WorldWideScience

Sample records for hugoniot shock states

  1. A New Hugoniot Equation of State for Shocked Porous Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿华运; 谭华; 吴强

    2002-01-01

    A thermodynamic equation of state (EOS) is derived to be appropriate for investigating the thermodynamic variations along isobaric paths to predict the compression behaviour of porous materials. This EOS model is tested on porous iron, copper, lead and tungsten with different initial densities. The calculated temperature and Hugoniot are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental and theoretical data published previously. It is interesting that this model can satisfactorily predict the shock behaviour of porous materials over a wide range of porosity and pressure.

  2. Hugoniot equation of state of rock materials under shock compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q B; Braithwaite, C H; Zhao, J

    2017-01-28

    Two sets of shock compression tests (i.e. conventional and reverse impact) were conducted to determine the shock response of two rock materials using a plate impact facility. Embedded manganin stress gauges were used for the measurements of longitudinal stress and shock velocity. Photon Doppler velocimetry was used to capture the free surface velocity of the target. Experimental data were obtained on a fine-grained marble and a coarse-grained gabbro over a shock pressure range of approximately 1.5-12 GPa. Gabbro exhibited a linear Hugoniot equation of state (EOS) in the pressure-particle velocity (P-up) plane, while for marble a nonlinear response was observed. The EOS relations between shock velocity (US) and particle velocity (up) are linearly fitted as US = 2.62 + 3.319up and US = 5.4 85 + 1.038up for marble and gabbro, respectively.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  3. Shock Hugoniots of molecular liquids and the principle of corresponding states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisolm, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crockett, Scott D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shaw, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We observe that the shock velocity-particle velocity Hugoniots for various liquids (e.g. nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, argon) lie almost on top of one another. Recalling the work of Ross and Ree [J. Chem. Phys. 73, 6146-6152 (1980)], we hypothesize that these materials obey a principle of corresponding states. We use the principle to deduce how the Hugoniots of two corresponding materials should be related, and we compare the results with data and find good agreement. We suggest this as a method for estimating the Hugoniot of a material of the appropriate type in the absence of shock data, and we illustrate with fluorine.

  4. Tables of equation-of-state, thermodynamic properties, and shock Hugoniot for hot dense fluid deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R

    2015-01-01

    We present computational results and tables of the equation-of-state, thermodynamic properties, and shock Hugoniot for hot dense fluid deuterium. The present results are generated using a recently developed chemical model that takes into account different high density effects such as Coulomb interactions among charged particles, partial degeneracy, and intensive short range hard core repulsion. Internal partition functions are evaluated in a statistical-mechanically consistent way implementing recent developments in the literature. The shock Hugoniot curve derived from the present tables is in reasonable overall agreement with the Hugoniot derived from the Nova-laser shock wave experiments on liquid deuterium, showing that deuterium has a significantly higher compressibility than predicted by the SESAME tables or by Path Integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) calculations. Computational results are presented as surface plots for the dissociated fraction, degree of ionization, pressure, and specific internal energy for d...

  5. Tables of equation-of-state, thermodynamic properties, and shock Hugoniot for hot dense fluid deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R. [Department of Physics, College of Science, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 15551, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-11-15

    We present computational results and tables of the equation-of-state, thermodynamic properties, and shock Hugoniot for hot dense fluid deuterium. The present results are generated using a recently developed chemical model that takes into account different high density effects such as Coulomb interactions among charged particles, partial degeneracy, and intensive short range hard core repulsion. Internal partition functions are evaluated in a statistical-mechanically consistent way implementing recent developments in the literature. The shock Hugoniot curve derived from the present tables is overall in reasonable agreement with the Hugoniot derived from the Nova-laser shock wave experiments on liquid deuterium, showing that deuterium has a significantly higher compressibility than predicted by the SESAME tables or by Path Integral Monte Carlo calculations. Computational results are presented as surface plots for the dissociated fraction, degree of ionization, pressure, and specific internal energy for densities ranging from 0.0001 to 40 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures from 2000 to ∼10{sup 6 }K. Tables for values of the above mentioned quantities in addition to the specific heat at constant pressure, c{sub p}, ratio of specific heats, c{sub p}/c{sub v}, sound speed and Hugoniot curve (for a specific initial state) are presented for practical use.

  6. Shock Hugoniot and equations of states of water, castor oil, and aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, sucrose and gelatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojani, A. B.; Ohtani, K.; Takayama, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a result of experiments for the determination of reliable shock Hugoniot curves of liquids, in particular, at relatively low pressure region, which are needed to perform precise numerical simulations of shock wave/tissue interaction prior to the development of shock wave related therapeutic devices. Underwater shock waves were generated by explosions of laser ignited 10 mg silver azide pellets, which were temporally and spatially well controlled. Measuring temporal variation of shock velocities and over-pressures in caster oil, aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, sucrose and gelatin with various concentrations, we succeeded to determine shock Hugoniot curves of these liquids and hence parameters describing Tait type equations of state.

  7. Equation of state of dolomite from shock Hugoniot and static compression studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Comparisons are made between shock Hugoniot data and recent high-pressure static DAC (diamond anvil cell) data on dolomite mineral. Stark disparities are noted. DAC measurements reveal first order phase transformation within the pressure range of approximately 17-37 GPa. The preponderance of shock data failed to reveal phase transformation on the Hugoniot. Early time-resolved pressure reveal a possible transformation in the neighborhood of 20-25 GPa impeded by transformation kinetics. Static and dynamic data are contrasted and the underlying mechanisms assessed.

  8. First-principles Equations of State and Shock Hugoniots of First- and Second-Row Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Kevin; Soubiran, Francois; Zhang, Shuai; Militzer, Burkhard

    A first-principles methodology for studying high energy density physics and warm dense matter is important for the stewardship of plasma science and guiding inertial confinement fusion experiments. In order to address this challenge, we have been developing the capability of path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) for studying dense plasmas comprised of increasingly heavy elements, including nitrogen, oxygen, and neon. In recent work, we have extended PIMC methodology beyond the free-particle node approximation by implementing localized nodal surfaces capable of describing bound plasma states in second-row elements, such as silicon. We combine results from PIMC with results from density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) calculations to produce a coherent equation of state that bridges the entire WDM regime. Analysis of pair-correlation functions and the electronic density of states reveals an evolving plasma structure and ionization process that is driven by temperature and pressure. We also compute shock Hugoniot curves for a wide range of initial densities, which generally reveal an increase in compression as the second and first shells are ionized. This work is funded by the NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering (DE-SC0010517).

  9. Shock initiation sensitivity and Hugoniot-based equation of state of Composition B obtained using in situ electromagnetic gauging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, L. L.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Bartram, B. D.; Sheffield, S. A.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Brown, G. W.; Sandstrom, M. M.; Giambra, A. M.; Handley, C. A.

    2014-05-01

    A series of gas gun-driven plate impact experiments were performed on vacuum melt-cast Composition B to obtain new Hugoniot states and shock sensitivity (run-distance-to-detonation) information. The Comp B (ρ0 = 1.713 g/cm3) consisted of 59.5% RDX, 39.5% TNT, and 1% wax, with ~ 6.5% HMX in the RDX. The measured Hugoniot states were found to be consistent with earlier reports, with the compressibility on the shock adiabat softer than that of a 63% RDX material reported by Marsh.[4] The shock sensitivity was found to be more sensitive (shorter run distance to detonation at a given shock input condition) than earlier reports for Comp B-3 and a lower density (1.68-1.69 g/cm3) Comp B formulation. The reactive flow during the shock-to-detonation transition was marked by heterogeneous, hot spot-driven growth both in and behind the leading shock front.

  10. Shock initiation sensitivity and Hugoniot-based equation of state of Composition-B obtained using in situ electromagnetic gauging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, L.; Dattelbaum, Dana; Bartram, Brian; Sheffield, Stephen; Gustavsen, Richard; Handley, Caroline; Shock and Detonation Physics Team; Explosives Modelling Team

    2013-06-01

    Composition-B (Comp-B) is a solid cast explosive comprised of 59.5 wt% cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine (RDX), 39.5 wt% 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and 1 wt% wax. Its initial density depends on formulation method and as a result, the detonation properties of Comp-B have generally been studied at densities of 1.69 g/cm3 and 1.72 g/cm3. The shock initiation sensitivity (Pop-plot) of Comp-B has been reported previously; obtained using both explosively-driven wedge tests and embedded manganin gauge techniques. We describe the results of a series of gas-gun-driven plate-impact initiation experiments on Comp-B (ρ0 = 1.72 g/cm3) using embedded electromagnetic gauges to obtain in situ particle velocity wave profiles at 10 Lagrangian positions in each experiment. From the wave profiles, an unreacted Hugoniot locus, the run-distance-to-detonation, and initiation waveforms are obtained in each experiment. The results indicate that Comp-B at ρ0 = 1.72 g/cm3 is more sensitive than reported previously. Comparisons are made of the new Hugoniot states with an earlier Hugoniot-based EOS. Measurements of the detonation wave profile using photonic Doppler velocimetry are also presented and discussed in the context of ZND detonation theory.

  11. Quantum-statistical equation-of-state models of dense plasmas: high-pressure Hugoniot shock adiabats

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, Jean-Christophe

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison of two self-consistent equation-of-state models which differ from their electronic contribution: the atom in a spherical cell and the atom in a jellium of charges. It is shown that both models are well suited for the calculation of Hugoniot shock adiabats in the high pressure range (1 Mbar-10 Gbar), and that the atom-in-a-jellium model provides a better treatment of pressure ionization. Comparisons with experimental data are also presented. Shell effects on shock adiabats are reviewed in the light of these models. They lead to additional features not only in the variations of pressure versus density, but also in the variations of shock velocity versus particle velocity. Moreover, such effects are found to be responsible for enhancement of the electronic specific heat.

  12. Observation of off-Hugoniot shocked states with ultrafast time resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, M; Crowhurst, J; Bastea, S; Zaug, J

    2010-02-23

    We apply ultrafast single shot interferometry to determine the pressure and density of argon shocked from up to 7.8 GPa static initial pressure in a diamond anvil cell. This method enables the observation of thermodynamic states distinct from those observed in either single shock or isothermal compression experiments, and the observation of ultrafast dynamics in shocked materials. We also present a straightforward method for interpreting ultrafast shock wave data which determines the index of refraction at the shock front, and the particle and shock velocities for shock waves in transparent materials. Based on these methods, we observe shocked thermodynamic states between the room temperature isotherm of argon and the shock adiabat of cryogenic argon at final shock pressures up to 28 GPa.

  13. Nuclear Quantum Vibrational Effects in Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-23

    We present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a Grueneisen equation of state and a quasiharmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, we derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. We have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of shock compressed water. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or solids.

  14. Nuclear Quantum Vibrational Effects in Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-23

    We present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a Grueneisen equation of state and a quasiharmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, we derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. We have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of shock compressed water. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or solids.

  15. Quantum Mechanical Corrections to Simulated Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-17

    The authors present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a grueneisen equation of state and a quasi-harmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, they derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. They have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of both shock compressed water and methane. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data for these two systems. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or covalent solids, and has the potential to decrease the large uncertainties inherent in many experimental Hugoniot temperature measurements of these systems.

  16. Investigating velocity spectra at the Hugoniot state of shock loaded heterogenous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaJeunesse, Jeff; Stewart, Sarah T.; Kennedy, Greg; Thadhani, Naresh; Borg, John P.

    2017-01-01

    Particle velocity and stress profiles measured in planar impact experiments on heterogeneous materials have shown significant deviations about the idealized final shock state plateau in both experimental and simulated tests. These deviations arise from the scattering of the transmitted shock wave due to the presence of internal interfaces within heterogeneous materials. The goal of this work is to determine if the spectra of oscillatory behavior can be associated to characteristic length scales of the corresponding un-shocked heterogeneous material. Similarities between experimental and simulated particle velocity profiles from planar impacts on dry sand are compared.

  17. Shock Hugoniot equations of state for binary ideal (toluene/fluorobenzene) and nonideal (ethanol/water) liquid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Peter A; Dang, Nhan C; Bolme, Cynthia A; Brown, Kathryn E; McGrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S

    2013-07-25

    Laser shock Hugoniot data were obtained using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) for both nonideal (ethanol/water solutions with mole percent χ(ethanol) = 0%, 3.4%, 5.4%, 7.5%, 9.7%, 11%, 18%, 33%, 56%, 100%) and ideal liquid mixtures (toluene/fluorobenzene solutions with mole percent χ(toluene) = 0%, 26.0%, 49.1%, 74.9%, 100%). The shock and particle velocities obtained from the UDE data were compared to the universal liquid Hugoniot (ULH) and to literature shock (plate impact) data where available. It was found that the water UDE data fit to a ULH-form equation suggests an intercept of 1.32 km/s, lower than the literature ambient sound speed in water of 1.495 km/s (Mijakovic et al. J. Mol. Liq. 2011, 164, 66-73). Similarly, the ethanol UDE data fit to a ULH-form equation suggests an intercept of 1.45 km/s, which lies above the literature ambient sound speed in ethanol of 1.14 km/s. Both the literature plate impact and UDE Hugoniot data lie below the ULH for water. Likewise, the literature plate impact and UDE Hugoniot data lie above the ULH for ethanol. The UDE Hugoniot data for the mixtures of water and ethanol cross the predictions of the ULH near the same concentration where the sound speed reaches a maximum. In contrast, the UDE data from the ideal liquids and their mixtures are well behaved and agree with ULH predictions across the concentration range. The deviations of the nonideal ethanol/water data from the ULH suggest that complex hydrogen bonding networks in ethanol/water mixtures alter the compressibility of the mixture.

  18. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, Dennis E. [Applied Research Associates, Southwest Division, 4300 San Mateo Blvd NE, A-220, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110-129 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  19. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Dennis E.

    2015-04-01

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20-60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable mechanistic

  20. Calculation of Shock Hugoniot Curves of Precompressed Liquid Deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Militzer, B

    2002-11-18

    Path integral Monte Carlo simulations have been used to study deuterium at high pressure and temperature. The equation of state has been derived in the temperature and density region of 10,000 {le} T {le} 1,000,000 and 0.6 {le} {rho} {le} 2.5 g cm{sup -3}. A series of shock Hugoniot curves is computed for different initial compressions in order to compare with current and future shock wave experiments using liquid deuterium samples precompressed in diamond anvil cells.

  1. Shock Hugoniot measurements of CH at Gbar pressures at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritcher, A. L.; Doeppner, T.; Swift, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Nilsen, J.; Hammer, J.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G.; Landen, O.; Keane, C.; Glenzer, S.; Rothman, S.; Chapman, D.; Kraus, D.; Falcone, R. W.

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory measurements of the shock Hugoniot at high pressure, exceeding several hundred Mbar, are of great importance in the understanding and accurate modeling of matter at extreme conditions. In this work we present a platform to measure the material properties, specifically the single shock Hugoniot and electron temperature, at extreme pressures of ∼Gbar at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In these experiments we launch spherically convergent shocks into solid CH, using a Hohlraum radiation drive. X-ray radiography is applied to measure the shock speed and infer the mass density profile, enabling determining of the material pressure and Hugoniot equation of state. X-ray scattering is applied to measure the electron temperature through measurement of the electron velocity distribution.

  2. Hugoniot Measurements of Silicon Shock Compressed to 25 Mbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, B.; Polsin, D. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Gregor, M. C.; Hu, S. X.; Collins, G. W.; Rygg, J. R.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.

    2016-10-01

    We present results of laser-driven shock experiments that compressed silicon samples to 25 Mbar. Impedance matching to a quartz reference provided Hugoniot data. Since silicon is opaque, a quartz witness was placed adjacent to the silicon samples; this afforded the use of the unsteady wave correction to increase the precision of the transit-time measurements of shock velocity. Results are compared both SESAME tables and to quantum molecular dynamics calculations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Shock Hugoniot behavior of single crystal titanium using atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenchery, Karoon; Dongare, Avinash

    2017-01-01

    Atomistic shock simulations are performed for single crystal titanium using four different interatomic potentials at impact velocities ranging from 0.5 km/s to 2.0 km/s. These potentials comprise of three parameterizations in the formulation of the embedded atom method and one formulation of the modified embedded atom method. The capability of the potentials to model the shock deformation and failure behavior is investigated by computing the shock hugoniot response of titanium and comparing to existing experimental data. In addition, the capability to reproduce the shock induced alpha (α) to omega (ω) phase transformation seen in Ti is investigated. The shock wave structure is discussed and the velocities for the elastic, plastic and the α-ω phase transformation waves are calculated for all the interatomic potentials considered.

  4. Standing Rankine-Hugoniot Shocks in Black Hole Accretion Discs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Wei-Min; LU Ju-Fu

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study the problem of standing shocks in viscous disc-like accretion flows around black holes. For the first time we parametrize such a flow with two physical constants, namely the specific angular momentum accreted by the black hole j and the energy quantity K. By providing the global dependence of shock formation in the j - K parameter space, we show that a significant parameter region can ensure solutions with Rankine-Hugoniot shocks; and that the possibilities of shock formation are the largest for inviscid flows, decreasing with increasing viscosity, and ceasing to exist for a strong enough viscosity. Our results support the view that the standing shock is an essential ingredient in black hole accretion discs and is a general phenomenon in astrophysics, and that there should be a continuous change from the properties of inviscid flows to those of viscous ones.

  5. Shock Hugoniot measurements on Ta to 0. 78 TPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froeschner, K.E.; Lee, R.S.; Chau, H.H.; Weingart, R.C.

    1983-08-18

    Symmetric impact shock Hugoniot measurements have been made on Ta with an electrically exploded foil gun system. The results obtained to date for the Hugoniot of Ta cover the range 0.19 to 0.78 TPa (impact velocities from 4.0 to 9.7 km/s) and agree with data obtained by other researchers to within 2.7% rms. Recent improvements in the system include electromagnetic shielding of impactor and target, continuous measurement of impactor velocity with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and computer-aided analysis of shot film. Conservative extrapolation from current operating conditions indicate that pressures of 1.1 to 1.5 TPa could be achieved with little difficulty.

  6. Calculation of Hugoniot properties for shocked nitromethane based on the improved Tsien's EOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Cui, Ji-Ping; Fan, Jing

    2010-06-01

    We have calculated the Hugoniot properties of shocked nitromethane based on the improved Tsien’s equation of state (EOS) that optimized by “exact” numerical molecular dynamic data at high temperatures and pressures. Comparison of the calculated results of the improved Tsien’s EOS with the existed experimental data and the direct simulations show that the behavior of the improved Tsien’s EOS is very good in many aspects. Because of its simple analytical form, the improved Tsien’s EOS can be prospectively used to study the condensed explosive detonation coupling with chemical reaction.

  7. A pressure-transferable coarse-grained potential for modeling the shock Hugoniot of polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vipin; Peralta, Pedro; Li, Yiyang; Oswald, Jay

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the thermomechanical response of semi-crystalline polyethylene under shock compression by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a new coarse-graining scheme inspired by the embedded atom method. The coarse-graining scheme combines the iterative Boltzmann inversion method and least squares optimization to parameterize interactions between coarse-grained sites, including a many-body potential energy designed to improve the representability of the model across a wide range of thermodynamic states. We demonstrate that a coarse-grained model of polyethylene, calibrated to match target structural and thermodynamic data generated from isothermal MD simulations at different pressures, can also accurately predict the shock Hugoniot response. Analysis of the rise in temperature along the shock Hugoniot and comparison with analytical predictions from the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state are performed to thoroughly explore the thermodynamic consistency of the model. As the coarse-graining model affords nearly two orders of magnitude reduction in simulation time compared to all-atom MD simulations, the proposed model can help identify how nanoscale structure in semi-crystalline polymers, such as polyethylene, influences mechanical behavior under extreme loading.

  8. Variational-average-atom-in-quantum-plasmas (VAAQP) code and virial theorem: Equation-of-state and shock-Hugoniot calculations for warm dense Al, Fe, Cu, and Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, R.; Blenski, T.

    2011-02-01

    The numerical code VAAQP (variational average atom in quantum plasmas), which is based on a fully variational model of equilibrium dense plasmas, is applied to equation-of-state calculations for aluminum, iron, copper, and lead in the warm-dense-matter regime. VAAQP does not impose the neutrality of the Wigner-Seitz ion sphere; it provides the average-atom structure and the mean ionization self-consistently from the solution of the variational equations. The formula used for the electronic pressure is simple and does not require any numerical differentiation. In this paper, the virial theorem is derived in both nonrelativistic and relativistic versions of the model. This theorem allows one to express the electron pressure as a combination of the electron kinetic and interaction energies. It is shown that the model fulfills automatically the virial theorem in the case of local-density approximations to the exchange-correlation free-energy. Applications of the model to the equation-of-state and Hugoniot shock adiabat of aluminum, iron, copper, and lead in the warm-dense-matter regime are presented. Comparisons with other approaches, including the inferno model, and with available experimental data are given. This work allows one to understand the thermodynamic consistency issues in the existing average-atom models. Starting from the case of aluminum, a comparative study of the thermodynamic consistency of the models is proposed. A preliminary study of the validity domain of the inferno model is also included.

  9. Variational-average-atom-in-quantum-plasmas (VAAQP) code and virial theorem: equation-of-state and shock-Hugoniot calculations for warm dense Al, Fe, Cu, and Pb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, R; Blenski, T

    2011-02-01

    The numerical code VAAQP (variational average atom in quantum plasmas), which is based on a fully variational model of equilibrium dense plasmas, is applied to equation-of-state calculations for aluminum, iron, copper, and lead in the warm-dense-matter regime. VAAQP does not impose the neutrality of the Wigner-Seitz ion sphere; it provides the average-atom structure and the mean ionization self-consistently from the solution of the variational equations. The formula used for the electronic pressure is simple and does not require any numerical differentiation. In this paper, the virial theorem is derived in both nonrelativistic and relativistic versions of the model. This theorem allows one to express the electron pressure as a combination of the electron kinetic and interaction energies. It is shown that the model fulfills automatically the virial theorem in the case of local-density approximations to the exchange-correlation free-energy. Applications of the model to the equation-of-state and Hugoniot shock adiabat of aluminum, iron, copper, and lead in the warm-dense-matter regime are presented. Comparisons with other approaches, including the inferno model, and with available experimental data are given. This work allows one to understand the thermodynamic consistency issues in the existing average-atom models. Starting from the case of aluminum, a comparative study of the thermodynamic consistency of the models is proposed. A preliminary study of the validity domain of the inferno model is also included.

  10. Effect of shear strength on Hugoniot-compression curve and the equation of state of tungsten (W)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashimo, Tsutomu, E-mail: mashimo@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Liu, Xun [Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Kodama, Masao [Sojo University, Kumamoto 860-0082 (Japan); Zaretsky, Eugene [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Katayama, Masahide [Itochu Techno-Solutions Corporation, Tokyo 100-6080 (Japan); Nagayama, Kunihiko [Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2016-01-21

    The Hugoniot data for highly dense polycrystalline tungsten were obtained for pressures above 200 GPa, and the equation of state (EOS) was determined taking into account shear strength effects. For this study, we have made some improvements in measurement system and analyses of the shock wave data. Symmetric-impact Hugoniot measurements were performed using the high-time resolution streak camera system equipped on a one-stage powder gun and two-stage light gas gun, where the effects of tilting and bowing of flyer plate on the Hugoniot data were carefully considered. The shock velocity–particle velocity (U{sub S}–U{sub P}) Hugoniot relation in the plastic regime was determined to be U{sub S} = 4.137 + 1.242U{sub P} km/s (U{sub P} < 2 km/s). Ultrasonic and Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measurements were also performed in this study. The zero-intercept value of the U{sub S}–U{sub P} Hugoniot relation was found to be slightly larger than the ultrasonic bulk sound velocity (4.023 km/s). The hypothetical hydrostatic isothermal U{sub s}–U{sub p} Hugoniot curve, which corresponds to the hydrostatic isothermal compression curve derived from the Hugoniot data using the strength data, converged to the bulk sound velocity, clearly showing shear strength dependence in the Hugoniot data. The EOS for tungsten is derived from the hydrostatic isothermal compression curve using the strength data.

  11. Shock equation of state properties of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.

    1996-03-01

    Unique shock compression experiments have been developed and pursued which provide material equation of state data for dynamic strength, pore crush, shock Hugoniot and adiabatic decompression. Experimental data have been obtained on an aggregate concrete to Hugoniot pressures of 25 GPa. New analytic methods were developed to extract equation-of-state properties from dynamic test data. Unexpected residual strain results are compared with expected thermal expansion and dilatancy properties of concrete.

  12. Hugoniot-based equations of state for two filled EPDM rubbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, A. H.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Orler, E. B.; Bartram, B. D.; Gustavsen, R. L.

    2014-05-01

    Particle-filled elastomers are commonly used as engineering components due to their ability to provide structural support via their elastic mechanical response. Even small amounts of particle fillers are known to increase the mechanical strength of elastomers due to polymer-filler interactions. In this work, the shock response of two filled (SiO2 or silica and KevlarTMfillers) ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM) rubbers were studied using single and two-stage gas gun-driven plate impact experiments. Hugoniot states were determined using standard plate impact methods. Both filled-EPDM elastomers exhibit high compressibility under shock loading and have a response similar to adiprene rubber.

  13. Shell-structure effects on high-pressure Rankine-Hugoniot shock adiabats

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, J C

    2007-01-01

    Rankine-Hugoniot shock adiabats are calculated in the pressure range 1 Mbar-10 Gbar with two atomic-structure models: the atom in a spherical cell and the atom in a jellium of charges. These quantum self-consistent-field models include shell effects, which have a strong impact on pressure and shock velocity along the shock adiabat. Comparisons with experimental data are presented and quantum effects are interpreted in terms of electronic specific heat. A simple analytical estimate for the maximum compression is proposed, depending on initial density, atomic weight and atomic number.

  14. DETERMINATION OF THE SPEED OF SOUND ALONG THE HUGONIOT IN A SHOCKED MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-25

    REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) April 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DETERMINATION OF THE SPEED OF SOUND...Hugoniot to the isentrope was developed. The linear us- up and Mie-Grüneisen equations of state were applied to construct a comparison of the computed...2 + | [1 − 1 2 (0 − )] Using the linear equation of state, us- up : = 0 + Which when

  15. Hugoniot based equation of state for solid polyurea and polyurea aerogel foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Adam; Gustavsen, Richard; Aslam, Tariq; Bartram, Brian

    2015-06-01

    The shock response of solid polyurea and polyurea aerogel foams were studied using gas-gun driven plate impact experiments. The materials reported on here are commercially available, brand named AIRLOY X103, and supplied by Aerogel Technologies, LLC. PolyUrea Solid, with nominal density 1.13 g/cm3, and two aerogel foams, with nominal densities of 0.20 and 0.35 g/cm3, were studied. Most experiments were of the multi-slug type in which a sample of each density was mounted on an oxygen free high conductivity copper or 6061 aluminum baseplate. In these experiments, shock velocity was measured and other shock states calculated by the impedance matching technique. Other experiments were of the front surface impact type in which the foam sample was mounted in the projectile and impacted a lithium fluoride window. Shock states were calculated using the measured particle velocity, the projectile velocity, and the lithium fluoride Hugoniot. Peak particle velocity obtained in the foam was > 4.3 km/s, and peak pressure in the solid was > 29 GPa. A break in the data for the solid above particle velocities of 2.0 km/s (~ 18 GPa) indicates a probable decomposition reaction. A p- α model with Mie-Grueneisen form for the solid reasonably replicates the data.

  16. Characterization of lithium fluoride windows at 450 K for shock wave experiments: Hugoniot curves and refractive index at 532 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy G.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lithium fluoride (LiF windows are extensively used in traditional shock wave experiments because of their transparency beyond 100 GPa along [100] axis. A correct knowledge of the optical and mechanical properties of these windows is essential in order to analyze the experimental data and to determine the equation of state on a large variety of metals. This in mind, the windows supply is systematically characterized in order to determine the density, the thermal expansion and the crystalline orientation. Furthermore, an experimental campaign is conducted in order to characterize the windows properties under shock loading at 300 K and preheated conditions (450 K. This article describes the experiments, details the analysis and presents the results. Particle velocity measurements are carried out at the interface of a multiple windows stack using interferometer diagnostic (VISAR and IDL at 532 nm wavelength. Shock velocity is calculated as a function of the time of flight through each window. The optical correction is calculated as the ratio of the apparent velocity gap and the particle velocity at the free surface. To go further, the Rankine-Hugoniot relations are applied to calculate the pressure and the density. Then, the results and uncertainties are presented and compared with literature data.

  17. Equation of State for Shock Compression of High Distension Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Shock Hugoniot data for full-density and porous compounds of boron carbide, silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, uranium dioxide and playa alluvium are investigated for the purpose of equation-of-state representation of intense shock compression. Complications of multivalued Hugoniot behavior characteristic of highly distended solids are addressed through the application of enthalpy-based equations of state of the form originally proposed by Rice and Walsh in the late 1950's. Additivity of cold and thermal pressure intrinsic to the Mie-Gruneisen EOS framework is replaced by isobaric additive functions of the cold and thermal specific volume components in the enthalpy-based formulation. Additionally, experimental evidence supports acceleration of shock-induced phase transformation on the Hugoniot with increasing levels of initial distention for silicon dioxide, uranium dioxide and possibly boron carbide. Methods for addressing this experimentally observed facet of the shock compression are introduced into the EOS model.

  18. Equation of state for shock compression of distended solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Dennis; Fenton, Gregg; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-05-01

    Shock Hugoniot data for full-density and porous compounds of boron carbide, silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, uranium dioxide and playa alluvium are investigated for the purpose of equation-of-state representation of intense shock compression. Complications of multivalued Hugoniot behavior characteristic of highly distended solids are addressed through the application of enthalpy-based equations of state of the form originally proposed by Rice and Walsh in the late 1950's. Additive measures of cold and thermal pressure intrinsic to the Mie-Gruneisen EOS framework is replaced by isobaric additive functions of the cold and thermal specific volume components in the enthalpy-based formulation. Additionally, experimental evidence reveals enhancement of shock-induced phase transformation on the Hugoniot with increasing levels of initial distension for silicon dioxide, uranium dioxide and possibly boron carbide. Methods for addressing this experimentally observed feature of the shock compression are incorporated into the EOS model.

  19. Recovery of entire shocked samples in a range of pressure from ~100 GPa to Hugoniot Elastic Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaki, Keita; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Kondo, Tadashi; Kurosawa, Kosuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Shigemori, Keisuke; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We carried out laser shock experiments and wholly recovered shocked olivine and quartz samples. We investigated the petrographic features based on optical micrographs of sliced samples and found that each recovered sample comprises three regions, I (optically dark), II (opaque) and III (transparent). Scanning electron microscopy combined with electron back-scattered diffraction shows that there are no crystal features in the region I; the materials in the region I have once melted. Moreover, numerical calculations performed with the iSALE shock physics code suggest that the boundary between regions II and III corresponds to Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL). Thus, we succeeded in the recovery of the entire shocked samples experienced over a wide range of pressures from HEL (~ 10 GPa) to melting pressure (~ 100 GPa) in a hierarchical order.

  20. Interferometric windows characterization up to 450 K for shock wave experiments: Hugoniot curves and refractive index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godefroit J.-L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Conventional shock wave experiments need interferometric windows in order to determine the equation of state of a large variety of metals. Lithium fluoride (LiF and sapphire are extensively used for that purpose because their optical transparencies enable the optical diagnostics at interfaces under a given range of shock pressure. In order to simulate and analyse the experiments it is necessary to gather a correct knowledge of the optical and mechanical properties of these windows. Therefore, our window supplies are systematically characterized and an experimental campaign under shock loading is conducted. Our preliminary work on LiF windows at 532 nm is in good agreement with literature data at room temperature and the new characterization at 450 K enables a better interpretation of our preheated target experiments. It confirms the predominant effect of density on optical properties under pressure and temperature. The present work demonstrates that the initial density determination is a key point and that the uncertainties need to be improved. For that purpose, complementary experiments are conducted on LiF windows with simplified target designs and enriched diagnostics, coupling VISAR (532 nm and PdV (1550 nm diagnostics. Furthermore, a similar campaign is conducted on sapphire windows with symmetric impact configuration.

  1. Probing planetary interiors: Shock compression of water to 700 GPa and 3.8 g/cc, and recent high precision Hugoniot measurements of deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Marcus

    2013-06-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous increase in the number of identified extra-solar planetary systems. Our understanding of the formation of these systems is tied to our understanding of the internal structure of these exoplanets, which in turn rely upon equations of state of light elements and compounds such as water and hydrogen. Here we present shock compression data for water with unprecedented accuracy that shows commonly used models for water in planetary modeling significantly overestimate the compressibility at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Furthermore, we show that its behavior at these conditions, including reflectivity and isentropic response, is well described by a recent first-principles based equation of state. These findings advocate the use of this model as the standard for modeling Neptune, Uranus, and ``hot Neptune'' exoplanets, and should contribute to improved understanding of the interior structure of these planets, and perhaps improved understanding of formation mechanisms of planetary systems. We also present very recent experiments on deuterium that have taken advantage of continued improvements in both experimental configuration and the understanding of the quartz shock standard to obtain Hugoniot data with a significant increase in precision. These data will prove to provide a stringent test for the equation of state of hydrogen and its isotopes. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-ACO4-94AL85000.

  2. Recent Advances in Modeling Hugoniots with Cheetah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaesemann, K. R.; Fried, L. E.

    2006-07-01

    We describe improvements to the Cheetah thermochemical-kinetics code's equilibrium solver to enable it to find a wider range of thermodynamic states. Cheetah supports a wide range of elements, condensed detonation products, and gas phase reactions. Therefore, Cheetah can be applied to a wide range of shock problems involving both energetic and non-energetic materials. An improve equation of state is also introduced. New experimental validations of Cheetah's equation of state methodology have been performed, including both reacted and unreacted Hugoniots.

  3. The Liquid Krypton Hugoniot at Megabar Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth; Magyar, Rudy J.; Mattsson, Ann E.; Hanson, David L.; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2011-06-01

    Krypton is an ideal candidate to study multi-Mbar pressure effects on elements with filled-shell electron configurations. Few experimental data on Kr at high pressures exist, however, with prior Hugoniot data limited to below 1 Mbar. Similar to liquid xenon, the current Kr equation of state (EOS) models agree with the data and each other below 1 Mbar, but diverge with increasing pressure. We examine the liquid Kr Hugoniot up to 8 Mbar by using density functional theory (DFT) methods and by performing shock compression experiments on the Sandia Z - accelerator. Our initial DFT Kr Hugoniot calculations indicated the standard PAW potential is inadequate at the high pressures and temperatures occurring under strong shock compression. A new Kr PAW potential was constructed giving improved scattering properties of the atom at high energies. The Z Hugoniot measurements above 1 Mbar validated the DFT results and the pseudo-potential. The DFT and Z results suggest that the current EOS models require some modifications. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Hugoniot Information for Bromonitromethane, Isopropyl Nitrate, and 90 wt% H_2O_2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Stephen A.; Davis, Lloyd; Engelke, Ray

    1998-03-01

    Hugoniot curves and related information are reported for three liquid explosives: bromonitromethane (BrNM), isopropyl nitrate (IPN), and 90/10 wt% hydrogen peroxide/water (H_2O_2). Hugoniot curves were determined using the measured sound speeds and the universal liquid Hugoniot empirical form(Woolfolk, R. W.; Cowperthwaite, M.; Shaw, R. Thermochimica Acta,) 1973, 5, 409-414. which only requires the initial sound speed as a parameter. We measured sound speeds for these liquids. In addition, gas gun experiments were conducted to determine experimental Hugoniot states for BrNM and IPN. Magnetic gauges were used to measure the input particle velocity and to track the shock front (a shock velocity measurement), providing the necessary information to determine a Hugoniot state. These measured states were compared to those predicted using the universal liquid Hugoniot and agreement was found to be very good. Using the calculated Hugoniot curves and the detonation velocities for IPN and H_2O_2, von Neumann spike detonation conditions were estimated and compared to nitromethane (NM). BrNM was also found to be more sensitive to shock initiation than neat NM.

  5. High precision measurements of the diamond Hugoniot in and above the melt region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; McWilliams, R S; Collins, G

    2008-08-05

    High precision laser-driven shock wave measurements of the diamond principal Hugoniot have been made at pressures between 6 and 19 Mbar. Shock velocities were determined with 0.3-1.1% precision using a velocity interferometer. Impedance matching analysis, incorporating systematic errors in the equation-of-state of the quartz standard, was used to determine the Hugoniot with 1.2-2.7% precision in density. The results are in good agreement with published ab initio calculations which predict a small negative melt slope along the Hugoniot, but disagree with previous laser-driven shock wave experiments which had observed a large density increase in the melt region. In the extensive solid-liquid coexistence regime between 6 and 10 Mbar these measurements indicate that the mixed phase may be slightly more dense than would be expected from a simple interpolation between liquid and solid Hugoniots.

  6. 未反应乳化炸药冲击Hugoniot关系的测试%DETERMINATION OF SHOCK HUGONIOT RELATION OF UNREACTED EMULSION EXPLOSIVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋锦泉; 汪旭光; 焦彤

    2001-01-01

    未反应乳化炸药冲击Hugoniot关系是乳化炸药的 基本性能参数,它不仅是研究乳化炸药冲击引爆机理和确定其反应速率函数必不可少的数据 ,也是研究乳化炸药中冲击波演变为爆轰波的过程及进行乳化炸药爆轰数值模 拟的重要参数。本文利用设计的新型测试装置和建立的测试系统,较好地测 试了未反应乳化炸药冲击Hugoniot关系。%Shock Hugoniot relation is a basic characteristic parameter of emulsion explosive (EE).It's not only one of the absolutely necessary data for research of shock initiation and determination of the reaction rate function of EE,but also an important parameter in researching the evolution of shock-to-detonation waves in EE and for numerical simulation of EE detonation.In this paper,the shock Hugoniot relation of unreacted EE is determined by a new experimental system and good results have been gotten.

  7. Interaction between measurement time and observed Hugoniot cusp due to chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, S. D.; Brown, K. E.; Bolme, C. A.; Moore, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry occurring on picosecond timescales can be observed through ultrafast laser shock drive experiments that measure Hugoniot data and transient absorption. The shock stress needed to induce chemical reactions on picosecond time scales is significantly larger than the stress needed to induce reactions on nanosecond time scales typical of gas gun and explosively driven plate impact experiments. This discrepancy is consistent with the explanation that increased shock stress leads to increased temperature, which drives thermally activated processes at a faster rate. While the data are qualitatively consistent with the interpretation of thermally dominated reactions, they are not a critical test of this interpretation. In this paper, we review data from several shocked liquids that illustrate a Hugoniot cusp due to volume changing reactions that occurs at higher shock stress states in picosecond experiments than in nanosecond to microsecond experiments. We also correlate the observed Hugoniot cusp states with transient absorption changes that occur due to the buildup of reaction products.

  8. Equation-of-state model for shock compression of hot dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, J C

    2007-01-01

    A quantum equation-of-state model is presented and applied to the calculation of high-pressure shock Hugoniot curves beyond the asymptotic fourfold density, close to the maximum compression where quantum effects play a role. An analytical estimate for the maximum attainable compression is proposed. It gives a good agreement with the equation-of-state model.

  9. An equation of state for polymethylpentene (TPX) including multi-shock response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Tariq D.; Gustavsen, Rick; Sanchez, Nathaniel; Bartram, Brian D.

    2012-03-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of polymethylpentene (TPX) is examined through both single shock Hugoniot data as well as more recent multi-shock compression and release experiments. Results from the recent multi-shock experiments on LANL's two-stage gas gun will be presented. A simple conservative Lagrangian numerical scheme utilizing total variation diminishing interpolation and an approximate Riemann solver will be presented as well as the methodology of calibration. It is shown that a simple Mie-Grüneisen EOS based on a Keane fitting form for the isentrope can replicate both the single shock and multi-shock experiments.

  10. The multicomponent self-consistent Ornstein—Zernike application for CO2, N2, O2 shock Hugoniots simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeev, A. A.; Bogdanova, Yu A.; Gubin, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    A multicomponent equation of state with wide range of applicability is required to simulate shock waves in CxNyOz mixtures. This problem demands fine molecular interaction model due to competition between repulsion and attraction forces during shock compression process. A self-consistent Ornstein-Zernike application (SCOZA) based on distribution function integral equation theory can be used for it. The hypernetted-chain/soft core mean spherical approximation (HMSA) for SCOZA has been successfully applied to dense fluid systems with ambidextrous interactions. However, it was not designed to simulate mixtures, such as shock products of CxNyOz system. The convenient way to simulate multicomponent systems is the van der Waals one-fluid model (vdWlf). It has been shown, that vdWlf is not good enough for CO2 shock products at pressures higher, than 50 GPa. The multicomponent HMSA closure application based on partial version of the virial theorem has been offered in this paper. It is verified by molecular Monte-Carlo simulation at pressures up to 160 GPa with accuracy about 1-2%.

  11. Developing absolute shock wave equation of state measurements on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, Peter; Fratanduono, D. E.; Lazicki, A.; London, R. A.; Brygoo, S.; Swift, D. C.; Coppari, F.; Millot, M.; Peterson, J. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Erskine, D. J.; Ali, S.; Collins, G. W.

    2016-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility provides an unprecedented capability to generate ultra-high pressure planar shock waves (around 10 TPa) in solid samples. We are currently fielding impedance match equation of state (EOS) experiments to determine the shock Hugoniot of various samples relative to EOS standards, such as aluminum and quartz. However, the equations of state of the standards at multi-TPa shock pressures are not yet well-established. Absolute techniques are needed to provide the data needed to establish the Hugoniots of the standards, and also to measure the state of a sample directly. We are pursuing several approaches using absolute techniques. These approaches will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Laser Driven Compression Equations of State and Hugoniot Pressure Measurements in Thick Solid Metallic Targets at ˜0.17-13 TW/cm2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remo, John L.

    2010-10-01

    An electro-optic laser probe was developed to obtain parameters for high energy density equations of state (EoS), Hugoniot pressures (PH), and strain rates for high energy density laser irradiation intensity, I, experiments at ˜170 GW/cm2 (λ = 1064 nm) to ˜13 TW/cm2 (λ = 527 nm) on Al, Cu, Ti, Fe, Ni metal targets in a vacuum. At I ˜7 TW/cm2 front surface plasma pressures and temperatures reached 100's GPa and over two million K. Rear surface PH ranged from 7-120 GPa at average shock wave transit velocities 4.2-8.5 km/s, depending on target thickness and I. A surface plasma compression ˜100's GPa generated an impulsive radial expanding shock wave causing compression, rarefactions, and surface elastic and plastic deformations depending on I. A laser/fiber optic system measured rear surface shock wave emergence and particle velocity with ˜3 GHz resolution by monitoring light deflection from diamond polished rear surfaces of malleable metallic targets, analogous to an atomic force microscope. Target thickness, ˜0.5-2.9 mm, prevented front surface laser irradiation penetration, due to low radiation skin depth, from altering rear surface reflectivity (refractive index). At ˜10 TW electromagnetic plasma pulse noise generated from the target chamber overwhelmed detector signals. Pulse frequency analysis using Moebius loop antennae probed transient noise characteristics. Average shock (compression) and particle (rear surface displacement) velocity measurements determined rear surface PH and GPa) EoS that are compared with gas guns.

  13. Shock Initiation and Equation of State of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, David; Sheffield, Steve; Dattelbaum, Dana; Chellappa, Raja; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is a widely used fertilizer and mining explosive commonly found in ammonium nitrate-fuel oil. Neat AN is a non-ideal explosive with measured detonation velocities approaching 4 km/s. Previously, we reported a thermodynamically-complete equation of state for AN based on its maximum density, and showed that near-full density AN did not initiate when subjected to shock input conditions up to 22 GPa. In this work, we extend these initial results, by presenting new Hugoniot data for intermediate density neat AN obtained from gas gun-driven plate impact experiments. AN at densities from 1.8 to 1.5 g/cm3 were impacted into LiF windows using a two-stage light gas gun. Dual VISARs were used to measure the interfacial particle velocity wave profile as a function of time following impact. The new Hugoniot data, in addition to updates to thermodynamic parameters derived from structural analysis and vibrational spectroscopy measurements in high pressure diamond anvil cell experiments, are used to refine the unreacted EOS for AN. Furthermore, shock initiation of neat AN was observed as the initial porosity increased (density decreased). Insights into the relationship(s) between initial density and shock initiation sensitivity are also presented, from evidence of shock initiation in the particle velocity profiles obtained for the lower density AN samples.

  14. Hugoniot based equation of state for solid polyurea and polyurea aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, A. H.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Aslam, T. D.; Bartram, B. D.

    2017-01-01

    The shock response of solid polyurea and two polyurea aerogels were studied using gas-gun driven plate impact experiments. The materials reported on here are commercially available, brand named AIRLOY, and supplied by Aerogel Technologies, LLC. Polyurea Solid, with nominal density 1.13 g/cm3, and two aerogels, with nominal densities of 0.20 and 0.35 g/cm3, were studied. Most experiments were of the multi-slug type in which a sample of each density was mounted on an oxygen free high conductivity copper or 6061 aluminum baseplate. In these experiments, shock velocity was measured and other shock states calculated by the impedance matching technique. Peak particle velocity obtained in the 0.2 g/cm3 aerogel was > 4.3 km/s, and peak pressure in the solid was > 29 GPa. A break in the data for the solid above particle velocities of 2.0 km/s (˜ 18 GPa) indicates a probable reaction with higher density products. A P - α model with Mie-Grueneisen form for the solid reasonably replicates the data.

  15. An equation of state for polyurea aerogel based on multi-shock response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, T. D.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Bartram, B. D.

    2014-05-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of polyurea aerogel (PUA) is examined through both single shock Hugoniot data as well as more recent multi-shock compression experiments performed on the LANL 2-stage gas gun. A simple conservative Lagrangian numerical scheme, utilizing total variation diminishing (TVD) interpolation and an approximate Riemann solver, will be presented as well as the methodology of calibration. It will been demonstrated that a p-a model based on a Mie-Gruneisen fitting form for the solid material can reasonably replicate multi-shock compression response at a variety of initial densities; such a methodology will be presented for a commercially available polyurea aerogel.

  16. Phase Transitions of MgO Along the Hugoniot (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, S.; Shulenburger, L.; Lemke, R. W.; Cochrane, K. R.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of terrestrial planets and planetary structure has become of great interest because of recent exoplanet discoveries of super earths. MgO is a major constituent of Earth's mantle, the rocky cores of gas giants such as Jupiter, and likely constitutes the interiors of many exoplanets. The high pressure - high temperature behavior of MgO directly affects equation of state models for planetary structure and formation. In this work, we examine single crystal MgO under shock compression utilizing experimental and density functional theory (DFT) methods to determine phase transformations along the Hugoniot. We perform plate impact experiments using Sandia's Z - facility on MgO up to 11.6 Mbar. The plate impact experiments generate highly accurate Hugoniot state data. The experimental results show the B1 - B2 solid - solid phase transition occurs near 4 Mbar on the Hugoniot. The solid - liquid transition is determined to be near 7 Mbar with a large region of B2-liquid coexistence. Using DFT methods, we also determine melt along the B1 and B2 solid phase boundaries as well as along the Hugoniot. The combined experimental and DFT results have determined the phase boundaries along the Hugoniot, which can be implemented into new planetary and EOS models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. The Hugoniot and chemistry of ablator plastic below 100 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, M. C.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Chau, R.

    2016-01-01

    The equation of state of glow discharge polymer (GDP) was measured to high precision using the two-stage light gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at pressures up to 70 GPa. Both absolute measurements and impedance matching techniques were used to determine the principal and secondary Hugoniots. GDP likely reacts at about 30 GPa, demonstrated by specific emission at 450 nm coupled with changes to the Hugoniot and reshock points. As a result of these reactions, the shock pressure in GDP evolves in time, leading to a possible decrease in pressure as compression increases, or negative compressibility, and causing complex pressure profiles within the plastic. Velocity wave profile variation was observed as a function of position on each shot, suggesting some internal variation of GDP may be present, which would be consistent with previous observations. The complex temporal and possibly structural evolution of GDP under shock compression suggests that calculations of compression and pressure based upon bulk or mean measurements may lead to artificially low pressures and high compressions. Evidence for this includes a large shift in calculating reshock pressures based on the reflected Hugoniot. These changes also suggest other degradation mechanisms for inertial confinement fusion implosions.

  18. Hugoniot curve calculation of nitromethane decomposition mixtures:A reactive force field molecular dynamics approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭峰; 张红; 胡海泉; 程新路; 张利燕

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the Hugoniot curve, shock–particle velocity relations, and Chapman–Jouguet conditions of the hot dense system through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The detailed pathways from crystal nitromethane to reacted state by shock compression are simulated. The phase transition of N2 and CO mixture is found at about 10 GPa, and the main reason is that the dissociation of the C–O bond and the formation of C–C bond start at 10.0–11.0 GPa. The unreacted state simulations of nitromethane are consistent with shock Hugoniot data. The complete pathway from unreacted to reacted state is discussed. Through chemical species analysis, we find that the C–N bond breaking is the main event of the shock-induced nitromethane decomposition.

  19. Hugoniot measurements at near Gbar pressures at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritcher, Andrea; Swift, Damian; Doeppner, Tilo; Collins, Gilbert; Bachmann, Benjamin; Nilsen, Joe; Chapman, Dave; Correa, Alfredo; Sterne, Phil; Benedict, Lorin; Gaffney, Jim; Kraus, Dominik; Falcone, Roger; Glenzer, Siegfried; Rothman, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory measurements of the Equation of State (EOS) of matter at high pressure are of great importance in the understanding and accurate modeling of matter at extreme conditions. For example, at hundreds of Mbars - Gbar pressures atomic shell effects may come into play, which can change the predicted compressibility at given pressure due to pressure and temperature ionization. In this work we present measurements of the strong shock hugoniot, at pressures up to 720 Mbar for CH and 630 Mbar for High Density Carbon (HDC, or diamond) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Spherically convergent shocks are launched into solid CH or diamond samples, using a hohlraum radiation drive. X-ray radiography is applied to measure the shock speed and infer the mass density profile, enabling determining of the shock pressure and Hugoniot equation of state. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. Supported by LDRD 08-ERI-003.

  20. High precision Hugoniot measurements of D2 near maximum compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benage, John; Knudson, Marcus; Desjarlais, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The Hugoniot response of liquid deuterium has been widely studied due to its general importance and to the significant discrepancy in the inferred shock response obtained from early experiments. With improvements in dynamic compression platforms and experimental standards these results have converged and show general agreement with several equation of state (EOS) models, including quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) calculations within the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA). This approach to modeling the EOS has also proven quite successful for other materials and is rapidly becoming a standard approach. However, small differences remain among predictions obtained using different local and semi-local density functionals; these small differences show up in the deuterium Hugoniot at ~ 30-40 GPa near the region of maximum compression. Here we present experimental results focusing on that region of the Hugoniot and take advantage of advancements in the platform and standards, resulting in data with significantly higher precision than that obtained in previous studies. These new data may prove to distinguish between the subtle differences predicted by the various density functionals. Results of these experiments will be presented along with comparison to various QMD calculations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Analytical Method to Evaluate Hugoniot of Metallic Materials with Different Initial Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-Song; LAN Qiang; HU Jian-Bo; WU Jing; DAI Cheng-Da

    2008-01-01

    @@ An analytical method is proposed to evaluate the Hugoniot parameters of preheated metallic materials by relating to its principal Hugoniot.Modelling calculations for 1100 AI, Cu and Ta show that the preheating lowers to a certain extent the shock impedance and the degree of lowering the shock impedance increases with increasing pre-heating temperature.The Hugoniots of 6061-T6 AI and TC4 preheated flyers at known preheating temperatures are evaluated, and are utilized to calculate the particle velocity and shock pressure using the impedance-match method based on the measured shock wave velocity and impact velocity reported in Z pinch-driven and threestage gun-driven Hugoniot experiments.The presented method allows a reasonable evaluation for Hugoniot of the preheated metallic flyers.

  2. Equation of state of Mo from shock compression experiments on preheated samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2017-03-01

    We present a reanalysis of reported Hugoniot data for Mo, including both experiments shocked from ambient temperature (T) and those preheated to 1673 K, using the most general methods of least-squares fitting to constrain the Grüneisen model. This updated Mie-Grüneisen equation of state (EOS) is used to construct a family of maximum likelihood Hugoniots of Mo from initial temperatures of 298 to 2350 K and a parameterization valid over this range. We adopted a single linear function at each initial temperature over the entire range of particle velocities considered. Total uncertainties of all the EOS parameters and correlation coefficients for these uncertainties are given. The improved predictive capabilities of our EOS for Mo are confirmed by (1) better agreement between calculated bulk sound speeds and published measurements along the principal Hugoniot, (2) good agreement between our Grüneisen data and three reported high-pressure γ ( V ) functions obtained from shock-compression of porous samples, and (3) very good agreement between our 1 bar Grüneisen values and γ ( T ) at ambient pressure recalculated from reported experimental data on the adiabatic bulk modulus K s ( T ) . Our analysis shows that an EOS constructed from shock compression data allows a much more accurate prediction of γ ( T ) values at 1 bar than those based on static compression measurements or first-principles calculations. Published calibrations of the Mie-Grüneisen EOS for Mo using static compression measurements only do not reproduce even low-pressure asymptotic values of γ ( T ) at 1 bar, where the most accurate experimental data are available.

  3. The Hugoniot and chemistry of ablator plastic below 100 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akin, M. C., E-mail: akin1@llnl.gov; Fratanduono, D. E.; Chau, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    The equation of state of glow discharge polymer (GDP) was measured to high precision using the two-stage light gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at pressures up to 70 GPa. Both absolute measurements and impedance matching techniques were used to determine the principal and secondary Hugoniots. GDP likely reacts at about 30 GPa, demonstrated by specific emission at 450 nm coupled with changes to the Hugoniot and reshock points. As a result of these reactions, the shock pressure in GDP evolves in time, leading to a possible decrease in pressure as compression increases, or negative compressibility, and causing complex pressure profiles within the plastic. Velocity wave profile variation was observed as a function of position on each shot, suggesting some internal variation of GDP may be present, which would be consistent with previous observations. The complex temporal and possibly structural evolution of GDP under shock compression suggests that calculations of compression and pressure based upon bulk or mean measurements may lead to artificially low pressures and high compressions. Evidence for this includes a large shift in calculating reshock pressures based on the reflected Hugoniot. These changes also suggest other degradation mechanisms for inertial confinement fusion implosions.

  4. A Molecular Dynamics simulation of Hugoniot curves of HMX using ReaxFF and its application in SPH modeling of macroscale terminal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gui-Rong; Wang, Gangyu; Peng, Qing; de, Suvranu

    2015-06-01

    HMX is a widely used high explosive. Hugoniot curve is a valuable tool for analyzing the equations of state, and is of importance for all energetic materials including HMX. The Hugoniot curves serve as one of the key character in continuum modeling of high explosives. It can be obtained from experimental measurements, and recently also from computational studies. In this study, the Hugoniot curve of HMX is calculated using a multi-scale shock technique via Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, where the reactive force field ReaxFF is obtained from Quantum Mechanics calculations and tailored for HMX. It is found that our MD Hugoniot curve of HMX from the optimized ReaxFF potential agree well with experiments. The MD Hugoniot curve of HMX is also incorporated in our in-house Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code for the modeling of the macro-scale explosive behaviors of HMX explosives and HMX cased in a 3D cylinder. The authors would like to acknowledge the generous financial support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Grant HDTRA1-13-1-0025.

  5. Unreacted Equations of State of Shocked Single Crystal PETN and Beta-HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaug, Joseph; Armstrong, Michael; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Ferranti, Louis; Bastea, Sorin; Fried, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    We report results from ultrafast shockwave experiments conducted on single crystal high explosives. Ultrafast shock studies can enable high throughput characterizations of unreacted equations of state to higher pressures than previously reported and also quantify the magnitude of anisotropic mechanical response to shock waves. Our ultrafast results yield -as of this writing- [110] PETN data up to a pressure of 26 GPa, which is 1.6x higher than published mid-scale gun results. Published HMX shock data are strikingly sparse; seven points up to approximately 10 GPa are reported from shocked solvent-pressed beta-HMX and Robert Craig reported three single crystal points (undisclosed crystal orientation) between 34 and 42 GPa. Two nonhydrostatic cold-compression diamond-anvil cell studies, u-Raman + u-XRD, and u-Raman + deflagration rates, report a transition in HMX, possibly shear induced, beginning at 26-27 GPa. A previously posed question is whether Craig's data are affected by this transition. ∖pard An analysis of our results for [010] beta-HMX indicate it is less compressible than portrayed by the commonly accepted Hugoniot, which is based on a parameterized third-order Birch-Murnaghan model EoS using the ten before mentioned shock wave measurements and the more recent cold-compression u-XRD study by Yoo et al. Work performed by the U.S. Department of Energy jointly by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Shock wave equation of state experiments at multi-TPa pressures on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, P. M.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Peterson, J. L.; Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Braun, D. G.; Millot, M.; Fry, J.; Boehm, K. J.; Sterne, P. A.; Collins, G. W.; Nikroo, A.; Fitzsimmons, P.

    2015-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility provides an unprecedented capability to generate steady, planar, ultra-high pressure shock waves (up to 10 TPa or more) in solid samples. Building on successful laser shock equation of state experiments performed on a variety of other laser facilities, we have designed and fielded experiments to perform impedance match experiments on samples of C, Be, SiO2 and CH, in the range of 3 to 7 TPa. The experiments use a line-imaging VISAR as the primary diagnostic to measure the shock velocity in an Al reference standard and in an array of the four samples. Initial tests with the line-imaging VISAR show that the NIF is capable of driving shocks that are steady to better than 2% in velocity for several ns, with smooth planar breakout patterns over a 2 mm diameter spot. Hugoniot data points will be compared to current equation-of-state models for the various materials under study. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Probing off-Hugoniot states in Ta, Cu, and Al to 1000 GPa compression with magnetically driven liner implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemke, R. W., E-mail: rwlemke@sandia.gov; Dolan, D. H.; Dalton, D. G.; Brown, J. L.; Robertson, G. R.; Harding, E.; Mattsson, A. E.; Carpenter, J. H.; Drake, R. R.; Cochrane, K.; Robinson, A. C.; Mattsson, T. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1189 (United States); Tomlinson, K.; Blue, B. E. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Knudson, M. D. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1189 (United States); Institute for Shock Physics and Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    We report on a new technique for obtaining off-Hugoniot pressure vs. density data for solid metals compressed to extreme pressure by a magnetically driven liner implosion on the Z-machine (Z) at Sandia National Laboratories. In our experiments, the liner comprises inner and outer metal tubes. The inner tube is composed of a sample material (e.g., Ta and Cu) whose compressed state is to be inferred. The outer tube is composed of Al and serves as the current carrying cathode. Another aluminum liner at much larger radius serves as the anode. A shaped current pulse quasi-isentropically compresses the sample as it implodes. The iterative method used to infer pressure vs. density requires two velocity measurements. Photonic Doppler velocimetry probes measure the implosion velocity of the free (inner) surface of the sample material and the explosion velocity of the anode free (outer) surface. These two velocities are used in conjunction with magnetohydrodynamic simulation and mathematical optimization to obtain the current driving the liner implosion, and to infer pressure and density in the sample through maximum compression. This new equation of state calibration technique is illustrated using a simulated experiment with a Cu sample. Monte Carlo uncertainty quantification of synthetic data establishes convergence criteria for experiments. Results are presented from experiments with Al/Ta, Al/Cu, and Al liners. Symmetric liner implosion with quasi-isentropic compression to peak pressure ∼1000 GPa is achieved in all cases. These experiments exhibit unexpectedly softer behavior above 200 GPa, which we conjecture is related to differences in the actual and modeled properties of aluminum.

  8. Shock compression response of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) plastic to 985 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Root, Seth, E-mail: sroot@sandia.gov; Mattsson, Thomas R.; Cochrane, Kyle; Lemke, Raymond W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87125 (United States); Knudson, Marcus D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87125 (United States); Institute for Shock Physics and Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    Poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) plastic (PMP) is a hydrocarbon polymer with potential applications to inertial confinement fusion experiments and as a Hugoniot impedance matching standard for equation of state experiments. Using Sandia's Z-machine, we performed a series of flyer plate experiments to measure the principal Hugoniot and reshock states of PMP up to 985 GPa. The principal Hugoniot measurements validate density functional theory (DFT) calculations along the Hugoniot. The DFT calculations are further analyzed using a bond tracking method to understand the dissociation pathway under shock compression. Complete dissociation occurs at a compression factor similar to other sp3-hybridized, C-C bonded systems, which suggests a limiting compression for C-C bonds. The combined experimental and DFT results provide a solid basis for constructing an equation of state model for PMP.

  9. The Hugoniot Elastic Limit Decay Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, J. P.

    1997-07-01

    The Hugoniot Elastic Limit(HEL) precursor decay in shock loaded solids has been the subject of considerable experimental and theoretical investigation. Comparative evidence is presented to show that the elastic precursor wave particle velocity, UPHEL, for certain materials decays asymptotically with propagation distance to the DeBroglie velocity, V1, level. This is demonstrated for the following materials: iron, aluminum alloy 6061-T6, plexiglas(PMMA), nickel alloy(MAR-M200), and lithium flouride(LiF). The DeBroglie velocity, V1, equals h/2md, where h is Planck's Constant, m is the mass of one atom, and d is the closest distance between atoms. Thus a relationship has been established between a microscopically derived velocity, V1, and a macroscopically observed velocity, UPHEL.

  10. Dissociation along the principal Hugoniot of the Laser Mégajoule ablator material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin-Lalu, P.; Recoules, V.; Salin, G.; Plisson, T.; Brambrink, E.; Vinci, T.; Bolis, R.; Huser, G.

    2016-08-01

    Glow discharge polymer hydrocarbon (GDP-CH) is used as the ablator material in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules for the Laser Mégajoule and National Ignition Facility. Due to its fabrication process, GDP-CH chemical composition and structure differ from commercially available plastics and detailed knowledge of its properties in the warm dense matter regime is needed to achieve accurate design of ICF capsules. First-principles ab initio simulations of the GDP-CH principal Hugoniot up to 8 Mbar were performed using the quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) code abinit and showed that atomic bond dissociation has an effect on the compressibility. Results from these simulations are used to parametrize a quantum semiempirical model in order to generate a tabulated equation of state that includes dissociation. Hugoniot measurements obtained from an experiment conducted at the LULI2000 laser facility confirm QMD simulations as well as EOS modeling. We conclude by showing the EOS model influence on shock timing in a hydrodynamic simulation.

  11. The Hugoniot and Strength of Ultem 1000 Polyetherimide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Christopher; Chhabildas, Lalit

    2015-06-01

    Parallel-plate impact studies using a single stage powder gun have been performed to investigate the shock and subsequent release behavior of the commercial polyetherimide polymer Ultem™ up to 14 GPa. Two different types of setups were used to observe both the shock and unloading behavior. In one setup, the unloading was continuously tracked, and in the other the unloading was inferred from observing stress wave reverberations in a metallic plate on the sample. The results from the two methods concerning the loading behavior agreed very well and the resulting Hugoniot was found to be US = 2.42 + 1.601*UP. This study also demonstrated that the metallic plate reverberation method of following the unloading response, though not observing the continuous unloading of the sample, agrees extremely well with the unloading response recorded using continuous data obtained using interferometry windows. The results are used to build a case that the strength τ of Ultem when shock loaded to 1-8 GPa is ~0.05 GPa. Furthermore, an investigation of the ratio of the release wave velocity to the shock wave velocity indicates that a transition to bulk liquid (no strength) behavior is not achieved until Hugoniot strains exceed 0.35 for amorphous polymers such as Ultem.

  12. Shock-wave strength properties of boron carbide and silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.

    1994-02-01

    Time-resolved velocity interferometry measurements have been made on boron carbide and silicon carbide ceramics to assess dynamic equation-of-state and strength properties of these materials. Hugoniot pecursor characteristics, and post-yield shock and release wave properties, indicated markedly different dynamic strength and flow behavior for the two carbides.

  13. Shock State of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M.; Nishiizumi, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Chan, Q. H. S.; Martinez, J.; Caffee, M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the fundamental aspects of any astromaterial is its shock history, since this factor elucidates critical historical events, and also because shock metamorphism can alter primary mineralogical and petrographic features, and reset chronologies.

  14. Measuring the properties of shock released Quartz and Parylene-N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawreliak, James; Karasik, Max; Oh, Jaechul; Aglitskiy, Yefim

    2016-10-01

    The high pressure and temperature properties of Quartz and hydrocarbons are important to high energy density (HED) research and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) science. The bulk of HED material research studies the single shock Hugoniot. Here, we present experimental results from the NIKE laser where quartz and parylene-N are shock compressed to high pressure and temperature and the release state is measured through x-ray imaging. The shock state is characterized by shock front velocity measurements using VISAR and the release state is characterized by using side-on streaked x-ray radiography.

  15. Hugoniot model for Si from L140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitley, H. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wu, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-20

    In this document, we provide the Hugoniot for silicon from LEOS table L140. The Hugoniot pressures are supplied for temperatures between 298.0 and 1:16 109 Kelvin and densities of 2.329 and 10.07 g/cc. This EOS model was developed by the quotidian EOS methodology, which is a widely used and robust method for producing tabular EOS data.[1, 2] Table 1 lists the included quantities and units of those data.

  16. Shock and Release Response of Unreacted Epon 828: Shot 2s-905

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisa, Matthew Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fredenburg, David A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dattelbaum, Dana M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lang, John Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sandoval, Donald Leon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-16

    This document summarizes the shock and release response of Epon 828 measured in the dynamic impact experiment 2s-905. Experimentally, a thin Kel-F impactor backed by a low impedance foam impacted an Epon 828 target with embedded electromagnetic gauges. Computationally, a one dimensional simulation of the impact event was performed, and tracer particles were located at the corresponding electromagnetic gauge locations. The experimental configuration was such that the Epon 828 target was initially shocked, and then allowed to release from the high-pressure state. Comparisons of the experimental gauge and computational tracer data were made to assess the performance of equation of state (EOS) 7603, a SESAME EOS for Epon 828, on and off the principal shock Hugoniot. Results indicate that while EOS 7603 can capture the Hugoniot response to better that 1%, while the sound speeds at pressure are under-predicted by 6 - 7%.

  17. Measuring Hugoniot, reshock and release properties of natural snow and simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, M.D.; Boslough, M.B.

    1996-02-01

    We describe methods for measuring dynamical properties for underdense materials (e.g. snow) over a stress range of roughly 0. 1 - 4 GPa. Particular material properties measured by the present methods include Hugoniot states, reshock states and release paths. The underdense materials may pose three primary experimental difficulties. Snow in particular is perishable; it can melt or sublime during storage, preparation and testing. Many of these materials are brittle and crushable; they cannot withstand such treatment as traditional machining or launch in a gun system. Finally, with increasing porosity the calculated Hugoniot density becomes rapidly more sensitive to errors in wave time-of-arrival measurements. A family of 36 impact tests was conducted on snow and six proposed snow simulants at Sandia, yielding reliable Hugoniot states, somewhat less reliable reshock 3 states, and limited release property information. Natural snow of density {approximately}0.5 gm/cm{sup 3}, a lightweight concrete of density {approximately}0.7 gm/cm{sup 3} and a {open_quotes}snow-matching grout{close_quotes} of density {approximately}0.28 gm/cm 3 were the subjects of the majority of the tests. Hydrocode calculations using CTH were performed to elucidate sensitivities to edge effects as well as to assess the applicability of SESAME 2-state models to these materials. Simulations modeling snow as porous water provided good agreement for Hugoniot stresses to 1 GPa; a porous ice model was preferred for higher Hugoniot stresses. On the other hand, simulations of tests on snow, lightweight concrete and the snow-matching grout based on (respectively) porous ice, tuff and polyethylene showed a too-stiff response. Other methods for characterizing these materials are discussed. Based on the Hugoniot properties, the snow-matching grout appears to be a better snow simulant than does the lightweight concrete.

  18. Analysis of the Intrinsic Uncertainties in the Laser-Driven Iron Hugoniot Experiment Based on the Measurement of Velocities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan Zhang; Xiao-Xi Duan; Chen Zhang; Hao Liu; Hui-Ge Zhang; Quan-Xi Xue; Qing Ye

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging tasks in the laser-driven Hugoniot experiment is how to increase the reproducibility and precision of the experimental data to meet the stringent requirement in validating equation of state models.In such cases,the contribution of intrinsic uncertainty becomes important and cannot be ignored.A detailed analysis of the intrinsic uncertainty of the aluminum-iron impedance-match experiment based on the measurement of velocities is presented.The influence of mirror-reflection approximation on the shocked pressure of Fe and intrinsic uncertainties from the equation of state uncertainty of standard material are quantified.Furthermore,the comparison of intrinsic uncertainties of four different experimental approaches is presented.It is shown that,compared with other approaches including the most widely used approach which relies on the measurements of the shock velocities of Al and Fe,the approach which relies on the measurement of the particle velocity of Al and the shock velocity of Fe has the smallest intrinsic uncertainty,which would promote such work to significantly improve the diagnostics precision in such an approach.

  19. Shock Compression of Liquid Noble Gases to Multi-Mbar Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth

    2011-10-01

    The high pressure - high temperature behavior of noble gases is of considerable interest because of their use in z-pinch liners for fusion studies and for understanding astrophysical and planetary evolution. However, our understanding of the equation of state (EOS) of the noble gases at extreme conditions is limited. A prime example of this is the liquid xenon Hugoniot. Previous EOS models rapidly diverged on the Hugoniot above 1 Mbar because of differences in the treatment of the electronic contribution to the free energy. Similar divergences are observed for krypton EOS. Combining shock compression experiments and density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we can determine the thermo-physical behavior of matter under extreme conditions. The experimental and DFT results have been instrumental to recent developments in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Shock compression experiments are performed using Sandia's Z-Accelerator to determine the Hugoniot of liquid xenon and krypton in the Mbar regime. Under strong pressure, krypton and xenon undergo an insulator to metal transition. In the metallic state, the shock front becomes reflective allowing for a direct measurement of the sample's shock velocity using laser interferometry. The Hugoniot state is determined using a Monte Carlo analysis method that accounts for systematic error in the standards and for correlations. DFT simulations at these extreme conditions show good agreement with the experimental data - demonstrating the attention to detail required for dealing with elements with relativistic core states and d-state electrons. The results from shock compression experiments and DFT simulations are presented for liquid xenon to 840 GPa and for liquid krypton to 800 GPa, decidedly increasing the range of known behavior of both gases. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company

  20. Equation of state of laser-shocked compressed iron; Equation d'etat du fer comprime par choc laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huser, G

    2004-01-01

    This thesis enters the field of highly compressed materials equation of state studies. In particular, it focuses on the case of laser shock compressed iron. This work indeed aims at getting to the conditions of the earth's core, comprising a solid inner core and a liquid outer core. The understanding of phenomena governing the core's thermodynamics and the geodynamic process requires the knowledge of iron melting line locus around the solid-liquid interface at 3.3 Mbar. Several experiments were performed to that extent. First, an absolute measurement of iron Hugoniot was obtained. Following is a study of partially released states of iron into a window material: lithium fluoride (LiF). This configuration enables direct access to compressed iron optical properties such as reflectivity and self-emission. Interface velocity measurement is dominated by compressed LiF optical properties and is used as a pressure gauge. Using a dual wavelength reflectivity diagnostic, compressed iron electrical conductivity was estimated and found to be in good agreement with previous results found in geophysics literature. Self-emission diagnostic was used to measure temperature of partially released iron and revealed a solid-liquid phase transition at Mbar pressures. (author)

  1. Downstream plasma parameters in laminar shocks from ion kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedalin, M.

    2016-10-01

    Ion dynamics in oblique shocks is governed by the macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of the shock front. In laminar shocks, these fields are time-independent and depend only on the coordinate along the shock normal. The shock ramp is narrow and the ion motion across the shock is manifestly non-adiabatic. The ion distribution just behind the ramp is significantly non-gyrotropic. Gyrotropy is achieved well behind the ramp mainly due to the gyrophase mixing. The asymptotic values of the ion density and temperature are determined by the eventual collisionless relaxation of the gyrating ion distribution. Given a distribution at the downstream edge of the ramp, the moments of the distribution after gyrophase mixing are derived using proper spatial averaging. The obtained expressions can be used for independent determination of the downstream plasma state and implementation in Rankine-Hugoniot relations.

  2. Stress and temperature distributions of individual particles in a shock wave propagating through dry and wet sand mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Merit G.; Kennedy, Gregory; Thadhani, Naresh; Hankin, Markos; Stewart, Sarah T.; Borg, John P.

    2017-01-01

    Determining stress and temperature distributions of dynamically compacted particles is of interest to the geophysical and astrological research communities. However, the researcher cannot easily observe particle interactions during a planar shock experiment. By using mesoscale simulations, we can unravel granular particle interactions. Unlike homogenous materials, the averaged Hugoniot state for heterogeneous granular materials differs from the individual stress and temperature states of particles during a shock event. From planar shock experiments for dry and water-saturated Oklahoma sand, we constructed simulations using Sandia National Laboratory code known as CTH and then compared these simulated results to the experimental results. This document compares and presents stress and temperature distributions from simulations, with a discussion on the difference between Hugoniot measurements and distribution peaks for dry and water-saturated sand.

  3. A shock-fitting technique for cell-centered finite volume methods on unstructured dynamic meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Dongyang; Xu, Chunguang; Dong, Haibo; Liu, Jun

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the shock-fitting technique is further developed on unstructured dynamic meshes. The shock wave is fitted and regarded as a special boundary, whose boundary conditions and boundary speed (shock speed) are determined by solving Rankine-Hugoniot relations. The fitted shock splits the entire computational region into subregions, in which the flows are free from shocks and flow states are solved by a shock-capturing code based on arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian algorithm. Along with the motion of the fitted shock, an unstructured dynamic meshes algorithm is used to update the internal node's position to maintain the high quality of computational meshes. The successful applications prove the present shock-fitting to be a valid technique.

  4. Equation of State of Al Based on Quantum Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakov, Dmitry V.; Levashov, Pavel R.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, we present quantum molecular dynamics calculations of the shock Hugoniots of solid and porous samples as well as release isentropes and values of isentropic sound velocity behind the shock front for aluminum. We use the VASP code with an ultrasoft pseudopotential and GGA exchange-correlation functional. Up to 108 particles have been used in calculations. For the Hugoniots of Al we solve the Hugoniot equation numerically. To calculate release isentropes, we use Zel'dovich's approach and integrate an ordinary differential equation for the temperature thus restoring all thermodynamic parameters. Isentropic sound velocity is calculated by differentiation along isentropes. The results of our calculations are in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, quantum molecular dynamics results can be effectively used for verification or calibration of semiempirical equations of state under conditions of lack of experimental information at high energy densities. This work is supported by RFBR, grants 09-08-01129 and 11-08-01225.

  5. First-principle Calculations of Equation of State for Metals at High Energy Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakov, Dmitry; Levashov, Pavel; Khishchenko, Konstantin

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we present quantum molecular dynamics calculations of the shock Hugoniots of solid and porous samples as well as release isentropes and isentropic sound velocity behind the shock front for aluminum. Also we perform similar calculations for nickel and iron. We use the VASP code with ultrasoft and PAW pseudopotentials and GGA exchange-correlation functional. Up to 512 particles have been used in calculations. To calculate Hugoniots we solve the Hugoniot equation numerically. To obtain release isentropes, we use Zel'dovich's approach and integrate an ordinary differential equation for the temperature thus restoring all thermodynamic parameters. Isentropic sound velocity is calculated by differentiation of pressure along isentropes. The results of our calculations are in good agreement with experimental data at densities both higher and lower than the normal one. Thus, quantum molecular dynamics results can be effectively used for verification or calibration of semiempirical equations of state under conditions of lack of experimental information at high energy densities.

  6. Absolute Hugoniot measurements for CH foams in the 1.5-8 Mbar range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Velikovich, A. L.; Schmitt, A. J.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    We report the absolute Hugoniot measurements for dry CH foams at 10% of solid polystyrene density. The 400 μm thick, 500 μm wide planar foam slabs covered with a 10 μm solid plastic ablator were driven with 4 ns long Nike KrF laser pulses whose intensity was varied between 10 and 50 TW/cm2. The trajectories of the shock front and the ablative piston, as well as the rarefaction fan emerging after the shock breakout from the rear surface of the target were clearly observed using the side-on monochromatic x-ray imaging radiography. From these measurements the shock density compression ratio and the shock pressure are evaluated directly. The observed compression ratios varied between 4 and 8, and the corresponding shock pressures - between 1.5 and 8 Mbar. The data was simulated with the FASTRAD3D hydrocode, using standard models of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption, flux-limited thermal conduction, and multi-group radiation diffusion. The demonstrated diagnostics technique applied in a cryo experiment would make it possible to make the first absolute Hugoniot measurements for liquid deuterium or DT-wetted CH foams, which is relevant for designing the wetted-foam indirect-drive ignition targets for NIF. This work was supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  7. Evaluation and management of shock States: hypovolemic, distributive, and cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moranville, Michael P; Mieure, Katherine D; Santayana, Elena M

    2011-02-01

    Shock states have multiple etiologies, but all result in hypoperfusion to vital organs, which can lead to organ failure and death if not quickly and appropriately managed. Pharmacists should be familiar with cardiogenic, distributive, and hypovolemic shock and should be involved in providing safe and effective medical therapies. An accurate diagnosis is necessary to initiate appropriate lifesaving interventions and target therapeutic goals specific to the type of shock. Clinical signs and symptoms, as well as hemodynamic data, help with initial assessment and continued monitoring to provide adequate support for the patient. It is necessary to understand these hemodynamic parameters, medication mechanisms of action, and available mechanical support when developing a patient-specific treatment plan. Rapid therapeutic intervention has been proven to decrease morbidity and mortality and is crucial to providing the best patient outcomes. Pharmacists can provide their expertise in medication selection, titration, monitoring, and dose adjustment in these critically ill patients. This review will focus on parameters used to assess hemodynamic status, the major causes of shock, pathophysiologic factors that cause shock, and therapeutic interventions that should be employed to improve patient outcomes.

  8. PartialLy Shock-Transformed Olivine in Shocked Chondrites: Mechanisms of Solid-State Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, T. G.; Xie, Z.

    2007-12-01

    High-pressure minerals, produced by shock meta-morphism, are common in and around melt veins in highly shocked chondrites. These minerals either crys-tallized from silicate melt in the shock-vein or formed by solid- state transformation of host-rock fragments entrained in the melt or along shock-vein margins. Olivine- ringwoodite transformation kinetics can be used to constrain shock duration if one knows P-T conditions and transformation mechanisms. Here we examine the solid-state transformation of olivine to ringwoodite and the formation of ringwoodite lamellae in Tenham. Partially transformed olivines show a variety of ringwoodite textures. Some have granular textures whereas others have straight or curved ringwoodite lamellae, made up of distinct (1 to 2 ?m) crystals. Many of these polycrystalline ringwoodite lamellae occur in pairs. Where these paired lamellae cross the are offset, suggesting that the lamellae are associated with shearing. Electron diffraction reveals that the ringwoodites in the polycrystalline lamellae, occur in roughly the same crystallographic orientation, defining a lattice-preferred orientation. TEM also shows that the remnant olivine is highly deformed, with high densities of complex dislocations. This olivine has a poorly organized sub-grain structure that grades into polycrystalline olivine. The nearby untransformed olivine is also highly de-formed, but less than the partially transformed olivine. TEM images of complex dislocation and sub-grain microstructures suggests that the transformation of olivine to ringwoodite involves extensive deformation. High densities of dislocations provide potential sites for heterogeneous nucleation of ringwoodite and may enhance Fe-Mg inter-diffusion. The differential stress at the initial stage of the shock results in high strains and local heating. The paired ringwoodite lamellae in olivine appear to result from shearing and possibly shear heating, where nucleation occurs on both sides of a shear

  9. Equation of state measurements in liquid deuterium to 100 GPa

    CERN Document Server

    Knudson, M D; Bailey, J E; Lemke, R W; Hall, C A; Deeney, C; Asay, J R

    2003-01-01

    Using intense magnetic pressure, a method was developed to launch flyer plates to velocities in excess of 20 km s sup - sup 1. This technique was used to perform plate-impact, shock wave experiments on cryogenic liquid deuterium (LD sub 2) to examine its high-pressure equation of state (EOS). Using an impedance matching method, Hugoniot measurements were obtained in the pressure range of 22-100 GPa. The results of these experiments disagree with the previously reported Hugoniot measurements of LD sub 2 in the pressure range above approx 40 GPa, but are in good agreement with first principles, ab initio models for hydrogen and its isotopes.

  10. Off-Hugoniot characterization of alternative inertial confinement fusion ablator materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alastair S.; Prisbrey, Shon; Baker, Kevin L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Fry, Jonathan; Dittrich, Thomas R.; Wu, Kuang-Jen J.; Kervin, Margaret L.; Schoff, Michael E.; Farrell, Mike; Nikroo, Abbas; Hurricane, Omar A.

    2016-05-01

    The ablation material used during the National Ignition Campaign, a glow- discharge polymer (GDP), does not couple as efficiently as simulations indicated to the multiple- shock inducing radiation drive environment created by laser power profile [1]. We investigate the performance of two other ablators, boron carbide (B4C) and high-density carbon (HDC) and compare with GDP under the same hohlraum conditions. Ablation performance is determined through measurement of the shock speed produced in planar samples of the ablator subjected to the identical multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environments that are similar to a generic three-shock ignition drive. Simulations are in better agreement with the off-Hugoniot performance of B4C than either HDC or GDP.

  11. Inferring the equation of state of shocked liquid deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, K.; Murphy, C. D.; Gregori, G.; Regan, S. P.; Radha, P. B.; Boehly, T. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Hu, S. X.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hicks, D. G.

    2010-11-01

    The equation of state of light elements is essential to understanding the structure of Jovian planets. Here we present a combination of experimental techniques used to characterize warm dense deuterium. The OMEGA laser was used to directly drive a shock wave in a planar liquid-deuterium target. The shocked D2 conditions were diagnosed using VISAR and pyrometry to obtain the shock velocity and temperature. Two shock waves were launched with velocities of 17±0.9 and 23±1.0 km/s, as a result of intensity variations in the staggered laser beam drive. Using a blackbody approximation, a temperature of 0.4 to 0.8 eV range was inferred. Various equation of state models including SESAME, PROPACEOS, DFT-MD and Saumon & Chabrier EOS were used to obtain a range pressures (0.4-0.5 Mbar) and densities (0.65-0.88 g/cc). Differences between models will be discussed. Preliminary data from X-ray scattering, providing a direct measurement of microscopic state of the deuterium for extreme conditions not accessible with VISAR, will also be presented.

  12. Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arman, Bedri [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cagin, Tahir [TEXAS A& M UNIV

    2009-01-01

    We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

  13. Equation of State for Shock Compressed Xenon in the Ionization Regime:ab Initio Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王聪; 顾云军; 陈其峰; 贺贤土; 张平

    2012-01-01

    Quantum molecular dynamic (QMD) simulations have been applied to study the thermophysical properties of liquid xenon under dynamic compressions. The equation of state (EOS) obtained from QMD calculations are corrected according to Saha equation, and contributions from atomic ionization, which are of predominance in determining the EOS at high temperature and pressure, are considered. For the pressures below 160 GPa, the necessity in accounting for the atomic ionization has been demonstrated by the Hugoniot curve, which shows excellent agreement with previous experimental measurements, and three levels of ionization have been proved to be sufficient at this stage.

  14. Vibrational energy transfer in shocked molecular crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Joe

    2010-01-07

    We consider the process of establishing thermal equilibrium behind an ideal shock front in molecular crystals and its possible role in initiating chemical reaction at high shock pressures. A new theory of equilibration via multiphonon energy transfer is developed to treat the scattering of shock-induced phonons into internal molecular vibrations. Simple analytic forms are derived for the change in this energy transfer at different Hugoniot end states following shock compression. The total time required for thermal equilibration is found to be an order of magnitude or faster than proposed in previous work; in materials representative of explosive molecular crystals, equilibration is predicted to occur within a few picoseconds following the passage of an ideal shock wave. Recent molecular dynamics calculations are consistent with these time scales. The possibility of defect-induced temperature localization due purely to nonequilibrium phonon processes is studied by means of a simple model of the strain field around an inhomogeneity. The specific case of immobile straight dislocations is studied, and a region of enhanced energy transfer on the order of 5 nm is found. Due to the rapid establishment of thermal equilibrium, these regions are unrelated to the shock sensitivity of a material but may allow temperature localization at high shock pressures. Results also suggest that if any decomposition due to molecular collisions is occurring within the shock front itself, these collisions are not enhanced by any nonequilibrium thermal state.

  15. Shock conditions for hypoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renardy, Michael; Rogers, Robert C.

    1993-10-01

    The equations governing the motion of hypoelastic materials (and related models of non-Newtonian fluids) are not in conservation form. Hence there is no obvious formulation of Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions across a shock. In this paper we demonstrate that a viscosity criterion can be used to obtain meaningful shock conditions. In particular, we discuss shocks of small amplitude. The shock conditions obtained will in general depend on the form of the viscosity term.

  16. Shock Waves in Dense Hard Disk Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Sirmas, Nick; Barahona, Javier; Radulescu, Matei I

    2011-01-01

    Media composed of colliding hard disks (2D) or hard spheres (3D) serve as good approximations for the collective hydrodynamic description of gases, liquids and granular media. In the present study, the compressible hydrodynamics and shock dynamics are studied for a two-dimensional hard-disk medium at both the continuum and discrete particle level descriptions. For the continuum description, closed form analytical expressions for the inviscid hydrodynamic description, shock Hugoniot, isentropic exponent and shock jump conditions were obtained using the Helfand equation of state. The closed-form analytical solutions permitted us to gain physical insight on the role of the material's density on its compressibility, i.e. how the medium compresses under mechanical loadings and sustains wave motion. Furthermore, the predictions were found in excellent agreement with calculations using the Event Driven Molecular Dynamic method involving 30,000 particles over the entire range of compressibility spanning the dilute id...

  17. Shock compression of nitrobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozu, Naoshi; Arai, Mitsuru; Tamura, Masamitsu; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Yoshida, Masatake; Kondo, Ken-Ichi

    1999-06-01

    The Hugoniot (4 - 30 GPa) and the isotherm (1 - 7 GPa) of nitrobenzene have been investigated by shock and static compression experiments. Nitrobenzene has the most basic structure of nitro aromatic compounds, which are widely used as energetic materials, but nitrobenzene has been considered not to explode in spite of the fact its calculated heat of detonation is similar to TNT, about 1 kcal/g. Explosive plane-wave generators and diamond anvil cell were used for shock and static compression, respectively. The obtained Hugoniot consists of two linear lines, and the kink exists around 10 GPa. The upper line agrees well with the Hugoniot of detonation products calculated by KHT code, so it is expected that nitrobenzene detonates in that area. Nitrobenzene solidifies under 1 GPa of static compression, and the isotherm of solid nitrobenzene was obtained by X-ray diffraction technique. Comparing the Hugoniot and the isotherm, nitrobenzene is in liquid phase under experimented shock condition. From the expected phase diagram, shocked nitrobenzene seems to remain metastable liquid in solid phase region on that diagram.

  18. Comparison of Hugoniots calculated for aluminum in the framework of three quantum-statistical models

    CERN Document Server

    Kadatskiy, Maxim A

    2015-01-01

    The results of calculations of thermodynamic properties of aluminum under shock compression in the framework of the Thomas--Fermi model, the Thomas--Fermi model with quantum and exchange corrections and the Hartree--Fock--Slater model are presented. The influences of the thermal motion and the interaction of ions are taken into account in the framework of three models: the ideal gas, the one-component plasma and the charged hard spheres. Calculations are performed in the pressure range from 1 to $10^7$ GPa. Calculated Hugoniots are compared with available experimental data.

  19. Comparison of Hugoniots calculated for aluminum in the framework of three quantum-statistical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadatskiy, M. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of calculations of thermodynamic properties of aluminum under shock compression in the framework of the Thomas-Fermi model, the Thomas-Fermi model with quantum and exchange corrections and the Hartree-Fock-Slater model are presented. The influences of the thermal motion and the interaction of ions are taken into account in the framework of three models: the ideal gas, the one-component plasma and the charged hard spheres. Calculations are performed in the pressure range from 1 to 107 GPa. Calculated Hugoniots are compared with available experimental data.

  20. P-ρ-T measurements of H{sub 2}O up to 260 GPa under laser-driven shock loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, T. [Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sano, T.; Sakawa, Y. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Okuchi, T. [Institute for Study of the Earth’s Interior, Okayama University, Misasa, Tottori 682-0193 (Japan); Sano, T.; Miyanishi, K.; Terai, T.; Kakeshita, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Shimizu, K. [KYOKUGEN, Center for Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-04-28

    Pressure, density, and temperature data for H{sub 2}O were obtained up to 260 GPa by using laser-driven shock compression technique. The shock compression technique combined with the diamond anvil cell was used to assess the equation of state models for the P-ρ-T conditions for both the principal Hugoniot and the off-Hugoniot states. The contrast between the models allowed for a clear assessment of the equation of state models. Our P-ρ-T data totally agree with those of the model based on quantum molecular dynamics calculations. These facts indicate that this model is adopted as the standard for modeling interior structures of Neptune, Uranus, and exoplanets in the liquid phase in the multi-Mbar range.

  1. The Shock and Release Behavior of Diamond Compressed to 25 Mbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, M. C.

    2016-10-01

    The behavior of carbon at high pressure is important to the study of ice giants and white dwarfs, and because diamond is used as an ablator for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The adiabat of an ICF implosion is determined by a series of shocks that transit the ablator and fuel layer. To accurately model an implosion and design ignition targets, both the Hugoniot and the release behavior of the ablator material must be known. We report on experiments on the OMEGA laser that shocked diamond samples up to 25 Mbar, which then released into reference materials with known Hugoniots (quartz, 200-mg/cm3 SiO2 foam, liquid deuterium, and polystyrene). The impedance-matching technique with these reference materials provided data that constrains release models for diamond. This technique is applied to two forms of diamond: single-crystal and ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD); the latter is the NIF ablator material. Models for the release isentropes of both types of diamond will be developed using a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. This study also provided Hugoniot data for UNCD using the impedance-matching technique with a quartz standard. The accuracy of these data was improved by implementing an unsteady wave correction to determine instantaneous shock velocities in the opaque UNCD samples. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Equation of state formulation for unreacted solid high explosive PETN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, K.; Kubota, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a generalized procedure of providing p-v-ɛ equation of state (EOS) is developed based on the hydrostatic compression data with Birch-Murnaghan form of the isotherm. Obtained formula can be used to calculate Grüneisen EOS with arbitrary specific heat as a function of entropy, Cv(S), and arbitrary Grüneisen volume function, γ(v). It is found that different Grüneisen function gives only slight effects on EOS and p-v shock Hugoniot. On the contrary, T-v shock Hugoniot strongly depends on Cv(S) function. Constant Cv(S) gives overestimated high shock temperature TH, while linear Cv(S) gives much lower value, and intermediate function may give appropriate TH values.

  3. Molecular dissociation and shock-induced cooling in fluid nitrogen at high densities and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radousky, H. B.; Nellis, W. J.; Ross, M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    Radiative temperatures and electrical conductivities were measured for fluid nitrogen compressed dynamically to pressures of 18-90 GPa, temperatures of 4000-14,000 K, and densities of 2-3 g/cu cm. The data show a continuous phase transition above 30 GPa shock pressure and confirm that (delta-P/delta-T)v is less than 0, as indicated previously by Hugoniot equation-of-state experiments. The first observation of shock-induced cooling is also reported. The data are interpreted in terms of molecular dissociation, and the concentration of dissociated molecules is calculated as a function of density and temperature.

  4. Equation of state of aluminum-iron oxide-epoxy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jennifer L.; Ferranti, Louis; Austin, Ryan A.; Dick, Richard D.; Foley, Jason R.; Thadhani, Naresh N.; McDowell, David L.; Benson, David J.

    2007-05-01

    We report on the measurements of the shock equation of state (Hugoniot) of an Al/Fe2O3/epoxy composite, prepared by epoxy cast curing of powder mixtures. Explosive loading, with Baratol, trinitrotoluene (TNT), and Octol, was used for performing experiments at higher pressures, in which case shock velocities were measured in the samples and aluminum, copper, or polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) donor material, using piezoelectric pins. The explosive loading of the metal donors (aluminum and copper) will be discussed. Gas gun experiments provide complementary lower pressure data in which piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) stress gauges were used to measure the input and propagated stress wave profiles in the sample and the corresponding shock propagation velocity. The results of the Hugoniot equation of state are compared with mesoscale finite-element simulations, which show good agreement.

  5. Measurements of the principal Hugoniots of dense gaseous deuterium-helium mixtures: Combined multi-channel optical pyrometry, velocity interferometry, and streak optical pyrometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Guo; Chen, Qi-Feng; Gu, Yun-Jun; Zheng, Jun; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2016-10-01

    The accurate hydrodynamic description of an event or system that addresses the equations of state, phase transitions, dissociations, ionizations, and compressions, determines how materials respond to a wide range of physical environments. To understand dense matter behavior in extreme conditions requires the continual development of diagnostic methods for accurate measurements of the physical parameters. Here, we present a comprehensive diagnostic technique that comprises optical pyrometry, velocity interferometry, and time-resolved spectroscopy. This technique was applied to shock compression experiments of dense gaseous deuterium-helium mixtures driven via a two-stage light gas gun. The advantage of this approach lies in providing measurements of multiple physical parameters in a single experiment, such as light radiation histories, particle velocity profiles, and time-resolved spectra, which enables simultaneous measurements of shock velocity, particle velocity, pressure, density, and temperature and expands understanding of dense high pressure shock situations. The combination of multiple diagnostics also allows different experimental observables to be measured and cross-checked. Additionally, it implements an accurate measurement of the principal Hugoniots of deuterium-helium mixtures, which provides a benchmark for the impedance matching measurement technique.

  6. A cold energy mixture theory for the equation of state in solid and porous metal mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. F.; Qiao, L.; Shi, A. S.; Zhang, J.; Guan, Z. W.

    2011-07-01

    Porous or solid multi-component mixtures are ubiquitous in nature and extensively used as industrial materials such as multifunctional energetic structural materials (MESMs), metallic and ceramic powder for shock consolidation, and porous armor materials. In order to analyze the dynamic behavior of a particular solid or porous metal mixture in any given situation, a model is developed to calculate the Hugoniot data for solid or porous mixtures using only static thermodynamic properties of the components. The model applies the cold energy mixture theory to calculate the isotherm of the components to avoid temperature effects on the mixtures. The isobaric contribution from the thermodynamic equation of state is used to describe the porous material Hugoniot. Dynamic shock responses of solid or porous powder mixtures compacted by shock waves have been analyzed based on the mixture theory and Hugoniot for porous materials. The model is tested on both single-component porous materials such as aluminum 2024, copper, and iron; and on multi-component mixtures such as W/Cu, Fe/Ni, and Al/Ni. The theoretical calculations agree well with the corresponding experimental and simulation results. The present model produces satisfactory correlation with the experimentally obtained Hugoniot data for solid porous materials over a wide pressure range.

  7. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Properties of Shocks in Two-Dimensional Yukawa Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciante, M.; Murillo, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Particle-level simulations of shocked plasmas are carried out to examine kinetic properties not captured by hydrodynamic models. In particular, molecular dynamics simulations of 2D Yukawa plasmas with variable couplings and screening lengths are used to examine shock features unique to plasmas, including the presence of dispersive shock structures for weak shocks. A phase-space analysis reveals several kinetic properties, including anisotropic velocity distributions, non-Maxwellian tails, and the presence of fast particles ahead of the shock, even for moderately low Mach numbers. We also examine the thermodynamics (Rankine-Hugoniot relations) of recent experiments [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 015002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.015002] and find no anomalies in their equations of state.

  8. Release Behaviour of Shock Loaded LY12 Aluminium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Min; DAI Lan-Hong; SHEN Le-Tian

    2005-01-01

    @@ By making use of a light gas gun, a specially designed target is impacted by the LY12 flyer, and the pressure is taken in the range of 0.6-3 GPa. Based on the stress profiles measured in the buffer materials by manganese gauges, the Hugoniot curve and release curves of LY12 aluminium alloy are obtained. Meanwhile, the release curves from different initial shocked states are described in both the pressure-particle velocity plane and the pressure-specific volume plane.

  9. Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock can be caused by any condition that reduces blood flow, including: Heart problems (such as heart attack or heart failure ) Low blood volume (as with heavy bleeding or dehydration ) Changes in blood vessels (as with infection ...

  10. Non-equilibrium theory employing enthalpy-based equation of state for binary solid and porous mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B.; Menon, S. V. G.

    2017-04-01

    A generalized enthalpy-based equation of state, which includes thermal electron excitations and non-equilibrium thermal energies, is formulated for binary solid and porous mixtures. Our approach gives rise to an extra contribution to mixture volume, in addition to those corresponding to average mixture parameters. This excess term involves the difference of thermal enthalpies of the two components, which depend on their individual temperatures. We propose to use the Hugoniot of the components to compute non-equilibrium temperatures in the mixture. These are then compared with the average temperature obtained from the mixture Hugoniot, thereby giving an estimate of non-equilibrium effects. The Birch-Murnaghan model for the zero-temperature isotherm and a linear thermal model are then used for applying the method to several mixtures, including one porous case. Comparison with experimental data on the pressure-volume Hugoniot and shock speed versus particle speed shows good agreement.

  11. Forward modeling of shock-ramped tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin L.; Carpenter, John H.; Seagle, Christopher T.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic materials experiments on the Z-machine are beginning to reach a regime where traditional analysis techniques break down. Time dependent phenomena such as strength and phase transition kinetics often make the data obtained in these experiments difficult to interpret. We present an inverse analysis methodology to infer the equation of state (EOS) from velocimetry data in these types of experiments, building on recent advances in the propagation of uncertain EOS information through a hydrocode simulation. An example is given for a shock-ramp experiment in which tantalum was shock compressed to 40 GPa followed by a ramp to 80 GPa. The results are found to be consistent with isothermal compression and Hugoniot data in this regime.

  12. State of the art extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandel, L.B. (State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (US)); Harrison, L.H.; McCullough, D.L. (Wake Forest Univ. Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC (US))

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 16 chapters. Some of the topics that are covered are: Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Development; Laser-Generated Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripter; Radiation Exposure during ESWL; Caliceal Calculi; and Pediatric ESWL.

  13. Standing Shocks in Viscous Accretion Flows around Black Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Wei-Min; LU Ju-Fu

    2005-01-01

    @@ We study the problem of standing shocks in viscous accretion flows around black holes.We parameterize such a flow with two physical constants, namely the specific angular momentum accreted by the black hole j and the energy quantity K.By providing the global dependence of shock formation in the j - K parameter space, we show that a significant parameter region can ensure solutions with shocks of different types, namely Rankine-Hugoniot shocks, isothermal shocks, and more realistically, mixed shocks.

  14. Numerical solutions of several reflected shock-wave flow fields with nonequilibrium chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R. K.; Presley, L. L.; Williams, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    The method of characteristics for a chemically reacting gas is used in the construction of the time-dependent, one-dimensional flow field resulting from the normal reflection of an incident shock wave at the end wall of a shock tube. Nonequilibrium chemical reactions are allowed behind both the incident and reflected shock waves. All the solutions are evaluated for oxygen, but the results are generally representative of any inviscid, nonconducting, and nonradiating diatomic gas. The solutions clearly show that: (1) both the incident- and reflected-shock chemical relaxation times are important in governing the time to attain steady state thermodynamic properties; and (2) adjacent to the end wall, an excess-entropy layer develops wherein the steady state values of all the thermodynamic variables except pressure differ significantly from their corresponding Rankine-Hugoniot equilibrium values.

  15. The shock sensitivities of nitromethane/methanol mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, D. M.; Sheffield, S. A.; Bartram, B. D.; Gibson, L. L.; Bowden, P. R.; Schilling, B. F.

    2014-05-01

    Dilution of liquid explosives with "inert" solvents have been shown previously to affect a degradation in the detonation performance properties of the explosive, and result in a rapid increase in the critical diameter with increasing diluent. To date, the shock sensitivities of liquid explosive-diluent mixtures have not been measured. In this work, we describe the results of a series of gas gun-driven plate impact experiments on nitromethane (NM)-methanol (MeOH) solutions of several concentrations, using in situ electromagnetic gauging to measure the initial shock state (Hugoniot) of the mixture, as well as the overtake-time-to-detonation (Pop-plot). Surprisingly, the shock sensitivities did not fall off dramatically with increasing MeOH concentration. In fact, at some concentrations MeOH appears to sensitize NM, relative to neat NM.

  16. SESAME Equations of State for Stress Cushion and Related Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, Joshua Damon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-12

    I examine LANL equations of state (EOS) for stress cushion and related materials, namely S5370, SX358, and Sylgard 184. In the the rst two cases, the SESAME library contains entries for both the inert (unreacted) and decomposition products. I compare inert EOS results with ambient property measurements to the extent possible, then I check the compositions used to build the products tables. I plot the predicted Hugoniots alongside the available shock data, then draw some conclusions.

  17. Polymerization, shock cooling and ionization of liquid nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M; Rogers, F

    2005-07-21

    The trajectory of thermodynamic states passed through by the nitrogen Hugoniot starting from the liquid and up to 10{sup 6} GPa has been studied. An earlier report of cooling in the doubly shocked liquid, near 50 to 100 GPa and 7500 K, is revisited in light of the recent discovery of solid polymeric nitrogen. It is found that cooling occurs when the doubly shocked liquid is driven into a volume near the molecular to polymer transition and raising the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT). By increasing the shock pressure and temperature by an order of magnitude, theoretical calculations predict thermal ionization of the L shell drives the compression maxima to 5-6 fold compression at 10 Mbar (T {approx} 3.5 10{sup 5} K) and at 400 Mbar (T {approx} 2.3 10{sup 6} K) from K shell ionization. Near a pressure of 10{sup 6} GPa the K shell ionizes completely and the Hugoniot approaches the classical ideal gas compression fourfold limit.

  18. Hugoniot Models for Na and LiF from LEOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitley, Heather D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wu, Christine J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-12

    In this document, we provide the Hugoniot for sodium from two models: LEOS table L110 and Lynx table 110. We also provide the Hugoniot for lithium fluoride from LEOS (L2240) and Lynx (2240). The Hugoniot pressures are supplied for temperatures between 338.0 and 1.16×109 Kelvin and densities between 0.968 and 11.5 g/cc. These LEOS models were developed by the quotidian EOS methodology, which is a widely used and robust method for producing tabular EOS data. Tables list the model data for LEOS 110, Lynx 110, LEOS 2240, and Lynx 2240. The Lynx models follow the same methodology as the LEOS models; however, the Purgatorio average-atom DFT code was used to compute the electron thermal part of the EOS. The models for Lynx are only listed at high compression due to known issues with the Lynx library at lower pressures.

  19. Shock compression experiments on Lithium Deuteride single crystals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudson, Marcus D.; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Lemke, Raymond W.

    2014-10-01

    S hock compression exper iments in the few hundred GPa (multi - Mabr) regime were performed on Lithium Deuteride (LiD) single crystals . This study utilized the high velocity flyer plate capability of the Sandia Z Machine to perform impact experiments at flyer plate velocities in the range of 17 - 32 km/s. Measurements included pressure, density, and temperature between %7E200 - 600 GPa along the Principal Hugoniot - the locus of end states achievable through compression by large amplitude shock waves - as well as pressure and density of re - shock states up to %7E900 GPa . The experimental measurements are compared with recent density functional theory calculations as well as a new tabular equation of state developed at Los Alamos National Labs.

  20. The influence of state-to-state kinetics on diffusion and heat transfer behind shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunova, O.; Kustova, E.; Mekhonoshina, M.; Nagnibeda, E. [Saint Petersburg State University, 198504, Universitetskiy pr., 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-09

    In the paper, the influence of vibrational and chemical kinetics on heat transfer and diffusion in hypersonic flows of N{sub 2}/N mixture in the relaxation zone behind shock waves is studied on the basis of the state-to-state kinetic theory approach. The results of calculations of vibrational level populations ni, gas temperature T, total energy flux q, diffusion velocities of molecules at different vibrational states V{sub i} and atoms V{sub a} in the relaxation zone behind a shock front are presented for the free stream Mach number M = 10, 15. The contribution of different dissipative processes to the total energy flux is estimated for various flow conditions. The impact of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions in the free stream on molecular level populations and transport properties in the relaxation zone is shown.

  1. Shock Compression Response of the Light Noble Gases: Neon and Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth; Shulenburger, Luke; Cochrane, Kyle; Lopez, Andrew; Shelton, Keegan; Villalva, Jose; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Understanding material behavior at extreme conditions is important to a wide range of processes in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Modeling the high pressure - high temperature processes requires robust equations of state (EOS). For many materials, EOS models have been developed using low-pressure Hugoniot data. Assumptions are made to extrapolate the EOS models to Mbar pressure regimes, leading to different model behavior at extreme conditions. In this work, we examine the high pressure response of the light noble gases: neon and helium in the multi-Mbar regime. We perform a series of shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine on cryogenically cooled liquids of Ne (26 K) and He (2.2 K) to measure the Hugoniot and reshock states. In parallel, we use density functional theory methods to calculate the Hugoniot and reshock states. The experiments validated the DFT simulations and the combined experimental and simulation results are used to assess the EOS models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Theoretical study of the porosity effects on the shock response of graphitic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pineau Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a theoretical study of the shock compression of porous graphite by means of combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations using the LCBOPII potential. The results show that the Hugoniostat methods can be used with “pole” properties calculated from porous models to reproduce the experimental Hugoniot of pure graphite and diamond with good accuracy. The computed shock temperatures show a sharp increase for weak shocks which we analyze as the heating associated with the closure of the initial porosity. After this initial phase, the temperature increases with shock intensity at a rate comparable to monocrystalline graphite and diamond. These simulations data can be exploited in view to build a full equation of state for use in hydrodynamic simulations.

  3. Theoretical Insight into Shocked Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiding, Jeffery Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-29

    I present the results of statistical mechanical calculations on shocked molecular gases. This work provides insight into the general behavior of shock Hugoniots of gas phase molecular targets with varying initial pressures. The dissociation behavior of the molecules is emphasized. Impedance matching calculations are performed to determine the maximum degree of dissociation accessible for a given flyer velocity as a function of initial gas pressure.

  4. Shock-wave dynamics during oil-filled transformer explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, V. P.; Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.; Utkin, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a numerical and experimental study of the shock-wave processes evolving inside a closed vessel filled with mineral oil. Obtained experimental Hugoniot data for oil are compared with the corresponding data for water. It is found that compression of mineral oil and water can be described by approximately the same Hugoniot over a wide pressure range. Such similarity allows the use of water instead of mineral oil in the transformer explosion experiments and to describe the compression processes in both liquids using similar equations of state. The Kuznetsov equation of state for water is adopted for a numerical study of mineral oil compression. The features of the evolution of shock waves within mineral oil are analyzed using two-dimensional numerical simulations. Numerical results show that different energy sources may cause different scenarios of loading on the shell. The principal point is the phase transition taking place at relatively high temperatures for the case of high-power energy sources. In this case, a vapor-gaseous bubble emerges that qualitatively changes the dynamics of compression waves and the pattern of loads induced on the shell. Taking into account the features of the process together with the concept of water-oil similarity, the present work presents a new approach for experimental modeling of transformer shell destruction using an explosion with given characteristics in a water-filled shell.

  5. Shock-wave dynamics during oil-filled transformer explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, V. P.; Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.; Utkin, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical and experimental study of the shock-wave processes evolving inside a closed vessel filled with mineral oil. Obtained experimental Hugoniot data for oil are compared with the corresponding data for water. It is found that compression of mineral oil and water can be described by approximately the same Hugoniot over a wide pressure range. Such similarity allows the use of water instead of mineral oil in the transformer explosion experiments and to describe the compression processes in both liquids using similar equations of state. The Kuznetsov equation of state for water is adopted for a numerical study of mineral oil compression. The features of the evolution of shock waves within mineral oil are analyzed using two-dimensional numerical simulations. Numerical results show that different energy sources may cause different scenarios of loading on the shell. The principal point is the phase transition taking place at relatively high temperatures for the case of high-power energy sources. In this case, a vapor-gaseous bubble emerges that qualitatively changes the dynamics of compression waves and the pattern of loads induced on the shell. Taking into account the features of the process together with the concept of water-oil similarity, the present work presents a new approach for experimental modeling of transformer shell destruction using an explosion with given characteristics in a water-filled shell.

  6. Pump and probe measurements of shock-compressed states

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, K G; Hironaka, Y; Kondo, K

    2002-01-01

    A pump and probe technique is used for time-resolved measurements of the microstructure of condensed matter under laser shock compression. Two types of experiment (picosecond x-ray diffraction and nanosecond Raman spectroscopy) are performed. The picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction results for laser-shocked Si(111) give the time evolution of the strain profiles in 60 ps intervals. Nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for laser-shocked poly-tetrafluoroethylene shows transient bond scission of the polymer chain.

  7. Enhanced densification, strength and molecular mechanisms in shock compressed porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-06-01

    In most porous materials, void collapse during shock compression couples mechanical energy to thermal energy. Increased temperature drives up pressures and lowers densities in the final Hugoniot states as compared to full-density samples. Some materials, however, exhibit an anomalous enhanced densification in their Hugoniot states when porosity is introduced. We have recently shown that silicon is such a material, and demonstrated a molecular mechanism for the effect using molecular simulation. We will review results from large-scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and Hugoniotstat simulations of shock compressed porous silicon, highlighting the mechanism by which porosity produces local shear which nucleate partial phase transition and localized melting at shock pressures below typical thresholds in these materials. Further, we will characterize the stress states and strength of the material as a function of porosity from 5 to 50 percent and with various porosity microstructures. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicker, Dawn; Magyar, Rudolph; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Mixtures of light and heavy elements arise in inertial confinement fusion and planetary science. We present results on the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT/QMD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to obtain the properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate the QMD simulations, we performed high-precision shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis of the simulations correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with completion of dissociation in ethane. DFT-based simulation results compare well with experimental data and are used to provide insight into the dissociation as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for ethane, Xe-ethane, polymethyl-pentene, and polystyrene, suggesting that a limiting compression exists for C-C bonded systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Laser-Shock Experiments: Calorimetry Measurements to TPa Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, R.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-driven shock experiments are more like calorimetry measurements, characterized by determinations of Hugoniot temperature (TH) as a function of shock velocity (US), rather than the equation-of-state measurements afforded by mechanical-impact experiments. This is because particle velocity (up) is often not accessible to direct measurement in laser-shock experiments, so must be inferred with reference to a material having a well-determined, independently calibrated Hugoniot equation of state (up is obtained from the impact velocity in traditional shock experiments, and the combination of US and up yields the pressure-density equation of state for the sample). Application of a Mie-Grüneisen model shows that the isochoric specific heat for a given phase is: CV = (US - c0)2 {s2US (dTH/dUS) + γ0 c0 s (TH/US)}-1 with US = c0 + s up, and γ0 is the zero-pressure Grüneisen parameter (γ/V = constant is assumed here). This result is a generalization to TH-US variables of the Walsh and Christian (1955) formula for the temperature rise along the Hugoniot of a given phase (identified here with a US - up relation that is locally linear); it can be analytically integrated to give TH(US) in terms of an average value of CV, if no phase transition takes place. Analysis of the TH-US slopes obtained from laser-shock measurements on MgO yields specific-heat values ranging from 1.02 (± 0.05) kJ/kg/K at 320-345 GPa and TH = 7700-9000 K to 1.50 (± 0.05) kJ/kg/K at 350-380 GPa and TH = 8700-9500 K. A fit to the absolute values of TH(US) in this pressure-temperature range gives CV = 1.26 (± 0.10) kJ/kg/K, in good accord with the Dulong-Petit value CV = 1.24 kJ/kg/K.

  10. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of equation of state of warm dense ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan-Ying; Wang, Cong; Li, Yong-Sheng; Li, Da-Fang; Li, Zi; Zhang, Ping

    2016-09-01

    The equation of state of warm dense ethane is obtained using quantum molecular dynamics simulations based on finite-temperature density functional theory for densities from 0.1 g / cm 3 to 3.1 g / cm 3 and temperatures from 0.1 eV to 5.17 eV. The calculated pressure and internal energy are fitted with cubic polynomials in terms of density and temperature. Specific density-temperature-pressure tracks such as the principal and double shock Hugoniot curves along with release isentropes are predicted which are fundamental for the analysis and interpretation of high-pressure experiments. The principal and double shock Hugoniot curves are in agreement with the experimental data from the Sandia Z-Machine [Magyar et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 134109 (2015)].

  11. Measurements of the sound velocity of shock-compressed liquid silica to 1100 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, C. A.; Gregor, M. C.; Polsin, D. N.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2016-12-01

    The sound velocity in a shocked material provides information about its off-Hugoniot behavior of a material at high pressures. This information can be used to extend the knowledge gained in Hugoniot experiments and to model the re-shock and release behavior. Silica is one of the most important materials for equation of state studies because of its prevalence in the earth's interior and the well-defined properties of α-quartz. This article presents the sound velocity measurements of amorphous fused silica over the range 200 to 1100 GPa using laser-driven shocks and an α-quartz standard. These measurements demonstrate the technique proposed by Fratanduono et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 116, 033517 (2014)] to determine the sound velocity from the arrival of acoustic perturbations. The results compare favorably to the SESAME 7386 equation-of-state table. The Grüneisen parameter was calculated from the sound velocity data and found to be Γ=0.66 ±0.05 at densities above 6 g/cm3, an increase in precision by a factor of two over previous measurements.

  12. Exploring temporal transcription regulation structure of Aspergillus fumigatus in heat shock by state space model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyano Satoru

    2009-07-01

    feed-forward loop type of regulation of heat shock proteins with metabolic genes became less frequent with increasing temperature. This might be the reason for dramatic increase in the expression of heat shock proteins and the number of heat shock response genes at heat shock of 48°C. Conclusion We systemically analysed the thermal adaption mechanism of A. fumigatus by state space model with times series microarray data in terms of transcription regulation structure. We suggest for the first time that heat shock proteins might efficiently regulate metabolic genes using the coherent feed-forward loop type of regulation structure. This type of regulation structure would also be efficient for adjustment to the other stresses requiring rapid change of metabolic mode as well as thermal adaptation.

  13. Arterial blood pressure and heart rate regulation in shock state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaVolpe, Jeffrey D; Moore, Jason E; Pinsky, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    Circulatory shock is a complicated problem that carries a high risk of complications and mortality for critically ill patients. The heart rate and blood pressure targets to which a patient in shock should be resuscitated remain a challenge to intensivists. While the ideal blood pressure and heart rate in circulatory shock are still not definitive, recent studies have begun to refine these targets. A recent trial comparing a mean arterial pressure target of 80-85 mmHg with a target of 65-70 mmHg showed no difference in mortality, with a decreased need for renal replacement therapy in patients with pre-existing hypertension based on subgroup analysis. Regulation of heart rate was defined by a trial demonstrating that heart rate control in patients with severe sepsis on high-dose norepinephrine with esmolol titration did not result in additional adverse events. The ideal target blood pressure in the resuscitation of circulatory shock is variable and likely depends on prior blood pressure. Heart rate regulation with β-blockade appears to be safe in selected patients when accompanied by adequate resuscitation and monitoring.

  14. Estimate of shock thickness based on entropy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P. A.; Strock, T. W.; Lim, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    The shock thickness is estimated for a stationary shock in an ideal gas by equating the internal entropy production to the entropy increase found from the Rankine-Hugoniot equation. For elementary assumed profiles, the thickness is expressed by a simple formula. For realistic dependence of viscosity on temperature, results are in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  15. Time-resolved study of laser initiated shock wave propagation in superfluid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Allan; Buelna, Xavier; Popov, Evgeny; Eloranta, Jussi

    2016-09-01

    Intense shock waves in superfluid 4He between 1.7 and 2.1 K are generated by rapidly expanding confined plasma from laser ablation of a metal target immersed in the liquid. The resulting shock fronts in the liquid with initial velocities up to ca. Mach 10 are visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography. These high intensity shocks decay within 500 ns into less energetic shock waves traveling at Mach 2, which have their lifetime in the microsecond time scale. Based on the analysis using the classical Rankine-Hugoniot theory, the shock fronts created remain in the solid phase up to 1 μs and the associated thermodynamic state appears outside the previously studied region. The extrapolated initial shock pressure of 0.5 GPa is comparable to typical plasma pressures produced during liquid phase laser ablation. A secondary shock originating from fast heat propagation on the metal surface is also observed and a lower limit estimate for the heat propagation velocity is measured as 7 × 104 m/s. In the long-time limit, the high intensity shocks turn into liquid state waves that propagate near the speed of sound.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Wave Propagation and Phase Transition of Tin under Shock-Wave Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hai-Feng; LIU Hai-Feng; ZHANG Guang-Cai; ZHAO Yan-Song

    2009-01-01

    We undertake a numerical simulation of shock experiments on tin reported in the literature,by using a multiphase equation of state (MEOS) and a multiphase Steinberg Guinan (MSG) constitutive model for tin in the β,γ and liquid phases.In the MSG model,the Bauschinger effect is considered to better describe the unloading behavior.The phase diagram and Hugoniot of tin are calculated by MEOS,and they agree well with the experimental data.Combined with the MEOS and MSG models,hydrodynamic computer simulations are successful in reproducing the measured velocity profile of the shock wave experiment.Moreover,by analyzing the mass fraction contour as well as stress and temperature profiles of each phase for tin,we further discuss the complex behavior of tin under shock-wave loading.

  17. Grüneisen Parameter along Hugoniot and Melting Temperature of ε-Iron: a Result from Thermodynamic Calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hai-Jun; JING Fu-Qian; CAI Ling-Cang; Bi Yan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Based on the available data of specific heat Cv at constant volume and the Grüeisen parameter γ of both lattice and electron contributions, we present a consistent method for simultaneously calculating the effective or synthesized Grüeisen parameter along Hugoniot, γeH, covering solid, mixed, and liquid states, and the melting temperature Tm for ε-iron.The rationality validation for this method is confirmed as compared with the experimental data, including the measured Tm and Hugoniot bulk sound velocities Cb.The calculated γeH and Tm for ε-iron at the Earth's inner-core boundary (330GPa) are 1.58 and 5930K, respectively, which are close to the values of 1.53 and 6050K given by Anderson [J.Phys.Chem.Solids 64 (2003) 2125].This method for determination of γeH could be, in principle, also applicable to any thermodynamic state calculations, e.g., along isothermal and isentropic paths, other than the Hugoniot locus.

  18. Prediction of Shock-Induced Cavitation in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems that require estimating the response of thin structures within fluids to shock loading has wide applicability. For example, these problems may include underwater explosions and the dynamic response of ships and submarines; and biological applications such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and wound ballistics. In all of these applications the process of cavitation, where small cavities with dissolved gases or vapor are formed as the local pressure drops below the vapor pressure due to shock hydrodynamics, can cause significant damage to the surrounding thin structures or membranes if these bubbles collapse, generating additional shock loading. Hence, a two-phase equation of state (EOS) with three distinct regions of compression, expansion, and tension was developed to model shock-induced cavitation. This EOS was evaluated by comparing data from pressure and temperature shock Hugoniot measurements for water up to 400 kbar, and data from ultrasonic pressure measurements in tension to -0.3 kbar, to simulated responses from CTH, an Eulerian, finite volume shock code. The new EOS model showed significant improvement over pre-existing CTH models such as the SESAME EOS for capturing cavitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy/NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Hugoniot Models for Na and LiF from LEOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitley, Heather D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wu, Christine J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-12

    In this document, we provide the Hugoniot for sodium from two models: LEOS table L110 and Lynx table 110. We also provide the Hugoniot for lithium fluoride from LEOS (L2240) and Lynx (2240). The Hugoniot pressures are supplied for temperatures between 338.0 and 1.16×109 Kelvin and densities between 0.968 and 11.5 g/cc. These LEOS models were developed by the quotidian EOS methodology, which is a widely used and robust method for producing tabular EOS data.[1, 2] Table 1 lists the model data for LEOS 110, Table 2 contains Lynx 110, Table 3 contains LEOS 2240, and Table 4 contains Lynx 2240. The Lynx models follow the same methodology as the LEOS models, however the Purgatorio[3] average-atom DFT code was used to compute the electron ther- mal part of the EOS. The models for Lynx are only listed at high compression due to known issues with the Lynx library at lower pressures.

  20. Equations of state of detonation products: ammonia and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, John; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Garcia, Daniel; Coe, Joshua; Leiding, Jeffery; Gibson, Lloyd; Bartram, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) are two principal product gases resulting from explosives detonation, and the decomposition of other organic materials under shockwave loading (such as foams). Accurate thermodynamic descriptions of these gases are important for understanding the detonation performance of high explosives. However, shock compression data often do not exist for molecular species in the dense gas phase, and are limited in the fluid phase. Here, we present equation of state measurements of elevated initial density ammonia and methane gases dynamically compressed in gas-gun driven plate impact experiments. Pressure and density of the shocked gases on the principal Hugoniot were determined from direct particle velocity and shock wave velocity measurements recorded using optical velocimetry (Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector)). Streak spectroscopy and 5-color pyrometry were further used to measure the emission from the shocked gases, from which the temperatures of the shocked gases were estimated. Up to 0.07 GPa, ammonia was not observed to ionize, with temperature remaining below 7000 K. These results provide quantitative measurements of the Hugoniot locus for improving equations of state models of detonation products.

  1. Use of the Hugoniot elastic limit in laser shockwave experiments to relate velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Lévesque, Daniel; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre; Lord, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. This fuel-cladding interface qualification will ensure the survivability of the fuel plates in the harsh reactor environment even under abnormal operating conditions. One of the concerns of the project is the difficulty of calibrating and standardizing the laser shock technique. An analytical study under development and experimental testing supports the hypothesis that the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) in materials can be a robust and simple benchmark to compare stresses generated by different laser shock systems.

  2. Particle acceleration at shock waves: particle spectrum as a function of the equation of state of the shocked plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G; Vietri, M

    2007-01-01

    We determine the spectrum of particles accelerated at shocks with arbitrary speed and arbitrary scattering properties for different choices of the equation of state of the downstream plasma. More specifically we consider the effect of energy exchange between the electron and proton thermal components downstream, and the effect of generation of a turbulent magnetic field in the downstream plasma. The slope of the spectrum turns out to be appreciably affected by all these phenomena, especially in the Newtonian and trans-relativistic regime, while in the ultra-relativistic limit the universal spectrum $s\\approx 4.3$ seems to be a very solid prediction.

  3. Shock structures of astrospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Klaus; Kleimann, Jens; Wiengarten, Tobias; Bomans, Dominik J; Weis, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between a supersonic stellar wind and a (super-)sonic interstellar wind has recently been viewed with new interest. We here first give an overview of the modeling, which includes the heliosphere as an example of a special astrosphere. Then we concentrate on the shock structures of fluid models, especially of hydrodynamic (HD) models. More involved models taking into account radiation transfer and magnetic fields are briefly sketched. Even the relatively simple HD models show a rich shock structure, which might be observable in some objects. We employ a single fluid model to study these complex shock structures, and compare the results obtained including heating and cooling with results obtained without these effects. Furthermore, we show that in the hypersonic case valuable information of the shock structure can be obtained from the Rankine-Hugoniot equations. We solved the Euler equations for the single fluid case and also for a case including cooling and heating. We also discuss the analytic...

  4. Shock wave compression behavior of aluminum foam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程和法; 黄笑梅; 薛国宪; 韩福生

    2003-01-01

    The shock wave compression behavior of the open cell aluminum foam with relative density of 0. 396 was studied through planar impact experiments. Using polyvinylidene fluoride(PVDF) piezoelectric gauge technique, the stress histories and propagation velocities of shock wave in the aluminum foam were measured and analyzed. The results show that the amplitude of shock wave attenuates rapidly with increasing the propagation distance in the aluminum foam, and an exponential equation of the normalized peak stress vs propagation distance of shock wave is established, the attenuation factor in the equation is 0. 286. Furthermore, the Hugoniot relation, νs = 516.85+ 1.27νp,for the aluminum foam is determined by empirical fit to the experimental Hugoniot data.

  5. Sound velocities in shocked liquid deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, N.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Ross, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Recent measurements of shock temperatures and laser-driven Hugoniot measurements of shocked liquid deuterium strongly indicate that molecular dissociation is important above 20 GPa. Since the effect of dissociation is small on the Hugoniot pressure up to the 30 GPa limit of conventional impact experiments, other methods must be used to test our understanding of the physics of highly compressed deuterium in this regime. We have recently performed experiments to measure the sound velocity of deuterium which test the isentropic compressibility, a derivative quantity. We used the shock overtake method to measure the shock velocity at 28 GPa. These preliminary data provide support for a recently developed molecular dissociation model. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Temperature measurements for shocked polymethylmethacrylate, epoxy resin, and polytetrafluoroethylene and their equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordzilovskii, S. A.; Karakhanov, S. M.; Merzhievskii, L. A.; Voronin, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the results of computational and experimental studies of the temperature along the shock adiabat for three polymers. Measurements of the brightness temperatures of shock-compressed epoxy resin and polymethylmethacrylate and the brightness and color temperatures of shock-compressed polytetrafluoroethylene were carried out. The temperatures of the shock-compressed polymethylmethacrylate were determined in the range 1390-1900 K for shock pressures of 22-39 GPa. Similar measurements performed for epoxy resin in the pressure range of 18-40 GPa showed values of 940-1900 K, and the temperatures of polytetrafluoroethylene in the pressure range of 30-50 GPa were equal to 2000-3200 K. The equation of state for the three polymers with a nonspherical strain tensor was constructed to describe shock-wave and high-temperature processes in a wide range of thermodynamic parameters. In the proposed model, two Grüneisen parameters were used: the thermodynamic parameter corresponding to intrachain vibrations and the lattice parameter representing the contribution of interchain vibrations. The brightness temperatures of shocked-compressed polymethylmethacrylate and epoxy resin showed a good agreement with calculations using the proposed model and with the results of earlier calculation methods. Time dependences of the observed intensity of light were used to determine the absorption coefficients of the shocked polymers and estimate the effective thickness of the radiating layer. A typical feature of all the polymers is the width of the radiating layer of 0.8 to 2.5 mm, depending on the material and shock pressure.

  7. Shock Waves in Dense Hard Disk Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Sirmas, Nick; Tudorache, Marion; Barahona, Javier; Radulescu, Matei I.

    2011-01-01

    Media composed of colliding hard disks (2D) or hard spheres (3D) serve as good approximations for the collective hydrodynamic description of gases, liquids and granular media. In the present study, the compressible hydrodynamics and shock dynamics are studied for a two-dimensional hard-disk medium at both the continuum and discrete particle level descriptions. For the continuum description, closed form analytical expressions for the inviscid hydrodynamic description, shock Hugoniot, isentropi...

  8. (U) A Gruneisen Equation of State for TPX. Application in FLAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, David A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aslam, Tariq Dennis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bennett, Langdon Stanford [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-02

    A Gruneisen equation of state (EOS) is developed for the polymer TPX (poly 4-methyl-1-pentene) within the LANL hydrocode FLAG. Experimental shock Hugoniot data for TPX is fit to a form of the Gruneisen EOS, and the necessary parameters for implementing the TPX EOS in FLAG are presented. The TPX EOS is further validated through one-dimensional simulations of recent double-shock experiments, and a comparison is made between the new Gruneisen EOS for TPX and the EOS representation for TPX used in the LANL Common Model.

  9. Theory of the equation of state of hot dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T W; Surh, M; Yang, L H

    1999-07-23

    Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are adapted to treat dense plasmas for temperatures exceeding the electronic Fermi temperature. Extended electronic states are obtained in a plane wave basis by using pseudopotentials for the ion cores in the local density approximation to density functional theory. The method reduces to conventional first principles molecular dynamics at low temperatures with the expected high level of accuracy. The occurrence of thermally excited ion cores at high temperatures is treated by means of final state pseudopotentials. The method is applied to the shock compression Hugoniot equation of state for aluminum. Good agreement with experiment is found for temperatures ranging from zero through 105K.

  10. Attenuation of shock waves in copper and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, W.B.

    1986-06-01

    By using shock pins, data were gathered on the trajectories of shock waves in stainless steel (SS-304L) and oxygen-free-high-conductivity copper (OFHC-Cu). Shock pressures were generated in these materials by impacting the appropriate target with thin (approx.1.5 mm) flying plates. The flying plates in these experiments were accelerated to high velocities (approx.4 km/s) by high explosives. Six experiments were conducted, three using SS-304L as the target material and three experiments using OFHC-Cu as the target material. Peak shock pressures generated in the steel experiments were approximately 109, 130, and 147 GPa and in the copper experiments, the peak shock pressures were approximately 111, 132, and 143 GPa. In each experiment, an attenuation of the shock wave by a following release wave was clearly observed. An extensive effort using two characteristic codes (described in this work) to theoretically calculate the attenuation of the shock waves was made. The efficacy of several different constitutive equations to successfully model the experiments was studied by comparing the calculated shock trajectories to the experimental data. Based on such comparisons, the conclusion can be drawn that OFHC-Cu enters a melt phase at about 130 GPa on the principal Hugoniot. There was no sign of phase changes in the stainless-steel experiments. In order to match the observed attenuation of the shock waves in the SS-304L experiments, it was necessary to include strength effects in the calculations. It was found that the values for the parameters in the strength equations were dependent on the equation of state used in the modeling of the experiments. 66 refs., 194 figs., 77 tabs.

  11. Study on the dynamic behavior of matters using laser-driven shock waves in the water confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Yoh, Jack J.

    2015-06-01

    The strain rates achievable in laser-driven shock experiments overlap with gas gun and can reach much higher values. The laser-based method also has advantages in terms of system size, cost, repeatability, and controllability. In this research, we aim to measure equation of state, Hugoniot elastic limit, strain rate, and compressive yield strength of target samples by making use of the velocity interferometer or the VISAR. High pressure shock wave is generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm wavelength with pulse energy up to 3 joules and 9 ns pulse duration. All the experiments are conducted in the water confinement to increase the peak stresses to an order of GPa. Furthermore, quantitative comparisons are made to the existing shock data in order to emphasize the novelty of the proposed setup which is relatively simple and reliable. Corresponding author.

  12. Granular Material Response to Dynamic Shock Compression: A Study of SiO2 in the Form of Sand and Soda Lime Glass Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    method was used vice more accurate immersion techniques based on Archimedes principle . The initial volume of the technical sand was determined by filling...of Porous Materials In solid materials small stresses and strains are very close to being the same as the shock Hugoniot and the principle isentrope...experiment is no longer a traditional shock Hugoniot experiment but is rather more analogous to a ‘plate push ’ experiment. Multiple wave interactions

  13. First-Principle-Based Calculations of the Hugoniot of Cu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Shi-Kai; CAI Ling-Cang; JING Fu-Qian; WANG Shun-Jin

    2005-01-01

    @@ The equation of state of face-centred-cubic (fcc) copper crystals at pressures up to 500 GPa and relative volume to 0.55 have been evaluated by using the full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FPLMTO) total-energy method combining with a mean-field model of the vibrational partition function. The mean-field is constructed from the sum of all the pair potentials between the reference atom and the others of the system. The calculated properties are in good agreement with the available shock-wave experimental measurements.

  14. Measurements of the equations of state and spectrum of nonideal xenon plasma under shock compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J; Gu, Y J; Chen, Z Y; Chen, Q F

    2010-08-01

    Experimental equations of state on generation of nonideal xenon plasma by intense shock wave compression was presented in the ranges of pressure of 2-16 GPa and temperature of 31-50 kK, and the xenon plasma with the nonideal coupling parameter Γ range from 0.6-2.1 was generated. The shock wave was produced using the flyer plate impact and accelerated up to ∼6 km/s with a two-stage light gas gun. Gaseous specimens were shocked from two initial pressures of 0.80 and 4.72 MPa at room temperature. Time-resolved spectral radiation histories were recorded by using a multiwavelength channel pyrometer. The transient spectra with the wavelength range of 460-700 nm were recorded by using a spectrometer to evaluate the shock temperature. Shock velocity was measured and particle velocity was determined by the impedance matching methods. The equations of state of xenon plasma and ionization degree have been discussed in terms of the self-consistent fluid variational theory.

  15. A simulation-based and analytic analysis of the off-Hugoniot response of alternative inertial confinement fusion ablator materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alastair S.; Prisbrey, Shon; Baker, Kevin L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Fry, Jonathan; Dittrich, Thomas R.; Wu, Kuang-Jen J.; Kervin, Margaret L.; Schoff, Michael E.; Farrell, Mike; Nikroo, Abbas; Hurricane, Omar A.

    2016-09-01

    The attainment of self-propagating fusion burn in an inertial confinement target at the National Ignition Facility will require the use of an ablator with high rocket-efficiency and ablation pressure. The ablation material used during the National Ignition Campaign (Lindl et al. 2014) [1], a glow-discharge polymer (GDP), does not couple as efficiently as simulations indicated to the multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environment created by laser power profile (Robey et al., 2012). We investigate the performance of two other ablators, boron carbide (B4C) and high-density carbon (HDC) compared to the performance of GDP under the same hohlraum conditions. Ablation performance is determined through measurement of the shock speed produced in planar samples of the ablator material subjected to the identical multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environments that are similar to a generic three-shock ignition drive. Simulations are in better agreement with the off-Hugoniot performance of B4C than either HDC or GDP, and analytic estimations of the ablation pressure indicate that while the pressure produced by B4C and GDP is similar when the ablator is allowed to release, the pressure reached by B4C seems to exceed that of HDC when backed by a Au/quartz layer.

  16. A molecular dynamics study of dislocation density generation and plastic relaxation during shock of single crystal Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichani, Mehrdad M.; Spearot, Douglas E.

    2016-07-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation method is used to investigate the dependence of crystal orientation and shock wave strength on dislocation density evolution in single crystal Cu. Four different shock directions , , , and are selected to study the role of crystal orientation on dislocation generation immediately behind the shock front and plastic relaxation as the system reaches the hydrostatic state. Dislocation density evolution is analyzed for particle velocities between the Hugoniot elastic limit ( up H E L ) for each orientation up to a maximum of 1.5 km/s. Generally, dislocation density increases with increasing particle velocity for all shock orientations. Plastic relaxation for shock in the , , and directions is primarily due to a reduction in the Shockley partial dislocation density. In addition, plastic anisotropy between these orientations is less apparent at particle velocities above 1.1 km/s. In contrast, plastic relaxation is limited for shock in the orientation. This is partially due to the emergence of sessile stair-rod dislocations with Burgers vectors of 1/3 and 1/6. The nucleation of 1/6 dislocations at lower particle velocities is mainly due to the reaction between Shockley partial dislocations and twin boundaries. On the other hand, for the particle velocities above 1.1 km/s, the nucleation of 1/3 dislocations is predominantly due to reaction between Shockley partial dislocations at stacking fault intersections. Both mechanisms promote greater dislocation densities after relaxation for shock pressures above 34 GPa compared to the other three shock orientations.

  17. Equation of State measurements of hydrogen isotopes on Nova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, G. W., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    High intensity lasers can be used to perform measurements of materials at extremely high pressures if certain experimental issues can be overcome. We have addressed those issues and used the Nova laser to shock-compress liquid deuterium and obtain measurements of density and pressure on the principal Hugoniot at pressures from 300 kbar to more than 2 Mbar. The data are compared with a number of equation of state models. The data indicate that the effect of molecular dissociation of the deuterium into a monatomic phase may have a significant impact on the equation of state near 1 Mbar.

  18. Absolute Equation of State Measurements on Shocked Liquid Deuterium up to 200GPa (2Mbar)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.; Celliers, P.; Collins, G.; Budil, K.; Holmes, N.; Barbee, T. Jr.; Hammel, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Wallace, R.; Ross, M.; Cauble, R. [Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Ng, A.; Chiu, G. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    We present results of the first measurements of density, shock speed, and particle speed in liquid deuterium compressed by laser-generated shock waves to pressures from 25 to 210Gpa (0.25 to 2.1Mbar). The data show a significant increase in D{sub 2} compressibility above 50Gpa compared to a widely used equation of state model. The data strongly suggest a thermal molecular dissociation transition of the diatomic fluid into a monatomic phase. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Solid state amorphization of nanocrystalline nickel by cryogenic laser shock peening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Chang, E-mail: cye@uakron.edu; Ren, Zhencheng; Zhao, Jingyi; Hou, Xiaoning; Dong, Yalin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44325 (United States); Liu, Yang; Sang, Xiahan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    In this study, complete solid state amorphization in nanocrystalline nickel has been achieved through cryogenic laser shock peening (CLSP). High resolution transmission electron microscopy has revealed the complete amorphous structure of the sample after CLSP processing. A molecular dynamic model has been used to investigate material behavior during the shock loading and the effects of nanoscale grain boundaries on the amorphization process. It has been found that the initial nanoscale grain boundaries increase the initial Gibbs free energy before plastic deformation and also serve as dislocation emission sources during plastic deformation to contribute to defect density increase, leading to the amorphization of pure nanocrystalline nickel.

  20. Comparative Shock Response of Additively Manufactured Versus Conventionally Wrought 304L Stainless Steel*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, J. L.; Adams, D. P.; Nishida, E. E.; Song, B.; Maguire, M. C.; Carroll, J.; Reedlunn, B.; Bishop, J. E.

    2015-06-01

    Gas-gun experiments have probed the compression and release behavior of impact-loaded 304L stainless steel specimens machined from additively manufactured (AM) blocks as well as baseline ingot-derived bar stock. The AM technology allows direct fabrication of metal parts. For the present study, a velocity interferometer (VISAR) measured the time-resolved motion of samples subjected to one-dimensional (i.e., uniaxial strain) shock compression to peak stresses ranging from 0.2 to 7.5 GPa. The acquired wave-profile data have been analyzed to determine the comparative Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), Hugoniot equation of state, spall strength, and high-pressure yield strength of the AM and conventional materials. Observed differences in shock loading and unloading characteristics for the two 304L source variants have been correlated to complementary Kolsky bar results for compressive and tensile testing at lower strain rates. The effects of composition, porosity, microstructure (e.g., grain size and morphology), residual stress, and sample axis orientation relative to the additive manufacturing deposition trajectory have been assessed to explain differences between the AM and baseline 304L dynamic mechanical properties. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Validation of the activity expansion method with ultrahigh pressure shock equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Forrest J.; Young, David A.

    1997-11-01

    Laser shock experiments have recently been used to measure the equation of state (EOS) of matter in the ultrahigh pressure region between condensed matter and a weakly coupled plasma. Some ultrahigh pressure data from nuclear-generated shocks are also available. Matter at these conditions has proven very difficult to treat theoretically. The many-body activity expansion method (ACTEX) has been used for some time to calculate EOS and opacity data in this region, for use in modeling inertial confinement fusion and stellar interior plasmas. In the present work, we carry out a detailed comparison with the available experimental data in order to validate the method. The agreement is good, showing that ACTEX adequately describes strongly shocked matter.

  2. Validation of the activity expansion method with ultrahigh pressure shock equations of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, F.J.; Young, D.A. [Physics Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Laser shock experiments have recently been used to measure the equation of state (EOS) of matter in the ultrahigh pressure region between condensed matter and a weakly coupled plasma. Some ultrahigh pressure data from nuclear-generated shocks are also available. Matter at these conditions has proven very difficult to treat theoretically. The many-body activity expansion method (ACTEX) has been used for some time to calculate EOS and opacity data in this region, for use in modeling inertial confinement fusion and stellar interior plasmas. In the present work, we carry out a detailed comparison with the available experimental data in order to validate the method. The agreement is good, showing that ACTEX adequately describes strongly shocked matter. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. A comparative study of background flow geometries in Schwarzschild metric with shock

    CERN Document Server

    Tarafdar, Pratik

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of discontinuity in general relativistic axially symmetric background fluid flow in the Schwarzschild metric. The discontinuities, or 'shocks', are incorporated using general relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. A general shock-invariant quantity is thus derived analytically for three distinct geometric configurations of the background fluid flow, viz., constant height discs, quasi-spherical discs and discs in hydrostatic equilibrium in the vertical direction. As already pointed out in our previous works, even identical initial conditions may lead to completely different phase-space behaviour of the stationary solutions for separate flow geometries. Hence it is then useful to investigate and compare the influence of geometric configuration of the flow described by various thermodynamic equations of state, on different important properties and manifestations of such physical discontinuities.

  4. Sound Velocity and Release Behaviour of Shock-Compressed LY12 Al

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yu-Ying; TAN Hua; DAI Cheng-Da; HU Jian-Bo; CHEN Da-Nian

    2005-01-01

    @@ A velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) is used to measure the sound velocity of LY12 Al shock-compressed to peak pressures of 20, 32, 55 and 71 GPa. Unloading wave velocities from these pressures are obtained from the observed particle velocity profiles at the LY12 Al/LiF window interface; and the longitudinal,bulk and shear sound velocities at the initial Hugoniot state are well determined. The histories of stress, strain,density or volume, and particle velocity along the release paths are calculated by the impedance-matching method based on the unloading sound velocity data. It is revealed that the release behaviour of shocked LY12 Al departures obviously from the elastic perfectly-plastic response.

  5. Shock waves in polycrystalline iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadau, Kai; Germann, Timothy C; Lomdahl, Peter S; Albers, Robert C; Wark, Justin S; Higginbotham, Andrew; Holian, Brad Lee

    2007-03-30

    The propagation of shock waves through polycrystalline iron is explored by large-scale atomistic simulations. For large enough shock strengths the passage of the wave causes the body-centered-cubic phase to transform into a close-packed phase with most structure being isotropic hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) and, depending on shock strength and grain orientation, some fraction of face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure. The simulated shock Hugoniot is compared to experiments. By calculating the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) directly from the atomic configurations, a comparison to experimental EXAFS measurements of nanosecond-laser shocks shows that the experimental data is consistent with such a phase transformation. However, the atomistically simulated EXAFS spectra also show that an experimental distinction between the hcp or fcc phase is not possible based on the spectra alone.

  6. Laser driven single shock compression of fluid deuterium from 45 to 220 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Eggert, J; Moon, S; Meyerhofer, D; Collins, G

    2008-03-23

    The compression {eta} of liquid deuterium between 45 and 220 GPa under laser-driven shock loading has been measured using impedance matching to an aluminum (Al) standard. An Al impedance match model derived from a best fit to absolute Hugoniot data has been used to quantify and minimize the systematic errors caused by uncertainties in the high-pressure Al equation of state. In deuterium below 100 GPa results show that {eta} {approx_equal} 4.2, in agreement with previous impedance match data from magnetically-driven flyer and convergent-explosive shock wave experiments; between 100 and 220 GPa {eta} reaches a maximum of {approx}5.0, less than the 6-fold compression observed on the earliest laser-shock experiments but greater than expected from simple extrapolations of lower pressure data. Previous laser-driven double-shock results are found to be in good agreement with these single-shock measurements over the entire range under study. Both sets of laser-shock data indicate that deuterium undergoes an abrupt increase in compression at around 110 GPa.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock waves using the absorbing boundary condition: A case study of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolesta, Alexey V.; Zheng, Lianqing; Thompson, Donald L.; Sewell, Thomas D.

    2007-12-01

    We report a method that enables long-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of shock wave loading. The goal is to mitigate the severe interference effects that arise at interfaces or free boundaries when using standard nonequilibrium MD shock wave approaches. The essence of the method is to capture between two fixed pistons the material state at the precise instant in time when the shock front, initiated by a piston with velocity up at one end of the target sample, traverses the contiguous boundary between the target and a second, stationary piston located at the opposite end of the sample, at which point the second piston is also assigned velocity up and the simulation is continued. Thus, the target material is captured in the energy-volume Hugoniot state resulting from the initial shock wave, and can be propagated forward in time to monitor any subsequent chemistry, plastic deformation, or other time-dependent phenomena compatible with the spatial scale of the simulation. For demonstration purposes, we apply the method to shock-induced chemistry in methane based on the adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order force field [S. J. Stuart , J. Chem. Phys. 112, 6472 (2000)].

  8. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Intense shock waves and extreme states of matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortov, Vladimir E.

    2007-04-01

    The physical properties of hot dense matter over a broad domain of the phase diagram are of immediate interest in astrophysics, planetary physics, power engineering, controlled thermonuclear fusion, impulse technologies, enginery, and several special applications. The use of intense shock waves in dynamic physics and high-pressure chemistry has made the exotic high-energy-density states of matter a subject of laboratory experiments and enabled advancing by many orders of magnitude along the pressure scale to range into the megabars and even gigabars. The present report reviews the latest experimental research involving shock waves in nonideal plasmas under conditions of strong collective interparticle interaction. The results of investigations into the thermodynamic, transport, and optical properties of strongly compressed hot matter, as well as into its composition and conductivity, are discussed. Experimental techniques for high energy density cumulation, the drivers of intense shock waves, and methods for the fast diagnostics of high-energy plasma are considered. Also discussed are compression-stimulated physical effects: pressure-induced ionization, plasma phase transitions, the deformation of bound states, plasma blooming ('transparentization' of plasma), etc. Suggestions for future research are put forward.

  9. Fed state prior to hemorrhagic shock and polytrauma in a porcine model results in altered liver transcriptomic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Determan

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic shock is a leading cause of trauma-related mortality in both civilian and military settings. Resuscitation often results in reperfusion injury and survivors are susceptible to developing multiple organ failure (MOF. The impact of fed state on the overall response to shock and resuscitation has been explored in some murine models but few clinically relevant large animal models. We have previously used metabolomics to establish that the fed state results in a different metabolic response in the porcine liver following hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. In this study, we used our clinically relevant model of hemorrhagic shock and polytrauma and the Illumina HiSeq platform to determine if the liver transcriptomic response is also altered with respect to fed state. Functional analysis of the response to shock and resuscitation confirmed several typical responses including carbohydrate metabolism, cytokine inflammation, decreased cholesterol synthesis, and apoptosis. Our findings also suggest that the fasting state, relative to a carbohydrate prefed state, displays decreased carbohydrate metabolism, increased cytoskeleton reorganization and decreased inflammation in response to hemorrhagic shock and reperfusion. Evidence suggests that this is a consequence of a shrunken, catabolic state of the liver cells which provides an anti-inflammatory condition that partially mitigates hepatocellar damage.

  10. Equation of state of initially liquid carbon monoxide and nitrogen mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The modified liquid perturbation variational theory and the improved vdW-1f model were applied to calculating the equation of the state of liquid CO-N2 mixture with the ratio of 1:1, 4:1 and 1:4, respectively, in the shock pressure range of 9-49 GPa. It was shown that the calculated result for CO-N2 mixture with the ratio of 1:1 is well consistent with the earlier experimental data. The thermodynamics equilibrium, chemical equilibrium and phase equilibrium were all considered in detail. It was found that Hugoniot of liquid CO-N2 mixture is moderately softened in the pressure range of 20-30 GPa and 30-49 GPa for different initial proportions, and that the Hugoniot is more softened in the latter pressure range, which means that the structural phase transition occurs near 20 GPa and 30 GPa. Since the shock pro-ductions may absorb a plenty of systematic energy, the shock temperature and pressure decline compared with the case of no chemical reaction. Pressures and temperatures increase gradually with the increase in the mole fraction of nitrogen composition. The results for the 1:1 CO-N2 mixture lie in the middle of two others. Therefore, it was shown that the modified Lorentz-Berthelor rule used in the scheme is effective to study shock-compression properties of liquid CO-N2 mixture under high temperatures and high pressures.

  11. Equation of state formulation for unreacted solid high explosives, PETN and HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Kunihito

    2015-06-01

    Equation of state (EOS) for unreacted explosives has been formulated thermodynamically aiming at using with numerical code of SDT processes. A generalized form of EOS is given in terms of p-v-E from the available static isothermal compression curve with non-constant specific heat, and arbitrary Grüneisen volume function. In this paper, a procedure of providing p-v-E EOS is developed based on the specific heat at constant volume as a function of entropy, Grüneisen volume function, together with Birch-Murnagan form of the isotherm. Material function of EOS and shock Hugoniot for PETN and HMX has been calculated, which is compared with the experimental data of shock-particle velocity Hugoniot. Dependence of shock pressure and temperature on the Grüneisen volume function is discussed. Insensitivity of the shock-particle velocity relationship to functional form of Grüneisen volume function is also shown. Second author: Dr. Shiro Kubota (AIST Japan).

  12. Shock state: an unrecognized and underestimated presentation of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmoun, Antoine; Dubois, Elsa; Perez, Pierre; Barbaud, Annick; Levy, Bruno

    2013-11-01

    Some patients with drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) are probably admitted in intensive care unit (ICU), but data concerning their clinical features at admission are scarce. Therefore, in the present study, we used a clinical network of French intensivists to study the clinical features and evolution of DRESS patients hospitalized in ICU. A national, retrospective, multicenter study collected DRESS cases hospitalized in ICU for DRESS from 2000 to end of 2011. All files were analyzed through the RegiSCAR scoring system as "no," "possible," "probable," or "definite" DRESS. Patients were included only if they had a probable or definite DRESS. Demographic, hemodynamic, biological, and infectious data were recorded. Twenty-one patients were included. Hospital mortality was 10 (47%) of 21, and 16 of 21 patients had on admission a shock state necessitating vasopressor agents. Echocardiographic ejection fraction in shock patients was depressed (47% ± 13%). Mechanical ventilation was required in 13 of 21 cases. Hepatic failure was observed in 11 of 21 cases, acute renal failure in 18 of 20 cases, and lactic acidosis in 12 of 20 patients. Initial bacteriology was negative in all patients. Human herpesvirus reactivations were found in five of 15 cases. In conclusion, shock without bacteriological documentation associated with multiple organ failure is the most common presentation of DRESS at admission in ICU and is associated with a higher mortality than previously described.

  13. (U) Equation of State and Compaction Modeling for CeO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, David A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chisolm, Eric D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Recent efforts have focused on developing a solid-liquid and three-phase equation of state (EOS) for CeO2, while parallel experimental efforts have focused on obtaining high-fidelity Hugoniot measurements on CeO2 in the porous state. The current work examines the robustness of two CeO2 SESAME equations of state, a solid-liquid EOS, 96170, and a three-phase EOS, 96171, by validating the EOS against a suite of high-pressure shock compression experiments on initially porous CeO2. At lower pressures compaction is considered by incorporating a two-term exponential form of the P-compaction model, using three separate definitions for α(P). Simulations are executed spanning the partially compacted and fully compacted EOS regimes over the pressure range 0.5 - 109 GPa. Comparison of calculated Hugoniot results with those obtained experimentally indicate good agreement for all definitions of α(P) with both the solid-liquid and three-phase EOS in the low-pressure compaction regime. At higher pressures the three-phase EOS does a better job at predicting the measured Hugoniot response, though at the highest pressures EOS 96171 predicts a less compliant response than is observed experimentally. Measured material velocity profiles of the shock-wave after it has transmitted through the powder are also compared with those simulated using with solid-liquid and three-phase EOS. Profiles lend insight into limits of the current experimental design, as well as the threshold conditions for the shock-induced phase transition in CeO2.

  14. Photoacoustically Measured Speeds of Sound and the Equation of State of HBO2: On Understanding Detonation with Boron Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Crowhurst, J; Armstrong, M; Fried, L; Teslich, N

    2010-03-09

    Elucidation of geodynamic, geochemical, and shock induced processes is limited by challenges to accurately determine molecular fluid equations of state (EOS). High pressure liquid state reactions of carbon species underlie physiochemical mechanisms such as differentiation of planetary interiors, deep carbon sequestration, propellant deflagration, and shock chemistry. In this proceedings paper we introduce a versatile photoacoustic technique developed to measure accurate and precise speeds of sound (SoS) of high pressure molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. SoS of an intermediate boron oxide, HBO{sub 2} are measured up to 0.5 GPa along the 277 C isotherm. A polarized exponential-6 interatomic potential form, parameterized using our SoS data, enables EOS determinations and corresponding semi-empirical evaluations of >2000 C thermodynamic states including energy release from bororganic formulations. Our thermochemical model propitiously predicts boronated hydrocarbon shock Hugoniot results.

  15. Increased aerobic glycolysis through beta2 stimulation is a common mechanism involved in lactate formation during shock states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Bruno; Desebbe, Olivier; Montemont, Chantal; Gibot, Sebastien

    2008-10-01

    During septic shock, muscle produces lactate by way of an exaggerated NaK-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase)-stimulated aerobic glycolysis associated with epinephrine stimulation possibly through beta2 adrenoreceptor involvement. It therefore seems logical that a proportion of hyperlactatemia in low cardiac output states would be also related to this mechanism. Thus, in low-flow and normal-to-high-flow models of shock, we investigate (1) whether muscle produces lactate and (2) whether muscle lactate production is linked to beta2 adrenergic stimulation and Na+K+-ATPase. We locally modulated the adrenergic pathway and Na+K+-ATPase activity in male Wistar rats' skeletal muscle using microdialysis with nonselective and selective beta blockers and ouabain in different models of rodent shock (endotoxin, peritonitis, and hemorrhage). Blood flow at the probe site was evaluated by ethanol clearance. We measured the difference between muscle lactate and blood lactate concentration, with a positive gradient indicating muscle lactate or pyruvate production. Epinephrine levels were elevated in all shock groups. All models were associated with hypotension and marked hyperlactatemia. Muscle lactate concentrations were consistently higher than arterial levels, with a mean gradient of 2.5+/-0.3 in endotoxic shock, 2.1+/-0.2 mM in peritonitis group, and 0.9+/-0.2 mM in hemorrhagic shock (Pshock, 210+/-30 microM in peritonitis group, and 90+/-10 microM in hemorrhagic shock (Pshock mechanism. This demonstrates that lactate production during shock states is related, at least in part, to increased NaK-ATPase activity under beta2 stimulation. In shock state associated with a reduced or maintained blood flow, an important proportion of muscle lactate release is regulated by a beta2 receptor stimulation and not secondary to a reduced oxygen availability.

  16. Effects of Shock Pressure on Transition Pressure in Zr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying-Hua; ZHANG Lin; CAI Ling-Cang

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of free surface velocity profiles of high-purity Zr samples under shock-wave loading are performed to study the dynamic strength and phase transition parameters. The peak pressure of the compression waves is within the range from 9 to 14 GPa, and the Hugoniot elastic limit is 0.5 GPa. An anomalous structure of shock waves is observed due to the α - ω phase transition in Zr. Shock pressure has effects on transition pressure which increases with increasing compression strength, and the stronger shocks have a lower transit time.

  17. Comparative shock response of additively manufactured versus conventionally wrought 304L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, J. L.; Adams, D. P.; Nishida, E. E.; Song, B.; Maguire, M. C.; Carroll, J.; Reedlunn, B.; Bishop, J. E.; Palmer, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Gas-gun experiments have probed the compression and release behavior of impact-loaded 304L stainless steel specimens that were machined from additively manufactured (AM) blocks as well as baseline ingot-derived bar stock. The AM technology permits direct fabrication of net- or near-net-shape metal parts. For the present investigation, velocity interferometer (VISAR) diagnostics provided time-resolved measurements of sample response for one-dimensional (i.e., uniaxial strain) shock compression to peak stresses ranging from 0.2 to 7.0 GPa. The acquired wave-profile data have been analyzed to determine the comparative Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), Hugoniot equation of state, spall strength, and high-pressure yield strength of the AM and conventional materials. The possible contributions of various factors, such as composition, porosity, microstructure (e.g., grain size and morphology), residual stress, and/or sample axis orientation relative to the additive manufacturing deposition trajectory, are considered to explain differences between the AM and baseline 304L dynamic material results.

  18. Equations of state for titanium and Ti6A14V alloy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerley, Gerald Irwin (Kerley Technical Services, Appomattox, VA)

    2003-10-01

    The PANDA code is used to build tabular equations of state (EOS) for titanium and the alloy Ti4Al6V. Each EOS includes solid-solid phase transitions, melting, vaporization, and thermal electronic excitation. Separate EOS tables are constructed for the solid and fluid phases, and the PANDA phase transition model is used to construct a single multiphase table. The model explains a number of interesting features seen in the Hugoniot data, including an anomalous increase in shock velocity, recently observed near 200 GPa in Ti6Al4V. These new EOS tables are available for use with the CTH code and other hydrocodes that access the CTH database.

  19. Shock compression of simulated adobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, C. H.; Church, P. D.; Gould, P. J.; Stewart, B.; Jardine, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    A series of plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the shock response of a simulant for adobe, a traditional form of building material widely used around the world. Air dried bricks were sourced from the London brick company, dry machined and impacted at a range of velocities in a single stage gas gun. The shock Hugoniot was determined (Us =2.26up+0.37) as well as release information. The material was found to behave in a manner which was similar to that of loose sand and considerably less stiff than a weak porous sandstone. The effect of any cementing of the grains was examined by shocking powdered samples contained within a cell arrangement.

  20. Shock Compression of Simulated Adobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, C. H.; Church, P. D.; Gould, P. J.; Stewart, B.; Jardine, A. P.

    2015-06-01

    A series of plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the shock response of a simulant for adobe, a traditional form of building material widely used around the world. Air dried bricks were sourced from the London brick company, dry machined and impacted at a range of velocities in a single stage gas gun. The shock Hugoniot was determined (Us = 2.26up + 0.33) as well as release information. The material was found to behave in a manner which was similar to that of loose sand and considerably less stiff than a weak porous sandstone. The effect of any cementing of the grains was examined by shocking powdered samples contained within a cell arrangement. The research was funded by DSTL through a WSTC contract.

  1. [Definition of shock types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, H A; Baumann, G; Gänsslen, A; Janssens, U; Knoefel, W; Koch, T; Marx, G; Müller-Werdan, U; Pape, H C; Prange, W; Roesner, D; Standl, T; Teske, W; Werner, G; Zander, R

    2001-11-01

    Definitions of shock types. Hypovolaemic shock is a state of insufficient perfusion of vital organs with consecutive imbalance of oxygen supply and demand due to an intravascular volume deficiency with critically impaired cardiac preload. Subtypes are haemorrhagic shock, hypovolaemic shock in the narrow sense, traumatic-haemorrhagic shock and traumatic-hypovolaemic shock. Cardiac shock is caused by a primary critical cardiac pump failure with consecutive inadequate oxygen supply of the organism. Anaphylactic shock is an acute failure of blood volume distribution (distributive shock) and caused by IgE-dependent, type-I-allergic, classical hypersensibility, or a physically, chemically, or osmotically induced IgE-independent anaphylactoid hypersensibility. The septic shock is a sepsis-induced distribution failure of the circulating blood volume in the sense of a distributive shock. The neurogenic shock is a distributive shock induced by generalized and extensive vasodilatation with consecutive hypovolaemia due to an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of vascular smooth muscles.

  2. Scaling impact and shock-compression response for porous materials: Application to planetary formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, R.

    2016-12-01

    A thermodynamic model based on the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state does a good job of describing the response of porous materials to impact, so can provide insights into the accretion and cohesion of planetesimals too small to be significantly held together by gravity (e.g., tens of km or less in average diameter). The model identifies an offset in Hugoniot pressure (∆PH) due to porosity that is found to be in agreement with experimental shock-compression measurements for samples having a wide range of initial porosities. Assuming the Grüneisen parameter (γ) is proportional to volume (γ/V = constant), the relative offset in Hugoniot pressure as a function of initial porosity (φ = 1 - V0/V0por) and compression (η = 1 - V/V0) is ∆PH/PH = γ0 φ/[2(1 - φ) - γ0 (φ + η(1 - φ))] where subscripts 0 and por represent zero-pressure (non-porous) conditions and a porous sample, respectively. This additional thermal pressure at a given volume is due to the extra internal energy and corresponding temperature increase associated with collapsing pores (Fig. 1: near-identical curves for φ = 0.001 and 0.01). This result can be interpreted as indicating that upon collapse individual pores create hot spots with temperatures of order 103-104K above the background, suggesting that impact into an initially porous target can result in cohesion due to partial melting and vaporization. Moreover, the waste heat associated with pore closure far exceeds the dissipation in shock loading of non-porous material, reflecting the ability of a porous target to absorb and dissipate impact energy. The Mie-Grüneisen model along with analysis of waste heat thus provides a scaling for planetesimal impact that might explain how rock and regolith accrete into a gravitationally bound planet. Fig. 1. Porosity-induced anomaly in Hugoniot temperature per unit of porosity, shown as a function of compression for samples with initial porosity φ = 0.001 (green), 0.01 (blue) and 0.1 (gold

  3. Prediction of Shock Wave Structure in Weakly Ionized Gas Flow by Solving MGD Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z. T.; Oviedo-Rojas, Ruben; Chow, Alan; Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the recent research results of shockwave structure predictions using a new developed code. The modified Rankine-Hugoniot relations across a standing normal shock wave are discussed and adopted to obtain jump conditions. Coupling a electrostatic body force to the Burnett equations, the weakly ionized flow field across the shock wave was solved. Results indicated that the Modified Rankine-Hugoniot equations for shock wave are valid for a wide range of ionization fraction. However, this model breaks down with small free stream Mach number and with large ionization fraction. The jump conditions also depend on the value of free stream pressure, temperature and density. The computed shock wave structure with ionization provides results, which indicated that shock wave strength may be reduced by existence of weakly ionized gas.

  4. Shock loading characteristics of Zr and Ti metals using dual beam velocimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, A. K., E-mail: a-saxena@barc.gov.in; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-08-21

    The characteristics of titanium and zirconium metal foils under shock loading have been studied up to 16 GPa and 12 GPa pressure, respectively, using portable electric gun setup as projectile launcher. In these experiments, the capabilities of a single Fabry-Perot velocimeter have been enhanced by implementing it in dual beam mode to record the two velocity profiles on a single streak camera. The measured equation of state data for both the metals have been found to be well in agreement with the reported Hugoniot, within experimental accuracies. A phase transition from α to ω phase has been detected near to 11.4 GPa for titanium and 8.2 GPa for zirconium in the rising part of target-glass interface velocity profile.

  5. Experimental study on pressure, stress state, and temperature-dependent dynamic behavior of shear thickening fluid subjected to laser induced shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianqian; Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments by measuring the back free surface velocities of aluminum-shear thickening fluid (STF)-aluminum assembled targets. The results showed that the attenuation behavior of shock wave in the STF was dependent on shock pressure, stress state, and test temperature. The measured back free particle velocities of the targets and shock wave velocities in the STF decreased with the decrease in shock pressure while shocked at the same stress state and the same test temperature. In addition, two types of dragging mechanisms in the STF were observed while shocked at different stress states. For a uniaxial strain state, the impact induced jamming behavior in the STF is the dragging mechanism for the attenuation of shock wave, and a critical shock pressure was required for the impact induced thickening behavior. However, while the shock wave transformed from a uniaxial strain state to a dilatation state after transmitted to a certain distance, beside the dragging effect of impact induced jamming behavior, a strong dragging effect, induced by shear induced thickening behavior, was also observed.

  6. Calibration and Testing of a Large-Scale Electric Gun for Shock Hugoniot Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Fibre - optic coupler Figure 9: Single...break-beam arrangement. Beam Barrel displacing prism ’• • • •.__--I f He--Ne laser Laser line fi fi ter Fibre - optic cable Fibre - optic 0 coupler Figure...10: Dual break-beam arrangement. 16 Barrel Laser beams Flyer plate - 4 Photodetector Fibreoptic Figure 11: Thefront-on fibre optic impact

  7. Asymptotic Steady State Solution to a Bow Shock with an Infinite Mach Number

    CERN Document Server

    Yalinewich, Almog

    2015-01-01

    The problem of a cold gas flowing past a stationary object is considered. It is shown that at large distances from the obstacle the shock front forms a parabolic solid of revolution. The interior of the shock front is obtained by solution of the hydrodynamic equations in parabolic coordinates. The results are verified with a hydrodynamic simulation. The drag force and expected spectra are calculated for such shock, both in case of an optically thin and thick media. Finally, relations to astrophysical bow shocks and other analytic works on oblique shocks are discussed.

  8. Thermal shock behaviour of blisters on W surface during combined steady-state/pulsed plasma loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Luo, G.-N.; Li, C.; Qu, S. L.; Morgan, T. W.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-09-01

    The thermal shock behaviour of blister-covered W surfaces during combined steady-state/pulsed plasma loading was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The W samples were first exposed to steady-state D plasma to induce blisters on the surface, and then the blistered surfaces were exposed to steady-state/pulsed plasma. Growth and cracking of blisters were observed after the exposure to the steady-state/pulsed plasma, while no obvious damage occurred on the surface area not covered with blisters. The results confirm that blisters induced by D plasma might represent weak spots on the W surface when exposed to transient heat load of ELMs. The cracks on blisters were different from the cracks due to the transient heat loads reported before, and they were assumed to be caused by stress and strain due to the gas expansion inside the blisters during the plasma pulses. Moreover, most of cracks were found to appear on the blisters formed on grains with surface orientation near [1 1 1].

  9. The role of electrons at the solar wind termination shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahr, Hans Joerg; Siewert, Mark [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Describing the solar wind termination shock as a multi-fluid MHD Rankine-Hugoniot shock structure, it is usually assumed that electrons and protons experience identical jumps in density and pressure at the plasma passage over the shock. When analysing the specific kinetic conditions for electrons and ions at this MHD shock crossing, we find that electrons react very much different from protons at their shock passage undergoing an over-adiabatic heating due to conversion of electrically induced overshoot energies into downstream thermal energies. In case of an electron-proton two-fluid plasma, electrons constitute the dominant contribution to the downstream thermal plasma pressure and thereby determine the resulting compression ratio at the shock. We show that taking this over-adiabatic electron heating into account will then deliver a correct representation of all shock data taken with VOYAGER-2.

  10. A new equation of state for α-quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Rudolph; Carpenter, John

    2015-06-01

    Quartz (SiO2) is often used as an optically transparent window for visar signals in shock experiments and is itself an active component of the experiments. Therefore, the shock response of quartz is an important input that must be known to high fidelity for precise measurement of other materials. We describe on-going work to develop a wide-range equation of state table that includes multiple phases and incorporates the latest high quality experimental and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The emphasis in this work is the proper description of α-quartz along its principal Hugoniot through Stishovite and liquid phases. While molecular dissociation occurs at high pressures and temperatures, we find that an additional dissociation model is unnecessary. Although SiO2 possesses a number of solid phases, we restrict our focus to α-quartz and Stishovite as these two provide the density change along the Hugoniot path. We compare the model to recently measured data on Sandia's Z-machine. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE.

  11. Equations of state and melting curve of boron carbide in the high-pressure range of shock compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molodets, A. M., E-mail: molodets@icp.ac.ru; Golyshev, A. A.; Shakhrai, D. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    We have constructed the equations of state for crystalline boron carbide B{sub 11}C (C–B–C) and its melt under high dynamic and static pressures. A kink on the shock adiabat for boron carbide has been revealed in the pressure range near 100 GPa, and the melting curve with negative curvature in the pressure range 0–120 GPa has been calculated. The results have been used for interpreting the kinks on the shock adiabat for boron carbide in the pressure range of 0–400 GPa.

  12. Determination of the third-order elastic constants of diamond by shock wave simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, P.; Verma, Ashok K.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2015-06-01

    A new methodology comprising finite-strain theory, Hugoniot jump conditions, second-order elastic constants (SOECs) and their pressure derivatives, has been developed and was used to estimate the third-order elastic constants (TOECs) of diamond. Density functional theory was used to compute SOECs and their pressure derivatives. The required shock wave Hugoniots were estimated along the , and directions by classical molecular dynamics simulations. Calculated SOECs and TOECs were compared with available experimental and theoretical results. For SOECs, a fairly good agreement with experimental data was obtained and for TOECs our methodology predicts a better agreement with experimental data compared to other theoretical methods.

  13. Radiative Interaction Between Driver and Driven Gases in an Arc-Driven Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul

    2001-01-01

    An electric-arc driven shock tube was operated with hydrogen as the driven gas and either hydrogen or helium as the driver gas. Electron density was measured behind the primary shock wave spectroscopically from the width of the Beta line of hydrogen. The measured electron density values were many times greater than the values calculated by the Rankine - Hugoniot relations. By accounting for the radiative transfer from the driver gas to the driven gas, the measured electron density values were numerically recreated.

  14. Theoretical and experimental investigation of shock wave stressing of metal powders by an explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukyanov Ya.L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint theoretical and experimental investigations have allowed to realize an approach with use of mathematical and physical modeling of processes of a shock wave loading of powder materials. Hugoniot adiabats of the investigated powder have been measured with a noncontact electromagnetic method. The mathematical model of elastic-plastic deformation of the powder media used in the investigation has been validated. Numerical simulation of shock wave propagation and experimental assembly deformation has been performed.

  15. 冲击加载下Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9金属玻璃的塑性行为%Plastic behavior of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 metallic glass under planar shock loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞宇颖; 习锋; 戴诚达; 蔡灵仓; 谭华; 李雪梅; 胡昌明

    2012-01-01

    Planar shock compression experiments are performed on a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG), Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 at peak shock stresses from 10 GPa to 27 GPa to investigate its plastic behavior under high pressure and high strain-rate. The particle velocity profiles measured at the free surface of the samples are analyzed to estimate longitudinal stresses of the Zr-based BMG in the shock loading process,and then shear stresses are obtained by comparing longitudinal stresses with a hydrostat. Though there is an obvious relaxation effect after elastic front, the Hugoniot elastic limit of the Zr-based BMG is found to increase with shock stress increasing. However, the shear stresses across the plastic shock front display stress hardening above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a stress relaxation (softening) to Hugoniot state, and the relaxation level also increases with shock stress increasing. The changes of shear stresses under planar shock compression are consistent with the results from molecular dynamic simulations, but obviously different from the pressure-shear impact experimental results or uniaxial stress impact experimental results.%进行了10-27GPa应力范围内Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9金属玻璃的平面冲击实验以研究其高压.高应变率加载下的塑性行为.由样品自由面粒子速度剖面的分析获得了冲击加载过程的轴向应力,并通过轴向应力与静水压线的比较获得剪应力.实验结果表明,尽管存在明显的松弛效应,但Zr基金属玻璃的Hugoniot弹性极限随着冲击应力的增加而增加.然而,塑性波阵面上的剪应力则显示先硬化而后软化现象,而且软化的幅度随冲击应力的增加而增加.冲击加载下Zr基金属玻璃的上述剪应力变化特征与分子动力学模拟结果比较一致,但与压剪实验结果和一维应力冲击实验结果明显不同.

  16. Shock compression of glow discharge polymer (GDP): density functional theory (DFT) simulations and experiments on Sandia's Z machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Kyle R.; Ao, T.; Lemke, R. W.; Hamel, S.; Schoff, M. E.; Blue, B. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2014-03-01

    Glow discharge polymer (GDP) is used extensively as capsule/ablation material in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules. Accurate knowledge of the equation of state (EOS) under shock and release is particularly important for high-fidelity design, analysis, and optimization of ICF experiments since the capsule material is subject to several converging shocks as well as release towards the cryogenic fuel. We performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) based quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, to gain knowledge of the behavior of GDP - for example regarding the role of chemical dissociation during shock compression, we find that the dissociation regime along the Hugoniot extends from 50 GPa to 250 GPa. The shock pressures calculated from DFT are compared experimental data taken at Sandia's Z-machine. The GDP samples were grown in a planar geometry to improve the sample quality and maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere following manufacturing, thus allowing for a direct comparison to the DFT/QMD simulations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. International shock-wave database project : report of the requirements workshop.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidun, John Bahram (Institute of Problems of chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences); Lomonosov, Igor V. (Institute of Problems of chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences); Levashov, Pavel R. (Joint Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences)

    2012-03-01

    We report on the requirements workshop for a new project, the International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb), which was held October 31 - November 2, 2011, at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. Participants considered the idea of this database, its structure, technical requirements, content, and principles of operation. This report presents the consensus conclusions from the workshop, key discussion points, and the goals and plan for near-term and intermediate-term development of the ISWdb. The main points of consensus from the workshop were: (1) This international database is of interest and of practical use for the shock-wave and high pressure physics communities; (2) Intermediate state information and off-Hugoniot information is important and should be included in ISWdb; (3) Other relevant high pressure and auxiliary data should be included to the database, in the future; (4) Information on the ISWdb needs to be communicated, broadly, to the research community; and (5) Operating structure will consist of an Advisory Board, subject-matter expert Moderators to vet submitted data, and the database Project Team. This brief report is intended to inform the shock-wave research community and interested funding agencies about the project, as its success, ultimately, depends on both of these groups finding sufficient value in the database to use it, contribute to it, and support it.

  18. Reactions of 1-naphthyl radicals with ethylene. Single pulse shock tube experiments, quantum chemical, transition state theory, and multiwell calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Assa; Tamburu, Carmen; Dubnikova, Faina

    2008-02-07

    The reactions of 1-naphthyl radicals with ethylene were studied behind reflected shock waves in a single pulse shock tube, covering the temperature range 950-1200 K at overall densities behind the reflected shocks of approximately 2.5 x 10(-5) mol/cm3. 1-Iodonaphthalene served as the source for 1-naphthyl radicals as its C-I bond dissociation energy is relatively small. It is only approximately 65 kcal/mol as compared to the C-H bond strength in naphthalene which is approximately 112 kcal/mol and can thus produce naphthyl radicals at rather low reflected shock temperatures. The [ethylene]/[1-iodo-naphthalene] ratio in all of the experiments was approximately 100 in order to channel the free radicals into reactions with ethylene rather than iodonaphthalene. Four products resulting from the reactions of 1-naphthyl radicals with ethylene were found in the post shock samples. They were vinyl naphthalene, acenaphthene, acenaphthylene, and naphthalene. Some low molecular weight aliphatic products at rather low concentrations, resulting from the attack of various free radicals on ethylene were also found in the shocked samples. In view of the relatively low temperatures employed in the present experiments, the unimolecular decomposition rate of ethylene is negligible. Three potential energy surfaces describing the production of vinyl naphthalene, acenaphthene, and acenaphthylene were calculated using quantum chemical methods and rate constants for the elementary steps on the surfaces were calculated using transition state theory. Naphthalene is not part of the reactions on the surfaces. Acenaphthylene is obtained only from acenaphthene. A kinetics scheme containing 27 elementary steps most of which were obtained from the potential energy surfaces was constructed and computer modeling was performed. An excellent agreement between the experimental yields of the four major products and the calculated yields was obtained.

  19. An Equation of State for Foamed Divinylbenzene (DVB) Based on Multi-Shock Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Tariq; Schroen, Diana; Gustavsen, Richard; Bartram, Brian

    2013-06-01

    The methodology for making foamed Divinylbenzene (DVB) is described. For a variety of initial densities, foamed DVB is examined through multi-shock compression and release experiments. Results from multi-shock experiments on LANL's 2-stage gas gun will be presented. A simple conservative Lagrangian numerical scheme, utilizing total-variation-diminishing interpolation and an approximate Riemann solver, will be presented as well as the methodology of calibration. It has been previously demonstrated that a single Mie-Gruneisen fitting form can replicate foam multi-shock compression response at a variety of initial densities; such a methodology will be presented for foamed DVB.

  20. The equation-of-states of Jilin ordinary chondrite and Nandan iron meteorite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴诚达; 金孝刚; 傅世勤; 施尚春; 王道德

    1997-01-01

    Shock wave data for Jilin ordinary chondrite and Nandan iron meteorite are measured by electric-pin techniques on the dynamic high-pressure device equipped with a two-stage light gas gun, and then equation-of-states supposedly fit for describing their P-V-E relations are chosen to evaluate the values of their parameters. Demonstrated from the comparison between P-V curves of equation-of-states and experimental data points, P-V relation of Jilin ordinary chondrite can be described by the universal equation-of-state, of which bulk modulus value of zero-pressure K0s = 48.10 GPa, its pressure derivative K’os = 4.13. That of Nandan iron meteorite can be described by the three-term form of equation-of-state, of which the values of two matter parameters Q = 41.23531 GPa, 5 = 12.271 79. The Hugoniot data and equation-of-states for Jilin ordinary chondrite and Nandan iron meteorite are first reported in this paper. The equation-of-state defined by Hugoniot data measurement provides strong empirical support for d

  1. Experimental Measurement for Shock Velocity-Mass Velocity Relationship of Liquid Argon Up to 46 GPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟川民; 施尚春; 董石; 杨向东; 谭华; 经福谦

    2003-01-01

    Shock properties of liquid argon were measured in the shock pressure up to 46 GPa by employing the two-stage light gas gun. Liquid nitrogen was used as coolant liquid. The cryogenic target system has been improved to compare with the previous work. Shock velocities were measured with self-shorting electrical probes. Impactor velocities were measured with an electrical-magnetic induction system. Mass velocities were obtained by mean of shock impedance matching method. The experimental data shows that the slope of experimental Hugoniot curve of liquid argon begins to decrease above 30 GPa.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic Shocks in the Interplanetary Space: a Theoretical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    I discuss in this brief review some properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) discontinuities in the interplanetary space. My emphasis is on a special case of MHD discontinuity, namely interplanetary (IP) shocks, and those that are found at 1 AU. I derive the Rankine-Hugoniot (RH) equations to evaluate plasma parameters in the downstream region (shocked plasma) in relation to the upstream region (unshocked plasma). These properties are used to classify IP shocks in terms of their geometry and their direction of propagation in relation to the Sun. The shock geometry is determined in terms of two angles: θ _{Bn}, the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock normal, and θ _{xn}, the angle between the shock normal and the Sun-Earth line. Sources of IP shocks frequently found in the solar wind at Earth's orbit are presented. Then the RH equations are solved for two categories of IP shocks in a special case: perpendicular shocks, when θ _{Bn} is 90 ∘, and oblique shocks, when that angle is 45 ∘. Finally, I highlight the importance of knowing the shock geometry, mainly the impact angle θ _{xn}, specially whether the shock is frontal or inclined, for space weather-related investigations. IP shocks are known to be more geoeffective if they strike the Earth's magnetosphere frontally, or with impact angle nearly null. These results have been reported both by modeling and experimental studies in the literature.

  3. Equation of state of dense neon and krypton plasmas in the partial ionization regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Q. F., E-mail: chenqf01@gmail.com; Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, Z. G. [Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, P.O. Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan (China)

    2015-12-15

    The compression behaviors of dense neon and krypton plasmas over a wide pressure-temperature range are investigated by self-consistent fluid variational theory. The ionization degree and equation of state of dense neon and krypton are calculated in the density-temperature range of 0.01–10 g/cm{sup 3} and 4–50 kK. A region of thermodynamic instability is found which is related to the plasma phase transition. The calculated shock adiabat and principal Hugoniot of liquid krypton are in good agreement with available experimental data. The predicted results of shock-compressed liquid neon are presented, which provide a guide for dynamical experiments or numerical first-principle calculations aimed at studying the compression properties of liquid neon in the partial ionization regime.

  4. Intra-aortic balloon pump in cardiogenic shock: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETRONIO GENEROSO THOMAZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The clinical definition of cardiogenic shock is that of a low cardiac output and evidence of tissue hypoxia in the presence of adequate blood volume. Cardiogenic shock is the main cause of death related to acute myocardial infarction (AMI, with a mortality rate of 45-70% in the absence of aggressive and highly specialized technical care. The intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP is one of the most widely used mechanical assisting devices. During the last two decades, about 42% of patients with AMI who evolved with cardiogenic shock received mechanical circulatory assistance with IABP. Its clinical indication has been based on non-randomized studies and registry data. Recent studies have shown that the use of IABP did not reduce 30-day mortality in patients with AMI and cardiogenic shock treated with the strategy of early myocardial revascularization as the planned primary objective. The guidelines of the American Heart Association and of the European Society of Cardiology have reassessed their recommendations based on the results of meta-analyzes, including the IABP-SCHOCK II Trial study, which did not evidence an increase in survival of patients who received mechanical support with IABP. This review article addresses the clinical impact of IABP use in the cardiogenic shock caused by AMI.

  5. A child in a state of shock in emercency department: classification, mechanisms and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Равіч Maрцін

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric shock is a life-threatening condition that can often be difficult to recognize in the emergency department, especially in early stages. Once recognized, the emphasis of therapy is to correct cellular metabolism and gas exchange by increasing oxygen and other substrate delivery to tissue beds. This review discusses various mechanisms and aetiology of shock are discussed, among them hypoxia in infancy, hypovolaemia, impaired distribution, obstruction of the cardiac outflow and sepsis.In septic shock providing oxygen, improving tissue perfusion through restoration in the intravascular volume, augmentation of cardiac output, preservation of kidney function, and administering antibiotics in a timely manner have all been shown to significantly improve outcomes in children. Simple  algorithms for first aid in emergency room are given, emphasizes the importance of effective surveillance and timely recognition of this disease process, to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. The review indicates how to identify specific markers of septic shock, lays out the essential components of goal-directed therapy, and ways to avoid the devastating consequences of shock in paediatric patients

  6. Shock Melting of Iron Silicide as Determined by In Situ X-ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M.; Kraus, R. G.; Wicks, J. K.; Smith, R.; Duffy, T. S.

    2016-12-01

    The equation of state of core alloys at pressures and temperatures near the solid-liquid coexistence curve is important for understanding the dynamics at the inner core boundary of the Earth and super-Earths. Here, we present a series of laser driven shock experiments on textured polycrystalline Fe-15Si. These experiments were conducted at the Omega and Omega EP laser facilities. Particle velocities in the Fe-15Si samples were measured using a line VISAR and were used to infer the thermodynamic state of the shocked samples. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were used to probe the melting transition and investigate the potential decomposition of Fe-15Si in to hcp and B2 structures. This work examines the kinetic effects of decomposition due to the short time scale of dynamic compression experiments. In addition, the thermodynamic data collected in these experiments adds to a limited body of information regarding the equation of state of Fe-15Si, which is a candidate for the composition in Earth's outer core. Our experimental results show a highly textured solid phase upon shock compression to pressures ranging from 170 to 300 GPa. Below 320 GPa, we observe diffraction peaks consistent with decomposition of the D03 starting material in to an hcp and a cubic (potentially B2) structure. Upon shock compression above 320 GPa, the intense and textured solid diffraction peaks give way to diffuse scattering and loss of texture, consistent with melting along the Hugoniot. When comparing these results to that of pure iron, we can ascertain that addition of 15 wt% silicon increases the equilibrium melting temperature significantly, or that the addition of silicon significantly increases the metastability of the solid phase, relative to the liquid. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shock Compressed Quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Farrow, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of shock wave compression of quartz have been performed using the so-called BKS semi-empirical potential of van Beest, Kramer and van Santen to construct the Hugoniot of quartz. Our scheme mimics the real world experimental set up by using a flyer-plate impactor to initiate the shock wave and is the first shock wave simulation that uses a geom- etry optimised system of a polar slab in a 3-dimensional system employing periodic boundary conditions. Our scheme also includes the relaxation of the surface dipole in the polar quartz slab which is an essential pre-requisite to a stable simulation. The original BKS potential is unsuited to shock wave calculations and so we propose a simple modification. With this modification, we find that our calculated Hugoniot is in good agreement with experimental shock wave data up to 25 GPa, but significantly diverges beyond this point. We conclude that our modified BKS potential is suitable for quartz under repres...

  8. Equation-of-State Dependent Features in Shock-Oscillation Modulated Neutrino and Gravitational-Wave Signals from Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Marek, A; Müller, E

    2008-01-01

    We present 2D hydrodynamic simulations of the long-time accretion phase of a 15 solar mass star after core bounce and before the launch of a supernova explosion. Our simulations are performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code, employing multi-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport and an effective relativistic gravitational potential. Testing the influence of a stiff and a soft equation of state for hot neutron star matter, we find that the non-radial mass motions in the supernova core due to the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and convection impose a time variability on the neutrino and gravitational-wave signals. These variations have larger amplitudes as well as higher frequencies in the case of a more compact nascent neutron star. After the prompt shock-breakout burst of electron neutrinos, a more compact accreting remnant radiates neutrinos with higher luminosities and larger mean energies. The observable neutrino emission in the direction of SASI shock oscillations exhibits a modulation o...

  9. Design and analysis of x-ray driven shock wave equation-of-state experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, R. A.; Lazicki, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Erskine, D. J.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Meezan, N. B.; Peterson, J. L.; NIF EOS Team

    2016-10-01

    The equation-of-state (EOS) is important for describing and predicting material properties in the field of high energy density physics. Especially important is the EOS of materials compressed and heated from ambient conditions by shockwaves. For most materials, experimental data at high pressures, much above 10 Mbar, is sparse. The large energy and power of the National Ignition Facility readily enable EOS experiments in a new regime, at pressures on order of 100 Mbar. We describe a platform for EOS measurements using planar shockwaves driven by x rays within a hohlraum target. The EOS is determined by an impedance matching method, using a reference material of known EOS. For transparent materials, the shock velocity is measured directly by optical interferometry, while for opaque materials, the measurement is done by timing the entrance and exit of the shock and correcting for time variations with an adjacent transparent reference. We describe the computational design and analysis of experiments. Predicted shock velocities and transit times are used to set the target layer thicknesses and interferometer timing. Data from several NIF shots are compared to post-shot calculations. New, high pressure EOS data is presented for several materials. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Equation of state of initially liquid carbon monoxide and nitrogen mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG JinWen; SUN Dong; SUN Yue; SHI ShangChun

    2008-01-01

    Academy of Engineering Physics,Mianyang 621900,ChinaThe modified liquid perturbation variational theory and the improved vdW-1f model were applied to calculating the equation of the state of liquid CO-N2 mixture with the ratio of 1:1,4:1 and 1:4,respectively,in the shock pressure range of 9-49 Gpa.It was shown that the calculated result for CO-N2 mixture with the ratio of 1:1 is well consistent with the earlier experimental data.The thermodynamics equilibrium,chemical equilibrium and phase equilibrium were all considered in detail.It was found that Hugoniot of liquid CO-N2 mixture is moderately softened in the pressure range of 20-30 Gpa and 30-49 Gpa for different initial proportions,and that the Hugoniot is more softened in the latter pressure range,which means that the structural phase transition occurs near 20 Gpa and 30 Gpa.Since the shock pro-ductions may absorb a plenty of systematic energy,the shock temperature and pressure decline compared with the case of no chemical reaction.Pressures and temperatures increase gradually with the increase in the mole fraction of nitrogen composition.The results for the 1:1 CO-N2 mixture lie in the middle of two others.Therefore,it was shown that the modified Lorentz-Berthelor rule used in the scheme is effective to study shock-compression properties of liquid CO-N2 mixture under high temperatures and high pressures.

  11. On the Possibility of Radio Emission from Quasi-parallel and Quasi-perpendicular Propagation of Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Shanmugaraju; S. Umapathy

    2000-09-01

    A set of 21 solar type II radio bursts observed using Hiraiso radio spectrograph have been analysed to study the direction of propagation of coronal shocks. Α simple analysis is carried out to find the approximate angle between the shock normal and magnetic field by solving the Rankine-Hugoniot MHD relation with assumption of Alfven speed and plasma beta. From this analysis, it is suggested that both quasi-parallel shocks (favourable) and quasi-perpendicular shocks can generate type II bursts depending upon the circumstances of the corona.

  12. Delta Shocks and Vacuum States in Vanishing Pressure Limits of Solutions to the Relativistic Euler Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan YIN; Wancheng SHENG

    2008-01-01

    The Riemann problems for the Euler system of conservation laws of energy and momentum in special relativity as pressure vanishes are considered. The Riemann solutions for the pressureless relativistic Euler equations are obtained constructively. There are two kinds of solutions, the one involves delta shock wave and the other involves vacuum. The authors prove that these two kinds of solutions are the limits of the solutions as pressure vanishes in the Euler system of conservation laws of energy and momentum in special relativity.

  13. Hemodynamic consequences of severe lactic acidosis in shock states: from bench to bedside

    OpenAIRE

    Kimmoun, Antoine; Novy, Emmanuel; Auchet, Thomas; Ducrocq, Nicolas; Levy, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a very common biological issue for shock patients. Experimental data clearly demonstrate that metabolic acidosis, including lactic acidosis, participates in the reduction of cardiac contractility and in the vascular hyporesponsiveness to vasopressors through various mechanisms. However, the contributions of each mechanism responsible for these deleterious effects have not been fully determined and their respective consequences on organ failure are still poorly defined, part...

  14. SOME PROBLEMS ON JUMP CONDITIONS OF SHOCK WAVES IN 3-DIMENSIONAL SOLIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-chi; YAO Lei; HU Xiu-zhang; CAO Jie-dong; DONG Jie

    2006-01-01

    Based on the general conservation laws in continuum mechanics, the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of the jump conditions of shock waves in 3-dimensional solids were presented respectively. The implication of the jump conditions and their relations between each other, particularly the relation between the mass conservation and the displacement continuity, were discussed. Meanwhile the shock wave response curves in 3-dimensional solids, i.e. the Hugoniot curves were analysed, which provide the foundation for studying the coupling effects of shock waves in 3-dimensional solids.

  15. Molecular dynamic study of Shock wave response of bulk amorphous polyvinyl chloride: effect of chain length and force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2015-06-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics in conjunction with multi-scale shock technique is utilized to investigate shock wave response of bulk amorphous polyvinyl chloride. Dependence of chain length on physical and mechanical behaviour of polymeric material at ambient condition of temperature and pressure are well known but unknown for extreme conditions. Non-reactive force fields PCFF, COMPASS and PCFF+ were used to determine applicability of the force field for the study of the material subjected to shock loads. Several samples of PVC with various chain lengths were subjected to a range of shock compression from 1.5-10.0 km/s. Even though dependence of chain length was observed for lower shock strengths but was not for intense shock loads. The principle Hugoniot points, calculated by applying hydrostatic Rankine-Hugoniot equations and as well as multi-scale shock technique, were compared against LASL experimental shock data, demonstrating superior performance of PCFF+ force-field over PCFF and COMPASS. Shock induced melting characteristic and vibrational spectroscopic study were conducted and compared with experimental data to observe differences in response with relation to different force fields, chain length of the material for different shock intensities.

  16. Shock responses of nanoporous aluminum by molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, Meizhen; Yang, Yantao; Liao, Yi; Wang, Kun; Chen, Yun; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic investigations on the shock responses of nanoporous aluminum (np-Al) by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The dislocation nucleation sites are found to concentrate in low latitude region near the equator of the spherical void surfaces. We propose a continuum wave reflection theory and a resolved shear stress model to explain the distribution of dislocation nucleation sites. The simulations reveals two mechanisms of void collapse: the plasticity mechanism and the internal jetting mechanism. The plasticity mechanism, which leads to transverse collapse of voids, prevails under relatively weaker shocks; while the internal jetting mechanism, which leads to longitudinal filling of the void vacuum, plays more significant role as the shock intensity increases. In addition, an abnormal thermodynamic phenomenon (i.e., arising of temperature with pressure dropping) in shocked np-Al is discovered. This phenomenon is incompatible with the conventional Rankine-Hugoniot theory, and is expl...

  17. Equation of state measurements of hydrogen isotopes on Nova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, G.W.; Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.B.; Cauble, R.; Gold, D.; Foord, M.; Budil, K.S.; Stewart, R.; Holmes, N.C.; Ross, M.; Hammel, B.A.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Wallace, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California94550 (United States); Ng, A. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    The Nova laser [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams {bold 9}, 209 (1991)] was used to shock-compress liquid deuterium and obtain new principal Hugoniot measurements of density and pressure between 0.3 and 2.1 Mbar. In this pressure-density region, deuterium is predicted to transform from a molecular insulating fluid to an atomic conducting fluid. Nova data show a rapid increase in density from 0.6 g/cc at 0.3 Mbar, to 1 g/cc at 0.6 Mbar, suggestive of such a transition. The observed sixfold compression near 1 Mbar is larger than predicted by many widely used equation of state models.

  18. A method for shock determination and classification and Helios observations of fast, intermediate and slow interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Marsch, E.; Schwenn, R.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1995-01-01

    A new method to determine and classify shocks from in situ measurements is developed, using normalized velocities up- and down-stream in a velocity V(sub 1)-V(sub 2) diagram. With this method one can show how the shock solutions vary with different time averages over the data from the up- and down-stream region. For stable fast forward shocks the solutions are confined well in the 1 to 2 region, and for slow shocks most of the solutions are confined in the 3 to 4 region. A candidate for an intermediate shock was observed by Helios and with our method clearly identified. We found perhaps the first shock with parameters in the 2 to 3 region (with C(sub F1) greater than V(sub 1) greater than C(sub I1), and C(sub I2) greater than V(sub 2) greater than C(sub SL2) and a 180 deg rotation of the tangential magnetic field), which is interpreted as an intermediate shock with B(sub perpendicular 1) being less than B(sub perpendicular 2). The different shock solutions are somewhat distributed in the normalized V(sub 1)-V(sub 2) diagram, but only the intermediate shock solutions are consistent with the Rankine-Hugoniot relations for this particular shock. The Mach number M(sub I1) equals 1.067, a figure in good agreement with the Kennel et al. (1989) theoretical values.

  19. Experience with extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furia, John P.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to summarize the literature and to report on single treatment, high-energy ESWT for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis and lateral epicondylitis. Fifty-three patients (60 heels) were treated with 3800 shock waves. Sixteen patients (19 heels) were active, 21 (22 heels), were moderately active, and 16 (19 heels) were sedentary. Twelve weeks post treatment, mean visual analog scores (VAS) for the entire group improved from 9.2 to 2.4 (pepicondylitis were treated with 3200 shock waves. There were 9 workers compensation and 27 non-workers compensation patients. Twelve weeks post treatment, the mean VAS for the entire group improved from 8.0 to 2.5 (pelbows (77.8%) were assigned an excellent or good result. In both trials, outcome was similar for each subgroup. There were no significant complications in either trial. Using the therapeutic parameters applied, ESWT is a safe and effective treatment for chronic plantar fasciitis and lateral epicondylitis.

  20. Intra-aortic balloon pump in cardiogenic shock: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Petronio Generoso; Moura, Leonel Adelino; Muramoto, Giovana; Assad, Renato Samy

    2017-01-01

    The clinical definition of cardiogenic shock is that of a low cardiac output and evidence of tissue hypoxia in the presence of adequate blood volume. Cardiogenic shock is the main cause of death related to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), with a mortality rate of 45-70% in the absence of aggressive and highly specialized technical care. The intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) is one of the most widely used mechanical assisting devices. During the last two decades, about 42% of patients with AMI who evolved with cardiogenic shock received mechanical circulatory assistance with IABP. Its clinical indication has been based on non-randomized studies and registry data. Recent studies have shown that the use of IABP did not reduce 30-day mortality in patients with AMI and cardiogenic shock treated with the strategy of early myocardial revascularization as the planned primary objective. The guidelines of the American Heart Association and of the European Society of Cardiology have reassessed their recommendations based on the results of meta-analyzes, including the IABP-SCHOCK II Trial study, which did not evidence an increase in survival of patients who received mechanical support with IABP. This review article addresses the clinical impact of IABP use in the cardiogenic shock caused by AMI. RESUMO A definição clínica de choque cardiogênico é a de um quadro de baixo débito cardíaco e evidência de hipóxia tecidual, na presença de volemia adequada. O choque cardiogênico representa a principal causa de óbito relacionada ao infarto agudo do miocárdio (IAM), com índice de mortalidade em torno de 45% a 70%, na ausência de cuidados técnicos agressivos e altamente especializados. O balão intra-aórtico (BIA) é um dos dispositivos de assistência mecânica mais utilizados no mundo. Nas duas últimas décadas, cerca de 42% dos pacientes com IAM, que evoluíram com choque cardiogênico, receberam assistência circulatória mecânica com BIA. Sua indicação cl

  1. On the shock response of PCTFE (Kel-F 81¯)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D. C.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Fitzmaurice, B. C.; Hameed, A.; Millett, J. C. F.; Hazell, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    The polymeric material PCTFE (Kel-F 81®) has found a useful niche in explosive research due to its use not only an explosive binder but also as a explosive simulant. Knowledge of shock propagation in explosives is of paramount importance primarily from a safety perspective both in terms of reaction to a designed stimulus and to off-normal (accident) events. To this end, as part of a more general investigation into the relationship between polymeric structure and high strain-rate response, the dynamic response of PCFTE (more commonly known as Kel-F 81®) has been investigated via a series of plate-impact experiments. Using this technique both the shock and release behaviour of PCTFE have been investigated. The data obtained for the shock response agreed with previously obtained data from the literature. Deviation from the Hugoniot was seen in the pressure-particle velocity plane, a response attributed here to material strength. With regards to the behaviour of the release Hugoniot, a two-tiered response was observed. Initially a tensile elastic wave with an approximate velocity of 3.00 mm μs-1 was noted until a particle velocity of 0.36 mm μs-1. After this initial region a linear release Hugoniot was apparent, a response comparable to behaviour seen in other polymers.

  2. State of the evidence: mechanical ventilation with PEEP in patients with cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesen, Jonathan; Ornstein, Moshe; Tonelli, Adriano R; Menon, Venu; Ashton, Rendell W

    2013-12-01

    The need to provide invasive mechanical ventilatory support to patients with myocardial infarction and acute left heart failure is common. Despite the large number of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in this setting, there are remarkably few data addressing the ideal mode of respiratory support in such patients. Although there is near universal acceptance regarding the use of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in patients with acute pulmonary oedema, there is more concern with invasive positive pressure ventilation owing to its more significant haemodynamic impact. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is almost universally applied in mechanically ventilated patients due to benefits in gas exchange, recruitment of alveolar units, counterbalance of hydrostatic forces leading to pulmonary oedema and maintenance of airway patency. The limited available clinical data suggest that a moderate level of PEEP is safe to use in severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and cardiogenic shock, and may provide haemodynamic benefits as well in LV failure which exhibits afterload-sensitive physiology.

  3. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF THE CURRENCY REGIME CHANGE SHOCK ON THE EXTERNAL EQUILIBRIUM OF SOME NEW EUROPEAN UNION MEMBER STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAMELIA MILEA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of globalization and regionalization, we consider to be important an analysis of the asymmetries from the balances of payments of the member states of the European Union (EU. The propagation of a shock determines different effects in the member states of the European Union, due to the existence of some heterogeneous elements in the structure of these economies. Such a situation implies the risk of occurrence of divergences between the member states regarding the joint decisions with impact on the economic development and the external equilibrium. The article aims at providing a theoretical analysis of the way a shock considered by the authors as being representative affects the current account balance of some countries with different economic characteristics, at least in terms of the foreign exchange regime. The theoretical analysis is followed by an empirical analysis of two European Union countries that have undergone the shock of the exchange rate regime shift generated by the entry into ERM II (Exchange Rate Mechanism II. Our research aims at showing the way in which this shock has been reflected upon the balance of the current account, and if the change of the exchange rate regime has been beneficial or not for the economies analysed. The article is based on wider research studies concerning the matters of external equilibrium, asymmetric shocks and European integration, and which have been developed by the authors during the last three years.

  4. Cardiogenic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock - cardiogenic ... electrical system of the heart (heart block) Cardiogenic shock occurs when the heart is unable to pump ... orthostatic hypotension) Weak (thready) pulse To diagnose cardiogenic shock, a catheter (tube) may be placed in the ...

  5. Turbulent jumps and shock-structure in shock-turbulence interactions using shock-resolving direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Hsin; Donzis, Diego

    2016-11-01

    Substantial efforts have been made to understand the canonical interaction between isotropic turbulence and a normal shock. Evidence from theories, experiments and simulations, however, has shown that the interaction is complex and that the outcome is determined not only by mean flow behavior, as suggested by early theories, but also by characteristics of turbulence fluctuations typically quantified by parameters such as the Reynolds (Rλ) and the turbulent Mach number (Mt). An important, yet unresolved, issue is the accurate determination of departures from Rankine-Hugoniot relations due to turbulent fluctuations upstream of the shock. We present an analytic study, based on the quasi-equilibrium assumption, that yield turbulent jumps that depend not only on the mean flow but also on turbulence characteristics. In particular, the focus will be on thermodynamic jumps. Our analytical results agree well with new shock-resolving simulations at a range of Reynolds and Mach numbers. In the context of these results we also present a comparison of previous theory on the dilatation at the shock with the new DNS data. This is further discussed in the context of the transition from wrinkled to broken regimes and the difficulties associated with identifying a shock for very vigorous turbulence. Support from AFOSR is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Thermal decomposition of NH2OH and subsequent reactions: ab initio transition state theory and reflected shock tube experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klippenstein, S J; Harding, L B; Ruscic, B; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Srinivasan, N K; Su, M-C; Michael, J V

    2009-09-24

    Primary and secondary reactions involved in the thermal decomposition of NH2OH are studied with a combination of shock tube experiments and transition state theory based theoretical kinetics. This coupled theory and experiment study demonstrates the utility of NH2OH as a high temperature source of OH radicals. The reflected shock technique is employed in the determination of OH radical time profiles via multipass electronic absorption spectrometry. O-atoms are searched for with atomic resonance absorption spectrometry. The experiments provide a direct measurement of the rate coefficient, k1, for the thermal decomposition of NH2OH. Secondary rate measurements are obtained for the NH2 + OH (5a) and NH2OH + OH (6a) abstraction reactions. The experimental data are obtained for temperatures in the range from 1355 to 1889 K and are well represented by the respective rate expressions: log[k/(cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1))] = (-10.12 +/- 0.20) + (-6793 +/- 317 K/T) (k1); log[k/(cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1))] = (-10.00 +/- 0.06) + (-879 +/- 101 K/T) (k5a); log[k/(cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1))] = (-9.75 +/- 0.08) + (-1248 +/- 123 K/T) (k6a). Theoretical predictions are made for these rate coefficients as well for the reactions of NH2OH + NH2, NH2OH + NH, NH + OH, NH2 + NH2, NH2 + NH, and NH + NH, each of which could be of secondary importance in NH2OH thermal decomposition. The theoretical analyses employ a combination of ab initio transition state theory and master equation simulations. Comparisons between theory and experiment are made where possible. Modest adjustments of predicted barrier heights (i.e., by 2 kcal/mol or less) generally yield good agreement between theory and experiment. The rate coefficients obtained here should be of utility in modeling NOx in various combustion environments.

  7. Comparison of geometrical shock dynamics and kinematic models for shock-wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridoux, J.; Lardjane, N.; Monasse, L.; Coulouvrat, F.

    2017-09-01

    Geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) is a simplified model for nonlinear shock-wave propagation, based on the decomposition of the shock front into elementary ray tubes. Assuming small changes in the ray tube area, and neglecting the effect of the post-shock flow, a simple relation linking the local curvature and velocity of the front, known as the A{-}M rule, is obtained. More recently, a new simplified model, referred to as the kinematic model, was proposed. This model is obtained by combining the three-dimensional Euler equations and the Rankine-Hugoniot relations at the front, which leads to an equation for the normal variation of the shock Mach number at the wave front. In the same way as GSD, the kinematic model is closed by neglecting the post-shock flow effects. Although each model's approach is different, we prove their structural equivalence: the kinematic model can be rewritten under the form of GSD with a specific A{-}M relation. Both models are then compared through a wide variety of examples including experimental data or Eulerian simulation results when available. Attention is drawn to the simple cases of compression ramps and diffraction over convex corners. The analysis is completed by the more complex cases of the diffraction over a cylinder, a sphere, a mound, and a trough.

  8. Delta Shock Wave for the Suliciu Relaxation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard De la cruz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the one-dimensional Riemann problem for a hyperbolic system of three conservation laws of Temple class. This system is a simplification of a recently proposed system of five conservations laws by Bouchut and Boyaval that model viscoelastic fluids. An important issue is that the considered 3×3 system is such that every characteristic field is linearly degenerate. We show an explicit solution for the Cauchy problem with initial data in L∞. We also study the Riemann problem for this system. Under suitable generalized Rankine-Hugoniot relation and entropy condition, both existence and uniqueness of particular delta-shock type solutions are established.

  9. State-to-state vibrational kinetics of H$_2$ and H$_2^+$ in a post-shock cooling gas with primordial composition

    CERN Document Server

    Coppola, C M; Bruno, D; Esposito, F; Galli, D; Palla, F; Longo, S

    2016-01-01

    The radiative cooling of shocked gas with primordial chemical composition is an important process relevant to the formation of the first stars and structures, as well as taking place also in high velocity cloud collisions and supernovae explosions. Among the different processes that need to be considered, the formation kinetics and cooling of molecular hydrogen are of prime interest, since they provide the only way to lower the gas temperature to values well below $\\sim$10$^4$~K. In previous works, the internal energy level structure of H$_2$ and its cation has been treated in the approximation of rovibrational ground state at low densities, or trying to describe the dynamics using some arbitrary $v>0$ H$_2$ level that is considered representative of the excited vibrational manifold. In this study, we compute the vibrationally resolved kinetics for the time-dependent chemical and thermal evolution of the post-shock gas in a medium of primordial composition. The calculated non-equilibrium distributions are use...

  10. State-to-state modeling of non equilibrium low-temperature atomic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultel, Arnaud; Morel, Vincent; Annaloro, Julien; Druguet, Marie-Claude

    2017-03-01

    The most relevant approach leading to a thorough understanding of the behavior of non equilibrium atomic plasmas is to elaborate state-to-state models in which the mass conservation equation is applied directly to atoms or ions on their excited states. The present communication reports the elaboration of such models and the results obtained. Two situations close to each other are considered. First, the plasmas produced behind shock fronts obtained in ground test facilities (shock tubes) or during planetary atmospheric entries of spacecrafts are discussed. We focused our attention on the nitrogen case for which a complete implementation of the CoRaM-N2 collisional-radiative model has been performed in a steady one-dimensional computation code based on the Rankine-Hugoniot assumptions. Second, the plasmas produced by the interaction between an ultra short laser pulse and a tungsten sample are discussed in the framework of the elaboration of the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. In the present case, tungsten has been chosen in the purpose of validating an in situ experimental method able to provide the elemental composition of the divertor wall of a tokamak like WEST or ITER undergoing high energetic deuterium and tritium nuclei fluxes.

  11. The interaction of turbulence with parallel and perpendicular shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, L.; Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Hu, Q.

    2016-11-01

    Interplanetary shocks exist in most astrophysical flows, and modify the properties of the background flow. We apply the Zank et al 2012 six coupled turbulence transport model equations to study the interaction of turbulence with parallel and perpendicular shock waves in the solar wind. We model the 1D structure of a stationary perpendicular or parallel shock wave using a hyperbolic tangent function and the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. A reduced turbulence transport model (the 4-equation model) is applied to parallel and perpendicular shock waves, and solved using a 4th- order Runge Kutta method. We compare the model results with ACE spacecraft observations. We identify one quasi-parallel and one quasi-perpendicular event in the ACE spacecraft data sets, and compute various turbulent observed values such as the fluctuating magnetic and kinetic energy, the energy in forward and backward propagating modes, the total turbulent energy in the upstream and downstream of the shock. We also calculate the error associated with each turbulent observed value, and fit the observed values by a least square method and use a Fourier series fitting function. We find that the theoretical results are in reasonable agreement with observations. The energy in turbulent fluctuations is enhanced and the correlation length is approximately constant at the shock. Similarly, the normalized cross helicity increases across a perpendicular shock, and decreases across a parallel shock.

  12. Understanding the Acceleration of Energetic Particles at the Termination Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fisk, L. A.

    2006-05-01

    Voyager 1 observations of energetic particles during the crossing of the Termination Shock of the solar wind present a number of puzzles, and challenges to existing acceleration theories. For example, downstream from the shock the low-energy phase space density spectra are power laws exhibiting a remarkably constant spectral index, which is difficult to understand in terms of standard diffusive shock acceleration. Upstream from the shock there are beams of highly anisotropic energetic particles, with varying spectral shapes. Again, diffusive shock acceleration has difficultly in dealing with such large anisotropies. Here we show that the observed, constant spectral index of -5 can be accounted for by a simple theory in which the pressure in the accelerated particles behaves according to the Rankine-Hugoniot relationship of an ideal gas at the shock. We also demonstrate that the observed varying spectral shapes of the upstream beams result from velocity dispersion of a downstream spectrum with index of -5 propagating along magnetic flux tubes connecting the termination shock to Voyager 1. We show that even though the beams dominate the upstream foreshock region, they do not have an appreciable effect on the shock acceleration process. The implications of our theory for the acceleration of the Anomalous Cosmic Rays in the heliosheath are also discussed.

  13. Mean-field potential calculations of high-pressure equation of state for BeO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qi-Li; Zhang Ping; Song Hai-Feng; Liu Hai-Feng

    2008-01-01

    A systematic study of the Hugoniot equation of state, phase transition, and the other thermodynamic properties including the Hugoniot temperature, the electronic and ionic heat capacities, and the Griineisen parameter for shockcompressed BeO, has been carried out by calculating the total free energy. The method of calculations combines first-principles treatment for 0 K and finite-T electronic contribution and the mean-field-potential approach for the vibrational contribution of the lattice ion to the total energy. Our calculated Hugoniot is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Molecular-Level Analysis of Shock-Wave Physics and Derivation of the Hugoniot Relations for Fused Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    represents amorphous materials as a three-dimensional-linked network of polyhedra. The character (number of facets ) of the polyhedra is controlled by the...Investigation of the Multi-Hit Ballistic-Protection Performance of Laminated Transparent-armor Systems, J. Mater. Eng. Perfor., 2011. doi:10.1007

  15. An Approximate Analytical Model of Shock Waves from Underground Nuclear Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    exani )le, Johnson,, Higgins, and Violet [1959]; Nuckolls [1959]). All such methods are based on the fact that the strength of the shock wave produced by...reconstruct ion iPtOCeSS can (list ort thle particle sp)eed curve if thlt Huigoniot used inI thle reconstruct ion (differs from thle ingi niot uised1 iII the...simnulat ion. Throughou t this pper, when modlelinig shock waves iII quartz we uise the Hugoniot data compiled by King of ;11. [1 9S9] fromx several

  16. The Universal Role of Tubulence in the Propagation of Strong Shocks and Detonation Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John H.

    2001-06-01

    direction of propagation) apply across the shock transition zone if the downstream equilibrium plane is taken far enough away to ensure the decay of the turbulent fluctuations. Thus, the Hugoniot properties of one-dimensional propagation of shock and detonation waves remain valid. However, the conservation laws do not describe the important propagation mechanisms (i.e., the physical and chemical processes that effect the transition from initial to the final state) in the wave structure. Since gaseous detonations enjoy the advantage of being able to be observed experimentally in great detail, its complex turbulent structure is now quite well established. Furthermore, the equation of state for perfect gases is well known and the chemistry of most gas phase reactions is also sufficiently understood quantitatively to permit detailed numerical simulation of the complex detonation structure. Thus, a good database of information exists for gaseous detonation, and in this paper we shall explore the turbulent structure of gaseous detonation with the aim of answering the question as to "why nature prefers to evoke such a complicated manner to effect its propagation." We will then attempt to generalize the discussion to the "terra incognita" of condensed phase materials where the structure is much less understood. 1. Meshcheryakov, Yu.I., and Atroshenko, S.A., Izv. Vyssh. Uchebn. Zaved. Fiz., 4, 105-123 (1992). 2. Glass, I.I, and Liu, W.S., J. Fluid Mech., 84(1), 55-77 (1978). 3. Griffiths, R.W., Sanderman, R.J., and Hornung, H.G., J. Phys. D., 8, 1681-1691 (1975). 4. Lee, J.H.S., Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech., 16, 311-336 (1984). 5. Mallory, H.D., J. Appl. Physics, 38, 5302-5306 (1967).

  17. Travelling Waves in Hall-MHD and the Ion-Acoustic Shock Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hagstrom, George I

    2013-01-01

    Hall-MHD is a mixed hyperbolic-parabolic partial differential equation that describes the dynamics of an ideal two fluid plasma with massless electrons. We study the only shock wave family that exists in this system (the other discontinuities being contact discontinuities and not shocks). We study planar travelling wave solutions and we find solutions with discontinuities in the hydrodynamic variables, which arise due to the presence of real characteristics in Hall-MHD. We introduce a small viscosity into the equations and use the method of matched asymptotic expansions to show that solutions with a discontinuity satisfying the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and also an entropy condition have continuous shock structures. The lowest order inner equations reduce to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, plus an equation which implies the constancy of the magnetic field inside the shock structure. We are able to show that the current is discontinuous across the shock, even as the magnetic field is continuous, an...

  18. Influence of thermal anisotropy on best-fit estimates of shock normals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of thermal anisotropy on least-squares estimates of interplanetary shock parameters and the associated normals by using the Rankine-Hugoniot equations. A practical theorem is given for quantitatively correcting for anisotropic effects by weighting the before and after magnetic fields by the same 'anisotropy parameter' h. The quantity h depends only on the thermal anisotropies before and after the shock and on the angles between the magnetic fields and the shock normal. It is shown that, for fast shocks and for a liberal range of realistic conditions, the quantity h lies in the range from 0.90 to 1.22. The theorem can also be applied to most slow shocks, but in those instances h usually should be lower and sometimes markedly lower than unity.

  19. Structural Dynamics of Fe along the New \\textit{Ab Initio} Determined Hugoniot Curve from Warm to Hot Dense Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Jiayu; Zhao, Zengxiu; Wu, Yanqun; Yuan, Jianmin

    2011-01-01

    A new determined principal Hugoniot curve of Fe in the temperature range of 0.1-100 eV from Ab initio is presented, and the structural dynamics along this curve is shown. All experiments are on top or above our Hugoniot data, which are along the lower envelop of the distribution of experiments. The present data are the converged limit for experiments to remove the external effects such as preheating. In particular, the experimental data on the bottom of the distribution below 10 Mbar can be considered nearly free of errors caused by the external effects compared with our data. The dynamics of ionic structures shows the stable existence of complex clusters with persisted time length of hundreds of femto-seconds from cold to hot dense matter.

  20. Optimized nested Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling: application to the liquid nitrogen Hugoniot using density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Milton Sam [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coe, Joshua D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sewell, Thomas D [UNIV OF MISSOURI-COLUMBIA

    2009-01-01

    An optimized version of the Nested Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling method is applied to the calculation of the Hugoniot for liquid nitrogen. The 'full' system of interest is calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with a 6-31 G* basis set for the configurational energies. The 'reference' system is given by a model potential fit to the anisotropic pair interaction of two nitrogen molecules from DFT calculations. The EOS is sampled in the isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensemble with a trial move constructed from many Monte Carlo steps in the reference system. The trial move is then accepted with a probability chosen to give the full system distribution. The P's and T's of the reference and full systems are chosen separately to optimize the computational time required to produce the full system EOS. The method is numerically very efficient and predicts a Hugoniot in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  1. First-Principles Calculation of Principal Hugoniot and K-Shell X-ray Absorption Spectra for Warm Dense KCl

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Shijun; Kang, Wei; Li, Zi; Zhang, Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2015-01-01

    Principal Hugoniot and K-shell X-ray absorption spectra of warm dense KCl are calculated using the first-principles molecular dynamics method. Evolution of electronic structures as well as the influence of the approximate description of ionization on pressure (caused by the underestimation of the energy gap between conduction bands and valence bands) in the first-principles method are illustrated by the calculation. Pressure ionization and thermal smearing are shown as the major factors to prevent the deviation of pressure from global accumulation along the Hugoniot. In addition, cancellation between electronic kinetic pressure and virial pressure further reduces the deviation. The calculation of X-ray absorption spectra shows that the band gap of KCl persists after the pressure ionization of the $3p$ electrons of Cl and K taking place at lower energy, which provides a detailed understanding to the evolution of electronic structures of warm dense matter.

  2. Mechanical behaviors and damage constitutive model of ceramics under shock compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo Ning; Huilan Ren; Ping Li

    2008-01-01

    One-stage light gas gun was utilized to study the dynamic mechanical properties of AD90 alumina subjected to the shock loading. Manganin gauges were adopted to obtain the stress-time histories. The velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) was used to obtain the free surface velocity profile and determine the Hugoniot elastic limit. The Hugoniot curves were fitted with the experimental data. From Hugoniot curves the compressive behaviors of AD90 alumina were found to change typically from elastic to "plastic". The dynamic mechanical behaviors for alumina under impact loadings were analyzed by using the path line principle of Lagrange analysis, including the nonlinear characteristics, the strain rate dependence, the dispersion and declination of shock wave in the material. A damage model applicable to ceramics subjected to dynamic compressive loading has been developed. The model was based on the damage micromechanics and wing crack nucleation and growth. The effects of parameters of both the micro-cracks nucleation and the initial crack size on the dynamic fracture strength were discussed. The results of the dynamic damage evolution model were compared with the experimental results and a good agreement was found.

  3. 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sadot, Oren; Igra, Ozer

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings collect the papers presented at the 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW30), which was held in Tel-Aviv Israel from July 19 to July 24, 2015. The Symposium was organized by Ortra Ltd. The ISSW30 focused on the state of knowledge of the following areas: Nozzle Flow, Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Shocks, Supersonic Jets, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Reacting Flows, Detonation, Combustion, Ignition, Shock Wave Reflection and Interaction, Shock Wave Interaction with Obstacles, Shock Wave Interaction with Porous Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Granular Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Dusty Media, Plasma, Magnetohyrdrodynamics, Re-entry to Earth Atmosphere, Shock Waves in Rarefied Gases, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter (Solids and Liquids), Shock Waves in Dense Gases, Shock Wave Focusing, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock Boundary Layer Interaction, Multiphase Flow, Blast Waves, Facilities, Flow Visualization, and Numerical Methods. The two volumes serve as a reference ...

  4. Plasma ion stratification by weak planar shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Andrei N.; Keenan, Brett D.; Taitano, William T.; Chacón, Luis

    2017-09-01

    We derive fluid equations for describing steady-state planar shocks of a moderate strength ( 0 shock Mach number) propagating through an unmagnetized quasineutral collisional plasma comprising two separate ion species. In addition to the standard fluid shock quantities, such as the total mass density, mass-flow velocity, and electron and average ion temperatures, the equations describe shock stratification in terms of variations in the relative concentrations and temperatures of the two ion species along the shock propagation direction. We have solved these equations analytically for weak shocks ( 0 shocks, and they have been used to verify kinetic simulations of shocks in multi-ion plasmas.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Strong Shock Waves Propagating in Dense Deuterium With the Effect of Excited Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hao; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Huiling; He, X T

    2016-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of shock waves propagating in dense deuterium with the electron force field method [J. T. Su and W. A. Goddard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 185003 (2007)], which explicitly takes the excitation of electrons into consideration. Non-equilibrium features associated with the excitation of electrons are systematically investigated. We show that chemical bonds in D$_2$ molecules lead to a more complicated shock wave structure near the shock front, compared with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulation. Charge separation can bring about accumulation of net charges on the large scale, instead of the formation of a localized dipole layer, which might cause extra energy for the shock wave to propagate. In addition, the simulations also display that molecular dissociation at the shock front is the major factor corresponding to the "bump" structure in the principal Hugoniot. These results could help to build a more realistic picture of shock wave propagation in fuel mater...

  6. Deformation Behaviour of Coarse Grain Alumina under Shock Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Satish

    2013-06-01

    To develop better understanding of the shock wave induced deformation behavior of coarse grain alumina ceramics, and for measurement of its Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), in-situ and recovery gas gun experiments have been carried out on coarse grain alumina (grain size ~ 10 μm), prepared in the form of discs (>99.9% TMD) by pressure-less sintering of alpha alumina powder at 1583 K. The HEL value of 1.9 GPa has been determined from the kink in the pressure history recorded using piezoresistance gauge and also from the free surface velocity history of the sample shocked to 9 GPa. The nano-indentation measurements on the alumina samples shocked to 6.5 GPa showed hardness value 15% lower than 21.3 GPa for unshocked alumina, and strong Indentation Size Effect (ISE); the hardness value was still lower and the ISE was stronger for the sample shocked to 12 GPa. The XRD measurements showed reduced particle size and increased microstrains in the shocked alumina fragments. SEM, FESEM and TEM measurements on shock treated samples showed presence of grain localized micro- and nano-scale deformations, micro-cleavages, grain-boundary microcracks, extensive shear induced deformations, and localized micro-fractures, etc. These observations led to the development of a qualitative model for the damage initiation and its subsequent growth mechanisms in shocked alumina. The work performed in collaboration with K.D. Joshi of BARC and A.K. Mukhopadhyay of CGCRI.

  7. Neglected transport equations: extended Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and J -integrals for fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, K.; Darvizeh, R.

    2016-09-01

    Transport equations in integral form are well established for analysis in continuum fluid dynamics but less so for solid mechanics. Four classical continuum mechanics transport equations exist, which describe the transport of mass, momentum, energy and entropy and thus describe the behaviour of density, velocity, temperature and disorder, respectively. However, one transport equation absent from the list is particularly pertinent to solid mechanics and that is a transport equation for movement, from which displacement is described. This paper introduces the fifth transport equation along with a transport equation for mechanical energy and explores some of the corollaries resulting from the existence of these equations. The general applicability of transport equations to discontinuous physics is discussed with particular focus on fracture mechanics. It is well established that bulk properties can be determined from transport equations by application of a control volume methodology. A control volume can be selected to be moving, stationary, mass tracking, part of, or enclosing the whole system domain. The flexibility of transport equations arises from their ability to tolerate discontinuities. It is insightful thus to explore the benefits derived from the displacement and mechanical energy transport equations, which are shown to be beneficial for capturing the physics of fracture arising from a displacement discontinuity. Extended forms of the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions for fracture are established along with extended forms of J -integrals.

  8. Hypovolemic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thready Tests that may be done include: Blood chemistry, including kidney function tests and those tests looking ... severe shock. Severe hypovolemic shock may lead to death, even with immediate medical attention. Older adults are ...

  9. LDRD ER Final Report: Recreating Planetary Cores in the Laboratory: New Techniques to Extremely High Density States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, G; Celliers, P; Hicks, D; Cauble, R; Bradley, D; MacKinnon, A; Moon, S; Young, D; Chau, R; Eggert, J; Willi, P; Pasley, J; Jeanloz, R; Lee, K; Bennedetti, R; Koenig, M; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Batani, D; Loubeyre, P; Hubbard, W

    2003-02-07

    An accurate equation of state (EOS) for planetary constituents at extreme conditions is the key to any credible model of planets or low mass stars. However, very few materials have their high pressure (>few Mbar) EOS experimentally validated, and even then, only on the principal Hugoniot. For planetary and stellar interiors, compression occurs from gravitational force so that material states follow a line of isotropic compression (ignoring phase separation) to ultra-high densities. An example of the hydrogen phase space composing Jupiter and one particular Brown Dwarf is shown. At extreme densities, material states are predicted to have quite unearthly properties such as high temperature superconductivity and low temperature fusion. High density experiments on Earth are achieved with either static compression techniques (i.e. diamond anvil cells) or dynamic compression techniques using large laser facilities, gas guns, or explosives. The ultimate goal of this multi-directorate and multi-institutional proposal was to develop techniques that will enable us to understand material states that previously only existed at the core of giant planets, stars, or speculative theories. Our effort was a complete success, meeting all of the objectives set out in our proposals. First we focused on developing accurate Hugoniot techniques to be used for constraining the equation of state at high pressure/temperature. We mapped out an accurate water EOS and measured that the ionic->electronic conduction transition occurs at lower pressures than models predict. These data and their impact are fully described in the first enclosed paper ''The Equation of State and Optical Properties of Water Compressed by Strong Shock Waves.'' Currently models used to construct planetary isentropes are constrained by only the planet radius, outer atmospheric spectroscopy, and space probe gravitational moment and magnetic field data. Thus these data, which provide rigid constraints

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of the plastic behavior anisotropy of shock-compressed monocrystal nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Zhou; Zhou, Liu-Cheng; He, Wei-Feng; Sun, Yu; Li, Ying-Hong; Jiao, Yang; Luo, Si-Hai

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the plastic behavior of monocrystalline nickel under shock compression along the [100] and [110] orientations. The shock Hugoniot relation, local stress curve, and process of microstructure development were determined. Results showed the apparent anisotropic behavior of monocrystalline nickel under shock compression. The separation of elastic and plastic waves was also obvious. Plastic deformation was more severely altered along the [110] direction than the [100] direction. The main microstructure phase transformed from face-centered cubic to body-centered cubic and generated a large-scale and low-density stacking fault along the family of { 111 } crystal planes under shock compression along the [100] direction. By contrast, the main mechanism of plastic deformation in the [110] direction was the nucleation of the hexagonal, close-packed phase, which generated a high density of stacking faults along the [110] and [1̅10] directions.

  11. On the shock response of the magnesium alloy Elektron 675

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Paul; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Siviour, Clive; Wielewski, Euan

    2011-06-01

    Alloying elements such as aluminium, zinc or rare-earths allow precipitation hardening of magnesium (Mg). The low densities of such strengthened Mg alloys have led to their adoption as aerospace materials and (more recently) they are being considered as armour materials. Consequently, understanding their response to high-strain rate loading is becoming increasingly important. Here, the plate-impact technique was employed to measure longitudinal stress evolution in armour-grade wrought Mg-alloy Elektron 675 under 1D shock loading. The strength and spall behaviour was interrogated, with an estimate made of the material's Hugoniot elastic limit. Finally, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were employed to investigate post-shock microstructural changes.

  12. Double Shock Experiments on the Sandia Z Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanshaw, Heath; Knudson, Marcus; Desjarlais, Michael; Lemke, Ray

    2011-06-01

    The double shock layered high-velocity flyer plate is one new capability being developed on Sandia's Z machine. With this technique, dynamic material data at high energy densities can be obtained at points in phase space which lie neither on principal Hugoniots nor on quasi-isentropic ramp curves. For example, the hypothesized HCP to BCC phase transition in beryllium can be measured, as can the high pressure melt curve. Another example is a postulated refreeze of tantalum. We discuss the double shock experiments being performed on Z, including accessible conditions, design and experimental methods, and analysis of results. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Soda-lime glass behavior under laser shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loison, D.; Guin, J.-P.; Sangleboeuf, J.-C.; Nivard, M.; Lescoute, E.; Sollier, A.; Seisson, G.; Hebert, D.; Berthe, L.; Boustie, M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding and modeling the behavior of glass is an issue for certain aeronautical, military and civil applications. For example, parts of satellites and shuttles are made of glasses. During their lifetime, they are subjected to potentially damaging high velocity impacts. To determine the behavior of these structures during and after impact we used instrumented laser driven shock loading performed on high power intensity laser facilities. Transverse shadowgraphs of the front wave propagating inside the transparent material are collected at different times. These shadowgraphs provide information regarding the shock wave velocity. PDV or VISAR measurements provide time-resolved free surface velocity to determine material velocity when the shock wave breakout occurs. For some laser shots, shock wave corresponds to elastic wave then Hugoniot elastic limit may be determined. Under high pressure conditions glass permanently densifies and traces of such a plastic deformation are looked for on the path of the shock wave. Those experimental data are necessary to characterize the material behavior under such conditions and to model the mechanical behavior of glass structures. In this presentation we will present experimental results obtained for soda-lime silica glass samples loaded by laser induced shock.

  14. Ultrafast X-Ray Diffraction Studies of the Phase Transitions and Equation of State of Scandium Shock Compressed to 82 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, R; Gorman, M G; Coleman, A L; McWilliams, R S; McBride, E E; McGonegle, D; Wark, J S; Peacock, L; Rothman, S; Macleod, S G; Bolme, C A; Gleason, A E; Collins, G W; Eggert, J H; Fratanduono, D E; Smith, R F; Galtier, E; Granados, E; Lee, H J; Nagler, B; Nam, I; Xing, Z; McMahon, M I

    2017-01-13

    Using x-ray diffraction at the Linac Coherent Light Source x-ray free-electron laser, we have determined simultaneously and self-consistently the phase transitions and equation of state (EOS) of the lightest transition metal, scandium, under shock compression. On compression scandium undergoes a structural phase transition between 32 and 35 GPa to the same bcc structure seen at high temperatures at ambient pressures, and then a further transition at 46 GPa to the incommensurate host-guest polymorph found above 21 GPa in static compression at room temperature. Shock melting of the host-guest phase is observed between 53 and 72 GPa with the disappearance of Bragg scattering and the growth of a broad asymmetric diffraction peak from the high-density liquid.

  15. High pressure generation by laser driven shock waves: application to equation of state measurement; Generation de hautes pressions par choc laser: application a la mesure d'equations d'etat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benuzzi, A

    1997-12-15

    This work is dedicated to shock waves and their applications to the study of the equation of state of compressed matter.This document is divided into 6 chapters: 1) laser-produced plasmas and abrasion processes, 2) shock waves and the equation of state, 3) relative measuring of the equation of state, 4) comparison between direct and indirect drive to compress the target, 5) the measurement of a new parameter: the shock temperature, and 6) control and measurement of the pre-heating phase. In this work we have reached relevant results, we have shown for the first time the possibility of generating shock waves of very high quality in terms of spatial distribution, time dependence and of negligible pre-heating phase with direct laser radiation. We have shown that the shock pressure stays unchanged as time passes for targets whose thickness is over 10 {mu}m. A relative measurement of the equation of state has been performed through the simultaneous measurement of the velocity of shock waves passing through 2 different media. The great efficiency of the direct drive has allowed us to produce pressures up to 40 Mbar. An absolute measurement of the equation of state requires the measurement of 2 parameters, we have then performed the measurement of the colour temperature of an aluminium target submitted to laser shocks. A simple model has been developed to infer the shock temperature from the colour temperature. The last important result is the assessment of the temperature of the pre-heating phase that is necessary to know the media in which the shock wave propagates. The comparison of the measured values of the reflectivity of the back side of the target with the computed values given by an adequate simulation has allowed us to deduce the evolution of the temperature of the pre-heating phase. (A.C.)

  16. Vasogenic shock physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Gkisioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can understand its utmost importance, not only because of its association with sepsis but also because it can be the common final pathway for long-lasting, severe shock of any cause, even postresuscitation states. The effective management of any patient in shock requires the understanding of its underlying physiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have provided new insights into vascular physiology by revealing the interaction of rather complicated and multifactorial mechanisms, which have not been fully elucidated yet. Some of these mechanisms, such as the induction of nitric oxide synthases, the activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, and vasopressin deficiency, have gained general acceptance and are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vasodilatory shock. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the pathogenesis of vasogenic shock.Keywords: nitric oxide synthases, KATP channels, vasopressin, H2S, vasoplegic syndrome

  17. The Utility of Gas Gun Experiments in Developing Equations of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Emily; Hagelberg, Carl; Ramsey, Scott

    2016-11-01

    Gas gun experiments have the potential to investigate material properties in various well defined shock conditions, making them a valuable research tool for the development of equations of state (EOS) and material response under shock loading. Gas guns have the ability to create shocks for loading to pressures ranging from MPa to GPa. A variety of diagnostics techniques can be used to gather data from gas gun experiments; resulting data from these experiments is applicable to many fields of study. The focus of this set of experiments is the development of data on the Hugoniot for the overdriven products EOS of PBX 9501 to extend data from which current computational EOS models draw. This series of shots was conducted by M-9 using the two-stage gas-guns at LANL and aimed to gather data within the 30-120 GPa pressure regime. The experiment was replicated using FLAG, a Langrangian multiphysics code, using a one-dimensional setup which employs the Wescott Stewart Davis (WSD) reactive burn model. Prior to this series, data did not extend into this higher range, so the new data allowed for the model to be re-evaluated. A comparison of the results to the experimental data reveals that the model is a good fit to the data below 40 GPa. However, the model did not fall within the error bars for pressures above this region. This is an indication that the material models or burn model could be modified to better match the data.

  18. [Cardiogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houegnifioh, Komlanvi Kafui; Gfeller, Etienne; Garcia, Wenceslao; Ribordy, Vincent

    2014-08-13

    Cardiogenic shock, especially when it complicates a myocardial infarction, is still associated with high mortality rate. Emergency department or first care physicians are often the first providers to assess the cardiogenic shock patient, and plays thereby a key role in achieving a timely diagnosis and treatment. This review will detail the actual physiopathology understanding of the cardiogenic shock, its diagnosis and management focusing on the care within the emergency department.

  19. Identifying blueberry germplasm that is slow to get Blueberry shock virus in the Pacific Northwest United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueberry shock virus (BlShV) is a serious problem in blueberry production in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of North America. Infection occurs during bloom and the virus moves into other parts of the plant in an uneven but steady manner and may take several years to become fully systemic in mat...

  20. Structure-phase state and mechanical properties of surface layers in titanium nikelide single crystals after shock mechanical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surikova, N., E-mail: surikova@ispms.tsc.ru; Panin, V., E-mail: paninve@ispms.tsc.ru; Vlasov, I.; Narkevich, N., E-mail: natnark@list.ru; Tolmachev, A. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Surikov, N., E-mail: jet-n@mail.ru [Siberian Physical-Technical Institute, Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The influence of ultrasonic shock surface treatment (USST) on refine structure and mechanical characteristics of surface layers and deformation behaviour of volume samples of TiNi(Fe, Mo) shape memory effect alloy single crystals is studied using optical and transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, nanoindentation, mechanical attrition testing and experiments on uniaxial tension.

  1. Shock jump relations for a dusty gas atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents simplified forms of jump relations for one dimensional shock waves propagating in a dusty gas. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of a perfect gas and spherically small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. The simplified jump relations for the pressure, the temperature, the density, the velocity of the mixture and the speed of sound have been derived in terms of the upstream Mach number. The expressions for the adiabatic compressibility of the mixture and the change-in-entropy across the shock front have also been derived in terms of the upstream Mach number. Further, the handy forms of shock jump relations have been obtained in terms of the initial volume fraction of small solid particles and the ratio of specific heats of the mixture, simultaneously for the two cases viz., (i) when the shock is weak and, (ii) when it is strong. The simplified shock jump relations reduce to the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions for shock waves in an ideal gas when the mass fraction (concentration) of solid particles in the mixture becomes zero. Finally, the effects due to the mass fraction of solid particles in the mixture, and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas are studied on the pressure, the temperature, the density, the velocity of the mixture, the speed of sound, the adiabatic compressibility of the mixture and the change-in-entropy across the shock front. The results provided a clear picture of whether and how the presence of dust particles affects the flow field behind the shock front. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of how the shock waves behave in the gas-solid particle two-phase flows.

  2. Reentry Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorine; Houston

    1998-01-01

    Dear Xiao Lan, You remember the pain of culture and reentry shock; humor me please; let mereview the facts for the sake of the students you are sending here in greater numbers.Culture shock is the emotional pain that people experience when they visit a newcountry and find customs, experiences, smells, and non-verbal communication stylesto be different from their own country.

  3. The shock sensitivity of nitromethane/methanol mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Brian; Dattelbaum, Dana; Sheffield, Steve; Gibson, Lee

    2013-06-01

    The dilution of liquid explosives has multiple effects on detonation properties including an increase in critical diameter, spatiotemporal lengthening of the chemical reaction zone, and the development of propagating wave instabilities. Earlier detonation studies of NM/methanol mixtures have shown several effects of increasing dilution, including: 1) a continual increase in the critical diameter, 2) lowering of the Chapman-Jouguet detonation pressure, and 3) slowing of the steady detonation velocity (Koldunov et al., Comb. Expl. Shock Waves). Here, we present the results of a series of gas gun-driven plate-impact experiments to study the shock-to-detonation transition in NM/methanol mixtures. Embedded electromagnetic gauges were used to obtain in situ particle velocity wave profiles at multiple Lagrangian positions in the initiating explosive mixture. From the wave profiles obtained in each experiment, an unreacted Hugoniot locus, the initiation mechanism, and the overtake-time-to-detonation were obtained as a function of shock input condition for mixture concentrations from 100% NM to 50 wt%/50 wt% NM/methanol. Desensitization with dilution is less than expected. For example, little change in overtake time occurs in 80 wt%/20 wt% NM/methanol when compared with neat NM. Furthermore, the shock wave profiles from the gauges indicate that wave instabilities grow in as the overdriven detonation wave settles down following the shock-to-detonation transition.

  4. Global equation of state for copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeffrey H.; Honnell, Kevin G.; Greeff, Carl; Johnson, James D.; Boettger, Jonathan; Crockett, Scott

    2012-03-01

    A new, tabular (SESAME format) equation of state for Cu, suitable for use in hydrodynamic simulations, is described and compared to experimental data. Pressures, internal energies, and Helmholtz free energies are tabulated as functions of temperature and density. The new equation of state builds on the theoretical investigations of Greeff, et al., (J. Phys. Chem. Solids 67, 2033 (2006)), but extends the range of densities and temperatures covered to 10-5-105 g/cc and 0-108K. The staticlattice cold curve is modeled using the semi-empirical stabilized jellium equation near ambient densities, LDA and GGA density-functional predictions at moderate compressions, and Thomas- Fermi-Dirac theory at high compressions. The Johnson ionic model, which smoothly interpolates between Debye-like and ideal-gas behavior, is employed to model contributions from atomic motion, and Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory is used for contributions from thermal electronic excitations. Predictions for the compressibility, principle and porous shock Hugoniot, thermal expansion, heat capacity, and melt line are compared with experimental data.

  5. Equation of state of warm condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T.W., III; Young, D.A.; Rogers, F.J.

    1998-03-01

    Recent advances in computational condensed matter theory have yielded accurate calculations of properties of materials. These calculations have, for the most part, focused on the low temperature (T=0) limit. An accurate determination of the equation of state (EOS) at finite temperature also requires knowledge of the behavior of the electron and ion thermal pressure as a function of T. Current approaches often interpolate between calculated T=0 results and approximations valid in the high T limit. Plasma physics-based approaches are accurate in the high temperature limit, but lose accuracy below T{approximately}T{sub Fermi}. We seek to ``connect up`` these two regimes by using ab initio finite temperature methods (including linear-response[1] based phonon calculations) to derive an equation of state of condensed matter for T{<=}T{sub Fermi}. We will present theoretical results for the principal Hugoniot of shocked materials, including carbon and aluminum, up to pressures P>100 GPa and temperatures T>10{sup 4}K, and compare our results with available experimental data.

  6. One-dimensional plate impact experiments on the cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based explosive EDC32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Malcolm J.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Bartram, Brian D.

    2012-09-01

    Eight one-dimensional plate impact experiments have been performed to study both the Shock to Detonation Transition and Hugoniot state in the cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based explosive EDC32. The experiments covered shock pressures ranging from 0.59 to 7.5 GPa with sustained shocks, double shocks, and short pulse shocks. Experiments were instrumented with embedded magnetic particle velocity gauges. Results include; (1) wave profiles of particle velocity vs. time vs. depth in the explosive, (2) time-distance coordinates for onset of detonation vs. initial shock pressure (aka the Pop-plot), (3) a reactants Hugoniot, and (4) measurement of the Hugoniot Elastic Limit of 0.22.GPa.

  7. A technique to decrease surface roughness in overlapping laser shock peening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fengze; Zhou, Jianzhong; Lu, Jinzhong; Luo, Xinmin

    2016-05-01

    A technique called elastic contact laser shock peening (ECLSP) is presented in this paper. In this technique, a metal foil with high dynamic yield strength is fixed between absorbing layer and workpiece, and the peak pressure of laser shock wave is a little less than the dynamic yield strength of metal foil, but higher than the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) of work piece. Surface roughness, microhardness and residual stress are investigated. Compared with regular laser shock peening (LSP), ECLSP can reduce the depth and area of secondary plastic deformation of overlapping region. This can effectively reduce surface roughness in overlapping LSP. Measurement of microhardness and residual stress shows that the work hardening effects and strengthening effect are similar as regular LSP.

  8. Structure and Dynamics of Shock-Induced Nanobubble Collapse in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedadi, Mohammad; Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; van Duin, Adri

    2011-03-01

    Structure of water under shock and shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water are investigated with molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field. Shock induces dramatic structural changes, including an ice-VII-like structural motif at a particle velocity of 1 km/s. The incipient ice VII formation and the calculated Hugoniot curve are in good agreement with experimental results. In the presence of a nanobubble, we observe a focused nanojet at the onset of nanobubble shrinkage and a secondary shock wave upon nanobubble collapse. The secondary shock wave propagates spherically backwards and induces high pressure as it propagates. Both the propagation velocity and the induced pressure are larger than those of the primary shock. We explored effects of nanobubble radius and shock amplitude on nanojet formation. The nanojet size increases by increasing particle velocity but the effect of increasing radius is more significant. The jet length scales linearly with the nanobubble radius, as observed in experiments on micron-to-millimeter size bubbles. Shock-induced collapse of a nanobubble in the vicinity of a cell membrane creates a transient nanopore when the nanojet impacts the membrane. Transient cell poration has potential applications in drug delivery.

  9. Are gauge shocks really shocks?

    CERN Document Server

    Alcubierre, M

    2005-01-01

    The existence of gauge pathologies associated with the Bona-Masso family of generalized harmonic slicing conditions is proven for the case of simple 1+1 relativity. It is shown that these gauge pathologies are true shocks in the sense that the characteristic lines associated with the propagation of the gauge cross, which implies that the name ``gauge shock'' usually given to such pathologies is indeed correct. These gauge shocks are associated with places where the spatial hypersurfaces that determine the foliation of spacetime become non-smooth.

  10. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... that at resonance a stationary state arise consisting of multiple oscillating shock waves. Off resonance driving leads to a nearly linear oscillating ground state but superimposed by bursts of a fast oscillating shock wave. Based on a travelling wave ansatz for the fluid velocity potential with an added 2'nd order...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  11. Midwives' knowledge and utilization of non-pneumatic anti shock garment in reducing complication of postpartum haemorrhage in selected health care facilities in Bayelsa state Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olayinka A. Onasoga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG is a first-aid lower-body pressure device that reverses hypovolaemic shock and decreases obstetric hemorrhage thereby decreasing maternal morbidity and mortality due to post-partum haemorrhage (PPH.This study assessed the knowledge and utilization of non-pneumatic anti shock garment in the management of postpartum hemorrhage among midwives in selected health care facilities in Bayelsa state. Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study in which a sample size of 112 nurses were selected using purposive sampling technique. The instrument for data collection was questionnaire and data collected were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: The study revealed that majority of the respondents regardless of their educational level had good knowledge of the description, mechanism of action, and uses of NASG. It was also revealed that majority of the respondents do not use NASG in their centers and its application in management of post-partum hemorrhage was not part of the protocols in these centers, which was a clear indication of underutilization of the NASG in the primary health care centers. There was no significant association found between years of working experience of respondents and their utilization of NASG with (X2 = 8.577, df = 2, P = 0.114 as well as between the level of knowledge of midwives and their utilization of the NASG with (X2 = 0.387, df = 1, P = 0.534. Conclusions: It was recommended that non-pneumonic antishock garment should be made available by government and its utilization should be included in all health care centers policy as a management protocol for post-partum hemorrhage. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(4.000: 977-981

  12. Shock compression response of forsterite above 250 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Toshimori; Ozaki, Norimasa; Miyanishi, Kohei; Asaumi, Yuto; Kimura, Tomoaki; Albertazzi, Bruno; Sato, Yuya; Sakawa, Youichi; Sano, Takayoshi; Sugita, Seiji; Matsui, Takafumi; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2016-08-01

    Forsterite (Mg2SiO4) is one of the major planetary materials, and its behavior under extreme conditions is important to understand the interior structure of large planets, such as super-Earths, and large-scale planetary impact events. Previous shock compression measurements of forsterite indicate that it may melt below 200 GPa, but these measurements did not go beyond 200 GPa. We report the shock response of forsterite above ~250 GPa, obtained using the laser shock wave technique. We simultaneously measured the Hugoniot and temperature of shocked forsterite and interpreted the results to suggest the following: (i) incongruent crystallization of MgO at 271 to 285 GPa, (ii) phase transition of MgO at 285 to 344 GPa, and (iii) remelting above ~470 to 500 GPa. These exothermic and endothermic reactions are seen to occur under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. They indicate complex structural and chemical changes in the system MgO-SiO2 at extreme pressures and temperatures and will affect the way we understand the interior processes of large rocky planets as well as material transformation by impacts in the formation of planetary systems.

  13. Temperature kinetics during shock-wave consolidation of metallic powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, R.B.; Kasiraj, P.; Vreeland, T. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Powders (60 ..mu..m diam) of constantan and pure copper were compressed statically into cylindrical greens (20.3 mm diam, 5.3 mm long) with a flat interface separating the two powders. A 20-mm propellant gun was used to accelerate a flyer of Lexan, copper, or aluminum, and generate in the green a shock wave with front parallel to the Cu/constantan interface. The voltages between opposite ends of the greens were measured as a function of time and for shock pressures between 1.3 and 9.4 GPa. When the shock wave arrives at the Cu/constantan interface, the voltage signal shows an abrupt increase, which lasts between 45 and 81 ns and leads to a peak temperature T/sub p/. After this, the hotter and cooler parts of the compact equilibrate and the temperature decreases to a value T/sub h/. With increasing shock pressure, T/sub h/ increases from 425 to 1215 K. The measurements of T/sub h/ are in excellent agreement with the temperatures calculated from the measured flyer velocity, the Hugoniot for copper powder, and thermodynamic data for the flyer and powders.

  14. Shock wave reflection phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-dor, Gabi

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive state-of-the-knowledge description of the shock wave reflection phenomena from a phenomenological point of view. The first part is a thorough introduction to oblique shock wave reflections, presenting the two major well-known reflection wave configurations, namely, regular (RR) and Mach (MR) reflections, the corresponding two- and three-shock theories, their analytical and graphical solution and the proposed transition boundaries between these two reflection-wave configurations. The second, third and fourth parts describe the reflection phenomena in steady, pseudo-steady and unsteady flows, respectively. Here, the possible specific types of reflection wave configurations are described, criteria for their formation and termination are presented and their governing equations are solved analytically and graphically and compared with experimental results. The resolution of the well-known von Neumann paradox and a detailed description of two new reflection-wave configurations - t...

  15. Atomistic simulation of shocks in single crystal and polycrystalline Ta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringa, E. M.; Higginbotham, A.; Park, N.; Tang, Y.; Suggit, M.; Mogni, G.; Ruestes, C. J.; Hawreliak, J.; Erhart, P.; Meyers, M. A.; Wark, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of shocks in Ta single crystals and polycrystals were carried out using up to 360 million atoms. Several EAM and FS type potentials were tested up to 150 GPa, with varying success reproducing the Hugoniot and the behavior of elastic constants under pressure. Phonon modes were studied to exclude possible plasticity nucleation by soft-phonon modes, as observed in MD simulations of Cu crystals. The effect of loading rise time in the resulting microstructure was studied for ramps up to 0.2 ns long. Dislocation activity was not observed in single crystals, unless there were defects acting as dislocation sources above a certain pressure. E.M.B. was funded by CONICET, Agencia Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (PICT2008-1325), and a Royal Society International Joint Project award.

  16. Generalized multi-polytropic Rankine-Hugoniot relations and the entropy condition

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Klaus; Fahr, Hans Jörg; Röken, Christian; Kleimann, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The study aims at a derivation of generalized \\RH relations, especially that for the entropy, for the case of different upstream/downstream polytropic indices and their implications. We discuss the solar/stellar wind interaction with the interstellar medium for different polytropic indices and concentrate on the case when the polytropic index changes across hydrodynamical shocks. We use first a numerical mono-fluid approach with constant polytropic index in the entire integration region to show the influence of the polytropic index on the thickness of the helio-/astrosheath and on the compression ratio. Second, the Rankine-Hugonoit relations for a polytropic index changing across a shock are derived analytically, particularly including a new form of the entropy condition. In application to the/an helio-/astrosphere, we find that the size of the helio-/astrosheath as function of the polytropic index decreases in a mono-fluid model for indices less than $\\gamma=5/3$ and increases for higher ones and vice versa ...

  17. Equation of state of fluid helium at high temperatures and densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI; Lingcang; CHEN; Qifeng; GU; Yunjun; ZHANG; Ying; ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Hugoniot curves and shock temperatures of gas helium with initial temperature 293 K and three initial pressures 0.6, 1.2, and 5.0 Mpa were measured up to 15000 K using a two-stage light-gas gun and transient radiation pyrometer. It was found that the calculated Hugoniot EOS of gas helium at the same initial pressure using Saha equation with Debye-Hückel correction was in good agreement with the experimental data. The curve of the calculated shock wave velocity with the particle velocity of gas helium which is shocked from the initial pressure 5 Mpa and temperature 293 K, I.e., the D~u relation, D = C0+λu (u < 10 km/s, λ = 1.32) in a low pressure region, is approximately parallel with the fitted D~u (λ = 1.36) of liquid helium from the experimental data of Nellis et al. Our calculations show that the Hugoniot parameterλis independent of the initial density ρ0. The D~u curves of gas helium will transfer to another one and approach a limiting value of compression when their temperature elevates to about 18000 K and the ionization degree of the shocked gas helium reaches 10-3.

  18. [Neurogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Rafael; Pasquier, Mathieu; Clerc, David; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2014-08-13

    The neurogenic shock is a common complication of spinal cord injury, especially when localized at the cervical level. Characterized by a vasoplegia (hypotension) and bradycardia, the neurogenic shock is secondary to the damage of the sympathetic nervous system. The clinical presentation often includes tetraplegia, with or without respiratory failure. Early treatment aims to minimize the occurrence of secondary spinal cord lesions resulting from systemic ischemic injuries. Medical management consists in a standardized ABCDE approach, in order to stabilize vital functions and immobilize the spine. The hospital care includes performing imaging, further measures of neuro-resuscitation, and coordinated surgical assessment and treatment of any other injury.

  19. Dust-acoustic solitary and shock waves in a strongly coupled liquid state dusty plasma with a vortex-like ion distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamun, A.A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Eliasson, B. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)]. E-mail: bengt@tp4.rub.de; Shukla, P.K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2004-11-22

    It is shown that the nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma is governed by a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers (KdV-Burgers) equation. The latter is derived from a set of generalized hydrodynamic equations for strongly correlated dust grains in a liquid-like state, a Boltzmann electron distribution, and a non-isothermal vortex-like ion distribution. The numerical solutions of the modified KdV-Burgers equation are presented in order to provide some salient features of dust-acoustic solitary and shock structures that may exist in laboratory dusty plasmas where the dust grains are in a strongly coupled liquid phase.

  20. Remote shock sensing and notification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Britton, Charles L.; Pearce, James; Jagadish, Usha; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2008-11-11

    A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interference circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitting with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

  1. Remote shock sensing and notification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Britton, Charles L [Alcoa, TN; Pearce, James [Lenoir City, TN; Jagadish, Usha [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod K [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-02

    A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interface circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitter with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

  2. Growth arrest and a persister state enable resistance to osmotic shock and facilitate dissemination of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia A; Lazinski, David W; Kahne, Shoshanna C; Nguyen, Y; Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C; Camilli, Andrew

    2017-07-25

    Vibrio cholerae is a water-borne bacterial pathogen and causative agent of cholera. Although V. cholerae is a halophile, it can survive in fresh water, and this has a major role in cholera epidemics through consumption of contaminated water and subsequent fecal-oral spread. After dissemination from humans back into fresh water, V. cholerae encounters limited nutrient availability and an abrupt drop in conductivity but little is known about how V. cholerae adapts to, and survives in this environment. In this work, by abolishing or altering the expression of V. cholerae genes in a high-throughput manner, we observed that many osmotic shock tolerant mutants exhibited slowed or arrested growth, and/or generated a higher proportion of persister cells. In addition, we show that growth-arrested V. cholerae, including a persister subpopulation, are generated during infection of the intestinal tract and together allow for the successful dissemination to fresh water. Our results suggest that growth-arrested and persister subpopulations enable survival of V. cholerae upon shedding to the aquatic environment.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 25 July 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.121.

  3. Method and System for Weakening Shock Wave Strength at Leading Edge Surfaces of Vehicle in Supersonic Atmospheric Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daso, Endwell O. (Inventor); Pritchett, Victor E., II (Inventor); Wang, Ten-See (Inventor); Farr, Rebecca Ann (Inventor); Auslender, Aaron Howard (Inventor); Blankson, Isaiah M. (Inventor); Plotkin, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system are provided to weaken shock wave strength at leading edge surfaces of a vehicle in atmospheric flight. One or more flight-related attribute sensed along a vehicle's outer mold line are used to control the injection of a non-heated, non-plasma-producing gas into a local external flowfield of the vehicle from at least one leading-edge surface location along the vehicle's outer mold line. Pressure and/or mass flow rate of the gas so-injected is adjusted in order to cause a Rankine-Hugoniot Jump Condition along the vehicle's outer mold line to be violated.

  4. Shock Compression and Phase Transitions of Magnesiowüstite (Mg,Fe)O up to Earth's Lowermost Mantle Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; GONG Zi-Zheng

    2006-01-01

    @@ We report new shock-compression data for polycrystalline (Mg, Fe)O up to 130 Gpa shock pressures corresponding to Earth's lowermost mantle conditions. Our data together with the existing shock-wave data of (Mg,Fe)O and its end-members MgO and FeO reveal that the Hugoniot curves of (Mg, Fe)O does not change with varying FeO content for their B1 phase (NaCl-structure) in the pressure-relative-volume plane. The evidence of the volume change within 3% at around 120 Gpa along the Hugoniot of (Mg0.6, Fe0.4)O is consistent with a structural transition from B1 phase (NaCl cubic) to B8 phase (NiAs-type hexagonal). Such a structural transition of (Mg, Fe)O, if indeed occurs, may in part contribute to the scattering of seismic waves and change in velocity gradient found in the lowermost mantle.

  5. The shock response and suitability of Synbone® as a tissue simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Fitzmaurice, B. C.; Hameed, A.; Wood, D. C.; Gibson, M. C.; Painter, J.

    2017-01-01

    The applicability of various materials as human tissue analogues has been a topic of increasing interest in recent years. It allows for more cost-effective experiments to be carried out, but also avoids ethical issues that would arise from using real human tissue. Synbone®, a porous polyurethane material, is commonly used in ballistic experiments as a bone simulant, but until now has not been characterised in terms of its dynamic behaviour. Here, the Hugoniot equation-of-state (EOS) for Synbone® has been derived via a series of plate-impact experiments; highlighting the importance of the underlying material structure in terms of material collapse under high strain-rates. A compaction model was also used for a more extensive analysis of Synbone® and for further comparison of this material to solid polyurethane. This work - following on from previous in-house studies of other tissue analogues - has provided useful data for future simulation of this material. In addition, comparison to dynamic data for other tissue and simulant materials has highlighted the importance of considering tissue as non-monolithic; each layer of tissue should ideally be represented by its own simulant in ballistic experiments. The equation-of-state (EOS) of Synbone® was found to be Us = 0.33up + 0.97; up up<0.95 mm μs-1 , while the compaction Hugoniot curve tended towards the Hugoniot for polyurethane at higher pressures.

  6. Shock compression of polyurethane foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahl D.B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Several shock studies have been made on polyurethane materials, both fully dense and distended in the form of foams. However, there is a lack of shock data between the densities of 0.321 and 1.264g/cm3 (fully dense. We present here data obtained from two different types of shock experiments at densities of 0.35, 0.5, 0.68, 0.78, and 0.9g/cm3 in order to fill in the density deficiencies and make it easier to develop an unreacted equation of state (EOS for polyurethane as a function of density. A thermodynamically consistent EOS was developed, based on the Helmholtz free energy, and was used to predict the shock properties of polyurethane materials at densities from 1.264 to 0.348g/cm3. These estimates are compared to the available data. The data match quite close to the predictions and provide a basis for calculating polyurethane foam shock processes. Chemical reaction has been observed at relatively high pressure (21.7 GPa in fully dense polyurethane in an earlier study, and the equation of state presented here is representative of the unreacted polyurethane foam. Lowering the density is expected to drop the shock pressure for chemical reaction, yet there is not enough data to address the low density shock reaction thresholds in this study.

  7. Culture shock and travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L; Leggat, P A

    1998-06-01

    As travel has become easier and more affordable, the number of people traveling has risen sharply. People travel for many and varied reasons, from the business person on an overseas assignment to backpackers seeking new and exotic destinations. Others may take up residence in different regions, states or countries for family, business or political reasons. Other people are fleeing religious or political persecution. Wherever they go and for whatever reason they go, people take their culture with them. Culture, like language, is acquired innately in early childhood and is then reinforced through formal and complex informal social education into adulthood. Culture provides a framework for interpersonal and social interactions. Therefore, the contact with a new culture is often not the exciting or pleasurable experience anticipated. When immersed in a different culture, people no longer know how to act when faced with disparate value systems. Contact with the unfamiliar culture can lead to anxiety, stress, mental illness and, in extreme cases, physical illness and suicide. "Culture shock" is a term coined by the anthropologist Oberg. It is the shock of the new. It implies that the experience of the new culture is an unpleasant surprise or shock, partly because it is unexpected and partly because it can lead to a negative evaluation of one's own culture. It is also known as cross-cultural adjustment, being that period of anxiety and confusion experienced when entering a new culture. It affects people intellectually, emotionally, behaviorally and physically and is characterized by symptoms of psychological distress. Culture shock affects both adults and children. In travelers or workers who have prolonged sojourns in foreign countries, culture shock may occur not only as they enter the new culture, but also may occur on their return to their original culture. Children may also experience readjustment problems after returning from leading sheltered lives in expatriate

  8. Cosmology with a shock wave

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    We construct the simplest solution of the Einstein equations that incorporates a shock-wave into a standard Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric whose equation of state accounts for the Hubble constant and the microwave background radiation temperature. This produces a new solution of the Einstein equations from which we are able to derive estimates for the shock position at present time. We show that the distance from the shock-wave to the center of the explosion at present time is comparable t...

  9. Dynamic X-ray diffraction observation of shocked solid iron up to 170 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoeud, Adrien; Ozaki, Norimasa; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Uranishi, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Yoshihiko; Kodama, Ryosuke; Brambrink, Erik; Ravasio, Alessandra; Bocoum, Maimouna; Boudenne, Jean-Michel; Harmand, Marion; Guyot, François; Mazevet, Stephane; Riley, David; Makita, Mikako; Sano, Takayoshi; Sakawa, Youichi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Gregori, Gianluca; Koenig, Michel; Morard, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the iron phase diagram under high pressure and temperature is crucial for the determination of the composition of the cores of rocky planets and for better understanding the generation of planetary magnetic fields. Here we present X-ray diffraction results from laser-driven shock-compressed single-crystal and polycrystalline iron, indicating the presence of solid hexagonal close-packed iron up to pressure of at least 170 GPa along the principal Hugoniot, corresponding to a temperature of 4,150 K. This is confirmed by the agreement between the pressure obtained from the measurement of the iron volume in the sample and the inferred shock strength from velocimetry deductions. Results presented in this study are of the first importance regarding pure Fe phase diagram probed under dynamic compression and can be applied to study conditions that are relevant to Earth and super-Earth cores. PMID:27357672

  10. Hybrid simulation of a parallel collisionless shock in the Large Plasma Device

    CERN Document Server

    Weidl, M S; Jenko, F; Niemann, C

    2016-01-01

    We present two-dimensional hybrid kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic simulations of planned laser-ablation experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). Our results, based on parameters which have been validated in previous experiments, show that a parallel collisionless shock can begin forming within the available space. Carbon-debris ions that stream along the magnetic-field direction with a blow-off speed of four times the Alfven velocity excite strong magnetic fluctuations, eventually transfering part of their kinetic energy to the surrounding hydrogen ions. This acceleration and compression of the background plasma creates a shock front, which satisfies the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and can therefore propagate on its own. Furthermore, we analyze the upstream turbulence and show that it is dominated by the right-hand resonant instability.

  11. How the Term "Shock Waves" Came Into Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    The present paper considers the history of works on shock waves beginning from S. D. Poisson's publication in 1808. It expounds on the establishment of the Polytechnic School in Paris and its fellows and teachers — Gaspard Monge, Lazare Carnot, Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac, Simeon Denis Poisson, Henri Navier, Augustin Louis Cauchy, Joseph Liouville, Ademar de Saint-Venant, Henri Regnault, Pierre Dulong, Emile Jouguet, Pierre Duhem, and others. It also describes the participation in the development of the shock wave theory of young scientists from the universities of Cambridge, among which were George Airy, James Challis, Samuel Earnshaw, George Stokes, Lord Rayleigh, Lord Kelvin, and James Maxwell, as well as of scientists from the Göttingen University, Germany — Bernhard Riemann and Ernst Heinrich Weber. The pioneer works on shock waves of the Scottish engineer William Renkin, the French artillerist Pierre-Henri Hugoniot, German scientists August Toepler and Ernst Mach, and a Hungarian scientist Gyözö Zemplén are also considered.

  12. The female intestine is more resistant than the male intestine to gut injury and inflammation when subjected to conditions associated with shock states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Hiroshi; Hoy, Erik; Xu, Da-Zhong; Lu, Qi; Feinman, Rena; Deitch, Edwin A

    2005-03-01

    Having documented that proestrus female rats are more resistant to shock-induced acute gut and hence lung injury than male rats, we tested the hypothesis that the female gut is more resistant to injury and produces less of an inflammatory response than the male gut when exposed to conditions associated with shock states (hypoxia and acidosis) utilizing the ex vivo Ussing chamber system. Ileal mucosal membranes harvested from normal male and female rats mounted in Ussing chamber systems were exposed to normoxia or 40 min of hypoxia at a normal pH (pH 7.3) or acidosis (pH 6.8). Cytokine and nitric oxide levels in the serosal compartment of the Ussing chamber were measured at the end of the 3-h experimental period to assess the immunoinflammatory response, whereas FITC-dextran (mol wt 4,300) was employed to assess barrier function. Histomorphological changes were used to quantitate gut mucosal injury. Hypoxia, acidosis, or hypoxia plus acidosis was associated with a significant increase in proinflammatory cytokine production [interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor, and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2] by the male compared with the female intestinal segments. In contrast, the female gut manifested a higher anti-inflammatory response (nitric oxide and IL-10) and improved intestinal barrier function as well as less evidence of mucosal injury than the male intestinal segments. Administration of estradiol or the testosterone receptor antagonist, flutamide, to male rats abrogated the increase in gut injury and the increased IL-6 and MIP-2 response observed after hypoxia plus acidosis. These results suggest that gender differences in the ex vivo intestinal response to stresses, such as hypoxia and acidosis, exist and that the administration of estradiol or blockade of the testosterone receptor to male rats mitigates these gender differences.

  13. Reaction rate constant of CH2O + H = HCO + H2 revisited: a combined study of direct shock tube measurement and transition state theory calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengkai; Dames, Enoch E; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-11-06

    The rate constant of the H-abstraction reaction of formaldehyde (CH2O) by hydrogen atoms (H), CH2O + H = H2 + HCO, has been studied behind reflected shock waves with use of a sensitive mid-IR laser absorption diagnostic for CO, over temperatures of 1304-2006 K and at pressures near 1 atm. C2H5I was used as an H atom precursor and 1,3,5-trioxane as the CH2O precursor, to generate a well-controlled CH2O/H reacting system. By designing the experiments to maintain relatively constant H atom concentrations, the current study significantly boosted the measurement sensitivity of the target reaction and suppressed the influence of interfering reactions. The measured CH2O + H rate constant can be expressed in modified Arrhenius from as kCH2O+H(1304-2006 K, 1 atm) = 1.97 × 10(11)(T/K)(1.06) exp(-3818 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1)s(-1), with uncertainty limits estimated to be +18%/-26%. A transition-state-theory (TST) calculation, using the CCSD(T)-F12/VTZ-F12 level of theory, is in good agreement with the shock tube measurement and extended the temperature range of the current study to 200-3000 K, over which a modified Arrhenius fit of the rate constant can be expressed as kCH2O+H(200-3000 K) = 5.86 × 10(3)(T/K)(3.13) exp(-762 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1)s(-1).

  14. Culture Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋文玲

    2004-01-01

    Specialists say that it is not easy to get used to life in a new culture.“Culture shock”is the term these specialists use when talking about the feelings that people have in a new environment.There are three stages of culture shock,say the specialists.In the first stage,the newcomers like their new environment,Then when the fresh experience

  15. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  16. Shock interaction with organized structures: Theory and computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhong

    Unsteady interactions between shocks and turbulence are important phenomena frequently encountered in high-speed flows. In this dissertation the problem of a shock interaction with an entropy spot is studied by means of both theoretical analysis and nonlinear computation. The main objective of the studies is to apply both theoretical and computational approaches to study the physics underlying such shock interaction process. The theoretical analysis is based on the Fourier decomposition of the upstream disturbance, the interaction of each Fourier mode with the shock, and the reconstruction of the downstream disturbance via the inverse Fourier transform. The theory is linear in that it assumes the principle of superposition and that the Rankine-Hugoniot relations are linearized about the mean position of the shock. The numerical simulation is carried out within the framework of the unsteady and compressible Euler equations, coupled with an equation for the shock motion, solved numerically by a sixth-order accurate spatial scheme and a fourth-order Runge-Kutta time-integration method. Analyses of the results are concentrated on the case of a Mach 2.0 shock interaction with an entropy spot that has a Gaussian density distribution. The theoretical analysis and the numerical simulation are verified with each other for small amplitude disturbances. The roles of the evanescent and the non-evanescent waves and the mechanisms for downstream disturbance generations are explored in details. In addition, the quasi three-dimensional interaction between a shock and a vortex ring is investigated computationally within the framework of the axisymmetric Euler equations. The vortex ring, which is based on Lamb's formula, has an upstream circulation Gamma = 0.01 and its aspect ratio R lies in the range 8 ≤ R ≤ 100. The shock Mach number varies in the range 1.1 ≤ M1 ≤ 1.8. The interaction results in the streamwise compression of the vortex core and the generation of a toroidal

  17. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan, Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics, 2455 Hayward Dr., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Bingham, D.; Goh, J. [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada); Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10{sup 14} W cm{sup −2} to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code.

  18. Numerical and experimental investigation of the fracture behavior of shock loaded alumina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Plate impact expeiments are conducted to investigate the dynamic behavior of alumina by using one stage light gas gun. A ve-locity interferometer system for reflectors (VISAR) is used to obtain Hugoniot elastic limit and the free surface velocity profile,which consists of an elastic wave followed immediately by a dispersive inelastic wave. The stress histories under different impact velocities are measured by in-material manganin gauges. Based on the experimental data a Hugoniot curve is fitted,which shows the compressive characteristics that alumina changes typically from elastic to "plastic" ,and under higher pressure it will be transferred to similar-fluid state. The turning point of the Hugoniot curve from a high pressure region to a low pressure region is about 11.4 GPa. The fracture process of alumina is simulated by way of finite element code. After the analysis of the fracture mechanism,the numerical results show an important role played by the nucleation and the growth of the cracks in the macro-scopic fracture of the alumina target. The numerical predictions of stress histories are compared with the experimental results,which indicates consistency between them.

  19. Bridgman's concern (shock compression science)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R. A.

    1994-07-01

    In 1956 P. W. Bridgman published a letter to the editor in the Journal of Applied Physics reporting results of electrical resistance measurements on iron under static high pressure. The work was undertaken to verify the existence of a polymorphic phase transition at 130 kbar (13 GPa) reported in the same journal and year by the Los Alamos authors, Bancroft, Peterson, and Minshall for high pressure, shock-compression loading. In his letter, Bridgman reported that he failed to find any evidence for the transition. Further, he raised some fundamental concerns as to the state of knowledge of shock-compression processes in solids. Later it was determined that Bridgman's static pressure scale was in error, and the shock observations became the basis for calibration of pressure values in static high pressure apparatuses. In spite of the error in pressure scales, Bridgman's concerns on descriptions of shock-compression processes were perceptive and have provided the basis for subsequent fundamental studies of shock-compressed solids. The present paper, written in response to receipt of the 1993 American Physical Society Shock-Compression Science Award, provides a brief contemporary assessment of those shock-compression issues which were the basis of Bridgman's 1956 concerns.

  20. The optimal state estimation method. A tool to integrate full scale shock trial measurement data and numerical models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trouwborst, W.; Costanzo, F.A.

    1999-01-01

    In the joint US-NL research program DYCOSS (an acronym for Dynamic Behavior of Composite Ship Structures), a data analysis tool has been developed. The tool contains a mathematical method called the Optimal State Estimation method (OSE) and a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The OSE-method utilizes a

  1. Dissecting a Molecular Shock: Spatially Resolved H2 Line Ratios Across the HH7 Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Rosemary E.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Burton, Michael G.; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Brand, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We report on a detailed study of the physics of molecular shocks using Gemini NIFS (Near-Infrared Field Spectrometer) K-band spectra of a 3.'2 x 2.'9 region near the tip of the HH7 bow shock. The IFU data have an angular resolution of 0.3", much higher resolution then in any previous study of a molecular shock, and a velocity resolution of 60 km/s. We have detected 20 H2 emission lines with upper state energies as high as 28,000 K, and 6 additional unidentified lines which share the same bow shock morphology as the H2. We use excitation temperatures derived from line pairs measured in 0.15' x 0.15' bins to attempt to constrain the shock type and distinguish between low velocity jump shocks, continuous shocks, and dissociative shocks in which the H2 line emission arises from newly reformed H2.

  2. Localized shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Daniel A; Susskind, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    We study products of precursors of spatially local operators, $W_{x_{n}}(t_{n}) ... W_{x_1}(t_1)$, where $W_x(t) = e^{-iHt} W_x e^{iHt}$. Using chaotic spin-chain numerics and gauge/gravity duality, we show that a single precursor fills a spatial region that grows linearly in $t$. In a lattice system, products of such operators can be represented using tensor networks. In gauge/gravity duality, they are related to Einstein-Rosen bridges supported by localized shock waves. We find a geometrical correspondence between these two descriptions, generalizing earlier work in the spatially homogeneous case.

  3. Are shocks to natural gas consumption temporary or permanent? Evidence from a panel of U.S. states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apergis, Nicholas [Department of Banking and Financial Management, University of Piraeus, Karaoli and Dimitriou 80, Piraeus, Attiki 18534 (Greece); Loomis, David [The Institute for Regulatory Policy Studies, Department of Economics, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61790-4200 (United States); Payne, James E. [College of Arts and Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61790-4100 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    This short communication examines whether or not U.S. natural gas consumption follows a stationary process. Unlike previous research that has focused on regional country or industrial sector-based panel studies, this study undertakes a sub-national investigation of natural gas consumption for the 50 U.S. states. Levin et al. (2002), Im et al. (2003), Maddala and Wu (1999), and Hadri (2000) and panel unit root and stationarity tests reveal that natural gas consumption is integrated of order one. However, once allowance is made for endogenously determined structural breaks, the Carrion-i-Silvestre et al. (2005), Im et al. (2005), and Westerlund (2005) panel unit root and stationarity tests indicate that natural gas consumption is integrated of order zero. Discussion of the structural breaks is briefly surveyed in relation to the natural gas industry's response to legislative actions. (author)

  4. Theoretical study of the porosity and temperature effects on the shock response of graphitic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourasseau, Emeric; Pineau, Nicolas; Hebert, David; Soulard, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    The response of graphite, and graphite-like materials, to shock compression have been the subject of numerous experimental studies over a few decades, showing a substantial dependence of the shock properties (Hugoniot curves, transition to diamond, ...) on the initial porosity and granularity of the polycrystalline samples. Theoretical studies of these processes have been enabled only recently, thanks to the development of computationally efficient empirical potentials such as LCBOPII which reproduce accurately the various phases of carbon (graphene, graphite, diamond, liquid carbon) and the few available ab initio data for shock compression of graphite. These studies are restricted to monocrystalline samples which, in the case of graphite, represent a serious approximation to the actual experimental set-ups and may explain the large over-estimation of the graphite/diamond transition pressure (~ 60 GPa vs. 15-25 GPa). In this paper we present a theoretical study on the shock compression of porous graphite by means of Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations using the LCBOPII potential. The results are compared to the available experimental data and the role of porosity and temperature on the shock properties and graphite/diamond transition is discussed.

  5. Traveling waves in Hall-magnetohydrodynamics and the ion-acoustic shock structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagstrom, George I.; Hameiri, Eliezer [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Hall-magnetohydrodynamics (HMHD) is a mixed hyperbolic-parabolic partial differential equation that describes the dynamics of an ideal two fluid plasma with massless electrons. We study the only shock wave family that exists in this system (the other discontinuities being contact discontinuities and not shocks). We study planar traveling wave solutions and we find solutions with discontinuities in the hydrodynamic variables, which arise due to the presence of real characteristics in Hall-MHD. We introduce a small viscosity into the equations and use the method of matched asymptotic expansions to show that solutions with a discontinuity satisfying the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and also an entropy condition have continuous shock structures. The lowest order inner equations reduce to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, plus an equation which implies the constancy of the magnetic field inside the shock structure. We are able to show that the current is discontinuous across the shock, even as the magnetic field is continuous, and that the lowest order outer equations, which are the equations for traveling waves in inviscid Hall-MHD, are exactly integrable. We show that the inner and outer solutions match, which allows us to construct a family of uniformly valid continuous composite solutions that become discontinuous when the diffusivity vanishes.

  6. Atomistic Simulations of Orientation and Shock Velocity Dependences on Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Thompson, Aidan; Wixom, Ryan; Mattsson, Ann

    2012-02-01

    Predicting the behavior of energetic materials requires a detailed description of how chemical reaction, energy and pressure fronts propagate during initial stages of detonation. In this talk, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to examine orientation and shock velocity dependences in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). This work utilizes an empirical, variable charge reactive force field (ReaxFF) that is implemented in the LAMMPS package with a time-averaged bond-order method for on-the-fly chemical species identification. The accuracy of ReaxFF is validated by comparisons of activation barriers for dissociation of a single PETN molecule along various dissociation channels with higher-fidelity, but more expensive, density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The response of single-crystal PETN to shock compression is simulated using the multi-scale shock technique (MSST) along the insensitive (100) directions, as well as the sensitive (001) and (110) directions, at steady shock velocities ranging from 6-10 km/s. Hugoniot curves, particle velocities of shocked molecules, and evolution of reaction products with time from MD simulations with ReaxFF will be discussed and compared to that from DFT calculations.

  7. Nonstandard Analysis and Shock Wave Jump Conditions in a One-Dimensional Compressible Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy S. Baty, F. Farassat, John A. Hargreaves

    2007-05-25

    Nonstandard analysis is a relatively new area of mathematics in which infinitesimal numbers can be defined and manipulated rigorously like real numbers. This report presents a fairly comprehensive tutorial on nonstandard analysis for physicists and engineers with many examples applicable to generalized functions. To demonstrate the power of the subject, the problem of shock wave jump conditions is studied for a one-dimensional compressible gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. To use conservations laws, smooth pre-distributions of the Dirac delta measure are applied whose supports are contained within the shock thickness. Furthermore, smooth pre-distributions of the Heaviside function are applied which vary from zero to one across the shock wave. It is shown that if the equations of motion are expressed in nonconservative form then the relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters may be found unambiguously. The analysis yields the classical Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an inviscid shock wave. Moreover, non-monotonic entropy jump conditions are obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows. The report shows that products of generalized functions may be defined consistently using nonstandard analysis; however, physically meaningful products of generalized functions must be determined from the physics of the problem and not the mathematical form of the governing equations.

  8. Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interaction in Forced Shock Oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piotr Doerffer; Oskar Szulc; Franco Magagnato

    2003-01-01

    The flow in transonic diffusers as well as in supersonic air intakes becomes often unsteady due to shock wave boundary layer interaction. The oscillations may be induced by natural separation unsteadiness or may be forced by boundary conditions. Significant improvement of CFD tools, increase of computer resources as well as development of experimental methods have again.drawn the attention of researchers to this topic.To investigate the problem forced oscillations of transonic turbulent flow in asymmetric two-dimensional Laval nozzle were considered. A viscous, perfect gas flow, was numerically simulated using the Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes solver SPARC, employing a two-equation, eddy viscosity, turbulence closure in the URANS approach.For time-dependent and stationary flow simulations, Mach numbers upstream of the shock between 1.2 and 1.4 were considered. Comparison of computed and experimental data for steady states generally gave acceptable agreement. In the case of forced oscillations, a harmonic pressure variation was prescribed at the exit plane resulting in shock wave motion. Excitation frequencies between 0 Hz and 1024 Hz were investigated at the same pressure amplitude.The main result of the work carried out is the relation between the amplitude of the shock wave motion and the excitation frequency in the investigated range. Increasing excitation frequency resulted in decreasing amplitude of the shock movement. At high frequencies a natural mode of shock oscillation (of small amplitude) was observed which is not sensitive to forced excitement.

  9. Microscopic stability of cold shock protein A examined by NMR native state hydrogen exchange as a function of urea and trimethylamine N-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaravine, V. A.; Rathgeb-Szabo, K.; Alexandrescu, A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Native state hydrogen exchange of cold shock protein A (CspA) has been characterized as a function of the denaturant urea and of the stabilizing agent trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). The structure of CspA has five strands of beta-sheet. Strands beta1-beta4 have strongly protected amide protons that, based on experiments as a function of urea, exchange through a simple all-or-none global unfolding mechanism. By contrast, the protection of amide protons from strand beta5 is too weak to measure in water. Strand beta5 is hydrogen bonded to strands beta3 and beta4, both of which afford strong protection from solvent exchange. Gaussian network model (GNM) simulations, which assume that the degree of protection depends on tertiary contact density in the native structure, accurately predict the strong protection observed in strands beta1-beta4 but fail to account for the weak protection in strand beta5. The most conspicuous feature of strand beta5 is its low sequence hydrophobicity. In the presence of TMAO, there is an increase in the protection of strands beta1-beta4, and protection extends to amide protons in more hydrophilic segments of the protein, including strand beta5 and the loops connecting the beta-strands. TMAO stabilizes proteins by raising the free energy of the denatured state, due to highly unfavorable interactions between TMAO and the exposed peptide backbone. As such, the stabilizing effects of TMAO are expected to be relatively independent of sequence hydrophobicity. The present results suggest that the magnitude of solvent exchange protection depends more on solvent accessibility in the ensemble of exchange susceptible conformations than on the strength of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the native structure. PMID:10716181

  10. Numerical simulation of converging shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Seokjune; Abe, Kanji

    We can achieve the high pressure and high temperature state of gas if the shock wave converges stably. In order to check the stability of the converging shock wave, we introduce two kinds of perturbed initial conditions. The Euler equations of conservation form are integrated by using explicit Non-Muscl TVD finite difference scheme.

  11. Traffic Jams and Shocks of Molecular Motors inside Cellular Protrusions

    CERN Document Server

    Pinkoviezky, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motors are involved in key transport processes inside actin-based cellular protrusions. The motors carry cargo proteins to the protrusion tip which participate in regulating the actin polymerization, and play a key role in facilitating the growth and formation of such protrusions. It is observed that the motors accumulate at the tips of cellular protrusions, and in addition form aggregates that are found to drift towards the protrusion base at the rate of actin treadmilling. We present a one-dimensional driven lattice model, where motors become inactive after delivering their cargo at the tip, or by loosing their cargo to a cargo-less neighbor. The results suggest that the experimental observations may be explained by the formation of traffic jams that form at the tip. The model is solved using a novel application of mean-field and shock analysis. We find a new class of shocks that undergo intermittent collapses, and on average do not obey the Rankine-Hugoniot relation.

  12. Entropy Generation Across Earth's Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, George K.; McCarthy, Michael; Fu, Suiyan; Lee E. s; Cao, Jinbin; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Canu, Patrick; Dandouras, Iannis S.; Reme, Henri; Fazakerley, Andrew; Lin, Naiguo; Wilber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Earth's bow shock is a transition layer that causes an irreversible change in the state of plasma that is stationary in time. Theories predict entropy increases across the bow shock but entropy has never been directly measured. Cluster and Double Star plasma experiments measure 3D plasma distributions upstream and downstream of the bow shock that allow calculation of Boltzmann's entropy function H and his famous H-theorem, dH/dt O. We present the first direct measurements of entropy density changes across Earth's bow shock. We will show that this entropy generation may be part of the processes that produce the non-thermal plasma distributions is consistent with a kinetic entropy flux model derived from the collisionless Boltzmann equation, giving strong support that solar wind's total entropy across the bow shock remains unchanged. As far as we know, our results are not explained by any existing shock models and should be of interests to theorists.

  13. Shock experiments in metals and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, G.T. III.

    1990-01-01

    Shock recovery and spallation experiments, in which material structure/property effects are systematically varied and characterized quantitatively, offer two important experimental techniques to probe the physical mechanisms controlling shock processes and dynamic fracture. This paper highlights the current state of knowledge and principal challenges of the structure/property effects of shock-wave deformation on metals and ceramics. Recent shock-recovery and spallation experimental results on post-mortem material properties and fracture behavior in metals and ceramics are reviewed. Finally, the influence of shock-wave deformation on several intermetallics and a recent experiment examining the Bauschinger effect in Al-4% Cu during shock loading are presented. 65 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  15. [Toxic shock syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyll, T; Bílková, M; Revinová, A; Müller, M; Čurdová, M; Zlámal, M; Holub, M

    2015-10-01

    The authors present an up-to-date review of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) - a life-threatening condition where toxins of the Gram-positive bacteria Staphyloccocus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes play a key role in the pathogenesis. The authors provide insight into the epidemiology and pathogenesis of the disease and point out the relevant patient history data and clinical signs and symptoms that may indicate progression of TSS. Last but not least, the state of the art diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to early and full blown TSS are summarized. Case reports are presented to illustrate two different etiological forms of this relatively rare nosological entity.

  16. Reliability of Radial Distribution Functions Obtained from Muticomponent HMSA Integral Equation for CO2 Shock Product Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeev, A. A.; Bogdanova, Yu. A.; Gubin, S. A.

    Multicomponent hypernetted-chain/soft core mean spherical approximation (HMSA) was shown to be successfully applied for the problem of ambidextrous attractive/repulsive interaction simulation in dense fluids like shock compression products of CxNyOz liquid systems. This approximation provides high numerical accuracy for thermodynamic quantities due to its self-consistency. In addition, distribution function integral equation theory (DFIET) doesn't require chemical equilibrium for simulated systems. Reproducible shock Hugoniot curves verify the macroscopic properties such as pressure and internal energy. Radial distribution function analysis, proposed in this paper, approves macroscopic and microscopic/structural short-range order properties both by molecular Monte-Carlo (MC) method for multicomponent dissociation products of liquid CO2 up to 160 GPa.

  17. Dynamic compression of water to 700 GPa: single- and double shock experiments on Sandia's Z machine, first principles simulations, and structure of water planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2011-11-01

    Significant progress has over the last few years been made in high energy density physics (HEDP) by executing high-precision multi-Mbar experiments and performing first-principles simulations for elements ranging from carbon [1] to xenon [2]. The properties of water under HEDP conditions are of particular importance in planetary science due to the existence of ice-giants like Neptune and Uranus. Modeling the two planets, as well as water-rich exoplanets, requires knowing the equation of state (EOS), the pressure as a function of density and temperature, of water with high accuracy. Although extensive density functional theory (DFT) simulations have been performed for water under planetary conditions [3] experimental validation has been lacking. Accessing thermodynamic states along planetary isentropes in dynamic compression experiments is challenging because the principal Hugoniot follows a significantly different path in the phase diagram. In this talk, we present experimental data for dynamic compression of water up to 700 GPa, including in a regime of the phase-diagram intersected by the Neptune isentrope and water-rich models for the exoplanet GJ436b. The data was obtained on the Z-accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories by performing magnetically accelerated flyer plate impact experiments measuring both the shock and re-shock in the sample. The high accuracy makes it possible for the data to be used for detailed model validation: the results validate first principles based thermodynamics as a reliable foundation for planetary modeling and confirm the fine effect of including nuclear quantum effects on the shock pressure. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. [4pt] [1] M.D. Knudson, D.H. Dolan, and M.P. Desjarlais, SCIENCE

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of strong shock waves propagating in dense deuterium, taking into consideration effects of excited electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Huiling; He, X. T.

    2017-02-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of shock waves propagating in dense deuterium with the electron force field method [J. T. Su and W. A. Goddard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 185003 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.185003], which explicitly takes the excitation of electrons into consideration. Nonequilibrium features associated with the excitation of electrons are systematically investigated. We show that chemical bonds in D2 molecules lead to a more complicated shock wave structure near the shock front, compared with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulation. Charge separation can bring about accumulation of net charges on large scales, instead of the formation of a localized dipole layer, which might cause extra energy for the shock wave to propagate. In addition, the simulations also display that molecular dissociation at the shock front is the major factor that accounts for the "bump" structure in the principal Hugoniot. These results could help to build a more realistic picture of shock wave propagation in fuel materials commonly used in the inertial confinement fusion.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of strong shock waves propagating in dense deuterium, taking into consideration effects of excited electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Huiling; He, X T

    2017-02-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of shock waves propagating in dense deuterium with the electron force field method [J. T. Su and W. A. Goddard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 185003 (2007)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.99.185003], which explicitly takes the excitation of electrons into consideration. Nonequilibrium features associated with the excitation of electrons are systematically investigated. We show that chemical bonds in D_{2} molecules lead to a more complicated shock wave structure near the shock front, compared with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulation. Charge separation can bring about accumulation of net charges on large scales, instead of the formation of a localized dipole layer, which might cause extra energy for the shock wave to propagate. In addition, the simulations also display that molecular dissociation at the shock front is the major factor that accounts for the "bump" structure in the principal Hugoniot. These results could help to build a more realistic picture of shock wave propagation in fuel materials commonly used in the inertial confinement fusion.

  20. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  1. Anomalous flow deflection at planetary bow shocks in the low Alfven Mach number regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Masaki N.; Fujimoto, Masaki; Tai, Phan-Duc; Mukai, Toshifumi; Saito, Yoshifumi; Kuznetsova, Masha M.; Rastaetter, Lutz

    A planetary magnetosphere is an obstacle to the super-sonic solar wind and the bow shock is formed in the front-side of it. In ordinary hydro-dynamics, the flow decelerated at the shock is diverted around the obstacle symmetrically about the planet-Sun line, which is indeed observed in the magnetosheath most of the time. Here we show a case under a very low density solar wind in which duskward flow was observed in the dawnside magnetosheath of the Earth's magnetosphere. A Rankine-Hugoniot test across the bow shock shows that the magnetic effect is crucial for this "wrong flow" to appear. A full three-dimensional Magneto- Hydro-Dynamics (MHD) simulation of the situation in this previously unexplored parameter regime is also performed. It is illustrated that in addition to the "wrong flow" feature, various peculiar characteristics appear in the global picture of the MHD flow interaction with the obstacle. The magnetic effect at the bow shock should become more conspicuously around the Mercury's magnetosphere, because stronger interplanetary magnetic field and slower solar wind around the Mercury let the Alfven Mach number low. Resultant strong deformation of the magnetosphere induced by the "wrong flow" will cause more complex interaction between the solar wind and the Mercury.

  2. Shock initiation behavior of PBXN-9 determined by gas gun experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Nathaniel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The shock to detonation transition was evaluated in the HMX based explosive PBXN-9 by a series of light-gas gun experiments. PBXN-9 consists of 92 wt% HMX, 2wt% Hycar 4054 & 6 wt% dioctyl adipate with a density of 1.75 g/cm{sup 3} and 0.8% voids. The experiments were designed to understand the specifics of wave evolution and the run distance to detonation as a function of input shock pressure. These experiments were conducted on gas guns in order to vary the input shock pressure accurately. The primary diagnostics were embedded magnetic gauges, which are based on Faraday's law of induction, and Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The run distance to detonation vs. shock pressure, or 'Pop plot,' was redefined as log(X*) = 2.14-1.82 log(P), which is substantially different than previous data. The Hugoniot was refined as U{sub s} = 2.32 + 2.21 U{sub p}. This data will be useful for the development of predictive models for the safety and performance of PBXN-9 along with providing increased understanding of HMX based explosives in varying formulations.

  3. Advanced and Exploratory Shock Sensing Mechanisms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelsen, Nicholas; Kolb, James; Kulkarni, Akshay; Sorscher, Zachary; Habing, Clayton; Mathis, Allen; Beller, Zachary

    2017-09-01

    Mechanical component response to shock environments must be predictable in order to ensure reliability and safety. Whether the shock input results from accidental drops during transportation to projectile impact scenarios, the system must irreversibly transition into a safe state that is incapable of triggering the component . With this critical need in mind, the 2017 Nuclear Weapons Summer Product Realization Institute (NW SPRINT) program objective sought the design of a passive shock failsafe with emphasis on additively manufactured (AM) components. Team Advanced and Exploratory (A&E) responded to the challenge by designing and delivering multiple passive shock sensing mech anisms that activate within a prescribed mechanical shock threshold. These AM failsafe designs were tuned and validated using analytical and computational techniques including the shock response spectrum (SRS) and finite element analysis (FEA). After rapid prototyping, the devices experienced physical shock tests conducted on Sandia drop tables to experimentally verify performance. Keywords: Additive manufacturing, dynamic system, failsafe, finite element analysis, mechanical shock, NW SPRINT, shock respon se spectrum

  4. Group Invariance Properties of the Inviscid Compressible Flow Equations for a Modified Tait Equation of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Scott; Baty, Roy

    2015-11-01

    This work considers the group invariance properties of the inviscid compressible flow equations (Euler equations) under the assumptions of one-dimensional symmetry and a modified Tait equation of state (EOS) closure model. When written in terms of an adiabatic bulk modulus, a transformed version of these equations is found to be identical to that for an ideal gas EOS. As a result, the Lie group invariance structure of these equations - and their subsequent reduction to a lower-order system - is identical to the published results for the ideal gas case. Following the reduction of the Euler equations to a system of ordinary differential equations, a variety of elementary closed-form solutions are derived. These solutions are then used in conjunction with the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions to construct discontinuous shock wave and free surface solutions that are analogous to the classical Noh, Sedov, Guderley, and Hunter similarity solutions of the Euler equations for an ideal gas EOS. The versions of these problems for the modified Tait EOS are found to be semi-analytic in that a transcendental root extraction (and in some cases numerical integration of ordinary differential equations) enables solution of the relevant equations.

  5. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  6. Equations of State for Mixtures: Results from DFT Simulations of Xenon/Ethane Mixtures Compared to High Accuracy Validation Experiments on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Rudolph

    2013-06-01

    We report a computational and validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties of liquid / dense plasma mixtures of xenon and ethane to explore and to illustrate the physics of the molecular scale mixing of light elements with heavy elements. Accurate EOS models are crucial to achieve high-fidelity hydrodynamics simulations of many high-energy-density phenomena such as inertial confinement fusion and strong shock waves. While the EOS is often tabulated for separate species, the equation of state for arbitrary mixtures is generally not available, requiring properties of the mixture to be approximated by combining physical properties of the pure systems. The main goal of this study is to access how accurate this approximation is under shock conditions. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to assess the thermodynamics of the xenon-ethane mixture. The simulations are unbiased as to elemental species and therefore provide comparable accuracy when describing total energies, pressures, and other physical properties of mixtures as they do for pure systems. In addition, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-accelerator on pure xenon, ethane, and various mixture ratios thereof. The Hugoniot results are compared to the DFT-MD results and the predictions of different rules for combing EOS tables. The DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental points, and it is found that a mixing rule based on pressure equilibration performs reliably well for the mixtures considered. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. In-Situ Magnetic Gauging Technique Used at LANL -- Method and Shock Information Obtained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Stephen A.

    1999-06-01

    Measuring techniques, including magnetic gauges, quartz gauges, manganin gauges, PVDF gauges, velocity interferometry (VISAR, Fabry-Perot, ORVIS, etc.), piezoelectric pins, shorting pins, flash gaps, etc., have been used over the years to measure shock properties and wave evolution in condensed phase materials. In general, each of these techniques has its own strengths and weaknesses. The use of a particular technique depends on the measured parameter and the sample material properties. This paper will concentrate on in-situ magnetic gauging which is particularly useful in high explosive shock initiation experiments. A short history of this technique will be given but the main discussion will concentrate on the multiple magnetic gauge technique developed at Los Alamos National Lab.(LANL). Vorthman and Wackerle (Vorthman, J.E., ``Facilities for the Study of Shock Induced Decomposition in High Explosive,'' in Shock Waves in Condensed Matter -- 1981, Eds. W. J. Nellis, L. Seaman, and R.A. Graham, AIP Conference Proceedings No. 78 (1982) p. 680.) started developing the technique in 1980, concentrating on particle velocity and ``impulse'' gauges so that Lagrange analysis could be used to map the entire reactive field. Over the years, changes to the gauge design, fabrication, and experimental focus have led to the present LANL capability. During the past two years measurements have tracked the reactive wave evolution resulting from a shock-to-detonation transition in several high explosive materials. The data from a single experiment provides: 1)particle velocity wave profiles from ten to twelve depths in the sample, 2) shock front tracking, 3) an unreacted Hugoniot point (in which both the shock velocity and particle velocity are measured), 4) a ``Pop-plot'' or distance-(time-)to-detonation point, and 5) a 3% measurement of the detonation velocity. Details of the experimental setup and information from several experiments will be discussed.

  8. Theoretical calculation of the shock compression properties of liquid H2 + D2 mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈其峰; 蔡灵仓; 陈栋泉; 经福谦

    1999-01-01

    Based on liquid variational perturbation theory with quantum mechanics correction, the effective exp-6 potential is adopted to compute the shock Hugoniot of liquid H2+D2 mixtures at different molar rations. An examination of the confidence of the above computation is performed by comparing experiments and calculations, in which similar calculation procedure used for H2+D2 is adopted for H2 and D2 each, since no experimental data are available to conduct this kind of comparison. Good agreement in both comparisons is found. This fact may look as if an indirect positive verification of calculation procedure was used here at least in the pressure and temperature domain covered by the experimental data of H2 and D2 used for comparison, numerically nearly up to 20 GPa and 104 K.

  9. Shock Mechanism Analysis and Simulation of High-Power Hydraulic Shock Wave Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiu Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of regular shock wave (e.g., half-sine can be achieved by the traditional rubber shock simulator, but the practical high-power shock wave characterized by steep prepeak and gentle postpeak is hard to be realized by the same. To tackle this disadvantage, a novel high-power hydraulic shock wave simulator based on the live firing muzzle shock principle was proposed in the current work. The influence of the typical shock characteristic parameters on the shock force wave was investigated via both theoretical deduction and software simulation. According to the obtained data compared with the results, in fact, it can be concluded that the developed hydraulic shock wave simulator can be applied to simulate the real condition of the shocking system. Further, the similarity evaluation of shock wave simulation was achieved based on the curvature distance, and the results stated that the simulation method was reasonable and the structural optimization based on software simulation is also beneficial to the increase of efficiency. Finally, the combination of theoretical analysis and simulation for the development of artillery recoil tester is a comprehensive approach in the design and structure optimization of the recoil system.

  10. Shock initiation studies on high concentration hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gibson, L. Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. TV cameras are attached to the target so the cell filling can be monitored. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; initiation has been observed in some experiments that shows homogeneous shock initiation behavior. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these measurements, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot information, times (distances) to detonation (Pop-plot points) that indicate low sensitivity, and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions that agree with earlier estimates.

  11. Shock initiation studies on high concentration hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gibson, L. Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. TV cameras are attached to the target so the cell filling can be monitored. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; initiation has been observed in some experiments that shows homogeneous shock initiation behavior. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these measurements, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot information, times (distances) to detonation (Pop-plot points) that indicate low sensitivity, and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions that agree with earlier estimates.

  12. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION AT COSMOLOGICAL SHOCK WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyesung [Department of Earth Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dongsu, E-mail: kang@uju.es.pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-10

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large-scale structure of the universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfvenic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and acceleration efficiency. In our DSA model, the CR acceleration efficiency is determined mainly by the sonic Mach number M{sub s} , while the MFA factor depends on the Alfvenic Mach number and the degree of shock modification by CRs. We show that at strong CR modified shocks, if scattering centers drift with an effective Alfven speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum is steepened and the acceleration efficiency is reduced significantly, compared to the cases without such effects. As a result, the postshock CR pressure saturates roughly at {approx}20% of the shock ram pressure for strong shocks with M{sub s} {approx}> 10. In the test-particle regime (M{sub s} {approx}< 3), it is expected that the magnetic field is not amplified and the Alfvenic drift effects are insignificant, although relevant plasma physical processes at low Mach number shocks remain largely uncertain.

  13. Geometrical on-the-fly shock detection in SPH

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Alexander M; Donnert, Julius M F

    2015-01-01

    We present an on-the-fly geometrical approach for shock detection and Mach number calculation in simulations employing smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We utilize pressure gradients to select shock candidates and define up- and downstream positions. We obtain hydrodynamical states in the up- and downstream regimes with a series of normal and inverted kernel weightings parallel and perpendicular to the shock normals. Our on-the-fly geometrical Mach detector incorporates well within the SPH formalism and has low computational cost. We implement our Mach detector into the simulation code GADGET and alongside many SPH improvements. We test our shock finder in a sequence of shock-tube tests with successively increasing Mach numbers exceeding by far the typical values inside galaxy clusters. For the all shocks, we resolve the shocks well and the correct Mach numbers are assigned. An application to a strong magnetized shock-tube gives stable results in full magnetohydrodynamic set-ups. We simulate a merger of ...

  14. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana; Pasternak Janko; Milovanović Stanislav; Ivanov Dejan; Milić Saša

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella pre...

  15. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  16. The effects of shockwave profile shape and shock obliquity on spallation : studies of kinetics and stress state effects on damage evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, George T., III [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hull, Larry M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Faulkner, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Briggs, M E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, E K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Addessio, F L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, N K [AWE. ALDERMASTON UK

    2009-06-22

    Shock-loading of a material in contact with a high explosive (HE) experiences a 'Taylor wave' (triangular wave) loading profile in contrast to the square-wave loading profile imparted via the impact of a flyer plate. Detailed metallographic and mlcrotextural analysis of the damage evolution in spalled Cu samples as a function of square/triangle and sweeping detonation-wave loading is presented.

  17. Evolution and stability of shock waves in dissipative gases characterized by activated inelastic collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmas, N.; Radulescu, M. I.

    2015-02-01

    Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves driven through dissipative gases may become unstable, for example, in granular gases and in molecular gases undergoing strong relaxation effects. The mechanisms controlling these instabilities are not well understood. We successfully isolated and investigated this instability in the canonical problem of piston-driven shock waves propagating into a medium characterized by inelastic collision processes. We treat the standard model of granular gases, where particle collisions are taken as inelastic, with a constant coefficient of restitution. The inelasticity is activated for sufficiently strong collisions. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed for 30 000 particles. We find that all shock waves investigated become unstable, with density nonuniformities forming in the relaxation region. The wavelength of these fingers is found to be comparable to the characteristic relaxation thickness. Shock Hugoniot curves for both elastic and inelastic collisions were obtained analytically and numerically. Analysis of these curves indicates that the instability is not of the Bethe-Zeldovich-Thompson or D'yakov-Kontorovich type. Analysis of the shock relaxation rates and rates for clustering in a convected fluid element with the same thermodynamic history ruled out the clustering instability of a homogeneous granular gas. Instead, wave reconstruction of the early transient evolution indicates that the onset of instability occurs during repressurization of the gas following the initial relaxation of the medium behind the lead shock. This repressurization gives rise to internal pressure waves in the presence of strong density gradients. This indicates that the mechanism of instability is more likely of the vorticity-generating Richtmyer-Meshkov type, relying on the action of the inner pressure wave development during the transient relaxation.

  18. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Holst, B.; Tóth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Powell, K. G.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-06-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1 ns. Later times are calculated with the CRASH code. CRASH solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties are consistent with order-of-magnitude estimates. The synthetic radiographs produced can be used for comparison with future nozzle experiments at high-energy-density laser facilities.

  19. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I V; Daldorff, L K S; Powell, K G; Drake, R P

    2011-01-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1ns. The later times are calculated with the CRASH code. This code solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties a...

  20. Time-resolved lattice measurements of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milathianaki, Despina

    The response of materials under extreme temperature and pressure conditions is a topic of great significance because of its relevance in astrophysics, geophysics, and inertial confinement fusion. In recent years, environments exceeding several hundred gigapascals in pressure have been produced in the laboratory via laser-based dynamic loading techniques. Shock-loading is of particular interest as the shock provides a fiducial for measuring time-dependent processes in the lattice such as phase transitions. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction is the only technique that offers an insight into these shock-induced processes at the relevant spatial (atomic) and temporal scales. In this study, nanosecond resolution x-ray diffraction techniques were developed and implemented towards the study of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials. More specifically, the capability of a focusing x-ray diffraction geometry in high-resolution in situ lattice measurements was demonstrated by probing shock-compressed Cu and amorphous metallic glass samples. In addition, simultaneous lattice and free surface velocity measurements of shock-compressed Mg in the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) and shock-induced body centered cubic (bcc) phases between 12 and 45 GPa were performed. These measurements revealed x-ray diffraction signals consistent with a compressed bcc lattice above a shock pressure of 26.2+/-1.3 GPa, thus capturing for the first time direct lattice evidence of a shock-induced hcp to bcc phase transition in Mg. Our measurement of the hcp-bcc phase boundary in Mg was found to be consistent with the calculated boundary from generalized pseudopotential theory in the pressure and temperature region intersected by the principal shock Hugoniot. Furthermore, the subnanosecond timescale of the phase transition implied by the shock-loading conditions was in agreement with the kinetics of a martensitic transformation. In conclusion, we report on the progress and

  1. When Shock Waves Collide

    CERN Document Server

    Hartigan, P; Frank, A; Hansen, E; Yirak, K; Liao, A S; Graham, P; Wilde, B; Blue, B; Martinez, D; Rosen, P; Farley, D; Paguio, R

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than an oblique one does. In this paper we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and ...

  2. Nonequilibrium volumetric response of shocked polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, B E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Polymers are well known for their non-equilibrium deviatoric behavior. However, investigations involving both high rate shock experiments and equilibrium measured thermodynamic quantities remind us that the volumetric behavior also exhibits a non-equilibrium response. Experiments supporting the notion of a non-equilibrium volumetric behavior will be summarized. Following that discussion, a continuum-level theory is proposed that will account for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium response. Upon finding agreement with experiment, the theory is used to study the relaxation of a shocked polymer back towards its shocked equilibrium state.

  3. Shock compression of CO2: experiments on Z and first-principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, T. R.; Root, S.; Shulenburger, L.; Cochrane, K. R.

    2011-06-01

    The principal Hugoniot for CO2 is known up to 75 GPa and it displays a plateau in shock pressure interpreted as the result of dissociation. To confidently model the structure of gas-giant planets and the deep carbon cycle of the earth it is important to accurately know the properties of CO2 at even higher pressures. We present results from flyer-plate experiments on Sandia's Z-machine providing data for CO2 between 150 and 600 GPa. We also present Density Functional Theory (DFT) based simulations up to 500 GPa, including a chemical composition analysis. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) is applied to assess the accuracy of exchange-correlation functionals. We conclude that the plateau in shock pressure at 50 GPa is consistent with dissociation. Beyond 3.5 g/cm3 density, the shock pressure raises rapidly due to completed dissociation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Fast Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shock-induced Chemistry in Organic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2014-03-01

    The responses of liquid formic acid and phenylacetylene to shock compression have been investigated via quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations with the self-consistent tight-binding code LATTE. Microcanonical Born-Oppenheimer trajectories with precise conservation of the total energy were computed without relying on an iterative self-consistent field optimization of the electronic degrees of freedom at each time step via the Fast Quantum Mechanical Molecular Dynamics formalism [A. M. N. Niklasson and M. J. Cawkwell, Phys. Rev. B, 86, 174308 (2012)]. The conservation of the total energy in our trajectories was pivotal for the capture of adiabatic shock heating as well as temperature changes arising from endo- or exothermic chemistry. Our self-consistent tight-binding parameterizations yielded very good predictions for the gas-phase geometries of formic acid and phenylacetylene molecules and the principal Hugoniots of the liquids. In accord with recent flyer-plate impact experiments, our simulations revealed i) that formic acid reacts at relatively low impact pressures but with no change in volume between products and reactants, and ii) a two-step polymerization process for phenylacetylene. Furthermore, the evolution of the HOMO-LUMO gap tracked on-the-fly during our simulations could be correlated with changes transient absorption measured during laser-driven shock compression experiments on these liquids.

  5. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  6. Model for Shock Wave Chaos

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2013-03-08

    We propose the following model equation, ut+1/2(u2−uus)x=f(x,us) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x=0 for any t≥0. Here, us(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations.

  7. Shock desensitizing of solid explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, William C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shock wave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in testing these ideas.

  8. The shocking truth about meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Stephen; Shrive, Nigel; Ronsky, Janet

    2011-11-10

    The menisci of the knee are structures integral to the long term health of the knee joint. The primary function of these tissues is to distribute load across the tibiofemoral joint by increasing the congruency of the joint, thereby decreasing the resultant stress experienced by the articular cartilages. The menisci also play a secondary role in stabilizing the joint, particularly in the anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee, and also have roles in joint lubrication and proprioception. Also, an oft-cited role of this tissue is that of a shock absorber. We will review the literature supporting this shock absorption paradigm and describe the limitations and errors in the conclusions made by these studies. Consequently, we will show that the literature is inconclusive with no support for the shock absorption paradigm, which should therefore not be stated as a function of the menisci. We will describe how one of the three articles in support of this paradigm actually could be interpreted to the contrary and support the idea that the menisci may play no significant role in shock absorption at the knee at all, with the two remaining papers being inconclusive. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Overview of shock waves in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    A brief overview of three applications of shock waves is presented. Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has been in clinical use for more than 20 years. In the United States it is used to treat more than 80% of kidney stone cases and has wide acceptance with patients because it is a noninvasive procedure. Despite SWLs enormous success there is no agreement on how shock waves comminute stones. There is also a general acceptance that shock waves lead to trauma to the soft tissue of the kidney. Yet there has been little forward progress in developing lithotripters which provide comminution with less side-effects, indeed the original machine is still considered the gold standard. The last decade has seen the advent of new shock wave devices for treating principally musculoskeletal indications, such as plantar fasciitis, tennis elbow, and bone fractures that do not heal. This is referred to as shock wave therapy (SWT). The mechanisms by which SWT works are even less well understood than SWL and the consequences of bioeffects have also not been studied in detail. Shock waves have also been shown to be effective at enhancing drug delivery into cells and assisting with gene transfection. [Work partially supported by NIH.

  10. Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations of CO2 under shock compression and design of liquid CO2 experiments on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, T. R.; Shulenburger, L.; Root, S.; Cochrane, K. R.

    2011-03-01

    Quantitative knowledge of the thermo-physical properties of CO2 at high pressure is required to confidently model the structure of gas-giants like Neptune and Uranus and the deep carbon cycle of the earth. DFT based molecular dynamics has been established as a method capable of yielding high fidelity results for many materials, including shocked gases, at high pressure and temperature. We predict the principal Hugoniot for liquid CO2 up to 500GPa. Our simulations also show that the plateau in shock pressure identified by Nellis and co-workers is the result of dissociation. At low temperatures we validate the DFT results by comparing with diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. This allows for a more accurate determination of the initial conditions for the shock experiments. We also describe the design of upcoming flyer-plate experiments on the Z-machine aimed at providing high-precision shock compression data for CO2 between 150 and 600 GPa. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp. for the US Dept. of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Quantum-based Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shock-induced Reactions with Time-resolved Raman Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, Marc; Sanville, Edward; Coe, Joshua; Niklasson, Anders

    2012-02-01

    Shock-induced reactions in liquid hydrocarbons have been studied using quantum-based, self-consistent tight-binding (SC-TB) molecular dynamics simulations with an accurate and transferable model for interatomic bonding. Our SC-TB code LATTE enables explicit simulations of shock compression using the universal liquid Hugoniot. Furthermore, the effects of adiabatic shock heating are captured precisely using Niklasson's energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics formalism. We have been able to perform relatively large-scale SC-TB simulations by either taking advantage of the sparsity of the density matrix to achieve O(N) performance or by using graphics processing units to accelerate O(N^3) algorithms. We have developed the capability for the on-the-fly computation of Raman spectra from the Fourier transform of the polarizability autocorrelation function via the density matrix perturbation theory of Niklasson and Challacombe. These time-resolved Raman spectra enable us compare the results of our simulations with identical diagnostics collected experimentally. We will illustrate these capabilities with a series of simulations of shock-induced reaction paths in a number of simple molecules.

  12. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Toxic Shock Syndrome Print ... en español Síndrome de shock tóxico About Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a serious ...

  13. Germanium multiphase equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, S. D.; De Lorenzi-Venneri, G.; Kress, J. D.; Rudin, S. P.

    2014-05-01

    A new SESAME multiphase germanium equation of state (EOS) has been developed utilizing the best available experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The equilibrium EOS includes the Ge I (diamond), the Ge II (β-Sn) and the liquid phases. The foundation of the EOS is based on density functional theory calculations which are used to determine the cold curve and the Debye temperature. Results are compared to Hugoniot data through the solid-solid and solid-liquid transitions. We propose some experiments to better understand the dynamics of this element.

  14. Critical Shock Energy and Shock and Detonation Parameters of an Explosive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Yadav

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the connection between critical shock energy and detonation properties of an explosive. A relation for critical shock energy has been derived in terms of detonation velocity, width of reaction zone, initial density of the explosive, specific heat ratio of detonation products and either constants of linear relation between shock and particle velocity of the explosive or the constants of the Murnaghan’s type of equation of state of the explosive. These relations have been used to calculate the critical shock energy of RDX, HMX, RDX/TNT (60/40 and TNT explosives. The values of critical shock energies obtained in this study are in close agreement with those reported in the literature.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(4, pp.436-440, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1543

  15. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  16. When Shock Waves Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  17. Anti-Shock Garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Ames Research Center developed a prototype pressure suit for hemophiliac children, based on research of astronauts' physiological responses in microgravity. Zoex Corporation picked up the design and patents and developed an anti-shock garment for paramedic use. Marketed by Dyna Med, the suit reverses the effect of shock on the body's blood distribution by applying counterpressure to the legs and abdomen, returning blood to vital organs and stabilizing body pressure until the patient reaches a hospital. The DMAST (Dyna Med Anti-Shock Trousers) employ lower pressure than other shock garments, and are non-inflatable.

  18. Chiral Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Srimoyee

    2016-01-01

    We study shock waves in relativistic chiral matter. We argue that the conventional Rankine- Hugoinot relations are modified due to the presence of chiral transport phenomena. We show that the entropy discontinuity in a weak shock wave is linearly proportional to the pressure discontinuity when the effect of chiral transport becomes sufficiently large. We also show that rarefaction shock waves, which do not exist in usual nonchiral fluids, can appear in chiral matter. These features are exemplified by shock propagation in dense neutrino matter in the hydrodynamic regime.

  19. Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Cosmological Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2012-01-01

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large scale structure of the Universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfv'enic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfv'enic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and acceleration efficiency. In our DSA model the CR acceleration efficiency is determined mainly by the sonic Mach number Ms, while the MFA factor depends on the Alfv'enic Mach number and the degree of shock modification by CRs. We show that at strong CR modified shocks, if scattering centers drift with an effective Alfv'en speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum is steepened and the acceleration efficiency is reduced significantly, compared to the cases without such effects. As a result, the postshock C...

  20. Complexity and Shock Wave Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Stanford, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we refine a conjecture relating the time-dependent size of an Einstein-Rosen bridge to the computational complexity of the of the dual quantum state. Our refinement states that the complexity is proportional to the spatial volume of the ERB. More precisely, up to an ambiguous numerical coefficient, we propose that the complexity is the regularized volume of the largest codimension one surface crossing the bridge, divided by $G_N l_{AdS}$. We test this conjecture against a wide variety of spherically symmetric shock wave geometries in different dimensions. We find detailed agreement.

  1. Do structural oil-market shocks affect stock prices?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apergis, Nicholas [Department of Banking and Financial Management, University of Piraeus, 80 Karaoli and Dimitriou Str, 18534 Piraeus (Greece); Miller, Stephen M. [Department of Economics, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)

    2009-07-15

    This paper investigates how explicit structural shocks that characterize the endogenous character of oil price changes affect stock-market returns in a sample of eight countries - Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. For each country, the analysis proceeds in two steps. First, modifying the procedure of Kilian [Not All Oil Price Shocks are Alike: Disentangling Demand and Supply Shocks in the Crude Oil Market. American Economic Review.], we employ a vector error-correction or vector autoregressive model to decompose oil-price changes into three components: oil-supply shocks, global aggregate-demand shocks, and global oil-demand shocks. The last component relates to specific idiosyncratic features of the oil market, such as changes in the precautionary demand concerning the uncertainty about the availability of future oil supplies. Second, recovering the oil-supply shocks, global aggregate-demand shocks, and global oil-demand shocks from the first analysis, we then employ a vector autoregressive model to determine the effects of these structural shocks on the stock market returns in our sample of eight countries. We find that international stock market returns do not respond in a large way to oil market shocks. That is, the significant effects that exist prove small in magnitude. (author)

  2. Shock compressibility of iron calculated in the framework of quantum-statistical models with different ionic parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadatskiy, M. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    Quantum-statistical calculations of shock compressibility of iron are performed. Electronic part of thermodynamic functions is calculated in the framework of three quantum-statistical approaches: the Thomas-Fermi, the Thomas-Fermi with quantum and exchange corrections and the Hartree-Fock-Slater models. The influence of ionic part of thermodynamic functions is taken into account separately with using three models: the ideal gas, the one-component plasma and the charged hard spheres models. The results of calculations are presented in the pressure range from 1 to 107 GPa for samples with initially densities 7.85, 4.31 and 2.27 g/cm3. Calculated Hugoniots are compared with available experimental data.

  3. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  4. ANALYSIS OF ECONOMIC SHOCKS AFFECTING EURO AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIUS-CORNELIU MARINAS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to explain the causes of economic shocks that are manifested in the euro area countries and to examine the possibilities of their adjustment in the context of a common monetary policy. The member countries of the European Monetary Union can not use its own exchange rate or monetary policy to neutralize the economic shocks. Therefore, they must find new ways to adjust the shocks such increase labor market flexibility and promoting reforms in the areas with significant structural rigidities. Common monetary policy also generates asymmetric shocks, as long as Member States are in different phases of the business cycle. In this study I have demonstrated that the ECB's monetary policy has favored Germany and has disadvantaged the countries confronted in present with problems of debt financing.

  5. Thresholds in shock response across the elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, F. L.; Bourne, N. K.

    2017-01-01

    Compendia of shock data have been assembled across national laboratories across the world. Previous work has shown a threshold in behaviour for materials; the weak shock limit. This corresponds to the stress state at which the shock is overdriven in a single front. Here the shock velocity-particle velocity data for elements and compounds has been systematically analysed to note discontinuities in the data. A range of materials show such features and the form of the discontinuity in each case is analysed. Some of these are found to correspond to martensitic phase transformations as expected whilst others are more difficult to classify. Particular groups within the elements show characteristic forms according to their groupings within the periodic table. Typical datasets are presented and trends in behaviour are noted for a range of elements.

  6. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Toxic Shock Syndrome Print ... it, then take some precautions. What Is Toxic Shock Syndrome? If you're a girl who's had ...

  7. Comparison of Hydrocode Simulations with Measured Shock Wave Velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hixson, R. S. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Veeser, L. R. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2014-11-30

    We have conducted detailed 1- and 2-dimensional hydrodynamics calculations to assess the quality of simulations commonly made to understand various shock processes in a sample and to design shock experiments. We began with relatively simple shock experiments, where we examined the effects of the equation of state and the viscoplastic strength models. Eventually we included spallation in copper and iron and a solid-solid phase transformation in iron to assess the quality of the damage and phase transformation simulations.

  8. Climate shocks and conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaioannou, Kostadis J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a historical micro-level analysis of the impact of climate shocks on the incidence of civil conflict in colonial Nigeria (1912-1945). Primary historical sources on court cases, prisoners and homicides are used to capture conflict. To measure climate shocks we use the deviation f

  9. [Historical vision of shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosne Pasqualini, C

    1998-01-01

    The concept of shock and its close relationship with that of stress dates back to the experiments of Hans Selye initiated in 1936 at McGill University in Montreal, with whom I collaborated between 1939 and 1942. It was demonstrated that the General Adaptation Syndrome begins with an Alarm Reaction, which consists of a Stage of Shock and one of Counter-Shock, followed by a Stage of Adaptation and finally a Stage of Exhaustion. My Ph.D. thesis concluded that shock was due to an adrenal insufficiency postulating that active metabolic processes drain the body of certain essential compounds the lack of which causes shock. My interest in the role of the glucose metabolism in shock led me to work with Bernardo Houssay in 1942 at the Institute of Physiology of the University of Buenos Aires and in 1944 with C.N.H. Long at Yale University. There I developed a method for the induction of hemorrhagic shock in the guinea pig with 94% lethality; curiously, the administration of 200 mg of ascorbic acid prevented death. Upon my return to Buenos Aires, these results were confirmed and moreover, it was demonstrated that the administration of cortisone led to 40% survival of the animals while desoxycorticosterone had no effect. At the time, no explanation was available but to-day, half a century later, this Symposium should be able to explain the mechanisms leading to death by hemorrhagic shock.

  10. [Shock waves in orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, G

    1997-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock waves have revolutionized urological stone treatment. Nowadays shock waves are widely used in orthopedics, too. This article reviews the applications of extracorporeal shock waves on bone and adjacent soft tissue. The osteoneogenetic effect of extracorporeal shock waves has been proven and can be used to treat pseudarthrosis with a success rate of around 75%. Shock waves have a positive effect in tennis and golfer's elbow, calcaneal spur, and the complex called "periarthritis humero-scapularis." The mechanism for this is not yet known, and results from large prospective and randomized studies are still lacking. However, the treatment has been performed many thousands of times. In patients in whom conservative treatment has failed surgery used to be the only choice, but its success rate barely exceeds that of shock wave therapy and surgery can still be done if shock wave therapy fails. Extracorporeal shock waves will have an impact on orthopedics comparable to its effect in urology. Scientific evaluations, professional certifications, quality assurance and reimbursement issues present great challenges.

  11. The Shock Routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hooren, Franca; Kaasch, Alexandra; Starke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    in Australia, Belgium, the Netherlands and Sweden over the course of four global economic shocks, we ask whether the notion of critical junctures is useful in understanding the nature of change triggered by crisis. The main empirical finding is that fundamental change in the aftermath of an exogenous shock...

  12. Our Favorite Film Shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Rane; Suhr, Christian

    2014-01-01

    shocks? In this text we exchange personal experiences of cinematic shocks and ponder over these questions as related to wider theories on human trauma, emancipation, and enlightenment. In conclusion we argue for a revision of anthropological notions of validity in terms of the efficacy of the cinematic...

  13. Reflection of curved shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  14. Reflection of curved shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  15. Measurement of the equation of state of porous materials through the use of shock waves generated by laser radiation; Mesure de l'equation d'etat de materiaux poreux a l'aide d'ondes de choc generees par laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, F

    2001-12-15

    This work aims at measuring the equation of state of porous plastic materials in the view of their use in inertial confinement fusion. We have experimentally determined the shock polar curve of TMPTA (C{sub 15}H{sub 20}O{sub 6}) by the use of the impedance matching technique. This technique is based on the simultaneous measurement of the shock velocities in the 2 materials composing the target. The shock polar curve has been drawn for pressures ranging from 10 kbar to 3 Mbar and densities from 20 mg/cm{sup 3} to 1.1 g/cm{sup 3}. The use of a slit sweep camera to assess the propagation of the shock wave through the target has limited the accuracy of the technique to 10%. Experimental results match well data provided by the Sesame tables that are broadly used by hydrodynamic codes. Nevertheless the statistical distribution of experimental points seems to show a lower compressibility of the foam that might be attributed to a slight pre-heating process or to the effect of the foam micro-structure on the shock wave propagation. In order to improve the accuracy of the method, an attempt was made to use an active doppler interferometric diagnostic to measure shock wave velocities. It has been showed that the shock wave front in the foam is reflecting enough to make this method relevant if we can overcome the difficulty of a high luminous background. Despite that, we have succeeded in measuring with high accuracy, a point of the shock polar curve for 800 mg/cm{sup 3} dense TMPTA. (A.C.)

  16. Internal shock model for Microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, C R; Spruit, H C; Kaiser, Christian R.; Sunyaev, Rashid; Spruit, Henk C.

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for the radio outbursts of microquasars based on the assumption of quasi-continuous jet ejection. The jets are `lit up' by shock fronts traveling along the jets during outbursts. The observed comparatively flat decay light curves combined with gradually steepening spectral slopes are explained by a superposition of the radiation of the aging relativistic particle population left behind by the shocks. This scenario is the low energy, time-resolved equivalent to the internal shock model for GRBs. We show that this model predicts energy contents of the radiating plasma similar to the plasmon model. At the same time, the jet model relaxes the severe requirements on the central source in terms of the rate at which this energy must be supplied to the jet. Observations of `mini-bursts' with flat spectral slopes and of infrared emission far from the source centre suggest two different states of jet ejections: (i) A `mini-burst' mode with relatively stable jet production and weak radio emission with...

  17. Diagnosis and management of shock in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jeremy B; Wilcox, Susan R

    2014-03-01

    Shock is a state of acute circulatory failure leading to decreased organ perfusion, with inadequate delivery of oxygenated blood to tissues and resultant end-organ dysfunction. The mechanisms that can result in shock are divided into 4 categories: (1) hypovolemic, (2) distributive, (3) cardiogenic, and (4) obstructive. While much is known regarding treatment of patients in shock, several controversies continue in the literature. Assessment begins with identifying the need for critical interventions such as intubation, mechanical ventilation, or obtaining vascular access. Prompt workup should be initiated with laboratory testing (especially of serum lactate levels) and imaging, as indicated. Determining the intravascular volume status of patients in shock is critical and aids in categorizing and informing treatment decisions. This issue reviews the 4 primary categories of shock as well as special categories, including shock in pregnancy, traumatic shock, septic shock, and cardiogenic shock in myocardial infarction. Adherence to evidence-based care of the specific causes of shock can optimize a patient's chances of surviving this life-threatening condition.

  18. A cylindrical converging shock tube for shock-interface studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xisheng; Si, Ting; Yang, Jiming; Zhai, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    A shock tube facility for generating a cylindrical converging shock wave is developed in this work. Based on the shock dynamics theory, a specific wall profile is designed for the test section of the shock tube to transfer a planar shock into a cylindrical one. The shock front in the converging part obtained from experiment presents a perfect circular shape, which proves the feasibility and reliability of the method. The time variations of the shock strength obtained from numerical simulation, experiment, and theoretical estimation show the desired converging effect in the shock tube test section. Particular emphasis is then placed on the problem of shock-interface interaction induced by cylindrical converging shock waves. For this purpose, membrane-less gas cylinder is adopted to form the interface between two different fluids while the laser sheet technique to visualize the flow field. The result shows that it is convenient to perform such experiments in this facility.

  19. Thermodynamic bounds for existence of normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO COLLE

    Full Text Available Abstract The present paper is concerned with the thermodynamic theory of the normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes, in the lights of the pioneering works of Lord Rayleigh and G. Fanno. The theory of normal shock in pipes is currently presented in terms of the Rayleigh and Fanno curves, which are shown to cross each other in two points, one corresponding to a subsonic flow and the other corresponding to a supersonic flow. It is proposed in this paper a novel differential identity, which relates the energy flux density, the linear momentum flux density, and the entropy, for constant mass flow density. The identity so obtained is used to establish a theorem, which shows that Rayleigh and Fanno curves become tangent to each other at a single sonic point. At the sonic point the entropy reaches a maximum, either as a function of the pressure and the energy density flux or as a function of the pressure and the linear momentum density flux. A Second Law analysis is also presented, which is fully independent of the Second Law analysis based on the Rankine-Hugoniot adiabatic carried out by Landau and Lifshitz (1959.

  20. Thermodynamic bounds for existence of normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the thermodynamic theory of the normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes, in the lights of the pioneering works of Lord Rayleigh and G. Fanno. The theory of normal shock in pipes is currently presented in terms of the Rayleigh and Fanno curves, which are shown to cross each other in two points, one corresponding to a subsonic flow and the other corresponding to a supersonic flow. It is proposed in this paper a novel differential identity, which relates the energy flux density, the linear momentum flux density, and the entropy, for constant mass flow density. The identity so obtained is used to establish a theorem, which shows that Rayleigh and Fanno curves become tangent to each other at a single sonic point. At the sonic point the entropy reaches a maximum, either as a function of the pressure and the energy density flux or as a function of the pressure and the linear momentum density flux. A Second Law analysis is also presented, which is fully independent of the Second Law analysis based on the Rankine-Hugoniot adiabatic carried out by Landau and Lifshitz (1959).

  1. Formation of a disordered solid via a shock-induced transition in a dense particle suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petel, Oren E; Frost, David L; Higgins, Andrew J; Ouellet, Simon

    2012-02-01

    Shock wave propagation in multiphase media is typically dominated by the relative compressibility of the two components of the mixture. The difference in the compressibility of the components results in a shock-induced variation in the effective volume fraction of the suspension tending toward the random-close-packing limit for the system, and a disordered solid can take form within the suspension. The present study uses a Hugoniot-based model to demonstrate this variation in the volume fraction of the solid phase as well as a simple hard-sphere model to investigate the formation of disordered structures within uniaxially compressed model suspensions. Both models are discussed in terms of available experimental plate impact data in dense suspensions. Through coordination number statistics of the mesoscopic hard-sphere model, comparisons are made with the trends of the experimental pressure-volume fraction relationship to illustrate the role of these disordered structures in the bulk properties of the suspensions. A criterion for the dynamic stiffening of suspensions under high-rate dynamic loading is suggested as an analog to quasi-static jamming based on the results of the simulations.

  2. Similarity solution of the shock wave propagation in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller M.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the possibility of calculation of propagation of a shock wave generated during the bubble collapse in water including the dissipation effect. The used semi-empirical model is based on an assumption of similarity between the shock pressure time profiles in different shock wave positions. This assumption leads to a system of two ordinary differential equations for pressure jump and energy at the shock front. The NIST data are used for the compilation of the equation of state, which is applied to the calculation of the shock wave energy dissipation. The initial conditions for the system of equations are obtained from the modified method of characteristics in the combination with the differential equations of cavitation bubble dynamics, which considers viscous compressible liquid with the influence of surface tension. The initial energy of the shock wave is estimated from the energy between the energies of the bubble growth to the first and second maximum bubble radii.

  3. Testing the Asymmetry of Shocks with Euro Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius-Corneliu MARINAŞ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to identify the demand and supply shocks affecting 13 EU member states and to estimate their degree of correlation with the Euro area shocks. This research ensures identifying the asymmetry of shocks degree with the monetary union, depending on which it’s judging the desirability of adopting a single currency. The analysis is also useful for the economies outside the Euro area, because they are strongly commercial and financial integrated especially with the core economies from union. Applying the Blanchard and Quah methodology to estimate the shocks in the period from 1998:1- 2010:3, I have found a weak and negative correlation between demand shocks and a medium to high correlation of the supply shocks. The results obtained suggest the presence of a structural convergence process with the Euro area, in the context of domestic macroeconomic policies rather different, both inside and outside the monetary union.

  4. Two-temperature radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of electron thermal conduction on radiative shock structure is studied for both one- and two-temperature plasmas. The dimensionless ratio of the conductive length to the cooling length determines whether or not conduction is important, and shock jump conditions with conduction are established for a collisionless shock front. Approximate solutions are obtained, with the assumptions that the ionization state of the gas is constant and the cooling rate is a function of temperature alone. In the absence of magnetic fields, these solutions indicate that conduction noticeably influences normal-abundance interstellar shocks with velocities 50-100 km/s and dramatically affects metal-dominated shocks over a wide range of shock velocities.

  5. Role of Regulatory Peptide in Pathogenesis of Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董林旺; 常英姿; 佟利家; 汤健; 苏静怡; 唐朝枢

    1994-01-01

    The present study evaluated the pathogenetic roles of three kinds of regulatory peptide. The results showed that (i) plasma endothelin(ET) level elevated significantly in septic shock rats, persistent intravenous drip of low doses ET caused development of shock state in normal rats and the irreversible outcome of light hemorrhagic shock. Furthermore, i. v. administration of specific ET-antiserum was significantly effective to septic shock rats, (Ⅱ) Plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) increased by 260% in septic shock rats, i. v. drip of low doses CGRP both in early and late sepsis were effective to shock rats, (Ⅱi) An-giotensin-Ⅱ (ANG-Ⅱ) contents of heart and aorta increased dramatically both in early and late septic shock, and inhibiting its increase with Captopril in late sepsis significantly improved the shock state, but results were inverse in early sepsis. It could be concluded that ET was one of the most important factors participating in the pathogenesis of shock, CGRP had a compens

  6. Spectral signatures of dissipative standing shocks and mass outflow in presence of Comptonization around a black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak

    2014-01-01

    Accretion flows having positive specific energy are known to produce outflows and winds which escape to a large distance. According to Two Component Advective Flow (TCAF) model, centrifugal pressure dominated region of the flow just outside the black hole horizon, with or without shocks, acts as the base of this outflow. Electrons from this region are depleted due to the wind and consequently, energy transfer rate due to inverse Comptonization of low energy photons are affected. Specifically, it becomes easier to cool this region and emerging spectrum is softened. Our main goal is to show spectral softening due to mass outflow in presence of Compton cooling. To achieve this, we modify Rankine-Hugoniot relationships at the shock front when post-shock region suffers mass loss due to winds and energy loss due to inverse Comptonization. We solve two-temperature equations governing an accretion flow around a black hole which include Coulomb exchange between protons and electrons and other major radiative processes...

  7. Collisionless parallel shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. KH.; Galeev, A. A.; Galinskii, V. L.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to a collisionless parallel shock based on solitary-type solutions of the modified derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation (MDNLS) for parallel Alfven waves. The standard derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation is generalized in order to include the possible anisotropy of the plasma distribution and higher-order Korteweg-de Vies-type dispersion. Stationary solutions of MDNLS are discussed. The anisotropic nature of 'adiabatic' reflections leads to the asymmetric particle distribution in the upstream as well as in the downstream regions of the shock. As a result, nonzero heat flux appears near the front of the shock. It is shown that this causes the stochastic behavior of the nonlinear waves, which can significantly contribute to the shock thermalization.

  8. Counseling For Future Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lewis B.

    1974-01-01

    In this article the author looks at some of the searing prophecies made by Alvin Toffler in his book Future Shock and relates them to the world of the professional counselor and the clientele the counselor attempts to serve. (Author)

  9. A detailed examination of a X-line region in the distant tail: ISEE-3 observations of jet flow and B{sub z} reversals and a pair of slow shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.M.; Tsurutani, B.T.; Smith, E.J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Feldman, W.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-15

    The authors report an observation of Petschek-type magnetic reconnection at a distant neutral line (X = {minus}230 R{sub e}, July 8, 1983) with a full set of signatures of the magnetic merging process. These features include a reversal of plasma flows from earthward to tailward, a pair of slow shocks and the magnetic field X-type line. These two slow shocks are shown to satisfy the shock criteria used by Feldman et al. The spacecraft first crosses a slow shock to enter the earthward flowing plasmasheet with velocity of about 440 km/s. The embedded magnetic field has a positive B{sub z} component. The spacecraft next enters a region of tailward plasma flow with speed {approximately} 670 km/s and an embedded negative B{sub z}, indicating entry into the plasmasheet tailward of the X-line. These observed velocities are comparable to calculated velocities based on Rankine-Hugoniot conservation relationships. The spacecraft subsequently returns into the south tail lobe by crossing another slow shock. Coplanarity analyses show that the two shocks have orientations consistent with that predicted by the Petschek reconnection model. The authors note that this event occurs during northward interplanetary magnetic fields. Thus, a magnetic stress built-up in the distant tail may be responsible for this reconnection process. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. A detailed examination of a X-line region in the distant tail: ISEE-3 observations of jet flow and B(sub z) reversals and a pair of slow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1994-01-01

    We report an observation of Petschek-type magnetic reconnection at a distant neutral line (X = -230 R(sub e)) with a full set of signatures of the magnetic merging process. These features include a reversal of plasma flows from earthward to tailward, a pair of slow shocks and the magnetic field X-type line. These two slow shocks are shown to satisfy the shock criteria used by Feldman et al. (1987). The spacecraft first crosses a slow shock to enter the earthward flowing plasmasheet with velocity of about 440 km/s. The embedded magnetic field has a positive B(sub z) component. The spacecraft next enters a region of tailward plasma flow with speed approximately 670 km/s and an embedded negative B(sub z), indicating entry into the plasmasheet tailward of the X-line. These observed velocities are comparable to calculated velocities based on Rankine-Hugoniot conservation relationships. The spacecraft subsequently returns into the south tail lobe by crossing another slow shock. Coplanarity analyses shows that the two slow shocks have orientations consistent with that predicted by the Petschek reconnection model. We note that this event occurs during northward interplanetary magnetic fields. Thus, a magnetic stress built-up in the distant tail may be responsible for this reconnection process.

  11. [Pathophysiology of hemorragic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copotoiu, R; Cinca, E; Collange, O; Levy, F; Mertes, P-M

    2016-11-01

    This review addresses the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic shock, a condition produced by rapid and significant loss of intravascular volume, which may lead to hemodynamic instability, decreases in oxygen delivery, decreased tissue perfusion, cellular hypoxia, organ damage, and death. The initial neuroendocrine response is mainly a sympathetic activation. Haemorrhagic shock is associated altered microcirculatory permeability and visceral injury. It is also responsible for a complex inflammatory response associated with hemostasis alteration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Shock dynamics of phase diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Moro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    A thermodynamic phase transition denotes a drastic change of state of a physical system due to a continuous change of thermodynamic variables, as for instance pressure and temperature. The classical van der Waals equation of state is the simplest model that predicts the occurrence of a critical point associated with the gas-liquid phase transition. Nevertheless, below the critical temperature, theoretical predictions of the van der Waals theory significantly depart from the observed physical behaviour. We develop a novel approach to classical thermodynamics based on the solution of Maxwell relations for a generalised family of nonlocal entropy functions. This theory provides an exact mathematical description of discontinuities of the order parameter within the phase transition region, it explains the universal form of the equations of state and the occurrence of triple points in terms of the dynamics of nonlinear shock wave fronts.

  13. New developments in the physical chemistry of shock compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlott, Dana D

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses new developments in shock compression science with a focus on molecular media. Some basic features of shock and detonation waves, nonlinear excitations that can produce extreme states of high temperature and high pressure, are described. Methods of generating and detecting shock waves are reviewed, especially those using tabletop lasers that can be interfaced with advanced molecular diagnostics. Newer compression methods such as shockless compression and precompression shock that generate states of cold dense molecular matter are discussed. Shock compression creates a metallic form of hydrogen, melts diamond, and makes water a superionic liquid with unique catalytic properties. Our understanding of detonations at the molecular level has improved a great deal as a result of advanced nonequilibrium molecular simulations. Experimental measurements of detailed molecular behavior behind a detonation front might be available soon using femtosecond lasers to produce nanoscale simulated detonation fronts.

  14. Compaction shock dissipation in low density granular explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pratap T.; Gonthier, Keith A.; Chakravarthy, Sunada

    2016-06-01

    The microstructure of granular explosives can affect dissipative heating within compaction shocks that can trigger combustion and initiate detonation. Because initiation occurs over distances that are much larger than the mean particle size, homogenized (macroscale) theories are often used to describe local thermodynamic states within and behind shocks that are regarded as the average manifestation of thermodynamic fields at the particle scale. In this paper, mesoscale modeling and simulation are used to examine how the initial packing density of granular HMX (C4H8N8O8) C4H8N8O8 having a narrow particle size distribution influences dissipation within resolved, planar compaction shocks. The model tracks the evolution of thermomechanical fields within large ensembles of particles due to pore collapse. Effective shock profiles, obtained by averaging mesoscale fields over space and time, are compared with those given by an independent macroscale compaction theory that predicts the variation in effective thermomechanical fields within shocks due to an imbalance between the solid pressure and a configurational stress. Reducing packing density is shown to reduce the dissipation rate within shocks but increase the integrated dissipated work over shock rise times, which is indicative of enhanced sensitivity. In all cases, dissipated work is related to shock pressure by a density-dependent power law, and shock rise time is related to pressure by a power law having an exponent of negative one.

  15. Compaction shock dissipation in low density granular explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Pratap T.; Gonthier, Keith A., E-mail: gonthier@me.lsu.edu; Chakravarthy, Sunada [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2016-06-14

    The microstructure of granular explosives can affect dissipative heating within compaction shocks that can trigger combustion and initiate detonation. Because initiation occurs over distances that are much larger than the mean particle size, homogenized (macroscale) theories are often used to describe local thermodynamic states within and behind shocks that are regarded as the average manifestation of thermodynamic fields at the particle scale. In this paper, mesoscale modeling and simulation are used to examine how the initial packing density of granular HMX (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}N{sub 8}O{sub 8}) C{sub 4}H{sub 8}N{sub 8}O{sub 8} having a narrow particle size distribution influences dissipation within resolved, planar compaction shocks. The model tracks the evolution of thermomechanical fields within large ensembles of particles due to pore collapse. Effective shock profiles, obtained by averaging mesoscale fields over space and time, are compared with those given by an independent macroscale compaction theory that predicts the variation in effective thermomechanical fields within shocks due to an imbalance between the solid pressure and a configurational stress. Reducing packing density is shown to reduce the dissipation rate within shocks but increase the integrated dissipated work over shock rise times, which is indicative of enhanced sensitivity. In all cases, dissipated work is related to shock pressure by a density-dependent power law, and shock rise time is related to pressure by a power law having an exponent of negative one.

  16. Study of Windows Effects for Shock Wave Temperature Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. D. Turley, G. Stevens, L. Veeser, D. Holtkamp, A. Seifter

    2011-05-25

    Temperature measurements of shocked plutonium are needed for improved understanding of its equation of state (EOS) and will enable better understanding and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapon stockpile.

  17. Shock Wave Structure in Particulate Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauls, Michael; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-06-01

    Shock wave experiments are conducted on a particulate composite consisting of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix reinforced by glass beads. Such a composite with an impedance mismatch of 4.3 closely mimics heterogeneous solids of interest such as concrete and energetic materials. The composite samples are prepared using a compression molding process. The structure and particle velocity rise times of the shocks are examined using forward ballistic experiments. Reverse ballistic experiments are used to track how the interface density influences velocity overshoot above the steady state particle velocity. The effects of particle size (0.1 to 1 mm) and volume fraction of glass beads (30-40%) on the structure of the leading shock wave are investigated. It is observed that the rise time increases with increasing particle size and scales linearly for the range of particle sizes considered here. Results from numerical simulations using CTH are compared with experimental results to gain insights into wave propagation in heterogeneous particulate composites.

  18. Relativistic Radiation Mediated Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Budnik, Ran; Sagiv, Amir; Waxman, Eli

    2010-01-01

    The structure of relativistic radiation mediated shocks (RRMS) propagating into a cold electron-proton plasma is calculated and analyzed. A qualitative discussion of the physics of relativistic and non relativistic shocks, including order of magnitude estimates for the relevant temperature and length scales, is presented. Detailed numerical solutions are derived for shock Lorentz factors $\\Gamma_u$ in the range $6\\le\\Gamma_u\\le30$, using a novel iteration technique solving the hydrodynamics and radiation transport equations (the protons, electrons and positrons are argued to be coupled by collective plasma processes and are treated as a fluid). The shock transition (deceleration) region, where the Lorentz factor $ \\Gamma $ drops from $ \\Gamma_u $ to $ \\sim 1 $, is characterized by high plasma temperatures $ T\\sim \\Gamma m_ec^2 $ and highly anisotropic radiation, with characteristic shock-frame energy of upstream and downstream going photons of a few~$\\times\\, m_ec^2$ and $\\sim \\Gamma^2 m_ec^2$, respectively.P...

  19. Hydrodynamic simulations of gaseous Argon shock compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Daniel B.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Morris, John S.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Burkett, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    The lack of published Ar gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Ar Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 13.8 - 34.5 bar (0.025 - 0.056 g/ cm3) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Ar gas through Pagosa numerical simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian continuum dynamics code capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Ar gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, and reasonable comparisons for the ionization temperatures.

  20. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  1. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  2. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  3. Laboratory thermal emission spectroscopy of shocked basalt from Lonar Crater, India, and implications for Mars orbital and sample data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shawn P. Wright; Phil R. Christensen; Thomas G. Sharp

    2011-01-01

      TIR spectra of shocked basalt are shown Vibrations are affected by melting and solid state transformation due to shock TIR spectra of basaltic impactites have implications for Mars Whereas the thermal infrared (TIR...

  4. Earth's Magnetosphere Impinged by Interplanetary Shocks of Different Orientations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-Cheng; HU You-Qiu; WANG Chi

    2005-01-01

    @@ Using a recently developed PPMLR-MHD code, we carry out a global numerical simulation of the interaction between interplanetary shocks and Earth's magnetosphere. The initial magnetosphere is in a quasi-steady state,embedded in a uniform solar wind and a spiral interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). An interplanetary (IP)shock interacts in turn with the bow shock, the magnetosheath, the magnetopause, and the magnetosphere, and changes the magnetosphere in shape and structure, and the distribution of the electric current and potential in the ionosphere as well. A preliminary comparison is made between two IP shocks of the same solar wind dynamic pressure and a vanishing IMF Bz on the downstream side, but with different propagation directions, one parallel and the other oblique to the Sun-Earth line. The numerical results show that both shocks cause a compression of the magnetosphere, an enhancement of magnetic field strength and field-aligned current in the magnetosphere, and an increase of the dawn-dusk electric potential drops across the polar ionosphere. Moreover, the magnetosphereionosphere system approaches a similar quasi-steady state after the interaction, for the downstream states are very close for the two shocks. However, the evolution processes of the system are remarkably different during the interaction with the two shocks of different orientations. The shock with the normal oblique to the Sun-Earth line results in a much longer evolution time for the system. This demonstrates that the shock orientation plays an important role in determining the associated geophysical effects and interpreting multisatellite observations of IP shock-magnetosphere interaction events.

  5. Does Asia's choice of exchange rate regime affect Europe's exposure to US shocks?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    B Markovic; L Povoledo

    2011-01-01

    .... This happens because, without nominal exchange rate flexibility, Asian firms react to the shocks originating in the United States by implementing significant price adjustments, which in turn affect...

  6. [Traumatic neurogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, O; de Régloix, S; Caballé, D; Arvis, A-M; Perrochon, J-C; Tourtier, J-P

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic neurogenic shock is a rare but serious complication of spinal cord injury. It associates bradycardia and hypotension caused by a medullary trauma. It is life-threatening for the patient and it aggravates the neurological deficit. Strict immobilization and a quick assessment of the gravity of cord injury are necessary as soon as prehospital care has begun. Initial treatment requires vasopressors associated with fluid resuscitation. Steroids are not recommended. Early decompression is recommended for incomplete deficit seen in the first 6 hours. We relate the case of secondary spinal shock to a luxation C6/C7 treated in prehospital care.

  7. [Corticosteroids and septic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouletreau, P; Petit, P; Latarjet, J

    1976-01-01

    According to the data in the literature, the authors attempted to sum-up present attitudes on the value of corticoids in the treatment of septic shock. If their cardiovascular effects after a period of enthusiasm, are presently rather controversial, their cellular and sub-cellular actions, on the lysosomal membranes, capillary permeability and perhaps the intimate mechanisms of cellular oxygenation seem to be more real. However, the contra-indications which persist in the results of clinical works have resulted in the fact that the exact place of cortico-steroids in the therapeutic arsenal of septic shock still remains to be specified.

  8. The Operational Equations of State, 3: Recovery of the EOS for Hydrocode From the Measured Heat Capacity, Isentrope, and Hugoniot Adiabat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    JOHNSON J WALKER PO DRAWER 28510 SAN ANTONIO TX 78284 1 RSRCH AND TECHLGY DEV SCHOTT NORTH AMERICA INC M J DAVIS 400 YORK AVE...3 LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATL LABS L BENEDICT M A BARRIOS A TEWELDEBERHAN 7000 EAST AVE LIVERMORE CA 94550 1 RSRCH AND TECHLGY DEPT...NVL SURFACE WARFARE CTR G T SUTHERLAND INDIAN HEAD MD 20640 1 APPLIED RSRCH ASSOC D GRADY 4300 SAN MATEO BLVD A-220 ALBUQUERQUE

  9. Characteristics of Weak Interplanetary Shocks and Shock-like Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, A.; Gloag, J. M.

    The variation of magnetic and plasma parameters across the discontinuity of a colli- sionless shock wave are clearly understood and presented in MHD theory. The anal- ysis of 116 shock waves appearing on the Ulysses shock list in the period mid 1996 to the end of 1999 show that in the cases of the stronger shock waves, measured by the ratio of downstream to upstream magnetic field magnitudes, this MHD descrip- tion is adequate. However in the case of many of the weaker shocks there are events which are not clearly characterised in MHD terms and in these cases plasma param- eters are particularly difficult to interpret. To explore the issues associated with these very weak shocks further, a set of shock-like events is considered which have shock characteristics in the high frequency wave data measured by the plasma wave inves- tigation(URAP) but are not considered to be clearly shock waves purely considering magnetic and plasma data. These shock-like events are thought to extend the spectrum of interplanetary shocks at the very weakest end and possibly beyond what should be considered a collisionless shock wave.

  10. Shock Wave Response of Iron-based In Situ Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanolkar, Gauri R.; Rauls, Michael B.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Hodge, Andrea M.; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    The response of amorphous steels to shock wave compression has been explored for the first time. Further, the effect of partial devitrification on the shock response of bulk metallic glasses is examined by conducting experiments on two iron-based in situ metallic glass matrix composites, containing varying amounts of crystalline precipitates, both with initial composition Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4. The samples, designated SAM2X5-600 and SAM2X5-630, are X-ray amorphous and partially crystalline, respectively, due to differences in sintering parameters during sample preparation. Shock response is determined by making velocity measurements using interferometry techniques at the rear free surface of the samples, which have been subjected to impact from a high-velocity projectile launched from a powder gun. Experiments have yielded results indicating a Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) to be 8.58 ± 0.53 GPa for SAM2X5-600 and 11.76 ± 1.26 GPa for SAM2X5-630. The latter HEL result is higher than elastic limits for any BMG reported in the literature thus far. SAM2X5-600 catastrophically loses post-yield strength whereas SAM2X5-630, while showing some strain-softening, retains strength beyond the HEL. The presence of crystallinity within the amorphous matrix is thus seen to significantly aid in strengthening the material as well as preserving material strength beyond yielding.

  11. Flow behind concave shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is introduced and applied to calculate the flow behind concave shock waves. For sonic conditions, three characterizing types of flow are identified, based on the orientation of the sonic line, and it is shown that, depending on the ratio of shock curvatures, a continuously curving shock can exist with Type III flow, where the sonic line intercepts the reflected characteristics from the shock, thus preventing the formation of a reflected shock. The necessary shock curvature ratio for a Type III sonic point does not exist for a hyperbolic shock so that it will revert to Mach reflection for all Mach numbers. A demonstration is provided, by CFD calculations, at Mach 1.2 and 3.

  12. Flow behind concave shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Curved shock theory is introduced and applied to calculate the flow behind concave shock waves. For sonic conditions, three characterizing types of flow are identified, based on the orientation of the sonic line, and it is shown that, depending on the ratio of shock curvatures, a continuously curving shock can exist with Type III flow, where the sonic line intercepts the reflected characteristics from the shock, thus preventing the formation of a reflected shock. The necessary shock curvature ratio for a Type III sonic point does not exist for a hyperbolic shock so that it will revert to Mach reflection for all Mach numbers. A demonstration is provided, by CFD calculations, at Mach 1.2 and 3.

  13. Numerical investigation of shock induced bubble collapse in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apazidis, N.

    2016-04-01

    A semi-conservative, stable, interphase-capturing numerical scheme for shock propagation in heterogeneous systems is applied to the problem of shock propagation in liquid-gas systems. The scheme is based on the volume-fraction formulation of the equations of motion for liquid and gas phases with separate equations of state. The semi-conservative formulation of the governing equations ensures the absence of spurious pressure oscillations at the material interphases between liquid and gas. Interaction of a planar shock in water with a single spherical bubble as well as twin adjacent bubbles is investigated. Several stages of the interaction process are considered, including focusing of the transmitted shock within the deformed bubble, creation of a water-hammer shock as well as generation of high-speed liquid jet in the later stages of the process.

  14. Plane shock wave structure in a dilute granular gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M. H. Lakshminarayana; Alam, Meheboob

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the early time evolution of the Riemann problem of planar shock wave structures for a dilute granular gas by solving Navier-Stokes equations numerically. The one-dimensional reduced Navier-Stokes equations for plane shock wave problem are solved numerically using a relaxation-type numerical scheme. The results on the shock structures in granular gases are presented for different Mach numbers and restitution coefficients. Based on our analysis on early time shock dynamics we conclude that the density and temperature profiles are "asymmetric"; the density maximum and the temperature maximum occur within the shock layer; the absolute magnitudes of longitudinal stress and heat flux which are initially zero at both end states attain maxima in a very short time and thereafter decrease with time.

  15. High Temperature Phenomena in Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The high temperatures generated in gases by shock waves give rise to physical and chemical phenomena such as molecular vibrational excitation, dissociation, ionization, chemical reactions and inherently related radiation. In continuum regime, these processes start from the wave front, so that generally the gaseous media behind shock waves may be in a thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium state. This book presents the state of knowledge of these phenomena. Thus, the thermodynamic properties of high temperature gases, including the plasma state are described, as well as the kinetics of the various chemical phenomena cited above. Numerous results of measurement and computation of vibrational relaxation times, dissociation and reaction rate constants are given, and various ionization and radiative mechanisms and processes are presented. The coupling between these different phenomena is taken into account as well as their interaction with the flow-field. Particular points such as the case of rarefied flows an...

  16. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  17. The special relativistic shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1986-01-01

    The shock-tube problem has served as a popular test for numerical hydrodynamics codes. The development of relativistic hydrodynamics codes has created a need for a similar test problem in relativistic hydrodynamics. The analytical solution to the special relativistic shock-tube problem is presented here. The relativistic shock-jump conditions and rarefaction solution which make up the shock tube are derived. The Newtonian limit of the calculations is given throughout.

  18. Shock-initiation chemistry of nitroarenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, L.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Brower, K.R. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-11-01

    The authors present evidence that the shock-initiation chemistry of nitroarenes is dominated by the intermolecular hydrogen transfer mechanism discussed previously. The acceleration by pressure, kinetic isotope effect, and product distribution are consistent with the bimolecular transition state kinetic isotope effect, and product distribution are consistent with the bimolecular transition state rather than rate-determining C-N homolysis.GC-MS analysis of samples which were subjected to a shock wave generated by detonation of nitromethane shows that nitrobenzene produces aniline and biphenyl, and o-nitrotoluene forms aniline, toluene, o-toluidine and o-cresol, but not anthranil, benzoxazinone, or cyanocyclopentandiene. In isotopic labeling experiments o-nitrotoluene and TNT show extensive H-D exchange on their methyl groups, and C-N bond rupture is not consistent with the formation of aniline from nitrobenzene or nitrotoluene, nor the formation of o-toluidine from o-nitrotoluene. Recent work incorporating fast TOF mass spectroscopy of samples shocked and quenched by adiabatic expansion shows that the initial chemical reactions in shocked solid nitroaromatic explosives proceed along this path.

  19. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Cano, X. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, CU, Coyoacan 04510 DF (Mexico); Kajdic, P. [IRAP-University of Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Morelia (Mexico); Russell, C. T. [ESS and IGPP, University of California, Los Angeles, 603 Charles Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jian, L. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD and University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [SSL, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  20. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bren d'Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008-2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  1. Early Treatment in Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    of L-arginine resuscitation in shock were carried out by An-1 gele , Chaudry, and co-workers. 6-10 They used the rat model, bleeding to 40 mm Hg in...17 14. Preissler G, Lothe F, Ebersberger U, Huff I, Bittmann I, Messmer K, Jauch KW, An-18 gele , MK. Recipient treatment with L-arginine

  2. A Shocking New Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Hydro Dynamics, Inc. received a technical helping hand from NASA that made their Hydrosonic Pump (HPump) a reality. Marshall engineers resolved a bearing problem in the rotor of the pump and recommended new bearings, housings and mounting hardware as a solution. The resulting HPump is able to heat liquids with greater energy efficiency using shock waves to generate heat.

  3. Planetary Bow Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A

    2008-01-01

    Our present knowledge of the properties of the various planetary bow shocks is briefly reviewed. We do not follow the astronomical ordering of the planets. We rather distinguish between magnetised and unmagnetised planets which groups Mercury and Earth with the outer giant planets of the solar system, Mars and Moon in a separate group lacking magnetic fields and dense atmospheres, and Venus together with the comets as the atmospheric celestial objects exposed to the solar wind. Asteroids would, in this classification, fall into the group together with the Moon and should behave similarly though being much smaller. Extrasolar planets are not considered as we have only remote information about their behaviour. The presentation is brief in the sense that our in situ knowledge is rather sporadic yet, depending on just a countable number of bow shock crossings from which just some basic conclusions can be drawn about size, stationarity, shape and nature of the respective shock. The only bow shock of which we have ...

  4. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 196. Read More Acute kidney failure Heart failure - overview Shock Review Date 4/12/2016 Updated by: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Department ...

  5. Health Shocks and Retirement:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Larsen, Mona

    benefits in Denmark nor by the promotion of corporate social responsibility initiatives since the mid-1990s. In the late 1990s, however, the retirement rate following a health shock is reduced to 3% with the introduction of the subsidized employment program (fleksjob) but this effect is not strongly...

  6. In situ local shock speed and transit shock speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watari

    Full Text Available A useful index for estimating the transit speeds was derived by analyzing interplanetary shock observations. This index is the ratio of the in situ local shock speed and the transit speed; it is 0.6–0.9 for most observed shocks. The local shock speed and the transit speed calculated for the results of the magnetohydrodynamic simulation show good agreement with the observations. The relation expressed by the index is well explained by a simplified propagation model assuming a blast wave. For several shocks the ratio is approximately 1.2, implying that these shocks accelerated during propagation in slow-speed solar wind. This ratio is similar to that for the background solar wind acceleration.

    Keywords. Interplanetary physics (Flare and stream dynamics; Interplanetary shocks; Solar wind plasma

  7. Shock Dynamics in Stellar Outbursts. I. Shock Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2017-05-01

    Wave-driven outflows and non-disruptive explosions have been implicated in pre-supernova outbursts, supernova impostors, luminous blue variable eruptions, and some narrow-line and superluminous supernovae. To model these events, we investigate the dynamics of stars set in motion by strong acoustic pulses and wave trains, focusing on nonlinear wave propagation, shock formation, and an early phase of the development of a weak shock. We identify the shock formation radius, showing that a heuristic estimate based on crossing characteristics matches an exact expansion around the wave front and verifying both with numerical experiments. Our general analytical condition for shock formation applies to one-dimensional motions within any static environment, including both eruptions and implosions. We also consider the early phase of shock energy dissipation. We find that waves of super-Eddington acoustic luminosity always create shocks, rather than damping by radiative diffusion. Therefore, shock formation is integral to super-Eddington outbursts.

  8. Self Regulated Shocks in Massive Star Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2013-01-01

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, LX remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind-driving, we term this scenario as self regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the m...

  9. Numerical simulations of Mach stem formation via intersecting bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, E. C.; Frank, A.; Hartigan, P.; Yirak, K.

    2015-12-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations show bright knots of Hα emission within outflowing young stellar jets. Velocity variations in the flow create secondary bow shocks that may intersect and lead to enhanced emission. When the bow shocks intersect at or above a certain critical angle, a planar shock called a Mach stem is formed. These shocks could produce brighter Hα emission since the incoming flow to the Mach stem is parallel to the shock normal. In this paper we report first results of a study using 2-D numerical simulations designed to explore Mach stem formation at the intersection of bow shocks formed by hypersonic "bullets" or "clumps". Our 2-D simulations show how the bow shock shapes and intersection angles change as the adiabatic index γ changes. We show that the formation or lack of a Mach stem in our simulations is consistent with the steady-state Mach stem formation theory. Our ultimate goal, which is part of an ongoing research effort, is to characterize the physical and observational consequences of bow shock intersections including the formation of Mach stems.

  10. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  11. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  12. Shock waves on complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mones, Enys; Vicsek, Tamás; Herrmann, Hans J

    2014-01-01

    Power grids, road maps, and river streams are examples of infrastructural networks which are highly vulnerable to external perturbations. An abrupt local change of load (voltage, traffic density, or water level) might propagate in a cascading way and affect a significant fraction of the network. Almost discontinuous perturbations can be modeled by shock waves which can eventually interfere constructively and endanger the normal functionality of the infrastructure. We study their dynamics by solving the Burgers equation under random perturbations on several real and artificial directed graphs. Even for graphs with a narrow distribution of node properties (e.g., degree or betweenness), a steady state is reached exhibiting a heterogeneous load distribution, having a difference of one order of magnitude between the highest and average loads. Unexpectedly we find for the European power grid and for finite Watts-Strogatz networks a broad pronounced bimodal distribution for the loads. To identify the most vulnerable...

  13. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  14. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  15. On Poor Separation in Magnetically Driven Shock Tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C.T.

    1973-01-01

    Observations made at steady-state running conditions in a magnetically driven shock tube, with parallel-plate electrodes, showed that for a given discharge voltage, sufficient separation between the shock and the current-sheet occurred only at relatively high discharge pressures. As a comparison......, poor separations were also noted in conventional diaphragm-type shock tubes running at low initial pressures. It is demonstrated that the observed poor separation can be explained by a mass leakage, instead of through the wall boundary layer, but through the current-sheet itself....

  16. Latent Utility Shocks in a Structural Empirical Asset Pricing Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Raahauge, Peter

    We consider a random utility extension of the fundamental Lucas (1978) equilibriumasset pricing model. The resulting structural model leads naturally to a likelihoodfunction. We estimate the model using U.S. asset market data from 1871 to2000, using both dividends and earnings as state variables....... We find that current dividendsdo not forecast future utility shocks, whereas current utility shocks do forecastfuture dividends. The estimated structural model produces a sequence of predictedutility shocks which provide better forecasts of future long-horizon stock market returnsthan the classical...... dividend-price ratio.KEYWORDS: Randomutility, asset pricing, maximumlikelihood, structuralmodel,return predictability...

  17. Simulations of Relativistic Collisionless Shocks: Shock Structure and Particle Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-10

    We discuss 3D simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks in electron-positron pair plasmas using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The shock structure is mainly controlled by the shock's magnetization (''sigma'' parameter). We demonstrate how the structure of the shock varies as a function of sigma for perpendicular shocks. At low magnetizations the shock is mediated mainly by the Weibel instability which generates transient magnetic fields that can exceed the initial field. At larger magnetizations the shock is dominated by magnetic reflections. We demonstrate where the transition occurs and argue that it is impossible to have very low magnetization collisionless shocks in nature (in more than one spatial dimension). We further discuss the acceleration properties of these shocks, and show that higher magnetization perpendicular shocks do not efficiently accelerate nonthermal particles in 3D. Among other astrophysical applications, this may pose a restriction on the structure and composition of gamma-ray bursts and pulsar wind outflows.

  18. Suppression of spiral waves using intermittent local electric shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Jun; Ying He-Ping; Li Yan-Long

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an intermittent local electric shock scheme is proposed to suppress stable spiral waves in the Barkley model by a weak electric shock (about 0.4 to 0.7) imposed on a random selected n × n grids (n = 1-5, compared with the original 256×256 lattice) and monitored synchronically the evolutions of the activator on the grids as the sampled signal of the activator steps out a given threshold (i.e., the electric shock works on the n × n grids if the activator u (≤) 0.4 or u (≥) 0.8). The numerical simulations show that a breakup of spiral is observed in the media state evolution to finally obtain homogeneous states if the electric shock with appropriate intensity is imposed.

  19. Directional amorphization of boron carbide subjected to laser shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Remington, Bruce A.; LaSalvia, Jerry C.; Wehrenberg, Christopher E.; Behler, Kristopher D.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2016-10-01

    Solid-state shock-wave propagation is strongly nonequilibrium in nature and hence rate dependent. Using high-power pulsed-laser-driven shock compression, unprecedented high strain rates can be achieved; here we report the directional amorphization in boron carbide polycrystals. At a shock pressure of 45˜50 GPa, multiple planar faults, slightly deviated from maximum shear direction, occur a few hundred nanometers below the shock surface. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that these planar faults are precursors of directional amorphization. It is proposed that the shear stresses cause the amorphization and that pressure assists the process by ensuring the integrity of the specimen. Thermal energy conversion calculations including heat transfer suggest that amorphization is a solid-state process. Such a phenomenon has significant effect on the ballistic performance of B4C.

  20. Desalination shocks in microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Mani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Salt transport in bulk electrolytes is limited by diffusion and convection, but in microstructures with charged surfaces (e.g. microfluidic devices, porous media, soils, or biological tissues) surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow also contribute to ionic fluxes. For small applied voltages, these effects lead to well known linear electrokinetic phenomena. In this paper, we predict some surprising nonlinear dynamics that can result from the competition between bulk and interfacial transport at higher voltages. When counter-ions are selectively removed by a membrane or electrode, a "desalination shock" can propagate through the microstructure, leaving in its wake an ultrapure solution, nearly devoid of co-ions and colloidal impurities. We elucidate the basic physics of desalination shocks and develop a mathematical theory of their existence, structure, and stability, allowing for slow variations in surface charge or channel geometry. Via asymptotic approximations and similarity solutions, we show that des...

  1. Bow shock data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipf, Edward C.; Erdman, Peeter W.

    1994-08-01

    The University of Pittsburgh Space Physics Group in collaboration with the Army Research Office (ARO) modeling team has completed a systematic organization of the shock and plume spectral data and the electron temperature and density measurements obtained during the BowShock I and II rocket flights which have been submitted to the AEDC Data Center, has verified the presence of CO Cameron band emission during the Antares engine burn and for an extended period of time in the post-burn plume, and have adapted 3-D radiation entrapment codes developed by the University of Pittsburgh to study aurora and other atmospheric phenomena that involve significant spatial effects to investigate the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) envelope surrounding the re-entry that create an extensive plasma cloud by photoionization.

  2. SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy)

    2012-05-10

    The theory of diffusive shock acceleration is extended to the case of superdiffusive transport, i.e., when the mean square deviation grows proportionally to t{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} > 1. Superdiffusion can be described by a statistical process called Levy random walk, in which the propagator is not a Gaussian but it exhibits power-law tails. By using the propagator appropriate for Levy random walk, it is found that the indices of energy spectra of particles are harder than those obtained where a normal diffusion is envisaged, with the spectral index decreasing with the increase of {alpha}. A new scaling for the acceleration time is also found, allowing substantially shorter times than in the case of normal diffusion. Within this framework we can explain a number of observations of flat spectra in various astrophysical and heliospheric contexts, for instance, for the Crab Nebula and the termination shock of the solar wind.

  3. Generalized shock conditions and the contact discontinuity in the Hall-magnetohydrodynamics model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hameiri, Eliezer [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York 10012 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    It is shown that shocks and contact discontinuities in the Hall-magnetohydrodynamics (HMHD) model must satisfy solvability conditions that replace some of the familiar Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions when the latter do not apply due to singular behavior of fluxes of conserved quantities. Some of these conditions depend on the larger topology of the plasma and magnetic field and are not merely 'local.' The contact discontinuity which separates two adjoining plasma regions or plasma and vacuum regions is the simplest case where the new jump conditions are applicable and is discussed for a toroidal plasma with sheared magnetic field such as the tokamak, but with no initial mass flow. It is proven that a static discontinuous tokamak-like equilibrium is linearly stable in the HMHD model if it is linearly stable within the ideal magnetohydrodynamics model, provided that the electron pressure depends only on the density, and some other restrictions on the ratio of pressure to density gradients also apply. When the electron pressure does depend on two thermodynamic variables, a sufficient condition for Hall-MHD plasma stability is derived as well.

  4. A Spectacular Bow Shock in the 11 keV Galaxy Cluster Around 3C 438

    CERN Document Server

    Emery, Deanna L; Kraft, Ralph P; Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Forman, William R; Hardcastle, Martin J; Jones, Christine

    2016-01-01

    We present results of deep 153 ks Chandra observations of the hot, 11 keV, galaxy cluster associated with the radio galaxy 3C 438. By mapping the morphology of the hot gas and analyzing its surface brightness and temperature distributions, we demonstrate the presence of a merger bow shock. We identify the presence of two jumps in surface brightness and in density located at $\\sim$400 kpc and $\\sim$800 kpc from the cluster's core. At the position of the inner jump, we detect a factor of $2.3\\pm 0.2$ density jump, while at the location of the outer jump, we detect a density drop of a factor of $3.5 \\pm 0.7$. Combining this with the temperature distribution within the cluster, we establish that the pressure of the hot gas is continuous at the 400 kpc jump, while there is a factor of $6.2 \\pm 2.8$ pressure discontinuity at 800 kpc jump. From the magnitude of the outer pressure discontinuity, using the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions, we determine that the sub-cluster is moving at $M = 2.3\\pm 0.5$, or approximate...

  5. [Heat shock proteins and their characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzaman-Serafin, Sylwia; Telatyńska-Mieszek, Bogumiła; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2005-08-01

    The main adaptable response to increased temperature is heat shock response resulting in induction of proteins called heat shock proteins (HSP). They are present in all cells under proper growth conditions and they create 5-10% of the whole protein contents. HSP were divided into five basic groups according to their approximate molecular mass, expressed in kDa and called respectively: HSP 100, HSP 90, HSP 70, HSP 60 and small HSP. Heat shock proteins can act like antigens in many infectious diseases. Immunological response against proteins from HSP 60, HSP 70 and HSP 90 families was observed in diseases caused by bacterial and protozoan pathogens. It is known that ischemia and reperfusion activate HSP genes transcription in heart cells of various experimental animals. Human and Chlamydia pneumoniae HSP 60 were found in patients with stable coronary disease. Hence many researchers connect the increase of ischaemia with the passed infection caused by Chlamydia pneumoniae, which can influence the origin or development of atheromatous plaque in the vascular wall. HSPs play an important role in hyperthermic therapy commonly used together with irradiation. Moreover, works on the possibility of HSP application to delay of disease process in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson or Alzheimer diseases are conducted. The paper presents characteristics of heat shock proteins, role in the state of health and disease and possibilities of their usage in monitoring and/or treatment of diseases, e.g. cancers.

  6. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 1. Invited Papers, Submarine Shock Testing, Shock Analysis, Shock Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-06-01

    P. White, Jr., Rochester Applied Science Associates, Inc., Rochester, New York MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF A TYPICAL FLOATING SHOCK PLATFORM SUBJECTED TO...our offer. standardization projects as well as in the This asrect of cuantitive railroad technology various technical societies. This multi...Analysis of a Gravity phenomena which my education had kept care- Dam," using gelatin models . The stimulation fully hidden from me until that time. It’s

  7. Dynamic compaction of boron carbide by a shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzyurkin, Andrey E.; Kraus, Eugeny I.; Lukyanov, Yaroslav L.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents experiments on explosive compaction of boron carbide powder and modeling of the stress state behind the shock front at shock loading. The aim of this study was to obtain a durable low-porosity compact sample. The explosive compaction technology is used in this problem because the boron carbide is an extremely hard and refractory material. Therefore, its compaction by traditional methods requires special equipment and considerable expenses.

  8. Structures of Strong Shock Waves in Dense Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhong-He; HE Yong; HU Xi-Wei; LV Jian-Hong; HU Ye-Min

    2007-01-01

    @@ Structures of strong shock waves in dense plasmas are investigated via the steady-state Navier-Stokes equations and Poisson equation. The structures from fluid simulation agree with the ones from kinetic simulation. The effects of the transport coefficients on the structures are analysed. The enhancements of the electronic heat conduction and ionic viscosity both will broaden the width of the shock fronts, and decrease the electric fields in the fronts.

  9. Vacuum high harmonic generation in the shock regime

    CERN Document Server

    Böhl, P; Ruhl, H

    2015-01-01

    Electrodynamics becomes nonlinear and permits the self-interaction of fields when the quantised nature of vacuum states is taken into account. The effect on a plane probe pulse propagating through a stronger constant crossed background is calculated using numerical simulation and by analytically solving the corresponding wave equation. The electromagnetic shock resulting from vacuum high harmonic generation is investigated and a nonlinear shock parameter identified.

  10. Utility of Functional Hemodynamics and Echocardiography to Aid Diagnosis and Management of Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, William T; Raghunathan, Karthik; Adler, Adam C

    2015-12-01

    The utility of functional hemodynamics and bedside ultrasonography is increasingly recognized as advantageous for both improved diagnosis and management of shock states. In contrast to conventional "static" measures, "dynamic" hemodynamic measures and bedside imaging modalities enhance pathophysiology-based comprehensive understanding of shock states and the response to therapy. The current editions of major textbooks in the primary specialties--in which clinicians routinely encounter patients in shock--including surgery, anesthesia, emergency medicine, and internal medicine continue to incorporate traditional (conventional) descriptions of shock that use well-described (but potentially misleading) intravascular pressures to classify shock states. Reliance on such intravascular pressure measurements is not as helpful as newer "dynamic" functional measures including ultrasonography to both better assess volume responsiveness and biventricular cardiac function. This review thus emphasizes the application of current functional hemodynamics and ultrasonography to the diagnosis and management of shock as a contrast to conventional "static" pressure-based measures.

  11. Shock breakout theory

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, Eli

    2016-01-01

    The earliest supernova (SN) emission is produced when the optical depth of the plasma lying ahead of the shock, which ejects the envelope, drops below c/v, where v is the shock velocity. This "breakout" may occur when the shock reaches the edge of the star, producing a bright X-ray/UV flash on time scales of seconds to a fraction of an hour, followed by UV/optical "cooling" emission from the expanding cooling envelope on a day time-scale. If the optical depth of circumstellar material (CSM) ejected from the progenitor star prior to the explosion is larger than c/v, the breakout will take place at larger radii, within the CSM, extending its duration to days time scale. The properties of the early, breakout and cooling, emission carry unique signatures of the structure of the progenitor star (e.g. its radius and surface composition) and of its mass-loss history. The recent progress of wide-field transient surveys enable SN detections on a day time scale, and are being used to set unique constraints on the proge...

  12. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papin P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. In the current work, high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to accelerate the material. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. Two constitutive strength (plasticity models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS models, were calibrated using common quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data. However, simulations with the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured experimental wave profiles. The experimental results indicate that, even if fractured by the initial shock loading, the Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading. Additional “arrested” drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  13. Observation of anomalous slow-mode shock and reconnection layer in the dayside magnetospause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walthour, D. W.; Gosling, J. T.; Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Russell, C. T.

    1994-12-01

    Plasma and magnetic field data from the International Sun-Earth Explorer ISEE 2 spacecraft recorded during an outbound crossing of the dayside, northern hemisphere magnetopause in October 29, 1979, provide evidence for a slow shock (SS) in the observed reconnection layer. This layer is found to be bounded on the magnetosheath side by the SS; near the magnetospheric side of the layer, a second current sheet is found that may have been rotational discontinuity (RD). The direction of the accelerated plasma flow, the earthward sense of the normal magnetic filed across the SS and RD, and the relative orientation of the SS and the RD all indicate that the reconection site was located south of the spacecraft. Quantitative tests show that, allowing for experiemental uncertanties, data taken upstream and downstream of the SS are consistent with coplanarity and other Rankine-Hugoniot (RH) conditions. Examiniations of the flow parameters indicates two anomalous properties of the SS: the upstream flow, viewed in the deHoffmann-Teller frame, is superalfvenic and the downstream plasma is firehose unstable. In comparison to the long-wavelength slow-mode phase speed, however, the flow in the upstream region is super slow, while in the downstream region it is subslow, as requeired for a slow-mode shock. Further properties of the shock include a large decrease in total enthalpy across it, indicating the escape of a sizable heat flux from the shock structure, and the occurrence of a polarization reversal of the tangential magnetic field within the shock layer, a feature that is predicted by linear double-polytropic Hall-MHD and results from a large increase in pressure anistropy from the upstream region, where p(sub parallel) approximately equal to p(sub perp), to the downstream region, where p(sub parrallel) greater than p(sub perp). Quantitative tests of the RD-like discontinuity show that it satisfies the necessary RH conditions within experimental uncertainties and indicate that

  14. Radiative effects in radiative shocks in shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. P.; Doss, F. W.; McClarren, R. G.; Adams, M. L.; Amato, N.; Bingham, D.; Chou, C. C.; DiStefano, C.; Fidkowski, K.; Fryxell, B.; Gombosi, T. I.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Holloway, J. P.; van der Holst, B.; Huntington, C. M.; Karni, S.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Larsen, E.; van Leer, B.; Mallick, B.; Marion, D.; Martin, W.; Morel, J. E.; Myra, E. S.; Nair, V.; Powell, K. G.; Rauchwerger, L.; Roe, P.; Rutter, E.; Sokolov, I. V.; Stout, Q.; Torralva, B. R.; Toth, G.; Thornton, K.; Visco, A. J.

    2011-09-01

    Using modern high-energy-density facilities it is straightforward to produce radiative shock waves in which the transfer of energy by radiation controls the hydrodynamic structure of the system. Some of these experiments use shock tubes. This paper discusses such experiments, with an emphasis on the simple physical relations that determine the primary features of such shocks and on the details and impact of radiative energy transfer in such systems. Notable aspects include the creation of high-density shocked layers, the flow of radiative energy toward regions of higher energy density, and the creation of secondary shocks by ablation of the tube walls ahead of the primary shock front. Simulations of one such experimental system are also shown.

  15. Fundamentals of collisionless shocks for astrophysical application, 2. Relativistic shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, A M

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress on collisionless relativistic shocks. Kinetic instability theory is briefed including its predictions and limitations. The main focus is on numerical experiments in (i) pair and (ii) electron-nucleon plasmas. The main results are: (i) confirmation of shock evolution in non-magnetised relativistic plasma in 3D due to either the lepton-Weibel instability or the ion-Weibel instability; (ii) sensitive dependence on upstream magnetisation ; (iii) the sensitive dependence of particle dynamics on the upstream magnetic inclination angle $\\thetabn$, where particles of $\\thetabn>34^\\circ$ cannot escape upstream, leading to the distinction between `sub-luminal' and `super-luminal' shocks; (iv) particles in ultra-relativistic shocks can hardly overturn the shock and escape to upstream; they may oscillate around the shock ramp for a long time, so to speak `surfing it' and thereby becoming accelerated by a kind of SDA; (v) these particles form a power law tail on the downstream distribution; their...

  16. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Shrivastava; Kailash

    2005-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics and traumatology is still a young therapy method. Since the last few years the development of shock wave therapy has progressed rapidly. Shock waves have changed the treatment of urolithiasis substantially. Today shock waves are the first choice to treat kidney and urethral stones. Urology has long been the only medical field for shock waves in medicine. Meanwhile shock waves have been used in orthopedics and traumatology to treat insertion tendinitis, avascular necrosis of the head of femur and other necrotic bone alterations. Another field of shock wave application is the treatment of tendons, ligaments and bones on horses in veterinary medicine. In the present paper we discuss the basic theory and application of shock waves and its history in medicine. The idea behind using shock wave therapy for orthopedic diseases is the stimulation of healing in tendons, surrounding tissue and bones. This is a completely different approach compared to urology where shock waves are used for disintegration.

  17. Cardiogenic shock - diagnostic and therapeutic options in the light of new scientific data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Filip M; Filipiak, Krzysztof J

    2014-01-01

    Shock is a manifestation of circulatory failure related to an inadequate supply of oxygenated blood to the tissues. One type of shock is cardiogenic shock resulting from abnormalities of myocardial structure and function, impairment of mechanical function of the heart, or arrhythmia. Most commonly, cardiogenic shock is due to an acute myocardial infarction, particularly involving the anterior wall. However, establishing the diagnosis of cardiogenic shock and determining its aetiology is not always easy. Techniques of invasive haemodynamic monitoring, measurements of specific biomarkers, and noninvasive bedside echocardiography may be helpful. The effectiveness of shock management depends on the ability to institute appropriate therapy rapidly and to remove the underlying aetiologic factor(s). We present a state-of-the-art review of basic approaches used for the diagnosis and management of cardiogenic shock.

  18. Quasiperpendicular high Mach number Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, A H; Dougherty, M K; Burgess, D; Fujimoto, M; Hospodarsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasi-perpendicular shocks across two orders of magnitude in Alfven Mach number (MA) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted timescale of ~0.3 {\\tau}c, where {\\tau}c is the ion gyroperio...

  19. CMEs as a Shock Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Martínez, Guadalupe; Becerril, Carlos; Lopez-Lopez, Jose Luis

    Interplanetary shocks are associated to approximately one third of the CMEs detected in the interplanetary medium. Even though they have been associated to fast CMEs (V>1000 km/s) it has been shown that some slow ones (V 300 km/s) presented shocks at 1 AU. The structure of the features observed in coronograph images can be hardly compared to the ones detected beyond the coronograph field of view, where the shock is clearly identify. For a few cases, the shock in front of the CME has been distinguish in white light images, but, is there a real visual difference between the CME itself and the considered shock? In this work we compare the optical characteristics of CMEs and some hydrodynamic parameters of ICMEs to show that the feature observed in white light images can be considered as a shock structure.

  20. Physics of collisionless shocks - theory and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Novo, A Stockem; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-01-01

    Collisionless shocks occur in various fields of physics. In the context of space and astrophysics they have been investigated for many decades. However, a thorough understanding of shock formation and particle acceleration is still missing. Collisionless shocks can be distinguished into electromagnetic and electrostatic shocks. Electromagnetic shocks are of importance mainly in astrophysical environments and they are mediated by the Weibel or filamentation instability. In such shocks, charged particles gain energy by diffusive shock acceleration. Electrostatic shocks are characterized by a strong electrostatic field, which leads to electron trapping. Ions are accelerated by reflection from the electrostatic potential. Shock formation and particle acceleration will be discussed in theory and simulations.

  1. Which blood oxygen can sensitively indicate shock severity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Boan; Li, Kai; Gao, Yuan; Ruan, Zhengshang; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Clinical shock-monitoring mainly depends on measuring oxygen saturations from SVC blood samples invasively. The golden standard indicator is the central internal jugular vein oxygenation (SjvO2). Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) also can monitor shock in some papers published, but there is no discussion about which oxygen saturation (cerebral venous oxygen saturation, ScvO2; tissue oxygen saturation of internal jugular area; tissue oxygen saturation of extremities areas) can monitor shock patient more sensitively and accurately. The purpose of this paper is to examine which one is most effective. In order to discuss the problem, we continuously detected 56 critical patients who may be into shock state using NIRS oximeter at prefrontal, internal jugular vein area and forearm, and chose 24 patients who were into shock and then out of shock from the 56 critical patients. Combined with the patients' condition, the pulse oxygen saturation is most sensitively to monitoring shock than the others, and the internal jugular vein area oxygen saturation is most effective.

  2. Numerical Simulations of Mach Stem Formation via Intersecting Bow Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Edward C; Hartigan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations show bright knots of H$\\alpha$ emission within outflowing young stellar jets. Velocity variations in the flow create secondary bow shocks that may intersect and lead to enhanced emission. When the bow shocks intersect at or above a certain critical angle, a planar shock called a Mach stem is formed. These shocks could produce brighter H$\\alpha$ emission since the incoming flow to the Mach stem is parallel to the shock normal. In this paper we report first results of a study using 2-D numerical simulations designed to explore Mach stem formation at the intersection of bow shocks formed by hypersonic "bullets" or "clumps". Our 2-D simulations show how the bow shock shapes and intersection angles change as the adiabatic index $\\gamma$ changes. We show that the formation or lack of a Mach stem in our simulations is consistent with the steady-state Mach stem formation theory. Our ultimate goal, which is part of an ongoing research effort, is to characterize the physical and obse...

  3. Stability of oblique shock front

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Shuxing(陈恕行)

    2002-01-01

    The stability of the weak planar oblique shock front with respect to the perturbation of the wall is discussed. By the analysis of the formation and the global construction of shock and its asymptotic behaviour for stationary supersonic flow along a smooth rigid wall we obtain the stability of the solution containing a weak planar shock front. The stability can be used to single out a physically reasonable solution together with the entropy condition.

  4. Grain Destruction in Interstellar Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar shock waves can erode and destroy grains present in the shocked gas, primarily as the result of sputtering and grain-grain collisions. Uncertainties in current estimates of sputtering yields are reviewed. Results are presented for the simple case of sputtering of fast grains being stopped in cold gas. An upper limit is derived for sputtering of refractory grains in C-type MHD shocks: shock speeds $v_s \\gtrsim 50 \\kms$ are required for return of more than 30\\% of the silicate to t...

  5. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Burgess, D.; Fujimoto, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (MA ) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ˜0.3 τc , where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and MA and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same MA , a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming.

  6. Management of refractory cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyentovich, Alex; Barghash, Maya H; Hochman, Judith S

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock is a life-threatening condition that occurs in response to reduced cardiac output in the presence of adequate intravascular volume and results in tissue hypoxia. Cardiogenic shock has several underlying aetiologies, with the most common being acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Refractory cardiogenic shock presents as persistent tissue hypoperfusion despite administration of adequate doses of two vasoactive medications and treatment of the underlying aetiology. Investigators of the SHOCK trial reported a long-term mortality benefit of emergency revascularization for shock complicating AMI. Since the publication of the SHOCK trial and subsequent guideline recommendations, the increase in community-based use of percutaneous coronary intervention for this condition has resulted in a significant decline in mortality. Despite these successes in the past 15 years, mortality still remains exceptionally high, particularly in patients with refractory cardiogenic shock. In this Review, we discuss the aetiology and pathophysiology of cardiogenic shock and summarize the data on the available therapeutics and their limitations. Although new mechanical circulatory support devices have been shown to improve haemodynamic variables in patients with shock complicating AMI, they did not improve clinical outcomes and are associated with high costs and complications.

  7. Highly trabeculated structure of the human endocardium underlies asymmetrical response to low-energy monophasic shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Adam; Robson, Matthew D.; Schneider, Jürgen; Burton, Rebecca; Plank, Gernot; Bishop, Martin J.

    2017-09-01

    Novel low-energy defibrillation therapies are thought to be driven by virtual-electrodes (VEs), due to the interaction of applied monophasic electric shocks with fine-scale anatomical structures within the heart. Significant inter-species differences in the cardiac (micro)-anatomy exist, however, particularly with respect to the degree of endocardial trabeculations, which may underlie important differences in response to low-energy defibrillation protocols. Understanding the interaction of monophasic electric fields with the specific human micro-anatomy is therefore imperative in facilitating the translation and optimisation of these promising experimental therapies to the clinic. In this study, we sought to investigate how electric fields from implanted devices interact with the highly trabeculated human endocardial surface to better understand shock success in order to help optimise future clinical protocols. A bi-ventricular human computational model was constructed from high resolution (350 μm) ex-vivo MR data, including anatomically accurate endocardial structures. Monophasic shocks were applied between a basal right ventricular catheter and an exterior ground. Shocks of varying strengths were applied with both anodal [positive right ventricle (RV) electrode] and cathodal (negative RV electrode) polarities at different states of tissue refractoriness and during induced arrhythmias. Anodal shocks induced isolated positive VEs at the distal side of "detached" trabeculations, which rapidly spread into hyperpolarised tissue on the surrounding endocardial surfaces following the shock. Anodal shocks thus depolarised more tissue 10 ms after the shock than cathodal shocks where the propagation of activation from VEs induced on the proximal side of "detached" trabeculations was prevented due to refractory endocardium. Anodal shocks increased arrhythmia complexity more than cathodal shocks during failed anti-arrhythmia shocks. In conclusion, multiple detached

  8. A shocking experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S. Berns

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We study whether probability weighting is observed when individuals are presented with a series of choices between lotteries consisting of real non-monetary adverse outcomes, electric shocks. Our estimation of the parameters of the probability weighting function proposed by Tversky and Kahneman (1992 are similar to those obtained in previous studies of lottery choice for negative monetary payoffs and negative hypothetical payoffs. In addition, common ratio violations in choice behavior are widespread. Our results provide evidence that probability weighting is a general phenomenon, independent of the source of disutility.

  9. Characterization of Shocked Beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cady, Carl M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adams, Chris D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hull, Lawrence M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray III, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Addessio, Francis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wynn, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-24

    Beryllium metal has many excellent structural properties in addition to its unique radiation characteristics, including: high elastic modulus, low Poisson's ratio, low density, and high melting point. However, it suffers from several major mechanical drawbacks: 1) high anisotropy - due to its hexagonal lattice structure and its susceptibility to crystallographic texturing; 2) susceptibility to impurity-induced fracture - due to grain boundary segregation; and 3) low intrinsic ductility at ambient temperatures thereby limiting fabricability. While large ductility results from deformation under the conditions of compression, the material can exhibit a brittle behavior under tension. Furthermore, there is a brittle to ductile transition at approximately 200 C under tensile conditions. While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. The beryllium used in this study was Grade S200-F (Brush Wellman, Inc., Elmore, OH) material. The work focused on high strain rate deformation and examine the validity of constitutive models in deformation rate regimes, including shock, the experiments were modeled using a Lagrangian hydrocode. Two constitutive strength (plasticity) models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) models, were calibrated using the same set of quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data taken at temperatures from 77K to 873K and strain rates from 0.001/sec to 4300/sec. In spite of being calibrated on the same data, the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured wave profiles. These high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to

  10. Hypovolemic shock resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Leslie; Costantini, Todd W; Coimbra, Raul

    2012-12-01

    Several changes in the way patients with hemorrhagic shock are resuscitated have occurred over the past decades, including permissive hypotension, minimal crystalloid resuscitation, earlier blood transfusion, and higher plasma and platelet-to-red cell ratios. Hemostatic adjuncts, such as tranexamic acid and prothrombin complex, and the use of new methods of assessing coagulopathy are also being incorporated into resuscitation of the bleeding patient. These ideas have been incorporated by many trauma centers into institutional massive transfusion protocols, and adoption of these protocols has resulted in improvements in mortality and morbidity. This article discusses each of these new resuscitation strategies and the evidence supporting their use.

  11. Standing Shocks around Black Holes and Estimation of Outflow Rates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santabrata Das; Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    2002-03-01

    We self-consistently obtain shock locations in an accretion flow by using an analytical method. One can obtain the spectral properties, quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies and the outflowrates when the inflow parameters are known. Since temperature of the CENBOL decides the spectral states of the black hole, and also the outflow rate, the outflow rate is directly related to the spectral states.

  12. Shock Incarceration in New York: Focus on Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cherie L.; And Others

    Shock incarceration facilities, or boot camp prisons, for young adults are being developed in city, county, state, and federal jurisdictions. This report focuses on one state's program. Two key components of this boot camp program include substance abuse education and a therapeutic approach which seeks to support successful reintegration of…

  13. Simulations of Converging Shock Collisions for Shock Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Joshua; Dodd, Evan; Loomis, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Shock ignition (SI) has been proposed as an alternative to achieving high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. A central hot spot below the ignition threshold is created by an initial compression pulse, and a second laser pulse drives a strong converging shock into the fuel. The collision between the rebounding shock from the compression pulse and the converging shock results in amplification of the converging shock and increases the hot spot pressure above the ignition threshold. We investigate shock collision in SI drive schemes for cylindrical targets with a polystyrene foam interior using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations with the RAGE code. The configuration is similar to previous targets fielded on the Omega laser. The CH interior results in a lower convergence ratio and the cylindrical geometry facilitates visualization of the shock transit using an axial X-ray backlighter, both of which are important for comparison to potential experimental measurements. One-dimensional simulations are used to determine shock timing, and the effects of low mode asymmetries in 2D computations are also quantified. LA-UR-16-24773.

  14. Geometrical on-the-fly shock detection in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, A. M.; Dolag, K.; Donnert, J. M. F.

    2016-05-01

    We present an on-the-fly geometrical approach for shock detection and Mach number calculation in simulations employing smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We utilize pressure gradients to select shock candidates and define up- and downstream positions. We obtain hydrodynamical states in the up- and downstream regimes with a series of normal and inverted kernel weightings parallel and perpendicular to the shock normals. Our on-the-fly geometrical Mach detector incorporates well within the SPH formalism and has low computational cost. We implement our Mach detector into the simulation code GADGET and alongside many SPH improvements. We test our shock finder in a sequence of shock tube tests with successively increasing Mach numbers exceeding by far the typical values inside galaxy clusters. For all shocks, we resolve the shocks well and the correct Mach numbers are assigned. An application to a strong magnetized shock tube gives stable results in full magnetohydrodynamic setups. We simulate a merger of two idealized galaxy clusters and study the shock front. Shock structures within the merging clusters as well as the cluster shock are well captured by our algorithm and assigned correct Mach numbers.

  15. History of ``NANO''-Scale VERY EARLY Solid-State (and Liquid-State) Physics/Chemistry/Metallurgy/ Ceramics; Interstitial-Alloys Carbides/Nitrides/Borides/...Powders and Cermets, Rock Shocks, ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, Colin; Siegel, Edward

    History of ``NANO'': Siegel-Matsubara-Vest-Gregson[Mtls. Sci. and Eng. 8, 6, 323(`71); Physica Status Solidi (a)11,45(`72)] VERY EARLY carbides/nitrides/borides powders/cermets solid-state physics/chemistry/metallurgy/ ceramics FIRST-EVER EXPERIMENTAL NANO-physics/chemistry[1968 ->Physica Status Solidi (a)11,45(`72); and EARLY NANO-``physics''/NANO-``chemistry'' THEORY(after: Kubo(`62)-Matsubara(`60s-`70s)-Fulde (`65) [ref.: Sugano[Microcluster-Physics, Springer('82 `98)

  16. MHD Shock Conditions for Accreting Plasma onto Kerr Black Holes - I

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, M; Fukumura, K; Tsuruta, S; Takahashi, Masaaki; Rilett, Darrell; Fukumura, Keigo; Tsuruta, Sachiko

    2002-01-01

    We extend the work by Appl and Camenzind (1988) for special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets, to fully general relativistic studies of the standing shock formation for accreting MHD plasma in a rotating, stationary and axisymmetric black hole magnetosphere. All the postshock physical quantities are expressed in terms of the relativistic compression ratio, which can be obtained in terms of preshock quantities. Then, the downstream state of a shocked plasma is determined by the upstream state of the accreting plasma. In this paper sample solutions are presented for slow magnetosonic shocks for accreting flows in the equatorial plane. We find that some properties of the slow magnetosonic shock for the rotating magnetosphere can behave like a fast magnetosonic shock. In fact, it is confirmed that in the limit of weak gravity for the upstream non-rotating accretion plasma where the magnetic field lines are leading and rotating, our results are very similar to the fast magnetosonic shock solution by Appl...

  17. The hemodynamics of septic shock: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feihl, Francois; Waeber, Bernard; Liaudet, Lucas

    2013-03-01

    In the late 19th century, it was already known that severe infections could be associated with cardiovascular collapse, a fact essentially attributed to cardiac failure. A major experimental work in the rabbit, published by Romberg and Pässler in 1899, shifted attention to disturbed peripheral vascular tone as the mechanism of hypotension in these conditions. In the first half of the 20th century, great progresses were made in the pathophysiologic understanding of hemorrhagic and traumatic shocks, while researchers devoted relatively little attention to septic shock. Progress in the hemodynamic understanding of septic shock resumed with the advent of critical care units. The hyperdynamic state was recognized in the late fifties and early sixties. The present short review ends with landmark studies by Max Harry Weil, demonstrating the importance of venous pooling, and John H. Siegel, which introduced the concept of deficient peripheral utilization of oxygen, inspiring later work on the microvascular disturbances of septic shock.

  18. Optical studies of shock generated transient supersonic base flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, P.-Y.; Bershader, D.; Wray, A.

    1982-01-01

    A shock tube employing interferometric and schlieren techniques is used to study transient base flow phenomena following shock wave passage over two plane bluff bodies: a hemicircular cylinder and a cylinder with the Galileo Jovian probe profile. An attempt is made to understand the physics of transition from transient to steady state flow, and to provide code verification for a study employing the Illiac IV computer. Transient base flow interactions include a series of shock diffraction, regular, and Mach reflections, coupled with boundary layer development, separation, and recompression. Vorticity generation and transport underlie these features. The quantitative verification of the computer code includes comparisons of transient pressure and density fields, near wake geometries, and bow shock standoff distances.

  19. Transverse Diffraction at the LCLS: Shock-Compressed Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, E. E.; Krygier, A.; Harmand, M..; Konopkova, Z..; Liermann, H.-P.; Schropp, A.; Toleikis, S.; Pelka, A.; Roedel, M.; Spindloe, C.; Smith, R. F.; Galtier, E.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Tschentscher, Th.; Wark, J. S.; Higginbotham, A.

    2016-10-01

    Despite being the subject of numerous shock compression studies, the behavior of silicon under dynamic loading is vigorously debated. The few studies that combine shock compression and X-ray diffraction have exclusively focused on ``normal'' X-ray geometry whereby X-rays are collected along the shock propagation direction, consequently sampling numerous strain states at once, greatly complicating both phase identification and studies of phase transition kinetics. Here, we present a novel setup performing in situ X-ray diffraction studies perpendicular to the shock propagation direction at the Matter at Extreme Conditions end station at LCLS. Combining the extremely bright microfocussed X-ray beam with a nanosecond drive laser, we unambiguously determine the character of each wave for the first time.

  20. Component Representation for Shock Qualified Foundation Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Coats

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Navy ship foundations are typically designed for shock using the Navy's Dynamic Design Analysis Method. The NAVSEA 0908-LP-000-3010, Rev. 1 manual states that a component modeled as a lumped mass with rigid links should not provide constraint to the support structure. This ensures foundations are designed to withstand all shock loads without accounting for additional stiffness provided by the component. Investigations are provided herein to illustrate the trade-offs and consequences of several approaches for component representations. The observations reinforce the notion that one must give careful consideration for the system being modeled, the expected modal characteristics, and compliance with NAVSEA 0908-LP-000-3010, Rev. 1.

  1. Particle Acceleration at Shocks: Insights from Supernova Remnant Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. W. Jones

    2011-12-01

    I review some basic properties of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in the context of young supernova remnants (SNRs). I also point out some key differences with cosmological, cluster-related shocks. DSA seems to be very efficient in strong, young SNR shocks. Provided the magnetic fields exceed some hundreds of Gauss (possibly amplified by CR related dynamics), these shocks can accelerate cosmic ray hadrons to PeV energies in the time available to them. Electron energies, limited by radiative losses, are likely limited to the TeV range. Injection of fresh particles at these shocks is poorly understood, but hadrons are much more easily injected than the more highly magnetized electrons. That seems supported by observational data, as well. So, while CR protons in young SNRs may play very major roles in the SNR evolution, the CR electron populations have minimal such impact, despite their observational importance.

  2. Laser shock experiments to investigate and to model various aspects of the response of metals to shock loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthe L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser driven shocks allow studying the dynamic behaviour of condensed matter over small spatial (∼μm to mm-order and temporal (∼ps to ns-order scales, at extremely high strain rates (∼107 s−1. They can be used to test the predictive capability of constitutive models over wide ranges of loading pressures and pulse durations. We present experimental results in laser shock-loaded metals (iron, gold, tin, based on various, complementary techniques including time-resolved velocity measurements, transverse shadowgraphy and post-shock analyses of recovered samples. The data are used to investigate several shock wave processes such as yielding and polymorphic transformations, melting, spall fracture and dynamic fragmentation in both solid and melted states. On the basis of comparisons with numerical simulations, the abilities and limitations of several models are briefly discussed.

  3. Constitutive Theories for Woven Composite Structures Subjected to Shock Loading; Experimental Validation Using a Conical Shock Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Hufner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Woven polymer-based composites are currently used in a wide range of marine applications. These materials often exhibit highly nonlinear, rate dependent, anisotropic behavior under shock loadings. Correlation to transient response data, beyond an initial peak, is often difficult. The state of damage evolves throughout the time history and the unloading response varies based on the amount, and nature of, the accumulated damage. Constitutive theories that address the loading and unloading responses have been developed and integrated with each other. A complete theory, applicable to transient dynamic analysis, is presented. The model is implemented within the commercial finite element code, Abaqus, in the form of a user material subroutine. In this study, the conical shock tube is used to experimentally reproduce the high strain rates and fluid structure interactions typical of underwater shock loadings. The conical shock tube data is used to validate analytical model predictions. Simulation results are in good agreement with test data.

  4. Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    times only for high concentrations (of order 1% fuel or greater). The requirements of engine (IC, HCCI , CI and SI) modelers also present a different...Paper 03F-61 Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data D. F. Davidson and R. K. Hanson Mechanical Engineering ... Engineering Department Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305 Abstract Chemical kinetic modelers make extensive use of shock tube ignition data

  5. The Asymmetric Effects of Oil Price Shocks on the Chinese Stock Market: Evidence from a Quantile Impulse Response Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiming Zhu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses a quantile impulse response approach to investigate the impact of oil price shocks on Chinese stock returns. This process allows us to uncover asymmetric effects of oil price shocks on stock market returns by taking into account the different quantiles of oil price shocks. Our results show that the responses of Chinese stock market returns to oil price shocks differ greatly, depending on whether the oil and stock market is in a bust or boom state and whether the shock is driven by demand or supply. The impacts of oil price shocks on Chinese stock returns present asymmetric features. In particular during a bust phase, oil supply and demand shocks significantly depress stock market returns, while during a boom period, the aggregate demand shock enhances stock market returns. These results suggest some important implications for investors and decision makers.

  6. Nonparametric Regression with Common Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A. Souza-Rodrigues

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a nonparametric regression model for cross-sectional data in the presence of common shocks. Common shocks are allowed to be very general in nature; they do not need to be finite dimensional with a known (small number of factors. I investigate the properties of the Nadaraya-Watson kernel estimator and determine how general the common shocks can be while still obtaining meaningful kernel estimates. Restrictions on the common shocks are necessary because kernel estimators typically manipulate conditional densities, and conditional densities do not necessarily exist in the present case. By appealing to disintegration theory, I provide sufficient conditions for the existence of such conditional densities and show that the estimator converges in probability to the Kolmogorov conditional expectation given the sigma-field generated by the common shocks. I also establish the rate of convergence and the asymptotic distribution of the kernel estimator.

  7. High and low strength nonsynchronized shocks given during canine ventricular tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J H; Daubert, J P; Kavanagh, K M; Harrell, F E; Ideker, R E

    1992-07-01

    Cardioversion shocks given during ventricular tachycardia may cause ventricular fibrillation or acceleration of ventricular tachycardia, or arrest the tachycardia. A recently proposed theory may explain why the former two phenomena may occur. Briefly, this theory states that potential gradient shock fields of a critical strength delivered to tissue with a critical degree of refractoriness will cause circulating wave fronts of ventricular activation ("rotors") manifest as ventricular arrhythmia. We tested this theory by delivering nonsynchronized shocks 50% higher than defibrillation threshold or 50% lower than defibrillation threshold during 275 episodes of ventricular tachycardia in eight dogs with 5- to 7-day-old myocardial infarcts. Shocks stronger than the defibrillation threshold are likely to create shock fields in the ventricles everywhere stronger than this critical value, and therefore would not generate rotors. Shocks less strong than the defibrillation threshold may create shock fields within the ventricles that include the critical value, and therefore cause rotors if given when critically refractory tissue is present. Nonsynchronized shocks were used to increase the likelihood of encountering tissue with a critical degree of refractoriness. Ventricular fibrillation or acceleration of ventricular tachycardia occurred following 83 of 138 (60%) low strength shocks and following 20 of 137 (14.6%) high strength shocks. The pooled odds ratio for induction of ventricular fibrillation or accelerated ventricular tachycardia after low strength shocks as compared to high strength shocks was 8.9. when given during ventricular tachycardia, low strength shocks are much more likely to cause ventricular fibrillation or accelerated ventricular tachycardia than are high strength shocks (P less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Shock Compression and Strain Rate Effect in Composites and Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-20

    Polymers are increasingly being utilized as monolithic materials and composite matrices for structural applications historically reserved for metals. High strain and high strain-rate applications in aerospace, defense, and automotive industries have lead to interest in utilizing the ability of many polymers to withstand extensions to failure of several hundred percent, often without localization or necking and their strong rate dependence. A broad range of characterization techniques will be presented for semi-crystalline polymers and composites including elastic-plastic fracture, split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB), plate impact including soft-recovery and lateral gage measurements and Taylor Impact. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition to probe subtle changes in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Observed strong anisotropy on the hugoniot and spall behavior of fiber-reinforced composites will be discussed. Polymers are known to exhibit a strong dependence of the yield stress on temperature and strain-rate that are often observed to be linear for temperature and logarithmic for strain-rate. Temperature and strain-rate dependence will be reviewed in terms of classic time-temperature superposition and an empirical mapping function for superposition between temperature and strain-rate. The recent extension of the new Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to probe the dynamic tensile responses of polymers will be discussed, where more irregular deformation and stochastic-based damage and failure mechanisms than the stable plastic elongation and shear instabilities observed that in metals. The opportunity to use of Dyn-Ten-Ext to probe incipient damage at very high strain-rate by linking in situ and post mortem experimental observations with high

  9. Internal energy relaxation in shock wave structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josyula, Eswar; Suchyta, Casimir J.; Boyd, Iain D.; Vedula, Prakash

    2013-12-01

    The Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck (WCU) equation is numerically integrated to characterize the internal structure of Mach 3 and Mach 5 shock waves in a gas with excitation in the internal energy states for the treatment of inelastic collisions. Elastic collisions are modeled with the hard sphere collision model and the transition rates for the inelastic collisions modified appropriately using probabilities based on relative velocities of the colliding particles. The collision integral is evaluated by the conservative discrete ordinate method [F. Tcheremissine, "Solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation for high-speed flows," Comput. Math. Math. Phys. 46, 315-329 (2006); F. Cheremisin, "Solution of the Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck equation," Dokl. Phys. 47, 487-490 (2002)] developed for the Boltzmann equation. For the treatment of the diatomic molecules, the internal energy modes in the Boltzmann equation are described quantum mechanically given by the WCU equation. As a first step in the treatment of the inelastic collisions by the WCU equation, a two- and three-quantum system is considered to study the effect of the varying of (1) the inelastic cross section and (2) the energy gap between the quantum energy states. An alternative method, the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, is used for the Mach 3 shock wave to ensure the consistency of implementation in the two methods and there is an excellent agreement between the two methods. The results from the WCU implementation showed consistent trends for the Mach 3 and Mach5 standing shock waves simulations. Inelastic contributions change the downstream equilibrium state and allow the flow to transition to the equilibrium state further upstream.

  10. Dengue shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Sepehrar, Mona; Bangalore Raja, Shiva Kumar; Nataraju, Aravinda Settikere; Kumbhat, Mounica; Sathyanarayana, Deepak; Gummadi, Siddharth; Burra, Hemanth Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne arthropod-borne viral (arboviral) tropical disease in humans affecting 50–528 million people worldwide. The acute abdominal complications of dengue fever are acute appendicitis, acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis and non-specific peritonitis. Acute pancreatitis with new onset diabetes in dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is very rarely reported. We describe a case of 30-year-old man admitted in intensive care unit and was diagnosed with DSS with RT-PCR, NS1 antigen and dengue IgM antibody being positive. Abdominal ultrasound and computerized tomography confirmed acute pancreatitis. Patient required insulin after recovery. Diabetes mellitus caused by DSS is under-reported and lack of awareness may increase mortality and morbidity. PMID:28031845

  11. Shock induced cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  12. Shock waves & explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, PL

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of explosions is important to experts in a broad range of disciplines, including the military, industrial and environmental research, aeronautic engineering, and applied mathematics. Offering an introductory review of historic research, Shock Waves and Explosions brings analytic and computational methods to a wide audience in a clear and thorough way. Beginning with an overview of the research on combustion and gas dynamics in the 1970s and 1980s, the author brings you up to date by covering modeling techniques and asymptotic and perturbative methods and ending with a chapter on computational methods.Most of the book deals with the mathematical analysis of explosions, but computational results are also included wherever they are available. Historical perspectives are provided on the advent of nonlinear science, as well as on the mathematical study of the blast wave phenomenon, both when visualized as a point explosion and when simulated as the expansion of a high-pressure ...

  13. Unraveling shock-induced chemistry using ultrafast lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The exquisite time synchronicity between shock and diagnostics needed to unravel chemical events occurring in picoseconds has been achieved using a shaped ultrafast laser pulse to both drive the shocks and interrogate the sample via a multiplicity of optical diagnostics. The shaped laser drive pulse can produce well-controlled shock states of sub-ns duration with sub-10 ps risetimes, sufficient for investigation of fast reactions or phase transformations in a thin layer with picosecond time resolution. The shock state is characterized using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) in either planar or Gaussian spatial geometries, the latter allowing measurements of the equation of state of materials at a range of stresses in a single laser pulse. Time-resolved processes in materials are being interrogated using UDE, ultrafast infrared absorption, ultrafast UV/visible absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Using these tools we showed that chemistry in an energetic thin film starts only after an induction time of a few tens of ps, an observation that allows differentiation between proposed shock-induced reaction mechanisms. These tools are presently being applied to a variety of energetic and reactive sample systems, from nitromethane and carbon disulfide, to micro-engineered interfaces in tunable energetic mixtures.

  14. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Marcowith, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O C; Lembege, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebul\\ae, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in-situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasize is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in a...

  15. High-pressure minerals in shocked meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Naotaka; Miyahara, Masaaki

    2017-09-01

    Heavily shocked meteorites contain various types of high-pressure polymorphs of major minerals (olivine, pyroxene, feldspar, and quartz) and accessory minerals (chromite and Ca phosphate). These high-pressure minerals are micron to submicron sized and occur within and in the vicinity of shock-induced melt veins and melt pockets in chondrites and lunar, howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED), and Martian meteorites. Their occurrence suggests two types of formation mechanisms (1) solid-state high-pressure transformation of the host-rock minerals into monomineralic polycrystalline aggregates, and (2) crystallization of chondritic or monomineralic melts under high pressure. Based on experimentally determined phase relations, their formation pressures are limited to the pressure range up to 25 GPa. Textural, crystallographic, and chemical characteristics of high-pressure minerals provide clues about the impact events of meteorite parent bodies, including their size and mutual collision velocities and about the mineralogy of deep planetary interiors. The aim of this article is to review and summarize the findings on natural high-pressure minerals in shocked meteorites that have been reported over the past 50 years.

  16. Thermal Equation of State of Iron: Constraint on the Density Deficit of Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Y.; Murphy, C. A.; Shibazaki, Y.; Huang, H.

    2013-12-01

    The seismically inferred densities of Earth's solid inner core and the liquid outer core are smaller than the measured densities of solid hcp-iron and liquid iron, respectively. The inner core density deficit is significantly smaller than the outer core density deficit, implying different amounts and/or identities of light-elements incorporated in the inner and outer cores. Accurate measurements of the thermal equation-of-state of iron over a wide pressure and temperature range are required to precisely quantify the core density deficits, which are essential for developing a quantitative composition model for the core. The challenge has been evaluating the experimental uncertainties related to the choice of pressure scales and the sample environment, such as hydrostaticity at multi-megabar pressures and extreme temperatures. We have conducted high-pressure experiments on iron in MgO, NaCl, and Ne pressure media and obtained in-situ X-ray diffraction data up to 200 GPa at room temperature. Using inter-calibrated pressure scales including the MgO, NaCl, Ne, and Pt scales, we have produced a consistent compression curve of hcp-Fe at room temperature. We have also performed laser-heated diamond-anvil cell experiments on both Fe and Pt in a Ne pressure medium. The experiment was designed to quantitatively compare the thermal expansion of Fe and Pt in the same sample environment using Ne as the pressure medium. The thermal expansion data of hcp-Fe at high pressure were derived based on the thermal equation of state of Pt. Using the 300-K isothermal compression curve of iron derived from our static experiments as a constraint, we have developed a thermal equation of state of hcp-Fe that is consistent with the static P-V-T data of iron and also reproduces the shock wave Hugoniot data for pure iron. The thermodynamic model, based on both static and dynamic data, is further used to calculate the density and bulk sound velocity of liquid iron. Our results define the solid

  17. Simulation Study of Shock Reaction on Porous Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ai-Guo; ZHANG Guang-Cai; PAN Xiao-Fei; ZHU Jian-Shi

    2009-01-01

    Direct modeling of porous materials under shock is a complex issue.We investigate such a system via the newly developed material-point method.The effects of shock strength and porosity size are the main concerns.For the same porosity, the effects of mean-void-size are checked.It is found that local turbulence mixing and volume dissipation are two important mechanisms for transformation of kinetic energy to heat.When the porosity is very small, the shocked portion may arrive at a dynamical steady state; the voids in the downstream portion reflect back rarefactive waves and result in slight oscillations of mean density and pressure; for the same value of porosity, a larger mean-void-size makes a higher mean temperature.When the porosity becomes large, hydrodynamic quantities vary with time during the whole shock-loading procedure: after the initial stage, the mean density and pressure decrease, but the temperature increases with a higher rate.The distributions of local density, pressure, temperature and particle-velocity are generally non-Gaussian and vary with time.The changing rates depend on the porosity value, mean-void-size and shock strength.The stronger the loaded shock, the stronger the porosity effects.This work provides a supplement to experiments for the very quick procedures and reveals more fundamental mechanisms in energy and momentum transportation.

  18. Shock Radiation Tests for Saturn and Uranus Entry Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a test series in the Electric Arc Shock Tube at NASA Ames Research Center with the objective of quantifying shock-layer radiative heating magnitudes for future probe entries into Saturn and Uranus atmospheres. Normal shock waves are measured in Hydrogen/Helium mixtures (89:11 by mole) at freestream pressures between 13-66 Pa (0.1-0.5 Torr) and velocities from 20-30 km/s. No shock layer radiation is detected below 25 km/s, a finding consistent with predictions for Uranus entries. Between 25-30 km/s, radiance is quantified from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Near Infrared, with focus on the Lyman-alpha and Balmer series lines of Hydrogen. Shock profiles are analyzed for electron number density and electronic state distribution. The shocks do not equilibrate over several cm, and distributions are demonstrated to be non-Boltzmann. Radiation data are compared to simulations of Decadal survey entries for Saturn and shown to be significantly lower than predicted with the Boltzmann radiation model.

  19. Computations of Axisymmetric Flows in Hypersonic Shock Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Wilson, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    A time-accurate two-dimensional fluid code is used to compute test times in shock tubes operated at supersonic speeds. Unlike previous studies, this investigation resolves the finer temporal details of the shock-tube flow by making use of modern supercomputers and state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamic solution techniques. The code, besides solving the time-dependent fluid equations, also accounts for the finite rate chemistry in the hypersonic environment. The flowfield solutions are used to estimate relevant shock-tube parameters for laminar flow, such as test times, and to predict density and velocity profiles. Boundary-layer parameters such as bar-delta(sub u), bar-delta(sup *), and bar-tau(sub w), and test time parameters such as bar-tau and particle time of flight t(sub f), are computed and compared with those evaluated by using Mirels' correlations. This article then discusses in detail the effects of flow nonuniformities on particle time-of-flight behind the normal shock and, consequently, on the interpretation of shock-tube data. This article concludes that for accurate interpretation of shock-tube data, a detailed analysis of flowfield parameters, using a computer code such as used in this study, must be performed.

  20. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher, E-mail: ejacquet@mnhn.fr [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-12-10

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios ε ≳ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of 'sandblasting' by finer dust. A flow with ε ≳ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (∼2 versus 8 km s{sup –1}) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.