differentiation are necessary to produce functional human neural stem cells (hNSCs for cell therapy. However, the qualified procedure is scarce and detailed features of hNSCs originated from hES cells are still unclear. In this study, we developed a method to obtain hNSCs from hES cells, by which we could harvest abundant hNSCs in a relatively short time. Then, we examined the expression of pluripotent and multipotent marker genes through immunostaining and confirmed differentiation potential of the differentiated hNSCs. Furthermore, we analyzed the mitotic activity of these hNSCs. In this report, we provided comprehensive features of hNSCs and delivered the knowledge about how to obtain more high-quality hNSCs from hES cells which may help to accelerate the NSC-based therapies in brain injury treatment.

  7. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    exploring alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for cell based therapy in diabetes. Since in vitro culture of islet β-cells demonstrates loss in insulin (Beattie et al. 1999), several attempts have been made to identify stem / progenitor cells capable of differentiation into insulin-producing cells. Embryonic stem cells, which ...

  8. Human Cell and Tissue Establishment Registration Public Query

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This application provides Human Cell and Tissue registration information for registered, inactive, and pre-registered firms. Query options are by Establishment Name,...

  9. Adrenocortical Regulation, Eating in the Absence of Hunger and BMI in Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, L. A.; Granger, D.A.; Susman, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relations among adrenocortical regulation, eating in the absence of hunger, and body mass index (BMI) in children ages 5 to 9 years (N = 43). Saliva was collected before and after the Trier Social Stress Test for children (TSST-C), and was later assayed for cortisol. Area under the curve with respect to increase (AUCi) was used as a measure of changes in cortisol release from baseline to 60 minutes post-TSST-C. Age- and sex-specific BMI scores were cal...

  10. The first laparoscopic resection of an aldosterone-secreting adrenocortical oncocytoma in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melih Akin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oncocytomas of the adrenal cortex are usually benign and nonfunctional, consisting of oncocytes in which the cytoplasm becomes eosinophilic due to the accumulation of abnormal mitochondria. Oncocytomas can exist in many organs and are frequently found in the salivary gland, kidneys, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, and hypophysis. Functioning oncocytomas are very rarely observed in children, and no more than ten cases have been reported in the literature. Here, we present the first report of laparoscopic excision of an aldosterone-secreting adrenocortical oncocytoma in a child.

  11. Extension of adrenocortical carcinoma into the right atrium – echocardiographic diagnosis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozenman Yoseph

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare, highly malignant tumor. Cardiac involvement of the tumor is very rare. Echocardiography facilitates the evaluation of the cardiac involvement of the tumor. Case Presentation We describe a patient with an adrenal tumor. Transthoracic echo showed its extension into the right atrium. Accordingly, a combined abdominal and cardiac operation was performed, monitored by transesophageal echocardiography. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of echocardiography in revealing the cardiac involvement by this tumor and in planning the operative procedure.

  12. Unilateral Primary Pigmented Nodular Adrenocortical Disease: Report of a Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Deshmukh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary pigmented adrenocortical disease is a rare disorder usually affecting both adrenals. It causes Cushing’s syndrome that is adrenocorticotropic hormone independent. It is treated by bilateral adrenalectomy. We present an unusual case where this condition was unilateral and was diagnosed as adenoma on imaging. The patient was subsequently treated by unilateral adrenalectomy, and had no signs of recurrence in 5-year postoperative follow-up. This case emphasizes the importance of histopathology and immunohistochemistry in diagnosis of this condition.

  13. Preoperative FDG PET/CT in adrenocortical cancer depicts massive venous tumor invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Constantin; Werner, Rudolf A; Brumberg, Joachim; Higuchi, Takahiro

    2014-06-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain. Ultrasound revealed an intra-abdominal mass in the left renal region. Comprehensive endocrine workup was unremarkable. The patient was referred for further diagnostic workup. FDG PET/CT revealed a hypermetabolic mass in the left adrenal region. In addition, pathologically increased tracer uptake of 2 renal veins (the upper vein crossing in front of the aorta the lower one crossing behind the aorta) and the inferior vena cava raised the concern for malignant venous infiltration. Adrenalectomy, nephrectomy, and thrombectomy were carefully planned and performed. Adrenocortical carcinoma with tumor thrombus and caval extension was proven by histopathology.

  14. New frontiers in human cell biology and medicine: can pluripotent stem cells deliver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2012-11-12

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide enormous opportunities to treat disease using cell therapy. But human stem cells can also drive biomedical and cell biological discoveries in a human model system, which can be directly linked to understanding disease or developing new therapies. Finally, rigorous scientific studies of these cells can and should inform the many science and medical policy issues that confront the translation of these technologies to medicine. In this paper, I discuss these issues using amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as an example.

  15. Effects of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Human Trophoblast Cell Functions In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajing Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trophoblast cell dysfunction is involved in many disorders during pregnancy such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. Few treatments exist, however, that target improving trophoblast cell function. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs are capable of self-renewing, can undergo multilineage differentiation, and have homing abilities; in addition, they have immunomodulatory effects and paracrine properties and thus are a prospective source for cell therapy. To identify whether hUCMSCs can regulate trophoblast cell functions, we treated trophoblast cells with hUCMSC supernatant or cocultured them with hUCMSCs. Both treatments remarkably enhanced the migration and invasion abilities of trophoblast cells and upregulated their proliferation ability. At a certain concentration, hUCMSCs also modulated hCG, PIGF, and sEndoglin levels in the trophoblast culture medium. Thus, hUCMSCs have a positive effect on trophoblast cellular functions, which may provide a new avenue for treatment of placenta-related diseases during pregnancy.

  16. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Devon A.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D.; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality1. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours2–5. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown2. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are

  17. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoti Xu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2–4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50–70 fiber-associated, or 1,000–5,000 FACS-enriched CD56+/CD29+ human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications.

  18. Propagation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells on Human Amniotic Fluid Cells as Feeder Cells in Xeno-Free Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Juwon; Baek, Jin Ah; Seol, Hye Won; Choi, Young Min

    2016-03-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been routinely cultured on mouse embryonic fibroblast feederlayers with a medium containing animal materials. For clinical application of hESCs, animal-derived products from the animal feeder cells, animal substrates such as gelatin or Matrigel and animal serum are strictly to be eliminated in the culture system. In this study, we performed that SNUhES32 and H1 were cultured on human amniotic fluid cells (hAFCs) with KOSR XenoFree and a humanized substrate. All of hESCs were relatively well propagated on hAFCs feeders with xeno-free conditions and they expressed pluripotent stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase, SSEA-4, TRA1-60, TRA1-81, Oct-4, and Nanog like hESCs cultured on STO or human foreskin fibroblast feeders. In addition, we observed the expression of nonhuman N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5GC) molecules by flow cytometry, which was xenotransplantation components of contamination in hESCs cultured on animal feeder conditions, was not detected in this xeno-free condition. In conclusion, SNUhES32 and H1 could be maintained on hAFCs for humanized culture conditions, therefore, we suggested that new xenofree conditions for clinical grade hESCs culture will be useful data in future clinical studies.

  19. A Novel Class of Human Cardiac Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moccetti, Tiziano; Leri, Annarosa; Goichberg, Polina; Rota, Marcello; Anversa, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Following the recognition that hematopoietic stem cells improve the outcome of myocardial infarction in animal models, bone marrow mononuclear cells, CD34-positive cells and mesenchymal stromal cells have been introduced clinically. The intracoronary or intramyocardial injection of these cell classes has been shown to be safe and to produce a modest but significant enhancement in systolic function. However, the identification of resident cardiac stem cells in the human heart (hCSCs) has creat...

  20. Alloimmune Responses of Humanized Mice to Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapeutics

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    Nigel G. Kooreman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in using embryonic stem cell (ESC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC derivatives for tissue regeneration. However, an increased understanding of human immune responses to stem cell-derived allografts is necessary for maintaining long-term graft persistence. To model this alloimmunity, humanized mice engrafted with human hematopoietic and immune cells could prove to be useful. In this study, an in-depth analysis of graft-infiltrating human lymphocytes and splenocytes revealed that humanized mice incompletely model human immune responses toward allogeneic stem cells and their derivatives. Furthermore, using an “allogenized” mouse model, we show the feasibility of reconstituting immunodeficient mice with a functional mouse immune system and describe a key role of innate immune cells in the rejection of mouse stem cell allografts.

  1. Osteocalcin Effect on Human β-Cells Mass and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabek, Omaima M; Nishimoto, Satoru Ken; Fraga, Daniel; Tejpal, Neelam; Ricordi, Camillo; Gaber, A O

    2015-09-01

    The osteoblast-specific hormone osteocalcin (OC) was found to regulate glucose metabolism, fat mass, and β-cell proliferation in mice. Here, we investigate the effect of decarboxylated OC (D-OC) on human β-cell function and mass in culture and in vivo using a Nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model. We found that D-OC at dose ranges from 1.0 to 15 ng/mL significantly augmented insulin content and enhanced human β-cell proliferation of cultured human islets. This was paralleled by increased expression of sulfonylurea receptor protein; a marker of β-cell differentiation and a component of the insulin-secretory apparatus. Moreover, in a Nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model, systemic administration of D-OC at 4.5-ng/h significantly augmented production of human insulin and C-peptide from the grafted human islets. Finally, histological staining of the human islet grafts showed that the improvement in the β-cell function was attributable to an increase in β-cell mass as a result of β-cell proliferation indicated by MKI67 staining together with the increased β-cell number and decreased α-cell number data obtained using laser scanning cytometry. Our data for the first time show D-OC-enhanced β-cell function in human islets and support future exploitation of D-OC-mediated β-cell regulation for developing useful clinical treatments for patients with diabetes.

  2. Early stages in human and mouse T-cell development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.

    1994-01-01

    One important question in lymphopoiesis is where stem cells commit to T-, B- and natural killer (NK)-cell lineages. Recent findings in human and mouse systems suggest that the thymus is seeded by a yet uncommitted progenitor cell. The earliest murine thymic progenitor cells have the capacity to

  3. Characterizing the radioresponse of pluripotent and multipotent human stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary L Lan

    Full Text Available The potential capability of stem cells to restore functionality to diseased or aged tissues has prompted a surge of research, but much work remains to elucidate the response of these cells to genotoxic agents. To more fully understand the impact of irradiation on different stem cell types, the present study has analyzed the radioresponse of human pluripotent and multipotent stem cells. Human embryonic stem (ES cells, human induced pluripotent (iPS cells, and iPS-derived human neural stem cells (iPS-hNSCs cells were irradiated and analyzed for cell survival parameters, differentiation, DNA damage and repair and oxidative stress at various times after exposure. While irradiation led to dose-dependent reductions in survival, the fraction of surviving cells exhibited dose-dependent increases in metabolic activity. Irradiation did not preclude germ layer commitment of ES cells, but did promote neuronal differentiation. ES cells subjected to irradiation exhibited early apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression, but otherwise showed normal repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Cells surviving irradiation also showed acute and persistent increases in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that were significant at nearly all post-irradiation times analyzed. We suggest that stem cells alter their redox homeostasis to adapt to adverse conditions and that radiation-induced oxidative stress plays a role in regulating the function and fate of stem cells within tissues compromised by radiation injury.

  4. Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung cancer cells. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... (8-OHdG), and apoptosis based on 3-(4,5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay were evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, namely, H1155, ...

  5. Comparative mutagenesis of human cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thilly, W.G.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses measuring methods of point mutations; high density cell cultures for low dose studies; measurement and sequence determination of mutations in DNA; the mutational spectra of styrene oxide and ethlyene oxide in TK-6 cells; mutational spectrum of Cr in human lymphoblast cells; mutational spectra of radon in TK-6 cells; and the mutational spectra of smokeless tobacco. (CBS)

  6. Human memory T cells: generation, compartmentalization and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Donna L; Yudanin, Naomi A; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2014-01-01

    Memory T cells constitute the most abundant lymphocyte population in the body for the majority of a person's lifetime; however, our understanding of memory T cell generation, function and maintenance mainly derives from mouse studies, which cannot recapitulate the exposure to multiple pathogens that occurs over many decades in humans. In this Review, we discuss studies focused on human memory T cells that reveal key properties of these cells, including subset heterogeneity and diverse tissue residence in multiple mucosal and lymphoid tissue sites. We also review how the function and the adaptability of human memory T cells depend on spatial and temporal compartmentalization.

  7. Nanoscale Mechanical Stimulation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Nikukar

    2014-05-01

    We observed significant responses after 1 and 2-week stimulations in cell number, cell shapes and phenotypical markers. Microarray was performed for all groups. Cell count showed normal cell growth with stimulation. However, cell surface area, cell perimeter, and arboration after 1-week stimulation showed significant increases. Immunofluorescent studies have showed significant increase in osteocalcin production after stimulation. Conclusions: Nanoscale mechanical vibration showed significant changes in human mesenchymal stem cell behaviours. Cell morphology changed to become more polygonal and increased expression of the osteoblast markers were noted. These findings with gene regulation changes suggesting nanoscale mechanostimulation has stimulated osteoblastogenesis.  Keywords:  Mesenchymal, Nanoscale, Stem Cells.

  8. Comparison of the glycosphingolipids of human-induced pluripotent stem cells and human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säljö, Karin; Barone, Angela; Vizlin-Hodzic, Dzeneta; Johansson, Bengt R; Breimer, Michael E; Funa, Keiko; Teneberg, Susann

    2017-04-01

    High expectations are held for human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) since they are established from autologous tissues thus overcoming the risk of allogeneic immune rejection when used in regenerative medicine. However, little is known regarding the cell-surface carbohydrate antigen profile of hiPSC compared with human embryonic stem cells (hESC). Here, glycosphingolipids were isolated from an adipocyte-derived hiPSC line, and hiPSC and hESC glycosphingolipids were compared by concurrent characterization by binding assays with carbohydrate-recognizing ligands and mass spectrometry. A high similarity between the nonacid glycosphingolipids of hiPSC and hESC was found. The nonacid glycosphingolipids P1 pentaosylceramide, x2 pentaosylceramide and H type 1 heptaosylceramide, not previously described in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC), were characterized in both hiPSC and hESC. The composition of acid glycosphingolipids differed, with increased levels of GM3 ganglioside, and reduced levels of GD1a/GD1b in hiPSC when compared with hESC. In addition, the hESC glycosphingolipids sulf-globopentaosylceramide and sialyl-globotetraosylceramide were lacking in hiPSC. Neural stem cells differentiating from hiPSC had a reduced expression of sialyl-lactotetra, whereas expression of the GD1a ganglioside was significantly increased. Thus, while sialyl-lactotetra is a marker of undifferentiated hPSC, GD1a is a novel marker of neural differentiation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

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    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  10. The Evolution of Human Cells in Terms of Protein Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Adam J.; Oates, Matt E.; Fang, Hai; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Gough, Julian; Rackham, Owen J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are composed of hundreds of cell types. As the genomic DNA of each somatic cell is identical, cell type is determined by what is expressed and when. Until recently, little has been reported about the determinants of human cell identity, particularly from the joint perspective of gene evolution and expression. Here, we chart the evolutionary past of all documented human cell types via the collective histories of proteins, the principal product of gene expression. FANTOM5 data provide cell-type–specific digital expression of human protein-coding genes and the SUPERFAMILY resource is used to provide protein domain annotation. The evolutionary epoch in which each protein was created is inferred by comparison with domain annotation of all other completely sequenced genomes. Studying the distribution across epochs of genes expressed in each cell type reveals insights into human cellular evolution in terms of protein innovation. For each cell type, its history of protein innovation is charted based on the genes it expresses. Combining the histories of all cell types enables us to create a timeline of cell evolution. This timeline identifies the possibility that our common ancestor Coelomata (cavity-forming animals) provided the innovation required for the innate immune system, whereas cells which now form the brain of human have followed a trajectory of continually accumulating novel proteins since Opisthokonta (boundary of animals and fungi). We conclude that exaptation of existing domain architectures into new contexts is the dominant source of cell-type–specific domain architectures. PMID:24692656

  11. Human immunodeficiency syndromes affecting human natural killer cell cytolytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Denis Billadeau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T-cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with SNARE-dependent fusion promotes lytic granule release into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process.

  12. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin+) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34+CD38-Lin-/low). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 (7μM) and G2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular aging and rejuvenation of human muscle stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Morgan E; Suetta, Charlotte; Conboy, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Very little remains known about the regulation of human organ stem cells (in general, and during the aging process), and most previous data were collected in short-lived rodents. We examined whether stem cell aging in rodents could be extrapolated to genetically and environmentally variable humans....... Our findings establish key evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of human stem cell aging. We find that satellite cells are maintained in aged human skeletal muscle, but fail to activate in response to muscle attrition, due to diminished activation of Notch compounded by elevated transforming growth...... factor beta (TGF-beta)/phospho Smad3 (pSmad3). Furthermore, this work reveals that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/phosphate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) signalling declines in human muscle with age, and is important for activating Notch in human muscle stem cells. This molecular...

  14. Stem Cells: A Renaissance in Human Biology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-16

    The understanding of human biology and how it relates to that of other species represents an ancient quest. Limited access to human material, particularly during early development, has restricted researchers to only scratching the surface of this inherently challenging subject. Recent technological innovations, such as single cell "omics" and human stem cell derivation, have now greatly accelerated our ability to gain insights into uniquely human biology. The opportunities afforded to delve molecularly into scarce material and to model human embryogenesis and pathophysiological processes are leading to new insights of human development and are changing our understanding of disease and choice of therapy options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. In vitro proliferation of adult human beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    Full Text Available A decrease in functional beta-cell mass is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 analogues induce proliferation of rodent beta-cells. However, the proliferative capacity of human beta-cells and its modulation by GLP-1 analogues remain to be fully investigated. We therefore sought to quantify adult human beta-cell proliferation in vitro and whether this is affected by the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide.Human islets from 7 adult cadaveric organ donors were dispersed into single cells. Beta-cells were purified by FACS. Non-sorted cells and the beta-cell enriched ("beta-cells" population were plated on extracellular matrix from rat (804G and human bladder carcinoma cells (HTB9 or bovine corneal endothelial ECM (BCEC. Cells were maintained in culture+/-liraglutide for 4 days in the presence of BrdU.Rare human beta-cell proliferation could be observed either in the purified beta-cell population (0.051±0.020%; 22 beta-cells proliferating out of 84'283 beta-cells counted or in the non-sorted cell population (0.055±0.011%; 104 proliferating beta-cells out of 232'826 beta-cells counted, independently of the matrix or the culture conditions. Liraglutide increased human beta-cell proliferation on BCEC in the non-sorted cell population (0.082±0.034% proliferating beta-cells vs. 0.017±0.008% in control, p<0.05.These results indicate that adult human beta-cell proliferation can occur in vitro but remains an extremely rare event with these donors and particular culture conditions. Liraglutide increases beta-cell proliferation only in the non-sorted cell population and only on BCEC. However, it cannot be excluded that human beta-cells may proliferate to a greater extent in situ in response to natural stimuli.

  16. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

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    Puya G Yazdi

    Full Text Available The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Human Blastocoel Fluid and Blastocyst Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnert Jensen, Pernille; Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen

    The human blastocyst consists of 100-200 cells that are organized in an outer layer of differentiated trophectoderm (TE) cells lining the blastocyst cavity into which the undifferentiated inner cell mass (ICM) protrudes. The cavity of the blastocyst is filled with blastocoel fluid to which all...... the cells of the blastocyst are exposed. The ICM is the starting point for the development of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which posses the potential to develop into any cell type present in the adult human body [1,2]. This ability makes hESCs a potential source of cells...... blastocoel fluid (1-8 nanoliters per blastocyst), has hampered an in-depth study of the human blastocyst proteome. However, recent developments in mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques allow the identification and characterization of thousands of proteins from low microgram levels of protein extracted...

  18. Adrenocortical oncocytic carcinoma with recurrent metastases: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennatas Constantine

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adrenal cortex oncocytic carcinoma (AOC represents an exceptional pathological entity, since only 22 cases have been documented in the literature so far. Case presentation Our case concerns a 54-year-old man with past medical history of right adrenal excision with partial hepatectomy, due to an adrenocortical carcinoma. The patient was admitted in our hospital to undergo surgical resection of a left lung mass newly detected on chest Computed Tomography scan. The histological and immunohistochemical study revealed a metastatic AOC. Although the patient was given mitotane orally in adjuvant basis, he experienced relapse with multiple metastases in the thorax twice in the next year and was treated with consecutive resections. Two and a half years later, a right hip joint metastasis was found and concurrent chemoradiation was given. Finally, approximately five years post disease onset, the patient died due to massive metastatic disease. A thorough review of AOC and particularly all diagnostic difficulties are extensively stated. Conclusion Histological classification of adrenocortical oncocytic tumours has been so far a matter of debate. There is no officially established histological scoring system regarding these rare neoplasms and therefore many diagnostic difficulties occur for pathologists.

  19. Adrenocortical responsiveness to infusions of physiological doses of ACTH is not altered in posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen D Radant

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Early studies of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD reported that abnormal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA system was associated with the disorder. However, subsequent studies attempting to identify a specific aspect of HPA dysfunction that characterizes PTSD have been marked by considerable inconsistency of results. A facet of HPA regulation that has been considered but not definitively investigated is the possibility that the responsiveness of the adrenal cortex to physiological concentrations of ACTH is diminished in PTSD. Relationships between PTSD and the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA have also been postulated. In this study we investigated the magnitude and time course of changes in concentrations of plasma cortisol and DHEA in response to bolus infusions of physiological doses of ACTH 1-24 in PTSD patients and control subjects. We found no evidence for PTSD-related alterations in cortisol or DHEA secretion in response to stimulation by low doses of ACTH and conclude that adrenocortical responsiveness is normal in PTSD. Results from this and other studies suggest that the occurrence of defects in HPA function in PTSD may be specific responses to particular combinations of trauma type, genetic susceptibility, and individual history.

  20. Studies of lymphocyte reconstitution in a humanized mouse model reveal a requirement of T cells for human B cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Julie; Kelly, Margot; Freed, Brian M; McCarter, Martin D; Kedl, Ross M; Torres, Raul M; Pelanda, Roberta

    2013-03-01

    The hematopoietic humanized mouse (hu-mouse) model is a powerful resource to study and manipulate the human immune system. However, a major and recurrent issue with this model has been the poor maturation of B cells that fail to progress beyond the transitional B cell stage. Of interest, a similar problem has been reported in transplant patients who receive cord blood stem cells. In this study, we characterize the development of human B and T cells in the lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen of BALB/c-Rag2(null)Il2rγ(null) hu-mice. We find a dominant population of immature B cells in the blood and spleen early, followed by a population of human T cells, coincident with the detection of LNs. Notably, in older mice we observe a major population of mature B cells in LNs and in the spleens of mice with higher T cell frequencies. Moreover, we demonstrate that T cells are necessary for B cell maturation, as introduction of autologous human T cells expedites the appearance of mature B cells, whereas in vivo depletion of T cells retards B cell maturation. The presence of the mature B cell population correlates with enhanced IgG and Ag-specific responses to both T cell-dependent and T cell-independent challenges, indicating their functionality. These findings enhance our understanding of human B cell development, provide increased details of the reconstitution dynamics of hu-mice, and validate the use of this animal model to study mechanisms and treatments for the similar delay of functional B cells associated with cord blood transplantations.

  1. Development of human B cells and antibodies following human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Anne; Hallam, Steven J; Nielsen, Stanton J; Cuadra, German I; Berges, Bradford K

    2015-06-01

    Humanized mice represent a valuable model system to study the development and functionality of the human immune system. In the RAG-hu mouse model highly immunodeficient Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice are transplanted with human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells, resulting in human hematopoiesis and a predominant production of B and T lymphocytes. Human adaptive immune responses have been detected towards a variety of antigens in humanized mice but both cellular and humoral immune responses tend to be weak and sporadically detected. The underlying mechanisms for inconsistent responses are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of human B cell development and antibody production in RAG-hu mice to better understand the lack of effective antibody responses. We found that T cell levels in blood did not significantly change from 8 to 28 weeks post-engraftment, while B cells reached a peak at 14 weeks. Concentrations of 3 antibody classes (IgM, IgG, IgA) were found to be at levels about 0.1% or less of normal human levels, but human antibodies were still detected up to 32 weeks after engraftment. Human IgM was detected in 92.5% of animals while IgG and IgA were detected in about half of animals. We performed flow cytometric analysis of human B cells in bone marrow, spleen, and blood to examine the presence of precursor B cells, immature B cells, naïve B cells, and plasma B cells. We detected high levels of surface IgM(+) B cells (immature and naïve B cells) and low levels of plasma B cells in these organs, suggesting that B cells do not mature properly in this model. Low levels of human T cells in the spleen were observed, and we suggest that the lack of T cell help may explain poor B cell development and antibody responses. We conclude that human B cells that develop in humanized mice do not receive the signals necessary to undergo class-switching or to secrete antibody effectively, and we discuss strategies to potentially overcome these barriers. Copyright © 2015

  2. Persistent donor cell gene expression among human induced pluripotent stem cells contributes to differences with human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhumur Ghosh

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs generated by de-differentiation of adult somatic cells offer potential solutions for the ethical issues surrounding human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, as well as their immunologic rejection after cellular transplantation. However, although hiPSCs have been described as "embryonic stem cell-like", these cells have a distinct gene expression pattern compared to hESCs, making incomplete reprogramming a potential pitfall. It is unclear to what degree the difference in tissue of origin may contribute to these gene expression differences. To answer these important questions, a careful transcriptional profiling analysis is necessary to investigate the exact reprogramming state of hiPSCs, as well as analysis of the impression, if any, of the tissue of origin on the resulting hiPSCs. In this study, we compare the gene profiles of hiPSCs derived from fetal fibroblasts, neonatal fibroblasts, adipose stem cells, and keratinocytes to their corresponding donor cells and hESCs. Our analysis elucidates the overall degree of reprogramming within each hiPSC line, as well as the "distance" between each hiPSC line and its donor cell. We further identify genes that have a similar mode of regulation in hiPSCs and their corresponding donor cells compared to hESCs, allowing us to specify core sets of donor genes that continue to be expressed in each hiPSC line. We report that residual gene expression of the donor cell type contributes significantly to the differences among hiPSCs and hESCs, and adds to the incompleteness in reprogramming. Specifically, our analysis reveals that fetal fibroblast-derived hiPSCs are closer to hESCs, followed by adipose, neonatal fibroblast, and keratinocyte-derived hiPSCs.

  3. Human dental pulp stem cells: Applications in future regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potdar, Pravin D; Jethmalani, Yogita D

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are pluripotent cells, having a property of differentiating into various types of cells of human body. Several studies have developed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various human tissues, peripheral blood and body fluids. These cells are then characterized by cellular and molecular markers to understand their specific phenotypes. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are having a MSCs phenotype and they are differentiated into neuron, cardiomyocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, liver cells and β cells of islet of pancreas. Thus, DPSCs have shown great potentiality to use in regenerative medicine for treatment of various human diseases including dental related problems. These cells can also be developed into induced pluripotent stem cells by incorporation of pluripotency markers and use for regenerative therapies of various diseases. The DPSCs are derived from various dental tissues such as human exfoliated deciduous teeth, apical papilla, periodontal ligament and dental follicle tissue. This review will overview the information about isolation, cellular and molecular characterization and differentiation of DPSCs into various types of human cells and thus these cells have important applications in regenerative therapies for various diseases. This review will be most useful for postgraduate dental students as well as scientists working in the field of oral pathology and oral medicine. PMID:26131314

  4. Human dental pulp stem cells: Applications in future regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potdar, Pravin D; Jethmalani, Yogita D

    2015-06-26

    Stem cells are pluripotent cells, having a property of differentiating into various types of cells of human body. Several studies have developed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various human tissues, peripheral blood and body fluids. These cells are then characterized by cellular and molecular markers to understand their specific phenotypes. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are having a MSCs phenotype and they are differentiated into neuron, cardiomyocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, liver cells and β cells of islet of pancreas. Thus, DPSCs have shown great potentiality to use in regenerative medicine for treatment of various human diseases including dental related problems. These cells can also be developed into induced pluripotent stem cells by incorporation of pluripotency markers and use for regenerative therapies of various diseases. The DPSCs are derived from various dental tissues such as human exfoliated deciduous teeth, apical papilla, periodontal ligament and dental follicle tissue. This review will overview the information about isolation, cellular and molecular characterization and differentiation of DPSCs into various types of human cells and thus these cells have important applications in regenerative therapies for various diseases. This review will be most useful for postgraduate dental students as well as scientists working in the field of oral pathology and oral medicine.

  5. Research on human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCR) technology, amplified hVEGF165 gene fragments from human leukemia cells HL-60. hVEGF165 gene was reconstructed in pIRES2-EGFP and transferred into the human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HPMSCs) by ...

  6. Novel human multiple myeloma cell line UHKT-893

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uherková, L.; Vančurová, I.; Vyhlídalová, I.; Pleschnerová, M.; Špička, I.; Mihalová, R.; Březinová, J.; Hodný, Zdeněk; Čermáková, K.; Polanská, V.; Marinov, I.; Jedelský, P.L.; Kuželová, K.; Stöckbauer, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 3 (2013), s. 320-326 ISSN 0145-2126 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : human myeloma cell line * human multiple myeloma * plasma cell * IL-6 dependence * immunoglobulin * free light chain Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.692, year: 2013

  7. Sphere-forming cell subpopulations with cancer stem cell properties in human hepatoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer stem cells (CSCs are regarded as the cause of tumor formation and recurrence. The isolation and identification of CSCs could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies specifically targeting CSCs. Methods Human hepatoma cell lines were plated in stem cell conditioned culture system allowed for sphere forming. To evaluate the stemness characteristics of spheres, the self-renewal, proliferation, chemoresistance, tumorigenicity of the PLC/PRF/5 sphere-forming cells, and the expression levels of stem cell related proteins in the PLC/PRF/5 sphere-forming cells were assessed, comparing with the parental cells. The stem cell RT-PCR array was performed to further explore the biological properties of liver CSCs. Results The PLC/PRF/5, MHCC97H and HepG2 cells could form clonal nonadherent 3-D spheres and be serially passaged. The PLC/PRF/5 sphere-forming cells possessed a key criteria that define CSCs: persistent self-renewal, extensive proliferation, drug resistance, overexpression of liver CSCs related proteins (Oct3/4, OV6, EpCAM, CD133 and CD44. Even 500 sphere-forming cells were able to form tumors in NOD/SCID mice, and the tumor initiating capability was not decreased when spheres were passaged. Besides, downstream proteins DTX1 and Ep300 of the CSL (CBF1 in humans, Suppressor of hairless in Drosophila and LAG1 in C. elegans -independent Notch signaling pathway were highly expressed in the spheres, and a gamma-secretase inhibitor MRK003 could significantly inhibit the sphere formation ability. Conclusions Nonadherent tumor spheres from hepatoma cell lines cultured in stem cell conditioned medium possess liver CSC properties, and the CSL-independent Notch signaling pathway may play a role in liver CSCs.

  8. PERIOPERATIVE ANAESTHESIA MANAGEMENT OF A PATIENT WITH CUSHING’S SYNDROME DUE TO ADRENOCORTICAL CARCINOMA: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Mukund; Poornima; Sneha; Kirankumar

    2014-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma, a rare malignancy is a rare cause of Cushing’s syndrome. Open adrenalectomy, a preferred modality for its treatment has inherent problems of difficult surgical access, bleeding, massive blood transfusion, coagulation defect, pulmonary embolism, large fluid shifts, cardiovascular collapse and postoperative complications. Cushing syndrome also poses challenge to anaesthesiologist in perioperative period, due to presence of hyper-cortisolism, volume ...

  9. Expression of ACTH receptor, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and steroidogenic enzymes in canine cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galac, S.; Kool, M.; Naan, E.C.; Daminet, S.; Mol, J.A.; Kooistra, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Domest Anim Endocrinol. 2010 Nov;39(4):259-67. Expression of the ACTH receptor, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and steroidogenic enzymes in canine cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors. Galac S, Kool MM, Naan EC, Daminet S, Mol JA, Kooistra HS. Department of Clinical Sciences of

  10. Genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy as a cause of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome associated with recurrent virilizing adrenocortical tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoin, F; Letouzé, E; Grignani, P; Patey, M; Rossignol, S; Libé, R; Pasqual, C; Lardière-Deguelte, S; Hoeffel-Fornes, C; Gaillard, D; Previderè, C; Delemer, B; Lalli, E

    2015-06-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome characterized by fetal macrosomia, macroglossia, and abdominal wall defects. BWS patients are at risk to develop Wilms tumor, neuroblastoma, hepatoblastoma, and adrenal tumors. A young woman with BWS features, but with inconclusive genetic evidence for the disease, came to clinical observation for signs of virilization at the age of 16 years. An adrenocortical tumor was diagnosed and surgically resected. The tumor underwent 2 local relapses that were also surgically treated. The patient was also operated to remove a breast fibroadenoma. SNP arrays were used to analyze chromosome abnormalities in normal and tumor samples from the patient and her parents. The patient presented genome-wide mosaic paternal uniparental disomy (patUPD) both in the adrenocortical and the breast tumors, with different degrees of loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The more recent relapses of the adrenocortical tumor showed a loss of part of chromosome 17p that was absent in the first tumor. Analysis of a skin biopsy sample also showed mosaic patUPD with partial LOH, while no LOH was detected in leukocyte DNA. This case shows that virilizing adrenocortical tumors may be a clinical feature of patients with BWS. The SNP array technology is useful to diagnose genome-wide patUPD mosaicism in BWS patients with an inconclusive molecular diagnosis and underlines the tumorigenic potential of the absence of the maternal genome combined with an excess of the paternal genome. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Familial isolated primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease associated with a novel low penetrance PRKAR1A gene splice site mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storr, Helen L; Metherell, Louise A; Dias, Renuka

    2010-01-01

    Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is associated with inactivating germline protein kinase A regulatory subunit type 1-alpha (PRKAR1A) mutations and loss of heterozygosity at the 17q22-24 locus in approximately 50% patients. PRKAR1A mutations are observed in both isolated PP...

  12. Human white blood cells contain cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimer photolyase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, B.M.; Bennett, P.V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-10-10

    Although enzymatic photoreactivation of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers in DNA is present in almost all organisms, its presence in placental mammals is controversial. We tested human white blood cells for photolyase by using three defined DNAs (suprecoiled pET-2, nonsupercoiled bacteriphage {lambda}, and a defined-sequence 287-bp oligonucleotide), two dimer-specific endonucleases (T4 endonuclease V and UV endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus), and three assay methods. We show that human white blood cells contain photolyase that can photorepair pyrimidine dimers in defined supercoiled and linear DNAs and in a 287-bp oligonucleotide and that human photolyase is active on genomic DNA in intact human cells. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Human serum promotes osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells in vitro and in vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pisciotta, Alessandra; Riccio, Massimo; Carnevale, Gianluca; Beretti, Francesca; Gibellini, Lara; Maraldi, Tullia; Cavallini, Gian Maria; Ferrari, Adriano; Bruzzesi, Giacomo; De Pol, Anto

    2012-01-01

    Human dental pulp is a promising alternative source of stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering in regenerative medicine, for the easily recruitment with low invasivity for the patient and for the...

  14. Identifying gene expression modules that define human cell fates

    OpenAIRE

    Germanguz, I; Listgarten, J; Cinkornpumin, J.; Solomon, A; Gaeta, X.; Lowry, W. E.

    2016-01-01

    Using a compendium of cell-state-specific gene expression data, we identified genes that uniquely define cell states, including those thought to represent various developmental stages. Our analysis sheds light on human cell fate through the identification of core genes that are altered over several developmental milestones, and across regional specification. Here we present cell-type specific gene expression data for 17 distinct cell states and demonstrate that these modules of genes can in f...

  15. Human organomics: a fresh approach to understanding human development using single-cell transcriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, J Gray; Treutlein, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    Innovative methods designed to recapitulate human organogenesis from pluripotent stem cells provide a means to explore human developmental biology. New technologies to sequence and analyze single-cell transcriptomes can deconstruct these 'organoids' into constituent parts, and reconstruct lineage trajectories during cell differentiation. In this Spotlight article we summarize the different approaches to performing single-cell transcriptomics on organoids, and discuss the opportunities and challenges of applying these techniques to generate organ-level, mechanistic models of human development and disease. Together, these technologies will move past characterization to the prediction of human developmental and disease-related phenomena. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. STELLA facilitates differentiation of germ cell and endodermal lineages of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patompon Wongtrakoongate

    Full Text Available Stella is a developmentally regulated gene highly expressed in mouse embryonic stem (ES cells and in primordial germ cells (PGCs. In human, the gene encoding the STELLA homologue lies on chromosome 12p, which is frequently amplified in long-term cultured human ES cells. However, the role played by STELLA in human ES cells has not been reported. In the present study, we show that during retinoic acid (RA-induced differentiation of human ES cells, expression of STELLA follows that of VASA, a marker of germline differentiation. By contrast, human embryonal carcinoma cells express STELLA at a higher level compared with both karyotypically normal and abnormal human ES cell lines. We found that over-expression of STELLA does not interfere with maintenance of the stem cell state of human ES cells, but following retinoic acid induction it leads to up-regulation of germline- and endodermal-associated genes, whereas neural markers PAX6 and NEUROD1 are down-regulated. Further, STELLA over-expression facilitates the differentiation of human ES cells into BE12-positive cells, in which the expression of germline- and endodermal-associated genes is enriched, and suppresses differentiation of the neural lineage. Taken together, this finding suggests a role for STELLA in facilitating germline and endodermal differentiation of human ES cells.

  17. Exposure to Music Alters Cell Viability and Cell Motility of Human Nonauditory Cells in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia R. Lestard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although music is part of virtually all cultures in the world, little is known about how it affects us. Since the beginning of this century several studies suggested that the response to music, and to sound in general, is complex and might not be exclusively due to emotion, given that cell types other than auditory hair cells can also directly react to audible sound. The present study was designed to better understand the direct effects of acoustic vibrations, in the form of music, in human cells in culture. Our results suggest that the mechanisms of cell growth arrest and/or cell death induced by acoustic vibrations are similar for auditory and nonauditory cells.

  18. Human embryonic stem cells differentiate into functional renal proximal tubular-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Karl M; Tasnim, Farah; Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Annegret; Ni, Ming; Gao, Shujun; Gopalan, Began; Zink, Daniele; Ying, Jackie Y

    2013-04-01

    Renal cells are used in basic research, disease models, tissue engineering, drug screening, and in vitro toxicology. In order to provide a reliable source of human renal cells, we developed a protocol for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into renal epithelial cells. The differentiated stem cells expressed markers characteristic of renal proximal tubular cells and their precursors, whereas markers of other renal cell types were not expressed or expressed at low levels. Marker expression patterns of these differentiated stem cells and in vitro cultivated primary human renal proximal tubular cells were comparable. The differentiated stem cells showed morphological and functional characteristics of renal proximal tubular cells, and generated tubular structures in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the differentiated stem cells contributed in organ cultures for the formation of simple epithelia in the kidney cortex. Bioreactor experiments showed that these cells retained their functional characteristics under conditions as applied in bioartificial kidneys. Thus, our results show that human embryonic stem cells can differentiate into renal proximal tubular-like cells. Our approach would provide a source for human renal proximal tubular cells that are not affected by problems associated with immortalized cell lines or primary cells.

  19. Rapid induction of senescence in human cervical carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Edward C.; Yang, Eva; Lee, Chan-Jae; Lee, Han-Woong; Dimaio, Daniel; Hwang, Eun-Seong

    2000-09-01

    Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 regulatory protein in human cervical carcinoma cell lines repressed expression of the resident human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes and within a few days caused essentially all of the cells to synchronously display numerous phenotypic markers characteristic of cells undergoing replicative senescence. This process was accompanied by marked but in some cases transient alterations in the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and by decreased telomerase activity. We propose that the human papillomavirus E6 and E7 proteins actively prevent senescence from occurring in cervical carcinoma cells, and that once viral oncogene expression is extinguished, the senescence program is rapidly executed. Activation of endogenous senescence pathways in cancer cells may represent an alternative approach to treat human cancers.

  20. Proteomic analysis of human blastocoel fluid and blastocyst cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille; Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst and can differentiate into any cell type in the human body. These cells hold a great potential for regenerative medicine, but to obtain enough cells needed for medical treatment, culture is required......, the blastocoel fluid, which is in contact with all the cells in the blastocyst, including hESCs. Fifty-three surplus human blastocysts were donated after informed consent, and blastocoel fluid was isolated by micromanipulation. Using highly sensitive nano-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass...... from the ICM of the human blastocyst are exposed to via the blastocoel fluid. These results can be an inspiration for the development of improved culture conditions for hESCs....

  1. Piperlongumine Suppresses Proliferation of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Yuan Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, an aggressive cancer originating in the oral cavity, is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in males worldwide. This study investigated the antitumor activity and mechanisms of piperlongumine (PL, a natural compound isolated from Piper longum L., in human OSCC cells. The effects of PL on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in human OSCC cells were investigated. PL effectively inhibited cell growth, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis and senescence in OSCC cells. Moreover, PL-mediated anti-human OSCC behavior was inhibited by an ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC treatment, suggesting that regulation of ROS was involved in the mechanism of the anticancer activity of PL. These findings suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth by regulating the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis and senescence and is a potential chemotherapy agent for human OSCC cells.

  2. Advances in culture and manipulation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, X; Villa-Diaz, L G; Krebsbach, P H

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cell biology and emerging technologies to reprogram somatic cells to a stem cell-like state are helping bring stem cell therapies for a range of human disorders closer to clinical reality. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have become a promising resource for regenerative medicine and research into early development because these cells are able to self-renew indefinitely and are capable of differentiation into specialized cell types of all 3 germ layers and trophoectoderm. Human PSCs include embryonic stem cells (hESCs) derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst-stage embryos and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) generated via the reprogramming of somatic cells by the overexpression of key transcription factors. The application of hiPSCs and the finding that somatic cells can be directly reprogrammed into different cell types will likely have a significant impact on regenerative medicine. However, a major limitation for successful therapeutic application of hPSCs and their derivatives is the potential xenogeneic contamination and instability of current culture conditions. This review summarizes recent advances in hPSC culture and methods to induce controlled lineage differentiation through regulation of cell-signaling pathways and manipulation of gene expression as well as new trends in direct reprogramming of somatic cells.

  3. Abnormal number cell division of human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell line, SW 1736

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Ikeda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell division, during which a mother cell usually divides into two daughter cells during one cell cycle, is the most important physiological event of cell biology. We observed one-to-four cell division during imaging of live SW1736 human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cells transfected with a plasmid expressing the hybrid protein of green fluorescent protein and histone 2B (plasmid eGFP-H2B. Analysis of the images revealed a mother cell divided into four daughter cells. And one of the abnormally divided daughter cells subsequently formed a dinucleate cell.

  4. Tissuelike 3D Assemblies of Human Broncho-Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissuelike assemblies (TLAs) of human broncho-epithelial (HBE) cells have been developed for use in in vitro research on infection of humans by respiratory viruses. The 2D monolayer HBE cell cultures heretofore used in such research lack the complex cell structures and interactions characteristic of in vivo tissues and, consequently, do not adequately emulate the infection dynamics of in-vivo microbial adhesion and invasion. In contrast, the 3D HBE TLAs are characterized by more-realistic reproductions of the geometrical and functional complexity, differentiation of cells, cell-to-cell interactions, and cell-to-matrix interactions characteristic of human respiratory epithelia. Hence, the 3D HBE TLAs are expected to make it possible to perform at least some of the research in vitro under more-realistic conditions, without need to infect human subjects. The TLAs are grown on collagen-coated cyclodextran microbeads under controlled conditions in a nutrient liquid in the simulated microgravitational environment of a bioreactor of the rotating- wall-vessel type. Primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells are used as a foundation matrix, while adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cells are used as the overlying component. The beads become coated with cells, and cells on adjacent beads coalesce into 3D masses. The resulting TLAs have been found to share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelia including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The differentiation of the cells in these TLAs into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues is confirmed by the presence of compounds, including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium marker compounds, and by the production of tissue mucin. In a series of initial infection tests, TLA cultures were inoculated with human respiratory syncytial viruses and parainfluenza type 3 viruses. Infection was confirmed by photomicrographs that

  5. Human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets accelerate liver regeneration in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Noriko Itaba; Yoshiaki Matsumi; Kaori Okinaka; An Afida Ashla; Yohei Kono; Mitsuhiko Osaki; Minoru Morimoto; Naoyuki Sugiyama; Kazuo Ohashi; Teruo Okano; Goshi Shiota

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cell therapy. Based on our hypothesis that suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signal enhances hepatic differentiation of human MSCs, we developed human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets by a small molecule compound. Screening of 10 small molecule compounds was performed by WST assay, TCF reporter assay, and albumin mRNA expression. Consequently, hexachlorophene suppressed TCF reporter activity in time- and concentrat...

  6. Side Population Cells Derived from Adult Human Liver Generate Hepatocyte-like Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    HUSSAIN, SUNNY ZAHEED; Strom, Stephen C.; Kirby, Martha R.; Burns, Sean; Langemeijer, Saskia; Ueda, Takahiro; HSIEH, MATTHEW; Tisdale, John F.

    2005-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic side population (SP) cells derived from adult human liver possess the potential of a novel candidate hepatic stem cell. Human cadaveric donor liver was subjected to collagenase perfusion and hepatocytes were separated from nonparenchymal cells by differential centrifugation. SP cells were isolated from the nonparenchymal portion after Hoechst 33342 staining. Since CD45 is a panleukocyte antigen, CD45-negative SP cells were separated from the vast majorit...

  7. Proteins differentially expressed in human beta-cells-enriched pancreatic islet cultures and human insulinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terra, Letícia F; Teixeira, Priscila C; Wailemann, Rosangela A M

    2013-01-01

    In view of the great demand for human beta-cells for physiological and medical studies, we generated cell lines derived from human insulinomas which secrete insulin, C-peptide and express neuroendocrine and islet markers. In this study, we set out to characterize their proteomes, comparing them...... to those of primary beta-cells using DIGE followed by MS. The results were validated by Western blotting. An average of 1800 spots was detected with less than 1% exhibiting differential abundance. Proteins more abundant in human islets, such as Caldesmon, are involved in the regulation of cell......, a molecular snapshot of the orchestrated changes in expression of proteins involved in key processes which could be correlated with the altered phenotype of human beta-cells. Collectively our observations prompt research towards the establishment of bioengineered human beta-cells providing a new and needed...

  8. Comparison of human dental follicle cells and human periodontal ligament cells for dentin tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Bai, Ding; Guo, Weihua; Li, Jie; Zeng, Jin; Yang, Longqiang; Jiang, Zongting; Feng, Lian; Yu, Mei; Tian, Weidong

    2015-05-01

    To compare the odontogenic potential of human dental follicle cells (DFCs) and periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs). In vitro and in vivo characterization studies of DFCs and PDLCs were performed comparatively. DFCs and PDLCs were subcutaneously implanted into the dorsum of mice for 8 weeks after combined with treated dentin matrix scaffolds respectively. Proteomic analysis identified 32 differentially expressed proteins in DFCs and PDLCs. Examination of the harvested grafts showed PDLCs could form the dentin-like tissues as DFCs did. However, the structure of dentin tissues generated by DFCs was more complete. PDLCs could contribute to regenerate dentin-like tissues in the inductive microenvironment of treated dentin matrix. DFCs presented more remarkable dentinogenic capability than PDLCs did.

  9. Phenotype and functions of memory Tfh cells in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Ueno, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of the origin and functions of human blood CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells found in human blood has changed dramatically in the past years. These cells are currently considered to represent a circulating memory compartment of T follicular helper (Tfh) lineage cells. Recent studies have shown that blood memory Tfh cells are composed of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Here, we review the current understanding of human blood memory Tfh cells and the subsets within this compartment. We present a strategy to define these subsets based on cell surface profiles. Finally, we discuss how increased understanding of the biology of blood memory Tfh cells may contribute insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and the mode of action of vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome editing: a robust technology for human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Pandian; Song, Minjung; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2017-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells comprise induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells, which have tremendous potential for biological and therapeutic applications. The development of efficient technologies for the targeted genome alteration of stem cells in disease models is a prerequisite for utilizing stem cells to their full potential. Genome editing of stem cells is possible with the help of synthetic nucleases that facilitate site-specific modification of a gene of interest. Recent advances in genome editing techniques have improved the efficiency and speed of the development of stem cells for human disease models. Zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated system are powerful tools for editing DNA at specific loci. Here, we discuss recent technological advances in genome editing with site-specific nucleases in human stem cells.

  11. Human retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and IL2R expression of activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Jørgensen, Annette; Nielsen, Mette

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on activated T cells. Activated T cells were cocultured with adult and foetal human RPE cells whereafter apoptosis and proliferation were determined by flow cytometry and (3)H......-Thymidine incorporation assay, respectively. T cells and RPE cells were cultured directly together or in a transwell system for determination of the effect of cell contact. The importance of cell surface molecules was examined by application of a panel of blocking antibodies (CD2, CD18, CD40, CD40L, CD54, CD58...

  12. Human papilloma virus prevalence in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, A; Cincik, H; Baloglu, H; Cekin, E; Dogru, S; Dursun, E

    2007-08-01

    To determine the prevalence and type of human papilloma virus deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in cases of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. We analysed the prevalence of human papilloma virus infection in archived paraffin block specimens taken from 99 cases of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma between 1990 and 2005, using polymerase chain reaction techniques. Biopsy specimens from five proven verrucous skin lesions were used as positive controls, and peripheral blood samples from five healthy volunteers were used as negative controls. Four test samples were found to have inadequate deoxyribonucleic acid purity and were therefore excluded from the study. Human papilloma virus deoxyribonucleic acid was detected in seven of 95 cases of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (7.36 per cent). Human papilloma virus genotyping revealed double human papilloma virus infection in three cases and single human papilloma virus infection in the remaining four cases. The human papilloma virus genotypes detected were 6, 11 and 16 (the latter detected in only one case). In our series, a very low human papilloma virus prevalence was found among laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cases. The human papilloma virus genotypes detected were mostly 6 and/or 11, and 16 in only one case. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of human papilloma virus prevalence in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, based on polymerase chain reaction genotyping in a Turkish population.

  13. Human amniotic epithelial cells as feeder layer to derive and maintain human embryonic stem cells from poor-quality embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ávila-González

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Data from the literature suggest that human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines used in research do not genetically represent all human populations. The derivation of hESC through conventional methods involve the destruction of viable human embryos, as well the use of mouse embryonic fibroblasts as a feeder layer, which has several drawbacks. We obtained the hESC line (Amicqui-1 from poor-quality (PQ embryos derived and maintained on human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC. This line displays a battery of markers of pluripotency and we demonstrated the capacity of these cells to produce derivates of the three germ layers.

  14. Applied Developmental Biology: Making Human Pancreatic Beta Cells for Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genes and signaling pathways that determine the differentiation and fate of a cell is a central goal of developmental biology. Using that information to gain mastery over the fates of cells presents new approaches to cell transplantation and drug discovery for human diseases including diabetes. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancement of Bleomycin Sensitivity in Human Lung Cancer Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the effectiveness of Centella asiatica aqueous extract in augmenting the cytotoxic effect of bleomycin in the adenocarcinoma human alveolar basal epithelial A549 cell line. Methods: The inhibitory effect of bleomycin on A549 cells was determined by incubating the cells for 24 h in different ...

  16. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human liver stem cells (HLSCs are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs, and dendritic cells (DCs in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  17. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cells onto a partially wounded human cornea in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Charles; Hardarson, Thorir; Ellerström, Catharina; Nordberg, Markus; Caisander, Gunilla; Rao, Mahendra; Hyllner, Johan; Stenevi, Ulf

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether cells originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) could be successfully transplanted onto a partially wounded human cornea. A second aim was to study the ability of the transplanted cells to differentiate into corneal epithelial-like cells. Spontaneously, differentiated hESCs were transplanted onto a human corneal button (without limbus) with the epithelial layer partially removed. The cells were cultured on Bowman's membrane for up to 9 days, and the culture dynamics documented in a time-lapse system. As the transplanted cells originated from a genetically engineered hESC line, they all expressed green fluorescent protein, which facilitated their identification during the culture experiments, tissue preparation and analysis. To detect any differentiation into human corneal epithelial-like cells, we analysed the transplanted cells by immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for CK3, CK15 and PAX6. The transplanted cells established and expanded on Bowman's membrane, forming a 1-4 cell layer surrounded by host corneal epithelial cells. Expression of the corneal marker PAX6 appeared 3 days after transplantation, and after 6 days, the cells were expressing both PAX6 and CK3. This shows that it is possible to transplant cells originating from hESCs onto Bowman's membrane with the epithelial layer partially removed and to get these cells to establish, grow and differentiate into corneal epithelial-like cells in vitro. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  18. Male germline stem cells in non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sharma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, several studies have attempted to decipher the biology of mammalian germline stem cells (GSCs. These studies provide evidence that regulatory mechanisms for germ cell specification and migration are evolutionarily conserved across species. The characteristics and functions of primate GSCs are highly distinct from rodent species; therefore the findings from rodent models cannot be extrapolated to primates. Due to limited availability of human embryonic and testicular samples for research purposes, two non-human primate models (marmoset and macaque monkeys are extensively employed to understand human germline development and differentiation. This review provides a broader introduction to the in vivo and in vitro germline stem cell terminology from primordial to differentiating germ cells. Primordial germ cells (PGCs are the most immature germ cells colonizing the gonad prior to sex differentiation into testes or ovaries. PGC specification and migratory patterns among different primate species are compared in the review. It also reports the distinctions and similarities in expression patterns of pluripotency markers (OCT4A, NANOG, SALL4 and LIN28 during embryonic developmental stages, among marmosets, macaques and humans. This review presents a comparative summary with immunohistochemical and molecular evidence of germ cell marker expression patterns during postnatal developmental stages, among humans and non-human primates. Furthermore, it reports findings from the recent literature investigating the plasticity behavior of germ cells and stem cells in other organs of humans and monkeys. The use of non-human primate models would enable bridging the knowledge gap in primate GSC research and understanding the mechanisms involved in germline development. Reported similarities in regulatory mechanisms and germ cell expression profile in primates demonstrate the preclinical significance of monkey models for development of

  19. Induction of human neuronal cells by defined transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhiping P.; Yang, Nan; Vierbuchen, Thomas; Ostermeier, Austin; Fuentes, Daniel R.; Yang, Troy Q.; Citri, Ami; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Marro, Samuele; Südhof, Thomas C.; Wernig, Marius

    2011-01-01

    Summary Somatic cell nuclear transfer, cell fusion, or expression of lineage-specific factors have been shown to induce cell-fate changes in diverse somatic cell types1–12. We recently observed that forced expression of a combination of three transcription factors, Brn2 (also known as Pou3f2), Ascl1, and Myt1l can efficiently convert mouse fibroblasts into functional induced neuronal (iN) cells13. Here, we show that the same three factors can generate functional neurons from human pluripotent stem cells as early as 6 days after transgene activation. When combined with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1, these factors could also convert fetal and postnatal human fibroblasts into iN cells displaying typical neuronal morphologies and expressing multiple neuronal markers, even after downregulation of the exogenous transcription factors. Importantly, the vast majority of human iN cells were able to generate action potentials and many matured to receive synaptic contacts when co-cultured with primary mouse cortical neurons. Our data demonstrate that non-neural human somatic cells, as well as pluripotent stem cells, can be directly converted into neurons by lineage-determining transcription factors. These methods may facilitate robust generation of patient-specific human neurons for in vitro disease modeling or future applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:21617644

  20. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    of apoptosis and cell death in cultured human uterine leiomyosarcoma (SK-UT-1) cells and control human uterine smooth muscle cells (HutSMC). The intracellular levels of the AT2 receptor are low in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells but the receptor is substantially up-regulated in quiescent SK-UT-1 cells with high...... densities in mitochondria. Activation of the cell membrane AT2 receptors by a concomitant treatment with angiotensin II and the AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan, induces apoptosis but does not affect the rate of cell death. We demonstrate for the first time that the high-affinity, non-peptide AT2 receptor...... agonist, Compound 21 (C21) penetrates the cell membrane of quiescent SK-UT-1 cells, activates intracellular AT2 receptors and induces rapid cell death; approximately 70% of cells died within 24 h. The cells, which escaped from the cell death, displayed activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, i...

  1. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Feng

    Full Text Available Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI and B(aP compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery.

  2. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenqiang; Guo, Juanjuan; Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery.

  3. Surface differentiation antigens of human mammary epithelial cells carried on the human milk fat globule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriani, R L; Thompson, K; Peterson, J A; Abraham, S

    1977-02-01

    Rabbit antibodies against components of the human milk fat globule bind specifically to normal human breast epithelial cells and cell lines derived from breast carcinomas, as well as to the outer surface of the human milk fat globule. Variation in indirect immunofluorescence staining in both intensity per cell and percentage of cells stained is observed for the different brest cell lines. Cells derived from other epithelial and other ectodermal tissues, fetal fibroblasts, cells of the blood buffy coat, and even fibroblasts of the breast itself do not bind the antibodies. This suggests that these antibodies are detecting cell-type-specific antigens. These normal breast epithelial cell antigens are on the cell surface and their expression is stable in long-term cultured cell lines, even after much chromosomal variation in a given line. By affinity chromatography, three distinct antigenic components can be isolated from the milk fat globule, one of which contains carbohydrate. These differentiation antigens of the human breast epithelial cell are not only useful as specific cell-type markers, but also can provide a tool to study the role of the cell surface in normal and neoplastic mammary development.

  4. Cell therapy with human renal cell cultures containing erythropoietin-positive cells improves chronic kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaleyeva, Liliya M; Guimaraes-Souza, Nadia K; Krane, Louis S; Agcaoili, Sigrid; Gyabaah, Kenneth; Atala, Anthony; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Yoo, James J

    2012-05-01

    New therapeutic strategies for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are necessary to offset the rising incidence of CKD and donor shortage. Erythropoietin (EPO), a cytokine produced by fibroblast-like cells in the kidney, has recently emerged as a renoprotective factor with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant properties. This study (a) determined whether human renal cultures (human primary kidney cells [hPKC]) can be enriched in EPO-positive cells (hPKC(F+)) by using magnetic-bead sorting; (b) characterized hPKC(F+) following cell separation; and (c) established that intrarenal delivery of enriched hPKC(F+) cells would be more beneficial in treatment of renal injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress than unsorted hPKC cultures in a chronic kidney injury model. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed higher expression of EPO (36%) and CD73 (27%) in hPKC(F+) as compared with hPKC. After induction of renal injury, intrarenal delivery of hPKC(F+) or hPKC significantly reduced serum creatinine, interstitial fibrosis in the medulla, and abundance of CD68-positive cells in the cortex and medulla (p renal cortex and decreased urinary albumin (3.5-fold) and urinary tubular injury marker kidney injury molecule 1 (16-fold). hPKC(F+) also significantly reduced levels of renal cortical monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (1.8-fold) and oxidative DNA marker 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) (2.4-fold). After 12 weeks, we detected few injected cells, which were localized mostly to the cortical interstitium. Although cell therapy with either hPKC(F+) or hPKC improved renal function, the hPKC(F+) subpopulation provides greater renoprotection, perhaps through attenuation of inflammation and oxidative stress. We conclude that hPKC(F+) may be used as components of cell-based therapies for degenerative kidney diseases.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation and characterization from human spinal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Toru; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi; Tanaka, Sunao; Kudo, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Hiroki; Ono, Atsushi; Numasawa, Takuya; Kumagai, Gentaro; Motomura, Shigeru; Yagihashi, Soroku; Toh, Satoshi

    2012-01-27

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a fibroblast-like morphology, multilineage potential, long-term viability and capacity for self-renewal. While several articles describe isolating MSCs from various human tissues, there are no reports of isolating MSCs from human spinal ligaments, and their localization in situ. If MSCs are found in human spinal ligaments, they could be used to investigate hypertrophy or ossification of spinal ligaments. To isolate and characterize MSCs from human spinal ligaments, spinal ligaments were harvested aseptically from eight patients during surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. After collagenase digestion, nucleated cells were seeded at an appropriate density to avoid colony-to-colony contact. Cells were cultured in osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic media to evaluate their multilineage differentiation potential. Immunophenotypic analysis of cell surface markers was performed by flow cytometry. Spinal ligaments were processed for immunostaining using MSC-related antibodies. Cells from human spinal ligaments could be extensively expanded with limited senescence. They were able to differentiate into osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic cells. Flow cytometry revealed that their phenotypic characteristics met the minimum criteria of MSCs. Immunohistochemistry revealed the localization of CD90-positive cells in the collagenous matrix of the ligament, and in adjacent small blood vessels. We isolated and expanded MSCs from human spinal ligaments and demonstrated localization of MSCs in spinal ligaments. These cells may play an indispensable role in elucidating the pathogenesis of numerous spinal diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemical Conversion of Human Fibroblasts into Functional Schwann Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva C. Thoma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct transdifferentiation of somatic cells is a promising approach to obtain patient-specific cells for numerous applications. However, conversion across germ-layer borders often requires ectopic gene expression with unpredictable side effects. Here, we present a gene-free approach that allows efficient conversion of human fibroblasts via a transient progenitor stage into Schwann cells, the major glial cell type of peripheral nerves. Using a multikinase inhibitor, we transdifferentiated fibroblasts into transient neural precursors that were subsequently further differentiated into Schwann cells. The resulting induced Schwann cells (iSCs expressed numerous Schwann cell-specific proteins and displayed neurosupportive and myelination capacity in vitro. Thus, we established a strategy to obtain mature Schwann cells from human postnatal fibroblasts under chemically defined conditions without the introduction of ectopic genes.

  7. Calorimetric signatures of human cancer cells and their nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todinova, S. [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Stoyanova, E. [Department of Molecular Immunology, Institute of Biology and Immunology of Reproduction, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shose Blvd. 73, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Krumova, S., E-mail: sakrumo@gmail.com [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Iliev, I. [Institute of Experimental Morphology, Pathology and Anthropology with Museum, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Taneva, S.G. [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2016-01-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two temperature ranges are distinguished in the thermograms of cells/nuclei. • Different thermodynamic properties of cancer and normal human cells/nuclei. • Dramatic reduction of the enthalpy of the low-temperature range in cancer cells. • Oxaliplatin and 5-FU affect the nuclear matrix proteins and the DNA stability. - Abstract: The human cancer cell lines HeLa, JEG-3, Hep G2, SSC-9, PC-3, HT-29, MCF7 and their isolated nuclei were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. The calorimetric profiles differed from normal human fibroblast (BJ) cells in the two well distinguished temperature ranges—the high-temperature range (H{sub T}, due to DNA-containing structures) and the low-temperature range (L{sub T}, assigned to the nuclear matrix and cellular proteins). The enthalpy of the L{sub T} range, and, respectively the ratio of the enthalpies of the L{sub T}- vs. H{sub T}-range, ΔH{sub L}/ΔH{sub H}, is strongly reduced for all cancer cells compared to normal fibroblasts. On the contrary, for most of the cancer nuclei this ratio is higher compared to normal nuclei. The HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells/nuclei differed most drastically from normal human fibroblast cells/nuclei. Our data also reveal that the treatment of HT-29 cancer cells with cytostatic drugs affects not only the DNA replication but also the cellular proteome.

  8. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-02-09

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy.

  9. Autoreactivity to Sulfatide by Human Invariant NKT Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stax, Annelein M; Tuengel, Jessica; Girardi, Enrico; Kitano, Naoki; Allan, Lenka L; Liu, Victor; Zheng, Dongjun; Panenka, William J; Guillaume, Joren; Wong, Chi-Huey; van Calenbergh, Serge; Zajonc, Dirk M; van den Elzen, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes that recognize lipid Ags presented by CD1d. The prototypical Ag, α-galactosylceramide, strongly activates human and mouse iNKT cells, leading to the assumption that iNKT cell physiology in human and mouse is similar. In this article, we report the surprising finding that human, but not mouse, iNKT cells directly recognize myelin-derived sulfatide presented by CD1d. We propose that sulfatide is recognized only by human iNKT cells because of the unique positioning of the 3-O-sulfated β-galactose headgroup. Surface plasmon resonance shows that the affinity of human CD1d-sulfatide for the iNKT cell receptor is relatively low compared with CD1d-α-galactosylceramide (KD of 19-26 μM versus 1 μM). Apolipoprotein E isolated from human cerebrospinal fluid carries sulfatide that can be captured by APCs and presented by CD1d to iNKT cells. APCs from patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy, who accumulate sulfatides due to a deficiency in arylsulfatase-A, directly activate iNKT cells. Thus, we have identified sulfatide as a self-lipid recognized by human iNKT cells and propose that sulfatide recognition by innate T cells may be an important pathologic feature of neuroinflammatory disease and that sulfatide in APCs may contribute to the endogenous pathway of iNKT cell activation. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Rhein Induces Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yao Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human breast cancers cells overexpressing HER2/neu are more aggressive tumors with poor prognosis, and resistance to chemotherapy. This study investigates antiproliferation effects of anthraquinone derivatives of rhubarb root on human breast cancer cells. Of 7 anthraquinone derivatives, only rhein showed antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on both HER2-overexpressing MCF-7 (MCF-7/HER2 and control vector MCF-7 (MCF-7/VEC cells. Rhein induced dose- and time-dependent manners increase in caspase-9-mediated apoptosis correlating with activation of ROS-mediated activation of NF-κB- and p53-signaling pathways in both cell types. Therefore, this study highlighted rhein as processing anti-proliferative activity against HER2 overexpression or HER2-basal expression in breast cancer cells and playing important roles in apoptotic induction of human breast cancer cells.

  11. Cardiac Progenitor Cell Extraction from Human Auricles

    KAUST Repository

    Di Nardo, Paolo

    2017-02-22

    For many years, myocardial tissue has been considered terminally differentiated and, thus, incapable of regenerating. Recent studies have shown, instead, that cardiomyocytes, at least in part, are slowly substituted by new cells originating by precursor cells mostly embedded into the heart apex and in the atria. We have shown that an elective region of progenitor cell embedding is represented by the auricles, non-contractile atria appendages that can be easily sampled without harming the patient. The protocol here reported describes how from auricles a population of multipotent, cardiogenic cells can be isolated, cultured, and differentiated. Further studies are needed to fully exploit this cell population, but, sampling auricles, it could be possible to treat cardiac patients using their own cells circumventing rejection or organ shortage limitations.

  12. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Emilio eRojas; Yolanda eLorenzo; Kristiane eHuag-Berg; Bjørn eNicolaissen; Mahara eValverde

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many org...

  13. 3D map of the human corneal endothelial cell

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiguo He; Fabien Forest; Philippe Gain; Damien Rageade; Aurélien Bernard; Sophie Acquart; Michel Peoc’h; Dennis M. Defoe; Gilles Thuret

    2016-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) are terminally differentiated cells, specialized in regulating corneal hydration and transparency. They are highly polarized flat cells that separate the cornea from the aqueous humor. Their apical surface, in contact with aqueous humor is hexagonal, whereas their basal surface is irregular. We characterized the structure of human CECs in 3D using confocal microscopy of immunostained whole corneas in which cells and their interrelationships remain intact. Hexa...

  14. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  15. Dark cells in human oral leukoplakias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein-Szanto, A.J.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Sega, M.; Banoczy, J.; Albrecht, M.

    1982-01-01

    Dark basal keratinocytes, characterized by a strong affinity for basic dyes and by electron density of cytoplasm and nucleus, could be recognized in eleven oral leukoplakias. The percentage of dark cells was higher in the group comprising leukoplakias verrucosa, and erosiva (28% of the basal cells) than in the leukoplakia simplex group (10%). The presence of these cells is a good indicator of the degree of histological dysplasia and correlates well with the preneoplastic potential of these lesions.

  16. The contribution of human/non-human animal chimeras to stem cell research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Levine

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric animals are made up of cells from two separate zygotes. Human/non-human animal chimeras have been used for a number of research purposes, including human disease modeling. Pluripotent stem cell (PSC research has relied upon the chimera approach to examine the developmental potential of stem cells, to determine the efficacy of cell replacement therapies, and to establish a means of producing human organs. Based on ethical issues, this work has faced pushback from various sources including funding agencies. We discuss here the essential role these studies have played, from gaining a better understanding of human biology to providing a stepping stone to human disease treatments. We also consider the major ethical issues, as well as the current status of support for this work in the United States.

  17. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G-Andre Banat

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+, cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+, T-helper cells (CD4+, B cells (CD20+, macrophages (CD68+, mast cells (CD117+, mononuclear cells (CD11c+, plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+, B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+ and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+ compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition.

  18. Antiproliferative action of metformin in human lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashinuma, Hironori; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Kitazono, Satoru; Kitazono-Saitoh, Miyako; Kitamura, Atsushi; Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Tada, Yuji; Kurosu, Katsushi; Sakaida, Emiko; Sekine, Ikuo; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2012-07-01

    The oral antidiabetic agent metformin has anticancer properties, probably via adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation. In the present study, growth inhibition was assessed by a clonogenic and by a cell survival assay, apoptosis induction was assessed by Hoechst staining and caspase activities and cell cycle alteration after exposure to metformin, and the interaction of metformin with cisplatin in vitro were elucidated in four human lung cancer cell lines representing squamous, adeno-, large cell and small cell carcinoma. Clonogenicity and cell proliferation were inhibited by metformin in all the cell lines examined. This inhibitory effect was not specific to cancer cells because it was also observed in a non-transformed human mesothelial cell line and in mouse fibroblast cell lines. Inhibition of clonogenicity was observed only when the cells were exposed to metformin for a long period, (10 days) and the surviving fraction, obtained after inhibiting proliferation by increasing the dose, reached a plateau at approximately 0.1-0.3, indicating the cytostatic characteristics of metformin. Metformin induced significant apoptosis only in the small cell carcinoma cell line. A tendency of cell cycle accumulation at the G0/G1 phase was observed in all four cell lines. Cisplatin, in a dose-dependent manner, severely antagonized the growth inhibitory effect of metformin, and even reversed the effect in three cell lines but not in the adenocarcinoma cell line. The present data obtained using various histological types of human lung cancer cell lines in vitro illustrate the cytostatic nature of metformin and its cytoprotective properties against cisplatin.

  19. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... block alloactivation, had no inhibitory effect on RPE-mediated T-cell apoptotic responses in MHC class II-specific CD4+ T-cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells express FasL and induce TCR-independent apoptosis in activated human T cells through Fas-FasL interaction. Retinal pigment...

  20. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    block alloactivation, had no inhibitory effect on RPE-mediated T-cell apoptotic responses in MHC class II-specific CD4+ T-cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells express FasL and induce TCR-independent apoptosis in activated human T cells through Fas-FasL interaction. Retinal pigment...... human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...

  1. The evolution of human cells in terms of protein innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Adam J; Oates, Matt E; Fang, Hai; Forrest, Alistair R R; Kawaji, Hideya; Gough, Julian; Rackham, Owen J L

    2014-06-01

    Humans are composed of hundreds of cell types. As the genomic DNA of each somatic cell is identical, cell type is determined by what is expressed and when. Until recently, little has been reported about the determinants of human cell identity, particularly from the joint perspective of gene evolution and expression. Here, we chart the evolutionary past of all documented human cell types via the collective histories of proteins, the principal product of gene expression. FANTOM5 data provide cell-type-specific digital expression of human protein-coding genes and the SUPERFAMILY resource is used to provide protein domain annotation. The evolutionary epoch in which each protein was created is inferred by comparison with domain annotation of all other completely sequenced genomes. Studying the distribution across epochs of genes expressed in each cell type reveals insights into human cellular evolution in terms of protein innovation. For each cell type, its history of protein innovation is charted based on the genes it expresses. Combining the histories of all cell types enables us to create a timeline of cell evolution. This timeline identifies the possibility that our common ancestor Coelomata (cavity-forming animals) provided the innovation required for the innate immune system, whereas cells which now form the brain of human have followed a trajectory of continually accumulating novel proteins since Opisthokonta (boundary of animals and fungi). We conclude that exaptation of existing domain architectures into new contexts is the dominant source of cell-type-specific domain architectures. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Gaforio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7. We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  3. Myxoma virus is oncolytic for human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Yanghee; Kelly, Kaitlyn J; Stanford, Marianne M; Galanis, Charles; Chun, Yun Shin; Fong, Yuman; McFadden, Grant

    2008-08-01

    Viral oncolytic therapy, which seeks to exploit the use of live viruses to treat cancer, has shown promise in the treatment of cancers resistant to conventional anticancer therapies. Among the most difficult to treat cancers is advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study investigates the ability of a novel oncolytic agent, myxoma virus, to infect, productively replicate in, and kill human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The myxoma virus vMyxgfp was tested against a panel of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. Infectivity, viral proliferation, and tumor cell kill were assessed. Infection of tumor cells was assessed by expression of the marker gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (e-GFP). vMyxgfp had the ability to infect all pancreatic cancer cell lines tested. Killing of tumor cells varied among the 6 cell lines tested, ranging from >90% cell kill at 7 days for the most sensitive Panc-1 cells, to 39% in the most resistant cell line Capan-2. Sensitivity correlated to replication of virus, and was found to maximally exhibit a four-log increase in foci-forming units for the most sensitive Panc-1 cells within 72 h. Our study demonstrates for the first time the ability of the myxoma virus to productively infect, replicate in, and lyse human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. These data encourage further investigation of this virus, which is pathogenic only in rabbits, for treatment of this nearly uniformly fatal cancer.

  4. Variations in Humanized and Defined Culture Conditions Supporting Derivation of New Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher, Judy M; Ferrier, Patricia M; Gardner, John O

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of "humanized" (i.e., free of animal sourced reagents) and ultimately chemically defined culture systems for human embryo stem cell (hESC) isolation and culture is of importance to improving their efficacy and safety in research and therapeutic applications. This can be achieved...... serum-free medium (SFM) containing only human sourced and recombinant protein. Further, outgrowth of embryonic cells from whole blastocysts in both media could be achieved for up to 1 week without reliance on feeder cells. All variant conditions sustained undifferentiated cell status, a stable karyotype......, with a transitional requirement for human feeder cells. This represents another sequential step in the generation of therapeutic grade stem cells with reduced risk of zoonotic pathogen transmission....

  5. On the Sulfation and Methylation of Catecholestrogens in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hui, Ying; Yasuda, Shin; Liu, Ming-Yih; Wu, Yi-yong; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2008-01-01

    .... The present study was designed to examine the role of sulfation in the metabolism of CEs. MCF-7 breast cancer cells and MCF 10A human mammary epithelial cells were metabolically labeled with [35S...

  6. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feng, Wenqiang; Guo, Juanjuan; Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    .... hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals...

  7. [Isolation and identification of side population cells in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tong; Li, Li; Li, Dan-rong; Mao, Nai-quan; Liu, De-seng; Zuo, Chuan-tian; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Ding-ming

    2011-02-01

    To isolate and characterize the side population cells (SP cells) in the lung adenocarcinomas cell line A549. The protein expression of ABCG2 in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 was detected by immunohistochemistry. SP and NSP cells in the cell line A549 were isolated by FACS, and their differentiation was analysed. ABCG2 expression in the two cell subsets was detected by RT-PCR. The cell growth curves, cell division indexes, cell cycles, plate clone formation tests, migration and invasion assays, chemotherapeutic susceptibility tests, tests of the intracellular drug levels, and the tumor cell implantation experiments on nude mice were applied to study the biological properties of the two cell subsets. The expression of ABCG2 in the transplanted tumor in nude mice was detected by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The positive rate of ABCG2 expression in the A549 cells by immunohistochemistry was 2.13%. SP and NSP cells were isolated by FACS. The SP cells could produce both SP and NSP cells, while NSP cells only produced NSP cells. SP cells expressed ABCG2, but NSP cells did not. The proliferation and migration abilities of the two cell subsets were similar, but the invasion and tumorigenic ability of SP cells was significantly higher than that of NSP cells. The susceptibilities to DDP and its intracellular levels of the two cell subsets were similar, but the susceptibilities to 5-FU, VP16, NVB and GEM and their intracellular levels of NSP cells were significantly higher than those of the SP cells. SP cells in the human lung adenocarcinomas cell line A549 is enriched with tumor stem cells. An effective way to get lung adenocarcinomas stem cells is to isolate SP cells by FACS.

  8. The association between human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal squamous cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walvik, Lena; Svensson, Amanda Björk; Friborg, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging evidence of the association between human papillomavirus and a subset of head and neck cancers. However, the role of human papillomavirus as a causal factor is still debated. This review addresses the association between human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal squamous cell...... carcinoma using the Bradford Hill criteria. The strength of the association is supported by, detection of human papillomavirus infection and antibodies prior to oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. This is furthermore reinforced by the absence of human papillomavirus DNA in healthy tonsils....... The association is geographically consistent throughout the economically developed world. The presence and integration of high-risk human papillomavirus genome in tonsillar tumours, and expression of viral oncogenes, are specific and plausible. Analogous to human papillomavirus in cervical cancer, the rising...

  9. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of human memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Iñaki; Wei, Chungwen; Lee, F Eun-Hyung; Anolik, Jennifer

    2008-02-01

    Memory B cells are more heterogeneous than previously thought. Given that B cells play powerful antibody-independent effector functions, it seems reasonable to assume division of labor between distinct memory B cells subpopulations in both protective and pathogenic immune responses. Here we review the information emerging regarding the heterogeneity of human memory B cells. A better understanding of this topic should greatly improve our ability to target specific B cell subsets either in vaccine responses or in autoimmune diseases and organ rejection among other pathological conditions where B cells play central pathogenic roles.

  10. Identifying gene expression modules that define human cell fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanguz, I; Listgarten, J; Cinkornpumin, J; Solomon, A; Gaeta, X; Lowry, W E

    2016-05-01

    Using a compendium of cell-state-specific gene expression data, we identified genes that uniquely define cell states, including those thought to represent various developmental stages. Our analysis sheds light on human cell fate through the identification of core genes that are altered over several developmental milestones, and across regional specification. Here we present cell-type specific gene expression data for 17 distinct cell states and demonstrate that these modules of genes can in fact define cell fate. Lastly, we introduce a web-based database to disseminate the results. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Model Skeletal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barruet, Emilie; Hsiao, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders affecting the bones and joints are major health problems among children and adults. Major challenges such as the genetic origins or poor diagnostics of severe skeletal disease hinder our understanding of human skeletal diseases. The recent advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (human iPS cells) provides an unparalleled opportunity to create human-specific models of human skeletal diseases. iPS cells have the ability to self-renew, allowing us to obtain large amounts of starting material, and have the potential to differentiate into any cell types in the body. In addition, they can carry one or more mutations responsible for the disease of interest or be genetically corrected to create isogenic controls. Our work has focused on modeling rare musculoskeletal disorders including fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive (FOP), a congenital disease of increased heterotopic ossification. In this review, we will discuss our experiences and protocols differentiating human iPS cells toward the osteogenic lineage and their application to model skeletal diseases. A number of critical challenges and exciting new approaches are also discussed, which will allow the skeletal biology field to harness the potential of human iPS cells as a critical model system for understanding diseases of abnormal skeletal formation and bone regeneration.

  12. Catalpol regulates function of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical-axis in an Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Hong; Li, Wen-Tao; Yu, Shu-Tian; Xie, Hai; Han, Hui-Rong

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the regulating effects of catalpol on the hypothalamic-pituitary- adrenocortical-axis (HPA) in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) rat model. Healthy male Wistar Rats were selected. The AD model was generated by orthotopic injection of beta-amyloid 25-35 (Abeta25-35) into the right lateral ventricle. The animals were divided into five study groups: Catalpol at low dose (5 mg/kg), Catalpol at high dose (10 mg/kg), model control group and sham surgery control group, n = 9 respectively. The serum concentration of hydrocortisone (HYD), adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) determined by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Structural alterations of the hypothalamus were examined by H&E stain and electron microscope. The CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) positive neurons were detected with immunohistochemistry. Serum HYD level was significantly increased (p endocrine function of the HPA and alleviate the structural damage of hypothalamus in AD rats.

  13. Synchronous adrenocortical neoplasms, paragangliomas, and pheochromocytomas: syndromic considerations regarding an unusual constellation of endocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Melissa; Tabrizi, Mohsen; Kapsner, Patricia; Hanson, Joshua Anspach

    2014-12-01

    The most common clinical syndromes presenting with paragangliomas and/or pheochromocytomas as their endocrine components are multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, neurofibromatosis, Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, Carney-Stratakis syndrome, Carney triad, and the recently described hereditary paraganglioma syndrome. Only Carney triad is known to also present with adrenocortical adenomas, currently representing the only described syndrome in which all 3 of the aforementioned tumors are found together. In most cases, prototypical lesions of the triad such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor and pulmonary chondromas are also seen. We present a case of a young woman with synchronous paragangliomas, adrenal/extra-adrenal cortical neoplasms, and pheochromocytoma without genetic mutations for multiple endocrine neoplasia 2, Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, neurofibromatosis, and succinate dehydrogenase. We speculate that this represents a previously undescribed presentation of Carney triad and, at the very least, indicates the need for monitoring for the development of other tumors of the triad. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adrenocortical carcinoma presenting as varicocele and renal vein thrombosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horne John M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Adrenocortical carcinomas are rare aggressive tumors. Their annual incidence is approximately one to two per million among the population of the United States of America. Patients with active endocrine tumors often present with Cushing's syndrome accompanied by virilizing features. Conversely, patients with non-functioning tumors may present with symptoms related to a mass-occupying lesion, such as abdominal pain and flank pain. Although varicoceles and acute kidney injuries are common problems in medicine, they are uncommon presentations of these rare tumors and easy to miss. We report a case of a large adrenocortical carcinoma that presented as testicular pain, varicocele, and acute kidney injury secondary to renal vein thrombosis. Case presentation A 54-year-old Caucasian man with a left-sided varicocele presented to our emergency department with lower abdominal pain and a decrease in urination. Four months previously, he had noticed pain and swelling in his left groin and had been diagnosed with left-sided varicocele. For one week, he began developing left-sided abdominal pain and decreased urination frequency, so he came to our emergency department for evaluation. His physical examination revealed a hard mass occupying the entire left side of his abdomen, crossing the midline, and extending to the pelvic brim. His blood tests showed acute kidney injury and mild anemia. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed a large retroperitoneal mass on the left side, displacing the left kidney inferiorly and the spleen superiorly with thoracic epidural compression. Thrombus was also identified in his left renal vein and inferior vena cava. Computed tomography of his chest showed bilateral pulmonary nodules. A computed tomography-guided abdominal mass biopsy was performed, and the diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma was made on the basis of pathology and immunohistochemistry. His hormonal evaluations were normal. His kidney

  15. The effect of human papillomavirus infection on sperm cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Y M; Lee, J F; Huang, H Y; Soong, Y K; Yang, F P; Pao, C C

    1997-06-01

    To investigate the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in human sperm cells and to evaluate potential effects of HPV on the sperm functions. A descriptive clinical study. Specimens of semen were collected from 24 randomly selected patients who attended the fertility clinics at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The presence of HPV DNA and RNA were examined by polymerase chain reaction. Semen quality and sperm cell function were analyzed by computer-aided autoanalyzer. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA and RNA were found in 6 (25%) and 2 (8%) of the sperm cells specimens, respectively. Human papillomavirus type 18 DNA and RNA were present in 11 (46%) and 5 (21%) of the same sperm cells specimens, respectively. Incidence of asthenozoospermia among patients infected with either HPV was significantly higher than in those without HPV in their sperm cells (75% versus 8%). Although performance of curvilinear velocity, straight-line velocity, and mean amplitude of lateral head displacement was significantly lower in HPV-infected specimens, the differences of linearity, beat cross frequency, and straightness were not statistically significant. These results suggest that human papillomavirus can be found in human sperm cells and that certain HPV-specific genes are actively transcribed. Sperm motility parameters seem to be affected by the presence of HPV in the sperm cells, and also the incidence of asthenozoospermia may be associated with HPV infection.

  16. [Progress in the research of germ cell from human embryonic stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; Cai, Zhi-Ming; Gui, Yao-Ting

    2006-01-01

    As the development of spontaneous differentiation of germ cells and gametogenesis from mouse embryonic stem cells (mES) in vitro, hES (human embryonic stem cells) also have potential to differentiated into germ cells in theory. This review focuses on the stem cells niches and genes regulating the hES differentiation toward germ cells, as well as the recent advance and application on the reproductive medicine and therapy of infertility.

  17. Human Red Cells With Paroxysmal Nocturnal Haemoglobinuria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired blood disorder characterised by acute intravascular haemolysis, due to increased susceptibility of red cells to complement -mediated lysis. Any red cell abnormality that would affect the invasion and growth of Plasmodium falciparum would serve as a useful tool ...

  18. Controlled Delivery of Human Cells by Temperature Responsive Microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, W.C.; Olesen, K.; Sivlér, P.; Lee, C.J.; Moreno-Jimenez, I.; Edin, J.; Courtman, D.; Skog, M.; Griffith, M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is one of the most promising areas within regenerative medicine. However, its full potential is limited by the rapid loss of introduced therapeutic cells before their full effects can be exploited, due in part to anoikis, and in part to the adverse environments often found within the pathologic tissues that the cells have been grafted into. Encapsulation of individual cells has been proposed as a means of increasing cell viability. In this study, we developed a facile, high throughput method for creating temperature responsive microcapsules comprising agarose, gelatin and fibrinogen for delivery and subsequent controlled release of cells. We verified the hypothesis that composite capsules combining agarose and gelatin, which possess different phase transition temperatures from solid to liquid, facilitated the destabilization of the capsules for cell release. Cell encapsulation and controlled release was demonstrated using human fibroblasts as model cells, as well as a therapeutically relevant cell line—human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). While such temperature responsive cell microcapsules promise effective, controlled release of potential therapeutic cells at physiological temperatures, further work will be needed to augment the composition of the microcapsules and optimize the numbers of cells per capsule prior to clinical evaluation. PMID:26096147

  19. Controlled Delivery of Human Cells by Temperature Responsive Microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.C. Mak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy is one of the most promising areas within regenerative medicine. However, its full potential is limited by the rapid loss of introduced therapeutic cells before their full effects can be exploited, due in part to anoikis, and in part to the adverse environments often found within the pathologic tissues that the cells have been grafted into. Encapsulation of individual cells has been proposed as a means of increasing cell viability. In this study, we developed a facile, high throughput method for creating temperature responsive microcapsules comprising agarose, gelatin and fibrinogen for delivery and subsequent controlled release of cells. We verified the hypothesis that composite capsules combining agarose and gelatin, which possess different phase transition temperatures from solid to liquid, facilitated the destabilization of the capsules for cell release. Cell encapsulation and controlled release was demonstrated using human fibroblasts as model cells, as well as a therapeutically relevant cell line—human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. While such temperature responsive cell microcapsules promise effective, controlled release of potential therapeutic cells at physiological temperatures, further work will be needed to augment the composition of the microcapsules and optimize the numbers of cells per capsule prior to clinical evaluation.

  20. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism reduces human myeloma cells proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Tirado-Vélez

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells. It has been proposed that targeting cancer cell metabolism would provide a new selective anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis would reduce cell proliferation in human myeloma cells. We evaluated the effect of etomoxir and orlistat on fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, cell cycle distribution, proliferation, cell death and expression of G1/S phase regulatory proteins in myeloma cells. Etomoxir and orlistat inhibited β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis respectively in myeloma cells, without altering significantly glucose metabolism. These effects were associated with reduced cell viability and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. Specifically, etomoxir and orlistat reduced by 40-70% myeloma cells proliferation. The combination of etomoxir and orlistat resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Orlistat induced apoptosis and sensitized RPMI-8226 cells to apoptosis induction by bortezomib, whereas apoptosis was not altered by etomoxir. Finally, the inhibitory effect of both drugs on cell proliferation was associated with reduced p21 protein levels and phosphorylation levels of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid metabolism represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat human multiple myeloma.

  1. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  2. Human B cells produce chemokine CXCL10 in the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Soren T; Salman, Ahmed M; Ruhwald, Morten; Ravn, Pernille; Brock, Inger; Elsheikh, Nabila; Andersen, Peter; Agger, Else Marie

    2015-01-01

    The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment. A candidate for such regulation could be the chemokine CXCL10. CXCL10 is mainly produced by human monocytes, but a few reports have also found CXCL10 production by human B cells. The objective of this study was to investigate CXCL10 production by human B cells in response to in vitro stimulation with Mtb antigens. We analyzed human blood samples from 30 volunteer donors using multiparameter flow cytometry, and identified a subgroup of B cells producing CXCL10 in response to in vitro stimulation with antigens. T cells did not produce CXCL10, but CXCL10 production by B cells appeared to be mediated via IFN-γ and dependent on contact with antigen-specific T cells recognizing the antigen. Human B cells are able to produce CXCL10 in an IFN-γ and T cell contact-dependent manner. The present findings suggest a possible mechanism through which B cells in part may influence granuloma formation in human tuberculosis (TB) and participate in infection control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chlamydia pneumoniae induces aponecrosis in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walch Michael

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intracellular bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae is suspected to play a role in formation and progression of atherosclerosis. Many studies investigated cell death initiation versus inhibition by Chlamydia pneumoniae in established cell lines but nothing is known in primary human aortic smooth muscle cells, a cell type among others known to be involved in the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque. Type of cell death was analyzed by various methods in primary aortic smooth muscle cells after infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae to investigate a possible pathogenic link in atherosclerosis. Results Chlamydiae were found to be localized up to 72 h post infection in aortic smooth muscle cells either as single bacteria or inside of large inclusions. Quantification of host cell death by lactate dehydrogenase release assay revealed strictly dose and time dependent lysis for all tested isolates of Chlamydia pneumoniae. Phosphatidylserine exposure was detected by flow cytometry in Chlamydia pneumoniae infected cells. Ultrastructure of Chlamydia pneumoniae infected human aortic smooth muscle cells showed extensive membrane- and organelle damage, chromatin condensation but no nuclear fragmentation. DNA fragmentation as well as cell membrane permeability was analyzed by TUNEL and NHS-biotin staining and occurred exclusively in cells carrying Chlamydia pneumoniae spots but not in smooth muscle cells with inclusions. These morphological features of cell death were not accompanied by an activation of caspase-3 as revealed by analysis of enzyme activity but involved mitochondrial membrane depolarization as shown by TMRE uptake and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Conclusion This study provides evidence that Chlamydia pneumoniae induce a spot like infection in human aortic smooth muscle cells, which results in a chimeric cell death with both apoptotic and necrotic characteristics. This aponecrotic cell death may assist chronic

  4. Non-Invasive Measurement of Adrenocortical Activity in Blue-Fronted Parrots (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João C. P.; Fujihara, Caroline J.; Fruhvald, Erika; Trevisol, Eduardo; Destro, Flavia C.; Teixeira, Carlos R.; Pantoja, José C. F.; Schmidt, Elizabeth M. S.; Palme, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Parrots kept in zoos and private households often develop psychological and behavioural disorders. Despite knowing that such disorders have a multifactorial aetiology and that chronic stress is involved, little is known about their development mainly due to a poor understanding of the parrots’ physiology and the lack of validated methods to measure stress in these species. In birds, blood corticosterone concentrations provide information about adrenocortical activity. However, blood sampling techniques are difficult, highly invasive and inappropriate to investigate stressful situations and welfare conditions. Thus, a non-invasive method to measure steroid hormones is critically needed. Aiming to perform a physiological validation of a cortisone enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) in droppings of 24 Blue-fronted parrots (Amazona aestiva), two experiments were designed. During the experiments all droppings were collected at 3-h intervals. Initially, birds were sampled for 24 h (experiment 1) and one week later assigned to four different treatments (experiment 2): Control (undisturbed), Saline (0.2 mL of 0.9% NaCl IM), Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg IM) and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 25 IU IM). Treatments (always one week apart) were applied to all animals in a cross-over study design. A daily rhythm pattern in GCM excretion was detected but there were no sex differences (first experiment). Saline and dexamethasone treatments had no effect on GCM (not different from control concentrations). Following ACTH injection, GCM concentration increased about 13.1-fold (median) at the peak (after 3–9 h), and then dropped to pre-treatment concentrations. By a successful physiological validation, we demonstrated the suitability of the cortisone EIA to non-invasively monitor increased adrenocortical activity, and thus, stress in the Blue-fronted parrot. This method opens up new perspectives for investigating the connection between behavioural

  5. Anthropometric, haemodynamic, humoral and hormonal evaluation in patients with incidental adrenocortical adenomas before and after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, Giampaolo; Moretti, Angelica; Iacconi, Pietro; Miccoli, Paolo; Nami, Renato; Lucani, Barbara; Salvetti, Antonio

    2003-02-01

    To compare clinical and humoral parameters before and after surgery in patients with incidental adrenocortical adenomas. Six patients with subclinical Cushing's syndrome and nine with non-functioning adenomas were investigated before and 12 Months after removal of the mass. Anthropometric (body weight, body mass index and waist to hip ratio), haemodynamic (blood pressure and heart rate), metabolic (lipids and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)), hormonal (cortisol, plasma renin activity, aldosterone, androgens and catecholamines) and bone metabolism (hydroxyproline, parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin and ostase) parameters were evaluated. In the whole group, a significant decrease in body weight (69.7+/-3.5 vs 70.8+/-3.5 kg, P<0.03), in systolic (135.3+/-5.1 vs 145.6+/-4.9 mmHg, P<0.009) and diastolic (83.7+/-1.9 vs 91.0+/-3.5 mmHg, P<0.03) blood pressure and in glucose levels in response to OGTT (106.4+/-9.6 vs 127.5+/-6.5 mg/dl, P<0.05) was observed after surgery. All other parameters examined did not change significantly. This trend was also found in both groups separately. Analytical data showed a high frequency of overweight/obesity (66.6%), hypertension (66.6%) and impaired glucose profile (26.6%) in our patients, with a greater prevalence of these cardiovascular risk factors in the subclinical Cushing's syndrome group. After surgery, values normalized or improved in eight out of ten hypertensive patients and in three out of four patients with impaired glucose profile. Solid adrenocortical incidentalomas are associated with some cardiovascular risk factors which may be corrected after removal of the mass. Therefore, surgery may be an appropriate choice in patients with subclinical Cushing's syndrome but also in those with solid non-functioning adenomas and coexistent cardiovascular risk factors.

  6. Non-Invasive Measurement of Adrenocortical Activity in Blue-Fronted Parrots (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João C P; Fujihara, Caroline J; Fruhvald, Erika; Trevisol, Eduardo; Destro, Flavia C; Teixeira, Carlos R; Pantoja, José C F; Schmidt, Elizabeth M S; Palme, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Parrots kept in zoos and private households often develop psychological and behavioural disorders. Despite knowing that such disorders have a multifactorial aetiology and that chronic stress is involved, little is known about their development mainly due to a poor understanding of the parrots' physiology and the lack of validated methods to measure stress in these species. In birds, blood corticosterone concentrations provide information about adrenocortical activity. However, blood sampling techniques are difficult, highly invasive and inappropriate to investigate stressful situations and welfare conditions. Thus, a non-invasive method to measure steroid hormones is critically needed. Aiming to perform a physiological validation of a cortisone enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) in droppings of 24 Blue-fronted parrots (Amazona aestiva), two experiments were designed. During the experiments all droppings were collected at 3-h intervals. Initially, birds were sampled for 24 h (experiment 1) and one week later assigned to four different treatments (experiment 2): Control (undisturbed), Saline (0.2 mL of 0.9% NaCl IM), Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg IM) and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 25 IU IM). Treatments (always one week apart) were applied to all animals in a cross-over study design. A daily rhythm pattern in GCM excretion was detected but there were no sex differences (first experiment). Saline and dexamethasone treatments had no effect on GCM (not different from control concentrations). Following ACTH injection, GCM concentration increased about 13.1-fold (median) at the peak (after 3-9 h), and then dropped to pre-treatment concentrations. By a successful physiological validation, we demonstrated the suitability of the cortisone EIA to non-invasively monitor increased adrenocortical activity, and thus, stress in the Blue-fronted parrot. This method opens up new perspectives for investigating the connection between behavioural

  7. Non-Invasive Measurement of Adrenocortical Activity in Blue-Fronted Parrots (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João C P Ferreira

    Full Text Available Parrots kept in zoos and private households often develop psychological and behavioural disorders. Despite knowing that such disorders have a multifactorial aetiology and that chronic stress is involved, little is known about their development mainly due to a poor understanding of the parrots' physiology and the lack of validated methods to measure stress in these species. In birds, blood corticosterone concentrations provide information about adrenocortical activity. However, blood sampling techniques are difficult, highly invasive and inappropriate to investigate stressful situations and welfare conditions. Thus, a non-invasive method to measure steroid hormones is critically needed. Aiming to perform a physiological validation of a cortisone enzyme immunoassay (EIA to measure glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM in droppings of 24 Blue-fronted parrots (Amazona aestiva, two experiments were designed. During the experiments all droppings were collected at 3-h intervals. Initially, birds were sampled for 24 h (experiment 1 and one week later assigned to four different treatments (experiment 2: Control (undisturbed, Saline (0.2 mL of 0.9% NaCl IM, Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg IM and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 25 IU IM. Treatments (always one week apart were applied to all animals in a cross-over study design. A daily rhythm pattern in GCM excretion was detected but there were no sex differences (first experiment. Saline and dexamethasone treatments had no effect on GCM (not different from control concentrations. Following ACTH injection, GCM concentration increased about 13.1-fold (median at the peak (after 3-9 h, and then dropped to pre-treatment concentrations. By a successful physiological validation, we demonstrated the suitability of the cortisone EIA to non-invasively monitor increased adrenocortical activity, and thus, stress in the Blue-fronted parrot. This method opens up new perspectives for investigating the connection between behavioural

  8. Rho GTPases and regulation of cell migration and polarization in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Epithelial cell migration is required for regeneration of tissues and can be defective in a number of ocular surface diseases. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of Rho family small G-proteins in human corneal epithelial cells to test their requirement in directional cell migration. METHODS: Rho family small G-protein expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Dominant-inhibitory constructs encoding Rho proteins or Rho protein targeting small interfering RNA were transfected into human corneal epithelial large T antigen cells, and wound closure rate were evaluated by scratch wounding assay, and a complementary non-traumatic cell migration assay. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to study cell polarization and to assess Cdc42 downstream effector. RESULTS: Cdc42, Chp, Rac1, RhoA, TC10 and TCL were expressed in human corneal epithelial cells. Among them, Cdc42 and TCL were found to significantly affect cell migration in monolayer scratch assays. These results were confirmed through the use of validated siRNAs directed to Cdc42 and TCL. Scramble siRNA transfected cells had high percentage of polarized cells than Cdc42 or TCL siRNA transfected cells at the wound edge. We showed that the Cdc42-specific effector p21-activated kinase 4 localized predominantly to cell-cell junctions in cell monolayers, but failed to translocate to the leading edge in Cdc42 siRNA transfected cells after monolayer wounding. CONCLUSION: Rho proteins expressed in cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and Cdc42, TCL facilitate two-dimensional cell migration in-vitro. Although silencing of Cdc42 and TCL did not noticeably affect the appearance of cell adhesions at the leading edge, the slower migration of these cells indicates both GTP-binding proteins play important roles in promoting cell movement of human corneal epithelial cells.

  9. Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Stem Cells Improve Heat Tolerance and Hypothalamic Damage in Heat Stressed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Shu Tseng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heatstroke is characterized by excessive hyperthermia associated with systemic inflammatory responses, which leads to multiple organ failure, in which brain disorders predominate. This definition can be almost fulfilled by a mouse model of heatstroke used in the present study. Unanesthetized mice were exposed to whole body heating (41.2°C for 1 hour and then returned to room temperature (26°C for recovery. Immediately after termination of whole body heating, heated mice displayed excessive hyperthermia (body core temperature ~42.5°C. Four hours after termination of heat stress, heated mice displayed (i systemic inflammation; (ii ischemic, hypoxic, and oxidative damage to the hypothalamus; (iii hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis impairment (reflected by plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic-hormone and corticosterone; (iv decreased fractional survival; and (v thermoregulatory deficits (e.g., they became hypothermia when they were exposed to room temperature. These heatstroke reactions can be significantly attenuated by human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells therapy. Our data suggest that human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells therapy may improve outcomes of heatstroke in mice by reducing systemic inflammation as well as hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis impairment.

  10. Toona Sinensis Extracts Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in the Human Lung Large Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Toona sinensis extracts have been shown to exhibit anti-cancer effects in human ovarian cancer cell lines, human promyelocytic leukemia cells and human lung adenocarcinoma. Its safety has also been confirmed in animal studies. However, its anti-cancer properties in human lung large cell carcinoma have not been studied. Here, we used a powder obtained by freeze-drying the super-natant of centrifuged crude extract from Toona sinensis leaves (TSL-1 to treat the human lung carcinoma cell line H661. Cell viability was evaluated by the 3-(4-,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that TSL-1 blocked H661 cell cycle progression. Western blot analysis showed decreased expression of cell cycle proteins that promote cell cycle progression, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin D1, and increased the expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression, including p27. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that TSL-1 induced H661 cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that TSL-1 reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2, and degraded the DNA repair protein, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase. TSL-1 shows potential as a novel therapeutic agent or for use as an adjuvant for treating human lung large cell carcinoma.

  11. Side Population Cells Derived from Adult Human Liver Generate Hepatocyte-like Cells In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUSSAIN, SUNNY ZAHEED; STROM, STEPHEN C.; KIRBY, MARTHA R.; BURNS, SEAN; LANGEMEIJER, SASKIA; UEDA, TAKAHIRO; HSIEH, MATTHEW; TISDALE, JOHN F.

    2009-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic side population (SP) cells derived from adult human liver possess the potential of a novel candidate hepatic stem cell. Human cadaveric donor liver was subjected to collagenase perfusion and hepatocytes were separated from nonparenchymal cells by differential centrifugation. SP cells were isolated from the nonparenchymal portion after Hoechst 33342 staining. Since CD45 is a panleukocyte antigen, CD45-negative SP cells were separated from the vast majority of CD45-positive SP cells (90%), and hepatic growth medium was used to culture both groups. Both CD45-negative and CD45-positive hepatic SP cells generated colonies in the hepatic growth medium in 2–3 weeks. The colonies yielded large cells morphologically consistent with human hepatocytes, demonstrating granule-rich cytoplasm, dense, often double nuclei, and intracellular lipofuscin pigment. The cultured cells from both sources were positive for markers of human hepatocytes: HepPar, cytokeratin 8 (CK8), and human albumin. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) performed on both groups demonstrated positivity for additional liver markers including human albumin, CK18, α-1 anti-trypsin, and the human cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2B6. Double immunostaining (CD45 and HepPar) and RT-PCR confirmed that the hepatocyte-like cells derived from the CD45-negative SP cells acquired HepPar positivity but had no detectable CD45 antigen expression. In contrast, the cultured cells derived from the CD45-positive SP cells also acquired HepPar positivity, but only a minimal fraction expressed the CD45 antigen. We conclude that hepatic SP cells derived from the nonparenchymal portion of human liver are a potential source of human hepatocytes irrespective of their CD45 status, and further animal studies will be required to assess their regenerative potential. PMID:16187169

  12. Cell shape regulates global histone acetylation in human mammaryepithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Beyec, Johanne; Xu, Ren; Lee, Sun-Young; Nelson, Celeste M.; Rizki, Aylin; Alcaraz, Jordi; Bissell, Mina J.

    2007-02-28

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell morphology and gene expression in vivo; these relationships are maintained in three-dimensional (3D) cultures of mammary epithelial cells. In the presence of laminin-rich ECM (lrECM), mammary epithelial cells round up and undergo global histone deacetylation, a process critical for their functional differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether lrECM-dependent cell rounding and global histone deacetylation are indeed part of a common physical-biochemical pathway. Using 3D cultures as well as nonadhesive and micropatterned substrata, here we showed that the cell 'rounding' caused by lrECM was sufficient to induce deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the absence of biochemical cues. Microarray and confocal analysis demonstrated that this deacetylation in 3D culture is associated with a global increase in chromatin condensation and a reduction in gene expression. Whereas cells cultured on plastic substrata formed prominent stress fibers, cells grown in 3D lrECM or on micropatterns lacked these structures. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D phenocopied the lrECM-induced cell rounding and histone deacetylation. These results reveal a novel link between ECM-controlled cell shape and chromatin structure, and suggest that this link is mediated by changes in the actin cytoskeleton.

  13. Human fetal liver stromal cells that overexpress bFGF support growth and maintenance of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafei Xi

    Full Text Available In guiding hES cell technology toward the clinic, one key issue to be addressed is to culture and maintain hES cells much more safely and economically in large scale. In order to avoid using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs we isolated human fetal liver stromal cells (hFLSCs from 14 weeks human fetal liver as new human feeder cells. hFLSCs feeders could maintain hES cells for 15 passages (about 100 days. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF is known to play an important role in promoting self-renewal of human embryonic stem (hES cells. So, we established transgenic hFLSCs that stably express bFGF by lentiviral vectors. These transgenic human feeder cells--bFGF-hFLSCs maintained the properties of H9 hES cells without supplementing with any exogenous growth factors. H9 hES cells culturing under these conditions maintained all hES cell features after prolonged culture, including the developmental potential to differentiate into representative tissues of all three embryonic germ layers, unlimited and undifferentiated proliferative ability, and maintenance of normal karyotype. Our results demonstrated that bFGF-hFLSCs feeder cells were central to establishing the signaling network among bFGF, insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2, and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β, thereby providing the framework in which hES cells were instructed to self-renew or to differentiate. We also found that the conditioned medium of bFGF-hFLSCs could maintain the H9 hES cells under feeder-free conditions without supplementing with bFGF. Taken together, bFGF-hFLSCs had great potential as feeders for maintaining pluripotent hES cell lines more safely and economically.

  14. Analysis of allelic differential expression in human white blood cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pant, P V Krishna; Tao, Heng; Beilharz, Erica J; Ballinger, Dennis G; Cox, David R; Frazer, Kelly A

    2006-01-01

    .... To identify human genes with allelic expression differences, we genotype DNA and examine mRNA isolated from the white blood cells of 12 unrelated individuals using oligonucleotide arrays containing 8406 exonic SNPs...

  15. Recent developments on human cell lines for the bioartificial liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.

    2002-01-01

    Most bioartificial liver (BAL) devices contain porcine primary hepatocytes as their biological component. However, alternatives are needed due to xenotransplantation associated risks. Human liver cell lines have excellent growth characteristics and are therefore candidates for application in BAL

  16. The development of human mast cells. An historical reappraisal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribatti, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.ribatti@uniba.it

    2016-03-15

    The understanding of mast cell (MC) differentiation is derived mainly from in vitro studies of different stages of stem and progenitor cells. The hematopoietic lineage development of human MCs is unique compared to other myeloid-derived cells. Human MCs originate from CD34{sup +}/CD117{sup +}/CD13{sup +}multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which undergo transendothelial recruitment into peripheral tissues, where they complete differentiation. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a major chemotactic factor for MCs and their progenitors. SCF also elicits cell-cell and cell-substratum adhesion, facilitates the proliferation, and sustains the survival, differentiation, and maturation, of MCs. Because MC maturation is influenced by local microenvironmental factors, different MC phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs. - Highlights: • Human mast cells originate from CD34/CD117/CD13 positive multipotent hematopoietic progenitors. • Stem cell factor is a major chemotactic factor for mast cells and their progenitors. • Different mast cell phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs.

  17. β-CELL SPECIFIC CYTOPROTECTION BY PROLACTIN ON HUMAN ISLETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ricordi, Camillo; Mita, Atsuyoshi; Miki, Atsushi; Sakuma, Yasunaru; Damaris Molano, R.; Fornoni, Alessia; Pileggi, Antonello; Inverardi, Luca; Ichii, Hirohito

    2008-01-01

    Many cytoprotective agents have been reported to improve islet isolation and transplantation outcomes. However, several cytoprotective agents may improve all cell subsets within an islet preparation, and selected non- β-cells components may have a negative effect on β-cell function and survival (e.g., acinar cells). In this study, we examined the effect of prolactin (PRL) supplementation to the culture medium, to determine whether it could exert β-cell-selective cytoprotection (islet viability and function) towards a possible use of PRL during pre transplant islet culture. Materials and Methods Human islets pre-cultured or not with recombinant human PRL (500 μg/L) for 48 hours. Non-β-cells and β-cell-specific fractional viability and cellular composition were assessed by FACS and Laser Scanning Cytometry (LSC). Islet potency was assessed in vivo by transplantation into chemically-induced diabetic immunodeficient mice. Results The relative viable β-cell mass and the relative islet β-cell content in PRL group were 28% higher (p=0.018) and 19% higher (p=0.029) than control group, respectively. All transplanted mice achieved normoglycemia in both groups, indicating that PRL treatment did not alter islet function. Conclusions PRL treatment improves β-cell-specific viability and survival in human islets in vitro. The development of novel β-cell-specific cytoprotective strategies will be of assistance in improving islet transplantation. PMID:18374075

  18. Nuclear DNA Content Varies with Cell Size across Human Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillooly, James F.; Hein, Andrew; Damiani, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the size of cells, and the DNA they contain, is a basic feature of multicellular organisms that affects countless aspects of their structure and function. Within humans, cell size is known to vary by several orders of magnitude, and differences in nuclear DNA content among cells have been frequently observed. Using published data, here we describe how the quantity of nuclear DNA across 19 different human cell types increases with cell volume. This observed increase is similar to intraspecific relationships between DNA content and cell volume in other species, and interspecific relationships between diploid genome size and cell volume. Thus, we speculate that the quantity of nuclear DNA content in somatic cells of humans is perhaps best viewed as a distribution of values that reflects cell size distributions, rather than as a single, immutable quantity. PMID:26134319

  19. Nuclear DNA Content Varies with Cell Size across Human Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillooly, James F; Hein, Andrew; Damiani, Rachel

    2015-07-01

    Variation in the size of cells, and the DNA they contain, is a basic feature of multicellular organisms that affects countless aspects of their structure and function. Within humans, cell size is known to vary by several orders of magnitude, and differences in nuclear DNA content among cells have been frequently observed. Using published data, here we describe how the quantity of nuclear DNA across 19 different human cell types increases with cell volume. This observed increase is similar to intraspecific relationships between DNA content and cell volume in other species, and interspecific relationships between diploid genome size and cell volume. Thus, we speculate that the quantity of nuclear DNA content in somatic cells of humans is perhaps best viewed as a distribution of values that reflects cell size distributions, rather than as a single, immutable quantity. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Adrenocortical carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common in children younger than 5 years old and adults in their 40s and 50s. The condition may be linked to a cancer syndrome that is passed down through families (inherited). Both men and women can develop this ...

  1. T CELL REPLICATIVE SENESCENCE IN HUMAN AGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Jennifer P.; Effros, Rita B.

    2013-01-01

    The decline of the immune system appears to be an intractable consequence of aging, leading to increased susceptibility to infections, reduced effectiveness of vaccination and higher incidences of many diseases including osteoporosis and cancer in the elderly. These outcomes can be attributed, at least in part, to a phenomenon known as T cell replicative senescence, a terminal state characterized by dysregulated immune function, loss of the CD28 costimulatory molecule, shortened telomeres and elevated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Senescent CD8 T cells, which accumulate in the elderly, have been shown to frequently bear antigen specificity against cytomegalovirus (CMV), suggesting that this common and persistent infection may drive immune senescence and result in functional and phenotypic changes to the T cell repertoire. Senescent T cells have also been identified in patients with certain cancers, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections, such as HIV. This review discusses the in vivo and in vitro evidence for the contribution of CD8 T cell replicative senescence to a plethora of age-related pathologies and a few possible therapeutic avenues to delay or prevent this differentiative end-state in T cells. The age-associated remodeling of the immune system, through accumulation of senescent T cells has far-reaching consequences on the individual and society alike, for the current healthcare system needs to meet the urgent demands of the increasing proportions of the elderly in the US and abroad. PMID:23061726

  2. Cell-to-Cell Contact and Nectin-4 Govern Spread of Measles Virus from Primary Human Myeloid Cells to Primary Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Li, Ni; Mark, Anna C.; Mateo, Mathieu; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles is a highly contagious, acute viral illness. Immune cells within the airways are likely first targets of infection, and these cells traffic measles virus (MeV) to lymph nodes for amplification and subsequent systemic dissemination. Infected immune cells are thought to return MeV to the airways; however, the mechanisms responsible for virus transfer to pulmonary epithelial cells are poorly understood. To investigate this process, we collected blood from human donors and generated primary myeloid cells, specifically, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and dendritic cells (DCs). MDMs and DCs were infected with MeV and then applied to primary cultures of well-differentiated airway epithelial cells from human donors (HAE). Consistent with previous results obtained with free virus, infected MDMs or DCs were incapable of transferring MeV to HAE when applied to the apical surface. Likewise, infected MDMs or DCs applied to the basolateral surface of HAE grown on small-pore (0.4-μm) support membranes did not transfer virus. In contrast, infected MDMs and DCs applied to the basolateral surface of HAE grown on large-pore (3.0-μm) membranes successfully transferred MeV. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that MDMs and DCs are capable of penetrating large-pore membranes but not small-pore membranes. Further, by using a nectin-4 blocking antibody or recombinant MeV unable to enter cells through nectin-4, we demonstrated formally that transfer from immune cells to HAE occurs in a nectin-4-dependent manner. Thus, both infected MDMs and DCs rely on cell-to-cell contacts and nectin-4 to efficiently deliver MeV to the basolateral surface of HAE. IMPORTANCE Measles virus spreads rapidly and efficiently in human airway epithelial cells. This rapid spread is based on cell-to-cell contact rather than on particle release and reentry. Here we posit that MeV transfer from infected immune cells to epithelial cells also occurs by cell-to-cell contact rather than through cell

  3. Human B cells produce chemokine CXCL10 in the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Soren T; Salman, Ahmed M; Ruhwald, Morten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment. A candid......BACKGROUND: The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment....... A candidate for such regulation could be the chemokine CXCL10. CXCL10 is mainly produced by human monocytes, but a few reports have also found CXCL10 production by human B cells. The objective of this study was to investigate CXCL10 production by human B cells in response to in vitro stimulation with Mtb...

  4. Human placenta-derived adherent cells induce tolerogenic immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Morschauser, Andrew; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Xiaohua; Gleason, Joseph; He, Shuyang; Chen, Hong-Jung; Jankovic, Vladimir; Ye, Qian; Labazzo, Kristen; Herzberg, Uri; Albert, Vivian R; Abbot, Stewart E; Liang, Bitao; Hariri, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Human placenta-derived adherent cells (PDAC cells) are a culture expanded, undifferentiated mesenchymal-like population derived from full-term placental tissue, with immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. PDA-001 (cenplacel-L), an intravenous formulation of PDAC cells, is in clinical development for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the immunoregulatory properties of PDAC cells, we investigated their effects on immune cell populations, including T cells and dendritic cells (DC) in vitro and in vivo. PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation in an OT-II T-cell adoptive transfer model, reduced the severity of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and ameliorated inflammation in a delayed type hypersensitivity response model. In vitro, PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation and inhibited Th1 and Th17 differentiation. Analysis of tissues derived from PDAC cell-treated animals revealed diminished CD86 expression on splenic DC, suggesting that they can also modulate DC populations. Furthermore, PDAC cells modulate the differentiation and maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived DC. Similarly, human DC differentiated from CD14+ monocytes in the presence of PDAC cells acquired a tolerogenic phenotype. These tolerogenic DC failed to induce allogeneic T-cell proliferation and differentiation toward Th1, but skewed T-cell differentiation toward Th2. Inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity resulted in a significant, but not complete, abrogation of PDAC cells' effects on DC phenotype and function, implying a role for prostaglandin E2 in PDAC-mediated immunomodulation. This study identifies modulation of DC differentiation toward immune tolerance as a key mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory activities of PDAC cells. PMID:25505962

  5. Chimeric animal models in human stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc; Halasi, Gabor; Kasumacic, Nedim

    2009-01-01

    The clinical use of stem cells for regenerative medicine is critically dependent on preclinical studies in animal models. In this review we examine some of the key issues and challenges in the use of animal models to study human stem cell biology-experimental standardization, body size, immunological barriers, cell survival factors, fusion of host and donor cells, and in vivo imaging and tracking. We focus particular attention on the various imaging modalities that can be used to track cells in living animals, comparing their strengths and weaknesses and describing technical developments that are likely to lead to new opportunities for the dynamic assessment of stem cell behavior in vivo. We then provide an overview of some of the most commonly used animal models, their advantages and disadvantages, and examples of their use for xenotypic transplantation of human stem cells, with separate reviews of models involving rodents, ungulates, nonhuman primates, and the chicken embryo. As the use of human somatic, embryonic, and induced pluripotent stem cells increases, so too will the range of applications for these animal models. It is likely that increasingly sophisticated uses of human/animal chimeric models will be developed through advances in genetic manipulation, cell delivery, and in vivo imaging.

  6. Nanoparticle labeling identifies slow cycling human endometrial stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Evidence suggests that the human endometrium contains stem or progenitor cells that are responsible for its remarkable regenerative capability. A common property of somatic stem cells is their quiescent state. It remains unclear whether slow-cycling cells exist in the human endometrium. We hypothesized that the human endometrium contains a subset of slow-cycling cells with somatic stem cell properties. Here, we established an in vitro stem cell assay to isolate human endometrial-derived mesenchymal stem-like cells (eMSC). Methods Single-cell stromal cultures were initially labeled with fluorescent nanoparticles and a small population of fluorescent persistent cells (FPC) remained after culture of 21 days. Two populations of stromal cells, namely FPC and non-FPC were sorted. Results Quantitative analysis of functional assays demonstrated that the FPC had higher colony forming ability, underwent more rounds of self-renewal and had greater enrichment of phenotypically defined prospective eMSC markers: CD146+/CD140b+ and W5C5+ than the non-FPC. They also differentiate into multiple mesenchymal lineages and the expression of lineage specific markers was lower than that of non-FPC. The FPC exhibit low proliferation activities. A proliferation dynamics study revealed that more FPC had a prolonged G1 phase. Conclusions With this study we present an efficient method to label and isolate slow-proliferating cells obtained from human endometrial stromal cultures without genetic modifications. The FPC population could be easily maintained in vitro and are of interest for tissue-repair and engineering perspectives. In summary, nanoparticle labeling is a promising tool for the identification of putative somatic stem or progenitor cells when their surface markers are undefined. PMID:24996487

  7. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  8. [Isolation and characterization of side population cells in human gastric cancer cell line BGC-823].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting; Li, Jin-yi; Lu, Shi-xin

    2012-04-01

    Isolate and characterize the side population (SP) cells with potency of stem cells from human gastric carcinoma cell line BGC-823. SP and non-SP cells were sorted from BGC-823 cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) using Hoechst33342 staining. The tumorigenic ability of the SP cells was assessed by in vivo transplantation into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice. SP cells were isolated from BGC-823 cells in a proportion of 0.9% to 2.1% with respect to the whole cell population. The colony formation assay showed that the colony formation rate of the SP cells was significantly higher than that of the non-SP cells (72.56% vs. 49.00%, P line BGC-823 cells. Further characterization of this SP cell population may provide new insights for diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer.

  9. Cell diversity and network dynamics in photosensitive human brain organoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrato, Giorgia; Nguyen, Tuan; Macosko, Evan Z.; Sherwood, John L.; Yang, Sung Min; Berger, Daniel; Maria, Natalie; Scholvin, Jorg; Goldman, Melissa; Kinney, Justin; Boyden, Edward S.; Lichtman, Jeff; Williams, Ziv M.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Arlotta, Paola

    2017-01-01

    In vitro models of the developing brain such as 3D brain organoids offer an unprecedented opportunity to study aspects of human brain development and disease. However, it remains undefined what cells are generated within organoids and to what extent they recapitulate the regional complexity, cellular diversity, and circuit functionality of the brain. Here, we analyzed gene expression in over 80,000 individual cells isolated from 31 human brain organoids. We find that organoids can generate a broad diversity of cells, which are related to endogenous classes, including cells from the cerebral cortex and the retina. Organoids could be developed over extended periods (over 9 months) enabling unprecedented levels of maturity including the formation of dendritic spines and of spontaneously-active neuronal networks. Finally, neuronal activity within organoids could be controlled using light stimulation of photoreceptor-like cells, which may offer ways to probe the functionality of human neuronal circuits using physiological sensory stimuli. PMID:28445462

  10. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaolan, E-mail: huxiaolan1998@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xianqi [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Qiu, Shuifeng [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin [Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  11. Interactions of human microglia cells with Japanese encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannes, Nils; Neuhaus, Viviane; Scolari, Brigitte; Kharoubi-Hess, Solange; Walch, Michael; Summerfield, Artur; Filgueira, Luis

    2017-01-14

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a neurotropic flavivirus causing mortality and morbidity in humans. Severe Japanese encephalitis cases display strong inflammatory responses in the central nervous system and an accumulation of viral particles in specific brain regions. Microglia cells are the unique brain-resident immune cell population with potent migratory functions and have been proposed to act as a viral reservoir for JEV. Animal models suggest that the targeting of microglia by JEV is partially responsible for inflammatory reactions in the brain. Nevertheless, the interactions between human microglia and JEV are poorly documented. Using human primary microglia and a new model of human blood monocyte-derived microglia, the present study explores the interaction between human microglia and JEV as well as the role of these cells in viral transmission to susceptible cells. To achieve this work, vaccine-containing inactivated JEV and two live JEV strains were applied on human microglia. Live JEV was non-cytopathogenic to human microglia but increased levels of CCL2, CXCL9 and CXCL10 in such cultures. Furthermore, human microglia up-regulated the expression of the fraktalkine receptor CX3CR1 upon exposure to both JEV vaccine and live JEV. Although JEV vaccine enhanced MHC class II on all microglia, live JEV enhanced MHC class II mainly on CX3CR1+ microglia cells. Importantly, human microglia supported JEV replication, but infectivity was only transmitted to neighbouring cells in a contact-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that human microglia may be a source of neuronal infection and sustain JEV brain pathogenesis.

  12. Human T cell receptor gamma delta + T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.

    1991-01-01

    TCR gamma delta + T cells represent a minority of CD3+ T cells in many species including man. The molecular structure of the TCR gamma and delta loci in man is well understood. The gamma and delta loci contain V, D, J and C gene segments. These segments do not rearrange randomly but in a

  13. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from osteoarthritis patient-derived synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Son, Myung Jin; Son, Mi-Young; Seol, Binna; Kim, Janghwan; Park, Jongjin; Kim, Jung Hwa; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Su A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Kang-Sik; Han, Yong-Mahn; Chang, Jae-Suk; Cho, Yee Sook

    2011-10-01

    This study was undertaken to generate and characterize human induced pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and to examine whether these cells can be developed into disease-relevant cell types for use in disease modeling and drug discovery. Human synovial cells isolated from two 71-year-old women with advanced OA were characterized and reprogrammed into induced PSCs by ectopic expression of 4 transcription factors (Oct-4, SOX2, Klf4, and c-Myc). The pluripotency status of each induced PSC line was validated by comparison with human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We found that OA patient-derived human synovial cells had human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like characteristics, as indicated by the expression of specific markers, including CD14-, CD19-, CD34-, CD45-, CD44+, CD51+, CD90+, CD105+, and CD147+. Microarray analysis of human MSCs and human synovial cells further determined their unique and overlapping gene expression patterns. The pluripotency of established human induced PSCs was confirmed by their human ESC-like morphology, expression of pluripotency markers, gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, normal karyotype, and in vitro and in vivo differentiation potential. The potential of human induced PSCs to differentiate into distinct mesenchymal cell lineages, such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes, was further confirmed by positive expression of markers for respective cell types and positive staining with alizarin red S (osteoblasts), oil red O (adipocytes), or Alcian blue (chondrocytes). Functional chondrocyte differentiation of induced PSCs in pellet culture and 3-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffold culture was assessed by chondrocyte self-assembly and histology. Our findings indicate that patient-derived synovial cells are an attractive source of MSCs as well as induced PSCs and have the potential to advance cartilage tissue engineering and cell-based models of cartilage defects. Copyright © 2011 by the

  14. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  15. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-15

    after reinfusion. Blood 1982; 56: 1141-1147. 11. Danon D, Marikovsky Y. Determination of density distribution of red cell population. J Lab Clin Med...back to the study site. The lyophilized red cells will be stored refrigerated until use. Fourteen days after phlebotomy, the subject will return to the...The subject will remain in confinement at the study site for 24 hours following the transfusion and return on the following four days (Study Days 2

  16. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Human muscle satellite cells as targets of Chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ozden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya (CHIK virus is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes in humans an acute infection characterised by fever, polyarthralgia, head-ache, and myalgia. Since 2005, the emergence of CHIK virus was associated with an unprecedented magnitude outbreak of CHIK disease in the Indian Ocean. Clinically, this outbreak was characterized by invalidating poly-arthralgia, with myalgia being reported in 97.7% of cases. Since the cellular targets of CHIK virus in humans are unknown, we studied the pathogenic events and targets of CHIK infection in skeletal muscle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistology on muscle biopsies from two CHIK virus-infected patients with myositic syndrome showed that viral antigens were found exclusively inside skeletal muscle progenitor cells (designed as satelllite cells, and not in muscle fibers. To evaluate the ability of CHIK virus to replicate in human satellite cells, we assessed virus infection on primary human muscle cells; viral growth was observed in CHIK virus-infected satellite cells with a cytopathic effect, whereas myotubes were essentially refractory to infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report provides new insights into CHIK virus pathogenesis, since it is the first to identify a cellular target of CHIK virus in humans and to report a selective infection of muscle satellite cells by a viral agent in humans.

  18. Establishment of human cell lines showing circadian rhythms of bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Aki; Shimada, Hiroko; Numazawa, Kahori; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Ikeda, Masaaki; Kawashima, Minae; Kato, Nobumasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Ebisawa, Takashi

    2008-11-28

    We have established human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines stably expressing the luciferase gene, driven by the human Bmal1 promoter, to obtain human-derived cells that show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence after dexamethasone treatment. The average circadian period of bioluminescence for the obtained clones was 24.07+/-0.48 h. Lithium (10 mM) in the medium significantly lengthened the circadian period of bioluminescence, which is consistent with previous reports, while 2 mM or 5 mM lithium had no effect. This is the first report on the establishment of human-derived cell lines that proliferate infinitely and show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence, and also the first to investigate the effects of low-dose lithium on the circadian rhythms of human-derived cells in vitro. The established cells will be useful for various in vitro studies of human circadian rhythms and for the development of new therapies for human disorders related to circadian rhythm disturbances.

  19. Carrageenan delays cell cycle progression in human cancer cells in vitro demonstrated by FUCCI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasedya, Eka Sunarwidhi; Miyake, Masao; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hazama, Akihiro

    2016-08-04

    Carrageenan is a sulfated polysaccharide that exists in red seaweeds recently shown to have anticancer properties. Previous findings show various effects of carrageenan suppressing tumor cell growth. One of the hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation, a consequence of loss of normal cell-cycle control, that underlies tumor growth. Recently there is an increasing interest in potential anticancer agents that affect cell cycle in cancer cells. Thus, in this study we investigated the effects of carrageenan on the tumor cell cycle. Using human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa) cells as and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), the cytotoxic effects of kappa carrageenan (k-CO) and lambda carrageenan (λ-CO) at the concentrations of 250-2500 μg/mL were observed. Cell viability was determined using the MTT assay while cell death rates were determined using staining with calcein-AM/propidium iodide. Cell-cycle profile and progression were demonstrated with HeLa cells expressing FUCCI (fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator) probes (HeLa-FUCCI). Carrageenan had no significant effect on HUVEC (normal cells). In contrast both forms of carrageenan were cytotoxic towards HeLa cells (cancer cells). Furthermore, according to cell-cycle analysis with FUCCI cells, the cell cycle of HeLa cells was delayed in specific phases due to different carrageenan treatments. Considering these results, it could be suggested that carrageenan affects the cell-cycle of HeLa cells not only by arresting the cell cycle in specific phases but also by delaying the time needed for the cell to progress through the cell cycle. Additionally, different types of carrageenans have different effects on cell cycle progression. This effect of carrageenan towards cancer cells could possibly be developed into a tumor cell-specific anticancer agent.

  20. The endocannabinoid anandamide impairs in vitro decidualization of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almada, M; Amaral, C; Diniz-da-Costa, M; Correia-da-Silva, G; Teixeira, N A; Fonseca, B M

    2016-10-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are endogenous mediators that along with the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), a membrane transporter and metabolic enzymes form the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Several eCBs have been discovered with emphasis on anandamide (AEA). They are involved in several biological processes such as energy balance, immune response and reproduction. Decidualization occurs during the secretory phase of human menstrual cycle, which involves proliferation and differentiation of endometrial stromal cells into decidual cells and is crucial for the establishment and progression of pregnancy. In this study, a telomerase-immortalized human endometrial stromal cell line (St-T1b) and non-differentiated primary cultures of human decidual fibroblasts from term placenta were used to characterize the ECS using immunoblotting and qRT-PCR techniques. It was shown that St-T1b cells express CB1, but not CB2, and that both receptors are expressed in HdF cells. Furthermore, the expression of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main degrading enzyme of AEA, increased during stromal cell differentiation. AEA inhibited cell proliferation, through deregulation of cell cycle progression and induced polyploidy. Moreover, through CB1 binding receptor, AEA also impaired cell differentiation. Therefore, AEA is proposed as a modulator of human decidualization. Our findings may provide wider implications, as deregulated levels of AEA, due to Cannabis sativa consumption or altered expression of the metabolic enzymes, may negatively regulate human endometrial stromal cell decidualization with an impact on human (in)fertility.Free Portuguese abstract: A Portuguese translation of this abstract is freely available at http://www.reproduction-online.org/content/152/4/351/suppl/DC1. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  1. Corticosteroid Production in H295R Cells During Exposure to 3 Endocrine Disrupters Analyzed With LC-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Christina S; Nielsen, Frederik Knud; Hansen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The adrenocortical human cell line H295R is a valuable tool for screening endocrine disrupting compounds. In general, previous research focus has been on the production of the 2 sex steroids, 17β-estradiol and testosterone, and less attention has been paid to other important steroid end points......295R cell line. The method was applied by studying the effects of 2 model endocrine disrupters, ketoconazole and prochloraz, the pharmaceutical budesonide, and the inducer forskolin on the steroid production in this cell line. Dose-response curves were obtained for the correlation between hormone...... concentrations and the concentration of the individual disruptors. Exposing cells to ketoconazole resulted in a decrease in cortisol and corticosterone concentrations in a dose-dependent manner with EC50 values of 0.24 and 0.40 μmol/L, respectively. The same applied for cells exposed to prochloraz with EC50...

  2. Influenza A virus infection of human Schwann cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joshua; Buchman, Craig A; Fregien, Nevis

    2003-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular neuronitis, vocal fold paralysis and Bell's palsy have been associated with a viral etiology, due to the infection of nerve cells. The goal of this research was to ascertain whether Schwann cells can support infection with human influenza A virus and thereby represent a plausible alternative site for virus-host interaction. Viral infection of Schwann cells may lead to secretion of inflammatory mediators, leukocyte recruitment, demyelination and nerve damage. Cultured human Schwann cells were exposed to human influenza A virus. Infection was assayed at various times post-inoculation (0, 24, 48 and 72 h) using light microscopy, immunocytochemistry and influenza A virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A group of unexposed cells served as controls. Following exposure to the virus, vacuolization, cellular expansion and detachment from the dish were seen as early as 24 h post-inoculation. The exposed cells demonstrated positive immunocytochemical staining for influenza A virus antigen at 24, 48 and 72 h. Using RT-PCR, a sharp rise in influenza A virus-specific mRNA was detected. Human Schwann cells can be infected with human influenza A virus. Further studies will assess the inflammatory response in this model.

  3. NFKB1 regulates human NK cell maturation and effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougaris, Vassilios; Patrizi, Ornella; Baronio, Manuela; Tabellini, Giovanna; Tampella, Giacomo; Damiati, Eufemia; Frede, Natalie; van der Meer, Jos W M; Fliegauf, Manfred; Grimbacher, Bodo; Parolini, Silvia; Plebani, Alessandro

    2017-02-01

    NFKB1, a component of the canonical NF-κB pathway, was recently reported to be mutated in a limited number of CVID patients. CVID-associated mutations in NFKB2 (non-canonical pathway) have previously been shown to impair NK cell cytotoxic activity. Although a biological function of NFKB1 in non-human NK cells has been reported, the role of NFKB1 mutations for human NK cell biology and disease has not been investigated yet. We decided therefore to evaluate the role of monoallelic NFKB1 mutations in human NK cell maturation and functions. We show that NFKB1 mutated NK cells present impaired maturation, defective cytotoxicity and reduced IFN-γ production upon in vitro stimulation. Furthermore, human IL-2 activated NFKB1 mutated NK cells fail to up-regulate the expression of the activating marker NKp44 and show reduced proliferative capacity. These data suggest that NFKB1 plays an essential novel role for human NK cell maturation and effector functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The safety of human pluripotent stem cells in clinical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Oscar E; Domogatskaya, Anna; Volchkov, Pavel; Rodin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have practically unlimited proliferation potential and a capability to differentiate into any cell type in the human body. Since the first derivation in 1998, they have been an attractive source of cells for regenerative medicine. Numerous ethical, technological, and regulatory complications have been hampering hPSC use in clinical applications. Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), parthenogenetic human ESCs, human nuclear transfer ESCs, and induced pluripotent stem cells are four types of hPSCs that are different in many clinically relevant features such as propensity to epigenetic abnormalities, generation methods, and ability for development of autologous cell lines. Propensity to genetic mutations and tumorigenicity are common features of all pluripotent cells that complicate hPSC-based therapies. Several recent advances in methods of derivation, culturing, and monitoring of hPSCs have addressed many ethical concerns and technological challenges in development of clinical-grade hPSC lines. Generation of banks of such lines may be useful to minimize immune rejection of hPSC-derived allografts. In this review, we discuss different sources of hPSCs available at the moment, various safety risks associated with them, and possible solutions for successful use of hPSCs in the clinic. We also discuss ongoing clinical trials of hPSC-based treatments.

  5. Alteration of Cell Cycle Mediated by Zinc in Human Bronchial ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc (Zn2+), a ubiquitous ambient air contaminant, presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung and is linked to adverse human health effects. To further elucidate the adaptive and apoptotic cellular responses of human airway cells to Zn2+, we performed pilot studies to examine cell cycle perturbation upon exposure using a normal human bronchial epithelial cell culture (BEAS-2B). BEAS-2B cells were treated with low (0, 1, 2 µM) and apoptotic (3 µM) doses of Zn2+ plus 1 µM pyrithione, a Zn2+-specific ionophore facilitating cellular uptake, for up to 24 h. Fixed cells were then stained with propidium iodine (PI) and cell cycle phase was determined by fluorescent image cytometry. Initial results report the percentage of cells in the S phase after 18 h exposure to 1, 2, and 3 µM Zn2+ were similar (8%, 7%, and 12%, respectively) compared with 7% in controls. Cells exposed to 3 µM Zn2+ increased cell populations in G2/M phase (76% versus 68% in controls). Interestingly, exposure to 1 µM Zn2+ resulted in decreased (59%) cells in G2/M. While preliminary, these pilot studies suggest Zn2+ alters cell cycle in BEAS-2B cells, particularly in the G2/M phase. The G2/M checkpoint maintains DNA integrity by enabling initiation of DNA repair or apoptosis. Our findings suggest that the adaptive and apoptotic responses to Zn2+ exposure may be mediated via perturbation of the cell cycle at the G2/M checkpoint. This work was a collaborative summer student project. The st

  6. Human tissue legislation in South Africa: Focus on stem cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-04

    Aug 4, 2015 ... under the Human Tissue Act 65 of 1983, which was repealed with the enactment of the final sections of the NHA in 2012.[5]. Chapter 8 of the NHA covers seven areas that are relevant to human tissues. These include: • Blood and blood products. • Assisted reproductive technology. • Cell-based therapy.

  7. Humanizing recombinant glycoproteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Holmgaard; Amann, Thomas; Kol, Stefan

    hamster ovary (CHO) cells are making a very heterogeneous mixture of NGlycans. We speculate that the CHO pattern of N-Glycans would affect half-life and/or efficacy of the glycoprotein in the bloodstream making it unsuitable for human intravenous use, whereas our humanized version would be identical...

  8. DIVERSITY OF ARSENIC METABOLISM IN CULTURED HUMAN CANCER CELL LINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diversity of arsenic metabolism in cultured human cancer cell lines. Arsenic has been known to cause a variety of malignancies in human. Pentavalent As (As 5+) is reduced to trivalent As (As3+) which is further methylated by arsenic methyltransferase(s) to monomethylarson...

  9. Protein dynamics in individual human cells: experiment and theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Aharon Cohen

    Full Text Available A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle-dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell-cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell-cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells.

  10. Hexavalent Chromium Induces Chromosome Instability in Human Urothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie L.; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-01-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of Cr(VI) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer specifically and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer in general. PMID:26908176

  11. A Novel Class of Human Cardiac Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccetti, Tiziano; Leri, Annarosa; Goichberg, Polina; Rota, Marcello; Anversa, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Following the recognition that hematopoietic stem cells improve the outcome of myocardial infarction in animal models, bone marrow mononuclear cells, CD34-positive cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells have been introduced clinically. The intracoronary or intramyocardial injection of these cell classes has been shown to be safe and to produce a modest but significant enhancement in systolic function. However, the identification of resident cardiac stem cells in the human heart (hCSCs) has created great expectation concerning the potential implementation of this category of autologous cells for the management of the human disease. Although phase 1 clinical trials have been conducted with encouraging results, the search for the most powerful hCSC for myocardial regeneration is in its infancy. This manuscript discusses the efforts performed in our laboratory to characterize the critical biological variables that define the growth reserve of hCSCs. Based on the theory of the immortal DNA template, we propose that stem cells retaining the old DNA represent 1 of the most powerful cells for myocardial regeneration. Similarly, the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors in hCSCs recognizes a cell phenotype with superior replicating reserve. However, the impressive recovery in ventricular hemodynamics and anatomy mediated by clonal hCSCs carrying the "mother" DNA underscores the clinical relevance of this hCSC class for the treatment of human heart failure.

  12. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Comparison of the Gene Expression Profiles of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells between Humans and a Humanized Xenograft Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Hideyuki; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yahata, Takashi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2017-04-20

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of NOD/Shi-scid-IL2Rγnull(NOG) mice transplanted with human CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low hematopoietic cells from cord blood (CB) as an experimental model of the gene expression in human hematopoiesis. We compared the gene expressions of human CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low cells from human bone marrow (BM) and in xenograft models. The microarray data revealed that 25 KEGG pathways were extracted from the comparison of human CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low HSCs between CB and BM, and that 17 of them--which were mostly related to cellular survival, RNA metabolism and lymphoid development--were shared with the xenograft model. When the probes that were commonly altered in CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low cells from both human and xenograft BM were analyzed, most of them, including the genes related hypoxia, hematopoietic differentiation, epigenetic modification, translation initiation, and RNA degradation, were downregulated. These alterations of gene expression suggest a reduced differentiation capacity and likely include key alterations of gene expression for settlement of CB CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low cells in BM. Our findings demonstrate that the xenograft model of human CB CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low cells using NOG mice was useful, at least in part, for the evaluation of the gene expression profile of human hematopoietic stem cells.

  14. New Monoclonal Antibodies to Defined Cell Surface Proteins on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Carmel M; Chy, Hun S; Zhou, Qi; Blumenfeld, Shiri; Lambshead, Jack W; Liu, Xiaodong; Kie, Joshua; Capaldo, Bianca D; Chung, Tung-Liang; Adams, Timothy E; Phan, Tram; Bentley, John D; McKinstry, William J; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Rossello, Fernando J; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Chen, Di; Jarde, Thierry; Clark, Amander T; Abud, Helen E; Visvader, Jane E; Nefzger, Christian M; Polo, Jose M; Loring, Jeanne F; Laslett, Andrew L

    2017-03-01

    The study and application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) will be enhanced by the availability of well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) detecting cell-surface epitopes. Here, we report generation of seven new mAbs that detect cell surface proteins present on live and fixed human ES cells (hESCs) and human iPS cells (hiPSCs), confirming our previous prediction that these proteins were present on the cell surface of hPSCs. The mAbs all show a high correlation with POU5F1 (OCT4) expression and other hPSC surface markers (TRA-160 and SSEA-4) in hPSC cultures and detect rare OCT4 positive cells in differentiated cell cultures. These mAbs are immunoreactive to cell surface protein epitopes on both primed and naive state hPSCs, providing useful research tools to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying human pluripotency and states of cellular reprogramming. In addition, we report that subsets of the seven new mAbs are also immunoreactive to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), normal human breast subsets and both normal and tumorigenic colorectal cell populations. The mAbs reported here should accelerate the investigation of the nature of pluripotency, and enable development of robust cell separation and tracing technologies to enrich or deplete for hPSCs and other human stem and somatic cell types. Stem Cells 2017;35:626-640. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. Endogenous collagen influences differentiation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, H.; Mentink, A.; Bank, R.; Stoop, R.; Blitterswijk, C. van; Boer, J. de

    2010-01-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells that, in the presence of appropriate stimuli, can differentiate into different lineages such as the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In the presence of ascorbic acid, MSCs secrete an extracellular matrix

  16. Endogenous Collagen Influences Differentiation of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, H.A.M.; Mentink-Leusink, Anouk; Bank, Ruud; Stoop, Reinout; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells that, in the presence of appropriate stimuli, can differentiate into different lineages such as the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In the presence of ascorbic acid, MSCs secrete an extracellular matrix

  17. Endogenous Collagen Influences Differentiation of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Mentink, Anouk; Bank, Ruud; Stoop, Reinout; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells that, in the presence of appropriate stimuli, can differentiate into different lineages such as the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In the presence of ascorbic acid, MSCs secrete an extracellular matrix

  18. In vitro radiosensitivity of human leukemia cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Greenberger, J.S.; Schmidt, A.; Karpas, A.; Moloney, W.C.; Little, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    The in vitro radiobiologic survival values (anti n, D/sub 0/) of four tumor lines derived from human hematopoietic tumors were studied. These cell lines were HL60 promyelocytic leukemia; K562 erythroleukemia; 45 acute lymphocytic leukemia; and 176 acute monomyelogenous leukemia. More cell lines must be examined before the exact relationship between in vitro radiosensitivity and clinical radiocurability is firmly established.

  19. Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung cancer cells. Jie Huang, Fa-jiu Li, Shi Chen, Yi Shi, Xiao-jiang Wang, Chuan-hai Wang, Qing- ..... method for the determination of green and black tea polyphenols in biomatrices by high-performance liquid chromatography with coulometric array detection.

  20. Phosphorylation dynamics during early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hoof, Dennis; Muñoz, Javier; Braam, Stefan R

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells self-renew indefinitely and possess characteristic protein-protein networks that remodel during differentiation. How this occurs is poorly understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we analyzed the (phospho)proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) during...

  1. Wnt signaling inhibits osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan; Siddappa, R.; Gaspar, Claudia; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Fodde, Riccardo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2004-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) from the bone marrow represent a potential source of pluripotent cells for autologous bone tissue engineering. We previously discovered that over activation of the Wnt signal transduction pathway by either lithium or Wnt3A stimulates hMSC proliferation while

  2. Phosphorylation dynamics during early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, D.; Munoz, J.; Braam, S.R.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Linding, R.; Heck, A.J.R.; Mummery, C.L.; Krijgsveld, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells self-renew indefinitely and possess characteristic protein-protein networks that remodel during differentiation. How this occurs is poorly understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we analyzed the (phospho)proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) during

  3. Improved genetic manipulation of human embryonic stem cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, S.R.; Denning, C.; van den Brink, S.; Kats, P.; Hochstenbach, R.; Passier, R.; Mummery, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    Low efficiency of transfection limits the ability to genetically manipulate human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and differences in cell derivation and culture methods require optimization of transfection protocols. We transiently transferred multiple independent hESC lines with different growth

  4. Tangeretin sensitises human lung cancer cells to TRAIL- induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. (H1299 and H1975). Methods: ... Western blotting was performed to assess the expression of death receptors, apoptosis pathway proteins, JNK and ERK1/2. ...... upregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. World J.

  5. (Ezh2) Enhancement in Human Esophageal Cell Lines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the inhibitory effect of berberine treatment on enhancement of zeste of homolog 2 (Ezh2) expressions in KYSE450 human esophageal cancer cells. Methods: Transwell motility chambers were used to analyze cell migration and invasion. Bio-Rad protein assay was used for the determination of ...

  6. Human Pluripotent Stem Cells to Engineer Blood Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Xin Yi; Elliott, Morgan B; Macklin, Bria; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-11-01

    Development of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is a remarkable scientific advancement that allows scientists to harness the power of regenerative medicine for potential treatment of disease using unaffected cells. PSCs provide a unique opportunity to study and combat cardiovascular diseases, which continue to claim the lives of thousands each day. Here, we discuss the differentiation of PSCs into vascular cells, investigation of the functional capabilities of the derived cells, and their utilization to engineer microvascular beds or vascular grafts for clinical application. Graphical Abstract Human iPSCs generated from patients are differentiated toward ECs and perivascular cells for use in disease modeling, microvascular bed development, or vascular graft fabrication.

  7. Renal cell apoptosis in human lupus nephritis: a histological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, M; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, C B

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear autoantigens from apoptotic cells are believed to drive the immunological response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Conflicting data exist as to the possible renal origin of apoptotic cells in SLE patients with nephritis. We assessed the level of renal cell apoptosis in kidney...... biopsies from 35 patients with lupus nephritis by means of terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL). Five samples of normal kidney tissue served as control specimens. We did not observe apoptotic glomerular cells in any...... cells constitute a quantitatively important source of auto-antibody-inducing nuclear auto-antigens in human lupus nephritis....

  8. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Xuejiang [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Hu, Jiayue [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai, Jiayin, E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Differential expression of proteins induced by PFOA in HL-7702 was identified. • Most of the differentially expressed proteins are related to cell proliferation. • A low dose of PFOA stimulates HL-7702 cell proliferation. • A high dose of PFOA inhibits HL-7702 cell proliferation. - Abstract: Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOA for 48 h and 96 h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50–100 μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200–400 μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure.

  9. Growth in Agarose of Human Cells Infected with Cytomegalovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, David J.; Montagnier, Luc; Latarjet, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    After infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV), human diploid fibroblasts could grow in agarose medium for several generations. Clones of infected cells grew for weeks, although in every case they ultimately underwent lysis owing to the cytopathic effect of the virus. Virus was inoculated at high dilution and after UV irradiation in an effort to derive cells infected with noninfectious defective particles still capable of inducing cell stimulation. Dilute or irradiated virus occasionally yielded large colonies of replicating cells, although permanent transformation was not observed. One clone derived from UV-CMV-infected cells was passaged four times before undergoing lysis. During these passages the cells exhibited alterations in morphology and orientation. Images PMID:4367907

  10. Long-term maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells by automated cell culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konagaya, Shuhei; Ando, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Suemori, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-11-17

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are regarded as new sources for cell replacement therapy. These cells can unlimitedly expand under undifferentiated conditions and be differentiated into multiple cell types. Automated culture systems enable the large-scale production of cells. In addition to reducing the time and effort of researchers, an automated culture system improves the reproducibility of cell cultures. In the present study, we newly designed a fully automated cell culture system for human iPS maintenance. Using an automated culture system, hiPS cells maintained their undifferentiated state for 60 days. Automatically prepared hiPS cells had a potency of differentiation into three germ layer cells including dopaminergic neurons and pancreatic cells.

  11. Identification and quantitation of morphological cell types in electrophoretically separated human embryonic kidney cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K. B.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Four major cell types were identified by phase microscopy in early passage human embryonic kidney cell cultures. They are small and large epithelioid, domed, and fenestrated cells. Fibroblasts are also present in some explants. The percent of each cell type changes with passage number as any given culture grows. As a general rule, the fraction of small epithelioid cells increases, while the fraction of fenestrated cells, always small, decreases further. When fibroblasts are present, they always increase in percentage of the total cell population. Electrophoretic separation of early passage cells showed that the domed cells have the highest electrophoretic mobility, fibroblasts have an intermediate high mobility, small epithelioid cells have a low mobility, broadly distributed, and fenestrated cells have the lowest mobility. All cell types were broadly distributed among electrophoretic subfractions, which were never pure but only enriched with respect to a given cell type.

  12. Generating a non-integrating human induced pluripotent stem cell bank from urine-derived cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanting Xue

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS cell holds great potential for applications in regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and disease modeling. We describe here a practical method to generate human iPS cells from urine-derived cells (UCs under feeder-free, virus-free, serum-free condition and without oncogene c-MYC. We showed that this approach could be applied in a large population with different genetic backgrounds. UCs are easily accessible and exhibit high reprogramming efficiency, offering advantages over other cell types used for the purpose of iPS generation. Using the approach described in this study, we have generated 93 iPS cell lines from 20 donors with diverse genetic backgrounds. The non-viral iPS cell bank with these cell lines provides a valuable resource for iPS cells research, facilitating future applications of human iPS cells.

  13. Purified Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Promote Osteogenic Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, T; Mabuchi, Y; Toriumi, H; Ebine, T; Niibe, K; Houlihan, D D; Morikawa, S; Onizawa, K; Kawana, H; Akazawa, C; Suzuki, N; Nakagawa, T; Okano, H; Matsuzaki, Y

    2016-02-01

    Human dental pulp stem/progenitor cells (hDPSCs) are attractive candidates for regenerative therapy because they can be easily expanded to generate colony-forming unit-fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) on plastic and the large cell numbers required for transplantation. However, isolation based on adherence to plastic inevitably changes the surface marker expression and biological properties of the cells. Consequently, little is currently known about the original phenotypes of tissue precursor cells that give rise to plastic-adherent CFU-Fs. To better understand the in vivo functions and translational therapeutic potential of hDPSCs and other stem cells, selective cell markers must be identified in the progenitor cells. Here, we identified a dental pulp tissue-specific cell population based on the expression profiles of 2 cell-surface markers LNGFR (CD271) and THY-1 (CD90). Prospectively isolated, dental pulp-derived LNGFR(Low+)THY-1(High+) cells represent a highly enriched population of clonogenic cells--notably, the isolated cells exhibited long-term proliferation and multilineage differentiation potential in vitro. The cells also expressed known mesenchymal cell markers and promoted new bone formation to heal critical-size calvarial defects in vivo. These findings suggest that LNGFR(Low+)THY-1(High+) dental pulp-derived cells provide an excellent source of material for bone regenerative strategies. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  14. Optimized DNA electroporation for primary human T cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Qiu, Shunfang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Wei

    2018-01-30

    Effective gene-delivery systems for primary human T cell engineering are useful tools for both basic research and clinical immunotherapy applications. Pseudovirus-based systems and electro-transfection are the most popular strategies for genetic material transduction. Compared with viral-particle-mediated approaches, electro-transfection is theoretically safer, because it does not promote transgene integration into the host genome. Additionally, the simplicity and speed of the procedure increases the attractiveness of electroporation. Here, we developed and optimized an electro-transfection method for the production of engineered chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells. Stimulation of T cells had the greatest effect on their transfection, with stimulation of cells for up to 3 days substantially improving transfection efficiency. Additionally, the strength of the external electric field, input cell number, and the initial amount of DNA significantly affected transfection performance. The voltage applied during electroporation affected plasmid permeation and was negatively correlated with the number of viable cells after electroporation. Moreover, higher plasmid concentration increased the proportion of positively transfected cells, but decreased cell viability, and for single-activated cells, higher cell density enhanced their viability. We evaluated the effects of two clinically relevant factors, serum supplementation in the culture medium and cryopreservation immediately after the isolation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Our findings showed that our protocol performed well using xeno-free cultured, fresh T cells, with application resulting in a lower but acceptable transfection efficiency of cells cultured with fetal bovine serum or thawed cells. Furthermore, we described an optimized procedure to generate CAR-T cells within 6 days and that exhibited cytotoxicity toward targeted cells. Our investigation of DNA electro-transfection for the use in human primary

  15. DNA Repair in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Is Distinct from That in Non-Pluripotent Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li Z.; Park, Sang-Won; Bates, Steven E.; Zeng, Xianmin; Iverson, Linda E.; O'Connor, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for human disease treatment using human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), also carries the risk of added genomic instability. Genomic instability is most often linked to DNA repair deficiencies, which indicates that screening/characterization of possible repair deficiencies in pluripotent human stem cells should be a necessary step prior to their clinical and research use. In this study, a comparison of DNA repair pathways in pluripotent cells, as compared to those in non-pluripotent cells, demonstrated that DNA repair capacities of pluripotent cell lines were more heterogeneous than those of differentiated lines examined and were generally greater. Although pluripotent cells had high DNA repair capacities for nucleotide excision repair, we show that ultraviolet radiation at low fluxes induced an apoptotic response in these cells, while differentiated cells lacked response to this stimulus, and note that pluripotent cells had a similar apoptotic response to alkylating agent damage. This sensitivity of pluripotent cells to damage is notable since viable pluripotent cells exhibit less ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage than do differentiated cells that receive the same flux. In addition, the importance of screening pluripotent cells for DNA repair defects was highlighted by an iPSC line that demonstrated a normal spectral karyotype, but showed both microsatellite instability and reduced DNA repair capacities in three out of four DNA repair pathways examined. Together, these results demonstrate a need to evaluate DNA repair capacities in pluripotent cell lines, in order to characterize their genomic stability, prior to their pre-clinical and clinical use. PMID:22412831

  16. Human Blood Cell Sensing with Platinum Black Electroplated Impedance Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Siyang; Nandra, Mandheerej S.; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2007-01-01

    AC impedance sensing is an important method for biological cell analysis in flow cytometry. For micro impedance cell sensors, downsizing electrodes increases the double layer impedance of the metal-electrolyte interface, thus leaves no sensing zone in frequency domain and reduces the sensitivity significantly. We proposed using platinum black electroplated electrodes to solve the problem. In this paper, using this technique we demonstrated human blood cell sensing with high signal to noise ra...

  17. Property Of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells And Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cells That Differentiated Both Group To Cardiac Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jabari F; Mohammadnejad J; Yavari K

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is the soft live tissue inside a tooth. Dental pulp contains stem cells, known as Dental Pulp Stem Cells. The finest Dental Pulp Stem Cells are found in a baby teeth or milk teeth. The stem cells from the milk teeth are ‘mesenchymal’ type of cells. cells that have the ability to generate a wide variety of cell types like chondrocytes, osteoblasts and adipocytes. To isolate high-quality human dental pulp stem cells from accessible resources is an important goal for stem-cell resear...

  18. Gut microbiota modulate T cell trafficking into human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, Eleonora; Governa, Valeria; Garzon, Jesus Francisco Glaus; Mele, Valentina; Amicarella, Francesca; Muraro, Manuele Giuseppe; Trella, Emanuele; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Oertli, Daniel; Däster, Silvio Raffael; Droeser, Raoul A; Weixler, Benjamin; Bolli, Martin; Rosso, Raffaele; Nitsche, Ulrich; Khanna, Nina; Egli, Adrian; Keck, Simone; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Terracciano, Luigi M; Zajac, Paul; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Borsig, Lubor; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2018-02-06

    Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) favour survival in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Chemotactic factors underlying their recruitment remain undefined. We investigated chemokines attracting T cells into human CRCs, their cellular sources and microenvironmental triggers. Expression of genes encoding immune cell markers, chemokines and bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (16SrRNA) was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in fresh CRC samples and corresponding tumour-free tissues. Chemokine receptor expression on TILs was evaluated by flow cytometry on cell suspensions from digested tissues. Chemokine production by CRC cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo, on generation of intraperitoneal or intracecal tumour xenografts in immune-deficient mice. T cell trafficking was assessed on adoptive transfer of human TILs into tumour-bearing mice. Gut flora composition was analysed by 16SrRNA sequencing. CRC infiltration by distinct T cell subsets was associated with defined chemokine gene signatures, including CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10 for cytotoxic T lymphocytes and T-helper (Th)1 cells; CCL17, CCL22 and CXCL12 for Th1 and regulatory T cells; CXCL13 for follicular Th cells; and CCL20 and CCL17 for interleukin (IL)-17-producing Th cells. These chemokines were expressed by tumour cells on exposure to gut bacteria in vitro and in vivo. Their expression was significantly higher in intracecal than in intraperitoneal xenografts and was dramatically reduced by antibiotic treatment of tumour-bearing mice. In clinical samples, abundance of defined bacteria correlated with high chemokine expression, enhanced T cell infiltration and improved survival. Gut microbiota stimulate chemokine production by CRC cells, thus favouring recruitment of beneficial T cells into tumour tissues. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. CD34-positive interstitial cells of the human detrusor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle; Hansen, Alastair; Smedts, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are well described in the bowel wall. They are c-kit positive and play a role as pacemaker cells. Similar c-kit-positive cells have recently been described in the human bladder. The aim of this study was to characterize interstitial cells of the bladder detrusor...... using a panel of antibodies directed against CD117/c-kit, CD34, CD31, S100, tryptase, neurofilament, NSE, Factor-VIII and GFAP. A striking finding was an interstitial type of cell which is CD34 immunoreactive (CD34-ir) but CD117/c-kit negative. The cells have a tentacular morphology, enveloping...... and intermingling with individual muscle fasicles. Morphologically and immunohistochemically, they show no neurogenic, endothelial or mast cell differentiation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the presence of interstitial cells with a round-to-oval nucleus, sparse perinuclear cytoplasm and long...

  20. Vulnerability of Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells to Oncogenic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    escape senescence and acquire genomic changes. Nature 2001;409:633–7. 10. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR. Raf-1- induced growth arrest in...p16INK4a. Cell 88:593–602. 10. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR (2002) Raf-1-induced growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells is p16...Cycle 3, 244–246. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR (2002) Raf-1-induced growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells is p16-independent and

  1. Human thymic epithelial cells express functional HLA-DP molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Röpke, C; Nielsen, M

    1996-01-01

    T lymphocytes, we examined whether human thymic epithelial cells (TEC) expressed HLA-DP molecules. We present evidence that TEC obtained from short time culture express low but significant levels of HLA-DP molecules. The expression of HLA-DP molecules was comparable to or higher than the expression...... of HLA-DP allospecific primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) CD4 T cell lines. IFN-gamma treatment strongly upregulated the HLA-DP allospecific PLT responses whereas other PLT responses remained largely unchanged. In conclusion, these data indicate that human thymus epithelial cells express significant levels...

  2. [Development of human embryonic stem cell platforms for human health-safety evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guang-yan; Cao, Tong; Zou, Xiao-hui; Zhang, Xue-hui; Fu, Xin; Peng, Shuang-qing; Deng, Xu-liang; Li, Sheng-lin; Liu, He; Xiao, Ran; Ouyang, Hong-wei; Peng, Hui; Chen, Xiao; Zhao, Zeng-ming; Wang, Xiao-ying; Fang, Hai-qin; Lu, Lu; Ren, Yu-lan; Xu, Ming-ming

    2016-02-18

    The human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) serve as a self-renewable, genetically-healthy, pluripotent and single source of all body cells, tissues and organs. Therefore, it is considered as the good standard for all human stem cells by US, Europe and international authorities. In this study, the standard and healthy human mesenchymal progenitors, ligament tissues, cardiomyocytes, keratinocytes, primary neurons, fibroblasts, and salivary serous cells were differentiated from hESCs. The human cellular health-safety of NaF, retinoic acid, 5-fluorouracil, dexamethasone, penicillin G, adriamycin, lead acetate PbAc, bisphenol A-biglycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA) were evaluated selectively on the standardized platforms of hESCs, hESCs-derived cardiomyocytes, keratinocytes, primary neurons, and fibroblasts. The evaluations were compared with those on the currently most adopted cellular platforms. Particularly, the sensitivity difference of PM2.5 toxicity on standardized and healthy hESCs derived fibroblasts, currently adopted immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells Beas-2B and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were evaluated. The RESULTS showed that the standardized hESCs cellular platforms provided more sensitivity and accuracy for human cellular health-safety evaluation.

  3. Yeast cell-based analysis of human lactate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Lulu Ahmed; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has attracted attention as a potential target for cancer therapy and contraception. In this study, we reconstituted human lactic acid fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the goal of constructing a yeast cell-based LDH assay system. pdc null mutant yeast (mutated in the endogenous pyruvate decarboxylase genes) are unable to perform alcoholic fermentation; when grown in the presence of an electron transport chain inhibitor, pdc null strains exhibit a growth defect. We found that introduction of the human gene encoding LDHA complemented the pdc growth defect; this complementation depended on LDHA catalytic activity. Similarly, introduction of the human LDHC complemented the pdc growth defect, even though LDHC did not generate lactate at the levels seen with LDHA. In contrast, the human LDHB did not complement the yeast pdc null mutant, although LDHB did generate lactate in yeast cells. Expression of LDHB as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusion yielded blebs in yeast, whereas LDHA-RFP and LDHC-RFP fusion proteins exhibited cytosolic distribution. Thus, LDHB exhibits several unique features when expressed in yeast cells. Because yeast cells are amenable to genetic analysis and cell-based high-throughput screening, our pdc/LDH strains are expected to be of use for versatile analyses of human LDH. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Cytokine activation induces human memory-like NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romee, Rizwan; Schneider, Stephanie E; Leong, Jeffrey W; Chase, Julie M; Keppel, Catherine R; Sullivan, Ryan P; Cooper, Megan A; Fehniger, Todd A

    2012-12-06

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that play an important role in the immune response to infection and malignancy. Recent studies in mice have shown that stimulation of NK cells with cytokines or in the context of a viral infection results in memory-like properties. We hypothesized that human NK cells exhibit such memory-like properties with an enhanced recall response after cytokine preactivation. In the present study, we show that human NK cells preactivated briefly with cytokine combinations including IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 followed by a 7- to 21-day rest have enhanced IFN-γ production after restimulation with IL-12 + IL-15, IL-12 + IL-18, or K562 leukemia cells. This memory-like phenotype was retained in proliferating NK cells. In CD56(dim) NK cells, the memory-like IFN-γ response was correlated with the expression of CD94, NKG2A, NKG2C, and CD69 and a lack of CD57 and KIR. Therefore, human NK cells have functional memory-like properties after cytokine activation, which provides a novel rationale for integrating preactivation with combinations of IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 into NK cell immunotherapy strategies.

  5. Subpopulations of stem-like cells in side population cells from the human bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Z-F; Huang, Y-J; Lin, T-X; Zhou, Y-X; Jiang, C; Xu, K-W; Huang, H; Yin, X-B; Huang, J

    2009-01-01

    Cancer stem cells can be isolated from human tumours using specific cell surface markers. Bladder cancer cells, however, lack specific cell surface markers, making this approach impracticable. In this study an alternative method was used, involving isolation of side population cells to explore the stem cell characteristics of bladder cancer. Side population cells were isolated from the bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24 and examined for potential stem cell characteristics related to proliferation, cell cycle distribution, self-renewal and differentiation. It was observed that T24 side population cells have stronger proliferative and colony formation abilities than non-side population cells. Side population cells were also more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which may be due to expression of the ATP-binding cassette half-transporter, sub-family G, member 2 protein. Overall, the results suggest that side population cells from the human bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24 harbour stem-like cells.

  6. Probing Human NK Cell Biology Using Human Immune System (HIS) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Di Santo, James P

    2016-01-01

    Our incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that orchestrate human lymphocyte differentiation and condition human immune responses is in part due to the limited access to normal human tissue samples that can inform on these complex processes. In addition, in vitro culture conditions fail to recapitulate the three-dimensional microenvironments that influence cell-cell interactions and impact on immune outcomes. Small animals provide a preclinical model to dissect and probe immunity and over the past decades, development of immunodeficient hosts that can be engrafted with human hematopoietic precursors and mature cells have led to the development of new in vivo models to study human lymphocyte development and function. Natural killer (NK) cells are implicated in the recognition and elimination of pathogen-infected and transformed cells and belong to a family of diverse innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) that provide early immune defense against disease. Here, we summarize the use of humanized mouse models for the study of NK cell and group 1 ILCs and their respective roles in immunity and tissue homeostasis.

  7. Fraction against Human Cancer Cell Lines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-proliferative and apoptotic activity of crude and dichloromethane fraction of A. sieberi against seven cancer cell lines (Colo20, HCT116, DLD, MCF7, Jurkat, HepG2 and. L929). Methods: A. sieberi was extracted with methanol and further purification was carried out using liquid-.

  8. Genetic Expeditions with Haploid Human Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jae, L.T.

    2015-01-01

    Random mutagenesis followed by phenotypic selection (forward genetics) is among the most powerful tools to elucidate the molecular basis of intricate biological processes and has been used in a suite of model organisms throughout the last century. However, its application to cultured mammalian cells

  9. Epigenetic Classification of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Candido de Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Standardization of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs is hampered by the lack of a precise definition for these cell preparations; for example, there are no molecular markers to discern MSCs and fibroblasts. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that specific DNA methylation (DNAm patterns can assist classification of MSCs. We utilized 190 DNAm profiles to address the impact of tissue of origin, donor age, replicative senescence, and serum supplements on the epigenetic makeup. Based on this, we elaborated a simple epigenetic signature based on two CpG sites to classify MSCs and fibroblasts, referred to as the Epi-MSC-Score. Another two-CpG signature can distinguish between MSCs from bone marrow and adipose tissue, referred to as the Epi-Tissue-Score. These assays were validated by site-specific pyrosequencing analysis in 34 primary cell preparations. Furthermore, even individual subclones of MSCs were correctly classified by our epigenetic signatures. In summary, we propose an alternative concept to use DNAm patterns for molecular definition of cell preparations, and our epigenetic scores facilitate robust and cost-effective quality control of MSC cultures.

  10. Vascular potential of human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death and disability in the US. Understanding the biological activity of stem and progenitor cells, and their ability to contribute to the repair, regeneration and remodeling of the heart and blood vessels affected by pathological processes is an ess...

  11. Epitope tagging of endogenous genes in diverse human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Sik; Bonifant, Challice; Bunz, Fred; Lane, William S; Waldman, Todd

    2008-11-01

    Epitope tagging is a powerful and commonly used approach for studying the physical properties of proteins and their functions and localization in eukaryotic cells. In the case of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it has been possible to exploit the high efficiency of homologous recombination to tag proteins by modifying their endogenous genes, making it possible to tag virtually every endogenous gene and perform genome-wide proteomics experiments. However, due to the relative inefficiency of homologous recombination in cultured human cells, epitope-tagging approaches have been limited to ectopically expressed transgenes, with the attendant limitations of their nonphysiological transcriptional regulation and levels of expression. To overcome this limitation, a modification and extension of adeno-associated virus-mediated human somatic cell gene targeting technology is described that makes it possible to simply and easily create an endogenous epitope tag in the same way that it is possible to knock out a gene. Using this approach, we have created and validated human cell lines with epitope-tagged alleles of two cancer-related genes in a variety of untransformed and transformed human cell lines. This straightforward approach makes it possible to study the physical and biological properties of endogenous proteins in human cells without the need for specialized antibodies for individual proteins of interest.

  12. French legal framework relating to human tissues and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, P; Damour, O; Colpart, J J; Braye, F

    2000-03-01

    Thousands of patients receive human tissue grafts every year. Developments in cell and tissue engineering have also increased considerably the number of available products of human origin. France has very strict regulations, in part stimulated by problems of public health and ethics that have emerged in recent years and also in part as a result of a report by the 'Inspection Générale des Affaires Sociales' on the removal and grafting of human tissues in May 1993. These have resulted in two laws on bio-ethics being passed, in July 1994, that are the basis of current legislation and represent the first steps in differentiating between organs and tissues or cells. Henceforth, the French legal framework covering tissues and cells of human origin has been increased to include a large number of legislative texts and regulations. The fundamental ethical principles that are consent, free donation, anonymity, no publicity and respect for public health have become a major ethical imperative that applies to all products originating from the human body including tissue and cells. In addition, specific provisions have been made covering: removal (conditions for removal and system for authorization); conservation, transformation, distribution, packaging, import and export of tissues and cells; and tissue and cell grafts. Finally, penal and administrative sanctions have been foreseen where there is non-compliance with these regulations.

  13. Transcriptome coexpression map of human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattson Mark P

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human embryonic stem (ES cells hold great promise for medicine and science. The transcriptome of human ES cells has been studied in detail in recent years. However, no systematic analysis has yet addressed whether gene expression in human ES cells may be regulated in chromosomal domains, and no chromosomal domains of coexpression have been identified. Results We report the first transcriptome coexpression map of the human ES cell and the earliest stage of ES differentiation, the embryoid body (EB, for the analysis of how transcriptional regulation interacts with genomic structure during ES self-renewal and differentiation. We determined the gene expression profiles from multiple ES and EB samples and identified chromosomal domains showing coexpression of adjacent genes on the genome. The coexpression domains were not random, with significant enrichment in chromosomes 8, 11, 16, 17, 19, and Y in the ES state, and 6, 11, 17, 19 and 20 in the EB state. The domains were significantly associated with Giemsa-negative bands in EB, yet showed little correlation with known cytogenetic structures in ES cells. Different patterns of coexpression were revealed by comparative transcriptome mapping between ES and EB. Conclusion The findings and methods reported in this investigation advance our understanding of how genome organization affects gene expression in human ES cells and help to identify new mechanisms and pathways controlling ES self-renewal or differentiation.

  14. Human platelet lysate: Replacing fetal bovine serum as a gold standard for human cell propagation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnouf, Thierry; Strunk, Dirk; Koh, Mickey B C; Schallmoser, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The essential physiological role of platelets in wound healing and tissue repair builds the rationale for the use of human platelet derivatives in regenerative medicine. Abundant growth factors and cytokines stored in platelet granules can be naturally released by thrombin activation and clotting or artificially by freeze/thaw-mediated platelet lysis, sonication or chemical treatment. Human platelet lysate prepared by the various release strategies has been established as a suitable alternative to fetal bovine serum as culture medium supplement, enabling efficient propagation of human cells under animal serum-free conditions for a multiplicity of applications in advanced somatic cell therapy and tissue engineering. The rapidly increasing number of studies using platelet derived products for inducing human cell proliferation and differentiation has also uncovered a considerable variability of human platelet lysate preparations which limits comparability of results. The main variations discussed herein encompass aspects of donor selection, preparation of the starting material, the possibility for pooling in plasma or additive solution, the implementation of pathogen inactivation and consideration of ABO blood groups, all of which can influence applicability. This review outlines the current knowledge about human platelet lysate as a powerful additive for human cell propagation and highlights its role as a prevailing supplement for human cell culture capable to replace animal serum in a growing spectrum of applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The ethics of patenting human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Audrey R

    2009-09-01

    Just as human embryonic stem cell research has generated controversy about the uses of human embryos for research and therapeutic applications, human embryonic stem cell patents raise fundamental ethical issues. The United States Patent and Trademark Office has granted foundational patents, including a composition of matter (or product) patent to the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), the University of Wisconsin-Madison's intellectual property office. In contrast, the European Patent Office rejected the same WARF patent application for ethical reasons. This article assesses the appropriateness of these patents placing the discussion in the context of the deontological and consequentialist ethical issues related to human embryonic stem cell patenting. It advocates for a patent system that explicitly takes ethical factors into account and explores options for new types of intellectual property arrangements consistent with ethical concerns.

  16. Human pluripotent stem cells: an emerging model in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zengrong; Huangfu, Danwei

    2013-02-01

    Developmental biology has long benefited from studies of classic model organisms. Recently, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, have emerged as a new model system that offers unique advantages for developmental studies. Here, we discuss how studies of hPSCs can complement classic approaches using model organisms, and how hPSCs can be used to recapitulate aspects of human embryonic development 'in a dish'. We also summarize some of the recently developed genetic tools that greatly facilitate the interrogation of gene function during hPSC differentiation. With the development of high-throughput screening technologies, hPSCs have the potential to revolutionize gene discovery in mammalian development.

  17. Generation of neuropeptidergic hypothalamic neurons from human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Florian T.; Maroof, Asif; Wataya, Takafumi; Sasai, Yoshiki; Studer, Lorenz; Eggan, Kevin; Schier, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons orchestrate many essential physiological and behavioral processes via secreted neuropeptides, and are relevant to human diseases such as obesity, narcolepsy and infertility. We report the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into many of the major types of neuropeptidergic hypothalamic neurons, including those producing pro-opiolemelanocortin, agouti-related peptide, hypocretin/orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone, oxytocin, arginine vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) or thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Hypothalamic neurons can be generated using a ‘self-patterning’ strategy that yields a broad array of cell types, or via a more reproducible directed differentiation approach. Stem cell-derived human hypothalamic neurons share characteristic morphological properties and gene expression patterns with their counterparts in vivo, and are able to integrate into the mouse brain. These neurons could form the basis of cellular models, chemical screens or cellular therapies to study and treat common human diseases. PMID:25670790

  18. Exclusive destruction of mitotic spindles in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visochek, Leonid; Castiel, Asher; Mittelman, Leonid; Elkin, Michael; Atias, Dikla; Golan, Talia; Izraeli, Shai; Peretz, Tamar; Cohen-Armon, Malka

    2017-03-28

    We identified target proteins modified by phenanthrenes that cause exclusive eradication of human cancer cells. The cytotoxic activity of the phenanthrenes in a variety of human cancer cells is attributed by these findings to post translational modifications of NuMA and kinesins HSET/kifC1 and kif18A. Their activity prevented the binding of NuMA to α-tubulin and kinesins in human cancer cells, and caused aberrant spindles. The most efficient cytotoxic activity of the phenanthridine PJ34, caused significantly smaller aberrant spindles with disrupted spindle poles and scattered extra-centrosomes and chromosomes. Concomitantly, PJ34 induced tumor growth arrest of human malignant tumors developed in athymic nude mice, indicating the relevance of its activity for cancer therapy.

  19. Gene expression signatures of human cell and tissue longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Ma, Siming; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types within the body exhibit substantial variation in the average time they live, ranging from days to the lifetime of the organism. The underlying mechanisms governing the diverse lifespan of different cell types are not well understood. To examine gene expression strategies that support the lifespan of different cell types within the human body, we obtained publicly available RNA-seq data sets and interrogated transcriptomes of 21 somatic cell types and tissues with reported cellular turnover, a bona fide estimate of lifespan, ranging from 2 days (monocytes) to a lifetime (neurons). Exceptionally long-lived neurons presented a gene expression profile of reduced protein metabolism, consistent with neuronal survival and similar to expression patterns induced by longevity interventions such as dietary restriction. Across different cell lineages, we identified a gene expression signature of human cell and tissue turnover. In particular, turnover showed a negative correlation with the energetically costly cell cycle and factors supporting genome stability, concomitant risk factors for aging-associated pathologies. In addition, the expression of p53 was negatively correlated with cellular turnover, suggesting that low p53 activity supports the longevity of post-mitotic cells with inherently low risk of developing cancer. Our results demonstrate the utility of comparative approaches in unveiling gene expression differences among cell lineages with diverse cell turnover within the same organism, providing insights into mechanisms that could regulate cell longevity.

  20. Telmisartan inhibits human urological cancer cell growth through early apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUYAMA, MASAHIDE; FUNAO, KIYOAKI; KURATSUKURI, KATSUYUKI; TANAKA, TOMOAKI; KAWAHITO, YUTAKA; SANO, HAJIME; CHARGUI, JAMEL; TOURAINE, JEAN-LOUIS; YOSHIMURA, NORIO; YOSHIMURA, RIKIO

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are widely used as hypertensive therapeutic agents. In addition, studies have provided evidence that ARBs have the potential to inhibit the growth of several types of cancer cells. It was reported that telmisartan (a type of ARB) has peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ activation activity. We previously reported that the PPAR-γ ligand induces growth arrest in human urological cancer cells through apoptosis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of telmisartan and other ARBs on cell proliferation in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer (BC), prostate cancer (PC) and testicular cancer (TC) cell lines. The inhibitory effects of telmisartan and other ARBs (candesartan, valsartan, irbesartan and losartan) on the growth of the RCC, BC, PC and TC cell lines was investigated using an MTT assay. Flow cytometry and Hoechst staining were used to determine whether the ARBs induced apoptosis. Telmisartan caused marked growth inhibition in the urological cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Urological cancer cells treated with 100 μM telmisartan underwent early apoptosis and DNA fragmentation. However, the other ARBs had no effect on cell proliferation in any of the urological cancer cell lines. Telmisartan may mediate potent anti-proliferative effects in urological cancer cells through PPAR-γ. Thus, telmisartan is a potent target for the prevention and treatment of human urological cancer. PMID:22993542

  1. Comparison of Human T Cell Repertoire Generated in Xenogeneic Porcine and Human Thymus Grafts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ichiro; Fudaba, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Akira; Yang, Yong-Guang; Sykes, Megan

    2009-01-01

    Background Xenogeneic thymus transplantation is an effective approach to achieving T cell tolerance across highly disparate xenogeneic species barriers. We have previously demonstrated that phenotypically normal, specifically tolerant human T cells are generated in porcine thymic grafts. In this study, we assessed the diversity of the human T cell repertoire generated in porcine thymic xenografts. We also examined the ability of porcine thymus grafts to coexist with human thymus grafts. Methods Fetal swine (SW) or human (HU) thymus with human fetal liver (FL) fragments were transplanted under the kidney capsule of 3Gy irradiated NOD/SCID mouse recipients. Thymus tissue was harvested approximately 16 weeks post-transplant for analysis of mixed lymphocyte reactions and spectratyping of human CD4 and CD8 single positive (SP) thymocytes. Results TCR β genes of human CD4 and CD8 SP cells developing in HU and SW thymus grafts showed similar, normal CDR3 length distributions. Human T cells developing in SW thymus grafts showed specific unresponsiveness to the MHC of the donor swine, in MLR assays. In 2 of 3 animals receiving SW and HU thymus grafts under opposite kidney capsules, both grafts functioned. In animals with surviving SW grafts, thymocytes from the SW but not the HU grafts showed specific unresponsiveness to the SW donor. Conclusion SW thymus grafts support generation of human T cells with a diverse TCR repertoire. Human thymocytes in human thymus grafts are not tolerized by the presence of an additional porcine thymus, but tolerance might be achieved by post-thymic encounter with porcine antigens. PMID:18724231

  2. Alteration of Cell Cycle Mediated by Zinc in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc (Zn2+), a ubiquitous ambient air contaminant, presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung and is linked to adverse human health effects. To further elucidate the adaptive and apoptotic cellular responses of human airway cells to Zn2+, we performed pilot studies to examin...

  3. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Erika

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p 6 cells, and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to SP (5 μM further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD pathogenesis.

  4. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Aharon G.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34+CD45RA+ hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field. PMID:24661538

  5. Mutation of human cells by kerosene soot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skopek, T.R. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA); Liber, H.L.; Kaden, D.A.; Hites, R.A.; Thilly, W.G.

    1979-08-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fraction of a kerosene soot induced forward mutation in human diploid lymphoblasts when coincubated with coincubated with Sprague-Dawley rat liver postmitochondrial supematant. Two components of the kerosene soot extract, benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and cyclopenta(cd)pyrene (CP), were also tested. BP was not mutagenic at the concentration found in the soot extract, although it was active at higher concentrations. The amount of CP present could account for approximately 8% of the total mutation observed with the soot. The results were compared to data obtained previously in a similar mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium. the protocol described permits the facile assay of mutation at the hgprt locus in human lymphoblasts; such mutation is induced by compounds or complex mixtures requiring mixed-function oxygenase activity for metabolism to genetically active derivatives.

  6. Live cell imaging of in vitro human trophoblast syncytialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Dang, Yan-Li; Zheng, Ru; Li, Yue; Li, Weiwei; Lu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Li-Juan; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Hongmei

    2014-06-01

    Human trophoblast syncytialization, a process of cell-cell fusion, is one of the most important yet least understood events during placental development. Investigating the fusion process in a placenta in vivo is very challenging given the complexity of this process. Application of primary cultured cytotrophoblast cells isolated from term placentas and BeWo cells derived from human choriocarcinoma formulates a biphasic strategy to achieve the mechanism of trophoblast cell fusion, as the former can spontaneously fuse to form the multinucleated syncytium and the latter is capable of fusing under the treatment of forskolin (FSK). Live-cell imaging is a powerful tool that is widely used to investigate many physiological or pathological processes in various animal models or humans; however, to our knowledge, the mechanism of trophoblast cell fusion has not been reported using a live- cell imaging manner. In this study, a live-cell imaging system was used to delineate the fusion process of primary term cytotrophoblast cells and BeWo cells. By using live staining with Hoechst 33342 or cytoplasmic dyes or by stably transfecting enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and DsRed2-Nuc reporter plasmids, we observed finger-like protrusions on the cell membranes of fusion partners before fusion and the exchange of cytoplasmic contents during fusion. In summary, this study provides the first video recording of the process of trophoblast syncytialization. Furthermore, the various live-cell imaging systems used in this study will help to yield molecular insights into the syncytialization process during placental development. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  7. Towards expansion of human hair follicle stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J H; Mohebi, P; Farkas, D L; Tajbakhsh, J

    2011-06-01

    Multipotential human hair follicle stem cells can differentiate into various cell lineages and thus are investigated here as potential autologous sources for regenerative medicine. Towards this end, we have attempted to expand these cells, directly isolated from minimal amounts of hair follicle explants, to numbers more suitable for stem-cell therapy. Two types of human follicle stem cells, commercially available and directly isolated, were cultured using an in-house developed medium. The latter was obtained from bulge areas of hair follicles by mechanical and enzymatic dissociation, and was magnetically enriched for its CD200(+) fraction. Isolated cells were cultured for up to 4 weeks, on different supports: blank polystyrene, laminin- and Matrigel(TM) -coated surfaces. Two-fold expansion was found, highlighting the slow-cycling nature of these cells. Flow cytometry characterization revealed: magnetic enrichment increased the proportion of CD200(+) cells from initially 43.3% (CD200+, CD34: 25.8%; CD200+, CD34+: 17.5%) to 78.2% (CD200+, CD34: 41.5%; CD200+, CD34+: 36.7%). Enriched cells seemed to have retained and passed on their morphological and molecular phenotypes to their progeny, as isolated CD200(+) presenting cells expanded in our medium to a population with 80% of cells being CD200(+): 51.5% (CD200(+), CD34(-)) and 29.6% (CD200(+), CD34(+)). This study demonstrates the possibility of culturing human hair follicle stem cells without causing any significant changes to phenotypes of the cells. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Delocalized Claudin-1 promotes metastasis of human osteosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian, Yuekui; Chen, Changqiong; Li, Bo; Tian, Xiaobin, E-mail: drtxb_guiyang@sina.com

    2015-10-23

    Tight junction proteins (TJPs) including Claudins, Occludin and tight junction associated protein Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), are the most apical component of junctional complex that mediates cell–cell adhesion in epithelial and endothelial cells. In human malignancies, TJPs are often deregulated and affect cellular behaviors of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated alternations of TJPs and related biological characteristics in human osteosarcoma (OS). Claudin1 was increased in the metastatic OS cells (KRIB and KHOS) compared with the normal osteoblast cells (hFOB1.19) or primary tumor cells (HOS and U2OS), whereas no significant difference was found in Occludin and ZO-1. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and Western blotting revealed that Claudin1 was initially localized at cell junctions of normal osteoblasts, but substantially delocalized to the nucleus of metastatic OS cells. Phenotypically, inhibition of the nucleus Claudin1 expression compromised the metastatic potential of KRIB and KHOS cells. Moreover, we found that protein kinase C (PKC) but not PKA phosphorylation influenced Claudin1 expression and cellular functions, as PKC inhibitor (Go 6983 and Staurosporine) or genetic silencing of PKC reduced Claudin1 expression and decreased the motility of KRIB and KHOS cells. Taken together, our study implied that delocalization of claudin-1 induced by PKC phosphorylation contributes to metastatic capacity of OS cells. - Highlights: • Claudin1 is increased during the malignant transformation of human OS. • Delocalization of Claudin1 in metastatic OS cells. • Silencing nuclear Claudin1 expression inhibits cell invasion of OS. • Deregulated Claudin1 is regulated by PKC.

  9. Inflammatory Alteration of Human T Cells Exposed Continuously to Asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Yamamoto, Shoko; Lee, Suni; Maeda, Megumi; Masuzzaki, Hidenori; Sada, Nagisa; Yu, Min; Yoshitome, Kei; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Otsuki, Takemi

    2018-02-08

    Asbestos is a known carcinogen and exposure can lead to lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma. To examine the effects of asbestos fibers on human immune cells, the human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus (HTLV)-1 immortalized human T cell line MT-2 was employed. Following continuous exposure to asbestos fibers for more than eight months, MT-2 sublines showed acquisition of resistance to asbestos-induced apoptosis with decreased death signals and increased surviving signals. These sublines showed various characteristics that suggested a reduction in anti-tumor immunity. On the other hand, inflammatory changes such as expression of MMP7, CXCR5, CXCL13 and CD44 was found to be markedly higher in sublines continuously exposed to asbestos compared with original MT-2 cells. All of these molecules contribute to lung inflammation, T and B cell interactions and connections between mesothelial cells and T cells. Thus, further investigation focusing on these molecules may shed light on the role of chronic inflammation caused by asbestos exposure and the occurrence of malignant mesothelioma. Finally, regarding peripheral T cells from healthy donors (HD) and asbestos-exposed patients with pleural plaque (PP) or malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), following stimulation of CD4+ T cells, T cells from MPM patients showed reduced potential of interferon (IFN)-γ expression. Moreover, levels of interleukin (IL)-6, one of the most important cytokines in chronic inflammation, in cultured supernatants were higher in PP and MPM patients compared with HD. Overall, asbestos-induced chronic inflammation in the lung as well as the pleural cavity may facilitate the onset of asbestos-induced cancers due to alterations in the interactions among fibers, immune cells such as T and B cells and macrophages, and mesothelial and lung epithelial cells. Further investigations regarding chronic inflammation caused by asbestos fibers may assist in identifying molecular targets for preventive and

  10. Tim-3 expression defines regulatory T cells in human tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yan

    Full Text Available Tim-3, a member of the novel Tim (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain family, has been reported to negatively regulate the immune responses against viral infection and had implications for autoimmune disease. However, the nature and role of Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells in human tumors remain largely unknown. In the present study, we characterized Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells in 100 specimens from human hepatocellular, cervical, colorectal and ovarian carcinoma patients. Compared with peripheral blood and nontumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, the lymphocytes isolated from the corresponding tumor tissues of hepatocellular, cervical, colorectal and ovarian carcinoma patients contained significantly greater proportion of Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells. The majority of tumor-derived Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells exhibited an impaired capacity to produce IFN-γ and IL-2, but expressed higher levels of CD25, Foxp3, CTLA-4 and GITR than their Tim-3(- CD4 T cell counterparts. In contrast, most Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells isolated from the paired nontumor tissues and peripheral blood did not express these molecules. Moreover, tumor-derived Tim-3(+ CD4 T cells, but not tumor-derived Tim-3(- CD4 T cells, significantly suppressed the proliferation of autologous CD8(+ T cells in vitro. Notably, multi-color immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy demonstrated that Tim-3(+Foxp3(+CD4(+ cells were preferentially distributed in the tumor nest rather than the peritumoral stroma of hepatocellular carcinoma. Together, our data indicate that Tim-3-expressing CD4 T cells in human tumors could represent the functional regulatory T cells which contribute to the formation of the immune-suppressive tumor micromilieu.

  11. MUC1 in human milk blocks transmission of human immunodeficiency virus from dendritic cells to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeland, Eirikur; de Jong, Marein A. W. P.; Nabatov, Alexey A.; Kalay, Hakan; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) occurs frequently via breast-feeding. HIV-1 targets DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) in mucosal areas that allow efficient transmission of the virus to T cells. Here, we demonstrate that the epithelial mucin MUC1, abundant in milk,

  12. Differentiation of reprogrammed human adipose mesenchymal stem cells toward neural cells with defined transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xinjian; Liu, Tianqing; Song, Kedong; Li, Xiangqin; Ge, Dan

    2013-10-04

    Somatic cell reprogramming may become a powerful approach to generate specific human cell types for cell-fate determination studies and potential transplantation therapies of neurological diseases. Here we report a reprogramming methodology with which human adipose stem cells (hADSCs) can be differentiated into neural cells. After being reprogrammed with polycistronic plasmid carrying defined factor OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC, and further treated with neural induce medium, the hADSCs switched to differentiate toward neural cell lineages. The generated cells had normal karyotypes and exogenous vector sequences were not inserted in the genomes. Therefore, this cell lineage conversion methodology bypasses the risk of mutation and gene instability, and provides a novel strategy to obtain patient-specific neural cells for basic research and therapeutic application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide induces IFN-γ production in human NK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid M Kanevskiy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells have been shown to play a regulatory role in sepsis. According to the current view, NK cells become activated via macrophages or dendritic cells primed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Recently TLR4 gene expression was detected in human NK cells suggesting the possibility of a direct action of LPS on NK cells. In this study, effects of LPS on NK cell cytokine production and cytotoxicity were studied using highly purified human NK cells. LPS induced IFN-γ production in the presence of IL-2 in cell populations containing >98% CD56+ cells. Surprisingly, in the same experiments LPS decreased NK cell degranulation. No significant expression of markers related to blood dendritic cells, monocytes or T or B lymphocytes in the NK cell preparations was observed; the portions of HLA-DRbright, CD14+, CD3+ and CD20+ cells amounted to less than 0.1% within the cell populations. No more than 0.2% of NK cells were shown to be slightly positive for surface TLR4 in our experimental system, although intracellular staining revealed moderate amounts of TLR4 inside the NK cell population. These cells were negative for surface CD14, the receptor participating in LPS recognition by TLR4. Incubation of NK cells with IL-2 or/and LPS did not lead to an increase in TLR4 surface expression. TLR4–CD56+ NK cells isolated by cell sorting secreted IFN-γ in response to LPS. Antibody to TLR4 did not block the LPS-induced increase in IFN-γ production. We have also shown that Re-form of LPS lacking outer core oligosaccharide and O-antigen induces less cytokine production in NK cells than full length LPS. We speculate that the polysaccharide fragments of LPS molecule may take part in LPS-induced IFN-γ production by NK cells. Collectively our data suggest the existence of a mechanism of LPS direct action on NK cells distinct from established TLR4-mediated signaling.

  14. Secretory products of breast cancer cells specifically affect human osteoblastic cells: partial characterization of active factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwek, B; Lacroix, M; De Pollak, C; Marie, P; Body, J J

    1997-04-01

    The pathogenesis of tumor-induced osteolysis (TIO) following breast cancer metastases in bone remains unclear. We postulated that osteoblasts could be target cells for the secretory products of breast cancer cells. We previously showed that serum-free conditioned medium (CM) of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 inhibits DNA synthesis by 75% of control values in osteoblast-like cells SaOS-2 and that this effect is only in a minor part due to transforming growth factor beta secretion. To establish the specificity of our observations and to look for other biologically active factors, we have tested the effects of medium conditioned by several cancer and noncancer cell lines (breast, colon, placenta, or fibrosarcoma) on the proliferation of osteoblast-like cells (SaOS-2, MG-63), normal human osteoblasts, human fibrosarcoma cells, and normal human fibroblasts. Culture medium (1:2) of the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, T-47D, MDA-MB-231, and SK-BR-3 inhibited by 25-50% the proliferation of osteoblast-like cells SaOS-2, MG-63, and normal osteoblasts as evaluated by the MTT survival test or [3H]thymidine incorporation. MCF-7 cells completely inhibited the proliferation of normal human osteoblasts in coculture. This inhibitory effect was reversible and not due to cytotoxicity. Moreover, the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response to parathyroid hormone (PTH) of osteoblast-like cells SaOS-2 was also increased by 100-240% by the same CM. Such activities were, however, not detected in medium from the breast noncancer cell line HBL-100 or in the medium conditioned by non-breast cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HT-29, JAR, or HT-1080). Medium from the breast cancer cells had no effect on normal human fibroblasts or fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080), suggesting the specificity of their action on human osteoblasts. After partial purification by ultrafiltration and size-exclusion chromatography, we found that medium of T-47D cells contained at least three nonprostanoid factors of

  15. Generation of mature T cells from human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in artificial thymic organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seet, Christopher S; He, Chongbin; Bethune, Michael T; Li, Suwen; Chick, Brent; Gschweng, Eric H; Zhu, Yuhua; Kim, Kenneth; Kohn, Donald B; Baltimore, David; Crooks, Gay M; Montel-Hagen, Amélie

    2017-05-01

    Studies of human T cell development require robust model systems that recapitulate the full span of thymopoiesis, from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) through to mature T cells. Existing in vitro models induce T cell commitment from human HSPCs; however, differentiation into mature CD3(+)TCR-αβ(+) single-positive CD8(+) or CD4(+) cells is limited. We describe here a serum-free, artificial thymic organoid (ATO) system that supports efficient and reproducible in vitro differentiation and positive selection of conventional human T cells from all sources of HSPCs. ATO-derived T cells exhibited mature naive phenotypes, a diverse T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire and TCR-dependent function. ATOs initiated with TCR-engineered HSPCs produced T cells with antigen-specific cytotoxicity and near-complete lack of endogenous TCR Vβ expression, consistent with allelic exclusion of Vβ-encoding loci. ATOs provide a robust tool for studying human T cell differentiation and for the future development of stem-cell-based engineered T cell therapies.

  16. Meta-analysis reveals conserved cell cycle transcriptional network across multiple human cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotti, Bruno; Joshi, Anagha; Freeman, Tom C

    2017-01-05

    Cell division is central to the physiology and pathology of all eukaryotic organisms. The molecular machinery underpinning the cell cycle has been studied extensively in a number of species and core aspects of it have been found to be highly conserved. Similarly, the transcriptional changes associated with this pathway have been studied in different organisms and different cell types. In each case hundreds of genes have been reported to be regulated, however there seems to be little consensus in the genes identified across different studies. In a recent comparison of transcriptomic studies of the cell cycle in different human cell types, only 96 cell cycle genes were reported to be the same across all studies examined. Here we perform a systematic re-examination of published human cell cycle expression data by using a network-based approach to identify groups of genes with a similar expression profile and therefore function. Two clusters in particular, containing 298 transcripts, showed patterns of expression consistent with cell cycle occurrence across the four human cell types assessed. Our analysis shows that there is a far greater conservation of cell cycle-associated gene expression across human cell types than reported previously, which can be separated into two distinct transcriptional networks associated with the G 1 /S-S and G 2 -M phases of the cell cycle. This work also highlights the benefits of performing a re-analysis on combined datasets.

  17. EXPLANTATION OF MESANGIAL CELL HILLOCKS - A METHOD FOR OBTAINING HUMAN MESANGIAL CELLS IN CULTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MULLER, EW; KIM, Y; MICHAEL, AF; VERNIER, RL; VANDERHEM, GK; VANDERWOUDE, FJ

    A simple method is presented for selective cell culture of human mesangial cells using explanatation of mesangial cell hillocks. Glomeruli which had been incubated with collagenase were explanted on plastic tissue culture flasks. Three to 6 weeks after explantation, a rapidly growing multilayer of

  18. Differential expression of cell-cycle regulators in human beta-cells derived from insulinoma tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueberberg, Sandra; Tannapfel, Andrea; Schenker, Peter; Viebahn, Richard; Uhl, Waldemar; Schneider, Stephan; Meier, Juris J

    2016-05-01

    The low frequency of beta-cell replication in the adult human pancreas limits beta-cell regeneration. A better understanding of the regulation of human beta-cell proliferation is crucial to develop therapeutic strategies aiming to enhance beta-cell mass. To identify factors that control beta-cell proliferation, cell-cycle regulation was examined in human insulinomas as a model of increased beta-cell proliferation (n=11) and healthy pancreatic tissue from patients with benign pancreatic tumors (n=9). Tissue sections were co-stained for insulin and cell-cycle proteins. Transcript levels of selected cell-cycle factors in beta-cells were determined by qRT-PCR after performing laser-capture microdissection. The frequency of beta-cell replication was 3.74±0.92% in the insulinomas and 0.11±0.04% in controls (p=0.0016). p21 expression was higher in insulinomas (p=0.0058), and Rb expression was higher by trend (p=0.085), whereas p16 (pcell-cycle factors in beta-cells derived from insulinomas and healthy adults differs markedly. Targeting such differentially regulated cell-cycle proteins may evolve as a future strategy to enhance beta-cell regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reprogramming Malignant Cancer Cells toward a Benign Phenotype following Exposure to Human Embryonic Stem Cell Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Vincenzo; Arena, Manuel; Arena, Goffredo Orazio

    2017-01-01

    The embryonic microenvironment is well known to be non-permissive for tumor development because early developmental signals naturally suppress the expression of proto-oncogenes. In an analogous manner, mimicking an early embryonic environment during embryonic stem cell culture has been shown to suppress oncogenic phenotypes of cancer cells. Exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells harbor substances that mirror the content of the cells of origin and have been reported to reprogram hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells via horizontal transfer of mRNA and proteins. However, the possibility that these embryonic stem cells-derived exosomes might be the main effectors of the anti-tumor effect mediated by the embryonic stem cells has not been explored yet. The present study aims to investigate whether exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells can reprogram malignant cancer cells to a benign stage and reduce their tumorigenicity. We show that the embryonic stem cell-conditioned medium contains factors that inhibit cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrate that exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells display anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects, and decrease tumor size in a xenograft model. These exosomes are also able to transfer their cargo into target cancer cells, inducing a dose-dependent increase in SOX2, OCT4 and Nanog proteins, leading to a dose-dependent decrease of cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity. This study shows for the first time that human embryonic stem cell-derived exosomes play an important role in the tumor suppressive activity displayed by human embryonic stem cells. PMID:28068409

  20. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Musunuru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  1. Dissection of a stem cell hierarchy in the human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubner Fridriksdottir, Agla Jael

    where senescence is bypassed. These findings identify an adult human breast ductal stem cell activity and the earliest descendants thereof. Further characterization of the ductal stem cell niche, especially in terms of possible interaction with surrounding stromal cells (Sigurdsson and Fridriksdottir et......The human breast is a unique organ in that it undergoes most of its development after birth under the control of systemic hormones. Throughout the reproductive life of women, the breast gland undergoes changes in morphogenesis as evidenced by continuous cell proliferation, differentiation...... and apoptosis during each menstrual cycle. These changes are most prominent during pregnancy, lactation and involution after breast feeding. These highly dynamic changes are thought to rely on the presence of a breast epithelial stem cell population (reviewed in (Fridriksdottir et al. 2005)). Nevertheless...

  2. Biology and relevance of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-23

    Evidence of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells (AML LSCs) was first reported nearly 2 decades ago through the identification of rare subpopulations of engrafting cells in xenotransplantation assays. These AML LSCs were shown to reside at the apex of a cellular hierarchy that initiates and maintains the disease, exhibiting properties of self-renewal, cell cycle quiescence, and chemoresistance. This cancer stem cell model offers an explanation for chemotherapy resistance and disease relapse and implies that approaches to treatment must eradicate LSCs for cure. More recently, a number of studies have both refined and expanded our understanding of LSCs and intrapatient heterogeneity in AML using improved xenotransplant models, genome-scale analyses, and experimental manipulation of primary patient cells. Here, we review these studies with a focus on the immunophenotype, biological properties, epigenetics, genetics, and clinical associations of human AML LSCs and discuss critical questions that need to be addressed in future research. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV in two human glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sedo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that dipeptidyl peptidase IV [DPP-IV, EC 3.4.14.5] takes part in the metabolism of biologically active peptides participating in the regulation of growth and transformation of glial cells. However, the knowledge on the DPP-IV expression in human glial and glioma cells is still very limited. In this study, using histochemical and biochemical techniques, the DPP-IV activity was demonstrated in two commercially available human glioma cell lines of different transformation degree, as represented by U373 astrocytoma (Grade III and U87 glioblastoma multiforme (Grade IV lines. Higher total activity of the enzyme, as well as its preferential localisation in the plasma membrane, was observed in U87 cells. Compared to U373 population, U87 cells were morphologically more pleiomorphic, they were cycling at lower rate and expressing less Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein. The data revealed positive correlation between the degree of transformation of cells and activity of DPP-IV. Great difference in expression of this enzyme, together with the phenotypic differences of cells, makes these lines a suitable standard model for further 57 studies of function of this enzyme in human glioma cells.

  4. Immunohistochemistry of Programmed Cell Death in Archival Human Pathology Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takami Matsuyama

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemistry (IHC for detecting key signal molecules involved in programmed cell death (PCD in archival human pathology specimens is fairly well established. Detection of cleaved caspase-3 in lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and gastric surface foveolar glandular epithelia but not in synoviocytes in RA, gastric fundic glandular epithelia, or nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL cells suggests anti-apoptotic mechanisms in cell differentiation and in oncogenesis such as the induction of survivin. Enzymatically pretreated and ultra-super sensitive detection of beclin-1 in synoviocytes in RA and gastric fundic glandular epithelia suggests enhanced autophagy. The deposition of beclin-1 in fibrinoid necrosis in RA and expression of beclin-1 in detached gastric fundic glandular cells suggest that enhanced autophagy undergoes autophagic cell death (ACD. NKTCL exhibited enhanced autophagy through LC3 labeling and showed densely LC3 labeled cell-debris in regions of peculiar necrosis without deposition of beclin-1, indicating massive ACD in NKTCL and the alternative pathway enhancing autophagy following autophagic vesicle nucleation. Autophagy progression was monitored by labeling aggregated mitochondria and cathepsin D. The cell-debris in massive ACD in NKTCL were positive for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting DNA oxidation occurred in ACD. Immunohistochemical autophagy and PCD analysis in archival human pathology specimens may offer new insights into autophagy in humans.

  5. Human T Cell Development, Localization, and Function throughout Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Brahma V; Connors, Thomas J; Farber, Donna L

    2018-02-20

    Throughout life, T cells coordinate multiple aspects of adaptive immunity, including responses to pathogens, allergens, and tumors. In mouse models, the role of T cells is studied in the context of a specific type of pathogen, antigen, or disease condition over a limited time frame, whereas in humans, T cells control multiple insults simultaneously throughout the body and maintain immune homeostasis over decades. In this review, we discuss how humancells develop and provide essential immune protection at different life stages and highlight tissue localization and subset delineation as key determinants of the T cell functional role in immune responses. We also discuss how anatomic compartments undergo distinct age-associated changes in T cell subset composition and function over a lifetime. It is important to consider age and tissue influences on humancells when developing targeted strategies to modulate T cell-mediated immunity in vaccines and immunotherapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Concise review: programming human pluripotent stem cells into blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Jennifer; Fidanza, Antonella; Forrester, Lesley M

    2016-06-01

    Blood disorders are treated with cell therapies including haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation as well as platelet and red blood cell transfusions. However the source of cells is entirely dependent on donors, procedures are susceptible to transfusion-transmitted infections and serious complications can arise in recipients due to immunological incompatibility. These problems could be alleviated if it was possible to produce haematopoietic cells in vitro from an autologous and renewable cell source. The production of haematopoietic cells in the laboratory from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a route to realize this goal but it has proven challenging to generate long-term reconstituting HSCs. To date, the optimization of differentiation protocols has mostly relied on the manipulation of extrinsic signals to mimic the in vivo environment. We review studies that have taken an alternative approach to modulate intrinsic signals by enforced expression of transcription factors. Single and combinations of multiple transcription factors have been used in a variety of contexts to enhance the production of haematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. This programming approach, together with the recent advances in the production and use of synthetic transcription factors, holds great promise for the production of fully functional HSCs in the future. © 2016 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells in the side population cells of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-hong; Cai, Ai-zhen; Wei, Xue-ming; Ding, Li; Li, Feng-zhi; Zheng, Ai-ming; Dai, Da-jiang; Huang, Rong-rong; Cao, Hou-jun; Zhou, Hai-yang; Wang, Jian-mei; Wang, Xue-jing; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Heng; Yuan, Xiao-ying; Chen, Lin

    2013-03-01

    Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer. Many kinds of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells, including several gastric cancer cell lines. This study is aimed to identify the cancer stem-like cells in the SP of gastric cancer cell line MKN-45. We used fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort SP cells in the human gastric carcinoma cell line MKN-45 (cells labeled with Hoechst 33342) and then characterized the cancer stem-like properties of SP cells. This study found that the SP cells had higher clone formation efficiency than major population (MP) cells. Five stemness-related gene expression profiles, including OCT-4, SOX-2, NANOG, CD44, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters gene ABCG2, were tested in SP and MP cells using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Western blot was used to show the difference of protein expression between SP and MP cells. Both results show that there was significantly higher protein expression in SP cells than in MP cells. When inoculated into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice, SP cells show higher tumorigenesis tendency than MP cells. These results indicate that SP cells possess cancer stem cell properties and prove that SP cells from MKN-45 are gastric cancer stem-like cells.

  8. Generation of human female reproductive tract epithelium from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louie Ye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have identified stem/progenitor cells in human and mouse uterine epithelium, which are postulated to be responsible for tissue regeneration and proliferative disorders of human endometrium. These progenitor cells are thought to be derived from Müllerian duct (MD, the primordial female reproductive tract (FRT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed a model of human reproductive tract development in which inductive neonatal mouse uterine mesenchyme (nMUM is recombined with green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged human embryonic stem cells (hESCs; GFP-hESC (ENVY. We demonstrate for the first time that hESCs can be differentiated into cells with a human FRT epithelial cell phenotype. hESC derived FRT epithelial cells emerged from cultures containing MIXL1(+ mesendodermal precursors, paralleling events occurring during normal organogenesis. Following transplantation, nMUM treated embryoid bodies (EBs generated epithelial structures with a typical MD phenotype that expressed the MD markers PAX2, HOXA10. Functionally, the hESCs derived FRT epithelium responded to exogenous estrogen by proliferating and secreting uterine-specific glycodelin A (GdA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data show nMUM can induce differentiation of hESC to form the FRT epithelium. This may provide a model to study early developmental events of the human FRT.

  9. [Stimulation of cholinogenesis in the human fetal nerve cells culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsymbaliuk, V I; Vasyl'ieva, I H; Oleksenko, N P; Chopyk, N H; Tsiubko, O I; Halanta, O S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the research was to establish cultured population of nerve cells reached by cholinergic neurons and their determinative precursors. The most effective combination of neuroinductors which stimulated cholinergic cells differentiation from the nerve stem cells was retinoic acid and acetylcholine. During the period of culturing the amount of ChAT+ cells reliably increased from 5.3 +/- 2.9% to 21.1 +/- 6.2%. At the same time in the control samples their concentration was 9.1 +/- 4.8% of total cell count. Enrichment of cell population by cholinergic neurons and their determinative precursors correlated with increasing of AChE-activity level. So, addition of retinoic acid and acetylcholine stimulate both neurogenesis and cholinogenesis in the culture of human fetal nerve cells.

  10. Electrical Guidance of Human Stem Cells in the Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Feng Feng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Limited migration of neural stem cells in adult brain is a roadblock for the use of stem cell therapies to treat brain diseases and injuries. Here, we report a strategy that mobilizes and guides migration of stem cells in the brain in vivo. We developed a safe stimulation paradigm to deliver directional currents in the brain. Tracking cells expressing GFP demonstrated electrical mobilization and guidance of migration of human neural stem cells, even against co-existing intrinsic cues in the rostral migration stream. Transplanted cells were observed at 3 weeks and 4 months after stimulation in areas guided by the stimulation currents, and with indications of differentiation. Electrical stimulation thus may provide a potential approach to facilitate brain stem cell therapies.

  11. Genetic engineering of human embryonic stem cells with lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chen; Tang, Dong-Qi; Xie, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Li; Xu, Ke-Feng; Thompson, Winston E; Chou, Wayne; Gibbons, Gary H; Chang, Lung-Ji; Yang, Li-Jun; Chen, Yuqing E

    2005-08-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells present a valuable source of cells with a vast therapeutic potential. However, the low efficiency of directed differentiation of hES cells remains a major obstacle in their uses for regenerative medicine. While differentiation may be controlled by the genetic manipulation, effective and efficient gene transfer into hES cells has been an elusive goal. Here, we show stable and efficient genetic manipulations of hES cells using lentiviral vectors. This method resulted in the establishment of stable gene expression without loss of pluripotency in hES cells. In addition, lentiviral vectors were effective in conveying the expression of an U6 promoter-driven small interfering RNA (siRNA), which was effective in silencing its specific target. Taken together, our results suggest that lentiviral gene delivery holds great promise for hES cell research and application.

  12. Adrenocortical tumors associated with the TP53 p.R337H germline mutation can be identified during child-care consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellaro, Maria J; Ribeiro, Raul C; Oliveira-Filho, Antônio G; Seidinger, Ana L; Cardinalli, Izilda A; Miranda, Eliana C M; Aguiar, Simone S; Brandalise, Silvia R; Yunes, José A; Barros-Filho, Antônio A

    2017-08-30

    To evaluate the clinical features associated with adrenocortical hormone overexpression and familial cancer profiling as potential markers for early detection of adrenocortical tumors in children from South and Southeast Brazil. The clinical manifestations and anthropometric measurements of 103 children diagnosed with adrenocortical tumors were analyzed. Between 1982 and 2011, 69 girls and 34 boys diagnosed with adrenocortical tumors were followed-up for a median time of 9.0 years (0-34 years). Signs of androgen overproduction alone (n=75) or associated with cortisol (n=18) were present in 90.3%. TP53 p.R337H mutation was found in 90.5% of patients. Stages I, II, III, and IV were observed in 45.6%, 27.2%, 19.4%, and 7.8% of patients, respectively. At diagnosis, there were no significant differences in height (p=0.92) and weight (p=0.22) among children with adrenocortical tumors, but children with virilization alone had significantly higher height-for-age Z-scores (0.92±1.4) than children with hypercortisolism alone or combined (-0.32±1,8; p=0.03). The five-year overall survival was 76.7% (SD±4.2). Patients with advanced-stage disease had a significantly worse prognosis than those with limited disease (pp.R337H carrier parents developed cancer, whereas none of the 55 non-carriers did. Signs of adrenocortical hormone overproduction appear early, even in cases with early-stage. These signs can be identified at the physical examination and anthropometric measurements. In southern Brazil, pediatric adrenocortical tumor is a sentinel cancer for detecting families with germline p.R337H mutation in TP53 gene. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. [Increase in cell metabolism in normal, diploid human glial cells in stationary cell cultures induced by meclofenoxate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig-Festl, M; Gräter, B; Bayreuther, K

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative biochemical studies were undertaken in order to examine the influence of the accumulation of lipofuscin in secondary lysosomes on cell metabolic activities of normal diploid human glia cells in a stationary cell culture system. Glia cells accumulate lipofuscin as a function of the duration of the stationary cultivation in vitro. The accumulation of lipofuscin can be decreased by the long-term treatment with the pharmacon meclofenoxate (centrophenoxine, Helfergin). Concomitant with the reduction of the accumulated lipofuscin, meclofenoxate-treated glia cells show enhanced rates of RNA synthesis, protein synthesis and glucose uptake. Most likely, in meclofenoxate-treated normal diploid human glia cells in vitro, the utilisation of glucose is shifted from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway. The data suggest that the meclofenoxate-induced reduction of lipofuscin accumulation has a positive effect on cell metabolic functions and causes a delay of the cellular aging of the human glia cells in vitro.

  14. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells regulates proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopp, Sabine; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ugarte, Fernando; Wobus, Manja; Kuhn, Matthias; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule defines mesenchymal stromal cells in the human bone marrow that regenerate bone and establish a hematopoietic microenvironment in vivo. The role of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in primary human mesenchymal stromal cells and the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during ex vivo culture has not yet been demonstrated. We applied RNA interference or ectopic overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells to evaluate the effect of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule on their proliferation and differentiation as well as its influence on co-cultivated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockdown and overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule affected several characteristics of human mesenchymal stromal cells related to osteogenic differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Furthermore, knockdown of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and strongly reduced the formation of long-term culture-initiating cells. In contrast, melanoma cell adhesion molecule-overexpressing human mesenchymal stromal cells provided a supportive microenvironment for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule increased the adhesion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to human mesenchymal stromal cells and their migration beneath the monolayer of human mesenchymal stromal cells. Our results demonstrate that the expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells determines their fate and regulates the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells through direct cell-cell contact.

  15. Progress towards human primordial germ cell specification in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, S; Campos, R; Aguilar, E; Cibelli, J B

    2017-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) have long been considered the link between one generation and the next. PGC specification begins in the early embryo as a result of a highly orchestrated combination of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms. Understanding the molecular events that lead to proper PGC development will facilitate the development of new treatments for human infertility as well as species conservation. This article describes the latest, most relevant findings about the mechanisms of PGC formation, emphasizing human PGC. It also discusses our own laboratory's progress in using transdifferentiation protocols to derive human PGCs (hPGCs). Our preliminary results arose from our pursuit of a sequential hPGC induction strategy that starts with the repression of lineage-specific factors in the somatic cell, followed by the reactivation of germ cell-related genes using specific master regulators, which can indeed reactivate germ cell-specific genes in somatic cells. While it is still premature to assume that fully functional human gametes can be obtained in a dish, our results, together with those recently published by others, provide strong evidence that generating their precursors, PGCs, is within reach. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. De Novo Generated Human Red Blood Cells in Humanized Mice Support Plasmodium falciparum Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anburaj Amaladoss

    Full Text Available Immunodeficient mouse-human chimeras provide a powerful approach to study host specific pathogens like Plasmodium (P. falciparum that causes human malaria. Existing mouse models of P. falciparum infection require repeated injections of human red blood cells (RBCs. In addition, clodronate lipsomes and anti-neutrophil antibodies are injected to suppress the clearance of human RBCs by the residual immune system of the immunodeficient mice. Engraftment of NOD-scid Il2rg-/- mice with human hematopoietic stem cells leads to reconstitution of human immune cells. Although human B cell reconstitution is robust and T cell reconstitution is reasonable in the recipient mice, human RBC reconstitution is generally poor or undetectable. The poor reconstitution is mainly the result of a deficiency of appropriate human cytokines that are necessary for the development and maintenance of these cell lineages. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding human erythropoietin and interleukin-3 into humanized mice by hydrodynamic tail-vein injection resulted in significantly enhanced reconstitution of erythrocytes