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Sample records for human acid alpha-glucosidase

  1. A specific acid [alpha]-glucosidase in lamellar bodies of the human lung

    OpenAIRE

    Vries, A.C.J. de; Schram, A.W.; Tager, J.M.; Batenburg, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In the present investigation, we have demonstrated that three lysosomal-type hydrolases, alpha-glucosidase, alpha-mannosidase and a phosphatase, are present in lamellar bodies isolated from adult human lung. The hydrolase activities that were studied, all showed an acidic pH optimum, which is characteristic for lysosomal enzymes. The properties of acid alpha-glucosidase in the lamellar body fraction and that in the lysosome-enriched fraction were compared. Using specific antibodies against ly...

  2. A specific acid [alpha]-glucosidase in lamellar bodies of the human lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, A.C.J. de; Schram, A.W.; Tager, J.M.; Batenburg, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In the present investigation, we have demonstrated that three lysosomal-type hydrolases, alpha-glucosidase, alpha-mannosidase and a phosphatase, are present in lamellar bodies isolated from adult human lung. The hydrolase activities that were studied, all showed an acidic pH optimum, which is charac

  3. A specific acid [alpha]-glucosidase in lamellar bodies of the human lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, A.C.J. de; Schram, A.W.; Tager, J.M.; Batenburg, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In the present investigation, we have demonstrated that three lysosomal-type hydrolases, alpha-glucosidase, alpha-mannosidase and a phosphatase, are present in lamellar bodies isolated from adult human lung. The hydrolase activities that were studied, all showed an acidic pH optimum, which is

  4. Cloning the mouse homologue of the human lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, J.H.; Yang, B.Z.; Liu, H.M. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Pompe disease (GSD II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase (GAA). In an attempt to create a mouse model for Pompe disease, we isolated and characterized the gene encoding the mouse homologue of the human GAA. Twenty clones that extend from exon 2 to the poly(A) tail were isolated from a mouse liver cDNA library, but the remainder of the mRNA proved difficult to obtain by conventional cDNA library screening. Sequences spanning exons 1-2 were cloned by RACE from mouse liver RNA. The full-length liver GAA cDNA contains 3365 nucleotides with a coding region of 2859 nucleotides and a 394 base pair 3{prime}-nontranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse GAA shows 84% identity to the human GAA. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the mouse GAA was encoded by a single copy gene. Then six bacteriophages containing DNA from the GAA gene were isolated by screening 10{sup 6} phage plaques of a mouse 129 genomic library using a mouse GAA cDNA as a probe. From one of these bacteriophages, an 11-kilobase EcoRI fragment containing exons 3 to 15 was subcloned and sequenced. Work is in progress using this genomic clone to disrupt the GAA gene in murine embryonic stem cells in order to create GSD II mice.

  5. Human acid alpha-glucosidase from rabbit milk has therapeutic effect in mice with glycogen storage disease type II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.A. Bijvoet (Agnes); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); H. van Hirtum (Hans); M.A. Kroos (Marian); E.H. van de Kamp; O. Schoneveld; P. Visser (Pim); J.P. Brakenhoff (Just); M. Weggeman; E.J.J.M. van Corven (Emiel); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPompe's disease or glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) belongs to the family of inherited lysosomal storage diseases. The underlying deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase leads in different degrees of severity to glycogen storage in heart, skeletal and s

  6. Transcriptional regulation of the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene. Identification of a repressor element and its transcription factors Hes-1 and YY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, B; Heus, J; Lu, N; Nichols, R C; Raben, N; Plotz, P H

    2001-01-19

    Acid alpha-glucosidase, the product of a housekeeping gene, is a lysosomal enzyme that degrades glycogen. A deficiency of this enzyme is responsible for a recessively inherited myopathy and cardiomyopathy, glycogenesis type II. We have previously demonstrated that the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene expression is regulated by a silencer within intron 1, which is located in the 5'-untranslated region. In this study, we have used deletion analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and footprint analysis to further localize the silencer to a 25-base pair element. The repressive effect on the TK promoter was about 50% in both orientations in expression plasmid, and two transcriptional factors were identified with antibodies binding specifically to the element. Mutagenesis and functional analyses of the element demonstrated that the mammalian homologue 1 of Drosophila hairy and Enhancer of split (Hes-1) binding to an E box (CACGCG) and global transcription factor-YY1 binding to its core site function as a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, the overexpression of Hes-1 significantly enhanced the repressive effect of the silencer element. The data should be helpful in understanding the expression and regulation of the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene as well as other lysosomal enzyme genes.

  7. N-glycans of recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase expressed in the milk of transgenic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Susanne P; Gerwig, Gerrit J; Leeflang, Bas R; Koles, Kate; Mannesse, Maurice L M; van Berkel, Patrick H C; Pieper, Frank R; Kroos, Marian A; Reuser, Arnold J J; Zhou, Qun; Jin, Xiaoying; Zhang, Kate; Edmunds, Tim; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2007-06-01

    Pompe disease is a lysosomal glycogen storage disorder characterized by acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency. More than 110 different pathogenic mutations in the gene encoding GAA have been observed. Patients with this disease are being treated by intravenous injection of recombinant forms of the enzyme. Focusing on recombinant approaches to produce the enzyme means that specific attention has to be paid to the generated glycosylation patterns. Here, human GAA was expressed in the mammary gland of transgenic rabbits. The N-linked glycans of recombinant human GAA (rhAGLU), isolated from the rabbit milk, were released by peptide-N(4)-(N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl)asparagine amidase F. The N-glycan pool was fractionated and purified into individual components by a combination of anion-exchange, normal-phase, and Sambucus nigra agglutinin-affinity chromatography. The structures of the components were analyzed by 500 MHz one-dimensional and 600 MHz cryo two-dimensional (total correlation spectroscopy [TOCSY] nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy) (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, combined with two-dimensional (31)P-filtered (1)H-(1)H TOCSY spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-profiling of 2-aminobenzamide-labeled glycans combined with exoglycosidase digestions. The recombinant rabbit glycoprotein contained a broad array of different N-glycans, comprising oligomannose-, hybrid-, and complex-type structures. Part of the oligomannose-type glycans showed the presence of phospho-diester-bridged N-acetylglucosamine. For the complex-type glycans (partially) (alpha2-6)-sialylated (nearly only N-acetylneuraminic acid) diantennary structures were found; part of the structures were (alpha1-6)-core-fucosylated or (alpha1-3)-fucosylated in the upper antenna (Lewis x). Using HPLC-mass spectrometry of glycopeptides, information was generated with respect to the

  8. Hes-1, a known transcriptional repressor, acts as a transcriptional activator for the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene in human fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bo; Raben, Nina; Plotz, Paul H

    2002-03-01

    Hes-1, the mammalian homologue 1 of Drosophila hairy and Enhancer of split proteins, belongs to a family of basic helix-loop-helix proteins that are essential to neurogenesis, myogenesis, hematopoiesis, and sex determination. Hes-1 is a transcriptional repressor for a number of known genes including the human acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) gene as we have previously shown in Hep G2 cells. The human GAA gene encodes the enzyme for glycogen breakdown in lysosomes, deficiency of which results in Glycogen Storage Disease type II (Pompe syndrome). Using constructs containing the DNA element that demonstrates repressive activity in Hep G2 cells and conditions in which the same transcription factors, Hes-1 and YY1, bind, we have shown that this element functions as an enhancer in human fibroblasts. Site-directed mutagenesis and overexpression of Hes-1 showed that Hes-1 functions as a transcriptional activator. The dual function of Hes-1 we have found is likely to contribute to the subtle tissue-specific control of this housekeeping gene.

  9. Cardiac remodeling and contractile function in acid alpha-glucosidase knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J. Kamphoven (Joep); R. Stubenitsky (René); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPompe's disease is an autosomal recessive and often fatal condition, caused by mutations in the acid alpha-glucosidase gene, leading to lysosomal glycogen storage in heart and skeletal muscle. We investigated the cardiac phenotype of an acid

  10. Effects of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors on mouth to caecum transit time in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Ladas, S D; Frydas, A; Papadopoulos, A.; S. A. Raptis

    1992-01-01

    The alpha-glucosidase inhibitors acarbose and miglitol have been successfully used to control postprandial hyperglycaemia in diabetics. They probably work by slowing carbohydrate digestion and absorption, but their effect on mouth to caecum transit time has not been studied. The effect acarbose (100 mg), miglitol (100 mg), and placebo on mouth to caecum transit time (380 kcal breakfast with 20 g of lactulose) was investigated in 18 normal volunteers using breath hydrogen analysis. Both miglit...

  11. Effects of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors on mouth to caecum transit time in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladas, S D; Frydas, A; Papadopoulos, A; Raptis, S A

    1992-09-01

    The alpha-glucosidase inhibitors acarbose and miglitol have been successfully used to control postprandial hyperglycaemia in diabetics. They probably work by slowing carbohydrate digestion and absorption, but their effect on mouth to caecum transit time has not been studied. The effect acarbose (100 mg), miglitol (100 mg), and placebo on mouth to caecum transit time (380 kcal breakfast with 20 g of lactulose) was investigated in 18 normal volunteers using breath hydrogen analysis. Both miglitol and acarbose significantly increased breath hydrogen excretion (F2,34 = 6.31, p = 0.005) and shortened the mouth to caecum transit time (F2,34 = 3.49, p = 0.04) after breakfast compared with placebo. There was a significant negative correlation between breath hydrogen excretion and mouth to caecum transit time suggesting that with shorter transit times significantly more carbohydrates were spilled into the colon. These results indicate that alpha-glucosidase inhibitors accelerate mouth to caecum transit time by inducing carbohydrate malabsorption.

  12. Relato do primeiro paciente brasileiro com a forma infantil da doença de Pompe tratado com alfa-glicosidase recombinante humana Report of the first Brazilian infantile Pompe disease patient to be treated with recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J. Pereira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Relatar o primeiro caso de forma infantil da doença de Pompe tratado no Brasil. Descrição: Trata-se de doença de depósito lisossomal que se caracteriza por defeitos da enzima alfa-glicosidase ácida, com acúmulo intracelular de glicogênio, principalmente nos músculos. São descritas a forma infantil e tardia. Desde 2006, está disponível tratamento com enzima recombinante humana. Descreve-se o primeiro caso de forma infantil da doença tratado no Brasil. Trata-se de menina com 2,5 meses de idade e progressão rápida da doença, com perda dos movimentos dos membros, miocardiopatia hipertrófica e insuficiência respiratória aos 7 meses de idade. Após 10 meses de tratamento, apresentou boa resposta clínica, com remissão da insuficiência respiratória, recuperação parcial dos movimentos dos membros e melhora importante do quadro cardiológico. Comentários: Apesar de pouco freqüente, a forma infantil da doença de Pompe é letal. A disponibilidade de tratamento eficaz aumenta a necessidade de conhecimento e diagnóstico precoce da doença.Objective: To describe the first case of infantile Pompe disease to be treated in Brazil. Description: Pompe disease is a glycogen storage disease related to defects in the acid alpha-glucosidase enzyme, leading to an intracellular accumulation of glycogen, mainly in muscles. Two forms are described: infantile and juvenile. Since 2006, treatment with recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase has been available. This article describes the first case of infantile Pompe disease treated in Brazil. A girl presented at 2.5 months of age with rapid disease progression, exhibiting severe hypotonia, loss of movements in both upper and lower limbs and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, progressing to respiratory failure by the age of 7 months. After 10 months of treatment, she exhibited a good clinical response, with remission of the respiratory failure, partial recovery of arm and leg movements and

  13. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A.; Byrne, Barry J.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. PMID:26053072

  14. [Clinical features and acid alpha-glucosidase gene mutation in 7 Chinese patients with glycogen storage disease type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Zhao, Juan; Wang, Zhao-xia; Zhang, Wei; Yuan, Yun

    2013-07-02

    To explore the clinical features and acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) gene mutations of Chinese patients with glycogen storage disease typeII(GSDII). Seven patients with GSDII were diagnosed by muscle pathology examination at Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital from 2003 to 2011. One patient with infant-onset presented development retardation, generalized muscle weakness, dyspnea, cardiomegaly and hepatomegaly. Six cases were of late-onset ranging from 1 to 29 years. Their main clinical features included progressive muscle weakness. Two patients developed respiratory insufficiency. Increased serum creatine kinase was detected in all of them. Electromyography studies showed myopathic (n = 5) and neuropathic (n = 1) changes. Muscle biopsies showed basophilic vacuoles in muscle fibers containing a large amounts of glycogen on electron microscopy. GAA gene mutation was detected by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product. Novel mutations were screened in 100 normal controls. GAA gene mutations were found in all of them, including 10 point mutations and 1 frameshift deletion. Six mutations (p. P361L, p. P266S, p.R437C, p.R600C, p.W746S and p.W746*) have been reported before. And five novel mutations (p.R168Q, p.R168P, p.E521V, p.R594H and c.827_845del) were found in this study. None of these novel mutations were found in 100 normal controls except for p.R168Q mutation in two normal controls. p. P361L and p.W746* were detected in two unrelated GSDII patients while other mutations were carried by only one patient. In our study, we found several novel GAA mutations in Chinese patients with GSDII. No hot spot mutation of GAA gene existed in our patient group. However, p. P266S, p. P361L and p.R437C might be associated with late-onset GSDII.

  15. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.P. van den Hout (Johanna); B. Sibbles (Barbara); J.P. Brakenhoff (Just); A.H. Cromme-Dijkhuis (Adri); N. Weisglas-Kuperus (Nynke); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); M.A. Boer (Marijke); J.A.M. Smeitink (Jan); O.P. van Diggelen (Otto); E. van der Voort (Edwin); E.J.J.M. van Corven (Emiel); H. van Hirtum (Hans); J.H.J. Kamphoven (Joep); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); J. van Hove (Johan); W.F.M. Arts (Willem Frans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); J.B.C. de Klerk (Johannes); M.C.B. Loonen (Christa); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); M.A. Kroos (Marian); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); L.P.F. Winkel (Léon); G. de Jong (Gerard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be

  16. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.P. van den Hout (Johanna); B. Sibbles (Barbara); J.P. Brakenhoff (Just); A.H. Cromme-Dijkhuis (Adri); N. Weisglas-Kuperus (Nynke); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); M.A. Boer (Marijke); J.A.M. Smeitink (Jan); O.P. van Diggelen (Otto); E. Voort (Edwin); E.J.J.M. van Corven (Emiel); H. van Hirtum (Hans); J.H.J. Kamphoven (Joep); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); J. van Hove (Johan); W.F.M. Arts (Willem Frans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); J.B.C. de Klerk (Johannes); M.C.B. Loonen (Christa); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); M.A. Kroos (Marian); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); L.P.F. Winkel (Léon); G. de Jong (Gerard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be obtain

  17. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hout, J.M. van den; Kamphoven, J.H.; Winkel, L.P.; Arts, W.F.M.; Klerk, J.B.C. de; Loonen, M.C.B.; Vulto, A.G.; Cromme-Dijkhuis, A.H.; Weisglas-Kuperus, N.; Hop, W.C.J.; Hirtum, H. van; Diggelen, O.P. van; Boer, M. de; Kroos, M.A.; Doorn, P.A. van; Voort, E.I. van der; Sibbles, B.; Corven, E.J. van; Brakenhoff, J.P.; Hove, J.L. van; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Jong, G. de; Reuser, A.J.J.; Ploeg, A.T. van der

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be obtained at relatively low costs, ev

  18. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hout, J.M. van den; Kamphoven, J.H.; Winkel, L.P.; Arts, W.F.M.; Klerk, J.B.C. de; Loonen, M.C.B.; Vulto, A.G.; Cromme-Dijkhuis, A.H.; Weisglas-Kuperus, N.; Hop, W.C.J.; Hirtum, H. van; Diggelen, O.P. van; Boer, M. de; Kroos, M.A.; Doorn, P.A. van; Voort, E.I. van der; Sibbles, B.; Corven, E.J. van; Brakenhoff, J.P.; Hove, J.L. van; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Jong, G. de; Reuser, A.J.J.; Ploeg, A.T. van der

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be obtained at relatively low costs, ev

  19. High frequency of acid alpha-glucosidase pseudodeficiency complicates newborn screening for glycogen storage disease type II in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Shingo; Katafuchi, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Endo, Fumio; Oda, Eri; Okuyama, Torayuki; Kroos, Marian A; Reuser, Arnold J J; Okumiya, Toshika

    2009-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of newborn screening for glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII; Pompe disease or acid maltase deficiency) in the Japanese population, we assayed the acid alpha-glucosidase activity in dried blood spots from 715 Japanese newborns and 18 previously diagnosed patients using a fluorometric procedure. The enzyme activity of apparently healthy newborns showed a bimodal distribution. The median activity of the minor group (31 individuals, 4.3% of the samples) was 6.5 times lower than that of the major group. Four of the 715 control samples (0.56%) fell in the patient range. We then analyzed genomic DNA, extracted from the same blood spots, for the occurrence of two sequence variants, c.1726G>A and c.2065G>A, known to cause "pseudodeficiency". This analysis revealed that 27 of 28 individuals homozygous for c.[1726A; 2065A] belonged to the minor group. One c.[1726A; 2065A] homozygote had just slightly higher activity. Twelve of the 18 patients with GSDII either had one (9 cases) or two (3 cases) c.[1726A; 2065A] alleles. The frequency of this allele was double in the patient compared to the control group (0.42 vs 0.19) at the expense of a lower frequency of the c.[1726G; 2065G] and c.[1726G; 2065A] alleles (0.58 vs 0.71 and 0 vs 0.1). These findings illustrate that c.[1726A; 2065A] homozygosity among apparently healthy individuals (3.9 per 100) complicates newborn screening for GSDII in Japan, and further that one or more pathogenic mutations are associated with the c.[1726A; 2065A] allele.

  20. A novel alpha-glucosidase from the moss Scopelophila cataractae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Susumu; Konno, Haruyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Scopelophila cataractae is a rare moss that grows on copper-containing soils. S. cataractae protonema was grown on basal MS medium containing copper. A starch-degrading activity was detected in homogenates of the protonema, after successive extraction with phosphate buffer and buffer containing 3 M LiCl. Buffer-soluble extract (BS) and LiCl-soluble extract (LS) readily hydrolyzed amylopectin to liberate only glucose, which shows that alpha-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.20) in BS and LS hydrolyzed amylopectin. The K(m) value of BS for maltose was 0.427. The K(m) value of BS for malto-oligosaccharide decreased with an increase in the molecular mass of the substrate. The value for maltohexaose was 0.106, which is about four-fold lower than that for maltose. BS was divided into two fractions of alpha-glucosidase (BS-1 and BS-2) by isoelectric focusing. The isoelectric points of these two enzymes were determined to be 4.36 (BS-1) and 5.25 (BS-2) by analytical gel electrofocusing. The two enzymes readily hydrolyzed malto-oligosaccharides. The two enzymes also hydrolyzed amylose, amylopectin and soluble starch at a rate similar to that with maltose. The two enzymes readily hydrolyzed panose to liberate glucose and maltose (1 : 1), and the K(m) value of BS for panose was similar to that for maltotriose, whereas the enzymes hydrolyzed isomaltose only weakly. With regard to substrate specificity, the two enzymes in BS are novel alpha-glucosidases. The two enzymes also hydrolyzed beta-limit dextrin, which has many alpha-1,6-glucosidic linkages near the non-reducing ends, more strongly than maltose, which shows that they do not need a debranching enzyme for starch digestion. The starch-degrading activity of BS was not inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoic acid or alpha-amylase inhibitor. When amylopectin was treated with BS and LS in phosphate buffer, pH 6.0, glucose, but not glucose-1-phosphate, was detected, showing that the extracts did not contain phosphorylase but did contain an

  1. [Development of alpha-glucosidase inhibitor from medicinal herbs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Fang; Xiao, Guochun; Dong, Li; Ma, Zijiao; Ni, Jingman

    2010-06-01

    Alpha-glucosidase inhibitor can reduce the postprandial hyperglycemia and have good effect on preventing and treating the diabetes and diabetic complication. Along with the application of acarbose which is a kind of alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, many research groups pay attention to the crude alpha-glucosidase inhibitor screened from the medicinal herbs in order to find new, safe, and effective medicine. The development of alpha-glucosidase inhibitor screened from the medicinal herbs and its evaluation in vivo and vitro as well as the varieties of the medicinal herbs that contain alpha-glucosidase inhibitor in recent 30 years were summarized in this paper.

  2. [Alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of Aeschynanthus maculatus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Pu-yu; Kang, Wen-yi

    2012-10-01

    To study the inhibitory activity of Aeschynanthus maculatus on alpha-glucosidase. The inhibilitory model of in vitro alpha-glucosidase was established. Active extracts of A. maculatus were isolated and identified bymultiple chromatographic methods, and their molecular structures were identifiied by spectral techniques. Seven coumpounts were isolated from A. maculatus and isolated as lupeol(1), stigmasterol(2), ursolic acid(3), stigmast-5,22(E)-diene-3beta-ol(4), beta-daucosterol(5), 3-hydroxy-12-taraxasten-28-oic-acid(6) and oleanic acid(7). Compounds 1 (IC50 25.41 mg x L(-1)),3(IC0 4.42 mg L(-1)),4(IC50 11.50 mg x L(-1)),6(IC50 14.17 mg x L(-1)) and 7(IC50 2.88 mg x L(-1)) had higher inhibitory activities than that of acarbose (IC50 1103.01 mg x L(-1)) as the positive control drug. Compound 1-7 were isolated from this plant for the first time. Compound 6 was isolated from Gesneriaceae family for the first time. Compound 7 was isolated from Aeschynanthus genus for the first time.

  3. Structural modeling of mutant alpha-glucosidases resulting in a processing/transport defect in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Kanako; Saito, Seiji; Sekijima, Masakazu; Ohno, Kazuki; Tajima, Youichi; Kroos, Marian A; Reuser, Arnold J J; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2009-06-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying transport and processing defects from the viewpoint of enzyme folding, we constructed three-dimensional models of human acid alpha-glucosidase encompassing 27 relevant amino acid substitutions by means of homology modeling. Then, we determined in each separate case the number of affected atoms, the root-mean-square distance value and the solvent-accessible surface area value. The analysis revealed that the amino acid substitutions causing a processing or transport defect responsible for Pompe disease were widely spread over all of the five domains comprising the acid alpha-glucosidase. They were distributed from the core to the surface of the enzyme molecule, and the predicted structural changes varied from large to very small. Among the structural changes, we paid particular attention to G377R and G483R. These two substitutions are predicted to cause electrostatic changes in neighboring small regions on the molecular surface. The quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum apparently detects these very small structural changes and degrades the mutant enzyme precursor (G377R), but also the cellular sorting system might be misled by these minor changes whereby the precursor is secreted instead of being transported to lysosomes (G483R).

  4. [Bioactivity guided isolation of alpha-glucosidase inhibitor from whole herbs of Crossostephium chinense].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Yang, Xiuwei; Zou, Lei; Fu, Dexian

    2009-09-01

    . The compounds 2, 3, 5-7, and 9 showed the strong inhibitory activity against alpha-glucosidase in vitro in the simple competitive manner. The results indicated that these compounds may be involved in the treatment of diabetes in the whole plant of C. chinense for human.

  5. Macroalage as a source of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors were screened from organic solvent extracts of macroalgae by a spectrophotometrical method with p-nitrophenyl-D-glucopyranosidase as the substrate. The result indicates that organic crude extracts from some macroalgae such as Rhodomela confervoides (Huds.) Silva, Gracilaria textorii (Suringar) DeToni, Plocamium telfairiae Harv., Dictyopteris divaricata (Okam.) Okam, Ulval pertusa and Enteromorpha intestinalis (L.) Link et al. show strong inhibitory activity of alpha-glucosidase at concentration of 79.6 μg/ml.

  6. The Role of alpha-Glucosidase in Germinating Barley Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanley, Duncan; Rejzek, Martin; Næsted, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The importance of alpha-glucosidase in the endosperm starch metabolism of barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings is poorly understood. The enzyme converts maltose to glucose (Glc), but in vitro studies indicate that it can also attack starch granules. To discover its role in vivo, we took complementary...... chemical-genetic and reverse-genetic approaches. We identified iminosugar inhibitors of a recombinant form of an alpha-glucosidase previously discovered in barley endosperm (ALPHA-GLUCOSIDASE97 [HvAGL97]), and applied four of them to germinating grains. All four decreased the Glc-to-maltose ratio...... in the endosperm 10 d after imbibition, implying inhibition of maltase activity. Three of the four inhibitors also reduced starch degradation and seedling growth, but the fourth did not affect these parameters. Inhibition of starch degradation was apparently not due to inhibition of amylases. Inhibition...

  7. The Role of alpha-Glucosidase in Germinating Barley Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanley, Duncan; Rejzek, Martin; Næsted, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    in the endosperm 10 d after imbibition, implying inhibition of maltase activity. Three of the four inhibitors also reduced starch degradation and seedling growth, but the fourth did not affect these parameters. Inhibition of starch degradation was apparently not due to inhibition of amylases. Inhibition......The importance of alpha-glucosidase in the endosperm starch metabolism of barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings is poorly understood. The enzyme converts maltose to glucose (Glc), but in vitro studies indicate that it can also attack starch granules. To discover its role in vivo, we took complementary...... silencing cassette for HvAgl97, alpha-glucosidase activity was reduced by up to 50%. There was a large decrease in the Glc-to-maltose ratio in these lines but no effect on starch degradation or seedling growth. Our results suggest that the alpha-glucosidase HvAGL97 is the major endosperm enzyme catalyzing...

  8. alpha-glucosidase inhibitors from Garcinia brevipedicellata (Clusiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoupayo, Joseph; Tabopda, Turibio Kuiate; Ali, Muhammad Shaiq; Tsamo, Etienne

    2008-10-01

    In our continuous search for alpha-glucosidase inhibitors from plants, four new depsidones named brevipsidones A-D (1-4) were isolated from stem bark of Garcinia brevipedicellata together with known damnacanthal, scopoletin and a mixture of stigmasterol and beta-sitosterol. Structural elucidations were made by spectroscopic analyses including 2D-NMR data.

  9. Twenty-two novel mutations in the lysosomal alpha-glucosidase gene (GAA) underscore the genotype-phenotype correlation in glycogen storage disease type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Monique M P; van Leenen, Dik; Kroos, Marian A; Beesley, Clare E; Van Der Ploeg, Ans T; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Wevers, Ron; Kleijer, Wim; Michelakakis, Helen; Kirk, Edwin P; Fletcher, Janice; Bosshard, Nils; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Besley, Guy; Reuser, Arnold J J

    2004-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII, Pompe disease) suffer from progressive muscle weakness due to acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency. The disease is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait with a spectrum of clinical phenotypes. We have investigated 29 cases of GSDII and thereby identified 55 pathogenic mutations of the acid alpha-glucosidase gene (GAA) encoding acid maltase. There were 34 different mutations identified, 22 of which were novel. All of the missense mutations and two other mutations with an unpredictable effect on acid alpha-glucosidase synthesis and function were transiently expressed in COS cells. The effect of a novel splice-site mutation was investigated by real-time PCR analysis. The outcome of our analysis underscores the notion that the clinical phenotype of GSDII is largely dictated by the nature of the mutations in the GAA alleles. This genotype-phenotype correlation makes DNA analysis a valuable tool to help predict the clinical course of the disease.

  10. Antidiabetic property of Symplocos cochinchinensis is mediated by inhibition of alpha glucosidase and enhanced insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalathookunnel Antony Antu

    Full Text Available The study is designed to find out the biochemical basis of antidiabetic property of Symplocos cochinchinensis (SC, the main ingredient of 'Nisakathakadi' an Ayurvedic decoction for diabetes. Since diabetes is a multifactorial disease, ethanolic extract of the bark (SCE and its fractions (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and 90% ethanol were evaluated by in vitro methods against multiple targets relevant to diabetes such as the alpha glucosidase inhibition, glucose uptake, adipogenic potential, oxidative stress, pancreatic beta cell proliferation, inhibition of protein glycation, protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV. Among the extracts, SCE exhibited comparatively better activity like alpha glucosidase inhibition (IC50 value-82.07 ± 2.10 µg/mL, insulin dependent glucose uptake (3 fold increase in L6 myotubes, pancreatic beta cell regeneration in RIN-m5F (3.5 fold increase and reduced triglyceride accumulation (22% decrease in 3T3L1 cells, protection from hyperglycemia induced generation of reactive oxygen species in HepG2 cells (59.57% decrease with moderate antiglycation and PTP-1B inhibition. Chemical characterization by HPLC revealed the superiority of SCE over other extracts due to presence and quantity of bioactives (beta-sitosterol, phloretin 2'glucoside, oleanolic acid in addition to minerals like magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium, zinc and manganese. So SCE has been subjected to oral sucrose tolerance test to evaluate its antihyperglycemic property in mild diabetic and diabetic animal models. SCE showed significant antihyperglycemic activity in in vivo diabetic models. We conclude that SC mediates the antidiabetic activity mainly via alpha glucosidase inhibition, improved insulin sensitivity, with moderate antiglycation and antioxidant activity.

  11. Impaired performance of skeletal muscle in alpha-glucosidase knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, Reinout P; Gorselink, Marchel; Schaart, Gert; Wagenmakers, Anton J M; Kamphoven, Joep; Reuser, Arnold J J; Van Der Vusse, Ger J; Drost, Maarten R

    2002-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD II) is an inherited progressive muscle disease in which lack of functional acid alpha-glucosidase (AGLU) results in lysosomal accumulation of glycogen. We report on the impact of a null mutation of the acid alpha-glucosidase gene (AGLU(-/-)) in mice on the force production capabilities, contractile mass, oxidative capacity, energy status, morphology, and desmin content of skeletal muscle. Muscle function was assessed in halothane-anesthetized animals, using a recently designed murine isometric dynamometer. Maximal torque production during single tetanic contraction was 50% lower in the knockout mice than in wild type. Loss of developed torque was found to be disproportionate to the 20% loss in muscle mass. During a series of supramaximal contraction, fatigue, expressed as percentile decline of developed torque, did not differ between AGLU(-/-) mice and age-matched controls. Muscle oxidative capacity, energy status, and protein content (normalized to either dry or wet weight) were not changed in knockout mice compared to control. Alterations in muscle cell morphology were clearly visible. Desmin content was increased, whereas alpha-actinin was not. As the decline in muscle mass is insufficient to explain the degree in decline of mechanical performance, we hypothesize that the large clusters of noncontractile material present in the cytoplasm hamper longitudinal force transmission, and hence muscle contractile function. The increase in muscular desmin content is most likely reflecting adaptations to altered intracellular force transmission.

  12. alpha-Glucosidase inhibitory pentacyclic triterpenes from the stem bark of Fagara tessmannii (Rutaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaze, Luc Meva'a; Poumale, Herve Martial P; Wansi, Jean Duplex; Lado, Jean Alexandre; Khan, Shamsun Nahar; Iqbal, Muhammad Choudhary; Ngadjui, Bonaventure Tchaleu; Laatsch, Hartmut

    2007-03-01

    In addition to fatty acids, a mixture of sterols (beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, campesterol and stigmastanol), lupeol, arctigenin methylether, sesamin, vanillic acid (1), 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (2), betulinic acid and two pentacyclic triterpene acetates were isolated from Fagara tessmannii Engl. They were identified as 3beta-acetoxy-16beta-hydroxybetulinic acid (3a) and 3beta,16beta-diacetoxybetulinic acid (3b), and their structures were established using 1 and 2D NMR spectra and by comparison with published data. Two derivatives of the compounds were prepared. Some isolated compounds were evaluated for their antifungal and antibacterial activities. Compounds 1 and 3a showed significant inhibition of alpha-glucosidase.

  13. Enzyme-synthesized highly branched maltodextrins have slow glucose generation at the mucosal alpha-glucosidase level and are slowly digestible "in vivo"

    Science.gov (United States)

    For digestion of starch in humans, alpha-amylase first hydrolyzes starch molecules to produce alpha-limit dextrins, followed by complete hydrolysis to glucose by the mucosal alpha-glucosidases in the small intestine. It is known that alpha-1,6 linkages in starch are hydrolyzed at a lower rate than a...

  14. Bio-assay guided isolation of alpha-glucosidase inhibitory constituents from Eclipta alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Gaonkar, Raghuvir H; Ghosh, Rina; Pal, Bikas C

    2012-08-01

    Eclipta alba (L.) Hassk is used traditionally in diabetes mellitus in India and the plant extract is reported to possess anti-diabetic activity. A bioactivity-guided isolation approach based on alpha-glucosidase inhibition was used to identify the constituents contributing towards the inhibition of the enzyme and probably contributing towards its anti-diabetic activity. Four echinocystic acid glycosides were thus isolated, of which eclalbasaponin VI, isolated from the n-butanol fraction, was found to be the most potent (IC50 54.2 +/- 1.3 microM). The compound is an uncompetitive type of inhibitor with Ki 26.1 microM. A quantitative estimation of the constituents was established using RP-HPLC.

  15. The pharmacological chaperone AT2220 increases the specific activity and lysosomal delivery of mutant acid alpha-glucosidase, and promotes glycogen reduction in a transgenic mouse model of Pompe disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richie Khanna

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder that results from a deficiency in acid α-glucosidase (GAA activity due to mutations in the GAA gene. Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of lysosomal glycogen primarily in heart and skeletal muscles, which leads to progressive muscle weakness. We have shown previously that the small molecule pharmacological chaperone AT2220 (1-deoxynojirimycin hydrochloride, duvoglustat hydrochloride binds and stabilizes wild-type as well as multiple mutant forms of GAA, and can lead to higher cellular levels of GAA. In this study, we examined the effect of AT2220 on mutant GAA, in vitro and in vivo, with a primary focus on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER-retained P545L mutant form of human GAA (P545L GAA. AT2220 increased the specific activity of P545L GAA toward both natural (glycogen and artificial substrates in vitro. Incubation with AT2220 also increased the ER export, lysosomal delivery, proteolytic processing, and stability of P545L GAA. In a new transgenic mouse model of Pompe disease that expresses human P545L on a Gaa knockout background (Tg/KO and is characterized by reduced GAA activity and elevated glycogen levels in disease-relevant tissues, daily oral administration of AT2220 for 4 weeks resulted in significant and dose-dependent increases in mature lysosomal GAA isoforms and GAA activity in heart and skeletal muscles. Importantly, oral administration of AT2220 also resulted in significant glycogen reduction in disease-relevant tissues. Compared to daily administration, less-frequent AT2220 administration, including repeated cycles of 4 or 5 days with AT2220 followed by 3 or 2 days without drug, respectively, resulted in even greater glycogen reductions. Collectively, these data indicate that AT2220 increases the specific activity, trafficking, and lysosomal stability of P545L GAA, leads to increased levels of mature GAA in lysosomes, and promotes glycogen reduction in situ. As

  16. The pharmacological chaperone AT2220 increases the specific activity and lysosomal delivery of mutant acid alpha-glucosidase, and promotes glycogen reduction in a transgenic mouse model of Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Richie; Powe, Allan C; Lun, Yi; Soska, Rebecca; Feng, Jessie; Dhulipala, Rohini; Frascella, Michelle; Garcia, Anadina; Pellegrino, Lee J; Xu, Su; Brignol, Nastry; Toth, Matthew J; Do, Hung V; Lockhart, David J; Wustman, Brandon A; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Pompe disease is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder that results from a deficiency in acid α-glucosidase (GAA) activity due to mutations in the GAA gene. Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of lysosomal glycogen primarily in heart and skeletal muscles, which leads to progressive muscle weakness. We have shown previously that the small molecule pharmacological chaperone AT2220 (1-deoxynojirimycin hydrochloride, duvoglustat hydrochloride) binds and stabilizes wild-type as well as multiple mutant forms of GAA, and can lead to higher cellular levels of GAA. In this study, we examined the effect of AT2220 on mutant GAA, in vitro and in vivo, with a primary focus on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-retained P545L mutant form of human GAA (P545L GAA). AT2220 increased the specific activity of P545L GAA toward both natural (glycogen) and artificial substrates in vitro. Incubation with AT2220 also increased the ER export, lysosomal delivery, proteolytic processing, and stability of P545L GAA. In a new transgenic mouse model of Pompe disease that expresses human P545L on a Gaa knockout background (Tg/KO) and is characterized by reduced GAA activity and elevated glycogen levels in disease-relevant tissues, daily oral administration of AT2220 for 4 weeks resulted in significant and dose-dependent increases in mature lysosomal GAA isoforms and GAA activity in heart and skeletal muscles. Importantly, oral administration of AT2220 also resulted in significant glycogen reduction in disease-relevant tissues. Compared to daily administration, less-frequent AT2220 administration, including repeated cycles of 4 or 5 days with AT2220 followed by 3 or 2 days without drug, respectively, resulted in even greater glycogen reductions. Collectively, these data indicate that AT2220 increases the specific activity, trafficking, and lysosomal stability of P545L GAA, leads to increased levels of mature GAA in lysosomes, and promotes glycogen reduction in situ. As such, AT2220 may

  17. In vitro alpha glucosidase inhibition and free-radical scavenging activity of propolis from Thai stingless bees in mangosteen orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonyadist Vongsak

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe chemical component and biological activity of propolis depend on flora area of bee collection and bee species. In the study, the propolis from three stingless bee species, Lepidotrigona ventralis Smith, Lepidotrigona terminata Smith, and Tetragonula pagdeni Schwarz, was collected in the same region of mangosteen garden from Thailand. Total phenolic content, alpha glucosidase inhibitory effect, and free-radical scavenging activity using FRAP, ABTS, DPPH assays were determined. The most potent activity of propolis extract was investigated for bioactive compounds and their quantity. The ethanol extract of T. pagdeni propolis had the highest total phenolic content 12.83 ± 0.72 g of gallic acid equivalents in 100 g of the extract, and the strongest alpha glucosidase inhibitory effect with the IC50 of 70.79 ± 6.44 µg/ml. The free-radical scavenging activity evaluated by FRAP, ABTS, DPPH assays showed the FRAP value of 279.70 ± 20.55 µmol FeSO4 equivalent/g extract and the IC50 of 59.52 ± 10.76 and 122.71 ± 11.76 µg/ml, respectively. Gamma- and alpha-mangostin from T. pagdeni propolis extract were isolated and determined for the biological activity. Gamma-mangostin exhibited the strongest activity for both alpha glucosidase inhibitory effect and free-radical scavenging activity. Using HPLC quantitative analysis method, the content of gamma- and alpha-mangostin in the extract was found to be 0.94 ± 0.01 and 2.77 ± 0.08% (w/w, respectively. These findings suggested that T. pagdeni propolis may be used as a more suitable raw material for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical products and these mangostin derivatives as markers.

  18. The role of alpha-glucosidase in germinating barley grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Duncan; Rejzek, Martin; Naested, Henrik; Smedley, Mark; Otero, Sofía; Fahy, Brendan; Thorpe, Frazer; Nash, Robert J; Harwood, Wendy; Svensson, Birte; Denyer, Kay; Field, Robert A; Smith, Alison M

    2011-02-01

    The importance of α-glucosidase in the endosperm starch metabolism of barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings is poorly understood. The enzyme converts maltose to glucose (Glc), but in vitro studies indicate that it can also attack starch granules. To discover its role in vivo, we took complementary chemical-genetic and reverse-genetic approaches. We identified iminosugar inhibitors of a recombinant form of an α-glucosidase previously discovered in barley endosperm (ALPHA-GLUCOSIDASE97 [HvAGL97]), and applied four of them to germinating grains. All four decreased the Glc-to-maltose ratio in the endosperm 10 d after imbibition, implying inhibition of maltase activity. Three of the four inhibitors also reduced starch degradation and seedling growth, but the fourth did not affect these parameters. Inhibition of starch degradation was apparently not due to inhibition of amylases. Inhibition of seedling growth was primarily a direct effect of the inhibitors on roots and coleoptiles rather than an indirect effect of the inhibition of endosperm metabolism. It may reflect inhibition of glycoprotein-processing glucosidases in these organs. In transgenic seedlings carrying an RNA interference silencing cassette for HvAgl97, α-glucosidase activity was reduced by up to 50%. There was a large decrease in the Glc-to-maltose ratio in these lines but no effect on starch degradation or seedling growth. Our results suggest that the α-glucosidase HvAGL97 is the major endosperm enzyme catalyzing the conversion of maltose to Glc but is not required for starch degradation. However, the effects of three glucosidase inhibitors on starch degradation in the endosperm indicate the existence of unidentified glucosidase(s) required for this process.

  19. Purification, enzymatic characterization, and nucleotide sequence of a high-isoelectric-point alpha-glucosidase from barley malt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, T P; Lok, F; Mirgorodskaya, E;

    2000-01-01

    High-isoelectric-point (pI) alpha-glucosidase was purified 7, 300-fold from an extract of barley (Hordeum vulgare) malt by ammonium sulfate fractionation, ion-exchange, and butyl-Sepharose chromatography. The enzyme had high activity toward maltose (k(cat) = 25 s(-1)), with an optimum at pH 4...... in the transition state complex. Mass spectrometry of tryptic fragments assigned the 92-kD protein to a barley cDNA (GenBank accession no. U22450) that appears to encode an alpha-glucosidase. A corresponding sequence (HvAgl97; GenBank accession no. AF118226) was isolated from a genomic phage library using a c......DNA fragment from a barley cDNA library. HvAgl97 encodes a putative 96.6-kD protein of 879 amino acids with 93.8% identity to the protein deduced from U22450. The sequence contains two active site motifs of glycoside hydrolase family 31. Three introns of 86 to 4,286 bp interrupt the coding region. The four...

  20. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitory and antiplasmodial properties of terpenoids from the leaves of Buddleja saligna Willd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwujekwu, Jude C; Rengasamy, Kannan R R; de Kock, Carmen A; Smith, Peter J; Slavětínská, Lenka Poštová; van Staden, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    In our continuing search for biologically active natural product(s) of plant origin, Buddleja saligna, a South African medicinal plant, was screened in line with its traditional use for antidiabetic (yeast alpha glucosidase inhibitory) and antiplasmodial (against a chloroquine sensitive strain of Plasmodium falciparum (NF54)) activities. The hexane fraction showed the most promising activity with regards to its antidiabetic (IC(50) = 260 ± 0.112 µg/ml) and antiplasmodial (IC(50) = 8.5 ± 1.6 µg/ml) activities. Using activity guided fractionation three known terpenoids (betulonic acid, betulone and spinasterol) were isolated from this species for the first time. The compounds displayed varying levels of biological activities (antidiabetic: 27.31 µg/ml ≥ IC(50) ≥ 5.6 µg/ml; antiplasmodial: 14 µg/ml ≥ IC(50) ≥ 2 µg/ml) with very minimal toxicity.

  1. Cuminaldehyde: Aldose Reductase and alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitor Derived from Cuminum cyminum L. Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2005-04-06

    The inhibitory activity of Cuminum cyminum seed-isolated component was evaluated against lens aldose reductase and alpha-glucosidase isolated from Sprague-Dawley male rats and compared to that of 11 commercially available components derived from C. cyminum seed oil, as well as quercitrin as an aldose reductase inhibitor and acarbose as an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. The biologically active constituent of C. cyminum seed oil was characterized as cuminaldehyde by various spectral analyses. The IC(50) value of cuminaldehyde is 0.00085 mg/mL against aldose reductase and 0.5 mg/mL against alpha-glucosidase, respectively. Cuminaldehyde was about 1.8 and 1.6 times less in inhibitory activity than acarbose and quercitin, respectively. Nonetheless, cuminaldehyde may be useful as a lead compound and a new agent for antidiabetic therapeutics.

  2. Unexpected high digestion rate of cooked starch by the Ct-Maltase-Glucoamylase small intestine mucosal alpha-glucosidase subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    For starch digestion to glucose, two luminal alpha-amylases and four gut mucosal alpha-glucosidase subunits are employed. The aim of this research was to investigate, for the first time, direct digestion capability of individual mucosal alpha-glucosidases on cooked (gelatinized) starch. Gelatinized ...

  3. Effective Control of Postprandial Glucose Level through Inhibition of Intestinal Alpha Glucosidase by Cymbopogon martinii (Roxb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Ghadyale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of intestinal alpha glucosidase plays a major role in preventing rise in postprandial glucose level in diabetics. Cymbopogon martinii (CM (family Poaceae is used in traditional Indian medicine in treatment of diabetes mellitus. The alpha glucosidase inhibitory action of the plant is studied. The active component was separated using hot water extraction of the whole plant powder, differential solvent extraction, and silica gel column chromatography. The 30 : 70 toluene : ethyl acetate fraction showed optimum activity. The silica gel chromatography fraction demonstrated 98, 98, and 68% inhibition for starch, maltose, and sucrose, respectively, at 5 mg/kg body weight of rats. Intestinal absorption studies using noneverted intestinal sacs, as well as in vivo studies in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats using oral glucose tolerance with maltose and sucrose load, revealed better inhibition of alpha glucosidase as compared to acarbose. Kinetic studies using Lineweaver Burk plot showed mixed to noncompetitive type of inhibition by CM. In vivo studies with maltose load of 2 mg and 3 mg/gm body weight showed a noncompetitive pattern of inhibition at 5 mg/kg body weight of CM as against 60 mg/kg body weight of acarbose. Thus CM is more effective alpha glucosidase inhibitor and at lower concentration than acarbose.

  4. Purification and partial characterization of three forms of alpha-glucosidase from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, T; Kitamura, K; Fukuda, T; Kikuchi, T

    1979-01-01

    Three forms of alpha-glucosidase, I, II, and III, have been purified from the whole body extract of adult flies of Drosophila melanogaster in yields of 2.1, 5.3, and 6.7%, respectively. The purification procedures involved ammonium sulfate fractionation, Con A-Sepharose 4B affinity chromatography, DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B ion exchange chromatography, Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration, and preparative gel electrophoresis. Each purified enzyme showed a single band on polyacrylamide gel on both protein and enzyme activity staining. The molecular weights of alpha-glucosidases I, II, and III were estimated to be 200,000, 56,000, and 76,000, respectively, by gel filtration. SDS gels indicated that alpha-glucosidases II and III were each composed of a single polypeptide chain, whereas alpha-glucosidase I was composed of two identical subunits. Both alpha-glucosidases II and III hydrolyzed sucrose and p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucoside (PNPG), but alpha-glucosidase I hydrolyzed PNPG to a much lesser extent than sucrose. For sucrose the pH optima of alpha-glucosidases I, II, and III were pH 6.0, 5.0, and 6.0 and the Km values were 13.1, 8.9, and 10 mM, respectively. For PNPG the pH optima of alpha-glucosidases II and III were pH 5.5 and 6.5 and the Km values were 0.77 and 0.21 mM, respectively.

  5. Oligomeric procyanidins of French maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol) effectively inhibit alpha-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Angelika; Högger, Petra

    2007-07-01

    The standardized maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol) was reported to exert clinical anti-diabetic effects after peroral intake. However, an increased insulin secretion was not observed after administration of the extract to patients. Our aim was to elucidate whether the described clinical effects of Pycnogenol are related to inhibition of alpha-glucosidase. Therefore, we analyzed the inhibitory activity of Pycnogenol, green tea extract and acarbose towards alpha-glucosidase. Furthermore, we explored different fractions of Pycnogenol containing compounds of diverse molecular masses from polyphenolic monomers, dimers and higher oligomers to uncover which components exhibited the most pronounced inhibitory activity. We found that Pycnogenol exhibited the most potent inhibition (IC(50) about 5 microg/mL) on alpha-glucosidase compared to green tea extract (IC(50) about 20 microg/mL) and acarbose (IC(50) about 1mg/mL). The inhibitory action of Pycnogenol was stronger in extract fractions containing higher procyanidin oligomers. The results obtained assign a novel, local effect to oligomeric procyanidins and contribute to the explanation of glucose-lowering effects of Pycnogenol observed in clinical trials with diabetic patients.

  6. Screening alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors from natural compounds by molecular docking in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhong, Chien-Hung; Riyaphan, Jirawat; Lin, Shih-Hung; Chia, Yi-Chen; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The alpha-glucosidase inhibitor is a common oral anti-diabetic drug used for controlling carbohydrates normally converted into simple sugars and absorbed by the intestines. However, some adverse clinical effects have been observed. The present study seeks an alternative drug that can regulate the hyperglycemia by down-regulating alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activity by molecular docking approach to screen the hyperglycemia antagonist against alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activities from the 47 natural compounds. The docking data showed that Curcumin, 16-hydroxy-cleroda-3,13-dine-16,15-olide (16-H), Docosanol, Tetracosanol, Antroquinonol, Berberine, Catechin, Quercetin, Actinodaphnine, and Rutin from 47 natural compounds had binding ability towards alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase as well. Curcumin had a better biding ability of alpha-amylase than the other natural compounds. Analyzed alpha-glucosidase activity reveals natural compound inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) are Curcumin, Actinodaphnine, 16-H, Quercetin, Berberine, and Catechin when compared to the commercial drug Acarbose (3 mM). A natural compound with alpha-amylase inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) includes Curcumin, Berberine, Docosanol, 16-H, Actinodaphnine/Tetracosanol, Catechin, and Quercetin when compared to Acarbose (1 mM). When taken together, the implication is that molecular docking is a fast and effective way to screen alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors as lead compounds of natural sources isolated from medicinal plants. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. An alpha-glucosidase inhibitor from an endophytic Cladosporium sp. with potential as a biocontrol agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bahaderjeet; Kaur, Tamanreet; Kaur, Sanehdeep; Manhas, Rajesh K; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2015-02-01

    This study highlights the importance of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors as mechanisms for endophyte-mediated resistance to insect pests. One of the major benefits which endophytes confer on plants is providing resistance against insect pests. This built-in defense mechanism of the plant can be used for exploring ecofriendly strategies for pest control. In the present study, 34 endophytic fungi were isolated from Tinospora cordifolia and screened for their ability to produce alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. Maximum inhibitory activity was observed in an isolate from T. cordifolia (TN-9S), identified to be Cladosporium sp. The inhibitor was purified using chromatographic techniques. The insecticidal activity of the purified inhibitor was evaluated against Spodoptera litura. The inhibitor induced a significant mortality in the larvae of S. litura and adversely affected its survival and development. It also inhibited the activity of α-glycosidases in vivo in the gut of the larvae. The purified inhibitor was determined to be a phenolic compound with amine groups, demonstrating a noncompetitive type of inhibition in vitro. The production of the inhibitor was optimized. Response surface methodology (RSM) analysis revealed a significant interaction between dextrose and malt extract, with first-order effect of pH.

  8. Screening of endophytic fungi having ability for antioxidative and alpha-glucosidase inhibitor activities isolated from Taxus sumatrana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artanti, N; Tachibana, S; Kardono, L B S; Sukiman, H

    2011-11-15

    Endophytic microbes are considered as an important source of natural products. They show antibiotic, anticancer, antioxidative and antidiabetic activities. Therefore, there are many reports on the isolation and bioactivity screening of endophytic fungi from various plants including Taxus species. Taxus sumatrana (Miq.) de Laub is found in Indonesia. The objective of this study is to conduct an in vitro screening of 14 endophytic fungi isolated from Taxus sumatrana having antioxidative and alpha-glucosidase inhibitor activities. Each endophytic fungus was cultured for 7 days and the fungal mycelium and medium were extracted with methanol and ethyl acetate, respectively, to produce each extract. The antioxidative activity of each extract was tested by DPPH free radical scavenging activity and beta-carotene bleaching assays, whereas antidiabetic activity was tested based on alpha-glucosidase inhibitor activity. The screening results showed that fungal mycelia of TSC 13 had the best alpha-glucosidase inhibitor activity and TSC 24 had the best antioxidative activity. Isolation of bioactive compounds from TSC 13 and TSC 24 is being conducted. This is the first report that endophytic fungi isolated from T. sumatrana exhibited anti alpha-glucosidase inhibitory and anti oxidative activities.

  9. Modulation of starch digestion for slow glucose release through "toggling" of activities of mucosal "alpha"-glucosidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starch digestion involves the breakdown by alpha-amylase to small linear and branched malto-oligosaccharides, which are in turn hydrolyzed to glucose by the mucosal alpha-glucosidases, maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI). MGAM and SI are anchored to the small intestinal brush-bor...

  10. AGI, a previously unreported D. melanogaster {alpha}-glucosidase: Partial purification, characterization, and cytogenetic mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, G.F.; Roberts, D.B. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    Inbred Drosophila melanogaster stocks were surveyed for {alpha}-glucosidases with nondenaturing gel electrophoresis using a fluorogenic substrate to stain the gels. The glucosidase most active under these conditions is polymorphic. We established that the polymorphism is genetic in origin and that the glucosidase was not likely to be a previously characterized enzyme. The gene encoding the enzyme was mapped cytogenetically to 33 A1-2- 33A8-B1, confirming that this is an enzyme not yet reported in D. melanogaster. The enzyme was partially purified by elution from nondenaturing gels, which enable us to establish that it has optimal activity at pH 6 and interacts most strongly with {alpha}- 1 -4 glucosides. A developmental and tissue survey suggested that this enzyme could have a purely digestive role or be involved in carbohydrate metabolism inside the organism. We propose that this enzyme is involved in either starch digestion or glycogen metabolism. 37 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. AGI, a previously unreported D. melanogaster alpha-glucosidase: partial purification, characterization, and cytogenetic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, G F; Roberts, D B

    1996-04-01

    Inbred Drosophila melanogaster stocks were surveyed for alpha-glucosidases with nondenaturing gel electrophoresis using a fluorogenic substrate to stain the gels. The glucosidase most active under these conditions is polymorphic. We established that the polymorphism is genetic in origin and that the glucosidase was not likely to be a previously characterized enzyme. The gene encoding the enzyme was mapped cytogenetically to 33 A1-2- 33A8-B1, confirming that this is an enzyme not yet reported in D. melanogaster. The enzyme was partially purified by elution from nondenaturing gels, which enabled us to establish that it has optimal activity at pH 6 and interacts most strongly with alpha-1-4 glucosides. A developmental and tissue survey suggested that this enzyme could have a purely digestive role or be involved in carbohydrate metabolism inside the organism. We propose that this enzyme is involved in either starch digestion or glycogen metabolism.

  12. Inhibitory Properties of Aqueous Ethanol Extracts of Propolis on Alpha-Glucosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongcheng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the inhibitory properties of various extracts of propolis on alpha-glucosidase from baker’s yeast and mammalian intestine. Inhibitory activities of aqueous ethanol extracts of propolis were determined by using 4-nitrophenyl-D-glucopyranoside, sucrose and maltose as substrates, and acarbose as a positive reference. All extracts were significantly effective in inhibiting α-glucosidase from baker’s yeast and rat intestinal sucrase in comparison with acarbose (P<0.05. The 75% ethanol extracts of propolis (75% EEP showed the highest inhibitory effect on α-glucosidase and sucrase and were a noncompetitive inhibition mode. 50% EEP, 95%, EEP and 100% EEP exhibited a mixed inhibition mode, while water extracts of propolis (WEP and 25% EEP demonstrated a competitive inhibition mode. Furthermore, WEP presented the highest inhibitory activity against maltase. These results suggest that aqueous ethanol extracts of propolis may be used as nutraceuticals for the regulation of postprandial hyperglycemia.

  13. Evaluation of anti-diabetic and alpha glucosidase inhibitory action of anthraquinones from Rheum emodi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvindekar, Aditya; More, Tanaji; Payghan, Pavan V; Laddha, Kirti; Ghoshal, Nanda; Arvindekar, Akalpita

    2015-08-01

    Rheum emodi is used as a culinary plant across the world and finds an eminent role in the Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese systems of medicine. The plant is known to principally contain 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinones (DHAQs) like rhein, aloe emodin, emodin, chrysophanol and physcion that possess diverse pharmacological and therapeutic actions. The present work deals with developing a platform technology for isolation of these DHAQs and evaluating their anti-diabetic potential. Herein, we report the anti-hyperglycemic activity and alpha glucosidase (AG) inhibitory actions of five isolated DHAQs from R. emodi. All the five isolated DHAQs showed good anti-hyperglycemic activity with aloe emodin exhibiting maximum lowering of blood glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test. However, on evaluation of the AG inhibitory potential of the DHAQs only emodin exhibited potent intestinal AG inhibition (93 ± 2.16%) with an IC50 notably lower than acarbose. Subsequent kinetic studies indicated a mixed type of inhibition for emodin. In vivo studies using oral maltose load showed almost total inhibition for emodin when compared to acarbose. Molecular docking studies revealed the presence of an allosteric topographically distinct 'quinone binding site' and showed that interaction with Ser 74 occurs exclusively with emodin, which is vital for AG inhibition. The net benefit from the glucose lowering effect and mixed type inhibition by emodin would enable the administration of a small dosage that is safe and non-toxic in the case of prolonged use in treating diabetes.

  14. [Chemical constituents from Psoralea corylifolia and their antioxidant alpha-glucosidase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian-Xiao; Yin, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Tao; Kang, Wen-Yi

    2013-07-01

    Twelve compounds were isolated from Psoralea corylifolia and their structures were identified as isopsoralen (1), psoralen (2), 8-methoxypsoralen (3), psoralidin (4), corylin (5), bavachin (6), daidzein (7), corylifolinin (8), bavachinin (9), neobavaisoflavone (10), daidzin (11) and astragalin (12). The results showed that psoralidin had the activity of scavenging DPPH free radicals activity (IC50 43.85 mg x L(-1)). Psoralidin (IC50 1.32 mg x L(-1))c, oryfolin (IC50 4.97 mg x L(-1)), daidzin (IC50 10.47 mg x S(-1)), daidzein (IC50 34.22 mg) x L(-1)) and astragalin (IC50 31.27 mg x L(-1)) had the activity of scavenging ABTS free radical. Psoralidin (IC50 40.74 mg x L(-1)), coryfolin (IC50 45.73 mg x L(-1)) and daidzein (IC50 49.44 mg x L(-1)) had alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Corylifolinin and neobavaisoflavone had significantly effect of inhibiting SA, MRSA and ESBLs-SA (MIC 0. 781 3, 1.562, 5, 0.781 25 microg x disc(-1) and 6.25, 6.25, 6.25 microg x disc(-1).

  15. Purification and biochemical characterization of an alpha-glucosidase from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Dolores; Linde, Dolores; Fernández Lobato, María

    2006-01-30

    Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous grown in different media shows amylolytic activity, consisting in an extracellular exo-acting enzyme able to hydrolysed alpha,1-4 glycosidic bonds from soluble starch, which also cleaves maltose and malto-oligosaccharides. The enzyme was purified, using basically a couple of chromatography process on DEAE-Sephacel. It is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight estimated to be 60.2 kDa based on its mobility in SDS-PAGE and 115 kDa based on gel filtration. N-linked carbohydrate accounts for 12% of the total mass. It exhibited optimum activity at pH 5.5 and 45 degrees C. Thermostability analysis indicated that it was stable to thermal treatment up to 50 degrees C; 50% of the activity was maintained after 3 h. The rate parameters measured for the hydrolysis of starch and various chain length malto-oligosaccharides shows high catalytic efficiency, calculated by the relationship V(cat)/K(m), for malto-oligosaccharides, such as maltotriose (873 mM(-1) min(-1)), or maltoheptose (698 mM(-1) min(-1)). The new enzyme hydrolysed soluble starch with nearly 3.5- and 1.4-fold lower efficiency than that for maltotriose and maltose, respectively. No activity was found on heterogeneous substrates, such as sucrose and aryl alpha-glucoside, or on isomalto-oligosaccharides. In accordance to substrate specificity profile, the new enzyme was classified as an alpha-glucosidase.

  16. Chemical chaperones improve transport and enhance stability of mutant alpha-glucosidases in glycogen storage disease type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumiya, Toshika; Kroos, Marian A; Vliet, Laura Van; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Van der Ploeg, Ans T; Reuser, Arnold J J

    2007-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII; Pompe disease or acid maltase deficiency) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (AalphaGlu) deficiency and manifests predominantly as skeletal muscle weakness. Defects in post-translational modification and transport of mutant AalphaGlu species are frequently encountered and may potentially be corrected with chaperone-mediated therapy. In the present study, we have tested this hypothesis by using deoxynojirimycin and derivatives as chemical chaperones to correct the AalphaGlu deficiency in cultured fibroblasts from patients with GSDII. Four mutant phenotypes were chosen: Y455F/Y455F, P545L/P545L, 525del/R600C and D645E/R854X. In case of Y455F/Y455F and P545L/P545L, N-(n-butyl)deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) restored the transport, maturation and activity of AalphaGlu in a dose dependent manner, while it had no effect on the reference enzyme beta-hexosaminidase. NB-DNJ promoted export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the lysosomes and stabilized the activity of mutant AalphaGlu species, Y455F and P545L, inside the lysosomes. In long-term culture, the AalphaGlu activity in the fibroblasts from the patients with mutant phenotypes, Y455F/Y455F and P545L/P545L, increased up to 14.0- and 7.9-fold, respectively, in the presence of 10mumol/L NB-DNJ. However, the effect of NB-DNJ on Y455F/Y455F subsided quickly after removal of the compound. We conclude that NB-DNJ acts in low concentration as chemical chaperone for certain mutant forms of AalphaGlu that are trapped in the ER, poorly transported or labile in the lysosomal environment. Chemical chaperone therapy could create new perspectives for therapeutic intervention in GSDII.

  17. Enzyme-assisted extraction of phenolics from winemaking by-products: Antioxidant potential and inhibition of alpha-glucosidase and lipase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; Regitano-d'Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Biasoto, Aline Camarão Telles; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2016-12-01

    Phenolics in food and agricultural processing by-products exist in the soluble and insoluble-bound forms. The ability of selected enzymes in improving the extraction of insoluble-bound phenolics from the starting material (experiment I) or the residues containing insoluble-bound phenolics (experiment II) were evaluated. Pronase and Viscozyme improved the extraction of insoluble-bound phenolics as evaluated by total phenolic content, antioxidant potential as determined by ABTS and DPPH assays, and hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity, reducing power as well as evaluation of inhibition of alpha-glucosidase and lipase activities. Viscozyme released higher amounts of gallic acid, catechin, and prodelphinidin dimer A compared to Pronase treatment. Furthermore, p-coumaric and caffeic acids, as well as procyanidin dimer B, were extracted with Viscozyme but not with Pronase treatment. Solubility plays an important role in the bioavailability of phenolic compounds, hence this study may assist in better exploitation of phenolics from winemaking by-products as functional food ingredients and/or supplements.

  18. Functional significance of amylase polymorphism in Drosophila melanogaster. III. Ontogeny of amylase and some alpha-glucosidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorn, A J; Scharloo, W

    1980-02-01

    Changes in amylase (E.C. 3.2.1.1), maltase (E.C. 3.2.1.20), sucrase, and PNPGase activities in relation to changes in wet weight and protein content were studied during the development of larvae and adult flies from two strains of Drosophila melanogaster, homozygous for different amylase alleles. All alpha-glucosidase activities increase exponentially during a large part of larval development, parallel to the increase in weight, and drop at the end of the third instar. Amylase activity of the Amy1 strain follows the same pattern. In contrast, amylase activity of the Amy4,6 strain continues its exponential increase longer. In the third larval instar amylase activity in the Amy4,6 strain becomes much higher than in the Amy1 strain. During the first hours of adult life amylase activity of the two strains does not differ. Then Amy4,6 activity starts to rise and becomes much higher (4-5 times) than Amy1 amylase activity, which remains approximately constant. All adult enzyme activities are much higher than in larvae. Comparison of enzyme activity of amylase and alpha-glucosidases in larvae and adults confirms that differences in amylase activities can become important only when starch is a limiting factor in the food.

  19. Nutrient Content, Phytonutrient Composition, Alpha Amylase, Alpha Glucosidase Inhibition Activity and Antioxidant Activity of the Stoechospermum Marginatum Collected in Pre Monsoon Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reka Palanivel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the nutrient content, phytonutrient composition, physicochemical properties, alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibition activity and antioxidant activity of the brown algae Stoechospermum marginatum collected from Gulf of Mannar, Tamil Nadu, India in pre monsoon season (June- September, 2015. Six and eight hours of ethanol and aqueous extract of Stoechospermum marginatum were used for phytonutrient screening, alpha amylase, alpha glucosidase inhibition activity and antioxidant activity. From the results of the study it is understood that Stoechospermum marginatum contain a high amount of carbohydrate, protein, crude fiber and phytonutrients like tannin, flavonoid, saponin, alkaloid, terpenoids, steroid and total phenolic content. The physicochemical properties namely Water absorption and Swelling power were very promising. Alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibition activity was recorded to be high in both aqueous and ethanol extracts of eight hour extraction than in extracts taken from six hours extraction. Antioxidant activity was detected using DPPH, FRAP, beta carotene scavenging and H2O2 assay and found to have a high radical scavenging activity. Stoechospermum marginatum possess a valuable amount of total phenolic content and other phytonutrients and physicochemical properties, it may the reason for the potential inhibition of alpha amylase, alpha glucosidase and antioxidant activity. It is concluded from the study that the brown algae may be incorporated into foods to enhance their nutritional and therapeutic value.

  20. Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis following alpha-glucosidase inhibitor treatment: A case report and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatsuhiro Tsujimoto; Hiroshi Fukui; Erika Shioyama; Kei Moriya; Hideto Kawaratani; Yasuyo Shirai; Masahisa Toyohara; Akira Mitoro; Jun-ichi Yarnao; Hisao Fujii

    2008-01-01

    A 69-year-old man was diagnosed as having myasthenia gravis (MG) in September 2004, and treated with thymectomy and prednisolone. He was then diagnosed as having steroid-induced diabetes mellitus, and received sulfonylurea (SU) therapy in May 2005. An alpha-glucosidase inhibitor (αGI) was added in March 2006, resulting in good glycemic control. He experienced symptoms of abdominal distention, increased flatus, and constipation in October 2007, and was admitted into our hospital in late November with hematochezia. Plain abdominal radiography revealed small linear radiolucent clusters in the wall of the colon. Computed tomography (CT) showed intramural air in the sigmoid colon. Colonoscopy revealed multiple smooth surfaced hemispherical protrusions in the sigmoid colon. The diagnosis of pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) was made on the basis of these findings. As the αGI voglibose was suspected as the cause of this patient's PCI, treatment was conservative, ceasing voglibose, with fasting and fluid supplementation. The patient progressed well, and was discharged 2 wk later. Recently, several reports of PCI associated with αGI therapy have been published, predominantly in Japan where αGIs are commonly used. If the use of αGIs becomes more widespread, we can expect more reports of this condition on a global scale. The possibility of PCI should be considered in diabetic patients complaining of gastrointestinal symptoms, and the gastrointestinal tract should be thoroughly investigated in these patients.

  1. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and hepatotoxicity in type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longhao; Chen, Qiyan; Li, Ling; Kwong, Joey S. W.; Jia, Pengli; Zhao, Pujing; Wang, Wen; Zhou, Xu; Zhang, Mingming; Sun, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) was reported to be associated with several rare adverse hepatic events, but with inconsistent results. We aimed to investigate the risk of hepatotoxicity associated with the use of AGIs in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. Fourteen studies (n = 2881) were eligible, all of which were RCTs. Meta-analysis of data regarding elevation of more than 3-fold the upper limit of normal (ULN) of AST and ALT showed statistically significant differences between AGIs treatment versus control (OR 6.86, 95% CI 2.50 to 18.80; OR 6.48, 95% CI 2.40 to 17.49). Subgroup analyses of elevation of more than 1.8-fold ULN of AST and ALT by dose of AGIs showed differential effects on AST and ALT (AST: OR 0.38 vs 7.31, interaction P = 0.003 ALT: OR 0.32 vs 4.55, interaction p = 0.02). Meta-analysis showed that AGIs might increase the risk of hepatotoxicity, and higher dose appeared to be associated with higher risk of hepatotoxicity. However, the evidence is limited with surrogate measures (i.e. ALT and AST), and no clinically important adverse events were observed.

  2. Miconia sp. Increases mRNA Levels of PPAR Gamma and Inhibits Alpha Amylase and Alpha Glucosidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortíz-Martinez, David Mizael; Rivas-Morales, Catalina; de la Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angelica; Verde-Star, Maria Julia; Nuñez-Gonzalez, Maria Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem worldwide. For this reason, ethanolic extract of Miconia sp. from Oaxaca, Mexico, was selected in search of an alternative against this disease. The effect of Miconia sp. on mRNA expression of PPARγ on cell line 3T3-L1, its effect on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase, lipid accumulation during adipogenesis, and cell viability on VERO cells were evaluated. The mRNA levels of PPARγ increased on 1.393 ± 0.008 folds, lipid accumulation was increased by 29.55% with Miconia sp. extract and 34.57% with rosiglitazone, and α-amylase and α-glycosidase were inhibited with IC50 values from 28.23 ± 2.15 μg/mL and 1.95 ± 0.15 μg/mL, respectively; the IC50 on antiproliferative activity on VERO cells was 314.54 ± 45.40 μg/mL. In case of α-amylase and α-glycosidase assays, IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50) refers to necessary extract amounts to inhibit 50% of enzymatic activity. On the other hand, on antiproliferative activity, IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50) refers to necessary extract amounts to inhibit 50% of cell proliferation. It was concluded that the compounds present in Miconia sp. ethanolic extract increase mRNA expression of PPARγ, inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase, and increase lipid accumulation. It constitutes an alternative as adjuvant in diabetes mellitus treatment; therefore, we recommend continuing identifying the compounds responsible for its promising in vivo antidiabetic activity. PMID:27478477

  3. Miconia sp. Increases mRNA Levels of PPAR Gamma and Inhibits Alpha Amylase and Alpha Glucosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mizael Ortíz-Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem worldwide. For this reason, ethanolic extract of Miconia sp. from Oaxaca, Mexico, was selected in search of an alternative against this disease. The effect of Miconia sp. on mRNA expression of PPARγ on cell line 3T3-L1, its effect on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase, lipid accumulation during adipogenesis, and cell viability on VERO cells were evaluated. The mRNA levels of PPARγ increased on 1.393±0.008 folds, lipid accumulation was increased by 29.55% with Miconia sp. extract and 34.57% with rosiglitazone, and α-amylase and α-glycosidase were inhibited with IC50 values from 28.23±2.15 μg/mL and 1.95±0.15 μg/mL, respectively; the IC50 on antiproliferative activity on VERO cells was 314.54±45.40 μg/mL. In case of α-amylase and α-glycosidase assays, IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50 refers to necessary extract amounts to inhibit 50% of enzymatic activity. On the other hand, on antiproliferative activity, IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50 refers to necessary extract amounts to inhibit 50% of cell proliferation. It was concluded that the compounds present in Miconia sp. ethanolic extract increase mRNA expression of PPARγ, inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase, and increase lipid accumulation. It constitutes an alternative as adjuvant in diabetes mellitus treatment; therefore, we recommend continuing identifying the compounds responsible for its promising in vivo antidiabetic activity.

  4. Miconia sp. Increases mRNA Levels of PPAR Gamma and Inhibits Alpha Amylase and Alpha Glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortíz-Martinez, David Mizael; Rivas-Morales, Catalina; de la Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angelica; Verde-Star, Maria Julia; Nuñez-Gonzalez, Maria Adriana; Leos-Rivas, Catalina

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem worldwide. For this reason, ethanolic extract of Miconia sp. from Oaxaca, Mexico, was selected in search of an alternative against this disease. The effect of Miconia sp. on mRNA expression of PPARγ on cell line 3T3-L1, its effect on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase, lipid accumulation during adipogenesis, and cell viability on VERO cells were evaluated. The mRNA levels of PPARγ increased on 1.393 ± 0.008 folds, lipid accumulation was increased by 29.55% with Miconia sp. extract and 34.57% with rosiglitazone, and α-amylase and α-glycosidase were inhibited with IC50 values from 28.23 ± 2.15 μg/mL and 1.95 ± 0.15 μg/mL, respectively; the IC50 on antiproliferative activity on VERO cells was 314.54 ± 45.40 μg/mL. In case of α-amylase and α-glycosidase assays, IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50) refers to necessary extract amounts to inhibit 50% of enzymatic activity. On the other hand, on antiproliferative activity, IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50) refers to necessary extract amounts to inhibit 50% of cell proliferation. It was concluded that the compounds present in Miconia sp. ethanolic extract increase mRNA expression of PPARγ, inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase, and increase lipid accumulation. It constitutes an alternative as adjuvant in diabetes mellitus treatment; therefore, we recommend continuing identifying the compounds responsible for its promising in vivo antidiabetic activity.

  5. Antiviral therapies targeting host ER alpha-glucosidases: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinhong; Block, Timothy M; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2013-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident α-glucosidases I and II sequentially trim the three terminal glucose moieties on N-linked glycans attached to nascent glycoproteins. These reactions are the first steps of N-linked glycan processing and are essential for proper folding and function of many glycoproteins. Because most viral envelope glycoproteins contain N-linked glycans, inhibition of ER α-glucosidases with derivatives of 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) or castanospermine (CAST), two well-studied pharmacophores of α-glucosidase inhibitors, efficiently disrupts the morphogenesis of a broad spectrum of enveloped viruses. Moreover, both DNJ and CAST derivatives have been demonstrated to prevent the death of mice infected with several distinct flaviviruses and filoviruses and suppress the multiplication of several other species of viruses in infected animals. N-Butyl derivative of DNJ (NB-DNJ) and 6 O-bytanoyl prodrug of CAST (Bu-CAST) have been evaluated in human clinical trials for their antiviral activities against human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, and there is an ongoing trial of treating dengue patients with Bu-CAST. This article summarizes the current status of ER α-glucosidase-targeted antiviral therapy and proposes strategies for development of more efficacious and specific ER α-glucosidase inhibitors as broad-spectrum, drug resistance-refractory antiviral therapeutics. These host function-targeted, broad-spectrum antiviral agents do not rely on time-consuming etiologic diagnosis, and should therefore be particularly promising in the management of viral hemorrhagic fever and respiratory tract viral infections, medical conditions that can be caused by many different enveloped RNA viruses, with a short window for medical intervention.

  6. Alpha-Glucosidase Enzyme Biosensor for the Electrochemical Measurement of Antidiabetic Potential of Medicinal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, M.; Arbain, D.; Islam, A. K. M. Shafiqul; Ahmad, M. S.; Ahmad, M. N.

    2016-02-01

    A biosensor for measuring the antidiabetic potential of medicinal plants was developed by covalent immobilization of α-glucosidase (AG) enzyme onto amine-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-NH2). The immobilized enzyme was entrapped in freeze-thawed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) together with p-nitrophenyl-α- d-glucopyranoside (PNPG) on the screen-printed carbon electrode at low pH to prevent the premature reaction between PNPG and AG enzyme. The enzymatic reaction within the biosensor is inhibited by bioactive compounds in the medicinal plant extracts. The capability of medicinal plants to inhibit the AG enzyme on the electrode correlates to the potential of the medicinal plants to inhibit the production of glucose from the carbohydrate in the human body. Thus, the inhibition indicates the antidiabetic potential of the medicinal plants. The performance of the biosensor was evaluated to measure the antidiabetic potential of three medicinal plants such as Tebengau ( Ehretis laevis), Cemumar ( Micromelum pubescens), and Kedondong ( Spondias dulcis) and acarbose (commercial antidiabetic drug) via cyclic voltammetry, amperometry, and spectrophotometry. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) response for the inhibition of the AG enzyme activity by Tebengau plant extracts showed a linear relation in the range from 0.423-8.29 μA, and the inhibition detection limit was 0.253 μA. The biosensor exhibited good sensitivity (0.422 μA/mg Tebengau plant extracts) and rapid response (22 s). The biosensor retains approximately 82.16 % of its initial activity even after 30 days of storage at 4 °C.

  7. SwissProt search result: AK110088 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110088 002-160-G07 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (Acid maltase) (Aglucosida...se alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 1e-62 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK066051 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066051 J013051B02 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (Acid maltase) (Aglucosida...se alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 1e-89 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK102309 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102309 J033090B18 (P10253) Lysosomal alpha-glucosidase precursor (EC 3.2.1.20) (Acid maltase) (Aglucosidas...e alfa) [Contains: 76 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase; 70 kDa lysosomal alpha-glucosidase] LYAG_HUMAN 1e-145 ...

  10. Production of enzymatically active recombinant full-length barley high pI alpha-glucosidase of glycoside family 31 by high cell-density fermentation of Pichia pastoris and affinity purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Kramhøft, Birte; Lok, F.

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant barley high pI alpha-glucosidase was produced by high cell-density fermentation of Pichia pastoris expressing the cloned full-length gene. The gene was amplified from a genomic clone and exons (coding regions) were assembled by overlap PCR. The resulting cDNA was expressed under contr...... nM x s(-1), and 85 s(-1) using maltose as substrate. This work presents the first production of fully active recombinant alpha-glucosidase of glycoside hydrolase family 31 from higher plants. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.......Recombinant barley high pI alpha-glucosidase was produced by high cell-density fermentation of Pichia pastoris expressing the cloned full-length gene. The gene was amplified from a genomic clone and exons (coding regions) were assembled by overlap PCR. The resulting cDNA was expressed under control...... of the alcohol oxidase 1 promoter using methanol induction of P. pastoris fermentation in a Biostat B 5 L reactor. Forty-two milligrams a-glucosidase was purified from 3.5 L culture in four steps applying an N-terminal hexa-histidine tag. The apparent molecular mass of the recombinant alpha-glucosidase was 100 k...

  11. Alternative Agents in Type 1 Diabetes in Addition to Insulin Therapy: Metformin, Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors, Pioglitazone, GLP-1 Agonists, DPP-IV Inhibitors, and SGLT-2 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGeeter, Michelle; Williamson, Bobbie

    2016-04-01

    Insulin is the mainstay of current treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Due to increasing insulin resistance, insulin doses are often continually increased, which may result in weight gain for patients. Medications currently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes offer varying mechanisms of action that can help to reduce insulin resistance and prevent or deter weight gain. A MEDLINE search was conducted to review literature evaluating the use of metformin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, pioglitazone, glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase, and sodium-dependent glucose transporter 2 inhibitors, in patients with T1DM. Varying results were found with some benefits including reductions in hemoglobin A1c, decreased insulin doses, and favorable effects on weight. Of significance, a common fear of utilizing multiple therapies for diabetes treatment is the risk of hypoglycemia, and this review displayed limited evidence of hypoglycemia with multiple agents.

  12. KAPASITAS ANTIOKSIDAN DAN INHIBITOR ALFA GLUKOSIDASE EKSTRAK UMBI BAWANG DAYAK [Antioxidant and Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitory Properties of Bawang Dayak Bulb Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Early Febrinda*

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bawang dayak (Eleutherine palmifolia is an indigenous plant in Borneo traditionally used by Dayak tribes to treat any kind of degenerative deseases including diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this research was to measure antioxidant and antidiabetic capacities of water and ethanolic extracts of bawang dayak bulb. Parameters evaluated in this research were phytochemical screening, total phenolics, flavonoid content, DPPH free-radical scavenging activity, and alpha glucosidase inhibiting (AGI activity. The result showed that the total phenolics and flavonoid content in bawang dayak ethanolic extract (217.71 mg GAE/g and 65.35 mg QE/g were higher than that of the water extract (139.93 mg GAE/g and 16.95 mg QE/g. The ethanolic extract also had higher antioxidant and AGI activities (IC50 112 and 241 ppm than that of the water extract (IC50 526 and 505 ppm. In addition, the IC50 values for AGI in bawang dayak ethanolic extract was lower than acarbose which is known as a commercial antidiabetic agent.

  13. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose, improves glycamic control and reduces body weight in type 2 diabetes: Findings on indian patients from the pooled data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are widely used especially in Asian countries as a treatment option for type 2 diabetes patients with high postprandial glycemia (PPG. The higher carbohydrate in the Indian diets lead to greater prandial glycemic excursion, increased glucosidase, and incretin activity in the gut and may need special therapeutic strategies to tackle these glucose peaks. This is the subgroup analysis of Indian subjects who participated in the GlucoVIP study that investigated the effectiveness and tolerability of acarbose as add-on or monotherapy in a range of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 1996 Indian patients were included in the effectiveness analysis. After 12.5 weeks (mean, the mean change in 2-hour PPG from baseline was −74.4 mg/dl, mean HbA1c decreased by -1.0%, and mean fasting blood glucose decreased by -37.9 mg/dl. The efficacy of acarbose was rated "very good" or "good" in 91.1% of patients, and tolerability as "very good" or "good" in 88.0% of patients. The results of this observational study suggest that acarbose was effective and well tolerated in the Indian patients with T2DM.

  14. Biogenesis of lysosomal enzymes in the alpha-glucosidase II-deficient modA mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum: retention of alpha-1,3-linked glucose on N-linked oligosaccharides delays intracellular transport but does not alter sorting of alpha-mannosidase or beta-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, D L; Bush, J M; Dimond, R L; Cardelli, J A

    1989-09-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzyme alpha-glucosidase II is responsible for removing the two alpha-1,3-linked glucose residues from N-linked oligosaccharides of glycoproteins. This activity is missing in the modA mutant strain, M31, of Dictyostelium discoideum. Results from both radiolabeled pulse-chase and subcellular fractionation experiments indicate that this deficiency did not prevent intracellular transport and proteolytic processing of the lysosomal enzymes, alpha-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase. However, the rate at which the glucosylated precursors left the rough endoplasmic reticulum was several-fold slower than the rate at which the wild-type precursors left this compartment. Retention of glucose residues did not disrupt the binding of the precursor forms of the enzymes with intracellular membranes, indicating that the delay in movement of proteins from the ER did not result from lack of association with membranes. However, the mutant alpha-mannosidase precursor contained more trypsin-sensitive sites than did the wild-type precursor, suggesting that improper folding of precursor molecules might account for the slow rate of transport to the Golgi complex. Percoll density gradient fractionation of extracts prepared from M31 cells indicated that the proteolytically processed mature forms of alpha-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase were localized to lysosomes. Finally, the mutation in M31 may have other, more dramatic, effects on the lysosomal system since two enzymes, N-acetylglucosaminidase and acid phosphatase, were secreted much less efficiently from lysosomal compartments by the mutant strain.

  15. Efecto de enzimas proteolíticas y de la abstinencia sexual en la cuantificación bioquímica de alfa-glucosidasa en plasma seminal humano

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Background: alpha-glucosidase is found in human seminal plasma as an acid form, located in accessory glands, and as a neutral form secreted almost exclusively by the epididymis. Quantification of alpha-glucosidase activity is a marker of the secretory function of the epididymis and indemnity of the sperm transport pathway Aim: To obtain reference values for alpha-glucosidase in normal samples of seminal plasma, to evaluate its behavior in serial samples and to determine the effect of proteoly...

  16. Inhibition of recombinant human maltase glucoamylase by salacinol and derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elena J; Sim, Lyann; Kuntz, Douglas A; Hahn, Dagmar; Johnston, Blair D; Ghavami, Ahmad; Szczepina, Monica G; Kumar, Nag S; Sterchi, Erwin E; Nichols, Buford L; Pinto, B M; Rose, David R

    2006-06-01

    Inhibitors targeting pancreatic alpha-amylase and intestinal alpha-glucosidases delay glucose production following digestion and are currently used in the treatment of Type II diabetes. Maltase-glucoamylase (MGA), a family 31 glycoside hydrolase, is an alpha-glucosidase anchored in the membrane of small intestinal epithelial cells responsible for the final step of mammalian starch digestion leading to the release of glucose. This paper reports the production and purification of active human recombinant MGA amino terminal catalytic domain (MGAnt) from two different eukaryotic cell culture systems. MGAnt overexpressed in Drosophila cells was of quality and quantity suitable for kinetic and inhibition studies as well as future structural studies. Inhibition of MGAnt was tested with a group of prospective alpha-glucosidase inhibitors modeled after salacinol, a naturally occurring alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, and acarbose, a currently prescribed antidiabetic agent. Four synthetic inhibitors that bind and inhibit MGAnt activity better than acarbose, and at comparable levels to salacinol, were found. The inhibitors are derivatives of salacinol that contain either a selenium atom in place of sulfur in the five-membered ring, or a longer polyhydroxylated, sulfated chain than salacinol. Six-membered ring derivatives of salacinol and compounds modeled after miglitol were much less effective as MGAnt inhibitors. These results provide information on the inhibitory profile of MGAnt that will guide the development of new compounds having antidiabetic activity.

  17. Effect of enzyme therapy in juvenile patients with Pompe disease: a three-year open-label study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capelle, C.I. van; Beek, N.A. van der; Hagemans, M.L.; Arts, W.F.M.; Hop, W.C.J.; Lee, P.; Jaeken, J.; Frohn-Mulder, I.M.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Corzo, D.; Puga, A.C.; Reuser, A.J.J.; Ploeg, A.T. van der

    2010-01-01

    Pompe disease is a rare neuromuscular disorder caused by deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase. Treatment with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase recently received marketing approval based on prolonged survival of affected infants. The current open-label study was performed to evaluate the response

  18. Effect of enzyme therapy in juvenile patients with Pompe disease: a three-year open-label study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capelle, C.I. van; Beek, N.A. van der; Hagemans, M.L.; Arts, W.F.M.; Hop, W.C.J.; Lee, P.; Jaeken, J.; Frohn-Mulder, I.M.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Corzo, D.; Puga, A.C.; Reuser, A.J.J.; Ploeg, A.T. van der

    2010-01-01

    Pompe disease is a rare neuromuscular disorder caused by deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase. Treatment with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase recently received marketing approval based on prolonged survival of affected infants. The current open-label study was performed to evaluate the response

  19. Effect of storage time on metabolite profile and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of Cosmos caudatus leaves – GCMS based metabolomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Javadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cosmos caudatus, which is a commonly consumed vegetable in Malaysia, is locally known as “Ulam Raja”. It is a local Malaysian herb traditionally used as a food and medicinal herb to treat several maladies. Its bioactive or nutritional constituents consist of a wide range of metabolites, including glucosinolates, phenolics, amino acids, organic acids, and sugars. However, many of these metabolites are not stable and easily degraded or modified during storage. In order to investigate the metabolomics changes occurring during post-harvest storage, C. caudatus samples were subjected to seven different storage times (0 hours, 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, 8 hours, 10 hours, and 12 hours at room temperature. As the model experiment, the metabolites identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS were correlated with α-glucosidase inhibitory activity analyzed with multivariate data analysis (MVDA to find out the variation among samples and metabolites contributing to the activity. Orthogonal partial least squares (OPLS analysis was applied to investigate the metabolomics changes. A profound chemical alteration, both in primary and secondary metabolites, was observed. The α-tocopherol, catechin, cyclohexen-1-carboxylic acid, benzoic acid, myo-inositol, stigmasterol, and lycopene compounds were found to be the discriminating metabolites at early storage; however, sugars such as sucrose, α-d-galactopyranose, and turanose were detected, which was attributed to the discriminating metabolites for late storage. The result shows that the MVDA method is a promising technique to identify biomarker compounds relative to storage at different times.

  20. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the absorption of chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in humans are lacking. We determined the absorption of chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in a cross-over study with 4 female and 3 male healthy ileo...

  1. Kynurenic acid synthesis by human glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vezzani, A; Gramsbergen, J B; Versari, P;

    1990-01-01

    Biopsy material from human gliomas obtained during neurosurgery was used to investigate whether pathological human brain tissue is capable of producing kynurenic acid (KYNA), a natural brain metabolite which can act as an antagonist at excitatory amino acid receptors. Upon in vitro exposure to 40...

  2. Optimization of Inhibitory Reaction System of Folium Mori Extracts on Alpha-glucosidase Activity and Enzyme Kinetics%桑叶提取物抑制α-葡萄糖苷酶活性体系的优化及动力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕欢; 罗明琍; 方飞; 吴新荣

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish an optimized inhibitory reaction system for the research of Folium Mori extracts in inhibiting alpha-glucosidase activity and to investigate the enzyme kinetics. Methods We studied the inhibitive effects of Folium Mori extracts on alpha-glucosidase by using enzyme-inhibitor model and optimized the reaction system by optimizing the substrate concentration, the amount of enzyme and the reaction time. We also investigated the inhibitory kinetic characteristics of extracts by using Lineweaver-Burk method. Results The optimized reaction system consisted of 40 mg/mL of the substrate concentration, 0.2 mL of enzyme and 25 min for reaction time. Inhibitory kinetic results indicated that the extracts were mixed competitive inhibitors, but the positive drug was noncompetitive inhibitor. Conclusion Folium Mori extracts have inhibitory effect on a- glucosidase activity, and the inhibitory type is in mixed competitive inhibition, which are expected to be used to develop as anti-diabetes drugs.%目的 研究桑叶提取物抑制α-葡萄糖苷酶活性反应体系的条件优化及酶动力学.方法 采用酶-抑制剂模型法,优化底物浓度、酶用量和反应时间,确定最佳反应体系,研究桑叶提取物对α-葡萄糖苷酶的抑制作用,并采用双倒数作图法研究桑叶提取物的酶抑制动力学特性.结果 当蔗糖浓度为40 mg/mL,酶用量为0.2mL(约1.6 U/mL),反应时间为25 min时为最佳反应体系;酶抑制动力学实验表明,桑叶提取物的抑制类型为混合型竞争性抑制,阳性对照为非竞争性抑制.结论 桑叶提取物对α-葡萄糖苷酶活性有抑制作用;桑叶提取物对α-葡萄糖苷酶抑制活性为混合性竞争性抑制,可以用于开发降糖药物.

  3. Bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Curt Einarsson; Ewa Ellis; Anna Abrahamsson; Bo-G6ran Ericzon; Ingemar Bj rkhem; Magnus Axelson

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate a culture system for bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes in comparison with HepG2 cells. METHODS Hepatocytes were isolated from normal human liver tissue and were cultured in serum-free William's E medium. The medium was collected and renewed every 24 h. Bile acids and their precursors in media were finally analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS Cholic acid ( CA ) andchenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) conjugated with glycine or taurine accounted for 70% and 25% of total steroids. A third of CDCA was also conjugated with sulphuric acid. Dexamathasone and thyroid hormorm alone or in combination did not significantly effect bile acid formation. The addition of cyclosporin A (10 μmol/L) inhibited the synthesis of CA and CDCA by about 13% and 30%, respectively. CONCLUSION Isolated human hepatocytes in primary culture behave as in the intact liver by converting cholesterol to conjugated CA and CDCA. This is in contrast to cultured HepG2 cells, which release large amounts of bile acid precursors and unconjugated bile acids into the medium.

  4. Bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Curt Einarsson; Ewa Ellis; Anna Abrahamsson; Bo-G ran Ericzon; Ingemar Bj rkhem; Magnus Axelson

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate a system for bile acid formation in human hepatocytes in comparison with HepG2 cells.METHODS Hepatocytes were isolated from normal human liver tissue and were cultured in serum-freeWilliam's E medium. The medium was collected and renewed every 24 h. Bile acids and their precursors inmedia were finally analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.RESULTS Cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) conjugated with glycine or taurineaccounted for 70% and 25% of total steroids. One third of CDCA was also conjugated with sulphuric acid.Dexamethasone and thyroid hormone alone or in combination did not significantly affect bile acid formation.The addition of cyclosporin A (10 tm) inhibited the synthesis of CA and CDCA by about 13% and 30%,respectively.CONCLUSION Isolated human hepatocytes in primary culture behave as in the intact liver by convertingalmost quantitatively cholesterol to conjugated CA and CDCA. This is in contrast to cultured HepG2 cells,which release large amounts of bile acid precursors and unconjugated bile acids into the medium.

  5. [Lysophosphatidic acid and human erythrocyte aggregation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremet'ev, Iu A; Popovicheva, A N; Levin, G Ia

    2014-01-01

    The effects of lysophosphatidic acid on the morphology and aggregation of human erythrocytes has been studied. Morphology of erythrocytes and their aggregates were studied by light microscopy. It has been shown that lysophosphatidic acid changes the shape of red blood cells: diskocyte become echinocytes. Aggregation of red blood cells (rouleaux) was significantly reduced in autoplasma. At the same time there is a strong aggregation of echinocytes. This was accompanied by the formation of microvesicles. Adding normal plasma to echinocytes restores shape and aggregation of red blood cells consisting of "rouleaux". A possible mechanism of action of lysophosphatidic acid on erythrocytes is discussed.

  6. Unsaturated fatty acids, desaturases, and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungjae; Park, Woo Jung

    2014-02-01

    With the increasing concern for health and nutrition, dietary fat has attracted considerable attention. The composition of fatty acids in a diet is important since they are associated with major diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) requires the expression of dietary fat-associated genes, such as SCD, FADS1, FADS2, and FADS3, which encode a variety of desaturases, to catalyze the addition of a double bond in a fatty acid chain. Recent studies using new molecular techniques and genomics, as well as clinical trials have shown that these genes and UFA are closely related to physiological conditions and chronic diseases; it was found that the existence of alternative transcripts of the desaturase genes and desaturase isoforms might affect human health and lipid metabolism in different ways. In this review, we provide an overview of UFA and desaturases associated with human health and nutrition. Moreover, recent findings of UFA, desaturases, and their associated genes in human systems are discussed. Consequently, this review may help elucidate the complicated physiology of UFA in human health and diseases.

  7. Nucleic acid association to human prostasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, I; Ronquist, G

    1990-01-01

    Human prostasomes isolated from seminal plasma were subjected to phenol extraction and then to absorbance (A) measurements at 260 nm (A260) and 280 nm (A280). The A260/A280 ratio was about 2 for prostasome extract and lower for seminal plasma extract, indicative of the presence of nucleic acid. The ratio of nucleic acid to protein in prostasomes was about 1:100, and the ratio in seminal plasma was 1:1,000. Hence nucleic acid is enriched in prostasomes (compared to seminal plasma of 10). Treatment of prostasome samples with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate resulted in an efficient dissociation of nucleic acid from prostasomes as demonstrated by electrophoresis. The association of nucleic acids of various sizes (range; 200 to 20,000 base pairs) to prostasome membranes was most probably genuine and not the result of contamination from spermatozoa, erythrocytes, leukocytes, or bacteria. The results of experiments employing nucleic acid-degrading enzymes favored the concept that double-stranded DNA but not RNA is present at the prostasome membrane surface.

  8. Study on the Optimum Proportion of Radix Astragalus with Flos Carthami on alpha - Glucosidase and Antioxidant Activities%黄芪与红花抑制α-葡萄糖苷酶及抗氧化活性的最佳配比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖晖; 王孝敏

    2015-01-01

    目的:依照国家食品药品监督管理总局(CFDA)制定的黄芪注射液与红花注射液的制备方法,分别对黄芪与红花进行相关提取。研究黄芪、红花提取物抑制α-葡萄糖苷酶及抗氧化活性的最佳配比。方法液相色谱仪测定黄芪中黄芪甲苷的含量,以山奈酚为标准品测定红花中总黄酮的含量。以4-甲基-伞形酮-β- D -半乳糖苷(4- MUG)为反应底物,测定样品对酵母α-葡萄糖苷酶活性的影响,阿卡波糖为阳性对照。以氧自由基清除能( Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity, ORAC)法测定样品的抗氧化活性,维生素 C 为阳性对照。结果每1 ml 黄芪提取液中含有0.127 mg黄芪甲苷,每1 ml 红花提取液中含0.57 mg 总黄酮,均符合 CFDA 有关活性成分的含量要求。红花抑制α-葡萄糖苷酶活性的半数抑制浓度(IC50)为(32.8±5.7)μg/ ml,显著低于黄芪[(1686±810)μg/ ml,P <0.01];黄芪与红花生药比为10:1、5:1、2:1时的 IC50值均显著低于20:1时(P <0.01)。红花的 ORAC 值为(1090±161)μmol TE/ g,显著高于黄芪[(205±32)μmol TE/ g,P <0.01];生药比为5:1及2:1时的 ORAC 值分别显著高于20:1及 10:1时(P <0.01)。结论黄芪与红花均具有抑制酵母α-葡萄糖苷酶活性的作用及一定的抗氧化活性,在同时改善以上两项指标方面,生药比为5:1及2:1时较20:1时作用显著(P <0.01)。%Objective To prepare radix astragalus injection and flos carthami injection according to the method of the China Food and Drug Administration(CFDA)and extract them respectively so as to study the optimum proportion of them on alpha - glucosidase and antioxidant activities. Methods The liquid chro-matograph was used to determine the content of astragaloside in radix astragalus. Kaempferol was used as the standard to determine the content of general flavone in flos carthami. 4 - MUG was as the

  9. Palmitic Acid in Early Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innis, Sheila M

    2016-09-09

    Palmitic acid (16:0) is a saturated fatty acid present in the diet and synthesized endogenously. Although often considered to have adverse effects on chronic disease in adults, 16:0 is an essential component of membrane, secretory, and transport lipids, with crucial roles in protein palmitoylation and signal molecules. At birth, the term infant is 13-15% body fat, with 45-50% 16:0, much of which is derived from endogenous synthesis in the fetus. After birth, the infant accumulates adipose tissue at high rates, reaching 25% body weight as fat by 4-5 months age. Over this time, human milk provides 10% dietary energy as 16:0, but in unusual triglycerides with 16:0 on the glycerol center carbon. This paper reviews the synthesis and oxidation of 16:0 and possible reasons why the infant is endowed with large amounts of fat and 16:0. The marked deviations in tissues with displacement of 16:0 that can occur in infants fed vegetable oil formulas is introduced. Assuming fetal fatty acid synthesis and the unusual delivery of 16:0 in human milk evolved to afford survival advantage to the neonate, it is timely to question if 16:0 is an essential component of tissue lipids whereby both deficiency and excess are detrimental.

  10. Essential fatty acids and human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Ke, Der-Shin; Chen, Jen-Yin

    2009-12-01

    The human brain is nearly 60 percent fat. We've learned in recent years that fatty acids are among the most crucial molecules that determine your brain's integrity and ability to perform. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) are required for maintenance of optimal health but they can not synthesized by the body and must be obtained from dietary sources. Clinical observation studies has related imbalance dietary intake of fatty acids to impaired brain performance and diseases. Most of the brain growth is completed by 5-6 years of age. The EFAs, particularly the omega-3 fatty acids, are important for brain development during both the fetal and postnatal period. Dietary decosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is needed for the optimum functional maturation of the retina and visual cortex, with visual acuity and mental development seemingly improved by extra DHA. Beyond their important role in building the brain structure, EFAs, as messengers, are involved in the synthesis and functions of brain neurotransmitters, and in the molecules of the immune system. Neuronal membranes contain phospholipid pools that are the reservoirs for the synthesis of specific lipid messengers on neuronal stimulation or injury. These messengers in turn participate in signaling cascades that can either promote neuronal injury or neuroprotection. The goal of this review is to give a new understanding of how EFAs determine our brain's integrity and performance, and to recall the neuropsychiatric disorders that may be influenced by them. As we further unlock the mystery of how fatty acids affect the brain and better understand the brain's critical dependence on specific EFAs, correct intake of the appropriate diet or supplements becomes one of the tasks we undertake in pursuit of optimal wellness.

  11. Oleanolic acid and related derivatives as medicinally important compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Nighat; Ata, Athar

    2008-12-01

    Oleanolic acid has been isolated from chloroform extract of Olea ferruginea Royle after removal of organic bases and free acids. The literature survey revealed it to be biologically very important. In this review the biological significance of oleanolic acid and its derivatives has been discussed. The aim of this review is to update current knowledge on oleanolic acid and its natural and semisynthetic analogs, focussing on its cytotoxic, antitumer, antioxidant, anti-inflamatory, anti-HIV, acetyl cholinesterase, alpha-glucosidase, antimicrobial, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antipruritic, spasmolytic activity, anti-angiogenic, antiallergic, antiviral and immunomodulatory activities. We present in this review, for the first time, a compilation of the most relevant scientific papers and technical reports of the chemical, pre-clinical and clinical research on the properties of oleanolic acid and its derivatives.

  12. Synthèses enzymatiques de néoglucoconjugués catalysées par l'alpha-glucosidase purifiée de la blatte Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamenan A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic synthesis of neoglucoconjugates by purified α-glucosidase from cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus. Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus contains in his digestive tract an acid (pH 5,0 and mesophile (50°C α-glucosidase. This enzyme, purified to homogeneity, hydrolyses highly maltose, sucrose and p-nitrophenyl-α-Dglucopyranoside. The ability of α-glucosidase from cockroach purified to homogeneity to catalyse transglucosylation reactions was tested using maltose and saccharose as glucosyl donors and 2-phenylethanol and phenol as acceptors. The experimental conditions were optimized in relation to the time course of the reaction, pH and concentrations of glucosyl donors and acceptors. The yields in transglucosylation reactions at 37 °C were very high and could attain 67% and 48% with 2-phenylethanol and phenol respectively as glucosyl acceptors. This α-glucosidase hydrolyzed the products formed. It seems that the products formed were the phenylethyl-α-D-glucoside and phenyl-α-D-glucoside. These results suggest that α- glucosidase from cockroach is an exoglucosidase which catalyse the splitting of the α-glucosyl residue from the non reducing terminal of the substrate to liberate α-glucose. This comportment indicates that this enzyme operated by a mechanism involving the retention of the anomeric configuration. On the basis of this work, α-glucosidase from P. americana appears to be a valuable tool for the preparation of α-neoglucoconjugates.

  13. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, M.R.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Katan, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the

  14. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, M.R.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Katan, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the

  15. Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitory and Antioxidant Activity of Solvent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Extracts were prepared using hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone (AE), methanol, ... screening has revealed moderate antiglucosidase and antioxidant activities in the ... glucosidase inhibitor in vivo and in vitro has been.

  16. Chemopreventive effect of corosolic acid in human hepatocellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemopreventive effect of corosolic acid in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. ... The anticancer activity of corosolic acid through cell growth inhibition by 3-(4 ... and apoptotic fragmentations by fluorescence microscope was evaluated.

  17. Monitoring Homovanillic Acid and Vanillylmandelic Acid in Human Urine by Capillary Electrophoresis with Electrochemical Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A simple, rapid and low-cost method of separation and determination of homovanillic acid and vanillylmandelic acid in human urine was developed based on capillary zone electrophoresis / amperometric detection with high sensitivity and good resolution.

  18. The gut microbiome, probiotics, bile acids axis, and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mitchell Lawrence; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Prakash, Satya

    2014-06-01

    The human gut microbiome produces potent ligands to bile acid receptors, and probiotics could act as therapeutics of bile acid dysmetabolism. A recent study in Cell Reports demonstrates that probiotic VSL#3 affects bile acid deconjugation and excretion, as well as the gut-liver FXR-FGF15 axis.

  19. Fatal Folic Acid Toxicity in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devnath, Gerard Pradeep; Kumaran, Senthil; Rajiv, R; Shaha, Kusa Kumar; Nagaraj, Ashok

    2017-03-06

    Folic acid is B-9 vitamin. Folic acid is prescribed commonly for pregnant women to prevent neural tube defects in the fetus, patients under chemotherapy, pernicious anemia and to reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease. Acute or chronic ingestion of a large dose of folic acid generally manifests as neurological complications, which are reversible. In this present case, a 23-year-old pregnant woman committed suicide by consuming folic acid tablets and succumbed to death within 36 h. Postmortem toxicological analysis detected folic acid in viscera. Death following acute consumption of folic acid is rare and has been not reported in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Multiple changes in sialic acid biology during human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varki, Ajit

    2009-04-01

    Humans are genetically very similar to "great apes", (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans), our closest evolutionary relatives. We have discovered multiple genetic and biochemical differences between humans and these other hominids, in relation to sialic acids and in Siglecs (Sia-recognizing Ig superfamily lectins). An inactivating mutation in the CMAH gene eliminated human expression of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) a major sialic acid in "great apes". Additional human-specific changes have been found, affecting at least 10 of the dietary sources, particularly red meat and milk products. As humans also have varying and sometime high levels of circulating anti-Neu5Gc antibodies, there are implications for biotechnology products, and for some human diseases associated with chronic inflammation.

  1. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITINABSTRACT Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  2. Incorporation and distribution of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in cultured human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1986-02-01

    Human keratinocytes in culture were labelled with /sup 14/C-dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid or /sup 14/C-eicosapentaenoic acid. All three eicosanoid precursor fatty acids were effectively incorporated into the cells. In phospholipids most of the radioactivity was recovered, in neutral lipids a substantial amount, and as free unesterified fatty acids only a minor amount. Most of the radioactivity was found in phosphatidylethanolamine which was also the major phospholipid as measured by phosphorous assay. The incorporation of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid into lipid subfractions was essentially similar. Eicosapentaenoic acid was, however, much less effectively incorporated into phosphatidylinositol + phosphatidylserine and, correspondingly, more effectively into triacylglycerols as compared to the two other precursor fatty acids. Once incorporated, the distribution of all three precursor fatty acids was relatively stable, and only minor amounts of fatty acids were released into the culture medium during short term culture (two days). Our study demonstrates that eicosanoid precursor fatty acids are avidly taken up by human keratinocytes and esterified into membrane lipids. The clinical implication of this finding is that dietary manipulations might be employed to cause changes in the fatty acid composition of keratinocytes.

  3. Rapid Extraction of Human DNA Containing Humic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Sutlović, Davorka; Definis Gojanović, Marija; Anđelinović, Šimun

    2007-01-01

    The identification process of dead bodies or human remains is nowadays conducted in numerous fields of forensic science, archeology and other judicial cases. A particular problem is the isolation and DNA typing of human remains found in mass graves, due to the degradation process, as well as post mortal DNA contamination with bacteria, fungi, humic acids, metals, etc. In this study, the influence of humic acid (HA) on the DNA extraction and typing is investigated. If present in...

  4. Asiatic acid attenuates malignancy of human metastatic ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Human metastatic ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3 was treated with various concentrations of asiatic acid for 24 and ... cancer [5], breast cancer [6], melanoma [7], ..... in human keloid fibroblasts via PPAR-gamma activation. Int J Biol ...

  5. Lentiviral gene therapy of murine hematopoietic stem cells ameliorates the Pompe disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Til, Niek P; Stok, Merel; Aerts Kaya, Fatima S F; de Waard, Monique C; Farahbakhshian, Elnaz; Visser, Trudi P; Kroos, Marian A; Jacobs, Edwin H; Willart, Monique A; van der Wegen, Pascal; Scholte, Bob J; Lambrecht, Bart N; Duncker, Dirk J; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Reuser, Arnold J J; Verstegen, Monique M; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2010-07-01

    Pompe disease (acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency) is a lysosomal glycogen storage disorder characterized in its most severe early-onset form by rapidly progressive muscle weakness and mortality within the first year of life due to cardiac and respiratory failure. Enzyme replacement therapy prolongs the life of affected infants and supports the condition of older children and adults but entails lifelong treatment and can be counteracted by immune responses to the recombinant enzyme. We have explored the potential of lentiviral vector-mediated expression of human acid alpha-glucosidase in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in a Pompe mouse model. After mild conditioning, transplantation of genetically engineered HSCs resulted in stable chimerism of approximately 35% hematopoietic cells that overexpress acid alpha-glucosidase and in major clearance of glycogen in heart, diaphragm, spleen, and liver. Cardiac remodeling was reversed, and respiratory function, skeletal muscle strength, and motor performance improved. Overexpression of acid alpha-glucosidase did not affect overall hematopoietic cell function and led to immune tolerance as shown by challenge with the human recombinant protein. On the basis of the prominent and sustained therapeutic efficacy without adverse events in mice we conclude that ex vivo HSC gene therapy is a treatment option worthwhile to pursue.

  6. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Training affects muscle phospholipid fatty acid composition in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Wu, B J; Willer, Mette

    2001-01-01

    Training improves insulin sensitivity, which in turn may affect performance by modulation of fuel availability. Insulin action, in turn, has been linked to specific patterns of muscle structural lipids in skeletal muscle. This study investigated whether regular exercise training exerts an effect...... on the muscle membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition in humans. Seven male subjects performed endurance training of the knee extensors of one leg for 4 wk. The other leg served as a control. Before, after 4 days, and after 4 wk, muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. After 4 wk......, the phospholipid fatty acid contents of oleic acid 18:1(n-9) and docosahexaenoic acid 22:6(n-3) were significantly higher in the trained (10.9 +/- 0.5% and 3.2 +/- 0.4% of total fatty acids, respectively) than the untrained leg (8.8 +/- 0.5% and 2.6 +/- 0.4%, P

  8. Hyaluronic acid production by irradiated human synovial fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaron, M.; Yaron, I.; Levita, M.; Herzberg, M.

    1977-03-01

    Radioactive particles as well as x irradiation from an external source has been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. In order to clarify effects of ionizing irradiation on synovial cells, radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) and yttrium (/sup 90/Y) were added to fibroblast cultures derived from human synovial membranes. Other cultures were irradiated by a Picker x-ray machine. Fibroblast growth and hyaluronic acid production were measured. Radioactive gold and yttrium particles induced a significant increase of hyaluronic acid synthesis rate (pg/cell/day) and inhibited fibroblast growth. Fibroblasts continued to overproduce hyaluronic acid and to show growth inhibition 3 weeks after irradiation with radioactive gold. Hydrocortisone inhibited hyaluronic acid overproduction induced by radioactive gold. Overproduction of hyaluronic acid induced by the x-ray machine was inhibited by hydrocortisone, actinomycin-D, and cycloheximide. Fibroblasts derived from normal and rheumatoid patients responded similarly to ionizing irradiation.

  9. Cyclic phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid induce hyaluronic acid synthesis via CREB transcription factor regulation in human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda-Sano, Katsura; Gotoh, Mari; Morohoshi, Toshiro; Someya, Takao; Murofushi, Hiromu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator and an analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). cPA has a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. We showed before that a metabolically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA, relieved osteoarthritis pathogenesis in vivo and induced hyaluronic acid synthesis in human osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro. This study focused on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts, which retain moisture and maintain health in the dermis. We investigated the effects of cPA and LPA on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells). Using particle exclusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that both cPA and LPA dose-dependently induced hyaluronic acid synthesis. We revealed that the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 messenger RNA and protein is up-regulated by cPA and LPA treatment time dependently. We then characterized the signaling pathways up-regulating hyaluronic acid synthesis mediated by cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. Pharmacological inhibition and reporter gene assays revealed that the activation of the LPA receptor LPAR1, Gi/o protein, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) but not nuclear factor κB induced hyaluronic acid synthesis by the treatment with cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that cPA and LPA induce hyaluronic acid synthesis in human skin fibroblasts mainly through the activation of LPAR1-Gi/o followed by the PI3K, ERK, and CREB signaling pathway.

  10. Disposition of dodecanedioic acid in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, A; Mingrone, G; Gandolfi, A; Greco, A V; Salinari, S

    2000-03-01

    The disposition of dodecanedioic acid (C12) was investigated in six overnight-fasting healthy male volunteers, who received a 165-min i. v. infusion of 42.45 mmol of C12 added to 150 microCi of [1-12-(14)C]C12. Blood samples were collected up to 360 min after the start of infusion, and concentration of serum labeled C12 was determined. Expired radioactivity (microCi/min) was measured up to 600 min and at 24 h. The 24-h C12 urinary excretion was around 5% of the administered amount. The percentage of C12 oxidized was 81.7 +/- 9.5% (mean +/- S.D.) of administered amount as estimated from the area under the curve of measured (14)CO(2) expiration rate. C12 kinetics was described by assuming a single compartment. A saturable rate of C12 tissue uptake (model A) and a linear rate of tissue uptake (model B) were considered. The kinetics of CO(2) produced by C12 oxidation was described by a fast pathway acting in parallel to a slow pathway modeled by first order kinetics. Parameters of model B were estimated for each subject, whereas model A was identified by fitting the pooled data of all subjects. On the basis of estimates obtained from model B, an average calorie delivery of 500 kcal/day was predicted in the plateau phase for the infusion rate of our experiments. When estimated from model A, the maximal rate of tissue uptake was 0.38 +/- 0.08 mmol/min, with a maximal calorie delivery of 750 kcal/day. These results appear promising for C12 utilization in parenteral nutrition, because C12 elimination with urine is low, whereas tissue uptake and oxidation are rather efficient.

  11. Quantitation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in human brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Bock, E; Warecka, K

    1980-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) content of 58 human brain tumours was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using monospecific antibody against GFA. Astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, spongioblastomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas contained relatively high...... amounts of GFA, up to 85 times the concentration in parietal grey substance of normal human brain. GFA was not found in neurinomas, meningiomas, adenomas of the hypophysis, or in a single case of metastasis of adenocarcinoma. Non-glial tumours of craniopharyngioma and haemangioblastoma were infiltrated...

  12. Fatty acid metabolism studies of human epidermal cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelo, C L; Dunham, W R

    1993-12-01

    Adult human epidermal keratinocytes grow rapidly in medium that is essential fatty acid (EFA)-deficient. In this medium they exhibit decreased amounts of the fatty acids, 18:2, 20:3, 20:4, and contain increased amounts of monounsaturated fatty acids. [14C]- and [3H]acetate and radiolabeled fatty acids, 16:0, 18:2, and 20:4 were used to study the fatty acid metabolism of these cells. Label from acetate appeared in 14- to 20-carbon fatty acids, both saturated and monounsaturated. No label was seen in the essential fatty acid 18:2, 18:3, and 20:4. Radiolabel from [9, 10-3H]palmitic acid (16:0) was detected in 16:0, 16:1, 18:0, and 18:1. [14C]linoleic acid (18:2) was converted to 18:3, 20:2, 20:3, and 20:4, demonstrating delta 6 and delta 5 desaturase activity in keratinocytes. Label from acetate, 16:0, or 18:2 was found mostly in the cellular phospholipids while only one third of the label from [14C]arachidonic was found in the phospholipids. [14C]acetate and [14C]18:2 time course data were used to construct a model of the metabolism of these reactants, using coupled, first-order differential equations. The data show that EFA-deficient keratinocytes metabolize fatty acids using pathways previously found in liver; they suggest the positioning of 18:2 desaturase and 18:3 elongase near the plasma membrane; they indicate that for the synthesis of nonessential fatty acids the formation of 18:0 from 16:0 is the rate-determining step; and they show that the conversion of 18:2 to 20:3 is rapid. These experiments demonstrate a method to study lipid enzyme kinetics in living cells.

  13. Enzyme replacement therapy in late-onset Pompe's disease: a three-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Léon P F; Van den Hout, Johanna M P; Kamphoven, Joep H J; Disseldorp, Janus A M; Remmerswaal, Maaike; Arts, Willem F M; Loonen, M Christa B; Vulto, Arnold G; Van Doorn, Pieter A; De Jong, Gerard; Hop, Wim; Smit, G Peter A; Shapira, Stuart K; Boer, Marijke A; van Diggelen, Otto P; Reuser, Arnold J J; Van der Ploeg, Ans T

    2004-04-01

    Pompe's disease is an autosomal recessive myopathy. The characteristic lysosomal storage of glycogen is caused by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency. Patients with late-onset Pompe's disease present with progressive muscle weakness also affecting pulmonary function. In search of a treatment, we investigated the feasibility of enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from rabbit milk. Three patients (aged 11, 16, and 32 years) were enrolled in the study. They were all wheelchair-bound and two of them were ventilator dependent with a history of deteriorating pulmonary function. After 3 years of treatment with weekly infusions of alpha-glucosidase, the patients had stabilized pulmonary function and reported less fatigue. The youngest and least affected patient showed an impressive improvement of skeletal muscle strength and function. After 72 weeks of treatment, he could walk without support and finally abandoned his wheelchair. Our findings demonstrate that recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from rabbit milk has a therapeutic effect in late-onset Pompe's disease. There is good reason to continue the development of enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe's disease and to explore further the production of human therapeutic proteins in the milk of mammals.

  14. Kinetic characteristics of acidic and alkaline ceramidase in human epidermis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, E.; Uchida, Y.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Paepe, K. de; Vanhaecke, T.; Holleran, W.M.; Rogiers, V.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become evident that at least five ceramidase (CDase) isoforms are present in human epidermis, and that specifically acidic CDase (aCDase) and alkaline CDase (alkCDase) activities increase during keratinocyte differentiation, and thus might play a pivotal role(s) in permeability

  15. Kinetic characteristics of acidic and alkaline ceramidase in human epidermis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, E.; Uchida, Y.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Paepe, K. de; Vanhaecke, T.; Holleran, W.M.; Rogiers, V.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become evident that at least five ceramidase (CDase) isoforms are present in human epidermis, and that specifically acidic CDase (aCDase) and alkaline CDase (alkCDase) activities increase during keratinocyte differentiation, and thus might play a pivotal role(s) in permeability barri

  16. Human placenta metabolizes fatty acids: implications for fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders and maternal liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Prem; Bennett, Michael J; Sadovsky, Yoel; Nelson, D Michael; Rakheja, Dinesh; Strauss, Arnold W

    2003-06-01

    The role of fat metabolism during human pregnancy and in placental growth and function is poorly understood. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders in an affected fetus are associated with maternal diseases of pregnancy, including preeclampsia, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and the hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome called HELLP. We have investigated the developmental expression and activity of six fatty acid beta-oxidation enzymes at various gestational-age human placentas. Placental specimens exhibited abundant expression of all six enzymes, as assessed by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses, with greater staining in syncytiotrophoblasts compared with other placental cell types. beta-Oxidation enzyme activities in placental tissues were higher early in gestation and lower near term. Trophoblast cells in culture oxidized tritium-labeled palmitate and myristate in substantial amounts, indicating that the human placenta utilizes fatty acids as a significant metabolic fuel. Thus human placenta derives energy from fatty acid oxidation, providing a potential explanation for the association of fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders with maternal liver diseases in pregnancy.

  17. Fatty acid and sn-2 fatty acid composition in human milk from Granada (Spain) and in infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, A; López-Sabater, M C; Campoy-Folgoso, C; Rivero-Urgell, M; Castellote-Bargalló, A I

    2002-12-01

    To investigate differences in fatty acid and sn-2 fatty acid composition in colostrum, transitional and mature human milk, and in term infant formulas. Departament de Nutrició i Bromatologia, University of Barcelona, Spain and University Hospital of Granada, Spain. One-hundred and twenty mothers and 11 available types of infant formulas for term infants. We analysed the fatty acid composition of colostrum (n=40), transitional milk (n=40), mature milk (n=40) and 11 infant formulas. We also analysed the fatty acid composition at sn-2 position in colostrum (n=12), transitional milk (n=12), mature milk (n=12), and the 11 infant formulas. Human milk in Spain had low saturated fatty acids, high monounsaturated fatty acids and high linolenic acid. Infant formulas and mature human milk had similar fatty acid composition. In mature milk, palmitic acid was preferentially esterified at the sn-2 position (86.25%), and oleic and linoleic acids were predominantly esterified at the sn-1,3 positions (12.22 and 22.27%, respectively, in the sn-2 position). In infant formulas, palmitic acid was preferentially esterified at the sn-1,3 positions and oleic and linoleic acids had higher percentages at the sn-2 position than they do in human milk. Fatty acid composition of human milk in Spain seems to reflect the Mediterranean dietary habits of mothers. Infant formulas resemble the fatty acid profile of human milk, but the distribution of fatty acids at the sn-2 position is markedly different.

  18. Kinetics of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert H; Mundi, Manpreet S; Vlazny, Danielle T; Smailovic, Almira; Muthusamy, Kalpana; Almandoz, Jaime P; Singh, Ekta; Jensen, Michael D; Miles, John M

    2013-03-01

    Plasma free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics in humans are often measured with only one tracer. In study 1, healthy volunteers received infusions of [U-¹³C]linoleate, [U-¹³C]oleate, and [U-¹³C]palmitate during continuous feeding with liquid meals low (n = 12) and high (n = 5) in palmitate and containing three labeled fatty acids to measure FFA appearance and fractional spillover of lipoprotein lipase-generated fatty acids. Study 2 used an intravenous lipid emulsion to increase FFA concentrations during infusion of linoleate and palmitate tracers. In study 1, there were no differences in spillover of the three fatty acids for the low-palmitate meal, but linoleate spillover was greater than oleate or palmitate for the high-palmitate meal. In studies 1 and 2, clearance was significantly greater for linoleate than for the other FFAs. There was a negative correlation between clearance and concentration for each fatty acid in the two studies. In study 1, concentration and spillover correlated positively for oleate and palmitate but negatively for linoleate. In conclusion, linoleate spillover is greater than that of other fatty acids under some circumstances. Linoleate clearance is greater than that of palmitate or oleate, indicating a need for caution when using a single FFA to infer the behavior of all fatty acids.

  19. Catabolism of coffee chlorogenic acids by human colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Iziar A; Paz de Peña, Maria; Concepción, Cid; Alan, Crozier

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have indicated potential health benefits associated with coffee consumption. These benefits might be ascribed in part to the chlorogenic acids (CGAs), the main (poly)phenols in coffee. The impact of these dietary (poly)phenols on health depends on their bioavailability. As they pass along the gastrointestinal tract, CGAs are metabolized extensively and it is their metabolites rather than the parent compounds that predominate in the circulatory system. This article reports on a study in which after incubation of espresso coffee with human fecal samples, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to monitor CGA breakdown and identify and quantify the catabolites produced by the colonic microflora. The CGAs were rapidly degraded by the colonic microflora and over the 6-h incubation period, 11 catabolites were identified and quantified. The appearance of the initial degradation products, caffeic and ferulic acids, was transient, with maximum quantities at 1 h. Dihydrocaffeic acid, dihydroferulic acid, and 3-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid were the major end products, comprising 75-83% of the total catabolites, whereas the remaining 17-25% consisted of six minor catabolites. The rate and extent of the degradation showed a clear influence of the composition of the gut microbiota of individual volunteers. Pathways involved in colonic catabolism of CGAs are proposed and comparison with studies on the bioavailability of coffee CGAs ingested by humans helped distinguish between colonic catabolites and phase II metabolites of CGAs.

  20. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.peter@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Rehli, Michael, E-mail: michael.rehli@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Singer, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.singer@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Renner-Sattler, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.renner-sattler@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Kreutz, Marina, E-mail: marina.kreutz@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  1. Omega-3 fatty acids (ῳ-3 fatty acids) in epilepsy: animal models and human clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGiorgio, Christopher M; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-10-01

    There is growing interest in alternative and nutritional therapies for drug resistant epilepsy. ῳ-3 fatty acids such as fish or krill oil are widely available supplements used to lower triglycerides and enhance cardiovascular health. ῳ-3 fatty acids have been studied extensively in animal models of epilepsy. Yet, evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials in epilepsy is at an early stage. This report focuses on the key ῳ-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, their incorporation into the lipid bilayer, modulation of ion channels, and mechanisms of action in reducing excitability within the central nervous system. This paper presents pre-clinical evidence from mouse, rat, and canine models, and reports the efficacy of n-3 fatty acids in randomized controlled clinical trials. An English language search of PubMed and Google scholar for the years 1981-2016 was performed for animal studies and human randomized controlled clinical trials. Expert commentary: Basic science and animal models provide a cogent rationale and substantial evidence for a role of ῳ-3 fatty acids in reducing seizures. Results in humans are limited. Recent Phase II RCT evidence suggests that low to moderate dose of ῳ-3 fatty acids reduce seizures; however, larger multicenter randomized trials are needed to confirm or refute the evidence. The safety, health effects, low cost and ease of use make ῳ-3 fatty acids an intriguing alternative therapy for drug resistant epilepsy. Though safety of profile is excellent, the human data is not yet sufficient to support efficacy in drug resistant epilepsy at this time.

  2. Identification of tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid in foodstuffs, human urine and human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, J; Mizoi, Y; Naito, T; Ogawa, Y; Uetani, Y; Ninomiya, I

    1991-05-01

    1-Methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid (MTCA) and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid (TCCA), both precursors of mutagenic N-nitroso compounds (N-nitrosamines, 1-methyl-2-nitroso-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid and 2-nitroso-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid), were detected in various food-stuffs, urine from healthy human subjects and human milk. A purification procedure, involving a chemically-bonded material followed by HPLC combined with fluorometric detection, was used for the quantitative determination of these compounds, allowing the separation of two diastereoisomers of MTCA. An HPLC and mass spectrometry method was also developed for their identification. Comparing the concentration of MTCA and TCCA in fermented products and raw materials suggested that tetrahydro-beta-carbolines may have been produced through fermentation or by condensation of tryptophan and acetaldehyde formed from ethanol added as a food preservative. This is the first report of excretion of tetrahydro-beta-carbolines in human urine and human milk. A comparison of the concentrations of tetrahydro-beta-carbolines in urine from human infants and human milk indicates that tetrahydro-beta-carbolines may be synthesized endogenously in humans. A possible pathway of tryptophan metabolism in plants and animals is presented.

  3. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA Signaling in Human and Ruminant Reproductive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Wocławek-Potocka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA through activating its G protein-coupled receptors (LPAR 1–6 exerts diverse cellular effects that in turn influence several physiological processes including reproductive function of the female. Studies in various species of animals and also in humans have identified important roles for the receptor-mediated LPA signaling in multiple aspects of human and animal reproductive tract function. These aspects range from ovarian and uterine function, estrous cycle regulation, early embryo development, embryo implantation, decidualization to pregnancy maintenance and parturition. LPA signaling can also have pathological consequences, influencing aspects of endometriosis and reproductive tissue associated tumors. The review describes recent progress in LPA signaling research relevant to human and ruminant reproduction, pointing at the cow as a relevant model to study LPA influence on the human reproductive performance.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis of acidic oligosaccharides from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuanwu; Newburg, David S

    2008-06-01

    Interest in defining the array of oligosaccharides of human milk has been increasing. Pathogens that bind glycans on their host mucosal surfaces may be inhibited by human milk oligosaccharides. It has been postulated that acidic oligosaccharides in human milk may inhibit binding by pathogens that bind acidic glycans in the gut, but testing this hypothesis requires their reliable quantification in milk. Sialyloligosaccharides of human milk have been quantified by HPLC and CE. A recent CE technique uses the MEKC mode with direct detection at 205 nm to resolve and quantify, in the native form, the 12 most dominant sialyloligosaccharides of human milk in a single 35-min run. The method gives a linear response from 39 to 2500 microg/mL with a coefficient of variation between 2 to 9% and accuracy from 93 to 109%. This was used to detect variation in expression of specific sialyloligosaccharides in milk. Individual sialyloligosaccharide concentrations in milk differ among individual donors and between less and more mature milk. Thus, CE can be used to measure variation in sialyloligosaccharide expression in milk, and thereby test the relationship of this variation-to-variation in risk of specific diseases in breastfed infants.

  5. Radioimmunoassay for prostatic acid phosphatase in human serum. Methodologic aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradalier, N.; Canal, P.; Pujol, A.; Fregevu, Y. (Groupe de Recherches du Centre Claudius-Regaud, Toulouse (France)); Soula, G. (Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Toulouse (France))

    1982-01-01

    We propose a double antibody radioimmunoassay for human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in serum for diagnosis and management of prostatic adenocarcinoma under treatment. The antigen is purified from human prostatic fluid by a gel-filtration on Sephadex G 100 followed by affinity chromatography on Con A Sepharose. A specific antibody is raised in rabbits and purified by immunoadsorption with a female serum. The described technique offers both radioisotopic sensibility and immunologic specificity. Physiological values determined in the serum of 125 healthy males are below 2 ng/ml. No significative differences are observed with age. The proposed technique also shows significant differences between values evaluated for benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma.

  6. Excretion of amino acids by humans during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    We measured the urine amino acid distribution patterns before, during and after space flight on the Space Shuttle. The urine samples were collected on two separate flights of the space shuttle. The first flight lasted 9.5 days and the second flight 15 days. Urine was collected continuously on 8 subjects for the period beginning 10 d before launch to 6 d after landing. Results: In contrast to the earlier Skylab missions where a pronounced amino aciduria was found, on shuttle the urinary amino acids showed little change with spaceflight except for a marked decrease in all of the amino acids on FD (flight day) 1 (pvaline on FD3 and FD4 (p<0.05). Conclusions: (i) Amino aciduria is not an inevitable consequence of space flight. (ii) The occurrence of amino aciduria, like muscle protein breakdown is a mission specific effect rather than part of the general human response to microgravity.

  7. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism reduces human myeloma cells proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Tirado-Vélez

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells. It has been proposed that targeting cancer cell metabolism would provide a new selective anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis would reduce cell proliferation in human myeloma cells. We evaluated the effect of etomoxir and orlistat on fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, cell cycle distribution, proliferation, cell death and expression of G1/S phase regulatory proteins in myeloma cells. Etomoxir and orlistat inhibited β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis respectively in myeloma cells, without altering significantly glucose metabolism. These effects were associated with reduced cell viability and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. Specifically, etomoxir and orlistat reduced by 40-70% myeloma cells proliferation. The combination of etomoxir and orlistat resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Orlistat induced apoptosis and sensitized RPMI-8226 cells to apoptosis induction by bortezomib, whereas apoptosis was not altered by etomoxir. Finally, the inhibitory effect of both drugs on cell proliferation was associated with reduced p21 protein levels and phosphorylation levels of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid metabolism represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat human multiple myeloma.

  8. In silico evidence for gluconeogenesis from fatty acids in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kaleta

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The question whether fatty acids can be converted into glucose in humans has a long standing tradition in biochemistry, and the expected answer is "No". Using recent advances in Systems Biology in the form of large-scale metabolic reconstructions, we reassessed this question by performing a global investigation of a genome-scale human metabolic network, which had been reconstructed on the basis of experimental results. By elementary flux pattern analysis, we found numerous pathways on which gluconeogenesis from fatty acids is feasible in humans. On these pathways, four moles of acetyl-CoA are converted into one mole of glucose and two moles of CO₂. Analyzing the detected pathways in detail we found that their energetic requirements potentially limit their capacity. This study has many other biochemical implications: effect of starvation, sports physiology, practically carbohydrate-free diets of inuit, as well as survival of hibernating animals and embryos of egg-laying animals. Moreover, the energetic loss associated to the usage of gluconeogenesis from fatty acids can help explain the efficiency of carbohydrate reduced and ketogenic diets such as the Atkins diet.

  9. Distribution of glycolipid and unsaturated fatty acids in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshie; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2014-09-01

    It has been recognized that human hair lipids play crucial roles in the integrity of cells and matrices, while the details of distribution and structure of the minor lipids are hardly known. Here we investigated the lipids at the hair surface, at the interface between cuticle and cortex and in the interior of hair (cortex, medulla and melanin granules). Hair lipids and fatty acids and their metabolites were detected and characterized by using infrared spectroscopy and several mass spectrometry techniques (FTIR, ToF-SIMS, GCMS, and ESI-MS). As a result, it was found that unsaturated fatty acids were present more in the cortex of hair than at the hair surface. At the interface between cuticle and cortex, it is suggested that steryl glycoside-like lipids containing N-acetylglucosamine were present, and contributing to the adhesion between the cuticle and cortex of hair. Oxidative metabolites derived from integral fatty acids such as linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids were found in the hair bulb and melanin granules. Especially the oxidative metabolites of alpha-linolenic acid were integrated into the lipids non-covalently and tightly bound to melanin granules (namely, melanin lipids) and suggested as being involved in the biosynthetic processes of melanosome.

  10. Effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and chitosan solutions on microhardness of the human radicular dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeta Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, and chitosan solutions on the microhardness of human radicular dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty dentin specimens were randomly divided into three groups of 10 specimens each according to the irrigant used: G1 - 1% phytic acid, G2 - 17% EDTA, and G3 - 0.2% chitosan. A standardized volume of each chelating solution was used for 3 min. Dentin microhardness was measured before and after application at the cervical, middle, and apical levels with a Vickers indenter under a 200-g load and a 10-s dwell time. The results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Student′s t test. Results: Microhardness of the radicular dentin varied at the cervical, middle, and apical levels. EDTA had the greatest overall effect, causing a sharp percentage reduction in dentin microhardness with a significant difference from phytic acid and chitosan (P = 0.002. However, phytic acid and chitosan differed insignificantly from each other (P = 0.887. Conclusion: All tested chelating solutions reduced microhardness of the radicular dentin layer at all the levels. However, reduction was least at the apical level. EDTA caused more reduction in dentin microhardness than chitosan while phytic acid reduced the least.

  11. Age estimation based on aspartic acid racemization in human sclera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumb, Karolin; Matzenauer, Christian; Reckert, Alexandra; Lehmann, Klaus; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Age estimation based on racemization of aspartic acid residues (AAR) in permanent proteins has been established in forensic medicine for years. While dentine is the tissue of choice for this molecular method of age estimation, teeth are not always available which leads to the need to identify other suitable tissues. We examined the suitability of total tissue samples of human sclera for the estimation of age at death. Sixty-five samples of scleral tissue were analyzed. The samples were hydrolyzed and after derivatization, the extent of aspartic acid racemization was determined by gas chromatography. The degree of AAR increased with age. In samples from younger individuals, the correlation of age and D-aspartic acid content was closer than in samples from older individuals. The age-dependent racemization in total tissue samples proves that permanent or at least long-living proteins are present in scleral tissue. The correlation of AAR in human sclera and age at death is close enough to serve as basis for age estimation. However, the precision of age estimation by this method is lower than that of age estimation based on the analysis of dentine which is due to molecular inhomogeneities of total tissue samples of sclera. Nevertheless, the approach may serve as a valuable alternative or addition in exceptional cases.

  12. Implication of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilzer, Allison; Park, Yeonhwa

    2012-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has drawn significant attention in the last two decades for its variety of biologically beneficial effects. CLA reduces body fat, cardiovascular diseases and cancer, and modulates immune and inflammatory responses as well as improves bone mass. It has been suggested that the overall effects of CLA are the results of interactions between two major isomers, cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12. This review will primarily focus on current CLA publications involving humans, which are also summarized in the tables. Along with a number of beneficial effects of CLA, there are safety considerations for CLA supplementation in humans, which include effects on liver functions, milk fat depression, glucose metabolism, and oxidative stresses.

  13. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Lei [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Xiao, Yongsheng [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Wang, Yinsheng, E-mail: yinsheng.wang@ucr.edu [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0403 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  14. Structure of the human 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase gene (HPD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awata, H.; Endo, F.; Matsuda, I. [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan)

    1994-10-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD) is an important enzyme in tyrosine catabolism in most organisms. The activity of this enzyme is expressed mainly in the liver and developmentally regulated in mammals, and a genetic deficiency in this enzyme in humans and mice leads to hereditary tyrosinemia type 3. Using human HPD cDNA as a probe, a chromosomal gene related to HPD was isolated from human gene libraries. The human HPD gene is over 30 kb long and is split into 14 exons. The extract sizes and boundaries of exon blocks were determined, and all of the splice donor and acceptor sites conformed to the GT/AG rule. Analysis of the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the gene suggests that expression of the gene is regulated by hepatocyte-specific and liver-enriched transcription factors, as well as by hormones. These features of the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene are similar to those of other genes that are specifically expressed in hepatocytes and that are developmentally regulated. 41 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. HPLC determination of valproic acid in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, P; Rajani Kumar, V; Satyanarayana, V; Krishna, D R

    2003-06-01

    A HPLC method for the determination of valproic acid (VA) in human serum using diazepam as internal standard (I.S.) is described. The eluates were separated with a C18 250 x 4.6 mm internal diameter reversed phase column maintained at a temperature of 50 degrees C. A mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 0.05 M phosphate buffer (pH 3.0) 45:55 v/v was used at a flow rate of 1.2 ml/min. Wavelength was switched from 360 nm to 210 nm during valproic acid retention. The method was linear over a concentration range of 20 to 160 microg/ml for valproic acid. Recovery was greater than 94% over a concentration range of 20 to 120 microg/ml and the limit of quantitation was 1 microg/ml. The intra day and inter day relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) measured at 20, 60, 80 and 120 microg/ml ranged from 1.46 to 5.34% and 0.83 to 5.03% respectively. The method is simple, rapid, accurate and sensitive and it was used for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) in Indian epileptic patient population. The results obtained with this method correlated well with clinical practice.

  16. Imputing amino acid polymorphisms in human leukocyte antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Jia

    Full Text Available DNA sequence variation within human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes mediate susceptibility to a wide range of human diseases. The complex genetic structure of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC makes it difficult, however, to collect genotyping data in large cohorts. Long-range linkage disequilibrium between HLA loci and SNP markers across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC region offers an alternative approach through imputation to interrogate HLA variation in existing GWAS data sets. Here we describe a computational strategy, SNP2HLA, to impute classical alleles and amino acid polymorphisms at class I (HLA-A, -B, -C and class II (-DPA1, -DPB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, and -DRB1 loci. To characterize performance of SNP2HLA, we constructed two European ancestry reference panels, one based on data collected in HapMap-CEPH pedigrees (90 individuals and another based on data collected by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC, 5,225 individuals. We imputed HLA alleles in an independent data set from the British 1958 Birth Cohort (N = 918 with gold standard four-digit HLA types and SNPs genotyped using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K and Illumina Immunochip microarrays. We demonstrate that the sample size of the reference panel, rather than SNP density of the genotyping platform, is critical to achieve high imputation accuracy. Using the larger T1DGC reference panel, the average accuracy at four-digit resolution is 94.7% using the low-density Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K, and 96.7% using the high-density Illumina Immunochip. For amino acid polymorphisms within HLA genes, we achieve 98.6% and 99.3% accuracy using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K and Illumina Immunochip, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate how imputation and association testing at amino acid resolution can facilitate fine-mapping of primary MHC association signals, giving a specific example from type 1 diabetes.

  17. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder.

  18. Assessment of human exposure effects of nitrous acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, T.R.; Kjaergaard, S.K. (University of Aarhus. Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (Denmark)); Brauer, M. (Harvard School of Public Health. Department of Environmental Health, Exposure Assessment and Engineering Program (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The study aimed at an estimation of the relative contribution of nitrous acid to measurable human exposure effects in relation to indoor environments with unvented gas combustion. Fifteen medically examined totally healthy non-smoker adults aged between 22 and 57 years were exposed in a double-blind, balanced design (3x3 latin square) to clean air and nitrous acid (HONO) concentration in an empty 74 m[sup 3] climate chamber. 3 teams of 5 subjects each were randomly exposed and the latin square was selected at random. Each exposure period was 3.5 hours and preceded by a 1 hour base-line pre-exposure measurement period. After 1 hr 40 minutes the subjects exercised for ten minutes on bicycle ergometers in order to increase the uptake of HONO by increasing ventilatory rate 3-4 fold. Workloads were calculated individually and ranged from 21800-34600 kpm/h. During the 10 minutes the test subjects were mouth-breathing to encourage deeper penetration of nitrous acid in the respiratory system so as to induce a mild cooling which would increase their responsiveness to irritants. The amount of deliverable H[sup +] was estimated at 16.350 nmoles with exposure to 395 ppb HONO with subjects breathing at the rate of 5 L min[sup -1]. It was assumed that HONO is efficiently absorbed into the respiratory system. Details are given of the results. Findings were highly variable, largely negative effects of exposure to nitrous acid which appear similiar to results seen in nitrogen dioxide exposure studies. It is concluded to be unlikely that HONO exposures alone can be responsible for exposure misclassification in NO[sub 2] exposure studies. (AB) (52 refs.).

  19. Assessment of human exposure effects of nitrous acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, T.R.; Kjaergaard, S.K. [University of Aarhus. Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (Denmark); Brauer, M. [Harvard School of Public Health. Department of Environmental Health, Exposure Assessment and Engineering Program (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The study aimed at an estimation of the relative contribution of nitrous acid to measurable human exposure effects in relation to indoor environments with unvented gas combustion. Fifteen medically examined totally healthy non-smoker adults aged between 22 and 57 years were exposed in a double-blind, balanced design (3x3 latin square) to clean air and nitrous acid (HONO) concentration in an empty 74 m{sup 3} climate chamber. 3 teams of 5 subjects each were randomly exposed and the latin square was selected at random. Each exposure period was 3.5 hours and preceded by a 1 hour base-line pre-exposure measurement period. After 1 hr 40 minutes the subjects exercised for ten minutes on bicycle ergometers in order to increase the uptake of HONO by increasing ventilatory rate 3-4 fold. Workloads were calculated individually and ranged from 21800-34600 kpm/h. During the 10 minutes the test subjects were mouth-breathing to encourage deeper penetration of nitrous acid in the respiratory system so as to induce a mild cooling which would increase their responsiveness to irritants. The amount of deliverable H{sup +} was estimated at 16.350 nmoles with exposure to 395 ppb HONO with subjects breathing at the rate of 5 L min{sup -1}. It was assumed that HONO is efficiently absorbed into the respiratory system. Details are given of the results. Findings were highly variable, largely negative effects of exposure to nitrous acid which appear similiar to results seen in nitrogen dioxide exposure studies. It is concluded to be unlikely that HONO exposures alone can be responsible for exposure misclassification in NO{sub 2} exposure studies. (AB) (52 refs.).

  20. Expression of retinoic acid receptors in human endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Kojiro; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Tamura, Mitsutoshi; Niikura, Hitoshi; Takano, Tadao; Yoshinaga, Kohsuke; Nagase, Satoru; Suzuki, Takashi; Ito, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyo; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-02-01

    The retinoids (vitamin A and its biologically active derivatives) are essential for the health and survival of the individual. Several studies have reported a strong rationale for the use of retinoids in cancer treatment and chemoprevention. It has been discovered that expression of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta is frequently silenced in epithelial carcinogenesis, which has led to the hypothesis that RAR beta could act as a tumor suppressor. However, the status of RAR beta in human endometrial carcinoma has not been examined. In the present study, we initially studied the effects of retinoic acid on cell proliferation and the expression of RAR alpha, RAR beta, and RAR gamma using AM580 (a RAR-specific agonist) in the Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line. We also examined the expression of RAR in human eutopic endometrium (30 cases), endometrial hyperplasia (28 cases), and endometrial carcinoma (103 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Finally, we correlated these findings with the clinicopathological parameters. In vitro, cell growth was inhibited and RAR beta and RAR gamma mRNA was significantly induced by AM580, compared with vehicle controls, whereas RAR alpha mRNA was significantly attenuated by AM580, compared with vehicle. RAR beta was detected predominantly in endometrial hyperplasia, compared with endometrial carcinoma. No statistically significant correlation was obtained between the expression of any other RAR subtypes and clinicopathological parameters in human endometrial carcinoma. The results of our study demonstrate that AM580 inhibits cell growth and induces RAR beta mRNA expression in the Ishikawa cell line, and the expression level of RAR beta in endometrial carcinoma is significantly lower than that in endometrial hyperplasia. AM580 might therefore be considered as a potential treatment for endometrial carcinoma.

  1. Influence of acid and bile acid on ERK activity, PPARY expression and cell proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Ru Jiang; Jun Gong; Zhen-Ni Zhang; Zhe Qiao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of acid and bile acid exposure on cell proliferation and the expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor Y (PPARy) in normal human esophageal epithelial cells in vitro.METHODS: In vitro cultured normal human esophageal epithelial cells were exposed to acidic media (pH 4.0-6.5), media containing different bile acid (250 μmol/L), media containing acid and bile acid, respectively.Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT and flow cytometry. The expressions of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and PPARy protein were determined by the immunoblotting technique.RESULTS: Acid-exposed (3 min) esophageal cells exhibited a significant increase in proliferation ratio,S phase of the cell cycle (P<0.05) and the level of phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein. When the acid-exposure period exceeded 6 min, we observed a decrease in proliferation ratio and S phase of the cell cycle, with an increased apoptosis ratio (P<0.05). Bile acid exposure (3-12 min) also produced an increase in proliferation ratio, S phase of the cell cycle (P<0.05)and phosphorylated ERK1/2 expression. On the contrary,deoxycholic acid (DCA) exposure (>20 min) decreased proliferation ratio. Compared with bile acid exposure (pH 7.4), bile acid exposure (pH 6.5, 4) significantly decreased proliferation ratio (P<0.05). There was no expression of PPARY in normal human esophageal epithelial cells.CONCLUSION: The rapid stimuli of acid or bile acid increase proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells by activating the ERK pathway.

  2. Cloning and characterization of a functional human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter, human GAT-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bolette; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Jensen, Anders A.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters act to terminate GABA neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. Intriguingly four distinct GABA transporters have been cloned from rat and mouse, whereas only three functional homologs of these transporters have been cloned from human....... The aim of this study therefore was to search for this fourth missing human transporter. Using a bioinformatics approach, we successfully identified and cloned the full-length cDNA of a so far uncharacterized human GABA transporter (GAT). The predicted protein displays high sequence similarity to rat GAT......-2 and mouse GAT3, and in accordance with the nomenclature for rat GABA transporters, we therefore refer to the transporter as human GAT-2. We used electrophysiological and cell-based methods to demonstrate that this protein is a functional transporter of GABA. The transport was saturable...

  3. Ursodeoxycholic acid but not tauroursodeoxycholic acid inhibits proliferation and differentiation of human subcutaneous adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Mališová

    Full Text Available Stress of endoplasmic reticulum (ERS is one of the molecular triggers of adipocyte dysfunction and chronic low inflammation accompanying obesity. ERS can be alleviated by chemical chaperones from the family of bile acids (BAs. Thus, two BAs currently used to treat cholestasis, ursodeoxycholic and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA and TUDCA, could potentially lessen adverse metabolic effects of obesity. Nevertheless, BAs effects on human adipose cells are mostly unknown. They could regulate gene expression through pathways different from their chaperone function, namely through activation of farnesoid X receptor (FXR and TGR5, G-coupled receptor. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze effects of UDCA and TUDCA on human preadipocytes and differentiated adipocytes derived from paired samples of two distinct subcutaneous adipose tissue depots, abdominal and gluteal. While TUDCA did not alter proliferation of cells from either depot, UDCA exerted strong anti-proliferative effect. In differentiated adipocytes, acute exposition to neither TUDCA nor UDCA was able to reduce effect of ERS stressor tunicamycin. However, exposure of cells to UDCA during whole differentiation process decreased expression of ERS markers. At the same time however, UDCA profoundly inhibited adipogenic conversion of cells. UDCA abolished expression of PPARγ and lipogenic enzymes already in the early phases of adipogenesis. This anti-adipogenic effect of UDCA was not dependent on FXR or TGR5 activation, but could be related to ability of UDCA to sustain the activation of ERK1/2 previously linked with PPARγ inactivation. Finally, neither BAs did lower expression of chemokines inducible by TLR4 pathway, when UDCA enhanced their expression in gluteal adipocytes. Therefore while TUDCA has neutral effect on human preadipocytes and adipocytes, the therapeutic use of UDCA different from treating cholestatic diseases should be considered with caution because UDCA alters functions of

  4. Fatty acid transport protein expression in human brain and potential role in fatty acid transport across human brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ryan W; On, Ngoc H; Del Bigio, Marc R; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2011-05-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by the brain capillary endothelial cells, provides a protective barrier between the systemic blood and the extracellular environment of the CNS. Passage of fatty acids from the blood to the brain may occur either by diffusion or by proteins that facilitate their transport. Currently several protein families have been implicated in fatty acid transport. The focus of the present study was to identify the fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) expressed in the brain microvessel endothelial cells and characterize their involvement in fatty acid transport across an in vitro BBB model. The major fatty acid transport proteins expressed in human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC), mouse capillaries and human grey matter were FATP-1, -4 and fatty acid binding protein 5 and fatty acid translocase/CD36. The passage of various radiolabeled fatty acids across confluent HBMEC monolayers was examined over a 30-min period in the presence of fatty acid free albumin in a 1 : 1 molar ratio. The apical to basolateral permeability of radiolabeled fatty acids was dependent upon both saturation and chain length of the fatty acid. Knockdown of various fatty acid transport proteins using siRNA significantly decreased radiolabeled fatty acid transport across the HBMEC monolayer. Our findings indicate that FATP-1 and FATP-4 are the predominant fatty acid transport proteins expressed in the BBB based on human and mouse expression studies. While transport studies in HBMEC monolayers support their involvement in fatty acid permeability, fatty acid translocase/CD36 also appears to play a prominent role in transport of fatty acids across HBMEC.

  5. Human monocyte differentiation stage affects response to arachidonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Alvarez, Elizabeth; Pelaez, Carlos A; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    AA-induced cell death mechanisms acting on human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), U937 promonocytes and PMA-differentiated U937 cells were studied. Arachidonic acid induced apoptosis and necrosis in monocytes and U937 cells but only apoptosis in MDM and U937D cells. AA increased both types of death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells and increased the percentage of TNFalpha+ cells and reduced IL-10+ cells. Experiments blocking these cytokines indicated that AA-mediated death was TNFalpha- and IL-10-independent. The differences in AA-mediated cell death could be explained by high ROS, calpain and sPLA-2 production and activity in monocytes. Blocking sPLA-2 in monocytes and treatment with antioxidants favored M. tuberculosis control whereas AA enhanced M. tuberculosis growth in MDM. Such evidence suggested that AA-modulated effector mechanisms depend on mononuclear phagocytes' differentiation stage.

  6. Kinetics of fatty acid binding ability of glycated human serum albumin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eiji Yamazaki; Minoru Inagaki; Osamu Kurita; Tetsuji Inoue

    2005-09-01

    Kinetics of fatty acid binding ability of glycated human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated by fluorescent displacement technique with 1-anilino-8-naphtharene sulphonic acid (ANS method), and photometric detection of nonesterified-fatty-acid (NEFA method). Changing of binding affinities of glycated HSA toward oleic acid, linoleic acid, lauric acid, and caproic acid, were not observed by the ANS method. However, decreases of binding capacities after 55 days glycation were confirmed by the NEFA method in comparison to control HSA. The decrease in binding affinities was: oleic acid (84%), linoleic acid (84%), lauric acid (87%), and caproic acid (90%), respectively. The decreases were consistent with decrease of the intact lysine residues in glycated HSA. The present observation indicates that HSA promptly loses its binding ability to fatty acid as soon as the lysine residues at fatty acid binding sites are glycated.

  7. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  9. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gholami, Parviz [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Feng [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fan, Fang [Department of Pathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hagenbuch, Bruno [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Olyaee, Mojtaba [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  10. Incretin effect after oral amino Acid ingestion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Ola; Pacini, Giovanni; Tura, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    is also present after amino acid ingestion is not known. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to explore insulin secretion and incretin hormones after oral and iv amino acid administration at matched total amino acid concentrations in healthy subjects. DESIGN: An amino acid mixture (Vaminolac......: Oral amino acid mixture ingestion elicits a stronger insulin secretory response than iv amino acid at matching amino acid levels and this is associated with increased GIP level, suggesting that an incretin effect exists also after oral amino acids, possibly mediated by GIP....

  11. Ultraviolet B irradiation induces changes in the distribution and release of arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1987-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that derivatives of 20-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids, the eicosanoids, play an important role in the inflammatory responses of the human skin. To better understand the metabolic fate of fatty acids in the skin, the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation (280-320 nm) on the distribution and release of /sup 14/C-labeled arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture was investigated. Ultraviolet B irradiation induced the release of all three /sup 14/C-labeled fatty acids from the phospholipids, especially from phosphatidylethanolamine, and this was accompanied by increased labeling of the nonphosphorus lipids. This finding suggests that UVB induces a significant liberation of eicosanoid precursor fatty acids from cellular phospholipids, but the liberated fatty acids are largely reincorporated into the nonphosphorus lipids. In conclusion, the present study suggests that not only arachidonic acid but also dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid might be involved in the UVB irradiation-induced inflammatory reactions of human skin.

  12. Gallic acid reduces cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human cervical cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Bing; HU, MENGCAI

    2013-01-01

    Gallic acid is a trihydroxybenzoic acid, also known as 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, which is present in plants worldwide, including Chinese medicinal herbs. Gallic acid has been shown to have cytotoxic effects in certain cancer cells, without damaging normal cells. The objective of the present study was to determine whether gallic acid is able to inhibit human cervical cancer cell viability, proliferation and invasion and suppress cervical cancer cell-mediated angiogenesis. Treatment of HeLa...

  13. Palmitic acid but not palmitoleic acid induces insulin resistance in a human endothelial cell line by decreasing SERCA pump expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavo Vazquez-Jimenez, J; Chavez-Reyes, Jesus; Romero-Garcia, Tatiana; Zarain-Herzberg, Angel; Valdes-Flores, Jesus; Manuel Galindo-Rosales, J; Rueda, Angelica; Guerrero-Hernandez, Agustin; Olivares-Reyes, J Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid is a negative regulator of insulin activity. At the molecular level, palmitic acid reduces insulin stimulated Akt Ser473 phosphorylation. Interestingly, we have found that incubation with palmitic acid of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced a biphasic effect, an initial transient elevation followed by a sustained reduction of SERCA pump protein levels. However, palmitic acid produced a sustained inhibition of SERCA pump ATPase activity. Insulin resistance state appeared before there was a significant reduction of SERCA2 expression. The mechanism by which palmitic acid impairs insulin signaling may involve endoplasmic reticulum stress, because this fatty acid induced activation of both PERK, an ER stress marker, and JNK, a kinase associated with insulin resistance. None of these effects were observed by incubating HUVEC-CS cells with palmitoleic acid. Importantly, SERCA2 overexpression decreased the palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance state. All these results suggest that SERCA pump might be the target of palmitic acid to induce the insulin resistance state in a human vascular endothelial cell line. Importantly, these data suggest that HUVEC-CS cells respond to palmitic acid-exposure with a compensatory overexpression of SERCA pump within the first hour, which eventually fades out and insulin resistance prevails.

  14. Neighbor Preferences of Amino Acids and Context-Dependent Effects of Amino Acid Substitutions in Human, Mouse, and Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingchuan Fu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids show apparent propensities toward their neighbors. In addition to preferences of amino acids for their neighborhood context, amino acid substitutions are also considered to be context-dependent. However, context-dependence patterns of amino acid substitutions still remain poorly understood. Using relative entropy, we investigated the neighbor preferences of 20 amino acids and the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions with protein sequences in human, mouse, and dog. For 20 amino acids, the highest relative entropy was mostly observed at the nearest adjacent site of either N- or C-terminus except C and G. C showed the highest relative entropy at the third flanking site and periodic pattern was detected at G flanking sites. Furthermore, neighbor preference patterns of amino acids varied greatly in different secondary structures. We then comprehensively investigated the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions. Our results showed that nearly half of 380 substitution types were evidently context dependent, and the context-dependent patterns relied on protein secondary structures. Among 20 amino acids, P elicited the greatest effect on amino acid substitutions. The underlying mechanisms of context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions were possibly mutation bias at a DNA level and natural selection. Our findings may improve secondary structure prediction algorithms and protein design; moreover, this study provided useful information to develop empirical models of protein evolution that consider dependence between residues.

  15. Neighbor preferences of amino acids and context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions in human, mouse, and dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mingchuan; Huang, Zhuoran; Mao, Yuanhui; Tao, Shiheng

    2014-09-10

    Amino acids show apparent propensities toward their neighbors. In addition to preferences of amino acids for their neighborhood context, amino acid substitutions are also considered to be context-dependent. However, context-dependence patterns of amino acid substitutions still remain poorly understood. Using relative entropy, we investigated the neighbor preferences of 20 amino acids and the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions with protein sequences in human, mouse, and dog. For 20 amino acids, the highest relative entropy was mostly observed at the nearest adjacent site of either N- or C-terminus except C and G. C showed the highest relative entropy at the third flanking site and periodic pattern was detected at G flanking sites. Furthermore, neighbor preference patterns of amino acids varied greatly in different secondary structures. We then comprehensively investigated the context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions. Our results showed that nearly half of 380 substitution types were evidently context dependent, and the context-dependent patterns relied on protein secondary structures. Among 20 amino acids, P elicited the greatest effect on amino acid substitutions. The underlying mechanisms of context-dependent effects of amino acid substitutions were possibly mutation bias at a DNA level and natural selection. Our findings may improve secondary structure prediction algorithms and protein design; moreover, this study provided useful information to develop empirical models of protein evolution that consider dependence between residues.

  16. Identification of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl in human adipose tissue and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledzinski, Tomasz; Mika, Adriana; Stepnowski, Piotr; Proczko-Markuszewska, Monika; Kaska, Lukasz; Stefaniak, Tomasz; Swierczynski, Julian

    2013-08-01

    Fatty acids containing a cyclopropane ring in their structure (cyclopropane FA) have been found in a wide variety of bacteria, a number of protozoa, and Myriapoda. Little is known about cyclopropane FA in mammal, especially in human tissues. The present study deals with the identification of cyclopropane FA in adipose tissue and serum of humans and rats. Fatty acids extracted from the adipose tissue and serum obtained from obese women during bariatric surgery were methylated and analyzed on GC-MS. We have identified: cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl, cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-octyl, cyclopropanenonanoic acid, and 2-[[2-[(2-ethylcyclopropyl)methyl]cyclopropyl]methyl] acid in human adipose tissue. We confirmed the presence of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl by derivatization of FA extracted from human adipose tissue to picolinyl esters. Cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl was the main cyclopropane FA (approximately 0.4 % of total fatty acids in human adipose tissue, and about 0.2 % of total fatty acids in the serum). In adipose tissue cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl was found mainly in triacylglycerols, whereas in serum in phospholipids and triacylglycerols. The cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl has also been found in serum, and adipose tissue of rats in amounts comparable to humans. The content of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl decreased in adipose tissue of rats maintained on a restricted diet for 1 month. In conclusion, we demonstrated that cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl is present in human adipose tissue and serum. Adipose tissue cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl is stored mainly in triacylglycerols and the storage of this cyclopropane FA is affected by food restriction.

  17. Glucosamine increases hyaluronic acid production in human osteoarthritic synovium explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uitterlinden EJ

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucosamine (GlcN used by patients with osteoarthritis was demonstrated to reduce pain, but the working mechanism is still not clear. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA is also described to reduce pain in osteoarthritis. The synthesis of HA requires GlcN as one of its main building blocks. We therefore hypothesized that addition of GlcN might increase HA production by synovium tissue. Methods Human osteoarthritic synovium explants were obtained at total knee surgery and pre-cultured for 1 day. The experimental conditions consisted of a 2 days continuation of the culture with addition of N-Acetyl-glucosamine (GlcN-Ac; 5 mM, glucosamine-hydrochloride (GlcN-HCl; 0.5 and 5 mM, glucose (Gluc; 0.5 and 5 mM. Hereafter HA production was measured in culture medium supernatant using an enzyme-linked binding protein assay. Real time RT-PCR was performed for hyaluronic acid synthase (HAS 1, 2 and 3 on RNA isolated from the explants. Results 0.5 mM and 5 mM GlcN-HCl significantly increased HA production compared to control (approximately 2 – 4-fold, whereas GlcN-Ac had no significant effect. Addition of 5 mM Gluc also increased HA production (approximately 2-fold, but 0.5 mM Gluc did not. Gene expression of the HA forming enzymes HAS 1, 2 and 3 was not altered by the addition of GlcN or Gluc. Conclusion Our data suggest that exogenous GlcN can increase HA production by synovium tissue and is more effective at lower concentrations than Gluc. This might indicate that GlcN exerts its potential analgesic properties through stimulation of synovial HA production.

  18. [Lactic acid bacteria and health: are probiotics safe for human?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiszewska, Izabela; Januszewska, Milena; Rybka, Joanna; Gackowska, Lidia

    2014-11-17

    The effect of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on human health has been examined for many years. Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have confirmed the beneficial activity of some exogenous lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of rotaviral infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and other gastrointestinal disorders. Probiotics support the action of the intestinal microflora and exhibit a favorable modulatory effect on the host's immune system. However, it should be remembered that relatively harmless lactobacilli can occasionally induce opportunistic infections. Due to reaching almost 20x10(12) probiotic doses per year which contain live cultures of bacteria, it is essential to monitor the safety aspect of their administration. In recent years, infections caused by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium made up 0.05% to 0.4% of cases of endocarditis and bacteremia. In most cases, the infections were caused by endogenous microflora of the host or bacterial strains colonizing the host's oral cavity. According to a review of cases of infections caused by bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus from 2005 (collected by J.P. Cannot'a), 1.7% of infections have been linked directly with intensive dairy probiotic consumption by patients. Additionally, due to the lack of a precise description of most individuals' eating habits, the possible effect of probiotics on infection development definitively should not be ruled out. The present paper describes cases of diseases caused by lactic acid bacteria, a potential mechanism for the adverse action of bacteria, and the possible hazard connected with probiotic supplementation for seriously ill and hospitalized patients.

  19. Endothelial Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Polyglycolic Acid/Polylactic Acid Mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng; Gu, Yunpeng; Liu, Zhenjun; Qi, Yue; Ma, Gui E; Kang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC) is considered as a cell source potentially useful for angiogenesis in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This study investigated the growth and endothelial differentiation of human ADSCs on polyglycolic acid/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA) mesh compared to 2D plastic. Cell adhesion, viability, and distribution of hADSCs on PGA/PLA mesh were observed by CM-Dil labeling, live/dead staining, and SEM examination while endothelial differentiation was evaluated by flow cytometry, Ac-LDL/UEA-1 uptake assay, immunofluorescence stainings, and gene expression analysis of endothelial related markers. Results showed hADSCs gained a mature endothelial phenotype with a positive ratio of 21.4 ± 3.7% for CD31+/CD34- when induced in 3D mesh after 21 days, which was further verified by the expressions of a comprehensive range of endothelial related markers, whereas hADSCs in 2D induced and 2D/3D noninduced groups all failed to differentiate into endothelial cells. Moreover, compared to 2D groups, the expression for α-SMA was markedly suppressed in 3D cultured hADSCs. This study first demonstrated the endothelial differentiation of hADSCs on the PGA/PLA mesh and pointed out the synergistic effect of PGA/PLA 3D culture and growth factors on the acquisition of mature characteristic endothelial phenotype. We believed this study would be the initial step towards the generation of prevascularized tissue engineered constructs.

  20. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Mellors, J.W. [ed.] [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Jeang, K.T. [ed.] [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Molecular Virology Section; Wain-Hobson, S. [Pasteur Inst., Paris (France)] [ed.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  1. Sialic acid content in human saliva and anti-influenza activity against human and avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsuwat, Nattavatchara; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2016-03-01

    It was shown previously that human saliva has higher antiviral activity against human influenza viruses than against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, and that the major anti-influenza activity was associated with sialic-acid-containing molecules. To further characterize the differential susceptibility to saliva among influenza viruses, seasonal influenza A and B virus, pandemic H1N1 virus, and 15 subtypes of avian influenza virus were tested for their susceptibility to human and chicken saliva. Human saliva showed higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization (NT) titers against seasonal influenza A virus and the pandemic H1N1 viruses than against influenza B virus and most avian influenza viruses, except for H9N2 and H12N9 avian influenza viruses, which showed high HI and NT titers. To understand the nature of sialic-acid-containing anti-influenza factors in human saliva, α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acid was measured in human saliva samples using a lectin binding and dot blot assay. α2,6-linked sialic acid was found to be more abundant than α2,3-linked sialic acid, and a seasonal H1N1 influenza virus bound more efficiently to human saliva than an H5N1 virus in a dot blot analysis. These data indicated that human saliva contains the sialic acid type corresponding to the binding preference of seasonal influenza viruses.

  2. Fatty acid composition of human milk and infant formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivančica Delaš

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate fatty acid composition of membrane lipids is necessary for structure and function of the developing nervous system. Rapid synthesis of brain tissue occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy and the early postnatal weeks. This synthesis of brain structure involves the formation of complex lipids, many of which contain significant quantities of essential fatty acids and their higher homologs. This study was undertaken to elucidate how fatty acid compositions of available diets for infants meet the requirements for essential fatty acids. Samples of infant formulas, present on the market, as well as milk samples obtained from breast feeding mothers, were extracted by chloroform : methanol mixtures in order to obtain total lipids. Fatty acid methyl esters were prepared and fatty acid composition was revealed by gas chromatography. Special interest was directed to the content of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The results have shown that infant formulas, designed to substitute mothers’ breast milk, contain medium chain fatty acids (C 10:0, C 12:0, along with the other saturated fatty acids, in the amounts acceptable for infants’ energy consumption. Although linoleic acid (C18:2, n-6 was present at the level expected to cover needs for essential fatty acids, most of the tested products did not contain sufficient amounts of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, despite the fact that these fatty acids are necessary for undisturbed brain development, ignoring the strong recommendations that they should be used as a supplement in infants’ food.

  3. Interaction of perfluorooctanoic acid with human serum albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Fang-Fang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA has become a significant issue in many aspects of environmental ecology, toxicology, pathology and life sciences because it may have serious effects on the endocrine, immune and nervous systems and can lead to embryonic deformities and other diseases. Human serum albumin (HSA is the major protein component of blood plasma and is called a multifunctional plasma carrier protein because of its ability to bind an unusually broad spectrum of ligands. Results The interaction of PFOA with HSA was investigated in the normal physiological condition by equilibrium dialysis, fluorospectrometry, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC and circular dichroism (CD. The non-covalent interaction is resulted from hydrogen bond, van der Waals force and hydrophobic stack. PFOA binding to HSA accorded with two-step binding model with the saturation binding numbers of PFOA, only 1 in the hydrophobic intracavity of HSA and 12 on the exposed outer surface. The interaction of PFOA with HSA is spontaneous and results in change of HSA conformation. The possible binding sites were speculated. Conclusion The present work suggested a characterization method for the intermolecular weak interaction. It is potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of perfluorochemicals when combined with biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological testing and the other experiments.

  4. Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase: Structure, Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Chaney

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAcP is a 100 kDa glycoprotein composed of two subunits. Recent advances demonstrate that cellular PAcP (cPAcP functions as a protein tyrosine phosphatase by dephosphorylating ErbB-2/Neu/HER-2 at the phosphotyrosine residues in prostate cancer (PCa cells, which results in reduced tumorigenicity. Further, the interaction of cPAcP and ErbB-2 regulates androgen sensitivity of PCa cells. Knockdown of cPAcP expression allows androgen-sensitive PCa cells to develop the castration-resistant phenotype, where cells proliferate under an androgen-reduced condition. Thus, cPAcP has a significant influence on PCa cell growth. Interestingly, promoter analysis suggests that PAcP expression can be regulated by NF-κB, via a novel binding sequence in an androgen-independent manner. Further understanding of PAcP function and regulation of expression will have a significant impact on understanding PCa progression and therapy.

  5. Genetic background affects human glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianshu Bai

    Full Text Available The human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP promoter has been used to generate numerous transgenic mouse lines, which has facilitated the analysis of astrocyte function in health and disease. Here, we evaluated the expression levels of various hGFAP transgenes at different ages in the two most commonly used inbred mouse strains, FVB/N (FVB and C57BL/6N (B6N. In general, transgenic mice maintained on the B6N background displayed weaker transgene expression compared with transgenic FVB mice. Higher level of transgene expression in B6N mice could be regained by crossbreeding to FVB wild type mice. However, the endogenous murine GFAP expression was equivalent in both strains. In addition, we found that endogenous GFAP expression was increased in transgenic mice in comparison to wild type mice. The activities of the hGFAP transgenes were not age-dependently regulated. Our data highlight the importance of proper expression analysis when non-homologous recombination transgenesis is used.

  6. Analysis of fatty acid composition in human bone marrow aspirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshimaru, Ryota; Ishitani, Ken; Makita, Kazuya; Horiguchi, Fumi; Nozawa, Shiro

    2005-09-01

    In the present study, the fatty acid composition of bone marrow aspirates and serum phospholipids in nine patients with hematologic diseases was investigated, and the effect of fatty acids on osteoblast differentiation in ST2 cells was examined. The concentrations of oleic acid and palmitic acid were significantly higher in bone marrow aspirates than in serum phospholipids, but the concentrations of other fatty acids did not differ. The rate of alkaline phosphatase positive ST2 cells induced by BMP2 was significantly increased by oleic acid, but was unaffected by the presence or absence of palmitic acid. We conclude that the fatty acid composition of bone marrow aspirates differs from that of serum phospholipids. This difference may affect osteoblast differentiation in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  7. Patterns of amino acid metabolism by proliferating human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera, G.A.; Schop, D.; Spitters, T.W.; Dijkhuizen, R.; Bracke, M.; Bruijn, J.D.; Martens, D.E.; Karperien, M.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of stem cells have not been determined; in particular, the amino acid metabolism of stem cells is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the amino acid metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), with focus on two questions: Which amino acids are consume

  8. Serum sialic acid and CEA concentrations in human breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan-Ryan, A.; Fennelly, J J; Jones, M.; Cantwell, B; Duffy, M J

    1980-01-01

    The concentration of bound sialic acid in the sera of 56 normal subjects and 65 subjects with breast cancer was measured, in order to determine (1) whether serum sialic acid concentrations are raised in breast cancer and (2) whether the concentration of sialic acid in serum reflects tumour stage. The amount of sialic acid in serum was compared to serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) values. Urinary hydroxyproline and serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations were used as indicators of bone an...

  9. Serum sialic acid and CEA concentrations in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan-Ryan, A; Fennelly, J J; Jones, M; Cantwell, B; Duffy, M J

    1980-04-01

    The concentration of bound sialic acid in the sera of 56 normal subjects and 65 subjects with breast cancer was measured, in order to determine (1) whether serum sialic acid concentrations are raised in breast cancer and (2) whether the concentration of sialic acid in serum reflects tumour stage. The amount of sialic acid in serum was compared to serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) values. Urinary hydroxyproline and serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations were used as indicators of bone and liver involvement. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was also measured. Significantly elevated serum sialic acid concentrations were found in breast cancer, and showed correlation with tumour stage. Serum sialic acid values did not correlate with CEA values. The results suggest that measurement of serum sialic acid concentrations may be of adjunctive value in assessing tumour stage.

  10. Supplementation with the omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid: influence on the lipid composition and fatty acid profile of human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Aparecida Fagundes Queiroz Bortolozo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the impact of supplementing the diet of women during pregnancy and lactation with fish oil containing the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid, and its influence on the composition of human milk. METHODS: The sample comprised 60 women aged 18 to 38 years with appropriate dietary pattern, all of them healthy and nonsmokers. The intervention consisted of a daily supplementation with fish oil capsules that corresponded to a daily intake of 315mg of docosahexaenoic acid and 80mg of eicosapentaenoic acid during the third trimester of pregnancy and the first three months postpartum. The total fat content and fatty acid profile of their milk were determined by creamatocrit and gas chromatography. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis and the significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference between the fat contents of the study (fish oil capsules and control (capsules containing corn starch as filler groups. However, the milk of women taking fish oil contained higher docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid levels 30 and 60 days after delivery. These results demonstrate that high omega-3 intake can influence its concentration in human milk. CONCLUSIONS: Given the importance of docosahexaenoic acid in the neonatal period, it is appropriate for pregnant and breastfeeding women to supplement on long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which may be done by adding fish oil to the regular diet.

  11. Endothelial Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Polyglycolic Acid/Polylactic Acid Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC is considered as a cell source potentially useful for angiogenesis in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This study investigated the growth and endothelial differentiation of human ADSCs on polyglycolic acid/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA mesh compared to 2D plastic. Cell adhesion, viability, and distribution of hADSCs on PGA/PLA mesh were observed by CM-Dil labeling, live/dead staining, and SEM examination while endothelial differentiation was evaluated by flow cytometry, Ac-LDL/UEA-1 uptake assay, immunofluorescence stainings, and gene expression analysis of endothelial related markers. Results showed hADSCs gained a mature endothelial phenotype with a positive ratio of 21.4 ± 3.7% for CD31+/CD34− when induced in 3D mesh after 21 days, which was further verified by the expressions of a comprehensive range of endothelial related markers, whereas hADSCs in 2D induced and 2D/3D noninduced groups all failed to differentiate into endothelial cells. Moreover, compared to 2D groups, the expression for α-SMA was markedly suppressed in 3D cultured hADSCs. This study first demonstrated the endothelial differentiation of hADSCs on the PGA/PLA mesh and pointed out the synergistic effect of PGA/PLA 3D culture and growth factors on the acquisition of mature characteristic endothelial phenotype. We believed this study would be the initial step towards the generation of prevascularized tissue engineered constructs.

  12. Gallic acid reduces cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Hu, Mengcai

    2013-12-01

    Gallic acid is a trihydroxybenzoic acid, also known as 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, which is present in plants worldwide, including Chinese medicinal herbs. Gallic acid has been shown to have cytotoxic effects in certain cancer cells, without damaging normal cells. The objective of the present study was to determine whether gallic acid is able to inhibit human cervical cancer cell viability, proliferation and invasion and suppress cervical cancer cell-mediated angiogenesis. Treatment of HeLa and HTB-35 human cancer cells with gallic acid decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. BrdU proliferation and tube formation assays indicated that gallic acid significantly decreased human cervical cancer cell proliferation and tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, respectively. Additionally, gallic acid decreased HeLa and HTB-35 cell invasion in vitro. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression of ADAM17, EGFR, p-Akt and p-Erk was suppressed by gallic acid in the HeLa and HTB-35 cell lines. These data indicate that the suppression of ADAM17 and the downregulation of the EGFR, Akt/p-Akt and Erk/p-Erk signaling pathways may contribute to the suppression of cancer progression by Gallic acid. Gallic acid may be a valuable candidate for the treatment of cervical cancer.

  13. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lidiia Astakhova; Mtakai Ngara; Olga Babich; Aleksandr Prosekov; Lyudmila Asyakina; Lyubov Dyshlyuk; Tore Midtvedt; Xiaoying Zhou; Ingemar Ernberg; Liudmila Matskova

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell l...

  14. Degradation of amino acids to short-chain fatty acids in humans. An in vitro study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H S; Holtug, K; Mortensen, P B

    1988-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) originate mainly in the colon through bacterial fermentation of polysaccharides. To test the hypothesis that SCFA may originate from polypeptides as well, the production of these acids from albumin and specific amino acids was examined in a faecal incubation system....... Albumin was converted to all C2-C5-fatty acids, whereas amino acids generally were converted to specific SCFA, most often through the combination of a deamination and decarboxylation of the amino acids, although more complex processes also took place. This study indicates that a part of the intestinal...

  15. Allometric scaling of dietary linoleic acid on changes in tissue arachidonic acid using human equivalent diets in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whelan Jay

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is hypothesized that dietary linoleic acid (LA promotes chronic and acute diseases in humans by enriching tissues with arachidonic acid (AA, its downstream metabolite, and dietary studies with rodents have been useful for validation. However, levels of LA in research diets of rodents, as published in the literature, are notoriously erratic making interspecies comparisons unreliable. Therefore, the ability to extrapolate the biological effects of dietary LA from experimental rodents to humans necessitates an allometric scaling model that is rooted within a human equivalent context. Methods To determine the physiological response of dietary LA on tissue AA, a mathematical model for extrapolating nutrients based on energy was used, as opposed to differences in body weight. C57BL/6J mice were divided into 9 groups fed a background diet equivalent to that of the US diet (% energy with supplemental doses of LA or AA. Changes in the phospholipid fatty acid compositions were monitored in plasma and erythrocytes and compared to data from humans supplemented with equivalent doses of LA or AA. Results Increasing dietary LA had little effect on tissue AA, while supplementing diets with AA significantly increased tissue AA levels, importantly recapitulating results from human trials. Conclusions Thus, interspecies comparisons for dietary LA between rodents and humans can be achieved when rodents are provided human equivalent doses based on differences in metabolic activity as defined by energy consumption.

  16. Loss of N-glycolylneuraminic acid in humans: Mechanisms, consequences, and implications for hominid evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varki, A

    2001-01-01

    The surface of all mammalian cells is covered with a dense and complex array of sugar chains, which are frequently terminated by members of a family of molecules called sialic acids. One particular sialic acid called N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) is widely expressed on most mammalian tissues, but is not easily detectable on human cells. In fact, it provokes an immune response in adult humans. The human deficiency of Neu5Gc is explained by an inactivating mutation in the gene encoding CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in generating Neu5Gc in cells of other mammals. This deficiency also results in an excess of the precursor sialic acid N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) in humans. This mutation appears universal to modern humans, occurred sometime after our last common ancestor with the great apes, and happens to be one of the first known human-great ape genetic differences with an obvious biochemical readout. While the original selection mechanisms and major biological consequences of this human-specific mutation remain uncertain, several interesting clues are currently being pursued. First, there is evidence that the human condition can explain differences in susceptibility or resistance to certain microbial pathogens. Second, the functions of some endogenous receptors for sialic acids in the immune system may be altered by this difference. Third, despite the lack of any obvious alternate pathway for synthesis, Neu5Gc has been reported in human tumors and possibly in human fetal tissues, and traces have even been detected in normal human tissues. One possible explanation is that this represents accumulation of Neu5Gc from dietary sources of animal origin. Finally, a markedly reduced expression of hydroxylase in the brains of other mammals raises the possibility that the human-specific mutation of this enzyme could have played a role in human brain evolution.

  17. Uptake of neutral alpha- and beta-amino acids by human proximal tubular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, H; Røigaard, H; Jacobsen, Christian

    1996-01-01

    The transport characteristics of amino acids in primary cell cultures from the proximal tubule of human adults (AHKE cells) were examined, using alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and beta-alanine as representatives of alpha- and beta-amino acids, respectively. The Na(+)-gradient dependent influx...... experiments revealed that all the neutral amino acids tested reduced the uptake of AIB, whereas there was no effect of taurine, L-aspartic acid, and L-arginine. By contrast, the influx of beta-alanine was only drastically reduced by beta-amino acids, whereas the inhibition by neutral alpha-amino acids...... was relatively low. Nor did L-arginine and L-aspartic acid affect the uptake of beta-alanine into AHKE cells. Comparison with the results obtained for normal (NHKE) and immortalized (IHKE) embryonic cells suggested an unaltered expression of the types of transport carriers for neutral alpha- and beta-amino acids...

  18. 21 CFR 170.50 - Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... consumption. 170.50 Section 170.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 170.50 Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption. (a) Heretofore,...

  19. Acids with an equivalent taste lead to different erosion of human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Markus; Reichert, Jörg; Bossert, Jörg; Sigusch, Bernd W; Watts, David C; Jandt, Klaus D

    2011-10-01

    The consumption of acidic soft drinks may lead to demineralization and softening of human dental enamel, known as dental erosion. The aims of this in vitro study were to determine: (i) if different acids with a similar sensorial acidic taste lead to different hardness loss of enamel and (ii) if the fruit acids tartaric, malic, lactic or ascorbic acid lead to less hardness loss of enamel than citric or phosphoric acid when their concentration in solution is based on an equivalent sensorial acidic taste. Enamel samples of non-erupted human third molars were treated with acidic solutions of tartaric (TA), malic (MA), lactic (LA), ascorbic (AA), phosphoric (PA) and citric (CA) acids with a concentration that gave an equivalent sensorial acidic taste. The acidic solutions were characterized by pH value and titratable acidity. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoindentation was used to study the nano mechanical properties and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the morphology of the treated enamel samples and the untreated control areas, respectively. The investigated acids fell into two groups. The nano hardnesses of MA, TA and CA treated enamel samples (group I) were statistically significantly greater (penamel samples (group II). Within each group the nano hardness was not statistically significantly different (p>0.05). The SEM micrographs showed different etch prism morphologies depending on the acid used. In vitro, the acids investigated led to different erosion effects on human dental enamel, despite their equivalent sensorial acidic taste. This has not been reported previously. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Aromatic hydroxylation of salicylic acid and aspirin by human cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojić, Mirza; Sedgeman, Carl A; Nagy, Leslie D; Guengerich, F Peter

    2015-06-20

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a well-known and widely-used analgesic. It is rapidly deacetylated to salicylic acid, which forms two hippuric acids-salicyluric acid and gentisuric acid-and two glucuronides. The oxidation of aspirin and salicylic acid has been reported with human liver microsomes, but data on individual cytochromes P450 involved in oxidation is lacking. In this study we monitored oxidation of these compounds by human liver microsomes and cytochrome P450 (P450) using UPLC with fluorescence detection. Microsomal oxidation of salicylic acid was much faster than aspirin. The two oxidation products were 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid, documented by its UV and mass spectrum) and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Formation of neither product was inhibited by desferrioxamine, suggesting a lack of contribution of oxygen radicals under these conditions. Although more liphophilic, aspirin was oxidized less efficiently, primarily to the 2,5-dihydroxy product. Recombinant human P450s 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4 all catalyzed the 5-hydroxylation of salicylic acid. Inhibitor studies with human liver microsomes indicated that all six of the previously mentioned P450s could contribute to both the 5- and 3-hydroxylation of salicylic acid and that P450s 2A6 and 2B6 have contributions to 5-hydroxylation. Inhibitor studies indicated that the major human P450 involved in both 3- and 5-hydroxylation of salicylic acid is P450 2E1.

  1. Associations of in Utero Exposure to Perfluorinated Alkyl Acids with Human Semen Quality and Reproductive Hormones in Adult Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested, Anne; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia; Olsen, Sjurdur Frodi

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs), persistent chemicals with unique water-, dirt-, and oil-repellent properties, are suspected of having endocrine-disrupting activity. The PFAA compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are found globally in humans; because...

  2. Conversion of cassava starch to biomass, carbohydrates, and acids by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, K H; Ferguson, L B; Carlton, C

    1984-01-01

    The filamentous fungus, Aspergillus niger, efficiently converted cassava polysaccharides to mycelial mass, simple sugars, and acids during the course of its growth. A typical 70-ml culture broth containing 2% cassava polysaccharides yielded 0.38 g dry mycelial mass, 1.14 mmol reducing sugars, and 1.17 meq acids at the end of 42 h. About 70% of the initial total carbohydrate in the medium was degraded during the same period. The sugars and acids in the culture broths were analyzed by HPLC on a single Aminex HPX-87 column at 55 degrees C, using 0.013 N H2SO4 as the eluting solvent. Cassava polysaccharides were degraded to oligosaccharides, maltotriose, maltose, and glucose beyond the 20-h growth periods, with maltotriose emerging as the major simple sugar. The appearance of citric, malic, gluconic, succinic, and fumaric acids accounted mostly for the decreasing pH in the growth media. Formation of carbohydrate species in the culture broths was closely related to the biosynthesis and secretion of several carbohydrases by A. niger. The extracellular carbohydrases were separated and identified by chromatofocusing and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to be amyloglucosidase (EC 3.1.2.3), alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1), and alpha-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.20), respectively.

  3. Lactic Acid Bacteria and the Human Intestinal Microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Vos, de W.M.

    2015-01-01

    The great interest in the human microbiome has revived attention paid to LAB presence in the human intestine. This chapter first discusses the LAB associated with the human intestinal microbiota and their potential roles in health and diseases. It then addresses recent metagenomic studies that chall

  4. Novel Bioactivity of Ellagic Acid in Inhibiting Human Platelet Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranates are widely consumed either as fresh fruit or in beverage form as juice and wine. Ellagic acid possesses potent antioxidative properties; it is known to be an effective phytotherapeutic agent with antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic qualities. Ellagic acid (20 to 80 μM exhibited a potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen; however, it did not inhibit platelet aggregation stimulated by thrombin, arachidonic acid, or U46619. Treatment with ellagic acid (50 and 80 μM significantly inhibited platelet activation stimulated by collagen; this alteration was accompanied by the inhibition of relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, and the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLCγ2, protein kinase C (PKC, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, and Akt, as well as hydroxyl radical (OH● formation. In addition, ellagic acid also inhibited p38 MAPK and Akt phosphorylation stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. By contrast, ellagic acid did not significantly affect PKC activation and platelet aggregation stimulated by PDBu. This study is the first to show that, in addition to being considered a possible agent for preventing tumor growth, ellagic acid possesses potent antiplatelet properties. It appears to initially inhibit the PLCγ2-PKC cascade and/or hydroxyl radical formation, followed by decreased phosphorylation of MAPKs and Akt, ultimately inhibiting platelet aggregation.

  5. Regional uptake of meal fatty acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Michael D; Sarr, Michael G; Dumesic, Daniel A; Southorn, Peter A; Levine, James A

    2003-12-01

    Two protocols were performed to study meal fatty acid metabolism. In protocol 1, 14 patients scheduled for elective intra-abdominal surgery (11 undergoing bariatric surgery for severe obesity) consumed a meal containing [3H]triolein in the evening before surgery. This allowed us to measure adipose tissue lipid specific activity (SA) in mesenteric and omental, deep and superficial abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. Intra-abdominal adipose tissue lipid SA was greater than subcutaneous lipid SA. There were no significant differences between mesenteric and omental or between deep and superficial abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. In protocol 2, meal fatty acid oxidation and uptake into subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue ([3H]triolein) were measured in six normal, healthy volunteers. Meal fatty acid oxidation (3H2O generation) plus that remaining in plasma ( approximately 1%) plus uptake into upper body subcutaneous, lower body subcutaneous, and visceral fat allowed us to account for 98 +/- 6% of meal fatty acids 24 h after meal ingestion. We conclude that omental fat is a good surrogate for visceral fat and that abdominal subcutaneous fat depots are comparable with regard to meal fatty acid metabolic studies. Using [3H]triolein, we were able to account for virtually 100% of meal fatty acids 24 h after meal ingestion. These results support the meal fatty acid tracer model as a way to study the metabolic fate of dietary fat.

  6. Bioavailability of chlorogenic acids following acute ingestion of coffee by humans with an ileostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalmach, Angélique; Steiling, Heike; Williamson, Gary; Crozier, Alan

    2010-09-01

    The intestinal absorption and metabolism of 385 micromol chlorogenic acids following a single intake of 200 mL of instant coffee by human volunteers with an ileostomy was investigated. HPLC-MS(3) analysis of 0-24h post-ingestion ileal effluent revealed the presence of 274+/-28 micromol of chlorogenic acids and their metabolites accounting for 71+/-7% of intake. Of the compounds recovered, 78% comprised parent compounds initially present in the coffee, and 22% were metabolites including free and sulfated caffeic and ferulic acids. Over a 24h period after ingestion of the coffee, excretion of chlorogenic acid metabolites in urine accounted for 8+/-1% of intake, the main compounds being ferulic acid-4-O-sulfate, caffeic acid-3-O-sulfate, isoferulic acid-3-O-glucuronide and dihydrocaffeic acid-3-O-sulfate. In contrast, after drinking a similar coffee, urinary excretion by humans with an intact colon corresponded to 29+/-4% of chlorogenic acid intake. This difference was due to the excretion of higher levels of dihydroferulic acid and feruloylglycine together with sulfate and glucuronide conjugates of dihydrocaffeic and dihydroferulic acids. This highlights the importance of colonic metabolism. Comparison of the data obtained in the current study with that of Stalmach et al. facilitated elucidation of the pathways involved in post-ingestion metabolism of chlorogenic acids and also helped distinguish between compounds absorbed in the small and the large intestine.

  7. Impulsivity is Associated with Uric Acid: Evidence from Humans and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutin, Angelina R.; Cutler, Roy G.; Camandola, Simonetta; Uda, Manuela; Feldman, Neil H.; Cucca, Francesco; Zonderman, Alan B.; Mattson, Mark P.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schlessinger, David; Terracciano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to control impulses varies greatly, and difficulty with impulse control can have severe consequences; in the extreme, it is the defining feature of many psychiatric disorders. Evidence from disparate lines of research suggests that uric acid is elevated in psychiatric disorders characterized by high impulsivity, such as ADHD and bipolar disorder. The present research tests the hypothesis that impulsivity is associated with higher uric acid in humans and mice. Methods Using two longitudinal, non-clinical community samples (total N=6883), we test whether there is an association between uric acid and normal variation in trait impulsivity measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. We also examined the effect of uric acid on behavior by comparing wild-type mice (WT), which naturally have low levels of uric acid, to mice genetically modified (UOX) to accumulate high levels of uric acid. Results In both human samples, the emotional aspects of trait impulsivity, specifically Impulsiveness and Excitement-Seeking, were associated with higher levels of uric acid concurrently and when uric acid was measured 3–5 years later. Consistent with the human data, the UOX mice displayed significantly more exploratory and novelty-seeking behavior than the WT mice. Conclusion Higher uric acid was associated with impulsivity in both humans and mice. The identification of biological markers of impulsivity may lead to a better understanding of the physiological mechanisms involved in impulsivity, and may suggest potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23582268

  8. Effects of inhaled acid aerosols on lung mechanics: an analysis of human exposure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utell, M J

    1985-11-01

    There exist significant gaps in our understanding of human health effects from inhalation of pollutants associated with acid precipitation. Controlled clinical studies examine effects of criteria pollutants almost exclusively by assessing changes in lung mechanics. One constituent of acid precipitation, sulfuric acid aerosols, has been shown to induce bronchoconstriction in exercising extrinsic asthmatics at near ambient levels. These asthmatics may be an order of magnitude more sensitive to sulfuric acid aerosols than normal adults. More recently, a second component nitrogen dioxide has been observed to provoke changes in lung mechanics at progressively lower concentrations. To date, virtually no data exist from clinical exposures to acidic aerosols for subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  9. N-Terminal peptidic boronic acids selectively inhibit human ClpXP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Kenneth; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Thorpe, Steven B; Lee, Irene; Santos, Webster L

    2010-08-07

    The synthesis and development of N-terminal peptidic boronic acids as protease inhibitors is reported. N-Terminal peptidic boronic acids interrogate the S' sites of the target protein for selectivity and provide a new strategy that complements the currently known peptidic alpha-amino boronic acids (C-terminal boronic acids). After screening a series of N-terminal peptidic boronic acids, the first selective inhibitor of human ClpXP, an ATP-dependent serine protease present in the mitochondrial matrix, was discovered. This should facilitate the understanding of the physiological function of this protease.

  10. Functional Roles of Fatty Acids and Their Effects on Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Philip C

    2015-09-01

    A variety of fatty acids exists in the diet of humans, in the bloodstream of humans, and in cells and tissues of humans. Fatty acids are energy sources and membrane constituents. They have biological activities that act to influence cell and tissue metabolism, function, and responsiveness to hormonal and other signals. The biological activities may be grouped as regulation of membrane structure and function; regulation of intracellular signaling pathways, transcription factor activity, and gene expression; and regulation of the production of bioactive lipid mediators. Through these effects, fatty acids influence health, well-being, and disease risk. The effects of saturated, cis monounsaturated, ω-6 and ω-3 polyunsaturated, and trans fatty acids are discussed. Although traditionally most interest in the health impact of fatty acids related to cardiovascular disease, it is now clear that fatty acids influence a range of other diseases, including metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Scientists, regulators, and communicators have described the biological effects and the health impacts of fatty acids according to fatty acid class. However, it is now obvious that within any fatty acid class, different members have different actions and effects. Thus, it would seem more appropriate to describe biological effects and health impacts of individual named fatty acids, although it is recognized that this would be a challenge when communicating outside of an academic environment (eg, to consumers).

  11. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein: Fatty Acid Binding Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jun; Lücke, Christian; Chen, Zhongjing; Qiao, Ye; Klimtchuk, Elena; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a cytosolic protein most abundant in liver, is associated with intracellular transport of fatty acids, nuclear signaling, and regulation of intracellular lipolysis. Among the members of the intracellular lipid binding protein family, L-FABP is of particular interest as it can i), bind two fatty acid molecules simultaneously and ii), accommodate a variety of bulkier physiological ligands such as bilirubin and fatty acyl CoA. To better understand the p...

  12. Acid-base homeostasis in the human system

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Acid-base regulation is a cooperative phenomena in vivo with body fluids, extracellular and intracellular buffers, lungs, and kidneys all playing important roles. The present account is much too brief to be considered a review of present knowledge of these regulatory systems, and should be viewed, instead, as a guide to the elements necessary to construct a simple model of the mutual interactions of the acid-base regulatory systems of the body.

  13. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  14. Obeticholic acid, a selective farnesoid X receptor agonist, regulates bile acid homeostasis in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jackson, Jonathan P; St Claire, Robert L; Freeman, Kimberly; Brouwer, Kenneth R; Edwards, Jeffrey E

    2017-08-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a master regulator of bile acid homeostasis through transcriptional regulation of genes involved in bile acid synthesis and cellular membrane transport. Impairment of bile acid efflux due to cholangiopathies results in chronic cholestasis leading to abnormal elevation of intrahepatic and systemic bile acid levels. Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a potent and selective FXR agonist that is 100-fold more potent than the endogenous ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). The effects of OCA on genes involved in bile acid homeostasis were investigated using sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes. Gene expression was determined by measuring mRNA levels. OCA dose-dependently increased fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF-19) and small heterodimer partner (SHP) which, in turn, suppress mRNA levels of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo synthesis of bile acids. Consistent with CYP7A1 suppression, total bile acid content was decreased by OCA (1 μmol/L) to 42.7 ± 20.5% relative to control. In addition to suppressing de novo bile acids synthesis, OCA significantly increased the mRNA levels of transporters involved in bile acid homeostasis. The bile salt excretory pump (BSEP), a canalicular efflux transporter, increased by 6.4 ± 0.8-fold, and the basolateral efflux heterodimer transporters, organic solute transporter α (OSTα ) and OSTβ increased by 6.4 ± 0.2-fold and 42.9 ± 7.9-fold, respectively. The upregulation of BSEP and OSTα and OSTβ, by OCA reduced the intracellular concentrations of d8 -TCA, a model bile acid, to 39.6 ± 8.9% relative to control. These data demonstrate that OCA does suppress bile acid synthesis and reduce hepatocellular bile acid levels, supporting the use of OCA to treat bile acid-induced toxicity observed in cholestatic diseases. © 2017 Intercept Pharmaceuticals. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and

  15. The stereospecific triacylglycerol structures and fatty acid profiles of human milk and infant formulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straarup, Ellen Marie; Lauritzen, L.; Færk, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Background: The stereospecific structures of the triacylglycerol molecules in human milk differ from that of cow's milk and vegetable oils, which are the fat sources used in infant formula. In human milk, palmitic acid (16:0) is predominantly esterified in the sn2 position, whereas vegetable oils...... or cow's milk fat contain most of their 16:0 in the outer positions of the triacylglycerol molecules. Furthermore, human milk contains long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are not present in either cow's milk or vegetable oils. Methods: By standard lipid analysis procedures, we examined...... the triacylglycerol structures and fatty acid profiles of fats from 28 infant formulas or formulas for special indications available in the Danish market from 1999 to 2003. Results: The total fatty acid compositions of the formulas showed a 16:0 content almost similar to human milk, whereas the content in the sn2...

  16. Dietary (n-3)-fatty acids, prostaglandins, and prolonged gestation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Olsen, S.F.

    1988-01-01

    in human urine. Very little is known about the tissue origin as well as the physiologicalfunctions of those prostaglandins, the metabolites of which are quantitated in urine from non-pregnant humans. In pregnant women the increased amount of prostaglandin F2 alpha-metabolites in urine, plasma and amniotic......Prostaglandins, especially prostaglandin F2 alpha, are important regulators in the onset and maintenance of parturition in humans. Inhibition of prostaglandin formation by drugs can prolong gestation in humans. High dietary intake of long chain (n-3)-fatty acids can inhibit formation of many...... arachidonic acid-derived prostaglandins as well as stimulate formation of eicosapentaenoic acid-derived prostaglandins. The latter ones often have lower biological activity than the former ones. The effect of (n-3)-fatty acids on prostaglandin formation has been shown by analysis of prostaglandin metabolites...

  17. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandi M. Hopkins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3 fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR family, FFA1 (GPR40 and FFA4 (GPR120. n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF, was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor.

  18. Structure and characterisation of a duplicated human alpha 1 acid glycoprotein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, C M; Board, P G

    1988-06-15

    Human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), also known as orosomucoid, is a major acute-phase plasma protein. The amino acid sequence of AGP, which was determined by sequencing from protein isolated from pooled plasma, contained amino acid substitutions in 21 different positions. Genomic and cDNA clones which correspond to one of the possible amino acid sequences have been previously reported. In this paper we present the complete nucleotide sequence of a second gene, AGP2 which is located approx. 3.3 kb downstream from AGP1. The derived amino acid sequence of AGP2 contains 19 of the possible alternative amino acid substitutions as well as two additional differences. It is clear from the results presented here that the AGP in human plasma is the product of two separate gene loci.

  19. Regulation of xanthine dehydrogensase gene expression and uric acid production in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Ryan D; Hsu, Alan C-Y; Nichol, Kristy S; Jones, Bernadette; Knight, Darryl A; Wark, Peter A B; Hansbro, Philip M; Hirota, Jeremy A

    2017-01-01

    The airway epithelium is a physical and immunological barrier that protects the pulmonary system from inhaled environmental insults. Uric acid has been detected in the respiratory tract and can function as an antioxidant or damage associated molecular pattern. We have demonstrated that human airway epithelial cells are a source of uric acid. Our hypothesis is that uric acid production by airway epithelial cells is induced by environmental stimuli associated with chronic respiratory diseases. We therefore examined how airway epithelial cells regulate uric acid production. Allergen and cigarette smoke mouse models were performed using house dust mite (HDM) and cigarette smoke exposure, respectively, with outcome measurements of lung uric acid levels. Primary human airway epithelial cells isolated from clinically diagnosed patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were grown in submerged cultures and compared to age-matched healthy controls for uric acid release. HBEC-6KT cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, were grown under submerged monolayer conditions for mechanistic and gene expression studies. HDM, but not cigarette smoke exposure, stimulated uric acid production in vivo and in vitro. Primary human airway epithelial cells from asthma, but not COPD patients, displayed elevated levels of extracellular uric acid in culture. In HBEC-6KT, production of uric acid was sensitive to the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) inhibitor, allopurinol, and the ATP Binding Cassette C4 (ABCC4) inhibitor, MK-571. Lastly, the pro-inflammatory cytokine combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ elevated extracellular uric acid levels and XDH gene expression in HBEC-6KT cells. Our results suggest that the active production of uric acid from human airway epithelial cells may be intrinsically altered in asthma and be further induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  20. Role of alpha-glucosidase in the fermentable sugar composition of sorghum malt mashes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taylor, JRN

    1994-11-01

    Full Text Available The cause of the high glucose to maltose ratio in sorghum malt worts was studied. Mashing temperature and pH strongly affected both the amount of glucose and the proportion of glucose relative to total fermentable sugars. The relative proportion...

  1. Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibition and Hypoglycemic Activities of Sweitenia mahagoni Seed Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutik Wresdiyat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of α-glucosidase and hypoglycemic activity are two effects commonly used to identify bioactive compounds with potential to treat diabetes. The objectives of this study were to analyse and compare the bioactive compounds and α-glucosidase inhibitory effect of four different types of Swietenia mahagoni seed extract, and to analyse the hypoglycemic activity of the greatest inhibition of α-glucosidase-extract in rats. The extracts were obtained using two different solvents (aqueous and ethanol and two different methods: maceration and reflux methods. This resulted in four types of extract varying by solvent and extraction method. Testing of these extracts for α-glucosidase inhibitory effect was carried out in vitro using spectrophotometer. Testing for hypoglycemic activity was carried out in vivo using rats. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into eight groups: (1 the negative control group, received an oral dose of aquadest only, (2 the positive control group, was given 90% sucrose orally without S. mahagoni seed extract, and five treated groups (3-7, were given 90% sucrose followed by the best extract-ethanolic S. mahagoni seed extract in doses of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 mg/kgBW, and (8 the acarbose group, was given 90% sucrose orally followed by acarbose. Glucose levels in each animal were measured at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after treatment. The results showed the greatest inhibition of α-glucosidase in ethanolic extract, using maceration methods. This ethanolic-maceration S. mahagoni seed extract also showed hypoglycemic effects in hyperglycemic rats at dose from 100 to 500 mg/kgBW. Ethanolic extract of S. mahagoni seed, using maceration method, can be proposed as potential antidiabetic agent.

  2. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitory effect and inorganic constituents of Phyllanthus amarus Schum. & Thonn. ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinee Wongnawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the -glucosidase inhibitory effect and determined the concentration of some inorganic constituents in P. amarus ash. Oral glucose and sucrose tolerance test were performed on normal mice. In vitro -glucosidase inhibitory activity was evaluated by using yeast a-glucosidase. The element concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectroscopy. Single oral administration of P. amarus ash did not show antihyperglycemic effect after glucose administration, but decreased blood glucose level after sucrose administration. The ash showed -glucosidase inhibitory activity in vitro with IC50 of 982 mg/mL. The concentrations of K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni and Co in P. amarus ash were 35049.80±340.64, 3337.24±52.10, 1368.52±13.29, 90.81±1.34, 87.68±1.15, 18.28±0.22, 4.69±0.07, 1.07±0.15, 0.29±0.03, 0.20±0.04 and 0.10±0.02 mg/g, respectively. These results indicate that the antihyperglycemic effect of P. amarus ash might be partly due to the -glucosidase inhibitory activity of the inorganic constituents.

  3. Dietary Flavonoids and Acarbose Synergistically Inhibit alpha-Glucosidase and Lower Postprandial Blood Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bowei; Li, Xia; Sun, Wenlong; Xing, Yan; Xiu, Zhilong; Zhuang, Chunlin; Dong, Yuesheng

    2017-09-06

    The inhibition of porcine pancreatic α-amylase and mammalian α-glucosidase by sixteen individual flavonoids was determined. The IC50 values for baicalein, (+)-catechin, quercetin, and luteolin were 74.1 ± 5.6, 175.1 ± 9.1, 281.2 ± 19.2, and 339.4 ± 16.3 μM, respectively, against α-glucosidase. The IC50 values for apigenin and baicalein were 146.8 ± 7.1 and 446.4 ± 23.9 μM, respectively, against α-amylase. The combination of baicalein, quercetin or luteolin with acarbose showed synergistic inhibition, and the combination of (+)-catechin with acarbose showed antagonistic inhibition of α-glucosidase. The combination of baicalein or apigenin with acarbose showed additive inhibition of α-amylase at lower concentrations and antagonistic inhibition at a higher concentration. Kinetic studies of α-glucosidase activity revealed that baicalein alone, acarbose alone, and the combination showed non-competitive, competitive, and mixed-type inhibition, respectively. Molecular modeling revealed that baicalein had higher affinity to the non-competitive binding site of maltase, glucoamylase, and isomaltase subunits of α-glucosidase, with glide scores of -7.64, -6.98, and -6.88, respectively. (+)-Catechin had higher affinity to the active sites of maltase and glucoamylase and to the non-competitive site of isomaltase. After sucrose loading, baicalein dose-dependently reduced the postprandial blood glucose (PBG) level in mice. The combination of 80 mg/kg baicalein and 1 mg/kg acarbose synergistically lowered the level of PBG, and the hypoglycemic effect was comparable to 8 mg/kg acarbose. The results indicated that baicalein could be used as a supplemental drug or dietary supplement in dietary therapy for diabetes mellitus.

  4. Bergamotane Sesquiterpenes with Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity from the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, You-Min; Fang, Cheng-An; Yao, Feng-Qi; Yu, Yuan; Shen, Ying; Hou, Zhuo-Ni; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Wei; Shan, Wei-Guang; Zhan, Zha-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Two new bergamotane sesquiterpene lactones, named expansolides C and D (1 and 2), together with two known compounds expansolides A and B (3 and 4), were isolated from the plant pathogenic fungus Penicillium expansum ACCC37275. The structures of the new compounds were established by detailed analyses of the spectroscopic data, especially 1D-, 2D-NMR, and HR-ESI-MS. In an in vitro bioassay, the epimeric mixture of expansolides C and D (1 and 2) (in a ratio of 2:1 at the temprature of the bioassay) exhibited more potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50 =0.50 ± 0.02 mm) as compared with the positive control acarbose (IC50 = 1.90 ± 0.05 mm). To the best of our knowledge, it was the first report on the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of bergamotane sesquiterpenes.

  5. Discovery of insect and human dengue virus host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, October M; Barrows, Nicholas J; Souza-Neto, Jayme A; Robinson, Timothy J; Hershey, Christine L; Rodgers, Mary A; Ramirez, Jose L; Dimopoulos, George; Yang, Priscilla L; Pearson, James L; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2009-04-23

    Dengue fever is the most frequent arthropod-borne viral disease of humans, with almost half of the world's population at risk of infection. The high prevalence, lack of an effective vaccine, and absence of specific treatment conspire to make dengue fever a global public health threat. Given their compact genomes, dengue viruses (DENV-1-4) and other flaviviruses probably require an extensive number of host factors; however, only a limited number of human, and an even smaller number of insect host factors, have been identified. Here we identify insect host factors required for DENV-2 propagation, by carrying out a genome-wide RNA interference screen in Drosophila melanogaster cells using a well-established 22,632 double-stranded RNA library. This screen identified 116 candidate dengue virus host factors (DVHFs). Although some were previously associated with flaviviruses (for example, V-ATPases and alpha-glucosidases), most of the DVHFs were newly implicated in dengue virus propagation. The dipteran DVHFs had 82 readily recognizable human homologues and, using a targeted short-interfering-RNA screen, we showed that 42 of these are human DVHFs. This indicates notable conservation of required factors between dipteran and human hosts. This work suggests new approaches to control infection in the insect vector and the mammalian host.

  6. Human milk arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid contents increase following supplementation during pregnancy and lactation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Saskia A.; Dijick-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Doornbos, Bennard; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.; Schaafsma, Anne; Muskiet, Frits A. J.; Djick-Brouwer, D.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) are important for neurodevelopment. Maternal diet influences milk DHA, whereas milk AA seems rather constant. We investigated milk AA, DHA and DHA/AA after supplementation of AA plus DHA, or DHA alone during pregnancy and lactation.

  7. Effects of inhaled acid aerosols on lung mechanics: an analysis of human exposure studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Utell, M J

    1985-01-01

    There exist significant gaps in our understanding of human health effects from inhalation of pollutants associated with acid precipitation. Controlled clinical studies examine effects of criteria pollutants almost exclusively by assessing changes in lung mechanics. One constituent of acid precipitation, sulfuric acid aerosols, has been shown to induce bronchoconstriction in exercising extrinsic asthmatics at near ambient levels. These asthmatics may be an order of magnitude more sensitive to ...

  8. High glucose levels reduce fatty acid oxidation and increase triglyceride accumulation in human placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Visiedo, Francisco; Bugatto, Fernando; Sánchez, Viviana; Cózar-Castellano, Irene; Bartha, Jose L.; Perdomo, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Placentas of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) exhibit an altered lipid metabolism. The mechanism by which GDM is linked to alterations in placental lipid metabolism remains obscure. We hypothesized that high glucose levels reduce mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and increase triglyceride accumulation in human placenta. To test this hypothesis, we measured FAO, fatty acid esterification, de novo fatty acid synthesis, triglyceride levels, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase...

  9. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are potent openers of human M-channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liin, Sara I; Karlsson, Urban; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth

    2016-01-01

    , by shifting the conductance-versus-voltage curve towards more negative voltages (by -7.4 to -11.3 mV by 70 μM). Uncharged docosahexaenoic acid methyl ester and monounsaturated oleic acid did not facilitate opening of the human KV 7.2/3 channel. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that circulating...... acids reduce neuronal excitability. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  10. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  11. Bioavailability of folic acid from fortified pasteurised and UHT-treated milk in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, R.J. de; Verwei, M.; West, C.E.; Vliet, T. van; Siebelink, E.; Berg, H. van den; Castenmiller, J.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether milk fortified with folic acid enhances the folate status of humans and whether the presence of folate-binding proteins (FBP) in pasteurised milk affects the bioavailability of folic acid from fortified milk. In untreated and pasteurised mi

  12. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250...

  13. Antiarrhythmic effects of n-3 fatty acids: evidence from human studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelen, A.; Brouwer, I.A.; Zock, P.L.; Katan, M.B.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose of review N-3 fatty acids from fish reduce cardiovascular mortality including sudden cardiac death. In this paper, the authors discuss the results of human studies with regard to the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of fatal coronary heart disease through antiarrhythmic effect

  14. Inactivation of human norovirus surrogates by benzalkonium chloride, potassium peroxymonosulfate, tannic acid, and gallic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaowei; D'Souza, Doris H

    2012-09-01

    Novel methods to effectively disinfect contact surfaces and prevent human norovirus transmission are essential. The effect of benzalkonium chloride (BAC), potassium peroxymonosulfate (KPMS), tannic acid (TA), and gallic acid (GA) on enteric virus surrogates, murine norovirus (MNV-1), feline calicivirus (FCV-F9), and bacteriophage MS2 was studied. Viruses at high (∼7 log₁₀ PFU/mL) or low (∼5 log₁₀ PFU/mL) titers were mixed with equal volumes of BAC (0.2, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL), KPMS (5, 10, and 20 mg/mL), TA (0.02 and 0.2 mg/mL), GA (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mg/mL), or water and incubated for 2 h at room temperature. Viral infectivity after triplicate treatments was evaluated using plaque assays in duplicate. Low titers of FCV-F9 and MNV-1 were completely reduced, while low-titer MS2 was reduced by 1.7-1.8 log₁₀ PFU/mL with BAC at all three concentrations. High-titer FCV-F9 was reduced by 2.87, 3.08, and 3.25 log₁₀ PFU/mL, and high-titer MNV-1 was reduced by 1.55, 2.32, and 2.75 log₁₀ PFU/mL with BAC at 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 mg/mL, respectively. High-titer MS2 was reduced by ∼2 log₁₀ PFU/mL with BAC at all three concentrations. KPMS at all three concentrations reduced high and low titers of FCV-F9 and MS2 and low-titer MNV-1 to undetectable levels, while high-titer MNV-1 was reduced by 0.92 and 3.44 log₁₀ PFU/mL with KMPS at 2.5 and 5 mg/mL, respectively. TA at 0.2 mg/mL only reduced high-titer FCV-F9 by 0.98 log₁₀ PFU/mL and low-titer FCV-F9 by 1.95 log₁₀ PFU/mL. GA at 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/mL reduced low-titer FCV-F9 by 2.50, 2.36, and 0.86 log₁₀ PFU/mL, respectively with negligible effects against high-titer FCV-F9. BAC and KPMS show promise to be used as broad-spectrum contact surface disinfectants for prevention of noroviral surrogate contamination.

  15. A nucleic acid dependent chemical photocatalysis in live human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arian, Dumitru; Cló, Emiliano; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2010-01-01

    Only two nucleic acid directed chemical reactions that are compatible with live cells have been reported to date. Neither of these processes generate toxic species from nontoxic starting materials. Reactions of the latter type could be applied as gene-specific drugs, for example, in the treatment...... of cancer. We report here the first example of a chemical reaction that generates a cytotoxic drug from a nontoxic prodrug in the presence of a specific endogeneous ribonucleic acid in live mammalian cells. In this case, the prodrug is triplet oxygen and the drug is singlet oxygen. The key component...... singlet oxygen per nucleic acid target. This reaction is highly sequence specific. To detect the generation of singlet oxygen in live cells, we prepared a membrane-permeable and water-soluble fluorescent scavenger, a derivative of 2,5-diphenylisobenzofurane. The scavenger decomposes upon reaction...

  16. Dietary (n-3)-fatty acids, prostaglandins, and prolonged gestation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Olsen, S.F.

    1988-01-01

    Prostaglandins, especially prostaglandin F2 alpha, are important regulators in the onset and maintenance of parturition in humans. Inhibition of prostaglandin formation by drugs can prolong gestation in humans. High dietary intake of long chain (n-3)-fatty acids can inhibit formation of many...... in human urine. Very little is known about the tissue origin as well as the physiologicalfunctions of those prostaglandins, the metabolites of which are quantitated in urine from non-pregnant humans. In pregnant women the increased amount of prostaglandin F2 alpha-metabolites in urine, plasma and amniotic...... chain (n-3)-fatty acids. We have hypothesized that a high intake of long chain (n-3)-fatty acids prolongs gestation in humans by interfering with uterine prostaglandin formation, possibly by inhibiting formation of prostaglandin F2 alpha and prostaglandin E2. Preliminary results of an epidemiological...

  17. Nicotinic acid receptor abnormalities in human skin cancer: implications for a role in epidermal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yira Bermudez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic UV skin exposure leads to epidermal differentiation defects in humans that can be largely restored by pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid. Nicotinic acid has been identified as a ligand for the human G-protein-coupled receptors GPR109A and GPR109B that signal through G(i-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. We have examined the expression, cellular distribution, and functionality of GPR109A/B in human skin and skin derived epidermal cells. RESULTS: Nicotinic acid increases epidermal differentiation in photodamaged human skin as judged by the terminal differentiation markers caspase 14 and filaggrin. Both GPR109A and GPR109B genes are transcribed in human skin and in epidermal keratinocytes, but expression in dermal fibroblasts is below limits of detection. Receptor transcripts are greatly over-expressed in squamous cell cancers. Receptor protein in normal skin is prominent from the basal through granular layers of the epidermis, with cellular localization more dispersive in the basal layer but predominantly localized at the plasma membrane in more differentiated epidermal layers. In normal human primary and immortalized keratinocytes, nicotinic acid receptors show plasma membrane localization and functional G(i-mediated signaling. In contrast, in a squamous cell carcinoma derived cell line, receptor protein shows a more diffuse cellular localization and the receptors are nearly non-functional. CONCLUSIONS: The results of these studies justify future genetic and pharmacological intervention studies to define possible specific role(s of nicotinic acid receptors in human skin homeostasis.

  18. Glucosamine increases hyaluronic acid production in human osteoarthritic synovium explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Uitterlinden (Elian); C.F. Verkoelen; S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); H. Jahr (Holger); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); J.L.M. Koevoet (Wendy)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Glucosamine (GlcN) used by patients with osteoarthritis was demonstrated to reduce pain, but the working mechanism is still not clear. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA) is also described to reduce pain in osteoarthritis. The synthesis of HA requires GlcN as one o

  19. Modelling dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) plasma kinetics in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Olie, J Daniël N; Bradberry, Sally M; Vale, J Allister; de Vries, Irma; Meulenbelt, Jan; Hunault, Claudine C

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: No kinetic models presently exist which simulate the effect of chelation therapy on lead blood concentrations in lead poisoning. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to develop a kinetic model that describes the kinetics of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA; succimer), a commonly used chelating agent, that c

  20. Plasma bile acids are not associated with energy metabolism in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brufau, Gemma; Bahr, Matthias J.; Staels, Bart; Claudel, Thierry; Ockenga, Johann; Boker, Klaus H. W.; Murphy, Elizabeth J.; Prado, Kris; Stellaard, Frans; Manns, Michael P.; Kuipers, Folkert; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) have recently been shown to increase energy expenditure in mice, but this concept has not been tested in humans. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between plasma BA levels and energy expenditure in humans. Type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients (n = 12) and gender, age and BMI-mat

  1. Metabolism of fatty acids and lipid hydroperoxides in human body monitoring with Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qin-Zeng

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of dietary fatty acids in human has been measured so far using human blood cells and stable-isotope labeled fatty acids, however, no direct data was available for human peripheral tissues and other major organs. To realize the role of dietary fatty acids in human health and diseases, it would be eager to develop convenient and suitable method to monitor fatty acid metabolism in human. Results We have developed the measurement system in situ for human lip surface lipids using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR – attenuated total reflection (ATR detection system with special adaptor to monitor metabolic changes of lipids in human body. As human lip surface lipids may not be much affected by skin sebum constituents and may be affected directly by the lipid constituents of diet, we could detect changes of FTIR-ATR spectra, especially at 3005~3015 cm-1, of lip surface polyunsaturated fatty acids in a duration time-dependent manner after intake of the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA-containing triglyceride diet. The ingested DHA appeared on the lip surface and was detected by FTIR-ATR directly and non-invasively. It was found that the metabolic rates of DHA for male volunteer subjects with age 60s were much lower than those with age 20s. Lipid hydroperoxides were found in lip lipids which were extracted from the lip surface using a mixture of ethanol/ethylpropionate/iso-octane solvents, and were the highest in the content just before noon. The changes of lipid hydroperoxides were detected also in situ with FTIR-ATR at 968 cm-1. Conclusion The measurements of lip surface lipids with FTIR-ATR technique may advance the investigation of human lipid metabolism in situ non-invasively.

  2. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  3. [Identification of rat and human hemoglobin acetilation sites after its interaction with acetylsalicylic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreĭner, E V; Murashko, E A; Dubrovskiĭ, Ia D; Krasnov, N V; Podol'skaia, E P; Babakov, V N

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of interaction of 0.1 mg/mL acetylsalicylic acid with purified human and rat globin in vitro during 24 h at 37 degrees C was investigated. The rat globin can be modified with acetylsalicylic acid on aminoacid residues K-17, K-57, K-91, K-140 in alpha subunit as well as on K-18, K-77 in beta subunit. The human globin can be modified with acetylsalicylic acid on aminoacid residues K-17, K-41, K-57 and K-91 in alpha subunit as well as on K-18, K-96 and K- 133 in beta subunit. We identified of acetetylated lysines K-17 and K-57 in alpha subunit of human hemoglobin after incubation whole blood with 0.1 mg/mL acetylsalicylic acid during 3 h.

  4. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective.

  5. Human CYP4Z1 catalyzes the in-chain hydroxylation of lauric acid and myristic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöllner, Andy; Dragan, Calin-Aurel; Pistorius, Dominik; Müller, Rolf; Bode, Helge B; Peters, Frank T; Maurer, Hans H; Bureik, Matthias

    2009-04-01

    Overexpression of human CYP4Z1, a cytochrome P450 enzyme, has been correlated with poor prognosis in human cancer. However, its catalytic properties are not yet known. We expressed this P450 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and demonstrate by whole-cell biotransformation assays CYP4Z1-dependent in-chain hydroxylation of lauric and myristic acid, which in both cases leads to the formation of four different monohydroxylated products at positions omega-2, omega-3, omega-4, and omega-5, respectively. The CYP4Z1-expressing fission yeast should be a new valuable tool for testing cancer drugs or for the development of new prodrug strategies.

  6. Human prefrontal cortex phospholipids containing docosahexaenoic acid increase during normal adult aging, whereas those containing arachidonic acid decrease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Sarah E; Friedrich, Michael G; Mitchell, Todd W; Truscott, Roger J W; Else, Paul L

    2015-04-01

    Membrane phospholipids make up a substantial portion of the human brain, and changes in their amount and composition are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative disease. Nevertheless, little is known about the changes that phospholipids undergo during normal adult aging. This study examined changes in phospholipid composition in the mitochondrial and microsomal membranes of human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex over the adult life span. The largest age-related changes were an increase in the abundance of both mitochondrial and microsomal phosphatidylserine 18:0_22:6 by approximately one-third from age 20 to 100 years and a 25% decrease in mitochondrial phosphatidylethanolamine 18:0_20:4. Generally, increases were seen with age in phospholipids containing docosahexaenoic acid across both membrane fractions, whereas phospholipids containing either arachidonic or adrenic acid decreased with age. These findings suggest a gradual change in membrane lipid composition over the adult life span.

  7. Effects of bile acids on human airway epithelial cells: implications for aerodigestive diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Aldhahrani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux and aspiration have been associated with chronic and end-stage lung disease and with allograft injury following lung transplantation. This raises the possibility that bile acids may cause lung injury by damaging airway epithelium. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bile acid challenge using the immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B. The immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B was cultured. A 48-h challenge evaluated the effect of individual primary and secondary bile acids. Post-challenge concentrations of interleukin (IL-8, IL-6 and granulocyte−macrophage colony-stimulating factor were measured using commercial ELISA kits. The viability of the BEAS-2B cells was measured using CellTiter-Blue and MTT assays. Lithocholic acid, deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid were successfully used to stimulate cultured BEAS-2B cells at different concentrations. A concentration of lithocholic acid above 10 μmol·L−1 causes cell death, whereas deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid above 30 μmol·L−1 was required for cell death. Challenge with bile acids at physiological levels also led to a significant increase in the release of IL-8 and IL6 from BEAS-2B. Aspiration of bile acids could potentially cause cell damage, cell death and inflammation in vivo. This is relevant to an integrated gastrointestinal and lung physiological paradigm of chronic lung disease, where reflux and aspiration are described in both chronic lung diseases and allograft injury.

  8. Comparative analysis of ascorbic acid in human milk and infant formula using varied milk delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickton Darby

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of human milk for later use is on the rise. Bottle systems are used to deliver the expressed milk. Research has shown that storage of both human milk and artificial baby milk, or infant formula, leads to a loss of ascorbic acid (commonly called Vitamin C. As milk is removed from the bottle during feeding and replaced by ambient air, it is unknown if loss of ascorbic acid occurs during the course of a feeding. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the milk delivery system on levels of ascorbic acid in human milk and infant formula. The objectives are to 1 determine changes in ascorbic acid concentration during a 20 minute "feed," 2 determine if there is a difference in ascorbic acid concentration between delivery systems, and 3 evaluate if any differences are of clinical importance. Methods Commonly available bottles were used for comparison of bottle delivery systems. Mature human milk was standardized to 42 mg/L of ascorbic acid. Infant formula with iron and infant formula with docosahexanoic acid were used for the formula samples. Each sample was analyzed for ascorbic acid concentration at baseline (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes. Each collection of samples was completed in triplicate. Samples were analyzed for ascorbic acid using normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Results Ascorbic acid concentration declined in all bottle systems during testing, Differences between the bottle systems were noted. Ascorbic acid concentrations declined to less than 40% of recommended daily intake for infants in 4 of the bottles systems at the 20 minute sampling. Conclusion The bottle systems used in this study had measurable decreases in the mean concentration of ascorbic acid. More research is needed to determine if the observed decreases are related to lower plasma ascorbic acid concentration in infants exclusively bottle fed. The decrease of ascorbic acid concentration observed in both

  9. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-05-01

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  10. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cinnamic acid and its hydroxyl derivatives with human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jiang; Meng-Xia, Xie; Dong, Zheng; Yuan, Liu; Xiao-Yu, Li; Xing, Chen

    2004-04-01

    Cinnamic acid and its derivatives possess various biological effects in remedy of many diseases. Interaction of cinnamic acid and its hydroxyl derivatives, p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid, with human serum albumin (HSA), and concomitant changes in its conformation were studied using fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic methods. Fluorescence data revealed the presence of one binding site on HSA for cinnamic acid and its hydroxyl derivatives, and their binding constants ( KA) are caffeic acid> p-coumaric acid> cinnamic acid when Cdrug/ CHSA ranging from 1 to 10. The changes of the secondary structure of HSA after interacting with the three drugs are estimated, respectively by combining the curve-fitting results of amid I and amid III bands. The α-helix structure has a decrease of ≈9, 5 and 3% after HSA interacted with caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and cinnamic acid, respectively. It was found that the hydroxyls substituted on aromatic ring of the drugs play an important role in the changes of protein's secondary structure. Combining the result of fluorescence quenching and the changes of secondary structure of HSA after interaction with the three drugs, the drug-HSA interaction mode was discussed.

  11. The four human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine; Christiansen, Bolette; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    , we perform the first elaborate pharmacological characterization of all four human GAT subtypes. We conduct the experiments in parallel in a [3H]GABA uptake assay using 14 standard GAT substrates and inhibitors. This setup enables direct comparison of the absolute values of inhibitory activities......, no subtype selective ligands have been reported for the three remaining GATs. Given the potential therapeutic relevance of the individual GAT subtypes, a search for novel structures displaying selectivities for specific GAT subtypes is important. In this study, we validate our [3H]GABA uptake assay for use...... at the four human GATs....

  12. Gene transfer of Chlorella vulgaris n-3 fatty acid desaturase optimizes the fatty acid composition of human breast cancer cells

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    Meilan Xue

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella vulgaris has the gene of n-3 fatty acid desaturase (CvFad3, which can synthesize the precursor of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs or convert n-6 to n-3 PUFAs. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the CvFad3 gene from C. vulgaris can be functionally and efficiently expressed in human breast cancer cells and whether its expression can exert a significant effect on cell fatty acid composition. We inserted the CvFad3 gene into the plasmid pEGFP-C3 to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C3-n-3 and to express the n-3 Fad gene in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells. Transfection of MCF-7 cells with the recombinant vector resulted in a high expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Lipid analysis indicated that the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs was decreased from 6:1 in the control cells to about 1:1 in the cells expressing the n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Accordingly, the CvFad3 gene significantly decreased the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs of the MCF-7 cell membrane. The expression of the CvFad3 gene can decrease cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that the CvFad3 gene can dramatically balance the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs and may provide an effective approach to the modification of the fatty acid composition of mammalian cells, also providing a basis for potential applications of its transfer in experimental and clinical settings.

  13. Gene transfer of Chlorella vulgaris n-3 fatty acid desaturase optimizes the fatty acid composition of human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Meilan; Ge, Yinlin; Zhang, Jinyu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong (China); Wang, Qing [Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong (China); Hou, Lin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao Shandong (China)

    2012-09-14

    Chlorella vulgaris has the gene of n-3 fatty acid desaturase (CvFad3), which can synthesize the precursor of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) or convert n-6 to n-3 PUFAs. The objective of the present study was to examine whether the CvFad3 gene from C. vulgaris can be functionally and efficiently expressed in human breast cancer cells and whether its expression can exert a significant effect on cell fatty acid composition. We inserted the CvFad3 gene into the plasmid pEGFP-C3 to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C3-n-3 and to express the n-3 Fad gene in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells). Transfection of MCF-7 cells with the recombinant vector resulted in a high expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Lipid analysis indicated that the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs was decreased from 6:1 in the control cells to about 1:1 in the cells expressing the n-3 fatty acid desaturase. Accordingly, the CvFad3 gene significantly decreased the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs of the MCF-7 cell membrane. The expression of the CvFad3 gene can decrease cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that the CvFad3 gene can dramatically balance the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs and may provide an effective approach to the modification of the fatty acid composition of mammalian cells, also providing a basis for potential applications of its transfer in experimental and clinical settings.

  14. New analogues of 13-hydroxyocatdecadienoic acid and 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid block human blood platelet aggregation and cyclooxygenase-1 activity

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    Hirz Taghreed

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thromboxane A2 is derived from arachidonic acid through the action of cyclooxygenases and thromboxane synthase. It is mainly formed in blood platelets upon activation and plays an important role in aggregation. Aspirin is effective in reducing the incidence of complications following acute coronary syndrome and stroke. The anti-thrombotic effect of aspirin is obtained through the irreversible inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Analogues of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 13-hydroxyocatdecadienoic acid were shown previously to modulate platelet activation and to block thromboxane receptors. Results and discussion We synthesized 10 compounds based on the structures of analogues of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 13-hydroxyocatdecadienoic acid and evaluated their effect on platelet aggregation triggered by arachidonic acid. The structure activity relationship was evaluated. Five compounds showed a significant inhibition of platelet aggregation and highlighted the importance of the lipidic hydrophobic hydrocarbon chain and the phenol group. Their IC50 ranged from 7.5 ± 0.8 to 14.2 ± 5.7 μM (Mean ± S.E.M.. All five compounds decreased platelet aggregation and thromboxane synthesis in response to collagen whereas no modification of platelet aggregation in response to thromboxane receptor agonist, U46619, was observed. Using COS-7 cells overexpressing human cyclooxygenase-1, we showed that these compounds are specific inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-1 with IC50 ranging from 1.3 to 12 μM. Docking observation of human recombinant cyclooxygenase-1 supported a role of the phenol group in the fitting of cyclooxygenase-1, most likely related to hydrogen bonding with the Tyr 355 of cyclooxygenase-1. Conclusions In conclusion, the compounds we synthesized at first based on the structures of analogues of 12 lipoxygenase metabolites showed a role of the phenol group in the anti-platelet and anti-cyclooxygenase-1 activities

  15. New α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Triterpenic Acid from Marine Macro Green Alga Codium dwarkense Boergs

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    Liaqat Ali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The marine ecosystem has been a key resource for secondary metabolites with promising biological roles. In the current study, bioassay-guided phytochemical investigations were carried out to assess the presence of enzyme inhibitory chemical constituents from the methanolic extract of marine green alga—Codium dwarkense. The bioactive fractions were further subjected to chromatographic separations, which resulted in the isolation of a new triterpenic acid; dwarkenoic acid (1 and the known sterols; androst-5-en-3β-ol (2, stigmasta-5,25-dien-3β,7α-diol (3, ergosta-5,25-dien-3β-ol (4, 7-hydroxystigmasta-4,25-dien-3-one-7-O-β-d-fucopyranoside (5, 7-hydroxystigmasta-4,25-dien-3-one (6, and stigmasta-5,25-dien-3β-ol (7. The structure elucidation of the new compound was carried out by combined mass spectrometry and 1D (1H and 13C and 2D (HSQC, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY NMR spectroscopic data. The sub-fractions and pure constituents were assayed for enzymatic inhibition of alpha-glucosidase. Compound 1 showed significant inhibition at all concentrations. Compounds 2, 3, 5, and 7 exhibited a dose-dependent response, whereas compounds 4–6 showed moderate inhibition. Utilizing such marine-derived biological resources could lead to drug discoveries related to anti-diabetics.

  16. Peanut fatty acids and their impact on human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanuts contain a large amount of fat. Much of it is unsaturated, giving peanuts a positive effect on human health. A number of positive health effects from consuming peanuts have been reported in the scientific literature. These include lowering blood pressure, decreasing the risk of heart disea...

  17. Comparative metabolism of mycophenolic acid by glucuronic acid and glucose conjugation in human, dog, and cat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, J E; Mealey, K; Court, M H

    2017-04-01

    Use of the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid (MPA) in cats is limited because MPA elimination depends on glucuronidation, which is deficient in cats. We evaluated formation of major (phenol glucuronide) and minor (acyl glucuronide, phenol glucoside, and acyl glucoside) MPA metabolites using liver microsomes from 16 cats, 26 dogs, and 48 humans. All MPA metabolites were formed by human liver microsomes, while dog and cat liver microsomes formed both MPA glucuronides, but only one MPA glucoside (phenol glucoside). Intrinsic clearance (CLint) of MPA for phenol glucuronidation by cat liver microsomes was only 15-17% that of dog and human liver microsomes. However, CLint for acyl glucuronide and phenol glucoside formation in cat liver microsomes was similar to or greater than that for dog and human liver microsomes. While total MPA conjugation CLint was generally similar for cat liver microsomes compared with dog and human liver microsomes, relative contributions of each pathway varied between species with phenol glucuronidation predominating in dog and human liver microsomes and phenol glucosidation predominating in cat liver microsomes. MPA conjugation variation between cat liver microsomes was threefold for total conjugation and for phenol glucosidation, sixfold for phenol glucuronidation, and 11-fold for acyl glucuronidation. Our results indicate that total MPA conjugation is quantitatively similar between liver microsomes from cats, dogs, and humans despite large differences in the conjugation pathways that are utilized by these species.

  18. Effect of fatty acids on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell energy metabolism and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, Natasha; Huqi, Alda; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Mori, Jun; Paulin, Roxane; Haromy, Alois; Onay-Besikci, Arzu; Ionescu, Lavinia; Thébaud, Bernard; Michelakis, Evangelos; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Successful stem cell therapy requires the optimal proliferation, engraftment, and differentiation of stem cells into the desired cell lineage of tissues. However, stem cell therapy clinical trials to date have had limited success, suggesting that a better understanding of stem cell biology is needed. This includes a better understanding of stem cell energy metabolism because of the importance of energy metabolism in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. We report here the first direct evidence that human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMMSC) energy metabolism is highly glycolytic with low rates of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The contribution of glycolysis to ATP production is greater than 97% in undifferentiated BMMSCs, while glucose and fatty acid oxidation combined only contribute 3% of ATP production. We also assessed the effect of physiological levels of fatty acids on human BMMSC survival and energy metabolism. We found that the saturated fatty acid palmitate induces BMMSC apoptosis and decreases proliferation, an effect prevented by the unsaturated fatty acid oleate. Interestingly, chronic exposure of human BMMSCs to physiological levels of palmitate (for 24 hr) reduces palmitate oxidation rates. This decrease in palmitate oxidation is prevented by chronic exposure of the BMMSCs to oleate. These results suggest that reducing saturated fatty acid oxidation can decrease human BMMSC proliferation and cause cell death. These results also suggest that saturated fatty acids may be involved in the long-term impairment of BMMSC survival in vivo.

  19. The natural course of non-classic Pompe's disease; a review of 225 published cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Léon P F; Hagemans, Marloes L C; van Doorn, Pieter A; Loonen, M Christa B; Hop, Wim J C; Reuser, Arnold J J; van der Ploeg, Ans T

    2005-08-01

    Pompe's disease is a neuromuscular disorder caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase. Recombinant human alpha- glucosidase is under evaluation as therapeutic drug. In light of this development we studied the natural course of cases not fitting the definition of classic infantile Pompe's disease. Our review of 109 reports including 225 cases shows a continuous spectrum of phenotypes. The onset of symptoms ranged from 0 to 71 years. Based on the available literature, no criteria to delineate clinical sub-types could be established.A common denominator of these cases is that first symptoms were related to or caused by muscle weakness. In general, patients with a later onset of symptoms seemed to have a better prognosis. Respiratory failure was the most frequent cause of death. CK, LDH, ASAT, ALAT and muscle glycogen levels were frequently but not always elevated. In most cases a muscle biopsy revealed lysosomal pathology, but normal muscle morphology does not exclude Pompe's disease. In 10% of the cases in which the enzyme assay on leukocytes was used, a normal alpha-glucosidase activity was reported. Data on skeletal muscle strength and function, pulmonary function, disability, handicap and quality of life were insufficiently reported in the literature. Studies of non-classic Pompe's disease should focus on these aspects, before enzyme replacement therapy becomes generally available.

  20. Hypoxia and the anticoagulants dalteparin and acetylsalicylic acid affect human placental amino acid transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Jens Kleppa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anticoagulants, e.g. low-molecular weight heparins (LMWHs and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA are prescribed to women at risk for pregnancy complications that are associated with impaired placentation and placental hypoxia. Beyond their role as anticoagulants these compounds exhibit direct effects on trophoblast but their impact on placental function is unknown. The amino acid transport systems A and L, which preferably transfer essential amino acids, are well-described models to study placental nutrient transport. We aimed to examine the effect of hypoxia, LMWHs and ASA on the activity of the placental amino acid transport systems A and L and associated signalling mechanisms. METHODS: The uptake of C14-MeAIB (system A or H3-leucin (system L was investigated after incubation of primary villous fragments isolated from term placentas. Villous tissue was incubated at 2% O2 (hypoxia, 8% O2 and standard culture conditions (21% O2 or at 2% O2 and 21% O2 with dalteparin or ASA. Activation of the JAK/STAT or mTOR signalling pathways was determined by Western analysis of total and phosphorylated STAT3 or Raptor. RESULTS: Hypoxia decreased system A mediated MeAIB uptake and increased system L mediated leucine uptake compared to standard culture conditions (21% O2. This was accompanied by an impairment of STAT3 and a stimulation of Raptor signalling. System L activity increased at 8% O2. Dalteparin treatment reduced system A and system L activity under normoxic conditions and ASA (1 mM decreased system A and L transporter activity under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our data underline the dependency of placental function on oxygen supply. LMWHs and ASA are not able to reverse the effects of hypoxia on placental amino acid transport. These findings and the uncovering of the signalling mechanisms in more detail will help to understand the impact of LMWHs and ASA on placental function and fetal growth.

  1. Ligand specificity and conformational stability of human fatty acid-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, A W; van Moerkerk, H T; Veerkamp, J H

    2001-09-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytosolic proteins with virtually identical backbone structures that facilitate the solubility and intracellular transport of fatty acids. At least eight different types of FABP occur, each with a specific tissue distribution and possibly with a distinct function. To define the functional characteristics of all eight human FABPs, viz. heart (H), brain (B), myelin (M), adipocyte (A), epidermal (E), intestinal (I), liver (L) and ileal lipid-binding protein (I-LBP), we studied their ligand specificity, their conformational stability and their immunological crossreactivity. Additionally, binding of bile acids to I-LBP was studied. The FABP types showed differences in fatty acid binding affinity. Generally, the affinity for palmitic acid was lower than for oleic and arachidonic acid. All FABP types, except E-FABP, I-FABP and I-LBP interacted with 1-anilinonaphtalene-8-sulphonic acid (ANS). Only L-FABP, I-FABP and M-FABP showed binding of 11-((5-dimethylaminonaphtalene-1-sulfonyl)amino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA). I-LBP showed increasing binding of bile acids in the order taurine-conjugated>glycine-conjugated>unconjugated bile acids. A hydroxylgroup of bile acids at position 7 decreased and at position 12 increased the binding affinity to I-LBP. The fatty acid-binding affinity and the conformation of FABP types were differentially affected in the presence of urea. Our results demonstrate significant differences in ligand binding, conformational stability and surface properties between different FABP types which may point to a specific function in certain cells and tissues. The preference of I-LBP (but not L-FABP) for conjugated bile acids is in accordance with a specific role in bile acid reabsorption in the ileum.

  2. Single amino acid radiocarbon dating of Upper Paleolithic modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Anat; McCullagh, James S O; Higham, Thomas F G; Sinitsyn, Andrey A; Hedges, Robert E M

    2012-05-01

    Archaeological bones are usually dated by radiocarbon measurement of extracted collagen. However, low collagen content, contamination from the burial environment, or museum conservation work, such as addition of glues, preservatives, and fumigants to "protect" archaeological materials, have previously led to inaccurate dates. These inaccuracies in turn frustrate the development of archaeological chronologies and, in the Paleolithic, blur the dating of such key events as the dispersal of anatomically modern humans. Here we describe a method to date hydroxyproline found in collagen (~10% of collagen carbon) as a bone-specific biomarker that removes impurities, thereby improving dating accuracy and confidence. This method is applied to two important sites in Russia and allows us to report the earliest direct ages for the presence of anatomically modern humans on the Russian Plain. These dates contribute considerably to our understanding of the emergence of the Mid-Upper Paleolithic and the complex suite of burial behaviors that begin to appear during this period.

  3. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, April D. [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Novak, Petr [Biology Centre ASCR, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice 37001 (Czech Republic); Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Lu, Zhenqiang [The Arizona Statistical Consulting Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Cherrington, Nathan J., E-mail: cherrington@pharmacy.arizona.edu [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  4. Decreased Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Content Contributes to Increased Survival in Human Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Oraldi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Among diet components, some fatty acids are known to affect several stages of colon carcinogenesis, whereas others are probably helpful in preventing tumors. In light of this, our aim was to determine the composition of fatty acids and the possible correlation with apoptosis in human colon carcinoma specimens at different Duke's stages and to evaluate the effect of enriching human colon cancer cell line with the possible reduced fatty acid(s. Specimens of carcinoma were compared with the corresponding non-neoplastic mucosa: a significant decrease of arachidonic acid, PPARα, Bad, and Bax and a significant increase of COX-2, Bcl-2, and pBad were found. The importance of arachidonic acid in apoptosis was demonstrated by enriching a Caco-2 cell line with this fatty acid. It induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner via induction of PPARα that, in turn, decreased COX-2. In conclusion, the reduced content of arachidonic acid is likely related to carcinogenic process decreasing the susceptibility of cancer cells to apoptosis.

  5. Interactions of hybrid gold-tannic acid nanoparticles with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekowski, Szymon; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Soliwoda, Katarzyna; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles present a wide spectrum of chemical, biological, and physical properties which result in their usage in many branches of science. We present an investigation of the interaction between human serum albumin and hybrid gold-tannic acid nanoparticles synthesized via a chemical reduction method. The results obtained demonstrate that tannic acid can be a very effective reducing and stabilizing agent and allows monodisperse hybrid gold nanomaterial to be obtained. The synthesized hybrid gold-tannic acid nanoparticles strongly interact with human serum albumin by formation of protein-corona complexes. The strength of the interaction with albumin depends on the number of tannic acid molecules on the surface of the nanoparticles and the presence of citric acid. Nanoparticles of large size and rich in tannic acid react more strongly with the protein [K SV = (8.00 ± 0.2) × 10(5) M(-1)] compared with smaller ones [K SV = (6.83 ± 0.5) × 10(4) M(-1)] containing citric acid and low concentration of tannic acid.

  6. Chlorogenic acids from green coffee extract are highly bioavailable in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Adriana; Monteiro, Mariana; Donangelo, Carmen M; Lafay, Sophie

    2008-12-01

    Chlorogenic acids (CGA) are cinnamic acid derivatives with biological effects mostly related to their antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities. Caffeoylquinic acids (CQA) and dicaffeoylquinic acids (diCQA) are the main CGA found in nature. Because green coffee is a major source of CGA, it has been used for production of nutraceuticals. However, data on the bioavailability of CGA from green coffee in humans are inexistent. The present study evaluated the pharmacokinetic profile and apparent bioavailability of CGA in plasma and urine of 10 healthy adults for 8 h after the consumption of a decaffeinated green coffee extract containing 170 mg of CGA. Three CQA, 3 diCQA, and caffeic, ferulic, isoferulic, and p-coumaric acids were identified in plasma by HPLC-Diode Array Detector-MS after treatment. Over 30% (33.1 +/- 23.1%) of the ingested cinnamic acid moieties were recovered in plasma, including metabolites, with peak levels from 0.5 to 8 h after treatment. CGA and metabolites identified in urine after treatment were 4-CQA, 5-CQA, and sinapic, p-hydroxybenzoic, gallic, vanillic, dihydrocaffeic, caffeic, ferulic, isoferulic, and p-coumaric acids, totaling 5.5 +/- 10.6% urinary recovery of the ingested cinnamic and quinic acid moiteties. This study shows that the major CGA compounds present in green coffee are highly absorbed and metabolized in humans.

  7. Gustatory sensation of (L)- and (D)-amino acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Misako; Sekine-Hayakawa, Yuki; Okiyama, Atsushi; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2012-12-01

    Amino acids are known to elicit complex taste, but most human psychophysical studies on the taste of amino acids have focused on a single basic taste, such as umami (savory) taste, sweetness, or bitterness. In this study, we addressed the potential relationship between the structure and the taste properties of amino acids by measuring the human gustatory intensity and quality in response to aqueous solutions of proteogenic amino acids in comparison to D-enantiomers. Trained subjects tasted aqueous solution of each amino acid and evaluated the intensities of total taste and each basic taste using a category-ratio scale. Each basic taste of amino acids showed the dependency on its hydrophobicity, size, charge, functional groups on the side chain, and chirality of the alpha carbon. In addition, the overall taste of amino acid was found to be the combination of basic tastes according to the partial structure. For example, hydrophilic non-charged middle-sized amino acids elicited sweetness, and L-enantiomeric hydrophilic middle-sized structure was necessary for umami taste. For example, L-serine had mainly sweet and minor umami taste, and D-serine was sweet. We further applied Stevens' psychophysical function to relate the total-taste intensity and the concentration, and found that the slope values depended on the major quality of taste (e.g., bitter large, sour small).

  8. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... memoranda entitled ``Revised Recommendations for the Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus...

  9. Structural and functional interaction of fatty acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-05-01

    The human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant, the most common in the FABP family, has been associated with elevated liver triglyceride levels. How this amino acid substitution elicits these effects is not known. This issue was addressed using human recombinant wild-type (WT) and T94A variant L-FABP proteins as well as cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the respective proteins (genotyped as TT, TC and CC). The T94A substitution did not alter or only slightly altered L-FABP binding affinities for saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids, nor did it change the affinity for intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Nevertheless, the T94A substitution markedly altered the secondary structural response of L-FABP induced by binding long chain fatty acids or intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Finally, the T94A substitution markedly decreased the levels of induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α-regulated proteins such as L-FABP, fatty acid transport protein 5 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α itself meditated by the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Thus, although the T94A substitution did not alter the affinity of human L-FABP for long chain fatty acids, it significantly altered human L-FABP structure and stability, as well as the conformational and functional response to these ligands.

  10. Are humans prone to autoimmunity? Implications from evolutionary changes in hominin sialic acid biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varki, Ajit

    2017-09-01

    Given varied intrinsic and extrinsic challenges to the immune system, it is unsurprising that each evolutionary lineage evolves distinctive features of immunoreactivity, and that tolerance mechanisms fail, allowing autoimmunity. Humans appear prone to many autoimmune diseases, with mechanisms both genetic and environmental. Another rapidly evolving biological system involves sialic acids, a family of monosaccharides that are terminal caps on cell surface and secreted molecules of vertebrates, and play multifarious roles in immunity. We have explored multiple genomic changes in sialic acid biology that occurred in human ancestors (hominins), some with implications for enhanced immunoreactivity, and hence for autoimmunity. Human ancestors lost the enzyme synthesizing the common mammalian sialic acid Neu5Gc, with an accumulation of the precursor sialic acid Neu5Ac. Resulting changes include an enhanced reactivity by some immune cells and increased ability of macrophages to kill bacteria, at the cost of increased endotoxin sensitivity. There are also multiple human-specific evolutionary changes in inhibitory and activating Siglecs, immune cell receptors that recognize sialic acids as "self-associated molecular patterns" (SAMPs) to modulate immunity, but can also be hijacked by pathogen molecular mimicry of SAMPs. Altered expression patterns and fixed or polymorphic SIGLEC pseudogenization in humans has modulated both innate and adaptive immunity, sometimes favoring over-reactivity. Meanwhile, dietary intake of Neu5Gc (derived primarily from red meats) allows metabolic incorporation of this non-human molecule into human cells--apparently the first example of "xeno-autoimmunity" involving "xeno-autoantigen" interactions with circulating "xeno-autoantibodies". Taken together, some of these factors may contribute to the apparent human propensity for autoimmunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibitor of fatty acid synthase induced apoptosis in human colonic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Lin Huang; Zhen Sheng Dai; Yue Lin Jin; Shi Neng Zhu; Shi Lun Lu

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION The treatment of human epithelial malignancies is limited by drug resistance and toxic and side effects,which results in the failure in the treatment of majority of advanced cancer victims. To seek for a new, and specific antineoplastic therapy will provide hope for tumor treatment. Although disordered intermediary metabolism in cancer cells has been known for many years, much of the work focused on abnormal glucose catabolism. At the same time, little attention has been paid to fatty acid synthasis in tumor tissues, dispite of the significance of fatty acid synthase (FAS) in some clinical human ovarian[1], breast[2], colorectal[3],and prostatic cancers[4,5]. Tumor cells which express high levels of fatty acid synthesizing enzymes use endogeneously synthesized fatty acids for membrance biosynthesis and appear to export large amounts of lipid. In contrast, normal cells preferentially utilize diary lipid.

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid suppresses arachidonic acid-induced proliferation of LS-174T human colon carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piet Habbel; Karsten H Weylandt; Katja Lichopoj; Johannes Nowak; Martin Purschke; Jing-Dong Wang; Cheng-Wei He; Daniel C Baumgart; Jing X Kang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and their combination on colon cancer cell growth.METHODS: The LS-174T colon cancer cell line was used to study the role of the prostaglandin precursor AA and the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA on cell growth. Cell viability was assessed in XTT assays. For analysis of cell cycle and cell death, flow cytometry and DAPI staining were applied. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), p21 and bcl-2 in cells incubated with AA or DHA was examined by real-time RT-PCR. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) generation in the presence of AA and DHA was measured using a PGE2ELISA.RESULTS: AA increased cell growth, whereas DHA reduced viability of LS 174T cells in a time- and dosedependent manner. Furthermore, DHA down- regulated mRNA of bcl-2 and up-regulated p21. Interestingly,DHA was able to suppress AA-induced cell proliferation and significantly lowered AA-derived PGE2 formation.DHA also down-regulated COX-2 expression. In addition to the effect on PGE2 formation, DHA directly reduced PGE2-induced cell proliferation in a dosedependent manner.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that DHA can inhibit the pro-proliferative effect of abundant AA or PGE2.

  13. Characterization of AQPs in Mouse, Rat, and Human Colon and Their Selective Regulation by Bile Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Jonathan; Keely, Stephen; Wu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    epithelial cells from rats (AQP1, 3, 4, 7, 8) and mice (AQP1, 4, 8). Several AQPs were also detected in human colon (AQP1, 3, 4, 7-9). Immunohistochemistry localized AQP1 to the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells in the bottom of the crypts, whereas AQP3 (rat, human) and AQP4 (mice, human) were......In normal individuals, the epithelium of the colon absorbs 1.5-2 l of water a day to generate dehydrated feces. However, in the condition of bile acid malabsorption (BAM), an excess of bile acids in the colon results in diarrhea. Several studies have attempted to address the mechanisms contributing...... to BAM induced by various bile acids. However, none have addressed a potential dysregulation of aquaporin (AQP) water channels, which are responsible for the majority of transcellular water transport in epithelial cells, as a contributing factor to the onset of diarrhea and the pathogenesis of BAM...

  14. Omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids in human and animal health: an African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, B S; Bosire, R V; Deckelbaum, R J

    2014-12-01

    Lipids are essential for plant and animal development, growth and nutrition and play critical roles in health and reproduction. The dramatic increase in the human population has put increasing pressure on human food sources, especially of those sources of food which contain adequate levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and more importantly, sources of food which have favorable ratios of the n-3 (18-carbon, α-linolenic acid, ALA) to n-6 (18-carbon linoleic acid, LA) PUFAs. Recent studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of the n-3 PUFAs in diets as well as potentially negative effects of excessive levels of n-6 PUFAs in diets. This review discusses these human health issues relating to changes in diets based on environmental and industrial changes as well as strategies in East Africa for improving lipid composition of food using indigenous sources.

  15. High and Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronic Acid Differentially Regulate Human Fibrocyte Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Maharjan, Anu S; Darrell Pilling; Gomer, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following tissue injury, monocytes can enter the tissue and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, but little is known about what regulates this differentiation. Extracellular matrix contains high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMWHA; ∼2×10(6) Da). During injury, HMWHA breaks down to low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA; ∼0.8-8×10(5) Da). METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this report, we show that HMWHA potentiates the differentiation of human monocytes into ...

  16. Evaluation of alternatives for human lysozyme purification from transgenic rice: impact of phytic acid and buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilken, Lisa R; Nikolov, Zivko L

    2010-01-01

    Producing economically competitive recombinant human lysozyme from transgenic rice demands an inexpensive purification process for nonpharmaceutical applications. Human lysozyme is a basic protein, and thus, cation exchange chromatography was the selected method for lysozyme purification. Similar to other protein production systems, the identification of critical impurities in the rice extract was important for the development of an efficient purification process. Previous adsorption data indicated that phytic acid was probably responsible for an unacceptably low cation exchange adsorption capacity. In this study, we confirm that reducing phytic acid concentration improves lysozyme binding capacity and investigate alternative process conditions that reduce phytic acid interference. Compared with the previous best process, the adsorption capacity of human lysozyme was increased from 8.6 to 19.7 mg/mL when rice extract was treated with phytase to degrade phytic acid. Using tris buffer to adjust pH 4.5 extract to pH 6 before adsorption reduced phytic acid interference by minimizing phytic acid-lysozyme interactions, eliminated the need for phytase treatment, and increased the binding capacity to 25 mg/mL. Another method of reducing phytic acid concentration was to extract human lysozyme from rice flour at pH 10 with 50 mM NaCl in 50 mM sodium carbonate buffer. A similar binding capacity (25.5 mg/mL) was achieved from pH 10 extract that was clarified by acidic precipitation and adjusted to pH 6 for adsorption. Lysozyme purities ranged from 95 to 98% for all three processing methods. The tris-mediated purification was the most efficient of the alternatives considered.

  17. A set of amino acids found to occur more frequently in human and fly than in plant and yeast proteomes consists of non-essential amino acids

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that essential amino acids are being replaced in proteins by non-essential amino acids.We compared the amino acid composition in human, worm and fly proteomes, organisms that cannot synthesize all amino acids, with the amino acids of the proteomes of plant, bakers yeast and budding yeast, which are capable of synthesizing them. The analysis covered 460,737 proteins (212,197,907 amino acids). The data suggest a bias towards the usage of non-essential ami...

  18. Expression of human acidic fibroblast growth factor in Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ying; CAI Shaoxi; Harald G. WERIRICH; XIA Yuxian

    2003-01-01

    Pichia pastoris expression system is similar to that of the mammal cell in modification of expressed protein, including refolding and glycosylation. A human aFGF gene was cloned into the intracellular expression vector pPIC9K. The Pichia pastoriS KM71 strain was transformed with the recombined expression plasmid. Transgenic expression was observed after screening the transformants with G418. The expression and secretion of recombinant human aFGF (rhaFGF) into the culture medium were testified by ELISA assay. The yield peaked after two days of induction and was approximately 10 mg.L-1 in shake-flask fermentation medium. The recombinant proteins were purified by the combination of heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Two proteins with relative molecular masses (Mr) of 17 000 and 35 000 were purified as a single band in SDS-PAGE, whose biological activities were determined by MTT assay. It is found that the protein with Mr of 1 7 000 is nonglycosylated haFGF, and that with Mr of 35 000 is glycosylated haFGF; and the latter has a lower biological activity than the former.

  19. Proteomic investigation into betulinic acid-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  20. Are fat acids of human milk impacted by pasteurization and freezing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgo, Luiz Antônio; Coelho Araújo, Wilma Maria; Conceição, Maria Hosana; Sabioni Resck, Inês; Mendonça, Márcio Antonio

    2014-10-03

    The Human Milk Bank undergo human milk to pasteurization, followed by storage in a freezer at -18° C for up to six months to thus keep available the stocks of this product in maternal and infant hospitals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of processing on the lipid fraction of human milk. A sample of human milk was obtained from a donor and was subdivided into ten sub-samples that was subjected to the following treatments: LC = raw milk; T0 = milk after pasteurization; T30 = milk after pasteurization and freezing for 30 days; T60 = milk after pasteurization and freeze for 60 days, and so on every 30 days until T240 = milk after pasteurization and freezing for 240 days, with 3 repetitions for each treatment. Lipids were extracted, methylated and fatty acid profiles determined by gas chromatography. The fatty acids were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and functional groups were identified by infrared spectroscopy. There were variations in the concentration of fatty acids. For unsaturated fatty acids there was increasing trend in their concentrations. The IR and NMR analyze characterized and identified functional groups presents in fatty acids.

  1. Fishy Business: Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Zinc Transporters and Free Zinc Availability in Human Neuronal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Damitha De Mel; Cenk Suphioglu

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA...

  2. Enzymatic transamination of D-kynurenine generates kynurenic acid in rat and human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de la Cruz, Veronica; Amori, Laura; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Wang, Xiao-Dan; Notarangelo, Francesca M; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Schwarcz, Robert

    2012-03-01

    In the mammalian brain, the α7 nicotinic and NMDA receptor antagonist kynurenic acid is synthesized by irreversible enzymatic transamination of the tryptophan metabolite l-kynurenine. d-kynurenine, too, serves as a bioprecursor of kynurenic acid in several organs including the brain, but the conversion is reportedly catalyzed through oxidative deamination by d-amino acid oxidase. Using brain and liver tissue homogenates from rats and humans, and conventional incubation conditions for kynurenine aminotransferases, we show here that kynurenic acid production from d-kynurenine, like the more efficient kynurenic acid synthesis from l-kynurenine, is blocked by the aminotransferase inhibitor amino-oxyacetic acid. In vivo, focal application of 100 μM d-kynurenine by reverse microdialysis led to a steady rise in extracellular kynurenic acid in the rat striatum, causing a 4-fold elevation after 2 h. Attesting to functional significance, this increase was accompanied by a 36% reduction in extracellular dopamine. Both of these effects were duplicated by perfusion of 2 μM l-kynurenine. Co-infusion of amino-oxyacetic acid (2 mM) significantly attenuated the in vivo effects of d-kynurenine and essentially eliminated the effects of l-kynurenine. Thus, enzymatic transamination accounts in part for kynurenic acid synthesis from d-kynurenine in the brain. These results are discussed with regard to implications for brain physiology and pathology.

  3. Anticancer Activities of Substituted Cinnamic Acid Phenethyl Esters on Human Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIShu-chun; LIHui; ZHANGFa; LIZhong-jun; CUIJing-rong

    2003-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and sixteen substituted cinnamic acid phenethyl esters were prepared via conventional procedures in order to test their in vitro anticancer activities by either MTT assay or SRB assay on six different human cancer cell lines. The results indicated that in the concentration of 10μmol·L-1 the lead compmuM CAPE possessed anficancer activities against human HL-60, Bel-7402, and Hela cell lines, and two other compounds possessed potent anticancer activities against Bel-7402 and Hela cell lines.

  4. The distribution of tissue fibronectin and sialic acid in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süer, S; Baloğlu, H; Güngör, Z; Sönmez, H; Kökoğlu, E

    1998-06-01

    Our findings indicate that sialic acid and fibronectin levels in breast tumors are higher than those in normal tissues. The mean tissue fibronectin and sialic acid concentrations for patients with breast cancer were 30.90 +/- 9.68 microg/mg protein and 21.60 +/- 9.35 microg/mg protein, respectively, and for normal controls were 12.47 +/- 5.69 microg/mg protein, respectively. Tissue fibronectin and sialic acid can be important markers for human breast cancer.

  5. Ascorbic acid against reperfusion injury in human renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norio, Karri; Wikström, Mårten; Salmela, Kaija; Kyllönen, Lauri; Lindgren, Leena

    2003-08-01

    The cadaveric renal graft is exposed to ischaemic injury during preservation and to oxidative damage during reperfusion. Both these mechanisms are known to cause cell damage, which may impair graft function. Reperfusion injury (RPI) is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ascorbic acid (AA) is a potent physiological extracellular scavenger of ROS. We perfused 31 renal grafts immediately before implantation with a solution of Euro-Collins containing 0.5 mg/ml of AA to diminish RPI. From every donor, the contralateral kidney served as a control. The control grafts were perfused with the same perfusion as those of the AA group, only without the AA substitution. We assessed the effect of AA by recording serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, initial graft function and early rejections. The incidence of delayed graft function (DGF) was 32% in the AA group, and 29% in the control group. Other parameters were also similar in both groups, except for the length of DGF, which showed a trend towards a shorter duration in the AA group. The pre-operative systemic AA concentration was significantly ( P=0.01) lower in the haemodialysis patients than in those on peritoneal dialysis. In conclusion, this clinical study could not demonstrate significant benefits of AA in renal transplantation.

  6. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Tracy L., E-mail: tracylmarion@qualyst.com [Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7270 (United States); Perry, Cassandra H., E-mail: cassandraperry@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); St Claire, Robert L., E-mail: bobstclaire@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Brouwer, Kim L.R., E-mail: kbrouwer@unc.edu [Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB 7569 Kerr Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7569 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  7. Oral sensitivity to fatty acids, food consumption and BMI in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jessica E; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Golding, Matthew; Delahunty, Conor; Clifton, Peter M; Keast, Russell S J

    2010-07-01

    Fatty acids are the chemical moieties that are thought to stimulate oral nutrient sensors, which detect the fat content of foods. In animals, oral hypersensitivity to fatty acids is associated with decreased fat intake and body weight. The aims of the present study were to investigate oral fatty acid sensitivity, food selection and BMI in human subjects. The study included two parts; study 1 established in thirty-one subjects (29 (sem 1.4) years, 22.8 (sem 0.5) kg/m2) taste thresholds using 3-AFC (3-Alternate Forced Choice Methodology) for oleic, linoleic and lauric acids, and quantified oral lipase activity. During study 2, fifty-four subjects (20 (sem 0.3) years, 21.5 (sem 0.4) kg/m2) were screened for oral fatty acid sensitivity using oleic acid (1.4 mm), and they were defined as hypo- or hypersensitive via triplicate triangle tests. Habitual energy and macronutrient intakes were quantified from 2 d diet records, and BMI was calculated from height and weight. Subjects also completed a fat ranking task using custard containing varying amounts (0, 2, 6 and 10 %) of fat. Study 1 reported median lipase activity as 2 mumol fatty acids/min per l, and detection thresholds for oleic, linoleic and lauric acids were 2.2 (sem 0.1), 1.5 (sem 0.1) and 2.6 (sem 0.3) mm. Study 2 identified twelve hypersensitive subjects, and hypersensitivity was associated with lower energy and fat intakes, lower BMI (P acid was correlated to performance in the fat ranking task (r 0.4, P fatty acid hypersensitivity is associated with lower energy and fat intakes and BMI, and it may serve as a factor that influences fat consumption in human subjects.

  8. Reconstruction of Pathways Associated with Amino Acid Metabolism in Human Mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Purnima Guda; Chittibabu Guda; Shankar Subramaniam

    2007-01-01

    We have used a bioinformatics approach for the identification and reconstruction of metabolic pathways associated with amino acid metabolism in human mitochon- dria. Human mitochondrial proteins determined by experimental and computa- tional methods have been superposed on the reference pathways from the KEGG database to identify mitochondrial pathways. Enzymes at the entry and exit points for each reconstructed pathway were identified, and mitochondrial solute carrier proteins were determined where applicable. Intermediate enzymes in the mito- chondrial pathways were identified based on the annotations available from public databases, evidence in current literature, or our MITOPRED program, which pre- dicts the mitochondrial localization of proteins. Through integration of the data derived from experimental, bibliographical, and computational sources, we recon- structed the amino acid metabolic pathways in human mitochondria, which could help better understand the mitochondrial metabolism and its role in human health.

  9. Modulation of human stratum corneum properties by salicylic acid and all-trans-retinoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Goffin, V; Piérard, G E

    1998-01-01

    Topical all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) has been reported to decrease the in vivo skin response to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). The converse was also shown with a synergistic effect of RA following prior applications of SLS. The reason for such effects is not clear. We employed measures of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), squamometry and sequential corneosurfametry to explore the protective activity of a 0.05% RA cream at the level of the stratum corneum. Nonionic oil-in-water emulsions with or without 5% salicylic acid (SA) served as test product references. Data indicated that the RA formulation was responsible for a stochastic impairment in the TEWL and for an increased intercorneocyte cohesion. SA and the unmedicated emulsion did not lead to similar TEWL changes. The squamometry test proved to be very sensitive to disclose the effects of SA and RA without, however, allowing to distinguish the difference in the physiological processes involved. The corneosurfametry bioassay did not show any protection or synergistic effect between RA or SA and SLS challenge on the stratum corneum. This is in contrast to a previous work showing a positive protective effect afforded by retinol against SLS. The combined effects of irritant compounds affecting the stratum corneum are complex. The precise reason for some of their biological consequences remains a conundrum. On balance, products such as SA and RA do not appear to afford protection or impairment to a surfactant challenge at the level of the stratum corneum.

  10. Fatty Acid Desaturase 1 (FADS1) Gene Polymorphisms Control Human Hepatic Lipid Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Libo; Athinarayanan, Shaminie; Jiang, Guanglong; Chalasani, Naga; Zhang, Min; Liu, Wanqing

    2014-01-01

    Fatty Acid Desaturase (FADS) genes and their variants have been associated with multiple metabolic phenotypes including liver enzymes and hepatic fat accumulation but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to delineate the role of FADSs in modulating lipid composition in human liver. We performed a targeted lipidomic analysis of a variety of phospholipids, sphingolipids and ceramides among 154 human liver tissue samples. The associations between previously Genome-wide Association St...

  11. Fatty Acid Incubation of Myotubues from Humans with Type 2 Diabetes Leads to Enhanced Release of Beta Oxidation Products Due to Impaired Fatty Acid Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wensaas, Andreas J; Rustan, Arild C; Just, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Increased availability of fatty acids is important for accumulation of intracellular lipids and development of insulin resistance in human myotubes. It is unknown whether different types of fatty acids like eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) influence...... these processes. Research Design and Methods: We examined fatty acid and glucose metabolism, and gene expression in cultured human skeletal muscle cells from control and T2D individuals after four days preincubation with EPA or TTA. Results: T2D myotubes exhibited reduced formation of CO(2) from palmitic acid (PA....... EPA markedly enhanced TAG accumulation in myotubes, more pronounced in T2D cells. TAG accumulation and fatty acid oxidation were inversely correlated only after EPA preincubation, and total level of acyl-CoA was reduced. Glucose oxidation (CO(2) formation) was enhanced and lactate production decreased...

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid and human brain development: evidence that a dietary supply is needed for optimal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenna, J Thomas; Carlson, Susan E

    2014-12-01

    Humans evolved a uniquely large brain among terrestrial mammals. Brain and nervous tissue is rich in the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Docosahexaenoic acid is required for lower and high order functions in humans because of understood and emerging molecular mechanisms. Among brain components that depend on dietary components, DHA is limiting because its synthesis from terrestrial plant food precursors is low but its utilization when consumed in diet is very efficient. Negligible DHA is found in terrestrial plants, but in contrast, DHA is plentiful at the shoreline where it is made by single-celled organisms and plants, and in the seas supports development of very large marine mammal brains. Modern human brains accumulate DHA up to age 18, most aggressively from about half-way through gestation to about two years of age. Studies in modern humans and non-human primates show that modern infants consuming infant formulas that include only DHA precursors have lower DHA levels than for those with a source of preformed DHA. Functional measures show that infants consuming preformed DHA have improved visual and cognitive function. Dietary preformed DHA in the breast milk of modern mothers supports many-fold greater breast milk DHA than is found in the breast milk of vegans, a phenomenon linked to consumption of shore-based foods. Most current evidence suggests that the DHA-rich human brain required an ample and sustained source of dietary DHA to reach its full potential.

  13. Effects of ursolic acid and oleanolic acid on human colon carcinoma cell line HCT15

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Li; Wei-Jian Guo; Qing-Yao Yang

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) aretriperpene acids having a similar chemical structure and aredistributed wildly in plants all over the world. In recentyearn, it was found that they had marked anti-tumor effects.There is little literature currently available regarding theireffects on colon carcinoma cells. The present study wasdesigned to investigate their inhibitory effects on humancolon carcinoma cell line HCT15 METHODS: HCT15 cells were cultured with different drugs.The treated cells were stained with hematoxylin-eosin andtheir morphologic changes observed under a lightmicroscope. The cytotoxicity of these drugs was evaluatedby tetrazolium dye assay. Cell cycle analysis was performedby flow cytometry (FCM). Data were expressed as means +SEM and Analysis of variance and Student' t-test forindividual comparisons.RESULTS: Twenty-four to 72 h after UA or OA 60 μmol/Ltreatment, the numbers of dead cells and cell fragmentswere increased and most cells were dead at the 72 nd hour.The cytotoxicity of UA was stronger than that of OA.Seventy-eight hours after 30 μmol/L of UA or OA treatment,a number of cells were degenerated, but cell fragments wererarely seen. The IC50 values for UA and OA were 30 and 60μmol/L, respectively. Proliferation assay showed thatproliferation of UA and OA-treated cells was slightlyincreased at 24 h and significantly decreased at 48 h and 60h, whereas untreated control cells maintained anexponential growth curve. Cell cycle analysis by FCMshowed HCT15 cells treated with UA 30 and OA 60 for 36 h and72 h gradually accumulated in G0/G1 phase (both drugs P< 0.05 for 72 h), with a concomitant decrease of cell populationsin S phase (both drugs P< 0.01 for 72 h) and no detectableapoptotic fraction.CONCLUSION: UA and OA have significant anti-ttumor activity.The effect of UA is stronger than that of OA. The possiblemechanism of action is that both drugs have an inhibitoryeffect on tumor cell proliferation through cell-cycle arrest.

  14. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kawada, Teruo, E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  15. Phenolic acid metabolites as biomarkers for tea- and coffee-derived polyphenol exposure in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Jonathan M; Chan, Shin Yee; Puddey, Ian B; Devine, Amanda; Wattanapenpaiboon, Naiyana; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Lukito, Widjaja; Burke, Valerie; Ward, Natalie C; Prince, Richard L; Croft, Kevin D

    2004-02-01

    Tea and coffee are rich in polyphenols with a variety of biological activities. Many of the demonstrated activities are consistent with favourable effects on the risk of chronic diseases. 4-O-methylgallic acid (4OMGA) and isoferulic acid are potential biomarkers of exposure to polyphenols derived from tea and coffee respectively. 4OMGA is derived from gallic acid in tea, and isoferulic acid is derived from chlorogenic acid in coffee. Our major objective was to explore the relationships of tea and coffee intake with 24 h urinary excretion of 4OMGA and isoferulic acid in human subjects. The relationships of long-term usual (111 participants) and contemporaneously recorded current (344 participants) tea and coffee intake with 24 h urinary excretion of 4OMGA and isoferulic acid were assessed in two populations. 4OMGA was related to usual (r 0.50, Pcoffee intake. Overall, our present results are consistent with the proposal that 4OMGA is a good biomarker for black tea-derived polyphenol exposure, but isoferulic acid may be of limited usefulness as a biomarker for coffee-derived polyphenol exposure.

  16. Gas chromatography determination of fatty acids in the human erythrocyte membranes - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrická, Zuzana; Ďuračková, Zdeňka

    2016-12-01

    Blood fatty acid measurements can reflect exogenously consumed fatty acids allowing to resolve some metabolic disorders (e.g. diabetes, anorexia) or mental disorders (e.g. depression, anxiety, schizophrenia). For this purpose, fatty acids can be determined in the whole blood or various blood fractions such as the plasma, serum or erythrocytes. Measurement of fatty acids in the whole blood by dried blood spot technique is becoming increasingly popular and is often used mainly for the screening of newborns due to the use of the small sample volume. The most popular is determination of fatty acids in plasma or serum samples. While the profile of plasma fatty acids fluctuates based on daily dietary intake, the red blood cell membrane composition of fatty acids reflects the 2-3 month dietary intake. Such results can be more reflective in contrast to the plasma/serum and therefore the present review will summarize available information on gas chromatography determination of fatty acids in human red blood cell membranes. Selection of extraction and derivatization reagents as well as presentation of chromatographic conditions will be discussed here. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Fumiyoshi; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Asztalos, Bela F; Iyer, Lakshmanan K; Richardson, Kris; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2015-08-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Subjects were sampled at baseline and six weeks after receiving either: olive oil 6.0 g/day (n = 16), EPA 1.8 g/day (n = 16), or DHA 1.8 g/day (n = 18). PBMC were subjected to gene expression analysis by microarray with key findings confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Plasma phospholipid EPA increased 3 fold in the EPA group, and DHA increased 63% in the DHA group (both p expression in the following pathways: 1) interferon signaling, 2) receptor recognition of bacteria and viruses, 3) G protein signaling, glycolysis and glycolytic shunting, 4) S-adenosyl-l-methionine biosynthesis, and 5) cAMP-mediated signaling including cAMP responsive element protein 1 (CREB1), as well as many other individual genes including hypoxia inducible factor 1, α subunit (HIF1A). The findings for CREB1 and HIF1A were confirmed by Q-PCR analysis. Our data indicate that EPA supplementation was associated with significant effects on gene expression involving the interferon pathway as well as down-regulation of CREB1 and HIF1A, which may relate to its beneficial effect on CVD risk reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genomics of lactation: role of nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics in the fatty acid composition of human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Castillo, Elizabeth; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Moltó-Puigmartí, Carolina

    2017-08-01

    Human milk covers the infant's nutrient requirements during the first 6 months of life. The composition of human milk progressively changes during lactation and it is influenced by maternal nutritional factors. Nowadays, it is well known that nutrients have the ability to interact with genes and modulate molecular mechanisms impacting physiological functions. This has led to a growing interest among researchers in exploring nutrition at a molecular level and to the development of two fields of study: nutrigenomics, which evaluates the influence of nutrients on gene expression, and nutrigenetics, which evaluates the heterogeneous individual response to nutrients due to genetic variation. Fatty acids are one of the nutrients most studied in relation to lactation given their biologically important roles during early postnatal life. Fatty acids modulate transcription factors involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism, which in turn causes a variation in the proportion of lipids in milk. This review focuses on understanding, on the one hand, the gene transcription mechanisms activated by maternal dietary fatty acids and, on the other hand, the interaction between dietary fatty acids and genetic variation in genes involved in lipid metabolism. Both of these mechanisms affect the fatty acid composition of human milk.

  19. Amino acid composition analysis of human secondary transport proteins and implications for reliable membrane topology prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidijam, Massoud; Azizpour, Sonia; Patching, Simon G

    2016-07-08

    Secondary transporters in humans are a large group of proteins that transport a wide range of ions, metals, organic and inorganic solutes involved in energy transduction, control of membrane potential and osmotic balance, metabolic processes and in the absorption or efflux of drugs and xenobiotics. They are also emerging as important targets for development of new drugs and as target sites for drug delivery to specific organs or tissues. We have performed amino acid composition (AAC) and phylogenetic analyses and membrane topology predictions for 336 human secondary transport proteins and used the results to confirm protein classification and to look for trends and correlations with structural domains and specific substrates and/or function. Some proteins showed statistically high contents of individual amino acids or of groups of amino acids with similar physicochemical properties. One recurring trend was a correlation between high contents of charged and/or polar residues with misleading results in predictions of membrane topology, which was especially prevalent in Mitochondrial Carrier family proteins. We demonstrate how charged or polar residues located in the middle of transmembrane helices can interfere with their identification by membrane topology tools resulting in missed helices in the prediction. Comparison of AAC in the human proteins with that in 235 secondary transport proteins from Escherichia coli revealed similar overall trends along with differences in average contents for some individual amino acids and groups of similar amino acids that are presumed to result from a greater number of functions and complexity in the higher organism.

  20. Identification of differences in human and great ape phytanic acid metabolism that could influence gene expression profiles and physiological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegmund Kimberly D

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that anatomical differences in human and great ape guts arose in response to species-specific diets and energy demands. To investigate functional genomic consequences of these differences, we compared their physiological levels of phytanic acid, a branched chain fatty acid that can be derived from the microbial degradation of chlorophyll in ruminant guts. Humans who accumulate large stores of phytanic acid commonly develop cerebellar ataxia, peripheral polyneuropathy, and retinitis pigmentosa in addition to other medical conditions. Furthermore, phytanic acid is an activator of the PPAR-alpha transcription factor that influences the expression of genes relevant to lipid metabolism. Results Despite their trace dietary phytanic acid intake, all great ape species had elevated red blood cell (RBC phytanic acid levels relative to humans on diverse diets. Unlike humans, chimpanzees showed sexual dimorphism in RBC phytanic acid levels, which were higher in males relative to females. Cultured skin fibroblasts from all species had a robust capacity to degrade phytanic acid. We provide indirect evidence that great apes, in contrast to humans, derive significant amounts of phytanic acid from the hindgut fermentation of plant materials. This would represent a novel reduction of metabolic activity in humans relative to the great apes. Conclusion We identified differences in the physiological levels of phytanic acid in humans and great apes and propose this is causally related to their gut anatomies and microbiomes. Phytanic acid levels could contribute to cross-species and sex-specific differences in human and great ape transcriptomes, especially those related to lipid metabolism. Based on the medical conditions caused by phytanic acid accumulation, we suggest that differences in phytanic acid metabolism could influence the functions of human and great ape nervous, cardiovascular, and skeletal systems.

  1. Expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase in human malignant lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Hastrup, Nina; Sehested, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine in human malignant lymphomas the expression patterns of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRT), the primary, rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of NAD+. NAMPT is a potential biomarker for se...

  2. Surfactant enhanced disinfection of the human norovirus surrogate, tulane virus with organic acids and surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human infection with foodborne viruses can occur following consumption of contaminated food, person-to-person body contact, or release of aerosols. Combinatorial treatments of surfactants and organic acids may have synergistic or additive mechanisms to inactivate foodborne viruses and prevent outbr...

  3. Analysis of Ascorbic Acid in Single Human Neutrophils by Electrochemical Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Ascorbic acid in individual human neutrophils was determined by capillary zone electrophoresis with electrochemical detection. In order to overcome the influence of the adsorption of the substances in cells on the inner surface wall of the capillary on the migration time and the number of theoretical plates, a procedure for treating capillaries has been described.

  4. Effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on human brain morphology and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Dienke J.; Montfort, van Simone J.T.; Oranje, Bob; Durston, Sarah; Smeets, P.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Public opinion and media coverage suggest that there are benefits of long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) intake on brain functioning. However, it is an open question whether this is indeed the case. Therefore, we reviewed the evidence for effects of ω-3 LC-PUFA on human brain morp

  5. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction of acidic drugs from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan-Pijuan, Mercedes; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    The new sample preparation concept “Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction (PALME)” was evaluated for extraction of the acidic drugs ketoprofen, fenoprofen, diclofenac, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, and gemfibrozil from human plasma samples. Plasma samples (250 μL) were loaded into individual...

  6. Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA: An Ancient Nutrient for the Modern Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Bradbury

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern humans have evolved with a staple source of preformed docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in the diet. An important turning point in human evolution was the discovery of high-quality, easily digested nutrients from coastal seafood and inland freshwater sources. Multi-generational exploitation of seafood by shore-based dwellers coincided with the rapid expansion of grey matter in the cerebral cortex, which characterizes the modern human brain. The DHA molecule has unique structural properties that appear to provide optimal conditions for a wide range of cell membrane functions. This has particular implications for grey matter, which is membrane-rich tissue. An important metabolic role for DHA has recently been identified as the precursor for resolvins and protectins. The rudimentary source of DHA is marine algae; therefore it is found concentrated in fish and marine oils. Unlike the photosynthetic cells in algae and higher plants, mammalian cells lack the specific enzymes required for the de novo synthesis of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, the precursor for all omega-3 fatty acid syntheses. Endogenous synthesis of DHA from ALA in humans is much lower and more limited than previously assumed. The excessive consumption of omega-6 fatty acids in the modern Western diet further displaces DHA from membrane phospholipids. An emerging body of research is exploring a unique role for DHA in neurodevelopment and the prevention of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. DHA is increasingly being added back into the food supply as fish oil or algal oil supplementation.

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): an ancient nutrient for the modern human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Joanne

    2011-05-01

    Modern humans have evolved with a staple source of preformed docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the diet. An important turning point in human evolution was the discovery of high-quality, easily digested nutrients from coastal seafood and inland freshwater sources. Multi-generational exploitation of seafood by shore-based dwellers coincided with the rapid expansion of grey matter in the cerebral cortex, which characterizes the modern human brain. The DHA molecule has unique structural properties that appear to provide optimal conditions for a wide range of cell membrane functions. This has particular implications for grey matter, which is membrane-rich tissue. An important metabolic role for DHA has recently been identified as the precursor for resolvins and protectins. The rudimentary source of DHA is marine algae; therefore it is found concentrated in fish and marine oils. Unlike the photosynthetic cells in algae and higher plants, mammalian cells lack the specific enzymes required for the de novo synthesis of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the precursor for all omega-3 fatty acid syntheses. Endogenous synthesis of DHA from ALA in humans is much lower and more limited than previously assumed. The excessive consumption of omega-6 fatty acids in the modern Western diet further displaces DHA from membrane phospholipids. An emerging body of research is exploring a unique role for DHA in neurodevelopment and the prevention of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. DHA is increasingly being added back into the food supply as fish oil or algal oil supplementation.

  8. Expression and localization of the omega-3 fatty acid receptor GPR120 in human term placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, S; Ramirez, V I; Gaccioli, F; Jansson, T; Powell, T L

    2014-07-01

    Fatty acids can function as signaling molecules, acting through receptors in the cytosol or on the cell surface. G-Protein Receptor (GPR)120 is a membrane-bound receptor mediating anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects of the omega-3 fatty acid docohexaenoic acid (DHA). GPR120 dysfunction is associated with obesity in humans. Cellular localization of GPR120 and the influence of maternal obesity on GPR120 protein expression in the placenta are unknown. Herein we demonstrate that GPR120 is predominantly expressed in the microvillous membrane (MVM) of human placenta and that the expression level of this receptor in MVM is not altered by maternal body mass index (BMI).

  9. Effect of acidity upon attrition-corrosion of human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Qi; Arsecularatne, Joseph A; Hoffman, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Attrition-corrosion is a synthesized human enamel wear process combined mechanical effects (attrition) with corrosion. With the rising consumption of acidic food and beverages, attrition-corrosion is becoming increasingly common. Yet, research is limited and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, in vitro wear loss of human enamel was investigated and the attrition-corrosion process and wear mechanism were elucidated by the analysis of the wear scar and its subsurface using focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Human enamel flat-surface samples were prepared with enamel cusps as the wear antagonists. Reciprocating wear testing was undertaken under load of 5N at the speed of 66 cycle/min for 2250 cycles with lubricants including citric acid (at pH 3.2 and 5.5), acetic acid (at pH 3.2 and 5.5) and distilled water. All lubricants were used at 37°C. Similar human enamel flat-surface samples were also exposed to the same solutions as a control group. The substance loss of enamel during wear can be linked to the corrosion potential of a lubricant used. Using a lubricant with very low corrosion potential (such as distilled water), the wear mechanism was dominated by delamination with high wear loss. Conversely, the wear mechanism changed to shaving of the softened layer with less material loss in an environment with medium corrosion potential such as citric acid at pH 3.2 and 5.5 and acetic acid at pH 5.5. However, a highly corrosive environment (e.g., acetic acid at pH 3.2) caused the greatest loss of substance during wear.

  10. Acid sulfate soils and human health--a Millennium Ecosystem Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Karin; Maley, Fiona; Cook, Angus; Weinstein, Philip

    2009-11-01

    Acid sulfate soils have been described as the "nastiest soils on earth" because of their strong acidity, increased mobility of potentially toxic elements and limited bioavailability of nutrients. They only cover a small area of the world's total problem soils, but often have significant adverse effects on agriculture, aquaculture and the environment on a local scale. Their location often coincides with high population density areas along the coasts of many developing countries. As a result, their negative impacts on ecosystems can have serious implications to those least equipped for coping with the low crop yields and reduced water quality that can result from acid sulfate soil disturbance. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment called on by the United Nations in 2000 emphasised the importance of ecosystems for human health and well-being. These include the service they provide as sources of food and water, through the control of pollution and disease, as well as for the cultural services ecosystems provide. While the problems related to agriculture, aquaculture and the environment have been the focus of many acid sulfate soil management efforts, the connection to human health has largely been ignored. This paper presents the potential health issues of acid sulfate soils, in relation to the ecosystem services identified in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. It is recognised that significant implications on food security and livelihood can result, as well as on community cohesiveness and the spread of vector-borne disease. However, the connection between these outcomes and acid sulfate soils is often not obvious and it is therefore argued that the impact of such soils on human well-being needs to be recognised in order to raise awareness among the public and decision makers, to in turn facilitate proper management and avoid potential human ill-health.

  11. Human lactation: oxidation and maternal transfer of dietary (13)C-labelled α-linolenic acid into human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmelmair, Hans; Kuhn, Angelika; Dokoupil, Katharina; Hegele, Verena; Sauerwald, Thorsten; Koletzko, Berthold

    2016-06-01

    The origin of fatty acids in milk has not been elucidated in detail. We investigated the contribution of dietary α-linolenic acid (ALA) to human milk fat, its oxidation and endogenous conversion to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Ten lactating women were given (13)C-ALA orally, and breath and milk samples were collected for a five-day period, while dietary intakes were assessed. 37.5 ± 2.7 % (M ± SE) of the tracer was recovered in breath-CO2, and 7.3 ± 1.1 % was directly transferred into milk. About 0.25 % of the tracer was found in milk long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Combining intake and milk data, we estimate that about 65 % of milk ALA is directly derived from maternal diet. Thus, the major portion of milk ALA is directly derived from the diet, but dietary ALA does not seem to contribute much as a precursor to milk n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids within the studied time period.

  12. Suppression of bile acid synthesis by thyroid hormone in primary human hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ewa Cristine Siljevik Ellis

    2006-01-01

    AIM: It is known that thyroid hormones alter the bile acid metabolism in humans, however the effect on individual enzymes has been difficult to elucidate.This is mainly due to the lack of human liver cell lines producing bile acids. We used cultures of primary human hepatocytes to study the effects of triiodothyronine (T3) on bile acid synthesis.METHODS: Primary hepatocytes were isolated from liver tissue obtained from three different patients undergoing liver resection due to underlying malignancy. The hepatocytes were cultured under serum-free conditions and treated from d 1 to d 5 with culture containing 0.1-1000 nmol/L of T3. Bile acid formation and mRNA levels of key enzymes were analysed.RESULTS: The lowest concentration of T3 decreased cholic acid (CA) formation to 43%-53% of controls and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to 52%-75% of controls on d 5. The highest dose further decreased CA formation to 16%-48% of controls while CDCA formation remained at 50%-117% of controls. Expression of mRNA levels of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and sterol 12α-hydroxylase (CYP8B1) dose-dependently decreased.Sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) levels also decreased,but not to the same extent.CONCLUSION: T3 dose-dependently decreased total bile acid formation in parallel with decreased expression of CYP7A1 and CYP8B1. CA formation is inhibited to a higher degree than CDCA, resulting in a marked decrease in the CA/CDCA ratio.

  13. Canine and feline parvoviruses preferentially recognize the non-human cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfling, Jonas; Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Parrish, Colin R; Varki, Ajit

    2013-05-25

    Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) is a pathogen whose canine-adapted form (canine parvovirus (CPV)) emerged in 1978. These viruses infect by binding host transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR), but also hemagglutinate erythrocytes. We show that hemagglutination involves selective recognition of the non-human sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) but not N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), which differs by only one oxygen atom from Neu5Gc. Overexpression of α2-6 sialyltransferase did not change binding, indicating that both α2-3 and α2-6 linkages are recognized. However, Neu5Gc expression on target cells did not enhance CPV or FPV infection in vitro. Thus, the conserved Neu5Gc-binding preference of these viruses likely plays a role in the natural history of the virus in vivo. Further studies must clarify relationships between virus infection and host Neu5Gc expression. As a first step, we show that transcripts of CMAH (which generates Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac) are at very low levels in Western dog breed cells.

  14. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, B. (Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (Unites States))

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of nigranoic acid esters as novel human neutrophil elastase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoli; Feng, Li; Liu, Bo; He, Yi; Li, Yiming; Chen, Yegao

    2015-01-01

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) has been implicated as a major contributor in the pathogenesis of diseases, such as lung disorders and other inflammatory diseases. A series of 12 new nigranoic acid esters were regioselectively synthesised in good yields and evaluated for HNE inhibitory activity. Nigranoic acid exhibited significant inhibitory activity against HNE with the IC50 value of 3.77 μM, and six esters displayed considerable inhibitory effects on HNE with IC50 values in the range of 2.61-8.95 μM. The nigranoic acid esters having phenyls substituted with bromine and trimethoxyls (3h and 3b) showed stronger inhibitory activity on HNE than nigranoic acid.

  16. Effects of essential amino acids on lipid metabolism in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fei; Du, Ying; Lv, Ziquan; Chen, Shanghai; Zhu, Jianmin; Sheng, Hongguang; Guo, Feifan

    2016-11-01

    Eight amino acids are considered essential for human nutrition, and three of them, including leucine, isoleucine and valine, are called as branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). We recently discovered that dietary deficiency of any BCAA for 7 days rapidly reduces the abdominal fat mass in mice. The goal of this study was to investigate (1) whether dietary deficiency of the other five essential amino acids (EAAs), including phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, methionine and lysine, would produce similar effects and (2) whether an association between serum AAs and obesity was observed in humans in Chinese Han population. Similar to BCAAs deprivation, dietary deficiency of any of these five EAAs for 7 days significantly reduced abdominal fat mass, which is likely caused by increased energy expenditure. Expression of genes and proteins related to lipolysis, however, were differentially regulated by different EAAs. These results suggest a crucial role of EAAs deprivation on lipid metabolism in mice. Our human studies revealed that levels of four EAAs (leucine, isoleucine, valine and phenylalanine) were elevated in obese humans compared with those in lean controls in Chinese Han population. Based on the results obtained from mice, we speculate that these four EAAs might play important roles in human obesity. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  17. Maternal dietary Alpine butter intake affects human milk: fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertschi, Isabelle; Collomb, Marius; Rist, Lukas; Eberhard, Pius; Sieber, Robert; Bütikofer, Ulrich; Wechsler, Daniel; Folkers, Gerd; von Mandach, Ursula

    2005-06-01

    Consumption of CLA by lactating women affects the composition of their milk, but the pattern of the different CLA isomers is still unknown. We determined the effects of short maternal supplementation with CLA-rich Alpine butter on the occurrence of FA and CLA isomers in human milk. In an open randomized controlled study with a two-period cross-over design, milk FA and CLA isomer concentrations were measured on postpartum days > or = 20 in two parallel groups of lactating women before, during, and after consumption of defined quantities of Alpine butter or margarine with comparable fat content (10 d of butter followed by 10 d of margarine for one group, and vice versa in the other). In the 16 women who completed the study (8/group), Alpine butter supplementation increased the C16 and C18 FA, the sum of saturated FA, the 18:1 trans FA, and the trans FA with CLA. The CLA isomer 18:2 c9,t11 increased by 49.7%. Significant increases were also found for the isomers t9,t11, t7,c9, t11,c13, and t8,c10 18:2. The remaining nine of the total 14 detectable isomers showed no changes, and concentrations were <5 mg/100 g fat. A breastfeeding mother can therefore modulate the FA/CLA supply of her child by consuming Alpine butter. Further studies will show whether human milk containing this FA and CLA isomer pattern acts as a functional food for newborns.

  18. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Differentially Modulate Cell Proliferation and Endocannabinoid System in Two Human Cancer Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastón, Repossi; María Eugenia, Pasqualini; Das, Undurti N; Eynard, Aldo R

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that quantity and quality of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) play a role in the development of cancer. However, the mechanisms involved in this interaction(s) are not clear. Endocannabinoids are lipid metabolites known to have growth modulatory actions. We studied the effect of supplementation with PUFAs ω-6 and ω-3 (essential fatty acids, EFAs), saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (non-EFAs) on the growth of tumor cells and modifications in their endocannabinoid content. Cell cultures of human glioblastoma (T98G) and breast cancer (MCF7) were supplemented with 50 or 100 mmol EFAs and non-EFAs for 72 h. Cell proliferation was then determined by MTT, anandamide (AEA) levels by HPLC, total fatty acids profiles by GLC, CB1 receptor expression by WB and FAAH activity by spectrophotometric method. Fatty acids profile reflected the incorporation of the lipids supplemented in each assay. Arachidonic acid (EFA ω-6) supplementation increased AEA levels and inhibited the growth of T98G, whereas palmitic acid (non-EFA) enhanced their proliferation. In breast cancer (MCF7) cells, eicosapentaenoic acid (EFA ω-3) reduced and oleic acid (non-EFA) enhanced their proliferation. CB1 expression was higher in T98G and no differences were observed in FAAH activity. The growth of tumor cells can be differentially modulated by fatty acids and, at least in part, can be attributed to their ability to act on the components of the endocannabinoid system. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Therapeutic potential of sulindac hydroxamic acid against human pancreatic and colonic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogli, Stefano; Banti, Irene; Stefanelli, Fabio; Picchianti, Luca; Digiacomo, Maria; Macchia, Marco; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Lapucci, Annalina

    2010-11-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac exhibits cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent and COX-independent chemopreventive properties in human cancer. The present study was aimed at investigating whether the hydroxamic acid substitution for the carboxylic acid group could enhance the in vitro antitumor and antiangiogenic activities of sulindac. Characterization tools used on this study included analyses of cell viability, caspase 3/7 induction, DNA fragmentation, and gene expression. Our findings demonstrate that the newly synthesized hydroxamic acid derivative of sulindac and its sulfone and sulfide metabolites were characterized by a good anticancer activity on human pancreatic and colon cancer cells, both in terms of potency (IC(50) mean values from 6 ± 1.1 μM to 64 ± 1.1 μM) and efficacy (E(max) of ∼100%). Hydroxamic acid derivatives trigger a higher degree of apoptosis than carboxylic acid counterparts, increase bax/bcl-2 expression ratio and induce caspase 3/7 activation. Most notably, these compounds significantly inhibit proangiogenic growth factor-stimulated proliferation of vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC) at sub-micromolar concentrations. Our data also provide evidence that the COX-active metabolite of sulindac hydroxamic acid were the most active of the series and selective inhibition of COX-1 but not COX-2 can mimic its effects, suggesting that COX inhibition could only play a partial role in the mechanism of compound action. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that substitution of the carboxylic acid group with the hydroxamic acid moiety enhances in vitro antiproliferative, proapoptotic and antiangiogenic properties of sulindac, therefore increasing the therapeutic potential of this drug.

  20. Substrate specificity of human ABCC4 (MRP4)-mediated cotransport of bile acids and reduced glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Maria; Hummel-Eisenbeiss, Johanna; Hofmann, Alan F; Keppler, Dietrich

    2006-04-01

    The multidrug resistance protein ABCC4 (MRP4), a member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, mediates ATP-dependent unidirectional efflux of organic anions out of cells. Previous studies showed that human ABCC4 is localized to the sinusoidal membrane of hepatocytes and mediates, among other substrates, the cotransport of reduced glutathione (GSH) with bile acids. In the present study, using inside-out membrane vesicles, we demonstrated that human ABCC4 in the presence of physiological concentrations of GSH has a high affinity for the taurine and glycine conjugates of the common natural bile acids as well as the unconjugated bile acid cholate. Chenodeoxycholyltaurine and chenodeoxycholylglycine were the GSH cosubstrates with the highest affinities for ABCC4, with K(m) values of 3.6 and 5.9 microM, respectively. Ursodeoxycholyltaurine and ursodeoxycholylglycine were cotransported together with GSH by ABCC4 with K(m) values of 7.8 and 12.5 microM, respectively, but no transport of ursodeoxycholate and deoxycholate was observed. The simultaneous transport of labeled GSH and cholyltaurine or cholylglycine was demonstrated in double-labeled cotransport experiments with a bile acid-to-GSH ratio of approximately 1:22. K(m) values of the bile acids for ABCC4 were in a range similar to those reported for the canalicular bile salt export pump ABCB11. Under physiological conditions, the sinusoidal ABCC4 may compete with canalicular ABCB11 for bile acids and thereby play a key role in determining the hepatocyte concentration of bile acids. In cholestatic conditions, ABCC4 may become a key pathway for efflux of bile acids from hepatocytes into blood.

  1. Characterization and quantification of endogenous fatty acid nitroalkene metabolites in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Sonia R; Vitturi, Dario A; Baker, Paul R S; Bonacci, Gustavo; Koenitzer, Jeffrey R; Woodcock, Steven R; Freeman, Bruce A; Schopfer, Francisco J

    2013-07-01

    The oxidation and nitration of unsaturated fatty acids transforms cell membrane and lipoprotein constituents into mediators that regulate signal transduction. The formation of 9-NO2-octadeca-9,11-dienoic acid and 12-NO2-octadeca-9,11-dienoic acid stems from peroxynitrite- and myeloperoxidase-derived nitrogen dioxide reactions as well as secondary to nitrite disproportionation under the acidic conditions of digestion. Broad anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective responses are mediated by nitro-fatty acids. It is now shown that electrophilic fatty acid nitroalkenes are present in the urine of healthy human volunteers (9.9 ± 4.0 pmol/mg creatinine); along with electrophilic 16- and 14-carbon nitroalkenyl β-oxidation metabolites. High resolution mass determinations and coelution with isotopically-labeled metabolites support renal excretion of cysteine-nitroalkene conjugates. These products of Michael addition are in equilibrium with the free nitroalkene pool in urine and are displaced by thiol reaction with mercury chloride. This reaction increases the level of free nitroalkene fraction >10-fold and displays a K(D) of 7.5 × 10(-6) M. In aggregate, the data indicates that formation of Michael adducts by electrophilic fatty acids is favored under biological conditions and that reversal of these addition reactions is critical for detecting both parent nitroalkenes and their metabolites. The measurement of this class of mediators can constitute a sensitive noninvasive index of metabolic and inflammatory status.

  2. Artificial and Natural Sialic Acid Precursors Influence the Angiogenic Capacity of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian P. Galuska

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac represents the most common terminal carbohydrate residue in many mammalian glycoconjugates and is directly involved in a number of different physiological as well as pathological cellular processes. Endogenous sialic acids derive from the biosynthetic precursor molecule N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc. Interestingly, N-acyl-analogues of D-mannosamine (ManN can also be incorporated and converted into corresponding artificial sialic acids by eukaryotic cells. Within this study, we optimized a protocol for the chemical synthesis of various peracetylated ManN derivatives resulting in yields of approximately 100%. Correct molecular structures of the obtained products ManNAc, N-propanoyl-ManN (ManNProp and N-butyl-ManN (ManNBut were verified by GC-, ESI-MS- and NMR-analyses. By applying these substances to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, we could show that each derivative was metabolized to the corresponding N-acylneuraminic acid variant and subsequently incorporated into nascent glycoproteins. To investigate whether natural and/or artificial sialic acid precursors are able to modulate the angiogenic capacity of HUVECs, a spheroid assay was performed. By this means, an increase in total capillary length has been observed when cells incorporated N-butylneuraminic acid (Neu5But into their glycoconjugates. In contrast, the natural precursor ManNAc inhibited the growth of capillaries. Thus, sialic acid precursors may represent useful agents to modulate blood vessel formation.

  3. Generation, Release, and Uptake of the NAD Precursor Nicotinic Acid Riboside by Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Veronika; Shabalin, Konstantin; Nerinovski, Kirill; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Yakimov, Alexander; Redpath, Philip; Khodorkovskiy, Mikhail; Migaud, Marie E; Ziegler, Mathias; Nikiforov, Andrey

    2015-11-06

    NAD is essential for cellular metabolism and has a key role in various signaling pathways in human cells. To ensure proper control of vital reactions, NAD must be permanently resynthesized. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as well as nicotinamide riboside (NR) and nicotinic acid riboside (NAR) are the major precursors for NAD biosynthesis in humans. In this study, we explored whether the ribosides NR and NAR can be generated in human cells. We demonstrate that purified, recombinant human cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTs) CN-II and CN-III, but not CN-IA, can dephosphorylate the mononucleotides nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN) and thus catalyze NR and NAR formation in vitro. Similar to their counterpart from yeast, Sdt1, the human 5'-NTs require high (millimolar) concentrations of nicotinamide mononucleotide or NAMN for efficient catalysis. Overexpression of FLAG-tagged CN-II and CN-III in HEK293 and HepG2 cells resulted in the formation and release of NAR. However, NAR accumulation in the culture medium of these cells was only detectable under conditions that led to increased NAMN production from nicotinic acid. The amount of NAR released from cells engineered for increased NAMN production was sufficient to maintain viability of surrounding cells unable to use any other NAD precursor. Moreover, we found that untransfected HeLa cells produce and release sufficient amounts of NAR and NR under normal culture conditions. Collectively, our results indicate that cytosolic 5'-NTs participate in the conversion of NAD precursors and establish NR and NAR as integral constituents of human NAD metabolism. In addition, they point to the possibility that different cell types might facilitate each other's NAD supply by providing alternative precursors.

  4. Generation, Release, and Uptake of the NAD Precursor Nicotinic Acid Riboside by Human Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Veronika; Shabalin, Konstantin; Nerinovski, Kirill; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Yakimov, Alexander; Redpath, Philip; Khodorkovskiy, Mikhail; Migaud, Marie E.; Ziegler, Mathias; Nikiforov, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    NAD is essential for cellular metabolism and has a key role in various signaling pathways in human cells. To ensure proper control of vital reactions, NAD must be permanently resynthesized. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as well as nicotinamide riboside (NR) and nicotinic acid riboside (NAR) are the major precursors for NAD biosynthesis in humans. In this study, we explored whether the ribosides NR and NAR can be generated in human cells. We demonstrate that purified, recombinant human cytosolic 5′-nucleotidases (5′-NTs) CN-II and CN-III, but not CN-IA, can dephosphorylate the mononucleotides nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN) and thus catalyze NR and NAR formation in vitro. Similar to their counterpart from yeast, Sdt1, the human 5′-NTs require high (millimolar) concentrations of nicotinamide mononucleotide or NAMN for efficient catalysis. Overexpression of FLAG-tagged CN-II and CN-III in HEK293 and HepG2 cells resulted in the formation and release of NAR. However, NAR accumulation in the culture medium of these cells was only detectable under conditions that led to increased NAMN production from nicotinic acid. The amount of NAR released from cells engineered for increased NAMN production was sufficient to maintain viability of surrounding cells unable to use any other NAD precursor. Moreover, we found that untransfected HeLa cells produce and release sufficient amounts of NAR and NR under normal culture conditions. Collectively, our results indicate that cytosolic 5′-NTs participate in the conversion of NAD precursors and establish NR and NAR as integral constituents of human NAD metabolism. In addition, they point to the possibility that different cell types might facilitate each other's NAD supply by providing alternative precursors. PMID:26385918

  5. Canine and feline parvoviruses preferentially recognize the non-human cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Löfling, Jonas [Departments of Medicine and Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Glycobiology Research and Training Center, Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny, 9500 Gilman Drive, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Michael Lyi, Sangbom; Parrish, Colin R. [Baker Institute for Animal Health, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Varki, Ajit, E-mail: a1varki@ucsd.edu [Departments of Medicine and Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Glycobiology Research and Training Center, Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny, 9500 Gilman Drive, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2013-05-25

    Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) is a pathogen whose canine-adapted form (canine parvovirus (CPV)) emerged in 1978. These viruses infect by binding host transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR), but also hemagglutinate erythrocytes. We show that hemagglutination involves selective recognition of the non-human sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) but not N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), which differs by only one oxygen atom from Neu5Gc. Overexpression of α2-6 sialyltransferase did not change binding, indicating that both α2-3 and α2-6 linkages are recognized. However, Neu5Gc expression on target cells did not enhance CPV or FPV infection in vitro. Thus, the conserved Neu5Gc-binding preference of these viruses likely plays a role in the natural history of the virus in vivo. Further studies must clarify relationships between virus infection and host Neu5Gc expression. As a first step, we show that transcripts of CMAH (which generates Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac) are at very low levels in Western dog breed cells. - Highlights: ► Feline and canine parvoviruses recognize Neu5Gc but not Neu5Ac, which differ by one oxygen atom. ► The underlying linkage of these sialic acids does not affect recognition. ► Induced Neu5Gc expression on target cells that normally express Neu5Ac did not enhance infection. ► Thus, the conserved binding preference plays an important yet unknown role in in vivo infections. ► Population and breed variations in Neu5Gc expression occur, likely by regulating the gene CMAH.

  6. Determination of Amino Acids in Single Human Lymphocytes after On-capillary Derivatization by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis with Electrochemical Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Amino acids in individual human lymphocytes were determined by capillary zone electrophoresis with electrochemical detection after on-capillary derivatization. In order to inject cells easily, a cell injector was designed. Four amino acids (serine, alanine, taurine, and glycine) in single human lymphocytes have been identified. Quantitation has been accomplished through the use of calibration curves.

  7. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for the quantification of free and total sialic acid in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, M. van der; Koning, T.J. de; Lefeber, D.J.; Fleer, A.; Prinsen, B.H.; Sain-van der Velden, M.G. de

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of sialic acid (SA) metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is important for clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) method for free sialic acid (FSA) and total sialic acid (TSA) in human CSF was v

  8. An increase in dietary n-3 fatty acids decreases a marker of bone resorption in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilpert Kirsten F

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human, animal, and in vitro research indicates a beneficial effect of appropriate amounts of omega-3 (n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA on bone health. This is the first controlled feeding study in humans to evaluate the effect of dietary plant-derived n-3 PUFA on bone turnover, assessed by serum concentrations of N-telopeptides (NTx and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP. Subjects (n = 23 consumed each diet for 6 weeks in a randomized, 3-period crossover design: 1 Average American Diet (AAD; [34% total fat, 13% saturated fatty acids (SFA, 13% monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, 9% PUFA (7.7% LA, 0.8% ALA], 2 Linoleic Acid Diet (LA; [37% total fat, 9% SFA, 12% MUFA, 16% PUFA (12.6% LA, 3.6% ALA], and 3 α-Linolenic Acid Diet (ALA; [38% total fat, 8% SFA, 12% MUFA, 17% PUFA (10.5% LA, 6.5% ALA]. Walnuts and flaxseed oil were the predominant sources of ALA. NTx levels were significantly lower following the ALA diet (13.20 ± 1.21 nM BCE, relative to the AAD (15.59 ± 1.21 nM BCE (p

  9. Amniotic fluid elicits appetitive responses in human newborns: fatty acids and appetitive responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Carlos M; Gutiérrez-García, Ana G; Mendoza-López, Remedios; Rodríguez-Landa, Juan Francisco; Bernal-Morales, Blandina; Díaz-Marte, Cynthia

    2013-04-01

    In humans, maternal cues guide newborns to the maternal breast, and transitional cues may be present in maternal-fetal fluids. The aim of the present study was to determine the consistent presence of sensorial cues in three maternal-fetal fluids--amniotic fluid, colostrum, and milk--and test the ability of these cues to produce appetitive responses in newborns. In the analytical study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) detected eight fatty acids consistently present in the amniotic fluid, colostrum, and milk from 12 healthy volunteers, but we do not find a mammalian pheromone, identified in another mammalian species (rabbits), in another 30 volunteers. In the behavioral study, we explored the ability of amniotic fluid or its fatty acids to produce appetitive responses in 19 human newborns fluid or an artificial fatty acid mixture produced a longer duration of facial reactions that suggested appetitive (sucking) movements compared with respective vehicles (i.e., propylene glycol or centrifuged amniotic fluid with a low fatty acid content verified by GC-MS). We conclude that the fatty acids contained in amniotic fluid may constitute a transitional sensorial cue that guides newborns to the maternal breast.

  10. Biometrics from the carbon isotope ratio analysis of amino acids in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Glen P; An, Yan; Konstantynova, Kateryna I; Rashaid, Ayat H B

    2015-01-01

    This study compares and contrasts the ability to classify individuals into different grouping factors through either bulk isotope ratio analysis or amino-acid-specific isotope ratio analysis of human hair. Using LC-IRMS, we measured the isotope ratios of 14 amino acids in hair proteins independently, and leucine/isoleucine as a co-eluting pair, to provide 15 variables for classification. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the essential amino acids and non-essential amino acids were mostly independent variables in the classification rules, thereby enabling the separation of dietary factors of isotope intake from intrinsic or phenotypic factors of isotope fractionation. Multivariate analysis revealed at least two potential sources of non-dietary factors influencing the carbon isotope ratio values of the amino acids in human hair: body mass index (BMI) and age. These results provide evidence that compound-specific isotope ratio analysis has the potential to go beyond region-of-origin or geospatial movements of individuals-obtainable through bulk isotope measurements-to the provision of physical and characteristic traits about the individuals, such as age and BMI. Further development and refinement, for example to genetic, metabolic, disease and hormonal factors could ultimately be of great assistance in forensic and clinical casework.

  11. Amino Acid Profiles in Term and Preterm Human Milk through Lactation: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiying Zhang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid profile is a key aspect of human milk (HM protein quality. We report a systematic review of total amino acid (TAA and free amino acid (FAA profiles, in term and preterm HM derived from 13 and 19 countries, respectively. Of the 83 studies that were critically reviewed, 26 studies with 3774 subjects were summarized for TAA profiles, while 22 studies with 4747 subjects were reviewed for FAA. Effects of gestational age, lactation stage, and geographical region were analyzed by Analysis of Variance. Data on total nitrogen (TN and TAA composition revealed general inter-study consistency, whereas FAA concentrations varied among studies. TN and all TAA declined in the first two months of lactation and then remained relatively unchanged. In contrast, the FAA glutamic acid and glutamine increased, peaked around three to six months, and then declined. Some significant differences were observed for TAA and FAA, based on gestational age and region. Most regional TAA and FAA data were derived from Asia and Europe, while information from Africa was scant. This systematic review represents a useful evaluation of the amino acid composition of human milk, which is valuable for the assessment of protein quality of breast milk substitutes.

  12. Mechanism of Ascorbic Acid-induced Reversion Against Malignant Phenotype in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YA-XUAN SUN; QIU-SHENG ZHENG; GANG LI; DE-AN GUO; ZI-REN WANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To find out the mechanisms of redifferentiation and reversion of malignant human gastric cancer cells induced by ascorbic acid. Methods Human gastric cancer cells grown in the laboratory were used. The Trypan blue dye exclusion method was used to determine the cell doubling time. The electrophoresis rate and colonogenic potential were the indices used to measure the rate of redifferentiation. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured using the thiobarbituric acid(TBA) method. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and the content of H2O2 were evaluated by spectrophotography. Results Six mmol/L ascorbic acid was used as a positive control. Human gastric cancer cells were treated with 75 μm hydrogen peroxide, which alleviated many of the malignant characteristics. For example, the cell surface charge obviously decreased and the electrophoresis rate dropped from 2.21 to 1.10 μm·s-1·V-1·cm-1. The colonogenic potential, a measure of cell differentiation, decreased 90.2%. After treatment with ascorbic acid, there was a concentration- and time-dependent increase in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD). However, the activity of catalase (CAT) resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease. SOD and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT) exhibited some effects, but there were statistically significant differences between the SOD and AT group and the H2O2 group. Conclusions Ascorbic acid induces growth inhibition and redifferentiation of human gastric cancer cells through the production of hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Sequence Classification: 398894 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BLE ALPHA-GLUCOSIDASE AGLA (MALTASE) (GLUCOINVERTASE) (GLUCOSIDOSUCRASE) (MALTASE-GLUCOAMYLASE) (LYSOSOMAL A...LPHA-GLUCOSIDASE) (ACID MALTASE) || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/15609608 ...

  14. Sequence Classification: 389141 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BLE ALPHA-GLUCOSIDASE AGLA (MALTASE) (GLUCOINVERTASE) (GLUCOSIDOSUCRASE) (MALTASE-GLUCOAMYLASE) (LYSOSOMAL A...LPHA-GLUCOSIDASE) (ACID MALTASE) || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/31793652 ...

  15. Pompe disease gene therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Byrne, Barry J; Falk, Darin J; Pacak, Christina A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W; Elder, Melissa E; Collins, Shelley W; Conlon, Thomas J; Clement, Nathalie; Cleaver, Brian D; Cloutier, Denise A; Porvasnik, Stacy L; Islam, Saleem; Elmallah, Mai K; Martin, Anatole; Smith, Barbara K; Fuller, David D; Lawson, Lee Ann; Mah, Cathryn S

    2011-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive metabolic myopathy caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase and results in cellular lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation...

  16. Uptake of sialic acid by human erythrocyte. Characterization of a transport system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulai, Tatiana; Bratosin, Daniela; Artenie, Vlad; Montreuil, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Upon incubation of human red blood cells (RBC) with [4-9-14C] N-acetylneuraminic acid, the cells incorporated this sugar, as demonstrated by the identification of labelled N-acetylmannosamine in the cytosol, as a result of the action of the sialic acid pyruvate-lyase we discovered previously (Biochimie 84 (2002) 655). The mechanism is saturable and indicates the presence of a limited number of transporter molecules in the RBC membrane. This transport process may have relevance to the desialylation of membrane glycoconjugates which occurs during ageing of erythrocytes.

  17. Differences in fatty acid composition between aquatic and terrestrial insects used as food in human nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaneto, Diego; Tommaseo-Ponzetta, Mila; Galli, Claudio; Risé, Patrizia; Glew, Robert H; Paoletti, Maurizio G

    2011-01-01

    Edible insects may be a source of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA). The aim of this article is to test for differences in aquatic and terrestrial insects used in human nutrition. We implemented linear models and discovered that differences in the proportion of LC-PUFA between aquatic and terrestrial insects do exist, with terrestrial insects being significantly richer in particular omega-6 fatty acids. In conclusion, any kind of insect may provide valuable sources of LC-PUFA. Because terrestrial insects are more abundant and easier to collect, they can be considered a better source of LC-PUFA than aquatic ones.

  18. Effect of acidity of drugs on the prediction of human oral absorption by biopartitioning micellar chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Biopartitioning micellar chromatography(BMC)is a potentially high throughput and low cost alternative for in vitro prediction of drug absorption,which can mimic the drug partitioning process in biological systems.In this paper,a data set of 56 compounds representing acidic,basic,neutral and amphoteric drugs from various structure classes with human oral absorption(HOA)data available were employed to show the effect of acidity of drugs in oral absorption prediction.HOA was reciprocally correlated to the nega...

  19. A biotin enrichment strategy identifies novel carbonylated amino acids in proteins from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper F.; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Davies, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Protein carbonylation is an irreversible protein oxidation correlated with oxidative stress, various diseases and ageing. Here we describe a peptide-centric approach for identification and characterisation of up to 14 different types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins. The modified residues...... in vitro metal ion-catalysed oxidation. Furthermore, we assigned 133 carbonylated sites in 36 proteins in native human plasma protein samples. The optimised workflow enabled detection of 10 hitherto undetected types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins: aldehyde and ketone modifications of leucine...

  20. Vitamins, fatty acids, and antioxidant capacity stability during storage of freeze-dried human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Blanca; Castellote, Ana Isabel; Montes, Rosa; López-Sabater, M Carmen

    2014-09-01

    Although freezing is the most common method used to preserve human milk, nutritional and immunological components may be lost during storage. Freeze-drying could increase the shelf life of human milk, while preserving its original characteristics. Seventy-two samples of freeze-dried human milk were stored for different periods of time, up to a maximum of 3 months, at 4 °C or 40 °C. Vitamin C, tocopherols, antioxidant capacity, and fatty acids composition were analyzed. A new HILIC-UHPLC method improving vitamin C determination was also validated. Ascorbic acid and total vitamin C concentrations significantly decreased at both temperatures, while antioxidant capacity only decreased at 40 °C. Fatty acids composition and both γ-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol contents remained unaltered. The stability after storage of freeze-dried milk was higher than that reported for frozen or fresh milk indicating that freeze-drying is a promising option to improve the preservation of human milk in banks.

  1. Acid etching of human enamel in clinical applications: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia Jun; Tang, Alexander T H; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Hägg, Urban

    2014-08-01

    The laboratory-based enamel acid-etching doctrine with 30% to 50% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds to generate the maximum amount of Type 1 and/or Type 2 etch pattern has been established for more than 30 years. However, this recommendation may not be clinically relevant. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare clinically accepted protocols of enamel acid etching with the laboratory protocol. Studies were identified by searching 4 electronic databases: Medline, CINAHL Plus, Embase, and Cochrane Library. The final search was run on November 8, 2012. All clinical studies published in English that investigated enamel acid pretreatment methods on human permanent teeth were included. Additional publications were obtained from the reference lists of the included studies. The clinical evidence of all included studies was tabulated. Initially, 4543 publications were retrieved from the databases. A total of 4508 articles were excluded, including 2285 duplicates, 1805 publications according to exclusion criteria by their titles and abstracts, 368 laboratory articles, 49 reviews, and 1 pilot study. Only 1 study was added from reference lists of the included studies. Finally, 36 clinical publications were included. The included clinical studies provided different levels of clinical evidence on the efficacy of acid-etching protocols to enable successful enamel adhesion. Clinical protocols of enamel acid etching differ from the laboratory-generated doctrine, which may imply that maximization of the Type 1 and/or Type 2 etch pattern is not important in the clinical acid etching of human enamel. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Description of urolithin production capacity from ellagic acid of two human intestinal Gordonibacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selma, María V; Beltrán, David; García-Villalba, Rocío; Espín, Juan C; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2014-08-01

    Ellagitannin and ellagic acid metabolism to urolithins in the gut shows a large human interindividual variability and this has been associated with differences in the colon microbiota. In the present study we describe the isolation of one urolithin-producing strain from the human faeces of a healthy volunteer and the ellagic acid transformation to different urolithin metabolites by two species of intestinal bacteria. The isolate belongs to a new species described as Gordonibacter urolithinfaciens, sp. nov. The type strain of the Gordonibacter genus, Gordonibacter pamelaeae DSM 19378(T), was also demonstrated to produce urolithins. Both human intestinal bacteria grew similarly in the presence and absence of ellagic acid at 30 μM concentration. Ellagic acid catabolism and urolithin formation occurred during the stationary phase of the growth of the bacteria under anaerobic conditions. The HPLC-MS analyses showed the sequential production of pentahydroxy-urolithin (urolithin M-5), tetrahydroxy-urolithin (urolithin M-6) and trihydroxy-urolithin (urolithin C), while dihydroxy-urolithins (urolithin A and isourolithin A), and monohydroxy-urolithin (urolithin B) were not produced in pure cultures. Consequently, either other bacteria from the gut or the physiological conditions found in vivo are necessary for completing metabolism until the final urolithins (dihydroxy and monohydroxy urolithins) are produced. This is the first time that the urolithin production capacity of pure strains has been demonstrated. The identification of the urolithin-producing bacteria is a relevant outcome as urolithin implication in health (cardiovascular protection, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties) has been supported by different bioassays and urolithins can be used in the development of functional foods and nutraceuticals. This study represents an initial work that opens interesting possibilities of describing enzymatic activities involved in urolithin production that can

  3. Human ortholog of a plant salicylic acid receptor found in SK-N-SH cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubatz, Hanna; Howald, William N

    2013-12-01

    Our previous studies have described the purification and characterization of a novel plant NAD(P)-reductase like protein (RL) from the thermogenic appendix of the Sauromatum guttatum inflorescence. RL is mainly located in cytoplasm of thermogenic plants and it can act like a bistable switch. It adopts a compact conformation during heat-production and a more expanded conformation when heat is not generated. Addition of salicylic acid, a natural thermogenic inducer, at picomolar concentration to a solution of purified RL induced a discontinuous volume phase transition in which the volume of RL in the oligomeric form expanded and shrunk repeatedly every 4-5 min. In the present study using ESI-MS analysis we have demonstrated the existence of RL in the human SK-N-SH cell line and in mouse brain tissue. The molecular mass of human RL is in the same range as of its plant counterpart, 34,140 ± 34 Da. The charge state distribution of the human RL is identical to its plant counterpart from the Sauromatum appendix during heat-production. Human RL was present in the compact state when it was purified from the SK-N-SH cell line When these cells were treated with salicylic acid (10 μM) a shift to a much more compact conformation was observed. It seems that the potential of RL to respond to salicylic acid was conserved. These results may reveal the existence of a thermoregulation system that is evolutionarily conserved and is operating by conformational changes. This discovery may also represent an opportunity for a better understanding of some of the diverse functions of salicylic acid and aspirin in plants and humans.

  4. Mechanisms behind changes in gastric acid and bicarbonate outputs during the human interdigestive motility cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenbäck, J; Fändriks, L; Olbe, L; Sjövall, H

    1996-01-01

    Human gastric interdigestive acid and bicarbonate outputs vary cyclically in association with the migrating motor complex (MMC). These phenomena were studied in 26 healthy volunteers by constant-flow gastric perfusion, with continuous recording of pH and Pco2 in mixed gastric effluent and concomitant open-tip manometry of gastroduodenal motility. Stable acid and bicarbonate outputs were registered during less than 50% of the MMC cycle. Acid secretion started to increase 71 +/- 3% into the cycle, with maximum output during antral phase III. Bicarbonate output increased biphasically 1) 40 +/- 5% into the cycle, coinciding with reflux of bile, and 2) at the end of duodenal phase III when the aspirate was devoid of bile. The bicarbonate peak associated with phase III was abolished by atropine (0.01 mg/kg iv, n = 8) and by pyloric occlusion (n = 9) but remained unchanged after omeprazole (n = 10). The acid peak was abolished by both atropine and omeprazole. It is concluded that the MMC-related changes in acid and alkaline outputs represent two different and independent phenomena. Acid secretion cyclicity is due to periodical variations in cholinergic stimulation of the parietal cells. In contrast, the phase III-associated increase in bicarbonate output is due to duodenogastric reflux.

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their mechanisms of action on apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in humans: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscarsson, Jan; Hurt-Camejo, Eva

    2017-08-10

    Epidemiological and genetic studies suggest that elevated triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoprotein levels in the circulation increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Prescription formulations of omega-3 fatty acids (OM3FAs), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), reduce plasma TG levels and are approved for the treatment of patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Many preclinical studies have investigated the TG-lowering mechanisms of action of OM3FAs, but less is known from clinical studies. We conducted a review, using systematic methodology, of studies in humans assessing the mechanisms of action of EPA and DHA on apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, including TG-rich lipoproteins and low-density lipoproteins (LDLs). A systematic search of PubMed retrieved 55 articles, of which 30 were used in the review; 35 additional arrticles were also included. In humans, dietary DHA is retroconverted to EPA, while production of DHA from EPA is not observed. Dietary DHA is preferentially esterified into TGs, while EPA is more evenly esterified into TGs, cholesterol esters and phospholipids. The preferential esterification of DHA into TGs likely explains the higher turnover of DHA than EPA in plasma. The main effects of both EPA and DHA are decreased fasting and postprandial serum TG levels, through reduction of hepatic very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG production. The exact mechanism for reduced VLDL production is not clear but does not include retention of lipids in the liver; rather, increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation is likely. The postprandial reduction in TG levels is caused by increased lipoprotein lipase activity and reduced serum VLDL-TG concentrations, resulting in enhanced chylomicron clearance. Overall, no clear differences between the effects of EPA and DHA on TG levels, or on turnover of TG-rich lipoproteins, have been observed. Effects on LDL are complex and may be influenced by genetics, such as APOE genotype. EPA and

  6. Increased presence of monounsaturated fatty acids in the stratum corneum of human skin equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoersing, Varsha S; van Smeden, Jeroen; Mulder, Aat A; Vreeken, Rob J; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2013-01-01

    Previous results showed that our in-house human skin equivalents (HSEs) differ in their stratum corneum (SC) lipid organization compared with human SC. To elucidate the cause of the altered SC lipid organization in the HSEs, a recently developed liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method was used to study the free fatty acid (FFA) and ceramide composition in detail. In addition, the SC lipid composition of the HSEs and human skin was examined quantitatively with high-performance thin-layer chromatography. Our results reveal that all our HSEs have an increased presence of monounsaturated FFAs compared with human SC. Moreover, the HSEs display the presence of ceramide species with a monounsaturated acyl chain, which are not detected in human SC. All HSEs also exhibit an altered expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase, the enzyme that converts saturated FFAs to monounsaturated FFAs. Furthermore, the HSEs show the presence of 12 ceramide subclasses, similar to native human SC. However, the HSEs have increased levels of ceramides EOS and EOH and ceramide species with short total carbon chains and a reduced FFA level compared with human SC. The presence of unsaturated lipid chains in HSE offers new opportunities to mimic the lipid properties of human SC more closely.

  7. The effect of short-chain fatty acids on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastasi, Claudia; Candela, Marco; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné

    2015-01-01

    negligible effects, while both butyrate and propionate strongly modulated gene expression in both immature and mature human monocyte-derived DC. An Ingenuity pathway analysis based on the differentially expressed genes suggested that propionate and butyrate modulate leukocyte trafficking, as SCFA strongly......The gut microbiota is essential for human health and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several diseases. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as acetate, butyrate and propionate, are end-products of microbial fermentation of macronutrients that distribute systemically via the blood....... The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional response of immature and LPS-matured human monocyte-derived DC to SCFA. Our data revealed distinct effects exerted by each individual SCFA on gene expression in human monocyte-derived DC, especially in the mature ones. Acetate only exerted...

  8. Comparative reactivity of the myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants hypochlorous acid and hypothiocyanous acid with human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Mitchell M; Grima, Michael A; Rayner, Benjamin S; Hadfield, Katrina A; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2013-12-01

    In the immune response, hypohalous acids are generated by activated leukocytes via the release of myeloperoxidase and the formation of H2O2. Although these oxidants have important bactericidal properties, they have also been implicated in causing tissue damage in inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) are the major oxidants formed by myeloperoxidase under physiological conditions, with the ratio of these oxidants dependent on diet and smoking status. HOCl is highly reactive and causes marked cellular damage, but few data are available on the effects of HOSCN on mammalian cells. In this study, we have compared the actions of HOCl and HOSCN on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). HOCl reacts rapidly with the cells, resulting in extensive cell death by both apoptosis and necrosis, with necrosis dominating at higher oxidant doses. In contrast, HOSCN is consumed more slowly, with cell death occurring only by apoptosis. Exposure of HCAEC to HOCl and HOSCN induces changes in mitochondrial membrane permeability, which, in the case of HOSCN, is associated with mitochondrial release of proapoptotic factors, including cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, and endonuclease G. With each oxidant, apoptosis appears to be caspase-independent, with the inactivation of caspases 3/7 observed, and pretreatment of the cells with the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk having no effect on the extent of cell death. Loss of cellular thiols, depletion of glutathione, and the inactivation of thiol-dependent enzymes, including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, were seen with both oxidants, though to a much greater extent with HOCl. The ability of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants to induce endothelial cell apoptosis may contribute to the formation of unstable lesions in atherosclerosis. The results with HOSCN may be particularly significant for smokers, who have elevated plasma levels of SCN(-), the precursor

  9. Uric acid priming in human monocytes is driven by the AKT-PRAS40 autophagy pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crişan, Tania O; Cleophas, Maartje C P; Novakovic, Boris; Erler, Kathrin; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo A B

    2017-05-23

    Metabolic triggers are important inducers of the inflammatory processes in gout. Whereas the high serum urate levels observed in patients with gout predispose them to the formation of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, soluble urate also primes for inflammatory signals in cells responding to gout-related stimuli, but also in other common metabolic diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms through which uric acid selectively lowers human blood monocyte production of the natural inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and shifts production toward the highly inflammatory IL-1β. Monocytes from healthy volunteers were first primed with uric acid for 24 h and then subjected to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence or absence of MSU. Transcriptomic analysis revealed broad inflammatory pathways associated with uric acid priming, with NF-κB and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling strongly increased. Functional validation did not identify NF-κB or AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, but uric acid priming induced phosphorylation of AKT and proline-rich AKT substrate 40 kDa (PRAS 40), which in turn activated mTOR. Subsequently, Western blot for the autophagic structure LC3-I and LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3) fractions, as well as fluorescence microscopy of LC3-GFP-overexpressing HeLa cells, revealed lower autophagic activity in cells exposed to uric acid compared with control conditions. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species production was diminished by uric acid priming. Thus, the Akt-PRAS40 pathway is activated by uric acid, which inhibits autophagy and recapitulates the uric acid-induced proinflammatory cytokine phenotype.

  10. Peanut consumption increases levels of plasma very long chain fatty acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Christina; Wong, Derek; Cederbaum, Stephen; Lim, Bennie; Qu, Yong

    2012-11-01

    Peanut consumption has been suspected of raising plasma very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) levels in humans. The effect of peanut consumption on VLCFAs was studied in six human subjects. After 3 to 4h of peanut butter ingestion, plasma C26:0 and C26:0/C22:0 were found to be significantly elevated to levels seen in patients with peroxisomal disorders. These levels returned to normal within 12h. Peanut consumption needs to be accounted for when interpreting VLCFAs.

  11. Plasma bile acids are not associated with energy metabolism in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brufau Gemma

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bile acids (BA have recently been shown to increase energy expenditure in mice, but this concept has not been tested in humans. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between plasma BA levels and energy expenditure in humans. Type 2 diabetic (T2DM patients (n = 12 and gender, age and BMI-matched healthy controls (n = 12 were studied before and after 8 weeks of treatment with a BA sequestrant. In addition, patients with liver cirrhosis (n = 46 were investigated, since these display elevated plasma BA together with increased energy expenditure. This group was compared to gender-, age- and BMI-matched healthy controls (n = 20. Fasting plasma levels of total BA and individual BA species as well as resting energy expenditure were determined. In response to treatment with the BA sequestrant, plasma deoxycholic acid (DCA levels decreased in controls (-60%, p

  12. The human fatty acid-binding protein family: Evolutionary divergences and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smathers Rebecca L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are members of the intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP family and are involved in reversibly binding intracellular hydrophobic ligands and trafficking them throughout cellular compartments, including the peroxisomes, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus. FABPs are small, structurally conserved cytosolic proteins consisting of a water-filled, interior-binding pocket surrounded by ten anti-parallel beta sheets, forming a beta barrel. At the superior surface, two alpha-helices cap the pocket and are thought to regulate binding. FABPs have broad specificity, including the ability to bind long-chain (C16-C20 fatty acids, eicosanoids, bile salts and peroxisome proliferators. FABPs demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation and are present in a spectrum of species including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse and human. The human genome consists of nine putatively functional protein-coding FABP genes. The most recently identified family member, FABP12, has been less studied.

  13. Thermodynamic parameters for binding of fatty acids to human serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A O; Honoré, B; Brodersen, R

    1990-01-01

    Binding of laurate and myristate anions to human serum albumin has been studied over a range of temperatures, 5-37 degrees C, at pH 7.4. The binding curves indicate that the strength of binding of the first few molecules of fatty acid to albumin (r less than 5) decreases with increasing temperature...... constant, it was possible to calculate values for the changes in enthalpy and entropy during the initial binding step. For the medium-chain fatty acids, laurate and myristate, binding of the first molecule to albumin appeared to be enthalpic, with a tendency to an increasing contribution of entropy...... to binding energy with increasing chain length of the fatty acid. Udgivelsesdato: 1990-Jul-5...

  14. Determination of uric acid in human urine by ion chromatography with conductivity detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yong Zhao; Zong Hua Wang; Hui Wang; Rui Zhao; Ming Yu Ding

    2011-01-01

    A simple, fast, precise and eco-friendly analytical method for the determination of uric acid (UA) in human urine by ion chromatography (IC) was established. The sample pretreatment was not required, only needed centrifugation and filtration. The separation was carried out on a cation exchange column with 2.0 mmol/L nitric acid as mobile phase at the flow-rate 1.0 mL/min. A non-suppressed conductivity detector was used. The IC analysis time for one run was within 10 min under the optimized IC condition. The detection limits were 0.5 μg/L(S/N = 3) for uric acid. The recovery was 100.1 % while the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 1.8% from 10 measurements.

  15. The human receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator. NH2-terminal amino acid sequence and glycosylation variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Ploug, M;

    1990-01-01

    -PA. The purified protein shows a single 55-60 kDa band after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. It is a heavily glycosylated protein, the deglycosylated polypeptide chain comprising only 35 kDa. The glycosylated protein contains N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and sialic acid......, but no N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Glycosylation is responsible for substantial heterogeneity in the receptor on phorbol ester-stimulated U937 cells, and also for molecular weight variations among various cell lines. The amino acid composition and the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence are reported....... The protein has a high content of cysteine residues. The NH2-terminal sequence is not closely related to any known sequence. The identification of the purified and sequenced protein with the human u-PA receptor is based on the following findings: 1) the ability of the purified protein to bind u-PA and its...

  16. Human Gastric Epithelial Cells Contribute to Gastric Immune Regulation by Providing Retinoic Acid to Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bimczok, Diane; John Y. Kao; Zhang, Min; Cochrun, Steven; Mannon, Peter; Peter, Shajan; Wilcox, Charles M.; Mönkemüller, Klaus E; Harris, Paul R.; Grams, Jayleen M.; Stahl, Richard D.; Smith, Phillip D.; Smythies, Lesley E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic gastritis caused by H. pylori, the gastric mucosa has received little investigative attention as a unique immune environment. Here, we analyzed whether retinoic acid (RA), an important homeostatic factor in the small intestinal mucosa, also contributes to gastric immune regulation. We report that human gastric tissue contains high levels of the RA precursor molecule, retinol, and that gastric epithelial cells express both RA biosynthesis genes and RA res...

  17. Human intestine luminal ACE2 and amino acid transporter expression increased by ACE-inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Camargo, Simone M; Emmenegger, Luca; Sasse, Tom; Kummer, Eva; Jando, Julia; Hamie, Qeumars M; Meier, Chantal F; Hunziker, Schirin; Forras-Kaufmann, Zsofia; Kuyumcu, Sena; Fox, Mark; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Götze, Oliver; Verrey, François

    2015-04-01

    Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) and imino acid (proline) transporter SIT1 (SLC6A20) are expressed at the luminal membrane of small intestine enterocytes and proximal tubule kidney cells where they exert key functions for amino acid (re)absorption as documented by their role in Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria, respectively. Expression of B(0)AT1 was shown in rodent intestine to depend on the presence of the carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This enzyme belongs to the renin-angiotensin system and its expression is induced by treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in many rodent tissues. We show here in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that human ACE2 also functionally interacts with SIT1. To investigate in human intestine the potential effect of ACEIs or ARBs on ACE2, we analysed intestinal biopsies taken during routine gastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy from 46 patients of which 9 were under ACEI and 13 ARB treatment. Analysis of transcript expression by real-time PCR and of proteins by immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of SIT1 and B(0)AT1 with ACE2 in the brush-border membrane of human small intestine enterocytes and a distinct axial expression pattern of the tested gene products along the intestine. Patients treated with ACEIs displayed in comparison with untreated controls increased intestinal mRNA levels of ACE2, peptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) and AA transporters B(0)AT1 and PAT1 (SLC36A1). This study unravels in human intestine the localization and distribution of intestinal transporters involved in amino acid absorption and suggests that ACEIs impact on their expression.

  18. Ascorbic Acid Efflux from Human Brain Microvascular Pericytes: Role of Re-uptake

    OpenAIRE

    May, James M.; Qu, Zhi-chao

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular pericytes take up ascorbic acid on the ascorbate transporter SVCT2. Intracellular ascorbate then protects the cells against apoptosis induced by culture at diabetic glucose concentrations. To investigate whether pericytes might also provide ascorbate to the underlying endothelial cells, we studied ascorbate efflux from human pericytes. When loaded with ascorbate to intracellular concentrations of 0.8–1.0 mM, almost two-thirds of intracellular ascorbate effluxed from the cells ov...

  19. Effects of Salvianolic Acid B on Protein Expression in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tsong-Min Chang; Guey-Yueh Shi; Hua-Lin Wu; Chieh-Hsi Wu; Yan-Di Su; Hui-Lin Wang; Hsin-Yun Wen; Huey-Chun Huang

    2011-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a pure water-soluble compound extracted from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae, has been reported to possess potential cardioprotective efficacy. To identify proteins or pathways by which Sal B might exert its protective activities on the cardiovascular system, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based comparative proteomics was performed, and proteins altered in their expression level after Sal B treatment were identified by MALDI-TOF MS/MS. Human umbilical vein endothe...

  20. Protein and Amino Acid Restriction, Aging and Disease: from yeast to humans

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzaei, Hamed; Suarez, Jorge A.; Valter D Longo

    2014-01-01

    Many of the effects of dietary restriction (DR) on longevity and health span in model organisms have been linked to reduced protein and amino acid (AA) intake and the stimulation of specific nutrient signaling pathways. Studies in yeast have shown that addition of serine, threonine, and valine in media promotes cellular sensitization and aging by activating different but connected pathways. Protein or essential AA restriction extends both lifespan and healthspan in rodent models. In humans, p...

  1. Fatty Acid Esters of Phloridzin Induce Apoptosis of Human Liver Cancer Cells through Altered Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sandhya V. G.; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Phloridzin (phlorizin or phloretin 2′-O-glucoside) is known for blocking intestinal glucose absorption. We have investigated the anticarcinogenic effect of phloridzin and its novel derivatives using human cancer cell lines. We have synthesised novel acylated derivatives of phloridzin with six different long chain fatty acids by regioselective enzymatic acylation using Candida Antarctica lipase B. The antiproliferative effects of the new compounds were investigated in comparison with the parent compounds, phloridzin, aglycone phloretin, the six free fatty acids and chemotherapeutic drugs (sorafenib, doxorubicin and daunorubicin) using human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells, human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells and acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells along with normal human and rat hepatocytes. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited significantly the growth of the two carcinoma and leukemia cells while similar treatment doses were not toxic to normal human or rat hepatocytes. The antiproliferative potency of fatty esters of phloridzin was comparable to the potency of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited DNA topoisomerases IIα activity that might induce G0/G1 phase arrest, induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-3, and decreased ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells. Based on the high selectivity on cancer cells, decosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ester of phloridzin was selected for gene expression analysis using RT2PCR human cancer drug target array. Antiproliferative effect of DHA ester of phloridzin could be related to the down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (BCL2), growth factor receptors (EBFR family, IGF1R/IGF2, PDGFR) and its downstream signalling partners (PI3k/AKT/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MAPK), cell cycle machinery (CDKs, TERT, TOP2A, TOP2B) as well as epigenetics regulators (HDACs). These results suggest that fatty esters of phloridzin have potential chemotherapeutic effects mediated

  2. Fatty acid esters of phloridzin induce apoptosis of human liver cancer cells through altered gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya V G Nair

    Full Text Available Phloridzin (phlorizin or phloretin 2'-O-glucoside is known for blocking intestinal glucose absorption. We have investigated the anticarcinogenic effect of phloridzin and its novel derivatives using human cancer cell lines. We have synthesised novel acylated derivatives of phloridzin with six different long chain fatty acids by regioselective enzymatic acylation using Candida Antarctica lipase B. The antiproliferative effects of the new compounds were investigated in comparison with the parent compounds, phloridzin, aglycone phloretin, the six free fatty acids and chemotherapeutic drugs (sorafenib, doxorubicin and daunorubicin using human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells, human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells and acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells along with normal human and rat hepatocytes. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited significantly the growth of the two carcinoma and leukemia cells while similar treatment doses were not toxic to normal human or rat hepatocytes. The antiproliferative potency of fatty esters of phloridzin was comparable to the potency of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited DNA topoisomerases IIα activity that might induce G0/G1 phase arrest, induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-3, and decreased ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells. Based on the high selectivity on cancer cells, decosahexaenoic acid (DHA ester of phloridzin was selected for gene expression analysis using RT2PCR human cancer drug target array. Antiproliferative effect of DHA ester of phloridzin could be related to the down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (BCL2, growth factor receptors (EBFR family, IGF1R/IGF2, PDGFR and its downstream signalling partners (PI3k/AKT/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MAPK, cell cycle machinery (CDKs, TERT, TOP2A, TOP2B as well as epigenetics regulators (HDACs. These results suggest that fatty esters of phloridzin have potential chemotherapeutic effects

  3. Determination of tenuazonic acid in human urine by means of a stable isotope dilution assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asam, Stefan; Habler, Katharina; Rychlik, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The content of tenuazonic acid in human urine was determined by a stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) that was recently developed for the analysis of food commodities and extensively re-validated for urine matrix in this study. Linearity of the response curve was proven between molar ratios n(labeled standard)/n(analyte) of 0.02-100. The limits of detection and determination were 0.2 and 0.6 μg/L, respectively. The mean recovery of the stable isotope dilution assay was 102 ± 3 % in the range between 1.0 and 100 μg/L. Interassay precision was 6.7 % (relative standard deviation of three triplicate analyses of a human urine sample during 3 weeks). The method was applied to two studies dealing with urinary excretion of tenuazonic acid: In the first study, tenuazonic acid was quantified in the 24-h urine of six volunteers from Germany (three female, three male) in a concentration range of 1.3-17.3 μg/L or 2.3-10.3 ng/mg(-1) creatinine, respectively. In the second study, two volunteers (one female, one male) ingested 30 μg tenuazonic acid by consumption of naturally contaminated whole meal sorghum infant cereals and tomato juice, respectively. The urinary excretion of the ingested tenuazonic acid was 54-81 % after 6 h, depending on matrix and volunteer. After 24 h, 87-93 % of the ingested amount of tenuazonic acid was excreted, but the fate of the remaining about 10 % is open. Thus, it is not possible to exclude potential health hazards for the consumer, completely.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis separation of human milk neutral and acidic oligosaccharides derivatized with 2-aminoacridone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, Fabio; Coppa, Giovanni V; Zampini, Lucia; Maccari, Francesca; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Padella, Lucia; Santoro, Lucia; Gabrielli, Orazio; Volpi, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Human milk is a unique fluid in glycobiology due to the presence of many free structurally complex oligosaccharides emerging as important dietary factors during early life and having many biological and protective functions. Methods that allow accurate profiling of oligosaccharide mixtures in this complex biological fluid with quantification of the four known genetically determined groups are welcomed. A high-voltage CE separation and detection at 254 nm of 17 neutral and acidic human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) standard along with lactose derivatized with 2-aminoacridone, using a BGE containing 20% methanol as an organic modifier and borate, able to form on-capillary anionic borate-polyol complexes, is reported. This CE approach was able to separate both neutral HMOs and acidic HMOs, with the sialic acid residue, also in the presence of lactose in high content. This method was applied to the four secretory groups individually extracted by a rapid and simple preparative step. LODs were found ranging from ∼50 to 700 fmol. We were able to measure HMO content also in the presence of excess fluorophore, or interference from proteins, peptides, salts, and other impurities normally present in this complex biological fluid. Overall, CE equipped with a UV detector is a common analytical approach and this simple CE separation offers high resolution and sensitivity for the differentiation of human milk samples related to genetic groups and days of lactation by considering that important changes in HMO content are a reflection of the lactation day.

  5. Improvement in skin wrinkles using a preparation containing human growth factors and hyaluronic acid serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Do Hyun; Oh, In Young; Koo, Kyo Tan; Suk, Jang Mi; Jung, Sang Wook; Park, Jin Oh; Kim, Beom Joon; Choi, Yoo Mi

    2015-02-01

    Skin aging is accompanied by wrinkle formation. At some sites, such as the periorbital skin, this is a relatively early phenomenon. We evaluated the anti-wrinkle effect of a preparation containing human growth factor and hyaluronic acid serum on periorbital wrinkles (crow's feet). In total, 23 Korean women (age range: 39-59 years), who were not pregnant, nursing, or undergoing any concurrent therapy, were enrolled in this study. All the patients completed an 8-week trial of twice-daily application of human growth factor and hyaluronic acid serum on the entire face. Efficacy was based on a global photodamage score, photographs, and image analysis using replicas and visiometer analysis every 4 weeks. The standard wrinkle and roughness parameters used in assessing skin by visiometer were calculated and statistically analyzed. Periorbital wrinkles were significantly improved after treatment, with improvements noted both by physician's assessment and visiometer analysis. Topical application of human growth factor and hyaluronic acid was beneficial in reducing periorbital wrinkles.

  6. Effect of animal and industrial trans fatty acids on HDL and LDL cholesterol levels in humans--a quantitative review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg A Brouwer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trans fatty acids are produced either by industrial hydrogenation or by biohydrogenation in the rumens of cows and sheep. Industrial trans fatty acids lower HDL cholesterol, raise LDL cholesterol, and increase the risk of coronary heart disease. The effects of conjugated linoleic acid and trans fatty acids from ruminant animals are less clear. We reviewed the literature, estimated the effects trans fatty acids from ruminant sources and of conjugated trans linoleic acid (CLA on blood lipoproteins, and compared these with industrial trans fatty acids. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched Medline and scanned reference lists for intervention trials that reported effects of industrial trans fatty acids, ruminant trans fatty acids or conjugated linoleic acid on LDL and HDL cholesterol in humans. The 39 studies that met our criteria provided results of 29 treatments with industrial trans fatty acids, 6 with ruminant trans fatty acids and 17 with CLA. Control treatments differed between studies; to enable comparison between studies we recalculated for each study what the effect of trans fatty acids on lipoprotein would be if they isocalorically replaced cis mono unsaturated fatty acids. In linear regression analysis the plasma LDL to HDL cholesterol ratio increased by 0.055 (95%CI 0.044-0.066 for each % of dietary energy from industrial trans fatty acids replacing cis monounsaturated fatty acids The increase in the LDL to HDL ratio for each % of energy was 0.038 (95%CI 0.012-0.065 for ruminant trans fatty acids, and 0.043 (95% CI 0.012-0.074 for conjugated linoleic acid (p = 0.99 for difference between CLA and industrial trans fatty acids; p = 0.37 for ruminant versus industrial trans fatty acids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Published data suggest that all fatty acids with a double bond in the trans configuration raise the ratio of plasma LDL to HDL cholesterol.

  7. Repurposing Resveratrol and Fluconazole To Modulate Human Cytochrome P450-Mediated Arachidonic Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherbeni, Ahmed A; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2016-04-04

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) to several biologically active epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Repurposing clinically-approved drugs could provide safe and readily available means to control EETs and HETEs levels in humans. Our aim was to determine how to significantly and selectively modulate P450-AA metabolism in humans by clinically-approved drugs. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine the formation of 15 AA metabolites by human recombinant P450 enzymes, as well as human liver and kidney microsomes. CYP2C19 showed the highest EET-forming activity, while CYP1B1 and CYP2C8 showed the highest midchain HETE-forming activities. CYP1A1 and CYP4 showed the highest subterminal- and 20-HETE-forming activity, respectively. Resveratrol and fluconazole produced the most selective and significant modulation of hepatic P450-AA metabolism, comparable to investigational agents. Monte Carlo simulations showed that 90% of human population would experience a decrease by 6-22%, 16-39%, and 16-35% in 16-, 18-, and 20-HETE formation, respectively, after 2.5 g daily of resveratrol, and by 22-31% and 14-23% in 8,9- and 14,15-EET formation after 50 mg of fluconazole. In conclusion, clinically-approved drugs can provide selective and effective means to modulate P450-AA metabolism, comparable to investigational drugs. Resveratrol and fluconazole are good candidates to be repurposed as new P450-based treatments.

  8. Redifferentiation of Human Gastric Cancer Cells Induced by Ascorbic Acid and Sodium Selenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects and mechanisms of ascorbic acid (AA) and sodium selenite (SS) on growth inhibition and redifferentiation in human gastric cancer cells. Methods In the present study, trypan blue dye exclusion method was used to determine the cell growth curve and mitotic index, cell electrophoresis and colonogenic potential were used as the indexes of redifferentiation. In order to find out the mechanisms of redifferentiation, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) were assayed, the content of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) and H2O2 were evaluated. Results After treatment with AA 3 mol/L + SS 2μmol/L, the growth rate and mitotic index of human gastric cancer cells (MGc-803) decreased remarkably. The indexes related with cell malignancy were alleviated. For example, cell surface charge was obviously decreased, the electrophoresis rate was dropped from 2.21 to 1.15μm@s-1@V-1@cm-1. The indexes related with cell redifferentiation were promoted. For example, the colonogenic potential was decreased to 93.5%. These results indicated that redifferentiation of human gastric cancer cells was successfully induced by AA + SS. The activities of SOD and GPX were significantly higher, while the activity of CAT was slower in treated group than that in the control. The content of MDA was slightly decreased, GSH was sharply decreased, and H2O2 content was dramatically increased. Conclusion These results indicated that combination of ascorbic acid and sodium selenite may induce the redifferentiation of human gastric cancer cells and inhibit cell growth by virtue of enhancing the activities of antioxidative enzymes and inducing the formation of H2O2, and altering the cell redox status. Combination of ascorbic acid and sodium selenite may be a potent anticancer agent for human gastric cancer.

  9. Trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid decreases de novo lipid synthesis in human adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obsen, Thomas; Faergeman, Nils J; Chung, Soonkyu;

    2012-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces adiposity in vivo. However, mechanisms mediating these changes are unclear. Therefore, we treated cultures of human adipocytes with trans-10, cis-12 (10,12) CLA, cis-9, trans-11 (9,11) CLA or other trans fatty acids (FA), and measured indices of lipid......]-oleic or [(14)C]-linoleic acids. When using [(14)C]-acetic acid and [(14)C]-pyruvic acid as substrates, 30 μM 10,12 CLA, but not 9,11 CLA, decreased de novo synthesis of triglyceride, free FA, diacylglycerol, cholesterol esters, cardiolipin, phospholipids and ceramides within 3-24 h. Treatment with 30 μM 10......,12 CLA, but not 9,11 CLA, decreased total cellular lipids within 3 days and the ratio of monounsaturated FA (MUFA) to saturated FA, and increased C18:0 acyl-CoA levels within 24 h. Consistent with these data, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)-1 mRNA and protein levels were down-regulated by 10,12 CLA within...

  10. Effects of a honeybee sting on the serum free amino acid profile in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Matysiak

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the response to a honeybee venom by analyzing serum levels of 34 free amino acids. Another goal of this study was to apply complex analytic-bioinformatic-clinical strategy based on up-to-date achievements of mass spectrometry in metabolomic profiling. The amino acid profiles were determined using hybrid triple quadrupole/linear ion trap mass spectrometer coupled with a liquid chromatography instrument. Serum samples were collected from 27 beekeepers within 3 hours after they were stung and after a minimum of 6 weeks following the last sting. The differences in amino acid profiles were evaluated using MetaboAnalyst and ROCCET web portals. Chemometric tests showed statistically significant differences in the levels of L-glutamine (Gln, L-glutamic acid (Glu, L-methionine (Met and 3-methyl-L-histidine (3MHis between the two analyzed groups of serum samples. Gln and Glu appeared to be the most important metabolites for distinguishing the beekeepers tested shortly after a bee sting from those tested at least 6 weeks later. The role of some amino acids in the response of an organism to the honeybee sting was also discussed. This study indicated that proposed methodology may allow to identify the individuals just after the sting and those who were stung at least 6 weeks earlier. The results we obtained will contribute to better understanding of the human body response to the honeybee sting.

  11. A biotin enrichment strategy identifies novel carbonylated amino acids in proteins from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Jesper F; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Davies, Michael J; Jensen, Ole N; Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-03-06

    Protein carbonylation is an irreversible protein oxidation correlated with oxidative stress, various diseases and ageing. Here we describe a peptide-centric approach for identification and characterisation of up to 14 different types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins. The modified residues are derivatised with biotin-hydrazide, enriched and characterised by tandem mass spectrometry. The strength of the method lies in an improved elution of biotinylated peptides from monomeric avidin resin using hot water (95°C) and increased sensitivity achieved by reduction of analyte losses during sample preparation and chromatography. For the first time MS/MS data analysis utilising diagnostic biotin fragment ions is used to pinpoint sites of biotin labelling and improve the confidence of carbonyl peptide assignments. We identified a total of 125 carbonylated residues in bovine serum albumin after extensive in vitro metal ion-catalysed oxidation. Furthermore, we assigned 133 carbonylated sites in 36 proteins in native human plasma protein samples. The optimised workflow enabled detection of 10 hitherto undetected types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins: aldehyde and ketone modifications of leucine, valine, alanine, isoleucine, glutamine, lysine and glutamic acid (+14Da), an oxidised form of methionine - aspartate semialdehyde (-32Da) - and decarboxylated glutamic acid and aspartic acid (-30Da).

  12. Acid and organic aerosol coatings on magnetic nanoparticles increase iron concentrations in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghio, Andrew J; Dailey, Lisa A; Richards, Judy H; Jang, Myoseon

    2009-07-01

    Numerous industrial applications for man-made nanoparticles have been proposed. Interactions of nanoparticles with agents in the atmosphere may impact human health. We tested the postulate that in vitro exposures of respiratory epithelial cells to airborne magnetic nanoparticles (MNP; Fe(3)O(4)) with and without a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and an inorganic acid could affect iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and interleukin (IL)-8 release. Cell iron concentrations were increased after exposures to MNP and values were further elevated with co-exposures to either SOA or inorganic acid. Increased expression of ferritin and elevated levels of RNA for DMT1, proteins for iron storage and transport respectively, followed MNP exposures, but values were significant for only those with co-exposures to inorganic acid and organic aerosols. Cell iron concentration corresponded to a measure of oxidative stress in the airway epithelial cells; MNP with co-exposures to SOA and inorganic acid increased both available metal and indices of oxidant generation. Finally, the release of a proinflammatory cytokine (i.e. IL-8) by the exposed cells similarly increased with cell iron concentration. We conclude that MNP can interact with a SOA and an inorganic acid to present metal in a catalytically reactive state to cultured respiratory cells. This produces an oxidative stress to affect a release of IL-8.

  13. Kinetic analysis of lauric acid hydroxylation by human cytochrome P450 4A11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghak; Cha, Gun-Su; Nagy, Leslie D; Yun, Chul-Ho; Guengerich, F Peter

    2014-10-07

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 4A11 is the only functionally active subfamily 4A P450 in humans. P450 4A11 catalyzes mainly ω-hydroxylation of fatty acids in liver and kidney; this process is not a major degradative pathway, but at least one product, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, has important signaling properties. We studied catalysis by P450 4A11 and the issue of rate-limiting steps using lauric acid ω-hydroxylation, a prototypic substrate for this enzyme. Some individual reaction steps were studied using pre-steady-state kinetic approaches. Substrate and product binding and release were much faster than overall rates of catalysis. Reduction of ferric P450 4A11 (to ferrous) was rapid and not rate-limiting. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) experiments yielded low but reproducible values (1.2-2) for 12-hydroxylation with 12-(2)H-substituted lauric acid. However, considerable "metabolic switching" to 11-hydroxylation was observed with [12-(2)H3]lauric acid. Analysis of switching results [Jones, J. P., et al. (1986) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 108, 7074-7078] and the use of tritium KIE analysis with [12-(3)H]lauric acid [Northrop, D. B. (1987) Methods Enzymol. 87, 607-625] both indicated a high intrinsic KIE (>10). Cytochrome b5 (b5) stimulated steady-state lauric acid ω-hydroxylation ∼2-fold; the apoprotein was ineffective, indicating that electron transfer is involved in the b5 enhancement. The rate of b5 reoxidation was increased in the presence of ferrous P450 mixed with O2. Collectively, the results indicate that both the transfer of an electron to the ferrous·O2 complex and C-H bond-breaking limit the rate of P450 4A11 ω-oxidation.

  14. Interaction of chlorogenic acids and quinides from coffee with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinisi, Valentina; Forzato, Cristina; Cefarin, Nicola; Navarini, Luciano; Berti, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Chlorogenic acids and their derivatives are abundant in coffee and their composition changes between coffee species. Human serum albumin (HSA) interacts with this family of compounds with high affinity. We have studied by fluorescence spectroscopy the specific binding of HSA with eight compounds that belong to the coffee polyphenols family, four acids (caffeic acid, ferulic acid, 5-O-caffeoyl quinic acid, and 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid) and four lactones (3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide, 3-O-[3,4-(dimethoxy)cinnamoyl]-1,5-γ-quinide, 3,4-O-bis[3,4-(dimethoxy)cinnamoyl]-1,5-γ-quinide, and 1,3,4-O-tris[3,4-(dimethoxy)cinnamoyl]-1,5-γ-quinide), finding dissociation constants of the albumin-chlorogenic acids and albumin-quinides complexes in the micromolar range, between 2 and 30μM. Such values are comparable with those of the most powerful binders of albumin, and more favourable than the values obtained for the majority of drugs. Interestingly in the case of 3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide, we have observed the entrance of two ligand molecules in the same binding site, leading up to a first dissociation constant even in the hundred nanomolar range, which is to our knowledge the highest affinity ever observed for HSA and its ligands. The displacement of warfarin, a reference drug binding to HSA, by the quinide has also been demonstrated.

  15. Combined fluorescence and electrochemical investigation on the binding interaction between organic acid and human serum albumin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yan-Min; GUO Liang-Hong

    2009-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a plasma protein responsible for the binding and transport of fatty acids and a variety of exogenous chemicals such as drugs and environmental pollutants. Such binding plays a crucial role in determining the ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) and bioavailability of the pollutants. We report investigation on the binding interaction between HSA and acetic acid (C2), octanoic acid (C8) and dodecanoic acid (C12) by the combination of site-specific fluorescent probe, tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence and tyrosine electrochemistry. Two fluorescent probes, dansylamide and dansyl-L-proline, were employed in the displacement measurement to study fatty acid interaction with the two drug-binding sites on HSA. Intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in HSA was monitored upon addition of the fatty acids into HSA. Electrocatalyzed response of the tyrosine residues in HSA by a redox mediator was used to investigate the binding interaction. Qualitatively, observations made by the three approaches are very similar. HSA did not show any change in either fluorescence or electrochemistry after mixing with C2, suggesting there is no significant interaction with the short-chain fatty acid. For C8, the measured signal dropped in a single-exponential fashion, indicative of independent and non-cooperative binding. The calculated association constant and binding ratio is 3.1×106 L/mol and 1 with drug binding Site I, 1.1×107 L/mol and 1 with Site II, and 7.0×104 L/mol and 4 with the tryptophan site. The measurement with C12 displayed multiple phases of fluorescence change, suggesting cooperativity and allosteric effect of C12 binding. These results correlate well with those obtained by the established methods, and validate the new approach as a viable tool to study the interactions of environmental pollutants with biological molecules.

  16. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of the human brain-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP7) in its apo form and the holo forms binding to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oeemig, Jesper S; Jørgensen, Mathilde L; Hansen, Mikka S

    2009-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present the backbone and side chain assignments of human brain-type fatty acid binding protein, also known as FABP7, in its apo form and in four different holo forms, bound to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid.......In this manuscript, we present the backbone and side chain assignments of human brain-type fatty acid binding protein, also known as FABP7, in its apo form and in four different holo forms, bound to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid....

  17. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Attenuates the Oxidative Stress-Induced Decrease of CD33 Expression in Human Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Guzmán-Beltrán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs. Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H2O2 in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20 μM attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H2O2. These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs.

  18. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid attenuates the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Gonzalez-Reyes, Susana; Hernández-Sánchez, Fernando; Juarez-Figueroa, Ulises E; Gonzalez, Yolanda; Bobadilla, Karen; Torres, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs). Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA) or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H(2)O(2) in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20  μ M) attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H(2)O(2). These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs.

  19. The Effects of Topically Applied Glycolic Acid and Salicylic Acid on Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Erythema, DNA Damage and Sunburn Cell Formation in Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhauser, Andrija; Wei, Rong-Rong; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Coelho, Sergio G.; Kaidbey, Kays; Barton, Curtis; Takahashi, Kaoruko; Beer, Janusz Z.; Miller, Sharon A.; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2009-01-01

    Background α-Hydroxy acids (αHA) are reported to reduce signs of aging in the skin and are widely used cosmetic ingredients. Several studies suggest that αHA can increase the sensitivity of skin to ultraviolet radiation. More recently, β-hydroxy acids (βHA), or combinations of αHA and βHA have also been incorporated into antiaging skin care products. Concerns have also arisen about increased sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation following use of skin care products containing β-HA. Objective To determine whether topical treatment with glycolic acid, a representative αHA, or with salicylic acid, a βHA, modifies the short-term effects of solar simulated radiation (SSR) in human skin. Methods Fourteen subjects participated in this study. Three of the four test sites on the mid-back of each subject were treated daily Monday - Friday, for a total of 3.5 weeks, with glycolic acid (10%), salicylic acid (2%), or vehicle (control). The fourth site received no treatment. After the last treatment, each site was exposed to SSR, and shave biopsies from all 4 sites were obtained. The endpoints evaluated in this study were erythema (assessed visually and instrumentally), DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Results Treatment with glycolic acid resulted in increased sensitivity of human skin to SSR, measured as an increase in erythema, DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Salicylic acid did not produce significant changes in any of these biomarkers. Conclusions Short-term topical application of glycolic acid in a cosmetic formulation increased the sensitivity of human skin to SSR, while a comparable treatment with salicylic acid did not. PMID:19411163

  20. Comparison of the protein and fatty acid fraction of Balkan donkey and human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Gubić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the protein and fatty acid fractions of Balkan donkey and human milk in the early lactation stage (40 and 90 day. This study revealed that donkey milk contains αs1-casein (1.38-1.89 g/L and higher concentration of β-casein (0.1-0.55 g/L in comparison to human milk. The concentration of α-lactalbumin increased during the lactation phases from 40 to 90 days in both types of milk. Donkey milk contained β-lactoglobulin in low concentrations which decreased to 90th day of lactation. Donkey milk was particularly rich in two whey proteins, lactoferrin and lysozyme, which were found to have molecular weight of approximately 76 kDa and 14.9-15.4 kDa, respectively. The content of lysozyme in donkey milk ranged from 2.39 to 2.97 g/L, while human milk contained 30-50 times lower concentrations of lysozyme in comparison to donkey milk. Thus, donkey milk contained also a higher concentration of lactoferrin (0.012-0.25 g/L than it was found in the human milk. Lysozyme and lactoferrin content in donkey milk increased during the period from 40th to 90th day of lactation. The percentage of total SFA, MUFA and PUFA was similar in donkey and human milk. The content of essential fatty acids increased during 40-90 days of lactation and was approximately 2.5 times higher in comparison to human milk.

  1. Hydrochloric acid alters the effect of L-glutamic acid on cell viability in human neuroblastoma cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Nicoletta; Bernardini, Sergio; Di Cecca, Stefano; Caltagirone, Carlo; Angelucci, Francesco

    2013-07-15

    l-Glutamic acid (l-glutamate) is used to induce excitotoxicity and test neuroprotective compounds in cell cultures. However, because l-glutamate powder is nearly insoluble in water, many manufacturers recommend reconstituting l-glutamate in hydrochloric acid (HCl) prior to successive dilutions. Nevertheless, HCl, even at low concentrations, may alter the pH of the cell culture medium and interfere with cell activity. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the reconstitution of l-glutamate powder in HCl alters its capacity to induce neurotoxicity in different human neuroblastoma cell lines. SH-SY5Y, IMR-32 and SK-N-BE(2) cells were exposed to various concentrations of l-glutamate, which was either reconstituted in HCl (1M) or post re-equilibrated to the pH of the culture medium (7.5). After 24 and 48h of incubation, changes in the cell viability of treated versus untreated cells were evaluated. The effect of an identical amount of HCl present in the l-glutamate dilutions on neuroblastoma cell survival was also investigated. Our data showed that the neurotoxicity of glutamate reconstituted in HCl was comparable to that of HCl alone. Moreover, the pH variations induced by glutamate or HCl in the culture medium were similar. When the pH of the glutamate stock solution was re-equilibrated, l-glutamate induced variation in cell viability to a lower extent and after a longer incubation time. This study demonstrated that HCl used to reconstitute l-glutamate powder might alter the effect of glutamate itself in neuroblastoma cell cultures. Thus, this information might be useful to scientists who use l-glutamate to induce excitotoxicity or to test neuroprotective agents.

  2. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Trigger Cell Cycle Arrest and Induce Apoptosis in Human Neuroblastoma LA-N-1 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wai Wing So; Wai Nam Liu; Kwok Nam Leung

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids are dietary long-chain fatty acids with an array of health benefits. Previous research has demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effect of n-3 fatty acids on different cancer cell lines in vitro, yet their anti-tumor effects and underlying action mechanisms on human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells have not yet been reported. In this study, we showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) exhibited time- and concentration-dependent anti-proliferative ...

  3. Identification of new flavone-8-acetic acid metabolites using mouse microsomes and comparison with human microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Minh Hien; Auzeil, Nicolas; Regazzetti, Anne; Dauzonne, Daniel; Dugay, Annabelle; Menet, Marie-Claude; Scherman, Daniel; Chabot, Guy G

    2007-11-01

    Flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA) is a potent anticancer agent in mouse but has not shown activity in humans. Because FAA metabolism could play a role in this interspecies difference, our aim was to identify the metabolites formed in vitro using mouse microsomes compared with those in human microsomes. Mouse microsomes produced six metabolites as detected by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS). Three metabolites were identified as the 3'-, 4'-, or 6-hydroxy-FAA, by comparison with retention times and UV and MS spectra of standards. Two metabolites presented a molecular weight of 296 (FAA = 280) indicating the presence of one oxygen but did not correspond to any monohydroxylated FAA derivative. These two metabolites were identified as epoxides because they were sensitive to epoxide hydrolase. The position of the oxygen was determined by the formation of the corresponding phenols under soft acidic conditions: one epoxide yielded the 3'- and 4'-hydroxy-FAA, thus corresponding to the 3',4'-epoxy-FAA, whereas the other epoxide yielded 5- and 6-hydroxy-FAA, thus identifying the 5,6-epoxy-FAA. The last metabolite was assigned to the 3',4'-dihydrodiol-FAA because of its molecular weight (314) and sulfuric acid dehydration that indicated that the 3'- and 4'-positions were involved. Compared with mouse microsomes, human microsomes (2 pools and 15 individual microsomes) were unable to metabolize FAA to a significant extent. In conclusion, we have identified six new FAA metabolites formed by mouse microsomes, whereas human microsomes could not metabolize this flavonoid to a significant extent. The biological importance of the new metabolites identified herein remains to be evaluated.

  4. Transgenic rabbits as therapeutic protein bioreactors and human disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianglin; Watanabe, Teruo

    2003-09-01

    Genetically modified laboratory animals provide a powerful approach for studying gene expression and regulation and allow one to directly examine structure-function and cause-and-effect relationships in pathophysiological processes. Today, transgenic mice are available as a research tool in almost every research institution. On the other hand, the development of a relatively large mammalian transgenic model, transgenic rabbits, has provided unprecedented opportunities for investigators to study the mechanisms of human diseases and has also provided an alternative way to produce therapeutic proteins to treat human diseases. Transgenic rabbits expressing human genes have been used as a model for cardiovascular disease, AIDS, and cancer research. The recombinant proteins can be produced from the milk of transgenic rabbits not only at lower cost but also on a relatively large scale. One of the most promising and attractive recombinant proteins derived from transgenic rabbit milk, human alpha-glucosidase, has been successfully used to treat the patients who are genetically deficient in this enzyme. Although the pronuclear microinjection is still the major and most popular method for the creation of transgenic rabbits, recent progress in gene targeting and animal cloning has opened new avenues that should make it possible to produce transgenic rabbits by somatic cell nuclear transfer in the future. Based on a computer-assisted search of the studies of transgenic rabbits published in the English literature here, we introduce to the reader the achievements made thus far with transgenic rabbits, with emphasis on the application of these rabbits as human disease models and live bioreactors for producing human therapeutic proteins and on the recent progress in cloned rabbits.

  5. Determination of monomethylarsonous acid, a key arsenic methylation intermediate, in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, X C; Ma, M; Cullen, W R; Aposhian, H V; Lu, X; Zheng, B

    2000-01-01

    In this study we report on the finding of monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] in human urine. This newly identified arsenic species is a key intermediate in the metabolic pathway of arsenic biomethylation, which involves stepwise reduction of pentavalent to trivalent arsenic species followed by oxidative addition of a methyl group. Arsenic speciation was carried out using ion-pair chromatographic separation of arsenic compounds with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Speciation of the inorganic arsenite [As(III)], inorganic arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)], dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)], and MMA(III) in a urine sample was complete in 5 min. Urine samples collected from humans before and after a single oral administration of 300 mg sodium 2,3-dimercapto-1-propane sulfonate (DMPS) were analyzed for arsenic species. MMA(III) was found in 51 out of 123 urine samples collected from 41 people in inner Mongolia 0-6 hr after the administration of DMPS. MMA(III )in urine samples did not arise from the reduction of MMA(V) by DMPS. DMPS probably assisted the release of MMA(III) that was formed in the body. Along with the presence of MMA(III), there was an increase in the relative concentration of MMA(V) and a decrease in DMA(V) in the urine samples collected after the DMPS ingestion. PMID:11102289

  6. Endogenous biosynthesis of arachidonic acid epoxides in humans: Increased formation in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catella, F.; Lawson, J.A.; Fitzgerald, D.J.; FitzGerald, G.A. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Arachidonic acid is metabolized by means of P450 isoenzyme(s) to form epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and their corresponding dihydroxy derivatives (DHETs). In the present study, we established the presence in human urine of 8,9-, 11,12-, and 14,15-EETs and their corresponding DHETs by developing quantitative assays and using negative ion, chemical ionization GC/MS and octadeuterated internal standards. Urinary excretion of 8,9- and 11,12-DHET increased in healthy pregnant women compared with nonpregnant female volunteers. By contrast, excretion of 11,12-DHET and 14,15-DHET, but not the 8,9-DHET regioisomer, increased even further in patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension. Intravenous administration of (3H)14,15-EET to three dogs markedly increased its DHET in plasma. The terminal half-life ranged from 7.9-12.3 min and the volume of distribution (3.5-5.3 liters) suggested limited distribution outside the plasma compartment. Negligible radioactivity was detected in urine; this fact infers that under physiological circumstances, urinary DHETs largely derive from the kidney. That P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid are formed in humans supports the hypothesis that these metabolites contribute to the physiological response to normal pregnancy and the pathophysiology of pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  7. Profiling serum bile acid glucuronides in humans: gender divergences, genetic determinants and response to fenofibrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottier, Jocelyn; Perreault, Martin; Rudkowska, Iwona; Levy, Cynthia; Dallaire-Theroux, Amélie; Verreault, Mélanie; Caron, Patrick; Staels, Bart; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Straka, Robert J.; Barbier, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Glucuronidation, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes detoxifies cholestatic bile acids (BAs). We aimed at i) characterizing the circulating BA-glucuronide (-G) pool composition in humans, ii) evaluating how sex and UGT polymorphisms influence this composition, and iii) analyzing the effects of lipid-lowering drug fenofibrate on the circulating BA-G profile in 300 volunteers and 5 cholestatic patients. Eleven BA-Gs were determined in pre- and post-fenofibrate samples. Men exhibited higher BA-G concentrations, and various genotype/BA-G associations were discovered in relevant UGT genes. The chenodeoxycholic acid-3G concentration was associated with the UGT2B7 802C>T polymorphism. Glucuronidation assays confirmed the predominant role of UGT2B7 and UGT1A4 in CDCA-3G formation. Fenofibrate exposure increased the serum levels of 5 BA-G species, including CDCA-3G, and up-regulated expression of UGT1A4, but not UGT2B7, in hepatic cells. This study demonstrates that fenofibrate stimulates BA glucuronidation in humans, and thus reduces bile acid toxicity in the liver. PMID:23756370

  8. High and low molecular weight hyaluronic acid differentially regulate human fibrocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu S Maharjan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Following tissue injury, monocytes can enter the tissue and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, but little is known about what regulates this differentiation. Extracellular matrix contains high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMWHA; ∼2×10(6 Da. During injury, HMWHA breaks down to low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA; ∼0.8-8×10(5 Da. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this report, we show that HMWHA potentiates the differentiation of human monocytes into fibrocytes, while LMWHA inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. Digestion of HMWHA with hyaluronidase produces small hyaluronic acid fragments, and these fragments inhibit fibrocyte differentiation. Monocytes internalize HMWHA and LMWHA equally well, suggesting that the opposing effects on fibrocyte differentiation are not due to differential internalization of HMWHA or LMWHA. Adding HMWHA to PBMC does not appear to affect the levels of the hyaluronic acid receptor CD44, whereas adding LMWHA decreases CD44 levels. The addition of anti-CD44 antibodies potentiates fibrocyte differentiation, suggesting that CD44 mediates at least some of the effect of hyaluronic acid on fibrocyte differentiation. The fibrocyte differentiation-inhibiting factor serum amyloid P (SAP inhibits HMWHA-induced fibrocyte differentiation and potentiates LMWHA-induced inhibition. Conversely, LMWHA inhibits the ability of HMWHA, interleukin-4 (IL-4, or interleukin-13 (IL-13 to promote fibrocyte differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: We hypothesize that hyaluronic acid signals at least in part through CD44 to regulate fibrocyte differentiation, with a dominance hierarchy of SAP>LMWHA≥HMWHA>IL-4 or IL-13.

  9. Human liver phosphatase 2A: cDNA and amino acid sequence of two catalytic subunit isotypes

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    Arino, J.; Woon, Chee Wai; Brautigan, D.L.; Miller, T.B. Jr.; Johnson, G.L. (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester (USA))

    1988-06-01

    Two cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver library that encode two phosphatase 2A catalytic subunits. The two cDNAs differed in eight amino acids (97% identity) with three nonconservative substitutions. All of the amino acid substitutions were clustered in the amino-terminal domain of the protein. Amino acid sequence of one human liver clone (HL-14) was identical to the rabbit skeletal muscle phosphatase 2A cDNA (with 97% nucleotide identity). The second human liver clone (HL-1) is encoded by a separate gene, and RNA gel blot analysis indicates that both mRNAs are expressed similarly in several human clonal cell lines. Sequence comparison with phosphatase 1 and 2A indicates highly divergent amino acid sequences at the amino and carboxyl termini of the proteins and identifies six highly conserved regions between the two proteins that are predicted to be important for phosphatase enzymatic activity.

  10. Effect of some saturated and unsaturated fatty acids on prostaglandin biosynthesis in washed human blood platelets from (1-/sup 14/ C)arachidonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, K.C.; Awasthi, K.K.; Lindegard, P.; Tiwari, K.P.

    1982-03-01

    The effects of some saturated (lauric, palmitic and stearic) an unsaturated (linoleic, gamma-linolenic, alpha-linolenic and oleic) fatty acids at 0.1. 0.25 and 0.5 mM concentrations on the in vitro metabolization of (1-14 C) arachidonic acid by washed human blood platelets have been studied. Effects of these fatty acids were studied with intact as well as lysed platelet preparations. With intact platelet preparations it was found that (i) all unsaturated fatty acids enhanced the biosynthesis of TxB2, PGE2, PGD2 and PGF2 alpha, (ii) unsaturated fatty acids reduced the formation of HHT and HETE with the exception of oleic acid which showed very little effect, (iii) unsaturated fatty acids reduced the formation of MDA, whereas palmitic and stearic acids increased its formation and (iv) all unsaturated fatty acids reduced the synthesis of prostaglandin endoperoxides. These results support our previous observations where effects of fatty acids were examined at higher concentrations (10). At 0.1 mM FA concentration, inconsistent results were obtained. With lysed platelet preparations all cyclooxygenase products were reduced in presence of unsaturated fatty acids, whereas HETE formation was reduced only in presence of linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids. Electron micrographs of washed platelet suspensions were obtained with untreated platelet preparations and platelet preparations treated with 0.25 and 0.5 mM linoleic acid concentrations. The results are discussed in the light of a possible soap-like effect of FA salt on platelets.

  11. Direct Analysis of Leucine and Its Metabolites β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyric Acid, α-Ketoisocaproic Acid, and α-Hydroxyisocaproic Acid in Human Breast Milk by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehling, Stefan; Reddy, Todime M

    2015-09-02

    A direct, quantitative, and confirmatory method based on stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed and validated for the analysis of leucine and metabolites β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyric acid (HMB), α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), and α-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) in human breast milk. Chromatographic resolution was achieved between isobaric leucine and isoleucine. Accuracy and intermediate precision were 89-117% and breast milk composition and its effect on protein turnover in developing infants.

  12. Conversion of alpha-linolenic acid in humans is influenced by the absolute amounts of alpha-linolenic acid and linoleic acid in the diet and not by their ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goyens, P.L.L.; Spilker, M.E.; Zock, P.L.; Katan, M.B.; Mensink, R.P.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human in vivo data on dietary determinants of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3) metabolism are scarce. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether intakes of ALA or linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6) or their ratio influences ALA metabolism. DESIGN: During 4 wk, 29 subjects received a control diet (7% of

  13. Transmembrane domain II of the human bile acid transporter SLC10A2 coordinates sodium translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabit, Hairat; Mallajosyula, Sairam S; MacKerell, Alexander D; Swaan, Peter W

    2013-11-01

    Human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT, SLC10A2) is responsible for intestinal reabsorption of bile acids and plays a key role in cholesterol homeostasis. We used a targeted and systematic approach to delineate the role of highly conserved transmembrane helix 2 on the expression and function of hASBT. Cysteine mutation significantly depressed transport activity for >60% of mutants without affecting cell surface localization of the transporter. All mutants were inaccessible toward chemical modification by membrane-impermeant MTSET reagent, strongly suggesting that transmembrane 2 (TM2) plays an indirect role in bile acid substrate translocation. Both bile acid uptake and sodium dependence of TM2 mutants revealed a distinct α-helical periodicity. Kinetic studies with conservative and non-conservative mutants of sodium sensitive residues further underscored the importance of Gln(75), Phe(76), Met(79), Gly(83), Leu(86), Phe(90), and Asp(91) in hASBT function. Computational analysis indicated that Asp(91) may coordinate with sodium during the transport cycle. Combined, our data propose that a consortium of sodium-sensitive residues along with previously reported residues (Thr(134), Leu(138), and Thr(149)) from TM3 may form the sodium binding and translocation pathway. Notably, residues Gln(75), Met(79), Thr(82), and Leu(86) from TM2 are highly conserved in TM3 of a putative remote bacterial homologue (ASBTNM), suggesting a universal mechanism for the SLC10A transporter family.

  14. IMAGING BRAIN SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION AND METABOLISM VIA ARACHIDONIC AND DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID IN ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), important second messengers in brain, are released from membrane phospholipid following receptor-mediated activation of specific phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes. We developed an in vivo method in rodents using quantitative autoradiography to image PUFA incorporation into brain from plasma, and showed that their incorporation rates equal their rates of metabolic consumption by brain. Thus, quantitative imaging of unesterified plasma AA or DHA incorporation into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain PUFA metabolism and neurotransmission. We have employed our method to image and quantify effects of mood stabilizers on brain AA/DHA incorporation during neurotransmission by muscarinic M1,3,5, serotonergic 5-HT2A/2C, dopaminergic D2-like (D2, D3, D4) or glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, and effects of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, of selective serotonin and dopamine reuptake transporter inhibitors, of neuroinflammation (HIV-1 and lipopolysaccharide) and excitotoxicity, and in genetically modified rodents. The method has been extended for the use with positron emission tomography (PET), and can be employed to determine how human brain AA/DHA signaling and consumption are influenced by diet, aging, disease and genetics. PMID:22178644

  15. Biomarkers of fish oil omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids intake in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Veronica; Barazzoni, Rocco; Singer, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    A biomarker is a measured characteristic that may be used as an indicator of some biological state or condition. In health and disease, biomarkers have been used not only for clinical diagnosis purposes but also as tools to assess effectiveness of a nutrition or drug intervention. When considering nutrition studies, evaluating the appropriate biomarker is a useful tool to assess compliance and incidence of a particular dietary component in the biochemistry of the organism. Fish oil is rich in ω-3 fatty acids that have well-known beneficial effects on human health mainly through its anti-inflammatory properties. It has been widely use to improve health and as a nutrition supplement in different pathological conditions such as cardiovascular, neurological, and critically ill related diseases. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid levels present in different biological moieties (plasma, cellular membranes, adipose tissue, etc) are the best biomarkers of fish oil intake. Each biological source of fatty acids has its own advantages and disadvantages, thus which biomarker to choose and where to measure it requires a comprehension of the objectives of the investigation. In this article we will review key facts about fish oil intake biomarkers to evaluate how components of a specific diet could be monitored and identified in biological samples. Having an accurate assessment of nutrition patterns could provide effective targets for intervention aimed at modifying eating habits and lifestyle towards the improvement of health.

  16. The iron-chelating agent picolinic acid enhances transferrin receptors expression in human erythroleukaemic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, U; Louache, F; Titeux, M; Thomopoulos, P; Rochant, H

    1985-07-01

    Picolinic acid, a metal chelating molecule, was administered to human erythroleukaemic cell lines (K 562 and HEL) that were grown in serum-containing media. Picolinic acid inhibited both iron uptake and cell growth. Furthermore, picolinic acid was shown to markedly decrease the level of ferritin in the cells. In spite of the inhibition of cell growth, picolinic acid induced a marked increase in the transferrin-binding capacity of the cells. This phenomenon was due to a two-five-fold enhancement of the rate of transferrin receptor biosynthesis. Other iron-chelating compounds, capable of reducing the level of intracellular iron, also elicited a marked enhancement of the transferrin-binding capacity of the cells. However, the addition of iron, as ferric ammonium citrate, in the culture medium elicited a marked increase in the level of ferritin and a strong decrease in the transferrin-binding capacity of the cells. On the basis of these data we propose that a feed-back mechanism is involved in the regulation of transferrin receptors: when the cells accumulate iron they decrease the number of transferrin receptors in order to prevent further accumulation of iron; when no or low iron is available to the cells, the number of transferrin receptors markedly increases as a compensatory mechanism.

  17. Evaluation of human D-amino acid oxidase inhibition by anti-psychotic drugs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishikura, Miho; Hakariya, Hitomi; Iwasa, Sumiko; Yoshio, Takashi; Ichiba, Hideaki; Yorita, Kazuko; Fukui, Kiyoshi; Fukushima, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    It is of importance to determine whether antipsychotic drugs currently prescribed for schizophrenia exert D-amino acid oxidase (DAO)-inhibitory effects. We first investigated whether human (h)DAO can metabolize D-kynurenine (D-KYN) to produce the fluorescent compound kynurenic acid (KYNA) by using high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, and fluorescence spectrometry. After confirmation of KYNA production from D-KYN by hDAO, 8 first- and second-generation antipsychotic drugs, and 6 drugs often prescribed concomitantly, were assayed for hDAO-inhibitory effects by using in vitro fluorometric methods with D-KYN as the substrate. DAO inhibitors 3-methylpyrazole-5-carboxylic acid and 4H-thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole-5-carboxylic acid inhibited KYNA production in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, the second-generation antipsychotics blonanserin and risperidone were found to possess relatively strong hDAO-inhibitory effects in vitro (5.29 ± 0.47 μM and 4.70 ± 0.17 μM, respectively). With regard to blonanserin and risperidone, DAO-inhibitory effects should be taken into consideration in the context of their in vivo pharmacotherapeutic efficacy.

  18. Induction of cell death by ascorbic acid derivatives in human renal carcinoma and glioblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Y; Sakagami, H; Takeda, M

    1999-01-01

    Sodium-L-ascorbate, L-ascorbic acid, D-isoascorbic acid, sodium 5,6-benzylidene-L-ascorbate and sodium-6-beta-O-galactosyl-L-ascorbate, which produce ascorbyl radicals during the oxidative degradation, also induced cytotoxicity against cultured human renal carcinoma (TC-1) and glioblastoma multiform tumor (T98G) cell lines. On the other hand, L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate magnesium and L-ascorbic acid 2-sulfate dipotassium salt, which do not produce the ascorbyl radical, were inactive. This suggests the possible role of the ascorbyl radical for cell death induction. T98G cells were more resistant to ascorbate analogs than TC-1 and HL-60 cells, possibly due to higher intracellular glutathione concentrations. Ascorbate treatment induced rapid elevation of both intracellular concentration of cAMP and Ca2+ in HL-60 cells, but not in TC-1 and T98G cells. However, the elevation of cAMP by theophyline and N,2-dibutyryl adenosine 3,5 cyclic monophosphate (dibutyryl cAMP) resulted in a decrease in the viable cell number. This suggests the possible role of cAMP for ascorbate-induced cell death.

  19. Fatty Acid Desaturase 1 (FADS1) Gene Polymorphisms Control Human Hepatic Lipid Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libo; Athinarayanan, Shaminie; Jiang, Guanglong; Chalasani, Naga; Zhang, Min; Liu, Wanqing

    2014-01-01

    Fatty Acid Desaturase (FADS) genes and their variants have been associated with multiple metabolic phenotypes including liver enzymes and hepatic fat accumulation but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to delineate the role of FADSs in modulating lipid composition in human liver. We performed a targeted lipidomic analysis of a variety of phospholipids, sphingolipids and ceramides among 154 human liver tissue samples. The associations between previously Genome-wide Association Studies (GWAS)-identified six FADS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and these lipid levels as well as total hepatic fat content (HFC) were tested. The potential function of these SNPs in regulating transcription of 3 FADS genes (FADS1, FADS2 and FADS3) in the locus was also investigated. We found that while these SNPs were in high linkage disequilibrium (r2 >0.8), the rare alleles of these SNPs were consistently and significantly associated with the accumulation of multiple very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), with C47H85O13P (C36:4), a phosphatidylinositol (PI) and C43H80O8PN (C38:3), a phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) reached the Bonferroni corrected significance (prs174556), but not FADS2 or FADS3 (p>0.05). Conclusion Our findings revealed critical insight into the mechanism underlying FADS1 and its polymorphisms in modulating hepatic lipid deposition by altering gene transcription and controlling lipid composition in human livers. PMID:25123259

  20. A radioisotopic technique for analysis of free fatty acid reesterification in human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibel, R L; Hirsch, J

    1985-01-01

    Reesterification rates of free fatty acids (FFA) formed by intracellular triglyceride hydrolysis in small fragments of human adipose tissue were measured. Subcutaneous gluteal adipose tissue, obtained by needle biopsy, was incubated in a buffered albumin medium containing [3H]palmitate and [14C]glucose, each of high specific activity. In triglycerides (TG) and diglycerides (DG) synthesized by the tissue, [14C]glucose is incorporated exclusively into the glyceride-glycerol moiety, and 3H appears solely in the esterified fatty acids. Since rates of TG and DG synthesis can be determined from 14C accumulation rates in these molecules, the total amounts of FFA esterified can also be calculated. The difference between this estimate of total FFA esterification and the moles of [3H]palmitate esterified to these molecules represents the amount of unlabeled FFA from ongoing TG hydrolysis that was reesterified during the incubation. FFA recycling by the reesterification pathway is an important mechanism for the control of the quantity and proportions of FFA and glycerol leaving the human adipocyte. Fasting and beta-adrenergic stimulation reduce the fraction of endogenously released FFA that are reesterified from resting values of 30-40% to 8-21%, thereby increasing the molar ratio of FFA to glycerol leaving the adipocyte. The technique described can be employed to monitor sequential changes in this important metabolic cycle in humans under a wide range of nutritional and clinical circumstances.

  1. Gastroprotective Mechanisms of Action of Semisynthetic Carnosic Acid Derivatives in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Theoduloz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carnosic acid (CA and its semisynthetic derivatives display relevant gastroprotective effects on HCl/ethanol induced gastric lesions in mice. However, little is known on the mechanisms of action of the new compounds. The aim of the present work was to assess the gastroprotective action mechanisms of CA and its derivatives using human cell culture models. A human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS and lung fibroblasts (MRC-5 were used to reveal the possible mechanisms involved. The ability of the compounds to protect cells against sodium taurocholate (NaT-induced damage, and to increase the cellular reduced glutathione (GSH and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 content was determined using AGS cells. Stimulation of cell proliferation was studied employing MRC-5 fibroblasts. Carnosic acid and its derivatives 10–18 raised GSH levels in AGS cells. While CA did not increase the PGE2 content in AGS cells, all derivatives significantly stimulated PGE2 synthesis, the best effect being found for the 12-O-indolebutyrylmethylcarnosate 13. A significant increase in MRC-5 fibroblast proliferation was observed for the derivatives 7 and 16–18. The antioxidant effect of the compounds was assessed by the inhibition of lipid peroxidation in human erythrocyte membranes, scavenging of superoxide anion and DPPH discoloration assay. The new CA derivatives showed gastroprotective effects by different mechanisms, including protection against cell damage induced by NaT, increase in GSH content, stimulation of PGE2 synthesis and cell proliferation.

  2. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration inversely correlates with basal perfusion in human occipital lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Manus J; Rane, Swati; Hussey, Erin; Mason, Emily; Pradhan, Subechhya; Waddell, Kevin W; Ally, Brandon A

    2014-03-01

    Commonly used neuroimaging approaches in humans exploit hemodynamic or metabolic indicators of brain function. However, fundamental gaps remain in our ability to relate such hemo-metabolic reactivity to neurotransmission, with recent reports providing paradoxical information regarding the relationship among basal perfusion, functional imaging contrast, and neurotransmission in awake humans. Here, sequential magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements of the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA+macromolecules normalized by the complex N-acetyl aspartate-N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid: [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG]), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of perfusion, fractional gray-matter volume, and arterial arrival time (AAT) are recorded in human visual cortex from a controlled cohort of young adult male volunteers with neurocognitive battery-confirmed comparable cognitive capacity (3 T; n=16; age=23±3 years). Regression analyses reveal an inverse correlation between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.46; P=0.037), yet no relationship between AAT and [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] (R=-0.12; P=0.33). Perfusion measurements that do not control for AAT variations reveal reduced correlations between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.13; P=0.32). These findings largely reconcile contradictory reports between perfusion and inhibitory tone, and underscore the physiologic origins of the growing literature relating functional imaging signals, hemodynamics, and neurotransmission.

  3. The role of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in human heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, Hemant; Brown, Lindsay

    2013-03-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been proposed as potential treatments for human heart failure. The cardioprotective effects of n-3 PUFA are supported by extensive cell culture, animal and human studies. Animal studies with n-3 PUFA have shown marked improvements in many independent risk factors for heart failure, including obesity, type II diabetes, insulin resistance, hypertension and inflammation. However, the evidence from observational studies, randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses that these benefits on risk factors lead to improvements in the symptoms of heart failure in patients is much less convincing. Further, most studies have used marine n-3 PUFA; the role of the plant-derived PUFA, α-linolenic acid (ALA), is even less clear. This discontinuity of scientific evidence from animal to human studies suggests that future studies should focus on defining the optimal dosage range and the efficacy of n-3 PUFA compared to standard treatments using standardised study designs. Further studies on ALA would seem justified.

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase β (LPAATβ promotes the tumor growth of human osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farbod Rastegar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone with poorly characterized molecular pathways important in its pathogenesis. Increasing evidence indicates that elevated lipid biosynthesis is a characteristic feature of cancer. We sought to investigate the role of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase β (LPAATβ, aka, AGPAT2 in regulating the proliferation and growth of human osteosarcoma cells. LPAATβ can generate phosphatidic acid, which plays a key role in lipid biosynthesis as well as in cell proliferation and survival. Although elevated expression of LPAATβ has been reported in several types of human tumors, the role of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma progression has yet to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Endogenous expression of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma cell lines is analyzed by using semi-quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical staining. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of LPAATβ and silencing LPAATβ expression is employed to determine the effect of LPAATβ on osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration in vitro and osteosarcoma tumor growth in vivo. We have found that expression of LPAATβ is readily detected in 8 of the 10 analyzed human osteosarcoma lines. Exogenous expression of LPAATβ promotes osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration, while silencing LPAATβ expression inhibits these cellular characteristics. We further demonstrate that exogenous expression of LPAATβ effectively promotes tumor growth, while knockdown of LPAATβ expression inhibits tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of human osteosarcoma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results strongly suggest that LPAATβ expression may be associated with the aggressive phenotypes of human osteosarcoma and that LPAATβ may play an important role in regulating osteosarcoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Thus, targeting LPAATβ may be exploited as a novel therapeutic strategy for the clinical management of osteosarcoma. This

  5. Boswellic acids target the human immune system-modulating antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Arne; Tausch, Lars; Pillong, Max; Jauch, Johann; Karas, Michael; Schneider, Gisbert; Werz, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    The antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is the sole member of the human cathelicidin family with immune system-modulating properties and roles in autoimmune disease development. Small molecules able to interact with LL-37 and to modulate its functions have not been described yet. Boswellic acids (BAs) are pentacyclic triterpene acids that are bioactive principles of frankincense extracts used as anti-inflammatory remedies. Although various anti-inflammatory modes of action have been proposed for BAs, the pharmacological profile of these compounds is still incompletely understood. Here, we describe the identification of human LL-37 as functional target of BAs. In unbiased target fishing experiments using immobilized BAs as bait and human neutrophils as target source, LL-37 was identified as binding partner assisted by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Thermal stability experiments using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirm direct interaction between BAs and LL-37. Of interest, this binding of BAs resulted in an inhibition of the functionality of LL-37. Thus, the LPS-neutralizing properties of isolated LL-37 were inhibited by 3-O-acetyl-β-BA (Aβ-BA) and 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-BA (AKβ-BA) in a cell-free limulus amoebocyte lysate assay with EC50=0.2 and 0.8 μM, respectively. Also, LL-37 activity was inhibited by these BAs in LL-37-enriched supernatants of stimulated neutrophils or human plasma derived from stimulated human whole blood. Together, we reveal BAs as inhibitors of LL-37, which might be a relevant mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory properties of BAs and suggests BAs as suitable chemical tools or potential agents for intervention with LL-37 and related disorders.

  6. Triglycerides, fatty acids, sterols, mono- and disaccharides and sugar alcohols in human milk and current types of infant formula milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M; vanBeusekom, CM; Nijeboer, HJ; Muskiet, FAJ; Boersma, ER

    Objective: To investigate differences in the fatty acid composition, sterols, minor carbohydrates and sugar alcohols between human and formula milk. Design: We analyzed the concentrations of triglycerides, sterols, di- and monosaccharides and sugar alcohols, as well as the fatty acid composition of

  7. Triglycerides, fatty acids, sterols, mono- and disaccharides and sugar alcohols in human milk and current types of infant formula milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M; vanBeusekom, CM; Nijeboer, HJ; Muskiet, FAJ; Boersma, ER

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To investigate differences in the fatty acid composition, sterols, minor carbohydrates and sugar alcohols between human and formula milk. Design: We analyzed the concentrations of triglycerides, sterols, di- and monosaccharides and sugar alcohols, as well as the fatty acid composition of

  8. White-to-brite conversion in human adipocytes promotes metabolic reprogramming towards fatty acid anabolic and catabolic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barquissau

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Conversion of human white fat cells into brite adipocytes results in a major metabolic reprogramming inducing fatty acid anabolic and catabolic pathways. PDK4 redirects glucose from oxidation towards triglyceride synthesis and favors the use of fatty acids as energy source for uncoupling mitochondria.

  9. Quantitative amino acid profiling and stable isotopically labeled amino acid tracer enrichment used for in vivo human systemic and tissue kinetics measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, Andreas; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    /ion exchange, derivatized using a phenylisothiocyanate reagent and each amino acid was quantitated with its own stable isotopically labeled internal standard (uniformly labeled-(13)C/(15)N). The method was validated according to general recommendations for chromatographic analytical methods. The calibration...... and plasma were 4.4 and 0.8%, and the interday variability was 3.4% and the recovery was 90.5%, respectively. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a method for quantitative amino acid profiling that meets the requirements for systemic and tissue human in vivo amino acid and protein turnover...

  10. Nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside: a molecular evaluation of NAD+ precursor vitamins in human nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Katrina L; Brenner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Although baseline requirements for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) synthesis can be met either with dietary tryptophan or with less than 20 mg of daily niacin, which consists of nicotinic acid and/or nicotinamide, there is growing evidence that substantially greater rates of NAD+ synthesis may be beneficial to protect against neurological degeneration, Candida glabrata infection, and possibly to enhance reverse cholesterol transport. The distinct and tissue-specific biosynthetic and/or ligand activities of tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and the newly identified NAD+ precursor, nicotinamide riboside, reviewed herein, are responsible for vitamin-specific effects and side effects. Because current data suggest that nicotinamide riboside may be the only vitamin precursor that supports neuronal NAD+ synthesis, we present prospects for human nicotinamide riboside supplementation and propose areas for future research.

  11. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity in subcellular fractions of normal and dystrophic human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, D; Rüstow, B; Olthoff, D; Jung, K

    1985-03-15

    Biopsy samples from normal and dystrophic human muscle (Duchenne type) were fractionated by differential centrifugation and microsomes, mitochondria and cytosol were assayed for phosphatidic acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.4) and marker enzymes of mitochondria and cytosol. The activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was significantly lower in microsomes and higher in cytosol and mitochondria of dystrophic muscle than in the corresponding subcellular fractions of normal muscle. The results support an explanation of earlier findings that there is reduced G3P incorporation into diglycerides and phosphatidylcholine and a qualitative and quantitative change in the amount of phosphatidylcholine in dystrophic microsomes. The possible reasons for the reduction in the activity of only microsomal PA-P-ase were discussed.

  12. Natively unfolded human prothymosin alpha adopts partially folded collapsed conformation at acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uversky, V N; Gillespie, J R; Millett, I S; Khodyakova, A V; Vasiliev, A M; Chernovskaya, T V; Vasilenko, R N; Kozlovskaya, G D; Dolgikh, D A; Fink, A L; Doniach, S; Abramov, V M

    1999-11-09

    Prothymosin alpha has previously been shown to be unfolded at neutral pH, thus belonging to a growing family of "natively unfolded" proteins. The structural properties and conformational stability of recombinant human prothymosin alpha were characterized at neutral and acidic pH by gel filtration, SAXS, circular dichroism, ANS fluorescence, (1)H NMR, and resistance to urea-induced unfolding. Interestingly, prothymosin alpha underwent a cooperative transition from the unfolded state into a partially folded conformation on lowering the pH. This conformation of prothymosin alpha is a compact denatured state, with structural properties different from those of the molten globule. The formation of alpha-helical structure by the glutamic acid-rich elements of the protein accompanied by the partial hydrophobic collapse is expected at lower pH due to the neutralization of the negatively charged residues. It is possible that such conformational changes may be associated with the protein function.

  13. Dietary requirements of "nutritionally non-essential amino acids" by animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoyao; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Yang, Ying; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Bin; Wang, Junjun; Yin, Yulong

    2013-04-01

    Amino acids are necessary for the survival, growth, development, reproduction and health of all organisms. They were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or non-essential for mammals, birds and fish based on nitrogen balance or growth. It was assumed that all "non-essential amino acids (NEAA)" were synthesized sufficiently in the body to meet the needs for maximal growth and health. However, there has been no compelling experimental evidence to support this assumption over the past century. NEAA (e.g., glutamine, glutamate, proline, glycine and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, neurotransmission, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine to maintain its digestive function and protect its mucosal integrity. Therefore, based on new research findings, NEAA should be taken into consideration in revising the classical "ideal protein" concept and formulating balanced diets to improve protein accretion, food efficiency, and health in animals and humans.

  14. LYZL6, an acidic, bacteriolytic, human sperm-related protein, plays a role in fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Li, Wenshu; Yang, Zhifang; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Yixin; Bao, Jianying; Jiang, Deke; Dong, Xianping

    2017-01-01

    Lysozyme-like proteins (LYZLs) belong to the c-type lysozyme/α-lactalbumin family and are selectively expressed in the mammalian male reproductive tract. Two members, human sperm lysozyme-like protein (SLLP) -1 and mouse LYZL4, have been reported to contribute to fertilization but show no bacteriolytic activity. Here, we focused on the possible contribution of LYZL6 to immunity and fertilization. In humans, LYZL6 was selectively expressed by the testis and epididymis and became concentrated on spermatozoa. Native LYZL6 isolated from sperm extracts exhibited bacteriolytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Recombinant LYZL6 (rLYZL6) reached its peak activity at pH 5.6 and 15 mM of Na+, and could inhibit the growth of Gram-positive, but not Gram-negative bacteria. Nevertheless, the bacteriolytic activity of rLYZL6 proved to be much lower than that of human lysozyme under physiological conditions. Immunodetection with a specific antiserum localized the LYZL6 protein on the postacrosomal membrane of mature spermatozoa. Immunoneutralization of LYZL6 significantly decreased the numbers of human spermatozoa fused with zona-free hamster eggs in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Thus, we report here for the first time that LYZL6, an acidic, bacteriolytic and human sperm-related protein, is likely important for fertilization but not for the innate immunity of the male reproductive tract. PMID:28182716

  15. Dimethylarsenic acid damages cellular DNA and inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication between human skin fibroblast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoXB; DengFR

    2002-01-01

    Although arsenic is identified as a human carcinogen,there is currently no accepted mechanism for its action or an established animal model for evaluating the carcinogenic activity of arsenic.To elucidate the mechanism of arsenic arcinogenesis,we investigated the effect of dimethylarsenic acid(DMAA),the main metabolite of inorganic arsenic in humans,on the cellular DNA and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between human skin fibroblast cells.Single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay was used to detect the DNA damage in human skin fibroblast cells exposed to DMAA,and the GJIC between cells was detected by the scrape loading/dye transfer assay.DMAA at concentrations of 0.01-1.0 mmol·L-1 induced DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner,and GJIC between human skin fibroblast cells was significantly inhibited by DMAA at 1.0 mmol·L-1.Our results suggest that both genotoxic and nongenotoxic mechanism are involved in the mechanism of DMAA-induced cellular toxicity.

  16. Comparative distribution of human and avian type sialic acid influenza receptors in the pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major determinant of influenza infection is the presence of virus receptors on susceptible host cells to which the viral haemagglutinin is able to bind. Avian viruses preferentially bind to sialic acid α2,3-galactose (SAα2,3-Gal linked receptors, whereas human strains bind to sialic acid α2,6-galactose (SAα2,6-Gal linked receptors. To date, there has been no detailed account published on the distribution of SA receptors in the pig, a model host that is susceptible to avian and human influenza subtypes, thus with potential for virus reassortment. We examined the relative expression and spatial distribution of SAα2,3-GalG(1-3GalNAc and SAα2,6-Gal receptors in the major organs from normal post-weaned pigs by binding with lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinins (MAA II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA respectively. Results Both SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors were extensively detected in the major porcine organs examined (trachea, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, skeletal muscle, cerebrum, small intestine and colon. Furthermore, distribution of both SA receptors in the pig respiratory tract closely resembled the published data of the human tract. Similar expression patterns of SA receptors between pig and human in other major organs were found, with exception of the intestinal tract. Unlike the limited reports on the scarcity of influenza receptors in human intestines, we found increasing presence of SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors from duodenum to colon in the pig. Conclusions The extensive presence of SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors in the major organs examined suggests that each major organ may be permissive to influenza virus entry or infection. The high similarity of SA expression patterns between pig and human, in particular in the respiratory tract, suggests that pigs are not more likely to be potential hosts for virus reassortment than humans. Our finding of relative abundance of SA receptors

  17. Quantitative amino acid profiling and stable isotopically labeled amino acid tracer enrichment used for in vivo human systemic and tissue kinetics measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornø, Andreas; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-03-01

    An important area within clinical functional metabolomics is in vivo amino acid metabolism and protein turnover measurements for which accurate amino acid concentrations and stable isotopically labeled amino acid enrichments are mandatory not the least when tissue metabolomics is determined. The present study describes a new sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry method quantifying 20 amino acids and their tracer(s) ([ring-(13)C6]/D5Phenylalanine) in human plasma and skeletal muscle specimens. Before analysis amino acids were extracted and purified via deprotonization/ion exchange, derivatized using a phenylisothiocyanate reagent and each amino acid was quantitated with its own stable isotopically labeled internal standard (uniformly labeled-(13)C/(15)N). The method was validated according to general recommendations for chromatographic analytical methods. The calibration curve correlations for amino acids were on average; r(2)=0.998. Interday accuracy for amino acids determined in spiked plasma was on average 97.3% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 2.6%. The ([ring-(13)C6]/D5Phenylalanine) enrichment CV's for machine reproducibility in muscle tissue fluid and plasma were 4.4 and 0.8%, and the interday variability was 3.4% and the recovery was 90.5%, respectively. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a method for quantitative amino acid profiling that meets the requirements for systemic and tissue human in vivo amino acid and protein turnover kinetics measurements. Moreover, citrulline, ornithine, π-methyl-histidine, τ-methyl-l-histidine, hydroxy-proline and carnitine were analysed but when similar precision and accuray are required an additional stable istopically labeled internal standard for these meatablites should be be added.

  18. Effect of obesity and metabolic syndrome on plasma oxysterols and fatty acids in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Zerbinati, Chiara; Pacelli, Antonio; Palmaccio, Giuseppina; Lubrano, Carla; Ducheix, Simon; Guillou, Hervé; Iuliano, Luigi

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and the related entity metabolic syndrome are characterized by altered lipid metabolism and associated with increased morbidity risk for cardiovascular disease and cancer. Oxysterols belong to a large family of cholesterol-derived molecules known to play crucial role in many signaling pathways underlying several diseases. Little is known on the potential effect of obesity and metabolic syndrome on oxysterols in human. In this work, we questioned whether circulating oxysterols might be significantly altered in obese patients and in patients with metabolic syndrome. We also tested the potential correlation between circulating oxysterols and fatty acids. 60 obese patients and 75 patients with metabolic syndrome were enrolled in the study along with 210 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects, used as control group. Plasma oxysterols were analyzed by isotope dilution GC/MS, and plasma fatty acids profiling was assessed by gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detection. We found considerable differences in oxysterols profiling in the two disease groups that were gender-related. Compared to controls, males showed significant differences only in 4α- and 4β-hydroxycholesterol levels in obese and metabolic syndrome patients. In contrast, females showed consistent differences in 7-oxocholesterol, 4α-hydroxycholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol and triol. Concerning fatty acids, we found minor differences in the levels of these variables in males of the three groups. Significant changes were observed in plasma fatty acid profile of female patients with obesity or metabolic syndrome. We found significant correlations between various oxysterols and fatty acids. In particular, 4β-hydroxycholesterol, which is reduced in obesity and metabolic syndrome, correlated with a number of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids that are end-products of de novo lipogenesis. Our data provide the first evidence that obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with

  19. Urolithins, ellagic acid-derived metabolites produced by human colonic microflora, exhibit estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrosa, Mar; González-Sarrías, Antonio; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2006-03-08

    Urolithins A and B (hydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one derivatives) are colonic microflora metabolites recently proposed as biomarkers of human exposure to dietary ellagic acid derivatives. Molecular models suggest that urolithins could display estrogenic and/or antiestrogenic activity. To this purpose, both urolithins and other known phytoestrogens (genistein, daidzein, resveratrol, and enterolactone) were assayed to evaluate the capacity to induce cell proliferation on the estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells as well as the ability to bind to alpha- and beta-estrogen receptors. Both urolithins A and B showed estrogenic activity in a dose-dependent manner even at high concentrations (40 microM), without antiproliferative or toxic effects, whereas the other phytoestrogens inhibited cell proliferation at high concentrations. Overall, urolithins showed weaker estrogenic activity than the other phytoestrogens. However, both urolithins displayed slightly higher antiestrogenic activity (antagonized the growth promotion effect of 17-beta-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner) than the other phytoestrogens. The IC(50) values for the ERalpha and ERbeta binding assays were 0.4 and 0.75 microM for urolithin A; 20 and 11 microM for urolithin B; 3 and 0.02 for genistein; and 2.3 and 1 for daidzein, respectively; no binding was detected for resveratrol and enterolactone. Urolithins A and B entered into MCF-7 cells and were metabolized to yield mainly urolithin-sulfate derivatives. These results, together with previous studies regarding absorption and metabolism of dietary ellagitannins and ellagic acid in humans, suggest that the gut microflora metabolites urolithins are potential endocrine-disrupting molecules, which could resemble other described "enterophytoestrogens" (microflora-derived metabolites with estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity). Further research is warranted to evaluate the possible role of ellagitannins and ellagic acid as dietary "pro-phytoestrogens".

  20. Determination of phthalic acid diesters in human milk at low ppb levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Simone; Gruber, Ludwig; Schlummer, Martin; Smolic, Sonja; Fromme, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Phthalic acid diesters (PAE) are omnipresent in the human environment and food is a major contributor to the overall human exposure towards these chemicals. Due to developmental effects, PAE infants' exposure via human milk has been subjected to a number of analytical studies. These previous studies, however, revealed that normal laboratory blank values are in the range of or even higher than human milk levels due to the presence of PAE in laboratory environments. In order to provide more reliable data on PAE exposure via human milk, the aim of this study was to develop and validate a robust and sensitive analytical method. This should be capable of removing matrix components efficiently and guarantee limits of quantification in the low ppb range. The method development took into account liquid-liquid extraction and selective pressurised fluid extraction (sPFE) as well as chromatography-based clean-up steps. The final method consisted of a liquid-liquid extraction followed by an automated chromatographic clean-up by an sPFE device. After volume reduction the cleaned extracts were analysed by quadrupole GC/MS. Quantification was based on internal standards. An extensive quality assurance and method test programme demonstrated conservatively determined limits of detection and quantification from 0.3 to 10 ng g⁻¹ in human milk, with recoveries of internal standards from 50% to 101%. Thus, the method allowed the quality-assured detection of di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), di-allyl phthalate (DAP), benzylbutyl phthalate (BBP) and di-cyclohexyl phthalate (DcHP) in 30 human milk samples provided by 30 volunteers from southern Germany. DiBP, DBP and DEHP were the most commonly detected PAE, with median levels of 1.0, 0.6 and 2.3 ng g⁻¹, respectively.

  1. "Determination of mycophenolic acid in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography"

    OpenAIRE

    "Mehdi Ahadi Barzoki; Mohammadreza Rouini; Kheirolla Gholami; Mahboob Lessan-Pezeshki; Saeed Rezaee

    2005-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and reproducible HPLC method is presented for determination of mycophenolic acid(MPA) in human plasma. Samples were prepared after precipitation of the plasma protein by addition of acetonitrile and naproxen was used as internal standard (I.S.). Separation was performed by reversedphase HPLC, using a Hamilton PRP-C18 Column, 51% acetonitrile and 49% potassium phosphate buffer (20 mM) at pH 3.0 as mobile phase, flow rate of 1.0 ml/min, and UV detection at 215 nm. MPA and I....

  2. Determination of talniflumate and niflumic acid in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wonku; Kim, Kibum

    2009-04-01

    A simple and rapid quantification method was developed for determining both talniflumate and niflumic acid in human plasma. After simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile, the analytes were chromatographed on a reversed-phase C(18) column and detected by LC/MS/MS with electrospray ionization. The assay accuracy and precision were within the FDA guidance for the analytical method validation. This method was used to measure the plasma concentrations of both compounds from healthy subjects after a single oral dose of talniflumate, 740 mg.

  3. Stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture for human embryonic stem cell proteomic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Prokhorova, Tatyana A; Kassem, Moustapha

    2012-01-01

    The identification and quantitative measurements of proteins in human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is a fast growing interdisciplinary area with an enormous impact on understanding the biology of hESC and the mechanism controlling self-renewal and differentiation. Using a quantitative mass...... spectroscopic method of stable isotope labelling with amino acids during cell culture (SILAC), we are able to analyse differential expression of proteins from different cellular compartments and to identify intracellular signalling pathways involved in self-renewal and differentiation. In this chapter, we...

  4. Antitumor Effect of Betulinic Acid on Human Acute Leukemia K562 Cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴秋玲; 何静; 方峻; 洪梅

    2010-01-01

    The effects of betulinic acid (BA), a pentacyclic lupane-type triterpene, on the cell viability, cell cycle and apoptosis in human leukemia K562 cells were investigated. The effects of BA on the growth of K562 cells were studied by MTT assay. Apoptosis was assayed through Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double-labeled cytometry. The effects of BA on the cell cycle of K562 cells were studied by a PI method. The expression of Bax and capase-3 was detected by using Western blot. The results showed that BA was ...

  5. The contribution of SNAT1 to system A amino acid transporter activity in human placental trophoblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desforges, M., E-mail: michelle.desforges@manchester.ac.uk [Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre, Developmental Biomedicine, School of Medicine, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, St. Mary' s Hospital, Level 5-Research, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9WL (United Kingdom); Greenwood, S.L.; Glazier, J.D.; Westwood, M.; Sibley, C.P. [Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre, Developmental Biomedicine, School of Medicine, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, St. Mary' s Hospital, Level 5-Research, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9WL (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} mRNA levels for SNAT1 are higher than other system A subtype mRNAs in primary human cytotrophoblast. {yields} SNAT1 knockdown in cytotrophoblast cells significantly reduces system A activity. {yields} SNAT1 is a key contributor to system A-mediated amino acid transport in human placenta. -- Abstract: System A-mediated amino acid transport across the placenta is important for the supply of neutral amino acids needed for fetal growth. All three system A subtypes (SNAT1, 2, and 4) are expressed in human placental trophoblast suggesting there is an important biological role for each. Placental system A activity increases as pregnancy progresses, coinciding with increased fetal nutrient demands. We have previously shown SNAT4-mediated system A activity is higher in first trimester than at term, suggesting that SNAT1 and/or SNAT2 are responsible for the increased system A activity later in gestation. However, the relative contribution of each subtype to transporter activity in trophoblast at term has yet to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to identify the predominant subtype of system A in cytotrophoblast cells isolated from term placenta, maintained in culture for 66 h, by: (1) measuring mRNA expression of the three subtypes and determining the Michaelis-Menten constants for uptake of the system A-specific substrate, {sup 14}C-MeAIB, (2) investigating the contribution of SNAT1 to total system A activity using siRNA. Results: mRNA expression was highest for the SNAT1 subtype of system A. Kinetic analysis of {sup 14}C-MeAIB uptake revealed two distinct transport systems; system 1: K{sub m} = 0.38 {+-} 0.12 mM, V{sub max} = 27.8 {+-} 9.0 pmol/mg protein/20 min, which resembles that reported for SNAT1 and SNAT2 in other cell types, and system 2: K{sub m} = 45.4 {+-} 25.0 mM, V{sub max} = 1190 {+-} 291 pmol/mg protein/20 min, which potentially represents SNAT4. Successful knockdown of SNAT1 mRNA using target-specific si

  6. Pyrazole phenylcyclohexylcarbamates as inhibitors of human fatty acid amide hydrolases (FAAH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh Tabrizi, Mojgan; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Ruggiero, Emanuela; Saponaro, Giulia; Baraldi, Stefania; Romagnoli, Romeo; Martinelli, Adriano; Tuccinardi, Tiziano

    2015-06-05

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors have gained attention as potential therapeutic targets in the management of neuropathic pain. Here, we report a series of pyrazole phenylcyclohexylcarbamate derivatives standing on the known carbamoyl FAAH inhibitor URB597. Structural modifications led to the recognition of compound 22 that inhibited human recombinant FAAH (hrFAAH) in the low nanomolar range (IC50 = 11 nM). The most active compounds of this series showed significant selectivity toward monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) enzyme. In addition, molecular modeling and reversibility behavior of the new class of FAAH inhibitors are presented in this article.

  7. Effects of dietary fiber from wheat, corn, and soy hull bran on excretion of fecal bile acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, E W; Emken, E A; Klevay, L M; Sandstead, H H

    1981-06-01

    Effects of dietary fiber on bile acid excretion and fecal bile acid concentration have been studied for seven subjects fed 26 g of either soft white wheat bran, corn bran, soybean hulls, or hard red spring wheat bran. Results indicate that even in a controlled study using a metabolic word, individual subject variation has a major impact on fecal bile acid excretion. This observation has not been fully appreciated in previous human studies. No significant change in the composition of fecal bile acids could be associated with the decrease in serum lipid levels previously reported. A method for the isolation and quantitation of fecal bile acids is described which does not require purification by thin-layer chromatography. A preliminary study of lyophilized fecal samples stored at -10 to -30 degrees C showed very little or no change in bile acid content. Samples stored at room temperatures for 11 months showed a substantial reduction in bile acid content.

  8. ASAM LEMAK TRANS DALAM MAKANAN DAN PENGARUHNYA TERHADAP KESEHATAN [Trans Fatty Acids in Foods and Their Effects on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Silalahi 1

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Unsaturated fatty acids are present in natural dietary fat as cis-isomer and, only small amount is in the form of trans-isomer fatty acids (TFA especially in food of ruminant- animal origin. Trans fatty acids are generated in fat during hydrogenation process and by heating treatment at 180 oC or above. Negative effects of TFA are of increasing concern as they are found to have more risk than saturated fatty acids with regard to coronary heard disease incidences. When consumed in large amounts (more than 2 % of total energy TFA increases total cholesterol levels by increasing low density lipoprotein (LDL and decreasing high density lipoprotein (HDL. Therefore the resulting effects may be twice as much as that caused by saturated fatty acids because saturated fatty acids increase LDL without affecting HDL. This article reviews trans fatty acids in foods and their effects on human health.

  9. Impact of folic acid supplementation on single- and double-stranded RNA degradation in human colostrum and mature milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocic, Gordana; Bjelakovic, Ljiljana; Bjelakovic, Bojko; Jevtoci-Stoimenov, Tatjana; Sokolovic, Dusan; Cvetkovic, Tatjana; Kocic, Hristina; Stojanovic, Svetlana; Langerholc, Tomaz; Jonovic, Marina

    2014-07-01

    Sufficient intake of folic acid is necessary for normal embryogenesis, fetal, and neonatal development. Folic acid facilitates nucleic acid internalization, and protects cellular DNA from nuclease degradation. Human milk contains enzymes, antimicrobial proteins, and antibodies, along with macrophages, that protect against infections and allergies. However, little to no information is available on the effects of folic acid supplementation on degradation of nucleic acids in human milk. In the present study, we aimed to determine the RNase activity (free and inhibitor-bound) in colostrum and mature milk, following folic acid supplementation. The study design included a total of 59 women, 27 of whom received 400 μg of folic acid daily periconceptionally and after. Folic acid supplementation increased the free RNase and polyadenylase activity following lactation. However, the increased RNase activity was not due to de novo enzyme synthesis, as the inhibitor-bound (latent) RNase activity was significantly lower and disappeared after one month. Folic acid reduced RNase activity by using double-stranded RNA as substrate. Data suggests that folic acid supplementation may improve viral RNAs degradation and mRNA degradation, but not dsRNA degradation, preserving in this way the antiviral defense.

  10. Effect of bile salts and bile acids on human gastric mucosal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinxue Song; Jun Gong

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of bile salt and bile acid on cultured eternalized human gastric mucosa epithelium GES-1 cells.Methods:Cultured eternalized human gastric mucosa epithelium GES-1 cells were treated with media containing 6 different kinds of bile salts and 3 different kinds of bile acids and their mixture with different concentrations: GCDC(glycochenodeoxycholate), GDC (glycodeoxycholate), GC(glycocholate), TCDC(taurochenodeoxycholate), TDC(taurodeoxycholate), TC (taurocholate), LCA (lithocholicacid), CA(cholic acid), DCA(deoxycholic acid)(50 μ mol/L,250 μ mol/L,500 μ mol/L, 1000 μ mol/L), DY(mixture of bile salts) and DS(mixture of bile acids)(250 μ mol/L,500 μ mol/L,1000 μ mol/L,1500 μ mol/L, 2000 μ mol/L), in comparison with thecontrol group(in normal media without bile salts and bile acids).Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT(3-[4,5-Dimethylthiaolyl]-2,5- diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay for 72 hours with different concentrations and the apoptotic cells were assayed by flow cytometry (FCM) with Annex V-FITC conjugated with propidium iodide(PI) staining for 24 hours with different concentrations(1500,2000 μ mol/L).Results:There was no significant difference in morphology and cell proliferation in GC group after 24-72 h.Low concentration(50 μ mol/L) of GCDC, GDC, TCDC, TDC and TC accelerated gastric epithelial cell growth in a dosage-time dependent manner.At middle concentration (250-500 μ mol/L), it showed positive effect after 24-48 h, while negative effect after 72 h.At high concentration(1000 μ tool/L), it accelerated gastric epithelial cell growth after 24h and show consistent inhibition even leading to necrosis after 48-72 h.LCA and CA showed a positive effect on the concentration of 50 μ mol/L after 24-72 h, while 250-1000 It mol/L showed a trend towards apoptosis after 24-72 h.At 50-500 μ mol/L, DCA showed proliferation after 24 h and apoptosis after 48-72 h, but showed necrosis after 24-72 h at 1000 μ moiFL.DY and DS

  11. Human platelet releasates combined with polyglycolic acid scaffold promote chondrocyte differentiation and phenotypic maintenance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Giulia Bernardini; Federico Chellini; Bruno Frediani; Adriano Spreafico; Annalisa Santucci

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate the differentiating properties of platelet-rich plasma releasates (PRPr) on human chondrocytes seeded on a polygtlycolic acid (PGA) 3D scaffold. Gene expression and biochemical analysis were carried out to assess the improved quality of our PGA-based cartilage constructs supplemented with PRPr. We observed that the use of PRPr as cell cultures supplementation to PGA-chondrocyte constructs may promote chondrocyte differentiation, and thus may contribute to maintaining the chondrogenic phenotype longer than conventional supplementation by increasing high levels of important chondrogenic markers (e.g. sox9, aggrecan and type II collagen), without induction of type I collagen. Moreover, our constructs were analysed for the secretion and deposition of important ECM molecules (sGAG, type II collagen, etc.). Our results indicate that PRPr supplementation may synergize with PGA-based scaffolds to stimulate human articular chondrocyte differentiation, maturation and phenotypic maintenance.

  12. Effect of simultaneous consumption of milk and coffee on chlorogenic acids' bioavailability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Giselle S; Farah, Adriana

    2011-07-27

    Different studies have shown that milk may interact with polyphenols and affect their bioavailability in humans. The present study investigated the effect of the simultaneous consumption of coffee and milk on the urinary excretion of chlorogenic acids (CGA) and metabolites. Subjects were submitted to consumption of water, instant coffee (609 mmol of CGA) dissolved in water, and instant coffee dissolved in whole milk. Urine was collected for 24 h after consumption of each treatment for analysis of CGA and metabolites by HPLC/LC-MS. The amount of CGA and metabolites recovered after consumption of combined coffee-milk (40% ± 27%) was consistently lower in all subjects compared to that of coffee alone (68% ± 20%). Concluding, the simultaneous consumption of milk and coffee may impair the bioavailability of coffee CGA in humans.

  13. Polymeric proanthocyanidins are catabolized by human colonic microflora into low-molecular-weight phenolic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déprez, S; Brezillon, C; Rabot, S; Philippe, C; Mila, I; Lapierre, C; Scalbert, A

    2000-11-01

    Polymeric proanthocyanidins are common constituents of many foods and beverages. Their fate in the human body remains largely unknown. Their metabolism by human colonic microflora incubated in vitro in anoxic conditions has been investigated using nonlabeled and (14)C-labeled purified proanthocyanidin polymers. Polymers were almost totally degraded after 48 h of incubation. Phenylacetic, phenylpropionic and phenylvaleric acids, monohydroxylated mainly in the meta or para position, were identified as metabolites by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Yields were similar to those previously reported for flavonoid monomers. These results provide the first evidence of degradation of dietary phenolic polymers into low-molecular-weight aromatic compounds. To understand the nutritional properties of proanthocyanidins, it is therefore essential to consider the biological properties of these metabolites.

  14. Purification of human immunoglobulins by sequential precipitation with caprylic acid and ammonium sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perosa, F; Carbone, R; Ferrone, S; Dammacco, F

    1990-03-27

    We have tested the usefulness of sequential precipitation with caprylic acid and ammonium sulfate to purify human monoclonal and polyclonal immunoglobulins from sera of 11 patients with monoclonal gammapathy (4 IgG kappa, 2 IgG lambda, 2 IgM kappa, 1 IgA kappa, 2 IgA lambda), four patients with autoimmune diseases and four healthy donors. In terms of purity and activity of Ig as well as execution time and cost, this two-step non-chromatographic procedure is highly efficient for the purification of IgG, IgA and IgM, thus offering several advantages over other methods of purification. Therefore, this procedure may have useful application in the preparation of human Ig for structural studies and therapeutic purposes.

  15. Comparison of Uric Acid Quantity with Different Food in Human Urine by Flow Injection Chemiluminescence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the inhibitory effect of uric acid (UA on luminol-Co2+ chemiluminescence (CL system, a sensitive method for the determination of UA at nanomolar level by flow injection (FI CL was proposed. The proposed method was successfully applied to real-time monitoring of UA excretion in human 24 h urine with different food intake, showing that meats, vegetables, and porridge intake caused differential UA excretions of 879, 798, and 742 mg, respectively. It was also found that UA concentrations in urine under the three kinds of food intake simultaneously reached maximum at 2 h after meals with the values of 417, 318, and 288 μg mL−1, respectively. The UA concentration in human serum was also determined by this approach, and the possible mechanism of luminol-Co2+-UA CL reaction was discussed in detail.

  16. Homology modeling of human γ-butyric acid transporters and the binding of pro-drugs 5-aminolevulinic acid and methyl aminolevulinic acid used in photodynamic therapy.

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    Yan Baglo

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a safe and effective method currently used in the treatment of skin cancer. In ALA-based PDT, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA, or ALA esters, are used as pro-drugs to induce the formation of the potent photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX. Activation of PpIX by light causes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and toxic responses. Studies have indicated that ALA and its methyl ester (MAL are taken up into the cells via γ-butyric acid (GABA transporters (GATs. Uptake via GATs into peripheral sensory nerve endings may also account for one of the few adverse side effects of ALA-based PDT, namely pain. In the present study, homology models of the four human GAT subtypes were constructed using three x-ray crystal structures of the homologous leucine transporter (LeuT as templates. Binding of the native substrate GABA and the possible substrates ALA and MAL was investigated by molecular docking of the ligands into the central putative substrate binding sites in the outward-occluded GAT models. Electrostatic potentials (ESPs of the putative substrate translocation pathway of each subtype were calculated using the outward-open and inward-open homology models. Our results suggested that ALA is a substrate of all four GATs and that MAL is a substrate of GAT-2, GAT-3 and BGT-1. The ESP calculations indicated that differences likely exist in the entry pathway of the transporters (i.e. in outward-open conformations. Such differences may be exploited for development of inhibitors that selectively target specific GAT subtypes and the homology models may hence provide tools for design of therapeutic inhibitors that can be used to reduce ALA-induced pain.

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA 18:1 transcriptional regulation of primary human gingival fibroblasts

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    D. Roselyn Cerutis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The pleiotropic, bioactive lipid lysophosphatidic acid [(LPA, 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate] exerts critical regulatory actions in physiology and pathophysiology in many systems. It is present in normal bodily fluids, and is elevated in pathology (1. In vivo, “LPA” exists as distinct molecular species, each having a single fatty acid of varying chain length and degree of unsaturation covalently attached to the glycerol backbone via an acyl, alkyl, or alkenyl link. These species differ in affinities for the individual LPA receptors [(LPARs, LPA1-6] and coupling to G proteins (2. However, LPA 18:1 has been and continues to be the most commonly utilized species in reported studies. The actions of “LPA” remain poorly defined in oral biology and pathophysiology. Our laboratory has addressed this knowledge gap by studying in vitro the actions of the major human salivary LPA species [18:1, 18:0, and 16:0 (3] in human oral cells (4–7. This includes gingival fibroblasts (GF, which our flow cytometry data from multiple donors found that they express LPA1-5 (6. We have also reported that these species are ten-fold elevated to pharmacologic levels in the saliva and gingival crevicular fluid obtained from patients with moderate–severe periodontitis (8. As the potential of LPA to regulate transcriptional activity had not been examined in the oral system, this study used whole human genome microarray analysis to test the hypothesis that LPA 18:1-treated human GF would show significant changes in gene transcripts relevant to their biology, wound-healing, and inflammatory responses. LPA 18:1 was found to significantly regulate a large, complex set of genes critical to GF biology in these categories and to periodontal disease. The raw data has been deposited at NCBI's GEO database as record GSE57496.

  18. Fat content, energy value and fatty acid profile of donkey milk during lactation and implications for human nutrition

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    Martemucci Giovanni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aims Milk contains numerous nutrients. The content of n-3 fatty acids, the n-6/n-3 ratio, and short- and medium-chain fatty acids may promote positive health effects. In Western societies, cow’s milk fat is perceived as a risk factor for health because it is a source of a high fraction of saturated fatty acids. Recently, there has been increasing interest in donkey’s milk. In this work, the fat and energetic value and acidic composition of donkey’s milk, with reference to human nutrition, and their variations during lactation, were investigated. We also discuss the implications of the acidic profile of donkey’s milk on human nutrition. Methods Individual milk samples from lactating jennies were collected 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 and 210days after foaling, for the analysis of fat, proteins and lactose, which was achieved using an infrared milk analyser, and fatty acids composition by gas chromatography. Results The donkey’s milk was characterised by low fat and energetic (1719.2kJ·kg-1 values, a high polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA content of mainly α-linolenic acid (ALA and linoleic acid (LA, a low n-6 to n-3 FA ratio or LA/ALA ratio, and advantageous values of atherogenic and thrombogenic indices. Among the minor PUFA, docosahesaenoic (DHA, eicosapentanoic (EPA, and arachidonic (AA acids were present in very small amounts ( The fatty acid patterns were affected by the lactation stage and showed a decrease (P Conclusions The high level of unsaturated/saturated fatty acids and PUFA-n3 content and the low n-6/n-3 ratio suggest the use of donkey’s milk as a functional food for human nutrition and its potential utilisation for infant nutrition as well as adult diets, particular for the elderly.

  19. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid attenuates human astrocyte neurotoxicity induced by interferon-γ

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    Hashioka Sadayuki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds Increasing evidence shows that the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. It is tempting to evaluate the potential of SAHA as a therapeutic agent in various neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Methods We examined the effects of SAHA on interferon (IFN-γ-induced neurotoxicity of human astrocytes and on IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT 3 in human astrocytes. We also studied the effects of SAHA on the astrocytic production of two representative IFN-γ-inducible inflammatory molecules, namely IFN-γ-inducible T cell α chemoattractant (I-TAC and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1. Results SAHA significantly attenuated the toxicity of astrocytes activated by IFN-γ towards SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells. In the IFN-γ-activated astrocytes, SAHA reduced the STAT3 phosphorylation. SAHA also inhibited the IFN-γ-induced astrocytic production of I-TAC, but not ICAM-1. These results indicate that SAHA suppresses IFN-γ-induced neurotoxicity of human astrocytes through inhibition of the STAT3 signaling pathway. Conclusion Due to its anti-neurotoxic and anti-inflammatory properties, SAHA appears to have the therapeutic or preventive potential for a wide range of neuroinflammatory disorders associated with activated astrocytes.

  20. Significance of the detection of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) in human breast tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Philip W; Everett, David J

    2004-01-01

    This issue of Journal of Applied Toxicology publishes the paper Concentrations of Parabens in Human Breast Tumours by Darbre et al. (2004), which reports that esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) can be detected in samples of tissue from human breast tumours. Breast tumour samples were supplied from 20 patients, in collaboration with the Edinburgh Breast Unit Research Group, and analysed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The parabens are used as antimicrobial preservatives in underarm deodorants and antiperspirants and in a wide range of other consumer products. The parabens also have inherent oestrogenic and other hormone related activity (increased progesterone receptor gene expression). As oestrogen is a major aetiological factor in the growth and development of the majority of human breast cancers, it has been previously suggested by Darbre that parabens and other chemicals in underarm cosmetics may contribute to the rising incidence of breast cancer. The significance of the finding of parabens in tumour samples is discussed here in terms of 1). Darbre et al's study design, 2). what can be inferred from this type of data (and what can not, such as the cause of these tumours), 3). the toxicology of these compounds and 4). the limitations of the existing toxicology database and the need to consider data that is appropriate to human exposures. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A human fatty acid synthase inhibitor binds β-ketoacyl reductase in the keto-substrate site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwicke, Mary Ann; Rendina, Alan R; Williams, Shawn P; Moore, Michael L; Wang, Liping; Krueger, Julie A; Plant, Ramona N; Totoritis, Rachel D; Zhang, Guofeng; Briand, Jacques; Burkhart, William A; Brown, Kristin K; Parrish, Cynthia A

    2014-09-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (hFAS) is a complex, multifunctional enzyme that is solely responsible for the de novo synthesis of long chain fatty acids. hFAS is highly expressed in a number of cancers, with low expression observed in most normal tissues. Although normal tissues tend to obtain fatty acids from the diet, tumor tissues rely on de novo fatty acid synthesis, making hFAS an attractive metabolic target for the treatment of cancer. We describe here the identification of GSK2194069, a potent and specific inhibitor of the β-ketoacyl reductase (KR) activity of hFAS; the characterization of its enzymatic and cellular mechanism of action; and its inhibition of human tumor cell growth. We also present the design of a new protein construct suitable for crystallography, which resulted in what is to our knowledge the first co-crystal structure of the human KR domain and includes a bound inhibitor.

  2. Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides Contribute to the Disposition of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Humans and Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen; Zitzow, Jeremiah D; Weaver, Yi; Ehresman, David J; Chang, Shu-Ching; Butenhoff, John L; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2016-12-24

    Perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs) such as perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have very long serum elimination half-lives in humans, and preferentially distribute to serum and liver. The enterohepatic circulation of PFHxS and PFOS likely contributes to their extended elimination half-lives. We previously demonstrated that perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), PFHxS, and PFOS are transported into hepatocytes both in a sodium-dependent and a sodium-independent manner. We identified Na(+)/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) as the responsible sodium-dependent transporter. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the human apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter (ASBT) contributes to the intestinal reabsorption of PFOS. However, so far no sodium-independent uptake transporters for PFSAs have been identified in human hepatocytes or enterocytes. In addition, perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) with 8 and 9 carbons were shown to preferentially distribute to the liver of rodents; however, no rat or human liver uptake transporters are known to transport these PFCAs. Therefore, we tested whether PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS, and PFCAs with 7-10 carbons are substrates of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs). We used CHO and HEK293 cells to demonstrate that human OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1 can transport PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS, and the 2 PFCAs (C8 and C9). In addition, we show that rat OATP1A1, OATP1A5, OATP1B2, and OATP2B1 transport all 3 PFSAs. In conclusion, our results suggest that besides NTCP and ASBT, OATPs also are capable of contributing to the enterohepatic circulation and extended human serum elimination half-lives of the tested perfluoroalkyl acids.

  3. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on UVR-related cancer risk in humans. An assessment of early genotoxic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhodes, L.E.; Shahbakhti, H.; Azurdia, R.M.; Moison, R.M.W.; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; Homburg, M.I.; Dean, M.P.; McArdle, F.; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G.M.J.; Epe, B.; Vink, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) protect against photocarcinogenesis in animals, but prospective human studies are scarce. The mechanism(s) underlying the photoprotection are uncertain, although ω-3 PUFAs may influence oxidative stress. We examined the effect of

  4. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on UVR-related cancer risk in humans. An assessment of early genotoxic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhodes, L.E.; Shahbakhti, H.; Azurdia, R.M.; Moison, R.M.W.; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; Homburg, M.I.; Dean, M.P.; McArdle, F.; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G.M.J.; Epe, B.; Vink, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) protect against photocarcinogenesis in animals, but prospective human studies are scarce. The mechanism(s) underlying the photoprotection are uncertain, although ω-3 PUFAs may influence oxidative stress. We examined the effect of supplementatio

  5. A New HPLC-MS Method for Measuring Maslinic Acid and Oleanolic Acid in HT29 and HepG2 Human Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peragón, Juan; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; Muñoz-Espada, Irene; Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) and oleanolic acid (OA), the main triterpenic acids present in olive, have important properties for health and disease prevention. MA selectively inhibits cell proliferation of the HT29 human colon-cancer cell line by inducing selective apoptosis. For measuring the MA and OA concentration inside the cell and in the culture medium, a new HPLC-MS procedure has been developed. With this method, a determination of the amount of MA and OA incorporated into HT29 and HepG2 human cancer-cell lines incubated with different concentrations of MA corresponding to 50% growth inhibitory concentration (IC50), IC50/2, IC50/4, and IC50/8 has been made. The results demonstrate that this method is appropriate for determining the MA and OA concentration in different types of cultured cells and reveals the specific dynamics of entry of MA into HT29 and HepG2 cells. PMID:26370984

  6. Sugar-coated: exopolysaccharide producing lactic acid bacteria for food and human health applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, P M; Ross, R P; Fitzgerald, G F; Caplice, N M; Stanton, C

    2015-03-01

    The human enteric microbiome represents a veritable organ relied upon by the host for a range of metabolic and homeostatic functions. Through the production of metabolites such as short chain fatty acids (SCFA), folate, vitamins B and K, lactic acid, bacteriocins, peroxides and exopolysaccharides, the bacteria of the gut microbiome provide nutritional components for colonocytes, liver and muscle cells, competitively exclude potential pathogenic organisms and modulate the hosts immune system. Due to the extensive variation in structure, size and composition, microbial exopolysaccharides represent a useful set of versatile natural ingredients for the food industrial sector, both in terms of their rheological properties and in many cases, their associated health benefits. The exopolysaccharide-producing bacteria that fall within the 35 Lactobacillus and five Bifidobacterium species which have achieved qualified presumption of safety (QPS) and generally recognised as safe (GRAS) status are of particular interest, as their inclusion in food products can avoid considerable scrutiny. In addition, additives commonly utilised by the food industry are becoming unattractive to the consumer, due to the demand for a more 'natural' and 'clean labelled' diet. In situ production of exopolysaccharides by food-grade cultures in many cases confers similar rheological and sensory properties in fermented dairy products, as traditional additives, such as hydrocolloids, collagen and alginate. This review will focus on microbial synthesis of exopolysaccharides, the human health benefits of dietary exopolysaccharides and the technofunctional applications of exopolysaccharide-synthesising microbes in the food industry.

  7. Mechanism of Orlistat Hydrolysis by the Thioesterase of Human Fatty Acid Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fako, Valerie E; Zhang, Jian-Ting; Liu, Jing-Yuan

    2014-10-03

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN), the sole protein capable of de novo synthesis of free fatty acids, is overexpressed in a wide variety of human cancers and is associated with poor prognosis and aggressiveness of these cancers. Orlistat, an FDA-approved drug for obesity treatment that inhibits pancreatic lipases in the GI tract, also inhibits the thioesterase (TE) of human FASN. The cocrystal structure of TE with orlistat shows a pseudo TE dimer containing two different forms of orlistat in the active site, an intermediate that is covalently bound to a serine residue (Ser(2308)) and a hydrolyzed and inactivated product. In this study, we attempted to understand the mechanism of TE-catalyzed orlistat hydrolysis by examining the role of the hexyl tail of the covalently bound orlistat in water activation for hydrolysis using molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the hexyl tail of the covalently bound orlistat undergoes a conformational transition, which is accompanied by destabilization of a hydrogen bond between a hydroxyl moiety of orlistat and the catalytic His(2481) of TE that in turn leads to an increased hydrogen bonding between water molecules and His(2481) and increased chance for water activation to hydrolyze the covalent bond between orlistat and Ser(2308). Thus, the conformation of the hexyl tail of orlistat plays an important role in orlistat hydrolysis. Strategies that stabilize the hexyl tail may lead to the design of more potent irreversible inhibitors that target FASN and block TE activity with greater endurance.

  8. Effects of chronic lithium administration on renal acid excretion in humans and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, I David; Leader, John P; Bedford, Jennifer J; Verlander, Jill W; Ellis, Gaye; Kalita, Priyakshi; Vos, Frederiek; de Jong, Sylvia; Walker, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    Lithium therapy's most common side effects affecting the kidney are nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) and chronic kidney disease. Lithium may also induce a distal renal tubular acidosis. This study investigated the effect of chronic lithium exposure on renal acid-base homeostasis, with emphasis on ammonia and citrate excretion. We compared 11 individuals on long-term lithium therapy with six healthy individuals. Under basal conditions, lithium-treated individuals excreted significantly more urinary ammonia than did control subjects. Following an acute acid load, urinary ammonia excretion increased approximately twofold above basal rates in both lithium-treated and control humans. There were no significant differences between lithium-treated and control subjects in urinary pH or urinary citrate excretion. To elucidate possible mechanisms, rats were randomized to diets containing lithium or regular diet for 6 months. Similar to humans, basal ammonia excretion was significantly higher in lithium-treated rats; in addition, urinary citrate excretion was also significantly greater. There were no differences in urinary pH. Expression of the critical ammonia transporter, Rhesus C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), was substantially greater in lithium-treated rats than in control rats. We conclude that chronic lithium exposure increases renal ammonia excretion through mechanisms independent of urinary pH and likely to involve increased collecting duct ammonia secretion via the ammonia transporter, Rhcg.

  9. Effect of quinolinic acid on human astrocytes morphology and functions: implications in Alzheimer's disease

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    Brew Bruce J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QUIN is synthesized through the kynurenine pathway (KP by activated monocyte lineage cells. QUIN is likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of several major neuroinflammatory diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD. The presence of reactive astrocytes, astrogliosis, increased oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines are important pathological hallmarks of AD. We assessed the stimulatory effects of QUIN at low physiological to high excitotoxic concentrations in comparison with the cytokines commonly associated with AD including IFN-γ and TNF-α on primary human astrocytes. We found that QUIN induces IL-1β expression, a key mediator in AD pathogenesis, in human astrocytes. We also explored the effect of QUIN on astrocyte morphology and functions. At low concentrations, QUIN treatment induced concomitantly a marked increase in glial fibrillary acid protein levels and reduction in vimentin levels compared to controls; features consistent with astrogliosis. At pathophysiological concentrations QUIN induced a switch between structural protein expressions in a dose dependent manner, increasing VIM and concomitantly decreasing GFAP expression. Glutamine synthetase (GS activity was used as a functional metabolic test for astrocytes. We found a significant dose-dependent reduction in GS activity following QUIN treatment. All together, this study showed that QUIN is an important factor for astroglial activation, dysregulation and cell death with potential relevance to AD and other neuroinflammatory diseases.

  10. Unnatural amino acids increase activity and specificity of synthetic substrates for human and malarial cathepsin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreba, Marcin; Mihelic, Marko; Krai, Priscilla; Rajkovic, Jelena; Krezel, Artur; Pawelczak, Malgorzata; Klemba, Michael; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Latajka, Rafal; Drag, Marcin

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cathepsin C is primarily responsible for the removal of N-terminal dipeptides and activation of several serine proteases in inflammatory or immune cells, while its malarial parasite ortholog dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 plays a crucial role in catabolizing the hemoglobin of its host erythrocyte. In this report, we describe the systematic substrate specificity analysis of three cathepsin C orthologs from Homo sapiens (human), Bos taurus (bovine) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria parasite). Here, we present a new approach with a tailored fluorogenic substrate library designed and synthesized to probe the S1 and S2 pocket preferences of these enzymes with both natural and a broad range of unnatural amino acids. Our approach identified very efficiently hydrolyzed substrates containing unnatural amino acids, which resulted in the design of significantly better substrates than those previously known. Additionally, in this study significant differences in terms of the structures of optimal substrates for human and malarial orthologs are important from the therapeutic point of view. These data can be also used for the design of specific inhibitors or activity-based probes.

  11. Simultaneous determination of niacin, niacinamide and nicotinuric acid in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfuhl, P; Kärcher, U; Häring, N; Baumeister, A; Tawab, Mona Abdel; Schubert-Zsilavecz, M

    2005-01-04

    A sensitive, specific, accurate, and reproducible HPLC/MS-method for the simultaneous quantitative determination of niacin (NA) and its main metabolites niacinamide (NAM) and nicotinuric acid (NUR) in human plasma using chinolin-3-carboxylic acid as an internal standard was developed and validated according to international guidelines for method validation. All analytes and the internal standard were separated from acidified plasma by solid phase extraction. Afterwards the extracted samples were analyzed by HPLC/MS in the positive electrospray ionization mode (ESI) and selected ion monitoring (SIM). The total run time was 7 min between injections. The assay had a lower limit of quantification of 50.0 ng/mL for each analyte using 1 mL of plasma. The calibration curves were linear in the measured range between 50.0 and 750 ng/mL plasma. The overall precision and accuracy for all concentrations of quality controls and standards was better than 15%. No indications were found for possible instabilities of niacin, niacinamide and nicotinuric acid in plasma at -20 degrees C, in the extraction solvent or after repeated thawing/freezing cycles. In stabilities were observed in whole blood and in plasma at room temperature. The recovery of the extraction method ranged from 86 to 89% for the three analytes.

  12. Amino acid metabolism in the human fetus at term: leucine, valine, and methionine kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker, Chris H P; Schierbeek, Henk; Minderman, Gardi; Vermes, Andras; Schoonderwaldt, Ernst M; Duvekot, Johannes J; Steegers, Eric A P; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2011-12-01

    Human fetal metabolism is largely unexplored. Understanding how a healthy fetus achieves its fast growth rates could eventually play a pivotal role in improving future nutritional strategies for premature infants. To quantify specific fetal amino acid kinetics, eight healthy pregnant women received before elective cesarean section at term, continuous stable isotope infusions of the essential amino acids [1-13C,15N]leucine, [U-13C5]valine, and [1-13C]methionine. Umbilical blood was collected after birth and analyzed for enrichments and concentrations using mass spectrometry techniques. Fetuses showed considerable leucine, valine, and methionine uptake and high turnover rates. α-Ketoisocaproate, but not α-ketoisovalerate (the leucine and valine ketoacids, respectively), was transported at net rate from the fetus to the placenta. Especially, leucine and valine data suggested high oxidation rates, up to half of net uptake. This was supported by relatively low α-ketoisocaproate reamination rates to leucine. Our data suggest high protein breakdown and synthesis rates, comparable with, or even slightly higher than in premature infants. The relatively large uptakes of total leucine and valine carbon also suggest high fetal oxidation rates of these essential branched chain amino acids.

  13. Genetic engineering activates biosynthesis of aromatic fumaric acid amides in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Daniel; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Lackner, Gerald; Scharf, Daniel H; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Brakhage, Axel A; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2015-03-01

    The Aspergillus fumigatus nonribosomal peptide synthetase FtpA is among the few of this species whose natural product has remained unknown. Both FtpA adenylation domains were characterized in vitro. Fumaric acid was identified as preferred substrate of the first and both l-tyrosine and l-phenylalanine as preferred substrates of the second adenylation domain. Genetically engineered A. fumigatus strains expressed either ftpA or the regulator gene ftpR, encoded in the same cluster of genes, under the control of the doxycycline-inducible tetracycline-induced transcriptional activation (tet-on) cassette. These strains produced fumaryl-l-tyrosine and fumaryl-l-phenylalanine which were identified by liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Modeling of the first adenylation domain in silico provided insight into the structural requirements to bind fumaric acid as peptide synthetase substrate. This work adds aromatic fumaric acid amides to the secondary metabolome of the important human pathogen A. fumigatus which was previously not known as a producer of these compounds.

  14. Structure of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase Reveals the Role of the Saposin Domain in Activating Substrate Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zi-Jian; Huang, Jingjing; Poda, Gennady; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-07-31

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal phosphodiesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine. While other lysosomal sphingolipid hydrolases require a saposin activator protein for full activity, the ASM polypeptide incorporates a built-in N-terminal saposin domain and does not require an external activator protein. Here, we report the crystal structure of human ASM and describe the organization of the three main regions of the enzyme: the N-terminal saposin domain, the proline-rich connector, and the catalytic domain. The saposin domain is tightly associated along an edge of the large, bowl-shaped catalytic domain and adopts an open form that exposes a hydrophobic concave surface approximately 30Å from the catalytic center. The calculated electrostatic potential of the enzyme is electropositive at the acidic pH of the lysosome, consistent with the strict requirement for the presence of acidic lipids in target membranes. Docking studies indicate that sphingomyelin binds with the ceramide-phosphate group positioned at the binuclear zinc center and molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the intrinsic flexibility of the saposin domain is important for monomer-dimer exchange and for membrane interactions. Overall, ASM uses a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions to cause local disruptions of target bilayers in order to bring the lipid headgroup to the catalytic center in a membrane-bound reaction.

  15. Development of fatty acid calcium stone ileus after initiation of human milk fortifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Masahiko; Miyazawa, Tokuo; Taki, Motohiro; Sakurai, Motoichiro; Miura, Fumihiro; Mizuno, Katsumi; Itabashi, Kazuo; Toki, Akira

    2013-02-01

    We report a case who was born with extremely low birth weight infant and had experienced abdominal operation for necrotizing enterocolitis, eventually developed ileus due to fatty acid calcium stones after giving human milk fortifier. He had developed necrotizing enterocolitis on day 30 of his age, such that we performed enterectomy and ileostomy. He could not tolerate enteral feeding fully, because intestinal fistula infection was repeated. Although we administered hindmilk, he grew up slowly and he suffered cholestasis as well. We performed end-to-end anastomosis to prevent fistula infections on day 87. After this operation, breast milk feeding volume was increased easily. However, we started to add HMF of half-strength on day 124, because his body weight gain remained very poor. And we confirmed to intensify the ratio of HMF full-strength on day 128. After that his abdomen had distended on day 131. As there is no effect of conservative therapy to occlusive ileus, we did emergency laparotomy on day 139. Intestinal calculi were impacted at anastomic portion. Although all stones were removed, he died on 144 days due to disseminated intravascular coagulation and renal failure. Calculi analysis revealed that all of them were fatty acid calcium stones. There is no report about like our case. We speculate that the construction of fatty acid calcium result from either high concentration of calcium/phosphorus or rapid increase in the fortification. We could have prevented this case happened by slower increment of fortification.

  16. Amino acids and peptides activate at least five members of the human bitter taste receptor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Susann; Behrens, Maik; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2013-01-09

    Amino acids and peptides represent important flavor molecules eliciting various taste sensations. Here, we present a comprehensive assessment of the interaction of various peptides and all proteinogenic amino acids with the 25 human TAS2Rs expressed in cell lines. L-Phenylalanine and L-tryptophan activate TAS2R1 and TAS2R4, respectively, whereas TAS2R4 and TAS2R39 responded to D-tryptophan. Structure-function analysis uncovered the basis for the lack of stereoselectivity of TAS2R4. The same three TAS2Rs or subsets thereof were also sensitive to various dipeptides containing L-tryptophan, L-phenylalanine, or L-leucine and to Trp-Trp-Trp, whereas Leu-Leu-Leu specifically activated TAS2R4. Trp-Trp-Trp also activated TAS2R46 and TAS2R14. Two key bitter peptides from Gouda cheese, namely, Tyr-Pro-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro-Ile-His-Asn-Ser and Leu-Val-Tyr-Pro-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro-Ile-His-Asn, both activated TAS2R1 and TAS2R39. Thus, the data demonstrate that the bitterness of amino acids and peptides is not mediated by specifically tuned TAS2Rs but rather is brought about by an unexpectedly complex pattern of sensitive TAS2Rs.

  17. Milk fat conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits growth of human mammary MCF-7 cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, M; Devery, R; Lawless, F; Murphy, J; Stanton, C

    The relationship between growth and the antioxidant enzyme defence system in human MCF-7 (breast) cancer cells treated with bovine milk fat enriched with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was studied. Milk enriched in CLA was obtained from cows on pasture supplemented with full fat rapeseeds and full fat soyabeans (1). Cell number decreased up to 90% (p milk fat yielding CLA concentrations between 16.9 and 22.6 ppm. Growth suppression and prooxidant effects of milk fat CLA were independent of the variable composition of the milk fat samples, suggesting that CLA was the active ingredient in milk fat responsible for the cytotoxic effect. Mixtures containing isomers of CLA (c9, t11-, t10, c12-, c11, t13- and minor amounts of other isomers) and linoleic acid (LA) at similar concentrations to the milk fat samples were as effective at inhibiting growth and stimulating peroxidation of MCF-7 cells as the milk fatty acids. Incubation of the cells with the c9, t11 CLA isomer (20 ppm) or the mixture of CLA isomers (20 ppm) for 8 days resulted in a 60% decrease (p milk fat than the c9, t11 synthetic CLA isomer. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were induced in MCF-7 cells exposed to milk fat (containing 16.9-22.6 ppm CLA) over 8 days. The data indicate that milk fat triglyceride-bound CLA, consisting primarily of the c9, t11 isomer, was cytotoxic towards MCF-7 cells.

  18. Unsaturated fatty acids prevent activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'homme, Laurent; Esser, Nathalie; Riva, Laura; Scheen, André; Paquot, Nicolas; Piette, Jacques; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in many obesity-associated diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and gouty arthritis, through its ability to induce interleukin (IL)-1β release. The molecular link between obesity and inflammasome activation is still unclear, but free fatty acids have been proposed as one triggering event. Here we reported opposite effects of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) compared with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) on NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages. Palmitate and stearate, both SFAs, triggered IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1/ASC/NLRP3-dependent pathway. Unlike SFAs, the UFAs oleate and linoleate did not lead to IL-1β secretion. In addition, they totally prevented the IL-1β release induced by SFAs and, with less efficiency, by a broad range of NLRP3 inducers, including nigericin, alum, and monosodium urate. UFAs did not affect the transcriptional effect of SFAs, suggesting a specific effect on the NLRP3 activation. These results provide a new anti-inflammatory mechanism of UFAs by preventing the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1β processing. By this way, UFAs might play a protective role in NLRP3-associated diseases. PMID:24006511

  19. Physiological and pharmacological characterization of transmembrane acid extruders in cultured human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunng-Shinng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intracellular pH (pH i is a pivotal factor for cellular functions and homeostasis. Apart from passive intracellular buffering capacity, active transmembrane transporters responsible for kinetic changes of pH i impacts. Acid extrusion transporters such as Na + /H + exchanger (NHE and Na + /HCO3− cotransporter (NBC have been found to be activated when cells are in an acidic condition in different cell types. However, such far, the pH i regulators have not been characterized in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs. Materials and Methods: We, therefore, investigated the mechanism of pH i recovery from intracellular acidosis, induced by NH 4 Cl-prepulse, using pH-sensitive fluorescence dye: 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxethyl-5(6-carboxy-fluorescein in HUASMCs. Cultured HUASMCs were derived from the segments of the human umbilical artery that were obtained from women undergoing children delivery. Results: The resting pH i is 7.23 ± 0.03 when cells in HEPES (nominally HCO 3− -free buffered solution. The resting pH i is higher as 7.27 ± 0.03 when cells in CO 2 /HCO3− -buffered solution. In HEPES-buffered solution, a pH i recovery following induced intracellular acidosis could be inhibited completely by 30 μM HOE 694 (a specific NHE inhibitor or by removing [Na +]o . In 5% CO2/HCO3− -buffered solution, 30 μM HOE 694 slowed the pH i recovery from the induced intracellular acidosis only. On the contrary, HOE 694 adding together with 0.2 mM 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (a specific NBC inhibitor or removal of [Na +]o entirely blocked the acid extrusion. By using Western blot technique, we demonstrated that four different isoforms of NBC, that is, SLC4A8 (NBCBE, SLC4A7 (NBCn1, SLC4A5 (NBCe2 and SLC4A4 (NBCe1, co-exist in the HUASMCs. Conclusions: We demonstrate, for the 1 st time, that apart from the housekeeping NHE1, another Na + couple HCO3− -transporter, that is, NBC, functionally coexists to

  20. Critical Amino Acid Residues for Nicotine 5' -Hydroxylation in Human CYP2A Enzymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyang He Xiaoyang He; Xu Xu; Jian Shen; Li Sun; Anthony Y. H. Lu; Clifford Weisel; Junyan Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We have continued previous work in which we demonstrated that #117 and #372 amino acids contrib-uted to the high activities of human CYP2A13 in catalyzing 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-hutanone(NNK) and aflatoxin B1(AFB1) carcinogenic activation. The present study was designed to identify other potential amino acid residues that contribute to the different catalytic characteristics of two CYP2A enzymes, CYP2A6 and CYP2A13, in nicotine metabolism and provide insights of the substrate and related amino acid residues interactions. Methods: A series of reciprocally substituted mutants of CYP2A6IIe'300→Phe, CYP2A6Gly'301Ala, CYP2A6Ser'369→Gly, CYP2A13Phe'300→Ile, CYP2A13AIa'301→Gly and CYP2A13Gly'369→Ser were generated by site-directed mutagenesis/baculovirus-Sf9 insect cells expression. Comparative kinetic analysis of nicotine 5'hydroxylatin by wild type and mutant CYP2A proteins was performed. Results:All amino acid residue substitutions at 300, 301 and 369 caused significant kinetic property changes in nicotine metabolism. While CYP2A6Ile'300→Phe and CYP2A6Gly'301→Ala mutations had notable catalytic efficiency increases compared to that for the wild type CYP2A6, CYP2A13Phe'300→Ile and CYP2A13Ala'301→Gly replacement introduced remarkable catalytic efficiency decreases. In addition, all these catalytic efficiency alterations were caused by V,maxvariations rather than K,m changes. Substi-tution of #369 residue significantly affected both K,m and V,max values. CYP2A6Ser'369→Gly increase the catalytic efficiency via a significant Km decrease versus V,max enhancement, while the opposite effects were seen with CYP2A13Gly'369→Ser. Conclusion:#300, #301 and #369 residues in human CYP2A6/13 play important roles in nicotine 5' -oxidation. Switching #300 or #301 residues did not affect the CYP2A protein affinities toward nicotine, although these amino acids are located in the active center. Seta69 to Gly substitution indirectly affected

  1. Fishy business: effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and free zinc availability in human neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mel, Damitha; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2014-08-15

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA deficiency may be the cause of many disorders such as depression, inability to concentrate, excessive mood swings, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dry skin and so on. On the other hand, zinc is the most abundant trace metal in the human brain. There are many scientific studies linking zinc, especially excess amounts of free zinc, to cellular death. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, are characterized by altered zinc metabolism. Both animal model studies and human cell culture studies have shown a possible link between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc transporter levels and free zinc availability at cellular levels. Many other studies have also suggested a possible omega-3 and zinc effect on neurodegeneration and cellular death. Therefore, in this review, we will examine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and the importance of free zinc for human neuronal cells. Moreover, we will evaluate the collective understanding of mechanism(s) for the interaction of these elements in neuronal research and their significance for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration.

  2. Fishy Business: Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Zinc Transporters and Free Zinc Availability in Human Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damitha De Mel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 (ω-3 fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA. The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA. Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA deficiency may be the cause of many disorders such as depression, inability to concentrate, excessive mood swings, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dry skin and so on. On the other hand, zinc is the most abundant trace metal in the human brain. There are many scientific studies linking zinc, especially excess amounts of free zinc, to cellular death. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, are characterized by altered zinc metabolism. Both animal model studies and human cell culture studies have shown a possible link between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc transporter levels and free zinc availability at cellular levels. Many other studies have also suggested a possible omega-3 and zinc effect on neurodegeneration and cellular death. Therefore, in this review, we will examine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and the importance of free zinc for human neuronal cells. Moreover, we will evaluate the collective understanding of mechanism(s for the interaction of these elements in neuronal research and their significance for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration.

  3. Transport of amino acids and GABA analogues via the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter, hPAT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mie; Larsen, Birger Brodin; Frølund, Bente

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate transepithelial amino acid transport as a function of Caco-2 cell culture time. Furthermore, the objective was to investigate apical uptake characteristics of hPAT1-mediated transport under various experimental conditions. Apical amino acid uptake......, which has been shown to function as a carboxylic acid bioisostere for substrates of the GABA receptor and transport systems....

  4. Simple and fast chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilli, M A

    1991-10-04

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid is described. The method is fast despite the great polarity differences between the two acids. Moreover the sample pretreatment is quick and it does not need complex or expensive equipment. The only requirement is the disposition of two pumps (or at least two eluent reservoirs) operated alternatively by means of a switching valve placed before the injection device. This makes the method available for most routine laboratories.

  5. High specificity of human secretory class II phospholipase A2 for phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitko, Y; Yoon, E T; Cho, W

    1997-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a potent lipid second messenger which stimulates platelet aggregation, cell proliferation and smooth-muscle contraction. The phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-catalysed hydrolysis of phosphatidic acid (PA) is thought to be a primary synthetic route for LPA. Of the multiple forms of PLA2 present in human tissues, human secretory class-II PLA2 (hs-PLA2) has been implicated in the production of LPA from platelets and whole blood cells challenged with inflammatory stimuli. To explore further the possibility that hs-PLA2 is involved in the production of LPA, we rigorously measured the phospholipid head group specificity of hs-PLA2 by a novel PLA2 kinetic system using polymerized mixed liposomes. Kinetic analysis of recombinant hs-PLA2 demonstrates that hs-PLA2 strongly prefers PA as substrate over other phospholipids found in the mammalian plasma membrane including phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The order of preference is PA > PE approximately PS > PC. To identify amino acid residues of hs-PLA2 that are involved in its unique substrate specificity, we mutated two residues, Glu-56 and Lys-69, which were shown to interact with the phospholipid head group in the X-ray-crystallographic structure of the hs-PLA2-transition-state-analogue complex. The K69Y mutant showed selective inactivation toward PA whereas the E56K mutant displayed a most pronounced inactivation to PE. Thus it appears that Lys-69 is at least partially involved in the PA specificity of hs-PLA2 and Glu-56 in the distinction between PE and PC. In conjunction with a recent cell study [Fourcade, Simon, Viode, Rugani, Leballe, Ragab, Fournie, Sarda and Chap (1995) Cell 80, 919-927], these studies suggest that hs-PLA2 can rapidly hydrolyse PA molecules exposed to the outer layer of cell-derived microvesicles and thereby produce LPA.

  6. Lactic acid bacteria protect human intestinal epithelial cells from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affhan, S; Dachang, W; Xin, Y; Shang, D

    2015-12-16

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens that cause nosocomial and food-borne infections. They promote intestinal diseases. Gastrointestinal colonization by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa has rarely been researched. These organisms spread to extra gastrointestinal niches, resulting in increasingly progressive infections. Lactic acid bacteria are Gram-positive bacteria that produce lactic acid as the major end-product of carbohydrate fermentation. These bacteria inhibit pathogen colonization and modulate the host immune response. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus on enteric infections caused by the paradigmatic human pathogens S. aureus ATCC25923 and P. aeruginosa ATCC27853. The effect of whole cells and neutralized cell-free supernatant (CFS) of the lactobacilli on LoVo human carcinoma enterocyte (ATCC CCL-229) infection was analyzed by co-exposure, pre-exposure, and post-exposure studies. Simultaneous application of whole cells and CFS of the lactobacilli significantly eradicated enterocyte infection (P cells and CFS were added after or prior to the infection (P > 0.05). This result could be attributed to interference by extracellular polymeric substances and cell surface hydrophobicity, which resulted in the development of a pathogen that did not form colonies. Furthermore, results of the plate count and LIVE/ DEAD BacLight bacterial viability staining attributed this inhibition to a non-bacteriocin-like substance, which acted independently of organic acid and H2O2 production. Based on these results, the cell-free supernatant derived from lactobacilli was concluded to restrain the development of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa enteric infections.

  7. Pretreatment of Ferulic Acid Protects Human Dermal Fibroblasts against Ultraviolet A Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Kim, Ki Bbeum; Bae, Seunghee; Choi, Byung Gon; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 90%~99% of ultraviolet A (UVA) ray reaches the Earth's surface. The deeply penetrating UVA rays induce the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which results in oxidative stress such as photoproducts, senescence, and cell death. Thus, UVA is considered a primary factor that promotes skin aging. Objective Researchers investigated whether pretreatment with ferulic acid protects human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) against UVA-induced cell damages. Methods HDF proliferation was analyzed using the water-soluble tetrazolium salt assay. Cell cycle distribution and intracellular ROS levels were assessed by flow cytometric analysis. Senescence was evaluated using a senescence-associated β-galactosidase assay, while Gadd45α promoter activity was analyzed through a luciferase assay. The expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), catalase (CAT), xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A and C, matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3, as well as p21 and p16 were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Inhibition of proliferation and cell cycle arrest were detected in cells that were irradiated with UVA only. Pretreatment with ferulic acid significantly increased the proliferation and cell cycle progression in HDFs. Moreover, ferulic acid pretreatment produced antioxidant effects such as reduced DCF intensity, and affected SOD1 and CAT mRNA expression. These effects were also demonstrated in the analysis of cell senescence, promoter activity, expression of senescent markers, and DNA repair. Conclusion These results demonstrate that ferulic acid exerts protective effects on UVA-induced cell damages via anti-oxidant and stress-inducible cellular mechanisms in HDFs. PMID:27904274

  8. Cysteine pK[subscript a] Depression by a Protonated Glutamic Acid in Human DJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Anna C.; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Remington, Benjamin C.; Hasim, Sahar; Pozharski, Edwin; Wilson, Mark A. (Maryland); (UNL)

    2008-07-09

    Human DJ-1, a disease-associated protein that protects cells from oxidative stress, contains an oxidation-sensitive cysteine (C106) that is essential for its cytoprotective activity. The origin of C106 reactivity is obscure, due in part to the absence of an experimentally determined pK{sub a} value for this residue. We have used atomic-resolution X-ray crystallography and UV spectroscopy to show that C106 has a depressed pK{sub a} of 5.4 {+-} 0.1 and that the C106 thiolate accepts a hydrogen bond from a protonated glutamic acid side chain (E18). X-ray crystal structures and cysteine pK{sub a} analysis of several site-directed substitutions at residue 18 demonstrate that the protonated carboxylic acid side chain of E18 is required for the maximal stabilization of the C106 thiolate. A nearby arginine residue (R48) participates in a guanidinium stacking interaction with R28 from the other monomer in the DJ-1 dimer and elevates the pK{sub a} of C106 by binding an anion that electrostatically suppresses thiol ionization. Our results show that the ionizable residues (E18, R48, and R28) surrounding C106 affect its pK{sub a} in a way that is contrary to expectations based on the typical ionization behavior of glutamic acid and arginine. Lastly, a search of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) produces several candidate hydrogen-bonded aspartic/glutamic acid-cysteine interactions, which we propose are particularly common in the DJ-1 superfamily.

  9. Cysteine pKa Depression by a Protonated Glutamic Acid in Human DJ-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Anna C.; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Remington, Benjamin C.; Hasim, Sahar; Pozharski, Edwin; Wilson, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Human DJ-1, a disease-associated protein that protects cells from oxidative stress, contains an oxidation-sensitive cysteine (C106) that is essential for its cytoprotective activity. The origin of C106 reactivity is obscure, due in part to the absence of an experimentally determined pKa value for this residue. We have used atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and UV spectroscopy to show that C106 has a depressed pKa of 5.4±0.1 and that the C106 thiolate accepts a hydrogen bond from a protonated glutamic acid sidechain (E18). X-ray crystal structures and cysteine pKa analysis of several site-directed substitutions at residue 18 demonstrate that the protonated carboxylic acid sidechain of E18 is required to maximally stabilize the C106 thiolate. A nearby arginine residue (R48) participates in a guanidinium stacking interaction with R28 from the other monomer in the DJ-1 dimer and elevates the pKa of C106 by binding an anion that electrostatically suppresses thiol ionization. Our results show that the ionizable residues (E18, R48 and R28) surrounding C106 affect its pKa in a way that is contrary to expectations based on the typical ionization behavior of glutamic acid and arginine. Lastly, a search of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) produces several candidate hydrogen bonded aspartic/glutamic acid-cysteine interactions, which we propose are particularly common in the DJ-1 superfamily. PMID:18570440

  10. Effect of caffeic acid esters on carcinogen-induced mutagenicity and human colon adenocarcinoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C V; Desai, D; Kaul, B; Amin, S; Reddy, B S

    1992-11-16

    Propolis, a honey bee hive product, is thought to exhibit a broad spectrum of activities including antibiotic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and tumor growth inhibition; some of the observed biological activities may be due to caffeic acid (cinnamic acid) esters that are present in propolis. In the present study we synthesized three caffeic acid esters, namely methyl caffeate (MC), phenylethyl caffeate (PEC) and phenylethyl dimethylcaffeate (PEDMC) and tested them against the 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl, (DMAB, a colon and mammary carcinogen)-induced mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100. Also, the effect of these agents on the growth of human colon adenocarcinoma, HT-29 cells and activities of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) was studied. Mutagenicity was induced in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 plus S9 activation using 5 and 10 micrograms DMAB and antimutagenic activities of 0-150 microM MC, 0-60 microM PEC and 0-80 microM PEDMC were determined. The results indicate that MC, PEC and PEDMC were not mutagenic in the Salmonella tester system. DMAB-induced mutagenicity was significantly inhibited with 150 microM MC, 40-60 microM PEC and 40-80 microM PEDMC in both tester systems. Treatment of HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells with > 150 microM MC, 30 microM PEC and 20 microM PEDMC significantly inhibited the cell growth and syntheses of RNA, DNA and protein. ODC and PTK activities were also inhibited in HT-29 cells treated with different concentrations of MC, PEC and PEDMC. These results demonstrate that caffeic acid esters which are present in Propolis possess chemopreventive properties when tested in short-term assay systems.

  11. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction of acidic drugs from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Pijuán, Mercedes; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    The new sample preparation concept "Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction (PALME)" was evaluated for extraction of the acidic drugs ketoprofen, fenoprofen, diclofenac, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, and gemfibrozil from human plasma samples. Plasma samples (250 μL) were loaded into individual wells in a 96-well donor plate and diluted with HCl to protonate the acidic drugs. The acidic drugs were extracted as protonated species from the individual plasma samples, through corresponding artificial liquid membranes each comprising 2 μL of dihexyl ether, and into corresponding acceptor solutions each comprising 50 μL of 25 mM ammonia solution (pH 10). The liquid membranes and the acceptor solutions were located in a 96-well filter plate, which was sandwiched with the 96-well donor plate during extraction. Parallel extraction of several samples was performed for 15 to 60 min, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection of the individual acceptor solutions. Important PALME parameters including the chemical composition of the liquid membrane, extraction time, and sample pH were optimized, and the extraction performance was evaluated. Except for flurbiprofen, exhaustive extraction was accomplished from plasma. Linearity was obtained for all six drugs in the range 0.025-10 μg/mL, with r (2) values ranging between 0.998 and 1.000. Precision data were in the range 3-22% RSD, and accuracy data were within 72-130% with spiked plasma samples. Based on the current experiences, PALME showed substantial potential for future high-throughput bioanalysis of non-polar acidic drugs.

  12. Ozonolysis products of membrane fatty acids activate eicosanoid metabolism in human airway epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leikauf, G.D.; Zhao, Q.; Zhou, S.; Santrock, J. (Univ. of Cincinnati Medical Center, OH (United States))

    1993-12-01

    When inhaled, ozone reacts at the airway luminal surface with unsaturated fatty acids contained in the extracellular fluid and plasma membrane to form an aldehyde and hydroxyhydroperoxide. The resulting hydroxyhydroperoxide degrades in aqueous systems to yield a second aldehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Previously, we demonstrated that ozone can augment eicosanoid metabolism in bovine airway epithelial cells. To examine structure-activity relationships of ozone-fatty acid degradation products on eicosanoid metabolism in human airway epithelial cells, 3-, 6-, and 9-carbon saturated aldehydes and hydroxyhydroperoxides were synthesized and purified. Eicosanoid metabolism was evaluated by determination of total 3H-activity release from confluent cells previously incubated with [3H]arachidonic acid and by identification of specific metabolites with high performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay. The major metabolites detected were prostaglandin E2, prostaglandin F2 alpha, and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. The 9-carbon aldehyde, nonanal, in contrast to 3- or 6-carbon aldehydes, stimulated release at concentrations > or = 100 microM, suggesting that the stimulatory effect increases with increasing chain length. When tested under identical conditions, the 3-, 6-, and 9-carbon hydroxyhydroperoxides were more potent than the corresponding aldehydes. Again, a greater effect was noted when the chain length was increased. One possible explanation for the increased potency of the hydroxyhydroperoxides over the aldehydes could be due to degradation of the hydroxyhydroperoxide into H2O2 and aldehyde. We consider this an unlikely explanation because responses varied with chain length (although each hydroxyhydroperoxide would produce an equivalent amount of H2O2) and because exposure to H2O2 alone or H2O2 plus hexanal produced a response dissimilar to 1-hydroxy-1-hexanehydroperoxide.

  13. Lithocholic acid attenuates cAMP-dependent Cl- secretion in human colonic epithelial T84 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Mei; Domingue, Jada C; Khan, Nabihah; Javed, Fatima; Osmani, Kashif; Sarathy, Jayashree; Rao, Mrinalini C

    2016-06-01

    Bile acids (BAs) play a complex role in colonic fluid secretion. We showed that dihydroxy BAs, but not the monohydroxy BA lithocholic acid (LCA), stimulate Cl(-) secretion in human colonic T84 cells (Ao M, Sarathy J, Domingue J, Alrefai WA, Rao MC. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 305: C447-C456, 2013). In this study, we explored the effect of LCA on the action of other secretagogues in T84 cells. While LCA (50 μM, 15 min) drastically (>90%) inhibited FSK-stimulated short-circuit current (Isc), it did not alter carbachol-stimulated Isc LCA did not alter basal Isc, transepithelial resistance, cell viability, or cytotoxicity. LCA's inhibitory effect was dose dependent, acted faster from the apical membrane, rapid, and not immediately reversible. LCA also prevented the Isc stimulated by the cAMP-dependent secretagogues 8-bromo-cAMP, lubiprostone, or chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). The LCA inhibitory effect was BA specific, since CDCA, cholic acid, or taurodeoxycholic acid did not alter FSK or carbachol action. While LCA alone had no effect on intracellular cAMP concentration ([cAMP]i), it decreased FSK-stimulated [cAMP]i by 90%. Although LCA caused a small increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), chelation by BAPTA-AM did not reverse LCA's effect on Isc LCA action does not appear to involve known BA receptors, farnesoid X receptor, vitamin D receptor, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3, or bile acid-specific transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5. LCA significantly increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which was completely abolished by the MEK inhibitor PD-98059. Surprisingly PD-98059 did not reverse LCA's effect on Isc Finally, although LCA had no effect on basal Isc, nystatin permeabilization studies showed that LCA both stimulates an apical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) current and inhibits a basolateral K(+) current. In summary, 50 μM LCA greatly inhibits cAMP-stimulated Cl(-) secretion, making low doses of LCA of

  14. Fatty acid desaturase 1 gene polymorphisms control human hepatic lipid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libo; Athinarayanan, Shaminie; Jiang, Guanglong; Chalasani, Naga; Zhang, Min; Liu, Wanqing

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid desaturase (FADS) genes and their variants have been associated with multiple metabolic phenotypes, including liver enzymes and hepatic fat accumulation, but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to delineate the role of FADSs in modulating lipid composition in human liver. We performed a targeted lipidomic analysis of a variety of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and ceramides among 154 human liver tissue samples. The associations between previously genome-wide association studies (GWASs)-identified six FADS single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and these lipid levels as well as total hepatic fat content (HFC) were tested. The potential function of these SNPs in regulating transcription of three FADS genes (FADS1, FADS2, and FADS3) in the locus was also investigated. We found that though these SNPs were in high linkage disequilibrium (r(2) > 0.8), the rare alleles of these SNPs were consistently and significantly associated with the accumulation of multiple long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), with C47H85O13P (C36:4), a phosphatidylinositol (PI), and C43H80O8PN (C38:3), a phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), reached the Bonferroni corrected significance (P rs174556), but not FADS2 or FADS3 (P > 0.05). Our findings revealed critical insight into the mechanism underlying FADS1 and its polymorphisms in modulating hepatic lipid deposition by altering gene transcription and controlling lipid composition in human livers. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. Zoledronic acid enhances Vδ2 T-lymphocyte antitumor response to human glioma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, E; Piacentini, P; Sacchi, A; Gioia, C; Leone, S; Lauro, G M; Martini, F; Agrati, C

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most frequent and aggressive primary brain tumor in humans, responds modestly to treatment: most patients survive less than one year after diagnosis, despite both classical and innovative treatment approaches. A recent paper focused on γδ T-cell response in GBM patients, suggesting the application of an immunomodulating strategy based on γδ T-cells which is already in clinical trials for other tumors. Human Vγ2 T-cells recognize changes in the mevalonate metabolic pathway of transformed cells by activating cytotoxic response, and by cytokine and chemokine release. Interestingly, this activation may also be induced in vivo by drugs, such as zoledronic acid, that induce the accumulation of Vγ2 T-cell ligand Isopentenyl-pyrophosphate by blocking the farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase enzyme. The aim of our work is to confirm whether bisphosphonate treatment would make glioma cell lines more susceptible to lysis by in vitro expanded γδ T-cells, improving their antitumor activity. We expanded in vitro human Vγ2 T-cells by phosphoantigen stimulation and tested their activity against glioma cell lines. Co-culture with glioma cells induced Vγ2 T-cell differentiation in effector/memory cells, killing glioma cells by the release of perforin. Interestingly, glioma cells were directly affected by zoledronic acid; moreover, treatment increased their activating ability on Vγ2 T-cells, inducing an effective antitumor cytotoxic response. Taken together, our results show that aminobisphosphonate drugs may play a dual role against GBM, by directly affecting tumor cells, and by enhancing the antitumor response of Vγ2 T-cells. Our results confirm the practicability of this approach as a new immunotherapeutic strategy for GBM treatment.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of hyaluronic acid/human-like collagen hydrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Ma, Xiaoxuan, E-mail: xiaoxuanma@163.com; Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn; Zhu, Chenhui; Deng, Jianjun; Hui, Junfeng; Ma, Pei

    2014-10-01

    Injectable hydrogel plays an important role in soft tissue filling and repair. We report an injectable hydrogel based on hyaluronic acid (HA) and human-like collagen (HLC), both with favorable biocompatibility and biodegradability. These two types of biomacromolecules were crosslinked with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether to form a three-dimensional network. The redundant crosslinker was removed by dialysis and distillation. An HA-based hydrogel prepared by the same method was used as a control. The cytocompatibility was studied with a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) test. Carbazole colorimetry was used to analyze the in vitro degradation rate. The histocompatibility was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) staining analysis and immunohistochemical analysis. The CCK-8 assay demonstrated that the HA/HLC hydrogel was less cytotoxic than the HA-based hydrogel and could promote baby hamster kidney cell (BHK) proliferation. The cell adhesion indicated that BHK could grow well on the surface of the materials and maintain good cell viability. The in vitro degradation test showed that the HA/HLC hydrogel had a longer degradation time and an excellent antienzyme ability. In vivo injection showed that there was little inflammatory response to HA/HLC after 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Therefore, the HA/HLC hydrogel is a promising biomaterial for soft tissue filling and repair. - Highlights: • Human-like collagen was used with hyaluronic acid to prepare soft tissue filling meterials. • 1,4-Butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE) was introduced to treat the hydrogels. • The addition of human-like collagen could improve the biological properties of hydrogels.

  17. Clinical performance of a dermal filler containing natural glycolic Acid and a polylactic Acid polymer: results of a clinical trial in human immunodeficiency virus subjects with facial lipoatrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Jorge M; Macchetto, Pedro Cervantes; Durán Páramo, Rosa Margarita

    2010-02-01

    Lipoatrophy is a condition that affects certain individuals, most commonly those who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.(1-3) Injectable fillers are used for the treatment of these dermal contour deformities to smooth dermal depressions formed by the loss of volume. These dermal fillers (also known as soft tissue augmentation devices) can correct contour deformities caused by lipoatrophy in patients who are human immunodeficiency virus positive or negative. The product used in this study is a patented, second-generation, injectable, dermal collagen stimulator that combines glycolic acid and polylactic acid. The glycolic acid used is not a polymer, but rather an acid derived from sugar cane. Its chemical structure corresponds to that of an alpha-hydroxy acid. Glycolic acid is a well-characterized agent that is present in a number of cosmetic products. Polylactic acid is a synthetic, biocompatible, biodegradable, inert, synthetic polymer from the poly a-hydroxy-acid family that is believed to stimulate fibroblasts to produce more collagen, thus increasing facial volume. Together, polylactic acid and glycolic acid act in concert to 1) stimulate collagen production and 2) hydrate the outer layers of the skin. A multicenter, clinical investigation authorized by the Mexican Secretariat of Health was conducted between September 20, 2002, and September 19, 2004. This clinical study was conducted in male patients between 32 and 60 years of age with lipoatrophy as a result of highly active antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infection. The study objective was to measure the improvement of contour deformities after the injection of a dermal collagen stimulator containing glycolic acid and polylactic acid. In addition to safety, this dermal filler was assessed when used to correct volume deformities caused by lipoatrophy in subjects who are human immunodeficiency virus positive. Thirty male subjects participated and were treated as follows

  18. Hemagglutinin protein of Asian strains of human influenza virus A H1N1 binds to sialic acid--a major component of human airway receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, K H; Chai, H C

    2012-03-16

    Hemagglutinin (HA) protein plays an important role in binding the influenza virus to infected cells and therefore mediates infection. Deposited HA sequences of 86 Asian strains of influenza A (H1N1) viruses during the first outbreak were obtained from the NCBI database and compared. Interaction of the HA protein of influenza A (H1N1) virus with the human sialic acid receptor was also studied using bioinformatics. Overall, not more than three single-point amino acid variants/changes were observed in the HA protein region of influenza A (H1N1) virus from Asian countries when a selected group sequence comparison was made. The bioinformatics study showed that the HA protein of influenza A (H1N1) binds to the sialic acid receptor in human airway receptors, possibly key to air-borne infection in humans.

  19. Retinoic Acid signalling and the control of meiotic entry in the human fetal gonad.

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    Andrew J Childs

    Full Text Available The development of mammalian fetal germ cells along oogenic or spermatogenic fate trajectories is dictated by signals from the surrounding gonadal environment. Germ cells in the fetal testis enter mitotic arrest, whilst those in the fetal ovary undergo sex-specific entry into meiosis, the initiation of which is thought to be mediated by selective exposure of fetal ovarian germ cells to mesonephros-derived retinoic acid (RA. Aspects of this model are hard to reconcile with the spatiotemporal pattern of germ cell differentiation in the human fetal ovary, however. We have therefore examined the expression of components of the RA synthesis, metabolism and signalling pathways, and their downstream effectors and inhibitors in germ cells around the time of the initiation of meiosis in the human fetal gonad. Expression of the three RA-synthesising enzymes, ALDH1A1, 2 and 3 in the fetal ovary and testis was equal to or greater than that in the mesonephros at 8-9 weeks gestation, indicating an intrinsic capacity within the gonad to synthesise RA. Using immunohistochemistry to detect RA receptors RARα, β and RXRα, we find germ cells to be the predominant target of RA signalling in the fetal human ovary, but also reveal widespread receptor nuclear localization indicative of signalling in the testis, suggesting that human fetal testicular germ cells are not efficiently shielded from RA by the action of the RA-metabolising enzyme CYP26B1. Consistent with this, expression of CYP26B1 was greater in the human fetal ovary than testis, although the sexually-dimorphic expression patterns of the germ cell-intrinsic regulators of meiotic initiation, STRA8 and NANOS2, appear conserved. Finally, we demonstrate that RA induces a two-fold increase in STRA8 expression in cultures of human fetal testis, but is not sufficient to cause widespread meiosis-associated gene expression. Together, these data indicate that while local production of RA within the fetal ovary may

  20. Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Simultaneous Determination of Ursodiol and its Major Metabolites, Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid and Glycoursodeoxycholic Acid in Human Plasma

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    M. Ganesan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and sensitive method is described for the quantification of ursodiol and its major metabolites glycoursodeoxycholic acid (GUDCA and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA in human plasma using single internal standard (Ursodeoxycholic Acid d4. Solid phase extraction was performed and chromatographic separation of 5µL injected sample was achieved using Waters Xterra, 5µm column with a mobile phase comprised of methanol and 5 mM ammonium formate with 0.1 % acetic acid ( 70 : 30, v/v . The mass spectrometer was used in negative ion mode and multiple reactions monitoring using electro spray ionization mode as an interface. The method was fully validated and the calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 25.9 to 15300.1 ng/mL for ursodiol, 2.7 to 1587.5ng/mLfor tauroursodeoxycholicacid and 25.4 to 15040.9 ng/mL for glycoursodeoxycholic acid. The method was sensitive and specific, with the lower limit of quantification of 25.9, 2.7 and 25.4 ng/ml for ursodiol, tauroursodeoxycholic acid and glycoursodeoxycholic acid respectively. The present method includes a simple and rapid sample preparation with shorter analysis run time and less flow rate compared to previously reported methods. The method was applied successfully for a bioequivalence study in healthy subjects.

  1. The Dietary {alpha}-Linolenic Acid to Linoleic Acid Ratio Does Not Affect the Serum Lipoprotein Profile in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goyens, P.L.L.; Mensink, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    alpha-Linolenic acid [ALA, 18:3(n-3)] and linoleic acid [LA, 18:2(n-6)] have comparable effects on serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations, but their effects on lipoprotein subclass distributions and particle sizes are unknown. It is also not known whether these effects are changed by the ALA:LA

  2. The actions of exogenous leucine on mTOR signalling and amino acid transporters in human myotubes

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    Cameron-Smith David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The branched-chain amino acid (BCAA leucine has been identified to be a key regulator of skeletal muscle anabolism. Activation of anabolic signalling occurs via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR through an undefined mechanism. System A and L solute carriers transport essential amino acids across plasma membranes; however it remains unknown whether an exogenous supply of leucine regulates their gene expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute and chronic leucine stimulation of anabolic signalling and specific amino acid transporters, using cultured primary human skeletal muscle cells. Results Human myotubes were treated with leucine, insulin or co-treated with leucine and insulin for 30 min, 3 h or 24 h. Activation of mTOR signalling kinases were examined, together with putative nutrient sensor human vacuolar protein sorting 34 (hVps34 and gene expression of selected amino acid transporters. Phosphorylation of mTOR and p70S6K was transiently increased following leucine exposure, independently to insulin. hVps34 protein expression was also significantly increased. However, genes encoding amino acid transporters were differentially regulated by insulin and not leucine. Conclusions mTOR signalling is transiently activated by leucine within human myotubes independently of insulin stimulation. While this occurred in the absence of changes in gene expression of amino acid transporters, protein expression of hVps34 increased.

  3. Determination of tolerable fatty acids and cholera toxin concentrations using human intestinal epithelial cells and BALB/c mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamari, Farshad; Tychowski, Joanna; Lorentzen, Laura

    2013-05-30

    The positive role of fatty acids in the prevention and alleviation of non-human and human diseases have been and continue to be extensively documented. These roles include influences on infectious and non-infectious diseases including prevention of inflammation as well as mucosal immunity to infectious diseases. Cholera is an acute intestinal illness caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. It occurs in developing nations and if left untreated, can result in death. While vaccines for cholera exist, they are not always effective and other preventative methods are needed. We set out to determine tolerable concentrations of three fatty acids (oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids) and cholera toxin using mouse BALB/C macrophages and human intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. We solubilized the above fatty acids and used cell proliferation assays to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of the fatty acids that are not detrimental to human intestinal epithelial cell viability. We solubilized cholera toxin and used it in an assay to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of cholera toxin that do not statistically decrease cell viability in BALB/C macrophages. We found the optimum fatty acid concentrations to be between 1-5 ng/μl, and that for cholera toxin to be cholera infections.

  4. Fatty acids do not pay the toll: effect of SFA and PUFA on human adipose tissue and mature adipocytes inflammation

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    Murumalla Ravi Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On the basis that high fat diet induces inflammation in adipose tissue, we wanted to test the effect of dietary saturated and polysunsaturated fatty acids on human adipose tissue and adipocytes inflammation. Moreover we wanted to determine if TLR2 and TLR4 are involved in this pathway. Methods Human adipose tissue and adipocytes primary cultures were treated with endotoxin-free BSA conjugated with SFA (lauric acid and palmitic acid - LA and PA and PUFA (eicosapentaeneic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and oleic acid - EPA, DHA and OA with or without LPS. Cytokines were then assayed by ELISA (TNF-alpha, IL-6 and MCP-1. In order to determine if TLR2 and TLR4 are activated by fatty acid (FA, we used HEK-Blue cells transfected by genes from TLR2 or TLR4 pathways associated with secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter gene. Results None of the FA tested in HEK-Blue cells were able to activate TLR2 or TLR4, which is concordant with the fact that after FA treatment, adipose tissue and adipocytes cytokines levels remain the same as controls. However, all the PUFA tested: DHA, EPA and to a lesser extent OA down-regulated TNF-alpha, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in human adipose tissue and adipocytes cultures. Conclusions This study first confirms that FA do not activate TLR2 and TLR4. Moreover by using endotoxin-free BSA, both SFA and PUFA tested were not proinflammatory in human adipose tissue and adipocytes model. More interestingly we showed that some PUFA exert an anti-inflammatory action in human adipose tissue and adipocytes model. These results are important since they clarify the relationship between dietary fatty acids and inflammation linked to obesity.

  5. Uric acid stimulates endothelin-1 gene expression associated with NADPH oxidase in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hung-hsing CHAO; Ju-chi LIU; Jia-wei LIN; Cheng-hsien CHEN; Chieh-hsi WU; Tzu-hurng CHENG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Recent experimental and human studies have shown that hyperuricemia is associated with hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Elevated levels of endotheliu-1 (ET-1) has been regarded as one of the most powerful indepen-dent predictors of cardiovascular diseases. For investigating whether uric acidinduced vascular diseases are related to ET-1, the uric acid-induced ET-1 expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) was examined. Methods: Cultured HASMC treated with uric acid, cell proliferation and ET-1 expression were examined. Antioxidant pretreatments on uric acid-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) phosphorylation were carried out to elucidate the redox-sensitive pathway in proliferation and ET-1 gene expression. Results: Uric acid was found to increase HASMC proliferation, ET-1 expression and reactive oxygen species production. The ability of both N-acetylcysteine and apocynin (1-[4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl]ethanone, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor) to inhibit uric acid-induced ET-1 secretion and cell proliferation suggested the involvement of intracellular redox pathways. Furthermore, apocynin, and p47phox small interfering RNA knockdown inhibited ET-1 secretion and cell proliferation induced by uric acid. Inhibition of ERK by U0126 (1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis[2-aminophenylthio]butadiene) significantly suppressed uric acid-induced ET-I expression, implicating this pathway in the response to uric acid. In addition, uric acid increased the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) medi-ated reporter activity, as well as the ERK phosphorylation. Mutational analysis of the ET-1 gene promoter showed that the AP-1 binding site was an important cis-element in uric acid-induced ET-1 gene expression. Conclusion: This is the first observation of ET-1 regulation by uric acid in HASMC, which implicates the important role of uric acid in the vascular changes associated with hypertension and vascular diseases.

  6. An ascorbic acid-enriched tomato genotype to fight UVA-induced oxidative stress in normal human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruk, Ganna; Raiola, Assunta; Del Giudice, Rita; Barone, Amalia; Frusciante, Luigi; Rigano, Maria Manuela; Monti, Daria Maria

    2016-10-01

    UVA radiations contribute up to 95% of the total UV exposure and are known to induce cell damage, leading to apoptosis. Since the benefic effects of ascorbic acid on human health are well known, a new tomato genotype (named DHO4), highly rich in ascorbic acid, has been recently obtained. Here, we compared the effects of ascorbic acid and hydrophilic DHO4 extracts in protecting human keratinocytes exposed to UVA stress. Keratinocytes were pre-incubated with ascorbic acid or with extracts from the ascorbic acid enriched tomato genotype and irradiated with UVA light. Then, ROS production, intracellular GSH and lipid peroxidation levels were quantified. Western blots were carried out to evaluate mitogen-activated protein kinases cascade, activation of caspase-3 and inflammation levels. We demonstrated that ROS, GSH and lipid peroxidation levels were not altered in cell exposed to UVA stress when cells were pre-treated with ascorbic acid or with tomato extracts. In addition, no evidence of apoptosis and inflammation were observed in irradiated pre-treated cells. Altogether, we demonstrated the ability of an ascorbic acid enriched tomato genotype to counteract UVA-oxidative stress on human keratinocytes. This protective effect is due to the high concentration of vitamin C that acts as free radical scavenger. This novel tomato genotype may be used as genetic material in breeding schemes to produce improved varieties with higher antioxidant levels.

  7. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of hydroxycitric acid or Garcinia cambogia extracts in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Fabiola; Babio, Nancy; Bulló, Mònica; Salas-Salvadó, J

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that Garcinia cambogia plays an important role in the regulation of endogenous lipid biosynthesis. This effect is specially attributed to (-)-hydroxycitric acid (HCA) inhibiting the enzyme ATP-dependent citrate lyase, which catalyzes the cleavage of citrate to oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA. Although several studies have found that the administration of G. cambogia extracts is associated with body weight and fat loss in both experimental animals and humans, we should be cautious when interpreting the results as other randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials have not reported the same outcomes. Furthermore, most studies in humans have been conducted on small samples and mainly in the short term. None of them have shown whether these effects persist beyond 12 weeks of intervention. Therefore, there is still little evidence to support the potential effectiveness and long-term benefits of G. cambogia extracts. With regard to toxicity and safety, it is important to note that except in rare cases, studies conducted in experimental animals have not reported increased mortality or significant toxicity. Furthermore, at the doses usually administered, no differences have been reported in terms of side effects or adverse events (those studied) in humans between individuals treated with G. cambogia and controls.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of human β-defensins against lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fang; Tian, Fei; Cao, Rui-Ming; Li, Jing; Wu, Sheng-Mei; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Chen, Tong-Xin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of human β-defensin-1 (hBD-1), human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) and human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3) against three internationally common probiotic strains of lactic acid bacterium. Our results indicated that hBD-1, hBD-2 and hBD-3 at the range of 0.08-10 μg/mL do not have obvious antimicrobial activity against these strains. Viability of Bifidobacterium longum JDM301 (B. longum JDM301), Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (B. lactis HN019) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) were still very high even at concentration of 10 μg hBD/mL. Then, we explored the mechanism of resistance by using carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) to inhibit efflux pumps. In the presence of CCCP, hBD-1, hBD-2 and hBD-3 exhibited enhanced antibacterial effect against B. longum JDM301 and B. lactis HN019, but not against LGG. Efflux pumps in B. longum JDM301 and B. lactis HN019 may partly contribute to their resistance to hBD-1, hBD-2, and hBD-3.

  9. Hyaluronic Acid- Paclitaxel: Antitumor Efficacy against CD44(+ Human Ovarian Carcinoma Xenografts

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    Edmond Auzenne

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous human tumor types, including ovarian cancer, display a significant expression of the CD44 family of cell surface proteoglycans. To develop tumortargeted drugs, we have initially evaluated whether the CD44 ligand hyaluronic acid (HA could serve as a backbone for paclitaxel (TXL prodrugs. HA-TXL was prepared by modification of previous techniques. The in vitro cytotoxicity of HA-TXL against the CD44(+ human ovarian carcinoma cell lines SKOV-3ip and NMP-1 could be significantly blocked by preincubation with a molar excess of free HA. Female nude mice bearing intraperitoneal implants of NMP-1 cells were treated intraperitoneally with a single sub-maximum tolerated dose dose of HA-TXL or with multiple-dose regimens of paclitaxel (Taxol; Mead Johnson, Princeton, NJ to determine the effects of these regimens on host survival and intraperitoneal tumor burden, with the latter being assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. NMP-1 xenograffs were highly resistant to Taxol regimens, as host survival was only nominally improved compared to controls (T/C ∼ 120, whereas singledose HA-TXL treatment significantly improved survival in this model (T/C ∼ 140; P = .004. In both NMP-1 and SKOV-3ip models, MR images of abdomens of HA-TXL-treated mice obtained shortly before controls required humane sacrifice revealed markedly reduced tumor burdens compared to control mice. This study is among the first to demonstrate that HA-based prodrugs administered locoregionally have antitumor activity in vivo.

  10. Combined Effects of Lipophilic Phycotoxins (Okadaic Acid, Azapsiracid-1 and Yessotoxin on Human Intestinal Cells Models

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    Pierre-Jean Ferron

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Phycotoxins are monitored in seafood because they can cause food poisonings in humans. Phycotoxins do not only occur singly but also as mixtures in shellfish. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro toxic interactions of binary combinations of three lipophilic phycotoxins commonly found in Europe (okadaic acid (OA, yessotoxin (YTX and azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1 using the neutral red uptake assay on two human intestinal cell models, Caco-2 and the human intestinal epithelial crypt-like cells (HIEC. Based on the cytotoxicity of individual toxins, we studied the interactions between toxins in binary mixtures using the combination index-isobologram equation, a method widely used in pharmacology to study drug interactions. This method quantitatively classifies interactions between toxins in mixtures as synergistic, additive or antagonistic. AZA-1/OA, and YTX/OA mixtures showed increasing antagonism with increasing toxin concentrations. In contrast, the AZA-1/YTX mixture showed increasing synergism with increasing concentrations, especially for mixtures with high YTX concentrations. These results highlight the hazard potency of AZA-1/YTX mixtures with regard to seafood intoxication.

  11. Simultaneous liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry quantification of cefixime and clavulanic acid in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubala, Anil; Nagarajan, Janaki Sankarachari Krishnan; Vimal, Chandran Sathish; George, Renjith

    2015-01-01

    A simple and specific liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) assay method has been developed and fully validated for the simultaneous quantification of cefixime (CX) and clavulanic acid (CA) in human plasma. Analytes and internal standard were extracted from human plasma by a solid phase extraction technique using a Sam prep (3 mL, 100 mg) extraction cartridge. The extracted samples were chromatographed on a reverse phase C18 column using a mixture of methanol : acetonitrile : 2 mM ammonium acetate (pH 3.5) (25 : 25 : 50, v/v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. Quantification of the analytes were carried out using single quadrupole LC-APCI-MS through selected ion monitoring at m/z 452 and 198, respectively, for CX and CA. The assay was linear over the concentration range of 0.05-10.0 and 0.1-10.0 μg/mL, respectively, for CX and CA. The mean plasma extraction recoveries of the CX and CA were found to be 95.20-96.27% and 94.67-95.58%, respectively. The method was successfully applied for the determination of pharmacokinetics of CX and CA after oral administration of single dosage CX/CA (200/125 mg) pill to the humans (n = 12).

  12. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates myeloid differentiation within the human bone marrow microenvironment.

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    Denis Evseenko

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a pleiotropic phospholipid present in the blood and certain tissues at high concentrations; its diverse effects are mediated through differential, tissue specific expression of LPA receptors. Our goal was to determine if LPA exerts lineage-specific effects during normal human hematopoiesis. In vitro stimulation of CD34+ human hematopoietic progenitors by LPA induced myeloid differentiation but had no effect on lymphoid differentiation. LPA receptors were expressed at significantly higher levels on Common Myeloid Progenitors (CMP than either multipotent Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells (HSPC or Common Lymphoid Progenitors (CLP suggesting that LPA acts on committed myeloid progenitors. Functional studies demonstrated that LPA enhanced migration, induced cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis of isolated CMP, but had no effect on either HSPC or CLP. Analysis of adult and fetal human bone marrow sections showed that PPAP2A, (the enzyme which degrades LPA was highly expressed in the osteoblastic niche but not in the perivascular regions, whereas Autotaxin (the enzyme that synthesizes LPA was expressed in perivascular regions of the marrow. We propose that a gradient of LPA with the highest levels in peri-sinusoidal regions and lowest near the endosteal zone, regulates the localization, proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors within the bone marrow marrow.

  13. Profiles of microbial fatty acids in the human metabolome are disease-specific

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    Zhanna A Ktsoyan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The human gastrointestinal tract is inhabited by a diverse and dense symbiotic microbiota, the composition of which is the result of host-microbe co-evolution and co-adaptation. This tight integration creates intense crosstalk and signalling between the host and microbiota at the cellular and metabolic levels. In many genetic or infectious diseases the balance between host and microbiota may be compromised resulting in erroneous communication. Consequently, the composition of the human metabolome, which includes the gut metabolome, may be different in health and disease states in terms of microbial products and metabolites entering systemic circulation. To test this hypothesis, we measured the level of hydroxy, branched, cyclopropyl and unsaturated fatty acids, aldehydes, and phenyl derivatives in blood of patients with a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, and in patients with peptic ulceration (PU resulting from Helicobacter pylori infection. Discriminant function analysis of a data matrix consisting of 94 cases as statistical units (37 FMF patients, 14 PU patients, and 43 healthy controls and the concentration of 35 microbial products in the blood as statistical variables revealed a high accuracy of the proposed model (all cases were correctly classified. This suggests that the profile of microbial products and metabolites in the human metabolome is specific for a given disease and may potentially serve as a biomarker for disease.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid promotes the differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells.

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    Yuki Kondo

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects and mechanism of action of valproic acid on hepatic differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells. Human induced pluripotent stem cells were differentiated into endodermal cells in the presence of activin A and then into hepatic progenitor cells using dimethyl sulfoxide. Hepatic progenitor cells were matured in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor, oncostatin M, and dexamethasone with valproic acid that was added during the maturation process. After 25 days of differentiation, cells expressed hepatic marker genes and drug-metabolizing enzymes and exhibited drug-metabolizing enzyme activities. These expression levels and activities were increased by treatment with valproic acid, the timing and duration of which were important parameters to promote differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells into hepatocytes. Valproic acid inhibited histone deacetylase activity during differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells, and other histone deacetylase inhibitors also enhanced differentiation into hepatocytes. In conclusion, histone deacetylase inhibitors such as valproic acid can be used to promote hepatic differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells.

  15. Oleanolic Acid, a Compound Present in Grapes and Olives, Protects against Genotoxicity in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

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    Cristina Sánchez-Quesada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oleanolic acid (AO and maslinic acid (MA are constituents of the skins of different fruits, including olives and white or red grapes. Although both compounds are known to have beneficial properties against different types of cancers, thus far, there are no studies about their chemopreventive effects in human breast cancer. Thus, we sought to elucidate whether both compounds possess chemopreventive activity. Two cell lines of human breast cancer cells and one noncancerous human mammary epithelial cells were used to determine the effects of OA and MA. The results showed that OA inhibited the proliferation and increased the oxidative stress of highly invasive cells. Additionally, OA decreased oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the DNA in human mammary epithelial cells. These results suggest that OA could act as a chemopreventive agent in human breast cancer and could inhibit the proliferation of highly invasive breast cancer cells.

  16. Different oral sensitivities to and sensations of short-, medium-, and long-chain fatty acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Running, Cordelia A; Mattes, Richard D

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acids that vary in chain length and degree of unsaturation have different effects on metabolism and human health. As evidence for a "taste" of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) accumulates, it may be hypothesized that fatty acid structures will also influence oral sensations. The present study examined oral sensitivity to caproic (C6), lauric (C12), and oleic (C18:1) acids over repeated visits. Analyses were also conducted on textural properties of NEFA emulsions and blank solutions. Oral thresholds for caproic acid were lower compared with oleic acid. Lauric acid thresholds were intermediate but not significantly different from either, likely due to lingering irritating sensations that prevented accurate discrimination. From particle size analysis, larger droplets were observed in blank solutions when mineral oil was used, leading to instability of the emulsion, which was not observed when emulsions contained NEFA or when mineral oil was removed from the blank. Rheological data showed no differences in viscosity among samples except for a slightly higher viscosity with oleic acid concentrations above 58 mM. Thus, texture was unlikely to be the property used to distinguish between the samples. Differences in oral detection and sensation of caproic, lauric, and oleic acids may be due to different properties of the fatty acid alkyl chains.

  17. Simultaneous determination of niflumic acid and its prodrug, talniflumate in human plasma by high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dong-Jin; Park, Jeong-Sook; Ko, Hye-Ran; Jee, Jun-Pil; Kim, Jin-Ki; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Chong-Kook

    2005-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of niflumic acid and its prodrug, talniflumate, in human plasma. Niflumic acid and talniflumate were eluted isocratically with methanol-water (73:27, v/v, adjusted to pH 3.5 by acetic acid) at a fl ow rate of 1 mL/min. Indomethacin was used as an internal standard. Signals were monitored by an UV detector at 288 nm. Retention times of indomethacin, niflumic acid and talniflumate were 5.9, 7.2 and 13.5 min, respectively. Calibration plots were linear over the range 50-5000 ng/mL for niflumic acid and 100-5000 ng/mL for talniflumate. The limits of quantitation were 50 ng/mL for niflumic acid and 100 ng/mL for talniflumate. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSD) of niflumic acid and talniflumate were less than 10% and the accuracies were higher than 90%. This method is rapid, sensitive and reproducible for the determination of niflumic acid and talniflumate in human plasma.

  18. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and salicylic acid interaction with the human erythrocyte membrane bilayer induce in vitro changes in the morphology of erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwalsky, Mario; Belmar, Jessica; Villena, Fernando; Gallardo, María José; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2013-11-01

    Despite the well-documented information, there are insufficient reports concerning the effects of salicylate compounds on the structure and functions of cell membranes, particularly those of human erythrocytes. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA) with cell membranes, human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models were utilized. These consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of ASA and SA to perturb the multibilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction while DMPC unilamellar vesicles (LUV) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, we took advantage of the capability of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to detect the changes in the thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayers resulting from ASA and SA interaction with PC and PE molecules. In an attempt to further elucidate their effects on cell membranes, the present work also examined their influence on the morphology of intact human erythrocytes by means of defocusing and scanning electron microscopy, while isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Results indicated that both salicylates interact with human erythrocytes and their molecular models in a concentration-dependent manner perturbing their bilayer structures.

  19. Anticancer effect and apoptosis induction of gambogic acid in human gastric cancer line BGC-823

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Liu; Qing-Long Guo; Qi-Dong You; Li Zhao; Hong-Yan Gu; Sheng-Tao Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anticancer effect of a traditional Chinese medicine gambogic acid (GA) in human gastric cancer line BGC-823 and further study the mechanism of apoptosis induction of GA.METHODS: Low differential human gastric cancer line BGC-823 were treated with GA at different doses and different times, the inhibitory rates were detected by MTT assay. Apoptosis induced by GA in BGC-823 cells was observed by Annexin-V/PI doubling staining flow cytometry assay. And T/C (%) was chosen to detect the inhibition of GA on human gastric adenocarcinoma BGC-823 nude mice xenografts. Apoptosis on nude mice xenografts was observed by Annexin-V/PI doubling staining flow cytometry assay and DNA fragmentation assay. To further determine the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induced by GA, the changes on the expression of bcl-2 and bax genes were detected by RT-PCR.RESULTS: After incubation with GA, low differential human gastric cancer line BGC-823 was dramatically inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. After these cells were exposedto GA for 24, 48 and 72 h, the IC50 value was 1.02±0.05, 1.41±0.20 and 1.14±0.19 μmol/L, respectively. Apoptosis in BGC-823 cells induced by GA was observed by AnnexinV/PI doubling staining flow cytometry assay. The apoptotic population of BGC-823 cells was about 12.96% and 24.58%, respectively, when cells were incubated with 1.2 μmol/L GA for 48 and 72 h. T/C (%) of human gastric carcinoma adenocarcinoma BGC-823 nude mice xenografts was 44.3, when the nude mice were treated with GA (8 mg/kg). Meanwhile, apoptosis induced by GA was observed in human gastric carcinoma adenocarcinoma BGC-823 nude mice xenografts. The increase of bax gene and the decrease of bc1-2 gene expressions were found by RT-PCR.CONCLUSION: The inhibition of GA on human gastric cancer line BGC-823 was confirmed. This effect connects with the inducing apoptosis in BGC-823 cells and the molecular mechanism might be related to the reduction of expression of apoptosis

  20. A nine-country study of the protein content and amino acid composition of mature human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Feng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous studies have evaluated protein and amino acid levels in human milk. However, research in this area has been limited by small sample sizes and study populations with little ethnic or racial diversity. Objective: Evaluate the protein and amino acid composition of mature (≥30 days human milk samples collected from a large, multinational study using highly standardized methods for sample collection, storage, and analysis. Design: Using a single, centralized laboratory, human milk samples from 220 women (30–188 days postpartum from nine countries were analyzed for amino acid composition using Waters AccQ-Tag high-performance liquid chromatography and total nitrogen content using the LECO FP-528 nitrogen analyzer. Total protein was calculated as total nitrogen×6.25. True protein, which includes protein, free amino acids, and peptides, was calculated from the total amino acids. Results: Mean total protein from individual countries (standard deviation [SD] ranged from 1,133 (125.5 to 1,366 (341.4 mg/dL; the mean across all countries (SD was 1,192 (200.9 mg/dL. Total protein, true protein, and amino acid composition were not significantly different across countries except Chile, which had higher total and true protein. Amino acid profiles (percent of total amino acids did not differ across countries. Total and true protein concentrations and 16 of 18 amino acid concentrations declined with the stage of lactation. Conclusions: Total protein, true protein, and individual amino acid concentrations in human milk steadily decline from 30 to 151 days of lactation, and are significantly higher in the second month of lactation compared with the following 4 months. There is a high level of consistency in the protein content and amino acid com