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Sample records for human ace2 complexed

  1. Pathological Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch in the stressed heart is transcriptionally controlled by the endothelial Brg1–FoxM1 complex

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    Yang, Jin; Feng, Xuhui; Zhou, Qiong; Cheng, Wei; Shang, Ching; Han, Pei; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Chen, Huei-Sheng Vincent; Quertermous, Thomas; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding angiotensin-converting enzymes (Ace and Ace2) are essential for heart function regulation. Cardiac stress enhances Ace, but suppresses Ace2, expression in the heart, leading to a net production of angiotensin II that promotes cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The regulatory mechanism that underlies the Ace2-to-Ace pathological switch, however, is unknown. Here we report that the Brahma-related gene-1 (Brg1) chromatin remodeler and forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) transcription factor cooperate within cardiac (coronary) endothelial cells of pathologically stressed hearts to trigger the Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch, angiotensin I-to-II conversion, and cardiac hypertrophy. In mice, cardiac stress activates the expression of Brg1 and FoxM1 in endothelial cells. Once activated, Brg1 and FoxM1 form a protein complex on Ace and Ace2 promoters to concurrently activate Ace and repress Ace2, tipping the balance to Ace2 expression with enhanced angiotensin II production, leading to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Disruption of endothelial Brg1 or FoxM1 or chemical inhibition of FoxM1 abolishes the stress-induced Ace2-to-Ace switch and protects the heart from pathological hypertrophy. In human hypertrophic hearts, BRG1 and FOXM1 expression is also activated in endothelial cells; their expression levels correlate strongly with the ACE/ACE2 ratio, suggesting a conserved mechanism. Our studies demonstrate a molecular interaction of Brg1 and FoxM1 and an endothelial mechanism of modulating Ace/Ace2 ratio for heart failure therapy. PMID:27601681

  2. Characterization and significance of ACE2 and Mas receptor in human colon adenocarcinoma.

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    Bernardi, Stella; Zennaro, Cristina; Palmisano, Silvia; Velkoska, Elena; Sabato, Nicoletta; Toffoli, Barbara; Giacomel, Greta; Buri, Luigi; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Bellini, Giuseppe; Burrell, Louise M; De Manzini, Nicolò; Fabris, Bruno

    2012-03-01

    A new arm of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been recently characterized; this includes angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)2 and angiotensin (Ang)1-7, a heptapeptide acting through the Mas receptor (MasR). Recent studies show that Ang1-7 has an antiproliferative action on lung adenocarcinoma cells. The aim of this study was to characterize RAS expression in human colon adenocarcinoma and to investigate whether Ang1-7 exerts an antiproliferative effect on human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Gene, protein expression and enzymatic activity of the main components of the RAS were determined on non-neoplastic colon mucosa as well as on the tumor mass and the mucosa taken 5 cm distant from it, both collected from patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Two different human colon cancer cell lines were treated with AngII and Ang1-7. The novel finding of this study was that MasR was significantly upregulated in colon adenocarcinoma compared with non-neoplastic colon mucosa, which showed little or no expression of it. ACE gene expression and enzymatic activity were also increased in the tumors. However, AngII and Ang1-7 did not have any pro-/antiproliferative effects in the cell lines studied. The data suggest that upregulation of the MasR could be used as a diagnostic marker of colon adenocarcinoma.

  3. A Human Long Non-Coding RNA ALT1 Controls the Cell Cycle of Vascular Endothelial Cells Via ACE2 and Cyclin D1 Pathway

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    Wen Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: ALT1 is a novel long non-coding RNA derived from the alternatively spliced transcript of the deleted in lymphocytic leukemia 2 (DLEU2. To date, ALT1 biological roles in human vascular endothelial cells have not been reported. Methods: ALT1 was knocked down by siRNAs. Cell proliferation was analyzed by cck-8. The existence and sequence of human ALT1 were identified by 3’ rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The interaction between lncRNA and proteins was analyzed by RNA-Protein pull down assay, RNA immunoprecipitation, and mass spectrometry analysis. Results: ALT1 was expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. The expression of ALT1 was significantly downregulated in contact-inhibited HUVECs and in hypoxia-induced, growth-arrested HUVECs. Knocking down of ALT1 inhibited the proliferation of HUVECs by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. We observed that angiotensin converting enzyme Ⅱ(ACE2 was a direct target gene of ALT1. Knocking-down of ALT1 or its target gene ACE2 could efficiently decrease the expression of cyclin D1 via the enhanced ubiquitination and degradation, in which HIF-1α and protein von Hippel-Lindau (pVHL might be involved. Conclusion: The results suggested the human long non-coding RNA ALT1 is a novel regulator for cell cycle of HUVECs via ACE2 and cyclin D1 pathway.

  4. Heterozygote loss of ACE2 is sufficient to increase the susceptibility to heart disease.

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    Wang, Wang; Patel, Vaibhav B; Parajuli, Nirmal; Fan, Dong; Basu, Ratnadeep; Wang, Zuocheng; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Penninger, Josef M; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2014-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) metabolizes Ang II into Ang 1-7 thereby negatively regulating the renin-angiotensin system. However, heart disease in humans and in animal models is associated with only a partial loss of ACE2. ACE2 is an X-linked gene; and as such, we tested the clinical relevance of a partial loss of ACE2 by using female ACE2(+/+) (wildtype) and ACE2(+/-) (heterozygote) mice. Pressure overload in ACE2(+/-) mice resulted in greater LV dilation and worsening systolic and diastolic dysfunction. These changes were associated with increased myocardial fibrosis, hypertrophy, and upregulation of pathological gene expression. In response to Ang II infusion, there was increased NADPH oxidase activity and myocardial fibrosis resulting in the worsening of Ang II-induced diastolic dysfunction with a preserved systolic function. Ang II-mediated cellular effects in cultured adult ACE2(+/-) cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts were exacerbated. Ang II-mediated pathological signaling worsened in ACE2(+/-) hearts characterized by an increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 and STAT-3 pathways. The ACE2(+/-) mice showed an exacerbated pressor response with increased vascular fibrosis and stiffness. Vascular superoxide and nitrotyrosine levels were increased in ACE2(+/-) vessels consistent with increased vascular oxidative stress. These changes occurred with increased renal fibrosis and superoxide production. Partial heterozygote loss of ACE2 is sufficient to increase the susceptibility to heart disease secondary to pressure overload and Ang II infusion. Heart disease in humans with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is associated with a partial loss of ACE2. Heterozygote female ACE2 mutant mice showed enhanced susceptibility to pressure overload-induced heart disease. Heterozygote female ACE2 mutant mice showed enhanced susceptibility to Ang II-induced heart and vascular diseases. Partial loss of ACE2 is sufficient to enhance the susceptibility to

  5. The ACE2 gene: its potential as a functional candidate for cardiovascular disease.

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    Burrell, Louise M; Harrap, Stephen B; Velkoska, Elena; Patel, Sheila K

    2013-01-01

    The RAS (renin-angiotensin system) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of CVD (cardiovascular disease), and RAS blockade is an important therapeutic strategy in the management of CVD. A new counterbalancing arm of the RAS is now known to exist in which ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) 2 degrades Ang (angiotensin) II, the main effector of the classic RAS, and generates Ang-(1-7). Altered ACE2 expression is associated with cardiac and vascular disease in experimental models of CVD, and ACE2 is increased in failing human hearts and atherosclerotic vessels. In man, circulating ACE2 activity increases with coronary heart disease, as well as heart failure, and a large proportion of the variation in plasma ACE2 levels has been attributed to hereditary factors. The ACE2 gene maps to chromosome Xp22 and this paper reviews the evidence associating ACE2 gene variation with CVD and considers clues to potential functional ACE2 variants that may alter gene expression or transcriptional activity. Studies to date have investigated ACE2 gene associations in hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and coronary artery disease, but the results have been inconsistent. The discrepancies may reflect the sample size of the studies, the gender or ethnicity of subjects, the cardiovascular phenotype or the ACE2 SNP investigated. The frequent observation of apparent sex-dependence might be of special importance, if confirmed. As yet, there are no studies to concurrently assess ACE2 gene polymorphisms and circulating ACE2 activity. Large-scale carefully conducted clinical studies are urgently needed to clarify more precisely the potential role of ACE2 in the CVD continuum.

  6. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE and ACE2 bind integrins and ACE2 regulates integrin signalling.

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    Nicola E Clarke

    Full Text Available The angiotensin converting enzymes (ACEs are the key catalytic components of the renin-angiotensin system, mediating precise regulation of blood pressure by counterbalancing the effects of each other. Inhibition of ACE has been shown to improve pathology in cardiovascular disease, whilst ACE2 is cardioprotective in the failing heart. However, the mechanisms by which ACE2 mediates its cardioprotective functions have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we demonstrate that both ACE and ACE2 bind integrin subunits, in an RGD-independent manner, and that they can act as cell adhesion substrates. We show that cellular expression of ACE2 enhanced cell adhesion. Furthermore, we present evidence that soluble ACE2 (sACE2 is capable of suppressing integrin signalling mediated by FAK. In addition, sACE2 increases the expression of Akt, thereby lowering the proportion of the signalling molecule phosphorylated Akt. These results suggest that ACE2 plays a role in cell-cell interactions, possibly acting to fine-tune integrin signalling. Hence the expression and cleavage of ACE2 at the plasma membrane may influence cell-extracellular matrix interactions and the signalling that mediates cell survival and proliferation. As such, ectodomain shedding of ACE2 may play a role in the process of pathological cardiac remodelling.

  7. ACE2 is augmented in dystrophic skeletal muscle and plays a role in decreasing associated fibrosis.

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    Cecilia Riquelme

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common inherited neuromuscular disease and is characterized by absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, muscle wasting, and fibrosis. We previously demonstrated that systemic infusion or oral administration of angiotensin-(1-7 (Ang-(1-7, a peptide with opposing effects to angiotensin II, normalized skeletal muscle architecture, decreased local fibrosis, and improved muscle function in mdx mice, a dystrophic model for DMD. In this study, we investigated the presence, activity, and localization of ACE2, the enzyme responsible for Ang-(1-7 production, in wild type (wt and mdx skeletal muscle and in a model of induced chronic damage in wt mice. All dystrophic muscles studied showed higher ACE2 activity than wt muscle. Immunolocalization studies indicated that ACE2 was localized mainly at the sarcolemma and, to a lesser extent, associated with interstitial cells. Similar results were observed in the model of chronic damage in the tibialis anterior (TA muscle. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of ACE2 overexpression in mdx TA muscle using an adenovirus containing human ACE2 sequence and showed that expression of ACE2 reduced the fibrosis associated with TA dystrophic muscles. Moreover, we observed fewer inflammatory cells infiltrating the mdx muscle. Finally, mdx gastrocnemius muscles from mice infused with Ang-(1-7, which decreases fibrosis, contain less ACE2 associated with the muscle. This is the first evidence supporting ACE2 as an important therapeutic target to improve the dystrophic skeletal muscle phenotype.

  8. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

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    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang; (Harvard-Med); (UMM-MED)

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  9. Circulating ACE2 activity correlates with cardiovascular disease development

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    Katalin Úri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It was shown recently that angiotensin-converting enzyme activity is limited by endogenous inhibition in vivo, highlighting the importance of angiotensin II (ACE2 elimination. The potential contribution of the ACE2 to cardiovascular disease progression was addressed. Serum ACE2 activities were measured in different clinical states (healthy, n=45; hypertensive, n=239; heart failure (HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF n=141 and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF n=47. ACE2 activity was significantly higher in hypertensive patients (24.8±0.8 U/ml than that in healthy volunteers (16.2±0.8 U/ml, p=0.01. ACE2 activity further increased in HFrEF patients (43.9±2.1 U/ml, p=0.001 but not in HFpEF patients (24.6±1.9 U/ml when compared with hypertensive patients. Serum ACE2 activity negatively correlated with left ventricular systolic function in HFrEF, but not in hypertensive, HFpEF or healthy populations. Serum ACE2 activity had a fair diagnostic value to differentiate HFpEF from HFrEF patients in this study. Serum ACE2 activity correlates with cardiovascular disease development: it increases when hypertension develops and further increases when the cardiovascular disease further progresses to systolic dysfunction, suggesting that ACE2 metabolism plays a role in these processes. In contrast, serum ACE2 activity does not change when hypertension progresses to HFpEF, suggesting a different pathomechanism for HFpEF, and proposing a biomarker-based identification of these HF forms.

  10. A single nucleotide polymorphism uncovers a novel function for the transcription factor Ace2 during Candida albicans hyphal development.

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    Diana M Calderón-Noreña

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major invasive fungal pathogen in humans. An important virulence factor is its ability to switch between the yeast and hyphal forms, and these filamentous forms are important in tissue penetration and invasion. A common feature for filamentous growth is the ability to inhibit cell separation after cytokinesis, although it is poorly understood how this process is regulated developmentally. In C. albicans, the formation of filaments during hyphal growth requires changes in septin ring dynamics. In this work, we studied the functional relationship between septins and the transcription factor Ace2, which controls the expression of enzymes that catalyze septum degradation. We found that alternative translation initiation produces two Ace2 isoforms. While full-length Ace2, Ace2L, influences septin dynamics in a transcription-independent manner in hyphal cells but not in yeast cells, the use of methionine-55 as the initiation codon gives rise to Ace2S, which functions as the nuclear transcription factor required for the expression of cell separation genes. Genetic evidence indicates that Ace2L influences the incorporation of the Sep7 septin to hyphal septin rings in order to avoid inappropriate activation of cell separation during filamentous growth. Interestingly, a natural single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP present in the C. albicans WO-1 background and other C. albicans commensal and clinical isolates generates a stop codon in the ninth codon of Ace2L that mimics the phenotype of cells lacking Ace2L. Finally, we report that Ace2L and Ace2S interact with the NDR kinase Cbk1 and that impairing activity of this kinase results in a defect in septin dynamics similar to that of hyphal cells lacking Ace2L. Together, our findings identify Ace2L and the NDR kinase Cbk1 as new elements of the signaling system that modify septin ring dynamics in hyphae to allow cell-chain formation, a feature that appears to have evolved in specific C

  11. Structural determinants for binding to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2 and angiotensin receptors

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    Daniel eClayton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2 is a zinc carboxypeptidase involved in the renin angiotensin system (RAS and inactivates the potent vasopressive peptide angiotensin II (Ang II by removing the C-terminal phenylalanine residue to yield Ang1-7. This conversion inactivates the vasoconstrictive action of Ang II and yields a peptide that acts as a vasodilatory molecule at the Mas receptor and potentially other receptors. Given the growing complexity of RAS and level of cross-talk between ligands and their corresponding enzymes and receptors, the design of molecules with selectivity for the major RAS binding partners to control cardiovascular tone is an on-going challenge. In previous studies we used single β-amino acid substitutions to modulate the structure of Ang II and its selectivity for ACE2, AT1R and angiotensin type 2 (AT2R receptor. We showed that modification at the C-terminus of Ang II generally resulted in more pronounced changes to secondary structure and ligand binding, and here we further explore this region for the potential to modulate ligand specificity. In this study, 1 a library of forty-seven peptides derived from the C-terminal tetra-peptide sequence (-IHPF of Ang II was synthesised and assessed for ACE2 binding, 2 the terminal group requirements for high affinity ACE2 binding were explored by and N- and C-terminal modification, 3 high affinity ACE2 binding chimeric AngII analogues were then synthesized and assessed, 4 the structure of the full-length Ang II analogues were assessed by circular dichroism, and 5 the Ang II analogues were assessed for AT1R/AT2R selectivity by cell-based assays. Studies on the C-terminus of Ang II demonstrated varied specificity at different residue positions for ACE2 binding and four Ang II chimeric peptides were identified as selective ligands for the AT2 receptor. Overall, these results provide insight into the residue and structural requirements for ACE2 binding and angiotensin receptor

  12. ACE2 Global Digital Elevation Model : User Analysis

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    Smith, R. G.; Berry, P. A. M.; Benveniste, J.

    2013-12-01

    Altimeter Corrected Elevations 2 (ACE2), first released in October 2009, is the Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) created by fusing the high accuracy of over 100 million altimeter retracked height estimates, derived primarily from the ERS-1 Geodetic Mission, with the high frequency content available within the near-global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. This novel ACE2 GDEM is freely available at 3”, 9”, 30” and 5' and has been distributed via the web to over 680 subscribers. This paper presents the results of a detailed analysis of geographical distribution of subscribed users, along with fields of study and potential uses. Investigations have also been performed to determine the most popular spatial resolutions and the impact these have on the scope of data downloaded. The analysis has shown that, even though the majority of users have come from Europe and America, a significant number of website hits have been received from South America, Africa and Asia. Registered users also vary widely, from research institutions and major companies down to individual hobbyists looking at data for single projects.

  13. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 activity and human atrial fibrillation: increased plasma angiotensin converting enzyme 2 activity is associated with atrial fibrillation and more advanced left atrial structural remodelling.

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    Walters, Tomos E; Kalman, Jonathan M; Patel, Sheila K; Mearns, Megan; Velkoska, Elena; Burrell, Louise M

    2017-08-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an integral membrane protein whose main action is to degrade angiotensin II. Plasma ACE2 activity is increased in various cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to determine the relationship between plasma ACE2 activity and human atrial fibrillation (AF), and in particular its relationship to left atrial (LA) structural remodelling. One hundred and three participants from a tertiary arrhythmia centre, including 58 with paroxysmal AF (PAF), 20 with persistent AF (PersAF), and 25 controls, underwent clinical evaluation, echocardiographic analysis, and measurement of plasma ACE2 activity. A subgroup of 20 participants underwent invasive LA electroanatomic mapping. Plasma ACE2 activity levels were increased in AF [control 13.3 (9.5-22.3) pmol/min/mL; PAF 16.9 (9.7-27.3) pmol/min/mL; PersAF 22.8 (13.7-33.4) pmol/min/mL, P = 0.006]. Elevated plasma ACE2 was associated with older age, male gender, hypertension and vascular disease, elevated left ventricular (LV) mass, impaired LV diastolic function and advanced atrial disease (P < 0.05 for all). Independent predictors of elevated plasma ACE2 activity were AF (P = 0.04) and vascular disease (P < 0.01). There was a significant relationship between elevated ACE2 activity and low mean LA bipolar voltage (adjusted R2 = 0.22, P = 0.03), a high proportion of complex fractionated electrograms (R2 = 0.32, P = 0.009) and a long LA activation time (R2 = 0.20, P = 0.04). Plasma ACE2 activity is elevated in human AF. Both AF and vascular disease predict elevated plasma ACE2 activity, and elevated plasma ACE2 is significantly associated with more advanced LA structural remodelling. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Hydronephrosis alters cardiac ACE2 and Mas receptor expression in mice.

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    Zhang, Yanling; Ma, Lulu; Wu, Junyan; Chen, Tingting

    2015-06-01

    Hydronephrosis is characterized by substantial loss of tubules and affects renin secretion in the kidney. However, whether alterations of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2 and Mas receptor in the heart are observed in hydronephrosis is unknown. Thus, we assessed these components in hydronephrotic mice treated with AT1 receptor blockade and ACE inhibitor. Hydronephrosis was induced by left ureteral ligation in Balb/C mice except sham-operated animals. The levels of cardiac ACE, ACE2 and Mas receptor were measured after treatment of losartan or enalapril. Hydronephrosis led to an increase of ACE level and a decrease of ACE2 and Mas receptor in the heart. Losartan decreased cardiac ACE level, but ACE2 and Mas receptor levels significantly increased in hydronephrotic mice (p Hydronephrosis increased cardiac ACE and suppressed ACE2 and Mas receptor levels. AT1 blockade caused sustained activation of cardiac ACE2 and Mas receptor, but ACE inhibitor had the limitation of such activation of Mas receptor in hydronephrotic animals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Human algorithmic stability and human Rademacher complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vahdat, Mehrnoosh; Oneto, L.; Ghio, A; Anguita, D.; Funk, M.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    In Machine Learning (ML), the learning process of an algo- rithm given a set of evidences is studied via complexity measures. The way towards using ML complexity measures in the Human Learning (HL) domain has been paved by a previous study, which introduced Human Rademacher Complexity (HRC): in this

  16. Isolation and characterization of a bat SARS-like coronavirus that uses the ACE2 receptor.

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    Ge, Xing-Yi; Li, Jia-Lu; Yang, Xing-Lou; Chmura, Aleksei A; Zhu, Guangjian; Epstein, Jonathan H; Mazet, Jonna K; Hu, Ben; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Ji; Luo, Chu-Ming; Tan, Bing; Wang, Ning; Zhu, Yan; Crameri, Gary; Zhang, Shu-Yi; Wang, Lin-Fa; Daszak, Peter; Shi, Zheng-Li

    2013-11-28

    The 2002-3 pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was one of the most significant public health events in recent history. An ongoing outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus suggests that this group of viruses remains a key threat and that their distribution is wider than previously recognized. Although bats have been suggested to be the natural reservoirs of both viruses, attempts to isolate the progenitor virus of SARS-CoV from bats have been unsuccessful. Diverse SARS-like coronaviruses (SL-CoVs) have now been reported from bats in China, Europe and Africa, but none is considered a direct progenitor of SARS-CoV because of their phylogenetic disparity from this virus and the inability of their spike proteins to use the SARS-CoV cellular receptor molecule, the human angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2). Here we report whole-genome sequences of two novel bat coronaviruses from Chinese horseshoe bats (family: Rhinolophidae) in Yunnan, China: RsSHC014 and Rs3367. These viruses are far more closely related to SARS-CoV than any previously identified bat coronaviruses, particularly in the receptor binding domain of the spike protein. Most importantly, we report the first recorded isolation of a live SL-CoV (bat SL-CoV-WIV1) from bat faecal samples in Vero E6 cells, which has typical coronavirus morphology, 99.9% sequence identity to Rs3367 and uses ACE2 from humans, civets and Chinese horseshoe bats for cell entry. Preliminary in vitro testing indicates that WIV1 also has a broad species tropism. Our results provide the strongest evidence to date that Chinese horseshoe bats are natural reservoirs of SARS-CoV, and that intermediate hosts may not be necessary for direct human infection by some bat SL-CoVs. They also highlight the importance of pathogen-discovery programs targeting high-risk wildlife groups in emerging disease hotspots as a strategy for pandemic preparedness.

  17. Collectrin, a homologue of ACE2, its transcriptional control and functional perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yanling; Wada, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Collectrin is a type I membrane protein and shares significant homology with C-terminal domain of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2). However, collectrin lacks catalytic domain and it suggests the presence of uncharacterized physiological functions of collectrin. Collectrin is transcriptionally regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor-α and -β and is highly expressed on renal proximal tubules and collecting ducts as well as pancreatic β-cells. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated interesting physiological roles of collectrin related to insulin secretion, formation of primary cilia, renal cyst formation and amino acid transport. The common underlying molecular mechanism may be suggested by the evidence that collectrin binds to SNARE complex by interacting with snapin. Collectrin is involved in the process of vesicle transport and membrane fusion and thus it delivers insulin for exocytosis or various membrane proteins to apical plasmalemma and primary cilia. Collectrin may be the new therapeutic target for various pathological processes such as diabetes, polycystic kidney disease, hypertension and aminoaciduria

  18. Short-term treatment with diminazene aceturate ameliorates the reduction in kidney ACE2 activity in rats with subtotal nephrectomy.

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    Elena Velkoska

    Full Text Available Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE 2 is an important modulator of the renin angiotensin system (RAS through its role to degrade angiotensin (Ang II. Depletion of kidney ACE2 occurs following kidney injury due to renal mass reduction and may contribute to progressive kidney disease. This study assessed the effect of diminazine aceturate (DIZE, which has been described as an ACE2 activator, on kidney ACE2 mRNA and activity in rats with kidney injury due to subtotal nephrectomy (STNx. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into Control groups or underwent STNx; rats then received vehicle or the DIZE (s.c. 15 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks. STNx led to hypertension (P<0.01, kidney hypertrophy (P<0.001 and impaired kidney function (P<0.001 compared to Control rats. STNx was associated with increased kidney cortical ACE activity, and reduced ACE2 mRNA in the cortex (P<0.01, with reduced cortical and medullary ACE2 activity (P<0.05, and increased urinary ACE2 excretion (P<0.05 compared to Control rats. Urinary ACE2 activity correlated positively with urinary protein excretion (P<0.001, and negatively with creatinine clearance (P=0.04. In STNx rats, DIZE had no effect on blood pressure or kidney function, but was associated with reduced cortical ACE activity (P<0.01, increased cortical ACE2 mRNA (P<0.05 and increased cortical and medullary ACE2 activity (P<0.05. The precise in vivo mechanism of action of DIZE is not clear, and its effects to increase ACE2 activity may be secondary to an increase in ACE2 mRNA abundance. In ex vivo studies, DIZE did not increase ACE2 activity in either Control or STNx kidney cortical membranes. It is not yet known if chronic administration of DIZE has long-term benefits to slow the progression of kidney disease.

  19. Oral delivery of ACE2/Ang-(1-7) bioencapsulated in plant cells protects against experimental uveitis and autoimmune uveoretinitis.

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    Shil, Pollob K; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Zhu, Ping; Verma, Amrisha; Daniell, Henry; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-12-01

    Hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) resulting in elevated Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to all stages of inflammatory responses including ocular inflammation. The discovery of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has established a protective axis of RAS involving ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas that counteracts the proinflammatory and hypertrophic effects of the deleterious ACE/AngII/AT1R axis. Here we investigated the hypothesis that enhancing the systemic and local activity of the protective axis of the RAS by oral delivery of ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) bioencapsulated in plant cells would confer protection against ocular inflammation. Both ACE2 and Ang-(1-7), fused with the non-toxic cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) were expressed in plant chloroplasts. Increased levels of ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) were observed in circulation and retina after oral administration of CTB-ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) expressing plant cells. Oral feeding of mice with bioencapsulated ACE2/Ang-(1-7) significantly reduced endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in mice. Treatment with bioencapsulated ACE2/Ang-(1-7) also dramatically decreased cellular infiltration, retinal vasculitis, damage and folding in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Thus, enhancing the protective axis of RAS by oral delivery of ACE2/Ang-(1-7) bioencapsulated in plant cells provide an innovative, highly efficient and cost-effective therapeutic strategy for ocular inflammatory diseases.

  20. Neuroprotective Mechanisms of the ACE2-Angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas Axis in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennion, Douglas M; Haltigan, Emily; Regenhardt, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of beneficial neuroprotective effects of the angiotensin converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas axis [ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas] in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke has spurred interest in a more complete characterization of its mechanisms of action. Here, we summarize findings that desc......The discovery of beneficial neuroprotective effects of the angiotensin converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas axis [ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas] in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke has spurred interest in a more complete characterization of its mechanisms of action. Here, we summarize findings...... that describe the protective role of the ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas axis in stroke, along with a focused discussion on the potential mechanisms of neuroprotective effects of Ang-(1-7) in stroke. The latter incorporates evidence describing the actions of Ang-(1-7) to counter the deleterious effects of angiotensin II...... complete understanding of the mechanisms of action of Ang-(1-7) to elicit neuroprotection will serve as an essential step toward research into potential targeted therapeutics in the clinical setting....

  1. Activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) attenuates allergic airway inflammation in rat asthma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhawale, Vaibhav Shrirang; Amara, Venkateswara Rao; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Malek, Vajir; Patel, Deep; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) is positively correlated to asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is highly expressed in lungs. ACE2, the counteracting enzyme of ACE, was proven to be protective in pulmonary, cardiovascular diseases. In the present study we checked the effect of ACE2 activation in animal model of asthma. Asthma was induced in male wistar rats by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin and then treated with ACE2 activator, diminazene aceturate (DIZE) for 2 weeks. 48 h after last allergen challenge, animals were anesthetized, blood, BALF, femoral bone marrow lavage were collected for leucocyte count; trachea for measuring airway responsiveness to carbachol; lungs and heart were isolated for histological studies and western blotting. In our animal model, the characteristic features of asthma such as altered airway responsiveness to carbachol, eosinophilia and neutrophilia were observed. Western blotting revealed the increased pulmonary expression of ACE1, IL-1β, IL-4, NF-κB, BCL2, p-AKT, p-p38 and decreased expression of ACE2 and IκB. DIZE treatment prevented these alterations. Intraalveolar interstitial thickening, inflammatory cell infiltration, interstitial fibrosis, oxidative stress and right ventricular hypertrophy in asthma control animals were also reversed by DIZE treatment. Activation of ACE2 by DIZE conferred protection against asthma as evident from biochemical, functional, histological and molecular parameters. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that activation of ACE2 by DIZE prevents asthma progression by altering AKT, p38, NF-κB and other inflammatory markers. - Highlights: • Diminazene aceturate (DIZE), an ACE2 activator prevents ovalbumin-induced asthma. • DIZE acted by upregulating ACE2, downregulating ACE1, MAPKs, markers of inflammation, apoptosis. • DIZE reduced airway inflammation, fibrosis, right ventricular hypertrophy and

  2. Activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) attenuates allergic airway inflammation in rat asthma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhawale, Vaibhav Shrirang; Amara, Venkateswara Rao; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Malek, Vajir; Patel, Deep; Tikoo, Kulbhushan, E-mail: tikoo.k@gmail.com

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) is positively correlated to asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is highly expressed in lungs. ACE2, the counteracting enzyme of ACE, was proven to be protective in pulmonary, cardiovascular diseases. In the present study we checked the effect of ACE2 activation in animal model of asthma. Asthma was induced in male wistar rats by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin and then treated with ACE2 activator, diminazene aceturate (DIZE) for 2 weeks. 48 h after last allergen challenge, animals were anesthetized, blood, BALF, femoral bone marrow lavage were collected for leucocyte count; trachea for measuring airway responsiveness to carbachol; lungs and heart were isolated for histological studies and western blotting. In our animal model, the characteristic features of asthma such as altered airway responsiveness to carbachol, eosinophilia and neutrophilia were observed. Western blotting revealed the increased pulmonary expression of ACE1, IL-1β, IL-4, NF-κB, BCL2, p-AKT, p-p38 and decreased expression of ACE2 and IκB. DIZE treatment prevented these alterations. Intraalveolar interstitial thickening, inflammatory cell infiltration, interstitial fibrosis, oxidative stress and right ventricular hypertrophy in asthma control animals were also reversed by DIZE treatment. Activation of ACE2 by DIZE conferred protection against asthma as evident from biochemical, functional, histological and molecular parameters. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that activation of ACE2 by DIZE prevents asthma progression by altering AKT, p38, NF-κB and other inflammatory markers. - Highlights: • Diminazene aceturate (DIZE), an ACE2 activator prevents ovalbumin-induced asthma. • DIZE acted by upregulating ACE2, downregulating ACE1, MAPKs, markers of inflammation, apoptosis. • DIZE reduced airway inflammation, fibrosis, right ventricular hypertrophy and

  3. Structural Analysis of Major Species Barriers between Humans and Palm Civets for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fang (UMM)

    2008-09-23

    It is believed that a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), was passed from palm civets to humans and caused the epidemic of SARS in 2002 to 2003. The major species barriers between humans and civets for SARS-CoV infections are the specific interactions between a defined receptor-binding domain (RBD) on a viral spike protein and its host receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In this study a chimeric ACE2 bearing the critical N-terminal helix from civet and the remaining peptidase domain from human was constructed, and it was shown that this construct has the same receptor activity as civet ACE2. In addition, crystal structures of the chimeric ACE2 complexed with RBDs from various human and civet SARS-CoV strains were determined. These structures, combined with a previously determined structure of human ACE2 complexed with the RBD from a human SARS-CoV strain, have revealed a structural basis for understanding the major species barriers between humans and civets for SARS-CoV infections. They show that the major species barriers are determined by interactions between four ACE2 residues (residues 31, 35, 38, and 353) and two RBD residues (residues 479 and 487), that early civet SARS-CoV isolates were prevented from infecting human cells due to imbalanced salt bridges at the hydrophobic virus/receptor interface, and that SARS-CoV has evolved to gain sustained infectivity for human cells by eliminating unfavorable free charges at the interface through stepwise mutations at positions 479 and 487. These results enhance our understanding of host adaptations and cross-species infections of SARS-CoV and other emerging animal viruses.

  4. From gene to protein—experimental and clinical studies of ACE2 in blood pressure control and arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Sheila K.; Velkoska, Elena; Freeman, Melanie; Wai, Bryan; Lancefield, Terase F.; Burrell, Louise M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, coronary events, heart and renal failure, and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a major role in its pathogenesis. Within the RAS, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin (Ang) I into the vasoconstrictor Ang II. An “alternate” arm of the RAS now exists in which ACE2 counterbalances the effects of the classic RAS through degradation of Ang II, and generation of the vasodilator Ang 1-7. ACE2 is highly expressed in the heart,...

  5. A virus-binding hot spot on human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 is critical for binding of two different coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kailang; Chen, Lang; Peng, Guiqing; Zhou, Wenbo; Pennell, Christopher A; Mansky, Louis M; Geraghty, Robert J; Li, Fang

    2011-06-01

    How viruses evolve to select their receptor proteins for host cell entry is puzzling. We recently determined the crystal structures of NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV) and SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) receptor-binding domains (RBDs), each complexed with their common receptor, human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2), and proposed the existence of a virus-binding hot spot on hACE2. Here we investigated the function of this hypothetical hot spot using structure-guided biochemical and functional assays. The hot spot consists of a salt bridge surrounded by hydrophobic tunnel walls. Mutations that disturb the hot spot structure have significant effects on virus/receptor interactions, revealing critical energy contributions from the hot spot structure. The tunnel structure at the NL63-CoV/hACE2 interface is more compact than that at the SARS-CoV/hACE2 interface, and hence RBD/hACE2 binding affinities are decreased either by NL63-CoV mutations decreasing the tunnel space or by SARS-CoV mutations increasing the tunnel space. Furthermore, NL63-CoV RBD inhibits hACE2-dependent transduction by SARS-CoV spike protein, a successful application of the hot spot theory that has the potential to become a new antiviral strategy against SARS-CoV infections. These results suggest that the structural features of the hot spot on hACE2 were among the driving forces for the convergent evolution of NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV.

  6. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties for Radiative Impact Assessments. Derived from Column Closure Analyses in TARFOX and ACE-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Philip A.; Bergstrom, Robert A.; Schmid, Beat; Livingston, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate in potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the climate change of the past century and predicting future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the 1996 Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the 1997 Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) measured the properties and radiative effects of aerosols over the Atlantic Ocean. Both experiments used remote and in situ measurements from aircraft and the surface, coordinated with overpasses by a variety of satellite radiometers. TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the United States over the western Atlantic, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols over the eastern Atlantic from both Europe and Africa. These aerosols often have a marked impact on satellite-measured radiances. However, accurate derivation of flux changes, or radiative forcing, from the satellite measured radiances or retrieved aerosol optical depths (AODs) remains a difficult challenge. Here we summarize key initial results from TARFOX and ACE-2, with a focus on closure analyses that yield aerosol microphysical models for use in improved assessments of flux changes. We show how one such model gives computed radiative flux sensitivities (dF/dAOD) that agree with values measured in TARFOX and preliminary values computed for the polluted marine boundary layer in ACE-2. A companion paper uses the model to compute aerosol-induced flux changes over the North Atlantic from AVHRR-derived AOD fields.

  7. Genome duplication and mutations in ACE2 cause multicellular, fast-sedimenting phenotypes in evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Bart; Guadalupe-Medina, Victor; Nijkamp, Jurgen F; de Ridder, Dick; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2013-11-05

    Laboratory evolution of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in bioreactor batch cultures yielded variants that grow as multicellular, fast-sedimenting clusters. Knowledge of the molecular basis of this phenomenon may contribute to the understanding of natural evolution of multicellularity and to manipulating cell sedimentation in laboratory and industrial applications of S. cerevisiae. Multicellular, fast-sedimenting lineages obtained from a haploid S. cerevisiae strain in two independent evolution experiments were analyzed by whole genome resequencing. The two evolved cell lines showed different frameshift mutations in a stretch of eight adenosines in ACE2, which encodes a transcriptional regulator involved in cell cycle control and mother-daughter cell separation. Introduction of the two ace2 mutant alleles into the haploid parental strain led to slow-sedimenting cell clusters that consisted of just a few cells, thus representing only a partial reconstruction of the evolved phenotype. In addition to single-nucleotide mutations, a whole-genome duplication event had occurred in both evolved multicellular strains. Construction of a diploid reference strain with two mutant ace2 alleles led to complete reconstruction of the multicellular-fast sedimenting phenotype. This study shows that whole-genome duplication and a frameshift mutation in ACE2 are sufficient to generate a fast-sedimenting, multicellular phenotype in S. cerevisiae. The nature of the ace2 mutations and their occurrence in two independent evolution experiments encompassing fewer than 500 generations of selective growth suggest that switching between unicellular and multicellular phenotypes may be relevant for competitiveness of S. cerevisiae in natural environments.

  8. Approaching human language with complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jin; Liu, Haitao

    2014-12-01

    The interest in modeling and analyzing human language with complex networks is on the rise in recent years and a considerable body of research in this area has already been accumulated. We survey three major lines of linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) characterization of human language as a multi-level system with complex network analysis; 2) linguistic typological research with the application of linguistic networks and their quantitative measures; and 3) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language (determined by the topology of linguistic networks) and microscopic linguistic (e.g., syntactic) features (as the traditional concern of linguistics). We show that the models and quantitative tools of complex networks, when exploited properly, can constitute an operational methodology for linguistic inquiry, which contributes to the understanding of human language and the development of linguistics. We conclude our review with suggestions for future linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language and microscopic linguistic features; 2) expansion of research scope from the global properties to other levels of granularity of linguistic networks; and 3) combination of linguistic network analysis with other quantitative studies of language (such as quantitative linguistics).

  9. Atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves the canine rapid atrial pacing-induced structural and electrical remodeling. Fan, ACE2 improves atrial substrate remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jinqi; Zou, Lili; Cui, Kun; Woo, Kamsang; Du, Huaan; Chen, Shaojie; Ling, Zhiyu; Zhang, Quanjun; Zhang, Bo; Lan, Xianbin; Su, Li; Zrenner, Bernhard; Yin, Yuehui

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) by homogeneous transmural atrial gene transfer can reverse atrial remodeling and its mechanisms in a canine atrial-pacing model. Twenty-eight mongrel dogs were randomly divided into four groups: Sham-operated, AF-control, gene therapy with adenovirus-enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad-EGFP) and gene therapy with Ad-ACE2 (Ad-ACE2) (n = 7 per subgroup). AF was induced in all dogs except the Sham-operated group by rapid atrial pacing at 450 beats/min for 2 weeks. Ad-EGFP and Ad-ACE2 group then received epicardial gene painting. Three weeks after gene transfer, all animals except the Sham group underwent rapid atrial pacing for another 3 weeks and then invasive electrophysiological, histological and molecular studies. The Ad-ACE2 group showed an increased ACE2 and Angiotensin-(1-7) expression, and decreased Angiotensin II expression in comparison with Ad-EGFP and AF-control group. ACE2 overexpression attenuated rapid atrial pacing-induced increase in activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) levels, and decrease in MAPK phosphatase 1(MKP-1) level, resulting in attenuation of atrial fibrosis collagen protein markers and transforming growth factor-β1. Additionally, ACE2 overexpression also modulated the tachypacing-induced up-regulation of connexin 40, down-regulation of connexin 43 and Kv4.2, and significantly decreased the inducibility and duration of AF. ACE2 overexpression could shift the renin-angiotensin system balance towards the protective axis, attenuate cardiac fibrosis remodeling associated with up-regulation of MKP-1 and reduction of MAPKs activities, modulate tachypacing-induced ion channels and connexin remodeling, and subsequently reduce the inducibility and duration of AF.

  10. Overexpression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F stimulates renal Ace-2 gene expression and prevents TGF-β1-induced kidney injury in a mouse model of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chao-Sheng; Shi, Yixuan; Chang, Shiao-Ying; Abdo, Shaaban; Chenier, Isabelle; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2015-10-01

    We investigated whether heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP F) stimulates renal ACE-2 expression and prevents TGF-β1 signalling, TGF-β1 inhibition of Ace-2 gene expression and induction of tubulo-fibrosis in an Akita mouse model of type 1 diabetes. Adult male Akita transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing specifically hnRNP F in their renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) were studied. Non-Akita littermates and Akita mice served as controls. Immortalised rat RPTCs stably transfected with plasmid containing either rat Hnrnpf cDNA or rat Ace-2 gene promoter were also studied. Overexpression of hnRNP F attenuated systemic hypertension, glomerular filtration rate, albumin/creatinine ratio, urinary angiotensinogen (AGT) and angiotensin (Ang) II levels, renal fibrosis and profibrotic gene (Agt, Tgf-β1, TGF-β receptor II [Tgf-βrII]) expression, stimulated anti-profibrotic gene (Ace-2 and Ang 1-7 receptor [MasR]) expression, and normalised urinary Ang 1-7 level in Akita Hnrnpf-Tg mice as compared with Akita mice. In vitro, hnRNP F overexpression stimulated Ace-2 gene promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression, and attenuated Agt, Tgf-β1 and Tgf-βrII gene expression. Furthermore, hnRNP F overexpression prevented TGF-β1 signalling and TGF-β1 inhibition of Ace-2 gene expression. These data demonstrate that hnRNP F stimulates Ace-2 gene transcription, prevents TGF-β1 inhibition of Ace-2 gene transcription and induction of kidney injury in diabetes. HnRNP F may be a potential target for treating hypertension and renal fibrosis in diabetes.

  11. Controller for the Power Converters of the O/OMOTOR Prototype Switched Reluctance Machine of the ACE2 Project; Controlador de los Convertidores Electronicos de Potencia de la Maquina Variable Prototipo O/OMOTOR del Proyecto ACE2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, C

    2006-12-19

    The ACE2 project deals with the development of a kynetic energy storage (KES) system for power peak shaving in high speed railway substations. This KES system consists in a double power converter which drives a switched reluctance machine (SRM) along with a flywheel operating in a wide speed range. This document presents from a technical point of view the features of the controller of the power converters for the U and UMOTOR SRM prototypes of that project. Hardware and software issues are treated in detail and the guide for the final user managing the KES module is introduced. (Author) 3 refs.

  12. The transcription factor Ace2 and its paralog Swi5 regulate ethanol production during static fermentation through their targets Cts1 and Rps4a in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yao; Du, Jie; Xu, Guoqiang; Jiang, Linghuo

    2016-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most widely used fermentation organism for ethanol production. However, the gene expression regulatory networks behind the ethanol fermentation are still not fully understood. Using a static fermentation model, we examined the ethanol yields on biomass of deletion mutants for 77 yeast genes encoding nonessential transcription factors, and found that deletion mutants for ACE2 and SWI5 showed dramatically increased ethanol yields. Overexpression of ACE2 or SWI5 in wild type cells reduced their ethanol yields. Furthermore, among the 34 target genes regulated by Ace2 and Swi5, deletion of CTS1,RPS4a,SIC1,EGT2,DSE2, or SCP160 led to increased ethanol yields, with the former two showing higher effects. Overexpression of CTS1 or RPS4a in both ace2/ace2 and swi5/swi5 mutants reduced their ethanol yields. In contrast, deletion of MCR1 or HO significantly decreased ethanol yields, with the former one showing the highest effect. Therefore, Ace2 and Swi5 are two negative regulators of ethanol yield during static fermentation of yeast cells, and both CTS1 and RPS4a are major effectors mediating these two transcription factors in regulating ethanol production. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Human Error Mechanisms in Complex Work Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1988-01-01

    will account for most of the action errors observed. In addition, error mechanisms appear to be intimately related to the development of high skill and know-how in a complex work context. This relationship between errors and human adaptation is discussed in detail for individuals and organisations...

  14. Human error mechanisms in complex work environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.

    1988-01-01

    Human error taxonomies have been developed from analysis of industrial incident reports as well as from psychological experiments. In this paper the results of the two approaches are reviewed and compared. It is found, in both cases, that a fairly small number of basic psychological mechanisms will account for most of the action errors observed. In addition, error mechanisms appear to be intimately related to the development of high skill and know-how in a complex work context. This relationship between errors and human adaptation is discussed in detail for individuals and organisations. The implications for system safety and briefly mentioned, together with the implications for system design. (author)

  15. Human error mechanisms in complex work environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Danmarks Tekniske Hoejskole, Copenhagen)

    1988-01-01

    Human error taxonomies have been developed from analysis of industrial incident reports as well as from psychological experiments. In this paper the results of the two approaches are reviewed and compared. It is found, in both cases, that a fairly small number of basic psychological mechanisms will account for most of the action errors observed. In addition, error mechanisms appear to be intimately related to the development of high skill and know-how in a complex work context. This relationship between errors and human adaptation is discussed in detail for individuals and organisations. The implications for system safety are briefly mentioned, together with the implications for system design. (author)

  16. The Brain Prize 2014: complex human functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigaityte, Kristina; Iacoboni, Marco

    2014-11-01

    Giacomo Rizzolatti, Stanislas Dehaene, and Trevor Robbins were recently awarded the 2014 Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Prize for their 'pioneering research on higher brain mechanisms underpinning such complex human functions as literacy, numeracy, motivated behavior and social cognition, and for their effort to understand cognitive and behavioral disorders'. Why was their work highlighted? Is there anything that links together these seemingly disparate lines of research? Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ACE-2/Ang1-7/Mas cascade mediates ACE inhibitor, captopril, protective effects in estrogen-deficient osteoporotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuohashish, Hatem M; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Sabry, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S

    2017-08-01

    The local role of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) was documented recently beside its conventional systemic functions. Studies showed that the effector angiotensin II (AngII) alters bone health, while inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE-1) preserved these effects. The newly identified Ang1-7 exerts numerous beneficial effects opposing the AngII. Thus, the current study examines the role of Ang1-7 in mediating the osteo-preservative effects of ACEI (captopril) through the G-protein coupled Mas receptor using an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of osteoporosis. 8 weeks after the surgical procedures, captopril was administered orally (40mgkg -1 d -1 ), while the specific Mas receptor blocker (A-779) was delivered at infusion rate of 400ngkg -1 min -1 for 6 weeks. Bone metabolic markers were measured in serum and urine. Minerals concentrations were quantified in serum, urine and femoral bones by inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Trabecular and cortical morphometry was analyzed in the right distal femurs using micro-CT. Finally, the expressions of RAS peptides, enzymes and receptors along with the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were determined femurs heads. OVX animals markedly showed altered bone metabolism and mineralization along with disturbed bone micro-structure. Captopril significantly restored the metabolic bone bio-markers and corrected Ca 2+ and P values in urine and bones of estrogen deficient rats. Moreover, the trabecular and cortical morphometric features were repaired by captopril in OVX groups. Captopril also improved the expressions of ACE-2, Ang1-7, Mas and OPG, while abolished OVX-induced up-regulation of ACE-1, AngII, Ang type 1 receptor (AT1R) and RANKL. Inhibition of Ang1-7 cascade by A-779 significantly eradicated captopril protective effects on bone metabolism, mineralization and micro-structure. A-779 also restored OVX effects on RANKL expression and ACE-1/AngII/AT1R

  18. Computational Complexity and Human Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossaerts, Peter; Murawski, Carsten

    2017-12-01

    The rationality principle postulates that decision-makers always choose the best action available to them. It underlies most modern theories of decision-making. The principle does not take into account the difficulty of finding the best option. Here, we propose that computational complexity theory (CCT) provides a framework for defining and quantifying the difficulty of decisions. We review evidence showing that human decision-making is affected by computational complexity. Building on this evidence, we argue that most models of decision-making, and metacognition, are intractable from a computational perspective. To be plausible, future theories of decision-making will need to take into account both the resources required for implementing the computations implied by the theory, and the resource constraints imposed on the decision-maker by biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Transcription regulation of the alpha-glucanase gene agn1 by cell separation transcription factor Ace2p in fission yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Nick; de Haan, Annett; Hochstenbach, Frans

    2006-01-01

    During the final stage of the cell division cycle in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, transcription factor Ace2p activates expression of genes involved in the separation of newly formed daughter cells, such as agn1+, which encodes the alpha-glucanase Agn1p. The agn1 promoter contains

  20. Human reliability in complex systems: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrey, D.E.

    1976-07-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of the main conceptual background underlying the areas of human reliability and human error. The concept of error is examined and generalized to that of human reliability, and some of the practical and methodological difficulties of reconciling the different standpoints of the human factors specialist and the engineer discussed. Following a survey of general reviews available on human reliability, quantitative techniques for prediction of human reliability are considered. An in-depth critical analysis of the various quantitative methods is then presented, together with the data bank requirements for human reliability prediction. Reliability considerations in process control and nuclear plant, and also areas of design, maintenance, testing and emergency situations are discussed. The effects of stress on human reliability are analysed and methods of minimizing these effects discussed. Finally, a summary is presented and proposals for further research are set out. (author)

  1. Angiotensin (1-7) ameliorates the structural and biochemical alterations of ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in rats via activation of ACE-2/Mas receptor axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuohashish, Hatem M; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Sabry, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S

    2017-05-23

    The local and systemic renin angiotensin system (RAS) influences the skeletal system micro-structure and metabolism. Studies suggested angiotensin 1-7 (Ang(1-7)) as the beneficial RAS molecule via Mas receptor activation. This study examines the function of Ang(1-7) in bone micro-architecture and metabolism in an ovariectomized (OVX) rodent model of osteoporosis. OVX rats showed structural and bone metabolic degeneration in parallel with suppressed expressions of the angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2)/Ang(1-7)/Mas components. The infusion of Ang(1-7) markedly alleviated the altered bone metabolism and significantly enhanced both trabecular (metaphyseal) and cortical (metaphyseal-diaphyseal) morphometry. Urinary and bones minerals were also improved in OVX rats by Ang(1-7). The infusion of the heptapeptide enhanced ACE-2/Mas receptor expressions, while down-regulated AngII, ACE, and AngII type-1 receptor (AT1R) in OVX animals. Moreover, Ang(1-7) markedly improved osteoprotegerin (OPG) and lowered receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expressions. The defensive properties of Ang(1-7) on bone metabolism, structure and minerals were considerably eradicated after blockage of Mas receptor with A-779. Ang(1-7)-induced up-regulated ACE-2/Ang(1-7)/Mas cascade and OPG expressions were abolished and the expressions of ACE/AngII/AT1R and RANKL were provoked by A-779. These findings shows for the first time the novel valuable therapeutic role of Ang(1-7) on bone health and metabolism through the ACE-2/Mas cascade.

  2. Airborne lidar measurements of aerosol spatial distribution and optical properties over the Atlantic Ocean during a European pollution outbreak of ACE-2[Special issue with manuscripts related to the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), 16 June-25 July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flamant, Cyrille; Pelon, Jaques; Trouillet, Vincent; Bruneau, Didier [CNRS-UPMC-UVSQ, Paris (France). Service d' Aeronomie; Chazette, Patrick; Leon, J.F. [CEA-CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environment; Quinn, P.K.; Bates, T.S.; Johnson, James [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA (United States). Pacific Marine Environmental Lab.; Frouin, Robert [Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Livingston, John [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2000-04-01

    Airborne lidar measurements of the aerosol spatial distribution and optical properties associated with an European pollution outbreak which occurred during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) are presented. Size distribution spectra measured over the ocean near Sagres (Portugal), on-board the Research Vessel Vodyanitsky and on-board the Avion de Recherche Atmospherique et Teledetection (ARAT) have been used to parameterize the aerosol vertical distribution. This parameterization, which is essential to the analysis of airborne lidar measurements, has been validated via closure experiments on extinction coefficient profiles and aerosol optical depth (AOD). During the studied event, AOD's retrieved from lidar measurements at 0.73 {mu}m range between 0.055 and 0.10. The parameterized aerosol vertical distribution has been used to shift AOD retrievals from 0.73 to 0.55 {mu}m to enable comparison with other remote sensing instruments. At the latter wavelength, AOD's retrieved from lidar measurements range between 0.08 and 0.14. An agreement better than 20% is obtained between AOD's derived from lidar and sunphotometer measurements made at the same time and place over the ocean near the coast. However, large differences are observed with the AOD estimated from Meteosat imagery in the same area. These differences are thought to be caused by large uncertainties associated with the Meteosat sensitivity for small AOD's or by the presence of thin scattered clouds. Lidar-derived particulate extinction profiles and scattering coefficient profiles measured by a nephelometer mounted on the ARAT, in a different part of the plume, were found in good agreement, which could be an indication that absorption by pollution aerosols is small and/or that soot is present in small amounts in the European pollution plume. Lidar measurements have also been used to differentiate the contribution of different aerosol layers to the total AOD. It is shown that

  3. Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Infections in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Hung, Chien-Ching; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus complex comprises a group of rapidly growing, multidrug-resistant, nontuberculous mycobacteria that are responsible for a wide spectrum of skin and soft tissue diseases, central nervous system infections, bacteremia, and ocular and other infections. M. abscessus complex is differentiated into 3 subspecies: M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. The 2 major subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, have different erm(41) gene patterns. This gene provides intrinsic resistance to macrolides, so the different patterns lead to different treatment outcomes. M. abscessus complex outbreaks associated with cosmetic procedures and nosocomial transmissions are not uncommon. Clarithromycin, amikacin, and cefoxitin are the current antimicrobial drugs of choice for treatment. However, new treatment regimens are urgently needed, as are rapid and inexpensive identification methods and measures to contain nosocomial transmission and outbreaks.

  4. Complex Human Dynamics From Mind to Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Winkowska-Nowak, Katarzyna; Brée, David

    2013-01-01

    This book, edited and authored by a closely collaborating network of social scientists and psychologists, recasts typical research topics in these fields into the language of nonlinear, dynamic and complex systems. The aim is to provide scientists with different backgrounds - physics, applied mathematics and computer sciences - with the opportunity to apply the tools of their trade to an altogether new range of possible applications. At the same time, this book will serve as a first reference for a new generation of social scientists and psychologists wishing to familiarize themselves with the new methodology and the "thinking in complexity".

  5. Complex epidemiological approach to human mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czeizel, A.

    1980-01-01

    The main characteristics of the epidemiological approach are summarised and the criteria discussed for the adoption of this approach for the detection of human mutagenesis. Mutation monitoring systems are described and results of epidemiological studies of higher risk populations are presented. (C.F.)

  6. The human RNase MRP complex : composition, assembly and role in human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenennaam, Hans van

    2002-01-01

    Not all RNA molecules in human cells are being translated into proteins. Some of them function in binding proteins, thereby forming so-called RNA-protein complexes. The RNase MRP complex is an example of such an RNA-protein complex. In this thesis two new protein components of the human RNase MRP

  7. Complex human mobility dynamics on a network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szell, M.

    2010-01-01

    Massive multiplayer online games provide a fascinating new way of observing hundreds of thousands of simultaneously interacting individuals engaged in virtual socio-economic activities. We have compiled a data set consisting of practically all actions of all players over a period of four years from an online game played by over 350,000 people. The universe of this online world is a lattice-like network on which players move in order to interact with other players. We focus on the mobility of human players on this network over a time-period of 500 days. We take a number of mobility measurements and compare them with measures of simulated random walkers on the same topology. Mobility of players is sub-diffusive - the mean squared displacement follows a power law with exponent 0.4 - and significantly deviates from mobility patterns of random walkers. Mean first passage times and transition counts relate via a power-law with slope -1/3. We compare our results with studies where human mobility was measured via mobile phone data and find striking similarities. (author)

  8. High Q ceramics in the ACe2(MoO4)4 (A = Ba, Sr and Ca) system for LTCC applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surjith, A.; Ratheesh, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Solid state synthesis of phase pure ACe 2 (MoO 4 ) 4 (A = Ba, Sr and Ca) ceramics. ► Structural and microstructural evaluation of the synthesized ceramic materials. ► Microwave dielectric property studies of ACe 2 (MoO 4 ) 4 (A = Ba, Sr and Ca) ceramics. ► Structure-property correlation through Laser Raman studies. - Abstract: Novel low temperature sinterable high Q ceramic systems ACe 2 (MoO 4 ) 4 (A = Ba, Sr and Ca) have been prepared through solid state ceramic method. The effect of ionic radii of alkaline earth cations on the structure, microstructure and microwave dielectric properties of these ceramics were studied using powder X-ray diffraction, Laser Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Vector Network Analyzer. A structural change from monoclinic to tetragonal structure was observed while substituting Sr 2+ and Ca 2+ cations in place of Ba 2+ . The Sr and Ca analogues possess better microwave dielectric properties compared to BaCe 2 (MoO 4 ) 4 . All the ceramics were well sintered below 840 °C with dielectric constant in the range 10.2–12.3 together with good quality factor. The SrCe 2 (MoO 4 ) 4 ceramic exhibits an unloaded quality factor of 6762 at 8.080662 GHz with a temperature coefficient of resonant frequency of −46 ppm/°C while the CaCe 2 (MoO 4 ) 4 ceramic shows an unloaded quality factor of 7549 at 6.928868 GHz and a temperature coefficient of resonant frequency of −44 ppm/°C.

  9. Characterization of the human GARP (Golgi associated retrograde protein) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liewen, Heike; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Oliveira, Vasco; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Luo Guorong; Wadle, Andreas; Jung, Martin; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Stenner-Liewen, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The Golgi associated retrograde protein complex (GARP) or Vps fifty-three (VFT) complex is part of cellular inter-compartmental transport systems. Here we report the identification of the VFT tethering factor complex and its interactions in mammalian cells. Subcellular fractionation shows that human Vps proteins are found in the smooth membrane/Golgi fraction but not in the cytosol. Immunostaining of human Vps proteins displays a vesicular distribution most concentrated at the perinuclear envelope. Co-staining experiments with endosomal markers imply an endosomal origin of these vesicles. Significant accumulation of VFT complex positive endosomes is found in the vicinity of the Trans Golgi Network area. This is in accordance with a putative role in Golgi associated transport processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, GARP is the main effector of the small GTPase Ypt6p and interacts with the SNARE Tlg1p to facilitate membrane fusion. Accordingly, the human homologue of Ypt6p, Rab6, specifically binds hVps52. In human cells, the 'orphan' SNARE Syntaxin 10 is the genuine binding partner of GARP mediated by hVps52. This reveals a previously unknown function of human Syntaxin 10 in membrane docking and fusion events at the Golgi. Taken together, GARP shows significant conservation between various species but diversification and specialization result in important differences in human cells

  10. Egg ovotransferrin-derived ACE inhibitory peptide IRW increases ACE2 but decreases proinflammatory genes expression in mesenteric artery of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Kaustav; Liang, Guanxiang; Chen, Yanhong; Guan, LeLuo; Davidge, Sandra T; Wu, Jianping

    2015-09-01

    Egg ovotransferrin-derived angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide IRW was previously shown to reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats through reduced vascular inflammation and increased nitric oxide-mediated vasorelaxation. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of this peptide through transcriptome analysis by RNAseq technique. Total RNA was extracted from kidney and mesenteric arteries; the RNAseq libraries (from untreated and IRW-treated groups) were constructed and subjected to sequence using HiSeq 2000 system (Illumina) system. A total of 12 764 and 13 352 genes were detected in kidney and mesenteric arteries, respectively. The differentially expressed (DE) genes between untreated and IRW-treated groups were identified and the functional analysis through ingenuity pathway analysis revealed a greater role of DE genes identified from mesenteric arteries than that of kidney in modulating various cardiovascular functions. Subsequent qPCR analysis further confirmed that IRW significantly increased the expression of ACE-2, ABCB-1, IRF-8, and CDH-1 while significantly decreased the expression ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in mesenteric arteries. Our research showed for the first time that ACE inhibitory peptide IRW could contribute to its antihypertensive activity through increased ACE2 and decreased proinflammatory genes expression. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Circular chromatin complexes in human lymphocytes high-resolution autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becak, M.L.; Fukuda-Pizzocaro, K.; Santos, R. de C.S. dos; Brunner, O.

    1985-01-01

    Transcriptionally active chromatin fibers were observed in chromosomes presenting the loops/scaffold configuration. The active fibers showed altered nucleosomes and presented multiforked aspects which led to the formation of ring complexes. The ribonucleoprotein transcripts (RNP) appeared as networks of 0.1 μm or multiples tandemly disposed along the fiber. It is suggested that the ring complexes belong to the human genome. The possibility that these circular structures come from a prokaryote is also considered. (author) [pt

  12. Peak Oil and the Everyday Complexity of Human Progress Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Pruit

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The “big” story of human progress has polarizing tendencies featuring the binary options of progress or decline. I consider human progress narratives in the context of everyday life. Analysis of the “little” stories from two narrative environments focusing on peak oil offers a more complex picture of the meaning and contours of the narrative. I consider the impact of differential blog site commitments to peak oil perspectives and identify five narrative types culled from two narrative dimensions. I argue that the lived experience complicates human progress narratives, which is no longer an either/or proposition.

  13. The dominating macromolecular complex of human gallbladder bile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, J.C.M.; Mijnlieff, P.F.

    The solutes of human gall bladder bile appear to exist mainly in the form of a complex macromolecule, formed around a nucleus of lipoprotein. The existence of this macromolecule was demonstrated by paper electrophoresis1, free electrophoresis and ultracentrifuge experiments. The molecular weight of

  14. Altered renal expression of angiotensin II receptors, renin receptor, and ACE-2 precede the development of renal fibrosis in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Ivonne Hernandez; Zhou, Ming-Sheng; Treuer, Adriana V; Chadipiralla, Kiranmai; Hare, Joshua M; Raij, Leopoldo

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility to fibrosis and progression of renal disease is mitigated by inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). We hypothesized that activation of the intrarenal RAS predisposes to renal fibrosis in aging. Intrarenal expression of angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)R), type 2 (AT(2)R), and (pro)renin receptors, ACE and ACE-2, as well as pro- and antioxidant enzymes were measured in 3-month-old (young), 14-month-old (middle-aged), and 24-month-old (old) male Sprague-Dawley rats. Old rats manifested glomerulosclerosis and severe tubulointerstitial fibrosis with increased fibronectin and TGF-β expression (7-fold). AT(1)R /AT(2)R ratios were increased in middle-aged (cortical 1.6-fold, medullary 5-fold) and old rats (cortical 2-fold, medullary 4-fold). Similarly, (pro)renin receptor expression was increased in middle-aged (cortical 2-fold, medullary 3-fold) and old (cortical 5-fold, medullary 3-fold) rats. Cortical ACE was increased (+35%) in old rats, whereas ACE-2 was decreased (-50%) in middle-aged and old rats. NADPH oxidase activity was increased (2-fold), whereas antioxidant capacity and expression of the mitochondrial enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (cortical -40%, medullary -53%) and medullary endothelial nitric oxide synthase (-48%) were decreased in old rats. Age-related intrarenal activation of the RAS preceded the development of severe renal fibrosis, suggesting that it contributes to the increased susceptibility to renal injury observed in the elderly. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The ACE-2/Ang1-7/Mas cascade enhances bone structure and metabolism following angiotensin-II type 1 receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuohashish, Hatem M; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Sabry, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S

    2017-07-15

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) regulates numerous systemic functions and is expressed locally in skeletal tissues. Angiotensin1-7 (Ang1-7) is a beneficial member of the RAS, and the therapeutic effects of a large number of angiotensin receptors blockers (ARBs) are mediated by an Ang1-7-dependent cascade. This study examines whether the reported osteo-preservative effects of losartan are mediated through the angiotensin converting enzyme2 (ACE-2)/Ang1-7/Mas pathway in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Sham and OVX animals received losartan (10mg/kg/d p.o.) for 6 weeks. A specific Mas receptor blocker (A-779) was delivered via mini-osmotic pumps during the losartan treatment period. Serum and urine bone metabolism biomarker levels were measured. Bone trabecular and cortical morphometry were quantified in distal femurs, whereas mineral contents were estimated in ashed bones, serum and urine. Finally, the expression of RAS components, the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) was determined. Losartan significantly improved the elevated bone metabolism marker levels and altered trabecular and cortical structures in OVX animals, and restored normal urinary and skeletal mineral levels. Mas receptor inhibition significantly abolished all osteo-protective effects of losartan and enhanced the deleterious effects of OVX. Losartan enhanced OVX-induced up-regulation of ACE-1, AngII, angiotensin type 1 (AT 1 ) receptor and RANKL expression, and increased ACE-2, Ang1-7, Mas and OPG expression in OVX animals. However, A-779 significantly eradicated the effects of losartan on RAS components and RANKL/OPG expression. Thus, Ang1-7 are involved in the osteo-preservative effects of losartan via Mas receptor, which may add therapeutic value to this well-known antihypertensive agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Architecture of the human mTORC2 core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuttfeld, Edward; Aylett, Christopher Hs; Imseng, Stefan; Boehringer, Daniel; Scaiola, Alain; Sauer, Evelyn; Hall, Michael N; Maier, Timm; Ban, Nenad

    2018-02-09

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key protein kinase controlling cellular metabolism and growth. It is part of the two structurally and functionally distinct multiprotein complexes mTORC1 and mTORC2. Dysregulation of mTOR occurs in diabetes, cancer and neurological disease. We report the architecture of human mTORC2 at intermediate resolution, revealing a conserved binding site for accessory proteins on mTOR and explaining the structural basis for the rapamycin insensitivity of the complex. © 2018, Stuttfeld et al.

  17. Human Health Risk Assessment of Trichloroethylene from Industrial Complex A

    OpenAIRE

    Sin, Saemi; Byeon, Sang-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the human health risks of trichloroethylene from Industrial Complex A. The excessive carcinogenic risks for central tendency exposure were 1.40 ? 10?5 for male and female residents in the vicinity of Industrial Complex A. The excessive cancers risk for reasonable maximum exposure were 2.88 ? 10?5 and 1.97 ? 10?5 for males and females, respectively. These values indicate that there are potential cancer risks for exposure to these concentrations. The hazard index for cen...

  18. Human health risk assessment of trichloroethylene from industrial complex a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Saemi; Byeon, Sang-Hoon

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the human health risks of trichloroethylene from Industrial Complex A. The excessive carcinogenic risks for central tendency exposure were 1.40 × 10(?5) for male and female residents in the vicinity of Industrial Complex A. The excessive cancers risk for reasonable maximum exposure were 2.88 × 10(?5) and 1.97 × 10(?5) for males and females, respectively. These values indicate that there are potential cancer risks for exposure to these concentrations. The hazard index for central tendency exposure to trichloroethylene was 1.71 for male and female residents. The hazard indexes for reasonable maximum exposure were 3.27 and 2.41 for males and females, respectively. These values were over one, which is equivalent to the threshold value. This result showed that adverse cancer and non-cancer health effects may occur and that some risk management of trichloroethylene from Industrial Complex A was needed.

  19. Environmental layout complexity affects neural activity during navigation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Edward; Burles, Ford; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Navigating large-scale surroundings is a fundamental ability. In humans, it is commonly assumed that navigational performance is affected by individual differences, such as age, sex, and cognitive strategies adopted for orientation. We recently showed that the layout of the environment itself also influences how well people are able to find their way within it, yet it remains unclear whether differences in environmental complexity are associated with changes in brain activity during navigation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how the brain responds to a change in environmental complexity by asking participants to perform a navigation task in two large-scale virtual environments that differed solely in interconnection density, a measure of complexity defined as the average number of directional choices at decision points. The results showed that navigation in the simpler, less interconnected environment was faster and more accurate relative to the complex environment, and such performance was associated with increased activity in a number of brain areas (i.e. precuneus, retrosplenial cortex, and hippocampus) known to be involved in mental imagery, navigation, and memory. These findings provide novel evidence that environmental complexity not only affects navigational behaviour, but also modulates activity in brain regions that are important for successful orientation and navigation. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Induction of human immunodeficiency virus neutralizing antibodies using fusion complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipeto, Donato; Matucci, Andrea; Ripamonti, Chiara; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Rossolillo, Paola; Turci, Marco; Sartoris, Silvia; Tridente, Giuseppe; Bertazzoni, Umberto

    2006-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infects cells by membrane fusion that is mediated by the envelope proteins gp120/gp41 and the cellular receptors CD4 and CCR5. During this process, some conserved viral epitopes are temporarily exposed and may induce a neutralizing antibody response when fixed in the fusogenic conformation. These transient structures are conserved and may be effective antigens for use in an anti-HIV-1 vaccine. In this study we tested different conditions of preparation of fusion complexes inducing neutralizing antibodies against both R5 and X4 tropic HIV-1 strains. Cell lines expressing HIV-1 gp120/gp41 and CD4-CCR5 were prepared and conditions for producing fusion complexes were tested. Complexes produced at different temperature and fixative combinations were used to immunize mice. Results indicated that (a) fusion complexes prepared at either 21 degrees C, 30 degrees C or 37 degrees C were immunogenic and induced neutralizing antibodies against both R5 and X4 HIV-1 heterologous isolates; (b) after extensive purification of antibodies there was no cytotoxic effect; (c) complexes prepared at 37 degrees C were more immunogenic and induced higher titers of neutralizing antibodies than complexes prepared at either 21 degrees C or 30 degrees C; (d) the fixative used did not affect the titer of neutralizing antibodies except for glutaraldehyde which was ineffective; (e) the neutralizing activity was retained after CD4-CCR5 antibody removal. The production of higher titers of neutralizing antibody with fusion complexes prepared at 37 degrees C, as compared to lower temperatures, may be related to the induction of antibodies against many different conformation intermediates that subsequently act synergistically at different steps in the fusion process.

  1. Dynamics of major histocompatibility complex class I association with the human peptide-loading complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, Michaela S; Jain, Ankur; Leonhardt, Ralf M; Ha, Taekjip; Cresswell, Peter

    2012-09-07

    Although the human peptide-loading complex (PLC) is required for optimal major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) antigen presentation, its composition is still incompletely understood. The ratio of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and MHC I to tapasin, which is responsible for MHC I recruitment and peptide binding optimization, is particularly critical for modeling of the PLC. Here, we characterized the stoichiometry of the human PLC using both biophysical and biochemical approaches. By means of single-molecule pulldown (SiMPull), we determined a TAP/tapasin ratio of 1:2, consistent with previous studies of insect-cell microsomes, rat-human chimeric cells, and HeLa cells expressing truncated TAP subunits. We also report that the tapasin/MHC I ratio varies, with the PLC population comprising both 2:1 and 2:2 complexes, based on mutational and co-precipitation studies. The MHC I-saturated PLC may be particularly prevalent among peptide-selective alleles, such as HLA-C4. Additionally, MHC I association with the PLC increases when its peptide supply is reduced by inhibiting the proteasome or by blocking TAP-mediated peptide transport using viral inhibitors. Taken together, our results indicate that the composition of the human PLC varies under normal conditions and dynamically adapts to alterations in peptide supply that may arise during viral infection. These findings improve our understanding of the quality control of MHC I peptide loading and may aid the structural and functional modeling of the human PLC.

  2. The human component in the safety of complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.

    1986-02-01

    The safety of nuclear power and other complex processes requires that human actions are carried though on time and without error. Investigations indicate that human errors are the main or an important contributing cause in more than half of the incidents which occur. This makes it important to try understand the mechanisms behind the human errors and to investigate possibilities for decreasing their likelihood. The present report presents an overview of the Nordic cooperation in the field of human factors in nuclear safety, under the LIT-programme carried out 1981-1985. The work was divided into six different projects in the following fields: human reliability in test and maintenance work; safety oriented organizations and company structures; design of information and control systems; new approaches for information presentation; experimental validation of man-machine interfaces; planning and evaluation of operator training. The research topics were selected from the findings of an earlier phase of the Nordic cooperation. The results are described in more detail in separate reports

  3. Activation pattern of ACE2/Ang-(1-7) and ACE/Ang II pathway in course of heart failure assessed by multiparametric MRI in vivo in Tgαq*44 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrankiewicz, Urszula; Olkowicz, Mariola; Skórka, Tomasz; Jablonska, Magdalena; Orzylowska, Anna; Bar, Anna; Gonet, Michal; Berkowicz, Piotr; Jasinski, Krzysztof; Zoladz, Jerzy A; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Here, we analyzed systemic (plasma) and local (heart/aorta) changes in ACE/ACE-2 balance in Tgαq*44 mice in course of heart failure (HF). Tgαq*44 mice with cardiomyocyte-specific Gαq overexpression and late onset of HF were analyzed at different age for angiotensin pattern in plasma, heart, and aorta using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, for progression of HF by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging under isoflurane anesthesia, and for physical activity by voluntary wheel running. Six-month-old Tgαq*44 mice displayed decreased ventricle radial strains and impaired left atrial function. At 8-10 mo, Tgαq*44 mice showed impaired systolic performance and reduced voluntary wheel running but exhibited preserved inotropic reserve. At 12 mo, Tgαq*44 mice demonstrated a severe impairment of basal cardiac performance and modestly compromised inotropic reserve with reduced voluntary wheel running. Angiotensin analysis in plasma revealed an increase in concentration of angiotensin-(1-7) in 6- to 10-mo-old Tgαq*44 mice. However, in 12- to 14-mo-old Tgαq*44 mice, increased angiotensin II was noted with a concomitant increase in Ang III, Ang IV, angiotensin A, and angiotensin-(1-10). The pattern of changes in the heart and aorta was also compatible with activation of ACE2, followed by activation of the ACE pathway. In conclusion, mice with cardiomyocyte Gαq protein overexpression develop HF that is associated with activation of the systemic and the local ACE/Ang II pathway. However, it is counterbalanced by a prominent ACE2/Ang-(1-7) activation, possibly allowing to delay decompensation. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Changes in ACE/ACE-2 balance were analyzed based on measurements of a panel of nine angiotensins in plasma, heart, and aorta of Tgαq*44 mice in relation to progression of heart failure (HF) characterized by multiparametric MRI and exercise performance. The early stage of HF was associated with upregulation of the ACE2/angiotensin-(1-7) pathway, whereas the end

  4. Proposal for analysis of human talent from complex thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Del Río Cortina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is expose a displaying scheme of the actions of the individual in the context of the productive world*, considering a series of demonstrations framed in the learning process, this, with respect to the complexity of the human development derived from the interactions of the individual, the family, the community, the labor environment, and society in general from the perspective of volitional, cognitive, and procedural dimensions. The proposed visualization, is conceived as a relational map that includes six pillars of human interaction immersed in the above dimensions, being them, know-to be, know-to know, Know-to live, Know-to create, know-to manage, and know-to communicate, being all these reflected as a synergic structure made manifest in the know-how, from the interplay of values, emotional skills or soft skills, attitudes, knowledge, and finally, ways of proceeding. All of the above, in order to generate an approach to the relational complexity of the human talent development in society. * The productive world, in this document, is conceived as the one in which people get articulated in order to live in family, community, entrepreneurial organization, a diverse kind of institutions, and society in general.

  5. Human RAD50 makes a functional DNA-binding complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Eri; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari; Sanchez, Humberto; Kertokalio, Aryandi; Wyman, Claire

    2015-06-01

    The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex has several distinct functions in DNA repair including important roles in both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). The biochemical activities of MR(N) have been well characterized implying specific functional roles for the components. The arrangement of proteins in the complex implies interdependence of their biochemical activities making it difficult to separate specific functions. We obtained purified human RAD50 and observed that it binds ATP, undergoes ATP-dependent conformational changes as well as having ATPase activity. Scanning force microscopy analysis clearly showed that RAD50 binds DNA although not as oligomers. RAD50 alone was not functional in tethering DNA molecules. ATP increased formation of RAD50 multimers which were however globular lacking extended coiled coils, in contrast to the MR complex where ATP induced oligomers have obvious coiled coils protruding from a central domain. These results suggest that MRE11 is important in maintaining the structural arrangement of RAD50 in the protein complex and perhaps has a role in reinforcing proper alignment of the coiled coils in the ATP-bound state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  6. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang XF

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Xue-Fen Pang,1 Li-Hui Zhang,2 Feng Bai,1 Ning-Ping Wang,3 Ron E Garner,3 Robert J McKallip,4 Zhi-Qing Zhao1,3 1Department of Physiology, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Cardiology, Shanxi Academy of Medical Sciences and Shanxi Dayi Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Basic Biomedical Sciences, Mercer University School of Medicine, Savannah, GA, USA; 4Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, GA, USA Abstract: Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2. Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2 receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02% vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05. These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was

  7. Complex-tone pitch representations in the human auditory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Federica

    in listeners with SNHL, it is likely that HI listeners rely on the enhanced envelope cues to retrieve the pitch of unresolved harmonics. Hence, the relative importance of pitch cues may be altered in HI listeners, whereby envelope cues may be used instead of TFS cues to obtain a similar performance in pitch......Understanding how the human auditory system processes the physical properties of an acoustical stimulus to give rise to a pitch percept is a fascinating aspect of hearing research. Since most natural sounds are harmonic complex tones, this work focused on the nature of pitch-relevant cues...... that are necessary for the auditory system to retrieve the pitch of complex sounds. The existence of different pitch-coding mechanisms for low-numbered (spectrally resolved) and high-numbered (unresolved) harmonics was investigated by comparing pitch-discrimination performance across different cohorts of listeners...

  8. Human erythrocytes inhibit complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes by human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorval, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an autologus human system to evaluate the effects of human erythrocytes on solubilization of immune complex precipitates (IC) by human serum. Incubation of IC with fresh human serum or guinea pig serum resulted in solubilization of IC. When packed erythrocytes were added to human serum or guinea pig serum binding of IC to the erythrocyte occurred and IC solubilization was inhibited significantly (p <.025). Sheep erythrocytes did not bind IC or inhibit IC solubilization. To evaluate the role of human erythrocyte complement receptor (CR1) on these findings, human erythrocytes were treated with trypsin or anti-CR1 antibodies. Both treatments abrogated IC binding to human erythrocytes but did not affect the ability of the human erythrocyte to inhibit IC solubilization. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure C3, C4 and C5 activation in human serum after incubation with IC, human erythrocytes, human erythrocytes plus IC, whole blood or in whole blood plus IC

  9. Teleconnections in complex human-Earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, K. V.; Edmonds, J.

    2017-12-01

    Human systems and physical Earth systems are closely coupled and interact in complex ways that are sometimes surprising. This presentation discusses a few examples of system interactions. We consider the coupled energy-water-land-economy systems. We show how reductions in fossil fuel emissions are inversely coupled to land rents, food prices and deforestation. We discuss how water shortages in one part of the world is propagated to other distant parts of the world. We discuss the sensitivity of international trade patterns to energy and land systems technology and markets, and the potentially unanticipated results that can emerge.

  10. Understanding Complex Human Ecosystems: The Case of Ecotourism on Bonaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Abel

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that ecotourism development on the island of Bonaire can be productively understood as a perturbation of a complex human ecosystem. Inputs associated with ecotourism have fueled transformations of the island ecology and sociocultural system. The results of this study indicate that Bonaire's social and economic hierarchy is approaching a new, stable systems state following a 50-yr transition begun by government and industry that stabilized with the appearance of ecotourism development and population growth. Ecotourism can be understood to have "filled in" the middle of the production hierarchy of Bonaire. Interpreted from this perspective, population growth has completed the transformation by expanding into production niches at smaller scales in the production hierarchy. Both a consequence and a cause, ecotourism has transformed the island's social structure and demography. The theory and methods applied in this case study of interdisciplinary research in the field of human ecosystems are also presented.

  11. Human more complex than mouse at cellular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E Vinogradov

    Full Text Available The family of transcription factors with the C2H2 zinc finger domain is expanding in the evolution of vertebrates, reaching its highest numbers in the mammals. The question arises: whether an increased amount of these transcription factors is related to embryogenesis, nervous system, pathology or more of them are expressed in individual cells? Among mammals, the primates have a more complex anatomical structure than the rodents (e.g., brain. In this work, I show that a greater number of C2H2-ZF genes are expressed in the human cells than in the mouse cells. The effect is especially pronounced for C2H2-ZF genes accompanied with the KRAB domain. The relative difference between the numbers of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes in the human and mouse cellular transcriptomes even exceeds their difference in the genomes (i.e. a greater subset of existing in the genome genes is expressed in the human cellular transcriptomes compared to the mouse transcriptomes. The evolutionary turnover of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes acts in the direction of the revealed phenomenon, i.e. gene duplication and loss enhances the difference in the relative number of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes between human and mouse cellular transcriptomes. A higher amount of these genes is expressed in the brain and embryonic cells (compared with other tissues, whereas a lower amount--in the cancer cells. It is specifically the C2H2-ZF transcription factors whose repertoire is poorer in the cancer and richer in the brain (other transcription factors taken together do not show this trend. These facts suggest that increase of anatomical complexity is accompanied by a more complex intracellular regulation involving these transcription factors. Malignization is associated with simplification of this regulation. These results agree with the known fact that human cells are more resistant to oncogenic transformation than mouse cells. The list of C2H2-ZF genes whose suppression might be involved in malignization is provided.

  12. Expression and evolutionary analyses of three acetylcholinesterase genes (Mi-ace-1, Mi-ace-2, Mi-ace-3) in the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ruqiang; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Yuyan; Huang, Wenkun; Fan, Chengming; Wu, Qingsong; Peng, Deliang; da Silva, Washington; Sun, Xiaotang

    2017-05-01

    The full cDNA of Mi-ace-3 encoding an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in Meloidogyne incognita was cloned and characterized. Mi-ace-3 had an open reading frame of 1875 bp encoding 624 amino acid residues. Key residues essential to AChE structure and function were conserved. The deduced Mi-ACE-3 protein sequence had 72% amino acid similarity with that of Ditylenchus destructor Dd-AChE-3. Phylogenetic analyses using 41 AChEs from 24 species showed that Mi-ACE-3 formed a cluster with 4 other nematode AChEs. Our results revealed that the Mi-ace-3 cloned in this study, which is orthologous to Caenorhabditis elegans AChE, belongs to the nematode ACE-3/4 subgroup. There was a significant reduction in the number of galls in transgenic tobacco roots when Mi-ace-1, Mi-ace-2, and Mi-ace-3 were knocked down simultaneously, whereas little or no effect were observed when only one or two of these genes were knocked down. This is an indication that the functions of these three genes are redundant. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Synchronization in human musical rhythms and mutually interacting complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Holger

    2014-09-09

    Though the music produced by an ensemble is influenced by multiple factors, including musical genre, musician skill, and individual interpretation, rhythmic synchronization is at the foundation of musical interaction. Here, we study the statistical nature of the mutual interaction between two humans synchronizing rhythms. We find that the interbeat intervals of both laypeople and professional musicians exhibit scale-free (power law) cross-correlations. Surprisingly, the next beat to be played by one person is dependent on the entire history of the other person's interbeat intervals on timescales up to several minutes. To understand this finding, we propose a general stochastic model for mutually interacting complex systems, which suggests a physiologically motivated explanation for the occurrence of scale-free cross-correlations. We show that the observed long-term memory phenomenon in rhythmic synchronization can be imitated by fractal coupling of separately recorded or synthesized audio tracks and thus applied in electronic music. Though this study provides an understanding of fundamental characteristics of timing and synchronization at the interbrain level, the mutually interacting complex systems model may also be applied to study the dynamics of other complex systems where scale-free cross-correlations have been observed, including econophysics, physiological time series, and collective behavior of animal flocks.

  14. Complex carbohydrate utilization by the healthy human microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi L Cantarel

    Full Text Available The various ecological habitats in the human body provide microbes a wide array of nutrient sources and survival challenges. Advances in technology such as DNA sequencing have allowed a deeper perspective into the molecular function of the human microbiota than has been achievable in the past. Here we aimed to examine the enzymes that cleave complex carbohydrates (CAZymes in the human microbiome in order to determine (i whether the CAZyme profiles of bacterial genomes are more similar within body sites or bacterial families and (ii the sugar degradation and utilization capabilities of microbial communities inhabiting various human habitats. Upon examination of 493 bacterial references genomes from 12 human habitats, we found that sugar degradation capabilities of taxa are more similar to others in the same bacterial family than to those inhabiting the same habitat. Yet, the analysis of 520 metagenomic samples from five major body sites show that even when the community composition varies the CAZyme profiles are very similar within a body site, suggesting that the observed functional profile and microbial habitation have adapted to the local carbohydrate composition. When broad sugar utilization was compared within the five major body sites, the gastrointestinal track contained the highest potential for total sugar degradation, while dextran and peptidoglycan degradation were highest in oral and vaginal sites respectively. Our analysis suggests that the carbohydrate composition of each body site has a profound influence and probably constitutes one of the major driving forces that shapes the community composition and therefore the CAZyme profile of the local microbial communities, which in turn reflects the microbiome fitness to a body site.

  15. Social complexity parallels vocal complexity: a comparison of three non-human primate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Hélène; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Lemasson, Alban

    2013-01-01

    Social factors play a key role in the structuring of vocal repertoires at the individual level, notably in non-human primates. Some authors suggested that, at the species level too, social life may have driven the evolution of communicative complexity, but this has rarely been empirically tested. Here, we use a comparative approach to address this issue. We investigated vocal variability, at both the call type and the repertoire levels, in three forest-dwelling species of Cercopithecinae presenting striking differences in their social systems, in terms of social organization as well as social structure. We collected female call recordings from twelve De Brazza's monkeys (Cercopithecus neglectus), six Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli) and seven red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) housed in similar conditions. First, we noted that the level of acoustic variability and individual distinctiveness found in several call types was related to their importance in social functioning. Contact calls, essential to intra-group cohesion, were the most individually distinctive regardless of the species, while threat calls were more structurally variable in mangabeys, the most "despotic" of our three species. Second, we found a parallel between the degree of complexity of the species' social structure and the size, diversity, and usage of its vocal repertoire. Mangabeys (most complex social structure) called twice as often as guenons and displayed the largest and most complex repertoire. De Brazza's monkeys (simplest social structure) displayed the smallest and simplest repertoire. Campbell's monkeys displayed an intermediate pattern. Providing evidence of higher levels of vocal variability in species presenting a more complex social system, our results are in line with the theory of a social-vocal coevolution of communicative abilities, opening new perspectives for comparative research on the evolution of communication systems in different animal taxa.

  16. The complexity of human walking: a knee osteoarthritis study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Kotti

    Full Text Available This study proposes a framework for deconstructing complex walking patterns to create a simple principal component space before checking whether the projection to this space is suitable for identifying changes from the normality. We focus on knee osteoarthritis, the most common knee joint disease and the second leading cause of disability. Knee osteoarthritis affects over 250 million people worldwide. The motivation for projecting the highly dimensional movements to a lower dimensional and simpler space is our belief that motor behaviour can be understood by identifying a simplicity via projection to a low principal component space, which may reflect upon the underlying mechanism. To study this, we recruited 180 subjects, 47 of which reported that they had knee osteoarthritis. They were asked to walk several times along a walkway equipped with two force plates that capture their ground reaction forces along 3 axes, namely vertical, anterior-posterior, and medio-lateral, at 1000 Hz. Data when the subject does not clearly strike the force plate were excluded, leaving 1-3 gait cycles per subject. To examine the complexity of human walking, we applied dimensionality reduction via Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis. The first principal component explains 34% of the variance in the data, whereas over 80% of the variance is explained by 8 principal components or more. This proves the complexity of the underlying structure of the ground reaction forces. To examine if our musculoskeletal system generates movements that are distinguishable between normal and pathological subjects in a low dimensional principal component space, we applied a Bayes classifier. For the tested cross-validated, subject-independent experimental protocol, the classification accuracy equals 82.62%. Also, a novel complexity measure is proposed, which can be used as an objective index to facilitate clinical decision making. This measure proves that knee osteoarthritis

  17. Architecture of human mTOR complex 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylett, Christopher H S; Sauer, Evelyn; Imseng, Stefan; Boehringer, Daniel; Hall, Michael N; Ban, Nenad; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR), a conserved protein kinase and central controller of cell growth, functions in two structurally and functionally distinct complexes: TORC1 and TORC2. Dysregulation of mammalian TOR (mTOR) signaling is implicated in pathologies that include diabetes, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We resolved the architecture of human mTORC1 (mTOR with subunits Raptor and mLST8) bound to FK506 binding protein (FKBP)-rapamycin, by combining cryo-electron microscopy at 5.9 angstrom resolution with crystallographic studies of Chaetomium thermophilum Raptor at 4.3 angstrom resolution. The structure explains how FKBP-rapamycin and architectural elements of mTORC1 limit access to the recessed active site. Consistent with a role in substrate recognition and delivery, the conserved amino-terminal domain of Raptor is juxtaposed to the kinase active site. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prank, K.; Wagner, M.; Brabant, G. [Medical School Hannover (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Complexity of human and ecosystem interactions in an agricultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, Richard H.; Barlow, Jeannie R.; Capel, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of human interaction in the commercial agricultural landscape and the resulting impacts on the ecosystem services of water quality and quantity is largely ignored by the current agricultural paradigm that maximizes crop production over other ecosystem services. Three examples at different spatial scales (local, regional, and global) are presented where human and ecosystem interactions in a commercial agricultural landscape adversely affect water quality and quantity in unintended ways in the Delta of northwestern Mississippi. In the first example, little to no regulation of groundwater use for irrigation has caused declines in groundwater levels resulting in loss of baseflow to streams and threatening future water supply. In the second example, federal policy which subsidizes corn for biofuel production has encouraged many producers to switch from cotton to corn, which requires more nutrients and water, counter to national efforts to reduce nutrient loads to the Gulf of Mexico and exacerbating groundwater level declines. The third example is the wholesale adoption of a system for weed control that relies on a single chemical, initially providing many benefits and ultimately leading to the widespread occurrence of glyphosate and its degradates in Delta streams and necessitating higher application rates of glyphosate as well as the use of other herbicides due to increasing weed resistance. Although these examples are specific to the Mississippi Delta, analogous situations exist throughout the world and point to the need for change in how we grow our food, fuel, and fiber, and manage our soil and water resources.

  20. Distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinjens, W N; ten Kate, J; van der Linden, E P; Wijnen, J T; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1989-12-01

    The normal distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human body was investigated quantitatively by ADCP-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and qualitatively by immunohistochemistry. In these studies we used a specific rabbit anti-human ADCP antiserum. In all 19 investigated tissues, except erythrocytes, ADCP was found by RIA in the soluble and membrane fractions. From all tissues the membrane fractions contained more ADCP (expressed per mg protein) than the soluble fractions. High membrane ADCP concentrations were found in skin, renal cortex, gastrointestinal tract, and prostate. Immunoperoxidase staining confirmed the predominant membrane-associated localization of the protein. In serous sweat glands, convoluted tubules of renal cortex, bile canaliculi, gastrointestinal tract, lung, pancreas, prostate gland, salivary gland, gallbladder, mammary gland, and uterus, ADCP immunoreactivity was found confined to the luminal membranes of the epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that ADCP is present predominantly in exocrine glands and absorptive epithelia. The localization of ADCP at the secretory or absorptive apex of the cells suggests that the function of ADCP is related to the secretory and/or absorptive process.

  1. High, but not low, exercise volume shifts the balance of renin-angiotensin system toward ACE2/Mas receptor axis in skeletal muscle in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Eliete Dalla Corte; Giori, Isabele Gomes; Machado, Marcus Vinícius; Magliano, D'Angelo Carlo; Freitas, Fernanda Marques; Andrade, Mariana Sodré Boêta; Vieira, Aline Bomfim; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2017-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic risk factors that is linked to central obesity, elevated blood pressure, insulin resistance (IR), and dyslipidemia, where the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may provide a link among them. This study aimed to evaluate volume exercise effects comparing low vs. high volume of chronic aerobic exercise on RAS axes in skeletal muscle in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) rat model. For this, male Wistar-Kyoto rats were fed a standard chow (SC) diet or a high-fat (HF) diet for 32 wk. Animals receiving the HF diet were randomly divided into low exercise volume (LEV, 150 min/wk) and high exercise volume (HEV, 300 min/wk) at the 20th week. After 12 wk of aerobic treadmill training, the body mass and composition, blood pressure, glucose and lipid metabolism, RAS axes, insulin signaling, and inflammatory pathway were performed. HEV slowed the body mass gain, reduced intra-abdominal fat pad and leptin levels, improved total and peripheral body composition and inflammatory cytokine, reduced angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression, and increased Mas receptor protein expression compared with the HF animals. Sedentary groups (SC and HF) presented lower time to exhaustion and maximal velocity compared with the LEV and HEV groups. Both exercise training groups showed reduced resting systolic blood pressure and heart rate, improved glucose tolerance, IR, insulin signaling, and lipid profile. We conclude that the HEV, but not LEV, shifted the balance of RAS toward the ACE2/Mas receptor axis in skeletal muscle, presenting protective effects against the DIO model. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Discrimination of complex human behavior by pigeons (Columba livia and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad A J Qadri

    Full Text Available The cognitive and neural mechanisms for recognizing and categorizing behavior are not well understood in non-human animals. In the current experiments, pigeons and humans learned to categorize two non-repeating, complex human behaviors ("martial arts" vs. "Indian dance". Using multiple video exemplars of a digital human model, pigeons discriminated these behaviors in a go/no-go task and humans in a choice task. Experiment 1 found that pigeons already experienced with discriminating the locomotive actions of digital animals acquired the discrimination more rapidly when action information was available than when only pose information was available. Experiments 2 and 3 found this same dynamic superiority effect with naïve pigeons and human participants. Both species used the same combination of immediately available static pose information and more slowly perceived dynamic action cues to discriminate the behavioral categories. Theories based on generalized visual mechanisms, as opposed to embodied, species-specific action networks, offer a parsimonious account of how these different animals recognize behavior across and within species.

  3. A role for Aurora C in the chromosomal passenger complex during human preimplantation embryo development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Margarida Avo; van de Werken, Christine; de Vries, Marieke; Jahr, Holger; Vromans, Martijn J. M.; Laven, Joop S. E.; Fauser, Bart C.; Kops, Geert J.; Lens, Susanne M.; Baart, Esther B.

    BACKGROUND: Human embryos generated by IVF demonstrate a high incidence of chromosomal segregation errors during the cleavage divisions. To analyse underlying molecular mechanisms, we investigated the behaviour of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) in human oocytes and embryos. This important

  4. A review of human factors challenges of complex adaptive systems: discovering and understanding chaos in human performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Waldemar

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the author explores a need for a greater understanding of the true nature of human-system interactions from the perspective of the theory of complex adaptive systems, including the essence of complexity, emergent properties of system behavior, nonlinear systems dynamics, and deterministic chaos. Human performance, more often than not, constitutes complex adaptive phenomena with emergent properties that exhibit nonlinear dynamical (chaotic) behaviors. The complexity challenges in the design and management of contemporary work systems, including service systems, are explored. Examples of selected applications of the concepts of nonlinear dynamics to the study of human physical performance are provided. Understanding and applications of the concepts of theory of complex adaptive and dynamical systems should significantly improve the effectiveness of human-centered design efforts of a large system of systems. Performance of many contemporary work systems and environments may be sensitive to the initial conditions and may exhibit dynamic nonlinear properties and chaotic system behaviors. Human-centered design of emergent human-system interactions requires application of the theories of nonlinear dynamics and complex adaptive system. The success of future human-systems integration efforts requires the fusion of paradigms, knowledge, design principles, and methodologies of human factors and ergonomics with those of the science of complex adaptive systems as well as modern systems engineering.

  5. The Complex Exogenous RNA Spectra in Human Plasma: An Interface with Human Gut Biota?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Li, Hong; Yuan, Yue; Etheridge, Alton; Zhou, Yong; Huang, David; Wilmes, Paul; Galas, David

    2012-01-01

    Human plasma has long been a rich source for biomarker discovery. It has recently become clear that plasma RNA molecules, such as microRNA, in addition to proteins are common and can serve as biomarkers. Surveying human plasma for microRNA biomarkers using next generation sequencing technology, we observed that a significant fraction of the circulating RNA appear to originate from exogenous species. With careful analysis of sequence error statistics and other controls, we demonstrated that there is a wide range of RNA from many different organisms, including bacteria and fungi as well as from other species. These RNAs may be associated with protein, lipid or other molecules protecting them from RNase activity in plasma. Some of these RNAs are detected in intracellular complexes and may be able to influence cellular activities under in vitro conditions. These findings raise the possibility that plasma RNAs of exogenous origin may serve as signaling molecules mediating for example the human-microbiome interaction and may affect and/or indicate the state of human health. PMID:23251414

  6. Economic Complexity and Human Development: DEA performance measurement in Asia and Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraz, Diogo; Moralles, Hérick Fernando; Suarez Campoli, Jéssica; Ribeiro de Oliveira, Fabíola Cristina; do Nascimento Rebelatto, Daisy Aparecida

    2018-01-01

    Economic growth is not the unique factor to explain human development. Due to that many authors have prioritized studies to measure the Human Development Index. However, these indices do not analyze how Economic Complexity can increase Human Development. The aim of this paper is to determine the efficiency of a set of nations from Latin America and Asia, to measure a country’s performance in converting Economic Complexity into Human Development, between 2010 and 2014. The method used was Data...

  7. Exploring the potential relevance of human-specific genes to complex disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper David N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although human disease genes generally tend to be evolutionarily more ancient than non-disease genes, complex disease genes appear to be represented more frequently than Mendelian disease genes among genes of more recent evolutionary origin. It is therefore proposed that the analysis of human-specific genes might provide new insights into the genetics of complex disease. Cross-comparison with the Human Gene Mutation Database (http://www.hgmd.org revealed a number of examples of disease-causing and disease-associated mutations in putatively human-specific genes. A sizeable proportion of these were missense polymorphisms associated with complex disease. Since both human-specific genes and genes associated with complex disease have often experienced particularly rapid rates of evolutionary change, either due to weaker purifying selection or positive selection, it is proposed that a significant number of human-specific genes may play a role in complex disease.

  8. Human as the chief controller in the complex system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yeonsub

    2012-01-01

    Due to accuracy of measurement and improvement of control logic, human beings are freed from time consuming and repeated task. When there are situations where the control logic cannot calculate the next state of system, human beings interrupt the system and steer the system manually. The most scope of human factors is focused on this interruption, and economists are concern how to present information cognitively and reliably. Fukushima nuclear accident has considered the role of human beings again. Human beings are forced to do something without proper knowledge, procedure, and process information. Thus post Fukushima actions should include how for human beings to be trained and how to get real time information. Finally because safety culture can determine behaviors of human beings, the method to cultivate safety culture should be considered

  9. Assembly factors for the membrane arm of human complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Byron; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2013-11-19

    Mitochondrial respiratory complex I is a product of both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The integration of seven subunits encoded in mitochondrial DNA into the inner membrane, their association with 14 nuclear-encoded membrane subunits, the construction of the extrinsic arm from 23 additional nuclear-encoded proteins, iron-sulfur clusters, and flavin mononucleotide cofactor require the participation of assembly factors. Some are intrinsic to the complex, whereas others participate transiently. The suppression of the expression of the NDUFA11 subunit of complex I disrupted the assembly of the complex, and subcomplexes with masses of 550 and 815 kDa accumulated. Eight of the known extrinsic assembly factors plus a hydrophobic protein, C3orf1, were associated with the subcomplexes. The characteristics of C3orf1, of another assembly factor, TMEM126B, and of NDUFA11 suggest that they all participate in constructing the membrane arm of complex I.

  10. The Impact of Evolutionary Driving Forces on Human Complex Diseases: A Population Genetics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr T. M. Saeb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the molecular evolution of human genome has paved the way to understand genetic adaptation of humans to the environmental changes and corresponding complex diseases. In this review, we discussed the historical origin of genetic diversity among human populations, the evolutionary driving forces that can affect genetic diversity among populations, and the effects of human movement into new environments and gene flow on population genetic diversity. Furthermore, we presented the role of natural selection on genetic diversity and complex diseases. Then we reviewed the disadvantageous consequences of historical selection events in modern time and their relation to the development of complex diseases. In addition, we discussed the effect of consanguinity on the incidence of complex diseases in human populations. Finally, we presented the latest information about the role of ancient genes acquired from interbreeding with ancient hominids in the development of complex diseases.

  11. Humanism and nature – some reflections on a complex relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Rüsen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper starts with a systematical analysis of the interrelationship of humanism and nature. It proceeds to a historical reconstruction of this relationship in the development of Western humanism from ancient Rome via Renaissance till the Enlightenment of the 18th century. In both respects the result of the analysis is the same: The Western tradition of humanism is characterised by a gap between an emphasis on the cultural quality of human life on the one hand and nature on the other one. Men are entitled to dominate and govern nature and use it for their purpose. This fits into an idea of a progressing destructive relationship between man and nature in the West. On the other the tradition of humanism has put the gap between man and nature into a harmonising cosmological or theological context. In this context a simple destructive relationship between man and nature is not possible. The humanism of today has to pick up the challenge of the ecological crisis and to refer to its tradition where man and nature are mediated into a meaningful and sense-bearing interrelationship. Instead of simply referring to the traditional cosmology a convincing idea of this mediation or even synthesis can only be made plausible by referring to the already pre-given synthesis between nature and culture, the human body.

  12. Performance in complex motor tasks deteriorates in hyperthermic humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Jacob Feder; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Trangmar, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    -motor tracking performance was reduced by 10.7 ± 6.5% following exercise-induced hyperthermia when integrated in the multipart protocol and 4.4 ± 5.7% when tested separately (bothP 1.3% (P math tasks...... of information or decision-making prior to responding. We hypothesized that divergences could relate to task complexity and developed a protocol consisting of 1) simple motor task [TARGET_pinch], 2) complex motor task [Visuo-motor tracking], 3) simple math task [MATH_type], 4) combined motor-math task [MATH...

  13. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human Rod–Zwilch–ZW10 (RZZ) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenfeld, Anika; Wohlgemuth, Sabine [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Wehenkel, Annemarie [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 3348/INSERM U1005, Bâtiment 110, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay CEDEX (France); Vetter, Ingrid R. [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Musacchio, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.musacchio@mpi-dortmund.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitätstrasse 1, 45141 Essen (Germany)

    2015-03-20

    The 800 kDa complex of the human Rod, Zwilch and ZW10 proteins (the RZZ complex) was reconstituted in insect cells, purified, crystallized and subjected to preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis. The spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors kinetochore–microtubule attachment during mitosis. In metazoans, the three-subunit Rod–Zwilch–ZW10 (RZZ) complex is a crucial SAC component that interacts with additional SAC-activating and SAC-silencing components, including the Mad1–Mad2 complex and cytoplasmic dynein. The RZZ complex contains two copies of each subunit and has a predicted molecular mass of ∼800 kDa. Given the low abundance of the RZZ complex in natural sources, its recombinant reconstitution was attempted by co-expression of its subunits in insect cells. The RZZ complex was purified to homogeneity and subjected to systematic crystallization attempts. Initial crystals containing the entire RZZ complex were obtained using the sitting-drop method and were subjected to optimization to improve the diffraction resolution limit. The crystals belonged to space group P3{sub 1} (No. 144) or P3{sub 2} (No. 145), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 215.45, c = 458.7 Å, α = β = 90.0, γ = 120.0°.

  14. Human resource management practices in a medical complex in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    staff, accountability, general HR efficiency, occupation-specific dispensation adjustments and performance management and development system efficiency, and availability of HR staff. All these characteristics were judged to be poor. Conclusion. HRM practices in this Eastern Cape medical complex were inadequate and a ...

  15. Accommodating complexity and human behaviors in decision analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Siirola, John Daniel; Schoenwald, David Alan; Strip, David R.; Hirsch, Gary B.; Bastian, Mark S.; Braithwaite, Karl R.; Homer, Jack [Homer Consulting

    2007-11-01

    This is the final report for a LDRD effort to address human behavior in decision support systems. One sister LDRD effort reports the extension of this work to include actual human choices and additional simulation analyses. Another provides the background for this effort and the programmatic directions for future work. This specific effort considered the feasibility of five aspects of model development required for analysis viability. To avoid the use of classified information, healthcare decisions and the system embedding them became the illustrative example for assessment.

  16. Alteration to the SWI/SNF complex in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa S. Gordon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The SWI/SNF complex is a key catalyst for gene expression and regulates a variety of pathways, many of which have anticancer roles. Its central roles in cellular growth control, DNA repair, differentiation, cell adhesion and development are often targeted, and inactivated, during cancer development and progression. In this review, we will discuss what is known about how SWI/SNF is inactivated, and describe the potential impact of abrogating this complex. BRG1 and BRM are the catalytic subunits which are essential for SWI/SNF function, and thus, it is not surprising that they are lost in a variety of cancer types. As neither gene is mutated when lost, the mechanism of suppression, as well as the impact of potential gene activity restoration, are reviewed.

  17. Interaction Profiling Identifies the Human Nuclear Exosome Targeting Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon; Christensen, Marianne Skovgaard; Kristiansen, Maiken Søndergaard

    2011-01-01

    from nucleoli, and consistently NEXT is specifically required for the exosomal degradation of promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs). We also detect putative homolog TRAMP subunits hTRF4-2 (Trf4p) and ZCCHC7 (Air2p) in hRRP6 and hMTR4 precipitates. However, at least ZCCHC7 function is restricted...... to nucleoli. Our results suggest that human nuclear exosome degradation pathways comprise modules of spatially organized cofactors that diverge from the yeast model....

  18. The Complex Functioning of the Human Brain: The Two Hemispheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia Cristina Timofti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study reveals just a glimpse of the possible functions and reactions that the human brain can have. I considered as good examples different situations characteristic both of a normal person and a split-brain one. These situations prove that the brain, although divided in two, works as a unit, as an amazing computer that has data processing as a main goal.

  19. Nucleotide excision repair : complexes and complexities : a study of global genome repair in human cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    Of all exogenous agents that damage genomic DNA and hence threaten its integrity, the ultraviolet B (UVB) component of sunlight is highly relevant because of its abundance. UVB induces predominantly cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. In humans, these photolesions are repaired by

  20. Inhibition of human aromatase complex (CYP19) by antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Birkved, Franziska Maria A Kramer

    2008-01-01

    of 1.4-49.7 mM. Carbamazepine, gabapentin, primidone, topiramate and vigabatrin showed no inhibition. Additionally, binary drug combinations were tested to investigate if combination therapy could potentiate the aromatase inhibition. Additive inhibition was seen in combination experiments...... with valproate and phenobarbital. When adding carbamazepine to a range of valproate concentrations no additional inhibition was seen. The data for some of the AEDs show that side effects on steroid synthesis in humans due to inhibition of aromatase should be considered....

  1. The Cultural Historical Complexity of Human Personality Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa E. Wynn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on implicit intelligence has conceptualized students’ beliefs about the nature of intelligence as either fixed or malleable. This research has largely not included African American adolescents, a group for whom beliefs about intelligence have a cultural historical complexity related to both scientific racism and master narratives of race and intelligence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature of implicit theories of intelligence for 63 African American adolescents who are seventh and eighth graders in a public charter school. The two-way ANOVA revealed that these adolescents held a malleable view of intelligence, which did not vary by gender or grade. Exploratory correlation analysis showed some consistent relationships with achievement motivation variables found in other studies. These findings may be explained by African American cultural values and the personality characteristic adaptations that they make living within a racialized society.

  2. Complex Trajectories of Brain Development in the Healthy Human Fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andescavage, Nickie N; du Plessis, Adre; McCarter, Robert; Serag, Ahmed; Evangelou, Iordanis; Vezina, Gilbert; Robertson, Richard; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    This study characterizes global and hemispheric brain growth in healthy human fetuses during the second half of pregnancy using three-dimensional MRI techniques. We studied 166 healthy fetuses that underwent MRI between 18 and 39 completed weeks gestation. We created three-dimensional high-resolution reconstructions of the brain and calculated volumes for left and right cortical gray matter (CGM), fetal white matter (FWM), deep subcortical structures (DSS), and the cerebellum. We calculated the rate of growth for each tissue class according to gestational age and described patterns of hemispheric growth. Each brain region demonstrated major increases in volume during the second half of gestation, the most pronounced being the cerebellum (34-fold), followed by FWM (22-fold), CGM (21-fold), and DSS (10-fold). The left cerebellar hemisphere, CGM, and DSS had larger volumes early in gestation, but these equalized by term. It has been increasingly recognized that brain asymmetry evolves throughout the human life span. Advanced quantitative MRI provides noninvasive measurements of early structural asymmetry between the left and right fetal brain that may inform functional and behavioral laterality differences seen in children and young adulthood. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Neutral Theory: From Complex Population History to Natural Selection and Sociocultural Phenomena in Human Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austerlitz, Frédéric; Heyer, Evelyne

    2018-06-01

    Here, we present a synthetic view on how Kimura's Neutral theory has helped us gaining insight on the different evolutionary forces that shape human evolution. We put this perspective in the frame of recent emerging challenges: the use of whole genome data for reconstructing population histories, natural selection on complex polygenic traits, and integrating cultural processes in human evolution.

  4. Improved methodology for the affinity isolation of human protein complexes expressed at near endogenous levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanski, Michal; Molloy, Kelly; Jiang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    An efficient and reliable procedure for the capture of affinity-tagged proteins and associated complexes from human cell lines is reported. Through multiple optimizations, high yield and low background affinity-purifications are achieved from modest quantities of human cells expressing endogenous...

  5. Skill networks and measures of complex human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Katharine A

    2017-11-28

    We propose a network-based method for measuring worker skills. We illustrate the method using data from an online freelance website. Using the tools of network analysis, we divide skills into endogenous categories based on their relationship with other skills in the market. Workers who specialize in these different areas earn dramatically different wages. We then show that, in this market, network-based measures of human capital provide additional insight into wages beyond traditional measures. In particular, we show that workers with diverse skills earn higher wages than those with more specialized skills. Moreover, we can distinguish between two different types of workers benefiting from skill diversity: jacks-of-all-trades, whose skills can be applied independently on a wide range of jobs, and synergistic workers, whose skills are useful in combination and fill a hole in the labor market. On average, workers whose skills are synergistic earn more than jacks-of-all-trades. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  6. The human cumulus--oocyte complex gene-expression profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assou, Said; Anahory, Tal; Pantesco, Véronique; Le Carrour, Tanguy; Pellestor, Franck; Klein, Bernard; Reyftmann, Lionel; Dechaud, Hervé; De Vos, John; Hamamah, Samir

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND The understanding of the mechanisms regulating human oocyte maturation is still rudimentary. We have identified transcripts differentially expressed between immature and mature oocytes, and cumulus cells. METHODS Using oligonucleotides microarrays, genome wide gene expression was studied in pooled immature and mature oocytes or cumulus cells from patients who underwent IVF. RESULTS In addition to known genes such as DAZL, BMP15 or GDF9, oocytes upregulated 1514 genes. We show that PTTG3 and AURKC are respectively the securin and the Aurora kinase preferentially expressed during oocyte meiosis. Strikingly, oocytes overexpressed previously unreported growth factors such as TNFSF13/APRIL, FGF9, FGF14, and IL4, and transcription factors including OTX2, SOX15 and SOX30. Conversely, cumulus cells, in addition to known genes such as LHCGR or BMPR2, overexpressed cell-tocell signaling genes including TNFSF11/RANKL, numerous complement components, semaphorins (SEMA3A, SEMA6A, SEMA6D) and CD genes such as CD200. We also identified 52 genes progressively increasing during oocyte maturation, comprising CDC25A and SOCS7. CONCLUSION The identification of genes up and down regulated during oocyte maturation greatly improves our understanding of oocyte biology and will provide new markers that signal viable and competent oocytes. Furthermore, genes found expressed in cumulus cells are potential markers of granulosa cell tumors. PMID:16571642

  7. The human factor in operation and maintenance of complex high-reliability systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, T.G.

    1989-01-01

    Human factors issues in probabilistic risk assessment (PRAs) of complex high-reliability systems are addressed. These PRAs influence system operation and technical support programs such as maintainability, test, and surveillance. Using the U.S. commercial nuclear power industry as the setting, the paper addresses the manner in which PRAs currently treat human performance, the state of quantification methods and source data for analyzing human performance, and the role of human factors specialist in the analysis. The paper concludes with a presentation of TALENT, an emerging concept for fully integrating broad-based human factors expertise into the PRA process, is presented. 47 refs

  8. Connectivity in the human brain dissociates entropy and complexity of auditory inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastase, Samuel A; Iacovella, Vittorio; Davis, Ben; Hasson, Uri

    2015-03-01

    Complex systems are described according to two central dimensions: (a) the randomness of their output, quantified via entropy; and (b) their complexity, which reflects the organization of a system's generators. Whereas some approaches hold that complexity can be reduced to uncertainty or entropy, an axiom of complexity science is that signals with very high or very low entropy are generated by relatively non-complex systems, while complex systems typically generate outputs with entropy peaking between these two extremes. In understanding their environment, individuals would benefit from coding for both input entropy and complexity; entropy indexes uncertainty and can inform probabilistic coding strategies, whereas complexity reflects a concise and abstract representation of the underlying environmental configuration, which can serve independent purposes, e.g., as a template for generalization and rapid comparisons between environments. Using functional neuroimaging, we demonstrate that, in response to passively processed auditory inputs, functional integration patterns in the human brain track both the entropy and complexity of the auditory signal. Connectivity between several brain regions scaled monotonically with input entropy, suggesting sensitivity to uncertainty, whereas connectivity between other regions tracked entropy in a convex manner consistent with sensitivity to input complexity. These findings suggest that the human brain simultaneously tracks the uncertainty of sensory data and effectively models their environmental generators. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Labeling of human serum albumin with 105Rh-cysteine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, J.M.; Pillai, M.R.A.; John, C.S.; Troutner, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    The conjugation of a complex formed by reacting RhCl 3 with cysteine to human serum albumin has been investigated. Approximately 50% of the rhodium (labelled with 105 Rh) was converted to the complex. Conjugation of the complex to HSA via the ECDI method resulted in yields of ∼ 40% of the total rhodium or ∼ 80% of the Rh-cysteine complex. No conjugation was observed in the absence of the ECDI. At approximately equal molar concentrations of rhodium and HSA, an average of ∼ 0.4 rhodium atoms per HSA molecule was achieved. (author)

  10. [Elderly human being with ostomy and environments of care: reflection on the perspective of complexity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Edaiane Joana Lima; Santos, Silvana Sidney Costa; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo

    2012-01-01

    This is discussion about the relationship between elderly human beings with ostomy and their environments care, under the perspective of Complexity Edgar Morin. An axis holds the reflection: environments of care for elderly humans with ostomy. In this sense, we present three types of environment that surround the context of elderly humans with ostomy: home environment, group environment and hospital environment. This brings, as a social contribution, a new look about resizing caring of elderly humans with ostomy in their environment. It is considered that the environment hosting this human being contains a diversity of feelings, emotions, experiences; it binds multiple meanings, from the Complexity perspective, about the relationship between the environment and the caring process.

  11. Reconstitution of active human core Mediator complex reveals a pivotal role of the MED14 subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevher, Murat A.; Shi, Yi; Li, Dan; Chait, Brian T.; Malik, Sohail; Roeder, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Mediator complex is a critical coactivator for RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-mediated transcription. Here, we report the reconstitution of a functional 15-subunit human core Mediator complex and its characterization by functional assays and chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry (CX-MS). Whereas the reconstituted head and middle modules can stably associate, only with incorporation of MED14 into the bi-modular complex does it acquire basal and coactivator functions. This results from a dramatically enhanced ability of MED14-containing complexes to associate with Pol II. Altogether, our analyses identify MED14 as both an architectural and a functional backbone of the Mediator complex. We further establish a conditional requirement for metazoan-specific MED26 that becomes evident in the presence of heterologous nuclear factors. This general approach paves the way for systematically dissecting the multiple layers of functionalities associated with the Mediator complex. PMID:25383669

  12. Reconstitution of active human core Mediator complex reveals a critical role of the MED14 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevher, Murat A; Shi, Yi; Li, Dan; Chait, Brian T; Malik, Sohail; Roeder, Robert G

    2014-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Mediator complex is a critical coactivator for RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-mediated transcription. Here we report the reconstitution of a functional 15-subunit human core Mediator complex and its characterization by functional assays and chemical cross-linking coupled to MS (CX-MS). Whereas the reconstituted head and middle modules can stably associate, basal and coactivator functions are acquired only after incorporation of MED14 into the bimodular complex. This results from a dramatically enhanced ability of MED14-containing complexes to associate with Pol II. Altogether, our analyses identify MED14 as both an architectural and a functional backbone of the Mediator complex. We further establish a conditional requirement for metazoan-specific MED26 that becomes evident in the presence of heterologous nuclear factors. This general approach paves the way for systematic dissection of the multiple layers of functionality associated with the Mediator complex.

  13. Human guidance of mobile robots in complex 3D environments using smart glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopinsky, Ryan; Sharma, Aneesh; Gupta, Nikhil; Ordonez, Camilo; Collins, Emmanuel; Barber, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In order for humans to safely work alongside robots in the field, the human-robot (HR) interface, which enables bi-directional communication between human and robot, should be able to quickly and concisely express the robot's intentions and needs. While the robot operates mostly in autonomous mode, the human should be able to intervene to effectively guide the robot in complex, risky and/or highly uncertain scenarios. Using smart glasses such as Google Glass∗, we seek to develop an HR interface that aids in reducing interaction time and distractions during interaction with the robot.

  14. A role for human mitochondrial complex II in the production of reactive oxygen species in human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial respiratory chain is a major generator of cellular oxidative stress, thought to be an underlying cause of the carcinogenic and ageing process in many tissues including skin. Previous studies of the relative contributions of the respiratory chain (RC complexes I, II and III towards production of reactive oxygen species (ROS have focussed on rat tissues and certainly not on human skin which is surprising as this tissue is regularly exposed to UVA in sunlight, a potent generator of cellular oxidative stress. In a novel approach we have used an array of established specific metabolic inhibitors and DHR123 fluorescence to study the relative roles of the mitochondrial RC complexes in cellular ROS production in 2 types of human skin cells. These include additional enhancement of ROS production by exposure to physiological levels of UVA. The effects within epidermal and dermal derived skin cells are compared to other tissue cell types as well as those harbouring a compromised mitochondrial status (Rho-zero A549. The results show that the complex II inhibitor, TTFA, was the only RC inhibitor to significantly increase UVA-induced ROS production in both skin cell types (P<0.05 suggesting that the role of human skin complex II in terms of influencing ROS production is more important than previously thought particularly in comparison to liver cells. Interestingly, two-fold greater maximal activity of complex II enzyme was observed in both skin cell types compared to liver (P<0.001. The activities of RC enzymes appear to decrease with increasing age and telomere length is correlated with ageing. Our study showed that the level of maximal complex II activity was higher in the MRC5/hTERT (human lung fibroblasts transfected with telomerase cells than the corresponding wild type cells (P=0.0012 which can be considered (in terms of telomerase activity as models of younger and older cells respectively.

  15. Rev and Rex proteins of human complex retroviruses function with the MMTV Rem-responsive element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudley Jaquelin P

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV encodes the Rem protein, an HIV Rev-like protein that enhances nuclear export of unspliced viral RNA in rodent cells. We have shown that Rem is expressed from a doubly spliced RNA, typical of complex retroviruses. Several recent reports indicate that MMTV can infect human cells, suggesting that MMTV might interact with human retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV, and human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K. In this report, we test whether the export/regulatory proteins of human complex retroviruses will increase expression from vectors containing the Rem-responsive element (RmRE. Results MMTV Rem, HIV Rev, and HTLV Rex proteins, but not HERV-K Rec, enhanced expression from an MMTV-based reporter plasmid in human T cells, and this activity was dependent on the RmRE. No RmRE-dependent reporter gene expression was detectable using Rev, Rex, or Rec in HC11 mouse mammary cells. Cell fractionation and RNA quantitation experiments suggested that the regulatory proteins did not affect RNA stability or nuclear export in the MMTV reporter system. Rem had no demonstrable activity on export elements from HIV, HTLV, or HERV-K. Similar to the Rem-specific activity in rodent cells, the RmRE-dependent functions of Rem, Rev, or Rex in human cells were inhibited by a dominant-negative truncated nucleoporin that acts in the Crm1 pathway of RNA and protein export. Conclusion These data argue that many retroviral regulatory proteins recognize similar complex RNA structures, which may depend on the presence of cell-type specific proteins. Retroviral protein activity on the RmRE appears to affect a post-export function of the reporter RNA. Our results provide additional evidence that MMTV is a complex retrovirus with the potential for viral interactions in human cells.

  16. The role of human performance in the safety complex plants' operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, Irina Aida; Lazar, Roxana Elena; Croitoru, Cornelia

    1999-01-01

    According to statistics, about 20-30% from the failures occurred in the plants are caused directly or indirectly by human errors. Furthermore, it was established that 10-15% of the global failures are related with the human errors. These are mainly due to the wrong actions, maintenance errors, and misinterpretation of instruments. The human performance is influenced by: professional ability, complexity and danger to the plant experience in the working place, level of skills, events in personal and/or professional life, discipline, social ambience, somatic health. The human performances' assessment in the probabilistic safety assessment offers the possibility of evaluation of human contribution to the events sequences outcome. Not all the human errors have impact on the system. A human error may be recovered before the unwanted consequences had been occurred on system. This paper presents the possibilities to use the probabilistic method (event tree, fault tree) to identify the solutions for human reliability improved in order to minimize the risk in industrial plants' operation. Also, the human error types and their causes are defined and the 'decision tree method' as technique in our analysis for human reliability assessment is presented. The exemplification of human error analysis method was achieved based on operation data for Valcea Heavy Water Pilot Plant. As initiating event for the accident state 'the steam supply interruption' event has been considered. The human errors' contribution was analysed for the accident sequence with the worst consequences. (authors)

  17. Sustaining Economic Exploitation of Complex Ecosystems in Computational Models of Coupled Human-Natural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Neo D.; Tonin, Perrine; Bauer, Barbara; Rael, Rosalyn C.; Singh, Rahul; Yoon, Sangyuk; Yoon, Ilmi; Dunne, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding ecological complexity has stymied scientists for decades. Recent elucidation of the famously coined "devious strategies for stability in enduring natural systems" has opened up a new field of computational analyses of complex ecological networks where the nonlinear dynamics of many interacting species can be more realistically mod-eled and understood. Here, we describe the first extension of this field to include coupled human-natural systems. This extension elucidates new strat...

  18. Model-based identification and use of task complexity factors of human integrated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Dong-Han; Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea

    2012-01-01

    Task complexity is one of the conceptual constructs that are critical to explain and predict human performance in human integrated systems. A basic approach to evaluating the complexity of tasks is to identify task complexity factors and measure them. Although a great deal of task complexity factors have been studied, there is still a lack of conceptual frameworks for identifying and organizing them analytically, which can be generally used irrespective of the types of domains and tasks. This study proposes a model-based approach to identifying and using task complexity factors, which has two facets—the design aspects of a task and complexity dimensions. Three levels of design abstraction, which are functional, behavioral, and structural aspects of a task, characterize the design aspect of a task. The behavioral aspect is further classified into five cognitive processing activity types. The complexity dimensions explain a task complexity from different perspectives, which are size, variety, and order/organization. Twenty-one task complexity factors are identified by the combination of the attributes of each facet. Identification and evaluation of task complexity factors based on this model is believed to give insights for improving the design quality of tasks. This model for complexity factors can also be used as a referential framework for allocating tasks and designing information aids. The proposed approach is applied to procedure-based tasks of nuclear power plants (NPPs) as a case study to demonstrate its use. Last, we compare the proposed approach with other studies and then suggest some future research directions.

  19. Complex forms of mitochondrial DNA in human B cells transformed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Christiansen, C; Zeuthen, J

    1983-01-01

    Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed lymphoblast......Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed...

  20. [Dinitrosyl iron complexes are endogenous signaling agents in animal and human cells and tissues (a hypothesis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanin, A F

    2004-01-01

    The hypothesis was advanced that dinitrosyl iron complexes generated in animal and human cells and tissues producing nitric oxide can function as endogenous universal regulators of biochemical and physiological processes. This function is realized by the ability of dinitrosyl iron complexes to act as donors of free nitric oxide molecules interacting with the heme groups of proteins, nitrosonium ions, or Fe+(NO+)2 interacting with the thiol groups of proteins. The effect of dinitrosyl iron complexes on the activity of some enzymes and the expression of the genome at the translation and transcription levels was considered.

  1. Human reliability and human factors in complex organizations: epistemological and critical analysis - practical avenues to action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llory, A.

    1991-08-01

    This article starts out with comment on the existence of persistent problems inherent to probabilistic safety assessments (PSA). It first surveys existing American documents on the subject which make a certain number of criticisms on human reliability analyses, e.g. limitations due to the scant quantities of data available, lack of a basic theoretical model, non-reproducibility of analyses, etc. The article therefore examines and criticizes the epistemological bases of these analyses. One of the fundamental points stressed is that human reliability analyses do not take account of all the special features of the work situation which result in human error (so as to draw up statistical data from a sufficiently representative number of cases), and consequently lose all notion of the 'relationships' between human errors and the different aspects of the working environment. The other key points of criticism concern the collective nature of work which is not taken into account, and the frequent confusion between what operatives actually do and their formally prescribed job-tasks. The article proposes aspects to be given thought in order to overcome these difficulties, e.g. quantitative assessment of the social environment within a company, non-linear model for assessment of the accident rate, analysis of stress levels in staff on off-shore platforms. The method approaches used in these three studies are of the same type, and could be transposed to human-reliability problems. The article then goes into greater depth on thinking aimed at developing a 'positive' view of the human factor (and not just a 'negative' one, i.e. centred on human errors and organizational malfunctions), applying investigation methods developed in the occupational human sciences (occupational psychodynamics, ergonomics, occupational sociology). The importance of operatives working as actors of a team is stressed

  2. Effects of human serun albumin in some biological properties of rhodium(II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espósito Breno P.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The affinities for human albumin (HSA of five rhodium(II complexes of general formula [Rh2(bridge4] (bridge = acetate, propionate, butyrate, trifluoroacetate and trifluoroacetamidate were determined by spectrophotometry. In the case of the alkylcarboxylates, an inverse correlation of affinity with their liposolubilities was observed. Diffusion of the free or protein-bound complexes into Ehrlich cells in vitro seems to be primarily governed by the hydrophobic character of the complex. The complex [Rh2(tfc4] exhibited affinity towards the protein (K = 214.1 as well as cell partition both in the absence (32.1% and presence (48.6% of HSA. The compound HSA: [Rh2(tfc4] has had its antitumoral action in tumor-bearing Balb-c mice investigated, showing that HSA can be a drug reservoir for the rhodium complex.

  3. How do precision medicine and system biology response to human body's complex adaptability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bing

    2016-12-01

    In the field of life sciences, although system biology and "precision medicine" introduce some complex scientifific methods and techniques, it is still based on the "analysis-reconstruction" of reductionist theory as a whole. Adaptability of complex system increase system behaviour uncertainty as well as the difficulties of precise identifification and control. It also put systems biology research into trouble. To grasp the behaviour and characteristics of organism fundamentally, systems biology has to abandon the "analysis-reconstruction" concept. In accordance with the guidelines of complexity science, systems biology should build organism model from holistic level, just like the Chinese medicine did in dealing with human body and disease. When we study the living body from the holistic level, we will fifind the adaptability of complex system is not the obstacle that increases the diffificulty of problem solving. It is the "exceptional", "right-hand man" that helping us to deal with the complexity of life more effectively.

  4. Interactions of the human MCM-BP protein with MCM complex components and Dbf4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin Nguyen

    Full Text Available MCM-BP was discovered as a protein that co-purified from human cells with MCM proteins 3 through 7; results which were recapitulated in frogs, yeast and plants. Evidence in all of these organisms supports an important role for MCM-BP in DNA replication, including contributions to MCM complex unloading. However the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood. Here we show that human MCM-BP is capable of interacting with individual MCM proteins 2 through 7 when co-expressed in insect cells and can greatly increase the recovery of some recombinant MCM proteins. Glycerol gradient sedimentation analysis indicated that MCM-BP interacts most strongly with MCM4 and MCM7. Similar gradient analyses of human cell lysates showed that only a small amount of MCM-BP overlapped with the migration of MCM complexes and that MCM complexes were disrupted by exogenous MCM-BP. In addition, large complexes containing MCM-BP and MCM proteins were detected at mid to late S phase, suggesting that the formation of specific MCM-BP complexes is cell cycle regulated. We also identified an interaction between MCM-BP and the Dbf4 regulatory component of the DDK kinase in both yeast 2-hybrid and insect cell co-expression assays, and this interaction was verified by co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins from human cells. In vitro kinase assays showed that MCM-BP was not a substrate for DDK but could inhibit DDK phosphorylation of MCM4,6,7 within MCM4,6,7 or MCM2-7 complexes, with little effect on DDK phosphorylation of MCM2. Since DDK is known to activate DNA replication through phosphorylation of these MCM proteins, our results suggest that MCM-BP may affect DNA replication in part by regulating MCM phosphorylation by DDK.

  5. Interactions of the human MCM-BP protein with MCM complex components and Dbf4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tin; Jagannathan, Madhav; Shire, Kathy; Frappier, Lori

    2012-01-01

    MCM-BP was discovered as a protein that co-purified from human cells with MCM proteins 3 through 7; results which were recapitulated in frogs, yeast and plants. Evidence in all of these organisms supports an important role for MCM-BP in DNA replication, including contributions to MCM complex unloading. However the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood. Here we show that human MCM-BP is capable of interacting with individual MCM proteins 2 through 7 when co-expressed in insect cells and can greatly increase the recovery of some recombinant MCM proteins. Glycerol gradient sedimentation analysis indicated that MCM-BP interacts most strongly with MCM4 and MCM7. Similar gradient analyses of human cell lysates showed that only a small amount of MCM-BP overlapped with the migration of MCM complexes and that MCM complexes were disrupted by exogenous MCM-BP. In addition, large complexes containing MCM-BP and MCM proteins were detected at mid to late S phase, suggesting that the formation of specific MCM-BP complexes is cell cycle regulated. We also identified an interaction between MCM-BP and the Dbf4 regulatory component of the DDK kinase in both yeast 2-hybrid and insect cell co-expression assays, and this interaction was verified by co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins from human cells. In vitro kinase assays showed that MCM-BP was not a substrate for DDK but could inhibit DDK phosphorylation of MCM4,6,7 within MCM4,6,7 or MCM2-7 complexes, with little effect on DDK phosphorylation of MCM2. Since DDK is known to activate DNA replication through phosphorylation of these MCM proteins, our results suggest that MCM-BP may affect DNA replication in part by regulating MCM phosphorylation by DDK.

  6. Mixed-complexity artificial grammar learning in humans and macaque monkeys: evaluating learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin; Smith, Kenny; Petkov, Christopher I

    2015-03-01

    Artificial grammars (AG) can be used to generate rule-based sequences of stimuli. Some of these can be used to investigate sequence-processing computations in non-human animals that might be related to, but not unique to, human language. Previous AG learning studies in non-human animals have used different AGs to separately test for specific sequence-processing abilities. However, given that natural language and certain animal communication systems (in particular, song) have multiple levels of complexity, mixed-complexity AGs are needed to simultaneously evaluate sensitivity to the different features of the AG. Here, we tested humans and Rhesus macaques using a mixed-complexity auditory AG, containing both adjacent (local) and non-adjacent (longer-distance) relationships. Following exposure to exemplary sequences generated by the AG, humans and macaques were individually tested with sequences that were either consistent with the AG or violated specific adjacent or non-adjacent relationships. We observed a considerable level of cross-species correspondence in the sensitivity of both humans and macaques to the adjacent AG relationships and to the statistical properties of the sequences. We found no significant sensitivity to the non-adjacent AG relationships in the macaques. A subset of humans was sensitive to this non-adjacent relationship, revealing interesting between- and within-species differences in AG learning strategies. The results suggest that humans and macaques are largely comparably sensitive to the adjacent AG relationships and their statistical properties. However, in the presence of multiple cues to grammaticality, the non-adjacent relationships are less salient to the macaques and many of the humans. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The role of human performance in safe operation of complex plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, Irina Aida; Lazar, Roxana Elena; Croitoru, Cornelia

    1999-01-01

    According to statistics, about 20-30% from the failures occurring in plants are caused directly or indirectly by human errors. Furthermore, it was established that 10-15 percents of the global failures are related to the human errors. These are mainly due to the wrong actions, maintenance errors, and misinterpretation of instruments. The human performance is influenced by: professional ability, complexity and danger of the plant, experience in the same working place, level of skills, events in personal and/or professional life, discipline, social ambience and somatic health. The human performances assessment in the probabilistic safety assessment offers the possibility of evaluation for human contribution to the events sequences outcome. A human error may be recovered before the unwanted consequences had been occurred on system. This paper presents the possibilities to use the probabilistic methods (event tree, fault tree) to identify the solution for human reliability improvement in order to minimise the risk in industrial plant operation. Also, are defined the human error types and their causes and the 'decision tree method' is presented as technique in our analyses for human reliability assessment. The exemplification of human error analysis method was achieved based on operation data for Valcea heavy water pilot plant. (authors)

  8. Concordance of gene expression in human protein complexes reveals tissue specificity and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börnigen, Daniela; Pers, Tune Hannes; Thorrez, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing variants in human genes usually lead to phenotypes specific to only a few tissues. Here, we present a method for predicting tissue specificity based on quantitative deregulation of protein complexes. The underlying assumption is that the degree of coordinated expression among prot...

  9. A model of the human triceps surae muscle-tendon complex applied to jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; Huijing, Peter A.; van Ingen Schenau, Gerrit Jan

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain more insight into the behavior of the muscle-tendon complex of human m. triceps surae in jumping. During one-legged vertical jumps of ten subjects ground reaction forces as well as cinematographic data were registered, and electromyograms were recorded from m.

  10. Modelling of spatially complex human-ecosystem, rural-urban and rich-poor interactions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naude, AH

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper outlines the challenges of modelling and assessing spatially complex human-ecosystem interactions, and the need to simultaneously consider rural-urban and rich-poor interactions. The context for exploring these challenges is South Africa...

  11. Collaborative Educational Leadership: The Emergence of Human Interactional Sense-Making Process as a Complex System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäppinen, Aini-Kristiina

    2014-01-01

    The article aims at explicating the emergence of human interactional sense-making process within educational leadership as a complex system. The kind of leadership is understood as a holistic entity called collaborative leadership. There, sense-making emerges across interdependent domains, called attributes of collaborative leadership. The…

  12. Finding the molecular basis of complex genetic variation in humans and mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mott, Richard

    2006-01-01

    I survey the state of the art in complex trait analysis, including the use of new experimental and computational technologies and resources becoming available, and the challenges facing us. I also discuss how the prospects of rodent model systems compare with association mapping in humans.

  13. Impact of familiarity on information complexity in human-computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakaev Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative measure of information complexity remains very much desirable in HCI field, since it may aid in optimization of user interfaces, especially in human-computer systems for controlling complex objects. Our paper is dedicated to exploration of subjective (subject-depended aspect of the complexity, conceptualized as information familiarity. Although research of familiarity in human cognition and behaviour is done in several fields, the accepted models in HCI, such as Human Processor or Hick-Hyman’s law do not generally consider this issue. In our experimental study the subjects performed search and selection of digits and letters, whose familiarity was conceptualized as frequency of occurrence in numbers and texts. The analysis showed significant effect of information familiarity on selection time and throughput in regression models, although the R2 values were somehow low. Still, we hope that our results might aid in quantification of information complexity and its further application for optimizing interaction in human-machine systems.

  14. Quantification of spatial structure of human proximal tibial bone biopsies using 3D measures of complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saparin, Peter I.; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Prohaska, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    3D data sets of human tibia bone biopsies acquired by a micro-CT scanner. In order to justify the newly proposed approach, the measures of complexity of the bone architecture were compared with the results of traditional 2D bone histomorphometry. The proposed technique is able to quantify...

  15. Complexities in human herpesvirus-6A and -6B binding to host cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon Metz; Höllsberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A and -6B uses the cellular receptor CD46 for fusion and infection of the host cell. The viral glycoprotein complex gH-gL from HHV-6A binds to the short consensus repeat 2 and 3 in CD46. Although all the major isoforms of CD46 bind the virus, certain isoforms may have higher...

  16. Multi-view 3D Human Pose Estimation in Complex Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, K.M.; Gavrila, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a framework for unconstrained 3D human upper body pose estimation from multiple camera views in complex environment. Its main novelty lies in the integration of three components: single-frame pose recovery, temporal integration and model texture adaptation. Single-frame pose recovery

  17. History matching of a complex epidemiological model of human immunodeficiency virus transmission by using variance emulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianakis, I; Vernon, I; McCreesh, N; McKinley, T J; Oakley, J E; Nsubuga, R N; Goldstein, M; White, R G

    2017-08-01

    Complex stochastic models are commonplace in epidemiology, but their utility depends on their calibration to empirical data. History matching is a (pre)calibration method that has been applied successfully to complex deterministic models. In this work, we adapt history matching to stochastic models, by emulating the variance in the model outputs, and therefore accounting for its dependence on the model's input values. The method proposed is applied to a real complex epidemiological model of human immunodeficiency virus in Uganda with 22 inputs and 18 outputs, and is found to increase the efficiency of history matching, requiring 70% of the time and 43% fewer simulator evaluations compared with a previous variant of the method. The insight gained into the structure of the human immunodeficiency virus model, and the constraints placed on it, are then discussed.

  18. Complex Host Genetics Influence the Microbiome in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    specific bacterial taxa. Methods Ethics and consent This study was approved by the Partners Human Re- search Committee, 116 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA...microbial ecology . Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2005, 102:11070–11075. 17. Hashimoto T, Perlot T, Rehman A, Trichereau J, Ishiguro H, Paolino M, Sigl V...JM: ACE2 links amino acid malnutrition to microbial ecology and intestinal inflammation. Nature 2012, 487:477–481. 18. Cortes A, Brown MA: Promise and

  19. Does human migration affect international trade? A complex-network perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Fagiolo

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationships between international human migration and merchandise trade, using a complex-network approach. We firstly compare the topological structure of worldwide networks of human migration and bilateral trade over the period 1960-2000. Next, we ask whether the position of any pair of countries in the migration network affects their bilateral trade flows. We show that: (i both weighted and binary versions of the networks of international migration and trade are strongly correlated; (ii such correlations can be mostly explained by country economic/demographic size and geographical distance; and (iii pairs of countries that are more central in the international-migration network trade more. Our findings suggest that bilateral trade between any two countries is not only affected by the presence of migrants from either countries but also by their relative embeddedness in the complex web of corridors making up the network of international human migration.

  20. Does human migration affect international trade? A complex-network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiolo, Giorgio; Mastrorillo, Marina

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships between international human migration and merchandise trade, using a complex-network approach. We firstly compare the topological structure of worldwide networks of human migration and bilateral trade over the period 1960-2000. Next, we ask whether the position of any pair of countries in the migration network affects their bilateral trade flows. We show that: (i) both weighted and binary versions of the networks of international migration and trade are strongly correlated; (ii) such correlations can be mostly explained by country economic/demographic size and geographical distance; and (iii) pairs of countries that are more central in the international-migration network trade more. Our findings suggest that bilateral trade between any two countries is not only affected by the presence of migrants from either countries but also by their relative embeddedness in the complex web of corridors making up the network of international human migration.

  1. Early modern human diversity suggests subdivided population structure and a complex out-of-Africa scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunz, Philipp; Bookstein, Fred L.; Mitteroecker, Philipp; Stadlmayr, Andrea; Seidler, Horst; Weber, Gerhard W.

    2009-01-01

    The interpretation of genetic evidence regarding modern human origins depends, among other things, on assessments of the structure and the variation of ancient populations. Because we lack genetic data from the time when the first anatomically modern humans appeared, between 200,000 and 60,000 years ago, instead we exploit the phenotype of neurocranial geometry to compare the variation in early modern human fossils with that in other groups of fossil Homo and recent modern humans. Variation is assessed as the mean-squared Procrustes distance from the group average shape in a representation based on several hundred neurocranial landmarks and semilandmarks. We find that the early modern group has more shape variation than any other group in our sample, which covers 1.8 million years, and that they are morphologically similar to recent modern humans of diverse geographically dispersed populations but not to archaic groups. Of the currently competing models of modern human origins, some are inconsistent with these findings. Rather than a single out-of-Africa dispersal scenario, we suggest that early modern humans were already divided into different populations in Pleistocene Africa, after which there followed a complex migration pattern. Our conclusions bear implications for the inference of ancient human demography from genetic models and emphasize the importance of focusing research on those early modern humans, in particular, in Africa. PMID:19307568

  2. Three-dimensional structure of a pre-catalytic human spliceosomal complex B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Daniel; Makarov, Evgeny M; Sander, Bjoern; Makarova, Olga V; Kastner, Berthold; Lührmann, Reinhard; Stark, Holger

    2004-05-01

    Major structural changes occur in the spliceosome during its transition from the fully assembled complex B to the catalytically activated spliceosome. To understand the rearrangement, it is necessary to know the detailed three-dimensional structures of these complexes. Here, we have immunoaffinity-purified human spliceosomes (designated B Delta U1) at a stage after U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP integration but before activation, and have determined the three-dimensional structure of B Delta U1 by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy at a resolution of approximately 40 A. The overall size of the complex is about 370 x 270 x 170 A. The three-dimensional structure features a roughly triangular body linked to a head domain in variable orientations. The body is very similar in size and shape to the isolated U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP. This provides initial insight into the structural organization of complex B.

  3. Ontogeny of neuro-insular complexes and islets innervation in the human pancreas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E. Proshchina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ontogeny of the neuro-insular complexes (NIC and the islets innervation in human pancreas has not been studied in detail. Our aim was to describe the developmental dynamics and distribution of the nervous system structures in the endocrine part of human pancreas. We used doublestaining with antibodies specific to pan-neural markers (neuron-specific enolase (NSE and S100 protein and to hormones of pancreatic endocrine cells. NSE and S100-positive nerves and ganglia were identified in the human fetal pancreas from gestation week (gw 10 onwards. Later the density of S100 and NSE-positive fibers increased. In adults this network was sparse. The islets innervation started to form from gw 14. NSE-containing endocrine cells were identified from gw 12 onwards. Additionally, S100-positive cells were detected both in the periphery and within some of the islets starting at gw 14. The analysis of islets innervation has shown that the fetal pancreas contained neuro-insular complexes and the number of these complexes was reduced in adults. The highest density of neuro-insular complexes is detected during middle and late fetal periods, when the mosaic islets, typical for adults, form. The close integration between the developing pancreatic islets and the nervous system structures may play an important role not only in the hormone secretion, but also in the islets morphogenesis.

  4. The Driving Forces of Cultural Complexity : Neanderthals, Modern Humans, and the Question of Population Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Laurel; Wakano, Joe Yuichiro; Feldman, Marcus W; Aoki, Kenichi

    2017-03-01

    The forces driving cultural accumulation in human populations, both modern and ancient, are hotly debated. Did genetic, demographic, or cognitive features of behaviorally modern humans (as opposed to, say, early modern humans or Neanderthals) allow culture to accumulate to its current, unprecedented levels of complexity? Theoretical explanations for patterns of accumulation often invoke demographic factors such as population size or density, whereas statistical analyses of variation in cultural complexity often point to the importance of environmental factors such as food stability, in determining cultural complexity. Here we use both an analytical model and an agent-based simulation model to show that a full understanding of the emergence of behavioral modernity, and the cultural evolution that has followed, depends on understanding and untangling the complex relationships among culture, genetically determined cognitive ability, and demographic history. For example, we show that a small but growing population could have a different number of cultural traits from a shrinking population with the same absolute number of individuals in some circumstances.

  5. Current theoretical models fail to predict the topological complexity of the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier eArsuaga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the folding of the human genome is a key challenge of modern structural biology. The emergence of chromatin conformation capture assays ({it e.g.} Hi-C has revolutionized chromosome biology and provided new insights into the three dimensional structure of the genome. The experimental data are highly complex and need to be analyzed with quantitative tools. It has been argued that the data obtained from Hi-C assays are consistent with a fractal organization of the genome. A key characteristic textcolor{red}{of the fractal globule} is the lack of topological complexity (knotting or inter-linking. However, the absence of topological complexity contradicts results from polymer physics showing that the entanglement of long linear polymers in a confined volume increases rapidly with the length and with decreasing volume. textcolor{red}{{it In vivo} and {it in vitro} assays support this claim in some biological systems. We simulate knotted lattice polygons confined inside a sphere and demonstrate that their contact frequencies agree with the human Hi-C data.} We conclude that the topological complexity of the human genome cannot be inferred from current Hi-C data.

  6. Human practice in the life cycle of complex systems. Challenges and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuutinen, M.; Luoma, J.

    2005-12-01

    This book describes the current and near future challenges in work and traffic environments in light of the rapid technology development. It focuses on the following domains: road and vessel traffic, nuclear power production, automatic mining, steel factory and the pulp and paper industry. Each example concerns complex technical systems where human practice and behaviour has an important role for the safety, efficiency and productivity of the system. The articles illustrate the enormous field of human-related research when considering the design, validation, implementation, operation and maintenance of complex sociotechnical systems. Nevertheless, these 14 chapters are only examples of the range of questions related to the issue. The authors of the book are VTT experts in work or traffic psychology and research, system usability, risk and safety analysis, virtual environments and they have experience in studying different domains. This book is an attempt to open up the complex world of human-technology interaction for readers facing practical problems with complex systems. It is aimed to help a technical or organisational designer, a policy-maker, an expert or 'a user', the one who works or lives within the technology. (orig.)

  7. Understanding complexities in coupled dynamics of human-water and food security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, M.; Kondal, A.; Lin, L.; Colwell, R. R.; Jutla, A.

    2017-12-01

    Traditional premise of food security is associated with satisfying human hunger by providing sufficient calories to population. Water is the key variable associated with the growth of crops, which is then used as a metric of success for abundance of food across globe. The current framework often negates complex coupled interaction between availability of food nutrients and human well-being (such as productivity, work efficiency, low birth weight, physical and mental growth). Our analysis suggests that 1 in 3 humans suffer from malnutrition across the globe. In last five decades, most of the countries have a decreasing availability trend in at least one of the twenty-three essential food nutrients required for human well-being. We argue that food security can only be achieved if information on use of water for crops and consumption of food must include availability of nutrients for humans. Here, we propose a new concept of "consumptive nutrients" that include constant feedback mechanism between water-human and societal processes- essential for growth, distribution and consumption of food nutrients. Using Ethiopia as a signature rain-fed agricultural region, we will show how decreasing precipitation has led to an increase in crop productivity, but decreased availability of nutrients for humans. This in turn has destabilizing impact on overall regional economy. We will demonstrate why inclusion of nutrients must be a part of discussion for ensuring food security to human population.

  8. The human cap-binding complex is functionally connected to the nuclear RNA exosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Refsing; Domanski, Michal; Kristiansen, Maiken Søndergaard

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear processing and quality control of eukaryotic RNA is mediated by the RNA exosome, which is regulated by accessory factors. However, the mechanism of exosome recruitment to its ribonucleoprotein (RNP) targets remains poorly understood. Here we report a physical link between the human exosome...... and the cap-binding complex (CBC). The CBC associates with the ARS2 protein to form CBC-ARS2 (CBCA) and then further connects, together with the ZC3H18 protein, to the nuclear exosome targeting (NEXT) complex, thus forming CBC-NEXT (CBCN). RNA immunoprecipitation using CBCN factors as well as the analysis...

  9. The major histocompatibility complex and perfumers' descriptions of human body odors

    OpenAIRE

    Wedekind, C.; Escher, S.; Van de Waal, M.; Frei, E.

    2007-01-01

    The MHC (major histocompatibility complex) is a group of genes that play a crucial role in immune recognition and in tolerance of tissue grafting. The MHC has also been found to influence body odors, body odor preferences, and mate choice in mice and humans. Here we test whether verbal descriptions of human body odors can be linked to the MHC. We asked 45 male students to live as odor neutral as possible for two consecutive days and to wear a T-shirt during the nights. The odors of these T-sh...

  10. Distinguishing humans from computers in the game of go: A complex network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquidé, C.; Georgeot, B.; Giraud, O.

    2017-08-01

    We compare complex networks built from the game of go and obtained from databases of human-played games with those obtained from computer-played games. Our investigations show that statistical features of the human-based networks and the computer-based networks differ, and that these differences can be statistically significant on a relatively small number of games using specific estimators. We show that the deterministic or stochastic nature of the computer algorithm playing the game can also be distinguished from these quantities. This can be seen as a tool to implement a Turing-like test for go simulators.

  11. Cognitive human reliability analysis for an assessment of the safety significance of complex transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amico, P.J.; Hsu, C.J.; Youngblood, R.W.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that as part of a probabilistic assessment of the safety significance of complex transients at certain PWR power plants, it was necessary to perform a cognitive human reliability analysis. To increase the confidence in the results, it was desirable to make use of actual observations of operator response which were available for the assessment. An approach was developed which incorporated these observations into the human cognitive reliability (HCR) modeling approach. The results obtained provided additional insights over what would have been found using other approaches. These insights were supported by the observations, and it is suggested that this approach be considered for use in future probabilistic safety assessments

  12. Better decision making in complex, dynamic tasks training with human-facilitated interactive learning environments

    CERN Document Server

    Qudrat-Ullah, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes interactive learning environments (ILEs) and their underlying concepts. It explains how ILEs can be used to improve the decision-making process and how these improvements can be empirically verified. The objective of this book is to enhance our understanding of and to gain insights into the process by which human facilitated ILEs are effectively designed and used in improving users’ decision making in complex, dynamic tasks. This book is divided into four major parts. Part I serves as an introduction to the importance and complexity of decision making in dynamic tasks. Part II provides background material, drawing upon relevant literature, for the development of an integrated process model on the effectiveness of human facilitated ILEs in improving decision making in dynamic tasks. Part III focuses on the design, development, and application of FishBankILE in laboratory experiments to gather empirical evidence for the validity of the process model. Finally, part IV presents a comprehensi...

  13. Cytotoxicity of Diimine Palladium (II) Complexes of Alkyldithiocarbamate Derivatives on Human Lung, Ovary and Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, Narges; Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Nakhjavan, Maryam; H Shirazi, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    Three new Complexes of formula [pd(bpy)(R-NH-CSS)] Cl (where bpy is 2/2'- bipyridine, and R-NH-CSS is butylamine, hexylamine- and octyamine-dithiocabamate anion) have been synthesized by University of Sistan and Blachostan. These complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic methods such as ultraviolet-visible, infrared and (1)H-NMR as well as conductivity measurements and chemical analysis. In these complexes, each of the dithiocarbamate ligands coordinates to Pd (II) center as bidentate with two sulfur atoms. We have found a 1:1 electrolyte in water conductivity test for the above mentioned compounds. To measure the biologic activity and potential anticancer efficacy of these compounds, they have been compared with cisplatin and its palladium analogue of [Pd (NH3)2 Cl2] on three different cell lines of human hepatocarcinoma HepG2, human ovarian carcinoma OV2008, and human lung adenocarcinoma A549. Clonogenic assay has shown LD50s in the range of 0.131±0.025 to 0.934 ± 0.194 for these compounds on above cell lines. In comparison, cisplatin has shown LD50s of 0.838 ± 0.074, 2.196 ± 0.220, and 2.799 ± 0.733 on OV2008, HepG2 and A549 cell lines, respectively. As a conclusion, above three new complexes have shown higher cytotoxicities compared to cisplatin on three different human cell lines. Based on biological tests, these compounds may potentially be considered as good anticancer candidates for further pharmacological studies.

  14. Mechanical properties of the normal human cartilage-bone complex in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Dalstra, M; Linde, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the age-related variations in the mechanical properties of the normal human tibial cartilage-bone complex and the relationships between cartilage and bone. DESIGN: A novel technique was applied to assess the mechanical properties of the cartilage and bone by mea...... that are of importance for the understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of degenerative joint diseases, such as arthrosis....

  15. Validating cognitive support for operators of complex human-machine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.; Wachtel, J.

    1995-01-01

    Modem nuclear power plants (NPPs) are complex systems whose performance is the result of an intricate interaction of human and system control. A complex system may be defined as one which supports a dynamic process involving a large number of elements that interact in many different ways. Safety is addressed through defense-in-depth design and preplanning; i.e., designers consider the types of failures that are most likely to occur and those of high consequence, and design their solutions in advance. However, complex interactions and their failure modes cannot always be anticipated by the designer and may be unfamiliar to plant personnel. These situations may pose cognitive demands on plant personnel, both individually and as a crew. Other factors may contribute to the cognitive challenges of NPP operation as well, including hierarchal processes, dynamic pace, system redundancy and reliability, and conflicting objectives. These factors are discussed in this paper

  16. Saving Human Lives: What Complexity Science and Information Systems can Contribute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbing, Dirk; Brockmann, Dirk; Chadefaux, Thomas; Donnay, Karsten; Blanke, Ulf; Woolley-Meza, Olivia; Moussaid, Mehdi; Johansson, Anders; Krause, Jens; Schutte, Sebastian; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-02-01

    We discuss models and data of crowd disasters, crime, terrorism, war and disease spreading to show that conventional recipes, such as deterrence strategies, are often not effective and sufficient to contain them. Many common approaches do not provide a good picture of the actual system behavior, because they neglect feedback loops, instabilities and cascade effects. The complex and often counter-intuitive behavior of social systems and their macro-level collective dynamics can be better understood by means of complexity science. We highlight that a suitable system design and management can help to stop undesirable cascade effects and to enable favorable kinds of self-organization in the system. In such a way, complexity science can help to save human lives.

  17. Complexity and dynamics of switched human balance control during quiet standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Salam; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Loram, Ian

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we use a combination of numerical simulations, time series analysis, and complexity measures to investigate the dynamics of switched systems with noise, which are often used as models of human balance control during quiet standing. We link the results with complexity measures found in experimental data of human sway motion during quiet standing. The control model ensuring balance, which we use, is based on an act-and-wait control concept, that is, a human controller is switched on when a certain sway angle is reached. Otherwise, there is no active control present. Given a time series data, we determine how does it look a typical pattern of control strategy in our model system. We detect the switched nonlinearity in the system using a frequency analysis method in the absence of noise. We also analyse the effect of time delay on the existence of limit cycles in the system in the absence of noise. We perform the entropy and detrended fluctuation analyses in view of linking the switchings (and the dead zone) with the occurrences of complexity in the model system in the presence of noise. Finally, we perform the entropy and detrended fluctuation analyses on experimental data and link the results with numerical findings in our model example.

  18. Human practice in the life cycle of complex systems. Challenges and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuutinen, M. (ed.) [VTT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland); Luoma, J. (ed.) [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-12-15

    This book describes the current and near future challenges in work and traffic environments in light of the rapid technology development. It focuses on the following domains: road and vessel traffic, nuclear power production, automatic mining, steel factory and the pulp and paper industry. Each example concerns complex technical systems where human practice and behaviour has an important role for the safety, efficiency and productivity of the system. The articles illustrate the enormous field of humanrelated research when considering the design, validation, implementation, operation and maintenance of complex sociotechnical systems. Nevertheless, these 14 chapters are only examples of the range of questions related to the issue. The authors of the book are VTT experts in work or traffic psychology and research, system usability, risk and safety analysis, virtual environments and they have experience in studying different domains. This book is an attempt to open up the complex world of human-technology interaction for readers facing practical problems with complex systems. It is aimed to help a technical or organisational designer, a policy- maker, an expert or a user, the one who works or lives within the technology. (orig.)

  19. Parkin Mutations Reduce the Complexity of Neuronal Processes in iPSC-derived Human Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yong; Jiang, Houbo; Hu, Zhixing; Fan, Kevin; Wang, Jun; Janoschka, Stephen; Wang, Xiaomin; Ge, Shaoyu; Feng, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons and non-DA neurons in many parts of the brain. Mutations of parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that strongly binds to microtubules, are the most frequent cause of recessively inherited Parkinson’s disease. The lack of robust PD phenotype in parkin knockout mice suggests a unique vulnerability of human neurons to parkin mutations. Here, we show that the complexity of neuronal processes as measured by total neurite length, number of terminals, number of branch points and Sholl analysis, was greatly reduced in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived TH+ or TH− neurons from PD patients with parkin mutations. Consistent with these, microtubule stability was significantly decreased by parkin mutations in iPSC-derived neurons. Overexpression of parkin, but not its PD-linked mutant nor GFP, restored the complexity of neuronal processes and the stability of microtubules. Consistent with these, the microtubule-depolymerizing agent colchicine mimicked the effect of parkin mutations by decreasing neurite length and complexity in control neurons while the microtubule-stabilizing drug taxol mimicked the effect of parkin overexpression by enhancing the morphology of parkin-deficient neurons. The results suggest that parkin maintains the morphological complexity of human neurons by stabilizing microtubules. PMID:25332110

  20. Neurochemical dynamics of acute orofacial pain in the human trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Nuno M P; Hock, Andreas; Wyss, Michael; Ettlin, Dominik A; Brügger, Mike

    2017-11-15

    The trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex is the first central relay structure mediating orofacial somatosensory and nociceptive perception. Animal studies suggest a substantial involvement of neurochemical alterations at such basal CNS levels in acute and chronic pain processing. Translating this animal based knowledge to humans is challenging. Human related examining of brainstem functions are challenged by MR related peculiarities as well as applicability aspects of experimentally standardized paradigms. Based on our experience with an MR compatible human orofacial pain model, the aims of the present study were twofold: 1) from a technical perspective, the evaluation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T regarding measurement accuracy of neurochemical profiles in this small brainstem nuclear complex and 2) the examination of possible neurochemical alterations induced by an experimental orofacial pain model. Data from 13 healthy volunteers aged 19-46 years were analyzed and revealed high quality spectra with significant reductions in total N-acetylaspartate (N-acetylaspartate + N-acetylaspartylglutamate) (-3.7%, p = 0.009) and GABA (-10.88%, p = 0.041) during the pain condition. These results might reflect contributions of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate in neuronal activity-dependent physiologic processes and/or excitatory neurotransmission, whereas changes in GABA might indicate towards a reduction in tonic GABAergic functioning during nociceptive signaling. Summarized, the present study indicates the applicability of 1 H-MRS to obtain neurochemical dynamics within the human trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. Further developments are needed to pave the way towards bridging important animal based knowledge with human research to understand the neurochemistry of orofacial nociception and pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biochemical reconstitution and phylogenetic comparison of human SET1 family core complexes involved in histone methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Monteith, Kelsey E; Viggiano, Susan; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2015-03-06

    Mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) is a member of the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases that are required for metazoan development. MLL1 is the best characterized human SET1 family member, which includes MLL1-4 and SETd1A/B. MLL1 assembles with WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, DPY-30 (WRAD) to form the MLL1 core complex, which is required for H3K4 dimethylation and transcriptional activation. Because all SET1 family proteins interact with WRAD in vivo, it is hypothesized they are regulated by similar mechanisms. However, recent evidence suggests differences among family members that may reflect unique regulatory inputs in the cell. Missing is an understanding of the intrinsic enzymatic activities of different SET1 family complexes under standard conditions. In this investigation, we reconstituted each human SET1 family core complex and compared subunit assembly and enzymatic activities. We found that in the absence of WRAD, all but one SET domain catalyzes at least weak H3K4 monomethylation. In the presence of WRAD, all SET1 family members showed stimulated monomethyltransferase activity but differed in their di- and trimethylation activities. We found that these differences are correlated with evolutionary lineage, suggesting these enzyme complexes have evolved to accomplish unique tasks within metazoan genomes. To understand the structural basis for these differences, we employed a "phylogenetic scanning mutagenesis" assay and identified a cluster of amino acid substitutions that confer a WRAD-dependent gain-of-function dimethylation activity on complexes assembled with the MLL3 or Drosophila trithorax proteins. These results form the basis for understanding how WRAD differentially regulates SET1 family complexes in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Crystal structure of a complex of human chymase with its benzimidazole derived inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki; Kakuda, Shinji; Koizumi, Masahiro; Mizuno, Tsuyoshi; Muroga, Yumiko; Kawamura, Takashi; Takimoto-Kamimura, Midori

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of human chymase complexed with a novel benzimidazole inhibitor, TJK002, was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The present study shows that the benzimidazole ring of the inhibitor takes the stable stacking interaction with the protonated His57 in the catalytic domain of human chymase. The crystal structure of human chymase complexed with a novel benzimidazole inhibitor, TJK002, was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The X-ray crystallographic study shows that the benzimidazole inhibitor forms a non-covalent interaction with the catalytic domain of human chymase. The hydrophobic fragment of the inhibitor occupies the S1 pocket. The carboxylic acid group of the inhibitor forms hydrogen bonds with the imidazole N(∊) atom of His57 and/or the O(γ) atom of Ser195 which are members of the catalytic triad. This imidazole ring of His57 induces π–π stacking to the benzene ring of the benzimidazole scaffold as P2 moiety. Fragment molecular orbital calculation of the atomic coordinates by X-ray crystallography shows that this imidazole ring of His57 could be protonated with the carboxyl group of Asp102 or hydroxyl group of Ser195 and the stacking interaction is stabilized. A new drug design strategy is proposed where the stacking to the protonated imidazole of the drug target protein with the benzimidazole scaffold inhibitor causes unpredicted potent inhibitory activity for some enzymes

  3. Aviation Safety: Modeling and Analyzing Complex Interactions between Humans and Automated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungta, Neha; Brat, Guillaume; Clancey, William J.; Linde, Charlotte; Raimondi, Franco; Seah, Chin; Shafto, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The on-going transformation from the current US Air Traffic System (ATS) to the Next Generation Air Traffic System (NextGen) will force the introduction of new automated systems and most likely will cause automation to migrate from ground to air. This will yield new function allocations between humans and automation and therefore change the roles and responsibilities in the ATS. Yet, safety in NextGen is required to be at least as good as in the current system. We therefore need techniques to evaluate the safety of the interactions between humans and automation. We think that current human factor studies and simulation-based techniques will fall short in front of the ATS complexity, and that we need to add more automated techniques to simulations, such as model checking, which offers exhaustive coverage of the non-deterministic behaviors in nominal and off-nominal scenarios. In this work, we present a verification approach based both on simulations and on model checking for evaluating the roles and responsibilities of humans and automation. Models are created using Brahms (a multi-agent framework) and we show that the traditional Brahms simulations can be integrated with automated exploration techniques based on model checking, thus offering a complete exploration of the behavioral space of the scenario. Our formal analysis supports the notion of beliefs and probabilities to reason about human behavior. We demonstrate the technique with the Ueberligen accident since it exemplifies authority problems when receiving conflicting advices from human and automated systems.

  4. Characterization of solubilized human and rat brain US -endorphin-receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmeste, D.M.; Li, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been solubilized from human striatal and rat whole-brain membranes by use of 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Tritiated human US -endorphin (TH-US /sub h/-EP) binding revealed high-affinity competition by morphine, naloxone, and various US -EP analogues. Lack of high-affinity competition by (+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl)benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate (U50-488, Upjohn) indicated that k sites were not labeled by TH-US -/sub h/-EP under these conditions. Affinities were similar in both soluble and membrane preparations except for (Met)enkephalin, which appears to be rapidly degraded by the solubilized extract. Size differences between human and rat solubilized TH-US /sub h/-EP-receptor complexes were revealed by exclusion chromatography.

  5. Nuclear pore complex protein mediated nuclear localization of dicer protein in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinari Ando

    Full Text Available Human DICER1 protein cleaves double-stranded RNA into small sizes, a crucial step in production of single-stranded RNAs which are mediating factors of cytoplasmic RNA interference. Here, we clearly demonstrate that human DICER1 protein localizes not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleoplasm. We also find that human DICER1 protein associates with the NUP153 protein, one component of the nuclear pore complex. This association is detected predominantly in the cytoplasm but is also clearly distinguishable at the nuclear periphery. Additional characterization of the NUP153-DICER1 association suggests NUP153 plays a crucial role in the nuclear localization of the DICER1 protein.

  6. Prediction of Complex Human Traits Using the Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Predictor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Vazquez, Ana I; Fernando, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    Despite important advances from Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS), for most complex human traits and diseases, a sizable proportion of genetic variance remains unexplained and prediction accuracy (PA) is usually low. Evidence suggests that PA can be improved using Whole-Genome Regression (WGR......) models where phenotypes are regressed on hundreds of thousands of variants simultaneously. The Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Prediction G-BLUP, a ridge-regression type method) is a commonly used WGR method and has shown good predictive performance when applied to plant and animal breeding populations....... However, breeding and human populations differ greatly in a number of factors that can affect the predictive performance of G-BLUP. Using theory, simulations, and real data analysis, we study the erformance of G-BLUP when applied to data from related and unrelated human subjects. Under perfect linkage...

  7. [The evolution of human cultural behavior: notes on Darwinism and complexity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric, Mikael; Murrieta, Rui Sérgio Sereni

    2015-12-01

    The article analyzes three schools that can be understood as central in studies of the evolution of human behavior within the paradigm of evolution by natural selection: human behavioral ecology (HBE), evolutionary psychology, and dual inheritance. These three streams of thought are used to depict the Darwinist landscape and pinpoint its strong suits and limitations. Theoretical gaps were identified that seem to reduce these schools' ability to account for the diversity of human evolutionary behavior. Their weak points include issues related to the concept of reproductive success, types of adaptation, and targets of selection. An interdisciplinary approach is proposed as the solution to this dilemma, where complex adaptive systems would serve as a source.

  8. The complexity of the calretinin-expressing progenitors in the human cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevena V Radonjic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The complex structure and function of the cerebral cortex critically depend on the balance of excitation and inhibition provided by the pyramidal projection neurons and GABAergic interneurons, respectively. The calretinin-expressing (CalR+ cell is a subtype of GABAergic cortical interneurons that is more prevalent in humans than in rodents. In rodents, CalR+ interneurons originate in the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE from Gsx2+ progenitors, but in humans it has been suggested that a subpopulation of CalR+ cells can also be generated in the cortical ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ. The progenitors for cortically generated CalR+ subpopulation in primates are not yet characterized. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify patterns of expression of the transcription factors (TFs that commit cortical stem cells to the CalR fate, with a focus on Gsx2. First, we studied the expression of Gsx2 and its downstream effectors, Ascl1 and Sp8 in the cortical regions of the fetal human forebrain at midgestation. Next, we established that a subpopulation of cells expressing these TFs are proliferating in the cortical SVZ, and can be co-labeled with CalR. The presence and proliferation of Gsx2+ cells, not only in the ventral telencephalon (GE as previously reported, but also in the cerebral cortex suggests cortical origin of a subpopulation of CalR+ neurons in humans. In vitro treatment of human cortical progenitors with Sonic hedgehog (Shh, an important morphogen in the specification of interneurons, decreased levels of Ascl1 and Sp8 proteins, but did not affect Gsx2 levels. Taken together, our ex-vivo and in vitro results on human fetal brain suggest complex endogenous and exogenous regulation of TFs implied in the specification of different subtypes of CalR+ cortical interneurons.

  9. Complexities in human herpesvirus-6A and -6B binding to host cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Simon Metz; Hoellsberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A and -6B uses the cellular receptor CD46 for fusion and infection of the host cell. The viral glycoprotein complex gH-gL from HHV-6A binds to the short consensus repeat 2 and 3 in CD46. Although all the major isoforms of CD46 bind the virus, certain isoforms may have higher affinity than others for the virus. Within recent years, elucidation of the viral complex has identified additional HHV-6A and -6B specific glycoproteins. Thus, gH-gL associates with a gQ1-gQ2 dimer to form a heterotetrameric complex. In addition, a novel complex consisting of gH-gL-gO has been described that does not bind CD46. Accumulating evidence suggests that an additional HHV-6A and -6B receptor exists. The previous simple picture of HHV-6A/B-host cell contact therefore includes more layers of complexities on both the viral and the host cell side of the interaction

  10. Structure of the active form of human origin recognition complex and its ATPase motor module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocilj, Ante; On, Kin Fan; Yuan, Zuanning; Sun, Jingchuan; Elkayam, Elad; Li, Huilin; Stillman, Bruce; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2017-01-23

    Binding of the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) to origins of replication marks the first step in the initiation of replication of the genome in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the structure of the active form of human ORC determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. The complex is composed of an ORC1/4/5 motor module lobe in an organization reminiscent of the DNA polymerase clamp loader complexes. A second lobe contains the ORC2/3 subunits. The complex is organized as a double-layered shallow corkscrew, with the AAA+ and AAA+-like domains forming one layer, and the winged-helix domains (WHDs) forming a top layer. CDC6 fits easily between ORC1 and ORC2, completing the ring and the DNA-binding channel, forming an additional ATP hydrolysis site. Analysis of the ATPase activity of the complex provides a basis for understanding ORC activity as well as molecular defects observed in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome mutations.

  11. Crystal structure of the human 4-1BB/4-1BBL complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, Ryan N; Oganesyan, Vaheh Y; Amdouni, Hamza; Novarra, Shabazz; Grinberg, Luba; Barnes, Arnita; Baca, Manuel

    2018-05-02

    4-1BBL is a member of the TNF superfamily and is the ligand for the TNFRsuperfamily receptor, 4-1BB. 4-1BB plays an immunomodulatory role in T cells and NK cells and agonists of this receptor have garnered strong attention as potentialimmunotherapy agents. Broadly speaking, the structural features of TNF superfamilymembers, their receptors and ligand/receptor complexes are similar. However, apublished crystal structure of human 4-1BBL suggests that it may be unique in thisregard, exhibiting a three-bladed propeller-like trimer assembly that is distinctly different from that observed in other family members. This unusual structure also suggests that the human 4-1BB/4-1BBL complex may be structurally unique within the TNF/TNFR superfamily, but to date no structural data have been reported. Here we report the crystal structure of the human 4-1BB/4-1BBL complex at 2.4 Å resolution. In this structure, 4-1BBL does not adopt the unusual trimer assembly previously reported, but instead forms a canonical bell-shaped trimer typical of other TNF superfamily members. The structure of 4-1BB is also largely canonical as is the 4-1BB/4-1BBL complex. Mutational data support the 4-1BBL structure reported here as being biologically relevant, suggesting that the previously reported structure is not. Together, the data presented here offer insight into structure/function relationships in the 4-1BB/4-1BBL system and improve our structural understanding of the TNF/TNFR superfamily more broadly. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Lateral gene transfer of an ABC transporter complex between major constituents of the human gut microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meehan Conor J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several links have been established between the human gut microbiome and conditions such as obesity and inflammatory bowel syndrome. This highlights the importance of understanding what properties of the gut microbiome can affect the health of the human host. Studies have been undertaken to determine the species composition of this microbiome and infer functional profiles associated with such host properties. However, lateral gene transfer (LGT between community members may result in misleading taxonomic attributions for the recipient organisms, thus making species-function links difficult to establish. Results We identified a peptides/nickel transport complex whose components differed in abundance based upon levels of host obesity, and assigned the encoded proteins to members of the microbial community. Each protein was assigned to several distinct taxonomic groups, with moderate levels of agreement observed among different proteins in the complex. Phylogenetic trees of these proteins produced clusters that differed greatly from taxonomic attributions and indicated that habitat-directed LGT of this complex is likely to have occurred, though not always between the same partners. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that certain membrane transport systems may be an important factor within an obese-associated gut microbiome and that such complexes may be acquired several times by different strains of the same species. Additionally, an example of individual proteins from different organisms being transferred into one operon was observed, potentially demonstrating a functional complex despite the donors of the subunits being taxonomically disparate. Our results also highlight the potential impact of habitat-directed LGT on the resident microbiota.

  13. Multistructure index in revealing complexity of regulatory mechanisms of human cardiovascular system at rest and orthostatic stress in healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiec, Danuta; Graff, Beata; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2017-02-01

    Biological regulation is sufficiently complex to pose an enduring challenge for characterization of both its equilibrium and transient non-equilibrium dynamics. Two univariate but coupled observables, heart rate and systolic blood pressure, are commonly characterized in the benchmark example of the human cardiovascular regulatory system. Asymmetric distributions of accelerations and decelerations of heart rate, as well as rises and falls in systolic blood pressure, recorded in humans during a head-up tilt test provide insights into the dynamics of cardiovascular response to a rapid, controlled deregulation of the system's homeostasis. The baroreflex feedback loop is assumed to be the fundamental physiological mechanism for ensuring homeostatic blood supply to distant organs at rest and during orthostatic stress, captured in a classical beat-to-beat autoregressive model of baroreflex by de Boer et al. (1987). For model corroboration, a multistructure index statistic is proposed, seamlessly evaluating the size spectrum of magnitudes of neural reflexes such as baroreflex, responsible for maintaining the homeostatic dynamics. The multistructure index exposes a distinctly different dynamics of multiscale asymmetry between results obtained from real-life signals recorded from healthy subjects and those simulated using both the classical and perturbed versions of the model. Nonlinear effects observed suggest the pronounced presence of complex mechanisms resulting from baroreflex regulation when a human is at rest, which is aggravated in the system's response to orthostatic stress. Using our methodology of multistructure index, we therefore show a marked difference between model and real-life scenarios, which we attribute to multiscale asymmetry of non-linear origin in real-life signals, which we are not reproducible by the classical model.

  14. Colloque S&T Symposium 2008: Understanding the Human Dimension in 21st Century Conflict/Warfare: The Complexities of Human-with-Human Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    intentionally left blank. DRDC Corporate TR [2008-004] v Executive summary Colloque S&T Symposium 2008: The Complexities of Human...mettaient en jeu notre capacité ou notre incapacité de déterminer le prochain choc radical et la manière dont la communauté y réagit. Il a aussi...iii Executive summary

  15. STARS experiential group intervention: a complex trauma treatment approach for survivors of human trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Elizabeth K; Azar, Naomi; Bhattacharyya, Sriya; Malebranche, Dominique A; Brennan, Kelsey E

    2018-01-01

    This is the abstract that was submitted online with the paper: Despite the fact that many survivors of human trafficking have experienced complex trauma, there are no established interventions designed to specifically address these impacts. Leaders in the field of complex trauma have advocated for the need for somatic approaches to intervention. This paper presents STARS Experiential Group treatment, the first structured bodybased group intervention that has been designed to address complex trauma in survivors of human trafficking. Three pilot groups were run in residential settings with adolescent and adult survivors of sex trafficking. Two adaptations were utilized, with one focusing on application of expressive arts modalities and the other incorporating theater games. Qualitative results, using thematic analysis, identified several themes related to challenges and potential benefits of these groups. Potential benefits of the STARS groups were found in the areas of Interpersonal Relationships, Regulation, and Self/ Identity, with fourteen sub-themes further describing positive impacts. Challenges within these areas are explored, to inform the development of group interventions for trafficking survivors. The results of this paper suggest that experiential, somatically-oriented group treatment shows promise as an important element of holistic intervention with trafficking survivors.

  16. The human CTC1/STN1/TEN1 complex regulates telomere maintenance in ALT cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chenhui; Jia, Pingping; Chastain, Megan; Shiva, Olga; Chai, Weihang, E-mail: wchai@wsu.edu

    2017-06-15

    Maintaining functional telomeres is important for long-term proliferation of cells. About 15% of cancer cells are telomerase-negative and activate the alternative-lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway to maintain their telomeres. Recent studies have shown that the human CTC1/STN1/TEN1 complex (CST) plays a multi-faceted role in telomere maintenance in telomerase-expressing cancer cells. However, the role of CST in telomere maintenance in ALT cells is unclear. Here, we report that human CST forms a functional complex localizing in the ALT-associated PML bodies (APBs) in ALT cells throughout the cell cycle. Suppression of CST induces telomere instabilities including telomere fragility and elevates telomeric DNA recombination, leading to telomere dysfunction. In addition, CST deficiency significantly diminishes the abundance of extrachromosomal circular telomere DNA known as C-circles and t-circles. Suppression of CST also results in multinucleation in ALT cells and impairs cell proliferation. Our findings imply that the CST complex plays an important role in regulating telomere maintenance in ALT cells. - Highlights: • CST localizes at telomeres and ALT-associated PML bodies in ALT cells throughout the cell cycle. • CST is important for promoting telomeric DNA replication in ALT cells. • CST deficiency decreases ECTR formation and increases T-SCE. • CST deficiency impairs ALT cell proliferation and results in multinucleation.

  17. Ontogeny of neuro-insular complexes and islets innervation in the human pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshchina, Alexandra E; Krivova, Yulia S; Barabanov, Valeriy M; Saveliev, Sergey V

    2014-01-01

    The ontogeny of the neuro-insular complexes (NIC) and the islets innervation in human pancreas has not been studied in detail. Our aim was to describe the developmental dynamics and distribution of the nervous system structures in the endocrine part of human pancreas. We used double-staining with antibodies specific to pan-neural markers [neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 protein] and to hormones of pancreatic endocrine cells. NSE and S100-positive nerves and ganglia were identified in the human fetal pancreas from gestation week (gw) 10 onward. Later the density of S100 and NSE-positive fibers increased. In adults, this network was sparse. The islets innervation started to form from gw 14. NSE-containing endocrine cells were identified from gw 12 onward. Additionally, S100-positive cells were detected both in the periphery and within some of the islets starting at gw 14. The analysis of islets innervation has shown that the fetal pancreas contained NIC and the number of these complexes was reduced in adults. The highest density of NIC is detected during middle and late fetal periods, when the mosaic islets, typical for adults, form. The close integration between the developing pancreatic islets and the nervous system structures may play an important role not only in the hormone secretion, but also in the islets morphogenesis.

  18. MUC1-C activates polycomb repressive complexes and downregulates tumor suppressor genes in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Hasan; Hiraki, Masayuki; Kufe, Donald

    2018-04-01

    The PRC2 and PRC1 complexes are aberrantly expressed in human cancers and have been linked to decreases in patient survival. MUC1-C is an oncoprotein that is also overexpressed in diverse human cancers and is associated with a poor prognosis. Recent studies have supported a previously unreported function for MUC1-C in activating PRC2 and PRC1 in cancer cells. In the regulation of PRC2, MUC1-C (i) drives transcription of the EZH2 gene, (ii) binds directly to EZH2, and (iii) enhances occupancy of EZH2 on target gene promoters with an increase in H3K27 trimethylation. Regarding PRC1, which is recruited to PRC2 sites in the hierarchical model, MUC1-C induces BMI1 transcription, forms a complex with BMI1, and promotes H2A ubiquitylation. MUC1-C thereby contributes to the integration of PRC2 and PRC1-mediated repression of tumor suppressor genes, such as CDH1, CDKN2A, PTEN and BRCA1. Like PRC2 and PRC1, MUC1-C is associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program, cancer stem cell (CSC) state, and acquisition of anticancer drug resistance. In concert with these observations, targeting MUC1-C downregulates EZH2 and BMI1, inhibits EMT and the CSC state, and reverses drug resistance. These findings emphasize the significance of MUC1-C as a therapeutic target for inhibiting aberrant PRC function and reprogramming the epigenome in human cancers.

  19. Fatigue crack propagation path across the dentinoenamel junction complex in human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X D; Ruse, N D

    2003-07-01

    The human tooth structures should be understood clearly to improve clinically used restorative materials. The dentinoenamel junction (DEJ) plays a key role in resisting crack propagation in teeth. The aim of this study was to determine the fracture toughness of the enamel-DEJ-dentin complex and to investigate the influence of the DEJ on the fatigue crack propagation path across it by characterizing fatigue-fractured enamel-DEJ-dentin complexes using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The results of this study showed that the fracture toughness of the enamel-DEJ-dentin complex was 1.50 +/- 0.28 Mpa x m(1/2). Based on the results of this investigation, it was concluded that the DEJ complex played a critical role in resisting crack propagation from enamel into dentin. The DEJ complex is, approximately, a 100 to 150 microm broad region at the interface between enamel and dentin. The toughening mechanism of the DEJ complex may be explained by the fact that crack paths were deflected as cracks propagated across it. Understanding the mechanism of crack deflection could help in improving dentin-composite as well as ceramic-cement interfacial qualities with the aim to decrease the risk of clinical failure of restorations. Both can be viewed as being composed from a layer of material of high strength and hardness bonded to a softer but tougher substratum (dentin). The bonding agent or the luting cement layer may play the critical role of the DEJ in improving the strength of these restorations in clinical situations. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Complexity and multifractality of neuronal noise in mouse and human hippocampal epileptiform dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, Demitre; Bardakjian, Berj L.; Valiante, Taufik A.; Carlen, Peter L.

    2012-10-01

    Fractal methods offer an invaluable means of investigating turbulent nonlinearity in non-stationary biomedical recordings from the brain. Here, we investigate properties of complexity (i.e. the correlation dimension, maximum Lyapunov exponent, 1/fγ noise and approximate entropy) and multifractality in background neuronal noise-like activity underlying epileptiform transitions recorded at the intracellular and local network scales from two in vitro models: the whole-intact mouse hippocampus and lesional human hippocampal slices. Our results show evidence for reduced dynamical complexity and multifractal signal features following transition to the ictal epileptiform state. These findings suggest that pathological breakdown in multifractal complexity coincides with loss of signal variability or heterogeneity, consistent with an unhealthy ictal state that is far from the equilibrium of turbulent yet healthy fractal dynamics in the brain. Thus, it appears that background noise-like activity successfully captures complex and multifractal signal features that may, at least in part, be used to classify and identify brain state transitions in the healthy and epileptic brain, offering potential promise for therapeutic neuromodulatory strategies for afflicted patients suffering from epilepsy and other related neurological disorders. This paper is based on chapter 5 of Serletis (2010 PhD Dissertation Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto).

  1. Comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional profile of the Mediator complex across human cancer types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syring, Isabella; Klümper, Niklas; Offermann, Anne; Braun, Martin; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Queisser, Angela; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Brägelmann, Johannes; Vogel, Wenzel; Schmidt, Doris; Majores, Michael; Schindler, Anne; Kristiansen, Glen; Müller, Stefan C; Ellinger, Jörg; Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Perner, Sven

    2016-04-26

    The Mediator complex is a key regulator of gene transcription and several studies demonstrated altered expressions of particular subunits in diverse human diseases, especially cancer. However a systematic study deciphering the transcriptional expression of the Mediator across different cancer entities is still lacking.We therefore performed a comprehensive in silico cancer vs. benign analysis of the Mediator complex subunits (MEDs) for 20 tumor entities using Oncomine datasets. The transcriptional expression profiles across almost all cancer entities showed differentially expressed MEDs as compared to benign tissue. Differential expression of MED8 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and MED12 in lung cancer (LCa) were validated and further investigated by immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarrays containing large numbers of specimen. MED8 in clear cell RCC (ccRCC) associated with shorter survival and advanced TNM stage and showed higher expression in metastatic than primary tumors. In vitro, siRNA mediated MED8 knockdown significantly impaired proliferation and motility in ccRCC cell lines, hinting at a role for MED8 to serve as a novel therapeutic target in ccRCC. Taken together, our Mediator complex transcriptome proved to be a valid tool for identifying cancer-related shifts in Mediator complex composition, revealing that MEDs do exhibit cancer specific transcriptional expression profiles.

  2. Ethics in Publishing: Complexity Science and Human Factors Offer Insights to Develop a Just Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurin, Tarcisio Abreu

    2016-12-01

    While ethics in publishing has been increasingly debated, there seems to be a lack of a theoretical framework for making sense of existing rules of behavior as well as for designing, managing and enforcing such rules. This letter argues that systems-oriented disciplines, such as complexity science and human factors, offer insights into new ways of dealing with ethics in publishing. Some examples of insights are presented. Also, a call is made for empirical studies that unveil the context and details of both retracted papers and the process of writing and publishing academic papers. This is expected to shed light on the complexity of the publication system as well as to support the development of a just culture, in which all participants are accountable.

  3. Behavior of the nucleic acid ethidium complex sedimentation of human lymphocytes after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langrock, K.

    1982-01-01

    Under standardized conditions the repair kinetic test by Fender and Hartwig demonstrates the dose dependence of the injury of the nucleic acid complex of human lymphocytes after gamma irradiation and their repair even in low dose regions. Seasonal changes with infect incubation, individual variability in the lymphocyte population and culture conditions are to be proved before clinical application of the test in radiotherapy to generalize the influence of the factors. 3.4 up to 6 μg/ml ethidium bromide should be chosen as an optimum ethidium concentration of the gradient. (author)

  4. Colour and luminance contrasts predict the human detection of natural stimuli in complex visual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas E; Rojas, Bibiana; Mappes, Johanna; Rautiala, Petri; Kemp, Darrell J

    2017-09-01

    Much of what we know about human colour perception has come from psychophysical studies conducted in tightly-controlled laboratory settings. An enduring challenge, however, lies in extrapolating this knowledge to the noisy conditions that characterize our actual visual experience. Here we combine statistical models of visual perception with empirical data to explore how chromatic (hue/saturation) and achromatic (luminant) information underpins the detection and classification of stimuli in a complex forest environment. The data best support a simple linear model of stimulus detection as an additive function of both luminance and saturation contrast. The strength of each predictor is modest yet consistent across gross variation in viewing conditions, which accords with expectation based upon general primate psychophysics. Our findings implicate simple visual cues in the guidance of perception amidst natural noise, and highlight the potential for informing human vision via a fusion between psychophysical modelling and real-world behaviour. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. The Major Histocompatibility Complex and Perfumers' Descriptions of Human Body Odors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Wedekind

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The MHC (major histocompatibility complex is a group of genes that play a crucial role in immune recognition and in tolerance of tissue grafting. The MHC has also been found to influence body odors, body odor preferences, and mate choice in mice and humans. Here we test whether verbal descriptions of human body odors can be linked to the MHC. We asked 45 male students to live as odor neutral as possible for two consecutive days and to wear a T-shirt during the nights. The odors of these T-shirts were then described by five evaluators: two professional perfumers and three laymen. One of the perfumers was able to describe the T-shirt odors in such a way that some of the allelic specificity of the MHC was significantly revealed (after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. This shows that, although difficult, some people are able to describe MHC-correlated body odor components.

  6. Genomic binding profiles of functionally distinct RNA polymerase III transcription complexes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moqtaderi, Zarmik; Wang, Jie; Raha, Debasish; White, Robert J; Snyder, Michael; Weng, Zhiping; Struhl, Kevin

    2010-05-01

    Genome-wide occupancy profiles of five components of the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) machinery in human cells identified the expected tRNA and noncoding RNA targets and revealed many additional Pol III-associated loci, mostly near short interspersed elements (SINEs). Several genes are targets of an alternative transcription factor IIIB (TFIIIB) containing Brf2 instead of Brf1 and have extremely low levels of TFIIIC. Strikingly, expressed Pol III genes, unlike nonexpressed Pol III genes, are situated in regions with a pattern of histone modifications associated with functional Pol II promoters. TFIIIC alone associates with numerous ETC loci, via the B box or a novel motif. ETCs are often near CTCF binding sites, suggesting a potential role in chromosome organization. Our results suggest that human Pol III complexes associate preferentially with regions near functional Pol II promoters and that TFIIIC-mediated recruitment of TFIIIB is regulated in a locus-specific manner.

  7. Integrated approach to knowledge acquisition and safety management of complex plants with emphasis on human factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosmowski, K.T.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper an integrated approach to the knowledge acquisition and safety management of complex industrial plants is proposed and outlined. The plant is considered within a man-technology-environment (MTE) system. The knowledge acquisition is aimed at the consequent reliability evaluation of human factor and probabilistic modeling of the plant. Properly structured initial knowledge is updated in life-time of the plant. The data and knowledge concerning the topology of safety related systems and their functions are created in a graphical CAD system and are object oriented. Safety oriented monitoring of the plant includes abnormal situations due to external and internal disturbances, failures of hard/software components and failures of human factor. The operation and safety related evidence is accumulated in special data bases. Data/knowledge bases are designed in such a way to support effectively the reliability and safety management of the plant. (author)

  8. Functional modelling for integration of human-software-hardware in complex physical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarres, M.

    1996-01-01

    A framework describing the properties of complex physical systems composed of human-software-hardware interactions in terms of their functions is described. It is argued that such a framework is domain-general, so that functional primitives present a language that is more general than most other modeling methods such as mathematical simulation. The characteristics and types of functional models are described. Examples of uses of the framework in modeling physical systems composed of human-software-hardware (hereby we refer to them as only physical systems) are presented. It is concluded that a function-centered model of a physical system provides a capability for generating a high-level simulation of the system for intelligent diagnostic, control or other similar applications

  9. Ubiquitous polygenicity of human complex traits: genome-wide analysis of 49 traits in Koreans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yang

    Full Text Available Recent studies in population of European ancestry have shown that 30% ~ 50% of heritability for human complex traits such as height and body mass index, and common diseases such as schizophrenia and rheumatoid arthritis, can be captured by common SNPs and that genetic variation attributed to chromosomes are in proportion to their length. Using genome-wide estimation and partitioning approaches, we analysed 49 human quantitative traits, many of which are relevant to human diseases, in 7,170 unrelated Korean individuals genotyped on 326,262 SNPs. For 43 of the 49 traits, we estimated a nominally significant (P<0.05 proportion of variance explained by all SNPs on the Affymetrix 5.0 genotyping array ([Formula: see text]. On average across 47 of the 49 traits for which the estimate of h(G(2 is non-zero, common SNPs explain approximately one-third (range of 7.8% to 76.8% of narrow sense heritability. The estimate of h(G(2 is highly correlated with the proportion of SNPs with association P<0.031 (r(2 = 0.92. Longer genomic segments tend to explain more phenotypic variation, with a correlation of 0.78 between the estimate of variance explained by individual chromosomes and their physical length, and 1% of the genome explains approximately 1% of the genetic variance. Despite the fact that there are a few SNPs with large effects for some traits, these results suggest that polygenicity is ubiquitous for most human complex traits and that a substantial proportion of the "missing heritability" is captured by common SNPs.

  10. Cognitive engineering models: A prerequisite to the design of human-computer interaction in complex dynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter examines a class of human-computer interaction applications, specifically the design of human-computer interaction for the operators of complex systems. Such systems include space systems (e.g., manned systems such as the Shuttle or space station, and unmanned systems such as NASA scientific satellites), aviation systems (e.g., the flight deck of 'glass cockpit' airplanes or air traffic control) and industrial systems (e.g., power plants, telephone networks, and sophisticated, e.g., 'lights out,' manufacturing facilities). The main body of human-computer interaction (HCI) research complements but does not directly address the primary issues involved in human-computer interaction design for operators of complex systems. Interfaces to complex systems are somewhat special. The 'user' in such systems - i.e., the human operator responsible for safe and effective system operation - is highly skilled, someone who in human-machine systems engineering is sometimes characterized as 'well trained, well motivated'. The 'job' or task context is paramount and, thus, human-computer interaction is subordinate to human job interaction. The design of human interaction with complex systems, i.e., the design of human job interaction, is sometimes called cognitive engineering.

  11. In Vitro Culture Conditions for Maintaining a Complex Population of Human Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Soo Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A stable intestinal microbiota is important in maintaining human physiology and health. Although there have been a number of studies using in vitro and in vivo approaches to determine the impact of diet and xenobiotics on intestinal microbiota, there is no consensus for the best in vitro culture conditions for growth of the human gastrointestinal microbiota. To investigate the dynamics and activities of intestinal microbiota, it is important for the culture conditions to support the growth of a wide range of intestinal bacteria and maintain a complex microbial community representative of the human gastrointestinal tract. Here, we compared the bacterial community in three culture media: brain heart infusion broth and high- and low-carbohydrate medium with different growth supplements. The bacterial community was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE, pyrosequencing and real-time PCR. Based on the molecular analysis, this study indicated that the 3% fecal inoculum in low-concentration carbohydrate medium with 1% autoclaved fecal supernatant provided enhanced growth conditions to conduct in vitro studies representative of the human intestinal microbiota.

  12. NDUFAF5 Hydroxylates NDUFS7 at an Early Stage in the Assembly of Human Complex I*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Virginie F.; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Complex I (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in mammalian mitochondria is an L-shaped assembly of 45 proteins. One arm lies in the inner membrane, and the other extends about 100 Å into the matrix of the organelle. The extrinsic arm contains binding sites for NADH, the primary electron acceptor FMN, and seven iron-sulfur clusters that form a pathway for electrons linking FMN to the terminal electron acceptor, ubiquinone, which is bound in a tunnel in the region of the junction between the arms. The membrane arm contains four antiporter-like domains, energetically coupled to the quinone site and involved in pumping protons from the matrix into the intermembrane space contributing to the proton motive force. Seven of the subunits, forming the core of the membrane arm, are translated from mitochondrial genes, and the remaining subunits, the products of nuclear genes, are imported from the cytosol. Their assembly is coordinated by at least thirteen extrinsic assembly factor proteins that are not part of the fully assembled complex. They assist in insertion of co-factors and in building up the complex from smaller sub-assemblies. One such factor, NDUFAF5, belongs to the family of seven-β-strand S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases. However, similar to another family member, RdmB, it catalyzes the introduction of a hydroxyl group, in the case of NDUFAF5, into Arg-73 in the NDUFS7 subunit of human complex I. This modification occurs early in the pathway of assembly of complex I, before the formation of the juncture between peripheral and membrane arms. PMID:27226634

  13. NDUFAF5 Hydroxylates NDUFS7 at an Early Stage in the Assembly of Human Complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Virginie F; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2016-07-08

    Complex I (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in mammalian mitochondria is an L-shaped assembly of 45 proteins. One arm lies in the inner membrane, and the other extends about 100 Å into the matrix of the organelle. The extrinsic arm contains binding sites for NADH, the primary electron acceptor FMN, and seven iron-sulfur clusters that form a pathway for electrons linking FMN to the terminal electron acceptor, ubiquinone, which is bound in a tunnel in the region of the junction between the arms. The membrane arm contains four antiporter-like domains, energetically coupled to the quinone site and involved in pumping protons from the matrix into the intermembrane space contributing to the proton motive force. Seven of the subunits, forming the core of the membrane arm, are translated from mitochondrial genes, and the remaining subunits, the products of nuclear genes, are imported from the cytosol. Their assembly is coordinated by at least thirteen extrinsic assembly factor proteins that are not part of the fully assembled complex. They assist in insertion of co-factors and in building up the complex from smaller sub-assemblies. One such factor, NDUFAF5, belongs to the family of seven-β-strand S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases. However, similar to another family member, RdmB, it catalyzes the introduction of a hydroxyl group, in the case of NDUFAF5, into Arg-73 in the NDUFS7 subunit of human complex I. This modification occurs early in the pathway of assembly of complex I, before the formation of the juncture between peripheral and membrane arms. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  15. High-Resolution Patterns of Meiotic Recombination across the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Michael; Perfetto, Stephen P.; Klitz, William; Nelson, George; Carrington, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Definitive characteristics of meiotic recombination events over large (i.e., >1 Mb) segments of the human genome remain obscure, yet they are essential for establishing the haplotypic structure of the genome and for efficient mapping of complex traits. We present a high-resolution map of recombination at the kilobase level across a 3.3-Mb interval encompassing the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Genotyping of 20,031 single sperm from 12 individuals resulted in the identification and fine mapping of 325 recombinant chromosomes within genomic intervals as small as 7 kb. Several principal characteristics of recombination in this region were observed: (1) rates of recombination can differ significantly between individuals; (2) intense hot spots of recombination occur at least every 0.8 Mb but are not necessarily evenly spaced; (3) distribution in the location of recombination events can differ significantly among individuals; (4) between hot spots, low levels of recombination occur fairly evenly across 100-kb segments, suggesting the presence of warm spots of recombination; and (5) specific sequence motifs associate significantly with recombination distribution. These data provide a plausible model for recombination patterns of the human genome overall. PMID:12297984

  16. Human-Chromatin-Related Protein Interactions Identify a Demethylase Complex Required for Chromosome Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Marcon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  17. SSFSE sequence functional MRI of the human cervical spinal cord with complex finger tapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Chuhai; Kong Kangmei; Guan Jitian; Chen Yexi; He Jiankang; Qi Weili; Wang Xinjia; Shen Zhiwei; Wu Renhua

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Functional MR imaging of the human cervical spinal cord was carried out on volunteers during alternated rest and a complex finger tapping task, in order to detect image intensity changes arising from neuronal activity. Methods: Functional MR imaging data using single-shot fast spin-echo sequence (SSFSE) with echo time 42.4 ms on a 1.5 T GE Clinical System were acquired in eight subjects performing a complex finger tapping task. Cervical spinal cord activation was measured both in the sagittal and transverse imaging planes. Postprocessing was performed by AFNI (Analysis of Functional Neuroimages) software system. Results: Intensity changes (5.5-7.6%) were correlated with the time course of stimulation and were consistently detected in both sagittal and transverse imaging planes of the cervical spinal cord. The activated regions localized to the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord in agreement with the neural anatomy. Conclusion: Functional MR imaging signals can be reliably detected with finger tapping activity in the human cervical spinal cord using a SSFSE sequence with 42.4 ms echo time. The anatomic location of neural activity correlates with the muscles used in the finger tapping task.

  18. α-1 Antitrypsin regulates human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by soluble immune complexes and IL-8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the protein α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) causes a chronic lung disease in humans that is characterized by excessive mobilization of neutrophils into the lung. However, the reason for the increased neutrophil burden has not been fully elucidated. In this study we have demonstrated using human neutrophils that serum AAT coordinates both CXCR1- and soluble immune complex (sIC) receptor-mediated chemotaxis by divergent pathways. We demonstrated that glycosylated AAT can bind to IL-8 (a ligand for CXCR1) and that AAT-IL-8 complex formation prevented IL-8 interaction with CXCR1. Second, AAT modulated neutrophil chemotaxis in response to sIC by controlling membrane expression of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) Fc receptor FcγRIIIb. This process was mediated through inhibition of ADAM-17 enzymatic activity. Neutrophils isolated from clinically stable AAT-deficient patients were characterized by low membrane expression of FcγRIIIb and increased chemotaxis in response to IL-8 and sIC. Treatment of AAT-deficient individuals with AAT augmentation therapy resulted in increased AAT binding to IL-8, increased AAT binding to the neutrophil membrane, decreased FcγRIIIb release from the neutrophil membrane, and normalization of chemotaxis. These results provide new insight into the mechanism underlying the effect of AAT augmentation therapy in the pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency.

  19. Structural insights into RNA processing by the human RISC-loading complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Noland, Cameron; Siridechadilok, Bunpote; Taylor, David W; Ma, Enbo; Felderer, Karin; Doudna, Jennifer A; Nogales, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Targeted gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) requires loading of a short guide RNA (small interfering RNA (siRNA) or microRNA (miRNA)) onto an Argonaute protein to form the functional center of an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). In humans, Argonaute2 (AGO2) assembles with the guide RNA-generating enzyme Dicer and the RNA-binding protein TRBP to form a RISC-loading complex (RLC), which is necessary for efficient transfer of nascent siRNAs and miRNAs from Dicer to AGO2. Here, using single-particle EM analysis, we show that human Dicer has an L-shaped structure. The RLC Dicer's N-terminal DExH/D domain, located in a short 'base branch', interacts with TRBP, whereas its C-terminal catalytic domains in the main body are proximal to AGO2. A model generated by docking the available atomic structures of Dicer and Argonaute homologs into the RLC reconstruction suggests a mechanism for siRNA transfer from Dicer to AGO2.

  20. Localization of MHC class II/human cartilage glycoprotein-39 complexes in synovia of rheumatoid arthritis patients using complex-specific monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, Peter G. A.; Baeten, Dominique; Rovers, Eric; Veys, Eric M.; Rijnders, Antonius W. M.; Meijerink, Jan; de Keyser, Filip; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2003-01-01

    Recently human cartilage gp-39 (HC gp-39) was identified as a candidate autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To further investigate the relevance of this Ag in RA, we have generated a set of five mAbs to a combination epitope of complexes of HC gp-39(263-275) and the RA-associated DR alpha beta

  1. Microsurgical and Tractographic Anatomy of the Supplementary Motor Area Complex in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Baran; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Middlebrooks, Erik H; Karadag, Ali; Ovalioglu, Talat Cem; Jagadeesan, Bharathi; Sandhu, Gauravjot; Tanriover, Necmettin; Grande, Andrew W

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the microsurgical anatomy of the fiber tract connections of the supplementary motor area (SMA) and pre-SMA, and examine its potential functional role with reference to clinical trials in the literature. Ten postmortem formalin-fixed human brains (20 sides) and 1 cadaveric head were prepared following Klingler's method. The fiber dissection was performed in a stepwise fashion, from lateral to medial and also from medial to lateral, under an operating microscope, with 3D images captured at each stage. Our findings were supported by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging tractography in 2 healthy subjects. The connections of the SMA complex, composed of the pre-SMA and the SMA proper, are composed of short "U" association fibers and the superior longitudinal fasciculus I, cingulum, claustrocortical fibers, callosal fibers, corticospinal tract, frontal aslant tract, and frontostriatal tract. The claustrocortical fibers may play an important role in the integration of motor, language, and limbic functions of the SMA complex. The frontostriatal tract connects the pre-SMA to the putamen and caudate nucleus, and also forms parts of both the internal capsule and the dorsal external capsule. The SMA complex has numerous connections throughout the cerebrum. An understanding of these connections is important for presurgical planning for lesions in the frontal lobe and helps explain symptoms related to SMA injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The CD63-Syntenin-1 Complex Controls Post-Endocytic Trafficking of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräßel, Linda; Fast, Laura Aline; Scheffer, Konstanze D; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Spoden, Gilles A; Tenzer, Stefan; Boller, Klaus; Bago, Ruzica; Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Berditchevski, Fedor; Florin, Luise

    2016-08-31

    Human papillomaviruses enter host cells via a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway involving tetraspanin proteins. However, post-endocytic trafficking required for virus capsid disassembly remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the early trafficking pathway of internalised HPV particles involves tetraspanin CD63, syntenin-1 and ESCRT-associated adaptor protein ALIX. Following internalisation, viral particles are found in CD63-positive endosomes recruiting syntenin-1, a CD63-interacting adaptor protein. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence experiments indicate that the CD63-syntenin-1 complex controls delivery of internalised viral particles to multivesicular endosomes. Accordingly, infectivity of high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 31 as well as disassembly and post-uncoating processing of viral particles was markedly suppressed in CD63 or syntenin-1 depleted cells. Our analyses also present the syntenin-1 interacting protein ALIX as critical for HPV infection and CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex formation as a prerequisite for intracellular transport enabling viral capsid disassembly. Thus, our results identify the CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex as a key regulatory component in post-endocytic HPV trafficking.

  3. Anatomically-specific intratubular and interstitial biominerals in the human renal medullo-papillary complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Chen

    Full Text Available Limited information exists on the anatomically-specific early stage events leading to clinically detectable mineral aggregates in the renal papilla. In this study, quantitative multiscale correlative maps of structural, elemental and biochemical properties of whole medullo-papillary complexes from human kidneys were developed. Correlative maps of properties specific to the uriniferous and vascular tubules using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and immunolocalization of noncollagenous proteins (NCPs along with their association with anatomy specific biominerals were obtained. Results illustrated that intratubular spherical aggregates primarily form at the proximal regions distant from the papillary tip while interstitial spherical and fibrillar aggregates are distally located near the papillary tip. Biominerals at the papillary tip were closely localized with 10 to 50 μm diameter vasa recta immunolocalized for CD31 inside the medullo-papillary complex. Abundant NCPs known to regulate bone mineralization were localized within nanoparticles, forming early pathologic mineralized regions of the complex. Based on the physical association between vascular and urothelial tubules, results from light and electron microscopy techniques suggested that these NCPs could be delivered from vasculature to prompt calcification of the interstitial regions or they might be synthesized from local vascular smooth muscle cells after transdifferentiation into osteoblast-like phenotypes. In addition, results provided insights into the plausible temporal events that link the anatomically specific intratubular mineral aggregates with the interstitial biomineralization processes within the functional unit of the kidney.

  4. Literature and Cinema from "Adaptation" to Re-creation: Coping with the Complexity of Human Recollection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Testa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Early 20th-century avant-gardes put a premium on the notion of "originality" and so created a cultural context in which "adaptation" -- in particular, lit-to cinema adaptation -- later came to be construed by film theory as a kind of derivative, inferior notion. This article offers the proof, based on work on the little-known original Russian sources, that none other than Èizenshtein opined differently, so much so that he preferred to argue instead for the use of the term "re-creation"; and that later semiotic theory, especially thanks to Iurii Lotman, provides us with the tools to develop the "re-creation" concept fully. In the process of re-creation, which is always a process of cultural re-contextualization, the original literary complexity lost in the transmutation must be made up in specific cinematic ways, in order to offer a final re-created artefact worthy of recollection by human society. In times of an overburdened human ability to remember historic sufferings, re-created artefacts that lose information vis-a-vis the original will be quite justly forgotten. On this basis, the article concludes with an elaboration on contemporary Italian cinema -- especially some commercially successful noirs -- drawn from literature (or rather, books of fiction and pinpoints the nature of one of that type of cinema's recurrent shortcomings. The essential defect of such films is identified in their inability to make up by cinematic means for the loss of complexity which they endure in the transition from one medium to another. This is all the more true when, as in the case of the noirs examined here, complexity is already scant in the original books in the first place.

  5. Applying mass spectrometry-based qualitative proteomics to human amygdaloid complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín eFernández-Irigoyen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The amygdaloid complex is a key brain structure involved in the expression of behaviours and emotions such as learning, fear, and anxiety. Brain diseases including depression, epilepsy, autism, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer`s disease, have been associated with amygdala dysfunction. For several decades, neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, volumetric, and cognitive approaches have been the gold standard techniques employed to characterize the amygdala functionality. However, little attention has been focused specifically on the molecular composition of the human amygdala from the perspective of proteomics. We have performed a global proteome analysis employing protein and peptide fractionation methods followed by nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS, detecting expression of at least 1820 protein species in human amygdala, corresponding to 1814 proteins which represent a 9-fold increase in proteome coverage with respect to previous proteomic profiling of the rat amygdala. Gene ontology analysis were used to determine biological process represented in human amygdala highlighting molecule transport, nucleotide binding, and oxidoreductase and GTPase activities. Bioinformatic analyses have revealed that nearly 4% of identified proteins have been previously associated to neurodegenerative syndromes, and 26% of amygdaloid proteins were also found to be present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. In particular, a subset of amygdaloid proteins was mainly involved in axon guidance, synaptic vesicle release, L1CAM interactome, and signaling pathways transduced by NGF and NCAM1. Taken together, our data contributes to the repertoire of the human brain proteome, serving as a reference library to provide basic information for understanding the neurobiology of the human amygdala.

  6. Stabilization of the soluble, cleaved, trimeric form of the envelope glycoprotein complex of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Rogier W.; Vesanen, Mika; Schuelke, Norbert; Master, Aditi; Schiffner, Linnea; Kalyanaraman, Roopa; Paluch, Maciej; Berkhout, Ben; Maddon, Paul J.; Olson, William C.; Lu, Min; Moore, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex of human immunodeficiency virus type I has evolved a structure that is minimally immunogenic while retaining its natural function of receptor-mediated virus-cell fusion. The Env complex is trimeric; its six individual subunits (three gp120 and three gp41

  7. Use of eye tracking equipment for human reliability analysis applied to complex system operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, Andre Ricardo Mendonça; Prado, Eugenio Anselmo Pessoa do; Martins, Marcelo Ramos

    2017-01-01

    This article will discuss the preliminary results of an evaluation methodology for the analysis and quantification of manual character errors (human), by monitoring cognitive parameters and skill levels in the operation of a complex control system based on parameters provided by a eye monitoring equipment (Eye Tracker). The research was conducted using a simulator (game) that plays concepts of operation of a nuclear reactor with a split sample for evaluation of aspects of learning, knowledge and standard operating within the context addressed. bridge operators were monitored using the EYE TRACKING, eliminating the presence of the analyst in the evaluation of the operation, allowing the analysis of the results by means of multivariate statistical techniques within the scope of system reliability. The experiments aim to observe state change situations such as stops and scheduled departures, incidents assumptions and common operating characteristics. Preliminary results of this research object indicate that technical and cognitive aspects can contribute to improving the reliability of the available techniques in human reliability, making them more realistic both in the context of quantitative approaches to regulatory and training purposes, as well as reduced incidence of human error. (author)

  8. Use of eye tracking equipment for human reliability analysis applied to complex system operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, Andre Ricardo Mendonça; Prado, Eugenio Anselmo Pessoa do; Martins, Marcelo Ramos, E-mail: andrericardopinheiro@usp.br, E-mail: eugenio.prado@labrisco.usp.br, E-mail: mrmatins@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LABRISCO/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2017-07-01

    This article will discuss the preliminary results of an evaluation methodology for the analysis and quantification of manual character errors (human), by monitoring cognitive parameters and skill levels in the operation of a complex control system based on parameters provided by a eye monitoring equipment (Eye Tracker). The research was conducted using a simulator (game) that plays concepts of operation of a nuclear reactor with a split sample for evaluation of aspects of learning, knowledge and standard operating within the context addressed. bridge operators were monitored using the EYE TRACKING, eliminating the presence of the analyst in the evaluation of the operation, allowing the analysis of the results by means of multivariate statistical techniques within the scope of system reliability. The experiments aim to observe state change situations such as stops and scheduled departures, incidents assumptions and common operating characteristics. Preliminary results of this research object indicate that technical and cognitive aspects can contribute to improving the reliability of the available techniques in human reliability, making them more realistic both in the context of quantitative approaches to regulatory and training purposes, as well as reduced incidence of human error. (author)

  9. Tracking a Subset of Skeleton Joints: An Effective Approach towards Complex Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Latif Anjum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a robust algorithm for complex human activity recognition for natural human-robot interaction. The algorithm is based on tracking the position of selected joints in human skeleton. For any given activity, only a few skeleton joints are involved in performing the activity, so a subset of joints contributing the most towards the activity is selected. Our approach of tracking a subset of skeleton joints (instead of tracking the whole skeleton is computationally efficient and provides better recognition accuracy. We have developed both manual and automatic approaches for the selection of these joints. The position of the selected joints is tracked for the duration of the activity and is used to construct feature vectors for each activity. Once the feature vectors have been constructed, we use a Support Vector Machines (SVM multiclass classifier for training and testing the algorithm. The algorithm has been tested on a purposely built dataset of depth videos recorded using Kinect camera. The dataset consists of 250 videos of 10 different activities being performed by different users. Experimental results show classification accuracy of 83% when tracking all skeleton joints, 95% when using manual selection of subset joints, and 89% when using automatic selection of subset joints.

  10. Genome-Wide Prediction of DNA Methylation Using DNA Composition and Sequence Complexity in Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengchao; Yao, Shixin; Li, Xinghao; Chen, Chujia; Hu, Xuehai

    2017-02-16

    DNA methylation plays a significant role in transcriptional regulation by repressing activity. Change of the DNA methylation level is an important factor affecting the expression of target genes and downstream phenotypes. Because current experimental technologies can only assay a small proportion of CpG sites in the human genome, it is urgent to develop reliable computational models for predicting genome-wide DNA methylation. Here, we proposed a novel algorithm that accurately extracted sequence complexity features (seven features) and developed a support-vector-machine-based prediction model with integration of the reported DNA composition features (trinucleotide frequency and GC content, 65 features) by utilizing the methylation profiles of embryonic stem cells in human. The prediction results from 22 human chromosomes with size-varied windows showed that the 600-bp window achieved the best average accuracy of 94.7%. Moreover, comparisons with two existing methods further showed the superiority of our model, and cross-species predictions on mouse data also demonstrated that our model has certain generalization ability. Finally, a statistical test of the experimental data and the predicted data on functional regions annotated by ChromHMM found that six out of 10 regions were consistent, which implies reliable prediction of unassayed CpG sites. Accordingly, we believe that our novel model will be useful and reliable in predicting DNA methylation.

  11. Assignment of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) gene(s) to human chromosome 2 in rodent-human somatic cell hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbschleb-Voogt, E; Grzeschik, K H; Pearson, P L; Meera Khan, P

    1981-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper indicate that the expression of human adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human-rodent somatic cell hybrids is influenced by the state of confluency of the cells and the background rodent genome. Thus, the complement of the L-cell derived A9 or B82 mouse parent apparently prevents the expression of human ADCP in the interspecific somatic cell hybrids. In the a3, E36, or RAG hybrids the human ADCP expression was not prevented by the rodent genome and was found to be proportional to the degree of confluency of the cell in the culture as in the case of primary human fibroblasts. An analysis of human chromosomes, chromosome specific enzyme markers, and ADCP in a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids optimally maintained and harvested at full confluency has shown that the expression of human ADCP in the mouse (RAG)-human as well as in the hamster (E36 or a3)-human hybrids is determined by a gene(s) in human chromosome 2 and that neither chromosome 6 nor any other of the chromosomes of man carry any gene(s) involved in the formation of human ADCP at least in the Chinese hamster-human hybrids. A series of rodent-human hybrid clones exhibiting a mitotic separation of IDH1 and MDH1 indicated that ADCP is most probably situated between corresponding loci in human chromosome 2.

  12. Genetic complexity in a Drosophila model of diabetes-associated misfolded human proinsulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Young; Ludwig, Michael Z; Tamarina, Natalia A; He, Bin Z; Carl, Sarah H; Dickerson, Desiree A; Barse, Levi; Arun, Bharath; Williams, Calvin L; Miles, Cecelia M; Philipson, Louis H; Steiner, Donald F; Bell, Graeme I; Kreitman, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been widely used as a model of human Mendelian disease, but its value in modeling complex disease has received little attention. Fly models of complex disease would enable high-resolution mapping of disease-modifying loci and the identification of novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we describe a fly model of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus and explore the complexity of this model. The approach involves the transgenic expression of a misfolded mutant of human preproinsulin, hINS(C96Y), which is a cause of permanent neonatal diabetes. When expressed in fly imaginal discs, hINS(C96Y) causes a reduction of adult structures, including the eye, wing, and notum. Eye imaginal discs exhibit defects in both the structure and the arrangement of ommatidia. In the wing, expression of hINS(C96Y) leads to ectopic expression of veins and mechano-sensory organs, indicating disruption of wild-type signaling processes regulating cell fates. These readily measurable "disease" phenotypes are sensitive to temperature, gene dose, and sex. Mutant (but not wild-type) proinsulin expression in the eye imaginal disc induces IRE1-mediated XBP1 alternative splicing, a signal for endoplasmic reticulum stress response activation, and produces global change in gene expression. Mutant hINS transgene tester strains, when crossed to stocks from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, produce F1 adults with a continuous range of disease phenotypes and large broad-sense heritability. Surprisingly, the severity of mutant hINS-induced disease in the eye is not correlated with that in the notum in these crosses, nor with eye reduction phenotypes caused by the expression of two dominant eye mutants acting in two different eye development pathways, Drop (Dr) or Lobe (L), when crossed into the same genetic backgrounds. The tissue specificity of genetic variability for mutant hINS-induced disease has, therefore, its own distinct signature. The genetic dominance

  13. Cellular responses induced by Cu(II quinolinonato complexes in human tumor and hepatic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trávníček Zdeněk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspired by the unprecedented historical success of cisplatin, one of the most important research directions in bioinorganic and medicinal chemistry is dedicated to the development of new anticancer compounds with the potential to surpass it in antitumor activity, while having lower unwanted side-effects. Therefore, a series of copper(II mixed-ligand complexes of the type [Cu(qui(L]Y · xH2O (1–6, where Hqui = 2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H-quinolinone, Y = NO3 (1, 3, 5 or BF4 (2, 4, 6, and L = 1,10-phenanthroline (phen (1, 2, 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen (3, 4 and bathophenanthroline (bphen (5, 6, was studied for their in vitro cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines (A549 lung carcinoma, HeLa cervix epitheloid carcinoma, G361 melanoma cells, A2780 ovarian carcinoma, A2780cis cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma, LNCaP androgen-sensitive prostate adenocarcinoma and THP-1 monocytic leukemia. Results The tested complexes displayed a stronger cytotoxic effect against all the cancer cells as compared to cisplatin. The highest cytotoxicity was found for the complexes 4 (IC50 = 0.36 ± 0.05 μM and 0.56 ± 0.15 μM, 5 (IC50 = 0.66 ± 0.07 μM and 0.73 ± 0.08 μM and 6 (IC50 = 0.57 ± 0.11 μM and 0.70 ± 0.20 μM against A2780, and A2780cis respectively, as compared with the values of 12.0 ± 0.8 μM and 27.0 ± 4.6 μM determined for cisplatin. Moreover, the tested complexes were much less cytotoxic to primary human hepatocytes than to the cancer cells. The complexes 5 and 6 exhibited significantly high ability to modulate secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α (2873 ± 238 pg/mL and 3284 ± 139 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively and IL-1β (1177 ± 128 pg/mL and 1087 ± 101 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively tested on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells as compared with the values of 1173

  14. Human sex hormone-binding globulin gene expression- multiple promoters and complex alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosner William

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG regulates free sex steroid concentrations in plasma and modulates rapid, membrane based steroid signaling. SHBG is encoded by an eight exon-long transcript whose expression is regulated by a downstream promoter (PL. The SHBG gene was previously shown to express a second major transcript of unknown function, derived from an upstream promoter (PT, and two minor transcripts. Results We report that transcriptional expression of the human SHBG gene is far more complex than previously described. PL and PT direct the expression of at least six independent transcripts each, resulting from alternative splicing of exons 4, 5, 6, and/or 7. We mapped two transcriptional start sites downstream of PL and PT, and present evidence for a third SHBG gene promoter (PN within the neighboring FXR2 gene; PN regulates the expression of at least seven independent SHBG gene transcripts, each possessing a novel, 164-nt first exon (1N. Transcriptional expression patterns were generated for human prostate, breast, testis, liver, and brain, and the LNCaP, MCF-7, and HepG2 cell lines. Each expresses the SHBG transcript, albeit in varying abundance. Alternative splicing was more pronounced in the cancer cell lines. PL- PT- and PN-derived transcripts were most abundant in liver, testis, and prostate, respectively. Initial findings reveal the existence of a smaller immunoreactive SHBG species in LNCaP, MCF-7, and HepG2 cells. Conclusion These results extend our understanding of human SHBG gene transcription, and raise new and important questions regarding the role of novel alternatively spliced transcripts, their function in hormonally responsive tissues including the breast and prostate, and the role that aberrant SHBG gene expression may play in cancer.

  15. Complexity, Compassion and Self-Organisation: Human Evolution and the Vulnerable Ape Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick P. Winder

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans are agents capable of helping others, learning new behaviours and forgetting old ones. The evolutionary approach to archaeological systems has therefore been hampered by the 'modern synthesis' - a gene-centred model of evolution as a process that eliminates those that cannot handle stress. The result has been a form of environmental determinism that explains human evolution in terms of heroic struggles and selective winnowing. Biologists committed to the modern synthesis have either dismissed agency as a delusion wrought in our bodies by natural selection, or imposed a sharp, Cartesian split between 'natural' and 'artificial' ecologies. We revisit the seminal literature of evolutionary biology and show that the paradigmatic fault lines of 21st century anthropology can be traced back to the 19th century and beyond. Lamarck had developed a two-factor evolutionary theory - one factor an endogenous tendency to become more advanced and complex, the other an exogenous constraint that drove organisms into conformity with environment. Darwin tried to eliminate the progressive tendency and imposed linearity constraints on evolution that Thomas Henry Huxley rejected. When experimental evidence falsified Darwin's linear hypothesis, the race began to develop a new, gene-centred model of evolution. This became the modern synthesis. The modern synthesis is now under pressure from the evidence of anthropology, sociology, palaeontology, ecology and genetics. An 'extended synthesis' is emerging. If evolution is adequately summarised by the aphorism survival of the fittest, then 'fitness' cannot always be defined in the heroic sense of 'better able to compete and reproduce'. The fittest organisms are often those that evade selective winnowing, even when their ability to compete and reproduce has been compromised by their genes. Characteristically human traits like language, abstraction, compassion and altruism may have arisen as coping strategies that

  16. The Ecology of Human-Machine Systems II: Mediating 'Direct Perception' in Complex Work Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Rasmussen, Jens

    1990-01-01

    Recently, a new class of artifacts has appeared in our environment: complex, high-technology work domains. An important characteristic of such systems is that their goal-relevant properties cannot be directly observed by the unaided eye. As a result, interface design is a ubiquitous problem in th...... in the design of these work environments. Nevertheless, the problem is one that has yet to be addressed in an adequate manner. An analogy to human perceptual mechanisms suggests that a smart instrument approach to interface design is needed to supplant the rote instrument (single......-sensor-single-indicator) approach that has dominated to this point. Ecological interface design (ED) is a theoretical framework in the smart instrument vein that postulates a set of general, prescriptive principles for design. The goal of E D is twofold: first, to reveal the affordances of the work domain through the interface...

  17. Hsp60 and p70S6K form a complex in human cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroupskaya I. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperon Hsp60 and protein kinase p70S6K play an important functional role in the regulation of cardiomyocytes vital function or apoptosis. Aim. To study a possibility of in vivo complex formation between Hsp60 and p70S6K in cardiomyocytes. Methods. Co-immunoprecipitation, Western-blot analysis. Results. We have identified in vivo interaction between molecular chaperone Hsp60 and two isoforms of proteinkinase p70S6K in human myocardium, normal and affected by cardiomyopathy. Conclusions. The results obtained suggest a possible participation of molecular chaperon Hsp60 in regulation of p70S6K activity in stressinduced apoptotic signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes.

  18. Computer-based diagnostic monitoring to enhance the human-machine interface of complex processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.

    1992-02-01

    There is a growing interest in introducing an automated, on-line, diagnostic monitoring function into the human-machine interfaces (HMIs) or control rooms of complex process plants. The design of such a system should be properly integrated with other HMI systems in the control room, such as the alarms system or the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS). This paper provides a conceptual foundation for the development of a Plant-wide Diagnostic Monitoring System (PDMS), along with functional requirements for the system and other advanced HMI systems. Insights are presented into the design of an efficient and robust PDMS, which were gained from a critical review of various methodologies developed in the nuclear power industry, the chemical process industry, and the space technological community

  19. Using virtual humans and computer animations to learn complex motor skills: a case study in karate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spanlang Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning motor skills is a complex task involving a lot of cognitive issues. One of the main issues consists in retrieving the relevant information from the learning environment. In a traditional learning situation, a teacher gives oral explanations and performs actions to provide the learner with visual examples. Using virtual reality (VR as a tool for learning motor tasks is promising. However, it raises questions about the type of information this kind of environments can offer. In this paper, we propose to analyze the impact of virtual humans on the perception of the learners. As a case study, we propose to apply this research problem to karate gestures. The results of this study show no significant difference on the after training performance of learners confronted to three different learning environments (traditional group, video and VR.

  20. A novel therapeutic strategy for experimental stroke using docosahexaenoic acid complexed to human albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belayev Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite tremendous efforts in ischemic stroke research and significant improvements in patient care within the last decade, therapy is still insufficient. There is a compelling, urgent need for safe and effective neuroprotective strategies to limit brain injury, facilitate brain repair, and improve functional outcome. Recently, we reported that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6, n-3 complexed to human albumin (DHA-Alb is highly neuroprotective after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo in young rats. This review highlights the potency of DHA-Alb therapy in permanent MCAo and aged rats and whether protection persists with chronic survival. We discovered that a novel therapy with DHA-Alb improved behavioral outcomes accompanied by attenuation of lesion volumes even when animals were allowed to survive three weeks after experimental stroke. This treatment might provide the basis for future therapeutics for patients suffering from ischemic stroke.

  1. A New Method to Develop Human Dental Pulp Cells and Platelet-rich Fibrin Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuan; Chen, Wen-Xia; Ban, Guifei; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Wen-Jin; Li, Xian-Yu

    2016-11-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) has been used as a scaffold material in various tissue regeneration studies. In the previous methods to combine seed cells with PRF, the structure of PRF was damaged, and the manipulation time in vitro was also increased. The objective of this in vitro study was to explore an appropriate method to develop a PRF-human dental pulp cell (hDPC) complex to maintain PRF structure integrity and to find out the most efficient part of PRF. The PRF-hDPC complex was developed at 3 different time points during PRF preparation: (1) the before centrifugation (BC) group, the hDPC suspension was added to the venous blood before blood centrifugation; (2) the immediately after centrifugation (IAC) group, the hDPC suspension was added immediately after blood centrifugation; (3) the after centrifugation (AC) group, the hDPC suspension was added 10 minutes after blood centrifugation; and (4) the control group, PRF without hDPC suspension. The prepared PRF-hDPC complexes were cultured for 7 days. The samples were fixed for histologic, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopic evaluation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to evaluate messenger RNA expression of alkaline phosphatase and dentin sialophosphoprotein. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay quantification for growth factors was performed within the different parts of the PRF. Histologic, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopic results revealed that hDPCs were only found in the BC group and exhibited favorable proliferation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that alkaline phosphatase and dentin sialophosphoprotein expression increased in the cultured PRF-hDPC complex. The lower part of the PRF released the maximum quantity of growth factors. Our new method to develop a PRF-hDPCs complex maintained PRF structure integrity. The hDPCs were distributed in the buffy coat, which might be the most efficient part of PRF. Copyright © 2016 American

  2. Structural characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 in complex with azole-based inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Roman, Gheorghe; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2010-03-01

    The development of inhibitors specific for heme oxygenases (HO) aims to provide powerful tools in understanding the HO system. Based on the lead structure (2S, 4S)-2-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-2-[(1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl]-4-[((4-aminophenyl)thio)methyl]-1,3-dioxolane (azalanstat, QC-1) we have synthesized structural modifications to develop novel and selective HO inhibitors. The structural study of human HO-1 (hHO-1) in complex with a select group of the inhibitors was initiated using X-ray crystallographic techniques. Comparison of the structures of four such compounds each in complex with hHO-1 revealed a common binding mode, despite having different structural fragments. The compounds bind to the distal side of heme through an azole "anchor" which coordinates with the heme iron. An expansion of the distal pocket, mainly due to distal helix flexibility, allows accommodation of the compounds without displacing heme or the critical Asp140 residue. Rather, binding displaces a catalytically critical water molecule and disrupts an ordered hydrogen-bond network involving Asp140. The presence of a triazole "anchor" may provide further stability via a hydrogen bond with the protein. A hydrophobic pocket acts to stabilize the region occupied by the phenyl or adamantanyl moieties of these compounds. Further, a secondary hydrophobic pocket is formed via "induced fit" to accommodate bulky substituents at the 4-position of the dioxolane ring. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Human broadly neutralizing antibodies to the envelope glycoprotein complex of hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giang, Erick; Dorner, Marcus; Prentoe, Jannick C

    2012-01-01

    , and an effective vaccine should target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Conserved B-cell epitopes overlapping the CD81 receptor-binding site (CD81bs) on the E2 viral envelope glycoprotein have been reported previously and provide promising vaccine targets. In this study, we isolated 73 human m......Abs recognizing five distinct antigenic regions on the virus envelope glycoprotein complex E1E2 from an HCV-immune phage-display antibody library by using an exhaustive-panning strategy. Many of these mAbs were broadly neutralizing. In particular, the mAb AR4A, recognizing a discontinuous epitope outside the CD81......bs on the E1E2 complex, has an exceptionally broad neutralizing activity toward diverse HCV genotypes and protects against heterologous HCV challenge in a small animal model. The mAb panel will be useful for the design and development of vaccine candidates to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies...

  4. The Human Nuclear Exosome Targeting Complex Is Loaded onto Newly Synthesized RNA to Direct Early Ribonucleolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lubas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The RNA exosome complex constitutes the major nuclear eukaryotic 3′-5′ exonuclease. Outside of nucleoli, the human nucleoplasmic exosome is directed to some of its substrates by the nuclear exosome targeting (NEXT complex. How NEXT targets RNA has remained elusive. Using an in vivo crosslinking approach, we report global RNA binding sites of RBM7, a key component of NEXT. RBM7 associates broadly with RNA polymerase II-derived RNA, including pre-mRNA and short-lived exosome substrates such as promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs, enhancer RNAs (eRNAs, and 3′-extended products from snRNA and replication-dependent histone genes. Within pre-mRNA, RBM7 accumulates at the 3′ ends of introns, and pulse-labeling experiments demonstrate that RBM7/NEXT defines an early exosome-targeting pathway for 3′-extended snoRNAs derived from such introns. We propose that RBM7 is generally loaded onto newly synthesized RNA to accommodate exosome action in case of available unprotected RNA 3′ ends.

  5. PHB Associates with the HIRA Complex to Control an Epigenetic-Metabolic Circuit in Human ESCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhexin; Li, Chunliang; Zeng, Yanwu; Ding, Jianyi; Qu, Zepeng; Gu, Junjie; Ge, Laixiang; Tang, Fan; Huang, Xin; Zhou, Chenlin; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Deyou; Jin, Ying

    2017-02-02

    The chromatin landscape and cellular metabolism both contribute to cell fate determination, but their interplay remains poorly understood. Using genome-wide siRNA screening, we have identified prohibitin (PHB) as an essential factor in self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Mechanistically, PHB forms protein complexes with HIRA, a histone H3.3 chaperone, and stabilizes the protein levels of HIRA complex components. Like PHB, HIRA is required for hESC self-renewal. PHB and HIRA act together to control global deposition of histone H3.3 and gene expression in hESCs. Of particular note, PHB and HIRA regulate the chromatin architecture at the promoters of isocitrate dehydrogenase genes to promote transcription and, thus, production of α-ketoglutarate, a key metabolite in the regulation of ESC fate. Our study shows that PHB has an unexpected nuclear role in hESCs that is required for self-renewal and that it acts with HIRA in chromatin organization to link epigenetic organization to a metabolic circuit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic recombination within the human T-cell receptor α-chain gene complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.A.; Kindt, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    Genetic analyses of the human T-cell receptor (TCR) α-chain genes indicate that recombination events may occur frequently within this gene complex. Examination of the inheritance of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) detected by using probes for constant or variable region gene segments made it possible to assign TCRα haplotypes to the 16 parents and 43 offspring of eight families studied. A total of six RFLP, three for the constant region and three for variable region segments, were examined in the present studies. Most enzyme and probe combinations tested revealed no polymorphism and those finally selected for the study showed limited polymorphism in that only two or, in one case, three allelic forms of the gene were seen. In spite of limited variability at this level, extensive heterogeneity was observed for the combinations of markers present in haplotypes, suggesting that frequent recombination events have occurred. Most strikingly, multiple combinations of RFLP occurring in close proximity of the TCRα constant region gene were observed in this study. A high recombination frequency for the TCRα gene complex is further supported by the observation that two children, one in each of two families, inherited recombinant TCRα haplotypes

  7. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  8. Carbohydrate linked organotin(IV) complexes as human topoisomerase Iα inhibitor and their antiproliferative effects against the human carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rais Ahmad; Yadav, Shipra; Hussain, Zahid; Arjmand, Farukh; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2014-02-14

    Dimethyltin(IV) complexes with ethanolamine (1) and biologically significant N-glycosides (2 and 3) were designed and synthesized. The structural elucidation of complexes 1-3 was done using elemental and spectroscopic methods; in addition, complex 1 was studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The in vitro DNA binding profile of complexes 2 and 3 was carried out by employing different biophysical methods to ascertain the feasibility of glycosylated complexes. Further, the cleaving ability of 2 and 3 was investigated by the agarose gel electrophoretic mobility assay with supercoiled pBR322 DNA, and demonstrated significantly good nuclease activity. Furthermore, both the complexes exhibited significant inhibitory effects on the catalytic activity of human Topo I at lower concentration than standard drugs. Computer-aided molecular docking techniques were used to ascertain the mode and mechanism of action towards the molecular target DNA and Topo I. The cytotoxicity of 2 and 3 against human hepatoma cancer cells (Huh7) was evaluated, which revealed significant regression in cancerous cells as compared with the standard drug. The antiproliferative activities of 2 and 3 were tested against human hepatoma cancer cells (Huh7), and results showed significantly good activity. Additionally, to validate the remarkable antiproliferative activity of complexes 2 and 3, specific regulatory gene expression (MMP-2 and TGF-β) was obtained by real time PCR.

  9. Crystal structure analysis of human serum albumin complexed with sodium 4-phenylbutyrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akito Kawai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PB is an orphan drug for the treatment of urea cycle disorders. It also inhibits the development of endoplasmic reticulum stress, the action of histone deacetylases and as a regulator of the hepatocanalicular transporter. PB is generally considered to have the potential for use in the treatment of the diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and metabolic diseases. In a previous study, we reported that PB is primarily bound to human serum albumin (HSA in plasma and its binding site is drug site 2. However, details of the binding mode of PB to HSA remain unknown. To address this issue, we examined the crystal structure of HSA with PB bound to it. The structure of the HSA–PB complex indicates that the binding mode of PB to HSA is quite similar to that for octanoate or drugs that bind to drug site 2, as opposed to that for other medium-chain length of fatty acids. These findings provide useful basic information related to drug–HSA interactions. Moreover, the information presented herein is valuable in terms of providing safe and efficient treatment and diagnosis in clinical settings. Keywords: Human serum albumin, X-ray crystallography, Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, Drug interaction, Drug site 2

  10. MULTIPLE HUMAN TRACKING IN COMPLEX SITUATION BY DATA ASSIMILATION WITH PEDESTRIAN BEHAVIOR MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Nakanishi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A new method of multiple human tracking is proposed. The key concept is that to assume a tracking process as a data assimilation process. Despite the importance of understanding pedestrian behavior in public space with regard to achieving more sophisticated space design and flow control, automatic human tracking in complex situation is still challenging when people move close to each other or are occluded by others. For this difficulty, we stochastically combine existing tracking method by image processing with simulation models of walking behavior. We describe a system in a form of general state space model and define the components of the model according to the review on related works. Then we apply the proposed method to the data acquired at the ticket gate of the railway station. We show the high performance of the method, as well as compare the result with other model to present the advantage of integrating the behavior model to the tracking method. We also show the method's ability to acquire passenger flow information such as ticket gate choice and OD data automatically from the tracking result.

  11. Balancing Human-machine Interface (HMI) Design in Complex Supervisory Tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Junsu; Kim, Arryum; Jang, Inseok; Seong, Poonghyun

    2013-01-01

    Human performance aspects such as plant performance, personnel task performance, situation awareness, cognitive workload, teamwork, and anthropomorphic/physiological factor are evaluated with the HUPESS. Even though the HUPESS provides evaluation results in each of the performance aspects for the integrated system validation (ISV), additional researches have been needed to develop methods on how to find out design deficiency leading to poor performance and give a solution for design improvement in HMI. The authors have developed a method of HMI design improvement for the monitoring and detection tasks which was named as 'DEMIS (Difficulty Evaluation Method in Information Searching)'. The DEMIS is a HMI evaluation method which bridge poor performance and design improvement. Lessons learned from the existing studies lead to a question about how to optimize the whole HMI design. Human factors principles provide the foundation for guidelines of various codes and standards in designing HMIs. Also in NPPs, a lot of guidelines directly from various codes and standard and derived from various research and development projects are available for designing MCR HMIs. In this study, a balancing principle and relevant two measures for HMI design optimization are proposed to be used in the HMI design of complex supervisory tasks in NPPs. The balancing principle is that a HMI element (e. g., an indicator or a push button) should be designed according to its importance

  12. Native gel electrophoresis of human telomerase distinguishes active complexes with or without dyskerin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardano, Laura; Holland, Linda; Oulton, Rena; Le Bihan, Thierry; Harrington, Lea

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres, the ends of linear chromosomes, safeguard against genome instability. The enzyme responsible for extension of the telomere 3′ terminus is the ribonucleoprotein telomerase. Whereas telomerase activity can be reconstituted in vitro with only the telomerase RNA (hTR) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), additional components are required in vivo for enzyme assembly, stability and telomere extension activity. One such associated protein, dyskerin, promotes hTR stability in vivo and is the only component to co-purify with active, endogenous human telomerase. We used oligonucleotide-based affinity purification of hTR followed by native gel electrophoresis and in-gel telomerase activity detection to query the composition of telomerase at different purification stringencies. At low salt concentrations (0.1 M NaCl), affinity-purified telomerase was ‘supershifted’ with an anti-dyskerin antibody, however the association with dyskerin was lost after purification at 0.6 M NaCl, despite the retention of telomerase activity and a comparable yield of hTR. The interaction of purified hTR and dyskerin in vitro displayed a similar salt-sensitive interaction. These results demonstrate that endogenous human telomerase, once assembled and active, does not require dyskerin for catalytic activity. Native gel electrophoresis may prove useful in the characterization of telomerase complexes under various physiological conditions. PMID:22187156

  13. Capturing complex human behaviors in representative sports contexts with a single camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ricardo; Araújo, Duarte; Fernandes, Orlando; Fonseca, Cristina; Correia, Vanda; Gazimba, Vítor; Travassos, Bruno; Esteves, Pedro; Vilar, Luís; Lopes, José

    2010-01-01

    In the last years, several motion analysis methods have been developed without considering representative contexts for sports performance. The purpose of this paper was to explain and underscore a straightforward method to measure human behavior in these contexts. Procedures combining manual video tracking (with TACTO device) and bidimensional reconstruction (through direct linear transformation) using a single camera were used in order to capture kinematic data required to compute collective variable(s) and control parameter(s). These procedures were applied to a 1vs1 association football task as an illustrative subphase of team sports and will be presented in a tutorial fashion. Preliminary analysis of distance and velocity data identified a collective variable (difference between the distance of the attacker and the defender to a target defensive area) and two nested control parameters (interpersonal distance and relative velocity). Findings demonstrated that the complementary use of TACTO software and direct linear transformation permit to capture and reconstruct complex human actions in their context in a low dimensional space (information reduction).

  14. The Structure of the Human Centrin 2-Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C Protein Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson,J.; Ryan, Z.; Salisbury, J.; Kumar, R.

    2006-01-01

    Human centrin-2 plays a key role in centrosome function and stimulates nucleotide excision repair by binding to the xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein. To determine the structure of human centrin-2 and to develop an understanding of molecular interactions between centrin and xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein, we characterized the crystal structure of calcium-loaded full-length centrin-2 complexed with a xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptide. Our structure shows that the carboxyl-terminal domain of centrin-2 binds this peptide and two calcium atoms, whereas the amino-terminal lobe is in a closed conformation positioned distantly by an ordered {alpha}-helical linker. A stretch of the amino-terminal domain unique to centrins appears disordered. Two xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptides both bound to centrin-2 also interact to form an {alpha}-helical coiled-coil. The interface between centrin-2 and each peptide is predominantly nonpolar, and key hydrophobic residues of XPC have been identified that lead us to propose a novel binding motif for centrin.

  15. The Structure of the Human Centrin 2-Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C Protein Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.; Ryan, Z.; Salisbury, J.; Kumar, R.

    2006-01-01

    Human centrin-2 plays a key role in centrosome function and stimulates nucleotide excision repair by binding to the xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein. To determine the structure of human centrin-2 and to develop an understanding of molecular interactions between centrin and xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein, we characterized the crystal structure of calcium-loaded full-length centrin-2 complexed with a xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptide. Our structure shows that the carboxyl-terminal domain of centrin-2 binds this peptide and two calcium atoms, whereas the amino-terminal lobe is in a closed conformation positioned distantly by an ordered α-helical linker. A stretch of the amino-terminal domain unique to centrins appears disordered. Two xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptides both bound to centrin-2 also interact to form an α-helical coiled-coil. The interface between centrin-2 and each peptide is predominantly nonpolar, and key hydrophobic residues of XPC have been identified that lead us to propose a novel binding motif for centrin

  16. Balancing Human-machine Interface (HMI) Design in Complex Supervisory Tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Junsu [Khalifa Univ. of Science, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Kim, Arryum; Jang, Inseok; Seong, Poonghyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Human performance aspects such as plant performance, personnel task performance, situation awareness, cognitive workload, teamwork, and anthropomorphic/physiological factor are evaluated with the HUPESS. Even though the HUPESS provides evaluation results in each of the performance aspects for the integrated system validation (ISV), additional researches have been needed to develop methods on how to find out design deficiency leading to poor performance and give a solution for design improvement in HMI. The authors have developed a method of HMI design improvement for the monitoring and detection tasks which was named as 'DEMIS (Difficulty Evaluation Method in Information Searching)'. The DEMIS is a HMI evaluation method which bridge poor performance and design improvement. Lessons learned from the existing studies lead to a question about how to optimize the whole HMI design. Human factors principles provide the foundation for guidelines of various codes and standards in designing HMIs. Also in NPPs, a lot of guidelines directly from various codes and standard and derived from various research and development projects are available for designing MCR HMIs. In this study, a balancing principle and relevant two measures for HMI design optimization are proposed to be used in the HMI design of complex supervisory tasks in NPPs. The balancing principle is that a HMI element (e. g., an indicator or a push button) should be designed according to its importance.

  17. Structure of a Human Astrovirus Capsid-Antibody Complex and Mechanistic Insights into Virus Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Campos, Jocelyn; Perez, Edmundo I.; Yin, Lu; Alexander, David L.; DuBois, Rebecca M. (UCSC)

    2016-11-02

    ABSTRACT

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. There are no vaccines or antiviral therapies against HAstV disease. Several lines of evidence point to the presence of protective antibodies in healthy adults as a mechanism governing protection against reinfection by HAstV. However, development of anti-HAstV therapies is hampered by the gap in knowledge of protective antibody epitopes on the HAstV capsid surface. Here, we report the structure of the HAstV capsid spike domain bound to the neutralizing monoclonal antibody PL-2. The antibody uses all six complementarity-determining regions to bind to a quaternary epitope on each side of the dimeric capsid spike. We provide evidence that the HAstV capsid spike is a receptor-binding domain and that the antibody neutralizes HAstV by blocking virus attachment to cells. We identify patches of conserved amino acids that overlap the antibody epitope and may comprise a receptor-binding site. Our studies provide a foundation for the development of therapies to prevent and treat HAstV diarrheal disease.

    IMPORTANCEHuman astroviruses (HAstVs) infect nearly every person in the world during childhood and cause diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Despite the prevalence of this virus, little is known about how antibodies in healthy adults protect them against reinfection. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a complex of the HAstV capsid protein and a virus-neutralizing antibody. We show that the antibody binds to the outermost spike domain of the capsid, and we provide evidence that the antibody blocks virus attachment to human cells. Importantly, our findings suggest that a subunit-based vaccine focusing the immune system on the HAstV capsid spike domain could be effective in protecting children against HAstV disease.

  18. Complex signatures of selection for the melanogenic loci TYR, TYRP1 and DCT in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyano María

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The observed correlation between ultraviolet light incidence and skin color, together with the geographical apportionment of skin reflectance among human populations, suggests an adaptive value for the pigmentation of the human skin. We have used Affymetrix U133a v2.0 gene expression microarrays to investigate the expression profiles of a total of 9 melanocyte cell lines (5 from lightly pigmented donors and 4 from darkly pigmented donors plus their respective unirradiated controls. In order to reveal signatures of selection in loci with a bearing on skin pigmentation in humans, we have resequenced between 4 to 5 kb of the proximal regulatory regions of three of the most differently expressed genes, in the expectation that variation at regulatory regions might account for intraespecific morphological diversity, as suggested elsewhere. Results Contrary to our expectations, expression profiles did not cluster the cells into unirradiated versus irradiated melanocytes, or into lightly pigmented versus darkly pigmented melanocytes. Instead, expression profiles correlated with the presence of Bovine Pituitary Extract (known to contain α-MSH in the media. This allowed us to differentiate between melanocytes that are synthesizing melanin and those that are not. TYR, TYRP1 and DCT were among the five most differently expressed genes between these two groups. Population genetic analyses of sequence haplotypes of the proximal regulatory flanking-regions included Tajima's D, HEW and DHEW neutrality tests analysis. These were complemented with EHH tests (among others in which the significance was obtained by a novel approach using extensive simulations under the coalescent model with recombination. We observe strong evidence for positive selection for TYRP1 alleles in Africans and for DCT and TYRP1 in Asians. However, the overall picture reflects a complex pattern of selection, which might include overdominance for DCT in Europeans

  19. Application of human erythrocytes to a radioimmune assay of immune complexes in serum. [Lupus erythematosus, type B hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, F; Miyakawa, Y; Mayumi, M [Tokyo Metropolitan Lab. of Public Health (Japan)

    1979-07-01

    An immune adherence receptor exists on the surface of primate erythrocytes, and has been characterized as a receptor for the activated third component of complement (C3b). Human red blood cells (RCBs, blood group O) were applied to a sensitive determination of complement-fixing, soluble immune complexes in serum. The method involved the binding of immune complexes with RBCs in the presence of complement and the detection of cell-bound IgG molecules by radiolabelled anti-human IgG antibodies. Since the binding of RBCs with monomeric IgG was minimal, cell bound IgG molecules were taken as representing immune complexes. When aggregated human gammaglobulin (AHG) was used as a model of immune complexes, as little as 5 ..mu..g dissolved in 1 ml of normal human serum were detected. The binding of RBCs with AHG was inhibited in EDTA solution where the classical complement pathway could not be activated. The RBC radioimmune assay was successfully applied to the determination of soluble immune complexes in pathological serum samples obtained from the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and those with fulminant Type B hepatitis. False-positive results by autoantibodies against RBCs could be excluded by a Coombs test and by comparing the binding in the presence of complement with that in EDTA solution. The ubiquitous availability of RBCs coupled with a high sensitivity would allow the RBC radioimmune assay to be used as a further method of determining immune complexes in the serum.

  20. Categorial Ontology of Complex Systems, Meta-Systems and Levels: The Emergence of Life, Human Consciousness and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Glazebrook

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Relational structures of organisms and the human mind are naturally represented in terms of novel variable topology concepts, non-Abelian categories and Higher Dimensional Algebra{ relatively new concepts that would be defined in
    this tutorial paper. A unifying theme of local-to-global approaches to organismic development, evolution and human consciousness leads to novel patterns of relations that emerge in super- and ultra- complex systems in terms of compositions of local procedures [1]. The claim is defended in this paper that human consciousness is unique and should be viewed as an ultra-complex, global process of processes, at a meta-level not sub{summed by, but compatible with, human brain dynamics [2]-[5]. The emergence of consciousness and its existence
    are considered to be dependent upon an extremely complex structural and functional unit with an asymmetric network topology and connectivities{the human brain. However, the appearance of human consciousness is shown to be critically dependent upon societal co-evolution, elaborate language-symbolic communication and `virtual', higher dimensional, non{commutative processes involving separate space and time perceptions. Theories of the mind are approached from the theory of levels and ultra-complexity viewpoints that throw
    new light on previous semantic models in cognitive science. Anticipatory systems and complex causality at the top levels of reality are discussed in the context of psychology, sociology and ecology. A paradigm shift towards non-commutative, or more generally, non-Abelian theories of highly complex dynamics [6] is suggested to unfold now in physics, mathematics, life and cognitive sciences, thus leading to the realizations of higher dimensional algebras in neurosciences and psychology, as well as in human genomics, bioinformatics and interactomics. The presence of strange attractors in modern society dynamics gives rise to very serious concerns for the future

  1. Chronic Treatment with Ang-(1-7 Reverses Abnormal Reactivity in the Corpus Cavernosum and Normalizes Diabetes-Induced Changes in the Protein Levels of ACE, ACE2, ROCK1, ROCK2 and Omega-Hydroxylase in a Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam H. M. Yousif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7] may have beneficial effects in diabetes mellitus-induced erectile dysfunction (DMIED but its molecular actions in the diabetic corpus cavernosum (CC are not known. We characterized the effects of diabetes and/or chronic in vivo administration of Ang-(1-7 on vascular reactivity in the rat corpus cavernosum (CC and on protein expression levels of potential downstream effectors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, ACE2, Rho kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2, and omega-hydroxylase, the cytochrome-P450 enzyme that metabolizes arachidonic acid to form the vasoconstrictor, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Streptozotocin-treated rats were chronicically administered Ang-(1-7 with or without A779, a Mas receptor antagonist, during weeks 4 to 6 of diabetes. Ang-(1-7 reversed diabetes-induced abnormal reactivity to vasoactive agents (endothelin-1, phenylepherine, and carbachol in the CC without correcting hyperglycemia. Six weeks of diabetes led to elevated ACE, ROCK1, ROCK 2, and omega-hydroxylase and a concomitant decrease in ACE2 protein expression levels that were normalized by Ang-(1-7 treatment but not upon coadministration of A779. These data are supportive of the notion that the beneficial effects of Ang-(1-7 in DMIED involve counterregulation of diabetes-induced changes in ACE, ACE2, Rho kinases, and omega-hydroxylase proteins in the diabetic CC via a Mas receptor-dependent mechanism.

  2. ACE-2 HILLCLOUD. An overview of the ACE-2 ground-based cloud experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, B.K.N.; Choularton, T.W.; Gallagher, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    the dependence of the cloud microphysics and chemistry on the characteristics of the aerosols and trace gases entering cloud, and to simultaneously study the influence of the physical and chemical processes occurring within the cloud on the size distribution, chemical and hygroscopic properties of the aerosol......) and higher aerosol mass loadings. Cloud droplet number concentrations N, increased from 50 cm-3 in background maritime air to >2500 cm-3 in aged polluted continental air, a concentration much higher than had previously been detected. Surprisingly, N was seen to vary almost linearly with aerosol number across...... were around 0.3 ppbv even in air originating over the ocean, another unexpected but important result for the region. NO2 was present in background concentrations of typically 15 pptv to 100 pptv and NO3. (the nitrate radical) was observed at night throughout. Calculations suggest NO3. losses were...

  3. An insight into the thermodynamic characteristics of human thrombopoietin complexation with TN1 antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibazaki, Chie; Adachi, Motoyasu; Honjo, Eijiro; Tamada, Taro; Maeda, Yoshitake; Tahara, Tomoyuki; Kato, Takashi; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Blaber, Michael; Kuroki, Ryota

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human thrombopoietin (hTPO) primarily stimulates megakaryocytopoiesis and platelet production and is neutralized by the mouse TN1 antibody. The thermodynamic characteristics of TN1 antibody–hTPO complexation were analyzed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) using an antigen‐binding fragment (Fab) derived from the TN1 antibody (TN1‐Fab). To clarify the mechanism by which hTPO is recognized by TN1‐Fab the conformation of free TN1‐Fab was determined to a resolution of 2.0 Å using X‐ray crystallography and compared with the hTPO‐bound form of TN1‐Fab determined by a previous study. This structural comparison revealed that the conformation of TN1‐Fab does not substantially change after hTPO binding and a set of 15 water molecules is released from the antigen‐binding site (paratope) of TN1‐Fab upon hTPO complexation. Interestingly, the heat capacity change (ΔCp) measured by ITC (−1.52 ± 0.05 kJ mol−1 K−1) differed significantly from calculations based upon the X‐ray structure data of the hTPO‐bound and unbound forms of TN1‐Fab (−1.02 ∼ 0.25 kJ mol−1 K−1) suggesting that hTPO undergoes an induced‐fit conformational change combined with significant desolvation upon TN1‐Fab binding. The results shed light on the structural biology associated with neutralizing antibody recognition. PMID:27419667

  4. Clarifying the impact of polycomb complex component disruption in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yukiya; Abe, Akihiro; Emi, Nobuhiko

    2014-04-01

    The dysregulation of proper transcriptional control is a major cause of developmental diseases and cancers. Polycomb proteins form chromatin-modifying complexes that transcriptionally silence genome regions in higher eukaryotes. The BCL6 corepressor (BCOR) complex comprises ring finger protein 1B (RNF2/RING1B), polycomb group ring finger 1 (PCGF1), and lysine-specific demethylase 2B (KDM2B) and is uniquely recruited to nonmethylated CpG islands, where it removes histone H3K36me2 and induces repressive histone H2A monoubiquitylation. Germline BCOR mutations have been detected in patients with oculofaciocardiodental and Lenz microphthalmia syndromes, which are inherited conditions. Recently, several variants of BCOR and BCOR-like 1 (BCORL1) chimeric fusion transcripts were reported in human cancers, including acute promyelocytic leukemia, bone sarcoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition, massively parallel sequencing has identified inactivating somatic BCOR and BCORL1 mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, medulloblastoma, and retinoblastoma. More importantly, patients with AML and MDS with BCOR mutations exhibit poor prognosis. This perspective highlights the detection of BCOR mutations and fusion transcripts of BCOR and BCORL1 and discusses their importance for diagnosing cancer subtypes and estimating the treatment responses of patients. Furthermore, this perspective proposes the need for additional functional studies to clarify the oncogenic mechanism by which BCOR and BCORL1 are disrupted in cancers, and how this may lead to the development of novel therapeutics. Mol Cancer Res; 12(4); 479-84. ©2014 AACR.

  5. Crystal Structure of the Human Symplekin-Ssu72-CTD Phosphopeptide Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Xiang; T Nigaike; S Xiang; T Kilic; M Beh; J Manley; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Symplekin (Pta1 in yeast) is a scaffold in the large protein complex that is required for 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation of eukaryotic messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs); it also participates in transcription initiation and termination by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Symplekin mediates interactions between many different proteins in this machinery, although the molecular basis for its function is not known. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution of the amino-terminal domain (residues 30-340) of human symplekin in a ternary complex with the Pol II carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) Ser5 phosphatase Ssu72 and a CTD Ser5 phosphopeptide. The N-terminal domain of symplekin has the ARM or HEAT fold, with seven pairs of antiparallel {alpha}-helices arranged in the shape of an arc. The structure of Ssu72 has some similarity to that of low-molecular-mass phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase, although Ssu72 has a unique active-site landscape as well as extra structural features at the C terminus that are important for interaction with symplekin. Ssu72 is bound to the concave face of symplekin, and engineered mutations in this interface can abolish interactions between the two proteins. The CTD peptide is bound in the active site of Ssu72, with the pSer5-Pro6 peptide bond in the cis configuration, which contrasts with all other known CTD peptide conformations. Although the active site of Ssu72 is about 25 {angstrom} from the interface with symplekin, we found that the symplekin N-terminal domain stimulates Ssu72 CTD phosphatase activity in vitro. Furthermore, the N-terminal domain of symplekin inhibits polyadenylation in vitro, but only when coupled to transcription. Because catalytically active Ssu72 overcomes this inhibition, our results show a role for mammalian Ssu72 in transcription-coupled pre-mRNA 3'-end processing.

  6. Protein kinases responsible for the phosphorylation of the nuclear egress core complex of human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Eric; Milbradt, Jens; Svrlanska, Adriana; Strojan, Hanife; Häge, Sigrun; Kraut, Alexandra; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Amin, Bushra; Sonnewald, Uwe; Couté, Yohann; Marschall, Manfred

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear egress of herpesvirus capsids is mediated by a multi-component nuclear egress complex (NEC) assembled by a heterodimer of two essential viral core egress proteins. In the case of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), this core NEC is defined by the interaction between the membrane-anchored pUL50 and its nuclear cofactor, pUL53. NEC protein phosphorylation is considered to be an important regulatory step, so this study focused on the respective role of viral and cellular protein kinases. Multiply phosphorylated pUL50 varieties were detected by Western blot and Phos-tag analyses as resulting from both viral and cellular kinase activities. In vitro kinase analyses demonstrated that pUL50 is a substrate of both PKCα and CDK1, while pUL53 can also be moderately phosphorylated by CDK1. The use of kinase inhibitors further illustrated the importance of distinct kinases for core NEC phosphorylation. Importantly, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses identified five major and nine minor sites of pUL50 phosphorylation. The functional relevance of core NEC phosphorylation was confirmed by various experimental settings, including kinase knock-down/knock-out and confocal imaging, in which it was found that (i) HCMV core NEC proteins are not phosphorylated solely by viral pUL97, but also by cellular kinases; (ii) both PKC and CDK1 phosphorylation are detectable for pUL50; (iii) no impact of PKC phosphorylation on NEC functionality has been identified so far; (iv) nonetheless, CDK1-specific phosphorylation appears to be required for functional core NEC interaction. In summary, our findings provide the first evidence that the HCMV core NEC is phosphorylated by cellular kinases, and that the complex pattern of NEC phosphorylation has functional relevance.

  7. Melarsoprol cyclodextrin inclusion complexes as promising oral candidates for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Rodgers

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, or sleeping sickness, results from infection with the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei (T. b. gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense and is invariably fatal if untreated. There are 60 million people at risk from the disease throughout sub-Saharan Africa. The infection progresses from the haemolymphatic stage where parasites invade the blood, lymphatics and peripheral organs, to the late encephalitic stage where they enter the central nervous system (CNS to cause serious neurological disease. The trivalent arsenical drug melarsoprol (Arsobal is the only currently available treatment for CNS-stage T. b. rhodesiense infection. However, it must be administered intravenously due to the presence of propylene glycol solvent and is associated with numerous adverse reactions. A severe post-treatment reactive encephalopathy occurs in about 10% of treated patients, half of whom die. Thus melarsoprol kills 5% of all patients receiving it. Cyclodextrins have been used to improve the solubility and reduce the toxicity of a wide variety of drugs. We therefore investigated two melarsoprol cyclodextrin inclusion complexes; melarsoprol hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and melarsoprol randomly-methylated-β-cyclodextrin. We found that these compounds retain trypanocidal properties in vitro and cure CNS-stage murine infections when delivered orally, once per day for 7-days, at a dosage of 0.05 mmol/kg. No overt signs of toxicity were detected. Parasite load within the brain was rapidly reduced following treatment onset and magnetic resonance imaging showed restoration of normal blood-brain barrier integrity on completion of chemotherapy. These findings strongly suggest that complexed melarsoprol could be employed as an oral treatment for CNS-stage HAT, delivering considerable improvements over current parenteral chemotherapy.

  8. A third component of the human cytomegalovirus terminase complex is involved in letermovir resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Sunwen

    2017-12-01

    Letermovir is a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) terminase inhibitor that was clinically effective in a Phase III prevention trial. In vitro studies have shown that viral mutations conferring letermovir resistance map primarily to the UL56 component of the terminase complex and uncommonly to UL89. After serial culture of a baseline CMV laboratory strain under letermovir, mutation was observed in a third terminase component in 2 experiments, both resulting in amino acid substitution P91S in gene UL51 and adding to a pre-existing UL56 mutation. Recombinant phenotyping indicated that P91S alone conferred 2.1-fold increased letermovir resistance (EC50) over baseline, and when combined with UL56 mutation S229F or R369M, multiplied the level of resistance conferred by those mutations by 3.5-7.7-fold. Similarly a combination of UL56 mutations S229F, L254F and L257I selected in the same experiment conferred 54-fold increased letermovir EC50 over baseline, but 290-fold when combined with UL51 P91S. The P91S mutant was not perceptibly growth impaired. Although pUL51 is essential for normal function of the terminase complex, its biological significance is not well understood. Letermovir resistance mutations mapping to 3 separate genes, and their multiplier effect on the level of resistance, suggest that the terminase components interactively contribute to the structure of a letermovir antiviral target. The diagnostic importance of the UL51 P91S mutation arises from its potential to augment the letermovir resistance of some UL56 mutations at low fitness cost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of spectral complexity and sound duration on automatic complex-sound pitch processing in humans - a mismatch negativity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaniemi, M; Schröger, E; Saher, M; Näätänen, R

    2000-08-18

    The pitch of a spectrally rich sound is known to be more easily perceived than that of a sinusoidal tone. The present study compared the importance of spectral complexity and sound duration in facilitated pitch discrimination. The mismatch negativity (MMN), which reflects automatic neural discrimination, was recorded to a 2. 5% pitch change in pure tones with only one sinusoidal frequency component (500 Hz) and in spectrally rich tones with three (500-1500 Hz) and five (500-2500 Hz) harmonic partials. During the recordings, subjects concentrated on watching a silent movie. In separate blocks, stimuli were of 100 and 250 ms in duration. The MMN amplitude was enhanced with both spectrally rich sounds when compared with pure tones. The prolonged sound duration did not significantly enhance the MMN. This suggests that increased spectral rather than temporal information facilitates pitch processing of spectrally rich sounds.

  10. Use of avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex for measurement of UV lesions in human DNA by microELISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leipold, B [Technischen Universitaet Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Dermatologische Klinik; Remy, W [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie, Muenchen (Germany, F.R.)

    1984-02-10

    The avidin/biotin system was introduced into the standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to increase its sensitivity for detecting UV lesions in human DNA. Goat anti-rabbit IgG-peroxidase used in the standard ELISA as second antibody was replaced by biotinylated goat anti-rabbit IgG plus the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) reagent. Sensitivity of detection of plate-fixed UV-DNA-antibody complexes was increased about 8-fold and photolesions in human DNA samples irradiated with as low a dose as 1 J/m/sup 2/ UVC or a suberythermal dose of UVB light could be detected.

  11. Complexity of Complement Resistance Factors Expressed by Acinetobacter baumannii Needed for Survival in Human Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Larrayoz, Amaro F; Elhosseiny, Noha M; Chevrette, Marc G; Fu, Yang; Giunta, Peter; Spallanzani, Raúl G; Ravi, Keerthikka; Pier, Gerald B; Lory, Stephen; Maira-Litrán, Tomás

    2017-10-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterial pathogen with increasing impact in healthcare settings, due in part to this organism's resistance to many antimicrobial agents, with pneumonia and bacteremia as the most common manifestations of disease. A significant proportion of clinically relevant A. baumannii strains are resistant to killing by normal human serum (NHS), an observation supported in this study by showing that 12 out of 15 genetically diverse strains of A. baumannii are resistant to NHS killing. To expand our understanding of the genetic basis of A. baumannii serum resistance, a transposon (Tn) sequencing (Tn-seq) approach was used to identify genes contributing to this trait. An ordered Tn library in strain AB5075 with insertions in every nonessential gene was subjected to selection in NHS. We identified 50 genes essential for the survival of A. baumannii in NHS, including already known serum resistance factors, and many novel genes not previously associated with serum resistance. This latter group included the maintenance of lipid asymmetry genetic pathway as a key determinant in protecting A. baumannii from the bactericidal activity of NHS via the alternative complement pathway. Follow-up studies validated the role of eight additional genes identified by Tn-seq in A. baumannii resistance to killing by NHS but not by normal mouse serum, highlighting the human species specificity of A. baumannii serum resistance. The identification of a large number of genes essential for serum resistance in A. baumannii indicates the degree of complexity needed for this phenotype, which might reflect a general pattern that pathogens rely on to cause serious infections. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Evolving hard problems: Generating human genetics datasets with a complex etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himmelstein Daniel S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A goal of human genetics is to discover genetic factors that influence individuals' susceptibility to common diseases. Most common diseases are thought to result from the joint failure of two or more interacting components instead of single component failures. This greatly complicates both the task of selecting informative genetic variants and the task of modeling interactions between them. We and others have previously developed algorithms to detect and model the relationships between these genetic factors and disease. Previously these methods have been evaluated with datasets simulated according to pre-defined genetic models. Results Here we develop and evaluate a model free evolution strategy to generate datasets which display a complex relationship between individual genotype and disease susceptibility. We show that this model free approach is capable of generating a diverse array of datasets with distinct gene-disease relationships for an arbitrary interaction order and sample size. We specifically generate eight-hundred Pareto fronts; one for each independent run of our algorithm. In each run the predictiveness of single genetic variation and pairs of genetic variants have been minimized, while the predictiveness of third, fourth, or fifth-order combinations is maximized. Two hundred runs of the algorithm are further dedicated to creating datasets with predictive four or five order interactions and minimized lower-level effects. Conclusions This method and the resulting datasets will allow the capabilities of novel methods to be tested without pre-specified genetic models. This allows researchers to evaluate which methods will succeed on human genetics problems where the model is not known in advance. We further make freely available to the community the entire Pareto-optimal front of datasets from each run so that novel methods may be rigorously evaluated. These 76,600 datasets are available from http://discovery.dartmouth.edu/model_free_data/.

  13. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen (Sanofi); (Michigan); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  14. Complexation of intracellular cyanide by hydroxocobalamin using a human cellular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astier, A; Baud, F J

    1996-01-01

    1. The rational for administering hydroxocobalamin (OHCbl) as an antidote to cyanide poisoning is based on the high affinity of CN ion for cobalt compounds. However, only few data are available on the influence of OHCbl on the intracellular cyanide pool. 2. In human fibroblasts incubated for 10 min with 500 microM of [14C] cyanide, the accumulation ratio was 25 at 37 degrees C (10.45 +/- 1.51 mM) and 11.9 at 4 degrees C. 3. Using the monoblastic U-937 cell line, a rapid uptake of radioactive cyanide was observed with a maximum accumulation ratio of 1.97 at 5 min. 4. A linear relationship between cyanide uptake by U-937 cells and cyanide concentration in incubation medium (10-500 microM; 5 min) was found suggesting a first order process (k = 0.25 min-1). 5. After incubation of fibroblasts with 500 microM of OHCbl, a 75% decrease of intracellular cyanide was observed, with concomittant formation of intracellular cyanocobalamin CNCbl (intracellular/extracellular ratio: 158). 6. These findings suggest that OHCbl is able to penetrate into heavily cyanide loaded cells and to complex cyanide to the non-toxic CNCbl form.

  15. Age and sex effects on human mutation rates. An old problem with new complexities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crow, James F.

    2006-01-01

    Base substitution mutations are far more common in human males than in females, and the frequency increases with paternal age. Both can be accounted for by the greater number of pre-meiotic cell divisions in males, especially old ones. In contrast, small deletions do not show any important age effect and occur with approximately equal frequency in the two sexes. Mutations in most genes include both types, and the sex and paternal age effect depends on the proportion of the two types. A few traits, of which Apert Syndrome is best understood, are mutation hot spots with all the mutations occurring in one or two codons, usually at one nucleotide. They occur with very high frequency almost exclusively in males and the frequency increases rapidly with paternal age. It has been suggested that the mutant cells have a selective advantage in the male germ-line prior to meiosis. Evidence for this surprising, but important, hypothesis is discussed. A possible mechanism is the conversion of asymmetrical stem-cell divisions into symmetric ones. Some traits with complex etiology show a slight paternal age effect. There is also a short discussion of the high deleterious mutation rate and the role of sexual reproduction in reducing the consequent mutation load. (author)

  16. Biomolecular identification of ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA in human remains from Britain and continental Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Romy; Roberts, Charlotte A; Brown, Terence A

    2014-02-01

    Tuberculosis is known to have afflicted humans throughout history and re-emerged towards the end of the 20th century, to an extent that it was declared a global emergency in 1993. The aim of this study was to apply a rigorous analytical regime to the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) DNA in 77 bone and tooth samples from 70 individuals from Britain and continental Europe, spanning the 1st-19th centuries AD. We performed the work in dedicated ancient DNA facilities designed to prevent all types of modern contamination, we checked the authenticity of all products obtained by the polymerase chain reaction, and we based our conclusions on up to four replicate experiments for each sample, some carried out in an independent laboratory. We identified 12 samples that, according to our strict criteria, gave definite evidence for the presence of MTBC DNA, and another 22 that we classified as "probable" or "possible." None of the definite samples came from vertebrae displaying lesions associated with TB. Instead, eight were from ribs displaying visceral new bone formation, one was a tooth from a skeleton with rib lesions, one was taken from a skeleton with endocranial lesions, one from an individual with lesions to the sacrum and sacroiliac joint and the last was from an individual with no lesions indicative of TB or possible TB. Our results add to information on the past temporal and geographical distribution of TB and affirm the suitability of ribs for studying ancient TB. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Crystal structure analysis of human serum albumin complexed with sodium 4-phenylbutyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Akito; Yamasaki, Keishi; Enokida, Taisuke; Miyamoto, Shuichi; Otagiri, Masaki

    2018-03-01

    Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PB) is an orphan drug for the treatment of urea cycle disorders. It also inhibits the development of endoplasmic reticulum stress, the action of histone deacetylases and as a regulator of the hepatocanalicular transporter. PB is generally considered to have the potential for use in the treatment of the diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and metabolic diseases. In a previous study, we reported that PB is primarily bound to human serum albumin (HSA) in plasma and its binding site is drug site 2. However, details of the binding mode of PB to HSA remain unknown. To address this issue, we examined the crystal structure of HSA with PB bound to it. The structure of the HSA-PB complex indicates that the binding mode of PB to HSA is quite similar to that for octanoate or drugs that bind to drug site 2, as opposed to that for other medium-chain length of fatty acids. These findings provide useful basic information related to drug-HSA interactions. Moreover, the information presented herein is valuable in terms of providing safe and efficient treatment and diagnosis in clinical settings.

  18. Non-canonical TAF complexes regulate active promoters in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maston, Glenn A; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Chamberlain, Lynn; Lin, Ling; Fang, Minggang; Green, Michael R

    2012-11-13

    The general transcription factor TFIID comprises the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP) and approximately 14 TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Here we find, unexpectedly, that undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) contain only six TAFs (TAFs 2, 3, 5, 6, 7 and 11), whereas following differentiation all TAFs are expressed. Directed and global chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses reveal an unprecedented promoter occupancy pattern: most active genes are bound by only TAFs 3 and 5 along with TBP, whereas the remaining active genes are bound by TBP and all six hESC TAFs. Consistent with these results, hESCs contain a previously undescribed complex comprising TAFs 2, 6, 7, 11 and TBP. Altering the composition of hESC TAFs, either by depleting TAFs that are present or ectopically expressing TAFs that are absent, results in misregulated expression of pluripotency genes and induction of differentiation. Thus, the selective expression and use of TAFs underlies the ability of hESCs to self-renew.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00068.001.

  19. Protein chimerism: novel source of protein diversity in humans adds complexity to bottom-up proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Vela, Juan; Lacal, Juan Carlos; Elortza, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Three main molecular mechanisms are considered to contribute expanding the repertoire and diversity of proteins present in living organisms: first, at DNA level (gene polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms); second, at messenger RNA (pre-mRNA and mRNA) level including alternative splicing (also termed differential splicing or cis-splicing); finally, at the protein level mainly driven through PTM and specific proteolytic cleavages. Chimeric mRNAs constitute an alternative source of protein diversity, which can be generated either by chromosomal translocations or by trans-splicing events. The occurrence of chimeric mRNAs and proteins is a frequent event in cells from the immune system and cancer cells, mainly as a consequence of gene rearrangements. Recent reports support that chimeric proteins may also be expressed at low levels under normal physiological circumstances, thus, representing a novel source of protein diversity. Notably, recent publications demonstrate that chimeric protein products can be successfully identified through bottom-up proteomic analyses. Several questions remain unsolved, such as the physiological role and impact of such chimeric proteins or the potential occurrence of chimeric proteins in higher eukaryotic organisms different from humans. The occurrence of chimeric proteins certainly seems to be another unforeseen source of complexity for the proteome. It may be a process to take in mind not only when performing bottom-up proteomic analyses in cancer studies but also in general bottom-up proteomics experiments. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The role of Mycobacterium avium complex fibronectin attachment protein in adherence to the human respiratory mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, A M; Chadwick, M V; Nicholson, A G; Dewar, A; Groger, R K; Brown, E J; Wilson, R

    2000-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are opportunistic respiratory pathogens that infect non-immunocompromised patients with established lung disease, although they can also cause primary infections. The ability to bind fibronectin is conserved among many mycobacterial species. We have investigated the adherence of a sputum isolate of MAC to the mucosa of organ cultures constructed with human tissue and the contribution of M. avium fibronectin attachment protein (FAP) to the process. MAC adhered to fibrous, but not globular mucus, and to extracellular matrix (ECM) in areas of epithelial damage, but not to intact extruded cells and collagen fibres. Bacteria occasionally adhered to healthy unciliated epithelium and to cells that had degenerated exposing their contents, but never to ciliated cells. The results obtained with different respiratory tissues were similar. Two ATCC strains of MAC gave similar results. There was a significant reduction (P fibrous mucus was unchanged. Immunogold labelling demonstrated fibronectin in ECM as well as in other areas of epithelial damage, but only ECM bound FAP. A Mycobacterium smegmatis strain had the same pattern of adherence to the mucosa as MAC. When the FAP gene was deleted, the strain demonstrated reduced adherence to ECM, and adherence was restored when the strain was transfected with an M. avium FAP expression construct. We conclude that MAC adheres to ECM in areas of epithelial damage via FAP and to mucus with a fibrous appearance via another adhesin. Epithelial damage exposing ECM and poor mucus clearance will predispose to MAC airway infection.

  1. Proteomic identification of dysferlin-interacting protein complexes in human vascular endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Cleo; Utokaparch, Soraya; Sharma, Arpeeta; Yu, Carol; Abraham, Thomas; Borchers, Christoph; Bernatchez, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bi-directional (inward and outward) movement of GFP-dysferlin in COS-7 cells. ► Dysferlin interacts with key signaling proteins for transcytosis in EC. ► Dysferlin mediates trafficking of vesicles carrying protein cargos in EC. -- Abstract: Dysferlin is a membrane-anchored protein known to facilitate membrane repair in skeletal muscles following mechanical injury. Mutations of dysferlin gene impair sarcolemma integrity, a hallmark of certain forms of muscular dystrophy in patients. Dysferlin contains seven calcium-dependent C2 binding domains, which are required to promote fusion of intracellular membrane vesicles. Emerging evidence reveal the unexpected expression of dysferlin in non-muscle, non-mechanically active tissues, such as endothelial cells, which cast doubts over the belief that ferlin proteins act exclusively as membrane repair proteins. We and others have shown that deficient trafficking of membrane bound proteins in dysferlin-deficient cells, suggesting that dysferlin might mediate trafficking of client proteins. Herein, we describe the intracellular trafficking and movement of GFP-dysferlin positive vesicles in unfixed reconstituted cells using live microscopy. By performing GST pull-down assays followed by mass spectrometry, we identified dysferlin binding protein complexes in human vascular endothelial cells. Together, our data further support the claims that dysferlin not only mediates membrane repair but also trafficking of client proteins, ultimately, help bridging dysferlinopathies to aberrant membrane signaling.

  2. Proteomic identification of dysferlin-interacting protein complexes in human vascular endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Cleo; Utokaparch, Soraya; Sharma, Arpeeta; Yu, Carol; Abraham, Thomas; Borchers, Christoph [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, Institute for Heart and Lung Health, Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of Victoria - Genome BC Proteomics Centre, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Bernatchez, Pascal, E-mail: pbernatc@mail.ubc.ca [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, Institute for Heart and Lung Health, Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of Victoria - Genome BC Proteomics Centre, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi-directional (inward and outward) movement of GFP-dysferlin in COS-7 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin interacts with key signaling proteins for transcytosis in EC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin mediates trafficking of vesicles carrying protein cargos in EC. -- Abstract: Dysferlin is a membrane-anchored protein known to facilitate membrane repair in skeletal muscles following mechanical injury. Mutations of dysferlin gene impair sarcolemma integrity, a hallmark of certain forms of muscular dystrophy in patients. Dysferlin contains seven calcium-dependent C2 binding domains, which are required to promote fusion of intracellular membrane vesicles. Emerging evidence reveal the unexpected expression of dysferlin in non-muscle, non-mechanically active tissues, such as endothelial cells, which cast doubts over the belief that ferlin proteins act exclusively as membrane repair proteins. We and others have shown that deficient trafficking of membrane bound proteins in dysferlin-deficient cells, suggesting that dysferlin might mediate trafficking of client proteins. Herein, we describe the intracellular trafficking and movement of GFP-dysferlin positive vesicles in unfixed reconstituted cells using live microscopy. By performing GST pull-down assays followed by mass spectrometry, we identified dysferlin binding protein complexes in human vascular endothelial cells. Together, our data further support the claims that dysferlin not only mediates membrane repair but also trafficking of client proteins, ultimately, help bridging dysferlinopathies to aberrant membrane signaling.

  3. Complexity of mechanisms among human proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Jacqueline S; Hegele, Robert A

    2017-04-01

    There are many reports of human variants in proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) that are either gain-of-function (GOF) or loss-of-function (LOF), with downstream effects on LDL cholesterol and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, data on particular mechanisms have only been minimally curated. GOF variants are individually ultrarare, affect all domains of the protein, act to reduce LDL receptor expression through several mechanisms, are a minor cause of familial hypercholesterolemia, have been reported mainly within families, have variable LDL cholesterol-raising effects, and are associated with increased CVD risk mainly through observational studies in families and small cohorts. In contrast, LOF variants can be either ultrarare mutations or relatively more common polymorphisms seen in populations, affect all domains of the protein, act to increase LDL receptor expression through several mechanisms, have variable LDL cholesterol-lowering effects, and have been associated with decreased CVD risk mainly through Mendelian randomization studies in epidemiologic populations. There is considerable complexity underlying the clinical concept of both LOF and GOF variants of PCSK9. But despite the underlying mechanistic heterogeneity, altered PCSK9 secretion or function is ultimately correlated with plasma LDL cholesterol level, which is also the driver of CVD outcomes.

  4. Structure of a retro-binding peptide inhibitor complexed with human alpha-thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, L; Chang, C Y; Ohringer, S L; Lau, W F; Iwanowicz, E J; Han, W C; Wang, T C; Seiler, S M; Roberts, D G; Sack, J S

    1995-02-10

    The crystallographic structure of the ternary complex between human alpha-thrombin, hirugen and the peptidyl inhibitor Phe-alloThr-Phe-O-CH3, which is acylated at its N terminus with 4-guanidino butanoic acid (BMS-183507), has been determined at 2.6 A resolution. The structure reveals a unique "retro-binding" mode for this tripeptide active site inhibitor. The inhibitor binds with its alkyl-guanidine moiety in the primary specificity pocket and its two phenyl rings occupying the hydrophobic proximal and distal pockets of the thrombin active site. In this arrangement the backbone of the tripeptide forms a parallel beta-strand to the thrombin main-chain at the binding site. This is opposite to the orientation of the natural substrate, fibrinogen, and all the small active site-directed thrombin inhibitors whose bound structures have been previously reported. BMS-183507 is the first synthetic inhibitor proved to bind in a retro-binding fashion to thrombin, in a fashion similar to that of the N-terminal residues of the natural inhibitor hirudin. Furthermore, this new potent thrombin inhibitor (Ki = 17.2 nM) is selective for thrombin over other serine proteases tested and may be a template to be considered in designing hirudin-based thrombin inhibitors with interactions at the specificity pocket.

  5. Dorso-medial and ventro-lateral functional specialization of the human retrosplenial complex in spatial updating and orienting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burles, Ford; Slone, Edward; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The retrosplenial complex is a region within the posterior cingulate cortex implicated in spatial navigation. Here, we investigated the functional specialization of this large and anatomically heterogeneous region using fMRI and resting-state functional connectivity combined with a spatial task with distinct phases of spatial 'updating' (i.e., integrating and maintaining object locations in memory during spatial displacement) and 'orienting' (i.e., recalling unseen locations from current position in space). Both spatial 'updating' and 'orienting' produced bilateral activity in the retrosplenial complex, among other areas. However, spatial 'updating' produced slightly greater activity in ventro-lateral portions, of the retrosplenial complex, whereas spatial 'orienting' produced greater activity in a more dorsal and medial portion of it (both regions localized along the parieto-occipital fissure). At rest, both ventro-lateral and dorso-medial subregions of the retrosplenial complex were functionally connected to the hippocampus and parahippocampus, regions both involved in spatial orientation and navigation. However, the ventro-lateral subregion of the retrosplenial complex displayed more positive functional connectivity with ventral occipital and temporal object recognition regions, whereas the dorso-medial subregion activity was more correlated to dorsal activity and frontal activity, as well as negatively correlated with more ventral parietal structures. These findings provide evidence for a dorso-medial to ventro-lateral functional specialization within the human retrosplenial complex that may shed more light on the complex neural mechanisms underlying spatial orientation and navigation in humans.

  6. Biophysical study on the interaction between two palladium(II) complexes and human serum albumin by Multispectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidifar, Maryam, E-mail: saeidifar@merc.ac.ir [Department of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Materials and Energy Research Center, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan [Department of Chemistry, University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbar Saboury, Ali [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The interaction of [Pd(bpy)(n-pr-dtc)]Br (I) and ([Pd(phen)(n-pr-dtc)]Br (II) (bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline and n-pr-dtc=n-propyldithiocarbamate) with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using fluorescence, UV–vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy techniques under simulative physiological conditions (pH=7.4). It was observed that the two complexes interact with HSA via static fluorescence quenching. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that the binding process was spontaneous and that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces play a major role in the association of the HSA–Pd(II) complexes. The activation energy (E{sub a}), binding constant (K{sub b}) and number of binding sites (n) of the HSA–Pd(II) complexes were calculated from fluorescence data at 293 K, 303 K and 311 K. The conformational alternations of protein secondary structure in the presence of Pd(II) complexes were demonstrated using synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, UV–vis absorption and circular dichroism techniques. Furthermore, the apparent distance between donor (HSA) and acceptor (Pd(II) complexes) was determined using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The binding studies between these complexes and HSA give us key insights into the transportation, distribution and toxicity of newly design antitumor Pd(II) complexes in human blood. - Highlights: • The HSA binding properties of two Palladium (II) complexes were studied. • Static quenching mechanism is effective in the interaction of HSA with Pd(II) complexes. • Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces were involved in the Pd(II) complexes–HSA interaction. • 3D fluorescence was used to study the interaction between two complexes and HSA.

  7. Immunohistochemical Mapping of Sensory Nerve Endings in the Human Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Susanne; Semisch, Manuel; Garcia-Elias, Marc; Lluch, Alex; Zwipp, Hans; Hagert, Elisabet

    2015-10-01

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex is the main stabilizer of the distal radioulnar joint. While static joint stability is constituted by osseous and ligamentous integrity, the dynamic aspects of joint stability chiefly concern proprioceptive control of the compressive and directional muscular forces acting on the joint. Therefore, an investigation of the pattern and types of sensory nerve endings gives more insight in dynamic distal radioulnar joint stability. We aimed to (1) analyze the general distribution of sensory nerve endings and blood vessels; (2) examine interstructural distribution of sensory nerve endings and blood vessels; (3) compare the number and types of mechanoreceptors in each part; and (4) analyze intrastructural distribution of nerve endings at different tissue depth. The subsheath of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon sheath, the ulnocarpal meniscoid, the articular disc, the dorsal and volar radioulnar ligaments, and the ulnolunate and ulnotriquetral ligaments were dissected from 11 human cadaver wrists. Sensory nerve endings were counted in five levels per specimen as total cell amount/cm(2) after staining with low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75, protein gene product 9.5, and S-100 protein and thereafter classified according to Freeman and Wyke. All types of sensory corpuscles were found in the various structures of the triangular fibrocartilage complex with the exception of the ulnolunate ligament, which contained only Golgi-like endings, free nerve endings, and unclassifiable corpuscles. The articular disc had only free nerve endings. Furthermore, free nerve endings were the predominant sensory nerve ending (median, 72.6/cm(2); range, 0-469.4/cm(2)) and more prevalent than all other types of mechanoreceptors: Ruffini (median, 0; range, 0-5.6/cm(2); difference of medians, 72.6; p fibrocartilage complex (p ≤ 0.001, respectively) except the ulnolunate ligament. More blood vessels were seen in the volar radioulnar ligament (median, 363

  8. A DYNAMIC PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED TOXICOKINETIC (DPBTK) MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF COMPLEX TOLUENE EXPOSURE SCENARIOS IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A GENERAL PHYSIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOKINETIC (GPAT) MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF COMPLEX TOLUENE EXPOSURE SCENARIOS IN HUMANS. E M Kenyon1, T Colemen2, C R Eklund1 and V A Benignus3. 1U.S. EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, PKB, RTP, NC, USA; 2Biological Simulators, Inc., Jackson MS, USA, 3U.S. EP...

  9. Human sperm bioassay has potential in evaluating the quality of cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, A M; Rizk, B; Huff, C; Helvacioglu, A; Thorneycroft, I H

    1996-01-01

    Human sperm bioassay is routinely used as a quality control check for the culture media. This is one of the three bioassays chosen by the College of American Pathologists (CAP) for interlaboratory proficiency testing to assess the standards of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and andrology laboratories. This study utilized sperm bioassay to assess the quality of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) retrieved in IVF procedures COCs, harvested from the female partner of IVF couples, undergoing identical ovarian stimulation protocols, were individually inseminated with the sperm of the corresponding male partner. Sperm motility in sperm-COC cocultures were compared. Cocultures were established by inseminating the 103 COCs, retrieved from 18 IVF couples with 1 x 10(5) to 2 x 10(5) sperm of the corresponding male partners of the couples. In all 18 cases, the sperm were prepared identically using the Percoll wash method. The cocultures were maintained for 48 h but the oocytes were removed immediately after the fertilization check (approximately 16 h). The motility of sperm in the cocultures and in the insemination stocks were noted and 17 of 18 sperm stocks used for insemination had similar high preinsemination motility (90.2 +/- 5.0%). At 48 h the sperm motility had significantly decreased in the cocultures compared to the insemination stocks; 52.7 +/- 19.9% versus 67.2 +/- 10.4%. There was no difference in the motility among the small, medium, and large COCs (56.4 +/- 24.6%, 52.5 +/- 17.9%, and 50.8 +/- 20.9%, respectively). In 45% of IVF cases, the motility in cocultures varied widely, falling below as well as above that of their corresponding insemination stocks. Furthermore, the sperm motility varied among the cocultures in both pregnant and nonpregnant patients but the extent of variation appears to be greater in the latter. The inter-COC coculture sperm motility variation most likely is due to the differences in the quality of cumulus-oocyte complexes.

  10. Complex interactions between human myoblasts and the surrounding 3D fibrin-based matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Chiron

    Full Text Available Anchorage of muscle cells to the extracellular matrix is crucial for a range of fundamental biological processes including migration, survival and differentiation. Three-dimensional (3D culture has been proposed to provide a more physiological in vitro model of muscle growth and differentiation than routine 2D cultures. However, muscle cell adhesion and cell-matrix interplay of engineered muscle tissue remain to be determined. We have characterized cell-matrix interactions in 3D muscle culture and analyzed their consequences on cell differentiation. Human myoblasts were embedded in a fibrin matrix cast between two posts, cultured until confluence, and then induced to differentiate. Myoblasts in 3D aligned along the longitudinal axis of the gel. They displayed actin stress fibers evenly distributed around the nucleus and a cortical mesh of thin actin filaments. Adhesion sites in 3D were smaller in size than in rigid 2D culture but expression of adhesion site proteins, including α5 integrin and vinculin, was higher in 3D compared with 2D (p<0.05. Myoblasts and myotubes in 3D exhibited thicker and ellipsoid nuclei instead of the thin disk-like shape of the nuclei in 2D (p<0.001. Differentiation kinetics were faster in 3D as demonstrated by higher mRNA concentrations of α-actinin and myosin. More important, the elastic modulus of engineered muscle tissues increased significantly from 3.5 ± 0.8 to 7.4 ± 4.7 kPa during proliferation (p<0.05 and reached 12.2 ± 6.0 kPa during differentiation (p<0.05, thus attesting the increase of matrix stiffness during proliferation and differentiation of the myocytes. In conclusion, we reported modulations of the adhesion complexes, the actin cytoskeleton and nuclear shape in 3D compared with routine 2D muscle culture. These findings point to complex interactions between muscle cells and the surrounding matrix with dynamic regulation of the cell-matrix stiffness.

  11. Issues of human resources management in the enterprises of the machine-building complex of the Tyumen region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lez’er Victoria

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, the authors have considered theoretical-methodological and practical aspects of human resource management in the process of restructuring enterprises of the machine-building complex of the Tyumen region. Based on the study of the evolution of theories concerning the human factor in the economy, the systematization and generalization of the provisions contained therein, the system of categories in the field of human resource management is substantiated. The basic principles of such management have been identified and supplemented, the tasks facing the enterprise management have been clarified, new tools for human resource management have been proposed, to ensure the completeness, continuity and validity of the decisions made in the field of human resources management in the restructuring of industrial enterprises.

  12. Complex nature of SNP genotype effects on gene expression in primary human leucocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesen Lotte C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association studies have been hugely successful in identifying disease risk variants, yet most variants do not lead to coding changes and how variants influence biological function is usually unknown. Methods We correlated gene expression and genetic variation in untouched primary leucocytes (n = 110 from individuals with celiac disease – a common condition with multiple risk variants identified. We compared our observations with an EBV-transformed HapMap B cell line dataset (n = 90, and performed a meta-analysis to increase power to detect non-tissue specific effects. Results In celiac peripheral blood, 2,315 SNP variants influenced gene expression at 765 different transcripts (cis expression quantitative trait loci, eQTLs. 135 of the detected SNP-probe effects (reflecting 51 unique probes were also detected in a HapMap B cell line published dataset, all with effects in the same allelic direction. Overall gene expression differences within the two datasets predominantly explain the limited overlap in observed cis-eQTLs. Celiac associated risk variants from two regions, containing genes IL18RAP and CCR3, showed significant cis genotype-expression correlations in the peripheral blood but not in the B cell line datasets. We identified 14 genes where a SNP affected the expression of different probes within the same gene, but in opposite allelic directions. By incorporating genetic variation in co-expression analyses, functional relationships between genes can be more significantly detected. Conclusion In conclusion, the complex nature of genotypic effects in human populations makes the use of a relevant tissue, large datasets, and analysis of different exons essential to enable the identification of the function for many genetic risk variants in common diseases.

  13. Differential association of protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welting, Tim J M; Kikkert, Bastiaan J; van Venrooij, Walther J; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2006-07-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in nucleolar and mitochondrial RNA processing events. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein particle, which is structurally related to RNase P, an endoribonuclease involved in pre-tRNA processing. Most of the protein components of RNase MRP have been reported to be associated with RNase P as well. In this study we determined the association of these protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P particles by glycerol gradient sedimentation and coimmunoprecipitation. In agreement with previous studies, RNase MRP sedimented at 12S and 60-80S. In contrast, only a single major peak was observed for RNase P at 12S. The analysis of individual protein subunits revealed that hPop4 (also known as Rpp29), Rpp21, Rpp20, and Rpp25 only sedimented in 12S fractions, whereas hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 were also found in 60-80S fractions. In agreement with their cosedimentation with RNase P RNA in the 12S peak, coimmunoprecipitation with VSV-epitope-tagged protein subunits revealed that hPop4, Rpp21, and in addition Rpp14 preferentially associate with RNase P. These data show that hPop4, Rpp21, and Rpp14 may not be associated with RNase MRP. Furthermore, Rpp20 and Rpp25 appear to be associated with only a subset of RNase MRP particles, in contrast to hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 (and possibly also hPop5), which are probably associated with all RNase MRP complexes. Our data are consistent with a transient association of Rpp20 and Rpp25 with RNase MRP, which may be inversely correlated to its involvement in pre-rRNA processing.

  14. Complex and changing patterns of natural selection explain the evolution of the human hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Mark; Roseman, Charles C

    2015-08-01

    Causal explanations for the dramatic changes that occurred during the evolution of the human hip focus largely on selection for bipedal function and locomotor efficiency. These hypotheses rest on two critical assumptions. The first-that these anatomical changes served functional roles in bipedalism-has been supported in numerous analyses showing how postcranial changes likely affected locomotion. The second-that morphological changes that did play functional roles in bipedalism were the result of selection for that behavior-has not been previously explored and represents a major gap in our understanding of hominin hip evolution. Here we use evolutionary quantitative genetic models to test the hypothesis that strong directional selection on many individual aspects of morphology was responsible for the large differences observed across a sample of fossil hominin hips spanning the Plio-Pleistocene. Our approach uses covariance among traits and the differences between relatively complete fossils to estimate the net selection pressures that drove the major transitions in hominin hip evolution. Our findings show a complex and changing pattern of natural selection drove hominin hip evolution, and that many, but not all, traits hypothesized to play functional roles in bipedalism evolved as a direct result of natural selection. While the rate of evolutionary change for all transitions explored here does not exceed the amount expected if evolution was occurring solely through neutral processes, it was far above rates of evolution for morphological traits in other mammalian groups. Given that stasis is the norm in the mammalian fossil record, our results suggest that large shifts in the adaptive landscape drove hominin evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The human milk protein-lipid complex HAMLET sensitizes bacterial pathogens to traditional antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laura R; Clementi, Emily A; Hakansson, Anders P

    2012-01-01

    The fight against antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to public health of our time. The inevitable development of resistance following the introduction of novel antibiotics has led to an urgent need for the development of new antibacterial drugs with new mechanisms of action that are not susceptible to existing resistance mechanisms. One such compound is HAMLET, a natural complex from human milk that kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) using a mechanism different from common antibiotics and is immune to resistance-development. In this study we show that sublethal concentrations of HAMLET potentiate the effect of common antibiotics (penicillins, macrolides, and aminoglycosides) against pneumococci. Using MIC assays and short-time killing assays we dramatically reduced the concentrations of antibiotics needed to kill pneumococci, especially for antibiotic-resistant strains that in the presence of HAMLET fell into the clinically sensitive range. Using a biofilm model in vitro and nasopharyngeal colonization in vivo, a combination of HAMLET and antibiotics completely eradicated both biofilms and colonization in mice of both antibiotic-sensitive and resistant strains, something each agent alone was unable to do. HAMLET-potentiation of antibiotics was partially due to increased accessibility of antibiotics to the bacteria, but relied more on calcium import and kinase activation, the same activation pathway HAMLET uses when killing pneumococci by itself. Finally, the sensitizing effect was not confined to species sensitive to HAMLET. The HAMLET-resistant respiratory species Acinetobacter baumanii and Moraxella catarrhalis were all sensitized to various classes of antibiotics in the presence of HAMLET, activating the same mechanism as in pneumococci. Combined these results suggest the presence of a conserved HAMLET-activated pathway that circumvents antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The ability to activate this pathway may extend

  16. Thin-plate spline analysis of allometry and sexual dimorphism in the human craniofacial complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Antonio; Bastir, Markus

    2002-03-01

    The relationship between allometry and sexual dimorphism in the human craniofacial complex was analyzed using geometric morphometric methods. Thin-plate splines (TPS) analysis has been applied to investigate the lateral profile of complete adult skulls of known sex. Twenty-nine three-dimensional (3D) craniofacial and mandibular landmark coordinates were recorded from a sample of 52 adult females and 52 adult males of known age and sex. No difference in the influence of size on shape was detected between sexes. Both size and sex had significant influences on shape. As expected, the influence of centroid size on shape (allometry) revealed a shift in the proportions of the neurocranium and the viscerocranium, with a marked allometric variation of the lower face. Adjusted for centroid size, males presented a relatively larger size of the nasopharyngeal space than females. A mean-male TPS transformation revealed a larger piriform aperture, achieved by an increase of the angulation of the nasal bones and a downward rotation of the anterior nasal floor. Male pharynx expansion was also reflected by larger choanae and a more posteriorly inclined basilar part of the occipital clivus. Male muscle attachment sites appeared more pronounced. In contrast, the mean-female TPS transformation was characterized by a relatively small nasal aperture. The occipital clivus inclined anteriorly, and muscle insertion areas became smoothed. Besides these variations, both maxillary and mandibular alveolar regions became prognathic. The sex-specific TPS deformation patterns are hypothesized to be associated with sexual differences in body composition and energetic requirements. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Apoptosis-like death in bacteria induced by HAMLET, a human milk lipid-protein complex.

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    Anders P Hakansson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is the primary means for eliminating unwanted cells in multicellular organisms in order to preserve tissue homeostasis and function. It is characterized by distinct changes in the morphology of the dying cell that are orchestrated by a series of discrete biochemical events. Although there is evidence of primitive forms of programmed cell death also in prokaryotes, no information is available to suggest that prokaryotic death displays mechanistic similarities to the highly regulated programmed death of eukaryotic cells. In this study we compared the characteristics of tumor and bacterial cell death induced by HAMLET, a human milk complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that HAMLET-treated bacteria undergo cell death with mechanistic and morphologic similarities to apoptotic death of tumor cells. In Jurkat cells and Streptococcus pneumoniae death was accompanied by apoptosis-like morphology such as cell shrinkage, DNA condensation, and DNA degradation into high molecular weight fragments of similar sizes, detected by field inverse gel electrophoresis. HAMLET was internalized into tumor cells and associated with mitochondria, causing a rapid depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and bound to and induced depolarization of the pneumococcal membrane with similar kinetic and magnitude as in mitochondria. Membrane depolarization in both systems required calcium transport, and both tumor cells and bacteria were found to require serine protease activity (but not caspase activity to execute cell death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that many of the morphological changes and biochemical responses associated with apoptosis are present in prokaryotes. Identifying the mechanisms of bacterial cell death has the potential to reveal novel targets for future antimicrobial therapy and to further our understanding of core activation mechanisms of cell death in eukaryote cells.

  18. Apoptosis-like death in bacteria induced by HAMLET, a human milk lipid-protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakansson, Anders P; Roche-Hakansson, Hazeline; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-03-10

    Apoptosis is the primary means for eliminating unwanted cells in multicellular organisms in order to preserve tissue homeostasis and function. It is characterized by distinct changes in the morphology of the dying cell that are orchestrated by a series of discrete biochemical events. Although there is evidence of primitive forms of programmed cell death also in prokaryotes, no information is available to suggest that prokaryotic death displays mechanistic similarities to the highly regulated programmed death of eukaryotic cells. In this study we compared the characteristics of tumor and bacterial cell death induced by HAMLET, a human milk complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid. We show that HAMLET-treated bacteria undergo cell death with mechanistic and morphologic similarities to apoptotic death of tumor cells. In Jurkat cells and Streptococcus pneumoniae death was accompanied by apoptosis-like morphology such as cell shrinkage, DNA condensation, and DNA degradation into high molecular weight fragments of similar sizes, detected by field inverse gel electrophoresis. HAMLET was internalized into tumor cells and associated with mitochondria, causing a rapid depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and bound to and induced depolarization of the pneumococcal membrane with similar kinetic and magnitude as in mitochondria. Membrane depolarization in both systems required calcium transport, and both tumor cells and bacteria were found to require serine protease activity (but not caspase activity) to execute cell death. Our results suggest that many of the morphological changes and biochemical responses associated with apoptosis are present in prokaryotes. Identifying the mechanisms of bacterial cell death has the potential to reveal novel targets for future antimicrobial therapy and to further our understanding of core activation mechanisms of cell death in eukaryote cells.

  19. Evidence supporting oral sensitivity to complex carbohydrates independent of sweet taste sensitivity in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Y Q Low

    Full Text Available Compared to simple sugars, complex carbohydrates have been assumed invisible to taste. However, two recent studies proposed that there may be a perceivable taste quality elicited by complex carbohydrates independent of sweet taste. There is precedent with behavioural studies demonstrating that rats are very attracted to complex carbohydrates, and that complex carbohydrates are preferred to simple sugars at low concentrations. This suggests that rats may have independent taste sensors for simple sugars and complex carbohydrates. The aim of this paper is to investigate oral sensitivities of two different classes of complex carbohydrates (a soluble digestible and a soluble non-digestible complex carbohydrate, and to compare these to other caloric and non-nutritive sweeteners in addition to the prototypical tastes using two commonly used psychophysical measures. There were strong correlations between the detection thresholds and mean intensity ratings for complex carbohydrates (maltodextrin, oligofructose (r = 0.94, P 0.05. However, moderate correlations were observed between perceived intensities of complex carbohydrates and sweeteners (r = 0.48-0.61, P < 0.05. These data provide evidence that complex carbohydrates can be sensed in the oral cavity over a range of concentrations independent of sweet taste sensitivity at low concentrations, but with partial overlap with sweet taste intensity at higher concentrations.

  20. "Bird biting" mosquitoes and human disease: a review of the role of Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes in epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajollahi, Ary; Fonseca, Dina M; Kramer, Laura D; Marm Kilpatrick, A

    2011-10-01

    The transmission of vector-borne pathogens is greatly influenced by the ecology of their vector, which is in turn shaped by genetic ancestry, the environment, and the hosts that are fed on. One group of vectors, the mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex, play key roles in the transmission of a range of pathogens including several viruses such as West Nile and St. Louis encephalitis viruses, avian malaria (Plasmodium spp.), and filarial worms. The Cx. pipiens complex includes Culex pipiens pipiens with two forms, pipiens and molestus, Culex pipiens pallens, Culex quinquefasciatus, Culex australicus, and Culex globocoxitus. While several members of the complex have limited geographic distributions, Cx. pipienspipiens and Cx. quinquefasciatus are found in all known urban and sub-urban temperate and tropical regions, respectively, across the world, where they are often principal disease vectors. In addition, hybrids are common in areas of overlap. Although gaps in our knowledge still remain, the advent of genetic tools has greatly enhanced our understanding of the history of speciation, domestication, dispersal, and hybridization. We review the taxonomy, genetics, evolution, behavior, and ecology of members of the Cx. pipiens complex and their role in the transmission of medically important pathogens. The adaptation of Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes to human-altered environments led to their global distribution through dispersal via humans and, combined with their mixed feeding patterns on birds and mammals (including humans), increased the transmission of several avian pathogens to humans. We highlight several unanswered questions that will increase our ability to control diseases transmitted by these mosquitoes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolites from invasive pests inhibit mitochondrial complex II: A potential strategy for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.ferramosca@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Conte, Annalea; Guerra, Flora; Felline, Serena [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Rimoli, Maria Grazia [Dipartimento di Farmacia, Università di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Mollo, Ernesto [Istituto di Chimica Biomolecolare, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pozzuoli (Italy); Zara, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Terlizzi, Antonio [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-05-13

    The red pigment caulerpin, a secondary metabolite from the marine invasive green algae Caulerpa cylindracea can be accumulated and transferred along the trophic chain, with detrimental consequences on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Despite increasing research efforts to understand how caulerpin modifies fish physiology, little is known on the effects of algal metabolites on mammalian cells. Here we report for the first time the mitochondrial targeting activity of both caulerpin, and its closely related derivative caulerpinic acid, by using as experimental model rat liver mitochondria, a system in which bioenergetics mechanisms are not altered. Mitochondrial function was tested by polarographic and spectrophotometric methods. Both compounds were found to selectively inhibit respiratory complex II activity, while complexes I, III, and IV remained functional. These results led us to hypothesize that both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in cell lines with defects in mitochondrial complex I. Ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells are a good example of cell lines with a defective complex I function on which these molecules seem to have a toxic effect on proliferation. This provided novel insight toward the potential use of metabolites from invasive Caulerpa species for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma cisplatin-resistant cells. -- Highlights: •Novel insight toward the potential use of the algal metabolites for the treatment of human diseases. •Caulerpin and caulerpinic acid inhibit respiratory complex II activity. •Both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells.

  2. Metabolites from invasive pests inhibit mitochondrial complex II: A potential strategy for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Guerra, Flora; Felline, Serena; Rimoli, Maria Grazia; Mollo, Ernesto; Zara, Vincenzo; Terlizzi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The red pigment caulerpin, a secondary metabolite from the marine invasive green algae Caulerpa cylindracea can be accumulated and transferred along the trophic chain, with detrimental consequences on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Despite increasing research efforts to understand how caulerpin modifies fish physiology, little is known on the effects of algal metabolites on mammalian cells. Here we report for the first time the mitochondrial targeting activity of both caulerpin, and its closely related derivative caulerpinic acid, by using as experimental model rat liver mitochondria, a system in which bioenergetics mechanisms are not altered. Mitochondrial function was tested by polarographic and spectrophotometric methods. Both compounds were found to selectively inhibit respiratory complex II activity, while complexes I, III, and IV remained functional. These results led us to hypothesize that both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in cell lines with defects in mitochondrial complex I. Ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells are a good example of cell lines with a defective complex I function on which these molecules seem to have a toxic effect on proliferation. This provided novel insight toward the potential use of metabolites from invasive Caulerpa species for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma cisplatin-resistant cells. -- Highlights: •Novel insight toward the potential use of the algal metabolites for the treatment of human diseases. •Caulerpin and caulerpinic acid inhibit respiratory complex II activity. •Both algal metabolites could be used as antitumor agents in ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cells.

  3. A large-scale analysis of tissue-specific pathology and gene expression of human disease genes and complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Lage; Hansen, Niclas Tue; Karlberg, Erik, Olof, Linnart

    2008-01-01

    to be overexpressed in the normal tissues where defects cause pathology. In contrast, cancer genes and complexes were not overexpressed in the tissues from which the tumors emanate. We specifically identified a complex involved in XY sex reversal that is testis-specific and down-regulated in ovaries. We also......Heritable diseases are caused by germ-line mutations that, despite tissuewide presence, often lead to tissue-specific pathology. Here, we make a systematic analysis of the link between tissue-specific gene expression and pathological manifestations in many human diseases and cancers. Diseases were...

  4. Biophysical characterization of the complex between human papillomavirus E6 protein and synapse-associated protein 97

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine Ngang; Bach, Anders; Engström, Åke

    2011-01-01

    The E6 protein of human papillomavirus exhibits complex interaction patterns with several host proteins and their roles in HPV mediated oncogenesis have proved challenging to study. Here we use several biophysical techniques to explore the binding of E6 to the three PDZ domains of the tumor......, this quaternary complex has the same apparent hydrodynamic volume as the unliganded PDZ region, suggesting that a conformational change occurs in the PDZ region upon binding, a conclusion supported by kinetic experiments. Using NMR, we discovered a new mode of interaction between E6 and PDZ: a subset of residues...

  5. Whole genome analysis of selected human and animal rotaviruses identified in Uganda from 2012 to 2014 reveals complex genome reassortment events between human, bovine, caprine and porcine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwogi, Josephine; Jere, Khuzwayo C; Karamagi, Charles; Byarugaba, Denis K; Namuwulya, Prossy; Baliraine, Frederick N; Desselberger, Ulrich; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren

    2017-01-01

    Rotaviruses of species A (RVA) are a common cause of diarrhoea in children and the young of various other mammals and birds worldwide. To investigate possible interspecies transmission of RVAs, whole genomes of 18 human and 6 domestic animal RVA strains identified in Uganda between 2012 and 2014 were sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq platform. The backbone of the human RVA strains had either a Wa- or a DS-1-like genetic constellation. One human strain was a Wa-like mono-reassortant containing a DS-1-like VP2 gene of possible animal origin. All eleven genes of one bovine RVA strain were closely related to those of human RVAs. One caprine strain had a mixed genotype backbone, suggesting that it emerged from multiple reassortment events involving different host species. The porcine RVA strains had mixed genotype backbones with possible multiple reassortant events with strains of human and bovine origin.Overall, whole genome characterisation of rotaviruses found in domestic animals in Uganda strongly suggested the presence of human-to animal RVA transmission, with concomitant circulation of multi-reassortant strains potentially derived from complex interspecies transmission events. However, whole genome data from the human RVA strains causing moderate and severe diarrhoea in under-fives in Uganda indicated that they were primarily transmitted from person-to-person.

  6. Extending network approach to language dynamics and human cognition. Comment on "Approaching human language with complex networks" by Cong and Liu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Shuai, Lan; Wu, Yicheng

    2014-12-01

    By analyzing complex networks constructed from authentic language data, Cong and Liu [1] advance linguistics research into the big data era. The network approach has revealed many intrinsic generalities and crucial differences at both the macro and micro scales between human languages. The axiom behind this research is that language is a complex adaptive system [2]. Although many lexical, semantic, or syntactic features have been discovered by means of analyzing the static and dynamic linguistic networks of world languages, available network-based language studies have not explicitly addressed the evolutionary dynamics of language systems and the correlations between language and human cognition. This commentary aims to provide some insights on how to use the network approach to study these issues.

  7. Linguistic complex networks as a young field of quantitative linguistics. Comment on "Approaching human language with complex networks" by J. Cong and H. Liu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Reinhard

    2014-12-01

    We have long been used to the domination of qualitative methods in modern linguistics. Indeed, qualitative methods have advantages such as ease of use and wide applicability to many types of linguistic phenomena. However, this shall not overshadow the fact that a great part of human language is amenable to quantification. Moreover, qualitative methods may lead to over-simplification by employing the rigid yes/no scale. When variability and vagueness of human language must be taken into account, qualitative methods will prove inadequate and give way to quantitative methods [1, p. 11]. In addition to such advantages as exactness and precision, quantitative concepts and methods make it possible to find laws of human language which are just like those in natural sciences. These laws are fundamental elements of linguistic theories in the spirit of the philosophy of science [2,3]. Theorization effort of this type is what quantitative linguistics [1,4,5] is devoted to. The review of Cong and Liu [6] has provided an informative and insightful survey of linguistic complex networks as a young field of quantitative linguistics, including the basic concepts and measures, the major lines of research with linguistic motivation, and suggestions for future research.

  8. Influence of complex circumstances and risks related to human relibaility: case of integral circuits fabrication in sterile environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doniol-Shaw, G.

    1991-08-01

    Concepts of operating the complex and risk bearing utilities tend to separate operators from potential sources of risk (automation, and remote control). Since isolation of operators from risk sources is not always possible and constant their exposure to risks during operation, the question of human errors is always an important issue. In such situations, independent of the control and failure detection systems, operators are responsible for achieving two objectives simultaneously: operation and safety. This presentation shows how human behaviour can be determined by safety conditions of a plant, in the frame of managing minor real risks that would cause minor

  9. Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the interaction of human serum albumin with copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Bhargab; Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Das, Suman; Bandyopadhyay, Nirmalya; Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli; Naskar, Jnan Prakash

    2017-02-01

    Two osazone based ligands, butane-2,3-dione bis(2‧-pyridylhydrazone) (BDBPH) and hexane-3,4-dione bis(2‧-pyridylhydrazone) (HDBPH), were synthesized out of the 2:1 M Schiff base condensation of 2-hydrazino pyridine respectively with 2,3-butanedione and 3,4-hexanedione. The X-ray crystal structures of both the ligands have been determined. The copper(II) complex of HDBPH has also been synthesized and structurally characterized. HDBPH and its copper(II) complex have thoroughly been characterized through various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The X-ray crystal structure of the copper complex of HDBPH shows that it is a monomeric Cu(II) complex having 'N4O2' co-ordination chromophore. Interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with these ligands and their monomeric copper(II) complexes have been studied by various spectroscopic means. The experimental findings show that the ligands as well as their copper complexes are good HSA binders. Molecular docking investigations have also been done to unravel the mode of binding of the species with HSA.

  10. Rescuing the Rescuer: On the Protein Complex between the Human Mitochondrial Acyl Carrier Protein and ISD11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, María Georgina; Pignataro, María Florencia; Noguera, Martín Ezequiel; Cruz, Karen Magalí; Santos, Javier

    2018-05-16

    Iron-sulfur clusters are essential cofactors in many biochemical processes. ISD11, one of the subunits of the protein complex that carries out the cluster assembly in mitochondria, is necessary for cysteine desulfurase NFS1 stability and function. Several authors have recently provided evidence showing that ISD11 interacts with the acyl carrier protein (ACP). We carried out the coexpression of human mitochondrial ACP and ISD11 in E. coli. This work shows that ACP and ISD11 form a soluble, structured, and stable complex able to bind to the human NFS1 subunit modulating its activity. Results suggest that ACP plays a key-role in ISD11 folding and stability in vitro. These findings offer the opportunity to study the mechanism of interaction between ISD11 and NFS1.

  11. Examining the evidence for major histocompatibility complex-dependent mate selection in humans and nonhuman primates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Winternitz, Jamie Caroline; Abbate, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, 13 May (2015), s. 73-88 ISSN 1179-7274 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : major histocompatibility complex * sexual selection * olfaction * facial attraction * parasite resistance * inbreeding avoidance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  12. Sitting is the new smoking : online complex human activity recognition with smartphones and wearables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoaib, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Human activity recognition plays an important role in fitness tracking, health monitoring, context-aware feedback and self-management of smartphones and wearable devices. These devices are equipped with different sensors which can be used to recognize various human activities. A significant amount of

  13. Humans with chimpanzee-like major histocompatibility complex-specificities control HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Kesmir, Can; Lund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    and the progression rate to AIDS. Chimpanzees control HIV-1 viral replication and develop a chronic infection without progressing to AIDS. A similar course of disease is observed in human long-term non-progressors. Objective: To investigate if long-term non-progressors and chimpanzees have functional similarities...... in their MHC class I repertoire. Methods: We compared the specificity of groups of human MHC molecules associated with different levels of viremia in HIV-1 infected individuals with those of chimpanzee. Results and conclusion: We demonstrate that human MHC with control of HIV-1 viral load share binding motifs...... with chimpanzee MHC. Moreover, we find that chimpanzee and human MHC associated with low viral load are predicted to elicit broader Gag-specific immune responses than human MHC associated with high viral load, thus supporting earlier findings that Gag-specific immune responses are essential for HIV-1 control....

  14. Structure of the Human Atg13-Atg101 HORMA Heterodimer: an Interaction Hub within the ULK1 Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shiqian; Kim, Do Jin; Stjepanovic, Goran; Hurley, James H

    2015-10-06

    The ULK1 complex, consisting of the ULK1 protein kinase itself, FIP200, Atg13, and Atg101, controls the initiation of autophagy in animals. We determined the structure of the complex of the human Atg13 HORMA (Hop1, Rev7, Mad2) domain in complex with the full-length HORMA domain-only protein Atg101. The two HORMA domains assemble with an architecture conserved in the Mad2 conformational heterodimer and the S. pombe Atg13-Atg101 HORMA complex. The WF finger motif that is essential for function in human Atg101 is sequestered in a hydrophobic pocket, suggesting that the exposure of this motif is regulated. Benzamidine molecules from the crystallization solution mark two hydrophobic pockets that are conserved in, and unique to, animals, and are suggestive of sites that could interact with other proteins. These features suggest that the activity of the animal Atg13-Atg101 subcomplex is regulated and that it is an interaction hub for multiple partners. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression, refolding and crystallization of murine MHC class I H-2Db in complex with human β2-microglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandalova, Tatyana; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Harris, Robert A.; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Kärre, Klas; Schneider, Gunter; Achour, Adnane

    2005-01-01

    Mouse MHC class I H-2Db in complex with human β2m and the LCMV-derived peptide gp33 has been produced and crystallized. Resolution of the structure of this complex combined with the structural comparison with the previously solved crystal structure of H-2Db/mβ2m/gp33 should lead to a better understanding of how the β2m subunit affects the overall conformation of MHC complexes as well as the stability of the presented peptides. β 2 -Microglobulin (β 2 m) is non-covalently linked to the major histocompatibility (MHC) class I heavy chain and interacts with CD8 and Ly49 receptors. Murine MHC class I can bind human β 2 m (hβ 2 m) and such hybrid molecules are often used in structural and functional studies. The replacement of mouse β 2 m (mβ 2 m) by hβ 2 m has important functional consequences for MHC class I complex stability and specificity, but the structural basis for this is unknown. To investigate the impact of species-specific β 2 m subunits on MHC class I conformation, murine MHC class I H-2D b in complex with hβ 2 m and the peptide gp33 derived from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) has been expressed, refolded in vitro and crystallized. Crystals containing two complexes per asymmetric unit and belonging to the space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 68.1, b = 65.2, c = 101.9 Å, β = 102.4°, were obtained

  16. Distribution of class ii major histocompatibility complex antigenexpressing cells in human dental pulp with carious lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is a bacterial infection which causes destruction of the hard tissues of the tooth. Exposure of the dentin to the oral environment as a result of caries inevitably results in a cellular response in the pulp. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a group of genes that code for cell-surface histocompatibility antigens. Cells expressing class II MHC molecules participate in the initial recognition and the processing of antigenic substances to serve as antigen-presenting cells. Purpose: The aim of the study was to elucidate the alteration in the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in human dental pulp as carious lesions progressed toward the pulp. Methods: Fifteen third molars with caries at the occlusal site at various stages of decay and 5 intact third molars were extracted and used in this study. Before decalcifying with 10% EDTA solution (pH 7.4, all the samples were observed by micro-computed tomography to confirm the lesion condition three-dimensionally. The specimens were then processed for cryosection and immunohistochemistry using an anti-MHC class II monoclonal antibody. Results: Class II MHC antigen-expressing cells were found both in normal and carious specimens. In normal tooth, the class II MHC-immunopositive cells were observed mainly at the periphery of the pulp tissue. In teeth with caries, class II MHC-immunopositive cells were located predominantly subjacent to the carious lesions. As the caries progressed, the number of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells was increased. Conclusion: The depth of carious lesions affects the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in the dental pulp.Latar belakang: Karies merupakan penyakit infeksi bakteri yang mengakibatkan destruksi jaringan keras gigi. Dentin yang terbuka akibat karies akan menginduksi respon imun seluler pada pulpa. Kompleks histokompatibilitas utama (MHC merupakan sekumpulan gen yang mengkode histokompatibilitas

  17. Human Cytomegalovirus pUL47 Modulates Tegumentation and Capsid Accumulation at the Viral Assembly Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadona, Ilaria; Villinger, Clarissa; Schutzius, Gabi; Mertens, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) tegument protein pUL47 is an interaction partner of pUL48 and highly conserved among herpesviruses. It is closely associated with the capsid and has an important function early in infection. Here, we report a specific role of pUL47 in the tegumentation of capsids in the cytoplasm. A newly generated mutant virus (TB-47stop), in which expression of pUL47 is blocked, exhibited a severe impairment in cell-to-cell spread and release of infectivity from infected cells. Ultrastructural analysis of TB-47stop-infected cells clearly showed cytoplasmic accumulations of nonenveloped capsids that were only partially tegumented, indicating that these capsids failed to complete tegumentation. Nevertheless, these accumulations were positive for HCMV inner tegument proteins pp150 and pUL48, suggesting that their attachment to capsids occurs independently of pUL47. Despite these morphological alterations, fully enveloped virus particles were found in the extracellular space and at the viral assembly complex (vAC) of TB-47stop-infected cells, indicating that pUL47 is not essential for the generation of virions. We confirmed findings that incorporation of pUL48 into virions is impaired in the absence of pUL47. Interestingly, pUL47 exhibited a strong nuclear localization in transfected cells, whereas it was found exclusively at the vAC in the context of virus infection. Colocalization of pUL47 and pUL48 at the vAC is consistent with their interaction. We also found a shift to a more nuclear localization of pUL47 when the expression of pUL48 was reduced. Summarizing our results, we hypothesize that pUL48 directs pUL47 to the vAC to promote tegumentation and secondary envelopment of capsids. IMPORTANCE Generation of infectious HCMV particles requires an organized and multistep process involving the action of several viral and cellular proteins as well as protein-protein interactions. A better understanding of these processes is important for

  18. Higher iron bioavailability of a human-like collagen iron complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Yang, Fan; Fan, Daidi; Wang, Ya; Yu, Yuanyuan

    2017-07-01

    Iron deficiency remains a public health problem around the world due to low iron intake and/or bioavailability. FeSO 4 , ferrous succinate, and ferrous glycinate chelate are rich in iron but have poor bioavailability. To solve the problem of iron deficiency, following previous research studies, a thiolated human-like collagen-ironcomplex supplement with a high iron content was prepared in an anaerobic workstation. In addition, cell viability tests were evaluated after conducting an MTT assay, and a quantitative analysis of the thiolated human-like collagen-iron digesta samples was performed using the SDS-PAGE method coupled with gel filtration chromatography. The iron bioavailability was assessed using Caco-2 cell monolayers and iron-deficiency anemia mice models. The results showed that (1) one mole of thiolated human-like collagen-iron possessed approximately 35.34 moles of iron; (2) thiolated human-like collagen-iron did not exhibit cytotoxity and (3) thiolated human-like collagen- iron digesta samples had higher bioavailability than other iron supplements, including FeSO 4 , ferrous succinate, ferrous glycine chelate and thiolated human-like collagen-Fe iron. Finally, the iron bioavailability was significantly enhanced by vitamin C. These results indicated that thiolated human-like collagen-iron is a promising iron supplement for use in the future.

  19. Phosphorylated STAT5 directly facilitates parvovirus B19 DNA replication in human erythroid progenitors through interaction with the MCM complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaie, Safder S; Zou, Wei; Xu, Peng; Deng, Xuefeng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Qiu, Jianming

    2017-05-01

    Productive infection of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) exhibits high tropism for burst forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) and colony forming unit erythroid (CFU-E) progenitor cells in human bone marrow and fetal liver. This exclusive restriction of the virus replication to human erythroid progenitor cells is partly due to the intracellular factors that are essential for viral DNA replication, including erythropoietin signaling. Efficient B19V replication also requires hypoxic conditions, which upregulate the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathway, and phosphorylated STAT5 is essential for virus replication. In this study, our results revealed direct involvement of STAT5 in B19V DNA replication. Consensus STAT5-binding elements were identified adjacent to the NS1-binding element within the minimal origins of viral DNA replication in the B19V genome. Phosphorylated STAT5 specifically interacted with viral DNA replication origins both in vivo and in vitro, and was actively recruited within the viral DNA replication centers. Notably, STAT5 interacted with minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex, suggesting that STAT5 directly facilitates viral DNA replication by recruiting the helicase complex of the cellular DNA replication machinery to viral DNA replication centers. The FDA-approved drug pimozide dephosphorylates STAT5, and it inhibited B19V replication in ex vivo expanded human erythroid progenitors. Our results demonstrated that pimozide could be a promising antiviral drug for treatment of B19V-related diseases.

  20. Drosophila and genome-wide association studies: a review and resource for the functional dissection of human complex traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangler, Michael F.; Hu, Yanhui

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified thousands of susceptibility loci for common diseases with complex genetic etiologies. Although the susceptibility variants identified by GWAS usually have only modest effects on individual disease risk, they contribute to a substantial burden of trait variation in the overall population. GWAS also offer valuable clues to disease mechanisms that have long proven to be elusive. These insights could lead the way to breakthrough treatments; however, several challenges hinder progress, making innovative approaches to accelerate the follow-up of results from GWAS an urgent priority. Here, we discuss the largely untapped potential of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, for functional investigation of findings from human GWAS. We highlight selected examples where strong genomic conservation with humans along with the rapid and powerful genetic tools available for flies have already facilitated fine mapping of association signals, elucidated gene mechanisms, and revealed novel disease-relevant biology. We emphasize current research opportunities in this rapidly advancing field, and present bioinformatic analyses that systematically explore the applicability of Drosophila for interrogation of susceptibility signals implicated in more than 1000 human traits, based on all GWAS completed to date. Thus, our discussion is targeted at both human geneticists seeking innovative strategies for experimental validation of findings from GWAS, as well as the Drosophila research community, by whom ongoing investigations of the implicated genes will powerfully inform our understanding of human disease. PMID:28151408

  1. Ultrasonography as a tool to study afferent feedback from the muscle-tendon complex during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin, Neil J.; Klint, Richard af; Grey, Michael James

    2011-01-01

    In humans, one of the most common tasks in everyday life is walking, and sensory afferent feedback from peripheral receptors, particularly the muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs (GTO), makes an important contribution to the motor control of this task. One factor that can complicate the ability...... with an examination of muscle activation to give a broader insight to neuromuscular interaction during walking. Despite the advances in understanding that these techniques have brought, there is clearly still a need for more direct methods to study both neural and mechanical parameters during human walking in order...... of these receptors to act as length, velocity and force transducers is the complex pattern of interaction between muscle and tendinous tissues, as tendon length is often considerably greater than muscle fibre length in the human lower limb. In essence, changes in muscle-tendon mechanics can influence the firing...

  2. Cytotoxic property of surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes on a human breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajendran Senthil; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Dinesh, Mohanakrishnan; Paul, Christo Preethy; Srinag, Suresh; Krishnamurthy, Hanumanthappa; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkadher

    2011-07-01

    The cancer chemotherapeutic potential of surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes, cis-[Co(bpy)(2)(C(14)H(29)NH(2))Cl](ClO(4))(2)·3 H(2)O (1) and cis-[Co(phen)(2)(C(14)H(29)NH(2))Cl](ClO(4))(2)·3 H(2)O (2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) on MCF-7 breast cancer cell was determined adopting MTT assay and specific staining techniques. The complexes affected the viability of the cells significantly and the cells succumbed to apoptosis as seen in the changes in the nuclear morphology and cytoplasmic features. Since the complex 2 appeared to be more potent, further assays were carried out on the complex 2. Single-cell electrophoresis indicated DNA damage. The translocation of phosphatidyl serine and loss of mitochondrial potential was revealed by annexin V-Cy3 staining and JC-1 staining respectively. Western blot analysis revealed up-regulation of pro-apoptotic p53 and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein. Taken together, the surfactant-cobalt(III) complex 2 would be a potential candidate for further investigation for application as a chemotherapeutic for cancers in general and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in particular. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Comprehension and utilisation of pointing gestures and gazing in dog-human communication in relatively complex situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Gabriella; Gácsi, Márta; Topál, József; Miklósi, Adám

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the visual communication between humans and dogs in relatively complex situations. In the present research, we have modelled more lifelike situations in contrast to previous studies which often relied on using only two potential hiding locations and direct association between the communicative signal and the signalled object. In Study 1, we have provided the dogs with four potential hiding locations, two on each side of the experimenter to see whether dogs are able to choose the correct location based on the pointing gesture. In Study 2, dogs had to rely on a sequence of pointing gestures displayed by two different experimenters. We have investigated whether dogs are able to recognise an 'indirect signal', that is, a pointing toward a pointer. In Study 3, we have examined whether dogs can understand indirect information about a hidden object and direct the owner to the particular location. Study 1 has revealed that dogs are unlikely to rely on extrapolating precise linear vectors along the pointing arm when relying on human pointing gestures. Instead, they rely on a simple rule of following the side of the human gesturing. If there were more targets on the same side of the human, they showed a preference for the targets closer to the human. Study 2 has shown that dogs are able to rely on indirect pointing gestures but the individual performances suggest that this skill may be restricted to a certain level of complexity. In Study 3, we have found that dogs are able to localise the hidden object by utilising indirect human signals, and they are able to convey this information to their owner.

  4. A novel thiolated human-like collage zinc complex as a promising zinc supplement: physicochemical characteristics and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Yonghui; Mi, Yu; Fan, Daidi; Deng, Jianjun; Xue, Wenjiao

    2014-11-01

    To improve zinc binding ability to human-like collagen (HLC) and stability of metal complex, HLC was thiolated by mercaptosuccinylation reaction with S-acetylmercaptosuccinic anhydride (S-AMSA) at pH8.0. One mole of thiolated HLC-Zn (SHLC-Zn) complex possessed 24.3mol zinc ions when pH was 8.0 and zinc concentration was 15 mM. The physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of thiolated HLC-Zn (SHLC-Zn) complex were investigated by UV-vis, CD, electrophoresis analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and cell viability assay, respectively. The results showed that SHLC-Zn complex(1) exhibited higher zinc ions than that of native HLC and still maintained the secondary structure of HLC though interaction occurred between SHLC and zinc ions, (2) increased the apparent molecular weight when compared with native HLC, (3) exhibited greater thermal stability than native HLC, and (4) presented toxicity free for BHK cells. This study suggests that the SHLC-Zn complex is a potential nutrition as well as zinc supplement in the medical application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. In Vitro Activation of the IκB Kinase Complex by Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type-1 Tax*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sohini; Negi, Veera S.; Keitany, Gladys; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Orth, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-I expresses Tax, a 40-kDa oncoprotein that activates IκB kinase (IKK), resulting in constitutive activation of NFκB. Herein, we have developed an in vitro signaling assay to analyze IKK complex activation by recombinant Tax. Using this assay in combination with reporter assays, we demonstrate that Tax-mediated activation of IKK is independent of phosphatases. We show that sustained activation of the Tax-mediated activation of the NFκB pathway is dependent on an intact Hsp90-IKK complex. By acetylating and thereby preventing activation of the IKK complex by the Yersinia effector YopJ, we demonstrate that Tax-mediated activation of the IKK complex requires a phosphorylation step. Our characterization of an in vitro signaling assay system for the mechanism of Tax-mediated activation of the IKK complex with a variety of mutants and inhibitors results in a working model for the biochemical mechanism of Tax-induced activation. PMID:18223255

  6. Defining the diverse spectrum of inversions, complex structural variation, and chromothripsis in the morbid human genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Ryan L; Brand, Harrison; Redin, Claire E.; Hanscom, Carrie; Antolik, Caroline; Stone, Matthew R; Glessner, Joseph T.; Mason, Tamara; Pregno, Giulia; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Mandrile, Giorgia; Giachino, Daniela; Perrin, Danielle; Walsh, Cole; Cipicchio, Michelle; Costello, Maura; Stortchevoi, Alexei; An, Joon Yong; Currall, Benjamin B; Seabra, Catarina M; Ragavendran, Ashok; Margolin, Lauren; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A.; Lucente, Diane; Levy, Brynn; Sanders, Jan-Stephan; Wapner, Ronald J.; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Kloosterman, Wigard; Talkowski, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Structural variation (SV) influences genome organization and contributes to human disease. However, the complete mutational spectrum of SV has not been routinely captured in disease association studies. Results: We sequenced 689 participants with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other

  7. Can transcriptomics provide insight into the underlying chemopreventive mechanisms of complex mixtures of phytochemicals in humans?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breda, van S.G.; Wilms, L.C.; Gaj, S.; Briedé, J.J.; Helsper, J.P.F.G.; Kleinjans, J.C.; Kok, de T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Blueberries contain relatively large amounts of different phytochemicals which are suggested to have chemopreventive properties, but little information is available on the underlying molecular modes of action. This study investigates whole genome gene expression changes in lymphocytes of 143 humans

  8. Flawed Assumptions, Models and Decision Making: Misconceptions Concerning Human Elements in Complex System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FORSYTHE, JAMES C.; WENNER, CAREN A.

    1999-01-01

    The history of high consequence accidents is rich with events wherein the actions, or inaction, of humans was critical to the sequence of events preceding the accident. Moreover, it has been reported that human error may contribute to 80% of accidents, if not more (dougherty and Fragola, 1988). Within the safety community, this reality is widely recognized and there is a substantially greater awareness of the human contribution to system safety today than has ever existed in the past. Despite these facts, and some measurable reduction in accident rates, when accidents do occur, there is a common lament. No matter how hard we try, we continue to have accidents. Accompanying this lament, there is often bewilderment expressed in statements such as, ''There's no explanation for why he/she did what they did''. It is believed that these statements are a symptom of inadequacies in how they think about humans and their role within technological systems. In particular, while there has never been a greater awareness of human factors, conceptual models of human involvement in engineered systems are often incomplete and in some cases, inaccurate

  9. Structural and dynamical effects induced by the anticancer drug topotecan on the human topoisomerase I - DNA complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano Mancini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human topoisomerase I catalyzes the relaxation of DNA supercoils in fundamental cell processes like transcription, replication and chromosomal segregation. It is the only target of the camptothecin family of anticancer drugs. Among these, topotecan has been used to treat lung and ovarian carcinoma for several years. Camptothecins reversibly binds to the covalent intermediate DNA-enzyme, stabilizing the cleavable complex and reducing the religation rate. The stalled complex then collides with the progression of the replication fork, producing lethal double strand DNA breaks and eventually cell death. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Long lasting molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA-topoisomerase I binary complex and of the DNA-topoisomerase-topotecan ternary complex have been performed and compared. The conformational space sampled by the binary complex is reduced by the presence of the drug, as observed by principal component and cluster analyses. This conformational restraint is mainly due to the reduced flexibility of residues 633-643 (the region connecting the linker to the core domain that causes an overall mobility loss in the ternary complex linker domain. During the simulation, DNA/drug stacking interactions are fully maintained, and hydrogen bonds are maintained with the enzyme. Topotecan keeps the catalytic residue Lys532 far from the DNA, making it unable to participate to the religation reaction. Arg364 is observed to interact with both the B and E rings of topotecan with two stable direct hydrogen bonds. An interesting constrain exerted by the protein on the geometrical arrangement of topotecan is also observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Atomistic-scale understanding of topotecan interactions with the DNA-enzyme complex is fundamental to the explaining of its poisonous effect and of the drug resistance observed in several single residue topoisomerase mutants. We observed significant alterations due to topotecan in

  10. Structure and function of human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET)-type complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Hun Mok, Kenneth; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A; Svanborg, Catharina

    2010-11-01

    Human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) and equine lysozyme with oleic acid (ELOA) are complexes consisting of protein and fatty acid that exhibit cytotoxic activities, drastically differing from the activity of their respective proteinaceous compounds. Since the discovery of HAMLET in the 1990s, a wealth of information has been accumulated, illuminating the structural, functional and therapeutic properties of protein complexes with oleic acid, which is summarized in this review. In vitro, both HAMLET and ELOA are produced by using ion-exchange columns preconditioned with oleic acid. However, the complex of human α-lactalbumin with oleic acid with the antitumor activity of HAMLET was found to be naturally present in the acidic fraction of human milk, where it was discovered by serendipity. Structural studies have shown that α-lactalbumin in HAMLET and lysozyme in ELOA are partially unfolded, 'molten-globule'-like, thereby rendering the complexes dynamic and in conformational exchange. HAMLET exists in the monomeric form, whereas ELOA mostly exists as oligomers and the fatty acid stoichiometry varies, with HAMLET holding an average of approximately five oleic acid molecules, whereas ELOA contains a considerably larger number (11- 48). Potent tumoricidal activity is found in both HAMLET and ELOA, and HAMLET has also shown strong potential as an antitumor drug in different in vivo animal models and clinical studies. The gain of new, beneficial function upon partial protein unfolding and fatty acid binding is a remarkable phenomenon, and may reflect a significant generic route of functional diversification of proteins via varying their conformational states and associated ligands. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  11. Cobinding of bilirubin and laurate to human serum albumin: spectroscopic characterization of stoichiometric complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Sato, H; Brodersen, R

    1988-01-01

    Light absorption and CD spectra of bound bilirubin and albumin fluorescence spectra have been recorded from mixtures containing albumin, A, bilirubin, B, and laurate, L, in Tris-NaCl buffer at pH 8.2, 25 degrees C. Concentrations of the corresponding stoichiometric complexes, ABiLj, for i = 0....../3 and j = 0/3, have been calculated from previously determined stoichiometric cobinding constants (H. Sato et al. (1988) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 260, 811-821). Spectral data of the complexes have finally been found by iterative computer fitting using the principle of several acceptable solutions (R...

  12. Human Diseases Associated with Form and Function of the Golgi Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy C. Simpson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi complex lies at the heart of the secretory pathway and is responsible for modifying proteins and lipids, as well as sorting newly synthesized molecules to their correct destination. As a consequence of these important roles, any changes in its proteome can negatively affect its function and in turn lead to disease. Recently, a number of proteins have been identified, which when either depleted or mutated, result in diseases that affect various organ systems. Here we describe how these proteins have been linked to the Golgi complex, and specifically how they affect either the morphology, membrane traffic or glycosylation ability of this organelle.

  13. Extremely stable soluble high molecular mass multi-protein complex with DNase activity in human placental tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya E Burkova

    Full Text Available Human placenta is an organ which protects, feeds, and regulates the grooving of the embryo. Therefore, identification and characterization of placental components including proteins and their multi-protein complexes is an important step to understanding the placenta function. We have obtained and analyzed for the first time an extremely stable multi-protein complex (SPC, ∼ 1000 kDa from the soluble fraction of three human placentas. By gel filtration on Sepharose-4B, the SPC was well separated from other proteins of the placenta extract. Light scattering measurements and gel filtration showed that the SPC is stable in the presence of NaCl, MgCl2, acetonitrile, guanidinium chloride, and Triton in high concentrations, but dissociates efficiently in the presence of 8 M urea, 50 mM EDTA, and 0.5 M NaCl. Such a stable complex is unlikely to be a casual associate of different proteins. According to SDS-PAGE and MALDI mass spectrometry data, this complex contains many major glycosylated proteins with low and moderate molecular masses (MMs 4-14 kDa and several moderately abundant (79.3, 68.5, 52.8, and 27.2 kDa as well as minor proteins with higher MMs. The SPC treatment with dithiothreitol led to a disappearance of some protein bands and revealed proteins with lower MMs. The SPCs from three placentas efficiently hydrolyzed plasmid supercoiled DNA with comparable rates and possess at least two DNA-binding sites with different affinities for a 12-mer oligonucleotide. Progress in study of placental protein complexes can promote understanding of their biological functions.

  14. A structured workflow for mapping human Sin3 histone deacetylase complex interactions using Halo-MudPIT AP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Charles A S; Thornton, Janet L; Eubanks, Cassandra G; Adams, Mark K; Miah, Sayem; Boanca, Gina; Liu, Xingyu; Katt, Maria; Parmely, Tari; Florens, Laurence A; Washburn, Michael P

    2018-03-29

    Although a variety of affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) strategies have been used to investigate complex interactions, many of these are susceptible to artifacts due to substantial overexpression of the exogenously expressed bait protein. Here we present a logical and systematic workflow that uses the multifunctional Halo tag to assess the correct localization and behavior of tagged subunits of the Sin3 histone deacetylase complex prior to further AP-MS analysis. Using this workflow, we modified our tagging/expression strategy with 21.7% of the tagged bait proteins that we constructed, allowing us to quickly develop validated reagents. Specifically, we apply the workflow to map interactions between stably expressed versions of the Sin3 subunits SUDS3, SAP30 or SAP30L and other cellular proteins.  Here we show that the SAP30 and SAP30L paralogues strongly associate with the core Sin3 complex, but SAP30L has unique associations with the proteasome and the myelin sheath.  Next, we demonstrate an advancement of the complex NSAF (cNSAF) approach, in which normalization to the scaffold protein SIN3A accounts for variations in the proportion of each bait capturing Sin3 complexes and allows a comparison between different baits capturing the same protein complex. This analysis reveals that although the Sin3 subunit SUDS3 appears to be used in both SIN3A and SIN3B based complexes, the SAP30 subunit is not used in SIN3B based complexes. Intriguingly, we do not detect the Sin3 subunits SAP18 and SAP25 among the 128 high-confidence interactions identified, suggesting that these subunits may not be common to all versions of the Sin3 complex in human cells. This workflow provides the framework for building validated reagents to assemble quantitative interaction networks for chromatin remodeling complexes and provides novel insights into focused protein interaction networks. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Controlling Uncertainty: A Review of Human Behavior in Complex Dynamic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Magda

    2010-01-01

    Complex dynamic control (CDC) tasks are a type of problem-solving environment used for examining many cognitive activities (e.g., attention, control, decision making, hypothesis testing, implicit learning, memory, monitoring, planning, and problem solving). Because of their popularity, there have been many findings from diverse domains of research…

  16. The SMC5/6 complex is involved in crucial processes during human spermatogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verver, Dideke E.; Langedijk, Nathalia S. M.; Jordan, Philip W.; Repping, Sjoerd; Hamer, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is crucial for safe reproduction. Therefore, chromatin structure and dynamics should be tightly regulated during germ cell development. Chromatin structure and function are in large part determined by the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes, of which SMC5/6

  17. Methodological issues in analyzing human communication – the complexities of multimodality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høegh, Tina

    2017-01-01

    This chapter develops a multimodal method for transcribing speech, communication, and performance. The chapter discusses the methodological solutions to the complex translation of speech, language rhythm and gesture in time and space into the two-dimensional format of a piece of paper. The focus...

  18. Twin-based DNA methylation analysis takes the center stage of studies of human complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Li, Shuxia; Tan, Qihua

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of complex diseases is characterized by the interaction between the genome and environmental conditions and the interface of epigenetics may be a central mechanism. Current technologies already allow us high-throughput profiling of epigenetic patterns at genome level. However, our un...

  19. Human vaccination against RH5 induces neutralizing antimalarial antibodies that inhibit RH5 invasion complex interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payne, Ruth O; Silk, Sarah E; Elias, Sean C

    2017-01-01

    serum antibodies exhibited cross-strain functional growth inhibition activity (GIA) in vitro, targeted linear and conformational epitopes within RH5, and inhibited key interactions within the RH5 invasion complex. This is the first time to our knowledge that substantial RH5-specific responses have been...

  20. Expression, purification and characterization of the human MTA2-RBBP7 complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Christoffer; Dorosz, Jerzy; Wiuf, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The repressive Nucleosome Remodeling and histone Deacetylation (NuRD) complex remodels the chromatin structure by coupling ATP-dependent remodeling activity with histone deacetylase function and plays important roles in regulating gene transcription, DNA damage repair and chromatin assembly. The ...

  1. The Complexity Paradigm for Studying Human Communication: A Summary and Integration of Two Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This popular quote from Hamlet might be recast for the field of communication as “There are more things in science than are dreamt of in our philosophies”. This article will review several new and strange ideas from complexity science about how the natural world is organized and how we can go about researching it. These strange ideas, (e.g., deterministic, but unpredictable systems resonate with many communication phenomena that our field has traditionally had difficulty studying. By reviewing these areas, we hope to add a new, compelling and useful way to think about science that goes beyond the current dominant philosophy of science employed in communication. Though the concepts reviewed here are difficult and often appear at odds with the dominant paradigm; they are not. Instead, this approach will facilitate research on problems of communication process and interaction that the dominant paradigm has struggled to study. Specifically, this article explores the question of process research in communication by reviewing three major paradigms of science and then delving more deeply into the most recent: complexity science. The article provides a broad overview of many of the major ideas in complexity science and how these ideas can be used to study many of the most difficult questions in communication science. It concludes with suggestions going forward for incorporating complexity science into communication.

  2. NDUFAF7 methylates arginine 85 in the NDUFS2 subunit of human complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Virginie F; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2013-11-15

    Complex I (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in mammalian mitochondria is an L-shaped assembly of 44 subunits. One arm is embedded in the inner membrane with the other protruding ∼100 Å into the matrix of the organelle. The extrinsic arm contains binding sites for NADH and the primary electron acceptor FMN, and it provides a scaffold for seven iron-sulfur clusters that form an electron pathway linking FMN to the terminal electron acceptor, ubiquinone, which is bound in the region of the junction between the arms. The membrane arm contains four antiporter-like domains, probably energetically coupled to the quinone site and involved in pumping protons from the matrix into the intermembrane space contributing to the proton motive force. Complex I is put together from preassembled subcomplexes. Their compositions have been characterized partially, and at least 12 extrinsic assembly factor proteins are required for the assembly of the complex. One such factor, NDUFAF7, is predicted to belong to the family of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases characterized by the presence in their structures of a seven-β-strand protein fold. In the present study, the presence of NDUFAF7 in the mitochondrial matrix has been confirmed, and it has been demonstrated that it is a protein methylase that symmetrically dimethylates the ω-N(G),N(G') atoms of residue Arg-85 in the NDUFS2 subunit of complex I. This methylation step occurs early in the assembly of complex I and probably stabilizes a 400-kDa subcomplex that forms the initial nucleus of the peripheral arm and its juncture with the membrane arm.

  3. NDUFAF7 Methylates Arginine 85 in the NDUFS2 Subunit of Human Complex I*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Virginie F.; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Complex I (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in mammalian mitochondria is an L-shaped assembly of 44 subunits. One arm is embedded in the inner membrane with the other protruding ∼100 Å into the matrix of the organelle. The extrinsic arm contains binding sites for NADH and the primary electron acceptor FMN, and it provides a scaffold for seven iron-sulfur clusters that form an electron pathway linking FMN to the terminal electron acceptor, ubiquinone, which is bound in the region of the junction between the arms. The membrane arm contains four antiporter-like domains, probably energetically coupled to the quinone site and involved in pumping protons from the matrix into the intermembrane space contributing to the proton motive force. Complex I is put together from preassembled subcomplexes. Their compositions have been characterized partially, and at least 12 extrinsic assembly factor proteins are required for the assembly of the complex. One such factor, NDUFAF7, is predicted to belong to the family of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases characterized by the presence in their structures of a seven-β-strand protein fold. In the present study, the presence of NDUFAF7 in the mitochondrial matrix has been confirmed, and it has been demonstrated that it is a protein methylase that symmetrically dimethylates the ω-NG,NG′ atoms of residue Arg-85 in the NDUFS2 subunit of complex I. This methylation step occurs early in the assembly of complex I and probably stabilizes a 400-kDa subcomplex that forms the initial nucleus of the peripheral arm and its juncture with the membrane arm. PMID:24089531

  4. Predicting DNA-binding proteins and binding residues by complex structure prediction and application to human proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Zhao

    Full Text Available As more and more protein sequences are uncovered from increasingly inexpensive sequencing techniques, an urgent task is to find their functions. This work presents a highly reliable computational technique for predicting DNA-binding function at the level of protein-DNA complex structures, rather than low-resolution two-state prediction of DNA-binding as most existing techniques do. The method first predicts protein-DNA complex structure by utilizing the template-based structure prediction technique HHblits, followed by binding affinity prediction based on a knowledge-based energy function (Distance-scaled finite ideal-gas reference state for protein-DNA interactions. A leave-one-out cross validation of the method based on 179 DNA-binding and 3797 non-binding protein domains achieves a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.77 with high precision (94% and high sensitivity (65%. We further found 51% sensitivity for 82 newly determined structures of DNA-binding proteins and 56% sensitivity for the human proteome. In addition, the method provides a reasonably accurate prediction of DNA-binding residues in proteins based on predicted DNA-binding complex structures. Its application to human proteome leads to more than 300 novel DNA-binding proteins; some of these predicted structures were validated by known structures of homologous proteins in APO forms. The method [SPOT-Seq (DNA] is available as an on-line server at http://sparks-lab.org.

  5. Haplotyping the human T-cell receptor β-chain gene complex by use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charmley, P.; Chao, A.; Gatti, R.A.; Concannon, P.; Hood, L.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have studied the genetic segregation of human T-cell receptor β-chain (TCRβ) genes on chromosome 7q in 40 CEPH (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) families by using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). They constructed haplotypes from eight RFLPs by using variable- and constant-region cDNA probes, which detect polymorphisms that span more than 600 kilobases of the TCRβ gene complex. Analysis of allele distributions between TCRβ genes revealed significant linkage disequilibrium between only 6 of the 28 different pairs of RFLPs. This linkage disequilibrium strongly influences the most efficient order to proceed for typing of these RFLPs in order to achieve maximum genetic informativeness, which in this study revealed a 97.3% level of heterozygosity within the TCRβ gene complex. The results should provide new insight into recent reports of disease associations with the TCRβ gene complex and should assist in designing future experiments to detect or confirm the existence of disease-susceptibility loci in this region of the human genome

  6. Complex Etiology, Prophylaxis and Hygiene Control in Mycotoxic Nephropathies in Farm Animals and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoycho D. Stoev

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Various etiological factors contributing to the development of mycotoxic nephropathy in farm animals and humans are reviewed. The possible synergistic effect between ochratoxin A (OTA and other mycotoxins, as penicillic acid (PA and fumonisin B1 (FB1, contributing to this nephropathy is also considered and discussed. The most convenient ways of prophylaxis and various preventive measures against OTA contamination of feeds or foods are reviewed. A reference is made concerning the most successful methods of veterinary hygiene control in the slaughterhouses in order to prevent the entering of OTA in commercial channels with a view to human health. The economic efficacy of these prophylactic procedures is also considered. An evaluation of human exposure to OTA is made.

  7. An experimental approach to validating a theory of human error in complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, N. M.; Rouse, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of 'human error' is pervasive in engineering systems in which the human is involved. In contrast to the common engineering approach of dealing with error probabilistically, the present research seeks to alleviate problems associated with error by gaining a greater understanding of causes and contributing factors from a human information processing perspective. The general approach involves identifying conditions which are hypothesized to contribute to errors, and experimentally creating the conditions in order to verify the hypotheses. The conceptual framework which serves as the basis for this research is discussed briefly, followed by a description of upcoming research. Finally, the potential relevance of this research to design, training, and aiding issues is discussed.

  8. Preparation of antisera specific for human B cells by immunization of rabbits with immune complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, K.I.; Turner, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Three rabbit antisera are described which are specific without absorption (titer 1:100) for separated human B cells, as measured by complement and non-complement fixing assays. The method of production of these sera involved injections of rabbits with precipitin lines formed between 10μ1 of three separate detergent solubilized membrane preparations and 4μ1 aliquots of rabbit antisera to human B cells. In addition to being B cell specific, the three sera block the MLC reaction, inhibit aggregated IgG binding to B cells, and show differential degrees of B cell lysis when tested on a panel of separated B and T cells. These and other properties suggest that the target specificities of the antibodies are the human equivalent of the murine Ia antigens. (author)

  9. Principle of an operational complexity index for the characterization of the human factor relevance of future reactors concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papin, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    With the increasing reliability of the modern technological systems, the human contribution to the global risk in the operation of industrial systems is becoming more and more significant : in the nuclear reactor operation for example, a recent PSA estimation of this contribution is about 25% of the risk of core melting, all situations considered. This urges the designers of future nuclear reactors to consider the minimisation of this Human Factor (HF) contribution, at the very early stage of their design : the experience feedback shows that this is indeed at this stage that the fundamental design options, impacting the most the human reliability in operation, are fixed. The problem is that at these early design stages, it is also quite impossible to apply formal human reliability methods to support this HF optimisation, while the precise operating conditions of the reactor are not yet known in enough details. In this paper, another approach of the HF evaluation during the design, based on the functional and operational complexity assessment, is proposed. As an illustration, this approach is used to compare various concepts of Pressurized Water Reactors from the point of view of the Human Factor relevance. (Author)

  10. A Conceptual Framework for Predicting Error in Complex Human-Machine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Michael; Remington, Roger; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    We present a Goals, Operators, Methods, and Selection Rules-Model Human Processor (GOMS-MHP) style model-based approach to the problem of predicting human habit capture errors. Habit captures occur when the model fails to allocate limited cognitive resources to retrieve task-relevant information from memory. Lacking the unretrieved information, decision mechanisms act in accordance with implicit default assumptions, resulting in error when relied upon assumptions prove incorrect. The model helps interface designers identify situations in which such failures are especially likely.

  11. Small-intestinal dysfunction accompanies the complex endocrinopathy of human proprotein convertase 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Robert S; Creemers, John W M; Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2003-01-01

    . The differences in the nature and severity of presentation between the two cases cannot readily be explained on the basis of allelic heterogeneity, as the nonsense and missense mutations from both subjects had comparably severe effects on the catalytic activity of PC1. Despite Subject A's negligible PC1 activity......We have previously described the only reported case of human proprotein convertase 1 (PC1) deficiency, in a female (Subject A) with obesity, hypogonadism, hypoadrenalism, and reactive hypoglycemia. We now report the second case of human PC1 deficiency (Subject B), also due to compound...

  12. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB1 cannabinoid receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jäntti, Maria H.; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • OX 1 and OX 2 orexin and CB 1 cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX 1 orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB 1 cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX 1 , OX 2 and CB 1 receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP 2 green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB 1 receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP 2 to CB 1 produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX 1 –OX 2 interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB 1 receptors, dimerization could be an effective way of forming signal complexes with optimal cannabinoid concentrations

  13. Structure of a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) family protein from the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Qingping; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Cai, Xiaohui; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Yeh, Andrew; Zhou, Jiadong; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of a novel MACPF protein, which may play a role in the adaptation of commensal bacteria to host environments in the human gut, was determined and analyzed. Membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) proteins are transmembrane pore-forming proteins that are important in both human immunity and the virulence of pathogens. Bacterial MACPFs are found in diverse bacterial species, including most human gut-associated Bacteroides species. The crystal structure of a bacterial MACPF-domain-containing protein BT-3439 (Bth-MACPF) from B. thetaiotaomicron, a predominant member of the mammalian intestinal microbiota, has been determined. Bth-MACPF contains a membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domain and two novel C-terminal domains that resemble ribonuclease H and interleukin 8, respectively. The entire protein adopts a flat crescent shape, characteristic of other MACPF proteins, that may be important for oligomerization. This Bth-MACPF structure provides new features and insights not observed in two previous MACPF structures. Genomic context analysis infers that Bth-MACPF may be involved in a novel protein-transport or nutrient-uptake system, suggesting an important role for these MACPF proteins, which were likely to have been inherited from eukaryotes via horizontal gene transfer, in the adaptation of commensal bacteria to the host environment

  14. A study on the complexes between human erythrocyte enzymes participating in the conversions of 1,3-diphosphoglycerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokina, K V; Dainyak, M B; Nagradova, N K; Muronetz, V I

    1997-09-15

    The ability of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzing the reaction of 1,3-diphosphoglycerate synthesis in human erythrocytes to form complexes with enzymes which use this metabolite as substrate (3-phosphoglycerate kinase (3-PGK) or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate mutase (2,3-DPGM)) was studied. It was found that highly active 2,3-DPGM can be extracted from human erythrocyte hemolysates in a complex with GAPDH adsorbed on Sepharose-bound anti-GAPDH antibodies at pH 6.5, the molar ratio being one 2,3-GPGM subunit per subunit of GAPDH. No complexation was, however, detected at pH 8.0. The opposite was true for the interaction between GAPDH and 3-PGK, which could be observed at pH 8.0. In experiments carried out at pH 7.4, both GAPDH x 2,3-DPGM and GAPGH x 3-PGK complexes were detected. The Kd values of the complexes determined with purified enzyme preparations were in the range 2.40-2.48 microM for both the GAPDH x 2,3-DPGM and GAPGH x 3-PGK enzyme pairs, when titrations of GAPDH covalently bound to CNBr-activated Sepharose were performed by the soluble 2,3-DPGM or 3-PGK. If, however, GAPDH adsorbed on the specific antibodies covalently bound to Sepharose was used in the titration experiments, the Kd for the GAPDH x 2,3-DPGM complex was found to be 0.54 microM, and the Kd for the GAPDH x 3-PGK complex was 0.49 microM. The concentration of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate determined after 1 h of incubation of erythrocytes in the presence of glucose was found to increase 1.5-fold if the incubation was carried out at pH 6.5, but did not change upon incubation at pH 8.0. On the other hand, the concentration of 3-phosphoglycerate after incubation at pH 8.0 was twice as large as that found after incubation at pH 6.5. The results are interpreted on the hypothesis that specific protein-protein interactions between GAPDH and 2,3-DPGM or between GAPDH and 3-PGK may play a role in determining the fate of 1,3-diphosphoglycerate produced in the GAPDH-catalyzed reaction.

  15. Contribution of ankyrin-band 3 complexes to the organization and mechanical properties of the membrane skeleton of human erythrocyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, B.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Biological and Medical Research Div.

    1995-02-01

    To understand the role of ankyrin-band 3 complexes in the organization of the spectrin-based membrane skeleton and its contribution to the mechanical properties of human erythrocytes, intact skeletons and single-layered skeleton leaflets were prepared from intact and physically sheared membrane ghosts, expanded in low salt buffer, and examined by transmission electron microscopy. While the structures of intact skeletons and single-layered skeleton leaflets shared many common features, including rigid junctional complexes of spectrin, actin, and band 4.1; short stretches ({approximately}50 {angstrom}) of flexible spectrin filaments; and globular masses of ankyrin-band 3 complexes situated close to the middle of the spectrin filaments, the definition of structural units in the intact skeleton is obscured by the superposition of the two layers. However, the spatial disposition of structural elements can be clearly defined in the images of the single-layered skeleton leaflets. Partially expanded skeletal leaflets contain conglomerates of ankyrin-band 3 complexes arranged in a circular or clove-leaf configuration that straddles multiple strands of thick spectrin cables, presumably reflecting the association of ankyrin-band 3 complexes on neighboring spectrin tetramers as well as the lateral association of the spectrin filaments. Hyperexpansion of the skeleton leaflets led to dissociation of the conglomerates of ankyrin-band 3 complexes, full-extension of the spectrin tetramers, and separation of the individual strands of spectrin tetramers. Clearly defined stands of spectrin tetramers in the hyperexpanded single-layered skeletal leaflets often contained two sets of globular protein masses that divided the spectrin tetramers into three segments of approximately equal length.

  16. Beyond description. Comment on "Approaching human language with complex networks" by Cong and Liu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-i-Cancho, R.

    2014-12-01

    In their historical overview, Cong & Liu highlight Sausurre as the father of modern linguistics [1]. They apparently miss G.K. Zipf as a pioneer of the view of language as a complex system. His idea of a balance between unification and diversification forces in the organization of natural systems, e.g., vocabularies [2], can be seen as a precursor of the view of complexity as a balance between order (unification) and disorder (diversification) near the edge of chaos [3]. Although not mentioned by Cong & Liu somewhere else, trade-offs between hearer and speaker needs are very important in Zipf's view, which has inspired research on the optimal networks mapping words into meanings [4-6]. Quantitative linguists regard G.K. Zipf as the funder of modern quantitative linguistics [7], a discipline where statistics plays a central role as in network science. Interestingly, that centrality of statistics is missing Saussure's work and that of many of his successors.

  17. Global spatio-temporal patterns in human migration: a complex network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyle F; D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Migration is a powerful adaptive strategy for humans to navigate hardship and pursue a better quality of life. As a universal vehicle facilitating exchanges of ideas, culture, money and goods, international migration is a major contributor to globalization. Consisting of countries linked by multiple connections of human movements, global migration constitutes a network. Despite the important role of human migration in connecting various communities in different parts of the world, the topology and behavior of the international migration network and its changes through time remain poorly understood. Here we show that the global human migration network became more interconnected during the latter half of the twentieth century and that migrant destination choice partly reflects colonial and postcolonial histories, language, religion, and distances. From 1960 to 2000 we found a steady increase in network transitivity (i.e. connectivity between nodes connected to the same node), a decrease in average path length and an upward shift in degree distribution, all of which strengthened the 'small-world' behavior of the migration network. Furthermore, we found that distinct groups of countries preferentially interact to form migration communities based largely on historical, cultural and economic factors.

  18. Global spatio-temporal patterns in human migration: a complex network perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle F Davis

    Full Text Available Migration is a powerful adaptive strategy for humans to navigate hardship and pursue a better quality of life. As a universal vehicle facilitating exchanges of ideas, culture, money and goods, international migration is a major contributor to globalization. Consisting of countries linked by multiple connections of human movements, global migration constitutes a network. Despite the important role of human migration in connecting various communities in different parts of the world, the topology and behavior of the international migration network and its changes through time remain poorly understood. Here we show that the global human migration network became more interconnected during the latter half of the twentieth century and that migrant destination choice partly reflects colonial and postcolonial histories, language, religion, and distances. From 1960 to 2000 we found a steady increase in network transitivity (i.e. connectivity between nodes connected to the same node, a decrease in average path length and an upward shift in degree distribution, all of which strengthened the 'small-world' behavior of the migration network. Furthermore, we found that distinct groups of countries preferentially interact to form migration communities based largely on historical, cultural and economic factors.

  19. Ionization of tyrosine residues in human serum albumin and in its complexes with bilirubin and laurate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Brodersen, R

    1992-01-01

    Spectrophotometric titration of human serum albumin indicates that ionization of the 18 tyrosine residues takes place between pH 9 and 12.7. A Hill plot indicates that protons dissociate co-operatively from tyrosine residues, in pure albumin between pH 11.0 and 11.4 with a Hill coefficient 1.7, a...

  20. A complex selection signature at the human AVPR1B gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagliani Rachele

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vasopressin receptor type 1b (AVPR1B is mainly expressed by pituitary corticotropes and it mediates the stimulatory effects of AVP on ACTH release; common AVPR1B haplotypes have been involved in mood and anxiety disorders in humans, while rodents lacking a functional receptor gene display behavioral defects and altered stress responses. Results Here we have analyzed the two exons of the gene and the data we present suggest that AVPR1B has been subjected to natural selection in humans. In particular, analysis of exon 2 strongly suggests the action of balancing selection in African populations and Europeans: the region displays high nucleotide diversity, an excess of intermediate-frequency alleles, a higher level of within-species diversity compared to interspecific divergence and a genealogy with common haplotypes separated by deep branches. This relatively unambiguous situation coexists with unusual features across exon 1, raising the possibility that a nonsynonymous variant (Gly191Arg in this region has been subjected to directional selection. Conclusion Although the underlying selective pressure(s remains to be identified, we consider this to be among the first documented examples of a gene involved in mood disorders and subjected to natural selection in humans; this observation might add support to the long-debated idea that depression/low mood might have played an adaptive role during human evolution.

  1. "Asexual propagation of a virulent clone complex in human and feline outbreak of sporotrichosis"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira, Marcus de Melo; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Tsui, Clement K M; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paulo; Van Diepeningen, Anne D; Gerrits van den Ende, Bert; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; Kano, Rui; Hamelin, Richard C; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila Maria; Ribeiro Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza; de Hoog, Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Felipe, Maria Sueli Soares

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is one of the most frequent subcutaneous fungal infections to human and animals caused by members of the plant-associated, dimorphic genus Sporothrix. Three of the four medically important Sporothrix species found in Brazil have been considered asexual, as no sexual stage has ever

  2. Hippocampus, Perirhinal Cortex, and Complex Visual Discriminations in Rats and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Jena B.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Velu, Priya D.; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Structures in the medial temporal lobe, including the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex, are known to be essential for the formation of long-term memory. Recent animal and human studies have investigated whether perirhinal cortex might also be important for visual perception. In our study, using a simultaneous oddity discrimination task, rats with…

  3. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoaib, M.; Bosch, S.; Durmaz, O.; Scholten, Johan; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such

  4. Expression of LacdiNAc Groups on N-Glycans among Human Tumors Is Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoko Hirano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant glycosylation of proteins and lipids is one of the characteristic features of malignantly transformed cells. The GalNAcβ1 → 4GlcNAc (LacdiNAc or LDN group at the nonreducing termini of both N- and O-glycans is not generally found in mammalian cells. We previously showed that the expression level of the LacdiNAc group in N-glycans decreases dramatically during the progression of human breast cancer. In contrast, the enhanced expression of the LacdiNAc group has been shown to be associated with the progression of human prostate, ovarian, and pancreatic cancers. Therefore, the expression of the disaccharide group appears to be dependent on types of tumors. The mechanism of formation of the LacdiNAc group in human tumors and cancer cells has been studied, and two β4-N-acetylgalacto-saminyltransferases (β4GalNAcTs, β4GalNAcT3 and β4GalNAcT4, have been shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of this disaccharide group in a tissue-dependent manner. Transfection of the β4GalNAcT3 gene brought about significant changes in the malignant phenotypes of human neuroblastoma, indicating that this disaccharide group is important for suppressing the tumor growth.

  5. A complex selection signature at the human AVPR1B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliani, Rachele; Fumagalli, Matteo; Pozzoli, Uberto; Riva, Stefania; Cereda, Matteo; Comi, Giacomo P; Pattini, Linda; Bresolin, Nereo; Sironi, Manuela

    2009-06-01

    The vasopressin receptor type 1b (AVPR1B) is mainly expressed by pituitary corticotropes and it mediates the stimulatory effects of AVP on ACTH release; common AVPR1B haplotypes have been involved in mood and anxiety disorders in humans, while rodents lacking a functional receptor gene display behavioral defects and altered stress responses. Here we have analyzed the two exons of the gene and the data we present suggest that AVPR1B has been subjected to natural selection in humans. In particular, analysis of exon 2 strongly suggests the action of balancing selection in African populations and Europeans: the region displays high nucleotide diversity, an excess of intermediate-frequency alleles, a higher level of within-species diversity compared to interspecific divergence and a genealogy with common haplotypes separated by deep branches. This relatively unambiguous situation coexists with unusual features across exon 1, raising the possibility that a nonsynonymous variant (Gly191Arg) in this region has been subjected to directional selection. Although the underlying selective pressure(s) remains to be identified, we consider this to be among the first documented examples of a gene involved in mood disorders and subjected to natural selection in humans; this observation might add support to the long-debated idea that depression/low mood might have played an adaptive role during human evolution.

  6. Complex formation in mixtures of lysozyme-stabilized emulsions and human saliva

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, E.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Norde, W.; Aken, van G.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the interaction between human unstimulated saliva and lysozyme-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions (10 wt/wt% oil phase, 10 mM NaCl, pH 6.7), to reveal the driving force for flocculation of these emulsions. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) showed formation of

  7. Specificity and functional interaction of the polymerase complex proteins of human and avian metapneumoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T. de Graaf (Marieke); S. Herfst (Sander); E.J.A. Schrauwen (Eefje); Y. Choi (Ying); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHuman metapneumovirus (HMPV) and avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) have a similar genome organization and protein composition, but a different host range. AMPV subgroup C (AMPV-C) is more closely relaled to HMPV than other AMPVs. To investigate the specificity and functional interaction of

  8. A high-quality human reference panel reveals the complexity and distribution of genomic structural variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Marschall, T.; Kloosterman, W.P.; Francioli, L.C.; Baaijens, J.A.; Dijkstra, L.J.; Abdellaoui, A.; Koval, V.; Thung, D.T.; Wardenaar, R.; Renkens, I.; Coe, B.P.; Deelen, P.; de Ligt, J.; Lameijer, E.W.; Dijk, F.; Hormozdiari, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; van Duijn, C.M.; Eichler, E.E.; Bakker, P.I.W.; Swertz, M.A.; Wijmenga, C.; van Ommen, G.J.B; Slagboom, P.E.; Boomsma, D.I.; Schönhuth, A.; Ye, K.; Guryev, V.

    2016-01-01

    Structural variation (SV) represents a major source of differences between individual human genomes and has been linked to disease phenotypes. However, the majority of studies provide neither a global view of the full spectrum of these variants nor integrate them into reference panels of genetic

  9. Complex I and the sAMP Cascade in Human Physiopathology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papa, S.; Scacco, S.; Sardanelli, A. M.; Petruzzella, V.; Vergari, R.; Signorile, A.; Dobrová, Zuzana

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2002), s. 3-16 ISSN 0144-8463 Grant - others:IT(XC) National Project on Bioenergetics and Biomembranes Minisry for Uneversity Scientific and Technological Research; IT Project on Molecular; IT Diagnostic and Epidemio logical Analysis of Pediatric and Neurologic Diseases Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : Complex * protein * kinase a Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.728, year: 2002

  10. Contribution of Human Oral Cells to Astringency by Binding Salivary Protein/Tannin Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Susana; Ferrer-Galego, Raúl; Brandão, Elsa; Silva, Mafalda; Mateus, Nuno; Freitas, Victor de

    2016-10-10

    The most widely accepted mechanism to explain astringency is the interaction and precipitation of salivary proteins by food tannins, in particular proline-rich proteins. However, other mechanisms have been arising to explain astringency, such as binding of tannins to oral cells. In this work, an experimental method was adapted to study the possible contribution of both salivary proteins and oral cells to astringency induced by grape seed procyanidin fractions. Overall, in the absence of salivary proteins, the extent of procyanidin complexation with oral cells increased with increasing procyanidin degree of polymerization (mDP). Procyanidin fractions rich in monomers were the ones with the lowest ability to bind to oral cells. In the presence of salivary proteins and for procyanidins with mDP 2 the highest concentrations (1.5 and 2.0 mM) resulted in an increased binding of procyanidins to oral cells. This was even more evident for fractions III and IV at 1.0 mM and upper concentrations. Regarding the salivary proteins affected, it was possible to observe a decrease of P-B peptide and aPRP proteins for fractions II and III. This decrease is greater as the procyanidins' mDP increases. In fact, for fraction IV an almost total depletion of all salivary proteins was observed. This decrease is due to the formation of insoluble salivary protein/procyanidin complexes. Altogether, these data suggest that some procyanidins are able to bind to oral cells and that the salivary proteins interact with procyanidins forming salivary protein/procyanidin complexes that are also able to link to oral cells. The procyanidins that remain unbound to oral cells are able to bind to salivary proteins forming a large network of salivary protein/procyanidin complexes. Overall, the results presented herein provide one more step to understand food oral astringency onset.

  11. Crystal structures of the UBX domain of human UBXD7 and its complex with p97 ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Yong; Xu, Min; Jiang, Tao

    2017-04-22

    In humans, UBXD7 (also called UBXN7), an adaptor of p97 ATPase, can participate in the degradation of misfolded or damaged proteins in the p97-mediated ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). UBXD7 binds to ubiquitinated substrates via its UBA domain and interacts with p97 N-terminal domain through its UBX domain to recruit p97 or the p97 core complex (p97/NPL4/UFD1). Here, we report the crystal structures of the UBX domain of UBXD7 (UBXD7 UBX ) at 2.0 Å resolution and its complex with p97 N-terminal domain (p97 NTD -UBXD7 UBX complex) at 2.4 Å resolution. A structural analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry results provide detailed molecular basis of interaction between UBXD7 UBX and p97 NTD . Moreover, structural superpositions suggest that dimerization of UBXD7 UBX via an intermolecular disulfide bond could interfere with the formation of the p97 NTD -UBXD7 UBX complex. Interestingly, UBXD7 may have a cooperative effect on p97 interaction with UFD1. Together, these results provide structural and biochemical insights into the interaction between p97 NTD and UBXD7 UBX . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Crystal structures of the CPAP/STIL complex reveal its role in centriole assembly and human microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottee, Matthew A; Muschalik, Nadine; Wong, Yao Liang; Johnson, Christopher M; Johnson, Steven; Andreeva, Antonina; Oegema, Karen; Lea, Susan M; Raff, Jordan W; van Breugel, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Centrioles organise centrosomes and template cilia and flagella. Several centriole and centrosome proteins have been linked to microcephaly (MCPH), a neuro-developmental disease associated with small brain size. CPAP (MCPH6) and STIL (MCPH7) are required for centriole assembly, but it is unclear how mutations in them lead to microcephaly. We show that the TCP domain of CPAP constitutes a novel proline recognition domain that forms a 1:1 complex with a short, highly conserved target motif in STIL. Crystal structures of this complex reveal an unusual, all-β structure adopted by the TCP domain and explain how a microcephaly mutation in CPAP compromises complex formation. Through point mutations, we demonstrate that complex formation is essential for centriole duplication in vivo. Our studies provide the first structural insight into how the malfunction of centriole proteins results in human disease and also reveal that the CPAP–STIL interaction constitutes a conserved key step in centriole biogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01071.001 PMID:24052813

  13. Study on the interaction of a copper(II) complex containing the artificial sweetener aspartame with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kashanian, Soheila; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh; Filli, Soraya Moradi

    2014-05-01

    A copper(II) complex containing aspartame (APM) as ligand, Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O, was synthesized and characterized. In vitro binding interaction of this complex with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied at physiological pH. Binding studies of this complex with HSA are useful for understanding the Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O-HSA interaction mechanism and providing guidance for the application and design of new and more efficient artificial sweeteners drive. The interaction was investigated by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, competition experiment and circular dichroism. Hyperchromicity observed in UV absorption band of Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of HSA to Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O was observed and the binding constant (Kf) and corresponding numbers of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (∆H) and entropy change (∆S) were calculated to be -458.67 kJ mol(-1) and -1,339 J mol(-1 )K(-1) respectively. According to the van't Hoff equation, the reaction is predominantly enthalpically driven. In conformity with experimental results, we suggest that Cu(APM)2Cl2·2H2O interacts with HSA. In comparison with previous study, it is found that the Cu(II) complex binds stronger than aspartame.

  14. Probing the reactivity of nucleophile residues in human 2,3-diphosphoglycerate/deoxy-hemoglobin complex by aspecific chemical modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaloni, A; Ferranti, P; De Simone, G; Mamone, G; Sannolo, N; Malorni, A

    1999-06-11

    The use of aspecific methylation reaction in combination with MS procedures has been employed for the characterization of the nucleophilic residues present on the molecular surface of the human 2,3-diphosphoglycerate/deoxy-hemoglobin complex. In particular, direct molecular weight determinations by ESMS allowed to control the reaction conditions, limiting the number of methyl groups introduced in the modified globin chains. A combined LCESMS-Edman degradation approach for the analysis of the tryptic peptide mixtures yielded to the exact identification of methylation sites together with the quantitative estimation of their degree of modification. The reactivities observed were directly correlated with the pKa and the relative surface accessibility of the nucleophilic residues, calculated from the X-ray crystallographic structure of the protein. The results here described indicate that this methodology can be efficiently used in aspecific modification experiments directed to the molecular characterization of the surface topology in proteins and protein complexes.

  15. A new metabolic pathway of arsenite: arsenic-glutathione complexes are substrates for human arsenic methyltransferase Cyt19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Toru [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Environmental Health Sciences Division, Ibaraki (Japan); Chiba University, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kobayashi, Yayoi; Cui, Xing; Hirano, Seishiro [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Environmental Health Sciences Division, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    The metabolism of arsenic is generally accepted to proceed by repetitive reduction and oxidative methylation; the latter is mediated by arsenic methyltransferase (Cyt19). In human urine, the major metabolites of inorganic arsenicals such as arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and arsenate (iAs{sup V}) are monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}). On the other hand, in rat bile, the major metabolites of iAs{sup III} have been reported to be arsenic-glutathione (As-GSH) complexes. In the present study we investigate whether these As-GSH complexes are substrates for arsenic methyltransferase by using human recombinant Cyt19. Analyses by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry suggested that arsenic triglutathione (ATG) was generated nonenzymatically from iAs{sup III} when GSH was present at concentrations 2 mM or higher. Human recombinant Cyt19 catalyzed transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to arsenic and produced monomethyl and dimethyl arsenicals. The methylation of arsenic was catalyzed by Cyt19 only when ATG was present in the reaction mixture. Moreover, monomethylarsonic diglutathione (MADG) was a substrate of Cyt19 for further methylation to dimethylarsinic glutathione (DMAG). On the other hand, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), a hydrolysis product of MADG, was not methylated to dimethyl arsenical by Cyt19. These results suggest that As-GSH complexes such as ATG and MADG were converted by Cyt19 to MADG and DMAG, respectively. Both MADG and DMAG were unstable in solution when the GSH concentration was lower than 1 mM, and were hydrolyzed and oxidized to MMA{sup V} and DMA{sup V}, respectively. Metabolism of iAs{sup III} to methylated arsenicals by Cyt19 was via ATG and MADG rather than by oxidative methylation of iAs{sup III} and MMA{sup III}. (orig.)

  16. Finding trans-regulatory genes and protein complexes modulating meiotic recombination hotspots of human, mouse and yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Li, Xiaoli; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-11

    The regulatory mechanism of recombination is one of the most fundamental problems in genomics, with wide applications in genome wide association studies (GWAS), birth-defect diseases, molecular evolution, cancer research, etc. Recombination events cluster into short genomic regions called "recombination hotspots". Recently, a zinc finger protein PRDM9 was reported to regulate recombination hotspots in human and mouse genomes. In addition, a 13-mer motif contained in the binding sites of PRDM9 is found to be enriched in human hotspots. However, this 13-mer motif only covers a fraction of hotspots, indicating that PRDM9 is not the only regulator of recombination hotspots. Therefore, the challenge of discovering other regulators of recombination hotspots becomes significant. Furthermore, recombination is a complex process. Hence, multiple proteins acting as machinery, rather than individual proteins, are more likely to carry out this process in a precise and stable manner. Therefore, the extension of the prediction of individual trans-regulators to protein complexes is also highly desired. In this paper, we introduce a pipeline to identify genes and protein complexes associated with recombination hotspots. First, we prioritize proteins associated with hotspots based on their preference of binding to hotspots and coldspots. Second, using the above identified genes as seeds, we apply the Random Walk with Restart algorithm (RWR) to propagate their influences to other proteins in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Hence, many proteins without DNA-binding information will also be assigned a score to implicate their roles in recombination hotspots. Third, we construct sub-PPI networks induced by top genes ranked by RWR for various species (e.g., yeast, human and mouse) and detect protein complexes in those sub-PPI networks. The GO term analysis show that our prioritizing methods and the RWR algorithm are capable of identifying novel genes associated with

  17. Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit Controlled by the TAL1 Complex in Human T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3 and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected auto-regulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1, and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MY...

  18. Cellular interactions of a water-soluble supramolecular polymer complex of carbon nanotubes with human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeonju; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2012-08-01

    Water-soluble, PAX-loaded carbon nanotubes are fabricated by employing a synthetic polyampholyte, PDM. To investigate the suitability of the polyampholyte and the nanotubes as drug carriers, different cellular interactions such as the human epithelial Caco-2 cells viability, their effect on the cell growth, and the change in the transepithelial electrical resistance in Caco-2 cells are studied. The resulting complex is found to exhibit an effective anti-cancer effect against colon cancer cells and an increased the reduction of the electrical resistance in the Caco-2 cells when compared to the precursor PAX. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hydrodynamic delivery of plasmid DNA encoding human Fc?R-Ig dimers blocks immune-complex mediated inflammation in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Machiah, Deepa; Bozeman, Erica N.; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Patel, Jaina; Cho, Alice; Jacob, Joshy; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic use and function of recombinant molecules can be studied by the expression of foreign genes in mice. In this study, we have expressed human Fcgamma receptor ?Ig fusion molecules (Fc?R-Igs) in mice by administering Fc?R-Ig plasmid DNAs hydrodynamically and compared their effectiveness to purified molecules in blocking immune-complex (IC) mediated inflammation in mice. The concentration of hydrodynamically expressed Fc?R-Igs (CD16AF-Ig, CD32AR-Ig and CD32AH-Ig) reached a maximum of ...

  20. Molecular modeling of human acidic mammalian chitinase in complex with the natural-product cyclopentapeptide chitinase inhibitor argifin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Hiroaki; Terashima, Shinichi; Iguchi, Kanami; Sugawara, Akihiro; Saito, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Hirose, Tomoyasu; Shiomi, Kazuro; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Omura, Satoshi; Hirono, Shuichi

    2009-09-01

    Human acidic mammalian chitinase (hAMCase) is an attractive target for developing anti-asthma medications. We used a variety of computational methods to investigate the interaction between hAMCase and the natural-product cyclopentapeptide chitinase inhibitor argifin. The three-dimensional structure of hAMCase was first constructed using homology modeling. The interaction mode and binding free energy between argifin and hAMCase were then examined by the molecular-docking calculation and the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method combined with molecular dynamics simulation, respectively. The results suggested that argifin binds to hAMCase in a similar fashion to the interaction mode observed in the crystal structure of argifin-human chitotriosidase complex, and possesses inhibitory activity against hAMCase in the micromolar range. We further designed argifin derivatives expected to be selective for hAMCase.

  1. Engaging Survivors of Human Trafficking: Complex Health Care Needs and Scarce Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Abigail M; Murphy, Jennifer A; Hidalgo, Jose; Macias-Konstantopoulos, Wendy

    2018-05-01

    Human trafficking, also known as modern-day slavery, is an egregious human rights violation associated with wide-ranging medical and mental health consequences. Because of the extensive health problems related to trafficking, health care providers play a critical role in identifying survivors and engaging them in ongoing care. Although guidelines for recognizing affected patients and a framework for developing response protocols in health care settings have been described, survivors' ongoing engagement in health care services is very challenging. High rates of disengagement, lost contact, premature termination, and attrition are common outcomes. For interventions to be effective in this marginalized population, challenges in engaging survivors in long-term therapeutic primary and mental health care must be better understood and overcome. This article uses the socioecological model of public health to identify barriers to engagement; offers evidence- and practice-based recommendations for overcoming these barriers; and proposes an interdisciplinary call to action for developing more flexible, adaptable models of care.

  2. Neurological surgery: the influence of physical and mental demands on humans performing complex operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Sarah K; Walcott, Brian P; Sheth, Sameer A; Coumans, Jean-Valery C E

    2013-03-01

    Performing neurological surgery is an inherently demanding task on the human body, both physically and mentally. Neurosurgeons routinely perform "high stakes" operations in the setting of mental and physical fatigue. These conditions may be not only the result of demanding operations, but also influential to their outcome. Similar to other performance-based endurance activities, training is paramount to successful outcomes. The inflection point, where training reaches the point of diminishing returns, is intensely debated. For the neurosurgeon, this point must be exploited to the maximum, as patients require both the best-trained and best-performing surgeon. In this review, we explore the delicate balance of training and performance, as well as some routinely used adjuncts to improve human performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine: A Review of the Human Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, Jacky; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vaccine of Sanofi Pasteur. This vaccine has recently cleared Phase III, and efficacy results have been published. Excellent tetravalent seroconversion was seen, yet the protective efficacy against infection was surprisingly low. Here, we will describe the complicating factors involved in the generation of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine. Furthermore, we will discuss the human antibody responses during infection, including the epitopes targeted in humans. Also, we will discuss the current understanding of the assays used to evaluate antibody response. We hope this review will aid future dengue vaccine development as well as fundamental research related to the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection. PMID:26065421

  4. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine: A Review of the Human Antibody Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky Flipse

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vaccine of Sanofi Pasteur. This vaccine has recently cleared Phase III, and efficacy results have been published. Excellent tetravalent seroconversion was seen, yet the protective efficacy against infection was surprisingly low. Here, we will describe the complicating factors involved in the generation of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine. Furthermore, we will discuss the human antibody responses during infection, including the epitopes targeted in humans. Also, we will discuss the current understanding of the assays used to evaluate antibody response. We hope this review will aid future dengue vaccine development as well as fundamental research related to the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

  5. Visual social network analysis: effective approach to model complex human social, behaviour & culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahram, Tareq Z; Karwowski, Waldemar

    2012-01-01

    The advent and adoption of internet-based social networking has significantly altered our daily lives. The educational community has taken notice of the positive aspects of social networking such as creation of blogs and to support groups of system designers going through the same challenges and difficulties. This paper introduces a social networking framework for collaborative education, design and modeling of the next generation of smarter products and services. Human behaviour modeling in social networking application aims to ensure that human considerations for learners and designers have a prominent place in the integrated design and development of sustainable, smarter products throughout the total system lifecycle. Social networks blend self-directed learning and prescribed, existing information. The self-directed element creates interest within a learner and the ability to access existing information facilitates its transfer, and eventual retention of knowledge acquired.

  6. Abundance of sewage-pollution indicator and human pathogenic bacteria in a tropical estuarine complex

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagvenkar, G.S.; Ramaiah, N.

    contamination, allochthonous bacteria Introduction: Environmental surveys are necessary for understanding and documenting the occurrence and distribution of pollution indicator and human pathogenic bacteria. In order to quantify and understand... and Chandramohan 1993; Ruiz et al. 2000; Ramaiah and De 2003). Mortality and survival rates of fecal contamination indicator Escherichia coli in the marine regimes have also been studied (Thom et al. 1992; Darakas 2001). Findings from these studies affirm...

  7. Complexity of the influence of gangliosides on histamine release from human basophils and rat mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C; Svendsen, U G; Thastrup, Ole

    1987-01-01

    The influence of exogenous addition of gangliosides on histamine release from human basophils and rat mast cells was examined in vitro. Gangliosides dose-dependently inhibited histamine release, and this inhibition was dependent on the ganglioside sialic acid content, since GT1b, having 3 sialic...... was reflected in the sensitivity of the cells to extracellular calcium, since inhibition of the release could be counteracted by increasing the extracellular concentration of calcium....

  8. Complexity of Human Antibody Response to Dengue Virus: Implication for Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Yang; Lin, Hong-En; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2017-01-01

    The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) are the leading cause of arboviral diseases in humans. Decades of efforts have made remarkable progress in dengue vaccine development. Despite the first dengue vaccine (dengvaxia from Sanofi Pasteur), a live-attenuated tetravalent chimeric yellow fever-dengue vaccine, has been licensed by several countries since 2016, its overall moderate efficacy (56.5-60.8%) in the presence of neutralizing antibodies during the Phase 2b and 3 trials, lower efficacy among dengue naïve compared with dengue experienced individuals, and increased risk of hospitalization among young children during the follow-up highlight the need for a better understanding of humoral responses after natural DENV infection. Recent studies of more than 300 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against DENV have led to the discovery of several novel epitopes on the envelope protein recognized by potent neutralizing mAbs. This information together with in-depth studies on polyclonal sera and B-cells following natural DENV infection has tremendous implications for better immunogen design for a safe and effective dengue vaccine. This review outlines the progress in our understanding of mouse mAbs, human mAbs, and polyclonal sera against DENV envelope and precursor membrane proteins, two surface proteins involved in vaccine development, following natural infection; analyses of these discoveries have provided valuable insight into new strategies involving molecular technology to induce more potent neutralizing antibodies and less enhancing antibodies for next-generation dengue vaccine development.

  9. Using Complex Event Processing (CEP) and vocal synthesis techniques to improve comprehension of sonified human-centric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimland, Jeff; Ballora, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The field of sonification, which uses auditory presentation of data to replace or augment visualization techniques, is gaining popularity and acceptance for analysis of "big data" and for assisting analysts who are unable to utilize traditional visual approaches due to either: 1) visual overload caused by existing displays; 2) concurrent need to perform critical visually intensive tasks (e.g. operating a vehicle or performing a medical procedure); or 3) visual impairment due to either temporary environmental factors (e.g. dense smoke) or biological causes. Sonification tools typically map data values to sound attributes such as pitch, volume, and localization to enable them to be interpreted via human listening. In more complex problems, the challenge is in creating multi-dimensional sonifications that are both compelling and listenable, and that have enough discrete features that can be modulated in ways that allow meaningful discrimination by a listener. We propose a solution to this problem that incorporates Complex Event Processing (CEP) with speech synthesis. Some of the more promising sonifications to date use speech synthesis, which is an "instrument" that is amenable to extended listening, and can also provide a great deal of subtle nuance. These vocal nuances, which can represent a nearly limitless number of expressive meanings (via a combination of pitch, inflection, volume, and other acoustic factors), are the basis of our daily communications, and thus have the potential to engage the innate human understanding of these sounds. Additionally, recent advances in CEP have facilitated the extraction of multi-level hierarchies of information, which is necessary to bridge the gap between raw data and this type of vocal synthesis. We therefore propose that CEP-enabled sonifications based on the sound of human utterances could be considered the next logical step in human-centric "big data" compression and transmission.

  10. Quantitative historical analysis uncovers a single dimension of complexity that structures global variation in human social organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchin, Peter; Currie, Thomas E.; Whitehouse, Harvey; François, Pieter; Feeney, Kevin; Mullins, Daniel; Hoyer, Daniel; Collins, Christina; Grohmann, Stephanie; Mendel-Gleason, Gavin; Turner, Edward; Dupeyron, Agathe; Cioni, Enrico; Reddish, Jenny; Levine, Jill; Jordan, Greine; Brandl, Eva; Williams, Alice; Cesaretti, Rudolf; Krueger, Marta; Ceccarelli, Alessandro; Figliulo-Rosswurm, Joe; Tuan, Po-Ju; Peregrine, Peter; Marciniak, Arkadiusz; Preiser-Kapeller, Johannes; Kradin, Nikolay; Korotayev, Andrey; Palmisano, Alessio; Baker, David; Bidmead, Julye; Bol, Peter; Christian, David; Cook, Connie; Covey, Alan; Feinman, Gary; Júlíusson, Árni Daníel; Kristinsson, Axel; Miksic, John; Mostern, Ruth; Petrie, Cameron; Rudiak-Gould, Peter; ter Haar, Barend; Wallace, Vesna; Mair, Victor; Xie, Liye; Baines, John; Bridges, Elizabeth; Manning, Joseph; Lockhart, Bruce; Bogaard, Amy; Spencer, Charles

    2018-01-01

    Do human societies from around the world exhibit similarities in the way that they are structured, and show commonalities in the ways that they have evolved? These are long-standing questions that have proven difficult to answer. To test between competing hypotheses, we constructed a massive repository of historical and archaeological information known as “Seshat: Global History Databank.” We systematically coded data on 414 societies from 30 regions around the world spanning the last 10,000 years. We were able to capture information on 51 variables reflecting nine characteristics of human societies, such as social scale, economy, features of governance, and information systems. Our analyses revealed that these different characteristics show strong relationships with each other and that a single principal component captures around three-quarters of the observed variation. Furthermore, we found that different characteristics of social complexity are highly predictable across different world regions. These results suggest that key aspects of social organization are functionally related and do indeed coevolve in predictable ways. Our findings highlight the power of the sciences and humanities working together to rigorously test hypotheses about general rules that may have shaped human history. PMID:29269395

  11. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2 + , CD3 + , CD4 + or CD2 + , CD3 + , CD8 + ) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by 51 Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of New Palladium(II) Thiosemicarbazone Complexes and Their Cytotoxic Activity against Various Human Tumor Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Wilfredo; Paz, Juan; Carrasco, Fernando; Spodine, Evgenia; Manzur, Jorge; Sieler, Joachim; Blaurock, Steffen; Beyer, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    The palladium(II) bis-chelate complexes of the type [Pd(TSC1-5)2] (6–10), with their corresponding ligands 4-phenyl-1-(acetone)-thiosemicarbazone, HTSC1 (1), 4-phenyl-1-(2′-chloro-benzaldehyde)-thiosemicarbazone, HTSC2 (2), 4-phenyl-1-(3′-hydroxy-benzaldehyde)-thiosemicarbazone, HTSC3 (3), 4-phenyl-1-(2′-naphthaldehyde)-thiosemicarbazone, HTSC4 (4), and 4-phenyl-1-(1′-nitro-2′-naphthaldehyde)-thiosemicarbazone, HTSC5 (5), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic techniques (IR and 1H- and 13C-NMR). The molecular structure of HTSC3, HTSC4, and [Pd(TSC1)2] (6) have been determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. Complex 6 shows a square planar geometry with two deprotonated ligands coordinated to PdII through the azomethine nitrogen and thione sulfur atoms in a cis arrangement. The in vitro cytotoxic activity measurements indicate that the palladium(II) complexes (IC50 = 0.01–9.87 μM) exhibited higher antiproliferative activity than their free ligands (IC50 = 23.48–70.86 and >250 μM) against different types of human tumor cell lines. Among all the studied palladium(II) complexes, the [Pd(TSC3)2] (8) complex exhibited high antitumor activity on the DU145 prostate carcinoma and K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, with low values of the inhibitory concentration (0.01 and 0.02 μM, resp.). PMID:24391528

  13. Resolving the Complexity of Human Skin Metagenomes Using Single-Molecule Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Tsai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Deep metagenomic shotgun sequencing has emerged as a powerful tool to interrogate composition and function of complex microbial communities. Computational approaches to assemble genome fragments have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for de novo reconstruction of genomes from these communities. However, the resultant “genomes” are typically fragmented and incomplete due to the limited ability of short-read sequence data to assemble complex or low-coverage regions. Here, we use single-molecule, real-time (SMRT sequencing to reconstruct a high-quality, closed genome of a previously uncharacterized Corynebacterium simulans and its companion bacteriophage from a skin metagenomic sample. Considerable improvement in assembly quality occurs in hybrid approaches incorporating short-read data, with even relatively small amounts of long-read data being sufficient to improve metagenome reconstruction. Using short-read data to evaluate strain variation of this C. simulans in its skin community at single-nucleotide resolution, we observed a dominant C. simulans strain with moderate allelic heterozygosity throughout the population. We demonstrate the utility of SMRT sequencing and hybrid approaches in metagenome quantitation, reconstruction, and annotation.

  14. Resolving the Complexity of Human Skin Metagenomes Using Single-Molecule Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Chih; Deming, Clayton; Segre, Julia A.; Kong, Heidi H.; Korlach, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deep metagenomic shotgun sequencing has emerged as a powerful tool to interrogate composition and function of complex microbial communities. Computational approaches to assemble genome fragments have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for de novo reconstruction of genomes from these communities. However, the resultant “genomes” are typically fragmented and incomplete due to the limited ability of short-read sequence data to assemble complex or low-coverage regions. Here, we use single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing to reconstruct a high-quality, closed genome of a previously uncharacterized Corynebacterium simulans and its companion bacteriophage from a skin metagenomic sample. Considerable improvement in assembly quality occurs in hybrid approaches incorporating short-read data, with even relatively small amounts of long-read data being sufficient to improve metagenome reconstruction. Using short-read data to evaluate strain variation of this C. simulans in its skin community at single-nucleotide resolution, we observed a dominant C. simulans strain with moderate allelic heterozygosity throughout the population. We demonstrate the utility of SMRT sequencing and hybrid approaches in metagenome quantitation, reconstruction, and annotation. PMID:26861018

  15. The Allelic Landscape of Human Blood Cell Trait Variation and Links to Common Complex Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astle, William J; Elding, Heather; Jiang, Tao; Allen, Dave; Ruklisa, Dace; Mann, Alice L; Mead, Daniel; Bouman, Heleen; Riveros-Mckay, Fernando; Kostadima, Myrto A; Lambourne, John J; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Downes, Kate; Kundu, Kousik; Bomba, Lorenzo; Berentsen, Kim; Bradley, John R; Daugherty, Louise C; Delaneau, Olivier; Freson, Kathleen; Garner, Stephen F; Grassi, Luigi; Guerrero, Jose; Haimel, Matthias; Janssen-Megens, Eva M; Kaan, Anita; Kamat, Mihir; Kim, Bowon; Mandoli, Amit; Marchini, Jonathan; Martens, Joost H A; Meacham, Stuart; Megy, Karyn; O'Connell, Jared; Petersen, Romina; Sharifi, Nilofar; Sheard, Simon M; Staley, James R; Tuna, Salih; van der Ent, Martijn; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Shuang-Yin; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wilder, Steven P; Iotchkova, Valentina; Moore, Carmel; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Kaptoge, Stephen; Kuijpers, Taco W; Carrillo-de-Santa-Pau, Enrique; Juan, David; Rico, Daniel; Valencia, Alfonso; Chen, Lu; Ge, Bing; Vasquez, Louella; Kwan, Tony; Garrido-Martín, Diego; Watt, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Guigo, Roderic; Beck, Stephan; Paul, Dirk S; Pastinen, Tomi; Bujold, David; Bourque, Guillaume; Frontini, Mattia; Danesh, John; Roberts, David J; Ouwehand, Willem H; Butterworth, Adam S; Soranzo, Nicole

    2016-11-17

    Many common variants have been associated with hematological traits, but identification of causal genes and pathways has proven challenging. We performed a genome-wide association analysis in the UK Biobank and INTERVAL studies, testing 29.5 million genetic variants for association with 36 red cell, white cell, and platelet properties in 173,480 European-ancestry participants. This effort yielded hundreds of low frequency (<5%) and rare (<1%) variants with a strong impact on blood cell phenotypes. Our data highlight general properties of the allelic architecture of complex traits, including the proportion of the heritable component of each blood trait explained by the polygenic signal across different genome regulatory domains. Finally, through Mendelian randomization, we provide evidence of shared genetic pathways linking blood cell indices with complex pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, schizophrenia, and coronary heart disease and evidence suggesting previously reported population associations between blood cell indices and cardiovascular disease may be non-causal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Complexity of Human Antibody Response to Dengue Virus: Implication for Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yang Tsai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV are the leading cause of arboviral diseases in humans. Decades of efforts have made remarkable progress in dengue vaccine development. Despite the first dengue vaccine (dengvaxia from Sanofi Pasteur, a live-attenuated tetravalent chimeric yellow fever-dengue vaccine, has been licensed by several countries since 2016, its overall moderate efficacy (56.5–60.8% in the presence of neutralizing antibodies during the Phase 2b and 3 trials, lower efficacy among dengue naïve compared with dengue experienced individuals, and increased risk of hospitalization among young children during the follow-up highlight the need for a better understanding of humoral responses after natural DENV infection. Recent studies of more than 300 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against DENV have led to the discovery of several novel epitopes on the envelope protein recognized by potent neutralizing mAbs. This information together with in-depth studies on polyclonal sera and B-cells following natural DENV infection has tremendous implications for better immunogen design for a safe and effective dengue vaccine. This review outlines the progress in our understanding of mouse mAbs, human mAbs, and polyclonal sera against DENV envelope and precursor membrane proteins, two surface proteins involved in vaccine development, following natural infection; analyses of these discoveries have provided valuable insight into new strategies involving molecular technology to induce more potent neutralizing antibodies and less enhancing antibodies for next-generation dengue vaccine development.

  17. Complex signal-based optical coherence tomography angiography enables in vivo visualization of choriocapillaris in human choroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhongdi; Chen, Chieh-Li; Zhang, Qinqin; Pepple, Kathryn; Durbin, Mary; Gregori, Giovanni; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2017-12-01

    The choriocapillaris (CC) plays an essential role in maintaining the normal functions of the human eye. There is increasing interest in the community to develop an imaging technique for visualizing the CC, yet this remains underexplored due to technical limitations. We propose an approach for the visualization of the CC in humans via a complex signal-based optical microangiography (OMAG) algorithm, based on commercially available spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We show that the complex signal-based OMAG was superior to both the phase and amplitude signal-based approaches in detailing the vascular lobules previously seen with histological analysis. With this improved ability to visualize the lobular vascular networks, it is possible to identify the feeding arterioles and draining venules around the lobules, which is important in understanding the role of the CC in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. With built-in FastTrac™ and montage scanning capabilities, we also demonstrate wide-field SD-OCT angiograms of the CC with a field of view at 9×11 mm2.

  18. Conformational changes in the bilirubin-human serum albumin complex at extreme alkaline pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Frandsen, P C

    1986-01-01

    Light-absorption, c.d. and fluorescence of the bilirubin-albumin complex were investigated at extreme alkaline pH. Above pH 11.1 albumin binds the bilirubin molecule, twisted oppositely to the configuration at more neutral pH. On the basis of light-absorption it is shown that two alkaline...... transitions occur. The first alkaline transition takes place at pH between 11.3 and 11.8, co-operatively dissociating at least six protons. The second alkaline transition takes place at pH between 11.8 and 12.0. It probably implies a reversible unfolding of the albumin molecule, increasing the distance...

  19. Human FAN1 promotes strand incision in 5'-flapped DNA complexed with RPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Sato, Koichi; Hirayama, Emiko; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a human infantile recessive disorder. Seventeen FA causal proteins cooperatively function in the DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair pathway. Dual DNA strand incisions around the crosslink are critical steps in ICL repair. FA-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1) is a DNA structure-specific endonuclease that is considered to be involved in DNA incision at the stalled replication fork. Replication protein A (RPA) rapidly assembles on the single-stranded DNA region of the stalled fork. However, the effect of RPA on the FAN1-mediated DNA incision has not been determined. In this study, we purified human FAN1, as a bacterially expressed recombinant protein. FAN1 exhibited robust endonuclease activity with 5'-flapped DNA, which is formed at the stalled replication fork. We found that FAN1 efficiently promoted DNA incision at the proper site of RPA-coated 5'-flapped DNA. Therefore, FAN1 possesses the ability to promote the ICL repair of 5'-flapped DNA covered by RPA. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Cosimo: a cognitive simulation model of human decision making and behaviour in complex work environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciabue, P.C.; Decortis, F.; Nordvik, J.P.; Drozdowicz, B.; Masson, M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the Cognitive Simulation Model (COSIMO), currently implemented at the Ispra JRC, is described, with particular emphasis on its theoretical foundations, on its computational implementation and on a number of simulations cases of man-machine system interactions. COSIMO runs on a lisp machine and it interacts with the simulation of the physical system implemented on a Sun computer. In our case the physical system is a typical Nuclear Power Plant subsystem - the Auxiliary Feed-Water System (AFWS). One basic application is to explore human behaviour in simulated accident situations in order to identify suitable safety recommendations. To be more specific, COSIMO can be used to: - analyse how operators are likely to act given a particular context, - identify difficult problem solving situations, given problem solving resources and constraints (operator knowledge, man-machine interfaces, procedures), - identify situations that can lead to human errors and evaluate their consequences, - identify and test conditions for error recovery, - investigate the effects of changes in the man-machine system. Since the modelling of the AFWS, its control system and procedures have also been the object of a detailed description (Cacciabue et al., 1990a), the objective of this paper is the presentation of the state of the art of the COSIMO simulation

  1. Latent physiological factors of complex human diseases revealed by independent component analysis of clinarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen David P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis and treatment of patients in the clinical setting is often driven by known symptomatic factors that distinguish one particular condition from another. Treatment based on noticeable symptoms, however, is limited to the types of clinical biomarkers collected, and is prone to overlooking dysfunctions in physiological factors not easily evident to medical practitioners. We used a vector-based representation of patient clinical biomarkers, or clinarrays, to search for latent physiological factors that underlie human diseases directly from clinical laboratory data. Knowledge of these factors could be used to improve assessment of disease severity and help to refine strategies for diagnosis and monitoring disease progression. Results Applying Independent Component Analysis on clinarrays built from patient laboratory measurements revealed both known and novel concomitant physiological factors for asthma, types 1 and 2 diabetes, cystic fibrosis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Serum sodium was found to be the most significant factor for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and was also significant in asthma. TSH3, a measure of thyroid function, and blood urea nitrogen, indicative of kidney function, were factors unique to type 1 diabetes respective to type 2 diabetes. Platelet count was significant across all the diseases analyzed. Conclusions The results demonstrate that large-scale analyses of clinical biomarkers using unsupervised methods can offer novel insights into the pathophysiological basis of human disease, and suggest novel clinical utility of established laboratory measurements.

  2. HCMV Infection of Human Trophoblast Progenitor Cells of the Placenta Is Neutralized by a Human Monoclonal Antibody to Glycoprotein B and Not by Antibodies to the Pentamer Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Zydek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the major viral cause of congenital infection and birth defects. Primary maternal infection often results in virus transmission, and symptomatic babies can have permanent neurological deficiencies and deafness. Congenital infection can also lead to intrauterine growth restriction, a defect in placental transport. HCMV replicates in primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs, the specialized cells of the placenta, and inhibits differentiation/invasion. Human trophoblast progenitor cells (TBPCs give rise to the mature cell types of the chorionic villi, CTBs and multi-nucleated syncytiotrophoblasts (STBs. Here we report that TBPCs are fully permissive for pathogenic and attenuated HCMV strains. Studies with a mutant virus lacking a functional pentamer complex (gH/gL/pUL128-131A showed that virion entry into TBPCs is independent of the pentamer. In addition, infection is blocked by a potent human neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb, TRL345, reactive with glycoprotein B (gB, but not mAbs to the pentamer proteins pUL130/pUL131A. Functional studies revealed that neutralization of infection preserved the capacity of TBPCs to differentiate and assemble into trophospheres composed of CTBs and STBs in vitro. Our results indicate that mAbs to gB protect trophoblast progenitors of the placenta and could be included in antibody treatments developed to suppress congenital infection and prevent disease.

  3. Mapping the human translation elongation factor eEF1H complex using the yeast two-hybrid system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Friis, Irene; Jadidi, Mandana

    2002-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A responsible for transporting amino-acylated tRNA to the ribosome forms a higher-order complex, eEF1H, with its guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor eEF1B. In metazoans, eEF1B consists of three subunits: eEF1B alpha, eEF1B eta and eEF1B...... of in vitro experiments have been proposed for the macromolecular organization of the eEF1H complex. However, these models differ in various aspects. This might be due to the difficulties of handling, particularly the eEF1B beta and eEF1B gamma subunits in vitro. Here, the human eEF1H complex is for the first...... gamma:eEF1B beta, where the last was observed using a three-hybrid approach. Surprisingly, eEF1A2 showed no or only little affinity for the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors. Truncated versions of the subunits of eEF1B were used to orientate these subunits within the resulting model. The model unit...

  4. Designing for Social Infrastructures in Complex Service Systems: A Human-Centered and Social Systems Perspective on Service Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke van der Bijl-Brouwer

    Full Text Available Service design is one of the keys to improving how we target today’s complex societal problems. The predominant view of service systems is mechanistic and linear. A service infrastructure—which includes solutions like service blueprints, scripts, and protocols—is, in some ways, designed to control the behavior of service professionals at the service interface. This view undermines the intrinsic motivation, expertise, and creativity of service professionals. This article presents a different perspective on service design. Using theories of social systems and complex responsive processes, I define service organizations as ongoing iterated patterns of relationships between people, and identify them as complex social service systems. I go on to show how the human-centeredness of design practices contributes to designing for such service systems. In particular, I show how a deep understanding of the needs and aspirations of service professionals through phenomenological themes contributes to designing for social infrastructures that support continuous improvement and adaptation of the practices executed by service professionals at the service interface.

  5. Binding of α2-macroglobulin-thrombin complexes and methylamine-treated α2-macroglobulin to human blood monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straight, D.L.; Jakoi, L.; McKee, P.A.; Snyderman, R.

    1988-01-01

    The binding of α 2 -macroglobulin (α 2 M) to human peripheral blood monocytes was investigated. Monocytes, the precursors of tissue macrophages, were isolated from fresh blood by centrifugal elutriation or density gradient centrifugation. Binding studies were performed using 125 I-labeled α 2 M. Cells and bound ligand were separated from free ligand by rapid vacuum filtration. Nonlinear least-squares analysis of data obtained in direct binding studies at 0 0 C showed that monocytes bound the α 2 M-thrombin complex with a K/sub d/ 3.0 +- .09 nM and the monocyte had 1545 +- 153 sitescell. Thrombin alone did not compete for the site. Binding was divalent cation dependent. Direct binding studies also demonstrated that monocytes bound methylamine-treated α 2 M in a manner similar to α 2 M-thrombin. Competitive binding studies showed that α 2 M-thrombin and methylamine-treated α 2 M bound to the same sites on the monocyte. In contrast, native α 2 M did not compete with α 2 M-thrombin for the site. Studies done at 37 0 C suggested that after binding, the monocyte internalized and degraded α 2 M-thrombin and excreted the degradation products. Receptor turnover and degradation of α 2 M-thrombin complexes were blocked in monocytes treated with chloroquine, an inhibitor of lysosomal function. The results indicate that human monocytes have a divalent cation dependent, high-affinity binding site for α 2 M-thrombin and methylamine-treated α 2 M which may function to clear α 2 M-proteinase complexes from the circulation

  6. Respiratory chain complex I, a main regulatory target of the cAMP/PKA pathway is defective in different human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papa, S.; De Rasmo, D.; Technikova-Dobrova, Z.

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has 31 supernumerary subunits in addition to the 14 conserved from prokaryotes to humans. Multiplicity of structural protein components, as well as of biogenesis factors, makes complex I a sensible pace-...

  7. IgG and complement deposition and neuronal loss in cats and humans with epilepsy and voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klang, Andrea; Schmidt, Peter; Kneissl, Sibylle; Bagó, Zoltán; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Moloney, Teresa; Bien, Christian G; Halász, Péter; Bauer, Jan; Pákozdy, Akos

    2014-05-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel complex (VGKC-complex) antibody (Ab) encephalitis is a well-recognized form of limbic encephalitis in humans, usually occurring in the absence of an underlying tumor. The patients have a subacute onset of seizures, magnetic resonance imaging findings suggestive of hippocampal inflammation, and high serum titers of Abs against proteins of the VGKC-complex, particularly leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1). Most patients are diagnosed promptly and recover substantially with immunotherapies; consequently, neuropathological data are limited. We have recently shown that feline complex partial cluster seizures with orofacial involvement (FEPSO) in cats can also be associated with Abs against VGKC-complexes/LGI1. Here we examined the brains of cats with FEPSO and compared the neuropathological findings with those in a human with VGKC-complex-Ab limbic encephalitis. Similar to humans, cats with VGKC-complex-Ab and FEPSO have hippocampal lesions with only moderate T-cell infiltrates but with marked IgG infiltration and complement C9neo deposition on hippocampal neurons, associated with neuronal loss. These findings provide further evidence that FEPSO is a feline form of VGKC-complex-Ab limbic encephalitis and provide a model for increasing understanding of the human disease.

  8. Defining the diverse spectrum of inversions, complex structural variation, and chromothripsis in the morbid human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ryan L; Brand, Harrison; Redin, Claire E; Hanscom, Carrie; Antolik, Caroline; Stone, Matthew R; Glessner, Joseph T; Mason, Tamara; Pregno, Giulia; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Mandrile, Giorgia; Giachino, Daniela; Perrin, Danielle; Walsh, Cole; Cipicchio, Michelle; Costello, Maura; Stortchevoi, Alexei; An, Joon-Yong; Currall, Benjamin B; Seabra, Catarina M; Ragavendran, Ashok; Margolin, Lauren; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Lucente, Diane; Levy, Brynn; Sanders, Stephan J; Wapner, Ronald J; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Kloosterman, Wigard; Talkowski, Michael E

    2017-03-06

    Structural variation (SV) influences genome organization and contributes to human disease. However, the complete mutational spectrum of SV has not been routinely captured in disease association studies. We sequenced 689 participants with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental abnormalities to construct a genome-wide map of large SV. Using long-insert jumping libraries at 105X mean physical coverage and linked-read whole-genome sequencing from 10X Genomics, we document seven major SV classes at ~5 kb SV resolution. Our results encompass 11,735 distinct large SV sites, 38.1% of which are novel and 16.8% of which are balanced or complex. We characterize 16 recurrent subclasses of complex SV (cxSV), revealing that: (1) cxSV are larger and rarer than canonical SV; (2) each genome harbors 14 large cxSV on average; (3) 84.4% of large cxSVs involve inversion; and (4) most large cxSV (93.8%) have not been delineated in previous studies. Rare SVs are more likely to disrupt coding and regulatory non-coding loci, particularly when truncating constrained and disease-associated genes. We also identify multiple cases of catastrophic chromosomal rearrangements known as chromoanagenesis, including somatic chromoanasynthesis, and extreme balanced germline chromothripsis events involving up to 65 breakpoints and 60.6 Mb across four chromosomes, further defining rare categories of extreme cxSV. These data provide a foundational map of large SV in the morbid human genome and demonstrate a previously underappreciated abundance and diversity of cxSV that should be considered in genomic studies of human disease.

  9. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäntti, Maria H., E-mail: maria.jantti@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Mandrika, Ilona, E-mail: ilona@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Ratsupites Str. 1, Riga LV 1067 (Latvia); Kukkonen, Jyrki P., E-mail: jyrki.kukkonen@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  10. Isolation, characterization, and mapping of gene encoding dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (E2k) of human [alpha]-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, G.; Cai, Xingang; Sheu, Kwan-Fu R.; Blass, J.P. (Cornell Univ. Medical College, White Plains, NY (United States)); Wasco, W.; Gaston, S.M.; Tanzi, R.E.; Cooper, A.J.L.; Gusella, J.F. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Charleston, MA (United States)); Szabo, P. (Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY (United States))

    1994-03-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced cDNAs representing the full-length (2987-bp) gene for dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (E2k component) of the human [alpha]-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KHDHC) from a human fetal brain cDNA library. The E2k cDNA was mapped to human chromosome 14 using a somatic cell hybrid panel, and more precisely to band 14q24.3 by in situ hybridization. This cDNA also cross-hybridized to an apparent E2k pseudogene on chromosome 1p31. Northern analysis revealed the E2k gene to be ubiquitously expressed in peripheral tissues and brain. Interestingly, chromosome 14q24.3 has recently been reported to contain gene defects for an early-onset form of familial Alzheimer's disease and for Machado-Joseph disease. Future studies will be necessary to determine whether the E2K gene plays a role in either of these two disorders.

  11. Expression of the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan molecular complex in six human melanoma xenograft lines studied by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelhus, T A; Rofstad, E K

    1993-06-01

    The expression of the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSP) molecular complex in six human melanoma xenograft lines (BEX-t, COX-t, HUX-t, ROX-t, SAX-t, WIX-t) was studied by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry using the monoclonal antibodies 9.2.27, ME31.3, G7A5, and NKI.M6. The two methods and the four antibodies gave consistent results. The six melanoma lines could be divided into three distinct groups of two lines each; expression was high in the HUX-t and ROX-t lines and intermediate in the BEX-t and SAX-t lines, whereas the COX-t and WIX-t lines were negative. The mean number of epitopes per cell for 9.2.27 was approximately twice as high as for ME31.3, G7A5, and NKI.M6 and was estimated to range from 0.8 +/- 0.1 x 10(5) to 1.9 +/- 0.2 x 10(5) in the positive xenograft lines. The expression of the CSP complex was heterogeneous. The immunofluorescence histograms measured by flow cytometry were therefore broad for all tumour lines. A significant fraction of the HUX-t cells was negative or weakly stained. These cells appeared as clear negative patches in the immunohistochemical preparations. Moreover, most morphologically intact tumour cells adjacent to necrotic areas did not show significant expression of the CSP complex, irrespective of tumour line. These cells were probably hypoxic and thus resistant to radiation therapy. The expression of the CSP complex in the xenograft lines was similar to that reported for melanoma in man.

  12. Stereological analysis of neuron, glial and endothelial cell numbers in the human amygdaloid complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María García-Amado

    Full Text Available Cell number alterations in the amygdaloid complex (AC might coincide with neurological and psychiatric pathologies with anxiety imbalances as well as with changes in brain functionality during aging. This stereological study focused on estimating, in samples from 7 control individuals aged 20 to 75 years old, the number and density of neurons, glia and endothelial cells in the entire AC and in its 5 nuclear groups (including the basolateral (BL, corticomedial and central groups, 5 nuclei and 13 nuclear subdivisions. The volume and total cell number in these territories were determined on Nissl-stained sections with the Cavalieri principle and the optical fractionator. The AC mean volume was 956 mm(3 and mean cell numbers (x10(6 were: 15.3 neurons, 60 glial cells and 16.8 endothelial cells. The numbers of endothelial cells and neurons were similar in each AC region and were one fourth the number of glial cells. Analysis of the influence of the individuals' age at death on volume, cell number and density in each of these 24 AC regions suggested that aging does not affect regional size or the amount of glial cells, but that neuron and endothelial cell numbers respectively tended to decrease and increase in territories such as AC or BL. These accurate stereological measures of volume and total cell numbers and densities in the AC of control individuals could serve as appropriate reference values to evaluate subtle alterations in this structure in pathological conditions.

  13. Does the centre of mass remain stable during complex human postural equilibrium tasks in weightlessness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapley, Paul; Pozzo, Thierry

    In normal gravity conditions the execution of voluntary movement involves the displacement of body segments as well as the maintenance of a stable reference value for equilibrium control. It has been suggested that centre of mass (CM) projection within the supporting base (BS) is the stabilised reference for voluntary action, and is conserved in weightlessness. The purpose of this study was to determine if the CM is stabilised during whole body reaching movements executed in weightlessness. The reaching task was conducted by two cosmonauts aboard the Russian orbital station MIR, during the Franco-Russian mission ALTAIR, 1993. Movements of reflective markers were recorded using a videocamera, successive images being reconstructed by computer every 40ms. The position of the CM, ankle joint torques and shank and thigh angles were computed for each subject pre- in- and post-flight using a 7-link mathematical model. Results showed that both cosmonauts adopted a backward leaning posture prior to reaching movements. Inflight, the CM was displaced throughout values in the horizontal axis three times those of pre-flight measures. In addition, ankle dorsi flexor torques inflight increased to values double those of pre- and post-flight tests. This study concluded that CM displacements do not remain stable during complex postural equilibrium tasks executed in weightlessness. Furthermore, in the absence of gravity, subjects changed their strategy for producing ankle torque during spaceflight from a forward to a backward leaning posture.

  14. Incorporating networks in a probabilistic graphical model to find drivers for complex human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezlini, Aziz M; Goldenberg, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Discovering genetic mechanisms driving complex diseases is a hard problem. Existing methods often lack power to identify the set of responsible genes. Protein-protein interaction networks have been shown to boost power when detecting gene-disease associations. We introduce a Bayesian framework, Conflux, to find disease associated genes from exome sequencing data using networks as a prior. There are two main advantages to using networks within a probabilistic graphical model. First, networks are noisy and incomplete, a substantial impediment to gene discovery. Incorporating networks into the structure of a probabilistic models for gene inference has less impact on the solution than relying on the noisy network structure directly. Second, using a Bayesian framework we can keep track of the uncertainty of each gene being associated with the phenotype rather than returning a fixed list of genes. We first show that using networks clearly improves gene detection compared to individual gene testing. We then show consistently improved performance of Conflux compared to the state-of-the-art diffusion network-based method Hotnet2 and a variety of other network and variant aggregation methods, using randomly generated and literature-reported gene sets. We test Hotnet2 and Conflux on several network configurations to reveal biases and patterns of false positives and false negatives in each case. Our experiments show that our novel Bayesian framework Conflux incorporates many of the advantages of the current state-of-the-art methods, while offering more flexibility and improved power in many gene-disease association scenarios.

  15. Stereological analysis of neuron, glial and endothelial cell numbers in the human amygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Cell number alterations in the amygdaloid complex (AC) might coincide with neurological and psychiatric pathologies with anxiety imbalances as well as with changes in brain functionality during aging. This stereological study focused on estimating, in samples from 7 control individuals aged 20 to 75 years old, the number and density of neurons, glia and endothelial cells in the entire AC and in its 5 nuclear groups (including the basolateral (BL), corticomedial and central groups), 5 nuclei and 13 nuclear subdivisions. The volume and total cell number in these territories were determined on Nissl-stained sections with the Cavalieri principle and the optical fractionator. The AC mean volume was 956 mm(3) and mean cell numbers (x10(6)) were: 15.3 neurons, 60 glial cells and 16.8 endothelial cells. The numbers of endothelial cells and neurons were similar in each AC region and were one fourth the number of glial cells. Analysis of the influence of the individuals' age at death on volume, cell number and density in each of these 24 AC regions suggested that aging does not affect regional size or the amount of glial cells, but that neuron and endothelial cell numbers respectively tended to decrease and increase in territories such as AC or BL. These accurate stereological measures of volume and total cell numbers and densities in the AC of control individuals could serve as appropriate reference values to evaluate subtle alterations in this structure in pathological conditions.

  16. Bioconjugated nano-bactericidal complex for potent activity against human and phytopathogens with concern of global drug resistant crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Baker; Nagendra Prasad, M N; Mohan Kumar, K; Satish, S

    2018-05-09

    The present study emphasizes the need for novel antimicrobial agents to combat the global drug resistant crisis. The development of novel nanomaterials is reported to be of the alternative tool to combat drug resistant pathogens. In present investigation, bioconjugated nano-complex was developed from secondary metabolite secreted from endosymbiont. The endosymbiont capable of secreting antimicrobial metabolite was subjected to fermentation and the culture supernatant was assessed for purification of antimicrobial metabolite via bio-assay guided fraction techniques such as thin layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and column chromatography. The metabolite was characterized as 2,4-Diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4 DAPG) which was used to develop bioconjugated nano-complex by treating with 1 mM silver nitrate under optimized conditions. The purified metabolite 2,4 DAPG reduced silver nitrate to form bioconjugated nano-complex to form association with silver nanoparticles. The oxidized form of DAPG consists of four hard ligands that can conjugate on to the surface of silver nanoparticles cluster. The bioconjugation was confirmed with UV-visible spectroscopy which displayed the shift and shoulder peak in the absorbance spectra. This biomolecular interaction was further determined by the Fourier-transform spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses which displayed different signals ascertaining the molecular binding of 2,4,DAPG with silver nanoparticles. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed the cluster formation due to bioconjugation. The XRD analysis revealed the crystalline nature of nano-complex with the characteristic peaks indexed to Bragg's reflection occurring at 2θ angle which indicated the (111), (200), (220) and (311) planes. The activity of bioconjugated nano-complex was tested against 12 significant human and phytopathogens. Among all the test pathogens, Shigella flexneri (MTCC

  17. Molecular structure of human KATP in complex with ATP and ADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kenneth Pak Kin; Chen, Jue; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2017-12-29

    In many excitable cells, KATP channels respond to intracellular adenosine nucleotides: ATP inhibits while ADP activates. We present two structures of the human pancreatic KATP channel, containing the ABC transporter SUR1 and the inward-rectifier K + channel Kir6.2, in the presence of Mg 2+ and nucleotides. These structures, referred to as quatrefoil and propeller forms, were determined by single-particle cryo-EM at 3.9 Å and 5.6 Å, respectively. In both forms, ATP occupies the inhibitory site in Kir6.2. The nucleotide-binding domains of SUR1 are dimerized with Mg 2+ -ATP in the degenerate site and Mg 2+ -ADP in the consensus site. A lasso extension forms an interface between SUR1 and Kir6.2 adjacent to the ATP site in the propeller form and is disrupted in the quatrefoil form. These structures support the role of SUR1 as an ADP sensor and highlight the lasso extension as a key regulatory element in ADP's ability to override ATP inhibition. © 2017, Lee et al.

  18. Structural analysis of the complex between influenza B nucleoprotein and human importin-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaronne, Alice; Milles, Sigrid; Donchet, Amélie; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Crépin, Thibaut

    2017-12-07

    Influenza viruses are negative strand RNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus of the cell. The viral nucleoprotein (NP) is the major component of the viral ribonucleoprotein. In this paper we show that the NP of influenza B has a long N-terminal tail of 70 residues with intrinsic flexibility. This tail contains the Nuclear Location Signal (NLS). The nuclear trafficking of the viral components mobilizes cellular import factors at different stages, making these host-pathogen interactions promising targets for new therapeutics. NP is imported into the nucleus by the importin-α/β pathway, through a direct interaction with importin-α isoforms. Here we provide a combined nuclear magnetic resonance and small-angle X-ray scattering (NMR/SAXS) analysis to describe the dynamics of the interaction between influenza B NP and the human importin-α. The NP of influenza B does not have a single NLS nor a bipartite NLS but our results suggest that the tail harbors several adjacent NLS sequences, located between residues 30 and 71.

  19. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-03-24

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available.

  20. The concentric model of human working memory: A validation study using complex span and updating tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velichkovsky B. B.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Working memory (WM seems to be central to most forms of high-level cognition. This fact is fueling the growing interest in studying its structure and functional organization. The influential “concentric model” (Oberauer, 2002 suggests that WM contains a processing component and two storage components with different capacity limitations and sensitivity to interference. There is, to date, only limited support for the concentric model in the research literature, and it is limited to a number of specially designed tasks. Objective. In the present paper, we attempted to validate the concentric model by testing its major predictions using complex span and updating tasks in a number of experimental paradigms. Method. The model predictions were tested with the help of review of data obtained primarily in our own experiments in several research domains, including Sternberg’s additive factors method; factor structure of WM; serial position effects in WM; and WM performance in a sample with episodic long-term memory deficits. Results. Predictions generated by the concentric model were shown to hold in all these domains. In addition, several new properties of WM were identified. In particular, we recently found that WM indeed contains a processing component which functions independent of storage components. In turn, the latter were found to form a storage hierarchy which balances fast access to selected items, with the storing of large amounts of potentially relevant information. Processing and storage in WM were found to be dependent on shared cognitive resources which are dynamically allocated between WM components according to actual task requirements. e implications of these findings for the theory of WM are discussed. Conclusion. The concentric model was shown to be valid with respect to standard WM tasks. The concentric model others promising research perspectives for the study of higher- order cognition, including underlying

  1. Genomic prediction of complex human traits: relatedness, trait architecture and predictive meta-models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulou, Athina; Nagy, Reka; Bermingham, Mairead L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hayward, Caroline; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Agakov, Felix; Navarro, Pau; Haley, Chris S.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the prediction of individuals' phenotypes for complex traits using genomic data. We compare several widely used prediction models, including Ridge Regression, LASSO and Elastic Nets estimated from cohort data, and polygenic risk scores constructed using published summary statistics from genome-wide association meta-analyses (GWAMA). We evaluate the interplay between relatedness, trait architecture and optimal marker density, by predicting height, body mass index (BMI) and high-density lipoprotein level (HDL) in two data cohorts, originating from Croatia and Scotland. We empirically demonstrate that dense models are better when all genetic effects are small (height and BMI) and target individuals are related to the training samples, while sparse models predict better in unrelated individuals and when some effects have moderate size (HDL). For HDL sparse models achieved good across-cohort prediction, performing similarly to the GWAMA risk score and to models trained within the same cohort, which indicates that, for predicting traits with moderately sized effects, large sample sizes and familial structure become less important, though still potentially useful. Finally, we propose a novel ensemble of whole-genome predictors with GWAMA risk scores and demonstrate that the resulting meta-model achieves higher prediction accuracy than either model on its own. We conclude that although current genomic predictors are not accurate enough for diagnostic purposes, performance can be improved without requiring access to large-scale individual-level data. Our methodologically simple meta-model is a means of performing predictive meta-analysis for optimizing genomic predictions and can be easily extended to incorporate multiple population-level summary statistics or other domain knowledge. PMID:25918167

  2. Rethinking the Essence of Human and Other-Than-Human Communication in the Anthropocene Epoch: A Biosemiotic Interpretation of Edgar Morin’s “Complex Thought”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Moser

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this essay is to explore the philosophical and linguistic implications of the French philosopher Edgar Morin’s “complex thought.” In stark contrast to standard communicative models which profess that Homo sapiens are the only organisms that are capable of engaging in semiosis, Morin unequivocally proves that other-than-human communication is laden with significance and purpose. Living on an imperiled planet that is increasingly defined by an anthropogenic, ecological calamity that is spiraling further out of control with each passing day, Morin persuasively argues that we must transcend our myopic, anthropocentric frame of reference and adopt a more ecocentric view of communication.

  3. Levels and complexity of IgA antibody against oral bacteria in samples of human colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrechen, L N; Zago, F H; Sesso, M L T; Bertoldo, B B; Silva, C B; Azevedo, K P; de Lima Pereira, S A; Geraldo-Martins, V R; Ferriani, V P L; Nogueira, R D

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans (SM) have three main virulence antigens: glucan binding protein B (gbpB), glucosyltransferase (Gtf) and antigens I/II (Ag I/II) envolved in the capacity of those bacteria to adhere and accumulate in the dental biofilm. Also, the glycosyltransferases 153 kDa of Streptococcus gordonii (SGO) and 170kDa of Streptococcus sanguinis (SSA) were important antigens associated with the accumulation of those bacterias. Streptococcus mitis (SMI) present IgA1 protease of 202 kDa. We investigated the specificity and levels IgA against those antigens of virulence in samples of human colostrum. This study involved 77 samples of colostrum that were analyzed for levels of immunoglobulian A, M and G by Elisa. The specificity of IgA against extracts of SM and initials colonizators (SSA, SMI, SGO) were analyzed by the Western blot. The mean concentration of IgA was 2850.2 (±2567.2) mg/100 mL followed by IgM and IgG (respectively 321.8±90.3 and 88.3±51.5), statistically different (pbacteria antigens and theirs virulence antigens. To SM, the GbpB was significantly lower detected than others antigens of SM (p0.4). So, the breast milk from first hours after birth presented significant levels of IgA specific against important virulence of antigens those oral streptococci, which can disrupt the installation and accumulation process of these microorganisms in the oral cavity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Complexation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics with human serum albumin: A fluorescence quenching study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seedher, Neelam, E-mail: nseedher@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Agarwal, Pooja [Department of Chemistry, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Mechanism of interaction and detailed physico-chemical characterization of the binding of four fluoroquinolones: levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin HCl and enrofloxacin with human serum albumin has been studied at physiological pH (7.4) using fluorescence spectroscopic technique. The stoichiometry of interaction was found to be 1:1 for all the drugs used. The association constants for the interaction were of the order of 10{sup 4} in most cases. At low drug:protein ratios, a significant fraction of the added drug was bound. The predominant interactions involved are hydrogen bonding and Van der Waal's interactions in the case of levofloxacin, hydrophobic interactions in the case of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride and enrofloxacin and hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions in the case of sparfloxacin. The drug binding region did not coincide with that of the hydrophobic probe, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS). From the displacement of site-specific probes and site-marker drugs, it was concluded that ciprofloxacin hydrochloride is site II-specific while enrofloxacin is a site I-specific drug. Levofloxacin binds at both site I and site II with equal affinity. Sparfloxacin had higher affinity for site II than site I. It is also possible that sparfloxacin binds at the interface between site I and site II. Stern-Volmer analysis of the data showed that the quenching mechanism is predominantly collisional for the binding of ciprofloxacin HCl and enrofloxacin while both static and collisional quenching mechanisms are operative in the case of levofloxacin and sparfloxacin. High magnitude of the rate constant for quenching showed that the process is not entirely diffusion controlled. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies showed that the presence of drugs did not cause any major changes in the secondary structure of HSA.

  5. Asexual propagation of a virulent clone complex in a human and feline outbreak of sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Marcus de Melo; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Tsui, Clement K M; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paulo; Van Diepeningen, Anne D; van den Ende, Bert Gerrits; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; Kano, Rui; Hamelin, Richard C; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila Maria; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; de Hoog, Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Felipe, Maria Sueli Soares

    2015-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is one of the most frequent subcutaneous fungal infections in humans and animals caused by members of the plant-associated, dimorphic genus Sporothrix. Three of the four medically important Sporothrix species found in Brazil have been considered asexual as no sexual stage has ever been reported in Sporothrix schenckii, Sporothrix brasiliensis, or Sporothrix globosa. We have identified the mating type (MAT) loci in the S. schenckii (strain 1099-18/ATCC MYA-4821) and S. brasiliensis (strain 5110/ATCC MYA-4823) genomes by using comparative genomic approaches to determine the mating type ratio in these pathogen populations. Our analysis revealed the presence of a MAT1-1 locus in S. schenckii while a MAT1-2 locus was found in S. brasiliensis representing genomic synteny to other Sordariomycetes. Furthermore, the components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-pheromone pathway, pheromone processing enzymes, and meiotic regulators have also been identified in the two pathogens, suggesting the potential for sexual reproduction. The ratio of MAT1-1 to MAT1-2 was not significantly different from 1:1 for all three Sporothrix species, but the population of S. brasiliensis in the outbreaks originated from a single mating type. We also explored the population genetic structure of these pathogens using sequence data of two loci to improve our knowledge of the pattern of geographic distribution, genetic variation, and virulence phenotypes. Population genetics data showed significant population differentiation and clonality with a low level of haplotype diversity in S. brasiliensis isolates from different regions of sporotrichosis outbreaks in Brazil. In contrast, S. schenckii isolates demonstrated a high degree of genetic variability without significant geographic differentiation, indicating the presence of recombination. This study demonstrated that two species causing the same disease have contrasting reproductive strategies and genetic variability

  6. Complexation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics with human serum albumin: A fluorescence quenching study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seedher, Neelam; Agarwal, Pooja

    2010-01-01

    Mechanism of interaction and detailed physico-chemical characterization of the binding of four fluoroquinolones: levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin HCl and enrofloxacin with human serum albumin has been studied at physiological pH (7.4) using fluorescence spectroscopic technique. The stoichiometry of interaction was found to be 1:1 for all the drugs used. The association constants for the interaction were of the order of 10 4 in most cases. At low drug:protein ratios, a significant fraction of the added drug was bound. The predominant interactions involved are hydrogen bonding and Van der Waal's interactions in the case of levofloxacin, hydrophobic interactions in the case of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride and enrofloxacin and hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions in the case of sparfloxacin. The drug binding region did not coincide with that of the hydrophobic probe, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS). From the displacement of site-specific probes and site-marker drugs, it was concluded that ciprofloxacin hydrochloride is site II-specific while enrofloxacin is a site I-specific drug. Levofloxacin binds at both site I and site II with equal affinity. Sparfloxacin had higher affinity for site II than site I. It is also possible that sparfloxacin binds at the interface between site I and site II. Stern-Volmer analysis of the data showed that the quenching mechanism is predominantly collisional for the binding of ciprofloxacin HCl and enrofloxacin while both static and collisional quenching mechanisms are operative in the case of levofloxacin and sparfloxacin. High magnitude of the rate constant for quenching showed that the process is not entirely diffusion controlled. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies showed that the presence of drugs did not cause any major changes in the secondary structure of HSA.

  7. Human-Modified Permafrost Complexes in Urbanized Areas of the Russian North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenets, V. I.; Streletskiy, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Economic development in permafrost regions is accompanied by modification of natural geocryological conditions. Drastic landscape transformations in urbanized areas on permafrost are characterized by changes of heat and moisture exchange in permafrost - atmosphere system, and by engineering and technogenic influence upon the frozen ground, leading to alteration of its physical, thermal and mechanical properties. In northern cities this leads to overall increase of ground temperature relative to undisturbed areas and intensification of hazardous cryogenic processes in areas under engineering development, which together leads to reduction in stability of geotechnical environment. For example, deformations of structures in Norilsk district, Northern Siberia, in the last 15 years, became much more abundant than those revealed throughout the previous 50 years. About 250 large buildings in the local towns were deformed considerably due to deterioration of geocryological conditions, about 100 structures were functioning in emergency state, and almost 50 nine- and five-storey houses, built in the 1960-80s, have been recently disassembled. Increase in accident risk for various facilities (water and oil pipelines, industrial enterprises, etc.) enhances the technogenic pressure on permafrost, leading to the new milestone of changes in permafrost characteristics, i.e. to creation of 'another reality' of geocryological conditions. Social and natural factors dictate clustered spatial pattern of industrial development in permafrost regions. Cryogenic processes within the urban areas on permafrost are seldom similar with those under the natural conditions as intensity, duration and extent of the processes changes under technogenic impacts. Moreover, new cryogenic processes and phenomena may occur, which have not been typical for a given region. This makes mapping and characterization of these processes difficult task. Peculiar natural-technogenic geocryological complexes (NTGC

  8. Core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by the TAL1 complex in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A; Jamieson, Catriona H M; Staudt, Louis M; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2012-08-14

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3, and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected autoregulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1 and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MYB oncogene, forming a positive feed-forward regulatory loop that reinforces and stabilizes the TAL1-regulated oncogenic program. One of the critical downstream targets in this circuitry is the TRIB2 gene, which is oppositely regulated by TAL1 and E2A/HEB and is essential for the survival of T-ALL cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Cornell); (Scripps); (NIDA); (Columbia); (UCSD); (Receptos)

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  10. A core MRB1 complex component is indispensable for RNA editing in insect and human infective stages of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Ammerman

    Full Text Available Uridine insertion/deletion RNA editing is a unique and vital process in kinetoplastids, required for creation of translatable open reading frames in most mitochondrially-encoded RNAs. Emerging as a key player in this process is the mitochondrial RNA binding 1 (MRB1 complex. MRB1 comprises an RNA-independent core complex of at least six proteins, including the GAP1/2 guide RNA (gRNA binding proteins. The core interacts in an RNA-enhanced or -dependent manner with imprecisely defined TbRGG2 subcomplexes, Armadillo protein MRB10130, and additional factors that comprise the dynamic MRB1 complex. Towards understanding MRB1 complex function in RNA editing, we present here functional characterization of the pentein domain-containing MRB1 core protein, MRB11870. Inducible RNAi studies demonstrate that MRB11870 is essential for proliferation of both insect vector and human infective stage T. brucei. MRB11870 ablation causes a massive defect in RNA editing, affecting both pan-edited and minimally edited mRNAs, but does not substantially affect mitochondrial RNA stability or processing of precursor transcripts. The editing defect in MRB1-depleted cells occurs at the initiation stage of editing, as pre-edited mRNAs accumulate. However, the gRNAs that direct editing remain abundant in the knockdown cells. To examine the contribution of MRB11870 to MRB1 macromolecular interactions, we tagged core complexes and analyzed their composition and associated proteins in the presence and absence of MRB11870. These studies demonstrated that MRB11870 is essential for association of GAP1/2 with the core, as well as for interaction of the core with other proteins and subcomplexes. Together, these data support a model in which the MRB1 core mediates functional interaction of gRNAs with the editing machinery, having GAP1/2 as its gRNA binding constituents. MRB11870 is a critical component of the core, essential for its structure and function.

  11. Spectrophotometric determination of quetiapine fumarate in pharmaceuticals and human urine by two charge-transfer complexation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay K.B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two simple, rapid and accurate spectrophotometric procedures are proposed for the determination of quetiapine fumarate (QTF in pharmaceuticals and in spiked human urine. The methods are based on charge transfer complexation reactions of free base form of the drug (quetiapine, QTP, as n-electron donor (D, with either p-chloranilic acid (p-CAA (method A or 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyanoquinone (DDQ (method B as π-acceptors (A. The coloured charge transfer complexes produced exhibit absorption maxima at 520 and 540 nm, in method A and method B, respectively. The experimental conditions such as reagent concentration, reaction solvent and time have been carefully optimized to achieve the maximum sensitivity. Beer’s law is obeyed over the concentration ranges of 8.0 - 160 and 4.0 - 80.0 μg ml-1, for method A and method B, respectively. The calculated molar absorptivity values are 1.77 × 103 and 4.59 × 103 l mol-1cm-1, respectively, for method A and method B. The Sandell sensitivity values, limits of detection (LOD and quantification (LOQ have also been reported. The stoichiometry of the reaction in both cases was accomplished adopting the limiting logarithmic method and was found to be 1: 2 (D: A. The accuracy and precision of the methods were evaluated on intra-day and inter-day basis. The proposed methods were successfully applied for the determination of QTF in pharmaceutical formulations and spiked human urine.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of human RGS10 complexed with Gαi3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyung Ki; Rhee, Kyung Hee [Life Sciences Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan-Wha [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong, E-mail: eunice@kist.re.kr [Life Sciences Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-01

    Human RGS10 and Gαi3 have been overexpressed and purified. Their complex has been crystallized (space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, unit-cell parameters a = 99.88, b = 99.88, c = 144.59 Å, α = β = γ = 90°) and diffraction data have been collected to 2.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. G-protein-coupled receptors, which are major targets for drug discovery, play a major role in diverse physiological processes by relating changes in the extracellular environment to intracellular functions via activation of heterotrimeric G-proteins. However, G-protein activity is also modulated by a family of proteins called regulators of G-protein signalling (RGS), which are classified into six subfamilies. RGS10 belongs to the subgroup D/R12 and is known to act specifically on activated forms of three Gα proteins (Gαi3, Gαz and Gαo but not Gαs). It is abundantly expressed in brain and immune tissues and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The RGS domain of RGS10 was cloned, purified, complexed with human Gαi3 and crystallized. The crystals containing both RGS and Gαi3 belong to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 (or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2), with unit-cell parameters a = 99.88, b = 99.88, c = 144.59 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. A full set of diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation at Pohang beamline 4A.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of human RGS10 complexed with Gαi3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung Ki; Rhee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Chan-Wha; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong

    2005-01-01

    Human RGS10 and Gαi3 have been overexpressed and purified. Their complex has been crystallized (space group P4 3 2 1 2 or P4 1 2 1 2, unit-cell parameters a = 99.88, b = 99.88, c = 144.59 Å, α = β = γ = 90°) and diffraction data have been collected to 2.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. G-protein-coupled receptors, which are major targets for drug discovery, play a major role in diverse physiological processes by relating changes in the extracellular environment to intracellular functions via activation of heterotrimeric G-proteins. However, G-protein activity is also modulated by a family of proteins called regulators of G-protein signalling (RGS), which are classified into six subfamilies. RGS10 belongs to the subgroup D/R12 and is known to act specifically on activated forms of three Gα proteins (Gαi3, Gαz and Gαo but not Gαs). It is abundantly expressed in brain and immune tissues and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The RGS domain of RGS10 was cloned, purified, complexed with human Gαi3 and crystallized. The crystals containing both RGS and Gαi3 belong to space group P4 3 2 1 2 (or P4 1 2 1 2), with unit-cell parameters a = 99.88, b = 99.88, c = 144.59 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. A full set of diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation at Pohang beamline 4A

  14. Consistent manufacturing and quality control of a highly complex recombinant polyclonal antibody product for human therapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Torben P; Naested, Henrik; Rasmussen, Søren K; Hauptig, Peter; Wiberg, Finn C; Rasmussen, Lone Kjaer; Jensen, Anne Marie Valentin; Persson, Pia; Wikén, Margareta; Engström, Anders; Jiang, Yun; Thorpe, Susan J; Förberg, Cecilia; Tolstrup, Anne B

    2011-09-01

    The beneficial effect of antibody therapy in human disease has become well established mainly for the treatment of cancer and immunological disorders. The inherent monospecificity of mAbs present limitations to mAb therapy which have become apparent notably in addressing complex entities like infectious agents or heterogenic endogenous targets. For such indications mixtures of antibodies comprising a combination of specificities would convey more potent biological effect which could translate into therapeutic efficacy. Recombinant polyclonal antibodies (rpAb) consisting of a defined number of well-characterized mAbs constitute a new class of target specific antibody therapy. We have developed a cost-efficient cell banking and single-batch manufacturing concept for the production of such products and demonstrate that a complex pAb composition, rozrolimupab, comprising 25 individual antibodies can be manufactured in a highly consistent manner in a scaled-up manufacturing process. We present a strategy for the release and characterization of antibody mixtures which constitute a complete series of chemistry, manufacturing, and control (CMC) analytical methods to address identity, purity, quantity, potency, and general characteristics. Finally we document selected quality attributes of rozrolimupab based on a battery of assays at the genetic-, protein-, and functional level and demonstrate that the manufactured rozrolimupab batches are highly pure and very uniform in their composition. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Development of 111In-DTPA-human polyclonal antibody complex for long-term inflammation/infection detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalilian, A.R.; Rowshanfarzad, P.; Kamali-Dehghan, M.; Moafian, J.; Akhlaghi, M.; Rajabifar, S.; Mirzaii, M.; Shafaii, K.; Babaii, M.

    2005-01-01

    Human polyclonal antibody (HIgG) was successively labeled with 111-indium chloride after residulation with freshly prepared cyclic DTPA-dianhydride. The best results of the conjugation were obtained by the addition of solid DTPA-dianhydride (0.1-0.3 mg) to 100 μl of the HIgG solution (0.2-0.4 mg/ml) at pH = 6 in phosphate buffer media at 25 o C with continuous stirring for 30 min. Radio-thin-layer chromatography showed an overall radiochemical yield of 96-99% at optimized conditions (specific activity = 300-500 MBq/mg, radiochemical purity >98%). The final isotonic 111 In-DTPA-HIgG complex was checked by radio-TLC to ensure the formation of only one species followed by filtration through a 0.22 μ filter. Preliminary long-term in vivo studies in turpentine-oil induced inflammation in rat model was performed to determine late complex distribution of the radioimmunoconjugate. The target/skin and target/blood ratios were 27 and 51 after 24 h, and 23 and 51 after 110 h, showing a high selectivity of the radiopharmaceutical for inflammatory lesions. (author)

  16. EPR analysis of cyanide complexes of wild-type human neuroglobin and mutants in comparison to horse heart myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Trandafir, Florin; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data reveal large differences between the ferric ((13)C-)cyanide complexes of wild-type human neuroglobin (NGB) and its H64Q and F28L point mutants and the cyanide complexes of mammalian myo- and haemoglobin. The point mutations, which involve residues comprising the distal haem pocket in NGB, induce smaller, but still significant changes, related to changes in the stabilization of the cyanide ligand. Furthermore, for the first time, the full (13)C hyperfine tensor of the cyanide carbon of cyanide-ligated horse heart myoglobin (hhMb) was determined using Davies ENDOR (electron nuclear double resonance). Disagreement of these experimental data with earlier predictions based on (13)C NMR data and a theoretical model reveal significant flaws in the model assumptions. The same ENDOR procedure allowed also partial determination of the corresponding (13)C hyperfine tensor of cyanide-ligated NGB and H64QNGB. These (13)C parameters differ significantly from those of cyanide-ligated hhMb and challenge our current theoretical understanding of how the haem environment influences the magnetic parameters obtained by EPR and NMR in cyanide-ligated haem proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genomic structure of the native inhabitants of Peninsular Malaysia and North Borneo suggests complex human population history in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Chee-Wei; Lu, Dongsheng; Deng, Lian; Wong, Lai-Ping; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Lu, Yan; Wang, Xiaoji; Yunus, Yushimah; Aghakhanian, Farhang; Mokhtar, Siti Shuhada; Hoque, Mohammad Zahirul; Voo, Christopher Lok-Yung; Abdul Rahman, Thuhairah; Bhak, Jong; Phipps, Maude E; Xu, Shuhua; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kumar, Subbiah Vijay; Hoh, Boon-Peng

    2018-02-01

    Southeast Asia (SEA) is enriched with a complex history of peopling. Malaysia, which is located at the crossroads of SEA, has been recognized as one of the hubs for early human migration. To unravel the genomic complexity of the native inhabitants of Malaysia, we sequenced 12 samples from 3 indigenous populations from Peninsular Malaysia and 4 native populations from North Borneo to a high coverage of 28-37×. We showed that the Negritos from Peninsular Malaysia shared a common ancestor with the East Asians, but exhibited some level of gene flow from South Asia, while the North Borneo populations exhibited closer genetic affinity towards East Asians than the Malays. The analysis of time of divergence suggested that ancestors of Negrito were the earliest settlers in the Malay Peninsula, whom first separated from the Papuans ~ 50-33 thousand years ago (kya), followed by East Asian (~ 40-15 kya), while the divergence time frame between North Borneo and East Asia populations predates the Austronesian expansion period implies a possible pre-Neolithic colonization. Substantial Neanderthal ancestry was confirmed in our genomes, as was observed in other East Asians. However, no significant difference was observed, in terms of the proportion of Denisovan gene flow into these native inhabitants from Malaysia. Judging from the similar amount of introgression in the Southeast Asians and East Asians, our findings suggest that the Denisovan gene flow may have occurred before the divergence of these populations and that the shared similarities are likely an ancestral component.

  18. Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Capsids Associate with the Core Nuclear Egress Complex and the Viral Protein Kinase pUL97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbradt, Jens; Sonntag, Eric; Wagner, Sabrina; Strojan, Hanife; Wangen, Christina; Lenac Rovis, Tihana; Lisnic, Berislav; Jonjic, Stipan; Sticht, Heinrich; Britt, William J; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Marschall, Manfred

    2018-01-13

    The nuclear phase of herpesvirus replication is regulated through the formation of regulatory multi-component protein complexes. Viral genomic replication is followed by nuclear capsid assembly, DNA encapsidation and nuclear egress. The latter has been studied intensely pointing to the formation of a viral core nuclear egress complex (NEC) that recruits a multimeric assembly of viral and cellular factors for the reorganization of the nuclear envelope. To date, the mechanism of the association of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) capsids with the NEC, which in turn initiates the specific steps of nuclear capsid budding, remains undefined. Here, we provide electron microscopy-based data demonstrating the association of both nuclear capsids and NEC proteins at nuclear lamina budding sites. Specifically, immunogold labelling of the core NEC constituent pUL53 and NEC-associated viral kinase pUL97 suggested an intranuclear NEC-capsid interaction. Staining patterns with phospho-specific lamin A/C antibodies are compatible with earlier postulates of targeted capsid egress at lamina-depleted areas. Important data were provided by co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase analyses using lysates from HCMV-infected cells, nuclear fractions, or infectious virions. Data strongly suggest that nuclear capsids interact with pUL53 and pUL97. Combined, the findings support a refined concept of HCMV nuclear trafficking and NEC-capsid interaction.

  19. Genomic polymorphism, recombination, and linkage disequilibrium in human major histocompatibility complex-encoded antigen-processing genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Endert, P M; Lopez, M T; Patel, S D; Monaco, J J; McDevitt, H O

    1992-01-01

    Recently, two subunits of a large cytosolic protease and two putative peptide transporter proteins were found to be encoded by genes within the class II region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). These genes have been suggested to be involved in the processing of antigenic proteins for presentation by MHC class I molecules. Because of the high degree of polymorphism in MHC genes, and previous evidence for both functional and polypeptide sequence polymorphism in the proteins encoded by the antigen-processing genes, we tested DNA from 27 consanguineous human cell lines for genomic polymorphism by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. These studies demonstrate a strong linkage disequilibrium between TAP1 and LMP2 RFLPs. Moreover, RFLPs, as well as a polymorphic stop codon in the telomeric TAP2 gene, appear to be in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DR alleles and RFLPs in the HLA-DO gene. A high rate of recombination, however, seems to occur in the center of the complex, between the TAP1 and TAP2 genes. Images PMID:1360671

  20. Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Capsids Associate with the Core Nuclear Egress Complex and the Viral Protein Kinase pUL97

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Milbradt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear phase of herpesvirus replication is regulated through the formation of regulatory multi-component protein complexes. Viral genomic replication is followed by nuclear capsid assembly, DNA encapsidation and nuclear egress. The latter has been studied intensely pointing to the formation of a viral core nuclear egress complex (NEC that recruits a multimeric assembly of viral and cellular factors for the reorganization of the nuclear envelope. To date, the mechanism of the association of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV capsids with the NEC, which in turn initiates the specific steps of nuclear capsid budding, remains undefined. Here, we provide electron microscopy-based data demonstrating the association of both nuclear capsids and NEC proteins at nuclear lamina budding sites. Specifically, immunogold labelling of the core NEC constituent pUL53 and NEC-associated viral kinase pUL97 suggested an intranuclear NEC-capsid interaction. Staining patterns with phospho-specific lamin A/C antibodies are compatible with earlier postulates of targeted capsid egress at lamina-depleted areas. Important data were provided by co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase analyses using lysates from HCMV-infected cells, nuclear fractions, or infectious virions. Data strongly suggest that nuclear capsids interact with pUL53 and pUL97. Combined, the findings support a refined concept of HCMV nuclear trafficking and NEC-capsid interaction.

  1. Human major histocompatibility complex contains a minimum of 19 genes between the complement cluster and HLA-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, T.; Bresnahan, M.; Strominger, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    A 600-kilobase (kb) DNA segment from the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region was isolated by extension of a previous 435-kb chromosome walk. The contiguous series of cloned overlapping cosmids contains the entire 555-kb interval between C2 in the complement gene cluster and HLA-B. This region is known to encode the tumor necrosis factors (TNFs) α and β, B144, and the major heat shock protein HSP70. Moreover, a cluster of genes, BAT1-BAT5 (HLA-B-associated transcripts) have been localized in the vicinity of the genes for TNFα and TNFβ. An additional four genes were identified by isolation of corresponding cDNA clones with cosmid DNA probes. These genes for BAT6-BAT9 were mapped near the gene for C2 within a 120-kb region that includes a HSP70 gene pair. These results, together with complementary data from a similar recent study, indicated the presence of a minimum of 19 genes within the C2-HLA-B interval of the MHC class III region. Although the functional properties of most of these genes are yet unknown, they may be involved in some aspects of immunity. This idea is supported by the genetic mapping of the hematopoietic histocompatibility locus-1 (Hh-1) in recombinant mice between TNFα and H-2S, which is homologous to the complement gene cluster in humans

  2. Increased platelet reactivity is associated with circulating platelet-monocyte complexes and macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Rutten

    Full Text Available Platelet reactivity, platelet binding to monocytes and monocyte infiltration play a detrimental role in atherosclerotic plaque progression. We investigated whether platelet reactivity was associated with levels of circulating platelet-monocyte complexes (PMCs and macrophages in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques.Platelet reactivity was determined by measuring platelet P-selectin expression after platelet stimulation with increasing concentrations of adenosine diphosphate (ADP, in two independent cohorts: the Circulating Cells cohort (n = 244 and the Athero-Express cohort (n = 91. Levels of PMCs were assessed by flow cytometry in blood samples of patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention (Circulating Cells cohort. Monocyte infiltration was semi-quantitatively determined by histological examination of atherosclerotic carotid plaques collected during carotid endarterectomy (Athero-Express cohort.We found increased platelet reactivity in patients with high PMCs as compared to patients with low PMCs (median (interquartile range: 4153 (1585-11267 area under the curve (AUC vs. 9633 (3580-21565 AUC, P<0.001. Also, we observed increased platelet reactivity in patients with high macrophage levels in atherosclerotic plaques as compared to patients with low macrophage levels in atherosclerotic plaques (mean ± SD; 8969 ± 3485 AUC vs. 7020 ± 3442 AUC, P = 0.02. All associations remained significant after adjustment for age, sex and use of drugs against platelet activation.Platelet reactivity towards ADP is associated with levels of PMCs and macrophages in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques.

  3. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M

    2001-01-01

    of the CR1 binding site with the monoclonal antibody 3D9 also resulted in a minor reduction in MAC deposition, while FE8 and 3D9, in combination, markedly reduced deposition of both C3 fragments (91 +/- 5%) and C9 (95 +/- 3%). The kinetics of C3-fragment and MAC deposition, as well as the dependence of both......Normal human B lymphocytes activate the alternative pathway of complement via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), that binds hydrolysed C3 (iC3) and thereby promotes the formation of a membrane-bound C3 convertase. We have investigated whether this might lead to the generation of a C5...... convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...

  4. Structure of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase in complex with an aminopyridine bisphosphonate and two molecules of inorganic phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaeok [McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 1Y6 (Canada); Lin, Yih-Shyan [McGill University, 801 Rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal, QC H3A 0B8 (Canada); Tsantrizos, Youla S. [McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 1Y6 (Canada); McGill University, 801 Rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal, QC H3A 0B8 (Canada); McGill University, 3649 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 0B1 (Canada); Berghuis, Albert M., E-mail: albert.berghuis@mcgill.ca [McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 1Y6 (Canada); McGill University, 3649 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 0B1 (Canada); McGill University, 3775 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B4 (Canada)

    2014-02-19

    A co-crystal structure of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase in complex with an aminopyridine bisphosphonate, YS0470, and two molecules of inorganic phosphate has been determined. The identity of the phosphate ligands was confirmed by anomalous diffraction data. Human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (hFPPS) produces farnesyl pyrophos@@phate, an isoprenoid essential for a variety of cellular processes. The enzyme has been well established as the molecular target of the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs), which are best known for their antiresorptive effects in bone but are also known for their anticancer properties. Crystal structures of hFPPS in ternary complexes with a novel bisphosphonate, YS0470, and the secondary ligands inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}), inorganic pyrophosphate (PP{sub i}) and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) have recently been reported. Only the co-binding of the bisphosphonate with either PP{sub i} or IPP resulted in the full closure of the C-@@terminal tail of the enzyme, a conformational change that is required for catalysis and that is also responsible for the potent in vivo efficacy of N-BPs. In the present communication, a co-crystal structure of hFPPS in complex with YS0470 and two molecules of P{sub i} is reported. The unusually close proximity between these ligands, which was confirmed by anomalous diffraction data, suggests that they interact with one another, with their anionic charges neutralized in their bound state. The structure also showed the tail of the enzyme to be fully disordered, indicating that simultaneous binding of two P{sub i} molecules with a bisphosphonate cannot induce the tail-closing conformational change in hFPPS. Examination of homologous FPPSs suggested that this ligand-dependent tail closure is only conserved in the mammalian proteins. The prevalence of P{sub i}-bound hFPPS structures in the PDB raises a question regarding the in vivo relevance of P{sub i} binding to the function of the enzyme.

  5. Soluble immune complexes shift the TLR-induced cytokine production of distinct polarized human macrophage subsets towards IL-10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A Ambarus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Costimulation of murine macrophages with immune complexes (ICs and TLR ligands leads to alternative activation. Studies on human myeloid cells, however, indicate that ICs induce an increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production. This study aimed to clarify the effect of ICs on the pro- versus anti-inflammatory profile of human polarized macrophages. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Monocytes isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors were polarized for four days with IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, GM-CSF, M-CSF, or LPS, in the presence or absence of heat aggregated gamma-globulins (HAGGs. Phenotypic polarization markers were measured by flow cytometry. Polarized macrophages were stimulated with HAGGs or immobilized IgG alone or in combination with TLR ligands. TNF, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-23 were measured by Luminex and/or RT-qPCR. RESULTS: HAGGs did not modulate the phenotypic polarization and the cytokine production of macrophages. However, HAGGs significantly altered the TLR-induced cytokine production of all polarized macrophage subsets, with the exception of MΦ(IL-4. In particular, HAGGs consistently enhanced the TLR-induced IL-10 production in both classically and alternatively polarized macrophages (M1 and M2. The effect of HAGGs on TNF and IL-6 production was less pronounced and depended on the polarization status, while IL-23p19 and IL-12p35 expression was not affected. In contrast with HAGGs, immobilized IgG induced a strong upregulation of not only IL-10, but also TNF and IL-6. CONCLUSION: HAGGs alone do not alter the phenotype and cytokine production of in vitro polarized human macrophages. In combination with TLR-ligands, however, HAGGs but not immobilized IgG shift the cytokine production of distinct macrophage subsets toward IL-10.

  6. Model cortical association fields account for the time course and dependence on target complexity of human contour perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadas Gintautas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Can lateral connectivity in the primary visual cortex account for the time dependence and intrinsic task difficulty of human contour detection? To answer this question, we created a synthetic image set that prevents sole reliance on either low-level visual features or high-level context for the detection of target objects. Rendered images consist of smoothly varying, globally aligned contour fragments (amoebas distributed among groups of randomly rotated fragments (clutter. The time course and accuracy of amoeba detection by humans was measured using a two-alternative forced choice protocol with self-reported confidence and variable image presentation time (20-200 ms, followed by an image mask optimized so as to interrupt visual processing. Measured psychometric functions were well fit by sigmoidal functions with exponential time constants of 30-91 ms, depending on amoeba complexity. Key aspects of the psychophysical experiments were accounted for by a computational network model, in which simulated responses across retinotopic arrays of orientation-selective elements were modulated by cortical association fields, represented as multiplicative kernels computed from the differences in pairwise edge statistics between target and distractor images. Comparing the experimental and the computational results suggests that each iteration of the lateral interactions takes at least [Formula: see text] ms of cortical processing time. Our results provide evidence that cortical association fields between orientation selective elements in early visual areas can account for important temporal and task-dependent aspects of the psychometric curves characterizing human contour perception, with the remaining discrepancies postulated to arise from the influence of higher cortical areas.

  7. Human colon cancer targeted pro-apoptotic, anti-metastatic and cytostatic effects of binuclear Silver(I)-N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Iqbal, Muhammad Adnan; Hussein, Mouayed A; Oon, Chern Ein; Haque, Rosenani A; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B; Abdul Majid, Aman Shah; Abdul Majid, Amin Malik Shah

    2016-01-27

    The current mechanistic study was conducted to explore the effects of increased lipophilicity of binuclear silver(I)-NHC complexes on cytotoxicity. Two new silver(I)-N-Heterocyclic Carbene (NHC) complexes (3 and 4), having lypophilic terminal alkyl chains (Octyl and Decyl), were derived from meta-xylyl linked bis-benzimidazolium salts (1 and 2). Each of the synthesized compounds was characterized by microanalysis and spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were tested for their cytotoxicity against a panel of human cancer c as well normal cell lines using MTT assay. Based on MTT assay results, complex 4 was found to be selectively toxic towards human colorectal carcinoma cell line (HCT 116). Complex 4 was further studied in detail to explore the mechanism of cell death and findings of the study revealed that complex 4 has promising pro-apoptotic and anti-metastatic activities against HCT 116 cells. Furthermore, it showed pronounced cytostatic effects in HCT 116 multicellular spheroid model. Hence, binuclear silver(I)-NHC complexes with longer terminal aliphatic chains have worth to be further studied against human colon cancer for the purpose of drug development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. El aumento de la expresión del ARNm de la enzima convertidora de angiotensina I homóloga (ECA-2 inducido por atorvastatina se asocia a menor fibrosis e hipertrofia ventricular izquierda en un modelo de cardiomiopatía diabética Atorvastatin induced increase in homologous angiotensin i converting enzyme (ACE2 mRNA is associated to decreased fibrosis and decreased left ventricular hypertrophy in a rat model of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Aguilar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos. Evaluar el efecto de atorvastatina sobre la progresión del remodelado cardiaco y la expresión de ECA-2 en el miocardio de ratas diabéticas. Materiales y métodos. La diabetes fue inducida en ratas Holtzman con una inyección intraperitoneal de estreptozotocina. Los animales fueron divididos en tres grupos: (1 ratas control, (2 ratas diabéticas y (3 ratas diabéticas tratadas con atorvastatina (50 mg/kg/día. Después de ocho semanas de tratamiento, los corazones fueron extraídos para el análisis morfométrico, la cuantificación de colágeno y la determinación de los niveles de ARNm de ECA y ECA-2. Resultados. El índice de hipertrofia ventricular y el depósito de colágeno se incrementaron significativamente en las ratas diabéticas. La administración de atorvastatina previno estos cambios sin modificar los niveles de colesterol. La hiperglicemia produjo un incremento significativo en los niveles del ARNm de ECA y una marcada disminución en la expresión de ECA-2 en el miocardio de ratas diabéticas. La administración de atorvastatina indujo la expresión del ARNm de ECA-2 e inhibió la sobreexpresión del ARNm de ECA en el miocardio de las ratas diabéticas. Conclusiones. Nuestros resultados indican que la atorvastatina, independientemente de su capacidad para disminuir el colesterol, normaliza la relación de la expresión de ECA/ECA-2 y atenúa el desarrollo del remodelado adverso en el corazón diabético.Objectives. This study has investigated the effect of atorvastatin on the progression of cardiac remodelling and ACE- 2 expression in diabetic myocardium in rats. Materials and Methods. Diabetes was induced in Holtzman rats with an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The animals were divided into 3 groups: (1 normal control rats, (2 diabetic rats and (3 diabetic rats treated orally with atorvastatin (50 mg/kg/day. After eight weeks of treatment, the hearts were removed for morphometric studies, collagen

  9. Humanized HLA-DR4.RagKO.IL2RγcKO.NOD (DRAG) mice sustain the complex vertebrate life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayalath, Wathsala; Majji, Sai; Villasante, Eileen F; Brumeanu, Teodor D; Richie, Thomas L; Casares, Sofia

    2014-09-30

    Malaria is a deadly infectious disease affecting millions of people in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Among the five species of Plasmodium parasites that infect humans, Plasmodium falciparum accounts for the highest morbidity and mortality associated with malaria. Since humans are the only natural hosts for P. falciparum, the lack of convenient animal models has hindered the understanding of disease pathogenesis and prompted the need of testing anti-malarial drugs and vaccines directly in human trials. Humanized mice hosting human cells represent new pre-clinical models for infectious diseases that affect only humans. In this study, the ability of human-immune-system humanized HLA-DR4.RagKO.IL2RγcKO.NOD (DRAG) mice to sustain infection with P. falciparum was explored. Four week-old DRAG mice were infused with HLA-matched human haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and examined for reconstitution of human liver cells and erythrocytes. Upon challenge with infectious P. falciparum sporozoites (NF54 strain) humanized DRAG mice were examined for liver stage infection, blood stage infection, and transmission to Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Humanized DRAG mice reconstituted human hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, liver endothelial cells, and erythrocytes. Upon intravenous challenge with P. falciparum sporozoites, DRAG mice sustained liver to blood stage infection (average 3-5 parasites/microlitre blood) and allowed transmission to An. stephensi mosquitoes. Infected DRAG mice elicited antibody and cellular responses to the blood stage parasites and self-cured the infection by day 45 post-challenge. DRAG mice represent the first human-immune-system humanized mouse model that sustains the complex vertebrate life cycle of P. falciparum without the need of exogenous injection of human hepatocytes/erythrocytes or P. falciparum parasite adaptation. The ability of DRAG mice to elicit specific human immune responses to P. falciparum parasites may help deciphering immune correlates

  10. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes: altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werken, C; Avo Santos, M; Laven, J S E; Eleveld, C; Fauser, B C J M; Lens, S M A; Baart, E B

    2015-10-01

    Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal phosphorylation dynamics of histone H2A at T120 (H2ApT120) by Bub1 kinase and subsequent recruitment of Shugoshin, but phosphorylation of histone H3 at threonine 3 (H3pT3) by Haspin failed to show the expected centromeric enrichment on metaphase chromosomes in the zygote. Human cleavage stage embryos show high levels of chromosomal instability. What causes this high error rate is unknown, as mechanisms used to ensure proper chromosome segregation in mammalian embryos are poorly described. In this study, we investigated the pathways regulating CPC targeting to the inner centromere in human embryos. We characterized the distribution of the CPC in relation to activity of its two main centromeric targeting pathways: the Bub1-H2ApT120-Sgo-CPC and Haspin-H3pT3-CPC pathways. The study was conducted between May 2012 and March 2014 on human surplus embryos resulting from in vitro fertilization treatment and donated for research. In zygotes, nuclear envelope breakdown was monitored by time-lapse imaging to allow timed incubations with specific inhibitors to arrest at prometaphase and metaphase, and to interfere with Haspin and Aurora B/C kinase activity. Functionality of the targeting pathways was assessed through characterization of histone phosphorylation dynamics by immunofluorescent analysis, combined with gene expression by RT-qPCR and immunofluorescent localization of key pathway proteins. Immunofluorescent analysis of the CPC subunit Inner Centromere Protein revealed the pool of stably bound CPC proteins was not strictly confined to the inner centromere of prometaphase chromosomes in human zygotes, as observed in later stages of preimplantation development and somatic cells. Investigation of the

  11. Development of complex-shaped liver multicellular spheroids as a human-based model for nanoparticle toxicity assessment in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubiak-Szepietowska, Monika; Karczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Jönsson-Niedziółka, Martin; Winckler, Thomas; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of human-based models is incontestably required for the study of complex physiological pathways and validation of reliable in vitro methods as alternative for in vivo studies in experimental animals for toxicity assessment. With this objective, we have developed and tested three dimensional environments for cells using different types of hydrogels including transglutaminase-cross-linked gelatin, collagen type I, and growth-factor depleted Matrigel. Cells grown in Matrigel exhibited the greatest cell proliferation and spheroid diameter. Moreover, analysis of urea and albumin biosynthesis revealed that the created system allowed the immortalized liver cell line HepG2 to re-establish normal hepatocyte-like properties which were not observed under the conditions of conventional cell cultures. This study presents a scalable technology for production of complex-shaped liver multicellular spheroids as a system which improves the predictive value of cell-based assays for safety and risk assessment. The time- and dose-dependent toxicity of nanoparticles demonstrates a higher cytotoxic effect when HepG2 cells grown as monolayer than embedded in hydrogels. The experimental setup provided evidence that the cell environment has significant influence on cell sensitivity and that liver spheroid is a useful and novel tool to examine nanoparticle dosing effect even at the level of in vitro studies. Therefore, this system can be applied to a wide variety of potentially hostile compounds in basic screening to provide initial warning of adverse effects and trigger subsequent analysis and remedial actions. - Highlights: • Comparison of HepG2 cells growth in Matrigel, Collagen I gel and gelatin gel. • Examination of nanoparticles (NP) dosing effect at the level of in vitro studies. • Influence of the cell culture media composition on the cytotoxic effect of NP.

  12. Development of complex-shaped liver multicellular spheroids as a human-based model for nanoparticle toxicity assessment in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubiak-Szepietowska, Monika, E-mail: Monika.Dubiak-Szepietowska@fh-jena.de [Department of Medical Engineering and Biotechnology, Ernst-Abbe-University of Applied Sciences Jena, Carl-Zeiss Promenade 2, 07745 Jena (Germany); Karczmarczyk, Aleksandra [Department of Medical Engineering and Biotechnology, Ernst-Abbe-University of Applied Sciences Jena, Carl-Zeiss Promenade 2, 07745 Jena (Germany); Jönsson-Niedziółka, Martin [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Winckler, Thomas [Institute of Pharmacy, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Semmelweissstraße 10, 07743 Jena (Germany); Feller, Karl-Heinz [Department of Medical Engineering and Biotechnology, Ernst-Abbe-University of Applied Sciences Jena, Carl-Zeiss Promenade 2, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    The emergence of human-based models is incontestably required for the study of complex physiological pathways and validation of reliable in vitro methods as alternative for in vivo studies in experimental animals for toxicity assessment. With this objective, we have developed and tested three dimensional environments for cells using different types of hydrogels including transglutaminase-cross-linked gelatin, collagen type I, and growth-factor depleted Matrigel. Cells grown in Matrigel exhibited the greatest cell proliferation and spheroid diameter. Moreover, analysis of urea and albumin biosynthesis revealed that the created system allowed the immortalized liver cell line HepG2 to re-establish normal hepatocyte-like properties which were not observed under the conditions of conventional cell cultures. This study presents a scalable technology for production of complex-shaped liver multicellular spheroids as a system which improves the predictive value of cell-based assays for safety and risk assessment. The time- and dose-dependent toxicity of nanoparticles demonstrates a higher cytotoxic effect when HepG2 cells grown as monolayer than embedded in hydrogels. The experimental setup provided evidence that the cell environment has significant influence on cell sensitivity and that liver spheroid is a useful and novel tool to examine nanoparticle dosing effect even at the level of in vitro studies. Therefore, this system can be applied to a wide variety of potentially hostile compounds in basic screening to provide initial warning of adverse effects and trigger subsequent analysis and remedial actions. - Highlights: • Comparison of HepG2 cells growth in Matrigel, Collagen I gel and gelatin gel. • Examination of nanoparticles (NP) dosing effect at the level of in vitro studies. • Influence of the cell culture media composition on the cytotoxic effect of NP.

  13. Trans- and cis-2-phenylindole platinum(II) complexes as cytotoxic agents against human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Maria; López, Concepción; González, Asensio; Ozay, Bahadir; Quirante, Josefina; Font-Bardía, Mercè; Calvet, Teresa; Calvis, Carme; Messeguer, Ramon; Baldomá, Laura; Badía, Josefa

    2013-09-01

    The synthesis and characterization of the new 2-phenylindole derivative: C8H3N-2-C6H5-3NOMe-5OMe (3c) and the trans- and cis-isomers of [Pt(3c)Cl2(DMSO)] complexes (4c and 5c, respectively) are described. The crystal structures of 4c·CH2Cl2 and 5c confirm: (a) the existence of a Pt-Nindole bond, (b) the relative arrangement of the Cl- ligands [trans- (in 4c) or cis- (in 5c)] and (c) the anti-(E) configuration of the oxime. The cytotoxic assessment of C8H3N-2-(C6H4-4‧R1)-3NOMe-5R2 [with R1 = R2 = H (3a); R1 = Cl, R2 = H (3b) and R1 = H, R2 = OMe (3c)] and the geometrical isomers of [Pt(L)Cl2(DMSO)] with L = 3a-3c [trans- (4a-4c) and cis- (5a-5c), respectively] against human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7) is also reported and reveals that all the platinum(II) complexes (except 4a) are more cytotoxic than cisplatin in front of the MCF7 cell line. Electrophoretic DNA migration studies of the synthesized compounds in the absence and in the presence of topoisomerase-I have been performed, in order to get further insights into their mechanism of action.

  14. The HSPB8-BAG3 chaperone complex is upregulated in astrocytes in the human brain affected by protein aggregation diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, K; Vinet, J; Dunnen, W F A den; Brunt, E R; Meister, M; Boncoraglio, A; Zijlstra, M P; Boddeke, H W G M; Rüb, U; Kampinga, H H; Carra, S

    2012-02-01

    HSPB8 is a small heat shock protein that forms a complex with the co-chaperone BAG3. Overexpression of the HSPB8-BAG3 complex in cells stimulates autophagy and facilitates the clearance of mutated aggregation-prone proteins, whose accumulation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. HSPB8-BAG3 could thus play a protective role in protein aggregation diseases and might be specifically upregulated in response to aggregate-prone protein-mediated toxicity. Here we analysed HSPB8-BAG3 expression levels in post-mortem human brain tissue from patients suffering of the following protein conformation disorders: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). Western blotting and immunohistochemistry techniques were used to analyse HSPB8 and BAG3 expression levels in fibroblasts from SCA3 patients and post-mortem brain tissues, respectively. In all diseases investigated, we observed a strong upregulation of HSPB8 and a moderate upregulation of BAG3 specifically in astrocytes in the cerebral areas affected by neuronal damage and degeneration. Intriguingly, no significant change in the HSPB8-BAG3 expression levels was observed within neurones, irrespective of their localization or of the presence of proteinaceous aggregates. We propose that the upregulation of HSPB8 and BAG3 may enhance the ability of astrocytes to clear aggregated proteins released from neurones and cellular debris, maintain the local tissue homeostasis and/or participate in the cytoskeletal remodelling that astrocytes undergo during astrogliosis. © 2011 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2011 British Neuropathological Society.

  15. The origin of human complex diversity: Stochastic epistatic modules and the intrinsic compatibility between distributional robustness and phenotypic changeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijichi, Shinji; Ijichi, Naomi; Ijichi, Yukina; Imamura, Chikako; Sameshima, Hisami; Kawaike, Yoichi; Morioka, Hirofumi

    2018-01-01

    The continuing prevalence of a highly heritable and hypo-reproductive extreme tail of a human neurobehavioral quantitative diversity suggests the possibility that the reproductive majority retains the genetic mechanism for the extremes. From the perspective of stochastic epistasis, the effect of an epistatic modifier variant can randomly vary in both phenotypic value and effect direction among the careers depending on the genetic individuality, and the modifier careers are ubiquitous in the population distribution. The neutrality of the mean genetic effect in the careers warrants the survival of the variant under selection pressures. Functionally or metabolically related modifier variants make an epistatic network module and dozens of modules may be involved in the phenotype. To assess the significance of stochastic epistasis, a simplified module-based model was employed. The individual repertoire of the modifier variants in a module also participates in the genetic individuality which determines the genetic contribution of each modifier in the career. Because the entire contribution of a module to the phenotypic outcome is consequently unpredictable in the model, the module effect represents the total contribution of the related modifiers as a stochastic unit in the simulations. As a result, the intrinsic compatibility between distributional robustness and quantitative changeability could mathematically be simulated using the model. The artificial normal distribution shape in large-sized simulations was preserved in each generation even if the lowest fitness tail was un-reproductive. The robustness of normality beyond generations is analogous to the real situations of human complex diversity including neurodevelopmental conditions. The repeated regeneration of the un-reproductive extreme tail may be inevitable for the reproductive majority's competence to survive and change, suggesting implications of the extremes for others. Further model-simulations to

  16. Human-derived physiological heat shock protein 27 complex protects brain after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Teramoto

    Full Text Available Although challenging, neuroprotective therapies for ischemic stroke remain an interesting strategy for countering ischemic injury and suppressing brain tissue damage. Among potential neuroprotective molecules, heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 is a strong cell death suppressor. To assess the neuroprotective effects of HSP27 in a mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, we purified a "physiological" HSP27 (hHSP27 from normal human lymphocytes. hHSP27 differed from recombinant HSP27 in that it formed dimeric, tetrameric, and multimeric complexes, was phosphorylated, and contained small amounts of αβ-crystallin and HSP20. Mice received intravenous injections of hHSP27 following focal cerebral ischemia. Infarct volume, neurological deficit scores, physiological parameters, and immunohistochemical analyses were evaluated 24 h after reperfusion. Intravenous injections of hHSP27 1 h after reperfusion significantly reduced infarct size and improved neurological deficits. Injected hHSP27 was localized in neurons on the ischemic side of the brain. hHSP27 suppressed neuronal cell death resulting from cytochrome c-mediated caspase activation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses. Recombinant HSP27 (rHSP27, which was artificially expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and dephosphorylated hHSP27 did not have brain protective effects, suggesting that the phosphorylation of hHSP27 may be important for neuroprotection after ischemic insults. The present study suggests that hHSP27 with posttranslational modifications provided neuroprotection against ischemia/reperfusion injury and that the protection was mediated through the inhibition of apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Intravenously injected human HSP27 should be explored for the treatment of acute ischemic strokes.

  17. Complexes prepared from protein A and human serum, IgG, or Fc gamma fragments: characterization by immunochemical analysis of ultracentrifugation fractions and studies on their interconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, J J; Das, C; Mainwaring, R; Shearer, W T

    1985-01-01

    Protein A of Staphylococcus aureus is an Fc receptor for IgG that has been used as a therapeutic reagent to treat cancer in humans and experimental animals. We used ultracentrifugation combined with analysis of isolated fractions by radioimmunoprecipitation and competitive radioimmunoassay with chicken antibodies that bind free protein A or protein A in complexes but do bind free immunoglobulin reagents to localize and characterize the types of complexes formed with different molar ratios of 125I-protein A and human 131I-IgG alone or in serum, and 131I-Fc gamma fragments. This approach offers a distinct advantage over direct counting of radioactivity in the fractions because resolution of complexes and free reagents is much improved. With excess 131I-IgG or 131I-Fc, all the 125I-protein A is present only in complexes that contained 4 molecules of immunoglobulin reagent and 2 molecules of protein A (4:2 complexes), whereas with excess 125I-protein A the stoichiometry of the complexes was 1:1. We have also shown the preformed 4:2 and 1:1 complexes will interconvert in the presence of added excess protein A or IgG, respectively, and that fresh IgG will exchange with IgG or Fc gamma in preformed complexes. Because protein A has been found to elute from an immobilized reagent used in serotherapy of human cancer and is present in a large excess of IgG, the 4:2 complexes may play an active role in the tumoricidal or toxic reactions observed.

  18. Neutralization of Human Interleukin 23 by Multivalent Nanobodies Explained by the Structure of Cytokine-Nanobody Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmyter, Aline; Spinelli, Silvia; Boutton, Carlo; Saunders, Michael; Blachetot, Christophe; de Haard, Hans; Denecker, Geertrui; Van Roy, Maarten; Cambillau, Christian; Rommelaere, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    The heterodimeric cytokine interleukin (IL) 23 comprises the IL12-shared p40 subunit and an IL23-specific subunit, p19. Together with IL12 and IL27, IL23 sits at the apex of the regulatory mechanisms shaping adaptive immune responses. IL23, together with IL17, plays an important role in the development of chronic inflammation and autoimmune inflammatory diseases. In this context, we generated monovalent antihuman IL23 variable heavy chain domain of llama heavy chain antibody (V HH ) domains (Nanobodies ® ) with low nanomolar affinity for human interleukin (hIL) 23. The crystal structure of a quaternary complex assembling hIL23 and several nanobodies against p19 and p40 subunits allowed identification of distinct epitopes and enabled rational design of a multivalent IL23-specific blocking nanobody. Taking advantage of the ease of nanobody formatting, multivalent IL23 nanobodies were assembled with properly designed linkers flanking an antihuman serum albumin nanobody, with improved hIL23 neutralization capacity in vitro and in vivo , as compared to the monovalent nanobodies. These constructs with long exposure time are excellent candidates for further developments targeting Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis.

  19. Neutralization of Human Interleukin 23 by Multivalent Nanobodies Explained by the Structure of Cytokine–Nanobody Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Desmyter

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The heterodimeric cytokine interleukin (IL 23 comprises the IL12-shared p40 subunit and an IL23-specific subunit, p19. Together with IL12 and IL27, IL23 sits at the apex of the regulatory mechanisms shaping adaptive immune responses. IL23, together with IL17, plays an important role in the development of chronic inflammation and autoimmune inflammatory diseases. In this context, we generated monovalent antihuman IL23 variable heavy chain domain of llama heavy chain antibody (VHH domains (Nanobodies® with low nanomolar affinity for human interleukin (hIL 23. The crystal structure of a quaternary complex assembling hIL23 and several nanobodies against p19 and p40 subunits allowed identification of distinct epitopes and enabled rational design of a multivalent IL23-specific blocking nanobody. Taking advantage of the ease of nanobody formatting, multivalent IL23 nanobodies were assembled with properly designed linkers flanking an antihuman serum albumin nanobody, with improved hIL23 neutralization capacity in vitro and in vivo, as compared to the monovalent nanobodies. These constructs with long exposure time are excellent candidates for further developments targeting Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis.

  20. Neutralization of Human Interleukin 23 by Multivalent Nanobodies Explained by the Structure of Cytokine–Nanobody Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmyter, Aline; Spinelli, Silvia; Boutton, Carlo; Saunders, Michael; Blachetot, Christophe; de Haard, Hans; Denecker, Geertrui; Van Roy, Maarten; Cambillau, Christian; Rommelaere, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    The heterodimeric cytokine interleukin (IL) 23 comprises the IL12-shared p40 subunit and an IL23-specific subunit, p19. Together with IL12 and IL27, IL23 sits at the apex of the regulatory mechanisms shaping adaptive immune responses. IL23, together with IL17, plays an important role in the development of chronic inflammation and autoimmune inflammatory diseases. In this context, we generated monovalent antihuman IL23 variable heavy chain domain of llama heavy chain antibody (VHH) domains (Nanobodies®) with low nanomolar affinity for human interleukin (hIL) 23. The crystal structure of a quaternary complex assembling hIL23 and several nanobodies against p19 and p40 subunits allowed identification of distinct epitopes and enabled rational design of a multivalent IL23-specific blocking nanobody. Taking advantage of the ease of nanobody formatting, multivalent IL23 nanobodies were assembled with properly designed linkers flanking an antihuman serum albumin nanobody, with improved hIL23 neutralization capacity in vitro and in vivo, as compared to the monovalent nanobodies. These constructs with long exposure time are excellent candidates for further developments targeting Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. PMID:28871249

  1. Two putative subunits of a peptide pump encoded in the human major histocompatability complex class 2 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahram, S.; Arnold, D.; Bresnahan, M.; Strominger, J.L.; Spies, T.

    1991-01-01

    The class 2 region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may encode several genes controlling the processing of endogenous antigen and the presentation of peptide epitopes by MHC class 1 molecules to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. A previously described peptide supply factor (PSF1) is a member of the multidrug-resistance family of transporters and may pump cytosolic peptides into the membrane-bound compartment where class 1 molecules assemble. A second transporter gene, PSF2, was identified 10 kilobases (kb) from PSF1, near the class 2 DOB gene. The complete sequences of PSF1 and PSF2 were determined from cDNA clones. The translation products are closely related in sequence and predicted secondary structure. Both contain a highly conserved ATP-binding fold and share 25% homology in a hydrophobic domain with a tentative number of eight membrane-spanning segments. Based on the principle dimeric organization of these two domains in other transporters, PSF1 and PSF2 may function as complementary subunits, independently as homodimers, or both. Taken together with previous genetic evidence, the coregulation of PSF1 and PSF2 by γ interferon and the to-some-degree coordinate transcription of these genes suggest a common role in peptide-loading of class 1 molecules, although a distinct function of PSF2 cannot be ruled out

  2. Watershed System Model: The Essentials to Model Complex Human-Nature System at the River Basin Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Cheng, Guodong; Lin, Hui; Cai, Ximing; Fang, Miao; Ge, Yingchun; Hu, Xiaoli; Chen, Min; Li, Weiyue

    2018-03-01

    Watershed system models are urgently needed to understand complex watershed systems and to support integrated river basin management. Early watershed modeling efforts focused on the representation of hydrologic processes, while the next-generation watershed models should represent the coevolution of the water-land-air-plant-human nexus in a watershed and provide capability of decision-making support. We propose a new modeling framework and discuss the know-how approach to incorporate emerging knowledge into integrated models through data exchange interfaces. We argue that the modeling environment is a useful tool to enable effective model integration, as well as create domain-specific models of river basin systems. The grand challenges in developing next-generation watershed system models include but are not limited to providing an overarching framework for linking natural and social sciences, building a scientifically based decision support system, quantifying and controlling uncertainties, and taking advantage of new technologies and new findings in the various disciplines of watershed science. The eventual goal is to build transdisciplinary, scientifically sound, and scale-explicit watershed system models that are to be codesigned by multidisciplinary communities.

  3. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, J.C.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.A.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. (Wyeth); (MBL)

    2008-06-03

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca{sup 2+} and two Cu{sup 2+} ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  4. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Ki Ngo,J.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca(2+) and two Cu(2+) ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  5. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC and its application for DNA methylation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottaviani Diego

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs. Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics.

  6. NMR assignments of SPOC domain of the human transcriptional corepressor SHARP in complex with a C-terminal SMRT peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Suzuka; Kanaba, Teppei; Ito, Yutaka; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-10-01

    The transcriptional corepressor SMRT/HDAC1-associated repressor protein (SHARP) recruits histone deacetylases. Human SHARP protein is thought to function in processes involving steroid hormone responses and the Notch signaling pathway. SHARP consists of RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region and the spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain in the C-terminal region. It is known that the SPOC domain binds the LSD motif in the C-terminal tail of corepressors silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptor (SMRT)/nuclear receptor corepressor (NcoR). We are interested in delineating the mechanism by which the SPOC domain recognizes the LSD motif of the C-terminal tail of SMRT/NcoR. To this end, we are investigating the tertiary structure of the SPOC/SMRT peptide using NMR. Herein, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the SPOC domain in complex with a SMRT peptide, which contributes towards a structural understanding of the SPOC/SMRT peptide and its molecular recognition.

  7. A transcriptome-based assessment of the astrocytic dystrophin-associated complex in the developing human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew J; Murchison, Charles; Iliff, Jeffrey J

    2018-02-01

    Astrocytes play a critical role in regulating the interface between the cerebral vasculature and the central nervous system. Contributing to this is the astrocytic endfoot domain, a specialized structure that ensheathes the entirety of the vasculature and mediates signaling between endothelial cells, pericytes, and neurons. The astrocytic endfoot has been implicated as a critical element of the glymphatic pathway, and changes in protein expression profiles in this cellular domain are linked to Alzheimer's disease pathology. Despite this, basic physiological properties of this structure remain poorly understood including the developmental timing of its formation, and the protein components that localize there to mediate its functions. Here we use human transcriptome data from male and female subjects across several developmental stages and brain regions to characterize the gene expression profile of the dystrophin-associated complex (DAC), a known structural component of the astrocytic endfoot that supports perivascular localization of the astroglial water channel aquaporin-4. Transcriptomic profiling is also used to define genes exhibiting parallel expression profiles to DAC elements, generating a pool of candidate genes that encode gene products that may contribute to the physiological function of the perivascular astrocytic endfoot domain. We found that several genes encoding transporter proteins are transcriptionally associated with DAC genes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Purification of the active C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a receptor - G sub i complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollins, T.E.; Siciliano, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Cianciarulo, D.N.; Bonilla-Argudo, V.; Collier, K.; Springer, M.S. (Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Lab., Rahway, NJ (United States))

    1991-02-01

    The authors have isolated, in an active state, the C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The purification was achieved in a single step using a C5a affinity column in which the C5a molecule was coupled to the resin through its N terminus. The purified receptor, like the crude solubilized molecule, exhibited a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a K{sub d} of 30 pM. Further, the binding of C5a retained its sensitivity to guanine nucleotides, implying that the purified receptor contained a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of three polypeptides with molecular masses of 42, 40, and 36 kDa, which were determined to be the C5a-binding subunit and the {alpha} and {beta} subunits of G{sub i}, respectively. The 36- and 40-kDa polypeptides were identified by immunoblotting and by the ability of pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate the 40-kDa molecule. These results confirm their earlier hypothesis that the receptor exists as a complex with a G protein in the presence or absence of C5a. The tight coupling between the receptor and G protein should make possible the identification of the G protein(s) involved in the transduction pathways used by C5a to produce its many biological effects.

  9. Purification of the active C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a receptor - Gi complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollins, T.E.; Siciliano, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Cianciarulo, D.N.; Bonilla-Argudo, V.; Collier, K.; Springer, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated, in an active state, the C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The purification was achieved in a single step using a C5a affinity column in which the C5a molecule was coupled to the resin through its N terminus. The purified receptor, like the crude solubilized molecule, exhibited a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a K d of 30 pM. Further, the binding of C5a retained its sensitivity to guanine nucleotides, implying that the purified receptor contained a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of three polypeptides with molecular masses of 42, 40, and 36 kDa, which were determined to be the C5a-binding subunit and the α and β subunits of G i , respectively. The 36- and 40-kDa polypeptides were identified by immunoblotting and by the ability of pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate the 40-kDa molecule. These results confirm their earlier hypothesis that the receptor exists as a complex with a G protein in the presence or absence of C5a. The tight coupling between the receptor and G protein should make possible the identification of the G protein(s) involved in the transduction pathways used by C5a to produce its many biological effects

  10. DNA damage response and role of shelterin complex in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Divyalakshmi; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres are the DNA protein structures that cap the ends of linear DNA. It consists of short repetitive DNA sequences (TTAGGG)n and specialized telomere binding proteins. There are six telomeric proteins (TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TERF2, PTOP and POT1) called as shelterin complex/telosome which maintains telomere integrity. The function of this 'telosome' is to protect the natural ends of the chromosomes from being recognized as artificial DNA breaks, thereby preventing chromosome end-to-end fusions. DNA Damage Response (DDR) induced by radiation and its interaction with telomeric protein complex is poorly understood in human PBMCs at G 0 stage. Alterations in either telomeric DNA or telomere binding proteins can impair the function of the telosome, which may lead to senescence or apoptosis. Ionizing radiation which induces a plethora of DNA lesions in human cell may also alter the expression of telomere associated proteins. In the present study, we have made an attempt to study the DNA damage response of telomere proteins in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to gamma radiation. Venous blood samples were collected from eight random healthy volunteers and PBMCs were separated. Dose response as well as time point kinetics study was carried out at transcription as well as protein level. PBMCs were irradiated at various doses between 10 cGy to 2.0 Gy at a dose rate of 1.0 Gy/min. Total RNA was isolated for gene expression analysis at 0 hour and 4 hours respectively. cDNA was prepared and transcriptional pattern as studied using real time q-PCR where Taqman probes were used. Time point kinetics of transcriptional pattern of TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TERF2, PTOP and POT1 was carried out at 0 min, 15 min, 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min for two different doses (1.0 Gy and 2.0 Gy). Dose response and time point kinetics of TRF2 was studied at similar doses using confocal microscopy. Our results revealed that at 2.0 Gy there was a two fold increase at the level of transcription

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the ATPase domain of human TAP in nucleotide-free and ADP-, vanadate- and azide-complexed forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meena, Sita R.; Gangwar, Shanti P.; Saxena, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    The ATPase domain of human TAP in nucleotide free, ADP, vanadate and azide complexed forms were purified and crystallized. The X-ray diffraction data sets were collected for all crystals in the resolution range of 2.8–3.0 Å. The human transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) protein belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily and is formed by the heterodimerization of TAP1 and TAP2 subunits. TAP selectively pumps cytosolic peptides into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum in an ATP-dependent manner. The catalytic cycle of the ATPase domain of TAP is not understood at the molecular level. The structures of catalytic intermediates of the ATPase domain of TAP will contribute to the understanding of the chemical mechanism of ATP hydrolysis. In order to understand this mechanism, the ATPase domain of human TAP1 (NBD1) was expressed and purified, crystallized in nucleotide-free and transition-state complex forms and X-ray crystallographic studies were performed. The NBD1 protein was crystallized (i) in the nucleotide-free apo form; (ii) in complex with ADP–Mg 2+ , mimicking the product-bound state; (iii) in complex with vanadate–ADP–Mg 2+ , mimicking the ATP-bound state; and (iv) in complex with azide–ADP–Mg 2+ , also mimicking the ATP-bound state. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected for apo and complexed NBD1 using an in-house X-ray diffraction facility at a wavelength of 1.5418 Å. The apo and complexed NBD1 crystals belonged to the primitive hexagonal space group P6 2 , with one monomer in the asymmetric unit. Here, the crystallization, data collection and preliminary crystallographic analysis of apo and complexed NBD1 are reported

  12. Ecological characterization and molecular differentiation of Culex pipiens complex taxa and Culex torrentium in eastern Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittra, Carina; Flechl, Eva; Kothmayer, Michael; Vitecek, Simon; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Zechmeister, Thomas; Fuehrer, Hans-Peter

    2016-04-11

    Culex pipiens complex taxa differ in behaviour, ecophysiology and epidemiologic importance. Despite their epidemiologic significance, information on genetic diversity, occurrence and seasonal and spatial distribution patterns of the Cx. pipiens complex is still insufficient. Assessment of seasonal and spatial distribution patterns of Culex pipiens forms and their congener Cx. torrentium is crucial for the understanding of their vector-pathogen dynamics. Female mosquitoes were trapped from April-October 2014 twice a month for a 24-h time period with BG-sentinel traps at 24 sampling sites in eastern Austria, using carbon dioxide as attractant. Ecological forms of Cx. pipiens s.l. and their hybrids were differentiated using the CQ11 locus, and Cx. pipiens forms and their congener Cx. torrentium using the ACE-2 gene. Differential exploitation of ecological niches by Cx. pipiens forms and Cx. torrentium was analysed using likelihood ratio tests. Possible effects of environmental parameters on these taxa were tested using PERMANOVA based on distance matrices and, if significant, were modelled in nMDS ordination space to estimate non-linear relationships. For this study, 1476 Culex spp. were sampled. Culex pipiens f. pipiens representing 87.33 % of the total catch was most abundant, followed by hybrids of both forms (5.62 %), Cx. torrentium (3.79 %) and Cx. pipiens f. molestus (3.25 %). Differences in proportional abundances were found between land cover classes. Ecological parameters affecting seasonal and spatial distribution of these taxa in eastern Austria are precipitation duration, air temperature, sunlight and the interaction term of precipitation amount and the Danube water level, which can be interpreted as a proxy for breeding habitat availability. The Cx. pipiens complex of eastern Austria comprises both ecologically different forms, the mainly ornithophilic form pipiens and the mainly mammalophilic and anthropophilic form molestus. Heterogeneous agricultural

  13. Human papillomavirus vaccines, complex regional pain syndrome, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, and autonomic dysfunction - a review of the regulatory evidence from the European Medicines Agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jefferson, Tom; Jørgensen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Recent concerns about a possible association between exposure of young women to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and two "dysautonomic syndromes" (a collection of signs and symptoms thought to be caused by autoimmunity) - complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and postural orthostatic tachycardia...

  14. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on leucopenia in zidovudine-treated patients with AIDS and AIDS related complex, a phase I/II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouw, P. A.; van Leeuwen, R.; van Oers, R. H.; Lange, J. M.; Danner, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Twelve male patients, eight with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and four with AIDS related complex (ARC), who had zidovudine associated neutropenia (less than 1 x 10(9) neutrophils/l) were treated with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a phase I/II

  15. Molecular architecture of the recombinant human MCM2-7 helicase in complex with nucleotides and DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boskovic, Jasminka; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Saligram Prabhakar, Bhargav

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is a key biological process that involves different protein complexes whose assembly is rigorously regulated in a successive order. One of these complexes is a replicative hexameric helicase, the MCM complex, which is essential for the initiation and elongation phases of replicati...

  16. Significance of thymosin β4 and implication of PINCH-1-ILK-α-parvin (PIP complex in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Sopko

    Full Text Available Myocardial remodeling is a major contributor in the development of heart failure (HF after myocardial infarction (MI. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK, LIM-only adaptor PINCH-1, and α-parvin are essential components of focal adhesions (FAs, which are highly expressed in the heart. ILK binds tightly to PINCH-1 and α-parvin, which regulates FA assembly and promotes cell survival via the activation of the kinase Akt. Mice lacking ILK, PINCH or α-parvin have been shown to develop severe defects in the heart, suggesting that these proteins play a critical role in heart function. Utilizing failing human heart tissues (dilated cardiomyopathy, DCM, we found a 2.27-fold (p<0.001 enhanced expression of PINCH, 4 fold for α-parvin, and 10.5 fold (p<0.001 for ILK as compared to non-failing (NF counterparts. No significant enhancements were found for the PINCH isoform PINCH-2 and parvin isoform β-parvin. Using a co-immunoprecipitation method, we also found that the PINCH-1-ILK-α-parvin (PIP complex and Akt activation were significantly up-regulated. These observations were further corroborated with the mouse myocardial infarction (MI and transaortic constriction (TAC model. Thymosin beta4 (Tβ4, an effective cell penetrating peptide for treating MI, was found to further enhance the level of PIP components and Akt activation, while substantially suppressing NF-κB activation and collagen expression--the hallmarks of cardiac fibrosis. In the presence of an Akt inhibitor, wortmannin, we show that Tβ4 had a decreased effect in protecting the heart from MI. These data suggest that the PIP complex and activation of Akt play critical roles in HF development. Tβ4 treatment likely improves cardiac function by enhancing PIP mediated Akt activation and suppressing NF-κB activation and collagen-mediated fibrosis. These data provide significant insight into the role of the PIP-Akt pathway and its regulation by Tβ4 treatment in post-MI.

  17. Regulating with imagery and the complexity of basic emotions. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marcel; Kuchinke, Lars

    2015-06-01

    Literature, music and the arts have long attested to the complexity of human emotions. Hitherto, psychological and biological theories of emotions have largely neglected this rich heritage. In their review Koelsch and colleagues [1] have embarked upon the pioneering endeavour of integrating the diverse perspectives in emotion research. Noting that the focus of prior neurobiological theories relies mainly on animal studies, the authors sought to complement this body of research with a model of complex ("moral") emotions in humans (henceforth: complex emotions). According to this novel framework, there are four main interacting affective centres in the brain. Each centre is associated with a dominant affective function, such as ascending activation (brainstem), pain/pleasure (diencephalon), attachment-related affects (hippocampus) or moral emotions and unconscious cognitive appraisal (orbitofrontal cortex). Furthermore, language is ascribed a key role in (a) the communication of subjective feeling (reconfiguration) and (b) in the conscious regulation of emotions (by means of logic and rational thought).

  18. Protein C inhibits endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes in A549 lung cancer cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, I.; Majerus, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the effect of protein C on the endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes. We previously showed that exposure of umbilical vein endothelial cells to thrombin stimulated the internalization and degradation of thrombin. A similar internalization was stimulated by a monoclonal antithrombomodulin antibody. We have repeated these studies in the presence of protein C and found that endocytosis of 125 I-thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes, but not 125 I-antithrombomodulin-thrombomodulin complexes, is inhibited. Activated protein C did not inhibit endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes. Protein C inhibited both internalization and degradation of 125 I-thrombin and diisopropylphosphoryl (DIP) 125 I-thrombin in human lung cancer cells (A549). These effects were observed at protein C concentrations found in human plasma. Protein S had no effect on the inhibition of endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes by protein C. We propose that protein C may regulate the rate of endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes in vivo and thereby control the capacity for endothelium to activate protein C

  19. Pollution going multimodal: the complex impact of the human-altered sensory environment on animal perception and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfwerk, Wouter; Slabbekoorn, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic sensory pollution is affecting ecosystems worldwide. Human actions generate acoustic noise, emanate artificial light and emit chemical substances. All of these pollutants are known to affect animals. Most studies on anthropogenic pollution address the impact of pollutants in unimodal sensory domains. High levels of anthropogenic noise, for example, have been shown to interfere with acoustic signals and cues. However, animals rely on multiple senses, and pollutants often co-occur. Thus, a full ecological assessment of the impact of anthropogenic activities requires a multimodal approach. We describe how sensory pollutants can co-occur and how covariance among pollutants may differ from natural situations. We review how animals combine information that arrives at their sensory systems through different modalities and outline how sensory conditions can interfere with multimodal perception. Finally, we describe how sensory pollutants can affect the perception, behaviour and endocrinology of animals within and across sensory modalities. We conclude that sensory pollution can affect animals in complex ways due to interactions among sensory stimuli, neural processing and behavioural and endocrinal feedback. We call for more empirical data on covariance among sensory conditions, for instance, data on correlated levels in noise and light pollution. Furthermore, we encourage researchers to test animal responses to a full-factorial set of sensory pollutants in the presence or the absence of ecologically important signals and cues. We realize that such approach is often time and energy consuming, but we think this is the only way to fully understand the multimodal impact of sensory pollution on animal performance and perception. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiple correlation analyses revealed complex relationship between DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang-Fei; Deng, Fei-Yan; Wu, Long-Fei; Mo, Xing-Bo; Zhu, Hong; Wu, Jian; Guo, Yu-Fan; Zeng, Ke-Qin; Wang, Ming-Jun; Zhu, Xiao-Wei; Xia, Wei; Wang, Lan; He, Pei; Bing, Peng-Fei; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Lei, Shu-Feng

    2018-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important regulator on the mRNA expression. However, a genome-wide correlation pattern between DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) is largely unknown. The comprehensive relationship between mRNA and DNA methylation was explored by using four types of correlation analyses and a genome-wide methylation-mRNA expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in PBMCs in 46 unrelated female subjects. An enrichment analysis was performed to detect biological function for the detected genes. Single pair correlation coefficient (r T1 ) between methylation level and mRNA is moderate (-0.63-0.62) in intensity, and the negative and positive correlations are nearly equal in quantity. Correlation analysis on each gene (T4) found 60.1% genes showed correlations between mRNA and gene-based methylation at P correlation (R T4  > 0.8). Methylation sites have regulation effects on mRNA expression in eQTL analysis, with more often observations in region of transcription start site (TSS). The genes under significant methylation regulation both in correlation analysis and eQTL analysis tend to cluster to the categories (e.g., transcription, translation, regulation of transcription) that are essential for maintaining the basic life activities of cells. Our findings indicated that DNA methylation has predictive regulation effect on mRNA with a very complex pattern in PBMCs. The results increased our understanding on correlation of methylation and mRNA and also provided useful clues for future epigenetic studies in exploring biological and disease-related regulatory mechanisms in PBMC.

  1. Electron microscopy and in vitro deneddylation reveal similar architectures and biochemistry of isolated human and Flag-mouse COP9 signalosome complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockel, Beate; Schmaler, Tilo; Huang, Xiaohua; Dubiel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Deneddylation rates of human erythrocyte and mouse fibroblast CSN are very similar. • 3D models of native human and mouse CSN reveal common architectures. • The cryo-structure of native mammalian CSN shows a horseshoe subunit arrangement. - Abstract: The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a regulator of the ubiquitin (Ub) proteasome system (UPS). In the UPS, proteins are Ub-labeled for degradation by Ub ligases conferring substrate specificity. The CSN controls a large family of Ub ligases called cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), which ubiquitinate cell cycle regulators, transcription factors and DNA damage response proteins. The CSN possesses structural similarities with the 26S proteasome Lid complex and the translation initiation complex 3 (eIF3) indicating similar ancestry and function. Initial structures were obtained 14 years ago by 2D electron microscopy (EM). Recently, first 3D molecular models of the CSN were created on the basis of negative-stain EM and single-particle analysis, mostly with recombinant complexes. Here, we compare deneddylating activity and structural features of CSN complexes purified in an elaborate procedure from human erythrocytes and efficiently pulled down from mouse Flag-CSN2 B8 fibroblasts. In an in vitro deneddylation assay both the human and the mouse CSN complexes deneddylated Nedd8-Cul1 with comparable rates. 3D structural models of the erythrocyte CSN as well as of the mouse Flag-CSN were generated by negative stain EM and by cryo-EM. Both complexes show a central U-shaped segment from which several arms emanate. This structure, called the horseshoe, is formed by the PCI domain subunits. CSN5 and CSN6 point away from the horseshoe. Compared to 3D models of negatively stained CSN complexes, densities assigned to CSN2 and CSN4 are better defined in the cryo-map. Because biochemical and structural results obtained with CSN complexes isolated from human erythrocytes and purified by Flag-CSN pulldown from mouse B8 fibroblasts

  2. Electron microscopy and in vitro deneddylation reveal similar architectures and biochemistry of isolated human and Flag-mouse COP9 signalosome complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockel, Beate [Department of Molecular Structural Biology, Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Schmaler, Tilo; Huang, Xiaohua [Division of Molecular Biology, Department of General, Visceral, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Dubiel, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.dubiel@charite.de [Division of Molecular Biology, Department of General, Visceral, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Deneddylation rates of human erythrocyte and mouse fibroblast CSN are very similar. • 3D models of native human and mouse CSN reveal common architectures. • The cryo-structure of native mammalian CSN shows a horseshoe subunit arrangement. - Abstract: The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a regulator of the ubiquitin (Ub) proteasome system (UPS). In the UPS, proteins are Ub-labeled for degradation by Ub ligases conferring substrate specificity. The CSN controls a large family of Ub ligases called cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), which ubiquitinate cell cycle regulators, transcription factors and DNA damage response proteins. The CSN possesses structural similarities with the 26S proteasome Lid complex and the translation initiation complex 3 (eIF3) indicating similar ancestry and function. Initial structures were obtained 14 years ago by 2D electron microscopy (EM). Recently, first 3D molecular models of the CSN were created on the basis of negative-stain EM and single-particle analysis, mostly with recombinant complexes. Here, we compare deneddylating activity and structural features of CSN complexes purified in an elaborate procedure from human erythrocytes and efficiently pulled down from mouse Flag-CSN2 B8 fibroblasts. In an in vitro deneddylation assay both the human and the mouse CSN complexes deneddylated Nedd8-Cul1 with comparable rates. 3D structural models of the erythrocyte CSN as well as of the mouse Flag-CSN were generated by negative stain EM and by cryo-EM. Both complexes show a central U-shaped segment from which several arms emanate. This structure, called the horseshoe, is formed by the PCI domain subunits. CSN5 and CSN6 point away from the horseshoe. Compared to 3D models of negatively stained CSN complexes, densities assigned to CSN2 and CSN4 are better defined in the cryo-map. Because biochemical and structural results obtained with CSN complexes isolated from human erythrocytes and purified by Flag-CSN pulldown from mouse B8 fibroblasts

  3. Doubly end-on azido bridged mixed-valence cobalt trinuclear complex: Spectral study, VTM, inhibitory effect and antimycobacterial activity on human carcinoma and tuberculosis cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Amitabha; Das, Kuheli; Sen, Chandana; Karan, Nirmal Kumar; Huang, Jui-Hsien; Lin, Chia-Her; Garribba, Eugenio; Sinha, Chittaranjan; Askun, Tulin; Celikboyun, Pinar; Mane, Sandeep B.

    2015-09-01

    Doubly end-on azido-bridged mixed-valence trinuclear cobalt complex, [Co3(L)2(N3)6(CH3OH)2] (1) is afforded by employing a potential monoanionic tetradentate-N2O2 Schiff base precursor (2-[{[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]imino}methyl]-6-methoxyphenol; HL). Single crystal X-ray structure reveals that in 1, the adjacent CoII and CoIII ions are linked by double end-on azido bridges and thus the full molecule is generated by the site symmetry of a crystallographic twofold rotation axis. Complex 1 is subjected on different spectral analysis such as IR, UV-vis, emission and EPR spectroscopy. On variable temperature magnetic study, we observe that during cooling, the χMT values decrease smoothly until 15 K and then reaches to the value 1.56 cm3 K mol-1 at 2 K. Complex 1 inhibits the cell growth on human lung carcinoma (A549 cells), human colorectal (COLO 205 and HT-29 cells), and human heptacellular (PLC5 cells) carcinoma cells. Complex 1 exhibits anti-mycobacterial activity and considerable efficacy on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv ATCC 27294 and H37Ra ATCC 25177 strains.

  4. Comparative interactomics: analysis of arabidopsis 14-3-3 complexes reveals highly conserved 14-3-3 interactions between humans and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Liu, Li; McClung, Scott; Laughner, Beth; Chen, Sixue; Ferl, Robert J

    2009-04-01

    As a first step in the broad characterization of plant 14-3-3 multiprotein complexes in vivo, stringent and specific antibody affinity purification was used to capture 14-3-3s together with their interacting proteins from extracts of Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures. Approximately 120 proteins were identified as potential in vivo 14-3-3 interacting proteins by mass spectrometry of the recovered complexes. Comparison of the proteins in this data set with the 14-3-3 interacting proteins from a similar study in human embryonic kidney cell cultures revealed eight interacting proteins that likely represent reasonably abundant, fundamental 14-3-3 interaction complexes that are highly conserved across all eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis 14-3-3 interaction data set was also compared to a yeast in vivo 14-3-3 interaction data set. Four 14-3-3 interacting proteins are conserved in yeast, humans, and Arabidopsis. Comparisons of the data sets based on biochemical function revealed many additional similarities in the human and Arabidopsis data sets that represent conserved functional interactions, while also leaving many proteins uniquely identified in either Arabidopsis or human cells. In particular, the Arabidopsis interaction data set is enriched for proteins involved in metabolism.

  5. Regulation of human Nfu activity in Fe-S cluster delivery-characterization of the interaction between Nfu and the HSPA9/Hsc20 chaperone complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachnowsky, Christine; Liu, Yushi; Yoon, Taejin; Cowan, J A

    2018-01-01

    Iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis is a complex, but highly regulated process that involves de novo cluster formation from iron and sulfide ions on a scaffold protein, and subsequent delivery to final targets via a series of Fe-S cluster-binding carrier proteins. The process of cluster release from the scaffold/carrier for transfer to the target proteins may be mediated by a dedicated Fe-S cluster chaperone system. In human cells, the chaperones include heat shock protein HSPA9 and the J-type chaperone Hsc20. While the role of chaperones has been somewhat clarified in yeast and bacterial systems, many questions remain over their functional roles in cluster delivery and interactions with a variety of human Fe-S cluster proteins. One such protein, Nfu, has recently been recognized as a potential interaction partner of the chaperone complex. Herein, we examined the ability of human Nfu to function as a carrier by interacting with the human chaperone complex. Human Nfu is shown to bind to both chaperone proteins with binding affinities similar to those observed for IscU binding to the homologous HSPA9 and Hsc20, while Nfu can also stimulate the ATPase activity of HSPA9. Additionally, the chaperone complex was able to promote Nfu function by enhancing the second-order rate constants for Fe-S cluster transfer to target proteins and providing directionality in cluster transfer from Nfu by eliminating promiscuous transfer reactions. Together, these data support a hypothesis in which Nfu can serve as an alternative carrier protein for chaperone-mediated cluster release and delivery in Fe-S cluster biogenesis and trafficking. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Alu polymerase chain reaction: A method for rapid isolation of human-specific sequences from complex DNA sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.L.; Ledbetter, S.A.; Corbo, L.; Victoria, M.F.; Ramirez-Solis, R.; Webster, T.D.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Caskey, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    Current efforts to map the human genome are focused on individual chromosomes or smaller regions and frequently rely on the use of somatic cell hybrids. The authors report the application of the polymerase chain reaction to direct amplification of human DNA from hybrid cells containing regions of the human genome in rodent cell backgrounds using primers directed to the human Alu repeat element. They demonstrate Alu-directed amplification of a fragment of the human HPRT gene from both hybrid cell and cloned DNA and identify through sequence analysis the Alu repeats involved in this amplification. They also demonstrate the application of this technique to identify the chromosomal locations of large fragments of the human X chromosome cloned in a yeast artificial chromosome and the general applicability of the method to the preparation of DNA probes from cloned human sequences. The technique allows rapid gene mapping and provides a simple method for the isolation and analysis of specific chromosomal regions

  7. Cancer-associated cleavage of cytokeratin 8/18 heterotypic complexes exposes a neoepitope in human adenocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Henrik; Strik, Merel C M; Larsen, Morten K

    2002-01-01

    distribution of truncated K8/K18 heterotypic complexes in viable adenocarcinomas cells was probed using COU-1 showing small fibrillar structures distinct from those of intact K8/K18 complexes. Previously we demonstrated the binding and subsequent internalization of recombinant Fab COU-1 to live cancer cells...

  8. Prospects of a mathematical theory of human behavior in complex man-machine systems tasks. [time sharing computer analogy of automobile driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, G.; Rouse, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    A hierarchy of human activities is derived by analyzing automobile driving in general terms. A structural description leads to a block diagram and a time-sharing computer analogy. The range of applicability of existing mathematical models is considered with respect to the hierarchy of human activities in actual complex tasks. Other mathematical tools so far not often applied to man machine systems are also discussed. The mathematical descriptions at least briefly considered here include utility, estimation, control, queueing, and fuzzy set theory as well as artificial intelligence techniques. Some thoughts are given as to how these methods might be integrated and how further work might be pursued.

  9. Stability of the Human Hsp90-p50Cdc37 Chaperone Complex against Nucleotides and Hsp90 Inhibitors, and the Influence of Phosphorylation by Casein Kinase 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne H. Olesen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is regulated by co-chaperones such as p50Cdc37, which recruits a wide selection of client protein kinases. Targeted disruption of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex by protein–protein interaction (PPI inhibitors has emerged as an alternative strategy to treat diseases characterized by aberrant Hsp90 activity. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, ELISA and GST-pull down assays we evaluated reported Hsp90 inhibitors and nucleotides for their ability to inhibit formation of the human Hsp90β-p50Cdc37 complex, reconstituted in vitro from full-length proteins. Hsp90 inhibitors, including the proposed PPI inhibitors gedunin and H2-gamendazole, did not affect the interaction of Hsp90 with p50Cdc37 in vitro. Phosphorylation of Hsp90 and p50Cdc37 by casein kinase 2 (CK2 did not alter the thermodynamic signature of complex formation. However, the phosphorylated complex was vulnerable to disruption by ADP (IC50 = 32 µM, while ATP, AMPPNP and Hsp90 inhibitors remained largely ineffective. The differential inhibitory activity of ADP suggests that phosphorylation by CK2 primes the complex for dissociation in response to a drop in ATP/ADP levels. The approach applied herein provides robust assays for a comprehensive biochemical evaluation of potential effectors of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex, such as phosphorylation by a kinase or the interaction with small molecule ligands.

  10. Influence of physiologically active complex isolated from human amnion on lipid peroxide oxidation state and antioxidant activity of blood in rats after irradiation in different doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borshchevs'ka, M.Yi.; Popov, V.V.; Abramova, L.P.; Kuz'myinova, Yi.A.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have studied the influence of physiologically active complex isolated from human amnion on the state of lipid peroxide oxidation according to diene conjugate and malonic dialdehyde amount and antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase and glutationperoxidase) in the blood of the rats exposed to single total irradiation in different doses (4 and 6 Gy) was studied. Definite changes of peroxide process intensity and reduction of the enzymes activity were shown to be observed in the blood of experimental animals even at long terms after the radiation exposure. Under the background of radiation exposure, administration of physiologically active complex isolated from human amnion produced protective effect on antioxidant enzyme activity which promoted normalization of peroxidation processes within the post-radiation period

  11. Human-Systems Integration (HSI) and the Network Integration Evaluations (NIEs), Part 2: A Deeper Dive into Mission Command Complexity and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    system or process more likely to break down or fail when faced with unusual or ambiguous situations. These cautions from the flight management arena...signs, and symbols, and other distinctions in human performance models . IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics . 1983;13(3). 30 Salas E...itself is intrinsically complex and demanding. However, a work setting with a large number of design-related “rough edges” will give the impression of

  12. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciados, Mark; Yoo, Changwon; Roy, Deodutta

    2016-12-13

    signaling pathways. Our findings suggest that in addition to estrogen signaling, EEDs influencing NRF1 regulated communities of genes across genomic and epigenomic multiple networks may contribute in the development of complex chronic human brain health disorders.

  13. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Preciados

    2016-12-01

    findings suggest that in addition to estrogen signaling, EEDs influencing NRF1 regulated communities of genes across genomic and epigenomic multiple networks may contribute in the development of complex chronic human brain health disorders.

  14. Most of rare missense alleles in humans are deleterious:implications for evolution of complex disease and associationstudies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryukov, Gregory V.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2006-10-24

    The accumulation of mildly deleterious missense mutations inindividual human genomes has been proposed to be a genetic basis forcomplex diseases. The plausibility of this hypothesis depends onquantitative estimates of the prevalence of mildly deleterious de novomutations and polymorphic variants in humans and on the intensity ofselective pressure against them. We combined analysis of mutationscausing human Mendelian diseases, human-chimpanzee divergence andsystematic data on human SNPs and found that about 20 percent of newmissense mutations in humans result in a loss of function, while about 27percent are effectively neutral. Thus, more than half of new missensemutations have mildly deleterious effects. These mutations give rise tomany low frequency deleterious allelic variants in the human populationas evident from a new dataset of 37 genes sequenced in over 1,500individual human chromosomes. Surprisingly, up to 70 percent of lowfrequency missense alleles are mildly deleterious and associated with aheterozygous fitness loss in the range 0.001-0.003. Thus, the low allelefrequency of an amino acid variant can by itself serve as a predictor ofits functional significance. Several recent studies have reported asignificant excess of rare missense variants in disease populationscompared to controls in candidate genes or pathways. These studies wouldbe unlikely to work if most rare variants were neutral or if rarevariants were not a significant contributor to the genetic component ofphenotypic inheritance. Our results provide a justification for thesetypes of candidate gene (pathway) association studies and imply thatmutation-selection balance may be a feasible mechanism for evolution ofsome common diseases.

  15. The Effects of Aging and Dual Tasking on Human Gait Complexity During Treadmill Walking: A Comparative Study Using Quantized Dynamical Entropy and Sample Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Samira; Wu, Christine; Sepehri, Nariman; Kantikar, Anuprita; Nankar, Mayur; Szturm, Tony

    2018-01-01

    Quantized dynamical entropy (QDE) has recently been proposed as a new measure to quantify the complexity of dynamical systems with the purpose of offering a better computational efficiency. This paper further investigates the viability of this method using five different human gait signals. These signals are recorded while normal walking and while performing secondary tasks among two age groups (young and older age groups). The results are compared with the outcomes of previously established sample entropy (SampEn) measure for the same signals. We also study how analyzing segmented and spatially and temporally normalized signal differs from analyzing whole data. Our findings show that human gait signals become more complex as people age and while they are cognitively loaded. Center of pressure (COP) displacement in mediolateral direction is the best signal for showing the gait changes. Moreover, the results suggest that by segmenting data, more information about intrastride dynamical features are obtained. Most importantly, QDE is shown to be a reliable measure for human gait complexity analysis.

  16. Human reliability and human factors in complex organizations: epistemological and critical analysis - practical avenues to action; Fiabilite humaine et facteurs humains dans les organisations complexes: analyse epistemologique et critique voies pratiques pour l`action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llory, A

    1991-08-01

    This article starts out with comment on the existence of persistent problems inherent to probabilistic safety assessments (PSA). It first surveys existing American documents on the subject which make a certain number of criticisms on human reliability analyses, e.g. limitations due to the scant quantities of data available, lack of a basic theoretical