WorldWideScience

Sample records for human acceleration experience

  1. Plasma accelerator experiments in Yugoslavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purić, J.; Astashynski, V. M.; Kuraica, M. M.; Dojčinovié, I. P.

    2002-12-01

    An overview is given of the results obtained in the Plasma Accelerator Experiments in Belgrade, using quasi-stationary high current plasma accelerators constructed within the framework of the Yugoslavia-Belarus Joint Project. So far, the following plasma accelerators have been realized: Magnetoplasma Compressor type (MPC); MPC Yu type; one stage Erosive Plasma Dynamic System (EPDS) and, in final stage of construction two stage Quasi-Stationary High Current Plasma Accelerator (QHPA).

  2. Deuterium accelerator experiments for APT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causey, Rion A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hertz, Kristin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Cowgill, Donald F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories in California initiated an experimental program to determine whether tritium retention in the tube walls and permeation through the tubes into the surrounding coolant water would be a problem for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), and to find ways to mitigate the problem, if it existed. Significant holdup in the tube walls would limit the ability of APT to meet its production goals, and high levels of permeation would require a costly cleanup system for the cooling water. To simulate tritium implantation, a 200 keV accelerator was used to implant deuterium into Al 6061-T and SS3 16L samples at temperatures and particle fluxes appropriate for APT, for times varying between one week and five months. The implanted samples were characterized to determine the deuterium retention and Permeation. During the implantation, the D(d,p)T nuclear reaction was used to monitor the build-up of deuterium in the implant region of the samples. These experiments increased in sophistication, from mono-energetic deuteron implants to multi-energetic deuteron and proton implants, to more accurately reproduce the conditions expected in APT. Micron-thick copper, nickel, and anodized aluminum coatings were applied to the front surface of the samples (inside of the APT walls) in an attempt to lower retention and permeation. The reduction in both retention and permeation produced by the nickel coatings, and the ability to apply them to the inside of the APT tubes, indicate that both nickel-coated Al 6061-T6 and nickel-coated SS3 16L tubes would be effective for use in APT. The results of this work were submitted to the Accelerator Production of Tritium project in document number TPO-E29-Z-TNS-X-00050, APT-MP-01-17.

  3. Target irradiation experiments. [Hydra accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Target irradiation experiments have been carried out on the Hydra accelerator, operating at powers between 0.15 and 0.3 TW. As listed in Table I, four types of spherical shell targets have been studied: 3 mm diameter, 200 ..mu..m and 50 ..mu..m wall thickness Au targets; 3 mm diameter, 300 ..mu..m wall thickness plastic targets; and 0.85 mm diameter, 10 ..mu..m wall thickness Ni targets. When compared to a practical range for 700 keV electrons, the ratio of shell thickness to electron range varied between 0.03 for the Ni targets to 1.5 for the thick walled Au targets. Multiple exposure optical holography was utilized to determine ablator velocity, and a one-dimensional hydrodynamical materials code CHARTD was utilized to model target response and infer beam deposition. Energy deposition varied from 1 TW/gm for thick Au targets up to 8 TW/gm for thin Ni targets, and pusher velocities ranged between 0.5 and 3.5 cm/..mu..sec. Neutron production from D/sub 2/ and DT filled Ni exploding pusher targets was measured using Ag and Li activation counters and gated scintillator photomultiplier time of flight detectors.

  4. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarapata, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geer, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geesaman, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Harris, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lang, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); McFarland, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Moore, C. D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Nagaitsev, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Plunkett, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Reimer, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schmidt, J. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Soha, A. K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Tayloe, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Thomas, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Torretta, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Van de Water, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2014. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2014 MINOS and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment and Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  5. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, M.; Appel, J.A.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Dixon, R.; Escobar, C.; Ginther, G.; Gruenendahl, S.; Harris, D.; Henderson, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2010. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2010 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MINOS and MINER?A experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  6. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, P.; Bernardi, G.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Dixon, R.; Ginther, G.; Gruenendahl, S.; Hahn, S.; Harris, D.; Henderson, S.

    2011-11-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2011. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2011 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MINOS and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  7. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, C.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Holmes, S.; Louis, W.; Meyer, A.; Moore, Craig D.; Raja, R.; Ramberg, E.; Roser, R.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2004. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2004 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE neutrino experiment, and SY 120 activities.

  8. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, Stephen J.; Buehler, M.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Grinstein, S.; Habig, A.; Holmes, S.; Hylen, J.; Kissel, W.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2008. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2008 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  9. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, S.; Buchanan, N.; Coleman, R.; Convery, M.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Habig, A.; Holmes, S.; Kissel, W.; Lee, W.; Nakaya, T.; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2007. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2007 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  10. Diagnostics for advanced laser acceleration experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misuri, Alessio [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

    2002-01-01

    The first proposal for plasma based accelerators was suggested by 1979 by Tajima and Dawson. Since then there has been a tremendous progress both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical progress is particularly due to the growing interest in the subject and to the development of more accurate numerical codes for the plasma simulations (especially particle-in-cell codes). The experimental progress follows from the development of multi-terawatt laser systems based on the chirped-pulse amplification technique. These efforts have produced results in several experiments world-wide, with the detection of accelerated electrons of tens of MeV. The peculiarity of these advanced accelerators is their ability to sustain extremely large acceleration gradients. In the conventional radio frequency linear accelerators (RF linacs) the acceleration gradients are limited roughly to 100 MV/m; this is partially due to breakdown which occurs on the walls of the structure. The electrical breakdown is originated by the emission of the electrons from the walls of the cavity. The electrons cause an avalanche breakdown when they reach other metal parts of the RF linacs structure.

  11. Diagnostics for advanced laser acceleration experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misuri, Alessio

    2002-06-01

    The first proposal for plasma based accelerators was suggested by 1979 by Tajima and Dawson. Since then there has been a tremendous progress both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical progress is particularly due to the growing interest in the subject and to the development of more accurate numerical codes for the plasma simulations (especially particle-in-cell codes). The experimental progress follows from the development of multi-terawatt laser systems based on the chirped-pulse amplification technique. These efforts have produced results in several experiments world-wide, with the detection of accelerated electrons of tens of MeV. The peculiarity of these advanced accelerators is their ability to sustain extremely large acceleration gradients. In the conventional radio frequency linear accelerators (RF linacs) the acceleration gradients are limited roughly to 100 MV/m; this is partially due to breakdown which occurs on the walls of the structure. The electrical breakdown is originated by the emission of the electrons from the walls of the cavity. The electrons cause an avalanche breakdown when they reach other metal parts of the RF linacs structure.

  12. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, S.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Holmes, S.; James, C.; Lee, W.; Louis, W.; Moore, C.; Plunkett, R.; Raja, R.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2006. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2006 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam in neutrino and antineutrino modes, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and SY 120 activities.

  13. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarapata, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2015-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2015. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2015 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment and Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  14. Kinematics of transition during human accelerated sprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Nagahara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated kinematics of human accelerated sprinting through 50 m and examined whether there is transition and changes in acceleration strategies during the entire acceleration phase. Twelve male sprinters performed a 60-m sprint, during which step-to-step kinematics were captured using 60 infrared cameras. To detect the transition during the acceleration phase, the mean height of the whole-body centre of gravity (CG during the support phase was adopted as a measure. Detection methods found two transitions during the entire acceleration phase of maximal sprinting, and the acceleration phase could thus be divided into initial, middle, and final sections. Discriminable kinematic changes were found when the sprinters crossed the detected first transition—the foot contacting the ground in front of the CG, the knee-joint starting to flex during the support phase, terminating an increase in step frequency—and second transition—the termination of changes in body postures and the start of a slight decrease in the intensity of hip-joint movements, thus validating the employed methods. In each acceleration section, different contributions of lower-extremity segments to increase in the CG forward velocity—thigh and shank for the initial section, thigh, shank, and foot for the middle section, shank and foot for the final section—were verified, establishing different acceleration strategies during the entire acceleration phase. In conclusion, there are presumably two transitions during human maximal accelerated sprinting that divide the entire acceleration phase into three sections, and different acceleration strategies represented by the contributions of the segments for running speed are employed.

  15. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Convery, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geer, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geesaman, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harris, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Johnson, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lang, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); McFarland, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Messier, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moore, C. D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Newhart, D. [Fermilab; Reimer, P. E. [Argonne; Plunkett, R. [Fermilab; Rominsky, M. [Fermilab; Sanchez, M. [Iowa State U.; Schmidt, J. J. [Fermilab; Shanahan, P. [Fermilab; Tate, C. [Fermilab; Thomas, J. [University Coll. London; Donatella Torretta, Donatella Torretta [Fermilab; Matthew Wetstein, Matthew Wetstein [Iowa State University

    2016-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2016. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2016 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MicroBooNE experiment and the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment, LArIAT experiment and Meson Test Beam activities in the 120 GeV external switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was then edited for inclusion in this summary.

  16. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, F.W.

    1990-10-01

    On January 26, 1990 at 20:03:30, the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) was turned off with the shot counter reading 12,425,999. During the interval between 1985 and 1990 there were eight major experiments performed at ATA. Three of these experiments were for the Free Electron Laser program, and five were for the Charged Particle Beam (CPB) program. The five experiments were: Spring 1985 Propagation Experiment (April 1985), December 1985 20m Propagation Experiment (December 1985), Open Air Experiment (March--June 1987), Beam Transport Experiment (Spring 1988), and Multi Pulse Propagation Experiment (September 89--January 90). Several new technologies such as the rise time sharpener, the Beam Director, and the Fast Corrector Coil were also developed. Experiments for diagnostic development such as the transition radiation studies were also conducted. In this report the major experiments will be revisited; their highlights and shortcomings will be outlined. The current view on the understanding of lead pulse stability and CPB feasibility will be discussed.

  17. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  18. Photocathode microtron for laser wakefield acceleration experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kando, Masaki; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kondo, Shuji; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    We are constructing a high quality electron beam injector that consists of a photocathode rf gun and a racetrack microtron. This injector will be used for the second generation laser wakefield acceleration experiment at JAERI-Kansai. Beam commissioning of the system started this March. We succeeded in generating a 150 MeV electron single bunch with a charge of 91 pC, an emittance of 4-6 {pi}mm-mrad, and a pulse length of 10 ps (rms). A detailed description of the measurements is presented. (author)

  19. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Reisman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM, circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  20. LHC Accelerator Fault Tracker - First Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonio, Andrea; Roderick, Chris; Schmidt, Ruediger; Todd, Benjamin; Wollmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Availability is one of the key performance indicators of LHC operation, being directly correlated with integrated luminosity production. An effective tool for availability tracking is a necessity to ensure a coherent capture of fault information and relevant dependencies on operational modes and beam parameters. At the beginning of LHC Run 2 in 2015, the Accelerator Fault Tracking (AFT) tool was deployed at CERN to track faults or events affecting LHC operation. Information derived from the AFT is crucial for the identification of areas to improve LHC availability, and hence LHC physics production. For the 2015 run, the AFT has been used by members of the CERN Availability Working Group, LHC Machine coordinators and equipment owners to identify the main contributors to downtime and to understand the evolution of LHC availability throughout the year. In this paper the 2015 experience with the AFT for availability tracking is summarised and an overview of the first results as well as an outlook to future develo...

  1. Transcranial electrical stimulation accelerates human sleep homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Reato

    Full Text Available The sleeping brain exhibits characteristic slow-wave activity which decays over the course of the night. This decay is thought to result from homeostatic synaptic downscaling. Transcranial electrical stimulation can entrain slow-wave oscillations (SWO in the human electro-encephalogram (EEG. A computational model of the underlying mechanism predicts that firing rates are predominantly increased during stimulation. Assuming that synaptic homeostasis is driven by average firing rates, we expected an acceleration of synaptic downscaling during stimulation, which is compensated by a reduced drive after stimulation. We show that 25 minutes of transcranial electrical stimulation, as predicted, reduced the decay of SWO in the remainder of the night. Anatomically accurate simulations of the field intensities on human cortex precisely matched the effect size in different EEG electrodes. Together these results suggest a mechanistic link between electrical stimulation and accelerated synaptic homeostasis in human sleep.

  2. Effects of Horizontal Acceleration on Human Visual Acuity and Stereopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ting Horng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of horizontal acceleration on human visual acuity and stereopsis is demonstrated in this study. Twenty participants (mean age 22.6 years were enrolled in the experiment. Acceleration from two different directions was performed at the Taiwan High-Speed Rail Laboratory. Gx and Gy (< and >0.1 g were produced on an accelerating platform where the subjects stood. The visual acuity and stereopsis of the right eye were measured before and during the acceleration. Acceleration <0.1 g in the X- or Y-axis did not affect dynamic vision and stereopsis. Vision decreased (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.25 logMAR and stereopsis declined significantly (mean from 40 s to 60.2 s of arc when Gx > 0.1 g. Visual acuity worsened (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.19 logMAR and poor stereopsis was noted (mean from 40 s to 50.2 s of arc when Gy > 0.1 g. The effect of acceleration from the X-axis on the visual system was higher than that from the Y-axis. During acceleration, most subjects complained of ocular strain when reading. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the exact levels of visual function loss during Gx and Gy.

  3. Energy deposition via magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration: I. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilland, James; Mikellides, Pavlos; Marriott, Darin

    2009-02-01

    The expansion of a high-temperature fusion plasma through an expanding magnetic field is a process common to most fusion propulsion concepts. The propulsive efficiency of this process has a strong bearing on the overall performance of fusion propulsion. In order to simulate the expansion of a fusion plasma, a concept has been developed in which a high velocity plasma is first stagnated in a converging magnetic field to high (100s of eV) temperatures, then expanded though a converging/diverging magnetic nozzle. As a first step in constructing this experiment, a gigawatt magnetoplasmadynamic plasma accelerator was constructed to generate the initial high velocity plasma and has been characterized. The source is powered by a 1.6 MJ, 1.6 ms pulse forming network. The device has been operated with currents up to 300 kA and power levels up to 200 MWe. These values are among the highest levels reached in an magnetoplasmadynamic thruster. The device operation has been characterized by quasi-steady voltage and current measurements for helium mass flow rates from 0.5 to 27 g s-1. Probe results for downstream plasma density and electron temperature are also presented. The source behavior is examined in terms of current theories for magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters.

  4. Energy deposition via magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration: I. Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilland, James [Ohio Aerospace Institute, 22800 Cedar Point Rd., Brook Park, OH 44142 (United States); Mikellides, Pavlos [Arizona State University, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, PO Box 876106, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Marriott, Darin [MIT Lincoln Labs, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 02420 (United States)], E-mail: jamesgilland@oai.org

    2009-02-01

    The expansion of a high-temperature fusion plasma through an expanding magnetic field is a process common to most fusion propulsion concepts. The propulsive efficiency of this process has a strong bearing on the overall performance of fusion propulsion. In order to simulate the expansion of a fusion plasma, a concept has been developed in which a high velocity plasma is first stagnated in a converging magnetic field to high (100s of eV) temperatures, then expanded though a converging/diverging magnetic nozzle. As a first step in constructing this experiment, a gigawatt magnetoplasmadynamic plasma accelerator was constructed to generate the initial high velocity plasma and has been characterized. The source is powered by a 1.6 MJ, 1.6 ms pulse forming network. The device has been operated with currents up to 300 kA and power levels up to 200 MWe. These values are among the highest levels reached in an magnetoplasmadynamic thruster. The device operation has been characterized by quasi-steady voltage and current measurements for helium mass flow rates from 0.5 to 27 g s{sup -1}. Probe results for downstream plasma density and electron temperature are also presented. The source behavior is examined in terms of current theories for magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters.

  5. Staged electron laser accelerator (STELLA) experiment at brookhaven ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Steenbergen, A. van; Gallardo, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1998-03-01

    The STELLA experiment is being prepared at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (STF). The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate quasi-monochromatic inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) of electrons bunched to the laser wavelength period. Microbunches on the order of 2 {mu}m in length separated by 10.6 {mu}m will be produced using an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) accelerator driven by a CO{sub 2} laser. The design and simulations for two phases of this experiment including demonstration of 10 MeV and 100 MeV acceleration are presented. (author)

  6. Obesity accelerates epigenetic aging of human liver

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, S; Erhart, W.; Brosch, M; Ammerpohl, O.; von Schonfels, W.; Ahrens, M.; Heits, N.; Bell, J.T.; Tsai, P.-C.; Spector, T D; Deloukas, P.; Siebert, R.; Sipos, B.; Becker, T.; Rocken, C.

    2014-01-01

    Because obese people are at an increased risk of many age-related diseases, it is a plausible hypothesis that obesity increases the biological age of some tissues and cell types. However, it has been difficult to detect such an accelerated aging effect because it is unclear how to measure tissue age. Here we use a recently developed biomarker of aging (known as “epigenetic clock”) to study the relationship between epigenetic age and obesity in several human tissues. We report an unexpectedly ...

  7. Obesity accelerates epigenetic aging of human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Steve; Erhart, Wiebke; Brosch, Mario; Ammerpohl, Ole; von Schönfels, Witigo; Ahrens, Markus; Heits, Nils; Bell, Jordana T; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Spector, Tim D; Deloukas, Panos; Siebert, Reiner; Sipos, Bence; Becker, Thomas; Röcken, Christoph; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen

    2014-10-28

    Because of the dearth of biomarkers of aging, it has been difficult to test the hypothesis that obesity increases tissue age. Here we use a novel epigenetic biomarker of aging (referred to as an "epigenetic clock") to study the relationship between high body mass index (BMI) and the DNA methylation ages of human blood, liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. A significant correlation between BMI and epigenetic age acceleration could only be observed for liver (r = 0.42, P = 6.8 × 10(-4) in dataset 1 and r = 0.42, P = 1.2 × 10(-4) in dataset 2). On average, epigenetic age increased by 3.3 y for each 10 BMI units. The detected age acceleration in liver is not associated with the Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score or any of its component traits after adjustment for BMI. The 279 genes that are underexpressed in older liver samples are highly enriched (1.2 × 10(-9)) with nuclear mitochondrial genes that play a role in oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport. The epigenetic age acceleration, which is not reversible in the short term after rapid weight loss induced by bariatric surgery, may play a role in liver-related comorbidities of obesity, such as insulin resistance and liver cancer.

  8. Many human accelerated regions are developmental enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, John A; Erwin, Genevieve D; McKinsey, Gabriel; Rubenstein, John L R; Pollard, Katherine S

    2013-12-19

    The genetic changes underlying the dramatic differences in form and function between humans and other primates are largely unknown, although it is clear that gene regulatory changes play an important role. To identify regulatory sequences with potentially human-specific functions, we and others used comparative genomics to find non-coding regions conserved across mammals that have acquired many sequence changes in humans since divergence from chimpanzees. These regions are good candidates for performing human-specific regulatory functions. Here, we analysed the DNA sequence, evolutionary history, histone modifications, chromatin state and transcription factor (TF) binding sites of a combined set of 2649 non-coding human accelerated regions (ncHARs) and predicted that at least 30% of them function as developmental enhancers. We prioritized the predicted ncHAR enhancers using analysis of TF binding site gain and loss, along with the functional annotations and expression patterns of nearby genes. We then tested both the human and chimpanzee sequence for 29 ncHARs in transgenic mice, and found 24 novel developmental enhancers active in both species, 17 of which had very consistent patterns of activity in specific embryonic tissues. Of these ncHAR enhancers, five drove expression patterns suggestive of different activity for the human and chimpanzee sequence at embryonic day 11.5. The changes to human non-coding DNA in these ncHAR enhancers may modify the complex patterns of gene expression necessary for proper development in a human-specific manner and are thus promising candidates for understanding the genetic basis of human-specific biology.

  9. Toward GPGPU accelerated human electromechanical cardiac simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigueras, Guillermo; Roy, Ishani; Cookson, Andrew; Lee, Jack; Smith, Nicolas; Nordsletten, David

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we look at the acceleration of weakly coupled electromechanics using the graphics processing unit (GPU). Specifically, we port to the GPU a number of components of CHeart--a CPU-based finite element code developed for simulating multi-physics problems. On the basis of a criterion of computational cost, we implemented on the GPU the ODE and PDE solution steps for the electrophysiology problem and the Jacobian and residual evaluation for the mechanics problem. Performance of the GPU implementation is then compared with single core CPU (SC) execution as well as multi-core CPU (MC) computations with equivalent theoretical performance. Results show that for a human scale left ventricle mesh, GPU acceleration of the electrophysiology problem provided speedups of 164 × compared with SC and 5.5 times compared with MC for the solution of the ODE model. Speedup of up to 72 × compared with SC and 2.6 × compared with MC was also observed for the PDE solve. Using the same human geometry, the GPU implementation of mechanics residual/Jacobian computation provided speedups of up to 44 × compared with SC and 2.0 × compared with MC. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry at the Australian National University's 14UD accelerator: experience and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifield, L. K.; Ophel, T. R.; Allan, G. L.; Bird, J. R.; Davie, R. F.

    1990-12-01

    Although the major emphasis of the joint ANU/ANSTO accelerator mass spectrometry program has been the measurement of 36Cl samples, both 14C and 10Be capabilities have been implemented recently on the 14UD accelerator. The new developments and operating experience are reviewed.

  11. The Michelson-Morley experiment in an accelerated reference frame

    CERN Document Server

    Crossley, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the Michelson-Morley experiment in a reference frame moving with constant proper acceleration. Interestingly, we find an expected fringe shift which depends not only on the interferometer's rate of acceleration, but also on its speed relative to a preferred absolute reference frame. While it has been repeatedly shown that no experiment performed in an inertial reference frame can detect that frame's absolute speed, the analysis in this paper suggests that by considering experiments in accelerated reference frames it may be possible to measure absolute speed after all.

  12. Operational experience with room temperature continuous wave accelerator structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimov, A. S.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Piskarev, I. M.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Tiunov, A. V.

    1993-05-01

    The paper reports the results of the computer simulation of parameters of the on-axis coupled accelerator structure for the continuous wave racetrack microtron. The operational experience with the accelerating sections on the basis of the on-axis coupled structure is described.

  13. TeV/m Nano-Accelerator: Current Status of CNT-Channeling Acceleration Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Min [Northern Illinois U.; Lumpkin, Alex H. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, Jayakar Charles [Fermilab; Thurman-Keup, Randy Michael [Fermilab; Shiltsev, Vladimir D. [Fermilab

    2014-09-17

    Crystal channeling technology has offered various opportunities in the accelerator community with a viability of ultrahigh gradient (TV/m) acceleration for future HEP collider. The major challenge of channeling acceleration is that ultimate acceleration gradients might require a high power driver in the hard x-ray regime (~ 40 keV). This x-ray energy exceeds those for x-rays as of today, although x-ray lasers can efficiently excite solid plasma and accelerate particles inside a crystal channel. Moreover, only disposable crystal accelerators are possible at such high externally excited fields which would exceed the ionization thresholds destroying the atomic structure, so acceleration will take place only in a short time before full dissociation of the lattice. Carbon-based nanostructures have great potential with a wide range of flexibility and superior physical strength, which can be applied to channeling acceleration. This paper presents a beam- driven channeling acceleration concept with CNTs and discusses feasible experiments with the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) in Fermilab.

  14. The electron accelerator for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepitone, K., E-mail: kevin.pepitone@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Doebert, S., E-mail: steffen.doebert@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burt, G. [The University of Lancaster, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Chevallay, E.; Chritin, N.; Delory, C.; Fedosseev, V.; Hessler, Ch.; McMonagle, G. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Mete, O. [The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Verzilov, V. [Triumf, Vancouver (Canada); Apsimon, R. [The University of Lancaster, Lancaster (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE collaboration prepares a proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the SPS beam at CERN. A long proton bunch extracted from the SPS interacts with a high power laser and a 10 m long rubidium vapour plasma cell to create strong wakefields allowing sustained electron acceleration. The electron bunch to probe these wakefields is supplied by a 20 MeV electron accelerator. The electron accelerator consists of an RF-gun and a short booster structure. This electron source should provide beams with intensities between 0.1 and 1 nC, bunch lengths between 0.3 and 3 ps and an emittance of the order of 2 mm mrad. The wide range of parameters should cope with the uncertainties and future prospects of the planned experiments. The layout of the electron accelerator, its instrumentation and beam dynamics simulations are presented.

  15. New limits on Magnetic Monopoles searches from accelerator and non-accelerator experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cozzi, M

    2007-01-01

    Here the status of the searches for ``classical Dirac'' Magnetic Monopoles (MMs) at accelerators and for GUT MMs in the cosmic radiation is discussed. We present recent analysis for ``classical Dirac'' monopoles at accelerators and the lowest flux upper limit for Magnetic Monopoles in the mass range 10$^{5}$ - 10$^{12}$ GeV obtained with the SLIM experiment at the Chacaltaya High Altitude Laboratory (5290 m a.s.l.).

  16. A plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using CLARA beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, G., E-mail: guoxing.xia@cockcroft.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Angal-Kalinin, D.; Clarke, J. [STFC/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Smith, J. [Tech-X UK Corporation, Daresbury Innovation Centre, Warrington (United Kingdom); Cormier-Michel, E. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, J.; Williams, P.H.; Mckenzie, J.W.; Militsyn, B.L. [STFC/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Hanahoe, K.; Mete, O. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Aimidula, A.; Welsch, C.P. [The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); The University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-11

    We propose a Plasma Accelerator Research Station (PARS) based at proposed FEL test facility CLARA (Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications) at Daresbury Laboratory. The idea is to use the relativistic electron beam from CLARA, to investigate some key issues in electron beam transport and in electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration, e.g. high gradient plasma wakefield excitation driven by a relativistic electron bunch, two bunch experiment for CLARA beam energy doubling, high transformer ratio, long bunch self-modulation and some other advanced beam dynamics issues. This paper presents the feasibility studies of electron beam transport to meet the requirements for beam driven wakefield acceleration and presents the plasma wakefield simulation results based on CLARA beam parameters. Other possible experiments which can be conducted at the PARS beam line are also discussed.

  17. A plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using CLARA beam

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, G; Clarke, J; Smith, J; Cormier-Michel, E; Jones, J; Williams, P H; Mckenzie, J W; Militsyn, B L; Hanahoe, K; Mete, O; Aimidula, A; Welsch, C P

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Plasma Accelerator Research Station (PARS) based at proposed FEL test facility CLARA (Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications) at Daresbury Laboratory. The idea is to use the relativistic electron beam from CLARA, to investigate some key issues in electron beam transport and in electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration, e.g. high gradient plasma wakefield excitation driven by a relativistic electron bunch, two bunch experiment for CLARA beam energy doubling, high transformer ratio, long bunch self-modulation and some other advanced beam dynamics issues. This paper presents the feasibility studies of electron beam transport to meet the requirements for beam driven wakefield acceleration and presents the plasma wakefield simulation results based on CLARA beam parameters. Other possible experiments which can be conducted at the PARS beam line are also discussed.

  18. Scintillation Detectors in Experiments on Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Bystritsky, V M; Gerasimov, V V; Kublikov, R V; Nechaev, B A; Padalko, V M; Parzhitski, S S; Smirnov, V S; Wozniak, J

    2005-01-01

    The gating circuits for photomultipliers of scintillation detectors operating in powerful pulsed electromagnetic and nuclear radiation fields are investigated. PMTs with the jalousie-type dynode system and with the linear dynode system are considered. The basic gating circuits of the photomultipliers involving active and resistor high-voltage dividers are given. The results of the investigations are important for experiments in which it is necessary to discriminate in time the preceding background radiation and the process of interest.

  19. Computational model of sustained acceleration effects on human cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlly, Richard A; Gallimore, Jennie J

    2013-08-01

    Extreme acceleration maneuvers encountered in modern agile fighter aircraft can wreak havoc on human physiology, thereby significantly influencing cognitive task performance. As oxygen content declines under acceleration stress, the activity of high order cortical tissue reduces to ensure sufficient metabolic resources are available for critical life-sustaining autonomic functions. Consequently, cognitive abilities reliant on these affected areas suffer significant performance degradations. The goal was to develop and validate a model capable of predicting human cognitive performance under acceleration stress. Development began with creation of a proportional control cardiovascular model that produced predictions of several hemodynamic parameters, including eye-level blood pressure and regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSo2). An algorithm was derived to relate changes in rSo2 within specific brain structures to performance on cognitive tasks that require engagement of different brain areas. Data from the "precision timing" experiment were then used to validate the model predicting cognitive performance as a function of G(z) profile. The following are value ranges. Results showed high agreement between the measured and predicted values for the rSo2 (correlation coefficient: 0.7483-0.8687; linear best-fit slope: 0.5760-0.9484; mean percent error: 0.75-3.33) and cognitive performance models (motion inference task--correlation coefficient: 0.7103-0.9451; linear best-fit slope: 0.7416-0.9144; mean percent error: 6.35-38.21; precision timing task--correlation coefficient: 0.6856-0.9726; linear best-fit slope: 0.5795-1.027; mean percent error: 6.30-17.28). The evidence suggests that the model is capable of accurately predicting cognitive performance of simplistic tasks under high acceleration stress.

  20. Science and Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Leon N.

    2015-01-01

    Part I. Science and Society: 1. Science and human experience; 2. Does science undermine our values?; 3. Can science serve mankind?; 4. Modern science and contemporary discomfort: metaphor and reality; 5. Faith and science; 6. Art and science; 7. Fraud in science; 8. Why study science? The keys to the cathedral; 9. Is evolution a theory? A modest proposal; 10. The silence of the second; 11. Introduction to Copenhagen; 12. The unpaid debt; Part II. Thought and Consciousness: 13. Source and limits of human intellect; 14. Neural networks; 15. Thought and mental experience: the Turing test; 16. Mind as machine: will we rubbish human experience?; 17. Memory and memories: a physicist's approach to the brain; 18. On the problem of consciousness; Part III. On the Nature and Limits of Science: 19. What is a good theory?; 20. Shall we deconstruct science?; 21. Visible and invisible in physical theory; 22. Experience and order; 23. The language of physics; 24. The structure of space; 25. Superconductivity and other insoluble problems; 26. From gravity to light and consciousness: does science have limits?

  1. Choosing experiments to accelerate collective discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Foster, Jacob G; Foster, Ian T; Evans, James A

    2015-11-24

    A scientist's choice of research problem affects his or her personal career trajectory. Scientists' combined choices affect the direction and efficiency of scientific discovery as a whole. In this paper, we infer preferences that shape problem selection from patterns of published findings and then quantify their efficiency. We represent research problems as links between scientific entities in a knowledge network. We then build a generative model of discovery informed by qualitative research on scientific problem selection. We map salient features from this literature to key network properties: an entity's importance corresponds to its degree centrality, and a problem's difficulty corresponds to the network distance it spans. Drawing on millions of papers and patents published over 30 years, we use this model to infer the typical research strategy used to explore chemical relationships in biomedicine. This strategy generates conservative research choices focused on building up knowledge around important molecules. These choices become more conservative over time. The observed strategy is efficient for initial exploration of the network and supports scientific careers that require steady output, but is inefficient for science as a whole. Through supercomputer experiments on a sample of the network, we study thousands of alternatives and identify strategies much more efficient at exploring mature knowledge networks. We find that increased risk-taking and the publication of experimental failures would substantially improve the speed of discovery. We consider institutional shifts in grant making, evaluation, and publication that would help realize these efficiencies.

  2. Choosing experiments to accelerate collective discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Foster, Jacob G.; Foster, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    A scientist’s choice of research problem affects his or her personal career trajectory. Scientists’ combined choices affect the direction and efficiency of scientific discovery as a whole. In this paper, we infer preferences that shape problem selection from patterns of published findings and then quantify their efficiency. We represent research problems as links between scientific entities in a knowledge network. We then build a generative model of discovery informed by qualitative research on scientific problem selection. We map salient features from this literature to key network properties: an entity’s importance corresponds to its degree centrality, and a problem’s difficulty corresponds to the network distance it spans. Drawing on millions of papers and patents published over 30 years, we use this model to infer the typical research strategy used to explore chemical relationships in biomedicine. This strategy generates conservative research choices focused on building up knowledge around important molecules. These choices become more conservative over time. The observed strategy is efficient for initial exploration of the network and supports scientific careers that require steady output, but is inefficient for science as a whole. Through supercomputer experiments on a sample of the network, we study thousands of alternatives and identify strategies much more efficient at exploring mature knowledge networks. We find that increased risk-taking and the publication of experimental failures would substantially improve the speed of discovery. We consider institutional shifts in grant making, evaluation, and publication that would help realize these efficiencies. PMID:26554009

  3. AWAKE: Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E

    2014-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is a promising alternative reaching accelerating fields a magnitude of up to 3 higher (GV/m) when compared to conventional RF acceleration. AWAKE, world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield experiment, was launched at CERN to verify this concept. In this experiment proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent to the plasma cell, where the proton beam drives the plasma wakefields and creates a large accelerating field. This large gradient of ~GV/m can be achieved by relying on the self-modulation instability (SMI) of the proton beam; when seeded by ionization through a short laser pulse, a train of micro-bunches with a period on the order of the plasma wavelength (~mm) develops, which can drive such a large amplitude wake from a long proton bunch (~12 cm). An electron beam will be injected into the plasma to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment is being installed at CERN in the former CNGS facility, which must be modified to mat...

  4. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Caresana, M. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); De Martinis, C. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Delle Side, D. [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Gatti, G. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Giove, D. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Giulietti, D. [Physics Department, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L. [INO-CNR and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Londrillo, P. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Maggiore, M. [INFN LNL, Legnaro (Italy); Nassisi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.nassisi@le.infn.it [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Sinigardi, S. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Turchetti, G. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); and others

    2014-07-15

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  5. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Anania, M. P.; Caresana, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; De Martinis, C.; Delle Side, D.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, G.; Giove, D.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Londrillo, P.; Maggiore, M.; Nassisi, V.; Sinigardi, S.; Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Turchetti, G.; Varoli, V.; Velardi, L.

    2014-07-01

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50-75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  6. Modelling the non-gravitational acceleration during Cassini's gravitation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolami, O; Gil, P J S; Páramos, J

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a computation of the thermally generated acceleration on the Cassini probe during its solar conjunction experiment, obtained from a model of the spacecraft. We use a point-like source method to build a thermal model of the vehicle and find that the results are in close agreement with the estimates of this effect performed through Doppler data analysis.

  7. Micro-Bubble Experiments at the Van de Graaff Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Z. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wardle, Kent E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quigley, K. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, Roman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Youker, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakhtang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, D. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, S. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, G. F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-02-01

    In order to test and verify the experimental designs at the linear accelerator (LINAC), several micro-scale bubble ("micro-bubble") experiments were conducted with the 3-MeV Van de Graaff (VDG) electron accelerator. The experimental setups included a square quartz tube, sodium bisulfate solution with different concentrations, cooling coils, gas chromatography (GC) system, raster magnets, and two high-resolution cameras that were controlled by a LabVIEW program. Different beam currents were applied in the VDG irradiation. Bubble generation (radiolysis), thermal expansion, thermal convection, and radiation damage were observed in the experiments. Photographs, videos, and gas formation (O2 + H2) data were collected. The micro-bubble experiments at VDG indicate that the design of the full-scale bubble experiments at the LINAC is reasonable.

  8. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2001 Through FY 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey A. Appel et al.

    2004-02-05

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the accelerator and experiment operations for the period FY 2001 through FY 2003. The plan is to have an annual TM to gather such information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the startup of Run II at the Tevatron Collider and the beginning of the MiniBooNE neutrino experiment. While the focus is on the FY 2003 efforts, this document includes summaries of the earlier years where available for completeness.

  9. First results of the plasma wakefield acceleration experiment at PITZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishilin, O.; Gross, M.; Brinkmann, R.; Engel, J.; Grüner, F.; Koss, G.; Krasilnikov, M.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T.; Osterhoff, J.; Pathak, G.; Philipp, S.; Renier, Y.; Richter, D.; Schroeder, C.; Schütze, R.; Stephan, F.

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulation instability of long particle beams was proposed as a new mechanism to produce driver beams for proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). The PWFA experiment at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ) was launched to experimentally demonstrate and study the self-modulation of long electron beams in plasma. Key aspects for the experiment are the very flexible photocathode laser system, a plasma cell and well-developed beam diagnostics. In this contribution we report about the plasma cell design, preparatory experiments and the results of the first PWFA experiment at PITZ.

  10. Acceleration results from the microwave inverse FEL experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, R. B.; Marshall, T. C.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2001-05-01

    An inverse free-electron-laser accelerator has been developed, built, and operated in the microwave regime. Development of this device has been described at previous Workshops; the accelerator is driven by RF power at 2.8 GHz propagating in a smooth-walled circular waveguide surrounded by a pulsed bifilar helical undulator with tapered pitch, while an array of solenoid coils provides an axial guide magnetic field. In low-power experiments, injected electron beams at energies between 5 and 6 MeV have gained up to 0.35 MeV with minimal energy spread, and the phase sensitivity of the IFEL mechanism has been clearly demonstrated for the first time. Agreement with simulation is very good for accelerating phases, though less exact otherwise. Scaling the device to high power and high frequency is discussed.

  11. FY 88 laser transport experiments on ATA (Advanced Test Accelerator)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, F.W.; Boyd, J.K.; Caporaso, G.J.; Chong, Y.P.; Fawley, W.M.; Hildum, J.S.; Lee, P.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Prono, D.S.; Smith, A.C.

    1988-11-01

    An experiment was conducted at the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) in the spring/summer of 1988 to study the transport of the ''laser guided'' electron beam through the accelerator and beyond. The electron beam was guided from the /approximately/3.75 MeV point through the accelerator on an ion channel created by firing a KrF laser (248 nm, P approx.100--400 mJ) into a benzene filled (p approx..1 ..mu..) beamline. Beam transport was documented at several locations with a variety of diagnostics for various beam parameters; channel, gas, and laser parameters; and for various machine configurations. The focus of this experiment was to document, understand, and then alter (remove) the time variation in the observed accelerated beam parameters. The temporal variation of the beam manifests itself in several ways as has been documented. Beam radius versus time, R(t), from both bow probe and optical data shows the beam radius expanding by factors of up to several over the 40 ns of beam pulse. When the beam is threaded through any device with a limited acceptance the radius variation is parlayed into a current variation, I(t). This has been documented for transport through the fusible link, rise time sharpener, slits, bends, emittance selectors, and during free expansion. The beam temporal variation in time may be viewed as radius increase or blowup, brightness degradation, or emittance increase. The observations of blowup predate the introduction of the collimator. The observations prior to this experiment were made in the post accelerator transport sections. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Accelerating Vaccine Formulation Development Using Design of Experiment Stability Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahl, Patrick L; Mensch, Christopher; Hu, Binghua; Pixley, Heidi; Zhang, Lan; Dieter, Lance; Russell, Ryann; Smith, William J; Przysiecki, Craig; Kosinski, Mike; Blue, Jeffrey T

    2016-10-01

    Vaccine drug product thermal stability often depends on formulation input factors and how they interact. Scientific understanding and professional experience typically allows vaccine formulators to accurately predict the thermal stability output based on formulation input factors such as pH, ionic strength, and excipients. Thermal stability predictions, however, are not enough for regulators. Stability claims must be supported by experimental data. The Quality by Design approach of Design of Experiment (DoE) is well suited to describe formulation outputs such as thermal stability in terms of formulation input factors. A DoE approach particularly at elevated temperatures that induce accelerated degradation can provide empirical understanding of how vaccine formulation input factors and interactions affect vaccine stability output performance. This is possible even when clear scientific understanding of particular formulation stability mechanisms are lacking. A DoE approach was used in an accelerated 37(°)C stability study of an aluminum adjuvant Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B vaccine. Formulation stability differences were identified after only 15 days into the study. We believe this study demonstrates the power of combining DoE methodology with accelerated stress stability studies to accelerate and improve vaccine formulation development programs particularly during the preformulation stage. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced Gas-Cooled Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Experiment. AGATE; Advanced Gas-Cooled Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Experiment. AGATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettler, John; Biss, Klaus [RWTH Aachen (DE). Inst. fuer Nuklearen Brennstoffkreislauf (INBK); Bongardt, Klaus [RWTH Aachen (DE). Inst. fuer Kernphysik (IKP)] (and others)

    2011-07-01

    In Germany the question of final radioactive waste disposal is not yet decided. For intermediate-level radioactive waste the final repository Konrad is licensed, for the high-level radioactive waste not certified repository exists. Transmutation by neutron reaction can reduce the long-term heat output and the amount of long-living radionuclides (minor actinides MA). Several accelerator-driven transmutation concepts have been discussed in the past. The authors describe preliminary results of a feasibility study of the concept AGATE (advanced gas-cooled accelerator-driven transmutation experiment). An accelerated 600 MeV proton beam on the spallation target that is the neutron source in the subcritical reactor. In the starting phase the concept assumes MOX fuel with 20% Pu. In a later phase an optimized fuel for the MA transmutation has to be elaborated.

  14. Search for New Physics in reactor and accelerator experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iura, A.; Girardi, I.; Meloni, D.

    2016-01-01

    We consider two scenarios of New Physics: the Large Extra Dimensions (LED), where sterile neutrinos can propagate in a (4+d) -dimensional space-time, and the Non Standard Interactions (NSI), where the neutrino interactions with ordinary matter are parametrized at low energy in terms of effective flavour-dependent complex couplings \\varepsilon_{αβ} . We study how these models have an impact on oscillation parameters in reactor and accelerator experiments.

  15. The trapped human experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, R; Agapiou, A; Bocos-Bintintan, V; Brown, L J; Burns, C; Creaser, C S; Devenport, N A; Gao-Lau, B; Guallar-Hoyas, C; Hildebrand, L; Malkar, A; Martin, H J; Moll, V H; Patel, P; Ratiu, A; Reynolds, J C; Sielemann, S; Slodzynski, R; Statheropoulos, M; Turner, M A; Vautz, W; Wright, V E; Thomas, C L P

    2011-12-01

    This experiment observed the evolution of metabolite plumes from a human trapped in a simulation of a collapsed building. Ten participants took it in turns over five days to lie in a simulation of a collapsed building and eight of them completed the 6 h protocol while their breath, sweat and skin metabolites were passed through a simulation of a collapsed glass-clad reinforced-concrete building. Safety, welfare and environmental parameters were monitored continuously, and active adsorbent sampling for thermal desorption GC-MS, on-line and embedded CO, CO(2) and O(2) monitoring, aspirating ion mobility spectrometry with integrated semiconductor gas sensors, direct injection GC-ion mobility spectrometry, active sampling thermal desorption GC-differential mobility spectrometry and a prototype remote early detection system for survivor location were used to monitor the evolution of the metabolite plumes that were generated. Oxygen levels within the void simulator were allowed to fall no lower than 19.1% (v). Concurrent levels of carbon dioxide built up to an average level of 1.6% (v) in the breathing zone of the participants. Temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels and the physiological measurements were consistent with a reproducible methodology that enabled the metabolite plumes to be sampled and characterized from the different parts of the experiment. Welfare and safety data were satisfactory with pulse rates, blood pressures and oxygenation, all within levels consistent with healthy adults. Up to 12 in-test welfare assessments per participant and a six-week follow-up Stanford Acute Stress Response Questionnaire indicated that the researchers and participants did not experience any adverse effects from their involvement in the study. Preliminary observations confirmed that CO(2), NH(3) and acetone were effective markers for trapped humans, although interactions with water absorbed in building debris needed further study. An unexpected observation from the NH(3

  16. Subjective acceleration of time experience in everyday life across adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Dennis; Lang, Frieder R

    2015-12-01

    Most people believe that time seems to pass more quickly as they age. Building on assumptions of socioemotional selectivity theory, we investigated whether awareness that one's future lifetime is limited is associated with one's experience of time during everyday activities across adulthood in 3 studies. In the first 2 studies (Study 1: N = 608; Study 2: N = 398), participants completed a web-based version of the day reconstruction method. In Study 3 (N = 392) participants took part in a newly developed tomorrow construction method, a web-based experimental method for assessing everyday life plans. Results confirmed that older adults' subjective interpretation of everyday episodes is that these episodes pass more quickly compared with younger adults. The subjective acceleration of time experience in old age was more pronounced during productive activities than during regenerative-consumptive activities. The age differences were partly related to limited time remaining in life. In addition, subjective acceleration of time experience was associated with positive evaluations of everyday activities. Findings suggest that subjective acceleration of time in older adults' daily lives reflects an adaptation to limitations in time remaining in life. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. First results of the plasma wakefield acceleration experiment at PITZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lishilin, O., E-mail: osip.lishilin@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Gross, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Brinkmann, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Engel, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Grüner, F. [Universität Hamburg, UHH, Hamburg (Germany); Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, CFEL, Hamburg (Germany); Koss, G.; Krasilnikov, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T.; Osterhoff, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Pathak, G.; Philipp, S.; Renier, Y. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Richter, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, HZB, Berlin (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, LBNL, Berkeley (United States); Schütze, R.; Stephan, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulation instability of long particle beams was proposed as a new mechanism to produce driver beams for proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). The PWFA experiment at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ) was launched to experimentally demonstrate and study the self-modulation of long electron beams in plasma. Key aspects for the experiment are the very flexible photocathode laser system, a plasma cell and well-developed beam diagnostics. In this contribution we report about the plasma cell design, preparatory experiments and the results of the first PWFA experiment at PITZ. - Highlights: • A self-modulation mechanism for producing driver beams for PWFA is proposed. • A proof-of-principle experiment is launched at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY. • The self-modulation instability occurs in long particle beams passing through plasma. • A heat pipe oven and a laser are used to produce plasma.

  18. OPTIMUM DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS FOR ACCELERATED RELIABILITY TESTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Marian ZAHARIA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented a case study that demonstrates how design to experiments (DOE information can be used to design better accelerated reliability tests. In the case study described in this paper, will be done a comparison and optimization between main accelerated reliability test plans (3 Level Best Standard Plan, 3 Level Best Compromise Plan, 3 Level Best Equal Expected Number Failing Plan, 3 Level 4:2:1 Allocation Plan. Before starting an accelerated reliability test, it is advisable to have a plan that helps in accurately estimating reliability at operating conditions while minimizing test time and costs. A test plan should be used to decide on the appropriate stress levels that should be used (for each stress type and the amount of the test units that need to be allocated to the different stress levels (for each combination of the different stress types' levels. For the case study it used ALTA 7 software what provides a complete analysis for data from accelerated reliability tests

  19. A Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    The AWAKE Collaboration has been formed in order to demonstrate protondriven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time. This technology could lead to future colliders of high energy but of a much reduced length compared to proposed linear accelerators. The SPS proton beam in the CNGS facility will be injected into a 10m plasma cell where the long proton bunches will be modulated into significantly shorter micro-bunches. These micro-bunches will then initiate a strong wakefield in the plasma with peak fields above 1 GV/m that will be harnessed to accelerate a bunch of electrons from about 20MeV to the GeV scale within a few meters. The experimental program is based on detailed numerical simulations of beam and plasma interactions. The main accelerator components, the experimental area and infrastructure required as well as the plasma cell and the diagnostic equipment are discussed in detail. First protons to the experiment are expected at the end of 2016 and this will be followed by an initial 3–4 yea...

  20. Cryogenic supply for accelerators and experiments at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauschke, M.; Xiang, Y.; Schroeder, C. H.; Streicher, B.; Kollmus, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1,64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-29

    In the coming years the new international accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), one of the largest research projects worldwide, will be built at GSI. In the final construction FAIR consists of synchrotrons and storage rings with up to 1,100 meters in circumference, two linear accelerators and about 3.5 kilometers beam transfer lines. The existing GSI accelerators serve as pre-accelerators. Partly the new machines will consist of superconducting magnets and therefore require a reliable supply with liquid helium. As the requirements for the magnets is depending on the machine and have a high variety, the cooling system is different for each machine; two phase cooling, forced flow cooling and bath cooling respectively. In addition the cold mass of the individual magnets varies between less than 1t up to 80t and some magnets will cause a dynamic heat load due to ramping that is higher than the static loads. The full cryogenic system will be operated above atmospheric pressure. The refrigeration and liquefaction power will be provided by two main cryogenic plants of 8 and 25 kW at 4K and two smaller plants next to the experiments.

  1. The human ocular torsion position response during yaw angular acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S T; Curthoys, I S; Moore, S T

    1995-07-01

    Recent results by Wearne [(1993) Ph.D. thesis] using the scleral search-coil method of measuring eye position indicate that changes in ocular torsion position (OTP) occur during yaw angular acceleration about an earth vertical axis. The present set of experiments, using an image processing method of eye movement measurement free from the possible confound of search coil slippage, demonstrates the generality and repeatability of this phenomenon and examines its possible causes. The change in torsion position is not a linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR) response to interaural linear acceleration stimulation of the otoliths, but rather the effect is dependent on the characteristics of the angular acceleration stimulus, commencing at the onset and decaying at the offset of the angular acceleration. In the experiments reported here, the magnitude of the angular acceleration stimulus was varied and the torsion position response showed corresponding variations. We consider that the change in torsion position observed during angular acceleration is most likely to be due to activity of the semicircular canals.

  2. Passive protections against breakdowns between accelerating grids in SPIDER experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesce, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.pesce@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX - Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127, Padova (Italy); De Lorenzi, Antonio; Boldrin, Marco [Consorzio RFX - Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127, Padova (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    In the SPIDER experiment a ITER-like full size plasma source will be realized with the target to extract a D{sup -} beam of 70 A and then to accelerate it to 100 keV energy. The reduction of the effects due to the frequent breakdowns between the accelerating grids is needed, because of grids damage due to energy deposition by arcing and strong electromagnetic noise (EMI) emission. The solution proposed is a comprehensive design of the circuit. Two passive components are installed: a Damping Resistor and an Output Filter in series to the Power Supplies. Then a doubled screened structure will be adopted for the 30 m long - 100 kV Transmission Line TL, which connects the Ion Source and Acceleration Power Supplies to their loads: the Inner Screen will be connected to the reference ground (the vessel) by a resistive link, the Outer Screen acting as a low-impedance ground. Finally, a Distributed Core Snubber DCS (magnetic snubber) will be installed onto the TL, aimed to increase the damping of the oscillations due to the stray inductances and capacitances. The DCS is composed of 10 magnetic alloy cores and is equipped by a biasing circuit to enhance the flux swing in unsaturated condition during the breakdown. A detailed model of the circuit is developed to evaluate the passive components parameters for protection against breakdown, in which all the magnetic and capacitive couplings between components are modeled as well as the magnetic core snubber saturation.

  3. Study of neutrino oscillations in long-baseline accelerator experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudenko, Yurii G [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-30

    A review of the title subject is given. The phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in the framework of the so-called neutrino Standard Model ({nu}SM) with three active neutrinos is considered. The recently completed long-baseline accelerator experiment K2K and currently in-progress MINOS and OPERA experiments are described in detail. The oscillation parameters obtained from the global analysis of all oscillation data are given. The short-baseline experiment MiniBooNE and its results on the search for light sterile neutrinos are discussed in detail. Considerable attention is given to searching for {nu}{sub {mu}{yields}{nu}e} oscillations and measuring the {theta}{sub 13} angle in muon neutrino experiments. The concept of the off-axis neutrino beam is reviewed. The T2K experiment, collecting statistics since early 2010, is described for its details and objectives. The NO{nu}A experiment under construction and the next-generation beta beam and neutrino factory experiments are also discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  4. Nanodiamond targets for accelerator X-ray experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobko, A., E-mail: lobko@inp.bsu.by [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Golubeva, E. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Prosp., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Kuzhir, P.; Maksimenko, S. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Ryazan State RadioEngineering University, 59/1 Gagarina Street, Ryazan 390005 (Russian Federation); Paddubskaya, A. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Shenderova, O. [International Technology Center, 8100 Brownleigh Dr., S. 120, Raleigh, NC 27617 (United States); Uglov, V. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Prosp., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Valynets, N. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobrujskaya Str., Minsk 220030 (Belarus)

    2015-07-15

    Results of fabrication of a nanodiamond target for accelerator X-ray experiments are reported. Nanodiamond film with dimensions 5 × 7 mm and thickness of 500 nm has been made of the high pressure high temperature nanodiamonds using a filtration method. The average crystallite size of primary nanodiamond particles varies around 100 nm. Source nanodiamonds and fabricated nanodiamond film were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. Preliminary results show that targets made of nanodiamonds are perspective in generating crystal-assisted radiation by the relativistic charged particles, such as parametric X-rays, diffracted transition radiation, diffracted Bremsstrahlung, etc.

  5. Quark-Gluon Plasma: from accelerator experiments to early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Rosnet, P

    2015-01-01

    In the Big Bang scenario, the early Universe is characterized by the {\\it particle era}, i.e. a Universe made of particles. This period connects both scales of fundamental physics: infinitesimally small and infinitely large. So, particle physics and in particular experimental programs at accelerators can bring valuable inputs for the understanding of the early Universe and its evolution. These proceedings discuss the impact of the Quantum ChromoDynamics phase transition experienced by the {\\it particle era} in the expanding Universe, which is connected to the study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma produced in heavy-ion physics experiments.

  6. High Temperature μSR Experiments for Accelerator Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Chihiro; Koda, Akihiro; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Kusuo; Shimomura, Koichiro; Schnase, Alexander; Ezura, Eiji; Hara, Keigo; Hasegawa, Katsushi; Nomura, Masahiro; Shimada, Taihei; Takata, Koji; Tamura, Fumihiko; Toda, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito

    High temperature μSR is a powerful technique to study magnetic materials. In J-PARC accelerator synchrotrons, the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) and Main Ring (MR), a unique magnetic alloy-loaded cavity is used for the beam acceleration and much higher field gradient has been achieved. Such high field gradient cavities made a compact RCS possible by reducing the length for beam acceleration. Now, further upgrades of the J-PARC, RF cavities with higher RF voltage and less power loss in the magnetic core are needed for the MR. For the improvements of the magnetic property of magnetic alloy core, the high temperature μSR (muon Spin Rotation/Relaxation) was used to investigate the crystallization process of the material. Based on the measurement results, the test production of the large ring cores of a magnetic alloy, FT3L, was tried. The FT3L is the magnetic alloy which has two times better performance than the present one, FT3M. For the FT3L production, the magnetic annealing is needed to control the easy-magnetized axis of the crystalline. After the success of the test production, a mass production was started in the industry to replace all existing cavities in the MR. The first 5-cell FT3L cavity is assembled for the bench test before the installation in the accelerator tunnel. By the new cavities, the total RF voltage of J-PARC MR will be doubled to increase the beam power for neutrino experiment. In future, the cavities will be also used for the RCS to increase the beam power beyond 1 MW.

  7. Subpanel on accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Neutrinos are among nature`s fundamental constituents, and they are also the ones about which we know least. Their role in the universe is widespread, ranging from the radioactive decay of a single atom to the explosions of supernovae and the formation of ordinary matter. Neutrinos might exhibit a striking property that has not yet been observed. Like the back-and-forth swing of a pendulum, neutrinos can oscillate to-and-from among their three types (or flavors) if nature provides certain conditions. These conditions include neutrinos having mass and a property called {open_quotes}mixing.{close_quotes} The phenomenon is referred to as neutrino oscillations. The questions of the origin of neutrino mass and mixing among the neutrino flavors are unsolved problems for which the Standard Model of particle physics holds few clues. It is likely that the next critical step in answering these questions will result from the experimental observation of neutrino oscillations. The High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on Accelerator-Based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments was charged to review the status and discovery potential of ongoing and proposed accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations, to evaluate the opportunities for the U.S. in this area of physics, and to recommend a cost-effective plan for pursuing this physics, as appropriate. The complete charge is provided in Appendix A. The Subpanel studied these issues over several months and reviewed all the relevant and available information on the subject. In particular, the Subpanel reviewed the two proposed neutrino oscillation programs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The conclusions of this review are enumerated in detail in Chapter 7 of this report. The recommendations given in Chapter 7 are also reproduced in this summary.

  8. Improvement in performance and operational experience of 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility, BARC–TIFR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P V Bhagwat

    2002-11-01

    14 UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility at Mumbai has been operational since 1989. The project MEHIA (medium energy heavy ion accelerator) started in 1982 and was formally inaugurated on 30th December 1988. Since then the accelerator has been working round the clock. Improvement in accelerator performance and operational experience are described.

  9. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Capacitor Health Monitoring and Prognostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Celaya, Jose Ramon; Biswas, Gautam; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses experimental setups for health monitoring and prognostics of electrolytic capacitors under nominal operation and accelerated aging conditions. Electrolytic capacitors have higher failure rates than other components in electronic systems like power drives, power converters etc. Our current work focuses on developing first-principles-based degradation models for electrolytic capacitors under varying electrical and thermal stress conditions. Prognostics and health management for electronic systems aims to predict the onset of faults, study causes for system degradation, and accurately compute remaining useful life. Accelerated life test methods are often used in prognostics research as a way to model multiple causes and assess the effects of the degradation process through time. It also allows for the identification and study of different failure mechanisms and their relationships under different operating conditions. Experiments are designed for aging of the capacitors such that the degradation pattern induced by the aging can be monitored and analyzed. Experimental setups and data collection methods are presented to demonstrate this approach.

  10. Experience with the LEP Superconducting RF Accelerating System

    CERN Document Server

    Geschonke, Günther

    1998-01-01

    CERN is presently upgrading the large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) to higher energy by installing superconducting RF accelerating cavities. For a total installed circumferential voltage of about 2800 MV, 272 cavities operating at 352 MHz will be needed, representing an active length of 462 m and a cold surface of more than 1600 m2. The series production cavities are made out of copper, sputter-coated with a thin layer of niobium and cooled with liquid He to 4.5 K. The cavities are produced by industry and the acceptance testing is done at CERN. In 1996, 176 cavities had been installed and run successfully at their design gradient of 6 MV/m during physics at a beam energy of 86 GeV. As RF power sources 36 klystrons will finally be installed with a nominal RF output power of 1 MW each. In this paper the superconducting accelerating system in LEP will be described and experience gained during operation for physics as well as new developments will be presented.

  11. Beam Dynamics Studies for a Laser Acceleration Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Palmer, Dennis T; Siemann, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The NLC Test Accelerator at SLAC was built to address various beam dynamics issues for the Next Linear Collider. An S-Band RF gun, originally proposed for the NLCTA, is being installed together with a large-angle extraction line at 60 MeV. This is followed by a matching section, final focus and buncher for the laser acceleration experiment, E163. The laser-electron interaction area is followed by a broad range, high resolution spectrometer (HES) for electron bunch analysis. The RF gun is discussed in another paper. We discuss only the beam dynamics and high resolution analysis system at 6 MeV based on using Parmela and high-order Transport for bunch charges from 50 pC to 1 nC. Beyond the diagnostics, this system uses the emittance compensating solenoids and a low energy, high resolution spectrometer (LES) to help tune for best operating point and match to the linac. Optical symmetries in the design of the 25.5° extraction line provide 1:1 phase space transfer without linear dispersion or use of sextu...

  12. Experiments on heat pipes submitted to strong accelerations; Experimentation de caloducs soumis a de fortes accelerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labuthe, A. [Dassault Aviation, 92 - Saint Cloud (France)

    1996-12-31

    In order to evaluate the possibility to use heat pipes as efficient heat transfer devices in aircrafts, a study of their behaviour during strong accelerations is necessary. This study has been jointly carried out by the Laboratory of Thermal Studies of Poitiers (France) and Dassault Aviation company. It is based on a series of tests performed with an experimental apparatus that uses the centrifugal effect to simulate the acceleration fields submitted to the heat pipe. Un-priming - priming cycles have been performed under different power and acceleration levels and at various functioning temperatures in order to explore the behaviour of heat pipes: rate of un-priming and re-priming, functioning in blocked mode etc.. This preliminary study demonstrates the rapid re-priming of the tested heat pipes when submitted to favourable acceleration situations and the possibility to use them under thermosyphon conditions despite the brief unfavourable acceleration periods encountered. (J.S.)

  13. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Capacitor Health Monitoring and Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper discusses experimental setups for health monitoring and prognostics of electrolytic capacitors under nominal operation and accelerated aging conditions....

  14. Electron acceleration mechanisms in the interaction of ultrashort lasers with underdense plasmas: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, J.; Lefebvre, E.; Malka, V.; Marques, J.-R.; Amiranoff, F.; Solodov, A.; Mora, P.

    2002-06-30

    An experiment investigating the production of relativistic electrons from the interaction of ultrashort multi-terawatt laser pulses with an underdense plasma is presented. Electrons were accelerated to tens of MeV and the maximum electron energy increased as the plasma density decreased. Simulations have been performed in order to model the experiment. They show a good agreement with the trends observed in the experiment and the spectra of accelerated electrons could be reproduced successfully. The simulations have been used to study the relative contribution of the different acceleration mechanisms: plasma wave acceleration, direct laser acceleration and stochastic heating. The results show that in low density case (1 percent of the critical density) acceleration by laser is dominant mechanism. The simulations at high density also suggest that direct laser acceleration is more efficient that stochastic heating.

  15. Acrylamide induces accelerated endothelial aging in a human cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, Cyril; Boulanger, Eric; Maladry, François; Tessier, Frédéric J; Lorenzi, Rodrigo; Nevière, Rémi; Desreumaux, Pierre; Beuscart, Jean-Baptiste; Puisieux, François; Grossin, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Acrylamide (AAM) has been recently discovered in food as a Maillard reaction product. AAM and glycidamide (GA), its metabolite, have been described as probably carcinogenic to humans. It is widely established that senescence and carcinogenicity are closely related. In vitro, endothelial aging is characterized by replicative senescence in which primary cells in culture lose their ability to divide. Our objective was to assess the effects of AAM and GA on human endothelial cell senescence. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured in vitro were used as model. HUVECs were cultured over 3 months with AAM or GA (1, 10 or 100 μM) until growth arrest. To analyze senescence, β-galactosidase activity and telomere length of HUVECs were measured by cytometry and semi-quantitative PCR, respectively. At all tested concentrations, AAM or GA reduced cell population doubling compared to the control condition (p < 0.001). β-galactosidase activity in endothelial cells was increased when exposed to AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (≥1 μM) (p < 0.05). AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (100 μM) accelerated telomere shortening in HUVECs (p < 0.05). In conclusion, in vitro chronic exposure to AAM or GA at low concentrations induces accelerated senescence. This result suggests that an exposure to AAM might contribute to endothelial aging.

  16. Analysis of Human Accelerated DNA Regions Using Archaic Hominin Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Green, Richard E.; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  17. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwendtner, E; Adli, E.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.(CERN, Geneva, Switzerland); Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; AMORIM, L.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D; experiment at CERN and the world׳s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of ...

  18. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  19. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwendtner, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Adli, E. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Amorim, L. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Apsimon, R. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Assmann, R. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Bauche, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Berglyd Olsen, V.K. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Bernardini, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bingham, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Biskup, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Czech Technical University, Zikova 1903/4, 166 36 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Bohl, T.; Bracco, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P.N. [John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Buttenschön, B. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, Greifswald 17491 (Germany); Butterworth, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Caldwell, A. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Cascella, M. [UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  20. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  1. Experience with magnetic shielding of a large scale accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergei Nagaitsev et al.

    2001-08-14

    It is not unusual to place multiple accelerators in a common enclosure to save on civil construction costs. This often complicates operations, especially if accelerators are affecting each other. At Fermilab, the influence of a rapidly cycling Main Injector (MI) synchrotron on an antiproton storage ring (Recycler), placed in a common tunnel, was initially found to be unacceptable for a reliable operation of the Recycler. Initial closed orbit excursions in the Recycler ring during the MI ramp were in excess of 5 mm (rms). This paper describes a shielding technique, used to reduce these orbit excursions by a factor of five.

  2. A stochastic model of randomly accelerated walkers for human mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallotti, Riccardo; Bazzani, Armando; Rambaldi, Sandro; Barthelemy, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies of human mobility largely focus on displacements patterns and power law fits of empirical long-tailed distributions of distances are usually associated to scale-free superdiffusive random walks called Lévy flights. However, drawing conclusions about a complex system from a fit, without any further knowledge of the underlying dynamics, might lead to erroneous interpretations. Here we show, on the basis of a data set describing the trajectories of 780,000 private vehicles in Italy, that the Lévy flight model cannot explain the behaviour of travel times and speeds. We therefore introduce a class of accelerated random walks, validated by empirical observations, where the velocity changes due to acceleration kicks at random times. Combining this mechanism with an exponentially decaying distribution of travel times leads to a short-tailed distribution of distances which could indeed be mistaken with a truncated power law. These results illustrate the limits of purely descriptive models and provide a mechanistic view of mobility.

  3. RF ACCELERATING STRUCTURE FOR THE MUON COOLING EXPERIMENT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CORLETT,J.; GREEN,M.; LI,D.; HOLTKAMP,N.; MORETTI,A.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; ZHAO,Y.; SUMMERS,D.

    1999-03-29

    The ionization cooling of muons requires longitudinal acceleration of the muons after scattering in a hydrogen target. In order to maximize the accelerating voltage, we propose using linear accelerating structures with cells bounded by thin beryllium metal foils. This produces an on-axis field equivalent to the maximum surface field, whereas with beam-pipes the accelerating field is approximately half that of the peak surface field in the cavity. The muons interact only weakly with the thin foils. A {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure has been chosen, with alternate cells coupled together externally, and the two groups of cells fed in quadrature. At present they are considering an operating temperature of 77K to gain a factor of at least two in Q-value over room temperature. The authors describe the design of the {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure, design of an alternative {pi}-mode open structure, preliminary experimental results from a low-power test cavity, and plans for high-power testing.

  4. Wakefield Monitor Experiments with X-Band Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Malina, Lukas; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating structures for CLIC must be aligned with a precision of a few um with respect to the beam trajectory in order to mitigate emittance growth due to transverse wake fields. We report on first results from wake field monitor tests in an X-band structure, with a probe beam at the CLIC Test Facility. The monitors are currently installed in the CLIC Two-Beam Module. In order to fully demonstrate the feasibility of using wakefield monitors for CLIC, the precision of the monitors must be verified using a probe beam while simultaneously filling the structure with high power rf used to drive the accelerating mode. We outline plans to perform such a demonstration in the CLIC Test Facility.

  5. Reward motivation accelerates the onset of neural novelty signals in humans to 85 milliseconds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzeck, Nico; Doeller, Christian F; Fuentemilla, Lluis; Dolan, Raymond J; Duzel, Emrah

    2009-08-11

    The neural responses that distinguish novel from familiar items in recognition memory tasks are remarkably fast in both humans and nonhuman primates. In humans, the earliest onsets of neural novelty effects emerge at about approximately 150-200 ms after stimulus onset. However, in recognition memory studies with nonhuman primates, novelty effects can arise at as early as 70-80 ms. Here, we address the possibility that this large species difference in onset latencies is caused experimentally by the necessity of using reward reinforcement to motivate the detection of novel or familiar items in nonhuman primates but not in humans. Via magnetoencephalography in humans, we show in two experiments that the onset of neural novelty signals is accelerated from approximately 200 ms to approximately 85 ms if correct recognition memory for either novel or familiar items is rewarded. Importantly, this acceleration is independent of whether the detection of the novel or the familiar scenes is rewarded. Furthermore, this early novelty effect contributed to memory retrieval because neural reward responses, which were contingent upon novelty detection, followed approximately 100 ms later. Thus, under the contextual influence of reward motivation, behaviorally relevant novelty signals emerge much faster than previously held possible in humans.

  6. Classifying Human Body Acceleration Patterns Using a Hierarchical Temporal Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Federico; Ascari, Luca; Cagnoni, Stefano

    This paper introduces a novel approach to the detection of human body movements during daily life. With the sole use of one wearable wireless triaxial accelerometer attached to one's chest, this approach aims at classifying raw acceleration data robustly, to detect many common human behaviors without requiring any specific a-priori knowledge about movements. The proposed approach consists of feeding sensory data into a specifically trained Hierarchical Temporal Memory (HTM) to extract invariant spatial-temporal patterns that characterize different body movements. The HTM output is then classified using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) into different categories. The performance of this new HTM+SVM combination is compared with a single SVM using real-word data corresponding to movements like "standing", "walking", "jumping" and "falling", acquired from a group of different people. Experimental results show that the HTM+SVM approach can detect behaviors with very high accuracy and is more robust, with respect to noise, than a classifier based solely on SVMs.

  7. Association of hormonal responses and performance of student pilots during acceleration training on the human centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, D.; Rohleder, N.; Welsch, H.

    2005-08-01

    Prediction of student pilots' +Gz tolerance by stress hormone levels would be a useful tool in aviation medicine. The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between neuroendocrine parameters with performance during acceleration training on the human centrifuge (HC).We investigated 21 student pilots during self-controlled acceleration training on the HC. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were measured after individual training sessions and at rest. Performance was defined by several characteristics including maximum tolerated acceleration. ACTH and cortisol, were significantly higher 20 minutes after acceleration training compared to the resting condition. Subjects tolerated a maximal acceleration of +6.69 Gz. HPA hormone levels and responses were associated with maximum tolerated acceleration +Gz. These findings support the expectation that acceleration- induced increases in stress hormones may enable the organism to tolerate a higher acceleration and could therefore be used as predictors for acceleration tolerance.

  8. Experience in using FlexCtrl SCADA for accelerator automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, A.; Aleinikov, V.; Sychev, A.; Borina, I.; Rukavishnikov, A.

    2012-07-01

    The programmed component of the automatic control of accelerators on the basis of licensed software packages (FlexCtrl SCADA, Photon Application Builder, and Cogent DataHub) and an additionally developed library of classes (related to visual programming with regard to functional capabilities and which all together represent an integrated media for producing the automation system) is described in the article. The number of features of the media components and the number of the components themselves can be increased since the developed media is characterized as open.

  9. Flyer acceleration experiments using high-power laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadono T.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Flyer acceleration technique using high-power lasers has several advantages such as the achieved velocities higher than 10 km/s and non-contamination to the products generated by impacts. In this study, we show that a high-power laser can achieve flyer velocities higher than 10 km/s up to 60 km/s using spherical projectiles with a diameter of 0.1 − 0.3mm. We discuss the projectile condition during the flight based on the results of numerical simulations.

  10. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC_LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 1016-1017 cm-3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  11. Long baseline accelerator neutrino experiments present and future

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, André

    2000-01-01

    A nu /sub mu / disappearance effect has been seen in atmospheric neutrino experiments. This has led to the "evidence for neutrino oscillations". The next problem in neutrino physics is to perform the right experiment(s) to elucidate in a comprehensive way the pattern of neutrino masses and mixings. The long baseline experiments will play a fundamental role at settling definitively the question of flavor oscillation and at measuring with good precision the oscillation parameters. The CERN-NGS beam coupled with the proposed ICANOE and OPERA detectors is the only programme capable of sensitive tau and electron appearance searches. (14 refs).

  12. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-12-24

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams (?Beta Beams?), one based on decays of stored muon beams (?Neutrino Factory?), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam (?Superbeam?). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R&D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R&D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  13. Accelerated aging syndromes, are they relevant to normal human aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreesen, Oliver; Stewart, Colin L

    2011-09-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) and Werner syndromes are diseases that clinically resemble some aspects of accelerated aging. HGPS is caused by mutations in theLMNA gene resulting in post-translational processing defects that trigger Progeria in children. Werner syndrome, arising from mutations in the WRN helicase gene, causes premature aging in young adults. What are the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these disorders and what aspects of the diseases resemble physiological human aging? Much of what we know stems from the study of patient derived fibroblasts with both mutations resulting in increased DNA damage, primarily at telomeres. However, in vivo patients with Werner's develop arteriosclerosis, among other pathologies. In HGPS patients, including iPS derived cells from HGPS patients, as well as some mouse models for Progeria, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) appears to be among the most severely affected tissues. Defective Lamin processing, associated with DNA damage, is present in VSM from old individuals, indicating processing defects may be a factor in normal aging. Whether persistent DNA damage, particularly at telomeres, is the root cause for these pathologies remains to be established, since not all progeroid Lmna mutations result in DNA damage and genome instability.

  14. Human folate metabolism using 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Arjomand, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Duecker, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, P. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zulim, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bucholz, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vogel, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-03-25

    Folate is a water soluble vitamin required for optimal health, growth and development. It occurs naturally in various states of oxidation of the pteridine ring and with varying lengths to its glutamate chain. Folates function as one-carbon donors through methyl transferase catalyzed reactions. Low-folate diets, especially by those with suboptimal methyltransferase activity, are associated with increased risk of neural tube birth defects in children, hyperhomocysteinemic heart disease, and cancer in adults. Rapidly dividing (neoplastic) cells have a high folate need for DNA synthesis. Chemical analogs of folate (antifolates) that interfere with folate metabolism are used as therapeutic agents in cancer treatment. Although much is known about folate chemistry, metabolism of this vitamin in vivo in humans is not well understood. Since folate levels in blood and tissues are very low and methods to measure them are inadequate, the few previous studies that have examined folate metabolism used large doses of radiolabeled folic acid in patients with Hodgkin's disease and cancer (Butterworth et al. 1969, Krumdieck et al. 1978). A subsequent protocol using deuterated folic acid was also insufficiently sensitive to trace a physiologic folate dose (Stites et al. 1997). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an emerging bioanalytical tool that overcomes the limitations of traditional mass spectrometry and of decay counting of long lived radioisotopes (Vogel et al. 1995). AMS can detect attomolar concentrations of 14 C in milligram-sized samples enabling in vivo radiotracer studies in healthy humans. We used AMS to study the metabolism of a physiologic 80 nmol oral dose of 14 C-folic acid (1/6 US RDA) by measuring the 14 C-folate levels in serial plasma, urine and feces samples taken over a 150-day period after dosing a healthy adult volunteer.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates tumor angiogenesis of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunamura, Makoto; Duda, Dan G; Ghattas, Maivel H; Lozonschi, Lucian; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Yamauchi, Jun-Ichiro; Matsuno, Seiki; Shibahara, Shigeki; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for the continued growth of solid tumors, invasion and metastasis. Several studies clearly showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we used the vital microscope system, transparent skinfold model, lung colonization model and transduced pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1)/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) cells, to precisely analyze, for the first time, the effect of hHO-1 gene on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results revealed that HO-1 stimulates angiogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma in severe combined immune deficient mice. Overexpression of human hHO-1 after its retroviral transfer into Panc-1 cells did not interfere with tumor growth in vitro. While in vivo the development of tumors was accelerated upon transfection with hHO-1. On the other hand, inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) activity by stannous mesoporphyrin was able transiently to delay tumor growth in a dose dependent manner. Tumor angiogenesis was markedly increased in Panc-1/hHO-1 compared to mock transfected and wild type. Lectin staining and Ki-67 proliferation index confirmed these results. In addition hHO-1 stimulated in vitro tumor angiogenesis and increased endothelial cell survival. In a lung colonization model, overexpression of hHO-1 increased the occurrence of metastasis, while inhibition of HO activity by stannous mesoporphyrin completely inhibited the occurrence of metastasis. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 genes potentiates pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, by increasing tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis and that the inhibition of the HO system may be of useful benefit for the future treatment of the disease.

  16. Separating movement and gravity components in an acceleration signal and implications for the assessment of human daily physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hees, Vincent T; Gorzelniak, Lukas; Dean León, Emmanuel Carlos; Eder, Martin; Pias, Marcelo; Taherian, Salman; Ekelund, Ulf; Renström, Frida; Franks, Paul W; Horsch, Alexander; Brage, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Human body acceleration is often used as an indicator of daily physical activity in epidemiological research. Raw acceleration signals contain three basic components: movement, gravity, and noise. Separation of these becomes increasingly difficult during rotational movements. We aimed to evaluate five different methods (metrics) of processing acceleration signals on their ability to remove the gravitational component of acceleration during standardised mechanical movements and the implications for human daily physical activity assessment. An industrial robot rotated accelerometers in the vertical plane. Radius, frequency, and angular range of motion were systematically varied. Three metrics (Euclidian norm minus one [ENMO], Euclidian norm of the high-pass filtered signals [HFEN], and HFEN plus Euclidean norm of low-pass filtered signals minus 1 g [HFEN+]) were derived for each experimental condition and compared against the reference acceleration (forward kinematics) of the robot arm. We then compared metrics derived from human acceleration signals from the wrist and hip in 97 adults (22-65 yr), and wrist in 63 women (20-35 yr) in whom daily activity-related energy expenditure (PAEE) was available. In the robot experiment, HFEN+ had lowest error during (vertical plane) rotations at an oscillating frequency higher than the filter cut-off frequency while for lower frequencies ENMO performed better. In the human experiments, metrics HFEN and ENMO on hip were most discrepant (within- and between-individual explained variance of 0.90 and 0.46, respectively). ENMO, HFEN and HFEN+ explained 34%, 30% and 36% of the variance in daily PAEE, respectively, compared to 26% for a metric which did not attempt to remove the gravitational component (metric EN). In conclusion, none of the metrics as evaluated systematically outperformed all other metrics across a wide range of standardised kinematic conditions. However, choice of metric explains different degrees of variance in

  17. Separating movement and gravity components in an acceleration signal and implications for the assessment of human daily physical activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent T van Hees

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human body acceleration is often used as an indicator of daily physical activity in epidemiological research. Raw acceleration signals contain three basic components: movement, gravity, and noise. Separation of these becomes increasingly difficult during rotational movements. We aimed to evaluate five different methods (metrics of processing acceleration signals on their ability to remove the gravitational component of acceleration during standardised mechanical movements and the implications for human daily physical activity assessment. METHODS: An industrial robot rotated accelerometers in the vertical plane. Radius, frequency, and angular range of motion were systematically varied. Three metrics (Euclidian norm minus one [ENMO], Euclidian norm of the high-pass filtered signals [HFEN], and HFEN plus Euclidean norm of low-pass filtered signals minus 1 g [HFEN+] were derived for each experimental condition and compared against the reference acceleration (forward kinematics of the robot arm. We then compared metrics derived from human acceleration signals from the wrist and hip in 97 adults (22-65 yr, and wrist in 63 women (20-35 yr in whom daily activity-related energy expenditure (PAEE was available. RESULTS: In the robot experiment, HFEN+ had lowest error during (vertical plane rotations at an oscillating frequency higher than the filter cut-off frequency while for lower frequencies ENMO performed better. In the human experiments, metrics HFEN and ENMO on hip were most discrepant (within- and between-individual explained variance of 0.90 and 0.46, respectively. ENMO, HFEN and HFEN+ explained 34%, 30% and 36% of the variance in daily PAEE, respectively, compared to 26% for a metric which did not attempt to remove the gravitational component (metric EN. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, none of the metrics as evaluated systematically outperformed all other metrics across a wide range of standardised kinematic conditions. However, choice

  18. Simulation Prediction and Experiment Setup of Vacuum Laser Acceleration at Brookhaven National Lab-Accelerator Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, L; Ding, X; Ho, Y K; Kong, Q; Xu, J J; Pogorelsky, I; Yakimenko, V; Kusche, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the pre-experiment plan and prediction of the first stage of Vacuum Laser Acceleration (VLA) collaborating by UCLA, Fudan University and ATF-BNL. This first stage experiment is a Proof-of-Principle to support our previously posted novel VLA theory. Simulations show that based on ATF's current experimental conditions, the electron beam with initial energy of 15MeV can get net energy gain from intense CO2 laser beam. The difference of electron beam energy spread is observable by ATF beam line diagnostics system. Further this energy spread expansion effect increases along with the laser intensity increasing. The proposal has been approved by ATF committee and experiment will be the next project.

  19. Subjective Acceleration of Time Experience in Everyday Life across Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Dennis; Lang, Frieder R.

    2015-01-01

    Most people believe that time seems to pass more quickly as they age. Building on assumptions of socioemotional selectivity theory, we investigated whether awareness that one's future lifetime is limited is associated with one's experience of time during everyday activities across adulthood in 3 studies. In the first 2 studies (Study 1: N = 608;…

  20. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Universita di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano and INFN Sezione di Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-21

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a= 30 over 10{sup 8} protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least10{sup 7} protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  1. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a = 30 over 108 protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least107 protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  2. Laser measurements for experiments on the TROLL accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeland, S.

    1992-06-01

    Propagation of an electron beam over long distances can be accomplished by using a laser produced plasma channel. In experiments at the EPOCH Laboratory, a krypton/fluoride laser, lasing at 248 nm, is used to ionize trimethylamine gas to create a 91 m long channel. The laser radius was measured as 2.4 cm. Laser energy was measured and ranged from 0.5 to 6 J.

  3. Accelerator-based Short-baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gollapinni, Sowjanya

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several experiments have reported anomalous results that could be hinting at the exciting possibility of sterile neutrino states in the $eV^{2}$ mass scale. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) are a particularly promising technology to explore this physics due to their fine-grained tracking and exceptional calorimetric capabilities. The MicroBooNE experiment, a 170 ton LArTPC scheduled to start taking data very soon with Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), will combine LArTPC development with the main physics goal of understanding the low-energy electromagnetic anomaly seen by the MiniBooNE experiment. Looking towards the future, MicroBooNE will become a part of the \\textit{short-baseline neutrino} program which expands the physics capabilities of the BNB in many important ways by adding additional LArTPC detectors to search for light sterile neutrinos and bring a definitive resolution to the set of existing experimental anomalies. This paper will give an overview of...

  4. Advertising's new medium: human experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayport, Jeffrey F

    2013-03-01

    We live in a media-saturated world, where consumers are drowning in irrelevant messages delivered from the web, TV, radio, print, outdoor displays, and a proliferating array of mobile devices. Advertising strategies built on persuading through interruption, repetition, and brute ubiquity are increasingly ineffective. To win consumers' attention and trust, marketers must think less about what advertising says to its targets and more about what it does for them. Rayport outlines four domains of human experience: In the public sphere people move from one place or activity to another, both online and off. In the social sphere they interact with and relate to one another. In the tribal sphere they affiliate with groups to define or express their identity. In the psychological sphere they connect language with specific thoughts and feelings. Savvy marketers think about crafting messages that consumers will welcome in these domains. Zappos did that when it placed ads in airport security bins (the public sphere)--reaching people whose minds may be on their shoes. Nintendo identified young mothers who were willing to host Wii parties and provided them with everything they needed for these social-sphere events. Yelp's Elite Squad of reviewers have a heightened sense of tribal affiliation that makes them powerful brand ambassadors. Life is good Inc. is rooted in the psychological sphere: It advertises only through the optimism-promoting logo and slogan on its products.

  5. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Mishra, Anurag [Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Krynetskiy, Evgeny, E-mail: ekrynets@temple.edu [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  6. Spring gravimeter calibration experiment with an inertial acceleration platform

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Ping; Noel, Jean-Phillippe

    2014-01-01

    This experiment tested an automatically calibrate the relatively gravimeter with an absolute inertial force. The whole calibration system was controlled by microprocessor and low frequency oscillations were generated by a step motor. It could produce different period low frequency sinusoid inertial force. A LVDT (Linear Variable Differential Transformer) sensor was introduced to determine the frequency transfer function and the stability of platform vertical motion. The error of vertical displacement induced by the mechanical part of platform is less than 0.01 mm. Two LCR gravimeters (G336, G906) were settled on the platform. G336 was in the centre of platform and G906 was in the left side. A calibration program has been integrated in the micro processor which could send calibrate signal once a week. During the more than 7 moths experiment, the scale factor of G336 is 8128.647 nm/s2/v with 1.1% uncertainties and G906 is 9421.017 nm/s2/v with 2.7% fluctuations.

  7. Evaluation of commercial ADC radiation tolerance for accelerator experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kai; Kierstead, James; Takai, Helio; Rescia, Sergio; Hu, Xueye; Xu, Hao; Mead, Joseph; Lanni, Francesco; Minelli, Marena

    2014-01-01

    Electronic components used in high energy physics experiments are subjected to a radiation background composed of high energy hadrons, mesons and photons. These particles can induce permanent and transient effects that affect the normal device operation. Ionizing dose and displacement damage can cause chronic damage which disable the device permanently. Transient effects or single event effects are in general recoverable with time intervals that depend on the nature of the failure. The magnitude of these effects is technology dependent with feature size being one of the key parameters. Analog to digital converters are components that are frequently used in detector front end electronics, generally placed as close as possible to the sensing elements to maximize signal fidelity. We report on radiation effects tests conducted on 17 commercially available analog to digital converters and extensive single event effect measurements on specific twelve and fourteen bit ADCs that presented high tolerance to ionizing d...

  8. Probing new physics scenarios in accelerator and reactor neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iura, A.; Girardi, I.; Meloni, D.

    2015-06-01

    We perform a detailed combined fit to the {{\\bar{ν }}e}\\to {{\\bar{ν }}e} disappearence data of the Daya Bay experiment and the appearance {{ν }μ }\\to {{ν }e} and disappearance {{ν }μ }\\to {{ν }μ } data of the Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) one in the presence of two models of new physics affecting neutrino oscillations, namely a model where sterile neutrinos can propagate in a large compactified extra dimension and a model where non-standard interactions (NSI) affect the neutrino production and detection. We find that the Daya Bay ⨁ T2K data combination constrains the largest radius of the compactified extra dimensions to be R≲ 0.17 μm at 2σ C.L. (for the inverted ordering of the neutrino mass spectrum) and the relevant NSI parameters in the range O({{10}-3})-O({{10}-2}), for particular choices of the charge parity violating phases.

  9. Accelerator Technology and High Energy Physic Experiments, WILGA 2012; EuCARD Sessions

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2012-01-01

    Wilga Sessions on HEP experiments, astroparticle physica and accelerator technology were organized under the umbrella of the EU FP7 Project EuCARD – European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper is the second part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with accelerator technology and high energy physics experiments. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the XXXth Jubilee SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the ...

  10. Accelerator human interface. 4. Object analysis by OMT technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Isamu; Nakahara, Kazuo [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Mutoh, Masakatsu; Shibasaki, Yoshinobu

    1995-07-01

    The analysis of the objects of various classes in accelerator domain was carried out by OMT technique, and its summary is reported. By changing the technique from the conventional procedural type to object-oriented type, and reconsidering accelerator control, it becomes possible to give large impact to the development of software and accelerator control. Also the importance of establishing fundamental object system and its outline are described. As to the original objects of accelerators, the change due to age is small as compared with computer environment. Accordingly, by extracting the standard objects as far as possible, and making the objects so as to be able to deal with control system and multi-platform progressing with age, the situation that control systems become out of date can be clearly solved. The establishment of optimal objects shows the possibility of presenting optimal control system, and object analysis brings about many merits. OMT was adopted here. Accelerator control domain is divided into device class and generic task class, and the latter is divided into operation, diagnosis, operation support, simulation, data base, indication system and maintenance classes. The abstracting of data and procedure, the succession between devices and the behavior of objects are described. (K.I.)

  11. An investigation into the effectiveness of smartphone experiments on students’ conceptual knowledge about acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzella, Alessandra; Testa, Italo

    2016-09-01

    This study is a first attempt to investigate effectiveness of smartphone-based activities on students’ conceptual understanding of acceleration. 143 secondary school students (15-16 years old) were involved in two types of activities: smartphone- and non-smartphone activities. The latter consisted in data logging and ‘cookbook’ activities. For the sake of comparison, all activities featured the same phenomena, i.e., the motion on an inclined plane and pendulum oscillations. A pre-post design was adopted, using open questionnaires as probes. Results show only weak statistical differences between the smartphone and non-smartphone groups. Students who followed smartphone activities were more able to design an experiment to measure acceleration and to correctly describe acceleration in a free fall motion. However, students of both groups had many difficulties in drawing acceleration vector along the trajectory of the studied motion. Results suggest that smartphone-based activities may be effective substitutes of traditional experimental settings and represent a valuable aid for teachers who want to implement laboratory activities at secondary school level. However, to achieve a deeper conceptual understanding of acceleration, some issues need to be addressed: what is the reference system of the built-in smartphone sensor; relationships between smartphone acceleration graphs and experimental setup; vector representation of the measured acceleration.

  12. Development of Tandem Accelerator Mixed Target Cone and Its Application for Single Event Effects Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI; Li; SHEN; Dong-jun; YOU; Qu-bo; WANG; Hui

    2012-01-01

    <正>For carrying out heavy ion single event effects (SEE) test, the tandem accelerator has the advantage of rapid replacement of ion species, making it possible to replace 5 or 6 kinds of ion in one experiment (about 20 h) and get complete cross-section curve for devices under test (DUTs). In order to achieve the purpose of rapid replacement of ion species, multi-element mixed target cone using in tandem accelerator has been developed. In this way variety of ions can be extracted in one target cone, the time of replacing target cone can be saved, thereby further raise efficiency of experiment.

  13. Simultaneous induction acceleration and bunching in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Peter; Bazouin, G.; Lidia, S. M.; Roy, P. K.; Waldron, W. L.

    2009-11-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment uses a ramped, bipolar induction module waveform to compress the beam to nanosecond bunches for the study of warm dense matter (WDM). We have recently explored beam dynamics and possible beamline modifications required to simultaneously compress and accelerate the beam using a unipolar waveform. This has the advantage of a higher energy deposition in the target, and mimics beam manipulations in next-generation ion accelerators for WDM experiments. We report modeling and experimental results of this beam manipulation on the NDCX beamline with the new induction bunching module with approximately twice the volt-seconds.

  14. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Experiments in the Self Modulated Regime at Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paul; Albert, Felicie; Lemos, Nuno; Patankar, Siddarth; Ralph, Joseph; Shaw, Jessica; Hegelich, Manuel; Moody, John; Joshi, Chan

    2016-10-01

    Picosecond laser plasma interaction has been studied as a novel source of producing betatron x-rays. In this regime, electrons are accelerated through the interplay of two mechanisms: self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration and direct laser acceleration. The experiment, conducted on the Titan laser system (1 ps and 150 Joules) at Lawrence Livermore National Lab, using electron densities of 0.5 - 1.5 ×1019cm-3 , found electrons accelerated to energies of up to 250 MeV with divergence half angles on order of 10s of milliradians. Corresponding to the electron densities above, frequency shifts of laser light on order ωp 1.5 - 2 ×1014 rad/sec were measured using Raman forward scattering diagnostics.

  15. Letter of Intent for a Demonstration Experiment in Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Assmann, R; Bingham, R; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Delerue, N; Dias, F M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Elsen, E; Fartoukh, S; Ferreira, C M; Fonseca, R A; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Gruelke, O; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jarozinsky, D; Jolly, S; Joshi, C; Kumar, N; Lu, W; Lopes, N; Kaur, M; Lotov, K; Malka, V; Meddahi, M; Mete, O; Mori, W B; Mueller, A; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Norreys, P; Osterhoff, J; Pozimski, J; Pukhov, A; Reimann, O; Roesler, S; Ruhl, H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmitt, H v d; Schoening, A; Seryi, A; Simon, F; Silva, L O; Tajima, T; Trines, R; Tueckmantel, T; Upadhyay, A; Vieira, J; Willi, O; Wing, M; Xia, G; Yakimenko, V; Yan, X; Zimmermann, F; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2011-01-01

    We propose an experiment on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PDPWA) which could lead to a future TeV-scale e+- collider of much reduced length compared to conventional designs. Proton bunches are ideal drivers for high energy lepton accelerators, with the potential of reducing drastically the number of required driver stages. By using a plasma to modulate a long proton bunch, a strong plasma wave can be generated by a series of ‘micro-bunches’, so that an experimental program can start today with the existing proton beams. In this letter of intent, we propose a demonstration experiment using the existing CERN SPS beam. This project would be the first beam-driven wakefield acceleration experiment in Europe, and the first proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment worldwide. We have set as an initial goal the demonstration of 1 GeV energy gain for electrons in 10 m of plasma. A proposal for reaching 100 GeV within 100 m of plasma will be developed using results from the initial roun...

  16. Examining Nontraditional Graduate Students' Academic Writing Experiences in an Accelerated Adult Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crite, Charles E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The academic writing competencies of nontraditional graduate students enrolled in accelerated graduate programs have become a growing concern for many higher learning educators in those programs. The purpose of this nonexperimental quantitative study was to examine the writing experiences that impacted nontraditional graduate students enrolled in…

  17. Using the mobile phone acceleration sensor in Physics experiments: free and damped harmonic oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Castro-Palacio, Juan Carlos; Gimenez, Marcos H; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2012-01-01

    The mobile acceleration sensor has been used to in Physics experiments on free and damped oscillations. Results for the period, frequency, spring constant and damping constant match very well to measurements obtained by other methods. The Accelerometer Monitor application for Android has been used to get the outputs of the sensor. Perspectives for the Physics laboratory have also been discussed.

  18. Wet climate and transportation routes accelerate spread of human plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Stige, Leif Chr.; Kausrud, Kyrre Linné; Ben Ari, Tamara; Wang, Shuchun; Fang, Xiye; Schmid, Boris V.; Liu, Qiyong; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Zhang, Zhibin

    2014-01-01

    Currently, large-scale transmissions of infectious diseases are becoming more closely associated with accelerated globalization and climate change, but quantitative analyses are still rare. By using an extensive dataset consisting of date and location of cases for the third plague pandemic from 1772 to 1964 in China and a novel method (nearest neighbour approach) which deals with both short- and long-distance transmissions, we found the presence of major roads, rivers and coastline accelerated the spread of plague and shaped the transmission patterns. We found that plague spread velocity was positively associated with wet conditions (measured by an index of drought and flood events) in China, probably due to flood-driven transmission by people or rodents. Our study provides new insights on transmission patterns and possible mechanisms behind variability in transmission speed, with implications for prevention and control measures. The methodology may also be applicable to studies of disease dynamics or species movement in other systems. PMID:24523275

  19. Human Vestibular Function - Skylab Experiment M131

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    This set of photographs details Skylab's Human Vestibular Function experiment (M131). This experiment was a set of medical studies designed to determine the effect of long-duration space missions on astronauts' coordination abilities. This experiment tested the astronauts susceptibility to motion sickness in the Skylab environment, acquired data fundamental to an understanding of the functions of human gravity reception under prolonged absence of gravity, and tested for changes in the sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Data from this experiment was collected before, during, and after flight. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  20. Design and Development Tools for the Systems Engineering Experience Accelerator - Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-29

    Experience Accelerator infrastructure to HTML5 , which allows for more flexibility in developing functionality and interfaces for different experiences, and...interface technology needs to be upgraded from Flash to HTML5 . This is critical for Section 508 compliance, and is a requirement for U.S. Government use...infrastructure to HTML5 is described. The evaluation of the tools is provided next. Finally, the Conclusions and future research are presented. RESEARCH

  1. [Analysis of human tissue samples for volatile fire accelerants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibs, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    In police investigations of fires, the cause of a fire and the fire debris analysis regarding traces of fire accelerants are important aspects for forensic scientists. Established analytical procedures were recently applied to the remains of fire victims. When examining lung tissue samples, vapors inhaled from volatile ignitable liquids could be identified and differentiated from products of pyrolysis caused by the fire. In addition to the medico-legal results this evidence allowed to draw conclusions as to whether the fire victim was still alive when the fire started.

  2. Can agricultural fungicides accelerate the discovery of human antifungal drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Kyung; Klittich, Carla J R

    2015-01-01

    Twelve drugs from four chemical classes are currently available for treatment of systemic fungal infections in humans. By contrast, more than 100 structurally distinct compounds from over 30 chemical classes have been developed as agricultural fungicides, and these fungicides target many modes of action not represented among human antifungal drugs. In this article we introduce the diverse aspects of agricultural fungicides and compare them with human antifungal drugs. We propose that the information gained from the development of agricultural fungicides can be applied to the discovery of new mechanisms of action and new antifungal agents for the management of human fungal infections.

  3. Use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry in Human Health and Molecular Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Heather A; Malfatti, Michael A; Zimmermann, Maike; Ognibene, Ted; Henderson, Paul; Turteltaub, Kenneth W

    2016-12-19

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been adopted as a powerful bioanalytical method for human studies in the areas of pharmacology and toxicology. The exquisite sensitivity (10(-18) mol) of AMS has facilitated studies of toxins and drugs at environmentally and physiologically relevant concentrations in humans. Such studies include risk assessment of environmental toxicants, drug candidate selection, absolute bioavailability determination, and more recently, assessment of drug-target binding as a biomarker of response to chemotherapy. Combining AMS with complementary capabilities such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) can maximize data within a single experiment and provide additional insight when assessing drugs and toxins, such as metabolic profiling. Recent advances in the AMS technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have allowed for direct coupling of AMS with complementary capabilities such as HPLC via a liquid sample moving wire interface, offering greater sensitivity compared to that of graphite-based analysis, therefore enabling the use of lower (14)C and chemical doses, which are imperative for clinical testing. The aim of this review is to highlight the recent efforts in human studies using AMS, including technological advancements and discussion of the continued promise of AMS for innovative clinical based research.

  4. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Roots, R.

    1983-07-01

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/..mu..m to over 1000 keV/..mu..m. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/..mu..m. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  5. Establishment of technical prerequisites for cell irradiation experiments with laser-accelerated electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyreuther, E; Enghardt, W; Kaluza, M; Karsch, L; Laschinsky, L; Lessmann, E; Nicolai, M; Pawelke, J; Richter, C; Sauerbrey, R; Schlenvoigt, H P; Baumann, M

    2010-04-01

    In recent years, laser-based acceleration of charged particles has rapidly progressed and medical applications, e.g., in radiotherapy, might become feasible in the coming decade. Requirements are monoenergetic particle beams with long-term stable and reproducible properties as well as sufficient particle intensities and a controlled delivery of prescribed doses at the treatment site. Although conventional and laser-based particle accelerators will administer the same dose to the patient, their different time structures could result in different radiobiological properties. Therefore, the biological response to the ultrashort pulse durations and the resulting high peak dose rates of these particle beams have to be investigated. The technical prerequisites, i.e., a suitable cell irradiation setup and the precise dosimetric characterization of a laser-based particle accelerator, have to be realized in order to prepare systematic cell irradiation experiments. The Jena titanium:sapphire laser system (JETI) was customized in preparation for cell irradiation experiments with laser-accelerated electrons. The delivered electron beam was optimized with regard to its spectrum, diameter, dose rate, and dose homogeneity. A custom-designed beam and dose monitoring system, consisting of a Roos ionization chamber, a Faraday cup, and EBT-1 dosimetry films, enables real-time monitoring of irradiation experiments and precise determination of the dose delivered to the cells. Finally, as proof-of-principle experiment cell samples were irradiated using this setup. Laser-accelerated electron beams, appropriate for in vitro radiobiological experiments, were generated with a laser shot frequency of 2.5 Hz and a pulse length of 80 fs. After laser acceleration in the helium gas jet, the electrons were filtered by a magnet, released from the vacuum target chamber, and propagated in air for a distance of 220 mm. Within this distance a lead collimator (aperture of 35 mm) was introduced, leading

  6. Transcriptomic insights into human brain evolution: acceleration, neutrality, heterochrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somel, Mehmet; Rohlfs, Rori; Liu, Xiling

    2014-12-01

    Primate brain transcriptome comparisons within the last 12 years have yielded interesting but contradictory observations on how the transcriptome evolves, and its adaptive role in human cognitive evolution. Since the human-chimpanzee common ancestor, the human prefrontal cortex transcriptome seems to have evolved more than that of the chimpanzee. But at the same time, most expression differences among species, especially those observed in adults, appear as consequences of neutral evolution at cis-regulatory sites. Adaptive expression changes in the human brain may be rare events involving timing shifts, or heterochrony, in specific neurodevelopmental processes. Disentangling adaptive and neutral expression changes, and associating these with human-specific features of the brain require improved methods, comparisons across more species, and further work on comparative development.

  7. A stochastic model of randomly accelerated walkers for human mobility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallotti, Riccardo; Bazzani, Armando; Rambaldi, Sandro; Barthelemy, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of human mobility largely focus on displacements patterns and power law fits of empirical long-tailed distributions of distances are usually associated to scale-free superdiffusive random walks called Lévy flights...

  8. Rapid acceleration leads to rapid weakening in earthquake-like laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jefferson C.; Lockner, David A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-01-01

    After nucleation, a large earthquake propagates as an expanding rupture front along a fault. This front activates countless fault patches that slip by consuming energy stored in Earth’s crust. We simulated the slip of a fault patch by rapidly loading an experimental fault with energy stored in a spinning flywheel. The spontaneous evolution of strength, acceleration, and velocity indicates that our experiments are proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of moment magnitude (Mw) = 4 to 8. We show that seismically determined earthquake parameters (e.g., displacement, velocity, magnitude, or fracture energy) can be used to estimate the intensity of the energy release during an earthquake. Our experiments further indicate that high acceleration imposed by the earthquake’s rupture front quickens dynamic weakening by intense wear of the fault zone.

  9. Recent Developments on ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) at Daresbury Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saveliev, Y M; Buckley, R K; Buckley, S R; Clarke, J A; Corlett, P A; Dunning, D J; Goulden, A R; Hill, S F; Jackson, F; Jamison, S P; Jones, J K; Jones, L B; Leonard, S; McIntosh, P A; McKenzie, J W; Middleman, K J; Militsyn, B L; Moss, A J; Muratori, B D; Orrett, J F; Pattalwar, S M; Phillips, P J; Scott, D J; Seddon, E A; Shepherd, B.J.A.; Smith, S L; Thompson, N; Wheelhouse, A E; Williams, P H; Harrison, P; Holder, D J; Holder, G M; Schofield, A L; Weightman, P; Williams, R L; Laundry, D; Powers, T; Priebe, G

    2010-05-01

    Progress made in ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) commissioning and a summary of the latest experimental results are presented in this paper. After an extensive work on beam loading effects in SC RF linac (booster) and linac cavities conditioning, ALICE can now operate in full energy recovery mode at the bunch charge of 40pC, the beam energy of 30MeV and train lengths of up to 100us. This improved operation of the machine resulted in generation of coherently enhanced broadband THz radiation with the energy of several tens of uJ per pulse and in successful demonstration of the Compton Backscattering x-ray source experiment. The next steps in the ALICE scientific programme are commissioning of the IR FEL and start of the research on the first non-scaling FFAG accelerator EMMA. Results from both projects will be also reported.

  10. Ion Acceleration by Beating Electrostatic Waves: Theory, Experiments and Relevance to Spacecraft Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiri, Edgar

    2007-10-01

    After a brief overview of electrodeless plasma propulsion concepts, we will focus on a recently discovered ion acceleration mechanism, which appears to occur naturally in Earth's ionosphere, holds promise as an effective means to energize ions for applications in thermonuclear fusion and electrodeless space plasma propulsion. Unlike previously known mechanisms for energizing plasmas with electrostatic (ES) waves, and which accelerate only ions whose initial velocities are above a certain threshold (close to the wave's phase velocity), the new acceleration mechanism, involving pairs of beating ES waves, is non-resonant and can accelerate ions with arbitrarily small initial velocities, thus offering a more effective way to couple energy to plasmas. We will discuss the fundamentals of the nonlinear dynamics of a single magnetized ion interacting with a pair of beating ES waves and show that there exist necessary and sufficient conditions for the phenomenon to occur. We will see how these fundamental conditions are derived by analyzing the motion's Hamiltonian using a second-order perturbation technique in conjunction with Lie transformations. The analysis shows that when the Hamiltonian lies outside the energy barrier defined by the location of the elliptic and hyperbolic critical points of the motion, the electric field of the beating waves can accelerate ions regularly from low initial velocities, then stochastically, to high energies. We will then illustrate real plasma effects using Monte Carlo numerical simulation and discuss the recent results from a dedicated experiment in my lab in which laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of ion energies have provided the first laboratory observation of this acceleration mechanism. The talk will conclude with a few ideas on how the fundamental insight can be applied to develop novel plasma propulsion concepts.

  11. The Project PLASMONX for Plasma Acceleration Experiments and a Thomson X-Ray Source at SPARC

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, Luca; Alessandria, Franco; Bacci, Alberto; Baldeschi, Walter; Barbini, Alessandro; Bellaveglia, Marco; Bertolucci, Sergio; Biagini, Maria; Boni, Roberto; Bonifacio, Rodolfo; Boscolo, Ilario; Boscolo, Manuela; Bottigli, Ubaldo; Broggi, Francesco; Castellano, Michele; Cecchetti, Carlo A; Cialdi, Simone; Clozza, Alberto; De Martinis, Carlo; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Drago, Alessandro; Esposito, Adolfo; Ferrario, Massimo; Ficcadenti, L; Filippetto, Daniele; Fusco, Valeria; Galimberti, Marco; Gallo, Alessandro; Gatti, Giancarlo; Ghigo, Andrea; Giove, Dario; Giulietti, Antonio; Giulietti, Danilo; Gizzi, Leonida A; Golosio, Bruno; Guiducci, Susanna; Incurvati, Maurizio; Köster, Petra; Labate, Luca; Ligi, Carlo; Marcellini, Fabio; Maroli, Cesare; Mauri, Marco; Migliorati, Mauro; Mostacci, Andrea; Oliva, Pier N; Palumbo, Luigi; Pellegrino, Luigi; Petrillo, Vittoria; Piovella, Nicola; Poggiu, Angela; Pozzoli, Roberto; Preger, Miro; Ricci, Ruggero; Rome, Massimiliano; Rossi, Antonella; Sanelli, Claudio; Serio, Mario; Sgamma, Francesco; Spataro, Bruno; Stecchi, Alessandro; Stella, Angelo; Stumbo, Simone; Tazzioli, Franco; Tommasini, Paolo; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Vescovi, Mario; Vicario, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    We present the status of the activity on the project PLASMONX, which foresees the installation of a multi-TW Ti:Sa laser system at the CNR-ILIL laboratory to conduct plasma acceleration experiments and the construction of an additional beam line at SPARC to develop a Thomson X-ray source at INFN-LNF. After pursuing self-injection experiments at ILIL, when the electron beam at SPARC will be available the SPARC laser system will be upgraded to TW power level in order to conduct either external injection plasma acceleration experiments and ultra-bright X-ray pulse generation with the Thomson source. Results of numerical simulations modeling the interaction of the SPARC electron beam and the counter-propagating laser beam are presented with detailed discussion of the monochromatic X-ray beam spectra generated by Compton backscattering: X-ray energies are tunable in the range 20 to 1000 keV, with pulse duration from 30 fs to 20 ps. Preliminary simulations of plasma acceleration with self-injection are illustrated,...

  12. Accelerator Studies on a possible Experiment on Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefields at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W; Fartoukh, S; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Meddahi, M; Roesler, S; Zimmermann, F; Caldwell, A; Muggli, P; Xia, G

    2011-01-01

    There has been a proposal by Caldwell et al to use proton beams as drivers for high energy linear colliders. An experimental test with CERN’s proton beams is being studied. Such a test requires a transfer line for transporting the beam to the experiment, a focusing section for beam delivery into the plasma, the plasma cell and a downstream diagnostics and dump section. The work done at CERN towards the conceptual layout and design of such a test area is presented. A possible development of such a test area into a CERN test facility for high-gradient acceleration experiments is discussed.

  13. Influence of acceleration voltage on scanning electron microscopy of human blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, E

    2010-03-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to view a variety of surface structures, molecules, or nanoparticles of different materials, ranging from metals, dental and medical instruments, and chemistry (e.g. polymer analysis) to biological material. Traditionally, the operating conditions of the SEM are very important in the material sciences, particularly the acceleration voltage. However, in biological sciences, it is not typically seen as an important parameter. Acceleration voltage allows electrons to penetrate the sample; thus, the higher the acceleration voltage the more penetration into the sample will occur. As a result, ultrastructural information from deeper layers will interfere with the actual surface morphology that is seen. Therefore, ultimately, if acceleration voltage is lower, a better quality of the surface molecules and structures will be produced. However, in biological sciences, this is an area that is not well-documented. Typically, acceleration voltages of between 5 and 20 kV are used. This manuscript investigates the influence of acceleration voltages ranging from 5 kV to as low as 300 V, by studying surface ultrastructure of a human platelet aggregate. It is concluded that, especially at higher magnifications, much more surface detail is visible in biological samples when using an acceleration voltage between 2 kV and 300 V.

  14. Modular knowledge systems accelerate human migration in asymmetric random environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Deem, Michael W

    2016-12-01

    Migration is a key mechanism for expansion of communities. In spatially heterogeneous environments, rapidly gaining knowledge about the local environment is key to the evolutionary success of a migrating population. For historical human migration, environmental heterogeneity was naturally asymmetric in the north-south (NS) and east-west (EW) directions. We here consider the human migration process in the Americas, modelled as random, asymmetric, modularly correlated environments. Knowledge about the environments determines the fitness of each individual. We present a phase diagram for asymmetry of migration as a function of carrying capacity and fitness threshold. We find that the speed of migration is proportional to the inverse complement of the spatial environmental gradient, and in particular, we find that NS migration rates are lower than EW migration rates when the environmental gradient is higher in the NS direction. Communication of knowledge between individuals can help to spread beneficial knowledge within the population. The speed of migration increases when communication transmits pieces of knowledge that contribute in a modular way to the fitness of individuals. The results for the dependence of migration rate on asymmetry and modularity are consistent with existing archaeological observations. The results for asymmetry of genetic divergence are consistent with patterns of human gene flow. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kafka, Gene [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with signi cant exibility in mind, but without compromising cost e ciency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of di erent variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of- ight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  16. Beam dynamics studies for the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidia, Steven M.

    2001-04-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band \\(~8-12 GHz\\) through Ka-band \\(~30-35 GHz\\) frequency regions. The relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator project, whose aim is to study TBAs based upon extended relativistic klystrons, is described, and a new simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed, self-consistent calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed together with a beam line design that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 rf cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficiently capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beam line.

  17. Accelerating epistasis analysis in human genetics with consumer graphics hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cancare Fabio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human geneticists are now capable of measuring more than one million DNA sequence variations from across the human genome. The new challenge is to develop computationally feasible methods capable of analyzing these data for associations with common human disease, particularly in the context of epistasis. Epistasis describes the situation where multiple genes interact in a complex non-linear manner to determine an individual's disease risk and is thought to be ubiquitous for common diseases. Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR is an algorithm capable of detecting epistasis. An exhaustive analysis with MDR is often computationally expensive, particularly for high order interactions. This challenge has previously been met with parallel computation and expensive hardware. The option we examine here exploits commodity hardware designed for computer graphics. In modern computers Graphics Processing Units (GPUs have more memory bandwidth and computational capability than Central Processing Units (CPUs and are well suited to this problem. Advances in the video game industry have led to an economy of scale creating a situation where these powerful components are readily available at very low cost. Here we implement and evaluate the performance of the MDR algorithm on GPUs. Of primary interest are the time required for an epistasis analysis and the price to performance ratio of available solutions. Findings We found that using MDR on GPUs consistently increased performance per machine over both a feature rich Java software package and a C++ cluster implementation. The performance of a GPU workstation running a GPU implementation reduces computation time by a factor of 160 compared to an 8-core workstation running the Java implementation on CPUs. This GPU workstation performs similarly to 150 cores running an optimized C++ implementation on a Beowulf cluster. Furthermore this GPU system provides extremely cost effective

  18. 16 CFR 1500.4 - Human experience with hazardous substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human experience with hazardous substances... § 1500.4 Human experience with hazardous substances. (a) Reliable data on human experience with any..., the human experience takes precedence. (b) Experience may show that an article is more or less toxic...

  19. Positive selection, relaxation, and acceleration in the evolution of the human and chimp genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Arbiza

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available For years evolutionary biologists have been interested in searching for the genetic bases underlying humanness. Recent efforts at a large or a complete genomic scale have been conducted to search for positively selected genes in human and in chimp. However, recently developed methods allowing for a more sensitive and controlled approach in the detection of positive selection can be employed. Here, using 13,198 genes, we have deduced the sets of genes involved in rate acceleration, positive selection, and relaxation of selective constraints in human, in chimp, and in their ancestral lineage since the divergence from murids. Significant deviations from the strict molecular clock were observed in 469 human and in 651 chimp genes. The more stringent branch-site test of positive selection detected 108 human and 577 chimp positively selected genes. An important proportion of the positively selected genes did not show a significant acceleration in rates, and similarly, many of the accelerated genes did not show significant signals of positive selection. Functional differentiation of genes under rate acceleration, positive selection, and relaxation was not statistically significant between human and chimp with the exception of terms related to G-protein coupled receptors and sensory perception. Both of these were over-represented under relaxation in human in relation to chimp. Comparing differences between derived and ancestral lineages, a more conspicuous change in trends seems to have favored positive selection in the human lineage. Since most of the positively selected genes are different under the same functional categories between these species, we suggest that the individual roles of the alternative positively selected genes may be an important factor underlying biological differences between these species.

  20. The Accelerator Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE) Front Anti-Coincidence Counter (FACC) Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingqian

    The searching for proton decay (PDK) is going on current Water Cherenkov (WCh) detectors such as Super-Kamiokande. However, PDK-like backgrounds produced by the neutrino interactions will limit the sensitivity of the detectors. The Accelerator Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE) is going to measure the neutron yield of neutrino interactions in gadolinium-loaded water by the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) with known characteristics. In this thesis, neutrino, neutrino oscillations, Dirac neutrino and Majorana neutrino and neutrino interactions are introduced. ANNIE experiment is also introduced. And two modes of proton decays are discussed. The ANNIE experiment requires detection of the neutrons produced by the BNB interactions with water. However, dirt muons produced by the interaction of the BNB with the rock and dirt upstream of the ANNIE hall will cause a correlated background. Therefore, the Front Anti-Coincidence Counter (FACC) was built to measure the rock muons. This thesis details the design, installation, and commissioning of the ANNIE FACC.

  1. An Ultra-High Gradient Cherenkov Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at SLAC FFTB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Hoover, S.; Hogan, M.J.; Muggli, P.; Thompson, M.; Travish, G.; Yoder, R.; /UCLA /SLAC /Southern California U.

    2005-08-02

    The creation of ultra-high current, ultra-short pulse beams Q=3 nC, {sigma}{sub z} = 20{micro}m at the SLAC FFTB has opened the way for very high gradient plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. We study here the use of these beams in a proposed Cherenkov wakefield experiment, where one may excite electromagnetic wakes in a simple dielectric tube with inner diameter of few 100 microns that exceed the GV/m level. We discuss the scaling of the fields with design geometric design parameters, and choice of dielectric. We also examine measurable aspects of the experiment, such as the total coherent Cerenkov radiation energy one may collect, and the expected aspects of dielectric breakdown at high fields.

  2. Measurements of fusion neutrons from Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion Experiments on the Z accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E. C.; Awe, T. J.; Torres, J. A.; Jones, B.; Bur, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Styron, J. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    Strong evidence of thermonuclear neutron production has been observed during Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z accelerator. So far, these experiments have utilized deuterium fuel and produced primary DD fusion neutron yields up to 2e12 with electron and ion stagnation temperatures in the 2-3 keV range. We present MagLIF neutron measurements and compare to other data and implosion simulations. In addition to primary DD and secondary DT yields and ion temperatures, other complex physics regarding the degree of fuel magnetization and liner density are elucidated by the neutron measurements. Neutron diagnostic development for deuterium and future deuterium-tritium fuel experiments are also discussed. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Generation of Accelerated Stability Experiment Profile of Inertial Platform Based on Finite Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yunxia; HUANG Xiaokai; KANG Rui

    2012-01-01

    The residual stress generated in the manufacturing process of inertial platform causes the drift of inertial platform parameters in long-term storage condition.However,the existing temperature cycling experiment could not meet the increased repeatability technical requirements of inertial platform parameters.In order to solve this problem,in this paper,firstly the Unigraphics (UG) software and the interface compatibility of ANSYS software are used to establish the inertial platform finite element model.Secondly,the residual stress is loaded into finite element model by ANSYS function editor in the form of surface loads to analyze the efficiency.And then,the generation based on ANSYS simulation inertial platform to accelerate the stability of experiment profile is achieved by the application of the analysis method of orthogonal experimental design and ANSYS thermal-structural coupling.The optimum accelerated stability experiment profile is determined finally,which realizes the rapid,effective release of inertial platform residual stress.The research methodology and conclusion of this paper have great theoretical and practical significance to the production technology of inertial platform.

  4. Investigation of neutrino oscillations in the T2k long-baseline accelerator experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izmaylov, A. O., E-mail: izmaylov@inr.ru; Yershov, N. V.; Kudenko, Yu. G.; Matveev, V. A.; Mineev, O. V.; Musienko, Yu. V.; Khabibulliun, M. M.; Khotjantsev, A. N.; Shaykhiev, A. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15

    High-sensitivity searches for transitions of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos are the main task of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) second-generation long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The present article is devoted to describing basic principles of T2K, surveying experimental apparatuses that it includes, and considering in detail the muon-range detector (SMRD) designed and manufactured by a group of physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Research (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The results of the first measurements with a neutrino beam are presented, and plans for the near future are discussed.

  5. Accelerated evolution of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide precursor gene during human origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yin-Qiu; Qian, Ya-Ping; Yang, Su

    2005-01-01

    a strong functional constraint during the course of evolution. However, through comparative sequence analysis, we demonstrated that the PACAP precursor gene underwent an accelerated evolution in the human lineage since the divergence from chimpanzees, and the amino acid substitution rate in humans...... is at least seven times faster than that in other mammal species resulting from strong Darwinian positive selection. Eleven human-specific amino acid changes were identified in the PACAP precursors, which are conserved from murine to African apes. Protein structural analysis suggested that a putative novel...... neuropeptide might have originated during human evolution and functioned in the human brain. Our data suggested that the PACAP precursor gene underwent adaptive changes during human origin and may have contributed to the formation of human cognition. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Jun...

  6. Genome-Wide Identification of Regulatory Sequences Undergoing Accelerated Evolution in the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinran; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Feng; Tian, Weidong

    2016-10-01

    Accelerated evolution of regulatory sequence can alter the expression pattern of target genes, and cause phenotypic changes. In this study, we used DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) to annotate putative regulatory sequences in the human genome, and conducted a genome-wide analysis of the effects of accelerated evolution on regulatory sequences. Working under the assumption that local ancient repeat elements of DHSs are under neutral evolution, we discovered that ∼0.44% of DHSs are under accelerated evolution (ace-DHSs). We found that ace-DHSs tend to be more active than background DHSs, and are strongly associated with epigenetic marks of active transcription. The target genes of ace-DHSs are significantly enriched in neuron-related functions, and their expression levels are positively selected in the human brain. Thus, these lines of evidences strongly suggest that accelerated evolution on regulatory sequences plays important role in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Design of Web-Based Experiments on Acceleration and Speed Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Mani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote laboratories are becoming increasingly popular in academic arena due to availability of web-based technologies and infrastructure. Remote Labs are equipped with real instruments, where experiments are performed by controlling the instruments and observing the real data from a distant location through computer networks. They provide for student centric laboratory experience as students can perform experiments at their own convenience and requirements. Further, Remote Labs reduce management of work involved in running conventional laboratories. This paper describes design and implementation of such an experimental setup for performing characterization experiments on Transducers in general and Acceleration and Speed Transducers in particular from a remote location. The experiment can be made accessible to anyone over a TCP/IP network with a standard Web Browser, relevant plugin, and permission. This paper demonstrates that traditional experiments on sensors and transducers can be successfully made available online to both on-campus and off-campus students at their own schedule and convenience.

  8. 16 CFR 1702.8 - Human experience data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human experience data. 1702.8 Section 1702.8... REQUIREMENTS § 1702.8 Human experience data. Human experience data constitutes the primary criterion used by... literature, and (d) For drugs, where the human experience data submitted is based on data required by FDA to...

  9. Physical processes at work in sub-30 fs, PW laser pulse-driven plasma accelerators: Towards GeV electron acceleration experiments at CILEX facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, A.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Lifschitz, A.; Shadwick, B. A.; Malka, V.; Specka, A.

    2014-03-01

    Optimal regimes and physical processes at work are identified for the first round of laser wakefield acceleration experiments proposed at a future CILEX facility. The Apollon-10P CILEX laser, delivering fully compressed, near-PW-power pulses of sub-25 fs duration, is well suited for driving electron density wakes in the blowout regime in cm-length gas targets. Early destruction of the pulse (partly due to energy depletion) prevents electrons from reaching dephasing, limiting the energy gain to about 3 GeV. However, the optimal operating regimes, found with reduced and full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, show high energy efficiency, with about 10% of incident pulse energy transferred to 3 GeV electron bunches with sub-5% energy spread, half-nC charge, and absolutely no low-energy background. This optimal acceleration occurs in 2 cm length plasmas of electron density below 1018 cm-3. Due to their high charge and low phase space volume, these multi-GeV bunches are tailor-made for staged acceleration planned in the framework of the CILEX project. The hallmarks of the optimal regime are electron self-injection at the early stage of laser pulse propagation, stable self-guiding of the pulse through the entire acceleration process, and no need for an external plasma channel. With the initial focal spot closely matched for the nonlinear self-guiding, the laser pulse stabilizes transversely within two Rayleigh lengths, preventing subsequent evolution of the accelerating bucket. This dynamics prevents continuous self-injection of background electrons, preserving low phase space volume of the bunch through the plasma. Near the end of propagation, an optical shock builds up in the pulse tail. This neither disrupts pulse propagation nor produces any noticeable low-energy background in the electron spectra, which is in striking contrast with most of existing GeV-scale acceleration experiments.

  10. Physical processes at work in sub-30 fs, PW laser pulse-driven plasma accelerators: Towards GeV electron acceleration experiments at CILEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, A., E-mail: beck@llr.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet – École Polytechnique, CNRS-IN2P3, Palaiseau 91128 (France); Kalmykov, S.Y., E-mail: skalmykov2@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0299 (United States); Davoine, X. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Lifschitz, A. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech-CNRS UMR7639-École Polytechnique, Palaiseau 91762 (France); Shadwick, B.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0299 (United States); Malka, V. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech-CNRS UMR7639-École Polytechnique, Palaiseau 91762 (France); Specka, A. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet – École Polytechnique, CNRS-IN2P3, Palaiseau 91128 (France)

    2014-03-11

    Optimal regimes and physical processes at work are identified for the first round of laser wakefield acceleration experiments proposed at a future CILEX facility. The Apollon-10P CILEX laser, delivering fully compressed, near-PW-power pulses of sub-25 fs duration, is well suited for driving electron density wakes in the blowout regime in cm-length gas targets. Early destruction of the pulse (partly due to energy depletion) prevents electrons from reaching dephasing, limiting the energy gain to about 3 GeV. However, the optimal operating regimes, found with reduced and full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, show high energy efficiency, with about 10% of incident pulse energy transferred to 3 GeV electron bunches with sub-5% energy spread, half-nC charge, and absolutely no low-energy background. This optimal acceleration occurs in 2 cm length plasmas of electron density below 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}. Due to their high charge and low phase space volume, these multi-GeV bunches are tailor-made for staged acceleration planned in the framework of the CILEX project. The hallmarks of the optimal regime are electron self-injection at the early stage of laser pulse propagation, stable self-guiding of the pulse through the entire acceleration process, and no need for an external plasma channel. With the initial focal spot closely matched for the nonlinear self-guiding, the laser pulse stabilizes transversely within two Rayleigh lengths, preventing subsequent evolution of the accelerating bucket. This dynamics prevents continuous self-injection of background electrons, preserving low phase space volume of the bunch through the plasma. Near the end of propagation, an optical shock builds up in the pulse tail. This neither disrupts pulse propagation nor produces any noticeable low-energy background in the electron spectra, which is in striking contrast with most of existing GeV-scale acceleration experiments.

  11. Test particle acceleration in a numerical MHD experiment of an anemone jet

    CERN Document Server

    Rosdahl, Karl Joakim

    2010-01-01

    To use a 3D numerical MHD experiment representing magnetic flux emerging into an open field region as a background field for tracing charged particles. The interaction between the two flux systems generates a localised current sheet where MHD reconnection takes place. We investigate how efficiently the reconnection region accelerates charged particles and what kind of energy distribution they acquire. The particle tracing is done numerically using the Guiding Center Approximation on individual data sets from the numerical MHD experiment. We derive particle and implied photon distribution functions having power law forms, and look at the impact patterns of particles hitting the photosphere. We find that particles reach energies far in excess of those seen in observations of solar flares. However the structure of the impact region in the photosphere gives a good representation of the topological structure of the magnetic field.

  12. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ∼2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner∼1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  13. Structural Basis for Accelerated Cleavage of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) by Human Mesotrypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salameh,M.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, E.

    2008-01-01

    Human mesotrypsin is an isoform of trypsin that displays unusual resistance to polypeptide trypsin inhibitors and has been observed to cleave several such inhibitors as substrates. Whereas substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine 193 in the trypsin active site has been implicated as a critical factor in the inhibitor resistance of mesotrypsin, how this substitution leads to accelerated inhibitor cleavage is not clear. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) forms an extremely stable and cleavage-resistant complex with trypsin, and thus provides a rigorous challenge of mesotrypsin catalytic activity toward polypeptide inhibitors. Here, we report kinetic constants for mesotrypsin and the highly homologous (but inhibitor sensitive) human cationic trypsin, describing inhibition by, and cleavage of BPTI, as well as crystal structures of the mesotrypsin-BPTI and human cationic trypsin-BPTI complexes. We find that mesotrypsin cleaves BPTI with a rate constant accelerated 350-fold over that of human cationic trypsin and 150,000-fold over that of bovine trypsin. From the crystal structures, we see that small conformational adjustments limited to several side chains enable mesotrypsin-BPTI complex formation, surmounting the predicted steric clash introduced by Arg-193. Our results show that the mesotrypsin-BPTI interface favors catalysis through (a) electrostatic repulsion between the closely spaced mesotrypsin Arg-193 and BPTI Arg-17, and (b) elimination of two hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the amine leaving group portion of BPTI. Our model predicts that these deleterious interactions accelerate leaving group dissociation and deacylation.

  14. Research on Vacuum Laser Accelerator and Proof-of Principle Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lei

    BNL-ATF fit our project very well. The laser system at ATF is a short pulse CO2 laser. Under present ATF condition, the peak power of the CO2 laser is around 5J with pulse duration 5ps. Therefore the maximum laser intensity can reach a 0 ≈ 1.0. Such level of laser intensity is not sufficient to perform violent electron acceleration-CAS according to the threshold we defined. However this level intensity is already high enough to see basic proof-of-principle signal based on our extensive simulations with exact practical ATF experimental conditions. Another important factor is the electron beam condition. ATF uses photoinjector Radio Frequency (RF) gun system for electron beam. The working frequency is at constant level 2856MHz. Generally the electron beam deliver energy around 40MeV˜60MeV to the transport beam line. However as we mentioned before with relatively low laser intensity the electron initial energy is required to be lower as well correspondently. We tried best to tuned ATF electron beam energy down to 15MeV. With laser intensity around a 0 ≈ 1.0 and electron beam 15MeV, our simulation indicates to see energy spread expansion after interaction, and this effect increases while the laser intensity increases (even slightly change from a 0 ≈ 0.9 to 2.2). The experiment design is completed based on ATF beam line condition. The design and layout are presented. All the optical devices are acquired and machined. Installation and alignment have been done a few times for testing. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  15. Development of a Real-Time Ion Spectrometer with a Scintillator for Laser-Driven Ion Acceleration Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Miao-Hua; David Neely; Paul McKenna; WANG Zhao-Hua; WEI Zhi-Yi; YAN Xue-Qing; LI Yu-Tong; LI Ying-Jun; ZHANG Jie; LI Hong-Wei; LIU Bi-Cheng; LIU Feng; SU Lu-Ning; DU Fei; ZHANG Lu; ZHENG Yi; MA Jing-Long

    2011-01-01

    A real-time ion spectrometer mainly based on a high-resolution Thomson parabola and a plastic scintillator is designed and developed. The spectrometer is calibrated by protons from an electrostatic accelerator. The feasibility and reliability of the diagnostics ore demonstrated in laser-driven ion acceleration experiments performed on the XL-H laser facility. The proton spectrum extrapolated from the scintillator data is in excellent agreement with the CR39 spectrum in terms of beam temperature and the cutoff energy. This real-time spectrometer allows an online measurement of the ion spectra in single shot, which enables efficient and statistical studies and applications in high-repetition-rate laser acceleration experiments.%@@ A real-time ion spectrometer mainly based on a high-resolution Thomson parabola and a plastic scintillator is designed and developed.The spectrometer is calibrated by protons from an electrostatic accelerator.The feasi-bility and reliability of the diagnostics are demonstrated in laser-driven ion acceleration experiments performed on the XL-Ⅱ laser facility.The proton spectrum extrapolated from the scintillator data is in excellent agreement with the CR39 spectrum in terms of beam temperature and the cutoff energy.This real-time spectrometer allows an online measurement of the ion spectra in single shot,which enables efficient and statistical studies and applications in high-repetition-rate laser acceleration experiments.

  16. A Model of Human Orientation and Self Motion Perception during Body Acceleration: The Orientation Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Aviation accident investigators often conduct qualitative perceptual analyses of mishaps when spatial disorientation is inferred as a cause. We have...developed a quantitative perceptual model of human spatial orientation and have employed it to evaluate data from a variety of acceleration situations, in...Research and Material Command (USAMRMC; In-House Laboratory Independent Research), Small Business Innovative Research program (PEO Aviation), and the

  17. Behavior of human horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex in response to high-acceleration stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, E. F.; Huebner, W. P.; Seidman, S. H.; Leigh, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during transient, high-acceleration (1900-7100 deg/sec-squared) head rotations was studied in four human subjects. Such stimuli perturbed the angle of gaze and caused illusory movement of a viewed target (oscillopsia). The disturbance of gaze could be attributed to the latency of the VOR (which ranged from 6-15 ms) and inadequate compensatory eye rotations (median VOR gain ranged from 0.61-0.83).

  18. U.S. experience with hydrazine and flow-accelerated corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merilo, M.; Munson, D.; Horowitz, J.S. [EPRI US (United States); Bouchacourt, M. [EDF France (France)

    2002-07-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) has been studied intensely for the last 30 years. In most regards, the parametric behavior of FAC has been well understood since the eighties. However, recent experience showing the impact of hydrazine has challenged this understanding. Until the early 1990's, hydrazine levels at most U.S. PWRs had been low, typically around 20 ppb. Since the mid 1990's the U.S. trend has been to increase hydrazine concentration (> 100 ppb) to provide further protection the steam generators tubes from stress corrosion cracking. In the last five years, high concentrations of hydrazine have been shown in the laboratory to affect the rate of FAC. These experiments have demonstrated this effect although there remains considerable scatter in the data supporting this conclusion. It is believed that the impact of hydrazine is due to the change in the oxidizing-reducing potential of the solution, but there is no generally accepted theory to completely describe its behavior. Recently, plant experience has begun to support the laboratory data that high hydrazine does increase the rate of FAC. It should be noted that there are several factors affecting the rate of FAC. Since most plants have changed their water chemistry in recent years, it has been difficult to ''back-out'' the influence of hydrazine. But now, plant experience has clearly shown the impact of high hydrazine especially in the high temperature portions of the feedwater piping. This has been seen at two PWRs, discussed below, and perhaps at several others. This accelerated thinning of the feedwater piping is especially significant since feedwater piping is particularly expensive to inspect and to replace. In addition to the experience with piping, there has also been degradation reported in steam generators, particularly at Gravelines in France, possibly linked to high hydrazine. In order to deal with this issue, the EPRI computer program CHECWORKS was modified in

  19. Feasibility study of channeling acceleration experiment at the Fermilab ASTA facility

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Young-Min; Still, Dean A; Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Crystal channeling technology has offered various opportunities in accelerator community with a viability of ultrahigh gradient (TV/m) acceleration for future HEP collider in Energy Frontier. The major challenge of the channeling acceleration is that ultimate acceleration gradients might require high power driver at hard x-ray regime (~ 40 keV), exceeding those conceivable for x-rays as of today, though x-ray lasers can efficiently excite solid plasma and accelerate particles inside a crystal channel. Moreover, only disposable crystal accelerators are possible at such high externally excited fields which would exceed the ionization thresholds destroying the atomic structure, so acceleration will take place only in a short time before full dissociation of the lattice. Carbon- based nanostructures have great potential with a wide range of flexibility and superior physical strength, which can be applied to channeling acceleration. This paper present beam-driven channeling acceleration concept with CNTs and discu...

  20. Features of accelerated electron beam formation in LHCD experiments on FT-2 tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkul, S. I.; Rozhdestvensky, V. V.; Altukhov, A. B.; Dyachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Krikunov, S. V.; Kuprienko, D. V.; Stepanov, A. Yu.

    2012-12-01

    In experiments with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) on the FT-2 tokamak, lower hybrid (LH) waves have been successfully used for the first time to ensure effective additional heating of plasma electrons from 450 to 600 eV ( I Pl = 32 kA, Δ t RF = 14 ms, P RF = 100 kW, F = 920 MHz). Several factors influencing the efficiency of plasma heating have been discovered. In particular, significant growth of radiation losses in the LHCD regime has been found, which is probably related to an increase in the intensity of synchrotron radiation from accelerated electrons. The increase in this intensity in the 53-156 GHz frequency range was accompanied by short spikes of microwave radiation, which were observed only in a narrower frequency range (53-78 GHz) and apparently resulted from interaction of a runaway electron beam with significant local mirrors of toroidal magnetic field. A model of the additional heating of plasma electrons due to absorption of the microwave radiation generated by a beam of accelerated electrons is proposed.

  1. Proton acceleration experiments and warm dense matter research using high power lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, M; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Harres, K [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bagnoud, V [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brown, C R D [Plasma Physics Group, Imperial College London, SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Clarke, R; Heathcote, R; Li, B [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Chilton, Didcot, OX14 OQX (United Kingdom); Daido, H [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, Kizugawa-City, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Fernandez, J; Flippo, K; Gaillard, S; Gauthier, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Geissel, M [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Glenzer, S; Kritcher, A; Kugland, N; LePape, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Gregori, G, E-mail: markus.roth@physik.tu-darmstadt.d [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. In this paper we report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore, we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by x-ray Thomson scattering to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  2. Supernova / Acceleration Probe: A Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Aldering, G; Amanullah, R; Annis, J; Astier, Pierre; Baltay, C; Barrelet, E; Basa, S; Bebek, C; Bergström, L; Bernstein, G; Bester, M; Bigelow, B; Blandford, R D; Bohlin, R; Bonissent, A; Bower, C; Brown, M; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Commins, Eugene D; Craig, W; Day, C; De Jongh, F; Deustua, S; Diehl, T; Dodelson, S; Ealet, A; Ellis, R; Emmet, W; Fouchez, D; Frieman, J A; Fruchter, A; Gerdes, D; Gladney, L; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Groom, D; Heetderks, H; Hoff, M; Holland, S; Huffer, M; Hui, L; Huterer, D; Jain, B; Jelinsky, P N; Karcher, A; Kent, S; Kahn, S; Kim, A; Kolbe, W; Krieger, B; Kushner, G; Kuznetsova, N; Lafever, R; Lamoureux, J; Lampton, M; Lefèvre, O; Levi, M; Limon, P; Lin, H; Linder, E; Loken, S; Lorenzon, W; Malina, R; Marriner, J P; Marshall, P; Massey, R; Mazure, A; McKay, T; McKee, S; Miquel, R; Morgan, N; Mortsell, E; Mostek, N; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nugent, P; Olus, H; Pain, R; Palaio, N; Pankow, D; Peoples, John; Perlmutter, S; Prieto, E; Rabinowitz, D; Réfrégier, A; Rhodes, J; Roe, N; Rusin, D; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sholl, M; Smadja, G; Smith, R M; Smoot, George F; Snyder, J; Spadafora, A; Stebbins, A; Stoughton, C; Szymkowiak, A; Tarle, G; Taylor, K; Tilquin, A; Tomasch, A; Tucker, D; Vincent, D; Von der Lippe, H; Walder, J P; Wang, G; Wester, W

    2004-01-01

    The Supernova / Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universe's expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled measurements. We describe a self-consistent reference mission design for building a Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and for performing a wide-area weak gravitational lensing study. A 2-m wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The SNAP mission will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for several thousand supernovae at redshifts between z=0.1 and 1.7. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees resolves ~100 galaxies per square arcminute. If we assume we live in a cosmological-constant-dominated Universe, the matter density, dark energy density, and ...

  3. Imaging system QA of a medical accelerator, Novalis Tx, for IGRT per TG 142: our 1 year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zheng; Bowsher, James; Cai, Jing; Yoo, Sua; Wang, Zhiheng; Adamson, Justus; Ren, Lei; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2012-07-05

    American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group (TG) 142 has recently published a report to update recommendations of the AAPM TG 40 report and add new recommendations concerning medical accelerators in the era of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The recommendations of AAPM TG 142 on IGRT are timely. In our institute, we established a comprehensive imaging QA program on a medical accelerator based on AAPM TG 142 and implemented it successfully. In this paper, we share our one-year experience and performance evaluation of an OBI capable linear accelerator, Novalis Tx, per TG 142 guidelines.

  4. Metabolic acceleration and the evolution of human brain size and life history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzer, Herman; Brown, Mary H; Raichlen, David A; Dunsworth, Holly; Hare, Brian; Walker, Kara; Luke, Amy; Dugas, Lara R; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Schoeller, Dale; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E; Lambert, Estelle V; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Shumaker, Robert W; Ross, Stephen R

    2016-05-19

    Humans are distinguished from the other living apes in having larger brains and an unusual life history that combines high reproductive output with slow childhood growth and exceptional longevity. This suite of derived traits suggests major changes in energy expenditure and allocation in the human lineage, but direct measures of human and ape metabolism are needed to compare evolved energy strategies among hominoids. Here we used doubly labelled water measurements of total energy expenditure (TEE; kcal day(-1)) in humans, chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans to test the hypothesis that the human lineage has experienced an acceleration in metabolic rate, providing energy for larger brains and faster reproduction without sacrificing maintenance and longevity. In multivariate regressions including body size and physical activity, human TEE exceeded that of chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas and orangutans by approximately 400, 635 and 820 kcal day(-1), respectively, readily accommodating the cost of humans' greater brain size and reproductive output. Much of the increase in TEE is attributable to humans' greater basal metabolic rate (kcal day(-1)), indicating increased organ metabolic activity. Humans also had the greatest body fat percentage. An increased metabolic rate, along with changes in energy allocation, was crucial in the evolution of human brain size and life history.

  5. Beam Transfer Line Design for a Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Brethoux, D; Clerc, V; Goddard, B; Gschwendtner, E; Jensen, L K; Kosmicki, A; Le Godec, G; Meddahi, M; Muggli, P; Mutin, C; Osborne, O; Papastergiou, K; Pardons, A; Velotti, F M; Vincke, H

    2013-01-01

    The world’s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment (AWAKE) is presently being studied at CERN. The experimentwill use a high energy proton beam extracted from the SPS as driver. Two possible locations for installing the AWAKE facility were considered: the West Area and the CNGS beam line. The previous transfer line from the SPS to the West Area was completely dismantled in 2005 and would need to be fully re-designed and re-built. For this option, geometric constraints for radiation protection reasons would limit the maximum proton beam energy to 300 GeV. The existing CNGS line could be used by applying only minor changes to the lattice for the final focusing and the interface between the proton beam and the laser, required for plasma ionisation and bunch-modulation seeding. The beam line design studies performed for the two options are presented.

  6. Accelerated Telomere Shortening and Replicative Senescence in Human Fibroblasts Overexpressing Mutant and Wild Type Lamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectible WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes. PMID:17870066

  7. The cost of transport of human running is not affected, as in walking, by wide acceleration/deceleration cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, Alberto E; Gaudino, Paolo; Seminati, Elena; Cazzola, Dario

    2013-02-15

    Although most of the literature on locomotion energetics and biomechanics is about constant-speed experiments, humans and animals tend to move at variable speeds in their daily life. This study addresses the following questions: 1) how much extra metabolic energy is associated with traveling a unit distance by adopting acceleration/deceleration cycles in walking and running, with respect to constant speed, and 2) how can biomechanics explain those metabolic findings. Ten males and ten females walked and ran at fluctuating speeds (5 ± 0, ± 1, ± 1.5, ± 2, ± 2.5 km/h for treadmill walking, 11 ± 0, ± 1, ± 2, ± 3, ± 4 km/h for treadmill and field running) in cycles lasting 6 s. Field experiments, consisting of subjects following a laser spot projected from a computer-controlled astronomic telescope, were necessary to check the noninertial bias of the oscillating-speed treadmill. Metabolic cost of transport was found to be almost constant at all speed oscillations for running and up to ±2 km/h for walking, with no remarkable differences between laboratory and field results. The substantial constancy of the metabolic cost is not explained by the predicted cost of pure acceleration/deceleration. As for walking, results from speed-oscillation running suggest that the inherent within-stride, elastic energy-free accelerations/decelerations when moving at constant speed work as a mechanical buffer for among-stride speed fluctuations, with no extra metabolic cost. Also, a recent theory about the analogy between sprint (level) running and constant-speed running on gradients, together with the mechanical determinants of gradient locomotion, helps to interpret the present findings.

  8. The human experience with intravenous levodopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan H Siddiqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compile a comprehensive summary of published human experience with levodopa given intravenously, with a focus on information required by regulatory agencies.Background: While safe intravenous (IV use of levodopa has been documented for over 50 years, regulatory supervision for pharmaceuticals given by a route other than that approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA has become increasingly cautious. If delivering a drug by an alternate route raises the risk of adverse events, an investigational new drug (IND application is required, including a comprehensive review of toxicity data.Methods: Over 200 articles referring to IV levodopa were examined for details of administration, pharmacokinetics, benefit and side effects.Results: We identified 142 original reports describing IVLD use in humans, beginning with psychiatric research in 1959-1960 before the development of peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors. Over 2750 subjects have received IV levodopa, and reported outcomes include parkinsonian signs, sleep variables, hormone levels, hemodynamics, CSF amino acid composition, regional cerebral blood flow, cognition, perception and complex behavior. Mean pharmacokinetic variables were summarized for 49 healthy subjects and 190 with Parkinson’s disease. Side effects were those expected from clinical experience with oral levodopa and dopamine agonists. No articles reported deaths or induction of psychosis.Conclusion: Over 2750 patients have received IV levodopa with a safety profile comparable to that seen with oral administration.

  9. The Human Experience with Intravenous Levodopa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Shan H; Abraham, Natalia K; Geiger, Christopher L; Karimi, Morvarid; Perlmutter, Joel S; Black, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    To compile a comprehensive summary of published human experience with levodopa given intravenously, with a focus on information required by regulatory agencies. While safe intravenous (IV) use of levodopa has been documented for over 50 years, regulatory supervision for pharmaceuticals given by a route other than that approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has become increasingly cautious. If delivering a drug by an alternate route raises the risk of adverse events, an investigational new drug (IND) application is required, including a comprehensive review of toxicity data. Over 200 articles referring to IV levodopa were examined for details of administration, pharmacokinetics, benefit, and side effects. We identified 142 original reports describing IVLD use in humans, beginning with psychiatric research in 1959-1960 before the development of peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors. At least 2760 subjects have received IV levodopa, and reported outcomes include parkinsonian signs, sleep variables, hormone levels, hemodynamics, CSF amino acid composition, regional cerebral blood flow, cognition, perception and complex behavior. Mean pharmacokinetic variables were summarized for 49 healthy subjects and 190 with Parkinson's disease. Side effects were those expected from clinical experience with oral levodopa and dopamine agonists. No articles reported deaths or induction of psychosis. At least 2760 patients have received IV levodopa with a safety profile comparable to that seen with oral administration.

  10. Using films and television shows with a medical theme as a medium to accelerate the spread of medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenting; Qian, Haihong

    2017-05-23

    People have more visual experiences than ever before, and the same is true for situations in medicine. More mature films and television shows with a medical theme have been available over the past 20 years. In mainland China, the TV series "Angel Heart" has generated a wave of universal concern since it truly depicts the work of health care workers and it reflects the sharp distinction between doctors and patients to a certain extent. Riding this wave, many medical documentaries like The Human World have also been launched in China and have garnered sizable audiences. Such films and television shows with a medical theme strive to depict the lives of ordinary people. When watching these medical documentaries, audiences are able to better comprehend the work of health care workers in light of their life experiences and feelings towards current society. Audiences can gain a profound understanding of the medical humanities through films and television shows with a medical theme. We look forward to more such films and television shows with a medical theme that depict "hospitals-the realest place" on camera. Films and television shows with a medical theme can serve as a storytelling medium to accelerate the spread of medical humanities and to promote harmony among doctors, patients, and the public.

  11. Proof-Of-Principle Experiment for Laser-Driven Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in a Semi-Infinite Vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Colby, E.; Cowan, B.; Sears, C.M.S.; Spencer, J.E.; Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2006-03-01

    We recently achieved the first experimental observation of laser-driven particle acceleration of relativistic electrons from a single Gaussian near-infrared laser beam in a semi-infinite vacuum. This article presents an in-depth account of key aspects of the experiment. An analysis of the transverse and longitudinal forces acting on the electron beam is included. A comparison of the observed data to the acceleration viewed as an inverse transition radiation process is presented. This is followed by a detailed description of the components of the experiment and a discussion of future measurements.

  12. Musical experience sharpens human cochlear tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Nelms, Caitlin; Bhagat, Shaum P

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian cochlea functions as a filter bank that performs a spectral, Fourier-like decomposition on the acoustic signal. While tuning can be compromised (e.g., broadened with hearing impairment), whether or not human cochlear frequency resolution can be sharpened through experiential factors (e.g., training or learning) has not yet been established. Previous studies have demonstrated sharper psychophysical tuning curves in trained musicians compared to nonmusicians, implying superior peripheral tuning. However, these findings are based on perceptual masking paradigms, and reflect engagement of the entire auditory system rather than cochlear tuning, per se. Here, by directly mapping physiological tuning curves from stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs)-cochlear emitted sounds-we show that estimates of human cochlear tuning in a high-frequency cochlear region (4 kHz) is further sharpened (by a factor of 1.5×) in musicians and improves with the number of years of their auditory training. These findings were corroborated by measurements of psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) derived via simultaneous masking, which similarly showed sharper tuning in musicians. Comparisons between SFOAE and PTCs revealed closer correspondence between physiological and behavioral curves in musicians, indicating that tuning is also more consistent between different levels of auditory processing in trained ears. Our findings demonstrate an experience-dependent enhancement in the resolving power of the cochlear sensory epithelium and the spectral resolution of human hearing and provide a peripheral account for the auditory perceptual benefits observed in musicians. Both local and feedback (e.g., medial olivocochlear efferent) mechanisms are discussed as potential mechanisms for experience-dependent tuning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry for human biochemistry: The practice and the potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, John S.

    2000-10-01

    Isotopic labels are a primary tool for tracing chemicals in natural systems. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) quantifies long-lived isotopes that can be used in safe, sensitive and precise biochemical research with human participants. AMS could reduce the use of animals in biochemical research and remove the uncertain extrapolations from animal models to humans. Animal data seldom represent the sort of variability expected in a human population. People, knowingly or not, routinely expose themselves to radiation risks much greater than AMS-based biochemical research that traces μg/kg doses of chemicals containing tens of nCi of 14C for as long as 7 months. AMS is applied to research in toxicology, pharmacology and nutrition.

  14. Accelerated evolution of the ASPM gene controlling brain size begins prior to human brain expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalay Kouprina

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Primary microcephaly (MCPH is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global reduction in cerebral cortical volume. The microcephalic brain has a volume comparable to that of early hominids, raising the possibility that some MCPH genes may have been evolutionary targets in the expansion of the cerebral cortex in mammals and especially primates. Mutations in ASPM, which encodes the human homologue of a fly protein essential for spindle function, are the most common known cause of MCPH. Here we have isolated large genomic clones containing the complete ASPM gene, including promoter regions and introns, from chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and rhesus macaque by transformation-associated recombination cloning in yeast. We have sequenced these clones and show that whereas much of the sequence of ASPM is substantially conserved among primates, specific segments are subject to high Ka/Ks ratios (nonsynonymous/synonymous DNA changes consistent with strong positive selection for evolutionary change. The ASPM gene sequence shows accelerated evolution in the African hominoid clade, and this precedes hominid brain expansion by several million years. Gorilla and human lineages show particularly accelerated evolution in the IQ domain of ASPM. Moreover, ASPM regions under positive selection in primates are also the most highly diverged regions between primates and nonprimate mammals. We report the first direct application of TAR cloning technology to the study of human evolution. Our data suggest that evolutionary selection of specific segments of the ASPM sequence strongly relates to differences in cerebral cortical size.

  15. Vibrotactile masking experiments reveal accelerated somatosensory processing in congenitally blind braille readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Arindam; Ye, Amanda J; Lisak, Joy A; Vargas, Maria G; Goldreich, Daniel

    2010-10-27

    Braille reading is a demanding task that requires the identification of rapidly varying tactile patterns. During proficient reading, neighboring characters impact the fingertip at ∼100 ms intervals, and adjacent raised dots within a character at 50 ms intervals. Because the brain requires time to interpret afferent sensorineural activity, among other reasons, tactile stimuli separated by such short temporal intervals pose a challenge to perception. How, then, do proficient Braille readers successfully interpret inputs arising from their fingertips at such rapid rates? We hypothesized that somatosensory perceptual consolidation occurs more rapidly in proficient Braille readers. If so, Braille readers should outperform sighted participants on masking tasks, which demand rapid perceptual processing, but would not necessarily outperform the sighted on tests of simple vibrotactile sensitivity. To investigate, we conducted two-interval forced-choice vibrotactile detection, amplitude discrimination, and masking tasks on the index fingertips of 89 sighted and 57 profoundly blind humans. Sighted and blind participants had similar unmasked detection (25 ms target tap) and amplitude discrimination (compared with 100 μm reference tap) thresholds, but congenitally blind Braille readers, the fastest readers among the blind participants, exhibited significantly less masking than the sighted (masker, 50 Hz, 50 μm; target-masker delays, ±50 and ±100 ms). Indeed, Braille reading speed correlated significantly and specifically with masking task performance, and in particular with the backward masking decay time constant. We conclude that vibrotactile sensitivity is unchanged but that perceptual processing is accelerated in congenitally blind Braille readers.

  16. Identification of the imprinted KLF14 transcription factor undergoing human-specific accelerated evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker-Katiraee, Layla; Carson, Andrew R; Yamada, Takahiro; Arnaud, Philippe; Feil, Robert; Abu-Amero, Sayeda N; Moore, Gudrun E; Kaneda, Masahiro; Perry, George H; Stone, Anne C; Lee, Charles; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Stephen W

    2007-05-04

    Imprinted genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner and are located in clusters throughout the genome. Aberrations in the expression of imprinted genes on human Chromosome 7 have been suggested to play a role in the etiologies of Russell-Silver Syndrome and autism. We describe the imprinting of KLF14, an intronless member of the Krüppel-like family of transcription factors located at Chromosome 7q32. We show that it has monoallelic maternal expression in all embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues studied, in both human and mouse. We examine epigenetic modifications in the KLF14 CpG island in both species and find this region to be hypomethylated. In addition, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation and find that the murine Klf14 CpG island lacks allele-specific histone modifications. Despite the absence of these defining features, our analysis of Klf14 in offspring from DNA methyltransferase 3a conditional knockout mice reveals that the gene's expression is dependent upon a maternally methylated region. Due to the intronless nature of Klf14 and its homology to Klf16, we suggest that the gene is an ancient retrotransposed copy of Klf16. By sequence analysis of numerous species, we place the timing of this event after the divergence of Marsupialia, yet prior to the divergence of the Xenarthra superclade. We identify a large number of sequence variants in KLF14 and, using several measures of diversity, we determine that there is greater variability in the human lineage with a significantly increased number of nonsynonymous changes, suggesting human-specific accelerated evolution. Thus, KLF14 may be the first example of an imprinted transcript undergoing accelerated evolution in the human lineage.

  17. Identification of the imprinted KLF14 transcription factor undergoing human-specific accelerated evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Parker-Katiraee

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Imprinted genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner and are located in clusters throughout the genome. Aberrations in the expression of imprinted genes on human Chromosome 7 have been suggested to play a role in the etiologies of Russell-Silver Syndrome and autism. We describe the imprinting of KLF14, an intronless member of the Krüppel-like family of transcription factors located at Chromosome 7q32. We show that it has monoallelic maternal expression in all embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues studied, in both human and mouse. We examine epigenetic modifications in the KLF14 CpG island in both species and find this region to be hypomethylated. In addition, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation and find that the murine Klf14 CpG island lacks allele-specific histone modifications. Despite the absence of these defining features, our analysis of Klf14 in offspring from DNA methyltransferase 3a conditional knockout mice reveals that the gene's expression is dependent upon a maternally methylated region. Due to the intronless nature of Klf14 and its homology to Klf16, we suggest that the gene is an ancient retrotransposed copy of Klf16. By sequence analysis of numerous species, we place the timing of this event after the divergence of Marsupialia, yet prior to the divergence of the Xenarthra superclade. We identify a large number of sequence variants in KLF14 and, using several measures of diversity, we determine that there is greater variability in the human lineage with a significantly increased number of nonsynonymous changes, suggesting human-specific accelerated evolution. Thus, KLF14 may be the first example of an imprinted transcript undergoing accelerated evolution in the human lineage.

  18. Themes in the human experience of nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollio, Howard R; Heaps, Christopher

    2004-02-01

    To identify themes in the human experience of nature, a three-part study was run. In the first part, 100 undergraduate students were asked to list three situations in which they are or were aware of nature and to describe one of these in detail. In the second part, 26 descriptions were selected from these responses, summarized to a 2- to 5-sentence format, and presented to a different group of 30 subjects who sorted them into groups on the basis of cross-item similarity. These groupings were then analyzed by hierarchical clustering and multidimensional scaling procedures to produce thematic meanings. In the third part, a qualitative analysis of themes was performed over the unabridged initial versions of the same set of descriptions. Results of both qualitative and quantitative procedures led to the identification of four themes--Power and Scale, Danger and Safety, Beauty, and Connection and Alienation --and to a smaller number of themes unique to each mode of analysis. All themes were related to the everyday meanings of nature and to the more abstract definitions of nature employed in scientific or aesthetic analyses of the human response to this domain.

  19. Intuitional experiment and numerical analysis of flow characteristics affected by flow accelerated corrosion in elbow pipe system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Joon [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Hoon, E-mail: kimkh@khu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seochun 1, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Wall-thinning erosion of pipelines in plants leads to fatal accidents unexpectedly. • Flow Acceleration Corrosion (FAC) is a main reason of wall-thinning. • For industrial safety, it is necessary to verify the tendency of FAC. • We focused on local wall thinning by FAC with intuitional visualization experiment and numerical analysis in elbow pipe.

  20. Distributed Optical Fiber Radiation and Temperature Sensing at High Energy Accelerators and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090137; Brugger, Markus

    The aim of this Thesis is to investigate the feasibility of a distributed optical fiber radiation sensing system to be used at high energy physics accelerators and experiments where complex mixed-field environments are present. In particular, after having characterized the response of a selection of radiation sensitive optical fibers to ionizing radiation coming from a 60Co source, the results of distributed optical fiber radiation measurements in a mixed-field environment are presented along with the method to actually estimate the dose variation. This study demonstrates that distributed optical fiber dosimetry in the above mentioned mixed-field radiation environment is feasible, allowing to detect dose variations of about 10-15 Gy with a 1 m spatial resolution. The proof of principle has fully succeeded and we can now tackle the challenge of an industrial installation taking into account that some optimizations need to be done both on the control unit of the system as well as on the choice of the sensing f...

  1. Nike Experiments on Acceleration of Planar Targets Stabilized with a Short Spike Pulse^1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Metzler, N.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Oh, J.; Mostovych, A. N.; Gardner, J. H.

    2005-10-01

    Theoretical work has shown that a low energy spike pulse in front of the drive laser pulse can help mitigate the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities in targets for inertial confinement fusion.[1]^ While other experiments [2] used higher spike pulse energies, this study reports the influence of a lower energy spike and longer spike-main pulse delay on the acceleration of planar CH targets. Time evolution of preimposed sinusoidal ripples on the target surface was observed using a monochromatic x-ray imaging system. Delayed onset and/or suppression of mode growth was found for the spike prepulse shots compared to those with a low intensity foot, in good agreement with predictions from FAST2D simulations. The propagation velocity of the decaying shock wave from the spike pulse was measured with VISAR and was also in good agreement with an analytical prediction.[3] [1] Metzler et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 3283 (1999); 9, 5050 (2002); 10, 1897 (2003);Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 1906 (2003) ;Betti et al., Phys Plamas 12, 042703 (2005) ;[2]Knauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056306 (2005) ; [3]Velikovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3270 (2003). ^1Work supported by U. S. Department of Energy

  2. Numerical simulations of recent proton acceleration experiments with sub-100 TW laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinigardi, Stefano, E-mail: sinigardi@bo.infn.it

    2016-09-01

    Recent experiments carried out at the Italian National Research Center, National Optics Institute Department in Pisa, are showing interesting results regarding maximum proton energies achievable with sub-100 TW laser systems. While laser systems are being continuously upgraded in laboratories around the world, at the same time a new trend on stabilizing and making ion acceleration results reproducible is growing in importance. Almost all applications require a beam with fixed performance, so that the energy spectrum and the total charge exhibit moderate shot to shot variations. This result is surely far from being achieved, but many paths are being explored in order to reach it. Some of the reasons for this variability come from fluctuations in laser intensity and focusing, due to optics instability. Other variation sources come from small differences in the target structure. The target structure can vary substantially, when it is impacted by the main pulse, due to the prepulse duration and intensity, the shape of the main pulse and the total energy deposited. In order to qualitatively describe the prepulse effect, we will present a two dimensional parametric scan of its relevant parameters. A single case is also analyzed with a full three dimensional simulation, obtaining reasonable agreement between the numerical and the experimental energy spectrum.

  3. Patient and Staff (doctors and nurses) Experiences of Abdominal Hysterectomy in Accelerated Recovery Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Lis; Carlslund, Anne Mette; Møller, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The accelerated recovery programme (ARP) is becoming commonplace in surgical specialties and has also been introduced to hysterectomy patients. Diagnostic, prognostic and other clinical indicators are well described. The aim of this article is to relay knowledge about the ARP, throu...... of information relay and dialogue between staff and patients/family members. A nursing care ambulatory unit is recommended to support with information for women prior to and following hysterectomy in the ARP....... the experiences of the women operated and the staff involved. Material and methods: The study is exploratory and descriptive, using qualitative methods. Seventeen women, with good health status, were consecutively selected from August to September 2001. The women were observed and ten were interviewed twice...... themselves as being good girls but expressed that when the hospital's ARP had expired the attention from the staff declined. The staff continued to be concerned about whether the women received the information and psychological care they needed but claimed that the ARP proved better for the women than...

  4. Shock experiments and numerical simulations on low energy portable electrically exploding foil accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, A K; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2010-03-01

    Two low energy (1.6 and 8 kJ) portable electrically exploding foil accelerators are developed for moderately high pressure shock studies at small laboratory scale. Projectile velocities up to 4.0 km/s have been measured on Kapton flyers of thickness 125 microm and diameter 8 mm, using an in-house developed Fabry-Perot velocimeter. An asymmetric tilt of typically few milliradians has been measured in flyers using fiber optic technique. High pressure impact experiments have been carried out on tantalum, and aluminum targets up to pressures of 27 and 18 GPa, respectively. Peak particle velocities at the target-glass interface as measured by Fabry-Perot velocimeter have been found in good agreement with the reported equation of state data. A one-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on realistic models of equation of state and electrical resistivity has been developed to numerically simulate the flyer velocity profiles. The developed numerical scheme is validated against experimental and simulation data reported in literature on such systems. Numerically computed flyer velocity profiles and final flyer velocities have been found in close agreement with the previously reported experimental results with a significant improvement over reported magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Numerical modeling of low energy systems reported here predicts flyer velocity profiles higher than experimental values, indicating possibility of further improvement to achieve higher shock pressures.

  5. Ultra-High Gradient Channeling Acceleration in Nanostructures: Design/Progress of Proof-of-Concept (POC) Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Min [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator & Detector Development; Green, A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator & Detector Development; Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Thurman-Keup, R. M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Shiltsev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zhang, X. [Shanhai Inst. of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Shanghai (China); Farinella, D. M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Taborek, P. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Tajima, T. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Wheeler, J. A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Center for Ultrafast Optical Science and FOCUS Center; Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France). Lab. d' Optique Appliquee; Mourou, G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Center for Ultrafast Optical Science and FOCUS Center; Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France). Lab. d' Optique Appliquee

    2016-09-16

    A short bunch of relativistic particles or a short-pulse laser perturbs the density state of conduction electrons in a solid crystal and excites wakefields along atomic lattices in a crystal. Under a coupling condition the wakes, if excited, can accelerate channeling particles with TeV/m acceleration gradients in principle since the density of charge carriers (conduction electrons) in solids n0 = ~ 1020 – 1023 cm-3 is significantly higher than what can be obtained in gaseous plasma. Nanostructures have some advantages over crystals for channeling applications of high power beams. The dechanneling rate can be reduced and the beam acceptance increased by the large size of the channels. For beam-driven acceleration, a bunch length with a sufficient charge density would need to be in the range of the plasma wavelength to properly excite plasma wakefields, and channeled particle acceleration with the wakefields must occur before the ions in the lattices move beyond the restoring threshold. In the case of the excitation by short laser pulses, the dephasing length is appreciably increased with the larger channel, which enables channeled particles to gain sufficient amounts of energy. This paper describes simulation analyses on beam- and laser (X-ray)-driven accelerations in effective nanotube models obtained from Vsim and EPOCH codes. Experimental setups to detect wakefields are also outlined with accelerator facilities at Fermilab and NIU. In the FAST facility, the electron beamline was successfully commissioned at 50 MeV and it is being upgraded toward higher energies for electron accelerator R&D. The 50 MeV injector beamline of the facility is used for X-ray crystal-channeling radiation with a diamond target. It has been proposed to utilize the same diamond crystal for a channeling acceleration POC test. Another POC experiment is also designed for the NIU accelerator lab with time-resolved electron diffraction. Recently, a

  6. Ultra-High Gradient Channeling Acceleration in Nanostructures: Design/Progress of Proof-of-Concept (POC) Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young min [Fermilab; Green, A. [NICADD, DeKalb; Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Thurman-Keup, R. M. [Fermilab; Shiltsev, V. [Fermilab; Zhang, X. [Shanghai, Inst. Optics, Fine Mech.; Farinella, D. M. [UC, Irvine; Taborek, P. [UC, Irvine; Tajima, T. [UC, Irvine; Wheeler, J. A. [U. Michigan, Ann Arbor; Mourou, G. [U. Michigan, Ann Arbor

    2016-09-16

    A short bunch of relativistic particles or a short-pulse laser perturbs the density state of conduction electrons in a solid crystal and excites wakefields along atomic lattices in a crystal. Under a coupling condition the wakes, if excited, can accelerate channeling particles with TeV/m acceleration gradients [1] in principle since the density of charge carriers (conduction electrons) in solids n0 = ~ 10 to the power of 20 – 10 to the power of 23 cm-3 is significantly higher than what was considered above in gaseous plasma. Nanostructures have some advantages over crystals for channeling applications of high power beams. The dechanneling rate can be reduced and the beam acceptance increased by the large size of the channels. For beam driven acceleration, a bunch length with a sufficient charge density would need to be in the range of the plasma wavelength to properly excite plasma wakefields, and channeled particle acceleration with the wakefields must occur before the ions in the lattices move beyond the restoring threshold. In the case of the excitation by short laser pulses, the dephasing length is appreciably increased with the larger channel, which enables channeled particles to gain sufficient amounts of energy. This paper describes simulation analyses on beam- and laser (X-ray)-driven accelerations in effective nanotube models obtained from Vsim and EPOCH codes. Experimental setups to detect wakefields are also outlined with accelerator facilities at Fermilab and NIU. In the FAST facility, the electron beamline was successfully commissioned at 50 MeV and it is being upgraded toward higher energies for electron accelerator R&D. The 50 MeV injector beamline of the facility is used for X-ray crystal-channeling radiation with a diamond target. It has been proposed to utilize the same diamond crystal for a channeling acceleration POC test. Another POC experiment is also designed for the NIU accelerator lab with time-resolved electron diffraction. Recently, a

  7. Ultra-high gradient channeling acceleration in nanostructures: Design/progress of proof-of-concept (POC) experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Y. M.; Green, A.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Thurman-Keup, R. M.; Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.; Farinella, D. M.-A.; Taborek, P.; Tajima, T.; Wheeler, J. A.; Mourou, G.

    2017-03-01

    A short bunch of relativistic particles, or a short-pulse laser, perturb the density state of conduction electrons in a solid crystal and excite wakefields along atomic lattices in a crystal. Under a coupling condition between a driver and plasma, the wakes, if excited, can accelerate channeling particles with TeV/m acceleration gradients [1], in principle, since the density of charge carriers (conduction electrons) in solids n0 = 1020 - 1023 cm-3 is significantly higher than what was considered above in gaseous plasma. Nanostructures have some advantages over crystals for channeling applications of high power beams. The de-channeling rate can be reduced and the beam acceptance increased by the large size of the channels. For beam-driven acceleration, a bunch length with a sufficient charge density would need to be in the range of the plasma wavelength to properly excite plasma wakefields, and channeled particle acceleration with the wakefields must occur before the ions in the lattices move beyond the restoring threshold. In the case of the excitation by short laser pulses, the dephasing length is appreciably increased with the larger channel, which enables channeled particles to gain sufficient amounts of energy. This paper describes simulation analyses on beam- and laser (X-ray)-driven accelerations in effective nanotube models obtained from the Vsim and EPOCH codes. Experimental setups to detect wakefields are also outlined with accelerator facilities at Fermilab and Northern Illinois University (NIU). In the FAST facility, the electron beamline was successfully commissioned at 50 MeV, and it is being upgraded toward higher energies for electron accelerator R&D. The 50 MeV injector beamline of the facility is used for X-ray crystal-channeling radiation with a diamond target. It has been proposed to utilize the same diamond crystal for a channeling acceleration proof-of-concept (POC). Another POC experiment is also designed for the NIU accelerator lab with time

  8. Primate drum kit: a system for studying acoustic pattern production by non-human primates using acceleration and strain sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravignani, Andrea; Matellán Olivera, Vicente; Gingras, Bruno; Hofer, Riccardo; Rodríguez Hernández, Carlos; Sonnweber, Ruth-Sophie; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2013-07-31

    The possibility of achieving experimentally controlled, non-vocal acoustic production in non-human primates is a key step to enable the testing of a number of hypotheses on primate behavior and cognition. However, no device or solution is currently available, with the use of sensors in non-human animals being almost exclusively devoted to applications in food industry and animal surveillance. Specifically, no device exists which simultaneously allows: (i) spontaneous production of sound or music by non-human animals via object manipulation, (ii) systematical recording of data sensed from these movements, (iii) the possibility to alter the acoustic feedback properties of the object using remote control. We present two prototypes we developed for application with chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) which, while fulfilling the aforementioned requirements, allow to arbitrarily associate sounds to physical object movements. The prototypes differ in sensing technology, costs, intended use and construction requirements. One prototype uses four piezoelectric elements embedded between layers of Plexiglas and foam. Strain data is sent to a computer running Python through an Arduino board. A second prototype consists in a modified Wii Remote contained in a gum toy. Acceleration data is sent via Bluetooth to a computer running Max/MSP. We successfully pilot tested the first device with a group of chimpanzees. We foresee using these devices for a range of cognitive experiments.

  9. Primate Drum Kit: A System for Studying Acoustic Pattern Production by Non-Human Primates Using Acceleration and Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tecumseh Fitch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of achieving experimentally controlled, non-vocal acoustic production in non-human primates is a key step to enable the testing of a number of hypotheses on primate behavior and cognition. However, no device or solution is currently available, with the use of sensors in non-human animals being almost exclusively devoted to applications in food industry and animal surveillance. Specifically, no device exists which simultaneously allows: (i spontaneous production of sound or music by non-human animals via object manipulation, (ii systematical recording of data sensed from these movements, (iii the possibility to alter the acoustic feedback properties of the object using remote control. We present two prototypes we developed for application with chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes which, while fulfilling the aforementioned requirements, allow to arbitrarily associate sounds to physical object movements. The prototypes differ in sensing technology, costs, intended use and construction requirements. One prototype uses four piezoelectric elements embedded between layers of Plexiglas and foam. Strain data is sent to a computer running Python through an Arduino board. A second prototype consists in a modified Wii Remote contained in a gum toy. Acceleration data is sent via Bluetooth to a computer running Max/MSP. We successfully pilot tested the first device with a group of chimpanzees. We foresee using these devices for a range of cognitive experiments.

  10. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemery, Francois [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Zhu, Jun [Mianyang CAEP

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  11. Accelerating Inspire

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2266999

    2017-01-01

    CERN has been involved in the dissemination of scientific results since its early days and has continuously updated the distribution channels. Currently, Inspire hosts catalogues of articles, authors, institutions, conferences, jobs, experiments, journals and more. Successful orientation among this amount of data requires comprehensive linking between the content. Inspire has lacked a system for linking experiments and articles together based on which accelerator they were conducted at. The purpose of this project has been to create such a system. Records for 156 accelerators were created and all 2913 experiments on Inspire were given corresponding MARC tags. Records of 18404 accelerator physics related bibliographic entries were also tagged with corresponding accelerator tags. Finally, as a part of the endeavour to broaden CERN's presence on Wikipedia, existing Wikipedia articles of accelerators were updated with short descriptions and links to Inspire. In total, 86 Wikipedia articles were updated. This repo...

  12. The effect of three surface conditions, speed and running experience on vertical acceleration of the tibia during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boey, Hannelore; Aeles, Jeroen; Schütte, Kurt; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2016-09-05

    Research has focused on parameters that are associated with injury risk, e.g. vertical acceleration. These parameters can be influenced by running on different surfaces or at different running speeds, but the relationship between them is not completely clear. Understanding the relationship may result in training guidelines to reduce the injury risk. In this study, thirty-five participants with three different levels of running experience were recruited. Participants ran on three different surfaces (concrete, synthetic running track, and woodchip trail) at two different running speeds: a self-selected comfortable speed and a fixed speed of 3.06 m/s. Vertical acceleration of the lower leg was measured with an accelerometer. The vertical acceleration was significantly lower during running on the woodchip trail in comparison with the synthetic running track and the concrete, and significantly lower during running at lower speed in comparison with during running at higher speed on all surfaces. No significant differences in vertical acceleration were found between the three groups of runners at fixed speed. Higher self-selected speed due to higher performance level also did not result in higher vertical acceleration. These results may show that running on a woodchip trail and slowing down could reduce the injury risk at the tibia.

  13. Responses to rotating linear acceleration vectors considered in relation to a model of the otolith organs. [human oculomotor response to transverse acceleration stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, A. J.; Barnes, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Human subjects were exposed to a linear acceleration vector that rotated in the transverse plane of the skull without angular counterrotation. Lateral eye movements showed a sinusoidal change in slow phase velocity and an asymmetry or bias in the same direction as vector rotation. A model is developed that attributes the oculomotor response to otolithic mechanisms. It is suggested that the bias component is the manifestation of torsion of the statoconial plaque relative to the base of the utricular macula and that the sinusoidal component represents the translational oscillation of the statoconia. The model subsumes a hypothetical neural mechanism which allows x- and y-axis accelerations to be resolved. Derivation of equations of motion for the statoconial plaque in torsion and translation, which take into account forces acting in shear and normal to the macula, yield estimates of bias and sinusoidal components that are in qualitative agreement with the diverse experimental findings.

  14. Cellular and molecular effects for mutation induction in normal human cells irradiated with accelerated neon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kato, Takeshi; Yatagai, Fumio; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-02-22

    We investigated the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of mutation induction on the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in normal human fibroblast-like cells irradiated with accelerated neon-ion beams. The cells were irradiated with neon-ion beams at various LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/microm. Neon-ion beams were accelerated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. Mutation induction at the HPRT locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine-resistant clones. The mutation spectrum of the deletion pattern of exons of mutants was analyzed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The dose-response curves increased steeply up to 0.5 Gy and leveled off or decreased between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, compared to the response to (137)Cs gamma-rays. The mutation frequency increased up to 105 keV/microm and then there was a downward trend with increasing LET values. The deletion pattern of exons was non-specific. About 75-100% of the mutants produced using LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/mum showed all or partial deletions of exons, while among gamma-ray-induced mutants 30% showed no deletions, 30% partial deletions and 40% complete deletions. These results suggested that the dose-response curves of neon-ion-induced mutations were dependent upon LET values, but the deletion pattern of DNA was not.

  15. Supernova/Acceleration Probe: A Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, C.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Craig, W.; Day, C.; DeJongh, F.; Deustua, S.; Diehl, T.; Dodelson, S.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmet, W.; Fouchez, D.; Frieman, J.; Fruchter, A.; Gerdes, D.; Gladney, L.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Hoff, M.; Holland, S.; Huffer, M.; Hui, L.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jelinsky, P.; Karcher, A.; Kent, S.; Kahn, S.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Kushner, G.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Lampton, M.; Le Fevre, O.; Levi, M.; Limon, P.; Lin, H.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Lorenzon, W.; Malina, R.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, P.; Massey, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Peoples, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz, D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Roe, N.; Rusin, D.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Samdja, G.; Smith, R.M.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Stebbine, A.; Stoughton, C.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle, G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Tucker, D.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.; Wester, W.

    2004-05-12

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universes expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark energy

  16. Supernova / Acceleration Probe: a Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Fermilab /Paris U., VI-VII /Yale U.

    2005-08-15

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universe's expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark

  17. Frataxin Accelerates [2Fe-2S] Cluster Formation on the Human Fe–S Assembly Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nicholas G.; Das, Deepika; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A.; Barondeau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters function as protein cofactors for a wide variety of critical cellular reactions. In human mitochondria, a core Fe–S assembly complex [called SDUF and composed of NFS1, ISD11, ISCU2, and frataxin (FXN) proteins] synthesizes Fe–S clusters from iron, cysteine sulfur, and reducing equivalents and then transfers these intact clusters to target proteins. In vitro assays have relied on reducing the complexity of this complicated Fe–S assembly process by using surrogate electron donor molecules and monitoring simplified reactions. Recent studies have concluded that FXN promotes the synthesis of [4Fe-4S] clusters on the mammalian Fe–S assembly complex. Here the kinetics of Fe–S synthesis reactions were determined using different electron donation systems and by monitoring the products with circular dichroism and absorbance spectroscopies. We discovered that common surrogate electron donor molecules intercepted Fe–S cluster intermediates and formed high-molecular weight species (HMWS). The HMWS are associated with iron, sulfide, and thiol-containing proteins and have properties of a heterogeneous solubilized mineral with spectroscopic properties remarkably reminiscent of those of [4Fe-4S] clusters. In contrast, reactions using physiological reagents revealed that FXN accelerates the formation of [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] clusters as previously reported. In the preceding paper [Fox, N. G., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, DOI: 10.1021/bi5014485], [2Fe-2S] intermediates on the SDUF complex were shown to readily transfer to uncomplexed ISCU2 or apo acceptor proteins, depending on the reaction conditions. Our results indicate that FXN accelerates a rate-limiting sulfur transfer step in the synthesis of [2Fe-2S] clusters on the human Fe–S assembly complex. PMID:26016518

  18. Theobromine Upregulates Osteogenesis by Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and Accelerates Bone Development in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Bret H; Ylostalo, Joni; Browder, Elizabeth; McNeill, Eoin P; Bartosh, Thomas J; Rawls, H Ralph; Nakamoto, Tetsuo; Gregory, Carl A

    2017-03-01

    Theobromine (THB) is one of the major xanthine-like alkaloids found in cacao plant and a variety of other foodstuffs such as tea leaves, guarana and cola nuts. Historically, THB and its derivatives have been utilized to treat cardiac and circulatory disorders, drug-induced nephrotoxicity, proteinuria and as an immune-modulator. Our previous work demonstrated that THB has the capacity to improve the formation of hydroxyl-apatite during tooth development, suggesting that it may also enhance skeletal development. With its excellent safety profile and resistance to pharmacokinetic elimination, we reasoned that it might be an excellent natural osteoanabolic supplement during pregnancy, lactation and early postnatal growth. To determine whether THB had an effect on human osteoprogenitors, we subjected primary human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to osteogenic assays after exposure to THB in vitro and observed that THB exposure increased the rate of osteogenesis and mineralization by hMSCs. Moreover, THB exposure resulted in a list of upregulated mRNA transcripts that best matched an osteogenic tissue expression signature as compared to other tissue expression signatures archived in several databases. To determine whether oral administration of THB resulted in improved skeletal growth, we provided pregnant rats with chow supplemented with THB during pregnancy and lactation. After weaning, offspring received THB continuously until postnatal day 50 (approximately 10 mg kg(-1) day(-1)). Administration of THB resulted in neonates with larger bones, and 50-day-old offspring accumulated greater body mass, longer and thicker femora and superior tibial trabecular parameters. The accelerated growth did not adversely affect the strength and resilience of the bones. These results indicate that THB increases the osteogenic potential of bone marrow osteoprogenitors, and dietary supplementation of a safe dose of THB to expectant mothers and during the postnatal period

  19. Human fibrocyte-derived exosomes accelerate wound healing in genetically diabetic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Adolf, E-mail: ageiger@dreirosen-pharma.com; Walker, Audrey, E-mail: awalker@dreirosen-pharma.com; Nissen, Erwin, E-mail: enissen@dreirosen-pharma.com

    2015-11-13

    Diabetic ulcers represent a substantial societal and healthcare burden worldwide and scarcely respond to current treatment strategies. This study was addressed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of exosomes secreted by human circulating fibrocytes, a population of mesenchymal progenitors involved in normal wound healing via paracrine signaling. The exosomes released from cells sequentially stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1, in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2, did not show potential immunogenicity. These exosomes exhibited in-vitro proangiogenic properties, activated diabetic dermal fibroblasts, induced the migration and proliferation of diabetic keratinocytes, and accelerated wound closure in diabetic mice in vivo. Important components of the exosomal cargo were heat shock protein-90α, total and activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, proangiogenic (miR-126, miR-130a, miR-132) and anti-inflammatory (miR124a, miR-125b) microRNAs, and a microRNA regulating collagen deposition (miR-21). This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of the use of fibrocytes-derived exosomes for the treatment of diabetic ulcers. - Highlights: • Fibrocytes have shown potent wound healing properties in vitro and in vivo. • Their clinical use is precluded by low numbers and antigen-presenting function. • We isolated exosomes with no immunogenicity potential from human fibrocytes. • Their cargo included microRNAs and proteins that are known healing promoters. • They accelerated wound closure in diabetic mice in a dose-dependent manner.

  20. Inhibition of FGF signaling accelerates neural crest cell differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroonwitchawan, Thiranut; Muangchan, Pattamon; Noisa, Parinya

    2016-12-02

    Neural crest (NC) is a transient population, arising during embryonic development and capable of differentiating into various somatic cells. The defects of neural crest development leads to neurocristopathy. Several signaling pathways were revealed their significance in NC cell specification. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) is recognized as an important signaling during NC development, for instance Xenopus and avian; however, its contributions in human species are remained elusive. Here we used human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to investigate the consequences of FGF inhibition during NC cell differentiation. The specific-FGF receptor inhibitor, SU5402, was used in this investigation. The inhibition of FGF did not found to affect the proliferation or death of hPSC-derived NC cells, but promoted hPSCs to commit NC cell fate. NC-specific genes, including PAX3, SLUG, and TWIST1, were highly upregulated, while hPSC genes, such as OCT4, and E-CAD, rapidly reduced upon FGF signaling blockage. Noteworthy, TFAP-2α, a marker of migratory NC cells, abundantly presented in SU5402-induced cells. This accelerated NC cell differentiation could be due to the activation of Notch signaling upon the blockage of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, since NICD was increased by SU5402. Altogether, this study proposed the contributions of FGF signaling in controlling human NC cell differentiation from hPSCs, the crosstalk between FGF and Notch, and might imply to the influences of FGF signaling in neurocristophatic diseases.

  1. A direct PCR approach to accelerate analyses of human-associated microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto E Flores

    Full Text Available Since the composition of the human microbiome is highly variable both within and between individuals, researchers are increasingly reliant on high-throughput molecular approaches to identify linkages between the composition of these communities and human health. While new sequencing technologies have made it increasingly feasible to analyze large numbers of human-associated samples, the extraction of DNA from samples often remains a bottleneck in the process. Here we tested a direct PCR approach using the Extract-N-Amp Plant PCR Kit to accelerate the 16S rRNA gene-based analyses of human-associated bacterial communities, directly comparing this method to a more commonly-used approach whereby DNA is first extracted and purified from samples using a series of steps prior to PCR amplification. We used both approaches on replicate samples collected from each of five body habitats (tongue surface, feces, forehead skin, underarm skin, and forearm skin from four individuals. With the exception of the tongue samples, there were few significant differences in the estimates of taxon richness or phylogenetic diversity obtained using the two approaches. Perhaps more importantly, there were no significant differences between the methods in their ability resolve body habitat differences or inter-individual differences in bacterial community composition and the estimates of the relative abundances of individual taxa were nearly identical with the two methods. Overall, the two methods gave very similar results and the direct PCR approach is clearly advantageous for many studies exploring the diversity and composition of human-associated bacterial communities given that large numbers of samples can be processed far more quickly and efficiently.

  2. Gesture Recognition from Data Streams of Human Motion Sensor Using Accelerated PSO Swarm Search Feature Selection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Fong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human motion sensing technology gains tremendous popularity nowadays with practical applications such as video surveillance for security, hand signing, and smart-home and gaming. These applications capture human motions in real-time from video sensors, the data patterns are nonstationary and ever changing. While the hardware technology of such motion sensing devices as well as their data collection process become relatively mature, the computational challenge lies in the real-time analysis of these live feeds. In this paper we argue that traditional data mining methods run short of accurately analyzing the human activity patterns from the sensor data stream. The shortcoming is due to the algorithmic design which is not adaptive to the dynamic changes in the dynamic gesture motions. The successor of these algorithms which is known as data stream mining is evaluated versus traditional data mining, through a case of gesture recognition over motion data by using Microsoft Kinect sensors. Three different subjects were asked to read three comic strips and to tell the stories in front of the sensor. The data stream contains coordinates of articulation points and various positions of the parts of the human body corresponding to the actions that the user performs. In particular, a novel technique of feature selection using swarm search and accelerated PSO is proposed for enabling fast preprocessing for inducing an improved classification model in real-time. Superior result is shown in the experiment that runs on this empirical data stream. The contribution of this paper is on a comparative study between using traditional and data stream mining algorithms and incorporation of the novel improved feature selection technique with a scenario where different gesture patterns are to be recognized from streaming sensor data.

  3. Operational Experience of Cooling Water Systems for Accelerator Components at PLS

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyungryul; Kim, Young-Chan; Lee, Bongho; Sik Han, Hong; Soo Ko In; Wha Chung, Chin

    2005-01-01

    The cooling water system has been utilized for absorbing heat generated by a multitude of electromagnetic power delivering networks at PLS. The separate cooling water distribution systems for the storage ring, beam transport line and linear accelerator have been operated with a different operating temperature of supplying water. All water used for heat removal from the accelerator components are deionised and filtered to provide with over 2 MO-cm specific resistance. The operating pressures and flows of input water are also controlled with flow balancing scheme at a specified range. The operating temperature of components in the accelerator is sustained as tight as below ±0.1 deg C to minimize the influence of temperature fluctuation on the beam energy and stability. Although the PLS cooling systems were initially installed with a high degree of flexibility to allow for easy maintenance, a number of system improvements have been employed to enhance operational reliability and to incorporate the newly...

  4. Planned High-brightness Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Ben [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Panuganti, Harsha [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Brau, Charles [Vanderbilt U.; Choi, Bo [Vanderbilt U.; Gabella, William [Vanderbilt U.; Ivanov, Borislav [Vanderbilt U.; Mendenhall, Marcus [Vanderbilt U.; Lynn, Christopher [Swarthmore Coll.; Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab; Wagner, Wolfgang [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution we describe the technical details and experimental setup of our study aimed at producing high-brightness channeling radiation (CR) at Fermilab’s new user facility the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). In the ASTA photoinjector area electrons are accelerated up to 40-MeV and focused to a sub-micron spot on a ~40 micron thick carbon diamond, the electrons channel through the crystal and emit CR up to 80-KeV. Our study utilizes ASTA’s long pulse train capabilities and ability to preserve ultra-low emittance, to produce the desired high average brightness.

  5. 3D spatially encoded and accelerated TE-averaged echo planar spectroscopic imaging in healthy human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zohaib; Wilson, Neil E; Thomas, M Albert

    2016-03-01

    Several different pathologies, including many neurodegenerative disorders, affect the energy metabolism of the brain. Glutamate, a neurotransmitter in the brain, can be used as a biomarker to monitor these metabolic processes. One method that is capable of quantifying glutamate concentration reliably in several regions of the brain is TE-averaged (1) H spectroscopic imaging. However, this type of method requires the acquisition of multiple TE lines, resulting in long scan durations. The goal of this experiment was to use non-uniform sampling, compressed sensing reconstruction and an echo planar readout gradient to reduce the scan time by a factor of eight to acquire TE-averaged spectra in three spatial dimensions. Simulation of glutamate and glutamine showed that the 2.2-2.4 ppm spectral region contained 95% glutamate signal using the TE-averaged method. Peak integration of this spectral range and home-developed, prior-knowledge-based fitting were used for quantitation. Gray matter brain phantom measurements were acquired on a Siemens 3 T Trio scanner. Non-uniform sampling was applied retrospectively to these phantom measurements and quantitative results of glutamate with respect to creatine 3.0 (Glu/Cr) ratios showed a coefficient of variance of 16% for peak integration and 9% for peak fitting using eight-fold acceleration. In vivo scans of the human brain were acquired as well and five different brain regions were quantified using the prior-knowledge-based algorithm. Glu/Cr ratios from these regions agreed with previously reported results in the literature. The method described here, called accelerated TE-averaged echo planar spectroscopic imaging (TEA-EPSI), is a significant methodological advancement and may be a useful tool for categorizing glutamate changes in pathologies where affected brain regions are not known a priori. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Hosing Instability of the Drive Electron Beam in the E157 Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Brent Edward; /SLAC /UCLA

    2005-10-10

    In the plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC, known as E157, an ultra-relativistic electron beam is used to both excite and witness a plasma wave for advanced accelerator applications. If the beam is tilted, then it will undergo transverse oscillations inside of the plasma. These oscillations can grow exponentially via an instability know as the electron hose instability. The linear theory of electron-hose instability in a uniform ion column predicts that for the parameters of the E157 experiment (beam charge, bunch length, and plasma density) a growth of the centroid offset should occur. Analysis of the E157 data has provided four critical results. The first was that the incoming beam did have a tilt. The tilt was much smaller than the radius and was measured to be 5.3 {micro}m/{delta}{sub z} at the entrance of the plasma (IP1.) The second was the beam centroid oscillates in the ion channel at half the frequency of the beam radius (betatron beam oscillations), and these oscillations can be predicted by the envelope equation. Third, up to the maximum operating plasma density of E157 ({approx}2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}), no growth of the centroid offset was measured. Finally, time-resolved data of the beam shows that up to this density, no significant growth of the tail of the beam (up to 8ps from the centroid) occurred even though the beam had an initial tilt.

  7. Genomic and network patterns of schizophrenia genetic variation in human evolutionary accelerated regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E; Pollard, Katherine S; Roussos, Panos; Dudley, Joel T

    2015-05-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specific evolution. Our results suggest that schizophrenia-associated loci enrich in genes near previously identified human accelerated regions (HARs). Specifically, we find that genes near HARs conserved in nonhuman primates (pHARs) are enriched for schizophrenia-associated loci, and that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are under stronger selective pressure than other schizophrenia genes and other pHAR-associated genes. We further evaluate pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes in regulatory network contexts to investigate associated molecular functions and mechanisms. We find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes significantly enrich in a GABA-related coexpression module that was previously found to be differentially regulated in schizophrenia affected individuals versus healthy controls. In another two independent networks constructed from gene expression profiles from prefrontal cortex samples, we find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are located in more central positions and their average path lengths to the other nodes are significantly shorter than those of other schizophrenia genes. Together, our results suggest that HARs are associated with potentially important functional roles in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia.

  8. Periodic heat shock accelerated the chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in pellet culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of diseases that seriously affect elderly people's quality of life. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs offer a potential promise for the joint repair in OA patients. However, chondrogenic differentiation from hMSCs in vitro takes a long time (∼ 6 weeks and differentiated cells are still not as functionally mature as primary isolated chondrocytes, though chemical stimulations and mechanical loading have been intensively studied to enhance the hMSC differentiation. On the other hand, thermal stimulations of hMSC chondrogenesis have not been well explored. In this study, the direct effects of mild heat shock (HS on the differentiation of hMSCs into chondrocytes in 3D pellet culture were investigated. Periodic HS at 41 °C for 1 hr significantly increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan in 3D pellet culture at Day 10 of chondrogenesis. Immunohistochemical and Western Blot analyses revealed an increased expression of collagen type II and aggrecan in heat-shocked pellets than non heat-shocked pellets on Day 17 of chondrogenesis. In addition, HS also upregulated the expression of collagen type I and X as well as heat shock protein 70 on Day 17 and 24 of differentiation. These results demonstrate that HS accelerated the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs and induced an early maturation of chondrocytes differentiated from hMSCs. The results of this study will guide the design of future protocols using thermal treatments to facilitate cartilage regeneration with human mesenchymal stem cells.

  9. Kinetics of Beta-14[14C] Carotene in a Human Subject Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueker, S.R.; Lin, Y.; Follett, J.R.; Clifford, A.J.; Buchholz, B.A.

    2000-01-31

    {beta}-Carotene is a tetraterpenoid distributed widely throughout the plant kingdom. It is a member of a group of pigments referred to as carotenoids that have the distinction of serving as metabolic precursors to vitamin A in humans and many animals [1,2]. We used Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) [3] to determine the metabolic behavior of a physiologic oral dose of {beta}-[{sup 14}C]carotene (200 nanoCuries; 0.57 {micro}mol) in a healthy human subject. Serial blood specimens were collected for 210-d and complete urine and feces were collected for 17 and 10-d, respectively. Balance data indicated that the dose was 42% bioavailable. The absorbed {beta}-carotene was lost slowly via urine in accord with the slow body turnover of {beta}-carotene and vitamin A [4]. HPLC fractionation of plasma taken at early time points (0-24-h) showed the label was distributed between {beta}-carotene and retinyl esters (vitamin A) derived from intestinal metabolism.

  10. Does recombinant human erythropoietin accelerate correction of post-ulcer-bleeding anaemia? A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Spiros D. Ladas; Dimitrios Polymeros; Thomas Pagonis; Konstantinos Triantafyllou; Gregorios Paspatis; Maria Hatziargiriou; Sotirios A.Raptis

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Anaemia caused by acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is treated with blood transfusion or iron, but patients usually face a two-month recovery period from posthaemorrhage anaemia. This prospective, randomised, open,pilot study was designed to investigate whether recombinant human erythropoietin (Epoetin) therapy accelerate haematocrit increase in the post-bleeding recovery period.METHODS: We studied hospitalised patients admitted because of acute ulcer bleeding or haemorrhagic gastritis,who had a haematocrit of 27-33% and did not receive blood transfusions. One day after the endoscopic confirmation of cessation of bleeding, they were randomised either to erythropoietin (20 000 IU Epoetin alfa subcutaneously, on days 0, 4 and 6) plus iron (100 mg im, on days 1- 6, (G1) or iron only (G2). Haematocrit was measured on days 0, 6, 14,30, 45, and 60, respectively.RESULTS: One patient from G1 and two from G2 were lost to follow-up. Therefore, 14 and 13 patients from G1 and G2respectively were analysed. Demographic characteristics, serum iron, ferritin, total iron binding capacity, reticulocytes, and haematocrit were not significantly different at entry to the study.Median reticulocyte counts were significantly different between groups on day six (G1: 4.0, 3.0-6.4 vsG2: 3.5, 2.1-4.4%,P=0.03) and median haematocrit on day fourteen [G1: 35.9,30.7-41.0 vsG2: 32.5, 29.5-37.0% (median, range), P=0.04].CONCLUSION: Erythropoietin administration significantly accelerates correction of anemia after acute ulcer bleeding.The haematocrit gain is equivalent to one unit of transfused blood two weeks after the bleeding episode.

  11. Expected damage to accelerator equipment due to the impact of the full LHC beam: beam instrumentation, experiments and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Burkart, Florian

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the biggest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world, designed to collide two proton beams with particle momentum of 7 TeV/c each. The stored energy of 362MJ in each beam is sufficient to melt 500 kg of copper or to evaporate about 300 liter of water. An accidental release of even a small fraction of the beam energy can cause severe damage to accelerator equipment. Reliable machine protection systems are necessary to safely operate the accelerator complex. To design a machine protection system, it is essential to know the damage potential of the stored beam and the consequences in case of a failure. One (catastrophic) failure would be, if the entire beam is lost in the aperture due to a problem with the beam dumping system. This thesis presents the simulation studies, results of a benchmarking experiment, and detailed target investigation, for this failure case. In the experiment, solid copper cylinders were irradiated with the 440GeV proton beam delivered by the ...

  12. Calcium isolation from large-volume human urine samples for 41Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James J; Hui, Susanta K; Jackson, George S; Clark, Sara P; Einstein, Jane; Weaver, Connie M; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H

    2013-08-01

    Calcium oxalate precipitation is the first step in preparation of biological samples for (41)Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry. A simplified protocol for large-volume human urine samples was characterized, with statistically significant increases in ion current and decreases in interference. This large-volume assay minimizes cost and effort and maximizes time after (41)Ca administration during which human samples, collected over a lifetime, provide (41)Ca:Ca ratios that are significantly above background.

  13. Calcium Isolation from Large-Volume Human Urine Samples for 41Ca Analysis by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James J; Hui, Susanta K; Jackson, George S; Clark, Sara P; Einstein, Jane; Weaver, Connie M; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H

    2013-01-01

    Calcium oxalate precipitation is the first step in preparation of biological samples for 41Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry. A simplified protocol for large-volume human urine samples was characterized, with statistically significant increases in ion current and decreases in interference. This large-volume assay minimizes cost and effort and maximizes time after 41Ca administration during which human samples, collected over a lifetime, provide 41Ca:Ca ratios that are significantly above background. PMID:23672965

  14. First electrons from the new 220 TW Frascati Laser for Acceleration and Multidisciplinary Experiments (FLAME) at Frascati National Laboratories (LNF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levato, T., E-mail: tadzio.levato@lnf.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Calvetti, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); University of Florence, Department of Physics (Italy); Anelli, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Batani, D.; Benocci, R. [University of Milano Bicocca, Department of Physics (Italy); Cacciotti, L. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Cecchetti, C.A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Lab. (ILIL), Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO) - CNR, Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sect. of Pisa (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Cerafogli, O.; Chimenti, P.; Clozza, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Drenska, N. [University of Roma La Sapienza (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Esposito, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Faccini, R. [University of Roma La Sapienza (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Fioravanti, S. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Gamucci, A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Lab. (ILIL), Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO) - CNR, Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sect. of Pisa (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Gatti, C. [University of Roma La Sapienza (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Giulietti, A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Lab. (ILIL), Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO) - CNR, Pisa (Italy); Giulietti, D. [University of Pisa, Department of Physics (Italy); Intense Laser Irradiation Lab. (ILIL), Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO) - CNR, Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sect. of Pisa (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Labate, L. [Intense Laser Irradiation Lab. (ILIL), Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO) - CNR, Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sect. of Pisa (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); Lollo, V. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF), INFN (Italy); and others

    2013-08-21

    A new era of laser based plasma accelerators is emerging following the commissioning of many high power laser facilities around the world. Extremely short (tens of fs) laser pulses with energy of multi-joules level are available at these newly built facilities. Here we describe the new 220 TW FLAME facility. In particular we discuss the laser system general layout, the main measurements on the laser pulse parameters, the underground target area. Finally we give an overview of the first results of the Self-Injection Test Experiment (SITE), obtained at a low laser energy. This initial low laser energy experimental campaign was necessary for the validation of the radio-protection shielding (Esposito, 2011 [1]) we discuss here. With respect to our preliminary configuration, with a pulse duration of 30 fs and a focusing optic of F/15, we discuss here the minimum laser energy requirements for electron acceleration and the forward transmitted optical radiation.

  15. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy: initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, M.; Madeddu, A.; Malinverni, G.; Delmastro, E.; Bona, C.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC-Radiotherapy, Candiolo, TO (Italy); Baiotto, B.; Stasi, M. [IRCC-Medical Physics, Candiolo, TO (Italy); Ponzone, R.; Siatis, D. [IRCC-Surgery, Candiolo, TO (Italy)

    2006-11-15

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D-C.R.T. is technically sophisticate but feasible and acute toxicity to date has been minimal. A C.T.V.-to-P.T.V. margin of 10 mm seems to provide coverage for analyzed patients. However, more patients and additional studies will be needed to validate the accuracy of this margin, and longer follow-up will be needed to assess acute and chronic toxicity, tumor control, and cosmetic results. (author)

  16. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, Roark A.; /MIT /MIT /NIFS, Gifu /JAERI, Kyoto /LLNL, Livermore; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; /MIT; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  17. Experiments assigned to determine the acceleration of 8000kN shear laboratory model elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiul Berghian, A.; Vasiu, T.; Abrudean, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper presents an experimental kinetics study by measuring accelerations using a bi-axial accelerometer constructed in the basis of a miniature integrated circuit, included in the class of micro-electrical and mechanical systems - MMA6261Q on the experimental installation reduced to the 1:5 dividing rule by comparison with the shear existent in exploitation, conceived and projected at the Faculty of Engineering in Hunedoara.

  18. Characterization of compact accelerator DD neutron source for in situ calibration experiment on neutron measurement at LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Yasunari; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Ogata, Tomohiro; Umemura, Norihiro; Asai, Keisuke; Kawarabayashi, Jun [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Sasao, Mamiko [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    A compact Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator DD neutron source has been developed for in situ calibration experiments on neutron measurements at LHD. The equipment mainly consists of three parts; a deuterium (D) reservoir/ion source, a self-loaded deuterium target and a 100 kV high voltage power supply, all of which are contained in a compact cylindrical stainless steel (SUS) tube of 70 mm in diameter and 780 mm in length. About one hour steady operation was performed under the acceleration voltage of 80 keV and the ion beam current of {approx}60 {mu}A, corresponding to the DD neutron yield of around 10{sup 5} n/s. The neutron emission profile and energy spectrum were measured with an NE213 scintillator and a {sup 3}He gas proportional counter. Preliminary neutronic calculations with a Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP' were also executed for simulating the in situ calibration experiment for neutron detectors that will be installed on LHD. Through the experiments and the calculations, it is shown that the present DD neutron source is valid for in situ calibration on threshold type detectors used for neutron emission profile monitoring and neutron spectrometry at DD plasma experiments. (author)

  19. The developmental brain gene NPAS3 contains the largest number of accelerated regulatory sequences in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, Gretel B; Pisciottano, Francisco; Kliger, Rafi; Franchini, Lucía F

    2013-05-01

    To identify the evolutionary genetic novelties that contributed to shape human-specific traits such as the use of a complex language, long-term planning and exceptional learning abilities is one of the ultimate frontiers of modern biology. Evolutionary signatures of functional shifts could be detected by comparing noncoding regions that are highly conserved across mammals or primates and rapidly accumulated nucleotide substitutions only in the lineage leading to humans. As gene loci densely populated with human-accelerated elements (HAEs) are more likely to have contributed to human-specific novelties, we sought to identify the transcriptional units and genomic 1 Mb intervals of the entire human genome carrying the highest number of HAEs. To this end, we took advantage of four available data sets of human genomic accelerated regions obtained through different comparisons and algorithms and performed a meta-analysis of the combined data. We found that the brain developmental transcription factor neuronal PAS domain-containing protein 3 (NPAS3) contains the largest cluster of noncoding-accelerated regions in the human genome with up to 14 elements that are highly conserved in mammals, including primates, but carry human-specific nucleotide substitutions. We then tested the ability of the 14 HAEs identified at the NPAS3 locus to act as transcriptional regulatory sequences in a reporter expression assay performed in transgenic zebrafish. We found that 11 out of the 14 HAEs present in NPAS3 act as transcriptional enhancers during development, particularly within the nervous system. As NPAS3 is known to play a crucial role during mammalian brain development, our results indicate that the high density of HAEs present in the human NPAS3 locus could have modified the spatiotemporal expression pattern of NPAS3 in the developing human brain and, therefore, contributed to human brain evolution.

  20. Human productivity experience and undersea habitat design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, T. C.; Spencer, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Lessons learned from the Alaskan North Slope construction camps and the Western Regional Undersea Laboratory are analyzed with respect to possible improvements for space station interior space utilization and living areas. The human factors engineering aspects have a direct bearing on the condition of crew and occupants.

  1. Conceptual design of a 1013 -W pulsed-power accelerator for megajoule-class dynamic-material-physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stygar, W. A.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Austin, K. N.; Ao, T.; Benage, J. F.; Breden, E. W.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Davis, J.-P.; Ennis, J. B.; Gard, P. D.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Haill, T. A.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jones, P. A.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Lucero, D. J.; McKee, G. R.; Moore, J. K.; Mulville, T. D.; Muron, D. J.; Root, S.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Spielman, R. B.; Waisman, E. M.; Wisher, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a conceptual design of a next-generation pulsed-power accelerator that is optimized for megajoule-class dynamic-material-physics experiments. Sufficient electrical energy is delivered by the accelerator to a physics load to achieve—within centimeter-scale samples—material pressures as high as 1 TPa. The accelerator design is based on an architecture that is founded on three concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression, impedance matching, and transit-time-isolated drive circuits. The prime power source of the accelerator consists of 600 independent impedance-matched Marx generators. Each Marx comprises eight 5.8-GW bricks connected electrically in series, and generates a 100-ns 46-GW electrical-power pulse. A 450-ns-long water-insulated coaxial-transmission-line impedance transformer transports the power generated by each Marx to a system of twelve 2.5-m-radius water-insulated conical transmission lines. The conical lines are connected electrically in parallel at a 66-cm radius by a water-insulated 45-post sextuple-post-hole convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the conical lines, and delivers the combined current to a single solid-dielectric-insulated radial transmission line. The radial line in turn transmits the combined current to the load. Since much of the accelerator is water insulated, we refer to it as Neptune. Neptune is 40 m in diameter, stores 4.8 MJ of electrical energy in its Marx capacitors, and generates 28 TW of peak electrical power. Since the Marxes are transit-time isolated from each other for 900 ns, they can be triggered at different times to construct-over an interval as long as 1 μ s -the specific load-current time history required for a given experiment. Neptune delivers 1 MJ and 20 MA in a 380-ns current pulse to an 18 -m Ω load; hence Neptune is a megajoule-class 20-MA arbitrary waveform generator. Neptune will allow the international scientific community to conduct dynamic

  2. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bailey, J. E.; Bennett, N. L.; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Rovang, D. C.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    suggest Z 300 will deliver 4.3 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 18 MJ. Z 800 is 52 m in diameter and stores 130 MJ. This accelerator generates 890 TW at the output of its LTD system, and delivers 65 MA in 113 ns to a MagLIF target. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF liner is 2500 TW. The principal goal of Z 800 is to achieve high-yield thermonuclear fusion; i.e., a yield that exceeds the energy initially stored by the accelerator's capacitors. 2D MHD simulations suggest Z 800 will deliver 8.0 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 440 MJ. Z 300 and Z 800, or variations of these accelerators, will allow the international high-energy-density-physics community to conduct advanced inertial-confinement-fusion, radiation-physics, material-physics, and laboratory-astrophysics experiments over heretofore-inaccessible parameter regimes.

  3. Human fibrocyte-derived exosomes accelerate wound healing in genetically diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Adolf; Walker, Audrey; Nissen, Erwin

    2015-11-13

    Diabetic ulcers represent a substantial societal and healthcare burden worldwide and scarcely respond to current treatment strategies. This study was addressed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of exosomes secreted by human circulating fibrocytes, a population of mesenchymal progenitors involved in normal wound healing via paracrine signaling. The exosomes released from cells sequentially stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1, in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2, did not show potential immunogenicity. These exosomes exhibited in-vitro proangiogenic properties, activated diabetic dermal fibroblasts, induced the migration and proliferation of diabetic keratinocytes, and accelerated wound closure in diabetic mice in vivo. Important components of the exosomal cargo were heat shock protein-90α, total and activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, proangiogenic (miR-126, miR-130a, miR-132) and anti-inflammatory (miR124a, miR-125b) microRNAs, and a microRNA regulating collagen deposition (miR-21). This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of the use of fibrocytes-derived exosomes for the treatment of diabetic ulcers.

  4. Magnetic shielding accelerates the proliferation of human neuroblastoma cell by promoting G1-phase progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-chuan Mo

    Full Text Available Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF.

  5. Magnetic shielding accelerates the proliferation of human neuroblastoma cell by promoting G1-phase progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Wei-chuan; Zhang, Zi-jian; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F; He, Rong-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF) throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF) by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF.

  6. Human activity accelerating the rapid desertification of the Mu Us Sandy Lands, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yunfa; Jin, Heling; Cui, Jianxin

    2016-03-01

    Over the past several thousand years, arid and semiarid China has experienced a series of asynchronous desertification events in its semiarid sandy and desert regions, but the precise identification of the driving forces of such events has remained elusive. In this paper we identify two rapid desertification events (RDEs) at ~4.6 ± 0.2 ka BP and ~3.3 ± 0.2 ka BP from the JJ Profile, located in the eastern Mu Us Sandy Lands. These RDEs appear to have occurred immediately following periods marked by persistently frequent and intense fires. We argue that such fire patterns, directly linked to an uncontrolled human use of vegetation as fuel, played a key role in accelerating RDEs by ensuring that the land surface was degraded beyond the threshold required for rapid desertification. This would suggest that the future use of a massive and sustained ecological program of vegetation rehabilitation should reduce the risk of destructive fire.

  7. Human ankle plantar flexor muscle–tendon mechanics and energetics during maximum acceleration sprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schache, Anthony G.; Brown, Nicholas A. T.; Pandy, Marcus G.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon elastic strain energy is the dominant contributor to muscle–tendon work during steady-state running. Does this behaviour also occur for sprint accelerations? We used experimental data and computational modelling to quantify muscle fascicle work and tendon elastic strain energy for the human ankle plantar flexors (specifically soleus and medial gastrocnemius) for multiple foot contacts of a maximal sprint as well as for running at a steady-state speed. Positive work done by the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicles decreased incrementally throughout the maximal sprint and both muscles performed more work for the first foot contact of the maximal sprint (FC1) compared with steady-state running at 5 m s−1 (SS5). However, the differences in tendon strain energy for both muscles were negligible throughout the maximal sprint and when comparing FC1 to SS5. Consequently, the contribution of muscle fascicle work to stored tendon elastic strain energy was greater for FC1 compared with subsequent foot contacts of the maximal sprint and compared with SS5. We conclude that tendon elastic strain energy in the ankle plantar flexors is just as vital at the start of a maximal sprint as it is at the end, and as it is for running at a constant speed. PMID:27581481

  8. Cross-pollination of research findings, although uncommon, may accelerate discovery of human disease genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duda Marlena

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological leaps in genome sequencing have resulted in a surge in discovery of human disease genes. These discoveries have led to increased clarity on the molecular pathology of disease and have also demonstrated considerable overlap in the genetic roots of human diseases. In light of this large genetic overlap, we tested whether cross-disease research approaches lead to faster, more impactful discoveries. Methods We leveraged several gene-disease association databases to calculate a Mutual Citation Score (MCS for 10,853 pairs of genetically related diseases to measure the frequency of cross-citation between research fields. To assess the importance of cooperative research, we computed an Individual Disease Cooperation Score (ICS and the average publication rate for each disease. Results For all disease pairs with one gene in common, we found that the degree of genetic overlap was a poor predictor of cooperation (r2=0.3198 and that the vast majority of disease pairs (89.56% never cited previous discoveries of the same gene in a different disease, irrespective of the level of genetic similarity between the diseases. A fraction (0.25% of the pairs demonstrated cross-citation in greater than 5% of their published genetic discoveries and 0.037% cross-referenced discoveries more than 10% of the time. We found strong positive correlations between ICS and publication rate (r2=0.7931, and an even stronger correlation between the publication rate and the number of cross-referenced diseases (r2=0.8585. These results suggested that cross-disease research may have the potential to yield novel discoveries at a faster pace than singular disease research. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the frequency of cross-disease study is low despite the high level of genetic similarity among many human diseases, and that collaborative methods may accelerate and increase the impact of new genetic discoveries. Until we have a better

  9. Researching Human Experience: video intervention/prevention assessment (VIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Patashnick

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Human experience is a critical subject for research. By discussing Video Intervention/Prevention Assessment (VIA, a patient-centered health research method where patients teach their clinicians about living with a chronic condition through the creation of visual illness narratives, this paper examines the value of qualitative inquiry and why human experience rarely is investigated directly. An analysis of a sample VIA data is presented to demonstrate how, by utilizing grounded theory and qualitative analysis, one can derive rich and unique information from human experience.

  10. Adding value through accelerator mass spectrometry-enabled first in human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Mark A

    2016-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra-sensitive technique for the analysis of radiocarbon. It is applicable to bioanalysis of any (14) C-labelled analyte and any sample type. The increasing body of data generated using LC+AMS indicates that the methodology is robust and reliable, and capable of meeting the same validation criteria as conventional bioanalytical techniques. Because it is a tracer technique, AMS is capable of discriminating between an administered radiolabelled dose and endogenous compound or non-radiolabelled compound administered separately. This paper discusses how it can be used to enhance the design of first in human (FIH) clinical studies and generate significant additional data, including: fundamental pharmacokinetics (CL and V), absolute bioavailability, mass balance, routes and rates of excretion, metabolic fate (including first-pass metabolism, identification of biliary metabolites and quantitative data to address metabolite safety testing issues), and tissue disposition of parent compound and metabolites. Because the (14) C-labelled microtracer dose is administered at the same time as a pharmacologically relevant non-radiolabelled dose, there is no concern about dose-linearity. However the mass of the microtracer dose itself is negligible and therefore does not affect the outcome of the FIH study. The addition of microtracer doses to a FIH study typically requires little additional expense, apart from the AMS analytics, making the approach cost-effective. It can also save significant time, compared to conventional approaches, and, by providing reliable human in vivo data as early as possible, prevent unnecessary expenditure later in drug development.

  11. Reactor physics studies for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Reactor-Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovskiy, Evgeny Yuryevich

    In the recently completed RACE Project of the AFCI, accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADS) experiments were conducted to develop technology of coupling accelerators to nuclear reactors. In these experiments electron accelerators induced photon-neutron reactions in heavy-metal targets to initiate fission reactions in ADS. Although the Idaho State University (ISU) RACE ADS was constructed only to develop measurement techniques for advanced experiments, many reactor kinetics experiments were conducted there. In the research reported in this dissertation, a method was developed to calculate kinetics parameters for measurement and calculation of the reactivity of ADS, a safety parameter that is necessary for control and monitoring of power production. Reactivity is measured in units of fraction of delayed versus prompt neutron from fission, a quantity that cannot be directly measured in far-subcritical reactors such as the ISU RACE configuration. A new technique is reported herein to calculate it accurately and to predict kinetic behavior of a far-subcritical ADS. Experiments conducted at ISU are first described and experimental data are presented before development of the kinetic theory used in the new computational method. Because of the complexity of the ISU ADS, the Monte-Carlo method as applied in the MCNP code is most suitable for modeling reactor kinetics. However, the standard method of calculating the delayed neutron fraction produces inaccurate values. A new method was developed and used herein to evaluate actual experiments. An advantage of this method is that its efficiency is independent of the fission yield of delayed neutrons, which makes it suitable for fuel with a minor actinide component (e.g. transmutation fuels). The implementation of this method is based on a correlated sampling technique which allows the accurate evaluation of delayed and prompt neutrons. The validity of the obtained results is indicated by good agreement between experimental

  12. Accelerated Helium and Hydrogen Production in Fe-54 Doped Alloys - Measurements and Calculations for the FIST Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Oliver, Brian M.; Ohnuki, S.; Shiba, K.; Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Robertson, J. P.; Meadows, J. W.; Gelles, David S.

    2000-09-01

    Helium and hydrogen measurements for F-82H alloys enriched up to 96% in 54Fe demonstrate accelerated gas production due to differences in the isotopic cross sections. The samples were irradiated in the JP-17 and JP-22 experiments in HFIR. Results are compared to calculations using isotopic helium production cross sections from ENDF/B-VI or the computer code, GNASH, for the radioactive isotope 55Fe. Helium measurements demonstrated an accelerated helium (appm)/dpa ratio of 2.3 after a 1.25-year irradiation, an increase of a factor of 4.3 over natural iron, due to higher helium production cross sections for 54Fe and 55Fe. Alloys doped with 55Fe could achieve helium/dpa ratios up to about 20, well above the fusion reactor ratio of 10. Calculations predict that hydrogen production is accelerated by about a factor of 13 over natural iron. However, measurements show that most of this hydrogen is not retained in the samples.

  13. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J M; Wood, J C; Lopes, N C; Poder, K; Abel, R L; Alatabi, S; Bryant, J S J; Jin, A; Kneip, S; Mecseki, K; Symes, D R; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z

    2015-08-18

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications.

  14. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J. M.; Wood, J. C.; Lopes, N. C.; Poder, K.; Abel, R. L.; Alatabi, S.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Jin, A.; Kneip, S.; Mecseki, K.; Symes, D. R.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2015-01-01

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications. PMID:26283308

  15. Experiments on the emergence of human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steels, Luc

    2006-08-01

    Children learn language from their parents and then use the acquired system throughout the rest of their life with little change. At least that is commonly assumed. But a recent paper by Galantucci adds to the growing evidence that adults (and children) are able to create and negotiate complex communication systems from scratch and relatively quickly, without a prior model. This raises questions of what cognitive mechanisms are implied in this joint construction of communication systems, and what the implications are for the origins of human language.

  16. Body acceleration distribution and O2 uptake in humans during running and jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Mccutcheon, E. P.; Shvartz, E.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of body acceleration and associated oxygen uptake and heart rate responses are investigated in treadmill running and trampoline jumping. Accelerations in the +Gz direction were measured at the lateral ankle, lumbosacral region and forehead of eight young men during level treadmill walking and running at four speeds and trampoline jumping at four heights, together with corresponding oxygen uptake and heart rate. With increasing treadmill speed, peak acceleration at the ankle is found always to exceed that at the back and forehead, and acceleration profiles with higher frequency components than those observed during jumping are observed. Acceleration levels are found to be more uniformly distributed with increasing height in jumping, although comparable oxygen uptake and heat rates are obtained. Results indicate that the magnitude of the biomechanical stimuli is greater in trampoline jumping than in running, which finding could be of use in the design of procedures to avert deconditioning in persons exposed to weightlessness.

  17. The human orbitofrontal cortex: linking reward to hedonic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringelbach, Morten L

    2005-09-01

    Hedonic experience is arguably at the heart of what makes us human. In recent neuroimaging studies of the cortical networks that mediate hedonic experience in the human brain, the orbitofrontal cortex has emerged as the strongest candidate for linking food and other types of reward to hedonic experience. The orbitofrontal cortex is among the least understood regions of the human brain, but has been proposed to be involved in sensory integration, in representing the affective value of reinforcers, and in decision making and expectation. Here, the functional neuroanatomy of the human orbitofrontal cortex is described and a new integrated model of its functions proposed, including a possible role in the mediation of hedonic experience.

  18. Experiment M-131 - Human vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. F., II; Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the M-131 experiment is to measure responses in astronauts throughout orbital flight that reflect vestibular function and compare them with measurements made before and after flight. Three subtasks require measurement of (1) susceptibility to motion sickness, (2) thresholds of response to stimulation of the semicircular canals, and (3) space perception, viz, visual and nonvisual localization, using external spacecraft and internal morphological frames of reference. Four astronauts will be available for all measurements in Skylab 2 and 3 and two additional astronauts for only the 'static' measurements during the flights.

  19. The Human Experience of Death or, What Can We Learn from Near-Death Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Russell Jr.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of serious accidents and illness many persons undergo death-rebirth experiences. The changes in attitudes, personality, and beliefs that sometimes follow these experiences reflect rebirth and reveal a fundamental human strategy for coping with the threat of death. These experiences have great therapeutic potential. (Author)

  20. Design of Web-Based Experiments on Acceleration and Speed Transducers

    OpenAIRE

    Ashish Mani; Prasanth, R. S. S.; Patvardhan, C

    2011-01-01

    Remote laboratories are becoming increasingly popular in academic arena due to availability of web-based technologies and infrastructure. Remote Labs are equipped with real instruments, where experiments are performed by controlling the instruments and observing the real data from a distant location through computer networks. They provide for student centric laboratory experience as students can perform experiments at their own convenience and requirements. Further, Remote Labs reduce managem...

  1. Design and Development Tools for the Systems Engineering Experience Accelerator. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-20

    used to support any experience module. The specifics of a particular experience module are housed in libraries and other data files separate from the...pp. 235- 262). Parkville, Vic: University of Melbourne . 5. Herz, J. C., M. R. Macedonia, et al. (2002). Computer games and the military two views

  2. Feasibility of low energy radiative capture experiments at the LUNA underground accelerator facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bemmerer, D; Lemut, A; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Cruz, J; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, G; Imbriani, G; Jesus, A P; Junker, M; Limata, B; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rogalla, D; Rolfs, C; Romano, M; Alvarez, C R; Schumann, F; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Vomiero, A; Fulop, Zs.; Gyurky, Gy.

    2005-01-01

    The LUNA (Laboratory Underground for Nuclear Astrophysics) facility has been designed to study nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest. It is located deep underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. Two electrostatic accelerators, with 50 and 400 kV maximum voltage, in combination with solid and gas target setups allowed to measure the total cross sections of the radiative capture reactions $^2$H(p,$\\gamma$)3He and $^{14}$N(p,$\\gamma$)$^{15}$O within their relevant Gamow peaks. We report on the gamma background in the Gran Sasso laboratory measured by germanium and bismuth germanate detectors, with and without an incident proton beam. A method to localize the sources of beam induced background using the Doppler shift of emitted gamma rays is presented. The feasibility of radiative capture studies at energies of astrophysical interest is discussed for several experimental scenarios.

  3. Development of a PCI Based Data Acquisition Platform for High Intensity Accelerator Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Higuchi, T; Ikeno, M; Igarashi, Y; Inoue, E; Itoh, R; Kodama, H; Murakami, T; Nakao, M; Nakayoshi, K; Saitoh, M; Shimazaki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tanaka, M; Tauchi, K; Yamauchi, M; Yasu, Y; Varner, G; Nagasaka, Y; Katayama, T; Watanabe, K; Ishizuka, M; Onozawa, S; Li, C J

    2003-01-01

    Data logging at an upgraded KEKB accelerator or the J-PARC facility, currently under commission, requires a high density data acquisition platform with integrated data reduction CPUs. To follow market trends, we have developed a DAQ platform based on the PCI bus, a choice which permits a fast DAQ and a long expected lifetime of the system. The platform is a 9U-VME motherboard consisting of four slots for signal digitization modules, readout FIFOs for data buffering, and three PMC slots, on one of which resides a data reduction CPU. We have performed long term and thermal stability tests. The readout speed on the platform has been measured up to 125 MB/s in DMA mode.

  4. Human otolith function, experiment M009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, A.; Miller, E. F., II

    1971-01-01

    The experiments that were performed during the Gemini 5 and 7 missions resulted in quantitative information concerning otolithic function and orientation of four subjects exposed to an orbiting spacecraft environment for prolonged periods of time. Preflight counterrolling measurements revealed significant differences between crewmembers with regard to the basic magnitude of otolith response. However, after the flight, each crewmember maintained his respective preflight level of response. This was indicative that no significant change in otolithic sensitivity occurred as a result of the flight, or at least no change persisted long enough to be recorded several hours after recovery. The EVLH data recorded for each subject confirmed the observation that a coordinate space sense exists even in a weightless environment if contact cues are adequate. However, it was noted that the apparent location of the horizontal within the spacecraft may not agree necessarily with its physical correlate in the spacecraft.

  5. Astronauts Conrad and Kerwin practice Human Vestibular Function experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the first manned Skylab mission, checks out the Human Vestibular Function, Experiment M131, during Skylab training at JSC. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot of the mission, goes over a checklist. The two men are in the work and experiments compartment of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC.

  6. Isentropic Compression Experiments Performed By LLNL On Energetic Material Samples Using The Z Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersall, K S; Reisman, D B; Forbes, J W; Hare, D E; Garcia, F; Uphaus, T M; Elsholz, A J; Tarver, C M; Eggert, J H

    2007-10-25

    Several experiments have been conducted by LLNL researchers using isentropic compression experiments (ICE) on energetic materials as samples from Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01) to Fiscal Year 2005 (FY05). Over this span of time, advancements of the experimental techniques and modeling of the results have evolved to produce improved results. This report documents the experiments that have been performed, provides details of the results generated, and modeling and analysis advances to fully understand the results. Publications on the topics by the various principal investigators (PI's) are detailed in the Appendices for quick reference for the work as it progressed.

  7. Calcification of human vascular smooth muscle cells: associations with osteoprotegerin expression and acceleration by high-dose insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Ping; Knudsen, Kirsten Quyen Nguyen; Wogensen, Lise

    2007-01-01

    Arterial medial calcifications occur often in diabetic individuals as part of the diabetic macroangiopathy. The pathogenesis is unknown, but the presence of calcifications predicts risk of cardiovascular events. We examined the effects of insulin on calcifying smooth muscle cells in vitro...... and measured the expression of the bone-related molecule osteoprotegerin (OPG). Human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were grown from aorta from kidney donors. Induction of calcification was performed with beta-glycerophosphate. The influence of insulin (200 microU/ml or 1,000 microU/ml) on calcification...... calcification in human smooth muscle cells from a series of donors after variable time in culture. Decreased OPG amounts were observed from the cells during the accelerated calcification phase. High dose of insulin (1,000 microU/ml) accelerated the calcification, whereas lower concentrations (200 microU/ml) did...

  8. The Accelerating Access Initiative: experience with a multinational workplace programme in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Borght, S; Janssens, V; Schim van der Loeff, M F; Kajemba, A; Rijckborst, H; Lange, J M A; Rinke de Wit, T F

    2009-10-01

    A multinational company with operations in several African countries was committed to offer antiretroviral treatment to its employees and their dependants. The Accelerating Access Initiative (AAI), an initiative of six pharmaceutical companies and five United Nations' agencies, offered the possibility of obtaining brand antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) at 10% of the commercial price. PharmAccess, a foundation aimed at removing barriers to AIDS treatment in Africa, helped to establish an HIV policy and treatment guidelines, and a workplace programme was rolled out from September 2001. Private sector employers in Africa are keen to take more responsibility in HIV prevention and AIDS care. An important hurdle for African employers remains the price and availability of ARVs. The programme encountered various hurdles, among them the need for multiple contracts with multiple companies, complex importation procedures, taxes levied on ARVs, lack of support from pharmaceutical companies in importation and transportation, slow delivery of the drugs, lack of institutional memory in pharmaceutical companies and government policies excluding the company from access to ARVs under the AAI. The launch of the AAI enabled this multinational company to offer access to ARVs to its employees and dependants. The private sector should have access to these discounted drugs under the AAI. A network of local AAI offices should be created to assist in logistics of drugs ordering, purchase and clearance. No taxes should be levied on ARVs.

  9. Experiments on a relativistic magnetron driven by a microsecond electron beam accelerator with a ceramic insulating stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mike Rodriguez

    2003-10-01

    Relativistic magnetron experiments with a 6-vane, Titan tube have generated over 300 MW total microwave output power near 1 GHz. These experiments were driven by a long-pulse, e-beam accelerator. Parameters of the device were voltage = -0.3 to -0.4 MV, current = 1--10 kA, and pulselength = 0.5 microsecond. This body of work investigated pulse-shortening in the relativistic magnetron. Microwave generation with a conventional plastic insulator was compared to that with a new ceramic insulator. The ceramic insulator improved the vacuum by an order of magnitude (1 x 10-7 Torr) and increased voltage stability of the accelerator. The effect of RF breakdown in the waveguide on the intensity and duration of high power microwaves were also investigated. These experiments found that when SF6 gas was introduced into the waveguide, the measured efficiency, power, and pulselength of microwaves increased. Two different microwave extraction mechanisms were used. In the first system, two waveguides were connected to the magnetron pi-radians from each other. The second system used three waveguides to connect to the magnetron's extraction ports at 2pi/3 radians from each other. Microwaves were extracted into and measured from the waveguide. Pulselengths were found to be in the range of 10--200 ns. The theoretical investigation calculates the maximum injected current for a time-independent cycloidal flow in a relativistic, magnetically insulated diode. The analytical theory of Lovelace-Ott was extended by relaxing the space charge limited (SCL) assumption. This theory reduced to Christenson's results in the deeply non-relativistic regime, and to Lovelace-Ott under SCL. This theory has been successfully tested against relativistic PIC code simulations.

  10. Human Vestibular Function, Rotating Litter Chair - Skylab Experiment M131

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    This 1970 photograph shows the Rotating Litter Chair, a major component of Skylab's Human Vestibular Function experiment (M131). The experiment was a set of medical studies designed to determine the effect of long-duration space missions on astronauts' coordination abilities. The M131 experiment tested the astronauts susceptibility to motion sickness in the Skylab environment, acquired data fundamental to an understanding of the functions of human gravity reception under prolonged absence of gravity, and tested for changes in the sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Data from this experiment was collected before, during, and after flight. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  11. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail...

  12. Can cognitive activities during breaks in repetitive manual work accelerate recovery from fatigue? A controlled experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svend Erik Mathiassen

    Full Text Available Neurophysiologic theory and some empirical evidence suggest that fatigue caused by physical work may be more effectively recovered during "diverting" periods of cognitive activity than during passive rest; a phenomenon of great interest in working life. We investigated the extent to which development and recovery of fatigue during repeated bouts of an occupationally relevant reaching task was influenced by the difficulty of a cognitive activity between these bouts. Eighteen male volunteers performed three experimental sessions, consisting of six 7-min bouts of reaching alternating with 3 minutes of a memory test differing in difficulty between sessions. Throughout each session, recordings were made of upper trapezius muscle activity using electromyography (EMG, heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV using electrocardiography, arterial blood pressure, and perceived fatigue (Borg CR10 scale and SOFI. A test battery before, immediately after and 1 hour after the work period included measurements of maximal shoulder elevation strength (MVC, pressure pain threshold (PPT over the trapezius muscles, and a submaximal isometric contraction. As expected, perceived fatigue and EMG amplitude increased during the physical work bouts. Recovery did occur between the bouts, but fatigue accumulated throughout the work period. Neither EMG changes nor recovery of perceived fatigue during breaks were influenced by cognitive task difficulty, while heart rate and HRV recovered the most during breaks with the most difficult task. Recovery of perceived fatigue after the 1 hour work period was also most pronounced for the most difficult cognitive condition, while MVC and PPT showed ambiguous patterns, and EMG recovered similarly after all three cognitive protocols. Thus, we could confirm that cognitive tasks between bouts of fatiguing physical work can, indeed, accelerate recovery of some factors associated with fatigue, even if benefits may be moderate and some

  13. Can cognitive activities during breaks in repetitive manual work accelerate recovery from fatigue? A controlled experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Hallman, David M; Lyskov, Eugene; Hygge, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Neurophysiologic theory and some empirical evidence suggest that fatigue caused by physical work may be more effectively recovered during "diverting" periods of cognitive activity than during passive rest; a phenomenon of great interest in working life. We investigated the extent to which development and recovery of fatigue during repeated bouts of an occupationally relevant reaching task was influenced by the difficulty of a cognitive activity between these bouts. Eighteen male volunteers performed three experimental sessions, consisting of six 7-min bouts of reaching alternating with 3 minutes of a memory test differing in difficulty between sessions. Throughout each session, recordings were made of upper trapezius muscle activity using electromyography (EMG), heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) using electrocardiography, arterial blood pressure, and perceived fatigue (Borg CR10 scale and SOFI). A test battery before, immediately after and 1 hour after the work period included measurements of maximal shoulder elevation strength (MVC), pressure pain threshold (PPT) over the trapezius muscles, and a submaximal isometric contraction. As expected, perceived fatigue and EMG amplitude increased during the physical work bouts. Recovery did occur between the bouts, but fatigue accumulated throughout the work period. Neither EMG changes nor recovery of perceived fatigue during breaks were influenced by cognitive task difficulty, while heart rate and HRV recovered the most during breaks with the most difficult task. Recovery of perceived fatigue after the 1 hour work period was also most pronounced for the most difficult cognitive condition, while MVC and PPT showed ambiguous patterns, and EMG recovered similarly after all three cognitive protocols. Thus, we could confirm that cognitive tasks between bouts of fatiguing physical work can, indeed, accelerate recovery of some factors associated with fatigue, even if benefits may be moderate and some responses may be

  14. Interim report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-21

    The Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was created by President Clinton to advise the Human Radiation Interagency Working Group on the ethical and scientific criteria applicable to human radiation experiments carried out or sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Committee seeks to answer several fundamental question: What ethics criteria should be used to evaluate human radiation experiments? What was the Federal Government`s role in human radiation experiments? What are the criteria for determining appropriate Federal responses where wrongs or harms have occurred? What lessons learned from studying past and present research standards and practices should be applied to the future? The Committee has been gathering vast amounts of information and working to render it orderly and accessible. In the next six months, the Committee will continue with the tasks of data gathering and organizing. The focus of the work, however, will be developing criteria for judging historical and contemporary experiments, policies, and procedures, as well as criteria for remedies that may be appropriate where harms or wrongs have ocurred. Based on findings, the Committee will make specific recommendations regarding policies for the future.

  15. Beta-catenin accelerates human papilloma virus type-16 mediated cervical carcinogenesis in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Bulut

    Full Text Available Human papilloma virus (HPV is the principal etiological agent of cervical cancer in women, and its DNA is present in virtually all of these tumors. However, exposure to the high-risk HPV types alone is insufficient for tumor development. Identifying specific collaborating factors that will lead to cervical cancer remains an unanswered question, especially because millions of women are exposed to HPV. Our earlier work using an in vitro model indicated that activation of the canonical Wnt pathway in HPV-positive epithelial cells was sufficient to induce anchorage independent growth. We therefore hypothesized that constitutive activation of this pathway might function as the "second hit." To address this possibility, we developed two double-transgenic (DT mouse models, K14-E7/ΔN87βcat and K14-HPV16/ΔN87βcat that express either the proteins encoded by the E7 oncogene or the HPV16 early region along with constitutively active β-catenin, which was expressed by linking it to the keratin-14 (K14 promoter. We initiated tumor formation by treating all groups with estrogen for six months. Invasive cervical cancer was observed in 11% of the K14-ΔN87βcat mice, expressing activated β-catenin and in 50% of the animals expressing the HPV16 E7 oncogene. In double-transgenic mice, coexpression of β-catenin and HPV16 E7 induced invasive cervical cancer at about 7 months in 94% of the cases. We did not observe cervical cancer in any group unless the mice were treated with estrogen. In the second model, K14-HPV16 mice suffered cervical dysplasias, but this phenotype was not augmented in HPV16/ΔN87βcat mice. In summary, the phenotypes of the K14-E7/ΔN87βcat mice support the hypothesis that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in HPV-associated premalignant lesions plays a functional role in accelerating cervical carcinogenesis.

  16. A hybrid CPU-GPU accelerated framework for fast mapping of high-resolution human brain connectome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Du, Haixiao; Xia, Mingrui; Ren, Ling; Xu, Mo; Xie, Teng; Gong, Gaolang; Xu, Ningyi; Yang, Huazhong; He, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a combination of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques and graph theoretical approaches has provided a unique opportunity for understanding the patterns of the structural and functional connectivity of the human brain (referred to as the human brain connectome). Currently, there is a very large amount of brain imaging data that have been collected, and there are very high requirements for the computational capabilities that are used in high-resolution connectome research. In this paper, we propose a hybrid CPU-GPU framework to accelerate the computation of the human brain connectome. We applied this framework to a publicly available resting-state functional MRI dataset from 197 participants. For each subject, we first computed Pearson's Correlation coefficient between any pairs of the time series of gray-matter voxels, and then we constructed unweighted undirected brain networks with 58 k nodes and a sparsity range from 0.02% to 0.17%. Next, graphic properties of the functional brain networks were quantified, analyzed and compared with those of 15 corresponding random networks. With our proposed accelerating framework, the above process for each network cost 80∼150 minutes, depending on the network sparsity. Further analyses revealed that high-resolution functional brain networks have efficient small-world properties, significant modular structure, a power law degree distribution and highly connected nodes in the medial frontal and parietal cortical regions. These results are largely compatible with previous human brain network studies. Taken together, our proposed framework can substantially enhance the applicability and efficacy of high-resolution (voxel-based) brain network analysis, and have the potential to accelerate the mapping of the human brain connectome in normal and disease states.

  17. A hybrid CPU-GPU accelerated framework for fast mapping of high-resolution human brain connectome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    Full Text Available Recently, a combination of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques and graph theoretical approaches has provided a unique opportunity for understanding the patterns of the structural and functional connectivity of the human brain (referred to as the human brain connectome. Currently, there is a very large amount of brain imaging data that have been collected, and there are very high requirements for the computational capabilities that are used in high-resolution connectome research. In this paper, we propose a hybrid CPU-GPU framework to accelerate the computation of the human brain connectome. We applied this framework to a publicly available resting-state functional MRI dataset from 197 participants. For each subject, we first computed Pearson's Correlation coefficient between any pairs of the time series of gray-matter voxels, and then we constructed unweighted undirected brain networks with 58 k nodes and a sparsity range from 0.02% to 0.17%. Next, graphic properties of the functional brain networks were quantified, analyzed and compared with those of 15 corresponding random networks. With our proposed accelerating framework, the above process for each network cost 80∼150 minutes, depending on the network sparsity. Further analyses revealed that high-resolution functional brain networks have efficient small-world properties, significant modular structure, a power law degree distribution and highly connected nodes in the medial frontal and parietal cortical regions. These results are largely compatible with previous human brain network studies. Taken together, our proposed framework can substantially enhance the applicability and efficacy of high-resolution (voxel-based brain network analysis, and have the potential to accelerate the mapping of the human brain connectome in normal and disease states.

  18. Patient and Staff (doctors and nurses) Experiences of Abdominal Hysterectomy in Accelerated Recovery Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Lis; Carlslund, Anne Mette; Møller, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    the experiences of the women operated and the staff involved. Material and methods: The study is exploratory and descriptive, using qualitative methods. Seventeen women, with good health status, were consecutively selected from August to September 2001. The women were observed and ten were interviewed twice...... of information relay and dialogue between staff and patients/family members. A nursing care ambulatory unit is recommended to support with information for women prior to and following hysterectomy in the ARP....

  19. Accelerating experience : utility sector case studies in training and knowledge management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudel-Ferrari, C.C. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed the development of effective training and knowledge management systems for recently hired personnel in electric utilities. Case studies of best practices from electric utilities in Ontario, consultants, and universities were used to develop an overview of current training practices. Methods of identifying, attracting, and recruiting personnel were presented and knowledge management and mentoring programs were discussed. The use of training programs in developing knowledge databases was also evaluated. Knowledge management formats included qualification training; simulation training; knowledge transfer; and curriculum development. Human resources, revenue, and management issues currently challenging electric utilities were discussed along with various new training practices. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  20. Proposed Physics Experiments for Laser-Driven Electron Linear Acceleration in a Dielectric Loaded Vacuum, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byer, Robert L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics. Edward L. Ginzton Lab.

    2016-07-08

    This final report summarizes the last three years of research on the development of advanced linear electron accelerators that utilize dielectric wave-guide vacuum channels pumped by high energy laser fields to accelerate beams of electrons.

  1. Searching for Physics beyond the Standard Model with Accelerator Neutrino Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, William C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab was designed to test the LSND evidence for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations . The first MiniBooNE oscillation result in neutrino mode shows no significant excess of events at higher energies (E{sub {nu}} > 475 MeV), although a sizeable excess is observed at lower energies (E{sub {nu}}< 475 MeV). The lack of a significant excess at higher energies allows MiniBooNE to rule out simple 2 - {nu} oscillations as an explanation of the LSND signal. However, the low-energy excess is presently unexplained. Additional antineutrino data and NuMI data may allow the collaboration to determine whether the excess is due, for example, to a neutrino neutral-current radiative interaction or to neutrino oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. If the excess is consistent with being due to sterile neutrinos, then future experiments at FNAL (BooNE) or ORNL (OscSNS) could prove their existence.

  2. Magnetic flux compression experiments on the Z pulsed-power accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, R. D.; Gomez, M. R.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C. A.; Bliss, D. E.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Awe, T. J.; Martin, M. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Greenly, J. B.; Intrator, T. P.; Weber, T. E.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the progress made to date for diagnosing magnetic flux compression on Z. Each experiment consisted of an initially solid Be or Al liner (cylindrical tube), which was imploded using Z's drive current (0-20 MA in 100 ns). The imploding liner compresses a 10-T axial seed field, Bz(0), supplied by an independently driven Helmholtz coil pair. Assuming perfect flux conservation, the axial field amplification should be well described by Bz (t) =Bz (0) × [ R (0) / R (t) ]2 , where R is the liner's inner surface radius. With perfect flux conservation, Bz and dBz/dt values exceeding 104 T and 1012 T/s, respectively, are expected. These large values, the diminishing liner volume, and the harsh environment on Z, make it particularly challenging to measure these fields. We report our latest efforts to do so using three primary techniques: (1) micro B-dot probes, (2) streaked visible Zeeman spectroscopy, and (3) fiber-based Faraday rotation. We will also briefly highlight some recent developments using neutron diagnostics (ratio of secondary DT to primary DD neutrons and secondary DT neutron energy spectra) to assess the degree of magnetization in fully integrated magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments on Z. This project was funded in part by Sandia's LDRD program and US DOE-NNSA Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry in the study of vitamin and mineral metabolism in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is an isotopic ratio method that can estimate the concentrations of long-lived radioisotopes such as carbon-14 and calcium-41, making it useful in biochemical and physiological research. It is capable of measuring radio-labeled nutrients and their metabolites in attomol...

  4. Assessment of spatio-temporal gait parameters from trunk accelerations during human walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Hof, AL

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of an analysis of spatio-temporal gait parameters based upon accelerometry. To this purpose, acceleration patterns of the trunk and their relationships with spatio-temporal gait parameters were analysed in healthy subjects. Based on model predictions of the body's

  5. Establishing the Biodynamics Data Resource (BDR): Human Volunteer Impact Acceleration Research Data in the BDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    experienced pain , the acceleration level was either repeated for reliability or was increased by 1 to 2 Gs. Thus the volunteers stationed at NBDL...Neck Ht Axilla Ht Suprasternale Ht Substernale Ht 10th Rib Ht Waist Ht (Omph) Iliocristale Ht ASIS Ht Trochanterion Ht Gluteal Furrow Ht Tibiale

  6. Huntington's disease accelerates epigenetic aging of human brain and disrupts DNA methylation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Steve; Langfelder, Peter; Kwak, Seung; Aaronson, Jeff; Rosinski, Jim; Vogt, Thomas F; Eszes, Marika; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A; Waldvogel, Henry J; Choi, Oi-Wa; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V; Coppola, Giovanni; Yang, X William

    2016-07-01

    Age of Huntington's disease (HD) motoric onset is strongly related to the number of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the huntingtin gene, suggesting that biological tissue age plays an important role in disease etiology. Recently, a DNA methylation based biomarker of tissue age has been advanced as an epigenetic aging clock. We sought to inquire if HD is associated with an accelerated epigenetic age. DNA methylation data was generated for 475 brain samples from various brain regions of 26 HD cases and 39 controls. Overall, brain regions from HD cases exhibit a significant epigenetic age acceleration effect (p=0.0012). A multivariate model analysis suggests that HD status increases biological age by 3.2 years. Accelerated epigenetic age can be observed in specific brain regions (frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and cingulate gyrus). After excluding controls, we observe a negative correlation (r=-0.41, p=5.5×10-8) between HD gene CAG repeat length and the epigenetic age of HD brain samples. Using correlation network analysis, we identify 11 co-methylation modules with a significant association with HD status across 3 broad cortical regions. In conclusion, HD is associated with an accelerated epigenetic age of specific brain regions and more broadly with substantial changes in brain methylation levels.

  7. Assessment of spatio-temporal gait parameters from trunk accelerations during human walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Hof, AL

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of an analysis of spatio-temporal gait parameters based upon accelerometry. To this purpose, acceleration patterns of the trunk and their relationships with spatio-temporal gait parameters were analysed in healthy subjects. Based on model predictions of the body's

  8. Exosomes derived from human amniotic epithelial cells accelerate wound healing and inhibit scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Yijie; Han, Shichao; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Hao; Liu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jihong; Su, Linlin; Hu, Dahai

    2017-04-01

    Wound healing is a highly orchestrated physiological process consisting of a complex events, and scarless wound healing is highly desired for the development and application in clinical medicine. Recently, we have demonstrated that human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) promoted wound healing and inhibited scar formation through a paracrine mechanism. However, exosomes (Exo) are one of the most important paracrine factors. Whether exosomes derived from human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs-Exo) have positive effects on scarless wound healing have not been reported yet. In this study, we examined the role of hAECs-Exo on wound healing in a rat model. We found that hAECs, which exhibit characteristics of both embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, have the potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. hAECs-Exo ranged from 50 to 150 nm in diameter, and positive for exosomal markers CD9, CD63, CD81, Alix, TSG101 and HLA-G. Internalization of hAECs-Exo promoted the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts. Moreover, the deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) were partly abolished by the treatment of high concentration of hAECs-Exo (100 μg/mL), which may be through stimulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). In vivo animal experiments showed that hAECs-Exo improved the skin wound healing with well-organized collagen fibers. Taken together, These findings represent that hAECs-Exo can be used as a novel hope in cell-free therapy for scarless wound healing.

  9. Data quality management system (DQMS) for BAC detector in the ZEUS experiment at the HERA accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczak, Zbigniew; Jezynski, Tomasz; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Kuthan, Marcin; Bigos, Grzegorz; Gierej, Artur

    2003-10-01

    The paper presents functional structure of database system of data measurement quality for BAC detector in ZEUS experiment. The system collects diagnostic and experimental data. Diagnostic data are: work parameters of the detector and electronics/photonics, tests of electronic/photonic blocks. These data are archived for certain period of time. The quality of current data collection process is estimated using these archived data. The result of such estimation is generated in a form of status map of the detector. Such maps, describing status of the hardware, are fundamental for elementary particle analysis by the calorimeter. The DAQ system, collecting data to the database, estimates data quality on-line during transmission and writing. This mechanism of fast on-line data quality management leads to early discoveries of detector work irregularities and faults.

  10. Modeling of Nike Experiments on Acceleration of Planar Targets Stabilized with a Short Spike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, N.; Velikovich, A. L.; Gardner, J. H.

    2005-10-01

    A short sub-ns laser pulse (spike) produces a decelerating shock wave and a rarefaction wave immediately behind it, shaping a density gradient in the target. The following main pulse ``rides'' this graded density profile. We have demonstrated how the deceleration of the ablation front following the shock wave suppresses laser imprint and delays perturbation growth in the target [1]. We report the results of 2D numerical modeling of experiments on Nike laser at NRL, with its recently developed short-pulse capability, for a low-energy spike which does not affect the target adiabat. We studied the effect of spike on laser imprint on smooth planar targets and on the growth of perturbations imposed as single-mode ripples on the irradiated surface of the targets. For all cases, delay of the onset and/or suppression of the rate of the mass perturbation growth due to the spike are robust and significant enough to be observable on Nike. [1] N. Metzler et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 3283 (1999); 9, 5050 (2002); 10, 1897 (2003).

  11. Can we probe intrinsic C P and T violations and nonunitarity at long baseline accelerator experiments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Jogesh; Masud, Mehedi; Mehta, Poonam

    2017-04-01

    One of the fundamental parameters entering the neutrino oscillation framework is the leptonic C P phase δ13, and its measurement is an important goal of the planned long baseline experiments. It should be noted that ordinary matter effects complicate the determination of this parameter, and there are studies in the literature that deal with separation of intrinsic vs extrinsic C P violation. It is important to investigate the consequences of new physics effects that can not only hamper the measurement of δ13 but also impact the consequences of discrete symmetries such as C P , T , and unitarity in different oscillation channels. In the present work, we explore these discrete symmetries and implications on unitarity in the presence of two new physics scenarios (nonstandard interaction in propagation and the presence of sterile neutrinos) that serve as good examples of going beyond the standard scenario in different directions. We uncover the impact of new physics scenarios on disentangling intrinsic and extrinsic C P violation.

  12. Accelerated Capacity Development in Water Resources Education: the experiences of the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamirew, T.; Mekonnen, G.; Viglione, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ethiopia recently recognises that the water resources development is the major entry point in poverty alleviation and sustainable development. Water in Ethiopia plays a key role in the Water-Energy-Food-nexus. Over 98% of the electricity in the country is generated using hydropower and yet about 2000 MW has been developed. Out of the 3.5 Mha potentially irrigable land, only 0.25 Mha has been developed to date. Access to drinking water supply coverage is among the lowest in the world. One of the limiting factors in harnessing the resource base is the absence of water professionals to face the fast growing demand in education, research, development in the water sector. Recognising this, in collaboration with University of Connecticut of the United States, Addis Ababa University launched the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources (EIWR) by enrolling 18 PhD and 24 MSc students. The program is unique in that much of the course instructors are coming from US and European Universities, but deliver courses together with Ethiopian collaborators. This is supposed to facilitate knowledge and experience transfer from the US/EU scientist to Ethiopian counterparts. The theses/dissertations are designed to focus on Ethiopia's immediate hydrological problems on selected basins, and will be coordinated by three advisors for each PhD - one from US/EU, one from Ethiopian Universities, and one water professional from the sector. We report here the lessons learned in setting up the EIWR institute and the education program.

  13. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  14. Human Ecology and Health Advancement: The Newcastle Experience and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jenny; Honari, Morteza

    1992-01-01

    Argues for the necessity of adopting a human ecological framework for the advancement of health. Focusing on the Australian experience, highlights the difficulties in moving beyond the narrow mold of Western Medical Science to a more holistic, quality of life orientation, and suggests that the role of education at all levels of the community is…

  15. Animation, embodiment, and digital media human experience of technological liveliness

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, K

    2013-01-01

    Animation, Embodiment and Digital Media articulates the human experience of technology-mediated animated phenomena in terms of sensory perception, bodily action and imaginative interpretation, suggesting a new theoretical framework with analyses of exemplary user interfaces, video games and interactive artworks.

  16. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    When the Advisory Committee began work in April 1994 we were charged with determining whether the radiation experiments design and administration adequately met the ethical and scientific standards, including standards of informed consent, that prevailed at the time of the experiments and that exist today and also to determine the ethical and scientific standards and criteria by which it shall evaluate human radiation experiments. Although this charge seems straightforward, it is in fact difficult to determine what the appropriate standards should be for evaluating the conduct and policies of thirty or fifty years ago. First, we needed to determine the extent to which the standards of that time are similar to the standards of today. To the extent that there were differences we needed to determine the relative roles of each in making moral evaluations. In Chapter 1 we report what we have been able to reconstruct about government rules and policies in the 1940s and 1950s regarding human experiments. We focus primarily on the Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of Defense. In Chapter 2 we turn from a consideration of government standards to an exploration of the norms and practices of physicians and medical scientists who conducted research with human subjects during this period. Using the results of our Ethics Oral History Project, and other sources, we also examine how scientists of the time viewed their moral responsibilities to human subjects as well as how this translated into the manner in which they conducted their research.

  17. Experiments in human multi-issue negotiation: analysis and support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Jonker, C.M.; Schut, M.C.; Treur, J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on experiments in (human) multi-issue negotiation and their analysis, and to present a generic software environment supporting such an analysis. First, the paper presents a System for Analysis of Multi-Issue Negotiation (SAMIN). SAMIN is designed to analyse neg

  18. Neuroscience and the Soul: Competing Explanations for the Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jesse Lee; Ritter, Ryan S.; Hepler, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The development of fMRI techniques has generated a boom of neuroscience research across the psychological sciences, and revealed neural correlates for many psychological phenomena seen as central to the human experience (e.g., morality, agency). Meanwhile, the rise of neuroscience has reignited old debates over mind-body dualism and the soul.…

  19. Capturing Moment-To-Moment Changes in Multivariate Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruiter, Naomi M. P.; Van Der Steen, Steffie; Den Hartigh, Ruud J. R.; Van Geert, Paul L. C.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we aim to shed light on a technique to study intra-individual variability that spans the time frame of seconds and minutes, i.e., micro-level development. This form of variability is omnipresent in behavioural development and processes of human experience, yet is often ignored in empirical studies, given a lack of proper analysis…

  20. Neuroscience and the Soul: Competing Explanations for the Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jesse Lee; Ritter, Ryan S.; Hepler, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The development of fMRI techniques has generated a boom of neuroscience research across the psychological sciences, and revealed neural correlates for many psychological phenomena seen as central to the human experience (e.g., morality, agency). Meanwhile, the rise of neuroscience has reignited old debates over mind-body dualism and the soul.…

  1. Human strategic reasoning in dynamic games: Experiments, logics, cognitive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Sujata; Halder, Tamoghna; Sharma, Khyati; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2015-01-01

    © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.This article provides a three-way interaction between experiments, logic and cognitive modelling so as to bring out a shared perspective among these diverse areas, aiming towards better understanding and better modelling of human strategic reasoning in

  2. Human Ecology and Health Advancement: The Newcastle Experience and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jenny; Honari, Morteza

    1992-01-01

    Argues for the necessity of adopting a human ecological framework for the advancement of health. Focusing on the Australian experience, highlights the difficulties in moving beyond the narrow mold of Western Medical Science to a more holistic, quality of life orientation, and suggests that the role of education at all levels of the community is…

  3. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  4. Human strategic reasoning in dynamic games: Experiments, logics, cognitive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Sujata; Halder, Tamoghna; Sharma, Khyati; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2015-01-01

    © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.This article provides a three-way interaction between experiments, logic and cognitive modelling so as to bring out a shared perspective among these diverse areas, aiming towards better understanding and better modelling of human strategic reasoning in dynami

  5. High Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Audio Productions, Inc, New York

    1960-01-01

    Film about the different particle accelerators in the US. Nuclear research in the US has developed into a broad and well-balanced program.Tour of accelerator installations, accelerator development work now in progress and a number of typical experiments with high energy particles. Brookhaven, Cosmotron. Univ. Calif. Berkeley, Bevatron. Anti-proton experiment. Negative k meson experiment. Bubble chambers. A section on an electron accelerator. Projection of new accelerators. Princeton/Penn. build proton synchrotron. Argonne National Lab. Brookhaven, PS construction. Cambridge Electron Accelerator; Harvard/MIT. SLAC studying a linear accelerator. Other research at Madison, Wisconsin, Fixed Field Alternate Gradient Focusing. (FFAG) Oakridge, Tenn., cyclotron. Two-beam machine. Comments : Interesting overview of high energy particle accelerators installations in the US in these early years. .

  6. The human amygdala and the induction and experience of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Justin S; Adolphs, Ralph; Damasio, Antonio; Tranel, Daniel

    2011-01-11

    Although clinical observations suggest that humans with amygdala damage have abnormal fear reactions and a reduced experience of fear, these impressions have not been systematically investigated. To address this gap, we conducted a new study in a rare human patient, SM, who has focal bilateral amygdala lesions. To provoke fear in SM, we exposed her to live snakes and spiders, took her on a tour of a haunted house, and showed her emotionally evocative films. On no occasion did SM exhibit fear, and she never endorsed feeling more than minimal levels of fear. Likewise, across a large battery of self-report questionnaires, 3 months of real-life experience sampling, and a life history replete with traumatic events, SM repeatedly demonstrated an absence of overt fear manifestations and an overall impoverished experience of fear. Despite her lack of fear, SM is able to exhibit other basic emotions and experience the respective feelings. The findings support the conclusion that the human amygdala plays a pivotal role in triggering a state of fear and that the absence of such a state precludes the experience of fear itself. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The human amygdala and the induction and experience of fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Justin S.; Adolphs, Ralph; Damasio, Antonio R.; Tranel, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Summary Although clinical observations suggest that humans with amygdala damage have abnormal fear reactions and a reduced experience of fear [1–3], these impressions have not been systematically investigated. To address this gap, we conducted a new study in a rare human patient, SM, who has focal bilateral amygdala lesions [4]. To provoke fear in SM, we exposed her to live snakes and spiders, took her on a tour of a haunted house, and showed her emotionally evocative films. On no occasion did SM exhibit fear and she never endorsed feeling more than minimal levels of fear. Likewise, across a large battery of self-report questionnaires, three months of real-life experience sampling, and a life history replete with traumatic events, SM repeatedly demonstrated an absence of overt fear manifestations and an overall impoverished experience of fear. Despite her lack of fear, SM is able to exhibit other basic emotions and experience the respective feelings. The findings support the conclusion that the human amygdala plays a pivotal role in triggering a state of fear, and that the absence of such a state precludes the experience of fear itself. PMID:21167712

  8. Accelerating the Development of 21st-Century Toxicology: Outcome of a Human Toxicology Project Consortium Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Martin L.; Barrow, Craig; Andersen, Melvin E.; Boekelheide, Kim; Carmichael, Paul L.; Holsapple, Michael P.; Lafranconi, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. National Research Council (NRC) report on “Toxicity Testing in the 21st century” calls for a fundamental shift in the way that chemicals are tested for human health effects and evaluated in risk assessments. The new approach would move toward in vitro methods, typically using human cells in a high-throughput context. The in vitro methods would be designed to detect significant perturbations to “toxicity pathways,” i.e., key biological pathways that, when sufficiently perturbed, lead to adverse health outcomes. To explore progress on the report’s implementation, the Human Toxicology Project Consortium hosted a workshop on 9–10 November 2010 in Washington, DC. The Consortium is a coalition of several corporations, a research institute, and a non-governmental organization dedicated to accelerating the implementation of 21st-century Toxicology as aligned with the NRC vision. The goal of the workshop was to identify practical and scientific ways to accelerate implementation of the NRC vision. The workshop format consisted of plenary presentations, breakout group discussions, and concluding commentaries. The program faculty was drawn from industry, academia, government, and public interest organizations. Most presentations summarized ongoing efforts to modernize toxicology testing and approaches, each with some overlap with the NRC vision. In light of these efforts, the workshop identified recommendations for accelerating implementation of the NRC vision, including greater strategic coordination and planning across projects (facilitated by a steering group), the development of projects that test the proof of concept for implementation of the NRC vision, and greater outreach and communication across stakeholder communities. PMID:21948868

  9. Telomerase prevents accelerated senescence in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient human fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yi-Hsuan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroblasts derived from glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient patients display retarded growth and accelerated cellular senescence that is attributable to increased accumulation of oxidative DNA damage and increased sensitivity to oxidant-induced senescence, but not to accelerated telomere attrition. Here, we show that ectopic expression of hTERT stimulates telomerase activity and prevents accelerated senescence in G6PD-deficient cells. Stable clones derived from hTERT-expressing normal and G6PD-deficient fibroblasts have normal karyotypes, and display no sign of senescence beyond 145 and 105 passages, respectively. Activation of telomerase, however, does not prevent telomere attrition in earlier-passage cells, but does stabilize telomere lengths at later passages. In addition, we provide evidence that ectopic expression of hTERT attenuates the increased sensitivity of G6PD-deficient fibroblasts to oxidant-induced senescence. These results suggest that ectopic expression of hTERT, in addition to acting in telomere length maintenance by activating telomerase, also functions in regulating senescence induction.

  10. Time to accelerate integration of human factors and ergonomics in patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurses, Ayse P; Ozok, A Ant; Pronovost, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Progress toward improving patient safety has been slow despite engagement of the health care community in improvement efforts. A potential reason for this sluggish pace is the inadequate integration of human factors and ergonomics principles and methods in these efforts. Patient safety problems are complex and rarely caused by one factor or component of a work system. Thus, health care would benefit from human factors and ergonomics evaluations to systematically identify the problems, prioritize the right ones, and develop effective and practical solutions. This paper gives an overview of the discipline of human factors and ergonomics and describes its role in improving patient safety. We provide examples of how human factors and ergonomics principles and methods have improved both care processes and patient outcomes. We provide five major recommendations to better integrate human factors and ergonomics in patient safety improvement efforts: build capacity among health care workers to understand human factors and ergonomics, create market forces that demand the integration of human factors and ergonomics design principles into medical technologies, increase the number of human factors and ergonomic practitioners in health care organizations, expand investments in improvement efforts informed by human factors and ergonomics, and support interdisciplinary research to improve patient safety. In conclusion, human factors and ergonomics must play a more prominent role in health care if we want to increase the pace in improving patient safety.

  11. Combined small-molecule inhibition accelerates the derivation of functional cortical neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yuchen; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Renier, Nicolas; Wu, Zhuhao; Atkin, Talia; Sun, Ziyi; Ozair, M Zeeshan; Tchieu, Jason; Zimmer, Bastian; Fattahi, Faranak; Ganat, Yosif; Azevedo, Ricardo; Zeltner, Nadja; Brivanlou, Ali H; Karayiorgou, Maria; Gogos, Joseph; Tomishima, Mark; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Shi, Song-Hai; Studer, Lorenz

    2017-02-01

    Considerable progress has been made in converting human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into functional neurons. However, the protracted timing of human neuron specification and functional maturation remains a key challenge that hampers the routine application of hPSC-derived lineages in disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Using a combinatorial small-molecule screen, we previously identified conditions to rapidly differentiate hPSCs into peripheral sensory neurons. Here we generalize the approach to central nervous system (CNS) fates by developing a small-molecule approach for accelerated induction of early-born cortical neurons. Combinatorial application of six pathway inhibitors induces post-mitotic cortical neurons with functional electrophysiological properties by day 16 of differentiation, in the absence of glial cell co-culture. The resulting neurons, transplanted at 8 d of differentiation into the postnatal mouse cortex, are functional and establish long-distance projections, as shown using iDISCO whole-brain imaging. Accelerated differentiation into cortical neuron fates should facilitate hPSC-based strategies for disease modeling and cell therapy in CNS disorders.

  12. Astronaut Charles Conrad checks out Human Vestibular Function experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the first manned Skylab mission, checks out the Human Vestibular Function, Experiment M131, during Skylab training at JSC. Conrad is in the work and experiments compartment of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC. The reference sphere with a magnetic rod is used by the astronaut to indicate body orientation non-visually. The litter chair in which he is seated can be rotated by a motor at its base or, when not being rotated, can tilt forward, backward or to either side.

  13. When less equal is less human: Intragroup (dis)respect and the experience of being human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renger, Daniela; Mommert, Alex; Renger, Sophus; Simon, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated that equality-based respect is an important antecedent of positive social interaction and group-serving behavior. In the present research we tested whether intragroup equality-based respect affects perceptions of being treated as a human as well as self-dehumanization. In Experiment 1, we found that high respect received from fellow work group members heightens group members' sense of being treated as a human being, while low respect diminishes it. In Experiment 2, we secured evidence that (dis)respect also affected recipients' self-views in terms of self-dehumanization. More specifically, if respect was withheld by other ingroup members, fewer human nature and human uniqueness traits, as well as secondary positive emotions, were attributed to the self. This increase in self-infrahumanization was further related to higher endorsement of unethical behavior. We discuss the importance of equality-based respect for (de-)humanization processes in social groups.

  14. Androgen receptor accelerates premature senescence of human dermal papilla cells in association with DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chien Yang

    Full Text Available The dermal papilla, located in the hair follicle, expresses androgen receptor and plays an important role in hair growth. Androgen/Androgen receptor actions have been implicated in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia, but the exact mechanism is not well known. Recent studies suggest that balding dermal papilla cells exhibit premature senescence, upregulation of p16(INK4a, and nuclear expression of DNA damage markers. To investigate whether androgen/AR signaling influences the premature senescence of dermal papilla cells, we first compared frontal scalp dermal papilla cells of androgenetic alopecia patients with matched normal controls and observed that premature senescence is more prominent in the dermal papilla cells of androgenetic alopecia patients. Exposure of androgen induced premature senescence in dermal papilla cells from non-balding frontal and transitional zone of balding scalp follicles but not in beard follicles. Overexpression of the AR promoted androgen-induced premature senescence in association with p16(INK4a upregulation, whereas knockdown of the androgen receptor diminished the effects of androgen. An analysis of γ-H2AX expression in response to androgen/androgen receptor signaling suggested that DNA damage contributes to androgen/androgen receptor-accelerated premature senescence. These results define androgen/androgen receptor signaling as an accelerator of premature senescence in dermal papilla cells and suggest that the androgen/androgen receptor-mediated DNA damage-p16(INK4a axis is a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia.

  15. Demonstration of space-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering capability for warm dense matter experiments on the Z accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, T.; Harding, E. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Lemke, R. W.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Hansen, S. B.; Smith, I. C.; Geissel, M.; Maurer, A.; Reneker, J.; Romero, D.; Sinars, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Benage, J. F.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments on the Sandia Z pulsed-power accelerator have demonstrated the ability to produce warm dense matter (WDM) states with unprecedented uniformity, duration, and size, which are ideal for investigations of fundamental WDM properties. For the first time, space-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) spectra from shocked carbon foams were recorded on Z. The large (>20 MA) electrical current produced by Z was used to launch Al flyer plates up to 25 km/s. The impact of the flyer plate on a CH2 foam target produced a shocked state with an estimated pressure of 0.75 Mbar, density of 0.52 g/cm3, and temperature of 4.3 eV. Both unshocked and shocked portions of the foam target were probed with 6.2 keV x-rays produced by focusing the Z-Beamlet laser onto a nearby Mn foil. The data are composed of three spatially distinct spectra that were simultaneously captured with a single spectrometer with high spectral (4.8 eV) and spatial (190 μm) resolutions. Detailed spectral information from three target locations is provided simultaneously: the incident x-ray source, the scattered signal from unshocked foam, and the scattered signal from shocked foam.

  16. Commissioning and early experience with a new-generation low-energy linear accelerator with advanced delivery and imaging functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new-generation low-energy linear accelerator (UNIQUE was introduced in the clinical arena during 2009 by Varian Medical Systems. The world's first UNIQUE was installed at Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland and put into clinical operation in June 2010. The aim of the present contribution was to report experience about its commissioning and first year results from clinical operation. Methods Commissioning data, beam characteristics and the modeling into the treatment planning system were summarized. Imaging system of UNIQUE included a 2D-2D matching capability and tests were performed to identify system repositioning capability. Finally, since the system is capable of delivering volumetric modulated arc therapy with RapidArc, a summary of the tests performed for such modality to assess its performance in preclinical settings and during clinical usage was included. Results Isocenter virtual diameter was measured as less than 0.2 mm. Observed accuracy of isocenter determination and repositioning for 2D-2D matching procedures in image guidance was Conclusions The results of the commissioning tests and of the first period of clinical operation, resulted meeting specifications and having good margins respect to tolerances. UNIQUE was put into operation for all delivery techniques; in particular, as shown by the pre-treatment quality assurance results, it enabled accurate and safe delivery of RapidArc plans.

  17. The Ways of Advanced Human Capital: Discussions from Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayén Amanda Rovira Rubio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present research aimed to know the significance of academic training experienced by postgraduate students who are pursuing their studies abroad under the context of a Training Program for Advanced Human Capital promoted by the Government of Chile. A feminist epistemology of situated knowledge was used as methodological framework, and narrative productions were used as technique of data collection. With this approach, the experiences of seven graduate students in Spanish universities, mostly of them beneficiaries of scholarships from Chile, were analyzed. The main findings were: the positive assessment of the experience of studying abroad, the divergent testimonies about these experiences, which based on previous educational trajectories and the socioeconomic level of the professional. These aspects influenced the identifications with the concept of Advanced Human Capital for Chile. Also, for some participants, the Advanced Human Capital is seen as an imposed concept which does not coincide with the real opportunities for the professional practice in the country. Therefore, the participants are sceptical about the possibilities of adequate job insertion in the return to Chile.

  18. Integrating an Interprofessional Education Experience Into a Human Physiology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Scott; Molina, Patricia E; McDonough, Kathleen H; Mercante, Donald E; Gunaldo, Tina P

    2017-09-01

    To obtain physician assistant (PA) student perceptions about an interprofessional education (IPE) training experience embedded in a multidisciplinary science course. An IPE training experience was integrated into a graduate human physiology course offered to PA, physical therapy, and graduate studies students. The focus of the activity related to the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competency domains of (1) roles and responsibilities and (2) teams and teamwork. Effectiveness was assessed in pretraining and posttraining surveys, which included questions addressing student self-perceptions of IPEC competency domains, student assessment of the learning activity, and student reflection. We observed a statistically significant positive change in PA student perceptions of IPEC competency domains. Students also provided a positive evaluation of the IPE activity and communicated personal improvements in IPE perspectives. Incorporating planned IPE experiences into multidisciplinary health science courses represents an appropriate venue for PA students to learn and apply interprofessional competencies, which may benefit future interprofessional practice.

  19. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ryan D.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) [1] is a concept that involves using a pulsed electrical current to implode an initially-solid, cylindrical metal tube (liner) filled with preheated and magnetized fusion fuel. One- and two-dimensional simulations predict that if sufficient liner integrity can be maintained throughout the implosion, then significant fusion yield (>100 kJ) is possible on the 25-MA, 100-ns Z accelerator. The greatest threat to the liner integrity is the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability, which first develops on the outer liner surface, and then works its way inward toward the inner surface throughout the implosion. Two-dimensional simulations predict that a thick liner, with Router/δR=6, should be robust enough to keep the MRT instability from overly disrupting the fusion burn at stagnation. This talk will present the first experiments designed to study a thick, MagLIF-relevant liner implosion through to stagnation on Z [2]. The use of beryllium for the liner material enabled us to obtain penetrating monochromatic (6151±0.5 eV) radiographs that reveal information about the entire volume of the imploding liner. This talk will also discuss experiments that investigated Z's pulse-shaping capabilities to either shock- or shocklessly-compress the imploding liners [3], as well as our most recent experiments that used 2-micron-thick aluminum sleeves to provide high-contrast tracers for the positions and states of the inner surfaces of the imploding beryllium liners. The radiography data to be presented provide stringent constraints on the simulation tools used by the broader high energy density physics and inertial confinement fusion communities, where quantitative areal density measurements, particularly of convergent fusion targets, are relatively scarce. We will also present power-flow tests of the MagLIF load hardware as well as new micro-B-dot measurements of the azimuthal drive magnetic field that penetrates the initially vacuum

  20. Elevated IKKα accelerates the differentiation of human neuronal progenitor cells and induces MeCP2-dependent BDNF expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khoshnan

    Full Text Available The IκB kinase α (IKKα is implicated in the differentiation of epithelial and immune cells. We examined whether IKKα also plays a role in the differentiation and maturation of embryonic human neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs. We find that expression of an extra copy of IKKα (IKKα+ blocks self-renewal and accelerates the differentiation of NPCs. This coincides with reduced expression of the Repressor Element Silencing Transcription Factor/Neuron-Restrictive Silencing Factor (REST/NRSF, which is a prominent inhibitor of neurogenesis, and subsequent induction of the pro-differentiation non-coding RNA, miR-124a. However, the effects of IKKα on REST/NRSF and miR-124a expression are likely to be indirect. IKKα+ neurons display extensive neurite outgrowth and accumulate protein markers of neuronal maturation such as SCG10/stathmin-2, postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95, syntaxin, and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2. Interestingly, IKKα associates with MeCP2 in the nuclei of human neurons and can phosphorylate MeCP2 in vitro. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we find that IKKα is recruited to the exon-IV brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF promoter, which is a well-characterized target of MeCP2 activity. Moreover, IKKα induces the transcription of BDNF and knockdown expression of MeCP2 interferes with this event. These studies highlight a role for IKKα in accelerating the differentiation of human NPCs and identify IKKα as a potential regulator of MeCP2 function and BDNF expression.

  1. Human Empathy, Personality and Experience Affect the Emotion Ratings of Dog and Human Facial Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V; Somppi, Sanni; Jokela, Markus; Vainio, Outi; Parkkonen, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions are important for humans in communicating emotions to the conspecifics and enhancing interpersonal understanding. Many muscles producing facial expressions in humans are also found in domestic dogs, but little is known about how humans perceive dog facial expressions, and which psychological factors influence people's perceptions. Here, we asked 34 observers to rate the valence, arousal, and the six basic emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear, and anger/aggressiveness) from images of human and dog faces with Pleasant, Neutral and Threatening expressions. We investigated how the subjects' personality (the Big Five Inventory), empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index) and experience of dog behavior affect the ratings of dog and human faces. Ratings of both species followed similar general patterns: human subjects classified dog facial expressions from pleasant to threatening very similarly to human facial expressions. Subjects with higher emotional empathy evaluated Threatening faces of both species as more negative in valence and higher in anger/aggressiveness. More empathetic subjects also rated the happiness of Pleasant humans but not dogs higher, and they were quicker in their valence judgments of Pleasant human, Threatening human and Threatening dog faces. Experience with dogs correlated positively with ratings of Pleasant and Neutral dog faces. Personality also had a minor effect on the ratings of Pleasant and Neutral faces in both species. The results imply that humans perceive human and dog facial expression in a similar manner, and the perception of both species is influenced by psychological factors of the evaluators. Especially empathy affects both the speed and intensity of rating dogs' emotional facial expressions.

  2. Avoiding Human Error in Mission Operations: Cassini Flight Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Operating spacecraft is a never-ending challenge and the risk of human error is ever- present. Many missions have been significantly affected by human error on the part of ground controllers. The Cassini mission at Saturn has not been immune to human error, but Cassini operations engineers use tools and follow processes that find and correct most human errors before they reach the spacecraft. What is needed are skilled engineers with good technical knowledge, good interpersonal communications, quality ground software, regular peer reviews, up-to-date procedures, as well as careful attention to detail and the discipline to test and verify all commands that will be sent to the spacecraft. Two areas of special concern are changes to flight software and response to in-flight anomalies. The Cassini team has a lot of practical experience in all these areas and they have found that well-trained engineers with good tools who follow clear procedures can catch most errors before they get into command sequences to be sent to the spacecraft. Finally, having a robust and fault-tolerant spacecraft that allows ground controllers excellent visibility of its condition is the most important way to ensure human error does not compromise the mission.

  3. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spata, Michael F. [JLAB

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  4. Accelerated Recruitment of New Brain Development Genes into the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong E.; Landback, Patrick; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Long, Manyuan

    2011-01-01

    How the human brain evolved has attracted tremendous interests for decades. Motivated by case studies of primate-specific genes implicated in brain function, we examined whether or not the young genes, those emerging genome-wide in the lineages specific to the primates or rodents, showed distinct spatial and temporal patterns of transcription compared to old genes, which had existed before primate and rodent split. We found consistent patterns across different sources of expression data: there is a significantly larger proportion of young genes expressed in the fetal or infant brain of humans than in mouse, and more young genes in humans have expression biased toward early developing brains than old genes. Most of these young genes are expressed in the evolutionarily newest part of human brain, the neocortex. Remarkably, we also identified a number of human-specific genes which are expressed in the prefrontal cortex, which is implicated in complex cognitive behaviors. The young genes upregulated in the early developing human brain play diverse functional roles, with a significant enrichment of transcription factors. Genes originating from different mechanisms show a similar expression bias in the developing brain. Moreover, we found that the young genes upregulated in early brain development showed rapid protein evolution compared to old genes also expressed in the fetal brain. Strikingly, genes expressed in the neocortex arose soon after its morphological origin. These four lines of evidence suggest that positive selection for brain function may have contributed to the origination of young genes expressed in the developing brain. These data demonstrate a striking recruitment of new genes into the early development of the human brain. PMID:22028629

  5. Accelerated Evolution of Conserved Noncoding Sequences in theHuman Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prambhakar, Shyam; Noonan, James P.; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, EdwardM.

    2006-07-06

    Genomic comparisons between human and distant, non-primatemammals are commonly used to identify cis-regulatory elements based onconstrained sequence evolution. However, these methods fail to detect"cryptic" functional elements, which are too weakly conserved amongmammals to distinguish from nonfunctional DNA. To address this problem,we explored the potential of deep intra-primate sequence comparisons. Wesequenced the orthologs of 558 kb of human genomic sequence, coveringmultiple loci involved in cholesterol homeostasis, in 6 nonhumanprimates. Our analysis identified 6 noncoding DNA elements displayingsignificant conservation among primates, but undetectable in more distantcomparisons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that at least three ofthese 6 elements have regulatory function. Notably, the mouse orthologsof these three functional human sequences had regulatory activity despitetheir lack of significant sequence conservation, indicating that they arecryptic ancestral cis-regulatory elements. These regulatory elementscould still be detected in a smaller set of three primate speciesincluding human, rhesus and marmoset. Since the human and rhesus genomesequences are already available, and the marmoset genome is activelybeing sequenced, the primate-specific conservation analysis describedhere can be applied in the near future on a whole-genome scale, tocomplement the annotation provided by more distant speciescomparisons.

  6. Silencing BRE expression in human umbilical cord perivascular (HUCPV progenitor cells accelerates osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elve Chen

    Full Text Available BRE is a multifunctional adapter protein involved in DNA repair, cell survival and stress response. To date, most studies of this protein have been focused in the tumor model. The role of BRE in stem cell biology has never been investigated. Therefore, we have used HUCPV progenitor cells to elucidate the function of BRE. HUCPV cells are multipotent fetal progenitor cells which possess the ability to differentiate into a multitude of mesenchymal cell lineages when chemically induced and can be more easily amplified in culture. In this study, we have established that BRE expression was normally expressed in HUCPV cells but become down-regulated when the cells were induced to differentiate. In addition, silencing BRE expression, using BRE-siRNAs, in HUCPV cells could accelerate induced chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation. Hence, we postulated that BRE played an important role in maintaining the stemness of HUCPV cells. We used microarray analysis to examine the transcriptome of BRE-silenced cells. BRE-silencing negatively regulated OCT4, FGF5 and FOXO1A. BRE-silencing also altered the expression of epigenetic genes and components of the TGF-β/BMP and FGF signaling pathways which are crucially involved in maintaining stem cell self-renewal. Comparative proteomic profiling also revealed that BRE-silencing resulted in decreased expressions of actin-binding proteins. In sum, we propose that BRE acts like an adaptor protein that promotes stemness and at the same time inhibits the differentiation of HUCPV cells.

  7. The Expression and Action of Decay-Accelerating Factor (CD55 in Human Malignancies and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Henrik Mikesch

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, CD55 is physiologically acting as an inhibitor of the complement system, but is also broadly expressed in malignant tumours. Here DAF seems to exert different functions beyond its immunological role such as e.g. promotion of tumorigenesis, decrease of complement mediated tumor cell lysis, autocrine loops for cell rescue and evasion of apoptosis, neoangiogenesis, invasiveness, cell motility, and metastasis via oncogenic tyrosine kinase pathways and specific seven-span transmembrane receptors (CD97 binding. Therefore, DAF has already become a target for therapy. In this paper we review the role of DAF in human malignancies as described in different basic, diagnostic and experimental therapeutic studies.

  8. Detection of linear ego-acceleration from optic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festl, Freya; Recktenwald, Fabian; Yuan, Chunrong; Mallot, Hanspeter A

    2012-07-20

    Human observers are able to estimate various ego-motion parameters from optic flow, including rotation, translational heading, time-to-collision (TTC), time-to-passage (TTP), etc. The perception of linear ego-acceleration or deceleration, i.e., changes of translational velocity, is less well understood. While time-to-passage experiments indicate that ego-acceleration is neglected, subjects are able to keep their (perceived) speed constant under changing conditions, indicating that some sense of ego-acceleration or velocity change must be present. In this paper, we analyze the relation of ego-acceleration estimates and geometrical parameters of the environment using simulated flights through cylindrical and conic (narrowing or widening) corridors. Theoretical analysis shows that a logarithmic ego-acceleration parameter, called the acceleration rate ρ, can be calculated from retinal acceleration measurements. This parameter is independent of the geometrical layout of the scene; if veridical ego-motion is known at some instant in time, acceleration rate allows updating of ego-motion without further depth-velocity calibration. Results indicate, however, that subjects systematically confuse ego-acceleration with corridor narrowing and ego-deceleration with corridor widening, while veridically judging ego-acceleration in straight corridors. We conclude that judgments of ego-acceleration are based on first-order retinal flow and do not make use of acceleration rate or retinal acceleration.

  9. Quantifying human subjective experience and social interaction using the eXperience Induction Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardet, Ulysses; Väljamäe, Aleksander; Inderbitzin, Martin; Wierenga, Sytse; Mura, Anna; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2011-06-30

    With the advance of novel brain imaging technology more correlations between complex human properties and the neuronal substrate can be assessed. However, thus far, not many well-validated paradigms exist that would allow for a systematic and quantitative exploration of these phenomena. For instance, despite the rapid technological advances in the domain of mixed and virtual reality systems, a fundamental issue remains how we can define and quantify "presence". A standard approach has been to use questionnaires and self-report measures. However, it has been well established that humans' capabilities to access and externalize their internal states are limited. Hence, we have investigated the question whether other less subjective measures can be devised that can corroborate subjective self-reports on presence. In particular, we have developed a quantitative recollection task that assesses the ability of human subjects (N=40) to recollect the factual structure and organization of a structured and fully controlled experience in a human accessible mixed reality space, the eXperience Induction Machine (XIM). In this structured experience - referred to as the "Autodemo"--a virtual guide explains the key elements and properties of XIM while the user is able to freely move around in the space. To evaluate the users' experience and the amount of factual information retained about the Autodemo, we used the ITC-SOPI questionnaire and a recall test specifically designed for the Autodemo. We found significant correlations between spatial presence and engagement factors of ITC-SOPI and recall performance. Moreover we observed an interaction with the participants' gender. Our results show that we can assess correlates of "presence" by focusing on other dependent measures such as those related to memory and performance. Additionally, our work exemplifies how virtual and mixed reality systems provide new ways to address fundamental questions in psychology and cognitive neuroscience

  10. Genetic basis of human brain evolution: accelerating along the primate speedway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Toshiyuki; Altheide, Tasha K; Varki, Ajit

    2005-01-01

    Using novel variations of traditional methods, report in the December 29(th) issue of Cell that diverse genes involved in neural biology (particularly those critical in development) show higher rates of protein evolution in primates than in rodents-particularly in the lineage leading to humans.

  11. Wood smoke in a controlled exposure experiment with human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddervold, I S; Bønløkke, J H; Mølhave, L; Massling, A; Jensen, B; Grønborg, T K; Bossi, R; Forchhammer, L; Kjærgaard, S K; Sigsgaard, T

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to wood smoke in the general population is increasing and concurrently, also our awareness. This article describes a wood-smoke generating system for studying human exposure to wood smoke and symptoms related to this exposure. Twenty nonsmoking atopic human participants with normal lung function and normal bronchial reactivity were randomly exposed for 3 h at three different exposure conditions; clean filtered air (control exposure) and wood smoke with a characteristic particulate matter (PM) concentration of 200 µg/m³ (low) and 400 µg/m³ (high) under controlled environmental conditions. The range for PM₂.₅ load observed for single experiments was 165-303 µg/m³ for the low exposure and 205-662 µg/m³ for the high exposure, whereas particle loads during clean air exposure most often were below the detection limit (humans. The knowledge gained in this study on subjective-rated symptoms may be important for understanding human response to wood-smoke exposure.

  12. Brain and Social Networks: Fundamental Building Blocks of Human Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Emily B; Bassett, Danielle S

    2017-09-01

    How do brains shape social networks, and how do social ties shape the brain? Social networks are complex webs by which ideas spread among people. Brains comprise webs by which information is processed and transmitted among neural units. While brain activity and structure offer biological mechanisms for human behaviors, social networks offer external inducers or modulators of those behaviors. Together, these two axes represent fundamental contributors to human experience. Integrating foundational knowledge from social and developmental psychology and sociology on how individuals function within dyads, groups, and societies with recent advances in network neuroscience can offer new insights into both domains. Here, we use the example of how ideas and behaviors spread to illustrate the potential of multilayer network models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Accelerated generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells with retroviral transduction and chemical inhibitors under physiological hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Nakada, Akira; Shigeno, Keiji; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2012-01-13

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated from somatic cells by the forced expression of a defined set of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Human iPS cells can be propagated indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body except for extra-embryonic tissues. This technology not only represents a new way to use individual-specific stem cells for regenerative medicine but also constitutes a novel method to obtain large amounts of disease-specific cells for biomedical research. Despite their great potential, the long reprogramming process (up to 1month) remains one of the most significant challenges facing standard virus-mediated methodology. In this study, we report the accelerated generation of human iPS cells from adipose-derived stem (ADS) cells, using a new combination of chemical inhibitors under a setting of physiological hypoxia in conjunction with retroviral transduction of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and L-Myc. Under optimized conditions, we observed human embryonic stem (ES)-like cells as early as 6 days after the initial retroviral transduction. This was followed by the emergence of fully reprogrammed cells bearing Tra-1-81-positive and DsRed transgene-silencing properties on day 10. The resulting cell lines resembled human ES cells in many respects including proliferation rate, morphology, pluripotency-associated markers, global gene expression patterns, genome-wide DNA methylation states, and the ability to differentiate into all three of the germ layers, both in vitro and in vivo. Our method, when combined with chemical inhibitors under conditions of physiological hypoxia, offers a powerful tool for rapidly generating bona fide human iPS cells and facilitates the application of iPS cell technology to biomedical research.

  14. Human Gene and Protein Database (HGPD): a novel database presenting a large quantity of experiment-based results in human proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Yukio; Wakamatsu, Ai; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Kimura, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Kisu, Yasutomo; Sugano, Sumio; Goshima, Naoki; Isogai, Takao; Nomura, Nobuo

    2009-01-01

    Completion of human genome sequencing has greatly accelerated functional genomic research. Full-length cDNA clones are essential experimental tools for functional analysis of human genes. In one of the projects of the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) in Japan, the full-length human cDNA sequencing project (FLJ project), nucleotide sequences of approximately 30 000 human cDNA clones have been analyzed. The Gateway system is a versatile framework to construct a variety of expression clones for various experiments. We have constructed 33 275 human Gateway entry clones from full-length cDNAs, representing to our knowledge the largest collection in the world. Utilizing these clones with a highly efficient cell-free protein synthesis system based on wheat germ extract, we have systematically and comprehensively produced and analyzed human proteins in vitro. Sequence information for both amino acids and nucleotides of open reading frames of cDNAs cloned into Gateway entry clones and in vitro expression data using those clones can be retrieved from the Human Gene and Protein Database (HGPD, http://www.HGPD.jp). HGPD is a unique database that stores the information of a set of human Gateway entry clones and protein expression data and helps the user to search the Gateway entry clones.

  15. Carbamylated low-density lipoprotein induces oxidative stress and accelerated senescence in human endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo, Julia; Merino, Ana; Briceño, Carolina; Soriano, Sagrario; Buendía, Paula; Calleros, Laura; Rodriguez, Mariano; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Aljama, Pedro; Ramírez, Rafael

    2011-04-01

    Carbamylated low-density lipoprotein (cLDL) plays a role in atherosclerosis. In this study we evaluate the effect of uremia on LDL carbamylation and the effect of cLDL and oxidized LDL (oxLDL; 200 μg/ml) on number, function, and genomic stability of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) obtained from healthy volunteers. cLDL was generated after incubation of native LDL (nLDL) with uremic serum from patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 2-4. Oxidative stress was measured by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy, mitochondrial depolarization by flow cytometry, senescence by β-galactosidase activity and telomere length, and DNA damage by phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX). The percentage of cLDL by uremic serum was related to the severity of CKD. Compared with nLDL, cLDL induced an increase in oxidative stress (62±5 vs. 8±3%, P<0.001) and cells with mitochondrial depolarization (73±7 vs. 9±5%, P<0.001), and a decrease in EPC proliferation and angiogenesis. cLDL also induced accelerated senescence (73±16 vs. 12±9%, P<0.001), which was associated with a decrease in the expression of γH2AX (62±9 vs. 5±3%, P<0.001). The degree of injury induced by cLDL was comparable to that observed with oxLDL. This study supports the hypothesis that cLDL triggers genomic damage in EPCs, resulting in premature senescence. We can, therefore, hypothesize that EPCs injury by cLDL contributes to an increase in atherosclerotic disease in CKD.

  16. HUMAN MASS BALANCE STUDY OF TAS-102 USING 14C ANALYZED BY ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James J.; Seraj, Jabed; Yoshida, Kenichiro; Mizuguchi, Hirokazu; Strychor, Sandra; Fiejdasz, Jillian; Faulkner, Tyeler; Parise, Robert A.; Fawcett, Patrick; Pollice, Laura; Mason, Scott; Hague, Jeremy; Croft, Marie; Nugteren, James; Tedder, Charles; Sun, Weijing; Chu, Edward; Beumer, Jan Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Background TAS-102 is an oral fluoropyrimidine prodrug composed of trifluridine (FTD) and tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI) in a 1:0.5 ratio. FTD is a thymidine analog, and it is degraded by thymidine phosphorylase (TP) to the inactive trifluoromethyluracil (FTY) metabolite. TPI inhibits degradation of FTD by TP, increasing systemic exposure to FTD. Methods Patients with advanced solid tumors (6 M/2 F; median age 58 years; PS 0–1) were enrolled on this study. Patients in group A (N = 4) received 60 mg TAS-102 with 200 nCi [14C]-FTD, while patients in group B (N = 4) received 60 mg TAS-102 with 1000 nCi [14C]-TPI orally. Plasma, blood, urine, feces, and expired air (group A only) were collected up to 168 h, and were analyzed for 14C by accelerator mass spectrometry and analytes by LC-MS/MS. Results FTD: 59.8% of the 14C dose was recovered; 54.8% in urine mostly as FTY and FTD glucuronide isomers. The extractable radioactivity in the pooled plasma consisted of 52.7% FTD and 33.2% FTY. TPI: 76.8% of the 14C dose was recovered; 27.0% in urine mostly as TPI, and 49.7% in feces. The extractable radioactivity in the pooled plasma consisted of 53.1% TPI and 30.9% 6-HMU, the major metabolite of TPI. Conclusion Absorbed 14C-FTD was metabolized and mostly excreted in urine. The majority of 14C-TPI was recovered in feces, and the majority of absorbed TPI was excreted in urine. The current data with the ongoing hepatic and renal dysfunction studies will provide an enhanced understanding of the TAS-102 elimination profile. PMID:26787503

  17. Human mass balance study of TAS-102 using (14)C analyzed by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James J; Seraj, Jabed; Yoshida, Kenichiro; Mizuguchi, Hirokazu; Strychor, Sandra; Fiejdasz, Jillian; Faulkner, Tyeler; Parise, Robert A; Fawcett, Patrick; Pollice, Laura; Mason, Scott; Hague, Jeremy; Croft, Marie; Nugteren, James; Tedder, Charles; Sun, Weijing; Chu, Edward; Beumer, Jan Hendrik

    2016-03-01

    TAS-102 is an oral fluoropyrimidine prodrug composed of trifluridine (FTD) and tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI) in a 1:0.5 ratio. FTD is a thymidine analog, and it is degraded by thymidine phosphorylase (TP) to the inactive trifluoromethyluracil (FTY) metabolite. TPI inhibits degradation of FTD by TP, increasing systemic exposure to FTD. Patients with advanced solid tumors (6 M/2 F; median age 58 years; PS 0-1) were enrolled on this study. Patients in group A (N = 4) received 60 mg TAS-102 with 200 nCi [(14)C]-FTD, while patients in group B (N = 4) received 60 mg TAS-102 with 1000 nCi [(14)C]-TPI orally. Plasma, blood, urine, feces, and expired air (group A only) were collected up to 168 h and were analyzed for (14)C by accelerator mass spectrometry and analytes by LC-MS/MS. FTD: 59.8% of the (14)C dose was recovered: 54.8% in urine mostly as FTY and FTD glucuronide isomers. The extractable radioactivity in the pooled plasma consisted of 52.7% FTD and 33.2% FTY. TPI: 76.8% of the (14)C dose was recovered: 27.0% in urine mostly as TPI and 49.7% in feces. The extractable radioactivity in the pooled plasma consisted of 53.1% TPI and 30.9% 6-HMU, the major metabolite of TPI. Absorbed (14)C-FTD was metabolized and mostly excreted in urine. The majority of (14)C-TPI was recovered in feces, and the majority of absorbed TPI was excreted in urine. The current data with the ongoing hepatic and renal dysfunction studies will provide an enhanced understanding of the TAS-102 elimination profile.

  18. Fibrillization of human tau is accelerated by exposure to lead via interaction with His-330 and His-362.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Li Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurofibrillary tangles, mainly consisted of bundles of filaments formed by the microtubule-associated protein Tau, are a hallmark of Alzheimer disease. Lead is a potent neurotoxin for human being especially for the developing children, and Pb(2+ at high concentrations is found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease. However, it has not been reported so far whether Pb(2+ plays a role in the pathology of Alzheimer disease through interaction with human Tau protein and thereby mediates Tau filament formation. In this study, we have investigated the effect of Pb(2+ on fibril formation of recombinant human Tau fragment Tau(244-372 and its mutants at physiological pH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As revealed by thioflavin T and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid fluorescence, the addition of 5-40 µM Pb(2+ significantly accelerates the exposure of hydrophobic region and filament formation of wild-type Tau(244-372 on the investigated time scale. As evidenced by circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fibrils formed by wild-type Tau(244-372 in the presence of 5-40 µM Pb(2+ contain more β-sheet structure than the same amount of fibrils formed by the protein in the absence of Pb(2+. However, unlike wild-type Tau(244-372, the presence of 5-40 µM Pb(2+ has no obvious effects on fibrillization kinetics of single mutants H330A and H362A and double mutant H330A/H362A, and fibrils formed by such mutants in the absence and in the presence of Pb(2+ contain similar amounts of β-sheet structure. The results from isothermal titration calorimetry show that one Pb(2+ binds to one Tau monomer via interaction with His-330 and His-362, with sub-micromolar affinity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate for the first time that the fibrillization of human Tau protein is accelerated by exposure to lead via interaction with His-330 and His-362. Our results suggest the possible involvement of Pb(2+ in the

  19. Impact accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongierke, H. E.; Brinkley, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The degree to which impact acceleration is an important factor in space flight environments depends primarily upon the technology of capsule landing deceleration and the weight permissible for the associated hardware: parachutes or deceleration rockets, inflatable air bags, or other impact attenuation systems. The problem most specific to space medicine is the potential change of impact tolerance due to reduced bone mass and muscle strength caused by prolonged weightlessness and physical inactivity. Impact hazards, tolerance limits, and human impact tolerance related to space missions are described.

  20. Genomic and Network Patterns of Schizophrenia Genetic Variation in Human Evolutionary Accelerated Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E.; Pollard, Katherine S.; Roussos, Panos; Joel T Dudley

    2015-01-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specifi...

  1. From old organisms to new molecules: integrative biology and therapeutic targets in accelerated human ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, L S; Faragher, R. G. A.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. Understanding the basic biology of human ageing is a key milestone in attempting to ameliorate the deleterious consequences of old age. This is an urgent research priority given the global demographic shift towards an ageing population. Although some molecular pathways that have been proposed to contribute to ageing have been discovered using classical biochemistry and genetics, the complex, polygenic and stochastic nature of ageing is such that the process as a whole is not immedia...

  2. Genomic and Network Patterns of Schizophrenia Genetic Variation in Human Evolutionary Accelerated Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E.; Pollard, Katherine S.; Roussos, Panos; Dudley, Joel T

    2015-01-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specifi...

  3. [Christian responsibility and experimental medicine. Experiments with and on humans, experiments on animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Heinrich W

    2002-01-01

    The Jewish-Christian convictions that man was created as the image of God founded the "ethics of unavailability" which contrast with the utilitarian "ethics of interests." As man s nature is imperfect according to biblical understanding, those responsible in the field of experimental medicine should counteract all tendencies in society which promote an utopian definition of health and an eugenic mentality (idea of the "perfection of mankind"). Consequently, scientists must reflect their own image of man and the effects of their actions on this image. The goals of experimental medicine must also be examined under the aspect of fairness: do they only benefit a minority in the rich industrial nations? As in research on humans, the ethical evaluation of animal experiments must consider the question of the underlying image of humanity and the responsibility of mankind connected to it. Because of changes in society's values, the validity of traditional anthropocentrism is increasingly questioned. However, this does not affect the view of the special position of man as the bearer of responsibility. Even though there are different biblical statements on the relationship between man and animal, the Christian maxim to minimise violence towards animals can be derived from them. In the case of animal experiments this means: experiments which cause the animals severe suffering must be avoided by waiving the potential gain of knowledge from them. In general: in an ethical discussion on medical experiments using humans or animals, the public must be informed completely and involved effectively. A moratorium must be possible before plans become facts. Thinking about ethical problems in the area of experimental medicine should not be separated from the far-reaching questions about changes in our lifestyle and consumer behaviour.

  4. Laser acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  5. Identification of the Imprinted KLF14 Transcription Factor Undergoing Human-Specific Accelerated Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Layla Parker-Katiraee; Carson, Andrew R.; Takahiro Yamada; Philippe Arnaud; Robert Feil; Abu-Amero, Sayeda N.; Moore, Gudrun E; Masahiro Kaneda; Perry, George H.; Stone, Anne C.; Charles Lee; Makiko Meguro-Horike; Hiroyuki Sasaki; Keiko Kobayashi; Kazuhiko Nakabayashi

    2007-01-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner and are located in clusters throughout the genome. Aberrations in the expression of imprinted genes on human Chromosome 7 have been suggested to play a role in the etiologies of Russell-Silver Syndrome and autism. We describe the imprinting of KLF14, an intronless member of the Krüppel-like family of transcription factors located at Chromosome 7q32. We show that it has monoallelic maternal expression in all embryonic and extra-embryon...

  6. Identification of the imprinted KLF14 transcription factor undergoing human-specific accelerated evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Parker-Katiraee, L.; Carson, A.R.; Yamada, T; Meguro-Horike, M.; Nakabayashi, K.; Scherer, S.W.; Arnaud, P.; Feil, R; Abu-Amero, S. N.; Moore, G.E.; Kaneda, M.; Sasaki, H.; Perry, G. H.; Stone, A C; Lee, C

    2007-01-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner and are located in clusters throughout the genome. Aberrations in the expression of imprinted genes on human Chromosome 7 have been suggested to play a role in the etiologies of Russell-Silver Syndrome and autism. We describe the imprinting of KLF14, an intronless member of the Krüppel-like family of transcription factors located at Chromosome 7q32. We show that it has monoallelic maternal expression in all embryonic and extra-embryon...

  7. The use of EDTA and DTPA for accelerating the removal of deposited transuranic elements from humans

    CERN Document Server

    Spoor, N L

    1977-01-01

    EDTA and DTPA have been prominent among the chelating agents used to increase the rate of excretion of certain deposited heavy metals from the human body. Since 1959, DTPA, administered either by intravenous injection or by aerosol inhalation, has been widely used to treat workers contaminated by plutonium or a higher actinide. In this report, an attempt is made to assess the toxicities of EDTA and DTPA and to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of DTPA as a drug for removing deposited transuranic elements.

  8. 一种基于OPENACC指令的加速体验%A OPENACC Instruction of Accelerated Experiences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡玉贵

    2012-01-01

      Computer systems become increasingly widespread use of GPGPU devices to speed up the calculation, but, using the low-level API for accelerated calculation is cumbersome and inefficient To solve this problem, Based on the instruction of the higher level of abstraction for programming to solve this problem, in this article, Gaussian blur algorithm experience OPENACC just usage OPENACC through instruction in C or C + + in the calculation close code transfer to GUP in conduct, we compare the respectively use the CPU, OPENACC, CUDA achieve Gaussian mode Lake algorithm performance performance. Although CUDA have a good performance, but relative to the low efficiency of the development and the steep learning curve, OPENACC used only a dozen lines of code can achieve significant speedup, and with the development of the compiler and hard⁃ware technology, the command guidance compile getting more the larger development space.%  随着越来越多的公司和企业使用GPU来作为加速计算设备,对并行程序的需求也越来越大,目前我们一般都使用CUDA或OPENCL等底层API进程序开发,但是使用这些底层API来进行开发效率都不高,目前出现OPENACC指令就是针对这个问题提出来的,在该文里,我们针对高斯模糊算法,分别使用CPU,OPENACC,CUDA进行实现,比较他们的效率,发现在虽然OPENACC 相对于CUDA 性能要低一些,但相对其陡峭的学习曲线和低下的开发效率,OPENACC 有着不错的性价比,而且随着编译器和硬件技术的发展,OPENACC有着广阔的发展空间。

  9. A multi-sample changer coupled to an electron cyclotron resonance source for accelerator mass spectrometry experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrasek, R; Palchan, T; Pardo, R; Peters, C; Power, M; Scott, R

    2014-02-01

    A new multi-sample changer has been constructed allowing rapid changes between samples. The sample changer has 20 positions and is capable of moving between samples in 1 min. The sample changer is part of a project using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility to measure neutron capture rates on a wide range of actinides in a reactor environment. This project will require the measurement of a large number of samples previously irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly charged positive ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source followed by acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The sample material is introduced into the plasma via laser ablation chosen to limit the dependency of material feed rates upon the source material composition as well as minimize cross-talk between samples.

  10. Accelerated diffusion spectrum imaging via compressed sensing for the human connectome project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namgyun; Wilkins, Bryce; Singh, Manbir

    2012-02-01

    Diffusion Spectrum Imaging (DSI) has been developed as a model-free approach to solving the so called multiple-fibers-per- voxel problem in diffusion MRI. However, inferring heterogeneous microstructures of an imaging voxel rapidly remains a challenge in DSI because of extensive sampling requirements in a Cartesian grid of q-space. In this study, we propose compressed sensing based diffusion spectrum imaging (CS-DSI) to significantly reduce the number of diffusion measurements required for accurate estimation of fiber orientations. This method reconstructs each diffusion propagator of an MR data set from 100 variable density undersampled diffusion measurements minimizing the l1-norm of the finite-differences (i.e.,anisotropic total variation) of the diffusion propagator. The proposed method is validated against a ground truth from synthetic data mimicking the FiberCup phantom, demonstrating the robustness of CS-DSI on accurately estimating underlying fiber orientations from noisy diffusion data. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our CS-DSI method on a human brain dataset acquired from a clinical scanner without specialized pulse sequences. Estimated ODFs from CS-DSI method are qualitatively compared to those from the full dataset (DSI203). Lastly, we demonstrate that streamline tractography based on our CS-DSI method has a comparable quality to conventional DSI203. This illustrates the feasibility of CS-DSI for reconstructing whole brain white-matter fiber tractography from clinical data acquired at imaging centers, including hospitals, for human brain connectivity studies.

  11. From old organisms to new molecules: integrative biology and therapeutic targets in accelerated human ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, L S; Faragher, R G A

    2007-10-01

    Understanding the basic biology of human ageing is a key milestone in attempting to ameliorate the deleterious consequences of old age. This is an urgent research priority given the global demographic shift towards an ageing population. Although some molecular pathways that have been proposed to contribute to ageing have been discovered using classical biochemistry and genetics, the complex, polygenic and stochastic nature of ageing is such that the process as a whole is not immediately amenable to biochemical analysis. Thus, attempts have been made to elucidate the causes of monogenic progeroid disorders that recapitulate some, if not all, features of normal ageing in the hope that this may contribute to our understanding of normal human ageing. Two canonical progeroid disorders are Werner's syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeroid syndrome (also known as progeria). Because such disorders are essentially phenocopies of ageing, rather than ageing itself, advances made in understanding their pathogenesis must always be contextualised within theories proposed to help explain how the normal process operates. One such possible ageing mechanism is described by the cell senescence hypothesis of ageing. Here, we discuss this hypothesis and demonstrate that it provides a plausible explanation for many of the ageing phenotypes seen in Werner's syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeriod syndrome. The recent exciting advances made in potential therapies for these two syndromes are also reviewed.

  12. Increased human occupation and agricultural development accelerates the population contraction of an estuarine delphinid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Karczmarski, Leszek; Xia, Jia; Zhang, Xiyang; Yu, Xinjian; Wu, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few thousand years, human development and population expansion in southern China have led to local extirpation and population contraction of many terrestrial animals. At what extent this early human-induced environmental change has also affected coastal marine species remains poorly known. We investigated the demographic history of the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in the Pearl River Delta (PRD); an obligatory inshore species known for its susceptibility to anthropogenic impacts in one of China’s most developed coastal regions. Although the deltaic evolution of PRD has been influenced by climate since the Holocene, ~74% reduction of the dolphin’s effective population size occurred within the last 2000 years, consistent with ~61% habitat contraction during this period. This considerable and recent population contraction may have been due to land use practices and deforestation in the upper/middle Pearl River region, all leading to increasing sedimentation rate in the estuarine area. As anthropogenic impacts within the drainage of Pearl River affected a vast area, coastal dolphins and large terrestrial mammals in southern China may share a similar demographic history, whilst the demographic and biogeographic history of the PRD humpback dolphins may be symptomatic of similar processes that this species may have undergone elsewhere in the region. PMID:27759106

  13. A Comprehensive Analysis on Wearable Acceleration Sensors in Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Janidarmian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensor-based motion recognition integrates the emerging area of wearable sensors with novel machine learning techniques to make sense of low-level sensor data and provide rich contextual information in a real-life application. Although Human Activity Recognition (HAR problem has been drawing the attention of researchers, it is still a subject of much debate due to the diverse nature of human activities and their tracking methods. Finding the best predictive model in this problem while considering different sources of heterogeneities can be very difficult to analyze theoretically, which stresses the need of an experimental study. Therefore, in this paper, we first create the most complete dataset, focusing on accelerometer sensors, with various sources of heterogeneities. We then conduct an extensive analysis on feature representations and classification techniques (the most comprehensive comparison yet with 293 classifiers for activity recognition. Principal component analysis is applied to reduce the feature vector dimension while keeping essential information. The average classification accuracy of eight sensor positions is reported to be 96.44% ± 1.62% with 10-fold evaluation, whereas accuracy of 79.92% ± 9.68% is reached in the subject-independent evaluation. This study presents significant evidence that we can build predictive models for HAR problem under more realistic conditions, and still achieve highly accurate results.

  14. Atherosclerosis in ancient humans, accelerated aging syndromes and normal aging: is lamin a protein a common link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Michael I; Djabali, Karima; Gordon, Leslie B

    2014-06-01

    Imaging studies of ancient human mummies have demonstrated the presence of vascular calcification that is consistent with the presence of atherosclerosis. These findings have stimulated interest in the underlying biological processes that might impart to humans an inherent predisposition to the development of atherosclerosis. Clues to these processes may possibly be found in accelerated aging syndromes, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), an ultra-rare disorder characterized by premature aging phenotypes, including very aggressive forms of atherosclerosis, occurring in childhood. The genetic defect in HGPS eventuates in the production of a mutant form of the nuclear structural protein lamin A, called progerin, which is thought to interfere with normal nuclear functioning. Progerin appears to be expressed in vascular cells, resulting in vessel wall cell loss and replacement by fibrous tissue, reducing vessel compliance and promoting calcification, leading to the vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis seen in HGPS. Interestingly, vascular progerin is detectable in lower levels, in an age-related manner, in the general population, providing the basis for further study of the potential role of abnormal forms of lamin A in the atherosclerotic process of normal aging.

  15. Mechanism of heparin acceleration of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1 degradation by the human neutrophil elastase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel L C Nunes

    Full Text Available Heparin has been shown to regulate human neutrophil elastase (HNE activity. We have assessed the regulatory effect of heparin on Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteases-1 [TIMP-1] hydrolysis by HNE employing the recombinant form of TIMP-1 and correlated FRET-peptides comprising the TIMP-1 cleavage site. Heparin accelerates 2.5-fold TIMP-1 hydrolysis by HNE. The kinetic parameters of this reaction were monitored with the aid of a FRET-peptide substrate that mimics the TIMP-1 cleavage site in pre-steady-state conditionsby using a stopped-flow fluorescence system. The hydrolysis of the FRET-peptide substrate by HNE exhibits a pre-steady-state burst phase followed by a linear, steady-state pseudo-first-order reaction. The HNE acylation step (k₂ = 21±1 s⁻¹ was much higher than the HNE deacylation step (k₃ = 0.57±0.05 s⁻¹. The presence of heparin induces a dramatic effect in the pre-steady-state behavior of HNE. Heparin induces transient lag phase kinetics in HNE cleavage of the FRET-peptide substrate. The pre-steady-state analysis revealed that heparin affects all steps of the reaction through enhancing the ES complex concentration, increasing k₁ 2.4-fold and reducing k₋₁ 3.1-fold. Heparin also promotes a 7.8-fold decrease in the k₂ value, whereas the k₃ value in the presence of heparin was increased 58-fold. These results clearly show that heparin binding accelerates deacylation and slows down acylation. Heparin shifts the HNE pH activity profile to the right, allowing HNE to be active at alkaline pH. Molecular docking and kinetic analysis suggest that heparin induces conformational changes in HNE structure. Here, we are showing for the first time that heparin is able to accelerate the hydrolysis of TIMP-1 by HNE. The degradation of TIMP-1is associated to important physiopathological states involving excessive activation of MMPs.

  16. Accelerated genetic drift on chromosome X during the human dispersal out of Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinan, Alon; Mullikin, James C; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David

    2009-01-01

    Comparisons of chromosome X and the autosomes can illuminate differences in the histories of males and females as well as shed light on the forces of natural selection. We compared the patterns of variation in these parts of the genome using two datasets that we assembled for this study that are both genomic in scale. Three independent analyses show that around the time of the dispersal of modern humans out of Africa, chromosome X experienced much more genetic drift than is expected from the pattern on the autosomes. This is not predicted by known episodes of demographic history, and we found no similar patterns associated with the dispersals into East Asia and Europe. We conclude that a sex-biased process that reduced the female effective population size, or an episode of natural selection unusually affecting chromosome X, was associated with the founding of non-African populations.

  17. Time-Elastic Generative Model for Acceleration Time Series in Human Activity Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Organero, Mario; Ruiz-Blazquez, Ramona

    2017-02-08

    Body-worn sensors in general and accelerometers in particular have been widely used in order to detect human movements and activities. The execution of each type of movement by each particular individual generates sequences of time series of sensed data from which specific movement related patterns can be assessed. Several machine learning algorithms have been used over windowed segments of sensed data in order to detect such patterns in activity recognition based on intermediate features (either hand-crafted or automatically learned from data). The underlying assumption is that the computed features will capture statistical differences that can properly classify different movements and activities after a training phase based on sensed data. In order to achieve high accuracy and recall rates (and guarantee the generalization of the system to new users), the training data have to contain enough information to characterize all possible ways of executing the activity or movement to be detected. This could imply large amounts of data and a complex and time-consuming training phase, which has been shown to be even more relevant when automatically learning the optimal features to be used. In this paper, we present a novel generative model that is able to generate sequences of time series for characterizing a particular movement based on the time elasticity properties of the sensed data. The model is used to train a stack of auto-encoders in order to learn the particular features able to detect human movements. The results of movement detection using a newly generated database with information on five users performing six different movements are presented. The generalization of results using an existing database is also presented in the paper. The results show that the proposed mechanism is able to obtain acceptable recognition rates (F = 0.77) even in the case of using different people executing a different sequence of movements and using different hardware.

  18. Time-Elastic Generative Model for Acceleration Time Series in Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Munoz-Organero

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Body-worn sensors in general and accelerometers in particular have been widely used in order to detect human movements and activities. The execution of each type of movement by each particular individual generates sequences of time series of sensed data from which specific movement related patterns can be assessed. Several machine learning algorithms have been used over windowed segments of sensed data in order to detect such patterns in activity recognition based on intermediate features (either hand-crafted or automatically learned from data. The underlying assumption is that the computed features will capture statistical differences that can properly classify different movements and activities after a training phase based on sensed data. In order to achieve high accuracy and recall rates (and guarantee the generalization of the system to new users, the training data have to contain enough information to characterize all possible ways of executing the activity or movement to be detected. This could imply large amounts of data and a complex and time-consuming training phase, which has been shown to be even more relevant when automatically learning the optimal features to be used. In this paper, we present a novel generative model that is able to generate sequences of time series for characterizing a particular movement based on the time elasticity properties of the sensed data. The model is used to train a stack of auto-encoders in order to learn the particular features able to detect human movements. The results of movement detection using a newly generated database with information on five users performing six different movements are presented. The generalization of results using an existing database is also presented in the paper. The results show that the proposed mechanism is able to obtain acceptable recognition rates (F = 0.77 even in the case of using different people executing a different sequence of movements and using different

  19. Pristane-Accelerated Autoimmune Disease in (SWR X NZB) F1 Mice Leads to Prominent Tubulointerstitial Inflammation and Human Lupus Nephritis-Like Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardet, Agnes; Chou, Wei C.; Reynolds, Taylor L.; Velez, Diana B.; Fu, Kai; Czerkowicz, Julia M.; Bajko, Jeffrey; Ranger, Ann M.; Allaire, Normand; Kerns, Hannah M.; Ryan, Sarah; Legault, Holly M.; Dunstan, Robert W.; Lafyatis, Robert; Lukashev, Matvey; Viney, Joanne L.; Browning, Jeffrey L.; Rabah, Dania

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models lupus nephritis (LN) have provided important insights into disease pathogenesis, although none have been able to recapitulate all features of the human disease. Using comprehensive longitudinal analyses, we characterized a novel accelerated mouse model of lupus using pristane treatment in SNF1 (SWR X NZB F1) lupus prone mice (pristane-SNF1 mice). Pristane treatment in SNF1 mice accelerated the onset and progression of proteinuria, autoantibody production, immune complex deposition and development of renal lesions. At week 14, the pristane-SNF1 model recapitulated kidney disease parameters and molecular signatures seen in spontaneous disease in 36 week-old SNF1 mice and in a traditional IFNα-accelerated NZB X NZW F1 (BWF1) model. Blood transcriptome analysis revealed interferon, plasma cell, neutrophil, T-cell and protein synthesis signatures in the pristane-SNF1 model, all known to be present in the human disease. The pristane-SNF1 model appears to be particularly useful for preclinical research, robustly exhibiting many characteristics reminiscent of human disease. These include i) a stronger upregulation of the cytosolic nucleic acid sensing pathway, which is thought to be key component of the pathogenesis of the human disease, and ii) more prominent kidney interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, which have been both associated with poor prognosis in human LN. To our knowledge, this is the only accelerated model of LN that exhibits a robust tubulointerstitial inflammatory and fibrosis response. Taken together our data show that the pristane-SNF1 model is a novel accelerated model of LN with key features similar to human disease. PMID:27760209

  20. Human in Vivo Pharmacokinetics of [(14)C]Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Following Oral Microdosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeen, Erin; Corley, Richard A; Crowell, Susan; Turteltaub, Kenneth; Ognibene, Ted; Malfatti, Mike; McQuistan, Tammie J; Garrard, Mary; Sudakin, Dan; Williams, David E

    2015-01-20

    Dibenzo(def,p)chrysene (DBC), (also known as dibenzo[a,l]pyrene), is a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) found in the environment, including food, produced by the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. DBC, classified by IARC as a 2A probable human carcinogen, has a relative potency factor (RPF) in animal cancer models 30-fold higher than benzo[a]pyrene. No data are available describing the disposition of high molecular weight (>4 rings) PAHs in humans to compare to animal studies. Pharmacokinetics of DBC was determined in 3 female and 6 male human volunteers following oral microdosing (29 ng, 5 nCi) of [(14)C]-DBC. This study was made possible with highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), capable of detecting [(14)C]-DBC equivalents in plasma and urine following a dose considered of de minimus risk to human health. Plasma and urine were collected over 72 h. The plasma Cmax was 68.8 ± 44.3 fg·mL(-1) with a Tmax of 2.25 ± 1.04 h. Elimination occurred in two distinct phases: a rapid (α)-phase, with a T1/2 of 5.8 ± 3.4 h and an apparent elimination rate constant (Kel) of 0.17 ± 0.12 fg·h(-1), followed by a slower (β)-phase, with a T1/2 of 41.3 ± 29.8 h and an apparent Kel of 0.03 ± 0.02 fg·h(-1). In spite of the high degree of hydrophobicity (log Kow of 7.4), DBC was eliminated rapidly in humans, as are most PAHs in animals, compared to other hydrophobic persistent organic pollutants such as, DDT, PCBs and TCDD. Preliminary examination utilizing a new UHPLC-AMS interface, suggests the presence of polar metabolites in plasma as early as 45 min following dosing. This is the first in vivo data set describing pharmacokinetics in humans of a high molecular weight PAH and should be a valuable addition to risk assessment paradigms.

  1. Accelerated generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells with retroviral transduction and chemical inhibitors under physiological hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Hidenori [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hashimoto, Yoshiya [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1, Hanazonocho, Kuzuha, Hirakatashi, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Nakada, Akira; Shigeno, Keiji [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Tatsuo, E-mail: nakamura@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very rapid generation of human iPS cells under optimized conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five chemical inhibitors under hypoxia boosted reprogramming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. -- Abstract: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated from somatic cells by the forced expression of a defined set of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Human iPS cells can be propagated indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body except for extra-embryonic tissues. This technology not only represents a new way to use individual-specific stem cells for regenerative medicine but also constitutes a novel method to obtain large amounts of disease-specific cells for biomedical research. Despite their great potential, the long reprogramming process (up to 1 month) remains one of the most significant challenges facing standard virus-mediated methodology. In this study, we report the accelerated generation of human iPS cells from adipose-derived stem (ADS) cells, using a new combination of chemical inhibitors under a setting of physiological hypoxia in conjunction with retroviral transduction of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and L-Myc. Under optimized conditions, we observed human embryonic stem (ES)-like cells as early as 6 days after the initial retroviral transduction. This was followed by the emergence of fully reprogrammed cells bearing Tra-1-81-positive and DsRed transgene-silencing properties on day 10. The resulting cell lines resembled human ES cells in many respects including proliferation rate, morphology, pluripotency-associated markers, global gene expression patterns, genome-wide DNA methylation states, and the ability to differentiate into all three of the germ layers, both in vitro and in vivo. Our method, when combined with chemical inhibitors under conditions of physiological hypoxia, offers a powerful tool for rapidly

  2. Simulation of Electron Beam Dynamics in the 22 MeV Accelerator for a Coherent Electron Cooling Proof of Principle Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Justin [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CeC) offers a potential new method of cooling hadron beams in colliders such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) or the future electron ion collider eRHIC. A 22 MeV linear accelerator is currently being built as part of a proof of principle experiment for CeC at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In this thesis we present a simulation of electron beam dynamics including space charge in the 22 MeV CeC proof of principle experiment using the program ASTRA (A Space charge TRacking Algorithm).

  3. Accelerated helium and hydrogen production in {sup 54}Fe doped alloys - measurements and calculations for the FIST experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, L.R. E-mail: larry.greenwood@pnl.gov; Oliver, B.M.; Ohnuki, S.; Shiba, K.; Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Robertson, J.P.; Meadows, J.W.; Gelles, D.S

    2000-12-01

    F-82H alloys isotopically enriched in {sup 54}Fe up to 86% were irradiated in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) to determine the accelerated production of helium and hydrogen due to isotopic effects. Results are compared to calculations using isotopic helium production cross-sections from ENDF/B-VI or GNASH and measured neutron spectra. Helium measurements demonstrated an accelerated helium (appm)/dpa ratio of 2.3 after a 1.25-year irradiation, an increase of a factor of 4.3 over natural iron. The accelerated helium production is due to higher helium production cross-sections for {sup 54}Fe and {sup 55}Fe. Alloys doped with {sup 55}Fe could achieve helium/dpa ratios up to about 20, well above the fusion reactor ratio of 10. Hydrogen measurements were performed using a newly developed quadrupole mass spectrometer system at PNNL. Calculations predict that hydrogen production will be accelerated by about a factor of 13 over natural iron. However, measurements show that most of this hydrogen is not retained in the samples.

  4. Design of a 5-MA 100-ns linear-transformer-driver accelerator for wire array Z-pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Li, Zhenghong; Wang, Zhen; Liang, Chuan; Li, Mingjia; Qi, Jianmin; Chu, Yanyun

    2016-03-01

    The linear-transformer-driver (LTD) is a recently developed pulsed-power technology that shows great promise for a number of applications. These include a Z -pinch-driven fission-fusion-hybrid reactor that is being developed by the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics. In support of the reactor development effort, we are planning to build an LTD-based accelerator that is optimized for driving wire-array Z -pinch loads. The accelerator comprises six modules in parallel, each of which has eight series 0.8-MA LTD cavities in a voltage-adder configuration. Vacuum transmission lines are used from the interior of the adder to the central vacuum chamber where the load is placed. Thus the traditional stack-flashover problem is eliminated. The machine is 3.2 m tall and 12 m in outer diameter including supports. A prototype cavity was built and tested for more than 6000 shots intermittently at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A novel trigger, in which only one input trigger pulse is needed by utilizing an internal trigger brick, was developed and successfully verified in these shots. A full circuit modeling was conducted for the accelerator. The simulation result shows that a current pulse rising to 5.2 MA in 91 ns (10%-90%) can be delivered to the wire-array load, which is 1.5 cm in height, 1.2 cm in initial radius, and 1 mg in mass. The maximum implosion velocity of the load is 32 cm /μ s when compressed to 0.1 of the initial radius. The maximum kinetic energy is 78 kJ, which is 11.7% of the electric energy stored in the capacitors. This accelerator is supposed to enable a radiation energy efficiency of 20%-30%, providing a high efficient facility for research on the fast Z pinch and technologies for repetition-rate-operated accelerators.

  5. Human behavior in Prisoner's Dilemma experiments suppresses network reciprocity

    CERN Document Server

    Gracia-Lazaro, Carlos; Sanchez, Angel; Moreno, Yamir

    2012-01-01

    During the last few years, much research has been devoted to strategic interactions on complex networks. In this context, the Prisoner's Dilemma has become a paradigmatic model, and it has been established that imitative evolutionary dynamics lead to very different outcomes depending on the details of the network. We here report that when one takes into account the real behavior of people observed in the experiments, both at the mean-field level and on utterly different networks the observed level of cooperation is the same. We thus show that when human subjects interact in an heterogeneous mix including cooperators, defectors and moody conditional cooperators, the structure of the population does not promote or inhibit cooperation with respect to a well mixed population.

  6. Human behavior in Prisoner's Dilemma experiments suppresses network reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Cuesta, José A; Sánchez, Angel; Moreno, Yamir

    2012-01-01

    During the last few years, much research has been devoted to strategic interactions on complex networks. In this context, the Prisoner's Dilemma has become a paradigmatic model, and it has been established that imitative evolutionary dynamics lead to very different outcomes depending on the details of the network. We here report that when one takes into account the real behavior of people observed in the experiments, both at the mean-field level and on utterly different networks, the observed level of cooperation is the same. We thus show that when human subjects interact in a heterogeneous mix including cooperators, defectors and moody conditional cooperators, the structure of the population does not promote or inhibit cooperation with respect to a well mixed population.

  7. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to human-system interface modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba Alonso, Pedro; Fernandez Illobre, Luis; Ortega Pascual, Fernando [Tecnatom S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes (Spain). Simulation and Control Rooms Div.

    2015-07-15

    Almost all the existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) include plans to modernize their existing Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and associated Human System Interfaces (HSIs), due to obsolescence problems. Tecnatom, S.A. has been participating in modernization programs in NPPs to help them to plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and associated I and C and HSIs. The application of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in modernization programs is nowadays unavoidable. This is because is becoming a regulatory requirement, and also because it is needed to ensure that any plant modification, involving the modernization of I and C and HSI, is well designed to improve overall plant operations, reliability, and safety. This paper shows some experiences obtained during the application of HFE to the modernization of these HSIs. The experience applying HFE in modernizations and design modifications show a positive effect, improving the associated HSIs, with the acceptability of the final user.

  8. Recovery of the Decorin-Enriched Fraction, Extract (D, From Human Skin: An Accelerated Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys N. Wheatley

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The original extraction procedure of Engel and Catchpole [1] has often been used to recover decorin-enriched material from the skin. This material has a strong inhibitory effect on fibroblast proliferation, and clearly suppresses it in skin except after the first 5–6 days of wounding when new scaffold material is required. The aim of our present study has been to find and evaluate the product of a faster recovery method, and to check its consistency as a more reliable means of regularly obtaining sufficient material for topical application in wounds that might become hypertrophic. Modifications of the original Toole and Lowther [2] extraction procedure have been carefully evaluated in an attempt to cut preparation time without compromising biological activity of the inhibitory extract. We have devised a faster recovery procedure without compromising biological activity, even if initial recovery has been somewhat reduced. The latter problem could be offset by repeated cycles of the final extraction step. The main inhibitory activity is shown to be within the decorin-enriched “extract D,” as the core protein and DSPG II. Adjustment of the extract towards neutrality after dialysis against water keeps most of the extracted protein in solution and yielded a decorin-enriched preparation that had a specific activity equivalent to that of the old method. It also yielded a fraction that was readily lyophilised to give a small amount of material that could be stored indefinitely without loss of activity and readily redissolved in aqueous solution. A reliable and relatively quick method is presented for the production, from human skin, of a decorin-enriched preparation that has strong fibroblast inhibitory action. The value of the procedure is that it is inexpensive and can produce the quantities that might be used topically in reducing hypertrophic scarring of wounds.

  9. Accelerated modern human-induced species losses: Entering the sixth mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Gerardo; Ehrlich, Paul R; Barnosky, Anthony D; García, Andrés; Pringle, Robert M; Palmer, Todd M

    2015-06-01

    The oft-repeated claim that Earth's biota is entering a sixth "mass extinction" depends on clearly demonstrating that current extinction rates are far above the "background" rates prevailing between the five previous mass extinctions. Earlier estimates of extinction rates have been criticized for using assumptions that might overestimate the severity of the extinction crisis. We assess, using extremely conservative assumptions, whether human activities are causing a mass extinction. First, we use a recent estimate of a background rate of 2 mammal extinctions per 10,000 species per 100 years (that is, 2 E/MSY), which is twice as high as widely used previous estimates. We then compare this rate with the current rate of mammal and vertebrate extinctions. The latter is conservatively low because listing a species as extinct requires meeting stringent criteria. Even under our assumptions, which would tend to minimize evidence of an incipient mass extinction, the average rate of vertebrate species loss over the last century is up to 100 times higher than the background rate. Under the 2 E/MSY background rate, the number of species that have gone extinct in the last century would have taken, depending on the vertebrate taxon, between 800 and 10,000 years to disappear. These estimates reveal an exceptionally rapid loss of biodiversity over the last few centuries, indicating that a sixth mass extinction is already under way. Averting a dramatic decay of biodiversity and the subsequent loss of ecosystem services is still possible through intensified conservation efforts, but that window of opportunity is rapidly closing.

  10. Human acellular dermal wound matrix: evidence and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsner, Robert S; Bohn, Greg; Driver, Vickie R; Mills, Joseph L; Nanney, Lillian B; Williams, Marie L; Wu, Stephanie C

    2015-12-01

    A chronic wound fails to complete an orderly and timely reparative process and places patients at increased risk for wound complications that negatively impact quality of life and require greater health care expenditure. The role of extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in normal and chronic wound repair. Not only is ECM the largest component of the dermal skin layer, but also ECM proteins provide structure and cell signalling that are necessary for successful tissue repair. Chronic wounds are characterised by their inflammatory and proteolytic environment, which degrades the ECM. Human acellular dermal matrices, which provide an ECM scaffold, therefore, are being used to treat chronic wounds. The ideal human acellular dermal wound matrix (HADWM) would support regenerative healing, providing a structure that could be repopulated by the body's cells. Experienced wound care investigators and clinicians discussed the function of ECM, the evidence related to a specific HADWM (Graftjacket(®) regenerative tissue matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., licensed by KCI USA, Inc., San Antonio, TX), and their clinical experience with this scaffold. This article distills these discussions into an evidence-based and practical overview for treating chronic lower extremity wounds with this HADWM. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Acquisition of business intelligence from human experience in route planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello Orgaz, Gema; Barrero, David F.; R-Moreno, María D.; Camacho, David

    2015-04-01

    The logistic sector raises a number of highly challenging problems. Probably one of the most important ones is the shipping planning, i.e. plan the routes that the shippers have to follow to deliver the goods. In this article, we present an artificial intelligence-based solution that has been designed to help a logistic company to improve its routes planning process. In order to achieve this goal, the solution uses the knowledge acquired by the company drivers to propose optimised routes. Hence, the proposed solution gathers the experience of the drivers, processes it and optimises the delivery process. The solution uses data mining to extract knowledge from the company information systems and prepares it for analysis with a case-based reasoning (CBR) algorithm. The CBR obtains critical business intelligence knowledge from the drivers experience that is needed by the planner. The design of the routes is done by a genetic algorithm that, given the processed information, optimises the routes following several objectives, such as minimise the distance or time. Experimentation shows that the proposed approach is able to find routes that improve, on average, the routes made by the human experts.

  12. Accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles: application to ongoing projects of future X-ray missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perinati, E.; Diebold, S.; Kendziorra, E.;

    2012-01-01

    We report on our activities, currently in progress, aimed at performing accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles. They include tests of different types of X-ray detectors and related components (such as filters) and measurements of scattering of soft protons...... and hyper-velocity dust particles off X-ray mirror shells. These activities have been identified as a goal in the context of a number of ongoing space projects in order to assess the risk posed by environmental radiation and dust and qualify the adopted instrumentation with respect to possible damage...... or performance degradation. In this paper we focus on tests for the Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) used aboard the LOFT space mission. We use the Van de Graaff accelerators at the University of T\\"ubingen and at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, for soft proton and hyper...

  13. Common feature of concave growth pattern of oscillations in terms of speed, acceleration, fuel consumption and emission in car following: experiment and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Junfang; Treiber, Martin; Ma, Shoufeng; Jia, Bin; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    This paper has investigated the growth pattern of traffic oscillations by using vehicle trajectory data in a car following experiment. We measured the standard deviation of acceleration, emission and fuel consumption of each vehicle in the car-following platoon. We found that: (1) Similar to the standard deviation of speed, these indices exhibit a common feature of concave growth pattern along vehicles in the platoon; (2) The emission and fuel consumption of each vehicle decrease remarkably when the average speed of the platoon increases from low value; However, when reaches 30km/h, the change of emission and fuel consumption with is not so significant; (3), the correlations of emission and fuel consumption with both the standard deviation of acceleration and the speed oscillation are strong. Simulations show that with the memory effect of drivers taken into account, the improved two-dimensional intelligent driver model is able to reproduce the common feature of traffic oscillation evolution quite well.

  14. Electron Lenses for Experiments on Nonlinear Dynamics with Wide Stable Tune Spreads in the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, G. [Fermilab; Carlson, K. [Fermilab; McGee, M. W. [Fermilab; Nobrega, L. E. [Fermilab; Romanov, A. L. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab; Valishev, A. [Fermilab; Noll, D. [Frankfurt U.

    2015-06-01

    Recent developments in the study of integrable Hamiltonian systems have led to nonlinear accelerator lattice designs with two transverse invariants. These lattices may drastically improve the performance of high-power machines, providing wide tune spreads and Landau damping to protect the beam from instabilities, while preserving dynamic aperture. To test the feasibility of these concepts, the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is being designed and built at Fermilab. One way to obtain a nonlinear integrable lattice is by using the fields generated by a magnetically confined electron beam (electron lens) overlapping with the circulating beam. The parameters of the required device are similar to the ones of existing electron lenses. We present theory, numerical simulations, and first design studies of electron lenses for nonlinear integrable optics.

  15. Using corrected Cone-Beam CT image for accelerated partial breast irradiation treatment dose verification: the preliminary experience

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jiazhou; Hu, Weigang; Cai, Gang; Peng, Jiayuan; Pan, Ziqiang; Guo, Xiaomao; Chen, Jiayi

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate target localization is mandatory in the accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) delivery. Dosimetric verification for positional error will further guarantee the accuracy of treatment delivery. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical feasibility of a cone beam computer tomographic (CBCT) image correction method in APBI. Methods A CBCT image correction method was developed. First, rigid image registration was proceeded for CTs and CBCTs; second, these im...

  16. Let dependence of cell death, mutation induction and chromatin damage in human cells irradiated with accelerated carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M.; Watanabe, M.; Kanai, T.; Kase, Y.; Yatagai, F.; Kato, T.; Matsubara, S.

    We investigated the LET dependence of cell death, mutation induction and chromatin break induction in human embryo (HE) cells irradiated by accelerated carbon-ion beams. The results showed that cell death, mutation induction and induction of non-rejoining chromatin breaks detected by the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique had the same LET dependence. Carbon ions of 110 to 124keV/mum were the most effective at all endpoints. However, the number of initially induced chromatin breaks was independent of LET. About 10 to 15 chromatin breaks per Gy per cell were induced in the LET range of 22 to 230 keV/mum. The deletion pattern of exons in the HPRT locus, analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), was LET-specific. Almost all the mutants induced by 124 keV/mum carbon-ion beams showed deletion of the entire gene, while all mutants induced by 230keV/mum carbon-ion beams showed no deletion. These results suggest that the difference in the density distribution of carbon-ion track and secondary electron with various LET is responsible for the LET dependency of biological effects.

  17. Implementation of an Accelerated Rehabilitation Protocol for Total Joint Arthroplasty in the Managed Care Setting: The Experience of One Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas B. Robertson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated rehabilitation following total joint replacement (TJR surgery has become more common in contemporary orthopaedic practice. Increased utilization demands improvements in resource allocation with continued improvement in patient outcomes. We describe an accelerated rehab protocol (AR instituted at a community based hospital. All patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA and total hip arthroplasty (THA were included. The AR consisted of preoperative patient education, standardization of perioperative pain management, therapy, and next day in-home services consultation following discharge. Outcomes of interest include average length of stay (ALOS, discharge disposition, 42-day return to Urgent Care (UC, Emergency Department (ED, or readmission. A total of 4 surgeons performed TJR procedures on 1,268 patients in the study period (696 TKA, 572 THA. ALOS was reduced from 3.5 days at the start of the observation period to 2.4 days at the end. Discharge to skilled nursing reduced from 25% to 14%. A multifaceted and evidence based approach to standardization of care delivery has resulted in improved patient outcomes and a reduction in resource utilization. Adoption of an accelerated rehab protocol has proven to be effective as well as safe without increased utilization of UC, ER, or readmissions.

  18. Augmenting NMDA receptor signaling boosts experience-dependent neuroplasticity in the adult human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Jennifer K; Bachman, Peter; Mathalon, Daniel H; Roach, Brian J; Asarnow, Robert F

    2015-12-15

    Experience-dependent plasticity is a fundamental property of the brain. It is critical for everyday function, is impaired in a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders, and frequently depends on long-term potentiation (LTP). Preclinical studies suggest that augmenting N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) signaling may promote experience-dependent plasticity; however, a lack of noninvasive methods has limited our ability to test this idea in humans until recently. We examined the effects of enhancing NMDAR signaling using d-cycloserine (DCS) on a recently developed LTP EEG paradigm that uses high-frequency visual stimulation (HFvS) to induce neural potentiation in visual cortex neurons, as well as on three cognitive tasks: a weather prediction task (WPT), an information integration task (IIT), and a n-back task. The WPT and IIT are learning tasks that require practice with feedback to reach optimal performance. The n-back assesses working memory. Healthy adults were randomized to receive DCS (100 mg; n = 32) or placebo (n = 33); groups were similar in IQ and demographic characteristics. Participants who received DCS showed enhanced potentiation of neural responses following repetitive HFvS, as well as enhanced performance on the WPT and IIT. Groups did not differ on the n-back. Augmenting NMDAR signaling using DCS therefore enhanced activity-dependent plasticity in human adults, as demonstrated by lasting enhancement of neural potentiation following repetitive HFvS and accelerated acquisition of two learning tasks. Results highlight the utility of considering cellular mechanisms underlying distinct cognitive functions when investigating potential cognitive enhancers.

  19. Human vitamin B12 absorption measurement by accelerator mass spectrometry using specifically labeled (14)C-cobalamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carkeet, Colleen; Dueker, Stephen R; Lango, Jozsef; Buchholz, Bruce A; Miller, Joshua W; Green, Ralph; Hammock, Bruce D; Roth, John R; Anderson, Peter J

    2006-04-11

    There is a need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B(12). Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B(12) is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of carbon-14 ((14)C)-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of (14)C in microliter volumes of biological samples with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B(12) in the range of normal dietary intake. The B(12) used was quantitatively labeled with (14)C at one particular atom of the dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonella metabolism. To grow aerobically on ethanolamine, Salmonella enterica must be provided with either preformed B(12) or two of its precursors, cobinamide and DMB. When provided with (14)C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced (14)C-B(12) of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) (1 Ci = 37 GBq) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 microg, 2.2 kBq/59 nCi) of purified (14)C-B(12) was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B(12) assimilation.

  20. Human Vitamin B12 Absorption and Metabolism are Measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Using Specifically Labeled 14C-Cobalamin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carkeet, C; Dueker, S R; Lango, J; Buchholz, B A; Miller, J W; Green, R; Hammock, B D; Roth, J R; Anderson, P J

    2006-01-26

    There is need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B{sub 12}. Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B{sub 12} is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of {sup 14}C-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) in microliter volumes of biological samples, with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B{sub 12} in the range of normal dietary intake. The B{sub 12} used was quantitatively labeled with {sup 14}C at one particular atom of the DMB moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonellametabolism. In order to grow aerobically on ethanolamine, S. entericamust be provided with either pre-formed B{sub 12} or two of its precursors: cobinamide and dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). When provided with {sup 14}C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 mg, 2.2 KBq/59 nCi) of purified {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B{sub 12} assimilation.

  1. Injecting learning experience into geoethics for human and natural sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookall, David

    2016-04-01

    Our early life experience has a strong influence on our actions in later life. Humans today are just starting to re-learn, collectively, how to treat Earth with the respect that it deserves and that is needed for our offspring to inherit a decent home. However, we still have a long way to go to instill in people at large the ethics, knowledge and skills necessary to ensure a healthy journey for humanity on spaceship. The experience of early upbringing, of schooling and of everyday life is probably the only path strong enough to develop in people a strong desire for ethical behaviour towards their environment. The problem is that the measures taken today to ensure the development of ethical behaviours in the population at large are woefully inadequate. At best, western school programmes contain a few lessons devoted to the environment, and even then they usually just pay lip service to the basics of the environment; they rarely aim to instill skills and knowledge in order to understand and care deeply for the environment. My presentation will suggest some practical ways to help communities build ethical frameworks and strategies to guide and generate tools, methods and activities that guide young people (pupils, students, scholars, researchers) to toward more ethical behaviours regarding their environment and their communities. Examples might include: - Developing geoethical dimensions of internships, in all areas; - Designing, testing and running simulation/games+debriefing providing a rich affective-cognitive context for grappling with geoethical problems- eg, FISH BANKS, KEEP COOL. - Pressuring governments to make geoethics, environmental care and climate change understanding central components of (almost) all educational programmes (in, eg, history, language, business, law, medicine, etc). - Subsidizing environmental-care summer schools for families and teachers at all levels. - Etc. One of my actions is founding a academic journal in the area, maybe with the

  2. 77 FR 25533 - Agency Requests for Approval of a New Information Collection(s): Human Subjects Experiments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ...(s): Human Subjects Experiments Related to Keyless Ignition Controls, Gear Selection Controls, and....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OMB Control Number: 2127-New. Title: Human Subjects Experiments... available at www.regulations.gov . Human factors observational experiments are proposed to examine...

  3. Design of a 5-MA 100-ns linear-transformer-driver accelerator for wire array Z-pinch experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The linear-transformer-driver (LTD is a recently developed pulsed-power technology that shows great promise for a number of applications. These include a Z-pinch-driven fission-fusion-hybrid reactor that is being developed by the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics. In support of the reactor development effort, we are planning to build an LTD-based accelerator that is optimized for driving wire-array Z-pinch loads. The accelerator comprises six modules in parallel, each of which has eight series 0.8-MA LTD cavities in a voltage-adder configuration. Vacuum transmission lines are used from the interior of the adder to the central vacuum chamber where the load is placed. Thus the traditional stack-flashover problem is eliminated. The machine is 3.2 m tall and 12 m in outer diameter including supports. A prototype cavity was built and tested for more than 6000 shots intermittently at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A novel trigger, in which only one input trigger pulse is needed by utilizing an internal trigger brick, was developed and successfully verified in these shots. A full circuit modeling was conducted for the accelerator. The simulation result shows that a current pulse rising to 5.2 MA in 91 ns (10%–90% can be delivered to the wire-array load, which is 1.5 cm in height, 1.2 cm in initial radius, and 1 mg in mass. The maximum implosion velocity of the load is 32  cm/μs when compressed to 0.1 of the initial radius. The maximum kinetic energy is 78 kJ, which is 11.7% of the electric energy stored in the capacitors. This accelerator is supposed to enable a radiation energy efficiency of 20%–30%, providing a high efficient facility for research on the fast Z pinch and technologies for repetition-rate-operated accelerators.

  4. Exosomes derived from human adipose mensenchymal stem cells accelerates cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Zehuan; Zhao, Jiajia; Yu, Ran; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Handong; Chen, Lili

    2016-09-12

    Prolonged healing and scar formation are two major challenges in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) play an important role in tissue regeneration, and recent studies have suggested that exosomes secreted by stem cells may contribute to paracrine signaling. In this study, we investigated the roles of ASCs-derived exosomes (ASCs-Exos) in cutaneous wound healing. We found that ASCs-Exos could be taken up and internalized by fibroblasts to stimulate cell migration, proliferation and collagen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with increased genes expression of N-cadherin, cyclin-1, PCNA and collagen I, III. In vivo tracing experiments demonstrated that ASCs-Exos can be recruited to soft tissue wound area in a mouse skin incision model and significantly accelerated cutaneous wound healing. Histological analysis showed increased collagen I and III production by systemic administration of exosomes in the early stage of wound healing, while in the late stage, exosomes might inhibit collagen expression to reduce scar formation. Collectively, our findings indicate that ASCs-Exos can facilitate cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts. Our results provide a new perspective and therapeutic strategy for the use of ASCs-Exos in soft tissue repair.

  5. Exosomes derived from human adipose mensenchymal stem cells accelerates cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Zehuan; Zhao, Jiajia; Yu, Ran; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Handong; Chen, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged healing and scar formation are two major challenges in the treatment of soft tissue trauma. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) play an important role in tissue regeneration, and recent studies have suggested that exosomes secreted by stem cells may contribute to paracrine signaling. In this study, we investigated the roles of ASCs-derived exosomes (ASCs-Exos) in cutaneous wound healing. We found that ASCs-Exos could be taken up and internalized by fibroblasts to stimulate cell migration, proliferation and collagen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with increased genes expression of N-cadherin, cyclin-1, PCNA and collagen I, III. In vivo tracing experiments demonstrated that ASCs-Exos can be recruited to soft tissue wound area in a mouse skin incision model and significantly accelerated cutaneous wound healing. Histological analysis showed increased collagen I and III production by systemic administration of exosomes in the early stage of wound healing, while in the late stage, exosomes might inhibit collagen expression to reduce scar formation. Collectively, our findings indicate that ASCs-Exos can facilitate cutaneous wound healing via optimizing the characteristics of fibroblasts. Our results provide a new perspective and therapeutic strategy for the use of ASCs-Exos in soft tissue repair. PMID:27615560

  6. Effect of accelerated electron beam on mechanical properties of human cortical bone: influence of different processing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Artur; Grazka, Ewelina; Jastrzebska, Anna; Marowska, Joanna; Gut, Grzegorz; Wojciechowski, Artur; Uhrynowska-Tyszkiewicz, Izabela

    2012-08-01

    Accelerated electron beam (EB) irradiation has been a sufficient method used for sterilisation of human tissue grafts for many years in a number of tissue banks. Accelerated EB, in contrast to more often used gamma photons, is a form of ionizing radiation that is characterized by lower penetration, however it is more effective in producing ionisation and to reach the same level of sterility, the exposition time of irradiated product is shorter. There are several factors, including dose and temperature of irradiation, processing conditions, as well as source of irradiation that may influence mechanical properties of a bone graft. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect e-beam irradiation with doses of 25 or 35 kGy, performed on dry ice or at ambient temperature, on mechanical properties of non-defatted or defatted compact bone grafts. Left and right femurs from six male cadaveric donors, aged from 46 to 54 years, were transversely cut into slices of 10 mm height, parallel to the longitudinal axis of the bone. Compact bone rings were assigned to the eight experimental groups according to the different processing method (defatted or non-defatted), as well as e-beam irradiation dose (25 or 35 kGy) and temperature conditions of irradiation (ambient temperature or dry ice). Axial compression testing was performed with a material testing machine. Results obtained for elastic and plastic regions of stress-strain curves examined by univariate analysis are described. Based on multivariate analysis, including all groups, it was found that temperature of e-beam irradiation and defatting had no consistent significant effect on evaluated mechanical parameters of compact bone rings. In contrast, irradiation with both doses significantly decreased the ultimate strain and its derivative toughness, while not affecting the ultimate stress (bone strength). As no deterioration of mechanical properties was observed in the elastic region, the reduction of the energy

  7. Influence of elevator acceleration induced loading on injury levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Funai, K.; Schijndel-de Nooij, M. van; Nunen, E. van

    2008-01-01

    The influence on human body of the acceleration caused by the elevator emergency stop has been studied. Experiments were performed with an automotive dummy in an elevator. The study is furthermore based on numerical simulations in MADYMO with an active human model. Kinematics and contact forces of v

  8. Acceleration in astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  9. Cycle-Powered Short Radius (1.9 m) Centrifuge: Effect of Exercise Versus Passive Acceleration on Heart Rate in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Gundo, D. P.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Mulenburg, G. M.; Mckenzie, M. A.; Looft-Wilson, R.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    In addition to extensive use of lower extremity physical exercise training as a countermeasure for the work capacity component of spaceflight deconditioning, some form of additional head-to-foot (+Gz) gravitational (orthostatic) stress may be required to further attenuate or prevent the signs and symptoms (nausea, vertigo, instability, fatigue) of the general reentry syndrome (GRS) that can reduce astronaut performance during landing. Orthostatic (head-to-foot) stress can be induced by standing, by lower body negative pressure, and by +Gz acceleration. One important question is whether acceleration training alone or with concurrent leg exercise would provide sufficient additive stimulation to attenuate the GRS. Use of a new human-powered centrifuge may be the answer. Thus, the purpose for this study was to compare heart rate (HR), i.e., a stress response during human-powered acceleration, in four men (35-62 yr) and two women (30-31 yr) during exercise acceleration versus passive acceleration (by an off-board operator) at 100% (maximal acceleration = A(max)), and at 25%, 50%, and 75% of A(max). Mean (+/-SE) A(max) was 43.7 +/- 1.3 rpm (+3.9 +/- 0.2Gz). Mean HR at exercise A(max) was 189 +/- 13 b/min (50-70 sec run time), and 142 +/- 22 b/min at passive A(max) (40-70 sec run time). Regression of mean HR on the various +Gz levels indicated explained variance (correlations squared) of r(exp 2) = 0.88 (exercise) and r(exp 2) = 0.96 (passive): exercise HR of 107 +/- 4 (25%) to 189 +/- 13 (100%) b/min were 43-50 b/min higher (p less than 0.05) than comparable passive HR of 64 +/- 2 to 142 +/- 22 b/min. Thus, exercise adds significant physiological stress during +Gz acceleration. Inflight use of this combined exercise and acceleration countermeasure may maintain work capacity as well as normalize acceleration and orthostatic tolerances which could attenuate or perhaps eliminate the GRS.

  10. Multibiological life support system experiments with humans partially involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Li, Ming; Hu, Dawei; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Hu, Enzhu

    To establish bioregenerative life support system in lunar or mars bases in the future, manned stimulation experiments including several kinds of creatures are needed to be conducted first. Gas exchange relation, element transfer and transformation principles, etc. between human beings and the multibiological system composed of plants, animals, Chlorella vulgaris and so on must be investigated in order to place different organisms with appropriate numbers and proportions. This research cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) in the Closed Integrative Cultivating System (CICS) of the Integrative Experimental Sys-tem (IES) with Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in the Plate Photo Bioreactor (PPB) of the IES. Gas exchange between testers and the IES were conducted periodically. The automotive control system of the PPB changed the illumination intensity of the photo bioreactor according to the CO2 concentration in the IES to make CO2 /O2 in the system maintain at stable levels by regu-lating the photosynthesis of alga. The conveyor-type cultivation method which was harvesting the biggest batch of lettuce and silkworms through the mass exchange chamber of IES every four days and transferring the smallest batch of lettuce and silkworms into the system; carrying certain amount of alga liquid out of the bioreactor every day with nutrient liquid replenished into the system was implemented in the experiments. In terms of gas circulation, CO2 /O2 concentration changes in the system with trace gas contaminants (CH4 , NH3 and C2 H4 ) were measured. As to the mass transfer and transformation, element (C, H, O, N) contents, height, crown width and biomasses of lettuce in different developing stages, silkworms' bioconversion rates, alga's biomass changes, the amount and community change trends of the microorganism in different positions of the system, the quality of condensates gained under different running conditions and so on were studied. Results showed

  11. What experimental experience affects dogs' comprehension of human communicative actions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Marc D; Comins, Jordan A; Pytka, Lisa M; Cahill, Donal P; Velez-Calderon, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Studies of dogs report that individuals reliably respond to the goal-directed communicative actions (e.g., pointing) of human experimenters. All of these studies use some version of a multi-trial approach, thereby allowing for the possibility of rapid learning within an experimental session. The experiments reported here ask whether dogs can respond correctly to a communicative action based on only a single presentation, thereby eliminating the possibility of learning within the experimental context. We tested 173 dogs. For each dog reaching our test criteria, we used a single presentation of six different goal-directed actions within a session, asking whether they correctly follow to a target goal (container with concealed food) a (1) distal hand point, (2) step toward one container, (3) hand point to one container followed by step toward the other, (4) step toward one container and point to the other, (5) distal foot point with the experimenter's hands free, and (6) distal foot point with the experimenter's hands occupied. Given only a single presentation, dogs selected the correct container when the experimenter hand pointed, foot pointed with hands occupied, or stepped closer to the target container, but failed on the other actions, despite using the same method. The fact that dogs correctly followed foot pointing with hands occupied, but not hands free, suggests that they are sensitive to environmental constraints, and use this information to infer rational, goal-directed action. We discuss these results in light of the role of experience in recognizing communicative gestures, as well as the significance of coding criteria for studies of canine competence.

  12. Efficient production by sperm-mediated gene transfer of human decay accelerating factor (hDAF) transgenic pigs for xenotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica; Lazzereschi, Davide; Di Stefano, Carla; Fioretti, Daniela; Giancotti, Paola; Marfé, Gabriella; Pucci, Loredana; Renzi, Luigina; Wang, Hongjun; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Stassi, Giorgio; Sargiacomo, Massimo; Sinibaldi, Paola; Turchi, Valeria; Giovannoni, Roberto; Della Casa, Giacinto; Seren, Eraldo; Rossi, Giancarlo

    2002-01-01

    A large number of hDAF transgenic pigs to be used for xenotransplantation research were generated by using sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT). The efficiency of transgenesis obtained with SMGT was much greater than with any other method. In the experiments reported, up to 80% of pigs had the transgene integrated into the genome. Most of the pigs carrying the hDAF gene transcribed it in a stable manner (64%). The great majority of pigs that transcribed the gene expressed the protein (83%). The hDAF gene was transmitted to progeny. Expression was stable and found in caveolae as it is in human cells. The expressed gene was functional based on in vitro experiments performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These results show that our SMGT approach to transgenesis provides an efficient procedure for studies involving large animal models. PMID:12393815

  13. Sensitivity of the T2K accelerator-based neutrino experiment with an Extended run to $20\\times10^{21}$ POT

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Antonova, M; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Autiero, D; Ban, S; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bartet-Friburg, P; Batkiewicz, M; Berardi, V; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Bienstock, S; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Avanzini, M Buizza; Calland, R G; Campbell, T; Cao, S; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Chikuma, N; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Collazuol, G; Coplowe, D; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Denner, P F; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dolan, S; Drapier, O; Duffy, K E; Dumarchez, J; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Feusels, T; Finch, A J; Fiorentini, G A; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, D; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Garcia, A; Giganti, C; Gizzarelli, F; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haigh, M D; Hansen, D; Harada, J; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayashino, T; Hayato, Y; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hillairet, A; Hiraki, T; Hiramoto, A; Hirota, S; Hogan, M; Holeczek, J; Hosomi, F; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Jiang, M; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kim, H; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Knight, A; Knox, A; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Koga, T; Konaka, A; Kondo, K; Kopylov, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Lamoureux, M; Larkin, E; Lasorak, P; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lindner, T; Liptak, Z J; Litchfield, R P; Li, X; Longhin, A; Lopez, J P; Lou, T; Ludovici, L; Lu, X; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Martin, J F; Martins, P; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Ma, W Y; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K G; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, K D; Nakanishi, Y; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nantais, C; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; Novella, P; Nowak, J; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Patel, N D; Pavin, M; Payne, D; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pickering, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radermacher, T; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Rychter, A; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shah, R; Shaikhiev, A; Shaker, F; Shaw, D; Shiozawa, M; Shirahige, T; Short, S; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Steinmann, J; Stewart, T; Stowell, P; Suda, Y; Suvorov, S; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thakore, T; Thompson, L F; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vagins, M; Vallari, Z; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Warzycha, W; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, M; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yoo, J; Yoshida, K; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements at the T2K experiment indicate that CP violation in neutrino mixing may be observed in the future by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We explore the physics program of an extension to the currently approved T2K running of $7.8\\times 10^{21}$ protons-on-target to $20\\times 10^{21}$ protons-on-target,aiming at initial observation of CP violation with 3$\\,\\sigma$ or higher significance for the case of maximum CP violation. With accelerator and beam line upgrades, as well as analysis improvements, this program would occur before the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments that are expected to start operation in 2026.

  14. NASA Experience with Pogo in Human Spaceflight Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Curtis E.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of more than 45 years of NASA human spaceflight experience is presented with respect to the thrust axis vibration response of liquid fueled rockets known as pogo. A coupled structure and propulsion system instability, pogo can result in the impairment of the astronaut crew, an unplanned engine shutdown, loss of mission, or structural failure. The NASA history begins with the Gemini Program and adaptation of the USAF Titan II ballistic missile as a spacecraft launch vehicle. It continues with the pogo experienced on several Apollo-Saturn flights in both the first and second stages of flight. The defining moment for NASA s subsequent treatment of pogo occurred with the near failure of the second stage on the ascent of the Apollo 13 mission. Since that time NASA has had a strict "no pogo" philosophy that was applied to the development of the Space Shuttle. The "no pogo" philosophy lead to the first vehicle designed to be pogo-free from the beginning and the first development of an engine with an integral pogo suppression system. Now, more than 30 years later, NASA is developing two new launch vehicles, the Ares I crew launch vehicle propelling the Orion crew excursion vehicle, and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle. A new generation of engineers must again exercise NASA s system engineering method for pogo mitigation during design, development and verification.

  15. Experiments on the fluid dynamics of the human cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Gary

    2011-11-01

    Human coughing is studied non-intrusively by high-speed schlieren videography, revealing a turbulent jet lasting up to 1 sec with a total expelled air volume of about 2 L. Velocimetry of eddy motion reveals a jet centerline airspeed of at least 8 m/sec. With Re roughly 18,000 the cough jet is inertia-driven and buoyancy is negligible. It shows typical round-turbulent-jet behavior, including a conical spreading angle of 24 deg, despite irregular initial conditions. The cough jet is projected several m into the surrounding air before it mixes out. It is well known that a cough can transmit infectious agents, and we are advised to cover our mouths in an apparent attempt to thwart the jet formation. Present experiments have shown that wearing a surgical mask or respirator designed to prevent the inhalation of infectious agents also interferes with the cough-jet formation, redirecting it into the person's rising thermal plume. (Tang et al., J. Royal. Soc. Interface 6, S727, 2009.)

  16. sup 26 Al tracer experiment by accelerator mass spectrometry and its application to the studies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Koichi (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology); Yumoto, Sakae; Nagai, Hisao; Hosoyama, Yoshiyuki; Imamura, Mineo; Masuzawa, Shin-ichirou; Koizumi, Yoshinobu; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    1990-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was applied for {sup 26}Al tracer experiment to study the aluminum toxicity and metabolism in rats. To investigate the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease, the aluminum incorporation into the brain (cerebrum) was studied by AMS using {sup 26}Al as a tracer. When {sup 26}Al was intraperitoneally injected into rats, a considerable amount of {sup 26}Al was incorporated into the cerebrum after 5-35 days of the injection. (author).

  17. Future accelerators (?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  18. A single dose mass balance study of the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor vismodegib (GDC-0449) in humans using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Richard A; Lum, Bert L; Morrison, Glenn; Chang, Ilsung; Jorga, Karin; Dean, Brian; Shin, Young G; Yue, Qin; Mulder, Teresa; Malhi, Vikram; Xie, Minli; Low, Jennifer A; Hop, Cornelis E C A

    2011-08-01

    Vismodegib (GDC-0449), a small-molecule Hedgehog pathway inhibitor, was well tolerated in patients with solid tumors and showed promising efficacy in advanced basal cell carcinoma in a Phase I trial. The purpose of the study presented here was to determine routes of elimination and the extent of vismodegib metabolism, including assessment and identification of metabolites in plasma, urine, and feces. Six healthy female subjects of nonchildbearing potential were enrolled; each received a single 30-ml oral suspension containing 150 mg of vismodegib with 6.5 μg of [(14)C]vismodegib to yield a radioactivity dose of approximately 37 kBq (1000 nCi). Plasma, urine, and feces samples were collected over 56 days to permit sample collection for up to 5 elimination half-lives. Nonradioactive vismodegib was measured in plasma using liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometry, and total radioactivity in plasma, urine, and feces was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Vismodegib was slowly eliminated by a combination of metabolism and excretion of parent drug, most of which was recovered in feces. The estimated excretion of the administered dose was 86.6% on average, with 82.2 and 4.43% recovered in feces and urine, respectively. Vismodegib was predominant in plasma, with concentrations representing >98% of the total circulating drug-related components. Metabolic pathways of vismodegib in humans included oxidation, glucuronidation, and uncommon pyridine ring cleavage. We conclude that vismodegib and any associated metabolic products are mainly eliminated through feces after oral administration in healthy volunteers.

  19. Cell killing and chromatid damage in primary human bronchial epithelial cells irradiated with accelerated 56Fe ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M.; Piao, C.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We examined cell killing and chromatid damage in primary human bronchial epithelial cells irradiated with high-energy 56Fe ions. Cells were irradiated with graded doses of 56Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon) accelerated with the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The survival curves for cells plated 1 h after irradiation (immediate plating) showed little or no shoulder. However, the survival curves for cells plated 24 h after irradiation (delayed plating) had a small initial shoulder. The RBE for 56Fe ions compared to 137Cs gamma rays was 1.99 for immediate plating and 2.73 for delayed plating at the D10. The repair ratio (delayed plating/immediate plating) was 1.67 for 137Cs gamma rays and 1.22 for 56Fe ions. The dose-response curves for initially measured and residual chromatid fragments detected by the Calyculin A-mediated premature chromosome condensation technique showed a linear response. The results indicated that the induction frequency for initially measured fragments was the same for 137Cs gamma rays and 56Fe ions. On the other hand, approximately 85% of the fragments induced by 137Cs gamma rays had rejoined after 24 h of postirradiation incubation; the corresponding amount for 56Fe ions was 37%. Furthermore, the frequency of chromatid exchanges induced by gamma rays measured 24 h after irradiation was higher than that induced by 56Fe ions. No difference in the amount of chromatid damage induced by the two types of radiations was detected when assayed 1 h after irradiation. The results suggest that high-energy 56Fe ions induce a higher frequency of complex, unrepairable damage at both the cellular and chromosomal levels than 137Cs gamma rays in the target cells for radiation-induced lung cancers.

  20. A boost of BMP4 accelerates the commitment of human embryonic stem cells to the endothelial lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Orit; Feraud, Olivier; Boyer-Di Ponio, Julie; Driancourt, Catherine; Clay, Denis; Le Bousse-Kerdiles, Marie-Caroline; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Uzan, Georges

    2009-08-01

    Embryoid bodies (EBs) generated during differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) contain vascular-like structures, suggesting that commitment of mesoderm progenitors into endothelial cells occurs spontaneously. We showed that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), an inducer of mesoderm, accelerates the peak expression of CD133/kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR) and CD144/KDR. Because the CD133(+)KDR(+) population could represent endothelial progenitors, we sorted them at day 7 and cultured them in endothelial medium. These cells were, however, unable to differentiate into endothelial cells. Under standard conditions, the CD144(+)KDR(+) population represents up to 10% of the total cells at day 12. In culture, these cells, if sorted, give rise to a homogeneous population with a morphology typical of endothelial cells and express endothelial markers. These endothelial cells derived from the day 12 sorted population were functional, as assessed by different in vitro assays. When EBs were stimulated by BMP4, the CD144(+)KDR(+) peak was shifted to day 7. Most of these cells, however, were CD31(-), becoming CD31(+) in culture. They then expressed von Willebrand factor and were functional. This suggests that, initially, the BMP4-boosted day 7, CD144(+)KDR(+)CD31(-) population represents immature endothelial cells that differentiate into mature endothelial cells in culture. The expression of OCT3/4, a marker of immaturity for hESCs decreases during EB differentiation, decreasing faster following BMP4 induction. We also show that BMP4 inhibits the global expression of GATA2 and RUNX1, two transcription factors involved in hemangioblast formation, at day 7 and day 12.

  1. Fundamentals of human resource management : emerging experiences from Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itika, J.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamentals of human resource management are extensively described in European and American literature. This book summarises the general human resource management philosophies, theories, strategies and techniques and links them to the specific African context. The usefulness of these general

  2. Human Capital Development and Economic Growth: The Nigeria Experience

    OpenAIRE

    God’stime Osekhebhen Eigbiremolen; Uchechi Shirley Anaduaka

    2014-01-01

    This study employs the augmented Solow human-capital-growth model to investigate the impact of human capital development on national output, a proxy for economic growth, using quarterly time-series data from 1999-2012. Empirical results show that human capita development, in line with theory, exhibits significant positive impact on output level. This implies that human capital development is indispensable in the achievement of sustainable economic growth in Nigeria, as there is an increase in...

  3. Human body composition models and methodology: theory and experiment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Z.M.

    1997-01-01

    The study of human body composition is a branch of human biology which focuses on the in vivo quantification of body components, the quantitative relationships between components, and the quantitative changes in these components related to various influencing factors. Accordingly, the study of human

  4. Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Grafts May Accelerate the Healing of Ulcers on Free Flaps in Patients With Venous Insufficiency and/or Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Edward P.; Friedman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ulceration of free flaps in patients with venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema is an uncommon but challenging problem. We hypothesized that dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (Epifix) grafts would accelerate healing of these challenging ulcers. Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data identified 8 lower extremity free flaps with ulcerations in the context of venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema. The first 4 were flaps that had been treated with conse...

  5. The 2nd Order Focusing by Energy for TOF Sector Field Mass Analyzer with an Orthogonal Acceleration: Theory, Modeling, Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteshin, S. S.; Chernyshev, D. M.; Sysoev, Alexey A.; Sysoev, Alexander A.

    Currently axially symmetric type of analyzer with an electrostatic sector fields (AESF) is rarely used to construct time-of-flight mass spectrometers. The main drawback, hindering the wider use of the analyzers of this type, is the lack of chromatic second-order focusing by energy. However, the configuration of AESF in combination with orthogonal accelerator (OA) allows to achieved it through compensation of energy aberrations of the analyzer in the system of orthogonal input of the ion beam. In the presented work the results of theoretical calculation, simulation and experimentally obtained data are compared. Characteristics of the analyzer with OA in a large extent depend on the parameters of the incoming ion beam. Data of modeling the 2nd stage of gas-dynamic interface, which have the greatest influence on the parameters of the ion beam, is provided.

  6. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Nine years' experience in a single institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Rubio, A A; Martinez-Manrique, J J; Revuelta-Gutierrez, R; Gomez-Amador, J L; Martinez-Anda, J J; Ponce-Gomez, J A; Moreno-Jimenez, S

    2014-09-16

    INTRODUCTION. Pharmacological treatment is the first therapeutic step towards controlling pain in trigeminal neuralgia, but 25-50% of patients become medication resistant. There are currently several surgical alternatives for treating these patients. AIM. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with trigeminal neuralgia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A follow-up study was conducted on 30 patients who underwent radiosurgery using a Novalis linear accelerator. Eighty per cent of the dosage was calculated at the isocentre, the entry zone of the root of the trigeminal nerve. The mean follow-up time was 27.5 months (range: 1-65 months). RESULTS. The mean age was 66 years (range: 36-87 years), with a time to progression of 7.1 years (range: 4-27 years). The distribution of the pain was from the right side (63.3%). Of the 30 patients, 27 experienced an improvement (90%) 1.6 months (range: 1 week-4 months) after the treatment; 10 patients (33.3%) scored grade I, and 17 patients (56.6%) obtained a score of grade II. During the follow-up, four patients (14.2%) suffered a relapse; two underwent re-irradiation. Time without recurrence was 62.7 months (range: 54.6-70.8 months). The rate of side effects was 76.7% and only three patients developed facial anaesthesia with loss of the corneal reflex. CONCLUSIONS. The use of the linear accelerator is an effective therapeutic option in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, since it provides adequate long-term control of the pain, reduces the use of medication and improves the quality of life.

  7. Design and characterization of the DC acceleration and transport system required for the FOM 1 MW free electron maser experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Urbanus, W.H.; Geer, C. van der [FOM-Institut voor Plasma Fysica, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A Free Electron Maser (FEM) has been constructed and is soon to be tested at the FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen) Netherlands with the goal of producing 1 MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz to 250 GHz. The design uses a DC beam system in a depressed collector configuration in order to make the overall wall plug efficiency 50%. The high voltage ({approximately} 2 MeV) power supply provides only the body interception current ({approximately} 30 mA) while the 12 amp beam current is supplied by the 100-200 keV collector supplies. Some of the design features to ensure low interception current, which is critical to long pulse (CW) operation are: (1) DC beam in-line transport and acceleration system, (2) emittance conserving solenoid focusing system, (3) halo suppression techniques at cathode edge, and (4) very low beam fill factor (<20%). A relativistic version of the Herman Optical theory developed for microwave tubes is used to determine current distribution functions everywhere along the beam from the electron gun, through the DC accelerator and transport system to the wiggler. This theory takes into account thermals far out on the gaussian tail which translates into beam current far outside the ideal beam edge. This theory is applied to the FOM beam line design to predict a series of beam envelope contours containing various percentages of total beam current up to 99.9%. Predictions of body interception current due to finite emittance (effective temperature) are presented and compared with measured experimental results.

  8. Demonstration of long-pulse acceleration of high power positive ion beam with JT-60 positive ion source in Japan–Korea joint experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, A., E-mail: kojima.atsushi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Hanada, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Jeong, S.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Y.S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, D.H.; Kim, T.S.; Lee, K.W.; Park, M.; Jung, B.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Mogaki, K.; Komata, M.; Dairaku, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The long-pulse acceleration of the high-power positive ion beam has been demonstrated with the JT-60 positive ion source in the joint experiment among Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) under the collaboration program for the development of plasma heating and current drive systems. In this joint experiment, the increase of the heat load and the breakdowns induced by the degradation of the beam optics due to the gas accumulation was one of the critical issues for the long-pulse acceleration. As a result of development of the long-pulse operation techniques of the ion source and facilities of the neutral beam test stand in KAERI, 2 MW 100 s beam has been achieved for the first time. The achieved beam performance satisfies the JT-60SA requirement which is designed to be a 1.94 MW ion beam power from an ion source corresponding to total neutral beam power of 20 MW with 24 ion sources. Therefore, it was found that the JT-60 positive ion sources were applicable in the JT-60SA neutral beam injectors. Moreover, because this ion source is planned to be a backup ion source for KSTAR, the operational region and characteristic has been clarified to apply to the KSTAR neutral beam injector.

  9. Proposal for the Award of Two Contracts for the Technical Services for Work on Components of CERN Particle Accelerators and High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This document concerns the award of two contracts for the technical services for work on components of CERN particle accelerators and high energy physics experiments. Following a market survey carried out among 73 firms in fourteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-3156/SPL) was sent on 4 November 2002 to three consortia in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from the three consortia. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of two contracts with: 1) the consortium SERCO FACILITIES MANAGEMENT (NL) - GERARD PERRIER INDUSTRIE (FR) - INEO ALPES (FR), the lowest bidder, for approximately 55% of the technical services for work on components of CERN particle accelerators and high energy physics experiments, for an initial period of five years and for a total amount not exceeding 37 435 270 euros (54 902 500 Swiss francs), subject to revision for inflation from 1 January 2005. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial five-...

  10. Personal experience and reputation interact in human decisions to help reciprocally

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, Lucas; van den Broek, Eva; Egas, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    There is ample evidence that human cooperative behaviour towards other individuals is often conditioned on information about previous interactions. This information derives both from personal experience (direct reciprocity) and from experience of others (i.e. reputation; indirect reciprocity).

  11. Personal experience and reputation interact in human decisions to help reciprocally.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, L.; van den Broek, E.; Egas, M.

    2013-01-01

    There is ample evidence that human cooperative behaviour towards other individuals is often conditioned on information about previous interactions. This information derives both from personal experience (direct reciprocity) and from experience of others (i.e. reputation; indirect reciprocity).

  12. Short-term effects of hydrated lime and quicklime on the decay of human remains using pig cadavers as human body analogues: Laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotsmans, Eline M J; Denton, John; Fletcher, Jonathan N; Janaway, Robert C; Wilson, Andrew S

    2014-05-01

    Contradictions and misconceptions regarding the effect of lime on the decay of human remains have demonstrated the need for more research into the effect of different types of lime on cadaver decomposition. This study follows previous research by the authors who have investigated the effect of lime on the decomposition of human remains in burial environments. A further three pig carcasses (Sus scrofa), used as human body analogues, were observed and monitored for 78 days without lime, with hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) and with quicklime (CaO) in the taphonomy laboratory at the University of Bradford. The results showed that in the early stages of decay, the unlimed and hydrated lime cadavers follow a similar pattern of changes. In contrast, the application of quicklime instigated an initial acceleration of decay. Microbial investigation demonstrated that the presence of lime does not eliminate all aerobic bacteria. The experiment also suggested that lime functions as a sink, buffering the carbon dioxide evolution. This study complements the field observations. It has implications for the investigation of time since death of limed remains. Knowledge of the effects of lime on decomposition processes is of interest to forensic pathologists, archaeologists, humanitarian organisations and those concerned with disposal of animal carcasses or human remains in mass disasters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Past Experience Influences the Processing of Stimulus Compounds in Human Pavlovian Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchers, Klaus G.; Lachnit, Harold; Shanks, David R.

    2004-01-01

    In two human skin conductance conditioning experiments we investigated whether processing of stimulus compounds can be influenced by past experience. Participants were either pre-trained with a discrimination problem that could be solved elementally (A+, B-, AB+, C- in Experiment 1 and A+, AB+, C-, CB- in Experiment 2) or one that required a…

  14. Three-dimensional cardiac cine imaging using the kat ARC acceleration: Initial experience in clinical adult patients at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Shigeo; Yamada, Yoshitake; Tanimoto, Akihiro; Fujita, Jun; Sano, Motoaki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Nozaki, Atsushi; Lai, Peng

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional cardiac cine imaging has demonstrated promising clinical 1.5-Tesla results; however, its application to 3T scanners has been limited because of the higher sensitivity to off-resonance artifacts. The aim of this study was to apply 3D cardiac cine imaging during a single breath hold in clinical patients on a 3T scanner using the kat ARC (k- and adaptive-t auto-calibrating reconstruction for Cartesian sampling) technique and to evaluate the interchangeability between 2D and 3D cine imaging for cardiac functional analysis and detection of abnormalities in regional wall motion. Following institutional review board approval, we obtained 2D cine images with an acceleration factor of two during multiple breath holds and 3D cine images with a net scan acceleration factor of 7.7 during a single breath hold in 20 patients using a 3T unit. Two readers independently evaluated the wall motion of the left ventricle (LV) using a 5-point scale, and the consistency in the detection of regional wall motion abnormality between 2D and 3D cine was analyzed by Cohen's kappa test. The LV volume was calculated at end-diastole and end-systole (LVEDV, LVESV); the ejection fraction (LVEF) and myocardial weight (LVmass) were also calculated. The relationship between functional parameters calculated for 2D and 3D cine images was analyzed using Pearson's correlation analysis. The bias and 95% limit of agreement (LA) were calculated using Bland-Altman plots. In addition, a qualitative evaluation of image quality was performed with regard to the myocardium-blood contrast, noise level and boundary definition. Despite slight degradation in image quality for 3D cine, excellent agreement was obtained for the detection of wall motion abnormalities between 2D and 3D cine images (κ=0.84 and 0.94 for each reader). Excellent correlations between the two imaging methods were shown for the evaluation of functional parameters (r>0.97). Slight differences in LVEDV, LVESV, LVEF and LVmass

  15. Human Security: China’s Discourses and Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Ren

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses three research questions by elaborating on how the idea of human security is understood or defined by the government and social actors in China; how the distinction between the “protection” aspect and “empowerment” aspect of human security is understood and accepted; and what particular downside risks are perceived as pressing human security issues in China. Amongst these the major ones include air pollution, food security, and cyber security. The study reveals that, whilst as a term “human security” is not frequently used, there have been significant discussions leading to the consideration and implementation of various human security practices in China. The idea of human security has been firmly established and threats to human security detected. For both the government and academic community in China, human security and state security are not necessarily confrontational but can rather be combined, often complimenting each other. Recent developments in China are pointing to a positive direction in terms of human security in the country.

  16. Accelerating Value Creation with Accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Eythor Ivar

    2015-01-01

    accelerator programs. Microsoft runs accelerators in seven different countries. Accelerators have grown out of the infancy stage and are now an accepted approach to develop new ventures based on cutting-edge technology like the internet of things, mobile technology, big data and virtual reality. It is also...... with the traditional audit and legal universes and industries are examples of emerging potentials both from a research and business point of view to exploit and explore further. The accelerator approach may therefore be an Idea Watch to consider, no matter which industry you are in, because in essence accelerators...

  17. Accelerating Value Creation with Accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Eythor Ivar

    2015-01-01

    Accelerators can help to accelerate value creation. Accelerators are short-term programs that have the objective of creating innovative and fast growing ventures. They have gained attraction as larger corporations like Microsoft, Barclays bank and Nordea bank have initiated and sponsored accelera......Accelerators can help to accelerate value creation. Accelerators are short-term programs that have the objective of creating innovative and fast growing ventures. They have gained attraction as larger corporations like Microsoft, Barclays bank and Nordea bank have initiated and sponsored...... an approach to facilitate implementation and realization of business ideas and is a lucrative approach to transform research into ventures and to revitalize regions and industries in transition. Investors have noticed that the accelerator approach is a way to increase the possibility of success by funnelling...

  18. Cognition, Emotion, and Other Inescapable Dimensions of Human Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascara, Jorge

    1999-01-01

    Looks at human information processing as a complex system, concentrating on certain insights about field interactions that will reposition the understanding of mental processes, moving it from an analysis of logical steps to the exploration of the influence that contexts have on human cognitive performance. (CR)

  19. Human body composition models and methodology : theory and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Z.M.

    1997-01-01


    The study of human body composition is a branch of human biology which focuses on the in vivo quantification of body components, the quantitative relationships between components, and the quantitative changes in these components related to various influencing factors.

  20. Fundamentals of human resource management : emerging experiences from Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itika, J.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamentals of human resource management are extensively described in European and American literature. This book summarises the general human resource management philosophies, theories, strategies and techniques and links them to the specific African context. The usefulness of these general in

  1. Thinking and practice of accelerating transformation of traditional Chinese medicine from experience medicine to evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoyan; Zhang, Yanhong; Hu, Jingqing; He, Liyun; Zhou, Xuezhong

    2011-06-01

    The gradual development of Chinese medicine is based on constant accumulation and summary of experience in clinical practice, but without the benefit of undergoing the experimental medicine stage. Although Chinese medicine has formed a systematic and unique theory system through thousands of years, with the development of evidence-based medicine, the bondage of the research methods of experience medicine to Chinese medicine is appearing. The rapid transition and transformation from experience medicine to evidence-based medicine have become important content in the development of Chinese medicine. According to the features of Chinese medicine, we propose the research idea of "taking two ways simultaneously," which is the study both in the ideal condition and in the real world. Analyzing and constructing the theoretical basis and methodology of clinical research in the real world, and building the stage for research technique is key to the effective clinical research of Chinese medicine. Only by gradually maturing and completing the clinical research methods of the real world could we realize "taking two ways simultaneously" and complementing each other, continuously produce scientific and reliable evidence of Chinese medicine, as well as transform and develop Chinese medicine from experience medicine to evidence-based medicine.

  2. Accelerating Reflexivity? An Ethno-Theater Interpretation of a Pre-Service Teacher Literacy Methods Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jenifer Jasinski; King, James R.; Kozdras, Deborah; Minick, Vanessa; Welsh, James L.

    2012-01-01

    During a teaching methods field experience, we initiated several processes to facilitate pre-service teachers' reflection, empowerment, and performance as they learned to teach students. Through an ethno-theater presentation and subsequent revisions to an ethno-theater script, we turned the reflective lens on ourselves as we discovered instances…

  3. Wilderness as a place: human dimensions of the wilderness experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad P. Dawson

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the experiences sought by visitors to wilderness areas and how satisfied they are with their experiences is an important type of information for wilderness managers. Understanding how these dimensions are measures of the concept of "place" can help wilderness managers develop better visitor education and management programs. This paper briefly...

  4. Accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles: application to ongoing projects of future X-ray missions

    CERN Document Server

    Perinati, E; Kendziorra, E; Santangelo, A; Tenzer, C; Jochum, J; Bugiel, S; Srama, R; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Rubini, A; Rachevski, A; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Rashevskaya, I; Vacchi, A; Azzarello, P; Bozzo, E; Herder, J -W den; Zane, S; Brandt, S; Hernanz, M; Leutenegger, M A; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Meidinger, N; Strüder, L; Cordier, B; Götz, D; Fraser, G W; Osborne, J P; Dennerl, K; Freyberg, M; Friedrich, P

    2012-01-01

    We report on our activities, currently in progress, aimed at performing accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles. They include tests of different types of X-ray detectors and related components (such as filters) and measurements of scattering of soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles off X-ray mirror shells. These activities have been identified as a goal in the context of a number of ongoing space projects in order to assess the risk posed by environmental radiation and dust and qualify the adopted instrumentation with respect to possible damage or performance degradation. In this paper we focus on tests for the Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) used aboard the LOFT space mission. We use the Van de Graaff accelerators at the University of T\\"ubingen and at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, for soft proton and hyper-velocity dust tests respectively. We present the experimental set-up adopted to perform the tests, status of the activities...

  5. Qualitative analysis of cancer patients' experiences using donated human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rough, Susanne M; Sakamoto, Pauline; Fee, Caroline H; Hollenbeck, Clarie B

    2009-05-01

    This represents the first published account from the patient's perspective of the use of human milk as cancer therapy. Purposive sampling was used to select a sample of 10 participants. Five were patients and 5 were family proxies. Individual interviews were conducted using confirmatory interviewing technique to obtain individual perspectives on the motivation for cancer patients to take donated human milk. Human milk therapy improved the quality of life (QOL) measures in the physical, psychological, and spiritual domains for most patients interviewed. The patients continued their use of human milk despite cost, taste, and discouragement from the conventional medical community. The study results support the theory that QOL may be more important to cancer patients than cancer outcomes and may improve patient medical care overall. These interviews offer information to cancer patients, their practitioners, and donor milk banks on outcomes and symptom relief from this therapy.

  6. Emotions, fear, and empathy: a design approach to human experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Polinedrio, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Fear is an intrinsic human emotion, which produces with variable intensity a bodily reaction as a response to a stimuli. It is considered one of the basic human emotions, and it is universal of all animal species. Despite its subjective quality, fear has gained a rather negativistic stereotype that this research intends to debate and readdress, proposing that “negative fear” is part of an evolutionary transition cultivated by social and cultural constructs. This thesis will analyze the contex...

  7. Atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoichiro [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida-City, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    Results from the atmospheric neutrino measurements are presented. Evidence for the {nu}{sub {tau}} appearance in the atmospheric neutrino events was shown by statistical methods. The long baseline oscillation experiment using man-made neutrinos has confirmed the atmospheric neutrino oscillation. The future accelerator experiments are briefly discussed.

  8. Experience in system design for human-robot teaming in urban search & rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, G.J.M.; Janíček, M.; Keshavdas, S.; Larochelle, B.; Zender, H.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Diggelen, J. van; Colas, F.; Liu, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Svoboda, T.; Petriček, T.; Pirri, F.; Giannni, M.; Papadakis, P.; Sinha, A.; Balmer, P.; Tomatis, N.; WOrst, R.; Linder, T.; Surmann, H.; Tretyakov, V.; Corrao, S.; Pratzler-Wanczura, S.; Sulk, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes experience with applying a user-centric design methodology in developing systems for human-robot teaming in Urban Search & Rescue. A human-robot team consists of several robots (rovers/UGVs, microcopter/UAVs), several humans at an off-site command post (mission commander, UGV ope

  9. Experience in system design for human-robot teaming in urban search & rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, G.J.M.; Janíček, M.; Keshavdas, S.; Larochelle, B.; Zender, H.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Diggelen, J. van; Colas, F.; Liu, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Svoboda, T.; Petriček, T.; Pirri, F.; Giannni, M.; Papadakis, P.; Sinha, A.; Balmer, P.; Tomatis, N.; WOrst, R.; Linder, T.; Surmann, H.; Tretyakov, V.; Corrao, S.; Pratzler-Wanczura, S.; Sulk, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes experience with applying a user-centric design methodology in developing systems for human-robot teaming in Urban Search & Rescue. A human-robot team consists of several robots (rovers/UGVs, microcopter/UAVs), several humans at an off-site command post (mission commander, UGV ope

  10. Experience in system design for human-robot teaming in urban search & rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, G.J.M.; Janíček, M.; Keshavdas, S.; Larochelle, B.; Zender, H.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Diggelen, J. van; Colas, F.; Liu, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Svoboda, T.; Petriček, T.; Pirri, F.; Giannni, M.; Papadakis, P.; Sinha, A.; Balmer, P.; Tomatis, N.; WOrst, R.; Linder, T.; Surmann, H.; Tretyakov, V.; Corrao, S.; Pratzler-Wanczura, S.; Sulk, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes experience with applying a user-centric design methodology in developing systems for human-robot teaming in Urban Search & Rescue. A human-robot team consists of several robots (rovers/UGVs, microcopter/UAVs), several humans at an off-site command post (mission commander, UGV

  11. RECIRCULATING ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERG,J.S.; GARREN,A.A.; JOHNSTONE,C.

    2000-04-07

    This paper compares various types of recirculating accelerators, outlining the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches. The accelerators are characterized according to the types of arcs they use: whether there is a single arc for the entire recirculator or there are multiple arcs, and whether the arc(s) are isochronous or non-isochronous.

  12. LIBO accelerates

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The prototype module of LIBO, a linear accelerator project designed for cancer therapy, has passed its first proton-beam acceleration test. In parallel a new version - LIBO-30 - is being developed, which promises to open up even more interesting avenues.

  13. My 20 years of experience in the human factors field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnino, A. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

    1992-01-01

    My first encounter with human factors happened in early 1973: I was performing a reliability assessment of the safety injection system of the Fessenheim reactor, and I found that the operators had to switch to the recirculation phase manually and had only 6 min between the low and low-low level alarm indicating that the water tank was empty. It of course led us to replace this manual action by an automatic positioning for the recirculation phase. In July of the same year, I attended a North Atlantic Treaty Organization workshop in Liverpool on reliability assessment, and I met Alan Swain from the United States and Jens Rasmussen from Denmark. During the long rainy evenings of the seminar, we had time to discuss human errors and human factors, and that was the beginning of a very fruitful collaboration between us. I realized then the complexity of the problem. Quantification needs were obvious for reliability and risk assessment studies, but, at the same time, there were needs for better understanding of human behavior and the mechanisms that could lead to human errors. Knowledge of the man-machine interface also seemed very poor, although some basic ergonomic rules were available and could be applied. But a major problem was the lack of data.

  14. Assessment of Protein Binding of 5-Hydroxythalidomide Bioactivated in Humanized Mice with Human P450 3A-Chromosome or Hepatocytes by Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis/Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oofusa, Ken; Kuribayashi, Shunji; Shimizu, Makiko; Ninomiya, Shinichi; Horie, Toru; Shibata, Norio; Guengerich, F Peter

    2016-08-15

    Bioactivation of 5-hydroxy-[carbonyl-(14)C]thalidomide, a known metabolite of thalidomide, by human artificial or native cytochrome P450 3A enzymes, and nonspecific binding in livers of mice was assessed using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with accelerator mass spectrometry. The apparent major target proteins were liver microsomal cytochrome c oxidase subunit 6B1 and ATP synthase subunit α in mice containing humanized P450 3A genes or transplanted humanized liver. Liver cytosolic retinal dehydrogenase 1 and glutathione transferase A1 were targets in humanized mice with P450 3A and hepatocytes, respectively. 5-Hydroxythalidomide is bioactivated by human P450 3A enzymes and trapped with proteins nonspecifically in humanized mice.

  15. The International Space Station human life sciences experiment implementation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L J; Haven, C P; McCollum, S G; Lee, A M; Kamman, M R; Baumann, D K; Anderson, M E; Buderer, M C

    2001-01-01

    The selection, definition, and development phases of a Life Sciences flight research experiment has been consistent throughout the past decade. The implementation process, however, has changed significantly within the past two years. This change is driven primarily by the shift from highly integrated, dedicated research missions on platforms with well defined processes to self contained experiments with stand alone operations on platforms which are being concurrently designed. For experiments manifested on the International Space Station (ISS) and/or on short duration missions, the more modular, streamlined, and independent the individual experiment is, the more likely it is to be successfully implemented before the ISS assembly is completed. During the assembly phase of the ISS, science operations are lower in priority than the construction of the station. After the station has been completed, it is expected that more resources will be available to perform research. The complexity of implementing investigations increases with the logistics needed to perform the experiment. Examples of logistics issues include- hardware unique to the experiment; large up and down mass and volume needs; access to crew and hardware during the ascent or descent phases; maintenance of hardware and supplies with a limited shelf life,- baseline data collection schedules with lengthy sessions or sessions close to the launch or landing; onboard stowage availability, particularly cold stowage; and extensive training where highly proficient skills must be maintained. As the ISS processes become better defined, experiment implementation will meet new challenges due to distributed management, on-orbit resource sharing, and adjustments to crew availability pre- and post-increment.

  16. The International Space Station human life sciences experiment implementation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. J.; Haven, C. P.; McCollum, S. G.; Lee, A. M.; Kamman, M. R.; Baumann, D. K.; Anderson, M. E.; Buderer, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    The selection, definition, and development phases of a Life Sciences flight research experiment has been consistent throughout the past decade. The implementation process, however, has changed significantly within the past two years. This change is driven primarily by the shift from highly integrated, dedicated research missions on platforms with well defined processes to self contained experiments with stand alone operations on platforms which are being concurrently designed. For experiments manifested on the International Space Station (ISS) and/or on short duration missions, the more modular, streamlined, and independent the individual experiment is, the more likely it is to be successfully implemented before the ISS assembly is completed. During the assembly phase of the ISS, science operations are lower in priority than the construction of the station. After the station has been completed, it is expected that more resources will be available to perform research. The complexity of implementing investigations increases with the logistics needed to perform the experiment. Examples of logistics issues include- hardware unique to the experiment; large up and down mass and volume needs; access to crew and hardware during the ascent or descent phases; maintenance of hardware and supplies with a limited shelf life,- baseline data collection schedules with lengthy sessions or sessions close to the launch or landing; onboard stowage availability, particularly cold stowage; and extensive training where highly proficient skills must be maintained. As the ISS processes become better defined, experiment implementation will meet new challenges due to distributed management, on-orbit resource sharing, and adjustments to crew availability pre- and post-increment. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The international space station human life sciences experiment implementation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, LadonnaJ.; Haven, CynthiaP.; McCollum, SuzanneG.; Lee, AngeleneM.; Kamman, MichelleR.; Baumann, DavidK.; Anderson, MarkE.; Buderer, MelvinC.

    2001-08-01

    The selection, definition, and development phases of a Life Sciences flight research experiment has been consistent throughout the past decade. The implementation process, however, has changed significantly within the past two years. This change is driven primarily by the shift from highly integrated, dedicated research missions on platforms with well defined processes to self contained experiments with stand alone operations on platforms which are being concurrently designed. For experiments manifested on the International Space Station (ISS) and / or on short duration missions, the more modular, streamlined, and independent the individual experiment is, the more likely it is to be successfully implemented before the ISS assembly is completed. During the assembly phase of the ISS, science operations are lower in priority than the construction of the station. After the station has been completed, it is expected that more resources will be available to perform research. The complexity of implementing investigations increases with the logistics needed to perform the experiment. Examples of logistics issues include: hardware unique to the experiment; large up and down mass and volume needs; access to crew and hardware during the ascent or descent phases; maintenance of hardware and supplies with a limited shelf life; baseline data collection schedules with lengthy sessions or sessions close to the launch or landing; onboard stowage availability, particularly cold stowage; and extensive training where highly proficient skills must be maintained. As the ISS processes become better defined, experiment implementation will meet new challenges due to distributed management, on-orbit resource sharing, and adjustments to crew availability pre- and post-increment.

  18. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öz, E.; Batsch, F.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE) (Assmann et al., 2014 [1]) project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook (Marlow, 1967 [2]) method and has been described in great detail in the work by Hill et al. (1986) [3]. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of 1% for the vapor density–length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach–Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prototype 8 cm long novel Rb vapor cell.

  19. Belgian class II nuclear facilities such as irradiators and accelerators. Regulatory Body attention points and operating experience feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minne, Etienne; Peters, Christelle; Mommaert, Chantal; Kennes, Christian; Cortenbosch, Geert; Schmitz, Frederic; Haesendonck, Michel van [Bel V, Brussels (Belgium); Carlier, Pascal; Schrayen, Virginie; Wertelaers, An [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this paper is to present the Regulatory Body attention points and the operating experience feedback from Belgian ''class IIA'' facilities such as industrial and research irradiators, bulk radionuclides producers and conditioners. Reinforcement of the nuclear safety and radiation protection has been promoted by the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (FANC) since 2009. This paper is clearly a continuation of the former paper [1] presenting the evolution in the regulatory framework relative to the creation of Bel V, the subsidiary of the FANC, and to the new ''class IIA'' covering heavy installations such as those mentioned above. Some lessons learnt are extracted from the operating experience feedback based on the events declared to the authorities. Even though a real willingness to meet the new safety requirements is observed among the ''class IIA'' licensees, promoting the safety culture, the nuclear safety and radiation protection remains an endless challenge for the Regulatory Body.

  20. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    CERN Document Server

    Öz, E; Muggli, P

    2016-01-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE)~\\cite{bib:awake} project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook~\\cite{bib:Hook} method and has been described in great detail in the work by W. Tendell Hill et. al.~\\cite{bib:densitymeter}. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of $1\\%$ for the vapor density-length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach-Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prot...

  1. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, E.; Batsch, F.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE) (Assmann et al., 2014 [1]) project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook (Marlow, 1967 [2]) method and has been described in great detail in the work by Hill et al. (1986) [3]. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of 1% for the vapor density-length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach-Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prototype 8 cm long novel Rb vapor cell.

  2. Genetic mapping of high caries experience on human chromosome 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, Erika C; Deeley, Kathleen; Ho, Bao; Linkowski, Samantha; Meyer, Chelsea; Noel, Jacqueline; Kouzbari, M Zahir; Bezamat, Mariana; Granjeiro, José M; Antunes, Leonardo S; Antunes, Livia Azeredo; de Abreu, Fernanda Volpe; Costa, Marcelo C; Tannure, Patricia N; Seymen, Figen; Koruyucu, Mine; Patir, Asli; Mereb, Juan C; Poletta, Fernando A; Castilla, Eduardo E; Orioli, Ieda M; Marazita, Mary L; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2013-11-05

    Our previous genome-wide linkage scan mapped five loci for caries experience. The purpose of this study was to fine map one of these loci, the locus 13q31.1, in order to identify genetic contributors to caries. Seventy-two pedigrees from the Philippines were studied. Caries experience was recorded and DNA was extracted from blood samples obtained from all subjects. Sixty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 13q31.1 were genotyped. Association between caries experience and alleles was tested. We also studied 1,481 DNA samples obtained from saliva of subjects from the USA, 918 children from Brazil, and 275 children from Turkey, in order to follow up the results found in the Filipino families. We used the AliBaba2.1 software to determine if the nucleotide changes of the associated SNPs changed the prediction of the presence of transcription-binding site sequences and we also analyzed the gene expression of the genes selected based on binding predictions. Mutation analysis was also performed in 33 Filipino individuals of a segment of 13q31.1 that is highly conserved in mammals. Statistically significant association with high caries experience was found for 11 markers in 13q31.1 in the Filipino families. Haplotype analysis also confirmed these results. In the populations used for follow-up purposes, associations were found between high caries experience and a subset of these markers. Regarding the prediction of the transcription-binding site, the base change of the SNP rs17074565 was found to change the predicted-binding of genes that could be involved in the pathogenesis of caries. When the sequence has the allele C of rs17074565, the potential transcription factors binding the sequence are GR and GATA1. When the subject carries the G allele of rs17074565, the potential transcription factor predicted to bind to the sequence is GATA3. The expression of GR in whole saliva was higher in individuals with low caries experience when compared to individuals with high

  3. Tenure, Experience, Human Capital and Wages: A Tractable Equilibrium Search Model of Wage Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bagger, Jesper; Fontaine, François; Postel-Vinay, Fabien; Robin, Jean-Marc

    2011-01-01

    We develop and estimate an equilibrium job search model of worker careers, allowing for human capital accumulation, employer heterogeneity and individual-level shocks. Career wage growth is decomposed into the contributions of human capital and job search, within and between jobs. Human capital accumulation is largest for highly educated workers, and both human capital accumulation and job search contribute to the observed concavity of wage-experience profiles. The contribution from job searc...

  4. Immanuel Kant's Account of Cognitive Experience and Human Rights Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Gregory Lewis

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Gregory Bynum seeks to show that Immanuel Kant's thought, which was conceived in an eighteenth-century context of new, and newly widespread, pressures for nationally institutionalized human rights-based regimes (the American and French revolutions being the most prominent examples), can help us think in new and appreciative ways…

  5. Quaking aspen and the human experience: Dimensions, issues, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. McCool

    2001-01-01

    Humans assign four types of meanings to aspen landscapes: (1) instrumental meanings dealing with the attainment of a goal - such as production of pulp or provision of recreation opportunities; (2) aesthetic meanings; (3) cultural/symbolic meanings dealing with spiritual and social attachments to landscapes; and (4) individual/expressive meanings derived out of...

  6. Immanuel Kant's Account of Cognitive Experience and Human Rights Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Gregory Lewis

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Gregory Bynum seeks to show that Immanuel Kant's thought, which was conceived in an eighteenth-century context of new, and newly widespread, pressures for nationally institutionalized human rights-based regimes (the American and French revolutions being the most prominent examples), can help us think in new and appreciative ways…

  7. Photonic programmable pulser for the Weto Wall detector and measuring system tests in the ZEUS experiment at the HERA accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Adamus, Marek

    1999-05-01

    Background rejection power of Veto Wall detector in ZEUS experiment significantly depends on electronics and photonics efficiency. This paper describes idea, and recent solution, for programmable multi-channel optical pulser. The pulser excites, with short electrical pulses, certain light emitting diodes. LEDs are placed in scintillators. These tests simulate flight of real particles through scintillator. The scintillator works as an optical waveguide in which guides photons to both ends of scintillators. These ends are attached to photomultipliers. Photons cause avalanche multiplication of electrons and an electrical pulse resulting in registered by measuring system. Some results of pulser application are presented for diagnosis of all processing blocks of measuring system. Paper includes also, for the sake of completeness, description of the functional structure of measuring system.

  8. Tumor necrosis factor-α-accelerated degradation of type I collagen in human skin is associated with elevated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Magnus S; Schnabel, Reinhild; Christensen, Lise H

    2015-01-01

    /ml) in the absence or presence of the nonselective MMP inhibitor GM6001 for 8 days. The basal culture conditions promoted type I collagen catabolism that was accelerated by TNF-α (p...Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may disrupt skin integrity. We have investigated the effects and mechanisms of exogenous TNF-α on collagen degradation by incubating human skin explants in defined serum-free media with or without TNF-α (10ng...... were associated with increased collagen degradation. TNF-α increased secretion of MMP-1 (p

  9. New Postgraduate Student Experience and Engagement in Human Communication Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Godfrey A.

    2015-01-01

    New postgraduate students' feedback on their learning offers insights into engagement. Student feedback to students and teachers can contribute to teacher feedback to students. When this happens, students can feel engaged or connected to their learning experiences. Adopting a more inclusive notion of feedback on learning, this paper explores the…

  10. New Postgraduate Student Experience and Engagement in Human Communication Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Godfrey A.

    2015-01-01

    New postgraduate students' feedback on their learning offers insights into engagement. Student feedback to students and teachers can contribute to teacher feedback to students. When this happens, students can feel engaged or connected to their learning experiences. Adopting a more inclusive notion of feedback on learning, this paper explores the…

  11. Humanizing the Dissertation Defense: One Woman of Color's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon-Cobb, Elisha J.

    2005-01-01

    This essay reflects the author's understanding of the doctoral experience, including the candidacy or qualifying exam, the role of the advisor, and the dissertation defense. In theory this process is the same for all students, but in practice the process may vary from department to department and university to university. She also includes a few…

  12. "It's All Human Error!": When a School Science Experiment Fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viechnicki, Gail Brendel; Kuipers, Joel

    2006-01-01

    This paper traces the sophisticated negotiations to re-inscribe the authority of Nature when a school science experiment fails during the enactment of a highly rated science curriculum unit. Drawing on transcriptions from classroom videotapes, we identify and describe four primary patterns of interaction that characterize this process, arguing…

  13. "It's All Human Error!": When a School Science Experiment Fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viechnicki, Gail Brendel; Kuipers, Joel

    2006-01-01

    This paper traces the sophisticated negotiations to re-inscribe the authority of Nature when a school science experiment fails during the enactment of a highly rated science curriculum unit. Drawing on transcriptions from classroom videotapes, we identify and describe four primary patterns of interaction that characterize this process, arguing…

  14. Accelerated baccalaureate nursing students use of emotional intelligence in nursing as "caring for a human being": a mixed methods grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lisa Sherry

    2013-11-30

    Accelerated nursing students are ideal informants regarding abstract nursing concepts. How emotional intelligence (EI) is used in nursing remains a relatively elusive process that has yet to be empirically modeled. The purpose of this study was to generate a theoretical model that explains how EI is used in nursing by accelerated baccalaureate nursing students. Using a mixed methods grounded theory study design, theoretical sampling of EI scores directed sampling for individual interviews and focus groups. Caring for a human being emerged as the basic social process at the heart of which all other processes--Getting it; Being caring; The essence of professional nurse caring; Doing something to make someone feel better; and Dealing with difficulty--are interconnected. In addition to a theoretical explanation of the use of EI in nursing, this study corroborates findings from other qualitative studies in nursing and contributes a rich description of accelerated baccalaureate nursing students and an example of a mixed methods study design to the small but growing literature in these areas.

  15. Wood smoke in a controlled exposure experiment with human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad; Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Mølhave, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to wood smoke in the general population is increasing and concurrently, also our awareness. This article describes a wood-smoke generating system for studying human exposure to wood smoke and symptoms related to this exposure. Twenty nonsmoking atopic human participants with normal lung...... function and normal bronchial reactivity were randomly exposed for 3h at three different exposure conditions; clean filtered air (control exposure) and wood smoke with a characteristic particulate matter (PM) concentration of 200 µg/m3 (low) and 400 µg/m3 (high) under controlled environmental conditions.......0007), “irritative body perceptions” (p = 0.0127), “psychological/neurological effects” (p = 0.0075) and “weak inflammatory responses” (p = 0.0003). Furthermore, significant effects (p = 0.0192) on self-reported general mucosa irritation were found. In conclusion, exposure to wood smoke affected symptom rating...

  16. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  17. [Teaching experience in integrated course of human development and genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guang-Rong; Li, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Fang-Jie; Li, Chun-Yi; Liu, Hong; Li, Fu-Cai; Jin, Chun-Lian; Sun, Gui-Yuan; Liu, Cai-Xia; Zhao, Yan-Yan; Sun, Kai-Lai

    2010-04-01

    Establishment of integrated course system in human development and genetics is an important part of course reformation, and the improvement of this system is achieved by integrating the content of course, stabilizing teaching force, building teaching materials and applying problem-based learning. Integrity-PBL teaching model is founded and proved to be feasible and effective by teaching practice. Therefore, it maybe play an important role in improving teaching effect and cultivating ability of students to analyse and solve problems.

  18. Accelerator Technology Division annual report, FY 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This paper discusses: accelerator physics and special projects; experiments and injectors; magnetic optics and beam diagnostics; accelerator design and engineering; radio-frequency technology; accelerator theory and simulation; free-electron laser technology; accelerator controls and automation; and high power microwave sources and effects.

  19. Sphericall: A Human/Artificial Intelligence interaction experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frack Gechter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-agent systems are now wide spread in scientific works and in industrial applications. Few applications deal with the Human/Multi-agent system interaction. Multi-agent systems are characterized by individual entities, called agents, in interaction with each other and with their environment. Multi-agent systems are generally classified into complex systems categories since the global emerging phenomenon cannot be predicted even if every component is well known. The systems developed in this paper are named reactive because they behave using simple interaction models. In the reactive approach, the issue of Human/system interaction is hard to cope with and is scarcely exposed in literature. This paper presents Sphericall, an application aimed at studying Human/Complex System interactions and based on two physics inspired multi-agent systems interacting together. The Sphericall device is composed of a tactile screen and a spherical world where agents evolve. This paper presents both the technical background of Sphericall project and a feedback taken from the demonstration performed during OFFF Festival in La Villette (Paris.

  20. An experience of virtual leadership development for human resource managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Problem Strong leadership and management skills are crucial to finding solutions to the human resource crisis in health. Health professionals and human resource (HR managers worldwide who are in charge of addressing HR challenges in health systems often lack formal education in leadership and management. Approach Management Sciences for Health (MSH developed the Virtual Leadership Development Program (VLDP with support from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID. The VLDP is a Web-based leadership development programme that combines face-to-face and distance-learning methodologies to strengthen the capacity of teams to identify and address health challenges and produce results. Relevant changes The USAID-funded Leadership, Management and Sustainability (LMS Program, implemented by MSH, and the USAID-funded Capacity Project, implemented by IntraHealth, adapted the VLDP for HR managers to help them identify and address HR challenges that ministries of health, other public-sector organizations and nongovernmental organizations are facing. Local settings Three examples illustrate the results of the VLDP for teams of HR managers: 1. the Uganda Protestant and Catholic Medical Bureaus 2. the Christian Health Association of Malawi 3. the Developing Human Resources for Health Project in Uganda. Lessons learnt The VLDP is an effective programme for developing the management and leadership capacity of HR managers in health.

  1. Protein dynamics in individual human cells: experiment and theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Aharon Cohen

    Full Text Available A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle-dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell-cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell-cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells.

  2. Preliminary results from the first integrated Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Awe, T. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Herrmann, M.; Jennings, C.; Lamppa, D.; Martin, M.; McBride, R. D.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D.; Smith, I. C.

    2013-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' Z Machine provides a drive current of up to 27 MA with 100 ns risetime to a magnetically-driven load. Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) is the main focus of the inertial confinement fusion program on Z. The MagLIF concept uses an imploding metallic cylindrical liner to compress magnetized, pre-heated fusion fuel. Simulations indicate that fusion yields on the order of 100 kJ (5e16 DT neutrons) are achievable with a drive current of 27 MA in 100 ns, a laser preheat of 8 kJ in 8 ns, an applied axial B-field of 30 T, and deuterium-tritium fusion fuel. The first fully integrated MagLIF experiments are scheduled to be conducted on Z late summer 2013. These tests will utilize a drive current of 16 MA, a laser preheat of 2 kJ in 2 ns, an applied B-field of 10 T, and deuterium fuel. With these reduced parameters, simulations predict yields greater than 1e10 DD neutrons. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. 一种基于加速度信息的上肢动作识别研究方法%A Research Method of Human Upper Limb Motion Recognition Based on Acceleration Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪俊; 赵子恺

    2014-01-01

    A new method of binary decision analysis based GM threshold was proposed,applying to the research on recognition of human upper limb motion.The human motion acceleration acquisition system was designed,based on selection of the MEMS triaxial acceleration sensor ADXL345 .Through defined types of actions to do experiments,after obtained the three dimensional (3-D)acceler-ation signal of the body to perform upper limb actions,first the wavelet threshold denoising was preprocessed,extracting the Geometric Mean (GM)of upper limb actions as feature to select threshold.The experimental results show that,combined with wavelet analysis theory,this method based on GM threshold achieves the recognition of the type of action of the human upper limb,and validates the simplicity and efficiency of the system design and the theoretical algorithms,which has some reference value to research on human mo-tion recognition based on acceleration sensor.%提出一种基于GM阈值的二叉判决分析法,应用于人体上肢动作的分类识别研究。选用ME MS三轴加速度传感器ADXL345,设计一套人体动作的加速度采集系统。自定义上肢动作进行实验,采集人体执行上肢动作时的三维加速度信号后,进行小波阈值去噪的预处理过程,提取上肢动作的几何均值GM (Geometric Mean)作为特征值进行阈值的选取。实验结果表明:结合小波分析理论方法,基于GM阈值的方法实现了人体上肢动作的分类识别,并验证了系统设计及理论算法的简便性、高效性,对基于加速度传感器的动作识别研究具有一定的参考价值。

  4. Horizontal Accelerator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Horizontal Accelerator (HA) Facility is a versatile research tool available for use on projects requiring simulation of the crash environment. The HA Facility is...

  5. Future accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Hübner, K

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the various schemes for electron-positron linear colliders is given and the status of the development of key components and the various test facilities is given. The present studies of muon-muon colliders and very large hadron colliders are summarized including the plans for component development and tests. Accelerator research and development to achieve highest gradients in linear accelerators is outlined. (44 refs).

  6. Vancouver Experience of Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Alistair; Penner, Murray; Montijo, Harvey E

    2016-12-01

    Joint arthrodesis utilizing autogenous bone graft remains the gold standard of treatment in fusion procedures of the foot and ankle. Graft harvest, however, has been associated with increased morbidity to patients as well as increased costs. With this in mind, multiple clinical studies have evaluated the efficacy of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rh-PDGF-BB) with beta-tricalcium phosphate (B-TCP) to augment in foot and ankle arthrodesis with favorable results. These factors have led to the increased use of rh-PDGF-BB with B-TCP in Vancouver with good clinical results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Social practices and human experience (P. Bourdieu's discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I I Kvasova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The multidimensionality of the contemporary social process is increasingly revealing the discrepancies between the collective and the individual, the objective and the subjective. The underlying factors are rooted in history as well as in pro-reflexive levels of human activity. P. Bourdieu treats them as distinct «domains», i.e. structured realms of positions and dispositions of the activity agents. The «habitus» emerges as the objective-subjective system of group and individual attitudes, value orientations, goals of actions in the process of permanent conflict and transformations within each of the domains as well as between them.

  8. Talking with a Virtual Human: Controlling the Human Experience and Behavior in a Virtual Conversation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, C.

    2014-01-01

    Virtual humans are often designed to replace real humans in virtual reality applications for e.g., psychotherapy, education and entertainment. In general, applications with virtual humans are created for modifying a person's knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, emotions or behaviors. Reaching these intend

  9. Human Nutrition Research Conducted at State Agricultural Experiment Stations and 1890/Tuskegee Agricultural Research Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Judy A.; Myers, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooperative State Research Service-administered and state-appropriated State Agriculture Experiment Station funds for human nutrition research increased about two-fold from FY70-FY86, while the percentage of budget expended for this research decreased. (JOW)

  10. Human Nutrition Research Conducted at State Agricultural Experiment Stations and 1890/Tuskegee Agricultural Research Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Judy A.; Myers, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooperative State Research Service-administered and state-appropriated State Agriculture Experiment Station funds for human nutrition research increased about two-fold from FY70-FY86, while the percentage of budget expended for this research decreased. (JOW)

  11. Extraction and sensitive detection of toxins A and B from the human pathogen Clostridium difficile in 40 seconds using microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovleen Tina Joshi

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the primary cause of antibiotic associated diarrhea in humans and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Thus the rapid and accurate identification of this pathogen in clinical samples, such as feces, is a key step in reducing the devastating impact of this disease. The bacterium produces two toxins, A and B, which are thought to be responsible for the majority of the pathology associated with the disease, although the relative contribution of each is currently a subject of debate. For this reason we have developed a rapid detection assay based on microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence which is capable of detecting the presence of 10 bacteria in unprocessed human feces within 40 seconds. These promising results suggest that this prototype biosensor has the potential to be developed into a rapid, point of care, real time diagnostic assay for C. difficile.

  12. Accelerated Degradation of Caspase-8 Protein Correlates with TRAIL Resistance in a DLD1 Human Colon Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidong Zhang

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The tumor-selective cytotoxic effect of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL makes TRAIL an attractive candidate as an anticancer agent. However, resistance to TRAIL poses a challenge in anticancer therapy with TRAIL. Therefore, characterizing the mechanisms of resistance and developing strategies to overcome the resistance are important steps toward successful TRAIL-mediated cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated mechanisms of acquired TRAIL resistance in a colon cancer DLD1 cell line. Compared with the TRAIL-susceptible DLD1 cell line, TRAIL-resistant DLD1/TRAIL-R cells have a low level of caspase-8 protein, but not its mRNA. Suppression of caspase-8 expression by siRNA in parental DLD1 cells led to TRAIL resistance. Restoration of caspase-8 protein expression by stable transfection rendered the DLD1/TRAIL-R cell line fully sensitive to TRAIL protein, suggesting that the low level of caspase-8 protein expression might be the culprit in TRAIL resistance in DLDl/TRAIL-R cells. Sequencing analysis of the caspase-8 coding region revealed a missense mutation that is present in both TRAILsensitive and TRAIL-resistant DLD1 cells. Subsequent study showed that the degradation of caspase-8 protein was accelerated in DLDl/TRAIL-R cells compared to parental DLD1 cells. Thus, accelerated degradation of caspase-8 protein is one of the mechanisms that lead to TRAIL resistance.

  13. Impact of immigration on health and human services: Florida's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, C Aaron; Falconer, Mary Kay; Springer, David

    2002-01-01

    Florida has been the destination for large numbers of immigrants fleeing political persecution or economic hardships. Cubans and Haitians have been two of the largest immigrant groups arriving and settling in Florida. Both have received national and local attention. This article describes the immigration experience of Haitians and Cubans in Florida. The descriptions emphasize the differences between these two groups in their adjustment to life in south Florida. The article also addresses Florida's reaction to federal policies regarding immigration and highlights Florida's struggle to meet the service needs of these immigrant populations. Fiscal impacts of immigration are quantified in several service categories, including education, social services, health care, and criminal justice. Florida's action based on the documentation of the immigration fiscal impact is explained. Finally, how the state allocated the $18 million in federal funding provided as a response to Florida's documented impact is covered.

  14. United Nations Africa Human Development Report 2016 : Accelerating Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrasco Miro, G.

    2016-01-01

    Gender inequality is costing sub-Saharan Africa on average $US95 billion a year, peaking at US$105 billion in 2014– or six percent of the region’s GDP – jeopardising the continent’s efforts for inclusive human development and economic growth, according to the Africa Human Development Report 2016. Th

  15. Rare Kaon Decays, KEK experiment E391 and E14 at the Japan Physics and Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wah, Yau Wai [University of Chicago

    2012-12-06

    The goal of the J-PARC neutral kaon experiment (E14/KOTO) is to discover and measure the rate of the kaon rare decay to pi-zero and two neutrinos. This flavor changing neutral current decay proceeds through second-order weak interactions. Other, as yet undiscovered particles, which can mediate the decay could provide an enhancement (or depletion) to the branching ratio which in the Standard Model is accurately predicted within a few percent to be 2.8x10-11. The experiment is designed to observe more than 100 events at the Standard Model branching. It is a follow-up of the KEK E391a experiment and has stage-2 approval by J-PARC PAC in 2007. E14/KOTO has collaborators from Japan (Kyoto, Osaka, Yamagata, Saga), US (Arizona State, Chicago, Michigan Ann Arbor), Taiwan (National Taiwan), Korea, and Russia (Dubna). The experiment exploits the 300kW 30-50 GeV proton delivery of the J-PARC accelerator with a hermetic high acceptance detector with a fine grained Cesium Iodide (CsI) crystal calorimeter, and state of the art electronic front end and data acquisition system. With the recovery of the tsunami disaster on March 11th 2011, E14 is scheduled to start collecting data in December 2012. During the detector construction phase, Chicago focuses on the front end electronics readout of the entire detector system, particularly the CsI calorimeter. The CsI crystals together with its photomultipliers were previously used at the Fermilab KTeV experiment (E832/E799), and were loaned to E14 via this Chicago DOE support. The new readout electronics includes an innovative 10-pole pulse-shaping technique coupled with high speed digitization (14-bit 125MHz and 12-bit 500MHz). This new instrument enables us to measure both energy and timing, particularly with timing resolution better than 100 psec. Besides the cost saving by elimination of the standard time to digital converters, it is now possible to measure the momenta of the final state photons for additional background suppression

  16. Human Empathy, Personality and Experience Affect the Emotion Ratings of Dog and Human Facial Expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V.; Somppi, Sanni; Jokela, Markus; Vainio, Outi; Parkkonen, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions are important for humans in communicating emotions to the conspecifics and enhancing interpersonal understanding. Many muscles producing facial expressions in humans are also found in domestic dogs, but little is known about how humans perceive dog facial expressions, and which psychological factors influence people’s perceptions. Here, we asked 34 observers to rate the valence, arousal, and the six basic emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear, and anger/aggr...

  17. I'm Not Sure What to Do! Learning Experiences in the Humanities and Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, JaneMaree; Mitchell, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a focus group study of student experience in a large humanities and social science faculty in Australia. The study had two purposes: the first was to examine student study/work/life balance issues, and the second purpose was to investigate their experiences of study, workloads and assessment. This article reports on the…

  18. Experience With Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging Of Human Atherosclerotic Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, John A.; Gessert, James M.; Maciel, Mario; Tobis, John M.; Griffith, James M.; Berns, Michael W.; Henry, Walter L.

    1989-08-01

    Normal human arteries have a well-defined structure on intravascular images. The intima appears very thin and is most likely represented by a bright reflection arising from the internal elastic lamina. The smooth muscle tunica media is echo-lucent on the ultrasound image and appears as a dark band separating the intima from the adventitia. The adventitia is a brightly reflective layer of variable thickness. The thickness of the intima, and therefore of the atherosclerotic plaque can be accurately measured from the ultrasound images and correlates well with histology. Calcification within the wall of arteries is seen as bright echo reflection with shadowing of the peripheral wall. Fibrotic regions are highly reflective but do not shadow. Necrotic liquid regions within advanced atherosclerotic plaques are seen on ultrasound images as large lucent zones surrounded by echogenic tissue. Imaging can be performed before and after interventional procedures, such as laser angioplasty, balloon angioplasty and atherectomy. Intravascular ultrasound appears to provide an imaging modality for identifying the histologic characteristics of diseased arteries and for quantifying plaque thickness. It might be possible to perform such quantification to evaluate the results of interventional procedures.

  19. Emotion as a Human Experience: The Psychotherapist’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Paulino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Emotions are affective states of short duration, with concomitant vegetative symptoms, triggered by an internal or external perception. There are primary or universal emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise, disgust, secondary or social emo- tions (compassion, shame, guilt, contempt, jealousy, envy, pride, admiration and background emotions (wellbeing, malaise, calm, tension. Emotions are complex programs of actions shaped by evolution. The actions are completed by a cognitive program, but the world of emotions is primarily a world of actions carried out in our body from the facial expressions and body positions to the changes in the viscera and internal milieu. We can consider emotion as a primary value system of the brain, leading certain activations to be selectively reinforced. In clinical interviews we are often led from the line of verbal speech to the line of emotional speech. We use our own emotions or feelings as a way to detect discrepancies or incongruities in the relationship, probably between the channels of verbal, non-verbal and empathic communication. Carl Rogers made an important contribution to psychotherapy with his experience of unconditionally accepting the client, who comes to be heard, without prejudice or judgment. A feeling, an emotion, a reasoning were accepted with the same attention, care and respect. The forms of expression and the exact configuration of stimuli that can induce an emotion are different in different cultures and individuals. But what is striking is the similarity.

  20. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Christiane Lefèvre

    2008-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark grey line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  1. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    De Melis, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark blue line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  2. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Haffner, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark grey line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  3. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Mobs, Esma Anais

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark blue line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of intracellular concentrations of active drug metabolites in human target cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Garner, R C; Lee, L S; Seymour, M; Fuchs, E J; Hubbard, W C; Parsons, T L; Pakes, G E; Fletcher, C V; Flexner, C

    2010-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultrasensitive technique to detect radiolabeled compounds. We administered a microdose (100 µg) of (14)C-labeled zidovudine (ZDV) with or without a standard unlabeled dose (300 mg) to healthy volunteers. Intracellular ZDV-triphosphate (ZDV-TP) concentration was measured using AMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). AMS analysis yielded excellent concordance with LC/MS/MS and was 30,000-fold more sensitive. The kinetics of intracellular ZDV-TP formation changed several-fold over the dose range studied (100 µg-300 mg). AMS holds promise as a tool for quantifying intracellular drug metabolites and other biomediators in vivo.

  5. Method and System for Human Action Detections with Acceleration Sensors for the Proposed Rescue System for Disabled and Elderly Persons Who Need a Help in Evacuation from Disaster Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Method and system for human action detections with acceleration sensors for the proposed rescue system for disabled and elderly persons who need a help in evacuation from disaster areas is proposed. Not only vital signs, blood pressure, heart beat pulse rate, body temperature, bless and consciousness, but also, the location and attitude of the persons have to be monitored for the proposed rescue system. The attitude can be measured with acceleration sensors. In particular, it is better to discriminate the attitudes, sitting, standing up, and lying down. Also, action speed has to be detected. Experimental results show that these attitude monitoring can be done with acceleration sensors.

  6. Pathological concentration of zinc dramatically accelerates abnormal aggregation of full-length human Tau and thereby significantly increases Tau toxicity in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ji-Ying; Zhang, De-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Li, Xue-Shou; Cheng, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Jie; Du, Hai-Ning; Liang, Yi

    2017-02-01

    A pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies is the formation of neurofibrillary tangles mainly composed of bundles of fibrils formed by microtubule-associated protein Tau. Here we study the effects of Zn(2+) on abnormal aggregation and cytotoxicity of a pathological mutant ΔK280 of full-length human Tau. As revealed by Congo red binding assays, transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, Western blot, and immunogold electron microscopy, pathological concentration of Zn(2+) dramatically accelerates the fibrillization of ΔK280 both in vitro and in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. As evidenced by annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection assay and MTT reduction assay, pathological concentration of Zn(2+) remarkably enhances ΔK280 fibrillization-induced apoptosis and toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Substitution of Cys-291 and Cys-322 with Ala, however, essentially eliminates such enhancing effects of Zn(2+) on the fibrillization and the consequent cytotoxicity of ΔK280. Furthermore, Zn(2+) is co-localized with and highly enriched in amyloid fibrils formed by ΔK280 in SH-SY5Y cells. The results from isothermal titration calorimetry show that Zn(2+) binds to full-length human Tau by interacting with Cys-291 and Cys-322, forming a 1:1 Zn(2+)-Tau complex. Our data demonstrate that zinc dramatically accelerates abnormal aggregation of human Tau and significantly increases Tau toxicity in neuronal cells mainly via bridging Cys-291 and Cys-322. Our findings could explain how pathological zinc regulates Tau aggregation and toxicity associated with Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Designing With Empathy: Humanizing Narratives for Inspired Healthcare Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel-Gilfilen, Candy; Portillo, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Designers can and should play a critical role in shaping a holistic healthcare experience by creating empathetic design solutions that foster a culture of care for patients, families, and staff. Using narrative inquiry as a design tool, this case study shares strategies for promoting empathy. Designing for patient-centered care infuses empathy into the creative process. Narrative inquiry offers a methodology to think about and create empathetic design that enhances awareness, responsiveness, and accountability. This article shares discoveries from a studio on empathetic design within an outpatient cancer care center. The studio engaged students in narrative techniques throughout the design process by incorporating aural, visual, and written storytelling. Benchmarking, observations, and interviews were merged with data drawn from scholarly evidence-based design literature reviews. Using an empathy-focused design process not only motivated students to be more engaged in the project but facilitated the generation of fresh and original ideas. Design solutions were innovative and impactful in supporting the whole person. Similarities as well as differences defined empathetic cancer care across projects and embodied concepts of design empowerment, design for the whole person, and design for healing. By becoming more conscious of empathy, those who create healthcare environments can better connect holistically to the user to take an experiential approach to design. Explicitly developing a mind-set that raises empathy to the forefront of the design process offers a breakthrough in design thinking that bridges the gap between what might be defined as "good design" and patient-centered care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Practical experience of using human microdosing with AMS analysis to obtain early human drug metabolism and PK data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, R Colin

    2010-03-01

    The background to human microdosing or Phase 0 studies is reviewed, focusing particularly on the information that such studies can provide in the context of exploratory clinical development. Examples are provided of the microdose-validation studies known as the Consortium for Resourcing and Evaluating AMS Microdosing trial and EU Microdosing AMS Partnership Programme, which demonstrated that there was good dose proportionality between microdose and pharmacological dose pharmacokinetics. When microdosing was applied to ten development drugs, it was found that all ten molecules showed dose proportionality between the microdose and the pharmacological dose. The majority of microdose studies have used accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis and only these studies that are considered here; AMS provides information on all metabolites, even if these are minor. There is now sufficient scientific data to justify microdose studies being routinely conducted as part of the drug-development process.

  9. Plasma-Pulse-Acceleration Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    W. Pucher, Testing a new Type of Circuit Breaker for HVDC , Direct Current, Feb. 1966, pp. 3 - 6 /10/ D. Kind, E. Marx, K. Mollenhoff, J. Salge... breakers /4, 5/, exploding wires /6/, plasma jet tubes /7/, and high pressure radiation sources /8/. In particular current limiting circuit breakers ...length, radius, shaping, material to be evaporated etc.). Here it is possible to transfer design criteria from current-limiting circuit breakers and

  10. Human radiation experiments associated with the US Department of Energy and its predecessors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-07-01

    This document contains a listing, description, and selected references for documented human radiation experiments sponsored, supported, or performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessors, including the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), and the Off ice of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD). The list represents work completed by DOE`s Off ice of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE) through June 1995. The experiment list is available on the Internet via a Home Page on the World Wide Web (http://www.ohre.doe.gov). The Home Page also includes the full text of Human Radiation Experiments. The Department of Energy Roadmap to the Story and the Records (DOE/EH-0445), published in February 1995, to which this publication is a supplement. This list includes experiments released at Secretary O`Leary`s June 1994 press conference, as well as additional studies identified during the 12 months that followed. Cross-references are provided for experiments originally released at the press conference; for experiments released as part of The DOE Roadmap; and for experiments published in the 1986 congressional report entitled American Nuclear Guinea Pigs: Three Decades of Radiation Experiments on US Citizens. An appendix of radiation terms is also provided.

  11. Accelerated Nursing Degree Programs: Insights into Teaching and Learning Experiences. New Careers in Nursing. Research Report. ETS RR-15-29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Catherine M.; Stickler, Leslie M.; Wang, Haijiang

    2015-01-01

    The Study of Teaching and Learning in Accelerated Nursing Degree Programs explores how nurse educators are adapting their teaching practices for accelerated, second-degree nursing program students. To provide findings on topics including instructional practices and the roles and attitudes of faculty, a web survey was administered to almost 100…

  12. Gearing up and accelerating cross-fertilization between academic and industrial robotics research in Europe technology transfer experiments from the ECHORD project

    CERN Document Server

    Veiga, Germano; Natale, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    This monograph by Florian Röhrbein, Germano Veiga and Ciro Natale is an edited collection of 15 authoritative contributions in the area of robot technology transfer between academia and industry. It comprises three parts on Future Industrial Robotics, Robotic Grasping as well as Human-Centered Robots. The book chapters cover almost all the topics nowadays considered ‘hot’ within the robotics community, from reliable object recognition to dexterous grasping, from speech recognition to intuitive robot programming, from mobile robot navigation to aerial robotics, from safe physical human-robot interaction to body extenders. All contributions stem from the results of ECHORD – the European Clearing House for Open Robotics Development, a large-scale integrating project funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme from 2009 to 2013. ECHORD’s two main pillars were the so-called experiments, 52 small-sized industry-driven research projects, and the structured dialog, a powerful interac...

  13. Gearing up and accelerating cross-fertilization between academic and industrial robotics research in Europe technology transfer experiments from the ECHORD project

    CERN Document Server

    Veiga, Germano; Natale, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    This monograph by Florian Röhrbein, Germano Veiga and Ciro Natale is an edited collection of 15 authoritative contributions in the area of robot technology transfer between academia and industry. It comprises three parts on Future Industrial Robotics, Robotic Grasping as well as Human-Centered Robots. The book chapters cover almost all the topics nowadays considered ‘hot’ within the robotics community, from reliable object recognition to dexterous grasping, from speech recognition to intuitive robot programming, from mobile robot navigation to aerial robotics, from safe physical human-robot interaction to body extenders. All contributions stem from the results of ECHORD – the European Clearing House for Open Robotics Development, a large-scale integrating project funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme from 2009 to 2013. ECHORD’s two main pillars were the so-called experiments, 51 small-sized industry-driven research projects, and the structured dialog, a powerful interac...

  14. A mutein of human basic fibroblast growth factor TGP-580 accelerates colonic ulcer healing by stimulating angiogenesis in the ulcer bed in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, H; Szabo, S

    2015-10-01

    Previously, we reported that TGP-580, a mutein of human basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), accelerated the healing of gastric and duodenal ulcers in rats. In the present study, we examined the effect of TGP-580 on the healing of colonic ulcers. In male Sprague Dawley rats, ulcers were induced in the colon 6 cm from the anus by enema of 50 μl of 3% N-ethylmaleimide, a sulfhydryl alkylator. The lesions were examined under a dissecting microscope (x10). The concentration of bFGF in the ulcerated colon was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and both the distribution of bFGF and the density of microvessels in the ulcer bed were examined by immunohistochemical staining. The content of bFGF in the ulcerated colon was markedly increased associated with ulcer healing, and ulcer healing was significantly delayed by intravenous administration of a monoclonal antibody for bFGF (MAb 3H3) once daily for 10 days. In the ulcer bed, many cells such as fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells and macrophages were positively stained with bFGF antiserum. TGP-580, human bFGF or dexamethasone was given intracolonally twice daily for 10 days, starting the day after ulcer induction. TGP-580 (0.2 - 20 μg/ml, 200 μl/rat) dose-dependently accelerated ulcer healing, and its effect was more than 10 times stronger than that of human bFGF. Density (μm/0.01 mm(2)) of microvessels in the ulcer bed was significantly increased by treatment with TGP-580, and there was a good correlation between the density of microvessels and the decrease of ulcerated area (R(2) = 0.633). On the other hand dexamethasone (20 μg/ml) inhibited angiogenesis in the ulcer bed and delayed ulcer healing. These results suggest that angiogenesis in the ulcer bed plays an important role in ulcer healing, and that bFGF mutein TGP-580 accelerated colonic ulcer healing, at least in part, by stimulating angiogenesis, whereas glucocorticoids may delay the healing by inhibiting angiogenesis.

  15. Studying human-automation interactions: methodological lessons learned from the human-centred automation experiments 1997-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaiu, Salvatore; Skjerve, Ann Britt Miberg; Skraaning, Gyrd Jr.; Strand, Stine; Waeroe, Irene

    2004-04-15

    This report documents the methodological lessons learned from the Human Centred Automation (HCA) programme both in terms of psychometric evaluation of the measurement techniques developed for human-automation interaction study, and in terms of the application of advanced statistical methods for analysis of experiments. The psychometric evaluation is based on data from the four experiments performed within the HCA programme. The result is a single-source reference text of measurement instruments for the study of human-automation interaction, part of which were specifically developed by the programme. The application of advanced statistical techniques is exemplified by additional analyses performed on the IPSN-HCA experiment of 1998. Special importance is given to the statistical technique Structural Equation Modeling, for the possibility it offers to advance, and empirically test, comprehensive explanations about human-automation interactions. The additional analyses of the IPSN-HCA experiment investigated how the operators formed judgments about their own performance. The issue is of substantive interest for human automation interaction research because the operators' over- or underestimation of their own performance could be seen as a symptom of human-machine mismatch, and a potential latent failure. These analyses concluded that it is the interplay between (1) the level of automation and several factors that determines the operators' bias in performance self-estimation: (2) the nature of the task, (3) the level of scenario complexity, and (4) the level of trust in the automatic system. A structural model that expresses the interplay of all these factors was empirically evaluated and was found able to provide a concise and elegant explanation of the intricate pattern of relationships between the identified factors. (Author)

  16. Understanding the potentiality of accelerator based-boron neutron capture therapy for osteosarcoma: dosimetry assessment based on the reported clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolussi, Silva; Postuma, Ian; Protti, Nicoletta; Provenzano, Lucas; Ferrari, Cinzia; Cansolino, Laura; Dionigi, Paolo; Galasso, Olimpio; Gasparini, Giorgio; Altieri, Saverio; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; González, Sara J

    2017-08-15

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumour, and its incidence is higher in children and adolescents, for whom it represents more than 10% of solid cancers. Despite the introduction of adjuvant and neo-adjuvant chemotherapy that markedly increased the success rate in the treatment, aggressive surgery is still needed and a considerable percentage of patients do not survive due to recurrences or early metastases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), an experimental radiotherapy, was investigated as a treatment that could allow a less aggressive surgery by killing infiltrated tumour cells in the surrounding healthy tissues. BNCT requires an intense neutron beam to ensure irradiation times of the order of 1 h. In Italy, a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) proton accelerator has been designed and constructed for BNCT, and a suitable neutron spectrum was tailored by means of Monte Carlo calculations. This paper explores the feasibility of BNCT to treat osteosarcoma using this neutron source based on accelerator. The therapeutic efficacy of BNCT was analysed evaluating the dose distribution obtained in a clinical case of femur osteosarcoma. Mixed field dosimetry was assessed with two different formalisms whose parameters were specifically derived from radiobiological experiments involving in vitro UMR-106 osteosarcoma cell survival assays and boron concentration assessments in an animal model of osteosarcoma. A clinical case of skull osteosarcoma treated with BNCT in Japan was re-evaluated from the point of view of dose calculation and used as a reference for comparison. The results in the case of femur osteosarcoma show that the RFQ beam would ensure a suitable tumour dose painting in a total irradiation time of less than an hour. Comparing the dosimetry between the analysed case and the treated patient in Japan it turns out that doses obtained in the femur tumour are at least as good as the ones delivered in the skull osteosarcoma. The same is

  17. Accelerated Unification

    OpenAIRE

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cohen, Andrew; Georgi, Howard

    2001-01-01

    We construct four dimensional gauge theories in which the successful supersymmetric unification of gauge couplings is preserved but accelerated by N-fold replication of the MSSM gauge and Higgs structure. This results in a low unification scale of $10^{13/N}$ TeV.

  18. Ionizing radiation accelerates Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, which involves delayed mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in normal human fibroblast-like cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobashigawa, Shinko, E-mail: kobashin@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi [Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report first time that ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial dynamic changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced mitochondrial fission was caused by Drp1 localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that radiation causes delayed ROS from mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of Drp1 rescued mitochondrial dysfunction after radiation exposure. -- Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to increase intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through mitochondrial dysfunction. Although it has been as a basis of radiation-induced genetic instability, the mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. Here we studied the dynamics of mitochondrial structure in normal human fibroblast like cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Delayed mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} production was peaked 3 days after irradiation, which was coupled with accelerated mitochondrial fission. We found that radiation exposure accumulated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria. Knocking down of Drp1 expression prevented radiation induced acceleration of mitochondrial fission. Furthermore, knockdown of Drp1 significantly suppressed delayed production of mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-}. Since the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which was induced by radiation was prevented in cells knocking down of Drp1 expression, indicating that the excessive mitochondrial fission was involved in delayed mitochondrial dysfunction after irradiation.

  19. Human experience and product usability: principles to assist the design of user-product interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro-Koc, Marianella; Popovic, Vesna; Emmison, Michael

    2009-07-01

    This paper introduces research that investigates how human experience influences people's understandings of product usability. It describes an experiment that employs visual representation of concepts to elicit participants' ideas of a product's use. Results from the experiment lead to the identification of relationships between human experience, knowledge, and context-of-use--relationships that influence designers' and users' concepts of product usability. These relationships are translated into design principles that inform the design activity with respect to the aspects of experience that trigger people's understanding of a product's use. A design tool (ECEDT) is devised to aid designers in the application of these principles. This tool is then trialled in the context of a design task in order to verify applicability of the findings.

  20. Human perception of fear in dogs varies according to experience with dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Michele; Bolger, Niall; Champagne, Frances A

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of experience in humans' perception of emotion using canine visual signals, we asked adults with various levels of dog experience to interpret the emotions of dogs displayed in videos. The video stimuli had been pre-categorized by an expert panel of dog behavior professionals as showing examples of happy or fearful dog behavior. In a sample of 2,163 participants, the level of dog experience strongly predicted identification of fearful, but not of happy, emotional examples. The probability of selecting the "fearful" category to describe fearful examples increased with experience and ranged from.30 among those who had never lived with a dog to greater than.70 among dog professionals. In contrast, the probability of selecting the "happy" category to describe happy emotional examples varied little by experience, ranging from.90 to.93. In addition, the number of physical features of the dog that participants reported using for emotional interpretations increased with experience, and in particular, more-experienced respondents were more likely to attend to the ears. Lastly, more-experienced respondents provided lower difficulty and higher accuracy self-ratings than less-experienced respondents when interpreting both happy and fearful emotional examples. The human perception of emotion in other humans has previously been shown to be sensitive to individual differences in social experience, and the results of the current study extend the notion of experience-dependent processes from the intraspecific to the interspecific domain.

  1. Human perception of fear in dogs varies according to experience with dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Wan

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of experience in humans' perception of emotion using canine visual signals, we asked adults with various levels of dog experience to interpret the emotions of dogs displayed in videos. The video stimuli had been pre-categorized by an expert panel of dog behavior professionals as showing examples of happy or fearful dog behavior. In a sample of 2,163 participants, the level of dog experience strongly predicted identification of fearful, but not of happy, emotional examples. The probability of selecting the "fearful" category to describe fearful examples increased with experience and ranged from.30 among those who had never lived with a dog to greater than.70 among dog professionals. In contrast, the probability of selecting the "happy" category to describe happy emotional examples varied little by experience, ranging from.90 to.93. In addition, the number of physical features of the dog that participants reported using for emotional interpretations increased with experience, and in particular, more-experienced respondents were more likely to attend to the ears. Lastly, more-experienced respondents provided lower difficulty and higher accuracy self-ratings than less-experienced respondents when interpreting both happy and fearful emotional examples. The human perception of emotion in other humans has previously been shown to be sensitive to individual differences in social experience, and the results of the current study extend the notion of experience-dependent processes from the intraspecific to the interspecific domain.

  2. Drum-mate: interaction dynamics and gestures in human-humanoid drumming experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose-Bagci, Hatice; Dautenhahn, Kerstin; Syrdal, Dag S.; Nehaniv, Chrystopher L.

    2010-06-01

    This article investigates the role of interaction kinesics in human-robot interaction (HRI). We adopted a bottom-up, synthetic approach towards interactive competencies in robots using simple, minimal computational models underlying the robot's interaction dynamics. We present two empirical, exploratory studies investigating a drumming experience with a humanoid robot (KASPAR) and a human. In the first experiment, the turn-taking behaviour of the humanoid is deterministic and the non-verbal gestures of the robot accompany its drumming to assess the impact of non-verbal gestures on the interaction. The second experiment studies a computational framework that facilitates emergent turn-taking dynamics, whereby the particular dynamics of turn-taking emerge from the social interaction between the human and the humanoid. The results from the HRI experiments are presented and analysed qualitatively (in terms of the participants' subjective experiences) and quantitatively (concerning the drumming performance of the human-robot pair). The results point out a trade-off between the subjective evaluation of the drumming experience from the perspective of the participants and the objective evaluation of the drumming performance. A certain number of gestures was preferred as a motivational factor in the interaction. The participants preferred the models underlying the robot's turn-taking which enable the robot and human to interact more and provide turn-taking closer to 'natural' human-human conversations, despite differences in objective measures of drumming behaviour. The results are consistent with the temporal behaviour matching hypothesis previously proposed in the literature which concerns the effect that the participants adapt their own interaction dynamics to the robot's.

  3. Decursin was Accelerated Human Lung Cancer Cell Death Caused by Proton Beam Irradiation via Blocking the p42/44 MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myung Hwan; Ra, Se Jin; Kim, Kye Ryung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Decursin, which is one of the extract of Angelica gigas Nakai root, has been traditionally used in Korean folk medicine as a tonic and for treatment of anemia and other common diseases. There are some reports about the pharmacological properties of decursin showing anti-bacterial and anti-amnestic effect, depression of cardiac contraction, antitumor and anti-angiogenic activity. Cell death induced by proton beam is identified as apoptosis. The study investigated that genes involved in apoptosis are checked by RT-PCR and used LET instead of SPBP of proton beam. Apoptosis is the tight regulated by multi-protein action in physiological cell death program. Proton therapy is an attractive approach for the treatment of deep-seated tumor. Recently, many researchers tried to new therapeutic strategy, combination of proton therapy and chemotherapy, in order to increase therapeutic effect. In this study, we investigate whether decursin can accelerate effect of human lung cell apoptosis in proton irradiated cancer cells

  4. Particle Accelerators in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  5. Wnt1 Accelerates an Ex Vivo Expansion of Human Cord Blood CD34+CD38− Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamonnaree Chotinantakul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cord blood hematopoietic stem cells (CB-HSCs transplantation has been increasing gradually with facing the limitation of insufficient quantity of HSCs in each CB unit. Therefore, efficient expansion methods which can maintain stem cell characteristics are needed. In this study, umbilical CB-CD34+ cells were cultured in two different cytokine cocktails: 4 factors (4F = Flt3-L, SCF, IL-6, and TPO and 5 factors (5F = Wnt1 + 4F in both serum and serum-free media. The data revealed that the best condition to accelerate an expansion of CD34+CD38− cells was serum-free culture condition supplemented with 5F (5F KSR. This condition yielded 24.3 ± 2.1 folds increase of CD34+CD38− cells. The expanded cells exhibited CD34+ CD38− CD133+ CD71low CD33low CD3− CD19− markers, expressed nanog, oct3/4, c-myc, and sox2 genes, and maintained differentiation potential into lymphoid, erythroid and myeloid lineages. The achievement of CD34+CD38− cells expansion may overcome an insufficient quantity of the cells leading to the improvement of the stem cell transplantation. Altogether, our findings highlight the role of Wnt1 and the new culture condition in stimulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells expansion which may offer a new therapeutic avenue for cord blood transplantation, regenerative medicine, stem cell bank applications, and other clinical applications in the future.

  6. MUON ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERG,S.J.

    2003-11-18

    One of the major motivations driving recent interest in FFAGs is their use for the cost-effective acceleration of muons. This paper summarizes the progress in this area that was achieved leading up to and at the FFAG workshop at KEK from July 7-12, 2003. Much of the relevant background and references are also given here, to give a context to the progress we have made.

  7. Experiments for Evaluating Application of Bayesian Inference to Situation Awareness of Human Operators in NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seongkeun; Seong, Poong Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this paper is to confirm if Bayesian inference can properly reflect the situation awareness of real human operators, and find the difference between the situation of ideal and practical operators, and investigate the factors which contributes to those difference. As a results, human can not think like computer. If human can memorize all the information, and their thinking process is same to the CPU of computer, the results of these two experiments come out more than 99%. However the probability of finding right malfunction by humans are only 64.52% in simple experiment, and 51.61% in complex experiment. Cognition is the mental processing that includes the attention of working memory, comprehending and producing language, calculating, reasoning, problem solving, and decision making. There are many reasons why human thinking process is different with computer, but in this experiment, we suggest that the working memory is the most important factor. Humans have limited working memory which has only seven chunks capacity. These seven chunks are called magic number. If there are more than seven sequential information, people start to forget the previous information because their working memory capacity is running over. We can check how much working memory affects to the result through the simple experiment. Then what if we neglect the effect of working memory? The total number of subjects who have incorrect memory is 7 (subject 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 25). They could find the right malfunction if the memory hadn't changed because of lack of working memory. Then the probability of find correct malfunction will be increased to 87.10% from 64.52%. Complex experiment has similar result. In this case, eight subjects(1, 5, 8, 9, 15, 17, 18, 30) had changed the memory, and it affects to find the right malfunction. Considering it, then the probability would be (16+8)/31 = 77.42%.

  8. Cooling Rates of Humans in Air and in Water: An Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2012-12-01

    In a previous article I analyzed in detail the physical factors resulting in greater cooling rates of objects in still water than in still air, emphasizing cooling of the human body. By cooling rate I mean the rate of decrease of core temperature uncompensated by metabolism. I concluded that the "correct ratio for humans is closer to 2 than to 10." To support this assertion I subsequently did experiments, which I report following a digression on hypothermia.

  9. 21 CFR 310.305 - Records and reports concerning adverse drug experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human use without approved new drug applications. 310.305 Section 310.305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... adverse drug experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human use without approved new drug...

  10. Modified Corneosurfametry as a new accelerated high-throughput ex vivo methodology for predicting cleanser effects towards human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M; Mollica, L; Regan, J; Hawkins, S; McGuiness, H; Vetro, K; Garczarek, U; Shi, S; Vasudevan, V; Ananthapadmanabhan, K P

    2016-04-01

    deposited petrolatum. The MCSM assay was shown to be a valuable tool for accelerated high throughput evaluation of mildness of surfactants and fully formulated products. MCSM can also be used to assess the state of the corneum after a product treatment. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  11. Human amniotic membrane, best healing accelerator, and the choice of bone induction for vestibuloplasty technique (an animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahad Khoshzaban

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad H Samandari1, Shahriar Adibi2, Ahad Khoshzaban3, Sara Aghazadeh5, Parviz Dihimi4, Siamak S Torbaghan6, Saeed H Keshel5, Zohreh Shahabi71Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dentistry Faculty, 2Dental Research of Torabinejad Research Centre, 3Iranian Tissue Bank Research and Preparation Centre, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, 4Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Dentistry Faculty, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; 5Stem Cells Preparation Unit, Eye Research Center, Farabi Hospital, 6Department of Pathology, Imam Khomeini Medical Centre, 7BMT Center, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranObjective: To investigate the effects of amniotic membrane (AM in bone induction and wound healing after vestibuloplasty surgery on animal samples while receptacle proteins such as growth factors were considered as accelerators for wound healing and bone induction after these operations.Material and methods: Ten adult dogs (5 females, 5 males; race, Iranian mixed; weight, 44 pounds were included, which underwent surgery for transplantation on mandible and maxillary. AM was used for promoting bone induction and healing.Results: The tissue samples were obtained after 2, 8, and 12 weeks for histology survey. No significant differences were observed between male and female or left and right jaws. AM decreased fibrinoleukocytic exudates and inflammation in the experimental group, had significant effects on bone formation, considerably improves wound healing, and gives rise to bone induction (P < 0.0001.Conclusions: Our study findings indicate that the AM is a suitable cover for different injuries and acellular AM has the potential for rapid improvement and bone induction. The AM contains collagen, laminin, and fibronectin, which provide an appropriate substrate for bone induction. This substrate promoted bone induction and might contribute to induction of the progenitor cells and/or stem

  12. Personal experience and reputation interact in human decisions to help reciprocally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molleman, Lucas; van den Broek, Eva; Egas, Martijn

    2013-04-22

    There is ample evidence that human cooperative behaviour towards other individuals is often conditioned on information about previous interactions. This information derives both from personal experience (direct reciprocity) and from experience of others (i.e. reputation; indirect reciprocity). Direct and indirect reciprocity have been studied separately, but humans often have access to both types of information. Here, we experimentally investigate information use in a repeated helping game. When acting as donor, subjects can condition their decisions to help recipients with both types of information at a small cost to access such information. We find that information from direct interactions weighs more heavily in decisions to help, and participants tend to react less forgivingly to negative personal experience than to negative reputation. Moreover, effects of personal experience and reputation interact in decisions to help. If a recipient's reputation is positive, the personal experience of the donor has a weak effect on the decision to help, and vice versa. Yet if the two types of information indicate conflicting signatures of helpfulness, most decisions to help follow personal experience. To understand the roles of direct and indirect reciprocity in human cooperation, they should be studied in concert, not in isolation.

  13. The secret of neuroscience boom: Are there secret human experiments in Latin América?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Salinas Flores

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available About 6 years ago there sparked a phenomenon in science called the neuroscientific boom. Neurologists underpin this phenomenon to cost reduction techniques such as electroencephalograms and to improved noninvasive technology such as functional MRI. But the human brain, the most complex organ in the universe, has not yet been fully investigated with the existing noninvasive technologies. Thus, there is a suspicion that the real reason for this boom is a secret, forced, and illicit human experimentation in Latin America. Physicians should investigate, be alert, and report these potential unethical human experiments to prevent any further damage to the public health of the citizens of Latin societies.

  14. In vivo high-resolution conductivity imaging of the human leg using MREIT: the first human experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Joong; Kim, Young Tae; Minhas, Atul S; Jeong, Woo Chul; Woo, Eung Je; Seo, Jin Keun; Kwon, O Jung

    2009-11-01

    We present the first in vivo cross-sectional conductivity image of the human leg with 1.7 mm pixel size using the magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) technique. After a review of its experimental protocol by an Institutional Review Board (IRB), we performed MREIT imaging experiments of four human subjects using a 3 T MRI scanner. Adopting thin and flexible carbon-hydrogel electrodes with a large surface area and good contact, we could inject as much as 9 mA current in a form of 15 ms pulse into the leg without producing a painful sensation and motion artifact. Sequentially injecting two imaging currents in two different directions, we collected induced magnetic flux density data inside the leg. Scaled conductivity images reconstructed by using the single-step harmonic B(z) algorithm well distinguished different parts of the subcutaneous adipose tissue, muscle, crural fascia, intermuscular septum and bone inside the leg. We could observe spurious noise spikes in the outer layer of the bone primarily due to the MR signal void phenomenon there. Around the fat, the chemical shift of about two pixels occurred obscuring the boundary of the fat region. Future work should include a fat correction method incorporated in the MREIT pulse sequence and improvements in radio-frequency coils and image reconstruction algorithms. Further human imaging experiments are planned and being conducted to produce conductivity images from different parts of the human body.

  15. Electrical conductivity imaging of lower extremities using MREIT: postmortem swine and in vivo human experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Eung Je; Kim, Hyung Joong; Minhas, Atul S; Kim, Young Tae; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kwon, O

    2008-01-01

    Cross-sectional conductivity images of lower extremities were reconstructed using Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) techniques. Carbon-hydrogel electrodes were adopted for postmortem swine and in vivo human imaging experiments. Due to their large surface areas and good contacts on the skin, we could inject as much as 10 mA into the lower extremities of human subjects without producing a painful sensation. Using a 3T MREIT system, we first performed a series of postmortem swine experiments and produced high-resolution conductivity images of swine legs. Validating the experimental protocol for the lower extremities, we revised it for the following human experiments. After the review of the Institutional Review Board (IRB), we conducted our first MREIT experiments of human subjects using the same 3T MREIT system. Collecting magnetic flux density data inside lower extremities subject to multiple injection currents, we reconstructed cross-sectional conductivity images using the harmonic B(z) algorithm. The conductivity images very well distinguished different parts of muscles inside the lower extremities. The outermost fatty layer was clearly shown in each conductivity image. We could observe severe noise in the outer layer of the bones primarily due to the MR signal void phenomenon there. Reconstructed conductivity images indicated that the internal regions of the bones have relatively high conductivity values. Future study is desired in terms of the conductivity image reconstruction algorithm to improve the image quality. Further human imaging experiments are planned and being conducted to produce high-resolution conductivity images from different parts of the human body.

  16. Previous experience in manned space flight: A survey of human factors lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandlee, George O.; Woolford, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    Previous experience in manned space flight programs can be used to compile a data base of human factors lessons learned for the purpose of developing aids in the future design of inhabited spacecraft. The objectives are to gather information available from relevant sources, to develop a taxonomy of human factors data, and to produce a data base that can be used in the future for those people involved in the design of manned spacecraft operations. A study is currently underway at the Johnson Space Center with the objective of compiling, classifying, and summarizing relevant human factors data bearing on the lessons learned from previous manned space flights. The research reported defines sources of data, methods for collection, and proposes a classification for human factors data that may be a model for other human factors disciplines.

  17. Melanin and blood concentration in human skin studied by multiple regression analysis: experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, M.; Yamada, Y.; Itoh, M.; Yatagai, T.

    2001-09-01

    Knowledge of the mechanism of human skin colour and measurement of melanin and blood concentration in human skin are needed in the medical and cosmetic fields. The absorbance spectrum from reflectance at the visible wavelength of human skin increases under several conditions such as a sunburn or scalding. The change of the absorbance spectrum from reflectance including the scattering effect does not correspond to the molar absorption spectrum of melanin and blood. The modified Beer-Lambert law is applied to the change in the absorbance spectrum from reflectance of human skin as the change in melanin and blood is assumed to be small. The concentration of melanin and blood was estimated from the absorbance spectrum reflectance of human skin using multiple regression analysis. Estimated concentrations were compared with the measured one in a phantom experiment and this method was applied to in vivo skin.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates regeneration of human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells after gentamicin toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadasali, Reza; Mutsaers, Henricus A M; Azarnia, Mahnaz; Aghdami, Nasser; Baharvand, Hossein; Torensma, Ruurd; Wilmer, Martijn J G; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2013-07-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to regenerate renal tubule epithelia and repair renal function without fusing with resident tubular cells. The goal of the present project was to investigate the role of MSCs secreted cytokines on tubule cell viability and regeneration after a toxic insult, using a conditionally immortalized human proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) line. Gentamicin was used to induce nephrotoxicity, and cell viability and migration were studied in absence and presence of human MSC-conditioned medium (hMSC-CM) i.e. medium containing soluble factors produced and secreted by MSCs. Exposure of ciPTEC to 0-3000 μg/ml gentamicin for 24 h caused a significant dose-dependent increase in cell death. We further demonstrated that the nephrotoxic effect of 2000 μg/ml gentamicin was recovered partially by exposing cells to hMSC-CM. Moreover, exposure of ciPTEC to gentamicin (1500-3000 μg/ml) for 7 days completely attenuated the migratory capacity of the cells. In addition, following scrape-wounding, cell migration of both untreated and gentamicin-exposed cells was increased in the presence of hMSC-CM, as compared to exposures to normal medium, indicating improved cell recovery. Our data suggest that cytokines secreted by MSCs stimulate renal tubule cell regeneration after nephrotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  20. Pattern Analyses Reveal Separate Experience-Based Fear Memories in the Human Right Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braem, Senne; De Houwer, Jan; Demanet, Jelle; Yuen, Kenneth S L; Kalisch, Raffael; Brass, Marcel

    2017-08-23

    Learning fear via the experience of contingencies between a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US) is often assumed to be fundamentally different from learning fear via instructions. An open question is whether fear-related brain areas respond differently to experienced CS-US contingencies than to merely instructed CS-US contingencies. Here, we contrasted two experimental conditions where subjects were instructed to expect the same CS-US contingencies while only one condition was characterized by prior experience with the CS-US contingency. Using multivoxel pattern analysis of fMRI data, we found CS-related neural activation patterns in the right amygdala (but not in other fear-related regions) that dissociated between whether a CS-US contingency had been instructed and experienced versus merely instructed. A second experiment further corroborated this finding by showing a category-independent neural response to instructed and experienced, but not merely instructed, CS presentations in the human right amygdala. Together, these findings are in line with previous studies showing that verbal fear instructions have a strong impact on both brain and behavior. However, even in the face of fear instructions, the human right amygdala still shows a separable neural pattern response to experience-based fear contingencies.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In our study, we addressed a fundamental problem of the science of human fear learning and memory, namely whether fear learning via experience in humans relies on a neural pathway that can be separated from fear learning via verbal information. Using two new procedures and recent advances in the analysis of brain imaging data, we localized purely experience-based fear processing and memory in the right amygdala, thereby making a direct link between human and animal research. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/378116-15$15.00/0.